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Sample records for glucose responsive collagen

  1. Immune responses to implanted human collagen graft in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quteish, D.; Dolby, A.E.

    1991-01-01

    Immunity to collagen implants may be mediated by cellular and humoral immune responses. To examine the possibility of such immunological reactivity and crossreactivity to collagen, 39 Sprague-Dawley rats (female, 10 weeks old, approximately 250 g wt) were implanted subcutaneously at thigh sites with crosslinked, freeze-dried human placental type I collagen grafts (4x4x2 mm) which had been irradiated (520 Gray) or left untreated. Blood was obtained by intracardiac sampling prior to implantation or from normal rats, and at various times afterwards when the animals were sacrificed. The sera from these animals were examined for circulating antibodies to human, bovine and rat tail (type I) collagens by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Also, the lymphoblastogenic responses of spleen lymphocytes from the irradiated collagen-implanted animals were assessed in culture by measuring thymidine uptake with autologous and normal rat sera in the presence of human bovine type I collagens. Implantation of the irradiated and non-irradiated collagen graft in rats led to a significant increase in the level of circulating antibodies to human collagen. Also antibody to bovine and rat tail collagens was detectable in the animals implanted with irradiated collagen grafts but at a lower level than the human collagen. There was a raised lymphoblastogenic response to both human and bovine collagens. The antibody level and lymphoblastogenesis to the tested collagens gradually decreased towards the end of the post-implantation period. (author)

  2. Nonlinear optical response of the collagen triple helix and second harmonic microscopy of collagen liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniset-Besseau, A.; De Sa Peixoto, P.; Duboisset, J.; Loison, C.; Hache, F.; Benichou, E.; Brevet, P.-F.; Mosser, G.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2010-02-01

    Collagen is characterized by triple helical domains and plays a central role in the formation of fibrillar and microfibrillar networks, basement membranes, as well as other structures of the connective tissue. Remarkably, fibrillar collagen exhibits efficient Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and SHG microscopy proved to be a sensitive tool to score fibrotic pathologies. However, the nonlinear optical response of fibrillar collagen is not fully characterized yet and quantitative data are required to further process SHG images. We therefore performed Hyper-Rayleigh Scattering (HRS) experiments and measured a second order hyperpolarisability of 1.25 10-27 esu for rat-tail type I collagen. This value is surprisingly large considering that collagen presents no strong harmonophore in its amino-acid sequence. In order to get insight into the physical origin of this nonlinear process, we performed HRS measurements after denaturation of the collagen triple helix and for a collagen-like short model peptide [(Pro-Pro-Gly)10]3. It showed that the collagen large nonlinear response originates in the tight alignment of a large number of weakly efficient harmonophores, presumably the peptide bonds, resulting in a coherent amplification of the nonlinear signal along the triple helix. To illustrate this mechanism, we successfully recorded SHG images in collagen liquid solutions by achieving liquid crystalline ordering of the collagen triple helices.

  3. Stability and cellular responses to fluorapatite-collagen composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Byung-Ho; Kim, Hae-Won; Lee, Su-Hee; Bae, Chang-Jun; Koh, Young-Hag; Kong, Young-Min; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2005-06-01

    Fluorapatite (FA)-collagen composites were synthesized via a biomimetic coprecipitation method in order to improve the structural stability and cellular responses. Different amounts of ammonium fluoride (NH4F), acting as a fluorine source for FA, were added to the precipitation of the composites. The precipitated composites were freeze-dried and isostatically pressed in a dense body. The added fluorine was incorporated nearly fully into the apatite structure (fluoridation), and a near stoichiometric FA-collagen composite was obtained with complete fluoridation. The freeze-dried composites had a typical biomimetic network, consisting of collagen fibers and precipitates of nano-sized apatite crystals. The human osteoblast-like cells on the FA-collagen composites exhibited significantly higher proliferation and differentiation (according to alkaline phosphatase activity) than those on the hydroxyapatite-collagen composite. These enhanced osteoblastic cell responses were attributed to the fluorine release and the reduced dissolution rate.

  4. Glucose oxidase incorporated collagen matrices for dermal wound repair in diabetic rat models: a biochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arul, V; Masilamoni, J G; Jesudason, E P; Jaji, P J; Inayathullah, M; Dicky John, D G; Vignesh, S; Jayakumar, R

    2012-05-01

    Impaired wound healing in diabetes is a well-documented phenomenon. Emerging data favor the involvement of free radicals in the pathogenesis of diabetic wound healing. We investigated the beneficial role of the sustained release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in diabetic dermal wound healing. In order to achieve the sustained delivery of ROS in the wound bed, we have incorporated glucose oxidase in the collagen matrix (GOIC), which is applied to the healing diabetic wound. Our in vitro proteolysis studies on incorporated GOIC show increased stability against the proteases in the collagen matrix. In this study, GOIC film and collagen film (CF) are used as dressing material on the wound of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. A significant increase in ROS (p < 0.05) was observed in the fibroblast of GOIC group during the inflammation period compared to the CF and control groups. This elevated level up regulated the antioxidant status in the granulation tissue and improved cellular proliferation in the GOIC group. Interestingly, our biochemical parameters nitric oxide, hydroxyproline, uronic acid, protein, and DNA content in the healing wound showed that there is an increase in proliferation of cells in GOIC when compared to the control and CF groups. In addition, evidence from wound contraction and histology reveals faster healing in the GOIC group. Our observations document that GOIC matrices could be effectively used for diabetic wound healing therapy.

  5. Blood glucose response to pea fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamberg, O; Rumessen, J J; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1989-01-01

    Two new fiber types, pea fiber (PF) and sugar beet fiber (BF), were compared with wheat bran (WB) to investigate the effect on postprandial blood glucose and serum insulin responses in normal subjects. The control meal consisted of 150 g ground beef mixed with 50 g glucose and 20 g lactulose. Onl...

  6. Delphinidin prevents high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis by inhibition of NOX-1 and mitochondrial superoxide in mesangial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Eun Song

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of delphinidin on high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis in mesangial cells. Glucose dose-dependently (5.6–25 mM increased cell proliferation and collagen I and IV mRNA levels, whereas pretreatment with delphinidin (50 μM prevented cell proliferation and the increased collagen mRNA levels induced by high glucose (25 mM. High glucose increased reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, and this was suppressed by pretreating delphinidin or the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine. NADPH oxidase (NOX 1 was upregulated by high glucose, but pretreatment with delphinidin abrogated this upregulation. Increased mitochondrial superoxide by 25 mM glucose was also suppressed by delphinidin. The NOX inhibitor apocynin and mitochondria-targeted antioxidant Mito TEMPO inhibited ROS generation and cell proliferation induced by high glucose. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2 was increased by high glucose, which was suppressed by delphinidin, apocynin or Mito TEMPO. Furthermore, PD98059 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor prevented the high glucose-induced cell proliferation and increased collagen mRNA levels. Transforming growth factor (TGF-β protein levels were elevated by high glucose, and pretreatment with delphinidin or PD98059 prevented this augmentation. These results suggest that delphinidin prevents high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis by inhibition of NOX-1 and mitochondrial superoxide in mesangial cells.

  7. Polarized Raman anisotropic response of collagen in tendon: towards 3D orientation mapping of collagen in tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Galvis

    Full Text Available In this study, polarized Raman spectroscopy (PRS was used to characterize the anisotropic response of the amide I band of collagen as a basis for evaluating three-dimensional collagen fibril orientation in tissues. Firstly, the response was investigated theoretically by applying classical Raman theory to collagen-like peptide crystal structures. The theoretical methodology was then tested experimentally, by measuring amide I intensity anisotropy in rat tail as a function of the orientation of the incident laser polarization. For the theoretical study, several collagen-like triple-helical peptide crystal structures obtained from the Protein Data Bank were rotated "in plane" and "out of plane" to evaluate the role of molecular orientation on the intensity of the amide I band. Collagen-like peptides exhibit a sinusoidal anisotropic response when rotated "in plane" with respect to the polarized incident laser. Maximal intensity was obtained when the polarization of the incident light is perpendicular to the molecule and minimal when parallel. In the case of "out of plane" rotation of the molecular structure a decreased anisotropic response was observed, becoming completely isotropic when the structure was perpendicular to the plane of observation. The theoretical Raman response of collagen was compared to that of alpha helical protein fragments. In contrast to collagen, alpha helices have a maximal signal when incident light is parallel to the molecule and minimal when perpendicular. For out-of-plane molecular orientations alpha-helix structures display a decreased average intensity. Results obtained from experiments on rat tail tendon are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions, thus demonstrating the high potential of PRS for experimental evaluation of the three-dimensional orientation of collagen fibers in biological tissues.

  8. D-Glucose as a modifying agent in gelatin/collagen matrix and reservoir nanoparticles for Calendula officinalis delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, P-L; Kok, S H-L; Bian, Z-X; Lam, K-H; Tang, J C-O; Lee, K K-H; Gambari, R; Chui, C-H

    2014-05-01

    Gelatin/Collagen-based matrix and reservoir nanoparticles require crosslinkers to stabilize the formed nanosuspensions, considering that physical instability is the main challenge of nanoparticulate systems. The use of crosslinkers improves the physical integrity of nanoformulations under the-host environment. Aldehyde-based fixatives, such as formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde, have been widely applied to the crosslinking process of polymeric nanoparticles. However, their potential toxicity towards human beings has been demonstrated in many previous studies. In order to tackle this problem, D-glucose was used during nanoparticle formation to stabilize the gelatin/collagen-based matrix wall and reservoir wall for the deliveries of Calendula officinalis powder and oil, respectively. In addition, therapeutic selectivity between malignant and normal cells could be observed. The C. officinalis powder loaded nanoparticles significantly strengthened the anti-cancer effect towards human breast adenocarcinoma MCF7 cells and human hepatoma SKHep1 cells when compared with the free powder. On the contrary, the nanoparticles did not show significant cytotoxicity towards normal esophageal epithelial NE3 cells and human skin keratinocyte HaCaT cells. On the basis of these evidences, D-glucose modified gelatin/collagen matrix nanoparticles containing C. officinalis powder might be proposed as a safer alternative vehicle for anti-cancer treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Heterogeneity in glucose response curves during an oral glucose tolerance test and associated cardiometabolic risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulman, Adam; Simmons, Rebecca Kate; Vistisen, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    patterns of plasma glucose change during the oral glucose tolerance test. Cardiometabolic risk factor profiles were compared between the identified groups. Using latent class trajectory analysis, five glucose response curves were identified. Despite similar fasting and 2-h values, glucose peaks and peak......We aimed to examine heterogeneity in glucose response curves during an oral glucose tolerance test with multiple measurements and to compare cardiometabolic risk profiles between identified glucose response curve groups. We analyzed data from 1,267 individuals without diabetes from five studies...... in Denmark, the Netherlands and the USA. Each study included between 5 and 11 measurements at different time points during a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test, resulting in 9,602 plasma glucose measurements. Latent class trajectories with a cubic specification for time were fitted to identify different...

  10. Mechanical response of collagen molecule under hydrostatic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Karanvir; Kumar, Navin

    2015-01-01

    Proteins like collagen are the basic building blocks of various body tissues (soft and hard). Collagen molecules find their presence in the skeletal system of the body where they bear mechanical loads from different directions, either individually or along with hydroxy-apatite crystals. Therefore, it is very important to understand the mechanical behavior of the collagen molecule which is subjected to multi-axial state of loading. The estimation of strains of collagen molecule along different directions resulting from the changes in hydrostatic pressure magnitude, can provide us new insights into its mechanical behavior. In the present work, full atomistic simulations have been used to study global (volumetric) as well as local (along different directions) mechanical properties of the hydrated collagen molecule which is subjected to different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. To estimate the local mechanical properties, the strains of collagen molecule along its longitudinal and transverse directions have been acquired at different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. In spite of non-homogeneous distribution of atoms within the collagen molecule, the calculated values of local mechanical properties have been found to carry the same order of magnitude along the longitudinal and transverse directions. It has been demonstrated that the values of global mechanical properties like compressibility, bulk modulus, etc. as well as local mechanical properties like linear compressibility, linear elastic modulus, etc. are functions of magnitudes of applied hydrostatic pressures. The mechanical characteristics of collagen molecule based on the atomistic model have also been compared with that of the continuum model in the present work. The comparison showed up orthotropic material behavior for the collagen molecule. The information on collagen molecule provided in the present study can be very helpful in designing the future bio-materials.

  11. Mechanical response of collagen molecule under hydrostatic compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Karanvir; Kumar, Navin

    2015-04-01

    Proteins like collagen are the basic building blocks of various body tissues (soft and hard). Collagen molecules find their presence in the skeletal system of the body where they bear mechanical loads from different directions, either individually or along with hydroxy-apatite crystals. Therefore, it is very important to understand the mechanical behavior of the collagen molecule which is subjected to multi-axial state of loading. The estimation of strains of collagen molecule along different directions resulting from the changes in hydrostatic pressure magnitude, can provide us new insights into its mechanical behavior. In the present work, full atomistic simulations have been used to study global (volumetric) as well as local (along different directions) mechanical properties of the hydrated collagen molecule which is subjected to different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. To estimate the local mechanical properties, the strains of collagen molecule along its longitudinal and transverse directions have been acquired at different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. In spite of non-homogeneous distribution of atoms within the collagen molecule, the calculated values of local mechanical properties have been found to carry the same order of magnitude along the longitudinal and transverse directions. It has been demonstrated that the values of global mechanical properties like compressibility, bulk modulus, etc. as well as local mechanical properties like linear compressibility, linear elastic modulus, etc. are functions of magnitudes of applied hydrostatic pressures. The mechanical characteristics of collagen molecule based on the atomistic model have also been compared with that of the continuum model in the present work. The comparison showed up orthotropic material behavior for the collagen molecule. The information on collagen molecule provided in the present study can be very helpful in designing the future bio-materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  12. Mechanical response of collagen molecule under hydrostatic compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Karanvir, E-mail: karans@iitrpr.ac.in; Kumar, Navin

    2015-04-01

    Proteins like collagen are the basic building blocks of various body tissues (soft and hard). Collagen molecules find their presence in the skeletal system of the body where they bear mechanical loads from different directions, either individually or along with hydroxy-apatite crystals. Therefore, it is very important to understand the mechanical behavior of the collagen molecule which is subjected to multi-axial state of loading. The estimation of strains of collagen molecule along different directions resulting from the changes in hydrostatic pressure magnitude, can provide us new insights into its mechanical behavior. In the present work, full atomistic simulations have been used to study global (volumetric) as well as local (along different directions) mechanical properties of the hydrated collagen molecule which is subjected to different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. To estimate the local mechanical properties, the strains of collagen molecule along its longitudinal and transverse directions have been acquired at different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. In spite of non-homogeneous distribution of atoms within the collagen molecule, the calculated values of local mechanical properties have been found to carry the same order of magnitude along the longitudinal and transverse directions. It has been demonstrated that the values of global mechanical properties like compressibility, bulk modulus, etc. as well as local mechanical properties like linear compressibility, linear elastic modulus, etc. are functions of magnitudes of applied hydrostatic pressures. The mechanical characteristics of collagen molecule based on the atomistic model have also been compared with that of the continuum model in the present work. The comparison showed up orthotropic material behavior for the collagen molecule. The information on collagen molecule provided in the present study can be very helpful in designing the future bio-materials.

  13. Postprandial glucose response to selected tropical fruits in normal glucose-tolerant Nigerians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edo, A; Eregie, A; Adediran, O; Ohwovoriole, A; Ebengho, S

    2011-01-01

    The glycemic response to commonly eaten fruits in Nigeria has not been reported. Therefore, this study assessed the plasma glucose response to selected fruits in Nigeria. Ten normal glucose-tolerant subjects randomly consumed 50 g carbohydrate portions of three fruits: banana (Musa paradisiaca), pineapple (Ananus comosus), and pawpaw (Carica papaya), and a 50-g glucose load at 1-week intervals. Blood samples were collected in the fasting state and half-hourly over a 2-h period post-ingestion of the fruits or glucose. The samples were analyzed for plasma glucose concentrations. Plasma glucose responses were assessed by the peak plasma glucose concentration, maximum increase in plasma glucose, 2-h postprandial plasma glucose level, and incremental area under the glucose curve and glycemic index (GI). The results showed that the blood glucose response to these three fruits was similar in terms of their incremental areas under the glucose curve, maximum increase in plasma glucose, and glycemic indices (GIs). The 2-h postprandial plasma glucose level of banana was significantly higher than that of pineapple, P < 0.025. The mean ± SEM GI values were as follows: pawpaw; 86 ± 26.8%; banana, 75.1 ± 21.8%; pineapple, 64.5 ± 11.3%. The GI of glucose is taken as 100. The GI of pineapple was significantly lower than that of glucose (P < 0.05). Banana, pawpaw, and pineapple produced a similar postprandial glucose response. Measured portions of these fruits may be used as fruit exchanges with pineapple having the most favorable glycemic response.

  14. In Vitro Evaluation of Fluorescence Glucose Biosensor Response

    OpenAIRE

    Aloraefy, Mamdouh; Pfefer, T. Joshua; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Sapsford, Kim E.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid, accurate, and minimally-invasive glucose biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) for glucose measurement have the potential to enhance diabetes control. However, a standard set of in vitro approaches for evaluating optical glucose biosensor response under controlled conditions would facilitate technological innovation and clinical translation. Towards this end, we have identified key characteristics and response test methods, fabricated FRET-based glucose biosensor...

  15. CMOS image sensor-based implantable glucose sensor using glucose-responsive fluorescent hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Takashi; Takahashi, Masayuki; Uejima, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Keita; Kawamura, Toshikazu; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Okitsu, Teru; Takeuchi, Shoji; Ohta, Jun

    2014-11-01

    A CMOS image sensor-based implantable glucose sensor based on an optical-sensing scheme is proposed and experimentally verified. A glucose-responsive fluorescent hydrogel is used as the mediator in the measurement scheme. The wired implantable glucose sensor was realized by integrating a CMOS image sensor, hydrogel, UV light emitting diodes, and an optical filter on a flexible polyimide substrate. Feasibility of the glucose sensor was verified by both in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  16. The response to oestrogen deprivation of the cartilage collagen degradation marker, CTX-II, is unique compared with other markers of collagen turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Tabassi, Nadine C B; Sondergaard, Lene V

    2009-01-01

    The urinary level of the type II collagen degradation marker CTX-II is increased in postmenopausal women and in ovariectomised rats, suggesting that oestrogen deprivation induces cartilage breakdown. Here we investigate whether this response to oestrogen is also true for other type II collagen tu...

  17. Ethinyl oestradiol administration in women suppresses synthesis of collagen in tendon in response to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette; Koskinen, Satu O; Petersen, Susanne G

    2008-01-01

    24 h post-exercise through microdialysis catheters placed anterior to the patellar tendon in both legs and subsequently analysed for the amino-terminal propeptide of type I collagen (PINP), a marker of tendon collagen synthesis. To determine the long-term effect of OC usage, patellar tendon cross......-OC 24 h post-exercise is consistent with the hypothesis that oestradiol inhibits exercise-induced collagen synthesis in human tendon. The mechanism behind this is either a direct effect of oestradiol, or an indirect effect via a reduction in levels of free IGF-I. However, the data did not indicate any......Women are at greater risk than men of sustaining certain kinds of injury and diseases of collagen-rich tissues. To determine whether a high level of oestradiol has an acute influence on collagen synthesis in tendons at rest and in response to exercise, one-legged kicking exercise was performed...

  18. Response variability to glucose facilitation of cognitive enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Lauren; Scholey, Andrew; Finnegan, Yvonne; Sünram-Lea, Sandra I

    2013-11-01

    Glucose facilitation of cognitive function has been widely reported in previous studies (including our own). However, several studies have also failed to detect glucose facilitation. There is sparsity of research examining the factors that modify the effect of glucose on cognition. The aims of the present study were to (1) demonstrate the previously observed enhancement of cognition through glucose administration and (2) investigate some of the factors that may exert moderating roles on the behavioural response to glucose, including glucose regulation, body composition (BC) and hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis response. A total of twenty-four participants took part in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised, repeated-measures study, which examined the effect of 25 and 60 g glucose compared with placebo on cognitive function. At 1 week before the study commencement, all participants underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. Glucose facilitated performance on tasks of numeric and spatial working memory, verbal declarative memory and speed of recognition. Moderating variables were examined using several indices of glucoregulation and BC. Poorer glucoregulation predicted improved immediate word recall accuracy following the administration of 25 g glucose compared with placebo. Those with better glucoregulation showed performance decrements on word recall accuracy following the administration of 25 g glucose compared with placebo. These findings are in line with accumulating evidence that glucose load may preferentially enhance cognition in those with poorer glucoregulation. Furthermore, the finding that individuals with better glucoregulation may suffer impaired performance following a glucose load is novel and requires further substantiation.

  19. The response to estrogen deprivation on cartilage collagen degradation markers; CTX-II is unique compared to other markers of collagen turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Tabassi, Nadine; Sondergaard, Lene

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The urinary level of type II collagen degradation marker CTX-II is increased in postmenopausal women and in ovariectomized rats, suggesting that estrogen deprivation induces cartilage breakdown. Here we investigate whether this response to estrogen holds true for other type...... II collagen turnover markers known to be affected in osteoarthritis, and whether it relates to its presence in specific areas of cartilage tissue. METHODS: The type II collagen degradation markers CTX-II and Helix-II were measured in body fluids of pre- and postmenopausal women and of ovariectomized...... rats receiving estrogen or not. Levels of PIIANP, a marker of type II collagen synthesis, were also measured in rats. Rat knee cartilage was analyzed for immunoreactivity of CTX-II and PIIANP and for type II collagen expression. RESULTS: As expected, urinary levels of CTX-II are significantly increased...

  20. Pathophysiological Characteristics Underlying Different Glucose Response Curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulman, Adam; Witte, Daniel R; Vistisen, Dorte

    2018-01-01

    different glucose curve patterns and studied their stability and reproducibility over 3 years of follow-up. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We analyzed data from participants without diabetes from the observational cohort from the European Group for the Study of Insulin Resistance: Relationship between Insulin...... and secretion. The glucose patterns identified at follow-up were similar to those at baseline, suggesting that the latent class method is robust. We integrated our classification model into an easy-to-use online application that facilitates the assessment of glucose curve patterns for other studies. CONCLUSIONS...... Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease study; participants had a five-time point OGTT at baseline (n = 1,443) and after 3 years (n = 1,045). Measures of insulin sensitivity and secretion were assessed at baseline with a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp and intravenous glucose tolerance test. Heterogeneous...

  1. A BMP responsive transcriptional region in the chicken type X collagen gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, S W; Luvalle, P; Leask, T; Leboy, P S

    1998-10-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) were originally identified by their ability to induce ectopic bone formation and have been shown to promote both chondrogenesis and chondrocyte hypertrophy. BMPs have recently been found to activate a membrane serine/threonine kinase signaling mechanism in a variety of cell types, but the downstream effectors of BMP signaling in chondrocyte differentiation remain unidentified. We have previously reported that BMP-2 markedly stimulates type X collagen expression in prehypertrophic chick sternal chondrocytes, and that type X collagen mRNA levels in chondrocytes cultured under serum-free (SF) conditions are elevated 3- to 5-fold within 24 h. To better define the molecular mechanisms of induction of chondrocyte hypertrophy by BMPs, we examined the effect of BMPs on type X collagen production by 15-day chick embryo sternal chondrocytes cultured under SF conditions in the presence or absence of 30 ng/ml BMP-2, BMP-4, or BMP-7. Two populations of chondrocytes were used: one representing resting cartilage isolated from the caudal third of the sterna and the second representing prehypertrophic cartilage from the cephalic third of the sterna. BMP-2, BMP-4, and BMP-7 all effectively promoted chondrocyte maturation of cephalic sternal chondrocytes as measured by high levels of alkaline phosphatase, diminished levels of type II collagen, and induction of the hypertrophic chondrocyte-specific marker, type X collagen. To test whether BMP control of type X collagen expression occurs at the transcriptional level, we utilized plasmid constructs containing the chicken collagen X promoter and 5' flanking regions fused to a reporter gene. Constructs were transiently transfected into sternal chondrocytes cultured under SF conditions in the presence or absence of 30 ng/ml BMP-2, BMP-4, or BMP-7. A 533 bp region located 2.4-2.9 kb upstream from the type X collagen transcriptional start site was both necessary and sufficient for strong BMP responsiveness

  2. Combined effects of moderately elevated blood glucose and locally produced TGF-beta1 on glomerular morphology and renal collagen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Søren; Nyengaard, Jens R; Wogensen, Lise

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a correlation between renal graft rejection and blood glucose (BG) levels. Furthermore, diabetic patients may develop non-diabetic renal diseases, which in some circumstances progress rapidly. Since transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta) levels are elevated in many renal...... diseases, the accelerated progression may be due to interactions between glucose and locally produced TGF-beta1. Therefore, we investigated the effect of mild hyperglycaemia on glomerular morphology and collagen production in TGF-beta1 transgenic mice. METHODS: To achieve BG concentrations of approximately...... 15 mmol/l in TGF-beta1 transgenic and non-transgenic mice, we used multiple streptozotocin (STZ) injections, and after 8 weeks, we measured the changes in glomerular morphology and total collagen content. We also analysed extracellular matrix (ECM) and protease mRNA levels using real-time polymerase...

  3. In vitro evaluation of fluorescence glucose biosensor response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloraefy, Mamdouh; Pfefer, T Joshua; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Sapsford, Kim E

    2014-07-08

    Rapid, accurate, and minimally-invasive glucose biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) for glucose measurement have the potential to enhance diabetes control. However, a standard set of in vitro approaches for evaluating optical glucose biosensor response under controlled conditions would facilitate technological innovation and clinical translation. Towards this end, we have identified key characteristics and response test methods, fabricated FRET-based glucose biosensors, and characterized biosensor performance using these test methods. The biosensors were based on competitive binding between dextran and glucose to concanavalin A and incorporated long-wavelength fluorescence dye pairs. Testing characteristics included spectral response, linearity, sensitivity, limit of detection, kinetic response, reversibility, stability, precision, and accuracy. The biosensor demonstrated a fluorescence change of 45% in the presence of 400 mg/dL glucose, a mean absolute relative difference of less than 11%, a limit of detection of 25 mg/dL, a response time of 15 min, and a decay in fluorescence intensity of 72% over 30 days. The battery of tests presented here for objective, quantitative in vitro evaluation of FRET glucose biosensors performance have the potential to form the basis of future consensus standards. By implementing these test methods for a long-visible-wavelength biosensor, we were able to demonstrate strengths and weaknesses with a new level of thoroughness and rigor.

  4. In Vitro Evaluation of Fluorescence Glucose Biosensor Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamdouh Aloraefy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid, accurate, and minimally-invasive glucose biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET for glucose measurement have the potential to enhance diabetes control. However, a standard set of in vitro approaches for evaluating optical glucose biosensor response under controlled conditions would facilitate technological innovation and clinical translation. Towards this end, we have identified key characteristics and response test methods, fabricated FRET-based glucose biosensors, and characterized biosensor performance using these test methods. The biosensors were based on competitive binding between dextran and glucose to concanavalin A and incorporated long-wavelength fluorescence dye pairs. Testing characteristics included spectral response, linearity, sensitivity, limit of detection, kinetic response, reversibility, stability, precision, and accuracy. The biosensor demonstrated a fluorescence change of 45% in the presence of 400 mg/dL glucose, a mean absolute relative difference of less than 11%, a limit of detection of 25 mg/dL, a response time of 15 min, and a decay in fluorescence intensity of 72% over 30 days. The battery of tests presented here for objective, quantitative in vitro evaluation of FRET glucose biosensors performance have the potential to form the basis of future consensus standards. By implementing these test methods for a long-visible-wavelength biosensor, we were able to demonstrate strengths and weaknesses with a new level of thoroughness and rigor.

  5. Influence of glucose on the leukocyte response in women athletes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of glucose on the leukocyte response in women athletes during ... South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation ... Total WBC counts were raised at all stages in all three trials when compared with ...

  6. Collagen-induced arthritis in C57BL/6 mice is associated with a robust and sustained T-cell response to type II collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Julia J; Criado, Gabriel; Medghalchi, Mino; Andrews, Melanie; Sandison, Ann; Feldmann, Marc; Williams, Richard O

    2007-01-01

    Many genetically modified mouse strains are now available on a C57BL/6 (H-2b) background, a strain that is relatively resistant to collagen-induced arthritis. To facilitate the molecular understanding of autoimmune arthritis, we characterised the induction of arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and then validated the disease as a relevant pre-clinical model for rheumatoid arthritis. C57BL/6 mice were immunised with type II collagen using different protocols, and arthritis incidence, severity, and response to commonly used anti-arthritic drugs were assessed and compared with DBA/1 mice. We confirmed that C57BL/6 mice are susceptible to arthritis induced by immunisation with chicken type II collagen and develop strong and sustained T-cell responses to type II collagen. Arthritis was milder in C57BL/6 mice than DBA/1 mice and more closely resembled rheumatoid arthritis in its response to therapeutic intervention. Our findings show that C57BL/6 mice are susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis, providing a valuable model for assessing the role of specific genes involved in the induction and/or maintenance of arthritis and for evaluating the efficacy of novel drugs, particularly those targeted at T cells.

  7. In vitro degradation of pure Mg in response to glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Rong-Chang; Li, Xiao-Ting; Li, Shuo-Qi; Zhang, Fen; Han, En-Hou

    2015-08-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are promising biodegradable biomaterials but are still challenging to be used in person with high levels of blood glucose or diabetes. To date, the influence of glucose on magnesium degradation has not yet been elucidated, this issue requires more attention. Herein, we present pure Mg exhibiting different corrosion responses to saline and Hank’s solutions with different glucose contents, and the degradation mechanism of pure Mg in the saline solution with glucose in comparison with mannitol as a control. On one hand, the corrosion rate of pure Mg increases with the glucose concentration in saline solutions. Glucose rapidly transforms into gluconic acid, which attacks the oxides of the metal and decreases the pH of the solution; it also promotes the absorption of chloride ions on the Mg surface and consequently accelerates corrosion. On the other hand, better corrosion resistance is obtained with increasing glucose content in Hank’s solution due to the fact that glucose coordinates Ca2+ ions in Hank’s solution and thus improves the formation of Ca-P compounds on the pure Mg surface. This finding will open up new avenues for research on the biodegradation of bio-Mg materials in general, which could yield many new and interesting results.

  8. Modeling and process optimization of electrospinning of chitosan-collagen nanofiber by response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Nafise; Moradi, Ali; Abolghasem Sajjadi Tabasi, Sayyed; Movaffagh, Jebrail

    2018-04-01

    Chitosan-collagen composite nanofiber is of a great interest to researchers in biomedical fields. Since the electrospinning is the most popular method for nanofiber production, having a comprehensive knowledge of the electrospinning process is beneficial. Modeling techniques are precious tools for managing variables in the electrospinning process, prior to the more time- consuming and expensive experimental techniques. In this study, a central composite design of response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to develop a statistical model as well as to define the optimum condition for fabrication of chitosan-collagen nanofiber with minimum diameter. The individual and the interaction effects of applied voltage (10–25 kV), flow rate (0.5–1.5 mL h‑1), and needle to collector distance (15–25 cm) on the fiber diameter were investigated. ATR- FTIR and cell study were done to evaluate the optimized nanofibers. According to the RSM, a two-factor interaction (2FI) model was the most suitable model. The high regression coefficient value (R 2 ≥ 0.9666) of the fitted regression model and insignificant lack of fit (P = 0.0715) indicated that the model was highly adequate in predicting chitosan-collagen nanofiber diameter. The optimization process showed that the chitosan-collagen nanofiber diameter of 156.05 nm could be obtained in 9 kV, 0.2 ml h‑1, and 25 cm which was confirmed by experiment (155.92 ± 18.95 nm). The ATR-FTIR and cell study confirmed the structure and biocompatibility of the optimized membrane. The represented model could assist researchers in fabricating chitosan-collagen electrospun scaffolds with a predictable fiber diameter, and optimized chitosan-collagen nanofibrous mat could be a potential candidate for wound healing and tissue engineering.

  9. Collagen Type III and VI Turnover in Response to Long-Term Immobilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Sun

    Full Text Available Muscle mass and function are perturbed by immobilization and remobilization. When muscle mass changes, the quality and quantity of the extracellular matrix protein, particularly the collagens, change with it. In this study, we investigated the temporal profile of three peptide biomarkers derived from turnover of collagen type III and type VI in a long-term immobilization and remobilization study. We also compared individual biomarker levels with Lean body Mass (LBM and changes therein, hypothesizing that these biomarkers would be biomarkers of the remodeling processes associated with immobilization and/or remobilization.In the Berlin bed rest study, 20 young men were recruited and randomly assigned to 8-week's strict bed rest with or without resistive vibration exercise countermeasure. We measured three neo-epitope ELISA kits in the serum samples of this study: Pro-C3, measured the synthesis of collagen type III; Pro-C6, measured the synthesis of collagen type VI; and C6M measured the degradation of collagen type VI induced by MMP-2 and MMP-9 cleavage.Pro-C3 and Pro-C6 biomarkers are up-regulated with both immobilization and remobilization, whereas C6M is hardly affected at all. We found that Pro-C3 and C6M levels are related to LBM at baseline and that high levels of Pro-C6 are associated with smaller changes in muscle mass during both immobilization and remobilization.The Pro-C3 and-C6 biomarkers change likely reflect remodeling changes in response to unloading or reloading, whereas C6M does not appear to respond to unloading. Pro-C3 and C6M levels correlate with LBM at baseline, while Pro-C6 is related to the anabolic and catabolic responses to unloading and reloading.

  10. Type II collagen in cartilage evokes peptide-specific tolerance and skews the immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmström, V; Kjellén, P; Holmdahl, R

    1998-06-01

    T cell recognition of type II collagen (CII) is a crucial event in the induction of collagen-induced arthritis in the mouse. Several CII peptides have been shown to be of importance, dependent on which MHC haplotype the mouse carries. By sequencing the rat CII and comparing the sequence with mouse, human, bovine and chicken CII, we have found that the immunodominant peptides all differ at critical positions compared with the autologous mouse sequence. Transgenic expression of the immunodominant Aq-restricted heterologous CII 256-270 epitope inserted into type I collagen (TSC mice) or type II collagen (MMC-1 mice) led to epitope-specific tolerance. Immunization of TSC mice with chick CII led to arthritis and immune responses, dependent on the subdominant, Aq-restricted and chick-specific CII 190-200 epitope. Immunization of F1 mice, expressing both H-2q and H-2r as well as transgenic expression of the Aq-restricted CII 256-270 epitope in cartilage, with bovine CII, led to arthritis, dependent on the Ar-restricted, bovine-specific epitope CII 607-621. These data show that the immunodominance of CII recognition is directed towards heterologous determinants, and that T cells directed towards the corresponding autologous epitopes are tolerated without evidence of active suppression.

  11. IMMUNE RESPONSE TO EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX COLLAGEN IN CHRONIC HEPATITIS C INDUCED LIVER FIBROSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Borg, Brian B.; Seetharam, Anil; Subramanian, Vijay; Ilias, Haseeb; Lisker–Melman, Mauricio; Korenblat, Kevin; Anderson, Christopher; Shenoy, Surendra; Chapman, William C.; Crippin, Jeffrey S.; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection and recurrence post-transplant (OLT) is associated with extracellular matrix (ECM) components remodeling, particularly collagen (Col), leading to fibrosis. Our aim was to determine whether development of antibodies (Abs) to self antigen Col in HCV infection correlates with fibrosis stage and peripheral cytokine response. Chronic HCV patients, those with recurrence after OLT undergoing biopsy and healthy control subjects were enrolled. HCV subjects (n=70) were...

  12. Improvement in glucose biosensing response of electrochemically grown polypyrrole nanotubes by incorporating crosslinked glucose oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palod, Pragya Agar; Singh, Vipul

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a novel enzymatic glucose biosensor has been reported in which platinum coated alumina membranes (Anodisc™s) have been employed as templates for the growth of polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube arrays using electrochemical polymerization. The PPy nanotube arrays were grown on Anodisc™s of pore diameter 100 nm using potentiostatic electropolymerization. In order to optimize the polymerization time, immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) was first performed using physical adsorption followed by measuring its biosensing response which was examined amperometrically for increasing concentrations of glucose. In order to further improve the sensing performance of the biosensor fabricated for optimum polymerization duration, enzyme immobilization was carried out using cross-linking with glutaraldehyde and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Approximately six fold enhancement in the sensitivity was observed in the fabricated electrodes. The biosensors also showed a wide range of linear operation (0.2-13 mM), limit of detection of 50 μM glucose concentration, excellent selectivity for glucose, notable reliability for real sample detection and substantially improved shelf life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Starch and fibre intake and glucose postprandial response of dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Monti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Fibre has been studied to reduce the postprandial glucose response of dogs, but the results are inconsistent. Starch intake, however, was not properly considered in the published studies. The effects of starch and fibre intake on the postprandial glucose response were studied in non-obese adult dogs. Cellulose (CEL, carboxymethylcellulose (CMC, pea fibre (PE and sugarcane fibre (SCF were combined to form six diets with starch contents ranging from 33% to 42%: SCF+CEL and PE+CEL diets, both with high insoluble fibre (IF=22% and low soluble fibre (SF=2.5% content; SCF+CMC and PE+CMC diets with high SF (SF=4.5%; IF=19% content; and CMC and CEL diets with low dietary fibre (14% content. The diets were fed in two amounts, providing an intake of 9.5g or 12.5g of starch (kg0.75-1 day-1, totaling 12 treatments. Each diet was fed to six dogs conditioned to consume all of the daily food in 10min. Their plasma glucose levels were measured before and during 480min after food intake. Results of fibre and starch intake and their interactions were compared by repeated measures ANOVA and the Tukey test (P0.05. High-dose starch intake, however, induced a higher glycaemia at 180 and 240min after the meal and a greater maximal glycaemia and greater area under the glucose curve (P<0.05. A range in insoluble and soluble fibre intake does not change postprandial glucose response, and the amount of starch intake is a main factor for the postprandial glucose response of healthy non-obese dogs.

  14. Development of glucose-responsive 'smart' insulin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rege, Nischay K; Phillips, Nelson F B; Weiss, Michael A

    2017-08-01

    The complexity of modern insulin-based therapy for type I and type II diabetes mellitus and the risks associated with excursions in blood-glucose concentration (hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia) have motivated the development of 'smart insulin' technologies (glucose-responsive insulin, GRI). Such analogs or delivery systems are entities that provide insulin activity proportional to the glycemic state of the patient without external monitoring by the patient or healthcare provider. The present review describes the relevant historical background to modern GRI technologies and highlights three distinct approaches: coupling of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) to deliver devices (algorithm-based 'closed-loop' systems), glucose-responsive polymer encapsulation of insulin, and molecular modification of insulin itself. Recent advances in GRI research utilizing each of the three approaches are illustrated; these include newly developed algorithms for CGM-based insulin delivery systems, glucose-sensitive modifications of existing clinical analogs, newly developed hypoxia-sensitive polymer matrices, and polymer-encapsulated, stem-cell-derived pancreatic β cells. Although GRI technologies have yet to be perfected, the recent advances across several scientific disciplines that are described in this review have provided a path towards their clinical implementation.

  15. Expression of collagen and related growth factors in rat tendon and skeletal muscle in response to specific contraction types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, K M; Olesen, J L; Haddad, F

    2007-01-01

    greater than the effect of concentric training on the expression of several transcripts. In conclusion, the study supports an involvement of TGF-beta-1 in loading-induced collagen synthesis in the muscle-tendon unit and importantly, it indicates that muscle tissue is more sensitive than tendon......Acute exercise induces collagen synthesis in both tendon and muscle, indicating an adaptive response in the connective tissue of the muscle-tendon unit. However, the mechanisms of this adaptation, potentially involving collagen-inducing growth factors (such as transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF......-beta-1)), as well as enzymes related to collagen processing, are not clear. Furthermore, possible differential effects of specific contraction types on collagen regulation have not been investigated. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 4 days of concentric, eccentric or isometric training (n = 7...

  16. Rational Design of Glucose-Responsive Insulin Using Pharmacokinetic Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakh, Naveed A; Bisker, Gili; Lee, Michael A; Gong, Xun; Strano, Michael S

    2017-11-01

    A glucose responsive insulin (GRI) is a therapeutic that modulates its potency, concentration, or dosing of insulin in relation to a patient's dynamic glucose concentration, thereby approximating aspects of a normally functioning pancreas. Current GRI design lacks a theoretical basis on which to base fundamental design parameters such as glucose reactivity, dissociation constant or potency, and in vivo efficacy. In this work, an approach to mathematically model the relevant parameter space for effective GRIs is induced, and design rules for linking GRI performance to therapeutic benefit are developed. Well-developed pharmacokinetic models of human glucose and insulin metabolism coupled to a kinetic model representation of a freely circulating GRI are used to determine the desired kinetic parameters and dosing for optimal glycemic control. The model examines a subcutaneous dose of GRI with kinetic parameters in an optimal range that results in successful glycemic control within prescribed constraints over a 24 h period. Additionally, it is demonstrated that the modeling approach can find GRI parameters that enable stable glucose levels that persist through a skipped meal. The results provide a framework for exploring the parameter space of GRIs, potentially without extensive, iterative in vivo animal testing. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Expression of collagen and related growth factors in rat tendon and skeletal muscle in response to specific contraction types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemeier, K M; Olesen, J L; Haddad, F; Langberg, H; Kjaer, M; Baldwin, K M; Schjerling, P

    2007-08-01

    Acute exercise induces collagen synthesis in both tendon and muscle, indicating an adaptive response in the connective tissue of the muscle-tendon unit. However, the mechanisms of this adaptation, potentially involving collagen-inducing growth factors (such as transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-beta-1)), as well as enzymes related to collagen processing, are not clear. Furthermore, possible differential effects of specific contraction types on collagen regulation have not been investigated. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 4 days of concentric, eccentric or isometric training (n = 7-9 per group) of the medial gastrocnemius, by stimulation of the sciatic nerve. RNA was extracted from medial gastrocnemius and Achilles tendon tissue 24 h after the last training bout, and mRNA levels for collagens I and III, TGF-beta-1, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), lysyl oxidase (LOX), metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and -9) and their inhibitors (TIMP-1 and 2) were measured by Northern blotting and/or real-time PCR. In tendon, expression of TGF-beta-1 and collagens I and III (but not CTGF) increased in response to all types of training. Similarly, enzymes/factors involved in collagen processing were induced in tendon, especially LOX (up to 37-fold), which could indicate a loading-induced increase in cross-linking of tendon collagen. In skeletal muscle, a similar regulation of gene expression was observed, but in contrast to the tendon response, the effect of eccentric training was significantly greater than the effect of concentric training on the expression of several transcripts. In conclusion, the study supports an involvement of TGF-beta-1 in loading-induced collagen synthesis in the muscle-tendon unit and importantly, it indicates that muscle tissue is more sensitive than tendon to the specific mechanical stimulus.

  18. Immune response gene control of collagen reactivity in man: collagen unresponsiveness in HLA-DR4 negative nonresponders is due to the presence of T-dependent suppressive influences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solinger, A.M.; Stobo, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    To determine whether the failure to detect collagen reactivity in nonresponders represents an absence of collagen-reactive T cells or a preponderance of suppressive influences, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HLA-DR4 - individuals were subjected to three procedures capable of separating suppressive influences from LIF-secreting cells; irradiation (1000 rad), discontinuous gradient fractionation, and cytolysis with the monoclonal antibody OKT 8. Each procedure resulted in the specific appearance of reactivity to collagen, which was identical to that seen in HLA-DR4 + individuals with regard to its cellular requirements and antigenic specificity. Addition of unresponsive (i.e., nonirradiated or low-density T cells) to responsive (i.e., irradiated or high-density T cells) autologous populations resulted in specific suppression of collagen reactivity. Radiation-sensitive suppressive influences could not be detected in HLA-DR4 + collagen responders.These studies indicate that the expression of T-dependent reactivity to collagen in man reflects the net influence of collage-reactive vs collagen-suppressive T cells. Moreover, it is the influence of HLA-D-linked genes on the development of suppressive influences rather than on the development of collagen-reactive, LIF-secreting T cells that serves to distinguish HLA-DR4 + collagen responders from HLA-DR4 - collagen nonresponders

  19. Multi-scale mechanical response of freeze-dried collagen scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offeddu, Giovanni S; Ashworth, Jennifer C; Cameron, Ruth E; Oyen, Michelle L

    2015-02-01

    Tissue engineering has grown in the past two decades as a promising solution to unresolved clinical problems such as osteoarthritis. The mechanical response of tissue engineering scaffolds is one of the factors determining their use in applications such as cartilage and bone repair. The relationship between the structural and intrinsic mechanical properties of the scaffolds was the object of this study, with the ultimate aim of understanding the stiffness of the substrate that adhered cells experience, and its link to the bulk mechanical properties. Freeze-dried type I collagen porous scaffolds made with varying slurry concentrations and pore sizes were tested in a viscoelastic framework by macroindentation. Membranes made up of stacks of pore walls were indented using colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. It was found that the bulk scaffold mechanical response varied with collagen concentration in the slurry consistent with previous studies on these materials. Hydration of the scaffolds resulted in a more compliant response, yet lesser viscoelastic relaxation. Indentation of the membranes suggested that the material making up the pore walls remains unchanged between conditions, so that the stiffness of the scaffolds at the scale of seeded cells is unchanged; rather, it is suggested that thicker pore walls or more of these result in the increased moduli for the greater slurry concentration conditions. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Conformational assembly and biological properties of collagen mimetic peptides and their thermally responsive polymer conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Ohm Divyam

    2011-12-01

    Collagens are one of the most abundant proteins found in body tissues and organs, endowing structural integrity, mechanical strength, and multiple biological functions. Destabilized collagen inside human body leads to various degenerative diseases (ex. osteoarthritis) and ageing. This has continued to motivate the design of synthetic peptides and bio-synthetic polypeptides to closely mimic the native collagens in terms of triple helix structure and stability, potential for higher order assembly, and biological properties. However, the widespread application of de novo collagens has been limited in part by the need for hydroxylated proline in the formation of stable triple helical structures. To address this continued need, a hydroxyproline-free, thermally stable collagen-mimetic peptide (CLP-Cys) was rationally designed via the incorporation of electrostatically stabilized amino acid triplets. CLP-Cys was synthesized via solid phase peptide synthesis. The formation and stability of the triple helical structure were indicated via circular dichroism (CD) experiments and confirmed via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results. CLP-Cys also self-assembled into nano-rods and micro-fibrils, as evidenced via a combination of dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Given the high thermal stability and its propensity for higher-order assembly, CLP-Cys was further functionalized at both the ends with a thermally responsive polymer, poly(diethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate), (PDEGMEMA) to synthesize a biohybrid triblock copolymer. The CD results indicated that the triple helical form is retained, the thermal unfolding is sustained and helix to coil transition is reversible in the triblock hybrid context. The LCST of PDEGMEMA homopolymer (26 °C) is increased (to 35 °C) upon conjugation to the hydrophilic collagen peptide domain. Further, a combination of static light scattering, Cryo-SEM, TEM and confocal microscopy elucidated that the

  1. The glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucose-stimulated insulin response to exercise training and diet in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Karen R; Brooks, Latina M; Solomon, Thomas P J; Kashyap, Sangeeta R; O'Leary, Valerie B; Kirwan, John P

    2009-06-01

    Aging and obesity are characterized by decreased beta-cell sensitivity and defects in the potentiation of nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion by GIP. Exercise and diet are known to improve glucose metabolism and the pancreatic insulin response to glucose, and this effect may be mediated through the incretin effect of GIP. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a 12-wk exercise training intervention (5 days/wk, 60 min/day, 75% Vo(2 max)) combined with a eucaloric (EX, n = 10) or hypocaloric (EX-HYPO, pre: 1,945 +/- 190, post: 1,269 +/- 70, kcal/day; n = 9) diet on the GIP response to glucose in older (66.8 +/- 1.5 yr), obese (34.4 +/- 1.7 kg/m(2)) adults with impaired glucose tolerance. In addition to GIP, plasma PYY(3-36), insulin, and glucose responses were measured during a 3-h, 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Both interventions led to a significant improvement in Vo(2 max) (P HYPO (-8.3 +/- 1.1 vs. -2.8 +/- 0.5, P = 0.002). The glucose-stimulated insulin response was reduced after EX-HYPO (P = 0.02), as was the glucose-stimulated GIP response (P caloric restriction and exercise reduces the GIP response to ingested glucose, 2) GIP may mediate the attenuated glucose-stimulated insulin response after exercise/diet interventions, and 3) the increased PYY(3-36) response represents an improved capacity to regulate satiety and potentially body weight in older, obese, insulin-resistant adults.

  2. Oral administration of type-II collagen peptide 250-270 suppresses specific cellular and humoral immune response in collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping; Li, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Hong-Kun; Jia, Jun-Feng; Zheng, Zhao-Hui; Ding, Jin; Fan, Chun-Mei

    2007-01-01

    Oral antigen is an attractive approach for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Establishment of immune markers and methods in evaluating the effects of antigen-specific cellular and humoral immune responses will help the application of oral tolerance in the treatment of human diseases. The present article observed the effects of chicken collagen II (CII), the recombinant polymerized human collagen II 250-270 (rhCII 250-270) peptide and synthesized human CII 250-270 (syCII 250-270) peptide on the induction of antigen-specific autoimmune response in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and on the specific cellular and humoral immune response in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and mice fed with CII (250-270) prior to immunization with CII. In the study, proliferation, activation and intracellular cytokine production of antigen-specific T lymphocytes were simultaneously analyzed by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and flow cytometry at the single-cell level. The antigen-specific antibody and antibody-forming cells were detected by ELISA and ELISPOT, respectively. CII (250-270) was found to have stimulated the response of specific lymphocytes in PBMC from RA patients, including the increase expression of surface activation antigen marker CD69 and CD25, and DNA synthesis. Mice, fed with CII (250-270) before CII immunization, had significantly lower arthritic scores than the mice immunized with CII alone, and the body weight of the former increased during the study period. Furthermore, the specific T cell activity, proliferation and secretion of interferon (IFN)-gamma in spleen cells were actively suppressed in CII (250-270)-fed mice, and the serum anti-CII, anti-CII (250-270) antibody activities and the frequency of specific antibody-forming spleen cells were significantly lower in CII (250-270)-fed mice than in mice immunized with CII alone. These observations suggest that oral administration of CII (250-270) can

  3. The preosteoblast response of electrospinning PLGA/PCL nanofibers: effects of biomimetic architecture and collagen I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian YZ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Yunzhu Qian,1,2 Hanbang Chen,1 Yang Xu,1 Jianxin Yang,2 Xuefeng Zhou,3 Feimin Zhang,1 Ning Gu3 1Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 2Center of Stomatology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 3School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Constructing biomimetic structure and incorporating bioactive molecules is an effective strategy to achieve a more favorable cell response. To explore the effect of electrospinning (ES nanofibrous architecture and collagen I (COL I-incorporated modification on tuning osteoblast response, a resorbable membrane composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid/poly(caprolactone (PLGA/PCL; 7:3 w/w was developed via ES. COL I was blended into PLGA/PCL solution to prepare composite ES membrane. Notably, relatively better cell response was delivered by the bioactive ES-based membrane which was fabricated by modification of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and COL I. After investigation by field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurement, and mechanical test, polyporous three-dimensional nanofibrous structure with low tensile force and the successful integration of COL I was obtained by the ES method. Compared with traditional PLGA/PCL membrane, the surface hydrophilicity of collagen-incorporated membranes was largely enhanced. The behavior of mouse preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 cell infiltration and proliferation on membranes was studied at 24 and 48 hours. The negative control was fabricated by solvent casting. Evaluation of cell adhesion and morphology demonstrated that all the ES membranes were more favorable for promoting the cell adhesion and spreading than the casting membrane. Cell Counting Kit-8 assays revealed that biomimetic architecture, surface topography, and bioactive properties of membranes were favorable for cell

  4. Genetic variation in GIPR influences the glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saxena, Richa; Hivert, Marie-France; Langenberg, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Glucose levels 2 h after an oral glucose challenge are a clinical measure of glucose tolerance used in the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. We report a meta-analysis of nine genome-wide association studies (n = 15,234 nondiabetic individuals) and a follow-up of 29 independent loci (n = 6,958-30,620)......Glucose levels 2 h after an oral glucose challenge are a clinical measure of glucose tolerance used in the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. We report a meta-analysis of nine genome-wide association studies (n = 15,234 nondiabetic individuals) and a follow-up of 29 independent loci (n = 6...

  5. The glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucose-stimulated insulin response to exercise training and diet in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Karen R; Brooks, Latina M; Solomon, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    the incretin effect of GIP. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a 12-wk exercise training intervention (5 days/wk, 60 min/day, 75% Vo(2 max)) combined with a eucaloric (EX, n = 10) or hypocaloric (EX-HYPO, pre: 1,945 +/- 190, post: 1,269 +/- 70, kcal/day; n = 9) diet on the GIP response......Aging and obesity are characterized by decreased beta-cell sensitivity and defects in the potentiation of nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion by GIP. Exercise and diet are known to improve glucose metabolism and the pancreatic insulin response to glucose, and this effect may be mediated through...... to ingested glucose, 2) GIP may mediate the attenuated glucose-stimulated insulin response after exercise/diet interventions, and 3) the increased PYY(3-36) response represents an improved capacity to regulate satiety and potentially body weight in older, obese, insulin-resistant adults....

  6. Genetic variation in GIPR influences the glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Saxena (Richa); M.-F. Hivert (Marie-France); C. Langenberg (Claudia); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); J.S. Pankow (James); P. Vollenweider (Peter); V. Lyssenko (Valeriya); N. Bouatia-Naji (Nabila); J. Dupuis (Josée); A.U. Jackson (Anne); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); M. Li (Man); N.L. Glazer (Nicole); A.K. Manning (Alisa); J. Anluan (Jian); H.M. Stringham (Heather); I. Prokopenko (Inga); T. Johnson (Toby); N. Grarup (Niels); T.W. Boesgaard (Trine); C. Lecoeur (Cécile); P. Shrader (Peter); J.R. O´Connell; E. Ingelsson (Erik); D.J. Couper (David); K. Rice (Kenneth); K. Song (Kijoung); C.H. Andreasen (Camilla); C. Dina (Christian); A. Köttgen (Anna); O.L. Bacquer (Olivier); F. Pattou (François); J. Taneera (Jalal); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); D. Rybin (Denis); K.G. Ardlie (Kristin); M.J. Sampson (Michael); L. Qi (Lu); M.V. Hoek; M.N. Weedon (Michael); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); H. Grallert (Harald); B. Balkau (Beverley); R.N. Bergman (Richard); S.J. Bielinski (Suzette); A. Bonnefond (Amélie); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); K. Borch-Johnsen; Y. Böttcher (Yvonne); E. Brunner (Eric); T.A. Buchanan (Thomas); S. Bumpstead (Suzannah); C. Cavalcanti-Proença (Christine); G. Charpentier (Guillaume); Y.D.I. Chen (Yii-Der Ida); P.S. Chines (Peter); F.S. Collins (Francis); M. Cornelis (Marilyn); G. Crawford (Gabe); J. Delplanque (Jerome); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); J.M. Egan (Josephine); M.R. Erdos (Michael); M. Firmann (Mathieu); N.G. Forouhi (Nita); C.S. Fox (Caroline); M. Goodarzi (Mark); J. Graessler (Jürgen); A. Hingorani (Aroon); B. Isomaa (Bo); T. Jørgensen (Torben); M. Kivimaki (Mika); P. Kovacs (Peter); K. Krohn (Knut); M. Kumari (Meena); T. Lauritzen (Torsten); C. Lévy-Marchal (Claire); V. Mayor (Vladimir); J.B. McAteer (Jarred); D. Meyre (David); B.D. Mitchell (Braxton); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); M.A. Morken (Mario); N. Narisu (Narisu); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); R. Pakyz (Ruth); L. Pascoe (Laura); F. Payne (Felicity); D. Pearson (Daniel); W. Rathmann (Wolfgang); A. Sandbaek (Annelli); A.A. Sayer; L.J. Scott (Laura); S.J. Sharp (Stephen); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); A. Singleton (Andrew); D.S. Siscovick (David); N.L. Smith (Nicholas); T. Sparsø (Thomas); A.J. Swift (Amy); H. Syddall (Holly); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); A. Tönjes (Anke); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); T.T. Valle (Timo); G. Waeber (Gérard); A. Walley (Andrew); D. Waterworth (Dawn); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); G. Consortium (Giant); T. Illig (Thomas); H.E. Wichmann (Erich); J.F. Wilson (James); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); F.B. Hu (Frank); A.D. Morris (Andrew); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); P. Nilsson (Peter); A.C. Syvänen; A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); M. Walker (Mark); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan); P. Schwarz (Peter); G.H. Williams (Gordon); D.M. Nathan (David); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); M. Laakso (Markku); C. Cooper (Charles); M. Marmot (Michael); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); V. Mooser (Vincent); M. Stumvoll (Michael); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); D. Altshuler (David); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); T. Hansen (Torben); O. Pedersen (Oluf); J.C. Florez (Jose); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); M. Boehnke (Michael); I.E. Barroso (Inês); R. Sladek (Rob); P. Froguel (Philippe); J.B. Meigs (James); L. Groop (Leif); N.J. Wareham (Nick); R.M. Watanabe (Richard)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractGlucose levels 2 h after an oral glucose challenge are a clinical measure of glucose tolerance used in the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. We report a meta-analysis of nine genome-wide association studies (n = 15,234 nondiabetic individuals) and a follow-up of 29 independent loci (n =

  7. Betahistine attenuates murine collagen-induced arthritis by suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kuo-Tung; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Der-Yuan; Lim, Yun-Ping; Chen, Yi-Ming; Li, Yi-Rong; Yang, Deng-Ho; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential therapeutic effects of betahistine dihydrochloride (betahistine) in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. CIA was induced in DBA/1 male mice by primary immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml chicken type II collagen (CII) mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in an 1:1 ratio, and booster immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml CII mixed with incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) in an 1:1 ratio. Immunization was performed subcutaneously at the base of the tail. After being boosted on day 21, betahistine (1 and 5mg/kg) was orally administered daily for 2weeks. The severity of CIA was determined by arthritic scores and assessment of histopathological joint destruction. Expression of cytokines in the paw and anti-CII antibodies in the serum was evaluated by ELISA. The proliferative response against CII in the lymph node cells was measured by (3)H-thymidine incorporation assay. The frequencies of different CII specific CD4(+) T cell subsets in the lymph node were determined by flow-cytometric analysis. Betahistine treatment attenuated the severity of arthritis and reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6, IL-23 and IL-17A, in the paw tissues of CIA mice. Lymph node cells from betahistine-treated mice showed a decrease in proliferation, as well as a lower frequency of Th17 cells. In vitro, betahistine suppressed CD4(+) T cell differentiation into Th17 cells. These results indicate that betahistine is effective in suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 responses in mouse CIA and that it may have therapeutic value as an adjunct treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Study on the Glucose and Immunoreactive Insulin Response during Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Kang Won; Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mu Ho

    1973-01-01

    The blood glucose and plasma immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels were measured during aral glucose tolerance test in 7 healthy subjects and 6 patients with chronic liver diseases. The glucose tolerance was impaired in 5 of the 6 patients and normal in I. Plasma IRI responses were markedly increased and delayed in all patients, suggesting endogenous insulin resistance. Patients with more glucose intolerance showed less increase in plasma IRI than the group with less intolerance. lt is suggested that some insulin antagonists may decrease the peripheral insulin sensitivity and stimulate compensatory hyperactivity of pancreatic islets. If the compensatory hyperactivity is inadequate due to gemetic predisposition to diabetes mellitus or exhaustion of β-cells of pancreatic islets, the glucose intolerance and overt diabetes mellitus may ensue.

  9. A Study on the Glucose and Immunoreactive Insulin Response during Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Kang Won; Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mu Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1973-03-15

    The blood glucose and plasma immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels were measured during aral glucose tolerance test in 7 healthy subjects and 6 patients with chronic liver diseases. The glucose tolerance was impaired in 5 of the 6 patients and normal in I. Plasma IRI responses were markedly increased and delayed in all patients, suggesting endogenous insulin resistance. Patients with more glucose intolerance showed less increase in plasma IRI than the group with less intolerance. lt is suggested that some insulin antagonists may decrease the peripheral insulin sensitivity and stimulate compensatory hyperactivity of pancreatic islets. If the compensatory hyperactivity is inadequate due to gemetic predisposition to diabetes mellitus or exhaustion of beta-cells of pancreatic islets, the glucose intolerance and overt diabetes mellitus may ensue.

  10. Glucose-responsive insulin by molecular and physical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakh, Naveed A.; Cortinas, Abel B.; Weiss, Michael A.; Langer, Robert S.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Gu, Zhen; Dutta, Sanjoy; Strano, Michael S.

    2017-10-01

    The concept of a glucose-responsive insulin (GRI) has been a recent objective of diabetes technology. The idea behind the GRI is to create a therapeutic that modulates its potency, concentration or dosing relative to a patient's dynamic glucose concentration, thereby approximating aspects of a normally functioning pancreas. From the perspective of the medicinal chemist, the GRI is also important as a generalized model of a potentially new generation of therapeutics that adjust potency in response to a critical therapeutic marker. The aim of this Perspective is to highlight emerging concepts, including mathematical modelling and the molecular engineering of insulin itself and its potency, towards a viable GRI. We briefly outline some of the most important recent progress toward this goal and also provide a forward-looking viewpoint, which asks if there are new approaches that could spur innovation in this area as well as to encourage synthetic chemists and chemical engineers to address the challenges and promises offered by this therapeutic approach.

  11. Plasma levels of leptin, omentin, collagenous repeat-containing sequence of 26-kDa protein (CORS-26 and adiponectin before and after oral glucose uptake in slim adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schäffler Andreas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adipose tissue secreted proteins are collectively named adipocytokines and include leptin, adiponectin, resistin, collagenous repeat-containing sequence of 26-kDa protein (CORS-26 and omentin. Several of these adipocytokines influence insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism and therefore systemic levels may be affected by oral glucose uptake. Whereas contradictory results have been published for leptin and adiponectin, resistin has not been extensively investigated and no reports on omentin and CORS-26 do exist. Methods Therefore the plasma levels of these proteins before and 120 min after an oral glucose load were analyzed in 20 highly-insulin sensitive, young adults by ELISA or immunoblot. Results Circulating leptin was reduced 2 h after glucose uptake whereas adiponectin and resistin levels are not changed. Distribution of adiponectin and CORS-26 isoforms were similar before and after glucose ingestion. Omentin is highly abundant in plasma and immunoblot analysis revealed no alterations when plasma levels before and 2 h after glucose intake were compared. Conclusion Taken together our data indicate that only leptin is reduced by glucose uptake in insulin-sensitive probands whereas adiponectin and resistin are not altered. CORS-26 was demonstrated for the first time to circulate as high molecular weight form in plasma and like omentin was not influenced by oral glucose load. Omentin was shown to enhance insulin-stimulated glucose uptake but systemic levels are not correlated to postprandial blood glucose.

  12. Tissue response of defined collagen-elastin scaffolds in young and adult rats with special attention to calcification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daamen, WF; Nillesen, STM; Hafmans, T; Veerkamp, JH; van Luyn, MJA; van Kuppevelt, TH

    Collagen-elastin scaffolds may be valuable biomaterials for tissue engineering because they combine tensile strength with elasticity. In this study, the tissue response to and the calcification of these scaffolds were evaluated. In particular, the hypothesis was tested that calcification, a common

  13. M2-like macrophages are responsible for collagen degradation through a mannose receptor–mediated pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Daniel H.; Leonard, Daniel; Masedunskas, Andrius; Moyer, Amanda; Jürgensen, Henrik Jessen; Peters, Diane E.; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Selvaraj, Arul; Yamada, Susan S.; Brenner, David A.; Burgdorf, Sven; Engelholm, Lars H.; Behrendt, Niels; Holmbeck, Kenn; Weigert, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Tissue remodeling processes critically depend on the timely removal and remodeling of preexisting collagen scaffolds. Nevertheless, many aspects related to the turnover of this abundant extracellular matrix component in vivo are still incompletely understood. We therefore took advantage of recent advances in optical imaging to develop an assay to visualize collagen turnover in situ and identify cell types and molecules involved in this process. Collagen introduced into the dermis of mice underwent cellular endocytosis in a partially matrix metalloproteinase–dependent manner and was subsequently routed to lysosomes for complete degradation. Collagen uptake was predominantly executed by a quantitatively minor population of M2-like macrophages, whereas more abundant Col1a1-expressing fibroblasts and Cx3cr1-expressing macrophages internalized collagen at lower levels. Genetic ablation of the collagen receptors mannose receptor (Mrc1) and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor–associated protein (Endo180 and Mrc2) impaired this intracellular collagen degradation pathway. This study demonstrates the importance of receptor-mediated cellular uptake to collagen turnover in vivo and identifies a key role of M2-like macrophages in this process. PMID:24019537

  14. Glucose-6-phosphate mediates activation of the carbohydrate responsive binding protein (ChREBP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ming V.; Chen, Weiqin; Harmancey, Romain N.; Nuotio-Antar, Alli M.; Imamura, Minako; Saha, Pradip; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Chan, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is a Mondo family transcription factor that activates a number of glycolytic and lipogenic genes in response to glucose stimulation. We have previously reported that high glucose can activate the transcriptional activity of ChREBP independent of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-mediated increase in nuclear entry and DNA binding. Here, we found that formation of glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) is essential for glucose activation of ChREBP. The glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP is attenuated by D-mannoheptulose, a potent hexokinase inhibitor, as well as over-expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase); kinetics of activation of GAL4-ChREBP can be modified by exogenously expressed GCK. Further metabolism of G-6-P through the two major glucose metabolic pathways, glycolysis and pentose-phosphate pathway, is not required for activation of ChREBP; over-expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) diminishes, whereas RNAi knockdown of the enzyme enhances, the glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP, respectively. Moreover, the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), which is phosphorylated by hexokinase, but not further metabolized, effectively upregulates the transcription activity of ChREBP. In addition, over-expression of phosphofructokinase (PFK) 1 and 2, synergistically diminishes the glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP. These multiple lines of evidence support the conclusion that G-6-P mediates the activation of ChREBP.

  15. Evidencing of collagen polypeptide sequences responsible of hydration by means of 13 C NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trandafir, Viorica; Georgescu, Mariana; Albu, Bujor; Popescu, G.; Akutsu, Hiroshi; Nechifor, Gheorghe

    2000-01-01

    The aim of these studies is to prepare biomaterials of high biocompatibility to the human body, provided for a long lifetime. Among these important biomaterials also accounts the collagen, with a large application area in medicine, pharmaceutics, cosmetics, etc. Collagen biomaterials of various hydration levels (between 23 - 83%) were prepared by a particular technique, using a matrix of 23% initial humidity. In order to investigate the structural and conformational changes from the collagen macromolecules by denaturation - renaturation, hydration - dehydration, the high-resolution 13 C - NMR solid state and also pore size distribution analysis were carried out. The collagen biomaterials can be made in a large range of shapes and can have structures of mimesis, close to those of the live tissues, when hydrated. (authors)

  16. Enhanced Biological Response of AVS-Functionalized Ti-6Al-4V Alloy through Covalent Immobilization of Collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvanian, Parsa; Daza, Rafael; López, Patricia A; Ramos, Milagros; González-Nieto, Daniel; Elices, Manuel; Guinea, Gustavo V; Pérez-Rigueiro, José

    2018-02-20

    This study presents the development of an efficient procedure for covalently immobilizing collagen molecules on AVS-functionalized Ti-6Al-4V samples, and the assessment of the survival and proliferation of cells cultured on these substrates. Activated Vapor Silanization (AVS) is a versatile functionalization technique that allows obtaining a high density of active amine groups on the surface. A procedure is presented to covalently bind collagen to the functional layer using EDC/NHS as cross-linker. The covalently bound collagen proteins are characterized by fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy and their stability is tested. The effect of the cross-linker concentration on the process is assessed. The concentration of the cross-linker is optimized and a reliable cleaning protocol is developed for the removal of the excess of carbodiimide from the samples. The results demonstrate that the covalent immobilization of collagen type I on Ti-6Al-4V substrates, using the optimized protocol, increases the number of viable cells present on the material. Consequently, AVS in combination with the carbodiimide chemistry appears as a robust method for the immobilization of proteins and, for the first time, it is shown that it can be used to enhance the biological response to the material.

  17. Effect of blood glucose level on acute stress response of grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Danli; Wu, Yubo; Huang, Di; Ren, Xing; Wang, Yan

    2017-10-01

    Stress has a considerable impact on welfare and productivity of fish, and blood glucose level of fish may be a factor modulating stress response. This study evaluated the effect of blood glucose level and handling on acute stress response of grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella. Fish were intraperitoneally injected with glucose at 0, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 mg g -1 body mass (BM) and then were exposed to handling for 5 min. Glucose injection resulted in increase of plasma glucose level and liver glycogen content and decrease of plasma lactate level. Handling resulted in increase of plasma levels of cortisol, glucose, and lactate and plasma lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and decrease of liver glycogen content. At 1 h post-stress, the plasma cortisol level was lower in the stressed fish injected with glucose at 0.5 mg g -1 BM than the stressed fish injected with glucose at 0, 0.2, and 1.0 mg g -1 BM. No significant differences were found in the activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and pyruvate kinase (PK) in the liver between the stressed and unstressed fish, regardless of the dose of glucose injection. At 1 h post-stress, the liver glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activity was higher in the fish without glucose injection than in the fish injected with glucose. This study reveals that blood glucose level can affect stress response of grass carp by modulating cortisol release and glucose homeostasis through glycogen metabolism and gluconeogenesis in the liver.

  18. The glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucose-stimulated insulin response to exercise training and diet in obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Karen R.; Brooks, Latina M.; Solomon, Thomas P. J.; Kashyap, Sangeeta R.; O'Leary, Valerie B.; Kirwan, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Aging and obesity are characterized by decreased β-cell sensitivity and defects in the potentiation of nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion by GIP. Exercise and diet are known to improve glucose metabolism and the pancreatic insulin response to glucose, and this effect may be mediated through the incretin effect of GIP. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a 12-wk exercise training intervention (5 days/wk, 60 min/day, 75% V̇o2 max) combined with a eucaloric (EX, n = 10) or ...

  19. Molecular mechanisms of glucose uptake in skeletal muscle at rest and in response to exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Martins Pereira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose uptake is an important phenomenon for cell homeostasis and for organism health. Under resting conditions, skeletal muscle is dependent on insulin to promote glucose uptake.Insulin, after binding to its membrane receptor, triggers a cascade of intracellular reactions culminating in activation of the glucose transporter 4, GLUT4, among other outcomes.This transporter migrates to the plasma membrane and assists in glucose internalization.However, under special conditions such as physical exercise, alterations in the levels of intracellular molecules such as ATP and calcium actto regulate GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, regardless of insulinlevels.Regular physical exercise, due to stimulating pathways related to glucose uptake, is an important non-pharmacological intervention for improving glycemic control in obese and diabetic patients. In this mini-review the main mechanisms involved in glucose uptake in skeletal muscle in response to muscle contraction will be investigated.

  20. LOX-mediated collagen crosslinking is responsible for fibrosis-enhanced metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Bird, Demelza; Baker, Ann-Marie

    2013-01-01

    of metastastic tumor cells. We show that LOX-dependent collagen crosslinking is involved in creating a growth-permissive fibrotic microenvironment capable of supporting metastatic growth by enhancing tumor cell persistence and survival. We show that therapeutic targeting of LOX abrogates not only the extent...... to which fibrosis manifests, but also prevents fibrosis-enhanced metastatic colonization. Finally, we show that the LOX-mediated collagen crosslinking directly increases tumor cell proliferation, enhancing metastatic colonization and growth manifesting in vivo as increased metastasis. This is the first...... time that crosslinking of collagen I has been shown to enhance metastatic growth. These findings provide an important link between ECM homeostasis, fibrosis, and cancer with important clinical implications for both the treatment of fibrotic disease and cancer....

  1. Impaired glucose-induced thermogenesis and arterial norepinephrine response persist after weight reduction in obese humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, A; Andersen, T; Christensen, N J

    1990-01-01

    A reduced thermic response and an impaired activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) has been reported after oral glucose in human obesity. It is, however, not known whether the reduced SNS activity returns to normal along with weight reduction. The thermic effect of glucose was lower...... in eight obese patients than in matched control subjects (1.7% vs 9.2%, p less than 0.002). The increase in arterial norepinephrine after glucose was also blunted in the obese patients. After a 30-kg weight loss their glucose and lipid profiles were markedly improved but the thermic effect of glucose...... was still lower than that of the control subjects (4.2%, p less than 0.001). The glucose-induced arterial norepinephrine response remained diminished in the reduced obese patients whereas the changes in plasma epinephrine were similar in all three groups. The results suggest that a defective SNS may...

  2. Noradrenaline and acetylcholine responsiveness of glucose-monitoring and glucose-insensitive neurons in the mediodorsal prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Bernadett; Szabó, István; Csetényi, Bettina; Hormay, Edina; Papp, Szilárd; Keresztes, Dóra; Karádi, Zoltán

    2014-01-16

    The mediodorsal prefrontal cortex (mdPFC), as part of the forebrain glucose-monitoring (GM) system, plays important role in several regulatory processes to control the internal state of the organism and to initiate behavioral outputs accordingly. Little is known, however, about the neurochemical sensitivity of neurons located in this area. Substantial evidence indicates that the locus ceruleus - noradrenaline (NA) projection system and the nucleus basalis magnocellularis - cholinergic projection system regulate behavioral state and state dependent processing of sensory information, various cognitive functions already associated with the mdPFC. The main goal of the present study was to examine noradrenergic and cholinergic responsiveness of glucose-monitoring and glucose-insensitive (GIS) neurons in the mediodorsal prefrontal cortex. One fifth of the neurons tested changed in firing rate to microelectrophoretically applied NA. Responsiveness of the GM cells to this catecholamine proved to be significantly higher than that of the GIS units. Microiontophoretic application of acetylcholine (Ach) resulted in activity changes (predominantly facilitation) of more than 40% of the mdPFC neurons. Proportion of Ach sensitive units among the GM and the GIS neurons was found to be similar. The glucose-monitoring neurons of the mdPFC and their distinct NA and remarkable Ach sensitivity are suggested to be of particular significance in prefrontal control of adaptive behaviors. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Dose-response investigation into glucose facilitation of memory performance and mood in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sünram-Lea, Sandra I; Owen, Lauren; Finnegan, Yvonne; Hu, Henglong

    2011-08-01

    It has been suggested that the memory enhancing effect of glucose follows an inverted U-shaped curve, with 25 g resulting in optimal facilitation in healthy young adults. The aim of this study was to further investigate the dose dependency of the glucose facilitation effect in this population across different memory domains and to assess moderation by interindividual differences in glucose regulation and weight. Following a double-blind, repeated measures design, 30 participants were administered drinks containing five different doses of glucose (0 g, 15 g, 25 g, 50 g, and 60 g) and were tested across a range of memory tasks. Glycaemic response and changes in mood state were assessed following drink administration. Analysis of the data showed that glucose administration did not affect mood, but significant glucose facilitation of several memory tasks was observed. However, dose-response curves differed depending on the memory task with only performance on the long-term memory tasks adhering largely to the previously observed inverted U-shaped dose-response curve. Moderation of the response profiles by interindividual differences in glucose regulation and weight was observed. The current data suggest that dose-response function and optimal dose might depend on cognitive domain and are moderated by interindividual differences in glucose regulation and weight.

  4. Fibrillar collagen I matrix remodelling in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: Are lysyl oxidases responsible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjin, G.; Jegathees, T.; Mahar, A.; Kable, E.P.W.; Burgess, J.K.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The development of fibrosis in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) is a key feature and challenge in the treatment of the disease. The mechanisms of collagen I (COL1) reorganisation in the development of fibrosis, which may alter the stiffness of the tissue, are not well understood.

  5. Metabolic activity and collagen turnover in human tendon in response to physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, M; Langberg, H; Miller, B F

    2005-01-01

    Connective tissue of the human tendon plays an important role in force transmission. The extracellular matrix turnover of tendon is influenced by physical activity. Blood flow, oxygen demand, and the level of collagen synthesis and matrix metalloproteinases increase with mechanical loading. Gene...... of overuse tendon injuries occurring during sport, work or leisure-related activities....

  6. Transcriptional responses to glucose at different glycolytic rates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbing, Karin; Ståhlberg, Anders; Hohmann, Stefan; Gustafsson, Lena

    2004-12-01

    The addition of glucose to Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells causes reprogramming of gene expression. Glucose is sensed by membrane receptors as well as (so far elusive) intracellular sensing mechanisms. The availability of four yeast strains that display different hexose uptake capacities allowed us to study glucose-induced effects at different glycolytic rates. Rapid glucose responses were observed in all strains able to take up glucose, consistent with intracellular sensing. The degree of long-term responses, however, clearly correlated with the glycolytic rate: glucose-stimulated expression of genes encoding enzymes of the lower part of glycolysis showed an almost linear correlation with the glycolytic rate, while expression levels of genes encoding gluconeogenic enzymes and invertase (SUC2) showed an inverse correlation. Glucose control of SUC2 expression is mediated by the Snf1-Mig1 pathway. Mig1 dephosphorylation upon glucose addition is known to lead to repression of target genes. Mig1 was initially dephosphorylated upon glucose addition in all strains able to take up glucose, but remained dephosphorylated only at high glycolytic rates. Remarkably, transient Mig1-dephosphorylation was accompanied by the repression of SUC2 expression at high glycolytic rates, but stimulated SUC2 expression at low glycolytic rates. This suggests that Mig1-mediated repression can be overruled by factors mediating induction via a low glucose signal. At low and moderate glycolytic rates, Mig1 was partly dephosphorylated both in the presence of phosphorylated, active Snf1, and unphosphorylated, inactive Snf1, indicating that Mig1 was actively phosphorylated and dephosphorylated simultaneously, suggesting independent control of both processes. Taken together, it appears that glucose addition affects the expression of SUC2 as well as Mig1 activity by both Snf1-dependent and -independent mechanisms that can now be dissected and resolved as early and late/sustained responses.

  7. Lipolytic response to glucose infusion in human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, R.R.; Peters, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have determined the effect of various rates of glucose infusion on the rates of release of glycerol (R/sub a/ glycerol), free fatty acids (R/sub a/ FFA), and on energy metabolism in normal human volunteers. Plasma kinetics were determined with use of the stable isotopic tracers D-5-glycerol and [1- 13 C]palmitate, and energy metabolism was determined by indirect calorimetry. The effect of glucose infusion on R/sub a/ glycerol and R/sub a/ FFA was dose-dependent. At 4 mg x kg -1 x min -1 , both R/sub a/ glycerol and R/sub a/ FFA were suppressed; at 8 mg x kg -1 x min -1 , R/sub a/ FFA was even more depressed, but R/sub a/ glycerol was similar to the value during the 4 mg x kg -1 x min -1 infusion. At all infusion rates tested, the amount of potential energy available from the sum of the glucose infusion and endogenously mobilized fat was always greater than when no glucose was infused. Glucose decreased fat mobilization by both inhibiting lipolysis and stimulating reesterification, thus causing a significant increase in triglyceride-fatty acid substrate cycling within the adipose tissue. Plasma insulin was determined by radioimmunoassay

  8. Dissociated incretin response to oral glucose at 1 year after restrictive vs. malabsorptive bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldstrand, M; Ahrén, B; Näslund, E

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Compare the response to oral glucose of the two incretin hormones, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) at 1 year after restrictive vs. malabsorptive bariatric surgery. METHODS: Vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG, n = 7) or jejunoileal bypass...... (JIB, n = 5) was performed in 12 women, aged 26-39 years, with severe obesity [body mass index (BMI) 46.6 +/- 2.3 kg/m(2)]. After 1 year, 75 g glucose was administered and plasma levels of glucose, insulin, GIP and GLP-1 were determined regularly during the following 2 h. RESULTS: At 1 year after...

  9. Postprandial gut hormone responses and glucose metabolism in cholecystectomized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, David P; Hare, Kristine J; Martens, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    -rich liquid meal (2,200 kJ). Basal and postprandial plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), cholecystokinin (CCK), and gastrin were measured. Furthermore, gastric emptying and duodenal and serum......Preclinical studies suggest that gallbladder emptying, via bile acid-induced activation of the G protein-coupled receptor TGR5 in intestinal L cells, may play a significant role in the secretion of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and, hence, postprandial glucose homeostasis. We...... examined the secretion of gut hormones in cholecystectomized subjects to test the hypothesis that gallbladder emptying potentiates postprandial release of GLP-1. Ten cholecystectomized subjects and 10 healthy, age-, gender-, and body mass index-matched control subjects received a standardized fat...

  10. Blood glucose response of normoglycemic adults fed breakfast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gift

    Effect of high fibre leguminous products in breakfast porridges, made from Afzelia Africana (AA), ... Fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels were taken at 30 min interval for 2 .... ml to CSS and each was cooked (stirred continuously) for 10 min to ..... prevalence of diabetes, overweight/obesity and physical inactivity in.

  11. Functional MRI of human hypothalamic responses following glucose ingestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Graaf, C. de; Stafleu, A.; Osch, M.J.P. van; Grond, J. van der

    2005-01-01

    The hypothalamus is intimately involved in the regulation of food intake, integrating multiple neural and hormonal signals. Several hypothalamic nuclei contain glucose-sensitive neurons, which play a crucial role in energy homeostasis. Although a few functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

  12. Extracellular matrix production by nucleus pulposus and bone marrow stem cells in response to altered oxygen and glucose microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Syeda M; Buckley, Conor T

    2015-12-01

    Bone marrow (BM) stem cells may be an ideal source of cells for intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration. However, the harsh biochemical microenvironment of the IVD may significantly influence the biological and metabolic vitality of injected stem cells and impair their repair potential. This study investigated the viability and production of key matrix proteins by nucleus pulposus (NP) and BM stem cells cultured in the typical biochemical microenvironment of the IVD consisting of altered oxygen and glucose concentrations. Culture-expanded NP cells and BM stem cells were encapsulated in 1.5% alginate and ionically crosslinked to form cylindrical hydrogel constructs. Hydrogel constructs were maintained under different glucose concentrations (1, 5 and 25 mM) and external oxygen concentrations (5 and 20%). Cell viability was measured using the Live/Dead® assay and the production of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG), and collagen was quantified biochemically and histologically. For BM stem cells, IVD-like micro-environmental conditions (5 mM glucose and 5% oxygen) increased the accumulation of sGAG and collagen. In contrast, low glucose conditions (1 mM glucose) combined with 5% external oxygen concentration promoted cell death, inhibiting proliferation and the accumulation of sGAG and collagen. NP-encapsulated alginate constructs were relatively insensitive to oxygen concentration or glucose condition in that they accumulated similar amounts of sGAG under all conditions. Under IVD-like microenvironmental conditions, NP cells were found to have a lower glucose consumption rate compared with BM cells and may in fact be more suitable to adapt and sustain the harsh microenvironmental conditions. Considering the highly specialised microenvironment of the central NP, these results indicate that IVD-like concentrations of low glucose and low oxygen are critical and influential for the survival and biological behaviour of stem cells. Such findings may promote and accelerate

  13. Greater impairment of postprandial triacylglycerol than glucose response in metabolic syndrome subjects with fasting hyperglycaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kim G; Walden, Charlotte M; Murray, Peter; Smith, Adrian M; Minihane, Anne M; Lovegrove, Julie A; Williams, Christine M

    2013-08-01

    Studies have started to question whether a specific component or combinations of metabolic syndrome (MetS) components may be more important in relation to cardiovascular disease risk. Our aim was to examine the impact of the presence of raised fasting glucose as a MetS component on postprandial lipaemia. Men classified with the MetS underwent a sequential test meal investigation, in which blood samples were taken at regular intervals after a test breakfast (t=0 min) and lunch (t=330 min). Lipids, glucose and insulin were measured in the fasting and postprandial samples. MetS subjects with 3 or 4 components were subdivided into those without (n=34) and with (n=23) fasting hyperglycaemia (≥5.6 mmol/l), irrespective of the combination of components. Fasting lipids and insulin were similar in the two groups, with glucose significantly higher in the men with glucose as a MetS component (Pcurve (AUC) and incremental AUC (P ≤0.016) for the postprandial triacylglycerol (TAG) response in men with fasting hyperglycaemia. Greater glucose AUC (Pglucose to be an important predictor of the postprandial TAG and glucose response. Our data analysis has revealed a greater impairment of postprandial TAG than glucose response in MetS subjects with raised fasting glucose. The worsening of postprandial lipaemic control may contribute to the greater CVD risk reported in individuals with MetS component combinations which include hyperglycaemia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Collagen-induced arthritis in C57BL/6 mice is associated with a robust and sustained T-cell response to type II collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Inglis, Julia J; Criado, Gabriel; Medghalchi, Mino; Andrews, Melanie; Sandison, Ann; Feldmann, Marc; Williams, Richard O

    2007-01-01

    Many genetically modified mouse strains are now available on a C57BL/6 (H-2b) background, a strain that is relatively resistant to collagen-induced arthritis. To facilitate the molecular understanding of autoimmune arthritis, we characterised the induction of arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and then validated the disease as a relevant pre-clinical model for rheumatoid arthritis. C57BL/6 mice were immunised with type II collagen using different protocols, and arthritis incidence, severity, and respo...

  15. Sweet taste receptor serves to activate glucose- and leptin-responsive neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and participates in glucose responsiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Kohno

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamic feeding center plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In the feeding center, whole-body energy signals including hormones and nutrients are sensed, processed, and integrated. As a result, food intake and energy expenditure are regulated. Two types of glucose-sensing neurons exist in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC: glucose-excited neurons and glucose-inhibited neurons. While some molecules are known to be related to glucose sensing in the hypothalamus, the mechanism underlying glucose sensing in the hypothalamus are not fully understood. The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of taste type 1 receptor 2 (T1R2 and taste type 1 receptor 3 (T1R3 and senses sweet tastes. T1R2 and T1R3 receptors are distributed in multiple organs including the tongue, pancreas, adipose tissue, and hypothalamus. However, the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC remains to be clarified. To examine the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC, cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i in isolated single ARC neurons were measured using Fura-2 fluorescent imaging. An artificial sweetener, sucralose at 10-5 M-10-2 M dose dependently increased [Ca2+]i in 12-16% of ARC neurons. The sucralose-induced [Ca2+]i increase was suppressed by a sweet taste receptor inhibitor, gurmarin. The sucralose-induced [Ca2+]i increase was inhibited under an extracellular Ca2+-free condition and in the presence of an L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, nitrendipine. Sucralose-responding neurons were activated by high-concentration of glucose. This response to glucose was markedly suppressed by gurmarin. More than half of sucralose-responding neurons were activated by leptin but not ghrelin. Percentage of proopiomelanocortin (POMC neurons among sucralose-responding neurons and sweet taste receptor expressing neurons were low, suggesting that majority of sucralose-responding neurons are non-POMC neurons. These data suggest that sweet taste receptor-mediated cellular

  16. Sweet Taste Receptor Serves to Activate Glucose- and Leptin-Responsive Neurons in the Hypothalamic Arcuate Nucleus and Participates in Glucose Responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Daisuke; Koike, Miho; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Kojima, Itaru; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamic feeding center plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In the feeding center, whole-body energy signals including hormones and nutrients are sensed, processed, and integrated. As a result, food intake and energy expenditure are regulated. Two types of glucose-sensing neurons exist in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC): glucose-excited neurons and glucose-inhibited neurons. While some molecules are known to be related to glucose sensing in the hypothalamus, the mechanisms underlying glucose sensing in the hypothalamus are not fully understood. The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of taste type 1 receptor 2 (T1R2) and taste type 1 receptor 3 (T1R3) and senses sweet tastes. T1R2 and T1R3 are distributed in multiple organs including the tongue, pancreas, adipose tissue, and hypothalamus. However, the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC remains to be clarified. To examine the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC, cytosolic Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ) in isolated single ARC neurons were measured using Fura-2 fluorescent imaging. An artificial sweetener, sucralose at 10 -5 -10 -2 M dose dependently increased [Ca 2+ ] i in 12-16% of ARC neurons. The sucralose-induced [Ca 2+ ] i increase was suppressed by a sweet taste receptor inhibitor, gurmarin. The sucralose-induced [Ca 2+ ] i increase was inhibited under an extracellular Ca 2+ -free condition and in the presence of an L-type Ca 2+ channel blocker, nitrendipine. Sucralose-responding neurons were activated by high-concentration of glucose. This response to glucose was markedly suppressed by gurmarin. More than half of sucralose-responding neurons were activated by leptin but not ghrelin. Percentages of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons among sucralose-responding neurons and sweet taste receptor expressing neurons were low, suggesting that majority of sucralose-responding neurons are non-POMC neurons. These data suggest that sweet taste receptor-mediated cellular activation

  17. Alteration of cellular behavior and response to PI3K pathway inhibition by culture in 3D collagen gels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Fallica

    Full Text Available Most investigations into cancer cell drug response are performed with cells cultured on flat (2D tissue culture plastic. Emerging research has shown that the presence of a three-dimensional (3D extracellular matrix (ECM is critical for normal cell behavior including migration, adhesion, signaling, proliferation and apoptosis. In this study we investigate differences between cancer cell signaling in 2D culture and a 3D ECM, employing real-time, live cell tracking to directly observe U2OS human osteosarcoma and MCF7 human breast cancer cells embedded in type 1 collagen gels. The activation of the important PI3K signaling pathway under these different growth conditions is studied, and the response to inhibition of both PI3K and mTOR with PI103 investigated. Cells grown in 3D gels show reduced proliferation and migration as well as reduced PI3K pathway activation when compared to cells grown in 2D. Our results quantitatively demonstrate that a collagen ECM can protect U2OS cells from PI103. Overall, our data suggests that 3D gels may provide a better medium for investigation of anti-cancer drugs than 2D monolayers, therefore allowing better understanding of cellular response and behavior in native like environments.

  18. A novel N-terminal domain may dictate the glucose response of Mondo proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa G McFerrin

    Full Text Available Glucose is a fundamental energy source for both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The balance between glucose utilization and storage is integral for proper energy homeostasis, and defects are associated with several diseases, e.g. type II diabetes. In vertebrates, the transcription factor ChREBP is a major component in glucose metabolism, while its ortholog MondoA is involved in glucose uptake. Both MondoA and ChREBP contain five Mondo conserved regions (MCRI-V that affect their cellular localization and transactivation ability. While phosphorylation has been shown to affect ChREBP function, the mechanisms controlling glucose response of both ChREBP and MondoA remain elusive. By incorporating sequence analysis techniques, structure predictions, and functional annotations, we synthesized data surrounding Mondo family proteins into a cohesive, accurate, and general model involving the MCRs and two additional domains that determine ChREBP and MondoA glucose response. Paramount, we identified a conserved motif within the transactivation region of Mondo family proteins and propose that this motif interacts with the phosphorylated form of glucose. In addition, we discovered a putative nuclear receptor box in non-vertebrate Mondo and vertebrate ChREBP sequences that reveals a potentially novel interaction with nuclear receptors. These interactions are likely involved in altering ChREBP and MondoA conformation to form an active complex and induce transcription of genes involved in glucose metabolism and lipogenesis.

  19. Altered Brain Response to Drinking Glucose and Fructose in Obese Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastreboff, Ania M; Sinha, Rajita; Arora, Jagriti; Giannini, Cosimo; Kubat, Jessica; Malik, Saima; Van Name, Michelle A; Santoro, Nicola; Savoye, Mary; Duran, Elvira J; Pierpont, Bridget; Cline, Gary; Constable, R Todd; Sherwin, Robert S; Caprio, Sonia

    2016-07-01

    Increased sugar-sweetened beverage consumption has been linked to higher rates of obesity. Using functional MRI, we assessed brain perfusion responses to drinking two commonly consumed monosaccharides, glucose and fructose, in obese and lean adolescents. Marked differences were observed. In response to drinking glucose, obese adolescents exhibited decreased brain perfusion in brain regions involved in executive function (prefrontal cortex [PFC]) and increased perfusion in homeostatic appetite regions of the brain (hypothalamus). Conversely, in response to drinking glucose, lean adolescents demonstrated increased PFC brain perfusion and no change in perfusion in the hypothalamus. In addition, obese adolescents demonstrated attenuated suppression of serum acyl-ghrelin and increased circulating insulin level after glucose ingestion; furthermore, the change in acyl-ghrelin and insulin levels after both glucose and fructose ingestion was associated with increased hypothalamic, thalamic, and hippocampal blood flow in obese relative to lean adolescents. Additionally, in all subjects there was greater perfusion in the ventral striatum with fructose relative to glucose ingestion. Finally, reduced connectivity between executive, homeostatic, and hedonic brain regions was observed in obese adolescents. These data demonstrate that obese adolescents have impaired prefrontal executive control responses to drinking glucose and fructose, while their homeostatic and hedonic responses appear to be heightened. Thus, obesity-related brain adaptations to glucose and fructose consumption in obese adolescents may contribute to excessive consumption of glucose and fructose, thereby promoting further weight gain. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  20. Glucose-responsive neurons in the subfornical organ of the rat--a novel site for direct CNS monitoring of circulating glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, N; Dai, L; Ferguson, A V

    2012-01-10

    Glucose-sensitive neurons have been identified in a number of CNS regions including metabolic control centers of the hypothalamus. The location of these regions behind the blood-brain barrier restricts them to sensing central, but not circulating glucose concentrations. In this study, we have used patch-clamp electrophysiology to examine whether neurons in a specialized region lacking the blood-brain barrier, the subfornical organ (SFO), are also glucose sensitive. In dissociated SFO neurons, altering the bath concentration of glucose (1 mM, 5 mM, 10 mM) influenced the excitability of 49% of neurons tested (n=67). Glucose-inhibited (GI) neurons depolarized in response to decreased glucose (n=10; mean, 4.6±1.0 mV) or hyperpolarized in response to increased glucose (n=8; mean,-4.4±0.8 mV). In contrast, glucose-excited (GE) neurons depolarized in response to increased glucose (n=9; mean, 6.4±0.4 mV) or hyperpolarized in response to decreased glucose (n=6; mean,-4.8±0.6 mV). Using voltage-clamp recordings, we also identified GI (outward current to increased glucose) and GE (inward current to increased glucose) SFO neurons. The mean glucose-induced inward current had a reversal potential of -24±12 mV (n=5), while GE responses were maintained during sodium-dependent glucose transporter inhibition, supporting the conclusion that GE properties result from the activation of a nonselective cation conductance (NSCC). The glucose-induced outward current had a mean reversal potential of -78±1.2 mV (n=5), while GI responses were not observed in the presence of glibenclamide, suggesting that these properties result from the modulation of K(ATP) channels. These data demonstrate that SFO neurons are glucose responsive, further emphasizing the potential roles of this circumventricular organ as an important sensor and integrator of circulating signals of energy status. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of test meals of varying dietary fiber content on plasma insulin and glucose response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, J G; Coffman, K P; Reid, R L; Krall, J M; Albrink, M J

    1981-03-01

    To assess the effect of dietary fiber on glucose tolerance four different meals of varying fiber content but identical protein fat and carbohydrate content were fed to eight healthy men aged 22 to 45. Each meal provided 75 g of carbohydrate as liquid glucose formula, as brown rice, pinto beans, or All Bran. The mean plasma glucose and insulin responses were highest following the formula, and least for All Bran and pinto beans. Rice produced nearly as great a rise in insulin and glucose as did the formula. The rank of each meal by content of neutral detergent fiber was nearly the inverse of the rank by magnitude of the insulin response evoked, fiber content being greatest in All Bran (18 g) and pinto beans (16.2 g), low in rice (2.8 g) and absent from the formula. It was concluded that dietary fiber dampened the insulin response to a high carbohydrate meal.

  2. Collagenous sprue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soendergaard, Christoffer; Riis, Lene Buhl; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2014-01-01

    Collagenous sprue is a rare clinicopathological condition of the small bowel. It is characterised by abnormal subepithelial collagen deposition and is typically associated with malabsorption, diarrhoea and weight loss. The clinical features of collagenous sprue often resemble those of coeliac...... disease and together with frequent histological findings like mucosal thinning and intraepithelial lymphocytosis the diagnosis may be hard to reach without awareness of this condition. While coeliac disease is treated using gluten restriction, collagenous sprue is, however, not improved...... by this intervention. In cases of diet-refractory 'coeliac disease' it is therefore essential to consider collagenous sprue to initiate treatment at an early stage to prevent the fibrotic progression. Here, we report a case of a 78-year-old man with collagenous sprue and present the clinical and histological...

  3. Glucose impairs tamoxifen responsiveness modulating connective tissue growth factor in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Costa, Valerio; Liguoro, Domenico; Collina, Francesca; Cantile, Monica; Prevete, Nella; Passaro, Carmela; Mosca, Giusy; De Laurentiis, Michelino; Di Bonito, Maurizio; Botti, Gerardo; Franco, Renato; Beguinot, Francesco; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Formisano, Pietro

    2017-12-12

    Type 2 diabetes and obesity are negative prognostic factors in patients with breast cancer (BC). We found that sensitivity to tamoxifen was reduced by 2-fold by 25 mM glucose (High Glucose; HG) compared to 5.5 mM glucose (Low Glucose; LG) in MCF7 BC cells. Shifting from HG to LG ameliorated MCF7 cell responsiveness to tamoxifen. RNA-Sequencing of MCF7 BC cells revealed that cell cycle-related genes were mainly affected by glucose. Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) was identified as a glucose-induced modulator of cell sensitivity to tamoxifen. Co-culturing MCF7 cells with human adipocytes exposed to HG, enhanced CTGF mRNA levels and reduced tamoxifen responsiveness of BC cells. Inhibition of adipocyte-released IL8 reverted these effects. Interestingly, CTGF immuno-detection in bioptic specimens from women with estrogen receptor positive (ER + ) BC correlated with hormone therapy resistance, distant metastases, reduced overall and disease-free survival. Thus, glucose affects tamoxifen responsiveness directly modulating CTGF in BC cells, and indirectly promoting IL8 release by adipocytes.

  4. MCF-7 human mammary adenocarcinoma cells exhibit augmented responses to human insulin on a collagen IV surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Listov-Saabye, Nicolai; Jensen, Marianne Blirup; Kiehr, Benedicte

    2009-01-01

    Human mammary cell lines are extensively used for preclinical safety assessment of insulin analogs. However, it is essentially unknown how mitogenic responses can be optimized in mammary cell-based systems. We developed an insulin mitogenicity assay in MCF-7 human mammary adenocarcinoma cells......, under low serum (0.1% FCS) and phenol red-free conditions, with 3H thymidine incorporation as endpoint. Based on EC50 values determined from 10-fold dilution series, beta-estradiol was the most potent mitogen, followed by human IGF-1, human AspB10 insulin and native human insulin. AspB10 insulin...... was significantly more mitogenic than native insulin, validating the ability of the assay to identify hypermitogenic human insulin analogs. With MCF-7 cells on a collagen IV surface, the ranking of mitogens was maintained, but fold mitogenic responses and dynamic range and steepness of dose-response curves were...

  5. Serum deprivation induces glucose response and intercellular coupling in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma PANC-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiram-Bab, Sahar; Shapira, Yuval; Gershengorn, Marvin C; Oron, Yoram

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether the previously described differentiating islet-like aggregates of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells (PANC-1) develop glucose response and exhibit intercellular communication. Fura 2-loaded PANC-1 cells in serum-free medium were assayed for changes in cytosolic free calcium ([Ca]i) induced by depolarization, tolbutamide inhibition of K(ATP) channels, or glucose. Dye transfer, assayed by confocal microscopy or by FACS, was used to detect intercellular communication. Changes in messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of genes of interest were assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Proliferation was assayed by the MTT method. Serum-deprived PANC-1 cell aggregates developed [Ca]i response to KCl, tolbutamide, or glucose. These responses were accompanied by 5-fold increase in glucokinase mRNA level and, to a lesser extent, of mRNAs for K(ATP) and L-type calcium channels, as well as increase in mRNA levels of glucagon and somatostatin. Trypsin, a proteinase-activated receptor 2 agonist previously shown to enhance aggregation, modestly improved [Ca]i response to glucose. Glucose-induced coordinated [Ca]i oscillations and dye transfer demonstrated the emergence of intercellular communication. These findings suggest that PANC-1 cells, a pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line, can be induced to express a differentiated phenotype in which cells exhibit response to glucose and form a functional syncytium similar to those observed in pancreatic islets.

  6. Glucose-Responsive Implantable Polymeric Microdevices for "Smart" Insulin Therapy of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Michael Kok Loon

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic illness manifested by improper blood glucose management, affecting over 350 million worldwide. As a result, all type 1 patients and roughly 20% of type 2 patients require exogenous insulin therapy to survive. Typically, daily multiple injections are taken to maintain normal glucose levels in response glucose spikes from meals. However, patient compliance and dosing accuracy can fluctuate with variation in meals, exercise, glucose metabolism or stress, leading to poor clinical outcomes. A 'smart', closed-loop insulin delivery system providing on-demand release kinetics responding to circulating glucose levels would be a boon for diabetes patients, replacing constant self monitoring and insulin. This thesis focuses on the development of a novel, 'smart' insulin microdevice that can provide on-demand insulin release in response to blood glucose levels. In the early stage, the feasibility of integrating a composite membrane with pH-responsive nanoparticles embedded in ethylcellulose membrane to provide pH-responsive in vitro release was examined and confirmed using a model drug, vitamin B12. In the second microdevice, glucose oxidase for generating pH signals from glucose oxidation, catalase and manganese dioxide nanoparticles, as peroxide scavengers, were used in a bioinorganic, albumin-based membrane cross-linked with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) grid-microdevice system. This prototype device demonstrated insulin release in response to glucose levels in vitro and regulating plasma glucose in type 1 diabetic rats when implanted intraperitoneally. Advancement allowing for subcutaneous implantation and improved biocompatibility was achieved with surface modification of PDMS microdevices grafted with activated 20 kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains, dramatically reducing immune response and local inflammation. When implanted subcutaneously in diabetic rats, glucose-responsive insulin delivery microdevices showed short and long

  7. Bread making technology influences postprandial glucose response: a review of the clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamataki, Nikoleta S; Yanni, Amalia E; Karathanos, Vaios T

    2017-04-01

    Lowering postprandial glucose and insulin responses may have significant beneficial implications for prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders. Bread is a staple food consumed worldwide in a daily basis, and the use of different baking technologies may modify the glucose and insulin response. The aim of this review was to critically record the human studies examining the application of different bread making processes on postprandial glucose and insulin response to bread. Literature is rich of results which show that the use of sourdough fermentation instead of leavening with Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to modulate glucose response to bread, whereas evidence regarding its efficacy on lowering postprandial insulin response is less clear. The presence of organic acids is possibly involved, but the exact mechanism of action is still to be confirmed. The reviewed data also revealed that the alteration of other processing conditions (method of cooking, proofing period, partial baking freezing technology) can effectively decrease postprandial glucose response to bread, by influencing physical structure and retrogradation of starch. The development of healthier bread products that benefit postprandial metabolic responses is crucial and suggested baking conditions can be used by the bread industry for the promotion of public health.

  8. Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Augments Glucagon Responses to Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mikkel; Calanna, Salvatore; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander H

    2015-01-01

    constituted a "recovery phase." During the recovery phase, GIP infusions elicited larger glucagon responses (164 ± 50 [GIP] vs. 23 ± 25 [GLP-1] vs. 17 ± 46 [saline] min ⋅ pmol/L, P endogenous glucose production was higher with GIP and lower with GLP-1 compared with saline (P ... days, significantly less exogenous glucose was needed to keep plasma glucose above 2 mmol/L (155 ± 36 [GIP] vs. 232 ± 40 [GLP-1] vs. 212 ± 56 [saline] mg ⋅ kg(-1), P ... similar on all days. Our results suggest that during hypoglycemia in patients with T1DM, exogenous GIP increases glucagon responses during the recovery phase after hypoglycemia and reduces the need for glucose administration....

  9. Enhanced glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) response to oral glucose in glucose-intolerant HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O; Haugaard, S B; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    concentrations of GLP-1 and GIP were determined frequently during a 3-h, 75-g glucose tolerance test. Insulin secretion rates (ISRs) were calculated by deconvolution of C-peptide concentrations. RESULTS: The incremental area under the curve (incrAUC) for GLP-1 was increased by 250% in IGT patients compared...... without adjustment (r=0.38, Pglucose incrAUC (r=0.49, Pglucose-intolerant, HIV-infected male patients may display enhanced GLP-1 responses to oral glucose compared with normal glucose-tolerant HIV-infected male patients......OBJECTIVES: We investigated whether the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), which are major regulators of glucose tolerance through the stimulation of insulin secretion, contribute to impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) among HIV...

  10. Astroglial Pentose Phosphate Pathway Rates in Response to High-Glucose Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Takahashi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available ROS (reactive oxygen species play an essential role in the pathophysiology of diabetes, stroke and neurodegenerative disorders. Hyperglycaemia associated with diabetes enhances ROS production and causes oxidative stress in vascular endothelial cells, but adverse effects of either acute or chronic high-glucose environments on brain parenchymal cells remain unclear. The PPP (pentose phosphate pathway and GSH participate in a major defence mechanism against ROS in brain, and we explored the role and regulation of the astroglial PPP in response to acute and chronic high-glucose environments. PPP activity was measured in cultured neurons and astroglia by determining the difference in rate of 14CO2 production from [1-14C]glucose and [6-14C]glucose. ROS production, mainly H2O2, and GSH were also assessed. Acutely elevated glucose concentrations in the culture media increased PPP activity and GSH level in astroglia, decreasing ROS production. Chronically elevated glucose environments also induced PPP activation. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that chronic high-glucose environments induced ER (endoplasmic reticulum stress (presumably through increased hexosamine biosynthetic pathway flux. Nuclear translocation of Nrf2 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45 subunit-related factor 2, which regulates G6PDH (glyceraldehyde-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by enhancing transcription, was also observed in association with BiP (immunoglobulin heavy-chain-binding protein expression. Acute and chronic high-glucose environments activated the PPP in astroglia, preventing ROS elevation. Therefore a rapid decrease in glucose level seems to enhance ROS toxicity, perhaps contributing to neural damage when insulin levels given to diabetic patients are not properly calibrated and plasma glucose levels are not adequately maintained. These findings may also explain the lack of evidence for clinical benefits from strict glycaemic control during the acute phase of stroke.

  11. Astroglial pentose phosphate pathway rates in response to high-glucose environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shinichi; Izawa, Yoshikane; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2012-01-01

    ROS (reactive oxygen species) play an essential role in the pathophysiology of diabetes, stroke and neurodegenerative disorders. Hyperglycaemia associated with diabetes enhances ROS production and causes oxidative stress in vascular endothelial cells, but adverse effects of either acute or chronic high-glucose environments on brain parenchymal cells remain unclear. The PPP (pentose phosphate pathway) and GSH participate in a major defence mechanism against ROS in brain, and we explored the role and regulation of the astroglial PPP in response to acute and chronic high-glucose environments. PPP activity was measured in cultured neurons and astroglia by determining the difference in rate of 14CO2 production from [1-14C]glucose and [6-14C]glucose. ROS production, mainly H2O2, and GSH were also assessed. Acutely elevated glucose concentrations in the culture media increased PPP activity and GSH level in astroglia, decreasing ROS production. Chronically elevated glucose environments also induced PPP activation. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that chronic high-glucose environments induced ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress (presumably through increased hexosamine biosynthetic pathway flux). Nuclear translocation of Nrf2 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45 subunit-related factor 2), which regulates G6PDH (glyceraldehyde-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) by enhancing transcription, was also observed in association with BiP (immunoglobulin heavy-chain-binding protein) expression. Acute and chronic high-glucose environments activated the PPP in astroglia, preventing ROS elevation. Therefore a rapid decrease in glucose level seems to enhance ROS toxicity, perhaps contributing to neural damage when insulin levels given to diabetic patients are not properly calibrated and plasma glucose levels are not adequately maintained. These findings may also explain the lack of evidence for clinical benefits from strict glycaemic control during the acute phase of stroke. PMID:22300409

  12. Increased response to insulin of glucose metabolism in the 6-day unloaded rat soleus muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Erik J.; Tischler, Marc E.; Johnson, David G.

    1986-01-01

    Hind leg muscles of female rats were unloaded by tail cast suspension for 6 days. In the fresh-frozen unloaded soleus, the significantly greater concentration of glycogen correlated with a lower activity ratio of glycogen phosphorylase (p less than 0.02). The activity ratio of glycogen synthase also was lower (p less than 0.001), possibly due to the higher concentration of glycogen. In isolated unloaded soleus, insulin (0.1 milliunit/ml) increased the oxidation of D(U-C-14) glucose, release of lactate and pyruvate, incorporation of D-(U-C-14) glucose into glycogen, and the concentration of glucose 6-phosphate more (p less than 0.05) than in the weight-bearing soleus. At physiological doses of insulin, the percent of maximal uptake of 2-deoxy-D-(1,2-H-3) glucose/muscle also was greater in the unloaded soleus. Unloading of the soleus increased, by 50 percent the concentration of insuling receptors, due to no decrease in total receptor number during muscle atrophy. This increase may account for the greater response of glucose metabolism to insulin in this muscle. The extensor digitorum longus, which generally shows little response to unloading, displayed no differential response of glucose metabolism to insulin.

  13. Response of induced bone defects in horses to collagen matrix containing the human parathyroid hormone gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backstrom, Kristin C; Bertone, Alicia L; Wisner, Erik R; Weisbrode, Stephen E

    2004-09-01

    To determine whether human parathyroid hormone (hPTH) gene in collagen matrix could safely promote bone formation in diaphyseal or subchondral bones of horses. 8 clinically normal adult horses. Amount, rate, and quality of bone healing for 13 weeks were determined by use of radiography, quantitative computed tomography, and histomorphometric analysis. Diaphyseal cortex and subchondral bone defects of metacarpi were filled with hPTH(1-34) gene-activated matrix (GAM) or remained untreated. Joints were assessed on the basis of circumference, synovial fluid analysis, pain on flexion, lameness, and gross and histologic examination. Bone volume index was greater for cortical defects treated with hPTH(1-34) GAM, compared with untreated defects. Bone production in cortical defects treated with hPTH(1-34) GAM positively correlated with native bone formation in untreated defects. In contrast, less bone was detected in hPTH(1-34) GAM-treated subchondral bone defects, compared with untreated defects, and histology confirmed poorer healing and residual collagen sponge. Use of hPTH(1-34) GAM induced greater total bone, specifically periosteal bone, after 13 weeks of healing in cortical defects of horses. The hPTH(1-34) GAM impeded healing of subchondral bone but was biocompatible with joint tissues. Promotion of periosteal bone formation may be beneficial for healing of cortical fractures in horses, but the delay in onset of bone formation may negate benefits. The hPTH(1-34) GAM used in this study should not be placed in articular subchondral bone defects, but contact with articular surfaces is unlikely to cause short-term adverse effects.

  14. Curcumin attenuates collagen-induced inflammatory response through the "gut-brain axis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yannong; Luo, Jinque; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Tong, Bei; Yu, Juntao; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Xinyu; Yang, Yan; Yuan, Xusheng; Zhao, Peng; Xia, Yufeng; Hu, Huijuan; Dai, Yue

    2018-01-06

    Previous studies have demonstrated that oral administration of curcumin exhibited an anti-arthritic effect despite its poor bioavailability. The present study aimed to explore whether the gut-brain axis is involved in the therapeutic effect of curcumin. The collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model was induced by immunization with an emulsion of collagen II and complete Freund's adjuvant. Sympathetic and parasympathetic tones were measured by electrocardiographic recordings. Unilateral cervical vagotomy (VGX) was performed before the induction of CIA. The ChAT, AChE activities, and serum cytokine levels were determined by ELISA. The expression of the high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT1), ChAT, and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) were determined by real-time PCR and immunohistochemical staining. The neuronal excitability of the vagus nerve was determined by whole-cell patch clamp recording. Oral administration of curcumin restored the imbalance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic tones in CIA rats and increased ChAT activity and expression of ChAT and VAChT in the gut, brain, and synovium. Additionally, VGX eliminated the effects of curcumin on arthritis and ACh biosynthesis and transport. Electrophysiological data showed that curcumin markedly increased neuronal excitability of the vagus nerve. Furthermore, selective α7 nAChR antagonists abolished the effects of curcumin on CIA. Our results demonstrate that curcumin attenuates CIA through the "gut-brain axis" by modulating the function of the cholinergic system. These findings provide a novel approach for mechanistic studies of anti-arthritic compounds with low oral absorption and bioavailability.

  15. Age-related memory impairments due to reduced blood glucose responses to epinephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Ken A; Chang, Qing; Mohler, Eric G; Gold, Paul E

    2010-12-01

    Increases in blood glucose levels are an important component of the mechanisms by which epinephrine enhances memory formation. The present experiments addressed the hypothesis that a dysfunction in the blood glucose response to circulating epinephrine contributes to age-related memory impairments. Doses of epinephrine and glucagon that significantly increased blood glucose levels in young adult rats were far less effective at doing so in 2-year-old rats. In young rats, epinephrine and glucose were about equally effective in enhancing memory and in prolonging post-training release of acetylcholine in the hippocampus. However, glucose was more effective than epinephrine in enhancing both memory and acetylcholine release in aged rats. These results suggest that an uncoupling between circulating epinephrine and glucose levels in old rats may lead to an age-related reduction in the provision of glucose to the brain during training. This in turn may contribute to age-related changes in memory and neural plasticity. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Glucose-responsive insulin delivery for type 1 diabetes: The artificial pancreas story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bally, Lia; Thabit, Hood; Hovorka, Roman

    2018-06-15

    Insulin replacement therapy is integral to the management of type 1 diabetes, which is characterised by absolute insulin deficiency. Optimal glycaemic control, as assessed by glycated haemoglobin, and avoidance of hyper- and hypoglycaemic excursions have been shown to prevent diabetes-related complications. Insulin pump use has increased considerably over the past decade with beneficial effects on glycaemic control, quality of life and treatment satisfaction. The advent and progress of ambulatory glucose sensor technology has enabled continuous glucose monitoring based on real-time glucose levels to be integrated with insulin therapy. Low glucose and predictive low glucose suspend systems are currently used in clinical practice to mitigate against hypoglycaemia, and provide the first step towards feedback glucose control. The more advanced technology approach, an artificial pancreas or a closed-loop system, gradually increases and decreases insulin delivery in a glucose-responsive fashion to mitigate against hyper- and hypoglycaemia. Randomised outpatient clinical trials over the past 5 years have demonstrated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of the approach, and the recent FDA approval of the first single hormone closed-loop system establishes a new standard of care for people with type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A CREB-Sirt1-Hes1 Circuitry Mediates Neural Stem Cell Response to Glucose Availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Fusco

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Adult neurogenesis plays increasingly recognized roles in brain homeostasis and repair and is profoundly affected by energy balance and nutrients. We found that the expression of Hes-1 (hairy and enhancer of split 1 is modulated in neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs by extracellular glucose through the coordinated action of CREB (cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein and Sirt-1 (Sirtuin 1, two cellular nutrient sensors. Excess glucose reduced CREB-activated Hes-1 expression and results in impaired cell proliferation. CREB-deficient NSCs expanded poorly in vitro and did not respond to glucose availability. Elevated glucose also promoted Sirt-1-dependent repression of the Hes-1 promoter. Conversely, in low glucose, CREB replaced Sirt-1 on the chromatin associated with the Hes-1 promoter enhancing Hes-1 expression and cell proliferation. Thus, the glucose-regulated antagonism between CREB and Sirt-1 for Hes-1 transcription participates in the metabolic regulation of neurogenesis. : Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo studies, Fusco et al. find that excess glucose impairs the self-renewal capacity of neural stem cells through a molecular circuit that involves the transcription factor CREB and Sirtuin 1. The authors suggest that this circuitry may link nutrient excess with neurodegeneration and brain aging. Keywords: neural stem cells, adult neurogenesis, CREB, Sirt-1, nutrients, metabolism, diabetes

  18. Developmental, gustatory, and behavioral responses of leafroller larvae, Choristoneura rosaceana, to tannic acid and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzuto, M; Mauffette, Y; Alber, P J

    2002-01-01

    Soluble sugars are essential nutrients generally perceived as phagostimulants to most insects studied. However, tannins are known as digestibility reducers, hence deleterious to caterpillar development, and as deterrents as well. Previous work demonstrated that larvae of the polyphagous oblique-banded leafroller, Choristoneura rosaceana, performed better when reared on a control + 0.5% tannic acid diet than on the standard control diet and that larvae reared on a control + 5% glucose diet had slower development and reduced survival. This study was designed to elucidate the behavioral and neurophysiological components of the larval responses to tannic acid and glucose. C. rosaceana larvae were reared individually from the first to the sixth instar on one of four different artificial diets: (1) control; (2) control + 5% glucose; (3) control + 0.5% tannic acid; (4) control + 5% glucose + 0.5% tannic acid. After 14 days, larvae reared on the control + 5% glucose diet had not developed past the fourth instar, whereas a considerable proportion of larvae reared on the control + 0.5% tannic acid diet had already attained the pupal stage. Insects reared on the control or the control + 5% glucose + 0.5% tannic acid diet had intermediate development. with most larvae in the fifth instar. In addition, once the mid-sixth instar was reached, the feeding preferences to 25 and 300 mM glucose, 25 mM tannic acid, and 25 mM glucose + 25 mM tannic acid over water were assessed in two-choice tests. Feeding affected preference. Control-reared insects preferred feeding on treatments containing glucose and were not deterred by tannic acid. However, larvae that had been exposed to tannic acid during their development were deterred by tannic acid and their glucose discrimination was impaired. The sensitivity to glucose was also examined from neurophysiological recordings by stimulating the sugar-sensitive cell (cell 1) on the lateral styloconic sensillum of the maxillary galea with

  19. Integrative Genomic and Proteomic Analysis of the Response of Lactobacillus casei Zhang to Glucose Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jie; Hui, Wenyan; Cao, Chenxia; Pan, Lin; Zhang, Heping; Zhang, Wenyi

    2018-03-02

    Nutrient starvation is an important survival challenge for bacteria during industrial production of functional foods. As next-generation sequencing technology has greatly advanced, we performed proteomic and genomic analysis to investigate the response of Lactobacillus casei Zhang to a glucose-restricted environment. L. casei Zhang strains were permitted to evolve in glucose-restricted or normal medium from a common ancestor over a 3 year period, and they were sampled at 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 5000, 6000, 7000, and 8000 generations and subjected to proteomic and genomic analyses. Genomic resequencing data revealed different point mutations and other mutational events in each selected generation of L. casei Zhang under glucose restriction stress. The differentially expressed proteins induced by glucose restriction were mostly related to fructose and mannose metabolism, carbohydrate metabolic processes, lyase activity, and amino-acid-transporting ATPase activity. Integrative proteomic and genomic analysis revealed that the mutations protected L. casei Zhang against glucose starvation by regulating other cellular carbohydrate, fatty acid, and amino acid catabolism; phosphoenolpyruvate system pathway activation; glycogen synthesis; ATP consumption; pyruvate metabolism; and general stress-response protein expression. The results help reveal the mechanisms of adapting to glucose starvation and provide new strategies for enhancing the industrial utility of L. casei Zhang.

  20. Fever is not responsible for the elevated glucose kinetics in sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, C.H.; Bagby, G.J.; Blakesley, H.L.; Spitzer, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that alterations in the classical neuroendocrine system may not be responsible for the increased glucose metabolism observed during hypermetabolic sepsis. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether inhibition of the cyclooxygenase pathway with indomethacin, which prevents the production of arachidonic acid metabolites by this pathway and the sepsis-induced increase in body temperature, would abolish the increases in glucose appearance (Ra), recycling, and hyperlactacidemia. Sepsis was induced in chronically catheterized conscious rats by multiple injections of live Escherichia coli via a subcutaneous catheter. Septic animals received iv injections of indomethacin every 6-8 hr to block the cyclooxygenase pathway. Glucose kinetics were assessed in 24-hr fasted rats using a constant iv infusion of [6- 3 H]- and [U- 14 C] glucose. Treatment with indomethacin prevented the 1-2 0 C increase in body temperature observed in septic animals. Septic rats exhibited an elevated plasma lactate concentration and increased rates of glucose appearance and recycling. The sepsis-induced alterations in these variables were not attenuated by indomethacin. These results suggest that neither elevated body temperature nor the generation of arachidonic acid metabolites of the cyclooxygenase pathway is responsible for increasing glucose production in hypermetabolic septic rats

  1. Phenotypic and gene expression changes between low (glucose-responsive) and High (glucose non-responsive) MIN-6 beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O´Driscoll, L.; Gammell, p.; McKierman, E.

    2006-01-01

    The long-term potential to routinely use replacement beta cells/islets as cell therapy for type 1 diabetes relies on our ability to culture such cells/islets, in vitro, while maintaining their functional status. Previous beta cell studies, by ourselves and other researchers, have indicated...... that the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) phenotype is relatively unstable, in long-term culture. This study aimed to investigate phenotypic and gene expression changes associated with this loss of GSIS, using the MIN-6 cell line as model. Phenotypic differences between MIN-6(L, low passage) and MIN-6(H......, high passage) were determined by ELISA (assessing GSIS and cellular (pro)insulin content), proliferation assays, phase contrast light microscopy and analysis of alkaline phosphatase expression. Differential mRNA expression was investigated using microarray, bioinformatics and real-time PCR technologies...

  2. [Collagen nephritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, N R; Bulos, M J; Monserrat, A J

    1997-01-01

    Fibrillar collagen in the glomeruli is considered specific of the nail-patella syndrome. A new nephropathy with diffuse intraglomerular deposition of type III collagen without nail and skeletal abnormalities has been described. We report the case of a 26-year-old woman who presented persistent proteinuria, hematuria, deafness without nail and skeletal abnormalities. The renal biopsy showed focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis by light microscopy. The electron microscopy revealed the presence of massive fibrillar collagen within the mesangial matriz and the basement membrane. This is the first patient reported in our country. We emphasize the usefulness of electron microscopy in the study of glomerular diseases.

  3. Insulin response to oral glucose in healthy, lean young women and patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshreshtha, Bindu; Ganie, Mohammed Ashraf; Praveen, Edavan Pulikkanath; Gupta, Nandita; Lal Khurana, Madan; Seith, Ashu; Dwivedi, Sadanand N; Kumar, Guresh; Ammini, Ariachery C

    2008-11-01

    Insulin resistance and consequent hyperinsulinemia are common among patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Ethnicity and dietary habits affect insulin levels. There is little published information from India on insulin levels in PCOS patients. Thus the present study aimed to determine the insulin response to oral glucose in women with PCOS and healthy women. In a case-control study design, women with PCOS and lean healthy women without a family history of diabetes mellitus underwent oral glucose tolerance testing. Samples were collected at 0, 1 and 2 h after glucose ingestion. Two hundred and eighty-five women with PCOS and 27 lean healthy young women were enrolled into the study. The mean age of controls was 22.8 +/- 4.5 years (range 15-32 years) and their mean body mass index (BMI) was 19.7 +/- 2.6 kg/m(2). Mean blood glucose at 0, 1 and 2 h was 88.2 +/- 7.2, 115.5 +/- 25.5 and 91.8 +/- 20.5 mg/dl, respectively. Corresponding plasma insulin levels were 5.8 +/- 1.1, 32.7 +/- 26.5 and 14.6 +/- 9.6 mIU/l. Peak insulin levels were seen at 1 h and these came down to less than 40% of the peak value by 2 h. Glucose/insulin ratio at 0, 1 and 2 h was 15.6 +/- 3.1, 7.0 +/- 3.1 and 11.4 +/- 7.0. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was 1.2 +/- 0.2. The age of the PCOS women ranged from 15 to 40 years (mean 23.4 +/- 6.2 years) and their BMI ranged from 16.4 to 50.4 kg/m(2) (mean 27.7 +/- 6.3 kg/m(2)). One hundred and seventy-six (62%) PCOS patients had normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 39 (14%) had impaired fasting glucose (IFG), 49 (17%) had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and 21 (7%) had type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Insulin response was higher in women with PCOS. Peak insulin was observed at 1 h. The difference between 1-h and 2-h post-glucose insulin decreased with worsening glucose tolerance. Both plasma insulin and BMI showed a rising trend from NGT to IFG to IGT. There was no further increase in either insulin or BMI from IGT to T2DM

  4. Superior Glycemic Control with a Glucose-Responsive Insulin Analog: Hepatic and Nonhepatic Impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Mary Courtney; Kelley, David E; Camacho, Raul C; Zafian, Peter; Ye, Tian; Lin, Songnian; Kaarsholm, Niels C; Nargund, Ravi; Kelly, Terri M; Van Heek, Margaret; Previs, Stephen F; Moyes, Christopher; Smith, Marta S; Farmer, Ben; Williams, Phil; Cherrington, Alan D

    2018-03-14

    We evaluated the hepatic and nonhepatic responses to glucose-responsive insulin (GRI). Eight dogs received GRI or regular human insulin (HI) in random order. A primed, continuous intravenous infusion of [3- 3 H]glucose began at -120 min. Basal sampling (-30 to 0 min) was followed by 2 study periods (150 min each), P1 and P2. At 0 min, somatostatin and GRI (36±3 pmol/kg/min) or HI (1.8 pmol/kg/min) were infused IV; basal glucagon was replaced intraportally. Glucose was infused intravenously to clamp plasma glucose at 80 mg/dL (P1) and 240 mg/dL (P2). Whole body insulin clearance (WBIC) and insulin concentrations were not different in P1 vs P2 with HI, but WBIC was 23% higher and arterial insulin 16% lower in P1 vs P2 with GRI. Net hepatic glucose output was similar between treatments in P1. In P2, both treatments induced net hepatic glucose uptake (2.1±0.5 [HI] vs 3.3±0.4 [GRI] mg/kg/min). Nonhepatic glucose uptake (nonHGU, mg/kg/min) in P1 and P2, respectively, differed between treatments (2.6±0.3 and 7.4±0.6 with HI; 2.0±0.2 and 8.1±0.8 with GRI). Thus, glycemia impacted GRI but not HI clearance, with resultant differential effects on HGU and nonHGU. GRI holds promise for decreasing hypoglycemia risk while enhancing glucose uptake under hyperglycemic conditions. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  5. Changes in blood glucose and insulin responses to intravenous glucose tolerance tests and blood biochemical values in adult female Japanese black bears (Ursus thibetanus japonicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamine, Akari; Shimozuru, Michito; Shibata, Haruki; Tsubota, Toshio

    2012-02-01

    The metabolic mechanisms to circannual changes in body mass of bears have yet to be elucidated. We hypothesized that the Japanese black bear (Ursus thibetanus japonicus) has a metabolic mechanism that efficiently converts carbohydrates into body fat by altering insulin sensitivity during the hyperphagic stage before hibernation. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the changes in blood biochemical values and glucose and insulin responses to intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTT) during the active season (August, early and late November). Four, adult, female bears (5-17 years old) were anesthetized with 6 mg/kg TZ (tiletamine HCl and zolazepam HCl) in combination with 0.1 mg/kg acepromazine maleate. The bears were injected intravenously with glucose (0.5 g/kg of body mass), and blood samples were obtained before, at, and intermittently after glucose injection. The basal triglycerides concentration decreased significantly with increase in body mass from August to November. Basal levels of plasma glucose and serum insulin concentrations were not significantly different among groups. The results of IVGTT demonstrated the increased peripheral insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in early November. In contrast, peripheral insulin resistance was indicated by the exaggerated insulin response in late November. Our findings suggest that bears shift their glucose and lipid metabolism from the stage of normal activity to the hyperphagic stage in which they show lipogenic-predominant metabolism and accelerate glucose uptake by increasing the peripheral insulin sensitivity.

  6. Incretin responses to oral glucose and mixed meal tests and changes in fasting glucose levels during 7 years of follow-up: The Hoorn Meal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutters, F.; Rauh, S. P.; Nijpels, G.; Holst, J. J.; Beulens, J. W.; Alssema, M.; Dekker, J. M.

    2018-01-01

    We conducted the first prospective observational study in which we examined the association between incretin responses to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and mixed meal test (MMT) at baseline and changes in fasting glucose levels 7 years later, in individuals who were non-diabetic at baseline. We used data from the Hoorn Meal Study; a population-based cohort study among 121 subjects, aged 61.0±6.7y. GIP and GLP-1 responses were determined at baseline and expressed as total and incremental area under the curve (tAUC and iAUC). The association between incretin response at baseline and changes in fasting glucose levels was assessed using linear regression. The average change in glucose over 7 years was 0.43 ± 0.5 mmol/l. For GIP, no significant associations were observed with changes in fasting glucose levels. In contrast, participants within the middle and highest tertile of GLP-1 iAUC responses to OGTT had significantly smaller increases (actually decreases) in fasting glucose levels; -0.28 (95% confidence interval: -0.54;-0.01) mmol/l and -0.39 (-0.67;-0.10) mmol/l, respectively, compared to those in the lowest tertile. The same trend was observed for tAUC GLP-1 following OGTT (highest tertile: -0.32 (0.61;-0.04) mmol/l as compared to the lowest tertile). No significant associations were observed for GLP-1 responses following MMT. In conclusion, within our non-diabetic population-based cohort, a low GLP-1 response to OGTT was associated with a steeper increase in fasting glucose levels during 7 years of follow-up. This suggests that a reduced GLP-1 response precedes glucose deterioration and may play a role in the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:29324870

  7. Response to dexamethasone is glucose-sensitive in multiple myeloma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turturro Francesco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperglycemia is among the major side effects of dexamethasone (DEX. Glucose or glucocorticoid (GC regulates the expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP that controls the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS through the modulation of thioredoxin (TRX activity. Methods Multiple myeloma (MM cells were grown in 5 or 20 mM/L glucose with or without 25 μM DEX. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR was used to assess TXNIP RNA expression in response to glucose and DEX. ROS were detected by 5-6-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (CM-H2DCFDA. TRX activity was assayed by the insulin disulfide-reducing assay. Proliferation was evaluated using CellTiter96 reagent with 490-nm absorbtion and used to calculate the DEX IC50 in 20 mM/L glucose using the Chou's dose effect equation. Results TXNIP RNA level responded to glucose or DEX with the same order of magnitude ARH77 > NCIH929 > U266B1 in these cells. MC/CAR cells were resistant to the regulation. ROS level increased concurrently with reduced TRX activity. Surprisingly glucose increased TRX activity in MC/CAR cells keeping ROS level low. DEX and glucose were lacking the expected additive effect on TXNIP RNA regulation when used concurrently in sensitive cells. ROS level was significantly lower when DEX was used in conditions of hyperglycemia in ARH77/NCIH9292 cells but not in U266B1 cells. Dex-IC50 increased 10-fold when the dose response effect of DEX was evaluated with glucose in ARH && and MC/Car cells Conclusions Our study shows for the first time that glucose or DEX regulates important components of ROS production through TXNIP modulation or direct interference with TRX activity in MM cells. We show that glucose modulates the activity of DEX through ROS regualtion in MM cells. A better understanding of these pathways may help in improving the efficacy and reducing the toxicity of DEX, a drug still highly used in the treatment of

  8. Arctigenin suppresses unfolded protein response and sensitizes glucose deprivation-mediated cytotoxicity of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shengrong; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Changhua; Nawaz, Ahmed; Wei, Wen; Li, Juanjuan; Wang, Lijun; Yu, De-Hua

    2011-01-01

    The involvement of unfolded protein response (UPR) activation in tumor survival and resistance to chemotherapies suggests a new anticancer strategy targeting UPR pathway. Arctigenin, a natural product, has been recently identified for its antitumor activity with selective toxicity against cancer cells under glucose starvation with unknown mechanism. Here we found that arctigenin specifically blocks the transcriptional induction of two potential anticancer targets, namely glucose-regulated protein-78 (GRP78) and its analog GRP94, under glucose deprivation, but not by tunicamycin. The activation of other UPR pathways, e.g., XBP-1 and ATF4, by glucose deprivation was also suppressed by arctigenin. A further transgene experiment showed that ectopic expression of GRP78 at least partially rescued arctigenin/glucose starvation-mediated cell growth inhibition, suggesting the causal role of UPR suppression in arctigenin-mediated cytotoxicity under glucose starvation. These observations bring a new insight into the mechanism of action of arctigenin and may lead to the design of new anticancer therapeutics. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Subcellular localization, mobility, and kinetic activity of glucokinase in glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, M; Aiston, S; Agius, L

    2000-12-01

    We investigated the subcellular localization, mobility, and activity of glucokinase in MIN6 cells, a glucose-responsive insulin-secreting beta-cell line. Glucokinase is present in the cytoplasm and a vesicular/granule compartment that is partially colocalized with insulin granules. The granular staining of glucokinase is preserved after permeabilization of the cells with digitonin. There was no evidence for changes in distribution of glucokinase between the cytoplasm and the granule compartment during incubation of the cells with glucose. The rate of release of glucokinase and of phosphoglucoisomerase from digitonin-permeabilized cells was slower when cells were incubated at an elevated glucose concentration (S0.5 approximately 15 mmol/l). This effect of glucose was counteracted by competitive inhibitors of glucokinase (5-thioglucose and mannoheptulose) but was unaffected by fructose analogs and may be due to changes in cell shape or conformation of the cytoskeleton that are secondary to glucose metabolism. Based on the similar release of glucokinase and phosphoglucoisomerase, we found no evidence for specific binding of cytoplasmic digitonin-extractable glucokinase. The affinity of beta-cells for glucose is slightly lower than that in cell extracts and, unlike that in hepatocytes, is unaffected by fructose, tagatose, or a high-K+ medium, which is consistent with the lack of change in glucokinase distribution or release. We conclude that glucokinase is present in two locations, cytoplasm and the granular compartment, and that it does not translocate between them. This conclusion is consistent with the lack of adaptive changes in the glucose phosphorylation affinity. The glucokinase activity associated with the insulin granules may have a role in either direct or indirect coupling between glucose phosphorylation and insulin secretion.

  10. Newly identified interfibrillar collagen crosslinking suppresses cell proliferation and remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelli, Benedetto; Le Nihouannen, Damien; Hacking, S Adam; Tran, Simon; Li, Jingjing; Murshed, Monzur; Doillon, Charles J; Ghezzi, Chiara E; Zhang, Yu Ling; Nazhat, Showan N; Barralet, Jake E

    2015-06-01

    Copper is becoming recognised as a key cation in a variety of biological processes. Copper chelation has been studied as a potential anti-angiogenic strategy for arresting tumour growth. Conversely the delivery of copper ions and complexes in vivo can elicit a pro-angiogenic effect. Previously we unexpectedly found that copper-stimulated intraperitoneal angiogenesis was accompanied by collagen deposition. Here, in hard tissue, not only was healing accelerated by copper, but again enhanced deposition of collagen was detected at 2 weeks. Experiments with reconstituted collagen showed that addition of copper ions post-fibrillogenesis rendered plastically-compressed gels resistant to collagenases, enhanced their mechanical properties and increased the denaturation temperature of the protein. Unexpectedly, this apparently interfibrillar crosslinking was not affected by addition of glucose or ascorbic acid, which are required for crosslinking by advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Fibroblasts cultured on copper-crosslinked gels did not proliferate, whereas those cultured with an equivalent quantity of copper on either tissue culture plastic or collagen showed no effect compared with controls. Although non-proliferative, fibroblasts grown on copper-cross-linked collagen could migrate, remained metabolically active for at least 14 days and displayed a 6-fold increase in Mmps 1 and 3 mRNA expression compared with copper-free controls. The ability of copper ions to crosslink collagen fibrils during densification and independently of AGEs or Fenton type reactions is previously unreported. The effect on MMP susceptibility of collagen and the dramatic change in cell behaviour on this crosslinked ECM may contribute to shedding some light on unexplained phenomena as the apparent benefit of copper complexation in fibrotic disorders or the enhanced collagen deposition in response to localised copper delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of metformin hydrochloride on blood glucose and insulin responses to oral dextrose in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendle, D I; Rutledge, F; Hughes, K J; Heller, J; Durham, A E

    2013-11-01

    Metformin is a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of insulin resistance (IR). In laboratory animals, orally administered metformin reduces intestinal glucose absorption and may therefore affect insulinaemic responses to oral carbohydrate ingestion. To determine whether pretreatment with metformin reduces plasma glucose concentration and insulin responses following consumption of dextrose in horses. Therapeutic cross-over study. Seven healthy Standardbred and Thoroughbred geldings were subjected to an oral dextrose challenge test on 4 occasions: with and without metformin, before and after induction of IR with dexamethasone. Metformin was administered by nasogastric tube at 30 mg/kg bwt 1 h before administration of dextrose. Glucose and insulin concentrations in plasma/serum were measured at regular intervals during each test. Linear mixed models were specified for each predetermined outcome variable, and for each model the 'treatment' was included as a fixed effect with 4 categorical levels (none, metformin, dexamethasone and dexamethasone with metformin) and horse accounted for as a random effect. In healthy horses, the administration of metformin resulted in a statistically significant reduction in peak glucose concentration (P = 0.002), area under the glucose curve (Pdextrose administration (P = 0.011). Following the induction of IR, administration of metformin was associated with significant differences in peak glucose concentration (Pdextrose administration (P = 0.014). Metformin resulted in reduced glycaemic and insulinaemic responses both in healthy horses and in horses with experimentally induced IR. Metformin may benefit horses with naturally acquired IR by reducing glycaemic and insulinaemic responses to dietary nonstructural carbohydrates. Further investigations into the mechanisms of action of metformin in horses and controlled clinical trials are warranted. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  12. Collagen Matrix Density Drives the Metabolic Shift in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A. Morris

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased breast density attributed to collagen I deposition is associated with a 4–6 fold increased risk of developing breast cancer. Here, we assessed cellular metabolic reprogramming of mammary carcinoma cells in response to increased collagen matrix density using an in vitro 3D model. Our initial observations demonstrated changes in functional metabolism in both normal mammary epithelial cells and mammary carcinoma cells in response to changes in matrix density. Further, mammary carcinoma cells grown in high density collagen matrices displayed decreased oxygen consumption and glucose metabolism via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle compared to cells cultured in low density matrices. Despite decreased glucose entry into the TCA cycle, levels of glucose uptake, cell viability, and ROS were not different between high and low density matrices. Interestingly, under high density conditions the contribution of glutamine as a fuel source to drive the TCA cycle was significantly enhanced. These alterations in functional metabolism mirrored significant changes in the expression of metabolic genes involved in glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and the serine synthesis pathway. This study highlights the broad importance of the collagen microenvironment to cellular expression profiles, and shows that changes in density of the collagen microenvironment can modulate metabolic shifts of cancer cells.

  13. Single-cell imaging of bioenergetic responses to neuronal excitotoxicity and oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Niamh M C; Düssmann, Heiko; Anilkumar, Ujval; Huber, Heinrich J; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2014-07-30

    Excitotoxicity is a condition occurring during cerebral ischemia, seizures, and chronic neurodegeneration. It is characterized by overactivation of glutamate receptors, leading to excessive Ca(2+)/Na(+) influx into neurons, energetic stress, and subsequent neuronal injury. We and others have previously investigated neuronal populations to study how bioenergetic parameters determine neuronal injury; however, such experiments are often confounded by population-based heterogeneity and the contribution of effects of non-neuronal cells. Hence, we here characterized bioenergetics during transient excitotoxicity in rat and mouse primary neurons at the single-cell level using fluorescent sensors for intracellular glucose, ATP, and activation of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). We identified ATP depletion and recovery to energetic homeostasis, along with AMPK activation, as surprisingly rapid and plastic responses in two excitotoxic injury paradigms. We observed rapid recovery of neuronal ATP levels also in the absence of extracellular glucose, or when glycolytic ATP production was inhibited, but found mitochondria to be critical for fast and complete energetic recovery. Using an injury model of oxygen and glucose deprivation, we identified a similarly rapid bioenergetics response, yet with incomplete ATP recovery and decreased AMPK activity. Interestingly, excitotoxicity also induced an accumulation of intracellular glucose, providing an additional source of energy during and after excitotoxicity-induced energy depletion. We identified this to originate from extracellular, AMPK-dependent glucose uptake and from intracellular glucose mobilization. Surprisingly, cells recovering their elevated glucose levels faster to baseline survived longer, indicating that the plasticity of neurons to adapt to bioenergetic challenges is a key indicator of neuronal viability. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3410192-14$15.00/0.

  14. Dielectric response of biconcave erythrocyte membranes to D- and L-Glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livshits, L; Caduff, A; Talary, M S; Feldman, Y

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the influence of D- and L-glucose on the dielectric properties of native shaped (biconcave) human erythrocytes using time domain dielectric spectroscopy. The dielectric spectra of biconcave cells were analysed using a modified form of the model originally reported for spheroid particle suspensions (Asami and Yonezawa 1995 Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 1245 317-24) The observed increase in the specific membrane capacitance of the biconcave erythrocytes was correlated with an increase in the concentration of D-glucose. In contrast, no associated correlation was found to changes in the membrane capacitance with increasing concentrations of L-glucose. A similar analysis of the dielectric response of osmotically swollen erythrocytes to changes in D-glucose concentration revealed a significantly different calculated specific cell membrane capacitance at elevated (>12 mM) D-glucose concentrations. The paper outlines and discusses the possible biochemical mechanisms that could be responsible for the measured dielectric properties of the erythrocyte membrane capacitances

  15. Glucose intolerance induced by blockade of central FGF receptors is linked to an acute stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Rojas

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: The effect of acute inhibition of central FGFR signaling to impair glucose tolerance likely involves a stress response associated with pronounced, but transient, sympathoadrenal activation and an associated reduction of insulin secretion. Whether this effect is a true consequence of FGFR blockade or involves an off-target effect of the FGFR inhibitor requires additional study.

  16. The yeast Sks1p kinase signaling network regulates pseudohyphal growth and glucose response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole Johnson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes a dramatic growth transition from its unicellular form to a filamentous state, marked by the formation of pseudohyphal filaments of elongated and connected cells. Yeast pseudohyphal growth is regulated by signaling pathways responsive to reductions in the availability of nitrogen and glucose, but the molecular link between pseudohyphal filamentation and glucose signaling is not fully understood. Here, we identify the glucose-responsive Sks1p kinase as a signaling protein required for pseudohyphal growth induced by nitrogen limitation and coupled nitrogen/glucose limitation. To identify the Sks1p signaling network, we applied mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics, profiling over 900 phosphosites for phosphorylation changes dependent upon Sks1p kinase activity. From this analysis, we report a set of novel phosphorylation sites and highlight Sks1p-dependent phosphorylation in Bud6p, Itr1p, Lrg1p, Npr3p, and Pda1p. In particular, we analyzed the Y309 and S313 phosphosites in the pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit Pda1p; these residues are required for pseudohyphal growth, and Y309A mutants exhibit phenotypes indicative of impaired aerobic respiration and decreased mitochondrial number. Epistasis studies place SKS1 downstream of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR1 and the G-protein RAS2 but upstream of or at the level of cAMP-dependent PKA. The pseudohyphal growth and glucose signaling transcription factors Flo8p, Mss11p, and Rgt1p are required to achieve wild-type SKS1 transcript levels. SKS1 is conserved, and deletion of the SKS1 ortholog SHA3 in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans results in abnormal colony morphology. Collectively, these results identify Sks1p as an important regulator of filamentation and glucose signaling, with additional relevance towards understanding stress-responsive signaling in C. albicans.

  17. Impaired insulin-stimulated nonoxidative glucose metabolism in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients. Dose-response effects of insulin on glucose turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, E; Vestergaard, H; Tibell, A

    1996-01-01

    -response curve for glucose disposal rates (Rd) was shifted to the right in the Px and Kx groups, and the maximal glucose disposal rate was reduced by 40% in the Px group (11.7 +/- 1.1 mg.kg-1 fat-free mass.min-1) and 30% in the Kx group (13.9 +/- 1.2 mg.kg-1 fat-free mass.min-1) compared with that in control...

  18. Use of digitonin permeabilization for characterization of calcium incorporated into. beta. cells in response to glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesslen, N [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1985-01-01

    ..beta.. cell-rich pancreatic islets were used to characterize /sup 45/Ca uptake into pools with different sensitivities to permeabilization with digitonin. The plasma and secretory granule membranes were among the membranes most sensitive to digitonin treatment whereas the mitochondria were more resistant. Most of the /sup 45/Ca incorporated in response to glucose was found in a fraction released after exposure to a high concentration of digitonin. The results suggest that glucose promotes active sequestration of calcium in mitochondria and that the uptake of /sup 45/Ca in the secretory granules in secondary to a raised cytosolic Ca/sup 2 +/ activity.

  19. Human Subcutaneous Tissue Response to Glucose Sensors: Macrophages Accumulation Impact on Sensor Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigla, Mercedes; Pons, Belén; Rebasa, Pere; Luna, Alexis; Pozo, Francisco Javier; Caixàs, Assumpta; Villaplana, Maria; Subías, David; Bella, Maria Rosa; Combalia, Neus

    2018-04-01

    Subcutaneous (s.c.) glucose sensors have become a key component in type 1 diabetes management. However, their usability is limited by the impact of foreign body response (FBR) on their duration, reliability, and accuracy. Our study gives the first description of human acute and subacute s.c. response to glucose sensors, showing the changes observed in the sensor surface, the inflammatory cells involved in the FBR and their relationship with sensor performance. Twelve obese patients (seven type 2 diabetes) underwent two abdominal biopsies comprising the surrounding area where they had worn two glucose sensors: the first one inserted 7 days before and the second one 24 h before biopsy procedure. Samples were processed and studied to describe tissue changes by two independent pathologists (blind regarding sensor duration). Macrophages quantification was studied by immunohistochemistry methods in the area surrounding the sensor (CD68, CD163). Sensor surface changes were studied by scanning electron microscopy. Seven-day continuous glucose monitoring records were considered inaccurate when mean absolute relative difference was higher than 10%. Pathologists were able to correctly classify all the biopsies regarding sensor duration. Acute response (24 h) was characterized by the presence of neutrophils while macrophages were the main cell involved in subacute inflammation. The number of macrophages around the insertion hole was higher for less accurate sensors compared with those performing more accurately (32.6 ± 14 vs. 10.6 ± 1 cells/0.01 mm 2 ; P sensor-tissue interface is related with decrease in accuracy of the glucose measure.

  20. Response of plasma glucose, insulin, and nonesterified fatty acids to intravenous glucose tolerance tests in dairy cows during a 670-day lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marett, L C; Auldist, M J; Moate, P J; Wales, W J; Macmillan, K L; Dunshea, F R; Leury, B J

    2015-01-01

    This experiment investigated the metabolic response of dairy cows undergoing an extended lactation to a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test. The experiment used 12 multiparous Holstein cows that calved in late winter in a seasonally calving pasture-based system and were managed for a 670-d lactation by delaying rebreeding. In each of four 5-wk experimental periods commencing at approximately 73, 217, 422, and 520 (±9.1) days in milk (DIM), cows were offered a diet of perennial ryegrass (73 and 422 DIM) or pasture hay and silage (217 and 520 DIM) supplemented with 1kg of DM grain (control; CON) or 6kg of DM grain (GRN) as a ration. Daily energy intake was approximately 160 and 215 MJ of metabolizable energy/cow for the CON and GRN treatments, respectively. At all other times, cows were managed as a single herd and grazed pasture supplemented with grain to an estimated minimum daily total intake of 180 MJ of metabolizable energy/cow. Cows were fitted with an indwelling jugular catheter during the final week of each experimental period. The standard intravenous glucose tolerance test using 0.3g of glucose per kilogram of body weight was performed on each cow at approximately 100, 250, 460, and 560 DIM. Plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) responses were measured. Milk yield, milk solids yield, body weight, and basal plasma glucose were greater in the GRN compared with the CON treatment. The area under the plasma response curve relative to baseline (AUC) for glucose, insulin, and NEFA and their apparent fractional clearance rates indicated varied whole body responsiveness to insulin in terms of glucose metabolism throughout the 670-d lactation. The glucose AUC 0 to 20 min postinfusion was increased at 560 DIM, indicating reduced utilization of glucose by the mammary gland at this stage of lactation. The NEFA clearance rate, 6 to 30 min postinfusion, was greater at 460 and 560 DIM. These data indicated an

  1. Uncovering nanoscale electromechanical heterogeneity in the subfibrillar structure of collagen fibrils responsible for the piezoelectricity of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Yu, Min-Feng

    2009-07-28

    Understanding piezoelectricity, the linear electromechanical transduction, in bone and tendon and its potential role in mechanoelectric transduction leading to their growth and remodeling remains a challenging subject. With high-resolution piezoresponse force microscopy, we probed piezoelectric behavior in relevant biological samples at different scale levels: from the subfibrillar structures of single isolated collagen fibrils to bone. We revealed that, beyond the general understanding of collagen fibril being a piezoelectric material, there existed an intrinsic piezoelectric heterogeneity within a collagen fibril coinciding with the periodic variation of its gap and overlap regions. This piezoelectric heterogeneity persisted even for the collagen fibrils embedded in bone, bringing about new implications for its possible roles in structural formation and remodeling of bone.

  2. Loss of insulin response to glucose but not arginine during the development of autoimmune diabetes in BB/W rats: relationships to islet volume and glucose transport rate.

    OpenAIRE

    Tominaga, M; Komiya, I; Johnson, J H; Inman, L; Alam, T; Moltz, J; Crider, B; Stefan, Y; Baetens, D; McCorkle, K

    1986-01-01

    The insulin and glucagon responses to 10 mM glucose and 10 mM arginine were studied in pancreata isolated from nondiabetic diabetes-prone and diabetes-resistant BB/W rats at 60, 80, and 140 days of age and in diabetic BB/W rats on the 1st and 14th days of their diabetes. In the former group the insulin response to glucose declined progressively with age (r = -0.575; P less than 0.01) and at 140 days was significantly below age-matched diabetes-resistant controls (P less than 0.05). The insuli...

  3. Collagen Type III and VI Turnover in Response to Long-Term Immobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Shu; Henriksen, Kim; Karsdal, Morten A

    2015-01-01

    with immobilization and/or remobilization. METHODS: In the Berlin bed rest study, 20 young men were recruited and randomly assigned to 8-week's strict bed rest with or without resistive vibration exercise countermeasure. We measured three neo-epitope ELISA kits in the serum samples of this study: Pro-C3, measured...... to unloading or reloading, whereas C6M does not appear to respond to unloading. Pro-C3 and C6M levels correlate with LBM at baseline, while Pro-C6 is related to the anabolic and catabolic responses to unloading and reloading....

  4. Effects of intranasal insulin application on the hypothalamic BOLD response to glucose ingestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Opstal, Anna M.; Akintola, Abimbola A.; Elst, Marjan van der

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a crucial structure in the brain that responds to metabolic cues and regulates energy homeostasis. Patients with type 2 diabetes demonstrate a lack of hypothalamic neuronal response after glucose ingestion, which is suggested to be an underlying cause of the disease. In this s......The hypothalamus is a crucial structure in the brain that responds to metabolic cues and regulates energy homeostasis. Patients with type 2 diabetes demonstrate a lack of hypothalamic neuronal response after glucose ingestion, which is suggested to be an underlying cause of the disease...... effect. Our data provide proof of concept for future experiments testing the potential of intranasal application of insulin to ameliorate defective homeostatic control in patients with type 2 diabetes....

  5. Substance P ameliorates collagen II-induced arthritis in mice via suppression of the inflammatory response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hyun Sook [College of Medicine, East-West Medical Research Institute, Kyung Hee University, 1, Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-702 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Youngsook, E-mail: ysson@khu.ac.kr [Graduate School of Biotechnology and Department of Genetic Engineering, College of Life Science, Kyung Hee University Global Campus, Seochun-dong, Kiheung-ku, Yong In 441-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • SP can increase IL-10 levels and reduce TNF-α and IL-17 levels in RA. • SP causes the increase in T{sub reg}, M2 macrophage, and MSCs in RA. • SP-induced immune suppression leads to the blockade of RA progression. • SP can be used as the therapeutics for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases. - Abstract: Current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies such as biologics inhibiting pathogenic cytokines substantially delay RA progression. However, patient responses to these agents are not always complete and long lasting. This study explored whether substance P (SP), an 11 amino acids long endogenous neuropeptide with the novel ability to mobilize mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and modulate injury-mediated inflammation, can inhibit RA progression. SP efficacy was evaluated by paw swelling, clinical arthritis scoring, radiological analysis, histological analysis of cartilage destruction, and blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in vivo. SP treatment significantly reduced local inflammatory signs, mean arthritis scores, degradation of joint cartilage, and invasion of inflammatory cells into the synovial tissues. Moreover, the SP treatment markedly reduced the size of spleens enlarged by excessive inflammation in CIA, increased IL-10 levels, and decreased TNF-α and IL-17 levels. Mobilization of stem cells and induction of T{sub reg} and M2 type macrophages in the circulation were also increased by the SP treatment. These effect of SP might be associated with the suppression of inflammatory responses in RA and, furthermore, blockade of RA progression. Our results propose SP as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases.

  6. pH and Glucose Dual-Responsive Injectable Hydrogels with Insulin and Fibroblasts as Bioactive Dressings for Diabetic Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lingling; Niu, Lijing; Liang, Hongze; Tan, Hui; Liu, Chaozong; Zhu, Feiyan

    2017-11-01

    pH and glucose dual-responsive injectable hydrogels were prepared through the cross-linking of Schiff's base and phenylboronate ester using phenylboronic-modified chitosan, poly(vinyl alcohol) and benzaldehyde-capped poly(ethylene glycol). Protein drugs and live cells could be incorporated into the hydrogels during the in situ cross-linking, displaying sustained and pH/glucose-triggered drug release from the hydrogels and cell viability and proliferation in the three-dimensional hydrogel matrix as well. Hence, the hydrogels with insulin and fibroblasts were considered as bioactive dressings for diabetic wound healing. A streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model was used to evaluate the efficacy of hydrogel dressings in wound repair. The results revealed that the incorporation of insulin and L929 in the hydrogels could promote neovascularization and collagen deposition and enhance the wound-healing process of diabetic wounds. Thus, the drug- and cell-loaded hydrogels have promising potential in wound healing as a medicated system for various therapeutic proteins and live cells.

  7. Berberine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in rats by suppressing Th17 cell responses via inducing cortistatin in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Mengfan; Xia, Yufeng; Shi, Can; Guan, Chunge; Li, Yunfan; Liu, Rui; Wei, Zhifeng; Dai, Yue

    2017-09-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, has been reported to ameliorate various autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis by oral administration. However, its mechanism remains mysterious due to an extremely low bioavailability. The fact that berberine readily accumulates in the gut, the largest endocrine organ in the body, attracted us to explore its anti-arthritic mechanism in view of the induction of intestinal immunosuppressive neuropeptides. In this study, berberine (200 mg·kg -1 , i.g.) was shown to ameliorate collagen-induced arthritis in rats, which was manifested by the reduction of clinical signs and joint destruction, as well as marked down-regulation of Th17 cell frequency and interleukin-17 level in blood. In contrast, an intravenous injection of berberine failed to affect arthritis in rats, implying that its anti-arthritic effect was gut-dependent. Further studies revealed that oral berberine selectively elevated the levels of cortistatin, of five gut-derived neuropeptides tested, in the intestines and sera of arthrititic rats. Antagonists of ghrelin/growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1 (a subtype of cortistatin receptor) almost completely abolished the ameliorative effect of berberine on arthritis and Th17 cell responses in rats. In vitro, berberine showed a moderate ability to promote the expression of cortistatin in nerve cells, which was strengthened when the nerve cells were cocultured with enteroendocrine cells to induce an autocrine/paracrine environment. In summary, oral berberine exerted anti-arthritic effect through inhibiting the Th17 cell response, which was closely associated with the induction of cortistatin generation from gut through augmenting autocrine/paracrine action between enteric nerve cells and endocrine cells. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. Glucose-Responsive Insulin Delivery by Microneedle-Array Patches Loaded with Hypoxia-Sensitive Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Gu, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe the preparation of glucose-responsive vesicles (GRVs) and the fabrication of GRV-loaded microneedle-array patches for insulin delivery. The GRVs were formed of hypoxia-sensitive hyaluronic acid (HS-HA), the synthesis of which is presented in detail. We also describe the procedure to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of this smart patch in a mouse model of chemically induced type 1 diabetes through transcutaneous administration.

  9. Very low amounts of glucose cause repression of the stress-responsive gene HSP12 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, E; Bebelman, J P; Mager, W H; Planta, R J

    2000-02-01

    Changing the growth mode of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by adding fermentable amounts of glucose to cells growing on a non-fermentable carbon source leads to rapid repression of general stress-responsive genes like HSP12. Remarkably, glucose repression of HSP12 appeared to occur even at very low glucose concentrations, down to 0.005%. Although these low levels of glucose do not induce fermentative growth, they do act as a growth signal, since upon addition of glucose to a concentration of 0.02%, growth rate increased and ribosomal protein gene transcription was up-regulated. In an attempt to elucidate how this type of glucose signalling may operate, several signalling mutants were examined. Consistent with the low amounts of glucose that elicit HSP12 repression, neither the main glucose-repression pathway nor cAMP-dependent activation of protein kinase A appeared to play a role in this regulation. Using mutants involved in glucose metabolism, evidence was obtained suggesting that glucose 6-phosphate serves as a signalling molecule. To identify the target for glucose repression on the promoter of the HSP12 gene, a promoter deletion series was used. The major transcription factors governing (stress-induced) transcriptional activation of HSP12 are Msn2p and Msn4p, binding to the general stress-responsive promoter elements (STREs). Surprisingly, glucose repression of HSP12 appeared to be independent of Msn2/4p: HSP12 transcription in glycerol-grown cells was unaffected in a deltamsn2deltamsn4 strain. Nevertheless, evidence was obtained that STRE-mediated transcription is the target of repression by low amounts of glucose. These data suggest that an as yet unidentified factor is involved in STRE-mediated transcriptional regulation of HSP12.

  10. Response of Alteromonadaceae and Rhodobacteriaceae to glucose and phosphorus manipulation in marine mesocosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allers, Elke; Gómez-Consarnau, Laura; Pinhassi, Jarone; Gasol, Josep M; Simek, Karel; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2007-10-01

    Microbial successions were studied in experimental mesocosms of marine water in the presence of additional organic carbon (glucose), phosphorus (P) or both. P addition lead to pronounced blooms of phytoplankton and to significantly enhanced bacterial production. Characteristic succession patterns were observed for two phylogenetic groups of bacteria that both transiently formed > 50% of total cells. An initial bloom of bacteria affiliated to the Alteromonadaceae could not be assigned to any specific treatment and was interpreted as a response to the manipulations during mesocosm set-up. These bacteria rapidly declined with the appearance of heterotrophic nanoflagellates, suggesting a negative effect of selective grazing. The persistence of Alteromonadaceae in the microbial assemblages was significantly favored by the presence of additional glucose. During the second half of the experiment, bacteria affiliated to Rhodobacteriaceae formed a dominant component of the experimental assemblages in treatments with addition of P. The community contribution of Rhodobacteriaceae was significantly correlated with chlorophyll a concentrations only in the P-amended mesocosms (r(2) = 0.58). This was more pronounced in the absence of glucose (r(2) = 0.85). The phylogenetic and morphological diversity among Rhodobacteriaceae was high, and treatment-specific temporal successions of genotypes related to Rhodobacteriaceae were observed. We suggest that the observed succession patterns reflect different niche preferences: Alteromonadaceae rapidly responded to disturbance and profited from allochthonous glucose input, whereas Rhodobacteriaceae benefited from the phytoplankton bloom.

  11. Impaired first-phase insulin response predicts postprandial blood glucose increment in patients with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, C; Rosenfalck, A M; Dejgaard, Anders

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between postprandial blood glucose and first-phase insulin response and, furthermore, to assess whether the intravenous glucagon stimulation test can be used as a predictor for increased postprandial glucose in patients with recently diagnosed...... type 2 diabetes....

  12. Glucose response to exercise in the post-prandial period is independent of exercise intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambrook, P; Kingsley, M I; Wundersitz, D W; Xanthos, P D; Wyckelsma, V L; Gordon, B A

    2018-03-01

    This study investigated the acute glucose response to low-intensity, moderate-intensity, and high-intensity interval exercise compared to no-exercise in healthy insufficiently active males using a four-arm, randomized, crossover design. Ten males (age: 37.3 ± 7.3 years, BMI: 29.3 ± 6.5 kg·m -2 ) completed four 30-minute interventions at weekly intervals comprising low-intensity exercise (LIE) at ~35% V˙O 2 R, moderate-intensity exercise (MIE) at ~50% V˙O 2 R, high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) at ~80% V˙O 2 R, and a no-exercise control. Participants performed cycle ergometer exercise 30 minutes after finishing breakfast. Glucose response was assessed using a continuous glucose monitor under free-living conditions with dietary intake replicated. A significant effect for intensity on energy expenditure was identified (P exercise trial. Glucose response was not different between exercise intensities (P > .05). Twenty-four-hour AUC was not affected by exercise intensity (P = .75). There was a significant effect for exercise enjoyment (P = .02), with LIE (69 ± 4) preferred less than HIIE (mean ± SD: 84 ± 14; P = .02), MIE (73 ± 5; P = .03), and no-exercise (75 ± 4; P = .03). Exercise at any intensity 30 minutes after a meal affects glycemic regulation equally in insufficiently active males. Moderate to vigorous exercise intensities were preferred, and therefore, the exercise guidelines appear appropriate for the prevention of cardiometabolic disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Enhanced amperometric response of a glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase based bienzyme glucose biosensor modified with a film of polymerized toluidine blue containing reduced graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fang; Gong, Wencheng; Wang, Lili; Chen, Zilin

    2015-01-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) was used to construct a bienzyme biosensor containing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOx). A poly(toluidine blue) (pTB) film containing RGO acted as both enzyme immobilization matrix and electron transfer mediator. The bienzyme biosensor was characterized by electrochemical techniques and displays a highly sensitive amperometric response to glucose and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) at a potential as low as −0.1 V (vs. SCE). It is shown that use of RGO causes a strong enhancement on the amperometric responses. H 2 O 2 formed by the action of GOx in the presence of oxygen can be further reduced by HRP in the pTB film contacting the RGO modified electrode. In the absence of oxygen, glucose oxidation proceeds by another mechanism in which electron transfer occurs from GOx to the electrode and with pTB acting as the mediator. Amperometric responses to glucose and H2O2 follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The experimental conditions were optimized, and under these conditions glucose can be determined in the 80 μM to 3.0 mM range with a detection limit of 50 μM. H 2 O 2 , in turn, can be quantified in up to 30.0 μM concentration with a detection limit of 0.2 μM. The bienzyme biosensor is reproducible, repeatable and stable. Finally, it has been successfully applied to the determination of glucose in plasma samples. (author)

  14. Effect of adrenal medullectomy on metabolic responses to chronic intermittent hypoxia in the frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mi-Kyung; Han, Woobum; Joo, Hoon; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Shiota, Masakazu; Stefanovski, Darko; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2017-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with type 2 diabetes. We have previously developed a mouse model of intermittent hypoxia (IH) mimicking oxyhemoglobin desaturations in patients with sleep apnea and have shown that IH increases fasting glucose, hepatic glucose output, and plasma catecholamines. We hypothesize that adrenal medulla modulates glucose responses to IH and that such responses can be prevented by adrenal medullectomy. We performed adrenal medullectomy or sham surgery in lean C57BL/6J mice, which were exposed to IH or intermittent air (control) for 4 wk followed by the frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT) in unanesthetized unrestrained animals. IH was administered during the 12-h light phase (9 AM to 9 PM) by decreasing inspired oxygen from 21 to 6.5% 60 cycles/h. Insulin sensitivity (S I ), insulin independent glucose disposal [glucose effectiveness (S G )], and the insulin response to glucose (AIR G ) were determined using the minimal model method. In contrast to our previous data obtained in restrained mice, IH did not affect fasting blood glucose and plasma insulin levels in sham-operated mice. IH significantly decreased S G but did not affect S I and AIR G Adrenal medullectomy decreased fasting blood glucose and plasma insulin levels and increased glycogen synthesis in the liver in hypoxic mice but did not have a significant effect on the FSIVGTT metrics. We conclude that, in the absence of restraints, IH has no effect on glucose metabolism in lean mice with exception of decreased S G , whereas adrenal medullectomy decreases fasting glucose and insulin levels in the IH environment. NEW & NOTEWORTHY To our knowledge, this is the first study examining the role of adrenal catecholamines in glucose metabolism during intermittent hypoxia (IH) in unanesthetized unrestrained C57BL/6J mice. We report that IH did not affect fasting glucose and insulin levels nor insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion during, whereas glucose

  15. A Specific ChREBP and PPARα Cross-Talk Is Required for the Glucose-Mediated FGF21 Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Iroz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available While the physiological benefits of the fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 hepatokine are documented in response to fasting, little information is available on Fgf21 regulation in a glucose-overload context. We report that peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα, a nuclear receptor of the fasting response, is required with the carbohydrate-sensitive transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP to balance FGF21 glucose response. Microarray analysis indicated that only a few hepatic genes respond to fasting and glucose similarly to Fgf21. Glucose-challenged Chrebp−/− mice exhibit a marked reduction in FGF21 production, a decrease that was rescued by re-expression of an active ChREBP isoform in the liver of Chrebp−/− mice. Unexpectedly, carbohydrate challenge of hepatic Pparα knockout mice also demonstrated a PPARα-dependent glucose response for Fgf21 that was associated with an increased sucrose preference. This blunted response was due to decreased Fgf21 promoter accessibility and diminished ChREBP binding onto Fgf21 carbohydrate-responsive element (ChoRE in hepatocytes lacking PPARα. Our study reports that PPARα is required for the ChREBP-induced glucose response of FGF21.

  16. Effect of High Fat and High Sugar Diet on Glucose Tolerance, Insulin Response to Glucose Load and Insulin Sensitivity in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    岡﨑, 悟

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the precipitating effects of the westernized diet on diabetes mellitus, glucose tolerance and insulin response to oral glucose load (1.5g/kg body weight) and insulin sensitivity to exogenous insulin (0.2U/kg) were studied in rats fed an experimental diet for 8 weeks. Four experimental diets were used : low fat-no sugar diet (energy ratio of 10% fat, 70% starch, a model of the traditional Japanese diet), high fat-high sugar diet (40% fat, 20% starch, 20% sugar, a model of the we...

  17. A deep learning approach to estimate chemically-treated collagenous tissue nonlinear anisotropic stress-strain responses from microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Liu, Minliang; Sun, Wei

    2017-11-01

    Biological collagenous tissues comprised of networks of collagen fibers are suitable for a broad spectrum of medical applications owing to their attractive mechanical properties. In this study, we developed a noninvasive approach to estimate collagenous tissue elastic properties directly from microscopy images using Machine Learning (ML) techniques. Glutaraldehyde-treated bovine pericardium (GLBP) tissue, widely used in the fabrication of bioprosthetic heart valves and vascular patches, was chosen to develop a representative application. A Deep Learning model was designed and trained to process second harmonic generation (SHG) images of collagen networks in GLBP tissue samples, and directly predict the tissue elastic mechanical properties. The trained model is capable of identifying the overall tissue stiffness with a classification accuracy of 84%, and predicting the nonlinear anisotropic stress-strain curves with average regression errors of 0.021 and 0.031. Thus, this study demonstrates the feasibility and great potential of using the Deep Learning approach for fast and noninvasive assessment of collagenous tissue elastic properties from microstructural images. In this study, we developed, to our best knowledge, the first Deep Learning-based approach to estimate the elastic properties of collagenous tissues directly from noninvasive second harmonic generation images. The success of this study holds promise for the use of Machine Learning techniques to noninvasively and efficiently estimate the mechanical properties of many structure-based biological materials, and it also enables many potential applications such as serving as a quality control tool to select tissue for the manufacturing of medical devices (e.g. bioprosthetic heart valves). Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Eating on nightshift: A big vs small snack impairs glucose response to breakfast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Centofanti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Shift work is a risk factor for chronic diseases such as Type 2 diabetes. Food choice may play a role, however simply eating at night when the body is primed for sleep may have implications for health. This study examined the impact of consuming a big versus small snack at night on glucose metabolism. N = 31 healthy subjects (21–35 y; 18 F participated in a simulated nightshift laboratory study that included one baseline night of sleep (22:00 h-07:00 h and one night awake with allocation to either a big snack (2100 kJ or small snack (840 kJ group. The snack was consumed between 00:00–00:30 h and consisted of low fat milk, a sandwich, chips and fruit (big snack or half sandwich and fruit (small snack. Subjects ate an identical mixed meal breakfast (2100 kJ at 08:30 h after one full night of sleep and a simulated nightshift. Interstitial glucose was measured continuously during the entire study using Medtronic Continual Glucose Monitors. Only subjects with identical breakfast consumption and complete datasets were analysed (N = 20. Glucose data were averaged into 5-minute bins and area under the curve (AUC was calculated for 90 min post-breakfast. Pre-breakfast, glucose levels were not significantly different between Day1 and Day2, nor were they different between snack groups (p > 0.05. A snack group by day interaction effect was found (F1,16 = 5.36, p = 0.034 and post-hocs revealed that in the big snack group, AUC response to breakfast was significantly higher following nightshift (Day2 compared to Day1 (p = 0.001. This translated to a 20.8% (SEM 5.6 increase. AUC was not significantly different between days in the small snack group. Consuming a big snack at 00:00 h impaired the glucose response to breakfast at 08:30 h, compared to a smaller snack. Further research in this area will inform dietary advice for shift workers, which could include recommendations on how much to eat as well as content.

  19. Blood glucose response to rescue dextrose in hypoglycemic, critically ill patients receiving an insulin infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Manasa S; Duby, Jeremiah J; Parker, Patricia L; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe P; Roach, Denise M; Louie, Erin L

    2015-08-01

    There is inadequate guidance for clinicians on selection of the optimal dextrose 50% (D50W) dose for hypoglycemia correction in critically ill patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the blood glucose (BG) response to D50W in critically ill patients. A retrospective analysis was conducted of critically ill patients who received D50W for hypoglycemia (BG 150 mg/dL), resulting in a 6.8% rate of overcorrection; 49% of hypoglycemic episodes (230/470) corrected to a BG >100 mg/dL. A multivariable GEE analysis showed a significantly higher BG response in participants with diabetes (0.002) but a lower response in those with recurrent hypoglycemia (P = 0.049). The response to D50W increased with increasinginsulin infusion rate (P = 0.022). Burn patients experienced a significantly larger BG response compared with cardiac, medical, neurosurgical, or surgical patients. The observed median effect of D50W on BG was approximately 4 mg/dL per gram of D50W administered. Application of these data may aid in rescue protocol development that may reduce glucose variability associated with hypoglycemic episodes and the correction. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Changes in glucose-elicited blood metabolite responses following weight loss and long term weight maintenance in obese individuals with impaired glucose tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geidenstam, Nina; Danielsson, Anders P H; Spégel, Peter; Ridderstråle, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Weight loss improves insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in obese subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), but the long term dynamic effects on blood metabolites other than glucose during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), are largely unknown. Here, we studied changes in OGTT-elicited metabolite patterns in obese subjects during a diet-induced weight loss study. Blood samples from 14 obese individuals with IGT were collected at 0, 30 and 120 min during a standard 75 g OGTT at baseline (BMI 44 ± 2 kg/m(2)), after weight loss (BMI 36 ± 2 kg/m(2)) and after weight maintenance (BMI 35 ± 2 kg/m(2)). Serum metabolite levels were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and compared to a lean glucose tolerant group. Changes in the OGTT-elicited metabolite patterns occurred differentially during weight loss and weight maintenance. Enhanced suppression of aromatic amino acids were associated with decreased insulinogenic index observed after weight loss (tyrosine: r=0.72, p=0.013; phenylalanine: r=0.63, p=0.039). The OGTT-elicited suppression and/or lack of increase in levels of glutamate, glutamine, isoleucine, leucine, and the fatty acids laurate, oleate and palmitate, improved towards the lean profile after weight maintenance, paralleling an improvement in glucose tolerance. The greater heterogeneity in the response before and after weight loss in the obese, compared to lean subjects, was markedly reduced after weight maintenance. Diet-induced weight loss followed by weight maintenance results in changes in metabolite profiles associated with either hepatic insulin sensitivity or peripheral glucose tolerance. Our results highlight the importance of evaluating the effects of weight loss and weight maintenance separately. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Incretin responses to oral glucose and mixed meal tests and changes in fasting glucose levels during 7 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopman, A D M; Rutters, F; Rauh, S P

    2018-01-01

    . We used data from the Hoorn Meal Study; a population-based cohort study among 121 subjects, aged 61.0±6.7y. GIP and GLP-1 responses were determined at baseline and expressed as total and incremental area under the curve (tAUC and iAUC). The association between incretin response at baseline...... and changes in fasting glucose levels was assessed using linear regression. The average change in glucose over 7 years was 0.43 ± 0.5 mmol/l. For GIP, no significant associations were observed with changes in fasting glucose levels. In contrast, participants within the middle and highest tertile of GLP-1 iAUC...... responses to OGTT had significantly smaller increases (actually decreases) in fasting glucose levels; -0.28 (95% confidence interval: -0.54;-0.01) mmol/l and -0.39 (-0.67;-0.10) mmol/l, respectively, compared to those in the lowest tertile. The same trend was observed for tAUC GLP-1 following OGTT (highest...

  2. Adipose tissue insulin receptor and glucose transporter 4 expression, and blood glucose and insulin responses during glucose tolerance tests in transition Holstein cows with different body condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakson, H; Karis, P; Ling, K; Ilves-Luht, A; Samarütel, J; Henno, M; Jõudu, I; Waldmann, A; Reimann, E; Pärn, P; Bruckmaier, R M; Gross, J J; Kaart, T; Kass, M; Ots, M

    2018-01-01

    Glucose uptake in tissues is mediated by insulin receptor (INSR) and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of body condition during the dry period on adipose tissue mRNA and protein expression of INSR and GLUT4, and on the dynamics of glucose and insulin following the i.v. glucose tolerance test in Holstein cows 21 d before (d -21) and after (d 21) calving. Cows were grouped as body condition score (BCS) ≤3.0 (thin, T; n = 14), BCS = 3.25 to 3.5 (optimal, O; n = 14), and BCS ≥3.75 (overconditioned, OC; n = 14). Blood was analyzed for glucose, insulin, fatty acids, and β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Adipose tissue was analyzed for INSR and GLUT4 mRNA and protein concentrations. During the glucose tolerance test 0.15 g/kg of body weight glucose was infused; blood was collected at -5, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min, and analyzed for glucose and insulin. On d -21 the area under the curve (AUC) of glucose was smallest in group T (1,512 ± 33.9 mg/dL × min) and largest in group OC (1,783 ± 33.9 mg/dL × min), and different between all groups. Basal insulin on d -21 was lowest in group T (13.9 ± 2.32 µU/mL), which was different from group OC (24.9 ± 2.32 µU/mL. On d -21 the smallest AUC 5-60 of insulin in group T (5,308 ± 1,214 µU/mL × min) differed from the largest AUC in group OC (10,867 ± 1,215 µU/mL × min). Time to reach basal concentration of insulin in group OC (113 ± 14.1 min) was longer compared with group T (45 ± 14.1). The INSR mRNA abundance on d 21 was higher compared with d -21 in groups T (d -21: 3.3 ± 0.44; d 21: 5.9 ± 0.44) and O (d -21: 3.7 ± 0.45; d 21: 4.7 ± 0.45). The extent of INSR protein expression on d -21 was highest in group T (7.3 ± 0.74 ng/mL), differing from group O (4.6 ± 0.73 ng/mL), which had the lowest expression. The amount of GLUT4 protein on d -21 was lowest in group OC (1.2 ± 0.14 ng/mL), different from group O (1.8 ± 0.14 ng/mL), which had the highest amount

  3. Neuronal response of the hippocampal formation to injury: blood flow, glucose metabolism, and protein synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameyama, M.; Wasterlain, C.G.; Ackermann, R.F.; Finch, D.; Lear, J.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    The reaction of the hippocampal formation to entorhinal lesions was studied from the viewpoints of cerebral blood flow ([ 123 I]isopropyl-iodoamphetamine[IMP])-glucose utilization ([ 14 C]2-deoxyglucose), and protein synthesis ([ 14 C]leucine), using single- and double-label autoradiography. Researchers' studies showed decreased glucose utilization in the inner part, and increased glucose utilization in the outer part of the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus, starting 3 days after the lesion; increased uptake of [ 123 I]IMP around the lesion from 1 to 3 days postlesion; and starting 3 days after the lesion, marked decrease in [ 14 C]leucine incorporation into proteins and cell loss in the dorsal CA1 and dorsal subiculum in about one-half of the rats. These changes were present only in animals with lesions which invaded the ventral hippocampal formation in which axons of CA1 cells travel. By contrast, transsection of the 3rd and 4th cranial nerves resulted, 3 to 9 days after injury, in a striking increase in protein synthesis in the oculomotor and trochlear nuclei. These results raise the possibility that in some neurons the failure of central regeneration may result from the cell's inability to increase its rate of protein synthesis in response to axonal injury

  4. Response of lactate metabolism in brain glucosensing areas of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to changes in glucose levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-Rodiño, Cristina; Librán-Pérez, Marta; Velasco, Cristina; Álvarez-Otero, Rosa; López-Patiño, Marcos A; Míguez, Jesús M; Soengas, José L

    2015-12-01

    There is no evidence in fish brain demonstrating the existence of changes in lactate metabolism in response to alterations in glucose levels. We induced in rainbow trout through intraperitoneal (IP) treatments, hypoglycaemic or hyperglycaemic changes to assess the response of parameters involved in lactate metabolism in glucosensing areas like hypothalamus and hindbrain. To distinguish those effects from those induced by peripheral changes in the levels of metabolites or hormones, we also carried out intracerebroventricular (ICV) treatments with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG, a non-metabolizable glucose analogue thus inducing local glucopenia) or glucose. Finally, we also incubated hypothalamus and hindbrain in vitro in the presence of increased glucose concentrations. The changes in glucose availability were in general correlated to changes in the amount of lactate in both areas. However, when we assessed in these areas the response of parameters related to lactate metabolism, the results obtained were contradictory. The increase in glucose levels did not produce in general the expected changes in those pathways with only a minor increase in their capacity of lactate production. The decrease in glucose levels was, however, more clearly related to a decreased capacity of the pathways involved in the production and use of lactate, and this was especially evident after ICV treatment with 2-DG in both areas. In conclusion, the present results while addressing the existence of changes in lactate metabolism after inducing changes in glucose levels in brain glucosensing areas only partially support the possible existence of an astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle in hypothalamus and hindbrain of rainbow trout relating glucose availability to lactate production and use.

  5. Interrelations between glucose-induced insulin response, metabolic indicators, and time of first ovulation in high-yielding dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossaert, P; Leroy, J L M R; De Vliegher, S; Opsomer, G

    2008-09-01

    High-yielding dairy cows are more susceptible to metabolic and reproductive disorders than low-yielding cows. Insulin plays a pivotal role in the development of both problems. In the present study, we aimed to assess the glucose-induced insulin responses of dairy cows at different time points relative to calving and to relate this to the metabolic status and the time of first ovulation. Twenty-three healthy, multiparous Holstein-Friesian cows with a high genetic merit for milk yield were studied from 14 d prepartum to 42 d postpartum. Intravenous glucose tolerance tests were performed on -14, 14, and 42 d relative to calving to evaluate the plasma insulin and glucose responses to a glucose load, as estimated by the peak concentration, the area under the curve (AUC), and the clearance rates of insulin and glucose. Blood samples were obtained at 3-d intervals and analyzed for glucose, insulin, and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA). The time of first ovulation was defined by transrectal ultrasonography and plasma progesterone analysis. Glucose-induced insulin AUC and peak concentration decreased and glucose clearance increased during lactation compared with the dry period. Plasma NEFA concentrations were negatively related to insulin AUC and peak concentrations. Fourteen cows ovulated within 42 d postpartum, and the remaining 9 cows suffered from delayed resumption of ovarian function. Survival analysis demonstrated that cows with lower NEFA concentrations during the dry period tended to have earlier resumption of ovarian activity. In conclusion, our data suggest a decreased plasma insulin response to glucose postpartum in high-yielding dairy cows, possibly contributing to metabolic stress during the early postpartum period. It is hypothesized that NEFA impair glucose-induced insulin secretion in dairy cows. Additionally, our results suggest the importance of lipolysis during the transition period as a risk factor for delayed ovulation.

  6. High resolution imaging of collagen organisation and synthesis using a versatile collagen specific probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerboom, R.A.; Krahn - Nash, K.; Megens, R.T.A.; Zandvoort, van M.; Merkx, M.; Bouten, C.V.C.

    2007-01-01

    Collagen is the protein primarily responsible for the load-bearing properties of tissues and collagen architecture is one of the main determinants of the mechanical properties of tissues. Visualisation of changes in collagen three-dimensional structure is essential in order to improve our

  7. Expression, purification, and functional characterization of the insulin-responsive facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Thomas E; Hresko, Richard C; Hruz, Paul W

    2015-12-01

    The insulin-responsive facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4 is of fundamental importance for maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Despite intensive effort, the ability to express and purify sufficient quantities of structurally and functionally intact protein for biophysical analysis has previously been exceedingly difficult. We report here the development of novel methods to express, purify, and functionally reconstitute GLUT4 into detergent micelles and proteoliposomes. Rat GLUT4 containing FLAG and His tags at the amino and carboxy termini, respectively, was engineered and stably transfected into HEK-293 cells. Overexpression in suspension culture yielded over 1.5 mg of protein per liter of culture. Systematic screening of detergent solubilized GLUT4-GFP fusion protein via fluorescent-detection size exclusion chromatography identified lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol (LMNG) as highly effective for isolating monomeric GLUT4 micelles. Preservation of structural integrity and ligand binding was demonstrated via quenching of tryptophan fluorescence and competition of ATB-BMPA photolabeling by cytochalasin B. GLUT4 was reconstituted into lipid nanodiscs and proper folding was confirmed. Reconstitution of purified GLUT4 with amphipol A8-35 stabilized the transporter at elevated temperatures for extended periods of time. Functional activity of purified GLUT4 was confirmed by reconstitution of LMNG-purified GLUT4 into proteoliposomes and measurement of saturable uptake of D-glucose over L-glucose. Taken together, these data validate the development of an efficient means to generate milligram quantities of stable and functionally intact GLUT4 that is suitable for a wide array of biochemical and biophysical analyses. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  8. Quantitative proteomics reveals altered expression of extracellular matrix related proteins of human primary dermal fibroblasts in response to sulfated hyaluronan and collagen applied as artificial extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stephan A; van der Smissen, Anja; von Feilitzsch, Margarete; Anderegg, Ulf; Kalkhof, Stefan; von Bergen, Martin

    2012-12-01

    Fibroblasts are the main matrix producing cells of the dermis and are also strongly regulated by their matrix environment which can be used to improve and guide skin wound healing processes. Here, we systematically investigated the molecular effects on primary dermal fibroblasts in response to high-sulfated hyaluronan [HA] (hsHA) by quantitative proteomics. The comparison of non- and high-sulfated HA revealed regulation of 84 of more than 1,200 quantified proteins. Based on gene enrichment we found that sulfation of HA alters extracellular matrix remodeling. The collagen degrading enzymes cathepsin K, matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -14 were found to be down-regulated on hsHA. Additionally protein expression of thrombospondin-1, decorin, collagen types I and XII were reduced, whereas the expression of trophoblast glycoprotein and collagen type VI were slightly increased. This study demonstrates that global proteomics provides a valuable tool for revealing proteins involved in molecular effects of growth substrates for further material optimization.

  9. Postprandial glucose response to Chinese foods in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eliza M Y; Cheng, Winnie M W; Tiu, Sau-Cheung; Wong, Lily L L

    2004-12-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the glycemic response to common Chinese foods in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-four Chinese adults with type 2 diabetes participated. Subjects were allocated to eat a pair of test meals in random order. Test meals included plain porridge with lean pork (meal 1A), plain porridge and Shrimp Shao Mai (Doll Brand, Winner Food Products Limited, Hong Kong) (meal 1B), boiled rice with boiled egg white (meal 2A), fried rice with whole egg (meal 2B), plain noodles in clear soup (meal 3A), and Pickled Vegetable and Pork-flavored Instant Bowl Noodles (Doll Brand, Winner Food Products Limited) (meal 3B). Nutritional content of the meals was calculated from the nutritional label on the food package and the food composition table. Plasma glucose was checked before the meal and in 30-minute intervals for up to 4 hours after the meal. Significant differences in the area under the curve of glucose up to 2 hours after the meal were detected between meal 1A and 2A ( P =.044), 1A and 3A ( P =.001), and 3A and 3B ( P =.017). The results suggest that fat alone does not alter the glycemic response to rice or porridge. Porridge produces a higher glycemic response than rice and noodles despite similar carbohydrate contents, and different noodles lead to differences in glycemic excursion, suggesting that the glycemic index of common Chinese foods is affected by cooking methods and food processing.

  10. Effects of sitagliptin and metformin treatment on incretin hormone and insulin secretory responses to oral and "isoglycemic" intravenous glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vardarli, Irfan; Arndt, Elisabeth; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2014-01-01

    ,000 mg/day), sitagliptin (100 mg/day), or their combination, on GLP-1 responses and on the incretin effect in 20 patients with type 2 diabetes, comparing an oral glucose challenge (75 g, day 5) and an "isoglycemic" intravenous glucose infusion (day 6). Fasting total GLP-1 was significantly increased...... by metformin and not changed by sitagliptin. After oral glucose, metformin increased and sitagliptin significantly decreased (by 53%) total GLP-1. Fasting and postload intact GLP-1 increased with sitagliptin but not with metformin. After oral glucose, only sitagliptin, but not metformin, significantly...... the numerical contribution of the incretin effect. Insulin secretion with sitagliptin treatment was similarly stimulated with oral and "isoglycemic" intravenous glucose. This points to an important contribution of small changes in incretin concentrations within the basal range or to additional insulinotropic...

  11. Dielectric and biochemical response of a PLA-PGA-HAp-Chitosan-Collagen coated on Ti6Al4V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montanez Superlano, Nerly Deyanira; Pena Ballesteros, Dario Yesid; Estupinan Duran, Hugo Armando

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of a polymeric biomaterial with a culture medium and osteoblast cells, electrodeposited on Ti6Al4V was evaluated. The compound is integrated of polylactic acid-polyglycolic acid-hydroxyapatite, modified with collagen and chitosan. The relative permittivity data embodied in a dielectric impedance spectrum identified the alpha and beta dispersions related to the ion exchange and the polarization of the cell membrane was calculated. Adhesion and cell proliferation was analyzed by epifluorescence microscopy, where it was observed on the third day of the cell culture process represented by mitosis core condensation and separation of the chromosomes. The surface morphology by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) and AFM (Atomic Force Microscope) biomaterial was observed and cellular activity was assessed by measuring alkaline phosphatase. Finally the best surface for adhesion and cell growth was found by statistical analysis, which corresponded to the coating with the highest concentration of chitosan and collagen

  12. Ozone modifies the metabolic and endocrine response to glucose: Reproduction of effects with the stress hormone corticosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Errol M; Pilon, Shinjini; Guénette, Josée; Williams, Andrew; Holloway, Alison C

    2018-03-01

    Air pollution is associated with increased incidence of metabolic disease (e.g. metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes); however, underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Air pollutants increase the release of stress hormones (human cortisol, rodent corticosterone), which could contribute to metabolic dysregulation. We assessed acute effects of ozone, and stress axis involvement, on glucose tolerance and on the metabolic (triglyceride), endocrine/energy regulation (insulin, glucagon, GLP-1, leptin, ghrelin, corticosterone), and inflammatory/endothelial (TNF, IL-6, VEGF, PAI-1) response to exogenous glucose. Male Fischer-344 rats were exposed to clean air or 0.8 ppm ozone for 4 h in whole body chambers. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis involvement in ozone effects was tested through subcutaneous administration of the glucocorticoid synthesis inhibitor metyrapone (50 mg/kg body weight), corticosterone (10 mg/kg body weight), or vehicle (40% propylene glycol) prior to exposure. A glucose tolerance test (2 g/kg body weight glucose) was conducted immediately after exposure, with blood samples collected at 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. Ozone exposure impaired glucose tolerance, an effect accompanied by increased plasma triglycerides but no impairment of insulin release. Ozone diminished glucagon, GLP-1, and ghrelin responses to glucose, but did not significantly impact inflammatory/endothelial analytes. Metyrapone reduced corticosterone but increased glucose and triglycerides, complicating evaluation of the impact of glucocorticoid inhibition. However, administration of corticosterone reproduced the profile of ozone effects, supporting a role for the HPA axis. The results show that ozone-dependent changes in glucose tolerance are accompanied by altered metabolic and endocrine responses to glucose challenge that are reproduced by exogenous stress hormone. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Temporal metabolomic responses of cultured HepG2 liver cells to high fructose and high glucose exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissen, John K; Hirahatake, Kristin M; Adams, Sean H; Fiehn, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    High fructose consumption has been implicated with deleterious effects on human health, including hyperlipidemia elicited through de novo lipogenesis. However, more global effects of fructose on cellular metabolism have not been elucidated. In order to explore the metabolic impact of fructose-containing nutrients, we applied both GC-TOF and HILIC-QTOF mass spectrometry metabolomic strategies using extracts from cultured HepG2 cells exposed to fructose, glucose, or fructose + glucose. Cellular responses were analyzed in a time-dependent manner, incubated in media containing 5.5 mM glucose + 5.0 mM fructose in comparison to controls incubated in media containing either 5.5 mM glucose or 10.5 mM glucose. Mass spectrometry identified 156 unique known metabolites and a large number of unknown compounds, which revealed metabolite changes due to both utilization of fructose and high-carbohydrate loads independent of hexose structure. Fructose was shown to be partially converted to sorbitol, and generated higher levels of fructose-1-phosphate as a precursor for glycolytic intermediates. Differentially regulated ratios of 3-phosphoglycerate to serine pathway intermediates in high fructose media indicated a diversion of carbon backbones away from energy metabolism. Additionally, high fructose conditions changed levels of complex lipids toward phosphatidylethanolamines. Patterns of acylcarnitines in response to high hexose exposure (10.5 mM glucose or glucose/fructose combination) suggested a reduction in mitochondrial beta-oxidation.

  14. Glucose allostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stumvoll, Michael; Tataranni, P Antonio; Stefan, Norbert

    2003-01-01

    individuals with normal glucose tolerance, normoglycemia can always be maintained by compensatorily increasing AIR in response to decreasing M (and vice versa). This has been mathematically described by the hyperbolic relationship between AIR and M and referred to as glucose homeostasis, with glucose......In many organisms, normoglycemia is achieved by a tight coupling of nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion in the pancreatic beta-cell (acute insulin response [AIR]) and the metabolic action of insulin to stimulate glucose disposal (insulin action [M]). It is widely accepted that in healthy...... concentration assumed to remain constant along the hyperbola. Conceivably, glucose is one of the signals stimulating AIR in response to decreasing M. Hypothetically, as with any normally functioning feed-forward system, AIR should not fully compensate for worsening M, since this would remove the stimulus...

  15. Development of a three-dimensional unit cell to model the micromechanical response of a collagen-based extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilo, Monica E; Roeder, Blayne A; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Kokini, Klod; Nauman, Eric A

    2010-04-01

    The three-dimensional microstructure and mechanical properties of the collagen fibrils within the extracellular matrix (ECM) is now being recognized as a primary factor in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, an appreciation of the mechanical aspects by which a cell interacts with its ECM is required for the development of engineered tissues. Ultimately, using these interactions to design tissue equivalents requires mathematical models with three-dimensional architecture. In this study, a three-dimensional model of a collagen fibril matrix undergoing uniaxial tensile stress was developed by making use of cellular solids. A structure consisting of thin struts was chosen to represent the arrangement of collagen fibrils within an engineered ECM. To account for the large deformation of tissues, the collagen fibrils were modeled as hyperelastic neo-Hookean or Mooney-Rivlin materials. The use of cellular solids allowed the fibril properties to be related to the ECM properties in closed form, which, in turn, allowed the estimation of fibril properties using ECM experimental data. A set of previously obtained experimental data consisting of simultaneous measures of the fibril microstructure and mechanical tests was used to evaluate the model's capability to estimate collagen fibril mechanical property when given tissue-scale data and to predict the tissue-scale mechanical properties when given estimated fibril stiffness. The fibril tangent modulus was found to be 1.26 + or - 0.70 and 1.62 + or - 0.88 MPa when the fibril was modeled as neo-Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin material, respectively. There was no statistical significance of the estimated fibril tangent modulus among the different groups. Sensitivity analysis showed that the fibril mechanical properties and volume fraction were the two input parameters which required accurate values. While the volume fraction was easily obtained from the initial image of the gel, the fibril mechanical properties

  16. The role of O-linked GlcNAc modification on the glucose response of ChREBP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakiyama, Haruhiko [Department of Biochemistry, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Fujiwara, Noriko, E-mail: noriko-f@hyo-med.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Noguchi, Takahiro; Eguchi, Hironobu; Yoshihara, Daisaku [Department of Biochemistry, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Uyeda, Kosaku [Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, TX 75390-9038 (United States); Suzuki, Keiichiro [Department of Biochemistry, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan)

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} The O-linked GlcNAc modification is crucial for the glucose response. {yields} Mlx is required for nuclear localization and transcription activity of ChREBP. {yields} The presence of Mlx stabilizes ChREBP protein. -- Abstract: The carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) functions as a transcription factor in mediating the glucose-activated gene expression of multiple liver enzymes, which are responsible for converting excess carbohydrate to storage fat. ChREBP is translocated into the nucleus in response to high glucose levels, and then up-regulates transcriptional activity. Although this glucose activation of ChREBP is generally observed only in liver cells, overexpression of wild type max-like protein X (Mlx), but not an inactive mutant Mlx, resulted in the exhibition of the ChREBP functions also in a human kidney cell line. Because high glucose conditions induce the glycosylation of cellular proteins, the effect of O-linked GlcNAc modification on ChREBP functions was examined. Treatment with an O-GlcNAcase inhibitor (PUGNAc), which increases the O-linked GlcNAc modification of cellular proteins, caused an increase in the glucose response of ChREBP. In contrast, treatment with a glutamine fructose amidotransferase inhibitor (DON), which decreases O-GlcNAcylation by inhibiting the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, completely blocked the glucose response of ChREBP. These results suggest that the O-linked glycosylation of ChREBP itself or other proteins that regulate ChREBP is essential for the production of functional ChREBP.

  17. A glucose-responsive pH-switchable bioelectrocatalytic sensor based on phenylboronic acid-diol specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Peiyi; Wang, Zhihua; Yang, Lele; Ma, Tengfei; Yang, Ling; Guo, Qianqiong; Huang, Shasheng

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A pH-switchable bioelectrocatayltic sensor was developed, which exhibited an obvious anodic current in acidic conditions as “ON” state, yet a prohibited signal in alkaline conditions as “OFF” state. With the change of pH and/or the presence of glucose, our proposed biosensor produced the corresponding amplified signal, providing a better sensitivity. - Abstract: Aminophenylboronic acid moieties were covalently grafted onto mercaptobenzoic acid moieties, and glucose oxidase was then immobilized through boronic acid-diol specific recognition to form a pH-sensitive electrosensor switching between pH 5.8 and pH 8.0 base solution. Using potassium ferricyanide as electroactive probe, the response was intensified in acidic condition while hindered in alkaline condition. The sharp and stable contrast in current was performed alternately upon the change of pH like a “pH switch”. In the presence of glucose, the response to glucose was further amplified catalytically by glucose oxidase on “ON” state, while electron transfer was inhibited on “OFF” state. Furthermore, when our sensor was on “ON” state, it showed a good linearity ranging from 0 to 30 μmol L −1 of glucose, with a detection limit of 348 nmol L −1 (S/B = 3) and a dynamic range extending to 50 μmol L −1 . Glucose-responsive, pH-switchable and catalytically-amplified, our biosensor provided a new method for the detection of glucose in the form of pH switch in human serum sample, and was promising to more complicated environment

  18. Stromal cells and osteoclasts are responsible for exacerbated collagen-induced arthritis in interferon-beta-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treschow, Alexandra P; Teige, Ingrid; Nandakumar, Kutty S

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Clinical trials using interferon-beta (IFNbeta) in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis have shown conflicting results. We undertook this study to understand the mechanisms of IFNbeta in arthritis at a physiologic level. METHODS: Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in IFNbeta....... Differences in osteoclast maturation were determined in situ by histology of arthritic and naive paws and by in vitro maturation studies of naive bone marrow cells. The importance of IFNbeta-producing fibroblasts was determined by transferring fibroblasts into mice at the time of CIA immunization. RESULTS...

  19. Fructose intervention for 12 weeks does not impair glycemic control or incretin hormone responses during oral glucose or mixed meal tests in obese men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matikainen, N; Söderlund, S; Björnson, E

    2017-01-01

    were measured during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and triglycerides (TG), GLP-1, GIP and PYY during a mixed meal test before and after fructose intervention. Fructose intervention did not worsen glucose and insulin responses during OGTT, and GLP-1 and GIP responses during OGTT and fat-rich meal...... responses during OGTT or GLP-1, GIP or PYY responses during a mixed meal. Therefore, fructose intake, even accompanied with mild weight gain, increases in liver fat and worsening of postprandial TG profile, does not impair glucose tolerance or gut incretin response to oral glucose or mixed meal challenge....

  20. Pleocytosis is not fully responsible for low CSF glucose in meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Maxime O; Vitt, Jeffrey R; Robbins, Nathaniel M; Wabl, Rafael; Wilson, Michael R; Chow, Felicia C; Gelfand, Jeffrey M; Josephson, S Andrew; Miller, Steve

    2018-01-01

    The mechanism of hypoglycorrhachia-low CSF glucose-in meningitis remains unknown. We sought to evaluate the relative contribution of CSF inflammation vs microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) in lowering CSF glucose levels. We retrospectively categorized CSF profiles into microbial and aseptic meningitis and analyzed CSF leukocyte count, glucose, and protein concentrations. We assessed the relationship between these markers using multivariate and stratified linear regression analysis for initial and repeated CSF sampling. We also calculated the receiver operating characteristics of CSF glucose and CSF-to-serum glucose ratios to presumptively diagnose microbial meningitis. We found that increasing levels of CSF inflammation were associated with decreased CSF glucose levels in the microbial but not aseptic category. Moreover, elevated CSF protein levels correlated more strongly than the leukocyte count with low CSF glucose levels on initial ( R 2 = 36%, p CSF sampling ( R 2 = 46%, p CSF glucose and CSF-to-serum glucose ratios had similar low sensitivity and moderate-to-high specificity in diagnosing microbial meningitis at thresholds commonly used. The main driver of hypoglycorrhachia appears to be a combination of microbial meningitis with moderate to high degrees of CSF inflammation and proteins, suggesting that the presence of microorganisms capable of catabolizing glucose is a determinant of hypoglycorrhachia in meningitis. A major notable exception is neurosarcoidosis. Low CSF glucose and CSF-to-serum glucose ratios are useful markers for the diagnosis of microbial meningitis.

  1. Effects of Vildagliptin and Metformin on Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Responses to Small Intestinal Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tongzhi; Trahair, Laurence G; Little, Tanya J; Bound, Michelle J; Zhang, Xiang; Wu, Hang; Sun, Zilin; Horowitz, Michael; Rayner, Christopher K; Jones, Karen L

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate effects of vildagliptin and metformin on blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) responses to intraduodenal (ID) glucose in diet-controlled type 2 diabetes. Study A compared vildagliptin (50 mg) and placebo, given 60 min before a 120-min ID glucose infusion at 2 or 4 kcal/min (ID2 or ID4) in 16 patients. Study B compared metformin (850 mg) and placebo, given 30 min before ID2 over 120 min in 9 patients. Systolic ( P = 0.002) and diastolic ( P vildagliptin compared with placebo, without interaction between vildagliptin and the glucose infusion rate. In contrast, HR was greater after metformin than placebo ( P Vildagliptin reduces BP and increases HR, whereas metformin increases HR without affecting BP during ID glucose infusion in type 2 diabetes. These distinct cardiovascular profiles during enteral nutrient exposure may have implications for postprandial hypotension. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  2. Effects of rumen-protected Capsicum oleoresin on productivity and responses to a glucose tolerance test in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, J; Harper, M; Giallongo, F; Bravo, D M; Wall, E H; Hristov, A N

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this experiment was to investigate the effects of rumen-protected Capsicum oleoresin (RPC) supplementation on feed intake, milk yield and composition, nutrient utilization, fecal microbial ecology, and responses to a glucose tolerance test in lactating dairy cows. Nine multiparous Holstein cows were used in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design balanced for residual effects with three 28-d periods. Each period consisted of 14 d for adaptation and 14 d for data collection and sampling. Treatments were 0 (control), 100, and 200 mg of RPC/cow per day. They were mixed with a small portion of the total mixed ration and top-dressed. Glucose tolerance test was conducted once during each experimental period by intravenous administration of glucose at a rate of 0.3 g/kg of body weight. Dry matter intake was not affected by RPC. Milk yield tended to increase for RPC treatments compared to the control. Feed efficiency was linearly increased by RPC supplementation. Concentrations of fat, true protein, and lactose in milk were not affected by RPC. Apparent total-tract digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, and crude protein was linearly increased, and fecal nitrogen excretion was linearly decreased by RPC supplementation. Rumen-protected Capsicum oleoresin did not affect the composition of fecal bacteria. Glucose concentration in serum was not affected by RPC supplementation post glucose challenge. However, compared to the control, RPC decreased serum insulin concentration at 5, 10, and 40 min post glucose challenge. The area under the insulin concentration curve was also decreased 25% by RPC. Concentration of nonesterified fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate in serum were not affected by RPC following glucose administration. In this study, RPC tended to increase milk production and increased feed efficiency in dairy cows. In addition, RPC decreased serum insulin concentration during the glucose tolerance test, but glucose concentration was not affected

  3. Glucose-stimulated insulin response in pregnant sheep following acute suppression of plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriskandarajah Nadarajah

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA concentrations in non-pregnant animals have been reported to decrease pancreatic responsiveness. As ovine gestation advances, maternal insulin concentrations fall and NEFA concentrations increase. Experiments were designed to examine if the pregnancy-associated rise in NEFA concentration is associated with a reduced pancreatic sensitivity to glucose in vivo. We investigated the possible relationship of NEFA concentrations in regulating maternal insulin concentrations during ovine pregnancy at three physiological states, non-pregnant, non-lactating (NPNL, 105 and 135 days gestational age (dGA, term 147+/- 3 days. Methods The plasma concentrations of insulin, growth hormone (GH and ovine placental lactogen (oPL were determined by double antibody radioimmunoassay. Insulin responsiveness to glucose was measured using bolus injection and hyperglycaemic clamp techniques in 15 non-pregnant, non-lactating ewes and in nine pregnant ewes at 105 dGA and near term at 135 dGA. Plasma samples were also collected for hormone determination. In addition to bolus injection glucose and insulin Area Under Curve calculations, the Mean Plasma Glucose Increment, Glucose Infusion Rate and Mean Plasma Insulin Increment and Area Under Curve were determined for the hyperglycaemic clamp procedures. Statistical analysis of data was conducted with Students t-tests, repeated measures ANOVA and 2-way ANOVA. Results Maternal growth hormone, placental lactogen and NEFA concentrations increased, while basal glucose and insulin concentrations declined with advancing gestation. At 135 dGA following bolus glucose injections, peak insulin concentrations and insulin area under curve (AUC profiles were significantly reduced in pregnant ewes compared with NPNL control ewes (p Conclusions Results suggest that despite an acute suppression of circulating NEFA concentrations during pregnancy, the associated steroids and hormones

  4. Experimental model of bone response to collagenized xenografts of porcine origin (OsteoBiol® mp3): a radiological and histomorphometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo Guirado, Jose Luis; Ramírez Fernández, Maria Piedad; Negri, Bruno; Delgado Ruiz, Rafael Arcesio; Maté Sánchez de-Val, José Eduardo; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo

    2013-02-01

    Adequate alveolar ridges are fundamental to successful rehabilitation with implants. There are diverse techniques for reconstructing atrophied ridges, of which bone substitute grafts is one possibility. The aim of this study was to carry out radiological and histomorphometric evaluations of bone response to collagenized porcine bone xenografts over a 4-month period following their insertion in rabbits' tibiae. Twenty New Zealand rabbits were used. Twenty collagenized porcine bone xenografts (Osteobiol® mp3, Tecnoss Dental s.r.l., Torino, Italy), in granulated form of 600 to 1,000 µm, were inserted in the proximal metaphyseal area of the animals' tibiae and 20 control areas were created. Following implantation, the animals were sacrificed in four groups of five, after 1, 2, 3, and 4 months, respectively. Radiological and histomorphometric studies were made. After 4 months, radiological images revealed bone defects with a decrease in graft volume and the complete repair of the osseous defect. No healed or residual bone alterations attributable to the presence of the implants were observed. Histomorphometric analysis at 4 months found mean values for newly formed bone, residual graft material, and non-mineralized connective tissue of 25.4 ± 1.8%, 36.37 ± 3.0%, and 38.22 ± 2.5%, respectively. There were no statistical differences in the length of cortical formation with collagenized porcine xenograft (98.9 ± 1.1%) compared with the control samples (99.1 ± 0.7%) at the end of the study period. The biomaterial used proved to be biocompatible, bioabsorbable, and osteoconductive and as such, a possible bone substitute that did not interfere with the bone's normal reparative processes. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Uptake and release of glucose by the human kidney. Postabsorptive rates and responses to epinephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumvoll, M; Chintalapudi, U; Perriello, G; Welle, S; Gutierrez, O; Gerich, J

    1995-11-01

    Despite ample evidence that the kidney can both produce and use appreciable amounts of glucose, the human kidney is generally regarded as playing a minor role in glucose homeostasis. This view is based on measurements of arteriorenal vein glucose concentrations indicating little or no net release of glucose. However, inferences from net balance measurements do not take into consideration the simultaneous release and uptake of glucose by the kidney. Therefore, to assess the contribution of release and uptake of glucose by the human kidney to overall entry and removal of plasma glucose, we used a combination of balance and isotope techniques to measure renal glucose net balance, fractional extraction, uptake and release as well as overall plasma glucose appearance and disposal in 10 normal volunteers under basal postabsorptive conditions and during a 3-h epinephrine infusion. In the basal postabsorptive state, there was small but significant net output of glucose by the kidney (66 +/- 22 mumol.min-1, P = 0.016). However, since renal glucose fractional extraction averaged 2.9 +/- 0.3%, there was considerable renal glucose uptake (2.3 +/- 0.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1) which accounted for 20.2 +/- 1.7% of systemic glucose disposal (11.4 +/- 0.5 mumol.kg-1.min-1). Renal glucose release (3.2 +/- 0.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1) accounted for 27.8 +/- 2.1% of systemic glucose appearance (11.4 +/- 0.5 mumol.kg-1.min-1). Epinephrine infusion, which increased plasma epinephrine to levels observed during hypoglycemia (3722 +/- 453 pmol/liter) increased renal glucose release nearly twofold (5.2 +/- 0.5 vs 2.8 +/- 0.1 mol.kg-1.min-1, P = 0.01) so that at the end of the infusion, renal glucose release accounted for 40.3 +/- 5.5% of systemic glucose appearance and essentially all of the increase in systemic glucose appearance. These observations suggest an important role for the human kidney in glucose homeostasis.

  6. Preoperative octreotide therapy and surgery in acromegaly: associations between glucose homeostasis and treatment response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helseth, R; Carlsen, S M; Bollerslev, J; Svartberg, J; Øksnes, M; Skeie, S; Fougner, S L

    2016-02-01

    In acromegaly, high GH/IGF-1 levels associate with abnormal glucose metabolism. Somatostatin analogs (SSAs) reduce GH and IGF-1 but inhibit insulin secretion. We studied glucose homeostasis in de novo patients with acromegaly and changes in glucose metabolism after treatment with SSA and surgery. In this post hoc analysis from a randomized controlled trial, 55 de novo patients with acromegaly, not using antidiabetic medication, were included. Before surgery, 26 patients received SSAs for 6 months. HbA1c, fasting glucose, and oral glucose tolerance test were performed at baseline, after SSA pretreatment and at 3 months postoperative. Area under curve of glucose (AUC-G) was calculated. Glucose homeostasis was compared to baseline levels of GH and IGF-1, change after SSA pretreatment, and remission both after SSA pretreatment and 3 months postoperative. In de novo patients, IGF-1/GH levels did not associate with baseline glucose parameters. After SSA pretreatment, changes in GH/IGF-1 correlated positively to change in HbA1c levels (both p acromegaly, disease activity did not correlate with glucose homeostasis. Surgical treatment of acromegaly improved glucose metabolism in both cured and not cured patients, while SSA pretreatment led to deterioration in glucose homeostasis in patients not achieving biochemical control.

  7. Acute effect of meal glycemic index and glycemic load on blood glucose and insulin responses in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz Erik

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Foods with contrasting glycemic index when incorporated into a meal, are able to differentially modify glycemia and insulinemia. However, little is known about whether this is dependent on the size of the meal. The purposes of this study were: i to determine if the differential impact on blood glucose and insulin responses induced by contrasting GI foods is similar when provided in meals of different sizes, and; ii to determine the relationship between the total meal glycemic load and the observed serum glucose and insulin responses. Methods Twelve obese women (BMI 33.7 ± 2.4 kg/m2 were recruited. Subjects received 4 different meals in random order. Two meals had a low glycemic index (40–43% and two had a high-glycemic index (86–91%. Both meal types were given as two meal sizes with energy supply corresponding to 23% and 49% of predicted basal metabolic rate. Thus, meals with three different glycemic loads (95, 45–48 and 22 g were administered. Blood samples were taken before and after each meal to determine glucose, free-fatty acids, insulin and glucagon concentrations over a 5-h period. Results An almost 2-fold higher serum glucose and insulin incremental area under the curve (AUC over 2 h for the high- versus low-glycemic index same sized meals was observed (p Conclusion This study showed that foods of contrasting glycemic index induced a proportionally comparable difference in serum insulin response when provided in both small and large meals. The same was true for the serum glucose response but only in large meals. Glycemic load was useful in predicting the acute impact on blood glucose and insulin responses within the context of mixed meals.

  8. Insulin response of the glucose and fatty acid metabolism in dry dairy cows across a range of body condition scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Koster, J; Hostens, M; Van Eetvelde, M; Hermans, K; Moerman, S; Bogaert, H; Depreester, E; Van den Broeck, W; Opsomer, G

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the present research was to determine the insulin response of the glucose and fatty acid metabolism in dry dairy cows with a variable body condition score (BCS). Ten pregnant Holstein Friesian dairy cows (upcoming parity 2 to 5) were selected based on BCS at the beginning of the study (2mo before expected parturition date). During the study, animals were monitored weekly for BCS and backfat thickness and in the last 2wk, blood samples were taken for determination of serum nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration. Animals underwent a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp test in the third week before the expected parturition date. The hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp test consisted of 4 consecutive insulin infusions with increasing insulin doses: 0.1, 0.5, 2, and 5mIU/kg per minute. For each insulin infusion period, a steady state was defined as a period of 30min where no or minor changes of the glucose infusion were necessary to keep the blood glucose concentration constant and near basal levels. During the steady state, the glucose infusion rate [steady state glucose infusion rate (SSGIR) in µmol/kg per minute] and NEFA concentration [steady state NEFA concentration (SSNEFA) in mmol/L] were determined and reflect the insulin response of the glucose and fatty acid metabolism. Dose response curves were created based on the insulin concentrations during the steady state and the SSGIR or SSNEFA. The shape of the dose response curves is determined by the concentration of insulin needed to elicit the half maximal effect (EC50) and the maximal SSGIR or the minimal SSNEFA for the glucose or fatty acid metabolism, respectively. The maximal SSGIR was negatively associated with variables reflecting adiposity of the cows (BCS, backfat thickness, NEFA concentration during the dry period, and absolute weight of the different adipose depots determined after euthanasia and dissection of the different depots), whereas the EC50 of the glucose metabolism was

  9. Complete Histological Resolution of Collagenous Sprue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old woman developed a watery diarrhea syndrome with collagenous colitis. Later, weight loss and hypoalbuminemia were documented. This prompted small bowel biopsies that showed pathological changes of collagenous sprue. An apparent treatment response to a gluten-free diet and prednisone resulted in reduced diarrhea, weight gain and normalization of serum albumin. Later repeated biopsies from multiple small and large bowel sites over a period of over three years, however, showed reversion to normal small intestinal mucosa but persistent collagenous colitis. These results indicate that collagenous inflammatory disease may be a far more extensive process in the gastrointestinal tract than is currently appreciated. Moreover, collagenous colitis may be a clinical signal that occult small intestinal disease is present. Finally, collagenous sprue may, in some instances, be a completely reversible small intestinal disorder.

  10. Protein kinase N2 regulates AMP kinase signaling and insulin responsiveness of glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, Maxwell A; Riedl, Isabelle; Massart, Julie; Åhlin, Marcus; Zierath, Juleen R

    2017-10-01

    Insulin resistance is central to the development of type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders. Because skeletal muscle is responsible for the majority of whole body insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, regulation of glucose metabolism in this tissue is of particular importance. Although Rho GTPases and many of their affecters influence skeletal muscle metabolism, there is a paucity of information on the protein kinase N (PKN) family of serine/threonine protein kinases. We investigated the impact of PKN2 on insulin signaling and glucose metabolism in primary human skeletal muscle cells in vitro and mouse tibialis anterior muscle in vivo. PKN2 knockdown in vitro decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, incorporation into glycogen, and oxidation. PKN2 siRNA increased 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling while stimulating fatty acid oxidation and incorporation into triglycerides and decreasing protein synthesis. At the transcriptional level, PKN2 knockdown increased expression of PGC-1α and SREBP-1c and their target genes. In mature skeletal muscle, in vivo PKN2 knockdown decreased glucose uptake and increased AMPK phosphorylation. Thus, PKN2 alters key signaling pathways and transcriptional networks to regulate glucose and lipid metabolism. Identification of PKN2 as a novel regulator of insulin and AMPK signaling may provide an avenue for manipulation of skeletal muscle metabolism. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Early changes in plasma glucagon and growth hormone response to oral glucose in experimental hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, F; Moghetti, P; Castello, R; Negri, C; Bonora, E; Muggeo, M

    1996-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying deterioration of glucose tolerance associated with hyperthyroidism are not completely understood. Increases in glucagon and growth hormone (GH) secretion have been previously found in hyperthyroid subjects, and could play a crucial role in this phenomenon. However, studies have not yet established the time sequence of changes in plasma glucose on the one hand and glucagon and GH on the other. To assess the early effects of thyroid hormone excess on glucose tolerance and plasma concentrations of the main glucoregulatory hormones, 12 nondiabetic euthyroid subjects underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) before and after triiodothyronine ([T3] 120 micrograms/d) was administered for 10 days. Plasma levels of glucose, insulin, glucagon, and GH were determined at fasting and after the glucose load. T3 administration caused a marked increase in serum T3 (8.8 +/- 0.6 v 2.0 +/- 0.1 nmol/L), with clinical and biochemical signs of thyrotoxicosis. During the treatment, plasma glucose significantly increased both at fasting and after the glucose load (basal, 5.3 +/- 0.1 v 4.9 +/- 0.2 mmol/L, P hormone excess rapidly impairs glucose tolerance. Altered secretion of GH is an early event in thyrotoxicosis accompanying the onset of hyperglycemia, whereas plasma glucagon is appropriately suppressed by the increased plasma glucose levels. Thus, GH but not glucagon may contribute to the early hyperglycemic effect of thyrotoxicosis.

  12. Alleviation of collagen-induced arthritis by the benzoxathiole derivative BOT-4-one in mice: Implication of the Th1- and Th17-cell-mediated immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Hak; Yoon, Bo Ruem; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Noh, Kum Hee; Kwon, Sun-Ho; Yi, Eun Hee; Lee, Hyun Gyu; Choi, Jung Sook; Kang, Seong Wook; Park, In-Chul; Lee, Won-Woo; Ye, Sang-Kyu

    2016-06-15

    Autoimmune rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by chronic inflammation and hyperplasia in the synovial joints. Although the cause of rheumatoid arthritis is largely unknown, substantial evidence has supported the importance of immune cells and inflammatory cytokines in the initiation and progression of this disease. Herein, we demonstrated that the benzoxathiole derivative 2-cyclohexylimino-6-methyl-6,7-dihydro-5H-benzo[1,3]oxathiol-4-one (BOT-4-one) alleviated type II collagen-induced arthritis in a mouse model. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are elevated in both human patients with rheumatoid arthritis and mice with collagen-induced arthritis. BOT-4-one treatment reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in mice and endotoxin-stimulated macrophages. BOT-4-one treatment suppressed the polarization of Th1- and Th17-cell subsets by inhibiting the expression and production of their lineage-specific master transcription factors and cytokines, as well as activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins. In addition, BOT-4-one inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-kappaB signaling as well as the transcriptional activities and DNA-binding of transcription factors, including activator protein-1, cAMP response element-binding protein and NF-kappaB. Our results suggest that BOT-4-one may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of chronic inflammation associated with autoimmune rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Patients with collagen vascular disease and dyspnea. The value of gallium scanning and bronchoalveolar lavage in predicting response to steroid therapy and clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, N.B.; Solinger, A.M.; Baughman, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Patients with collagen vascular disease with or without pulmonary symptoms were studied to determine the value of gallium scan and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in predicting clinical outcome and response to steroid therapy. Thirty-six subjects, 20 with progressive dyspnea, were studied. Gallium uptake was seen in the lung in 17 of the 20 progressively dyspneic patient's and none of the 16 nonprogressive patients. The BAL fluid in the progressive patients had a higher percentage of neutrophils (13.4 percent +/- 2.88) and lymphocytes (16.1 percent +/- 2.75) than in the nonprogressive patients (neutrophils = 3.3 +/- 1.30 percent; lymphocytes = 5.6 +/- 1.57 percent. Of the 19 progressive patients who were treated with steroids or cyclophosphamide, six had only increased neutrophils in their BAL fluid and all died. The remaining 13 treated progressive patients had increased lymphocytes or a normal BAL (two patients): six had improvement in their vital capacity, six have had stable function, and one died. We found gallium scan and BAL useful in assessing progressive pulmonary fibrosis in collagen vascular disease

  14. Generation of glucose-responsive, insulin-producing cells from human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabakar, Kamalaveni R; Domínguez-Bendala, Juan; Molano, R Damaris; Pileggi, Antonello; Villate, Susana; Ricordi, Camillo; Inverardi, Luca

    2012-01-01

    We sought to assess the potential of human cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (CB-MSCs) to derive insulin-producing, glucose-responsive cells. We show here that differentiation protocols based on stepwise culture conditions initially described for human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) lead to differentiation of cord blood-derived precursors towards a pancreatic endocrine phenotype, as assessed by marker expression and in vitro glucose-regulated insulin secretion. Transplantation of these cells in immune-deficient animals shows human C-peptide production in response to a glucose challenge. These data suggest that human cord blood may be a promising source for regenerative medicine approaches for the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  15. Deletion of glutamate dehydrogenase in beta-cells abolishes part of the insulin secretory response not required for glucose homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carobbio, Stefania; Frigerio, Francesca; Rubi, Blanca

    2009-01-01

    Insulin exocytosis is regulated in pancreatic ss-cells by a cascade of intracellular signals translating glucose levels into corresponding secretory responses. The mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is regarded as a major player in this process, although its abrogation has not been...... tested yet in animal models. Here, we generated transgenic mice, named betaGlud1(-/-), with ss-cell-specific GDH deletion. Our results show that GDH plays an essential role in the full development of the insulin secretory response. In situ pancreatic perfusion revealed that glucose-stimulated insulin...... secretion was reduced by 37% in betaGlud1(-/-). Furthermore, isolated islets with either constitutive or acute adenovirus-mediated knock-out of GDH showed a 49 and 38% reduction in glucose-induced insulin release, respectively. Adenovirus-mediated re-expression of GDH in betaGlud1(-/-) islets fully restored...

  16. Energy metabolism and memory processing: role of glucose transport and glycogen in responses to adrenoceptor activation in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Dana S; Summers, Roger J; Gibbs, Marie E

    2008-06-15

    From experiments using a discriminated bead task in young chicks, we have defined when and where adrenoceptors (ARs) are involved in memory modulation. All three ARs subtypes (alpha(1)-, alpha(2)- and beta-ARs) are found in the chick brain and in regions associated with memory. Glucose and glycogen are important in the role of memory consolidation in the chick since increasing glucose levels improves memory consolidation while inhibiting glucose transporters (GLUTs) or glycogen breakdown inhibits memory consolidation. The selective beta(3)-AR agonist CL316243 enhances memory consolidation by a glucose-dependent mechanism and the administration of the non-metabolized glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose reduces the ability of CL316243 to enhance memory. Agents that reduce glucose uptake by GLUTs and its incorporation into the glycolytic pathway also reduce the effectiveness of CL316243, but do not alter the dose-response relationship to the beta(2)-AR agonist zinterol. However, beta(2)-ARs do have a role in memory related to glycogen breakdown and inhibition of glycogenolysis reduces the ability of zinterol to enhance memory. Both beta(2)- and beta(3)-ARs are found on astrocytes from chick forebrain, and the actions of beta(3)-ARs on glucose uptake, and beta(2)-ARs on the breakdown of glycogen is consistent with an effect on astrocytic metabolism at the time of memory consolidation 30 min after training. We have shown that both beta(2)- and beta(3)-ARs can increase glucose uptake in chick astrocytes but do so by different mechanisms. This review will focus on the role of ARs on memory consolidation and specifically the role of energy metabolism on AR modulation of memory.

  17. The IRE1α/XBP1s Pathway Is Essential for the Glucose Response and Protection of β Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R Hassler

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although glucose uniquely stimulates proinsulin biosynthesis in β cells, surprisingly little is known of the underlying mechanism(s. Here, we demonstrate that glucose activates the unfolded protein response transducer inositol-requiring enzyme 1 alpha (IRE1α to initiate X-box-binding protein 1 (Xbp1 mRNA splicing in adult primary β cells. Using mRNA sequencing (mRNA-Seq, we show that unconventional Xbp1 mRNA splicing is required to increase and decrease the expression of several hundred mRNAs encoding functions that expand the protein secretory capacity for increased insulin production and protect from oxidative damage, respectively. At 2 wk after tamoxifen-mediated Ire1α deletion, mice develop hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia, due to defective β cell function that was exacerbated upon feeding and glucose stimulation. Although previous reports suggest IRE1α degrades insulin mRNAs, Ire1α deletion did not alter insulin mRNA expression either in the presence or absence of glucose stimulation. Instead, β cell failure upon Ire1α deletion was primarily due to reduced proinsulin mRNA translation primarily because of defective glucose-stimulated induction of a dozen genes required for the signal recognition particle (SRP, SRP receptors, the translocon, the signal peptidase complex, and over 100 other genes with many other intracellular functions. In contrast, Ire1α deletion in β cells increased the expression of over 300 mRNAs encoding functions that cause inflammation and oxidative stress, yet only a few of these accumulated during high glucose. Antioxidant treatment significantly reduced glucose intolerance and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in mice with β cell-specific Ire1α deletion. The results demonstrate that glucose activates IRE1α-mediated Xbp1 splicing to expand the secretory capacity of the β cell for increased proinsulin synthesis and to limit oxidative stress that leads to β cell failure.

  18. Hepatic Glucose Production Increases in Response to Metformin Treatment in the Glycogen-depleted State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Marie Hougaard; Højlund, Kurt; Hother-Nielsen, Ole

    with two reduced-function alleles) were fasted for 42 h twice. In one of the periods, before the fasting, the volunteers were titrated to steady-state with 1 g metformin twice daily for seven days. Parameters of whole-body glucose metabolism were assessed using [3-3^H] glucose, indirect calorimetry......Metformin is believed to reduce glucose levels primarily by inhibiting hepatic glucose production, but at the same time do not cause hypoglycemia. Recent data indicate that metformin antagonizes the major glucose counterregulatory hormone, glucagon suggesting that other mechanisms protect against...... hypoglycemia. Here, we examined the effect of metformin on whole-body glucose metabolism after a glycogen-depleting 40 h fast and the role of reduced-function alleles in OCT1. In a randomized cross-over trial, 34 healthy volunteers with known OCT1 genotypes (12 with two wild-type alleles, 13 with one and 9...

  19. UCP2 Regulates Mitochondrial Fission and Ventromedial Nucleus Control of Glucose Responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Chitoku; Kim, Jung Dae; Impellizzeri, Daniela; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Diano, Sabrina

    2016-02-25

    The ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) plays a critical role in regulating systemic glucose homeostasis. How neurons in this brain area adapt to the changing metabolic environment to regulate circulating glucose levels is ill defined. Here, we show that glucose load results in mitochondrial fission and reduced reactive oxygen species in VMH neurons mediated by dynamin-related peptide 1 (DRP1) under the control of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2). Probed by genetic manipulations and chemical-genetic control of VMH neuronal circuitry, we unmasked that this mitochondrial adaptation determines the size of the pool of glucose-excited neurons in the VMH and that this process regulates systemic glucose homeostasis. Thus, our data unmasked a critical cellular biological process controlled by mitochondrial dynamics in VMH regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Growth and enzymatic responses of phytopathogenic fungi to glucose in culture media and soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz de Oliveira Costa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of inoculation of Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium verticillioides, and Penicillium sp. in Dystrophic Red Latosol (DRL and Eutroferric Red Latosol (ERL soils with or without glucose on the total carbohydrate content and the dehydrogenase and amylase activities was studied. The fungal growth and spore production in culture medium with and without glucose were also evaluated. A completely randomized design with factorial arrangement was used. The addition of glucose in the culture medium increased the growth rate of A. flavus and Penicillium sp. but not of F. verticillioides. The number of spores increased 1.2 for F. verticillioides and 8.2 times for A. flavus in the medium with glucose, but was reduced 3.5 times for Penicillium sp. The total carbohydrates contents reduced significantly according to first and second degree equations. The consumption of total carbohydrates by A. flavus and Penicillium sp. was higher than the control or soil inoculated with F. verticillioides. The addition of glucose to soils benefited the use of carbohydrates, probably due to the stimulation of fungal growth. Dehydrogenase activity increased between 1.5 to 1.8 times (p <0.05 in soils with glucose and inoculated with the fungi (except F. verticillioides, in relation to soil without glucose. Amylase activity increased 1.3 to 1.5 times due to the addition of glucose in the soil. Increased amylase activity was observed in the DRL soil with glucose and inoculated with A. flavus and Penicillium sp. when compared to control.

  1. Response of .i.Alteromonadaceae./i. and .i.Rhodobacteriaceae./i. to glucose and phosphorus manipulation in marine mesocosms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Allers, E.; Gómez-Consarnau, L.; Pinhassi, J.; Gasol, J.M.; Šimek, Karel; Pernthaler, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 10 (2007), s. 2417-2429 ISSN 1462-2912 Grant - others:EU(XE) EVK3-2001-00194 BASICS Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : bacterial community composition * Alteromonadaceae * Rhodobacteriaceae * responses to phosphorus and glucose additions * protozoan bacterivory Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.929, year: 2007

  2. Deletion of hepatic carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP impairs glucose homeostasis and hepatic insulin sensitivity in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Jois

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: Overall, hepatic ChREBP is protective in regards to hepatic insulin sensitivity and whole body glucose homeostasis. Hepatic ChREBP action can influence other peripheral tissues and is likely essential in coordinating the body's response to different feeding states.

  3. Atypical blood glucose response to continuous and interval exercise in a person with type 1 diabetes: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Othmar; Tschakert, Gerhard; Mueller, Alexander; Groeschl, Werner; Pieber, Thomas R; Koehler, Gerd; Eckstein, Max L; Bracken, Richard M; Hofmann, Peter

    2017-06-30

    Therapy must be adapted for people with type 1 diabetes to avoid exercise-induced hypoglycemia caused by increased exercise-related glucose uptake into muscles. Therefore, to avoid hypoglycemia, the preexercise short-acting insulin dose must be reduced for safety reasons. We report a case of a man with long-lasting type 1 diabetes in whom no blood glucose decrease during different types of exercise with varying exercise intensities and modes was found, despite physiological hormone responses. A Caucasian man diagnosed with type 1 diabetes for 24 years performed three different continuous high-intensity interval cycle ergometer exercises as part of a clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02075567). Intensities for both modes of exercises were set at 5% below and 5% above the first lactate turn point and 5% below the second lactate turn point. Short-acting insulin doses were reduced by 25%, 50%, and 75%, respectively. Measurements taken included blood glucose, blood lactate, gas exchange, heart rate, adrenaline, noradrenaline, cortisol, glucagon, and insulin-like growth factor-1. Unexpectedly, no significant blood glucose decreases were observed during all exercise sessions (start versus end, 12.97 ± 2.12 versus 12.61 ± 2.66 mmol L -1 , p = 0.259). All hormones showed the expected response, dependent on the different intensities and modes of exercises. People with type 1 diabetes typically experience a decrease in blood glucose levels, particularly during low- and moderate-intensity exercises. In our patient, we clearly found no decline in blood glucose, despite a normal hormone response and no history of any insulin insensitivity. This report indicates that there might be patients for whom the recommended preexercise therapy adaptation to avoid exercise-induced hypoglycemia needs to be questioned because this could increase the risk of severe hyperglycemia and ketosis.

  4. Collagen-Gold Nanoparticle Conjugates for Versatile Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Unser

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Integration of noble metal nanoparticles with proteins offers promising potential to create a wide variety of biosensors that possess both improved selectivity and versatility. The multitude of functionalities that proteins offer coupled with the unique optical properties of noble metal nanoparticles can allow for the realization of simple, colorimetric sensors for a significantly larger range of targets. Herein, we integrate the structural protein collagen with 10 nm gold nanoparticles to develop a protein-nanoparticle conjugate which possess the functionality of the protein with the desired colorimetric properties of the nanoparticles. Applying the many interactions that collagen undergoes in the extracellular matrix, we are able to selectively detect both glucose and heparin with the same collagen-nanoparticle conjugate. Glucose is directly detected through the cross-linking of the collagen fibrils, which brings the attached nanoparticles into closer proximity, leading to a red-shift in the LSPR frequency. Conversely, heparin is detected through a competition assay in which heparin-gold nanoparticles are added to solution and compete with heparin in the solution for the binding sites on the collagen fibrils. The collagen-nanoparticle conjugates are shown to detect both glucose and heparin in the physiological range. Lastly, glucose is selectively detected in 50% mouse serum with the collagen-nanoparticle devices possessing a linear range of 3–25 mM, which is also within the physiologically relevant range.

  5. Delayed ß-cell response and glucose intolerance in young women with Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerrild, Britta Eilersen; Holst, Jens Juul; Juhl, Claus

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate glucose homeostasis in detail in Turner syndrome (TS), where impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes are frequent. METHODS: Cross sectional study of women with Turner syndrome (TS)(n = 13) and age and body mass index matched controls (C) (n = 13), evaluated...

  6. St. John's wort impairs glucose tolerance by reducing insulin response in healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Tore Bjerregaard; Damkier, Per; Christensen, Mette Marie Hougaard

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if the over-the-counter herbal medicinal plant St. John's wort affects glucose tolerance in healthy men. To do this, we included 10 healthy men who were examined by a 2-hr oral glucose tolerance test on three occasions; A: Baseline, B: After 21 days...

  7. Curcumin attenuates inflammatory response in IL-1beta-induced human synovial fibroblasts and collagen-induced arthritis in mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Dong-Oh; Kim, Mun-Ok; Choi, Yung Hyun; Park, Yung-Min; Kim, Gi-Young

    2010-05-01

    Curcumin, a major component of turmeric, has been shown to exhibit anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The present study was performed to determine whether curcumin is efficacious against both collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and IL-1beta-induced activation in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs). DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (CII) and treated with curcumin every other day for 2weeks after the initial immunization. For arthritis, we evaluated the incidence of disease and used an arthritis index based on paw thickness. In vitro proliferation of CII- or concanavalin A-induced splenic T cells was examined using IFN-gamma production. Pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta were examined in the mouse ankle joint and serum IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes were analyzed. The expression levels of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in human FLSs were also determined. The results showed that compared with untreated CIA mice, curcumin-treated mice downregulated clinical arthritis score, the proliferation of splenic T cells, expression levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in the ankle joint, and expression levels of IgG2a in serum. Additionally, by altering nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB transcription activity in FLSs, curcumin inhibited PGE(2) production, COX-2 expression, and MMP secretion. These results suggest that curcumin can effectively suppress inflammatory response by inhibiting pro-inflammatory mediators and regulating humoral and cellular immune responses. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Neuroenergetic Response to Prolonged Cerebral Glucose Depletion after Severe Brain Injury and the Role of Lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patet, Camille; Quintard, Hervé; Suys, Tamarah; Bloch, Jocelyne; Daniel, Roy T; Pellerin, Luc; Magistretti, Pierre J; Oddo, Mauro

    2015-10-15

    Lactate may represent a supplemental fuel for the brain. We examined cerebral lactate metabolism during prolonged brain glucose depletion (GD) in acute brain injury (ABI) patients monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD). Sixty episodes of GD (defined as spontaneous decreases of CMD glucose from normal to low [brain oxygen and blood lactate remained normal. Dynamics of lactate and glucose supply during GD were further studied by analyzing the relationships between blood and CMD samples. There was a strong correlation between blood and brain lactate when LPR was normal (r = 0.56; p 25. The correlation between blood and brain glucose also decreased from r = 0.62 to r = 0.45. These findings in ABI patients suggest increased cerebral lactate delivery in the absence of brain hypoxia when glucose availability is limited and support the concept that lactate acts as alternative fuel.

  9. Extracts of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. attenuate the inflammatory response in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    XU, WEI; HUANG, MINGQING; ZHANG, YUQIN; LI, HUANG; ZHENG, HAIYIN; YU, LISHUANG; CHU, KEDAN; LIN, YU; CHEN, LIDIAN

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is considered a serious public health problem, which is commonly treated with traditional Chinese or herbal medicine. The present study evaluated the effects of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. extraction (BCBE) on a type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Wistar rats with CIA received either 125 or 500 mg/kg BCBE, after which, paw swelling was markedly suppressed compared with in the model group. In addition, BCBE significantly ameliorated pathological joint alterations, including synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone destruction. The protein and mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α and nuclear factor-κB in synovial tissue were determined by immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that the expression levels of these factors were significantly downregulated in the BCBE-treated group compared with in the model group. These results indicated that BCBE may exert an inhibitory effect on the CIA rat model, and its therapeutic potential is associated with its anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27035125

  10. Difference in postprandial GLP-1 response despite similar glucose kinetics after consumption of wheat breads with different particle size in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eelderink, Coby; Noort, Martijn W J; Sozer, Nesli; Koehorst, Martijn; Holst, Jens J; Deacon, Carolyn F; Rehfeld, Jens F; Poutanen, Kaisa; Vonk, Roel J; Oudhuis, Lizette; Priebe, Marion G

    2017-04-01

    Underlying mechanisms of the beneficial health effects of low glycemic index starchy foods are not fully elucidated yet. We varied the wheat particle size to obtain fiber-rich breads with a high and low glycemic response and investigated the differences in postprandial glucose kinetics and metabolic response after their consumption. Ten healthy male volunteers participated in a randomized, crossover study, consuming 13 C-enriched breads with different structures; a control bread (CB) made from wheat flour combined with wheat bran, and a kernel bread (KB) where 85 % of flour was substituted with broken wheat kernels. The structure of the breads was characterized extensively. The use of stable isotopes enabled calculation of glucose kinetics: rate of appearance of exogenous glucose, endogenous glucose production, and glucose clearance rate. Additionally, postprandial plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, glucagon, incretins, cholecystokinin, and bile acids were analyzed. Despite the attempt to obtain a bread with a low glycemic response by replacing flour by broken kernels, the glycemic response and glucose kinetics were quite similar after consumption of CB and KB. Interestingly, the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) response was much lower after KB compared to CB (iAUC, P bread did not result in a difference in glucose response and kinetics, but in a pronounced difference in GLP-1 response. Thus, changing the processing conditions of wheat for baking bread can influence the metabolic response beyond glycemia and may therefore influence health.

  11. Proximal collagenous gastroenteritides:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Riis, Lene Buhl; Danese, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    AIM: While collagenous colitis represents the most common form of the collagenous gastroenteritides, the collagenous entities affecting the proximal part of the gastrointestinal tract are much less recognized and possibly overlooked. The aim was to summarize the latest information through a syste...

  12. Glucose enhancement of recognition memory: differential effects on effortful processing but not aspects of 'remember-know' responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholey, Andrew; Macpherson, Helen; Sünram-Lea, Sandra; Elliott, Jade; Stough, Con; Kennedy, David

    2013-01-01

    The administration of a glucose drink has been shown to enhance cognitive performance with effect sizes comparable with those from pharmaceutical interventions in human trials. In the memory domain, it is currently debated whether glucose facilitation of performance is due to differential targeting of hippocampal memory or whether task effort is a more important determinant. Using a placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover 2(Drink: glucose/placebo) × 2(Effort: ± secondary task) design, 20 healthy young adults' recognition memory performance was measured using the 'remember-know' procedure. Two high effort conditions (one for each drink) included secondary hand movements during word presentation. A 25 g glucose or 30 mg saccharine (placebo) drink was consumed 10 min prior to the task. The presence of a secondary task resulted in a global impairment of memory function. There were significant Drink × Effort interactions for overall memory accuracy but no differential effects for 'remember' or 'know' responses. These data suggest that, in some circumstances, task effort may be a more important determinant of the glucose facilitation of memory effect than hippocampal mediation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Differential effects of fructose versus glucose on brain and appetitive responses to food cues and decisions for food rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shan; Monterosso, John R; Sarpelleh, Kayan; Page, Kathleen A

    2015-05-19

    Prior studies suggest that fructose compared with glucose may be a weaker suppressor of appetite, and neuroimaging research shows that food cues trigger greater brain reward responses in a fasted relative to a fed state. We sought to determine the effects of ingesting fructose versus glucose on brain, hormone, and appetitive responses to food cues and food-approach behavior. Twenty-four healthy volunteers underwent two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sessions with ingestion of either fructose or glucose in a double-blinded, random-order cross-over design. fMRI was performed while participants viewed images of high-calorie foods and nonfood items using a block design. After each block, participants rated hunger and desire for food. Participants also performed a decision task in which they chose between immediate food rewards and delayed monetary bonuses. Hormones were measured at baseline and 30 and 60 min after drink ingestion. Ingestion of fructose relative to glucose resulted in smaller increases in plasma insulin levels and greater brain reactivity to food cues in the visual cortex (in whole-brain analysis) and left orbital frontal cortex (in region-of-interest analysis). Parallel to the neuroimaging findings, fructose versus glucose led to greater hunger and desire for food and a greater willingness to give up long-term monetary rewards to obtain immediate high-calorie foods. These findings suggest that ingestion of fructose relative to glucose results in greater activation of brain regions involved in attention and reward processing and may promote feeding behavior.

  14. Efficient Generation of Glucose-Responsive Beta Cells from Isolated GP2+ Human Pancreatic Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Ameri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based therapy for type 1 diabetes would benefit from implementation of a cell purification step at the pancreatic endoderm stage. This would increase the safety of the final cell product, allow the establishment of an intermediate-stage stem cell bank, and provide a means for upscaling β cell manufacturing. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed glycoprotein 2 (GP2 as a specific cell surface marker for isolating pancreatic endoderm cells (PECs from differentiated hESCs and human fetal pancreas. Isolated GP2+ PECs efficiently differentiated into glucose responsive insulin-producing cells in vitro. We found that in vitro PEC proliferation declines due to enhanced expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitors CDKN1A and CDKN2A. However, we identified a time window when reducing CDKN1A or CDKN2A expression increased proliferation and yield of GP2+ PECs. Altogether, our results contribute tools and concepts toward the isolation and use of PECs as a source for the safe production of hPSC-derived β cells.

  15. Glucose-induced inhibition of the appetitive brain response to visual food cues in polycystic ovary syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vugt, Dean A; Krzemien, Alicja; Alsaadi, Hanin; Frank, Tamar C; Reid, Robert L

    2014-04-16

    We postulate that insulin regulation of food intake is compromised when insulin resistance is present. In order to investigate the effect of insulin sensitivity on appetitive brain responses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in a group of women diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in which insulin sensitivity ranged from normal to resistant. Subjects (n=19) were imaged while viewing pictures of high calorie (HC) foods and low calorie (LC) foods after ingesting either 75 g glucose or an equivalent volume of water. The insulin sensitive group showed reduced blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in response to food pictures following glucose ingestion in numerous corticolimbic brain regions, whereas the insulin resistant group did not. There was a significant interaction between insulin sensitivity (sensitive vs resistant) and condition (water vs glucose). The largest clusters identified included the left insula, bilateral limbic/parahippocampal gyrus/culmen/midbrain, bilateral limbic lobe/precuneus, and left superior/mid temporal gyrus/parietal for HC and LC stimuli combined, the left parahippocampal gyrus/fusiform/pulvinar/midbrain for HC pictures, and the left superior/mid temporal gyrus/parietal and middle/inferior frontal gyrus/orbitofrontal cortex for LC pictures. Furthermore, BOLD signal in the anterior cingulate, medial frontal gyrus, posterior cingulate/precuneus, and parietal cortex during a glucose challenge correlated negatively with insulin sensitivity. We conclude the PCOS women with insulin resistance have an impaired brain response to a glucose challenge. The inability of postprandial hyperinsulinemia to inhibit brain responsiveness to food cues in insulin resistant subjects may lead to greater non-homeostatic eating. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Response to glucose and lipid infusions in sepsis: a kinetic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, J.H.; Wolfe, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics and oxidation of glucose and free fatty acid (FFA) metabolism were assessed in control and Escherichia coli septicemic dogs by using primed, constant infusions of U- 14 C-glucose and 1,2, 13 C-palmitic acid. In the controls, the infusion of glucose suppressed endogenous glucose production completely, whereas, in the septic dogs, only a 30% suppression of glucose production occurred. The ability of the septic dogs to oxidize endogenous or exogenous glucose was decreased significantly. The basal rate of appearance of FFA was significantly higher in the septic dogs, but their ability to oxidize FFA was comparable to that of the control dogs; therefore, the basal rate of FFA oxidation was higher in the septic dogs. These studies indicate that septic dogs have a decreased capacity to oxidize glucose, but that they retain their ability to oxidize long-chain fatty acids. Because the rate of lipolysis was increased in sepsis, lipid was the predominate energy substrate in this septic model

  17. Immunosuppression by fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in collagen arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCune, W.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Belli, J.A.; Trentham, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    Treatments with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and cyclophosphamide were evaluated for rats injected with type II collagen. Preadministration of TLI and repeated injections of cyclophosphamide suppressed the severity of arthritis and lowered antibody titers to collagen significantly. TLI initiated at the onset of collagen arthritis decreased humoral and cellular responses to collagen but did not affect the severity of arthritis. These data demonstrate that both TLi and cyclophosphamide are immunosuppressive in an experimentally inducible autoimmune disease

  18. Effect of whey on blood glucose and insulin responses to composite breakfast and lunch meals in type 2 diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Anders H; Nilsson, Mikael; Holst, Jens Juul; Björck, Inger M E

    2005-07-01

    Whey proteins have insulinotropic effects and reduce the postprandial glycemia in healthy subjects. The mechanism is not known, but insulinogenic amino acids and the incretin hormones seem to be involved. The aim was to evaluate whether supplementation of meals with a high glycemic index (GI) with whey proteins may increase insulin secretion and improve blood glucose control in type 2 diabetic subjects. Fourteen diet-treated subjects with type 2 diabetes were served a high-GI breakfast (white bread) and subsequent high-GI lunch (mashed potatoes with meatballs). The breakfast and lunch meals were supplemented with whey on one day; whey was exchanged for lean ham and lactose on another day. Venous blood samples were drawn before and during 4 h after breakfast and 3 h after lunch for the measurement of blood glucose, serum insulin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). The insulin responses were higher after both breakfast (31%) and lunch (57%) when whey was included in the meal than when whey was not included. After lunch, the blood glucose response was significantly reduced [-21%; 120 min area under the curve (AUC)] after whey ingestion. Postprandial GIP responses were higher after whey ingestion, whereas no differences were found in GLP-1 between the reference and test meals. It can be concluded that the addition of whey to meals with rapidly digested and absorbed carbohydrates stimulates insulin release and reduces postprandial blood glucose excursion after a lunch meal consisting of mashed potatoes and meatballs in type 2 diabetic subjects.

  19. Association of H2A{sup b} with resistance to collagen-induced arthritis in H2-recombinant mouse strains: An allele associated with reduction of several apparently unrelated responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchison, N.A.; Brunner, M.C. [Deutsches Rheuma-Forschungszentrum, Berlin (Germany)

    1995-02-01

    HLA class II alleles can protect against immunological diseases. Seeking an animal model for a naturally occurring protective allele, we screened a panel of H2-congenic and recombinant mouse strains for ability to protect against collagen-induced arthritis. The strains were crossed with the susceptible strain DBA/1, and the F{sub 1} hybrids immunized with cattle and chicken type II collagen. Hybrids having the H2A{sup b} allele displayed a reduced incidence and duration of the disease. They also had a reduced level of pre-disease inflammation, but not of anti-collagen antibodies. The allele is already known to be associated with reduction of other apparently unrelated immune responses, suggesting that some form of functional differentiation may operate that is not exclusively related to epitope-binding. It is suggested that this may reflect allelic variation in the class II major histocompatibility complex promoter region. 42 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. When transcriptome meets metabolome : Fast cellular responses of yeast to sudden relief of glucose limitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen, J.J.; Daran, J.M.; Pronk, J.T.; Daran-Lapujade, P.; Knijnenburg, T.A.; Ras, C.; Ten Pierick, A.; Akmering, M.J.; Van Winden, W.A.; Kresnowati, M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Within the first 5 min after a sudden relief from glucose limitation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibited fast changes of intracellular metabolite levels and a major transcriptional reprogramming. Integration of transcriptome and metabolome data revealed tight relationships between the changes at

  1. Greater Glycaemic Response to an Oral Glucose Load in Healthy, Lean, Active and Young Chinese Adults Compared to Matched Caucasians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Simper

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available There are ethnic differences recorded in glycaemic response and rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM between Chinese and Caucasian populations. Whether these differences are evident in matched healthy, lean, active, young adults is unclear. This study compares the postprandial glycaemic response of a group of Chinese participants (n = 49 with a group of similar Caucasians, (n = 48 aged 23.8 (±4.35 years, body mass index (BMI 22.7 (±2.6 kg/m2, healthy (free from non-communicable disease, and lean (body fat % 23.28% (±5.04. Participants undertook an oral glucose tolerance test to identify any significant differences in postprandial blood glucose response. Body fat percentage, body mass, age, physical activity, baseline glucose and HbA1c did not significantly differ between groups. Data from food frequency questionnaires indicated that the Chinese participants consumed less starchy foods, candy and “other” sweets and sugary drinks, and more rice than the Caucasians (all p ≤ 0.001, but not a greater overall intake of carbohydrates or any other macronutrient (all p > 0.05. The two groups’ postprandial blood glucose responses and 2-h incremental area under the curve values (iAUC—156.67 (74.12 mmol/L 120 min for Caucasians versus 214.03 (77.49 mmol/L 120 min for Chinese—indicate significant differences (p = 0.003 and p < 0.001 respectively between groups. Findings suggest that the difference between the two groups’ iAUC values do not relate to obvious lifestyle factors. The Chinese group were eating the least sugary and starchy food but had the highest iAUC. It is argued that the Chinese group in this investigation have the most favourable BMI, body fat percentage, and body mass, yet “poorest” glycaemic response.

  2. Hypothalamic BOLD response to glucose intake and hypothalamic volume are similar in anorexia nervosa and healthy control subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Van Opstal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inconsistent findings about the neurobiology of Anorexia Nervosa (AN hinder the development of effective treatments for this severe mental disorder. Therefore the need arises for elucidation of neurobiological factors involved in the pathophysiology of AN. The hypothalamus plays a key role in the neurobiological processes that govern food intake and energy homeostasis, processes that are disturbed in anorexia nervosa (AN. The present study will assess the hypothalamic response to energy intake and the hypothalamic structure in patients with AN and healthy controls. Methods. 10 women aged 18-30 years diagnosed with AN and 11 healthy, lean (BMI <23 kg/m2 women in the same age range were recruited. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to determine function of the hypothalamus in response to glucose. Structural MRI was used to determine differences in hypothalamic volume and local grey volume using manual segmentation and voxel-based morphometry.Results. No differences were found in hypothalamic volume and neuronal activity in response to a glucose load between the patients and controls. Whole brain structural analysis showed a significant decrease in grey matter volume in the cingulate cortex in the AN patients, bilaterally.Conclusions. We argue that in spite of various known changes in the hypothalamus the direct hypothalamic response to glucose intake is similar in AN patients and healthy controls.

  3. Heat response of mouse tumor cells treated with 5-thio-D-glucose and Rhodamine-123

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, J.G.; Lyons, J.C.; Song, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    Cellular heat-sensitivity has been known to depend on intracellular energy. The authors studied the thermal response of cultured SCK mammary carcinoma cells in vitro, following glycolytic inhibition with 5-thio-D-glucose (TG) and mitochondrial inactivation with Rhodamine-123 (Rh). The cells in exponential growth phase in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with serum and antibiotics were exposed to medium containing Rh and/or TG, heated in a prewarmed water bath, and the clonogenic survivals of the heated cells were determined. Thermal cell killing by the 30 min. heating was increased, when 10 and 20 μg/ml Rh were present in the medium at temperatures above 42 0 and 40 0 C, respectively. The slope of the heat survival curve for 43 0 C heating became steeper in the presence of 10 and 20 μg/ml Rh, and the initial shoulder of the survival curve was unaltered at the dose of 10 μg/ml Rh, but disappeared at 20 μg/ml. A TG dose of 3 mg/ml, which is about 10 times that necessary to kill 90% of cells in 5 hrs. under hypoxic condition, was ineffective in altering any parameters of the heat survival curve of aerobic cells. The combined effect of TG and Rh on the thermal cell killing in aerobic condition did not exceed the effect of Rh alone. The above results indicate that the energy supply derived by mitochondria is an important determinant for the shape of heat survival curve of the proliferating and aerobic SCK tumor cells

  4. Influence of ripeness of banana on the blood glucose and insulin response in type 2 diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansen, K; Rasmussen, O; Gregersen, S; Larsen, S

    1992-10-01

    Banana is a popular and tasty fruit which often is restricted in the diet prescribed for diabetic patients owing to the high content of free sugars. However, in under-ripe bananas starch constitutes 80-90% of the carbohydrate content, which as the banana ripens changes into free sugars. To study the effect of ripening on the postprandial blood glucose and insulin responses to banana, 10 type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic subjects consumed three meals, consisting of 120 g under-ripe banana, 120 g over-ripe banana or 40 g white bread on separate days. The mean postprandial blood glucose response area to white bread (181 +/- 45 mmol l-1 x 240 min) was significantly higher compared with under-ripe banana (62 +/- 17 mmol l-1 x 240 min: p alfa-amylase in humans.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Effects of Preceding Ethanol Intake on Glucose Response to Low-Dose Glucagon in Individuals With Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjan, Ajenthen; Nørgaard, Kirsten; Tetzschner, Rikke

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated whether preceding ethanol intake impairs glucose response to low-dose glucagon in individuals with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This was a randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled study in 12 insulin pump-treated individuals (median...... ethanol compared with placebo. The second glucagon bolus had similar responses between visits, but PG remained 1.8 ± 0.7 mmol/L lower after ethanol compared with placebo. CONCLUSIONS: The ability of low-dose glucagon to treat mild hypoglycemia persisted with preceding ethanol intake, although it tended...... to be metabolized, and a subcutaneous (s.c.) insulin bolus was given to induce mild hypoglycemia. When plasma glucose (PG) was ≤3.9 mmol/L, 100 µg glucagon was given s.c., followed by another s.c. 100 µg glucagon 2 h later. Primary end point was incremental peak PG induced by the first glucagon bolus. RESULTS...

  6. Glucose Transporter 3 Potentiates Degranulation and Is Required for Platelet Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Trevor P; Middleton, Elizabeth A; Rowley, Jesse W; Boudreau, Luc H; Campbell, Robert A; Souvenir, Rhonda; Funari, Trevor; Tessandier, Nicolas; Boilard, Eric; Weyrich, Andrew S; Abel, E Dale

    2017-09-01

    On activation, platelets increase glucose uptake, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation and consume stored glycogen. This correlation between glucose metabolism and platelet function is not well understood and even less is known about the role of glucose metabolism on platelet function in vivo. For glucose to enter a cell, it must be transported through glucose transporters. Here we evaluate the contribution of GLUT3 (glucose transporter 3) to platelet function to better understand glucose metabolism in platelets. Platelet-specific knockout of GLUT3 was generated by crossing mice harboring GLUT3 floxed allele to a PF4 (platelet factor 4)-driven Cre recombinase. In platelets, GLUT3 is localized primarily on α-granule membranes and under basal conditions facilitates glucose uptake into α-granules to be used for glycolysis. After activation, platelets degranulate and GLUT3 translocates to the plasma membrane, which is responsible for activation-mediated increased glucose uptake. In vivo, loss of GLUT3 in platelets increased survival in a collagen/epinephrine model of pulmonary embolism, and in a K/BxN model of autoimmune inflammatory disease, platelet-specific GLUT3 knockout mice display decreased disease progression. Mechanistically, loss of GLUT3 decreased platelet degranulation, spreading, and clot retraction. Decreased α-granule degranulation is due in part to an impaired ability of GLUT3 to potentiate exocytosis. GLUT3-mediated glucose utilization and glycogenolysis in platelets promotes α-granule release, platelet activation, and postactivation functions. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Optimization of process parameters for the production of collagen peptides from fish skin (Epinephelus malabaricus) using response surface methodology and its characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hema, G S; Joshy, C G; Shyni, K; Chatterjee, Niladri S; Ninan, George; Mathew, Suseela

    2017-02-01

    The study optimized the hydrolysis conditions for the production of fish collagen peptides from skin of Malabar grouper ( Epinephelus malabaricus ) using response surface methodology. The hydrolysis was done with enzymes pepsin, papain and protease from bovine pancreas. Effects of process parameters viz: pH, temperature, enzyme substrate ratio and hydrolysis time of the three different enzymes on degree of hydrolysis were investigated. The optimum response of degree of hydrolysis was estimated to be 10, 20 and 28% respectively for pepsin, papain and protease. The functional properties of the product developed were analysed which showed changes in the properties from proteins to peptides. SDS-PAGE combined with MALDI TOF method was successfully applied to determine the molecular weight distribution of the hydrolysate. The electrophoretic pattern indicated that the molecular weights of peptides formed due to hydrolysis were nearly 2 kDa. MALDI TOF spectral analysis showed the developed hydrolysate contains peptides having molecular weight in the range below 2 kDa.

  8. Evaluation of glucose and insulin response to haylage diets with different content of nonstructural carbohydrates in 2 breeds of horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindåse, S; Müller, C; Nostell, K; Bröjer, J

    2018-04-09

    Information about the effect of nonstructural carbohydrates (NSCs) in forage on the postprandial glucose and insulin response in horses is scarce. This is of interest as postprandial hyperinsulinemia in horses is a risk factor for laminitis. In addition, insulin sensitivity (IS) differs between breeds. The aim was to evaluate the postprandial glucose and insulin response to haylage diets with different NSC content in horses of 2 different breeds and to evaluate the relationship between the postprandial insulin response and measures of IS derived from a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGTT). Standardbreds (n = 9) and Icelandic horses (n = 9) with a mean body condition score of 5.5 ± 0.6 (scale 1-9) were studied. Horses were clinically healthy at the start of the study and had no history of endocrinopathic laminitis. The experiment was conducted as a replicate 3 × 3 Latin square, in which horses were fed haylage diets with low (4.2%), medium (13.6%), and high (18.2%) NSC content of dry matter. Blood sampling was performed before feeding and every 30 min until 300 min after feeding. An FSIGTT was also performed in all horses. The early (first 60 min) and the total (300 min) postprandial glucose and insulin response (area under the curve [AUC]) was higher after a meal of both medium and high NSC haylage in comparison with low NSC haylage when both breeds were combined (P ≤ 0.02). There was a main effect of breed for the early (P ≤ 0.004) but not for the total (P > 0.12) postprandial glucose and insulin response. The IS index was comparable between breeds (P = 0.75). The natural logarithm of the peak concentration, the AUC for the first 60 min and the total AUC for insulin, after a meal of medium and high NSC haylage, were moderately negatively correlated (P haylage with low NSC content (P > 0.054). This study demonstrates that the postprandial insulin response is affected by both the NSC content of haylage and the horse's IS. However

  9. Endocytic collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H.; Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Ingvarsen, Signe Ziir

    2012-01-01

    it crucially important to understand both the collagen synthesis and turnover mechanisms in this condition. Here we show that the endocytic collagen receptor, uPARAP/Endo180, is a major determinant in governing the balance between collagen deposition and degradation. Cirrhotic human livers displayed a marked...... up-regulation of uPARAP/Endo180 in activated fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells located close to the collagen deposits. In a hepatic stellate cell line, uPARAP/Endo180 was shown to be active in, and required for, the uptake and intracellular degradation of collagen. To evaluate the functional...... groups of mice clearly revealed a fibrosis protective role of uPARAP/Endo180. This effect appeared to directly reflect the activity of the collagen receptor, since no compensatory events were noted when comparing the mRNA expression profiles of the two groups of mice in an array system focused on matrix-degrading...

  10. Binding of collagens to an enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visai, L.; Speziale, P.; Bozzini, S.

    1990-01-01

    An enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli, B34289c, has been shown to bind the N-terminal region of fibronectin with high affinity. We now report that this strain also binds collagen. The binding of 125I-labeled type II collagen to bacteria was time dependent and reversible. Bacteria expressed a limited number of collagen receptors (2.2 x 10(4) per cell) and bound collagen with a Kd of 20 nM. All collagen types tested (I to V) as well as all tested cyanogen bromide-generated peptides [alpha 1(I)CB2, alpha 1(I)CB3, alpha 1(I)CB7, alpha 1(I)CB8, and alpha 2(I)CB4] were recognized by bacterial receptors, as demonstrated by the ability of these proteins to inhibit the binding of 125I-labeled collagen to bacteria. Of several unlabeled proteins tested in competition experiments, fibronectin and its N-terminal region strongly inhibited binding of the radiolabeled collagen to E. coli cells. Conversely, collagen competed with an 125I-labeled 28-kilodalton fibronectin fragment for bacterial binding. Collagen bound to bacteria could be displaced by excess amounts of either unlabeled fibronectin or its N-terminal fragment. Similarly, collagen could displace 125I-labeled N-terminal peptide of fibronectin bound to the bacterial cell surface. Bacteria grown at 41 degrees C or in the presence of glucose did not express collagen or fibronectin receptors. These results indicate the presence of specific binding sites for collagen on the surface of E. coli cells and furthermore that the collagen and fibronectin binding sites are located in close proximity, possibly on the same structure

  11. A Stimuli-Responsive Biosensor of Glucose on Layer-by-Layer Films Assembled through Specific Lectin-Glycoenzyme Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqin Yao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The research on intelligent bioelectrocatalysis based on stimuli-responsive materials or interfaces is of great significance for biosensors and other bioelectronic devices. In the present work, lectin protein concanavalin A (Con A and glycoenzyme glucose oxidase (GOD were assembled into {Con A/GOD}n layer-by-layer (LbL films by taking advantage of the biospecific lectin-glycoenzyme affinity between them. These film electrodes possess stimuli-responsive properties toward electroactive probes such as ferrocenedicarboxylic acid (Fc(COOH2 by modulating the surrounding pH. The CV peak currents of Fc(COOH2 were quite large at pH 4.0 but significantly suppressed at pH 8.0, demonstrating reversible stimuli-responsive on-off behavior. The mechanism of stimuli-responsive property of the films was explored by comparative experiments and attributed to the different electrostatic interaction between the films and the probes at different pH. This stimuli-responsive films could be used to realize active/inactive electrocatalytic oxidation of glucose by GOD in the films and mediated by Fc(COOH2 in solution, which may establish a foundation for fabricating novel stimuli-responsive electrochemical biosensors based on bioelectrocatalysis with immobilized enzymes.

  12. Collagen degradation in the abdominal aneurysm: A conspiracy of matrix metalloproteinase and cysteine collagenases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdul-Hussien, H.; Soekhoe, R.G.V.; Weber, E.; Thüsen, J.H. von der; Kleemann, R.; Mulder, A.; Hajo Van Bockel, J.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Lindeman, J.H.N.

    2007-01-01

    Growth and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) result from increased collagen turnover. Collagen turnover critically depends on specific collagenases that cleave the triple helical region of fibrillar collagen. As yet, the collagenases responsible for collagen degradation in AAAs have not

  13. Demineralized dentin matrix composite collagen material for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianan; Yang, Juan; Zhong, Xiaozhong; He, Fengrong; Wu, Xiongwen; Shen, Guanxin

    2013-01-01

    Demineralized dentin matrix (DDM) had been successfully used in clinics as bone repair biomaterial for many years. However, particle morphology of DDM limited it further applications. In this study, DDM and collagen were prepared to DDM composite collagen material. The surface morphology of the material was studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). MC3T3-E1 cells responses in vitro and tissue responses in vivo by implantation of DDM composite collagen material in bone defect of rabbits were also investigated. SEM analysis showed that DDM composite collagen material evenly distributed and formed a porous scaffold. Cell culture and animal models results indicated that DDM composite collagen material was biocompatible and could support cell proliferation and differentiation. Histological evaluation showed that DDM composite collagen material exhibited good biocompatibility, biodegradability and osteoconductivity with host bone in vivo. The results suggested that DDM composite collagen material might have a significant clinical advantage and potential to be applied in bone and orthopedic surgery.

  14. Glucose production for cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, S; Karube, I

    1977-04-16

    Glucose was produced from cellulose by passing a cellulose solution through a column of an immobilized cellulase which was prepared by coating an inorganic carrier such as macadam or stainless steel beads with collagen containing the cellulase. Thus, 4 mL of 5% cellulase T-AP (60,000 units/g) solution was dissolved in 100 g of 0.9% collagen solution and the solution mixed with 60 g of macadam (diam. = 0.5 to 1.5 mm) and stirred for 10 min. The treated beads were dried in air at 10/sup 0/ to yield an immobilized enzyme retaining 64% of its activity. Through a column (0.8 x 20 cm) packed with 3 g of the immobilized enzyme, 100 mL of 0.33% Avicel SF solution was circulated at 26.4 mL/min at 30/sup 0/ for 60 h. The Avicel SF conversion to glucose was 23%.

  15. Up-Regulation of the Inflammatory Response by Ovariectomy in Collagen-Induced Arthritis. Effects of Tin Protoporphyrin IX.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ibanez, L.; Alcaraz, M.J.; Maicas Blasco, N.; Guede, D.; Caeiro, J.R.; Koenders, M.I.; Berg, W.B. van den; Ferrandiz, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the influence of ovariectomy on the inflammatory response and bone metabolism on CIA as a model of postmenopausal arthritis as well as the effects of tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP), a heme oxygenase inhibitor. Ovariectomy in non-arthritic mice produced increased serum PGD(2) levels and

  16. Intragastric administration of leucine or isoleucine lowers the blood glucose response to a mixed-nutrient drink by different mechanisms in healthy, lean volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Sina S; Fitzgerald, Penelope Ce; Schober, Gudrun; Steinert, Robert E; Horowitz, Michael; Feinle-Bisset, Christine

    2016-11-01

    The branched-chain amino acids leucine and isoleucine lower blood glucose after oral glucose ingestion, and the intraduodenal infusion of leucine decreases energy intake in healthy, lean men. We investigated the effects of the intragastric administration of leucine and isoleucine on the gastric emptying of, and blood glucose responses to, a physiologic mixed-macronutrient drink and subsequent energy intake. In 2 separate studies, 12 healthy, lean subjects received on 3 separate occasions an intragastric infusion of 5 g leucine (leucine-5g) or an intragastric infusion of 10 g leucine (leucine-10g), an intragastric infusion of 5 g isoleucine (isoleucine-5g) or an intragastric infusion of 10 g isoleucine (isoleucine-10g), or a control. Fifteen minutes later, subjects consumed a mixed-nutrient drink (400 kcal, 56 g carbohydrates, 15 g protein, and 12 g fat), and gastric emptying ( 13 C-acetate breath test) and blood glucose, plasma insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and cholecystokinin (leucine study only) were measured for 60 min. Immediately afterward, energy intake from a cold, buffet-style meal was assessed. Compared with the control, leucine-10g decreased the blood glucose area under the curve (AUC) (P blood glucose (P = 0.07), whereas effects of leucine-5g were NS. Leucine-10g, but not leucine-5g, increased plasma insulin and C-peptide AUCs (P blood glucose AUC and peak blood glucose (P blood glucose AUC. Isoleucine did not affect energy intake. In healthy subjects, both leucine and isoleucine reduced blood glucose in response to a mixed-nutrient drink but did not affect subsequent energy intake. The mechanisms underlying glucose lowering appear to differ; leucine stimulated insulin, whereas isoleucine acted insulin independently. These trials were registered at www.anzctr.org.au as 12613000899741 and 12614000837628. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  17. TOTAL HEMOCYTE COUNT AND HEMOLYMPH GLUCOSE CONCENRATION RESPONSE OF SPINY LOBSTER Panulirus homarus ON RATIO OF SHELTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaiba Djai

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted to assess the physiological response of the lobster Panulirus homarus for the ratio of the shelters. The method used completely randomized design with two replicates of each treatments with shelter ratio (A 1 : 5, (B 3 : 5, (C 4 : 5, (D 5 : 5. Weight average for 184 lobsters with the stocking density of 23 lobsters for each treatment was 32.64 ± 0.58 g. The experiment was conducted for 60 days. The lobster was fed with trash fish and acclimatized for 7 days before the experiment. Observations on the physiologycal of every 10 days. The physiological responses that observed were total hemocyte count (THC and hemolymph glucose concentration. The results showed that 4:5 was the best lobster shelter ratio because it could reduce stress levels. This is indicated by the stable values of THC and hemolymph glucose level during the experiment and supported by the growth of 57.28 ± 0.15 g and survival rate of 91.31 ± 2.60%. Keywords: lobster, Panulirus homarus, ratio, shelter, THC, glucose

  18. Engineering glucose oxidase to minimize the influence of oxygen on sensor response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horaguchi, Yohei; Saito, Shoko; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Tsugawa, Wakako; Ferri, Stefano; Sode, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Glucose oxidase (GOx) is an important industrial enzyme and is recognized as the gold standard for monitoring blood glucose. However, due to its inherent oxidase property, the presence of oxygen affects electrochemical measurements of venous blood glucose employing artificial electron mediators. We therefore attempted to engineer Penicillium amagasakiense-derived GOx into a dehydrogenase by focusing on the amino acid residues predicted to interact with oxygen. Our rational amino acid substitution approach resulted in the construction of the Ser114Ala/Phe355Leu mutant, which has an 11-fold decrease in oxidase activity and 2.8-fold increase in dehydrogenase activity compared with wild-type GOx. As a result, the dehydrogenase/oxidase activity ratio of the engineered enzyme was 32-fold greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. The enzyme sensor constructed with Ser114Ala/Phe355Leu was considerably less affected by oxygen than the wild-type GOx-based sensor at lower glucose concentrations

  19. Variations in postprandial blood glucose responses and satiety after intake of three types of bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunde, Marianne S H; Hjellset, Victoria T; Holmboe-Ottesen, Gerd; Høstmark, Arne T

    2011-01-01

    Background. The magnitude and duration of postprandial blood glucose (PPG) elevations are important risk factors of diabetes and coronary heart diseases. Aim. To study PPG after ingestion of breads with and without pea fibre and rapeseed oil. Methods. After fasting overnight, 10 Pakistani immigrant women participated in three experiments having a crossover design and involving ingestion of various types of bread: regular coarse bread or fibre enriched-bread with two levels of rapeseed oil, all providing 25 g available carbohydrates (CHO). Blood glucose and satiety were determined before the meal and every 15 min over the next 2 hours. Results. Intake of an amount of pea fibre-enriched bread containing 25 g CHO attenuated, the postprandial peak glucose value, the incremental area under the glucose versus time curve during 15 to 75 min, and the glycemic profile, and increased duration of satiety (P bread with 25 g carbohydrate. Conclusion. Pea fibre-enriched breads can reduce PPG and prolong satiety.

  20. Variations in Postprandial Blood Glucose Responses and Satiety after Intake of Three Types of Bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne S. H. Lunde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The magnitude and duration of postprandial blood glucose (PPG elevations are important risk factors of diabetes and coronary heart diseases. Aim. To study PPG after ingestion of breads with and without pea fibre and rapeseed oil. Methods. After fasting overnight, 10 Pakistani immigrant women participated in three experiments having a crossover design and involving ingestion of various types of bread: regular coarse bread or fibre enriched-bread with two levels of rapeseed oil, all providing 25 g available carbohydrates (CHO. Blood glucose and satiety were determined before the meal and every 15 min over the next 2 hours. Results. Intake of an amount of pea fibre-enriched bread containing 25 g CHO attenuated, the postprandial peak glucose value, the incremental area under the glucose versus time curve during 15 to 75 min, and the glycemic profile, and increased duration of satiety (<.05, as compared with intake of regular bread with 25 g carbohydrate. Conclusion. Pea fibre-enriched breads can reduce PPG and prolong satiety.

  1. Differential Responses of Plasma Adropin Concentrations To Dietary Glucose or Fructose Consumption In Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Andrew A; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Siebert, Emily A; Medici, Valentina; Stanhope, Kimber L; Havel, Peter J

    2015-10-05

    Adropin is a peptide hormone encoded by the Energy Homeostasis Associated (ENHO) gene whose physiological role in humans remains incompletely defined. Here we investigated the impact of dietary interventions that affect systemic glucose and lipid metabolism on plasma adropin concentrations in humans. Consumption of glucose or fructose as 25% of daily energy requirements (E) differentially affected plasma adropin concentrations (P Glucose consumption reduced plasma adropin from 3.55 ± 0.26 to 3.28 ± 0.23 ng/ml (N = 42). Fructose consumption increased plasma adropin from 3.63 ± 0.29 to 3.93 ± 0.34 ng/ml (N = 45). Consumption of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) as 25% E had no effect (3.43 ± 0.32 versus 3.39 ± 0.24 ng/ml, N = 26). Overall, the effect of glucose, HFCS and fructose on circulating adropin concentrations were similar to those observed on postprandial plasma triglyceride concentrations. Furthermore, increases in plasma adropin levels with fructose intake were most robust in individuals exhibiting hypertriglyceridemia. Individuals with low plasma adropin concentrations also exhibited rapid increases in plasma levels following consumption of breakfasts supplemented with lipids. These are the first results linking plasma adropin levels with dietary sugar intake in humans, with the impact of fructose consumption linked to systemic triglyceride metabolism. In addition, dietary fat intake may also increase circulating adropin concentrations.

  2. Blood flow and glucose metabolism in stage IV breast cancer: Heterogeneity of response during chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.C. Krak (Nanda); J. van der Hoeven (John); O.S. Hoekstra (Otto); J.W.R. Twisk (Jos); E.E. van der Wall (Ernst); A.A. Lammertsma (Adriaan)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjective: The purpose of the study was to compare early changes in blood flow (BF) and glucose metabolism (MRglu) in metastatic breast cancer lesions of patients treated with chemotherapy. Methods: Eleven women with stage IV cancer and lesions in breast, lymph nodes, liver, and bone

  3. Autonomic nervous system activation mediates the increase in whole-body glucose uptake in response to electroacupuncture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benrick, Anna; Kokosar, Milana; Hu, Min

    2017-01-01

    was higher after EA in controls and women with PCOS. Plasma serotonin levels and homovanillic acid, markers of vagal activity, decreased in both controls and patients with PCOS. Adipose tissue expression of pro-nerve growth factor (proNGF) decreased, and the mature NGF/proNGF ratio increased after EA in PCOS...... of EA increases whole-body glucose uptake by activation of the sympathetic and partly the parasympathetic nervous systems, which could have important clinical implications for the treatment of insulin resistance.-Benrick, A., Kokosar, M., Hu, M., Larsson, M., Maliqueo, M., Marcondes, R. R., Soligo, M......., Protto, V., Jerlhag, E., Sazonova, A., Behre, C. J., Højlund, K., Thorén, P., Stener-Victorin, E. Autonomic nervous system activation mediates the increase in whole-body glucose uptake in response to electroacupuncture....

  4. Do structural changes (eg, collagen/matrix) explain the response to therapeutic exercises in tendinopathy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Benjamin T; Smith, Toby O; Littlewood, Chris; Sturrock, Ben

    2014-06-01

    Previous reviews have highlighted the benefit of loaded therapeutic exercise in the treatment of tendinopathy. Changes in observable structural outcomes have been suggested as a possible explanation for this response to therapeutic exercise. However, the mechanism for the efficacy of therapeutic exercise remains unclear. To systematically review the relationship between the observable structural change and clinical outcomes following therapeutic exercise. An electronic search of AMED, CiNAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, PEDro and SPORTDiscus was undertaken from their inception to June 2012. Any study design that incorporated observable structural outcomes and clinical outcomes when assessing the effect of therapeutic exercise on participants with tendinopathy. Included studies were appraised for risk of bias using the tool developed by the Cochrane Back Review Group. Due to heterogeneity of studies, a qualitative synthesis was undertaken. Twenty articles describing 625 patients were included. Overall, there is a strong evidence to refute any observable structural change as an explanation for the response to therapeutic exercise when treated by eccentric exercise training. Moderate evidence does exist to support the response of heavy-slow resistance training (HSR). The available literature does not support observable structural change as an explanation for the response of therapeutic exercise except for some support from HSR. Future research should focus on indentifying other explanations including neural, biochemical and myogenic changes. Registered with PROSPERO, registration number CRD42011001638. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Glucose and urea kinetics in patients with early and advanced gastrointestinal cancer: the response to glucose infusion, parenteral feeding, and surgical resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, J.H.; Wolfe, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    We isotopically determined rates of glucose turnover, urea turnover, and glucose oxidation in normal volunteers (n = 16), patients with early gastrointestinal (EGI) cancer (n = 6), and patients with advanced gastrointestinal (AGI) cancer (n = 10). Studies were performed in the basal state, during glucose infusion (4 mg/kg/min), and during total parenteral feeding (patients with AGI cancer only). Patients with early stages of the disease were also studied 2 to 3 months after resection of the cancer. Basal rates of glucose turnover were similar in volunteers and in patients with EGI cancer (13.9 +/- 0.3 mumol/kg/min and 13.3 +/- 0.2 mumol/kg/min, respectively) but were significantly higher in patients with AGI cancer (17.6 +/- 1.4 mumol/kg/min). Glucose infusion resulted in significantly less suppression of endogenous production in both patient groups than that seen in the volunteers (76% +/- 6% for EGI group, 69% +/- 7% for AGI group, and 94% +/- 4% for volunteers). The rate of glucose oxidation increased progressively in proportion to the tumor bulk. In the volunteers the percent of VCO2 from glucose oxidation was 23.9% +/- 0.7%, and in EGI and AGI groups the values were 32.8% +/- 2.0% and 43.0% +/- 3.0%, respectively. After curative resection of the cancer, glucose utilization decreased significantly (p less than 0.05). The rate of urea turnover was significantly higher in the AGI group (8.4 +/- 1.0 mumol/kg/min) in comparison with the volunteer group value of 5.9 +/- 0.6 mumol/kg/min (p less than 0.03). Glucose infusion resulted in a significant suppression of urea turnover in the volunteers (p less than 0.02), but in the AGI group glucose infusion did not induce a statistically significant decrease

  6. Uncooked rice of relatively low gelatinization degree resulted in lower metabolic glucose and insulin responses compared with cooked rice in female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eun Young; Suh, Hyung Joo; Hong, Wan Soo; Kim, Dong Geon; Hong, Yang Hee; Hong, In Sun; Chang, Un Jae

    2009-07-01

    Cooking processes that gelatinize granules or disrupt structure might increase the glucose and insulin responses because a disruption of the structure of starch by gelatinization increases its availability for digestion and absorption in the small intestine. We hypothesized that the uncooked form of rice, which has a relatively low degree of gelatinization even though in powder form, would result in lower metabolic glucose and insulin responses compared with cooked rice (CR). To assess the effects of the gelatinization of rice on metabolic response of glucose and insulin, we investigated the glucose and insulin responses to 3 rice meals of different gelatinization degree in female college students (n = 12): CR (76.9% gelatinized), uncooked rice powder (UP; 3.5% gelatinized), and uncooked freeze-dried rice powder (UFP; 5.4% gelatinized). Uncooked rice powders (UP and UFP) induced lower glucose and insulin responses compared with CR. The relatively low gelatinization degree of UPs resulted in low metabolic responses in terms of the glycemic index (CR: 72.4% vs UP: 49.7%, UFP: 59.8%) and insulin index (CR: 94.8% vs UP: 74.4%, UFP: 68.0%). In summary, UPs that were less gelatinized than CR induced low postprandial glucose and insulin responses.

  7. Heterogeneity in 2-deoxy-D-glucose-induced modifications in energetics and radiation responses of human tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwarkanath, Bilikere S.; Zolzer, Frido; Chandana, Sudhir; Bauch, Thomas; Adhikari, Jawahar S.; Muller, Wolfgang U.; Streffer, Christian; Jain, Viney

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The glucose analog and glycolytic inhibitor, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), has been shown to differentially enhance the radiation damage in tumor cells by inhibiting the postirradiation repair processes. The present study was undertaken to examine the relationship between 2-DG-induced modification of energy metabolism and cellular radioresponses and to identify the most relevant parameter(s) for predicting the tumor response to the combined treatment of radiation + 2-DG. Methods and Materials: Six human tumor cell lines (glioma: BMG-1 and U-87, squamous cell carcinoma: 4451 and 4197, and melanoma: MeWo and Be-11) were investigated. Cells were exposed to 2 Gy of Co-60 γ-rays or 250 kVP X-rays and maintained under liquid-holding conditions 2-4 h to facilitate repair. 2-DG (5 mM, equimolar with glucose) that was added at the time of irradiation was present during the liquid holding. Glucose utilization, lactate production (enzymatic assays), and adenine nucleotides (high performance liquid chromatography and capillary isotachophoresis) were investigated as parameters of energy metabolism. Induction and repair of DNA damage (comet assay), cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation), and cell death (macrocolony assay) were analyzed as parameters of radiation response. Results: The glucose consumption and lactate production of glioma cell lines (BMG-1 and U-87) were nearly 2-fold higher than the squamous carcinoma cell lines (4197 and 4451). The ATP content varied from 3.0 to 6.5 femto moles/cell among these lines, whereas the energy charge (0.86-0.90) did not show much variation. Presence of 2-DG inhibited the rate of glucose usage and glycolysis by 30-40% in glioma cell lines and by 15-20% in squamous carcinoma lines, while ATP levels reduced by nearly 40% in all the four cell lines. ATP:ADP ratios decreased to a greater extent (∼40%) in glioma cells than in squamous carcinoma 4451 and MeWo cells; in contrast, presence of 2-DG reduced ADP:AMP ratios by 3-fold in

  8. A Rationally Designed TNF-α Epitope-Scaffold Immunogen Induces Sustained Antibody Response and Alleviates Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    Full Text Available The TNF-α biological inhibitors have significantly improved the clinical outcomes of many autoimmune diseases, in particular rheumatoid arthritis. However, the practical uses are limited due to high costs and the risk of anti-drug antibody responses. Attempts to develop anti-TNF-α vaccines have generated encouraging data in animal models, however, data from clinical trials have not met expectations. In present study, we designed a TNF-α epitope-scaffold immunogen DTNF7 using the transmembrane domain of diphtheria toxin, named DTT as a scaffold. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that the grafted TNF-α epitope is entirely surface-exposed and presented in a native-like conformation while the rigid helical structure of DTT is minimally perturbed, thereby rendering the immunogen highly stable. Immunization of mice with alum formulated DTNF7 induced humoral responses against native TNF-α, and the antibody titer was sustained for more than 6 months, which supports a role of the universal CD4 T cell epitopes of DTT in breaking self-immune tolerance. In a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, DTNF7-alum vaccination markedly delayed the onset of collagen-induced arthritis, and reduced incidence as well as clinical score. DTT is presumed safe as an epitope carrier because a catalytic inactive mutant of diphtheria toxin, CRM197 has good clinical safety records as an active vaccine component. Taken all together, we show that DTT-based epitope vaccine is a promising strategy for prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  9. Field trial on glucose-induced insulin and metabolite responses in Estonian Holstein and Estonian Red dairy cows in two herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaart Tanel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin secretion and tissue sensitivity to insulin is considered to be one of the factors controlling lipid metabolism post partum. The objective of this study was to compare glucose-induced blood insulin and metabolite responses in Estonian Holstein (EH, n = 14 and Estonian Red (ER, n = 14 cows. Methods The study was carried out using the glucose tolerance test (GTT performed at 31 ± 1.9 days post partum during negative energy balance. Blood samples were obtained at -15, -5, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 min relative to infusion of 0.15 g/kg BW glucose and analysed for glucose, insulin, triglycerides (TG, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA, cholesterol and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB. Applying the MIXED Procedure with the SAS System the basal concentration of cholesterol, and basal concentration and concentrations at post-infusion time points for other metabolites, area under the curve (AUC for glucose and insulin, clearance rate (CR for glucose, and maximum increase from basal concentration for glucose and insulin were compared between breeds. Results There was a breed effect on blood NEFA (P P P P P P th min nadir (P th min postinfusion (P Conclusion Our results imply that glucose-induced changes in insulin concentration and metabolite responses to insulin differ between EH and ER dairy cows.

  10. Glucose concentrations modulate brain-derived neurotrophic factor responsiveness of neurones in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIsaac, W; Ferguson, A V

    2017-04-01

    The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is critical for normal energy balance and has been shown to contain high levels of both brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-receptor kinase B mRNA. Microinjections of BDNF into the PVN increase energy expenditure, suggesting that BDNF plays an important role in energy homeostasis through direct actions in this nucleus. The present study aimed to examine the postsynaptic effects of BDNF on the membrane potential of PVN neurones, and also to determine whether extracellular glucose concentrations modulated these effects. We used hypothalamic PVN slices from male Sprague-Dawley rats to perform whole cell current-clamp recordings from PVN neurones. BDNF was bath applied at a concentration of 2 nmol L -1 and the effects on membrane potential determined. BDNF caused depolarisations in 54% of neurones (n=25; mean±SEM, 8.9±1.2 mV) and hyperpolarisations in 23% (n=11; -6.7±1.4 mV), whereas the remaining cells were unaffected. These effects were maintained in the presence of tetrodotoxin (n=9; 56% depolarised, 22% hyperpolarised, 22% nonresponders), or the GABA a antagonist bicuculline (n=12; 42% depolarised, 17% hyperpolarised, 41% nonresponders), supporting the conclusion that these effects on membrane potential were postsynaptic. Current-clamp recordings from PVN neurones next examined the effects of BDNF on these neurones at varying extracellular glucose concentrations. Larger proportions of PVN neurones hyperpolarised in response to BDNF as the glucose concentrations decreased [10 mmol L -1 glucose 23% (n=11) of neurones hyperpolarised, whereas, at 0.2 mmol L -1 glucose, 71% showed hyperpolarising effects (n=12)]. Our findings reveal that BDNF has direct GABA A independent effects on PVN neurones, which are modulated by local glucose concentrations. The latter observation further emphasises the critical importance of using physiologically relevant conditions in an investigation of the central

  11. [Blood glucose and insulin responses to two hypocaloric enteral formulas in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis, D A; Izaola, O; de la Fuente, B; Araújo, K

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the glycaemic and insulinemic response of type 2 diabetic patients after oral administration of 250 ml of two enteral formulas: a specific formula (Novasource Diabet Smartflex) against a standard isocaloric formula. The design was a cross-over study, with the diabetic patients (n = 15) receiving one of the two formulas in random order. Glycaemia and insulinemia curves were performed at 0, 10, 20, 30,60, 90,120,150 and 180 minutes. The variables studied were the area under the curve (AUC(0)-t), maximum concentration (Cmax), the time to reach maximum concentration (Tmax) and the concentrations of biochemical parameters in each study period. We studied 11 males (73.3%) and 4 females (26.7%), the mean age was 56.9 ± 10.9 years. Patients receiving Novasource Diabet showed a lower mean AUC(0)-t of glucose, mean difference - 4,753.26 mg/min/dl (95% CI: -7,256.7 to -2,249.82), also showed a mean insulinemia significantly lower AUC(0)-t, mean difference: 930.27 uU/min/ml (95% CI -1,696.34 to -164.2). The Cmax showed a significantly lower mean blood glucose levels with the specific formula, mean difference -26.89 mg/dl (95% CI -42.11 to -11.67) and insulin, mean difference: -5.39 uU/ml (95% CI: -10.37 to -1.43). The analysis shows that the mean Tmax of glucose with the specific formula are significantly lower, mean difference -19.82 min (95% CI: -32.11 to -7.33), however there was no difference in Tmax of insulin. Finally the analysis of glucose concentrations in the total study shows that the group with the specific formula has a lower mean glucose 25.77 mg / dl (95% CI 18.29 to 33.25), the same fact was detected with insulinemia 4.39 mU/ml (95% CI: 0.927 to 7.87). Diabetic patients treated diabet Novasource had significantly lower mean AUC0-t, Cmax and Tmax in blood glucose curves, also had lower mean AUC(0)-t and Cmax in insulin curves. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  12. Block versus Random Amphiphilic Glycopolymer Nanopaticles as Glucose-Responsive Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qianqian; Zhang, Tianqi; An, Jinxia; Wu, Zhongming; Zhao, Yu; Dai, Xiaomei; Zhang, Xinge; Li, Chaoxing

    2015-10-12

    To explore the effect of polymer structure on their self-assembled aggregates and their unique characteristics, this study was devoted to developing a series of amphiphilic block and random phenylboronic acid-based glycopolymers by RAFT polymerization. The amphiphilic glycopolymers were successfully self-assembled into spherically shaped nanoparticles with narrow size distribution in aqueous solution. For block and random copolymers with similar monomer compositions, block copolymer nanoparticles exhibited a more regular transmittance change with the increasing glucose level, while a more evident variation of size and quicker decreasing tendency in I/I0 behavior in different glucose media were observed for random copolymer nanoparticles. Cell viability of all the polymer nanoparticles investigated by MTT assay was higher than 80%, indicating that both block and random copolymers had good cytocompatibility. Insulin could be encapsulated into both nanoparticles, and insulin release rate for random glycopolymer was slightly quicker than that for the block ones. We speculate that different chain conformations between block and random glycopolymers play an important role in self-assembled nanoaggregates and underlying glucose-sensitive behavior.

  13. Estrogen response of MCF-7 cells grown on diverse substrates and in suspension culture: promotion of morphological heterogeneity, modulation of progestin receptor induction; cell-substrate interactions on collagen gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourreau-Schneider, N; Berthois, Y; Mittre, H; Charpin, C; Jacquemier, J; Martin, P M

    1984-12-01

    In this study we observed the incidence of hormone sensitivity in the response of MCF-7 cells to estrogen stimulation when the cells were cultured in different contact environments (hydrophilic plastic, bovine corneal extracellular matrix, type I collagen and in suspension culture). The major purpose was to describe the influence of cell to cell and cell to substrate contacts on the morphological response to estrogen treatment. However, other parameters including growth and induction of progestin receptor were also explored, keeping in mind that the MCF-7 cell line, although representative of normal mammary epithelium in that it contains a similar hormone receptivity, was selected in vitro from a metastatic population in a pleural effusion. Although substrate conditions did not modify growth enhancement by estrogens, progestin receptor levels were significantly higher in three-dimensional spheroid cultures in which cell to cell contacts were optimal due to elimination of basal contact. A careful morphological survey of large surfaces lead to an objective opinion of the overall effect of the hormone treatment on the non-cloned cell line in which a marked heterogeneity in the response of individual cells was observed. In terms of morphofunctional differentiation, the edification of acini with dense microvillus coating was best in suspension culture. When sections were made perpendicular to the plane of cultures on collagen gel rafts two other phenomena were noted: decrease in intercellular junctions, resulting in reduced cell to cell cohesion, and accumulation biodegradation products in the collagen lattice. This suggested a hormone-mediated interaction between the metastatic cells and the fibrillar substrate, collagen I, one of the major constituents of tissue stroma. This estrogen response might be related to the metastatic phenotype and must be distinct from their hormone sensitivity in terms of growth and differentiation since hormone receptivity is generally

  14. Incretin Effect and Glucagon Responses to Oral and Intravenous Glucose in Patients with Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young - Type 2 and Type 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostoft, Signe H; Bagger, Jonatan I; Hansen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous subgroup of non-autoimmune diabetes, constituting 1-2% of all diabetes. Because little is known about incretin function in patients with MODY, we studied the incretin effect and hormone responses to oral...... and intravenous glucose loads in patients with glucokinase (GCK)-diabetes (MODY2) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1A)-diabetes (MODY3), respectively, and in matched healthy control individuals (CTRLs). Both MODY groups exhibited glucose intolerance after oral glucose (most pronounced in patients with HNF1A-diabetes...... incretin effect and inappropriate glucagon responses, whereas incretin effect and glucagon response to oral glucose remain unaffected in GCK-diabetes, reflecting important pathogenetic differences between the two MODY forms....

  15. Effect of Curcumin on Blood Glucose Level and Some Neurobehavioral Responses in Alloxan-induced Diabetic Swiss Albino Mice

    OpenAIRE

    U. A. Garkuwa; A. W. Alhassan; Y. Tanko

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of curcumin on blood glucose level and neurobehavioral response in Alloxan-induced diabetic Swiss Albino mice. The animals were divided into five (5) groups of four each (n=4). Group I served as control and received distilled water, group II, III, IV and V were diabetic and received olive oil 1 ml/kg, glibenclamide 1 mg/kg, curcumin 50 mg/kg and curcumin 100 mg/kg respectively. Diabetes was induced using Alloxan (150 mg/kg). All administrations...

  16. Food intake, postprandial glucose, insulin and subjective satiety responses to three different bread-based test meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Jennifer; Atkinson, Fiona; Eisenhauer, Bronwyn; Inamdar, Amar; Brand-Miller, Jennie

    2011-12-01

    The effect of bread consumption on overall food intake is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to measure postprandial food intake after a set breakfast containing three different breads. Ten males and 10 females aged 20.1-44.8 years, BMI 18.4-24.8 kg/m(2), consumed two slices of White Bread, Bürgen Wholemeal and Seeds Bread or Lupin Bread (all 1300 kJ) with 10 g margarine and 30 g strawberry jam. Fullness and hunger responses and were measured before and during the test breakfasts. Glucose and insulin responses (incremental area under each two-hour curve (iAUC)) were calculated. Food intake was measured and energy and nutrient intake determined at a buffet meal two hours later. Subjects consumed significantly less energy after the Bürgen Bread meal compared to the White Bread meal (2548 ± 218 vs. 3040±328kJ, Bürgen Bread vs. White Bread, PBread (PBread (PBread. Lupin Bread and Bürgen Bread produced smaller postprandial glucose responses (79 ± 7, 74 ± 4, 120 ± 10 mmol/L min iAUC, Lupin, Bürgen and White Bread respectively, PBread respectively, Pbreads differed in their short-term satiation capacity. Further studies are needed to demonstrate any potential benefit for weight management. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Metformin improves glucose effectiveness, not insulin sensitivity: predicting treatment response in women with polycystic ovary syndrome in an open-label, interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, Cindy T; Keefe, Candace; Duran, Jessica; Welt, Corrine K

    2014-05-01

    Although metformin is widely used to improve insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), its mechanism of action is complex, with inconsistent effects on insulin sensitivity and variability in treatment response. The aim of the study was to delineate the effect of metformin on glucose and insulin parameters, determine additional treatment outcomes, and predict patients with PCOS who will respond to treatment. We conducted an open-label, interventional study at an academic medical center. Women with PCOS (n = 36) diagnosed by the National Institutes of Health criteria participated in the study. Subjects underwent fasting blood sampling, an IV glucose tolerance test, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan, transvaginal ultrasound, and measurement of human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated androgen levels before and after 12 weeks of treatment with metformin extended release 1500 mg/d. Interval visits were performed to monitor anthropometric measurements and menstrual cycle parameters. Changes in glucose and insulin parameters, androgen levels, anthropometric measurements, and ovulatory menstrual cycles were evaluated. Insulin sensitivity did not change despite weight loss. Glucose effectiveness (P = .002) and the acute insulin response to glucose (P = .002) increased, and basal glucose levels (P = .001) decreased after metformin treatment. T levels also decreased. Women with improved ovulatory function (61%) had lower baseline T levels and lower baseline and stimulated T and androstenedione levels after metformin treatment (all P effectiveness and insulin sensitivity, metformin does not improve insulin sensitivity in women with PCOS but does improve glucose effectiveness. The improvement in glucose effectiveness may be partially mediated by decreased glucose levels. T levels also decreased with metformin treatment. Ovulation during metformin treatment was associated with lower baseline T levels and greater T and androstenedione decreases during

  18. Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome with carbohydrate-responsive symptoms but without epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koy, Anne; Assmann, Birgit; Klepper, Joerg; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2011-12-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is caused by a defect in glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier. The main symptoms are epilepsy, developmental delay, movement disorders, and deceleration of head circumference. A ketogenic diet has been shown to be effective in controlling epilepsy in GLUT1-DS. We report a female child (3 y 4 mo) who presented with delayed psychomotor development and frequent episodes of staggering, impaired vigilance, and vomiting that resolved promptly after food intake. Electroencephalography was normal. The cerebrospinal fluid-blood glucose ratio was 0.42 (normal ≥ 0.45). GLUT1-DS was confirmed by molecular genetic testing, which showed a novel de novo heterozygous mutation in the SLC2A1 gene (c.497_499delTCG, p.VAL166del). Before starting a ketogenic diet, the child's cognitive development was tested using the Snijders-Oomen Non-Verbal Intelligence Test, which revealed a heterogeneous intelligence profile with deficits in her visuomotor skills and spatial awareness. Her motor development was delayed. Three months after introducing a ketogenic diet, she showed marked improvement in speech and motor development, as tested by the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (manual dexterity 16th centile, ball skills 1st centile, static and dynamic balance 5th centile). This case demonstrates that GLUT1-DS should be investigated in individuals with unexplained developmental delay. Epilepsy is not a mandatory symptom. The ketogenic diet is also beneficial for non-epileptic symptoms in GLUT1-DS. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2011 Mac Keith Press.

  19. Multi-response model for rheumatoid arthritis based on delay differential equations in collagen-induced arthritic mice treated with an anti-GM-CSF antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Gilbert; Wagner, Thomas; Plater-Zyberk, Christine; Lahu, Gezim; Schropp, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is an experimental model for rheumatoid arthritis, a human chronic inflammatory destructive disease. The therapeutic effect of neutralizing the cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by an antibody was examined in the mouse disease in a view of deriving a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) model. In CIA mice the development of disease is measured by a total arthritic score (TAS) and an ankylosis score (AKS). We present a multi-response PKPD model which describes the time course of the unperturbed and perturbed TAS and AKS. The antibody acts directly on GM-CSF by binding to it. Therefore, a compartment for the cytokine GM-CSF is an essential component of the mathematical model. This compartment drives the disease development in the PKPD model. Different known properties of arthritis development in the CIA model are included in the PKPD model. Firstly, the inflammation, driven by GM-CSF, dominates at the beginning of the disease and decreases after some time. Secondly, a destructive (ankylosis) part evolves in the TAS that is delayed in time. In order to model these two properties a delay differential equation was used. The PKPD model was applied to different experiments with doses ranging from 0.1 to 100 mg/kg. The influence of the drug was modeled by a non-linear approach. The final mathematical model consists of three differential equations representing the compartments for GM-CSF, inflammation and destruction. Our mathematical model described well all available dosing schedules by a simultaneous fit. We also present an equivalent and easy reformulation as ordinary differential equation which grants the use of standard PKPD software.

  20. Methyl salicylate lactoside inhibits inflammatory response of fibroblast-like synoviocytes and joint destruction in collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Wenyu; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Xue; Xin, Sheng; Zhou, Yiming; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dan; Li, Yongjie; Zhou, Sibai; Zhang, Dongming; Zhang, Tiantai; Du, Guanhua

    2014-07-01

    Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-d-lactoside (MSL), whose chemical structure is similar to that of salicylic acid, is a natural product derivative isolated from a traditional Chinese herb. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of MSL in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and explore its underlying mechanism. The anti-arthritic effects of MSL were evaluated on human rheumatoid fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in vitro and CIA in mice in vivo by obtaining clinical scores, measuring hind paw thickness and inflammatory cytokine levels, radiographic evaluations and histopathological assessments. Treatment with MSL after the onset of arthritis significantly prevented the progression and development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in CIA mice without megascopic gastric mucosa damage. In addition, MSL inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, the phosphorylation and translocation of NF-κB, and cell proliferation induced by TNF-α in FLS. MSL non-selectively inhibited the activity of COX in vitro, but was a more potent inhibitor of COX-2 than COX-1. MSL also inhibited the phosphorylation of inhibitor of NF-κB kinase, IκBα and p65, thus blocking the nuclear translocation of NF-κB in TNF-α-stimulated FLS. MSL exerts therapeutic effects on CIA mice, suppressing the inflammatory response and joint destruction by non-selectively inhibiting the activity of COX and suppressing activation of the NF-κB signalling pathway, but without damaging the gastric mucosa. Therefore, MSL has great potential to be developed into a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Glucose-responsive neurons of the paraventricular thalamus control sucrose-seeking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labouèbe, Gwenaël; Boutrel, Benjamin; Tarussio, David; Thorens, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    Feeding behavior is governed by homeostatic needs and motivational drive to obtain palatable foods. Here, we identify a population of glutamatergic neurons in the paraventricular thalamus of mice that express the glucose transporter Glut2 (encoded by Slc2a2) and project to the nucleus accumbens. These neurons are activated by hypoglycemia and, in freely moving mice, their activation by optogenetics or Slc2a2 inactivation increases motivated sucrose-seeking but not saccharin-seeking behavior. These neurons may control sugar overconsumption in obesity and diabetes.

  2. Opposite lipemic response of Wistar rats and C57BL/6 mice to dietary glucose or fructose supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R. Barbosa

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic effects of carbohydrate supplementation in mice have not been extensively studied. In rats, glucose- and fructose-rich diets induce hypertriacylglycerolemia. In the present study, we compared the metabolic responses to two monosaccharide supplementations in two murine models. Adult male Wistar rats (N = 80 and C57BL/6 mice (N = 60, after 3 weeks on a standardized diet, were submitted to dietary supplementation by gavage with glucose (G or fructose (F solutions (500 g/L, 8 g/kg body weight for 21 days. Glycemia was significantly higher in rats after fructose treatment (F: 7.9 vs 9.3 mM and in mice (G: 6.5 vs 10 and F: 6.6 vs 8.9 mM after both carbohydrate treatments. Triacylglycerolemia increased significantly 1.5 times in rats after G or F supplementation. Total cholesterol did not change with G treatment in rats, but did decrease after F supplementation (1.5 vs 1.4 mM, P < 0.05. Both supplementations in rats induced insulin resistance, as suggested by the higher Homeostasis Model Assessment Index. In contrast, mice showed significant decreases in triacylglycerol (G: 1.8 vs 1.4 and F: 1.9 vs 1.4 mM, P < 0.01 and total cholesterol levels (G and F: 2.7 vs 2.5 mM, P < 0.05 after both monosaccharide supplementations. Wistar rats and C57BL/6 mice, although belonging to the same family (Muridae, presented opposite responses to glucose and fructose supplementation regarding serum triacylglycerol, free fatty acids, and insulin levels after monosaccharide treatment. Thus, while Wistar rats developed features of plurimetabolic syndrome, C57BL/6 mice presented changes in serum biochemical profile considered to be healthier for the cardiovascular system.

  3. Four weeks of near-normalisation of blood glucose improves the insulin response to glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højberg, P V; Vilsbøll, T; Rabøl, R

    2008-01-01

    of near-normalisation of the blood glucose level could improve insulin responses to GIP and GLP-1 in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Eight obese patients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycaemic control (HbA(1c) 8.6 +/- 1.3%), were investigated before and after 4 weeks of near......-normalisation of blood glucose (mean blood glucose 7.4 +/- 1.2 mmol/l) using insulin treatment. Before and after insulin treatment the participants underwent three hyperglycaemic clamps (15 mmol/l) with infusion of GLP-1, GIP or saline. Insulin responses were evaluated as the incremental area under the plasma C......-peptide curve. RESULTS: Before and after near-normalisation of blood glucose, the C-peptide responses did not differ during the early phase of insulin secretion (0-10 min). The late phase C-peptide response (10-120 min) increased during GIP infusion from 33.0 +/- 8.5 to 103.9 +/- 24.2 (nmol/l) x (110 min)(-1...

  4. A shift in the collagen V antigenic epitope leads to T helper phenotype switch and immune response to self-antigen leading to chronic lung allograft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiriveedhi, V; Angaswamy, N; Brand, D; Weber, J; Gelman, A G; Hachem, R; Trulock, E P; Meyers, B; Patterson, G; Mohanakumar, T

    2012-01-01

    Immune responses to human leucocyte antigen (HLA) and self-antigen collagen V (Col-V) have been proposed in the pathogenesis of chronic rejection (bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, BOS) following human lung transplantation (LTx). In this study, we defined the role for the shift in immunodominant epitopes of Col-V in inducing T helper phenotype switch leading to immunity to Col-V and BOS. Sera and lavage from BOS(+) LTx recipients with antibodies to Col-V were analysed. Two years prior to BOS, patients developed antibodies to both Col-V,α1(V) and α2(V) chains. However, at clinical diagnosis of BOS, antibodies became restricted to α1(V). Further, lung biopsy from BOS(+) patients bound to antibodies to α1(V), indicating that these epitopes are exposed. Fourteen Col-V peptides [pep1-14, pep1-4 specific to α1(V), pep5-8 to α1,2(V) and pep9-14 to α2(V)] which bind to HLA-DR4 and -DR7, demonstrated that prior to BOS, pep 6, 7, 9, 11 and 14 were immunodominant and induced interleukin (IL)-10. However, at BOS, the response switched to pep1, 4 and 5 and induced interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-17 responses, but not IL-10. The T helper (Th) phenotype switch is accompanied by decreased frequency of regulatory T cells (T(regs) ) in the lavage. LTx recipients with antibodies to α1(V) also demonstrated increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation with decreased MMP inhibitor, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP), suggesting that MMP activation may play a role in the exposure of new Col-V antigenic epitopes. We conclude that a shift in immunodominance of self-antigenic determinants of Col-V results in induction of IFN-γ and IL-17 with loss of tolerance leading to autoimmunity to Col-V, which leads to chronic lung allograft rejection. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2011 British Society for Immunology.

  5. Glycemic state regulates melanocortin, but not nesfatin-1, responsiveness of glucose-sensing neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimee, Andrea; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2015-04-15

    The nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) is a medullary integrative center with critical roles in the coordinated control of energy homeostasis. Here, we used whole cell current-clamp recordings on rat NTS neurons in slice preparation to identify the presence of physiologically relevant glucose-sensing neurons. The majority of NTS neurons (n = 81) were found to be glucose-responsive, with 35% exhibiting a glucose-excited (GE) phenotype (mean absolute change in membrane potential: 9.5 ± 1.1 mV), and 21% exhibiting a glucose-inhibited (GI) response (mean: 6.3 ± 0.7 mV). Furthermore, we found glucose-responsive cells are preferentially influenced by the anorexigenic peptide α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), but not nesfatin-1. Accordingly, alterations in glycemic state have profound effects on the responsiveness of NTS neurons to α-MSH, but not to nesfatin-1. Indeed, NTS neurons showed increasing responsiveness to α-MSH as extracellular glucose concentrations were decreased, and in hypoglycemic conditions, all NTS neurons were depolarized by α-MSH (mean 10.6 ± 3.2 mV; n = 8). Finally, decreasing levels of extracellular glucose correlated with a significant hyperpolarization of the baseline membrane potential of NTS neurons, highlighting the modulatory effect of glucose on the baseline excitability of cells in this region. Our findings reveal individual NTS cells are capable of integrating multiple sources of metabolically relevant inputs, highlight the rapid capacity for plasticity in medullary melanocortin circuits, and emphasize the critical importance of physiological recording conditions for electrophysiological studies pertaining to the central control of energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Response of Blood Perfusion at ST 36 Acupoint after Drinking Cold Glucose or Saline Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjun Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin blood flux (SkBF changes caused by drinking cold water are generally associated with vagal tone and osmotic factors in digestive system. According to acupuncture theory, change of SkBF at ST 36 might reflect the functional changes of digestive system. The aim of this study is to analyze the changes of SkBF after drinking 3°C 0.9% saline or 5% glucose injection by monitor blood flux at bilateral ST 36. The results indicated that, after drinking different cold water, the change ratio of SkBF at right side ST 36 has been different. Because all solutions have the same temperature (3°C and both saline and glucose solution have the same osmolality, suggesting that the SkBF changes resulting from drinking cold water are not regulated just by the vagal tone and osmolality, there must have been other factors. These results have not been consistent with the frequency domain results of heart rate variability (HRV analysis. Coherence analysis of blood flux signals at bilateral ST 36 indicated that there have been different coherence-frequency curves among different groups in special frequency bands, which suggested that coherence analysis might provide a potential tool to evaluate different status.

  7. Gastric emptying, glucose responses, and insulin secretion after a liquid test meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willms, B; Werner, J; Holst, J J

    1996-01-01

    yr; body mass index, 30.0 +/- 5.2 kg/m2; hemoglobin A1c, 10.5 +/- 1.2%) were studied in the fasting state (plasma glucose, 11.1 +/- 1.1 mmol/L). A liquid meal of 400 mL containing 8% amino acids and 50 g sucrose (327 Kcal) was administered at time zero by a nasogastric tube. Gastric volume......The aim of the study was to investigate whether inhibition of gastric emptying of meals plays a role in the mechanism of the blood glucose-lowering action of glucagon-like peptide-1-(7-36) amide [GLP-1-(7-36) amide] in type 2 diabetes. Eight poorly controlled type 2 diabetic patients (age, 58 +/- 6...... to normal fasting values (5.4 +/- 0.7 mmol/L) within 3-4 h, whereas insulin was stimulated in most, but not all, patients, and glucagon remained at the basal level or was slightly suppressed. In conclusion, GLP-1-(7-36) amide inhibits gastric emptying in type 2 diabetic patients. Together...

  8. Responses of Blood Glucose, Insulin, Glucagon, and Fatty Acids to Intraruminal Infusion of Propionate in Hanwoo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. K. Oh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to investigate the effects of intraruminal infusion of propionate on ruminal fermentation characteristics and blood hormones and metabolites in Hanwoo (Korean cattle steers. Four Hanwoo steers (average body wt. 270 kg, 13 month of age equipped with rumen cannula were infused into rumens with 0.0 M (Water, C, 0.5 M (37 g/L, T1, 1.0 M (74 g/L, T2 and 1.5 M (111 g/L, T3 of propionate for 1 hour per day and allotted by 4×4 Latin square design. On the 5th day of infusion, samples of rumen and blood were collected at 0, 60, 120, 180, and 300 min after intraruminal infusion of propionate. The concentrations of serum glucose and plasma glucagon were not affected (p>0.05 by intraruminal infusion of propionate. The serum insulin concentration at 60 min after infusion was significantly (p<0.05 higher in T3 than in C, while the concentration of non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA at 60 and 180 min after infusion was significantly (p<0.05 lower in the propionate treatments than in C. Hence, intraruminal infusion of propionate stimulates the secretion of insulin, and decreases serum NEFA concentration rather than the change of serum glucose concentration.

  9. Development of a nonlinear model for the prediction of response times of glucose affinity sensors using concanavalin A and dextran and the development of a differential osmotic glucose affinity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Louis G.

    With the increasing prevalence of diabetes in the United States and worldwide, blood glucose monitoring must be accurate and reliable. Current enzymatic sensors have numerous disadvantages that make them unreliable and unfavorable among patients. Recent research in glucose affinity sensors correct some of the problems that enzymatic sensors experience. Dextran and concanavalin A are two of the more common components used in glucose affinity sensors. When these sensors were first explored, a model was derived to predict the response time of a glucose affinity sensor using concanavalin A and dextran. However, the model assumed the system was linear and fell short of calculating times representative of the response times determined through experimental tests with the sensors. In this work, a new model that uses the Stokes-Einstein Equation to demonstrate the nonlinear behavior of the glucose affinity assay was developed to predict the response times of similar glucose affinity sensors. In addition to the device tested by the original linear model, additional devices were identified and tested with the proposed model. The nonlinear model was designed to accommodate the many different variations between systems. The proposed model was able to accurately calculate response times for sensors using the concanavalin A-dextran affinity assay with respect to the experimentally reported times by the independent research groups. Parameter studies using the nonlinear model were able to identify possible setbacks that could compromise the response of thesystem. Specifically, the model showed that the improper use of asymmetrical membranes could increase the response time by as little as 20% or more as the device is miniaturized. The model also demonstrated that systems using the concanavalin Adextran assay would experience higher response times in the hypoglycemic range. This work attempted to replicate and improve an osmotic glucose affinity sensor. The system was designed to

  10. Mesenteric blood flow, glucose absorption and blood pressure responses to small intestinal glucose in critically ill patients older than 65 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Jennifer A; Horowitz, M; Summers, M J; Trahair, L G; Goud, R S; Zaknic, A V; Hausken, T; Fraser, J D; Chapman, M J; Jones, K L; Deane, A M

    2013-02-01

    To compare nutrient-stimulated changes in superior mesenteric artery (SMA) blood flow, glucose absorption and glycaemia in individuals older than 65 years with, and without, critical illness. Following a 1-h 'observation' period (t (0)-t (60)), 0.9 % saline and glucose (1 kcal/ml) were infused directly into the small intestine at 2 ml/min between t (60)-t (120), and t (120)-t (180), respectively. SMA blood flow was measured using Doppler ultrasonography at t (60) (fasting), t (90) and t (150) and is presented as raw values and nutrient-stimulated increment from baseline (Δ). Glucose absorption was evaluated using serum 3-O-methylglucose (3-OMG) concentrations during, and for 1 h after, the glucose infusion (i.e. t (120)-t (180) and t (120)-t (240)). Mean arterial pressure was recorded between t (60)-t (240). Data are presented as median (25th, 75th percentile). Eleven mechanically ventilated critically ill patients [age 75 (69, 79) years] and nine healthy volunteers [70 (68, 77) years] were studied. The magnitude of the nutrient-stimulated increase in SMA flow was markedly less in the critically ill when compared with healthy subjects [Δt (150): patients 115 (-138, 367) versus health 836 (618, 1,054) ml/min; P = 0.001]. In patients, glucose absorption was reduced during, and for 1 h after, the glucose infusion when compared with health [AUC(120-180): 4.571 (2.591, 6.551) versus 11.307 (8.447, 14.167) mmol/l min; P AUC(120-240): 26.5 (17.7, 35.3) versus 40.6 (31.7, 49.4) mmol/l min; P = 0.031]. A close relationship between the nutrient-stimulated increment in SMA flow and glucose absorption was evident (3-OMG AUC(120-180) and ∆SMA flow at t (150): r (2) = 0.29; P 65 years, stimulation of SMA flow by small intestinal glucose infusion may be attenuated, which could account for the reduction in glucose absorption.

  11. Collagen Quantification in Tissue Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coentro, João Quintas; Capella-Monsonís, Héctor; Graceffa, Valeria; Wu, Zhuning; Mullen, Anne Maria; Raghunath, Michael; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I

    2017-01-01

    Collagen is the major extracellular protein in mammals. Accurate quantification of collagen is essential in the biomaterials (e.g., reproducible collagen scaffold fabrication), drug discovery (e.g., assessment of collagen in pathophysiologies, such as fibrosis), and tissue engineering (e.g., quantification of cell-synthesized collagen) fields. Although measuring hydroxyproline content is the most widely used method to quantify collagen in biological specimens, the process is very laborious. To this end, the Sircol™ Collagen Assay is widely used due to its inherent simplicity and convenience. However, this method leads to overestimation of collagen content due to the interaction of Sirius red with basic amino acids of non-collagenous proteins. Herein, we describe the addition of an ultrafiltration purification step in the process to accurately determine collagen content in tissues.

  12. A chemo-electro-mechanical model for simulation of responsive deformation of glucose-sensitive hydrogels with the effect of enzyme catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Luo, Rongmo; Birgersson, Erik; Lam, Khin Yong

    2009-02-01

    A multi-effect-coupling glucose-stimulus (MECglu) model is developed and solved numerically for the swelling behavior of soft smart hydrogels responding to changes in the environmental glucose concentration. The model considers the effect of the glucose oxidation reaction catalyzed by enzymes including glucose oxidase and catalase. It is composed of the Nernst-Planck equation for the mobile species in the solvent, the Poisson equation for the electric potential, and a nonlinear mechanical equation for the large deformations of the hydrogel that arise due to the conversion of chemical energy to mechanical. Based on the theory of the chemo-electro-mechanical-coupled fields, the formulation of the fixed charge groups bound onto the cross-linked polymer network is associated with the change of the ambient solution pH. The MECglu model is validated by comparison between the steady-state computation and experimental equilibrium swelling curves, and good agreement is obtained. A parameter study is then conducted by steady-state simulations to ascertain the impact of various solvent parameters on the responsive swelling behavior of the hydrogel. One key parameter is the glucose concentration, which is varied within the range of practical physiological glucose concentrations from 0 to 16.5 mM (300 mg/ml) to support the design and optimization of an insulin delivery system based on a glucose-sensitive hydrogel with immobilized glucose oxidase and catalase. The influence of oxygen and glucose concentrations in the solvent is then further studied for the distributive profiles of reacting and diffusive species concentrations, the electric potential, the displacement, as well as the swelling ratio of the glucose-sensitive hydrogel.

  13. Humoral and cellular immune responses to glucose regulated protein 78 - a novel Leishmania donovani antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anja T R; Ismail, Ahmed; Gaafar, Ameera

    2002-01-01

    The recently cloned glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) of Leishmania donovani has been suggested as a new and promising Leishmania vaccine candidate. We assessed antibody and T-cell reactivity to GRP78 in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and in lymphoproliferative assays. Serological...... with a positive leishmanin skin test showed antibody reactivity to recombinant GRP78 (rGRP78). In lymphoproliferative assays, 9 of 13 isolates of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from individuals previously infected with L. donovani and one of three individuals previously infected with L. major showed...... in an area endemic for malaria but free of leishmaniasis and plasma from healthy Danes was negative in the assay. GRP78 antibody was detected in 10% and 5% of plasma samples from Sudanese and Ghanaian malaria patients, respectively, whereas 35% of plasma samples from otherwise healthy Sudanese individuals...

  14. Blood glucose responses of type-2 diabetics during and after exercise performed at intensities above and below anaerobic threshold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolysson C. Hiyane

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2008v10n1p8 With the objective of analyzing the blood glucose responses during and after exercise performed at 90 and 110% of anaerobic threshold (AT, 10 type-2 diabetes patients (56.9±11.2years; 80.3±14.4kg performed an incremental test (IT on a cycle ergometer. After an initial IT to identify AT, the volunteers participated in three experimental sessions on three different days: 20 minutes’ of cycling at either 90 or 110% of AT, and a control session (CON. Blood glucose was measured at rest, and at the 10th and 20th minutes of exercise or control condition, as well as every 15 minutes during a 2-hour postexercise recovery period (Rec. One-way ANOVA did not detect significant differences in blood glucose levels between the sessions at 90 and 110% of AT. Compared to CON, a signifi cant decrease was observed at the 20th minute of exercise, and at the 15th and 60th minutes of Rec from the 90% AT session. Significant reductions were also observed at the 10th and 20th minutes of exercise and at the 15th, 30th, 45th, 60th and 90th minutes of Rec from the session at 110% AT. Exercise performed at the higher intensity (110% AT resulted in a tendency of a more pronounced and prolonged hypoglycemic effect during and after exercise, and may be an alternative intensity for glycemic control in type 2 diabetics who do not have cardiovascular complications or other contraindications to exercising at intensities above the AT.

  15. Angiotensin receptor blockade improves cardiac mitochondrial activity in response to an acute glucose load in obese insulin resistant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Thorwald

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia increases the risk of oxidant overproduction in the heart through activation of a multitude of pathways. Oxidation of mitochondrial enzymes may impair their function resulting in accumulation of intermediates and reverse electron transfer, contributing to mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS becomes inappropriately activated during metabolic syndrome, increasing oxidant production. To combat excess oxidant production, the transcription factor, nuclear factor erythriod-2- related factor 2 (Nrf2, induces expression of many antioxidant genes. We hypothesized that angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1 blockade improves mitochondrial function in response to an acute glucose load via upregulation of Nrf2. To address this hypothesis, an oral glucose challenge was performed in three groups prior to dissection (n = 5–8 animals/group/time point of adult male rats: 1 Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO; lean strain-control, 2 insulin resistant, obese Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF, and 3 OLETF + angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB; 10 mg olmesartan/kg/d × 6 weeks. Hearts were collected at T0, T60, and T120 minutes post-glucose infusion. ARB increased Nrf2 binding 32% compared to OLETF at T60. Total superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT activities were increased 45% and 66% respectively in ARB treated animals compared to OLETF. Mitochondrial enzyme activities of aconitase, complex I, and complex II increased by 135%, 33% and 66%, respectively in ARB compared to OLETF. These data demonstrate the protective effects of AT1 blockade on mitochondrial function during the manifestation of insulin resistance suggesting that the inappropriate activation of AT1 during insulin resistance may impair Nrf2 translocation and subsequent antioxidant activities and mitochondrial function. Keywords: Angiotensin II, Mitochondria, Cardiac, Antioxidant enzymes, TCA cycle

  16. Duodenal and ileal glucose infusions differentially alter gastrointestinal peptides, appetite response, and food intake: a tube feeding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppitt, Sally D; Shin, Hyun Sang; McGill, Anne-Thea; Budgett, Stephanie C; Lo, Kim; Pahl, Malcolm; Duxfield, Janice; Lane, Mark; Ingram, John R

    2017-09-01

    Background: Activation of the ileal brake through the delivery of nutrients into the distal small intestine to promote satiety and suppress food intake provides a new target for weight loss. Evidence is limited, with support from naso-ileal lipid infusion studies. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate whether glucose infused into the duodenum and ileum differentially alters appetite response, food intake, and secretion of satiety-related gastrointestinal peptides. Design: Fourteen healthy male participants were randomly assigned to a blinded 4-treatment crossover, with each treatment of single-day duration. On the day before the intervention (day 0), a 380-cm multilumen tube (1.75-mm diameter) with independent port access to the duodenum and ileum was inserted, and position was confirmed by X-ray. Subsequently (days 1-4), a standardized breakfast meal was followed midmorning by a 90-min infusion of isotonic glucose (15 g, 235 kJ) or saline to the duodenum or ileum. Appetite ratings were assessed with the use of visual analog scales (VASs), blood samples collected, and ad libitum energy intake (EI) measured at lunch, afternoon snack, and dinner. Results: Thirteen participants completed the 4 infusion days. There was a significant effect of nutrient infused and site (treatment × time, P appetite, and decreased ad libitum EI at a subsequent meal. Although glucose to the duodenum also suppressed appetite ratings, eating behavior was not altered. This trial was registered at www.anzctr.org.au as ACTRN12612000429853. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  17. Role of tissue engineered collagen based tridimensional implant on the healing response of the experimentally induced large Achilles tendon defect model in rabbits: a long term study with high clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali

    2013-05-14

    Tendon injury is one of the orthopedic conditions poses with a significant clinical challenge to both the surgeons and patients. The major limitations to manage these injuries are poor healing response and development of peritendinous adhesions in the injured area. This study investigated the effectiveness of a novel collagen implant on tendon healing in rabbits. Seventy five mature White New-Zealand rabbits were divided into treated (n = 55) and control (n = 20) groups. The left Achilles tendon was completely transected and 2 cm excised. The defects of the treated animals were filled with collagen implants and repaired with sutures, but in control rabbits the defects were sutured similarly but the gap was left untreated. Changes in the injured and normal contralateral tendons were assessed weekly by measuring the diameter, temperature and bioelectrical characteristics of the injured area. Clinical examination was done and scored. Among the treated animals, small pilot groups were euthanized at 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 and 60 (n = 5 at each time interval) and the remainder (n = 20) and the control animals at 120 days post injury (DPI). The lesions of all animals were examined at macroscopic and microscopic levels and the dry matter content, water delivery and water uptake characteristics of the lesions and normal contralateral tendons of both groups were analyzed at 120 DPI. This novel collagen implant was biodegradable, biocompatible and possibly could be considered as a substitute for auto and allografts in clinical practice in near future.

  18. Distinct characteristics of mandibular bone collagen relative to long bone collagen: relevance to clinical dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Takashi; Tokutomi, Kentaro; Sasaki, Michiko; Katafuchi, Michitsuna; Mizumachi, Emiri; Sato, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    Bone undergoes constant remodeling throughout life. The cellular and biochemical mechanisms of bone remodeling vary in a region-specific manner. There are a number of notable differences between the mandible and long bones, including developmental origin, osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells, and the rate of bone turnover. Collagen, the most abundant matrix protein in bone, is responsible for determining the relative strength of particular bones. Posttranslational modifications of collagen, such as intermolecular crosslinking and lysine hydroxylation, are the most essential determinants of bone strength, although the amount of collagen is also important. In comparison to long bones, the mandible has greater collagen content, a lower amount of mature crosslinks, and a lower extent of lysine hydroxylation. The great abundance of immature crosslinks in mandibular collagen suggests that there is a lower rate of cross-link maturation. This means that mandibular collagen is relatively immature and thus more readily undergoes degradation and turnover. The greater rate of remodeling in mandibular collagen likely renders more flexibility to the bone and leaves it more suited to constant exercise. As reviewed here, it is important in clinical dentistry to understand the distinctive features of the bones of the jaw.

  19. Distinct Characteristics of Mandibular Bone Collagen Relative to Long Bone Collagen: Relevance to Clinical Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Matsuura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone undergoes constant remodeling throughout life. The cellular and biochemical mechanisms of bone remodeling vary in a region-specific manner. There are a number of notable differences between the mandible and long bones, including developmental origin, osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells, and the rate of bone turnover. Collagen, the most abundant matrix protein in bone, is responsible for determining the relative strength of particular bones. Posttranslational modifications of collagen, such as intermolecular crosslinking and lysine hydroxylation, are the most essential determinants of bone strength, although the amount of collagen is also important. In comparison to long bones, the mandible has greater collagen content, a lower amount of mature crosslinks, and a lower extent of lysine hydroxylation. The great abundance of immature crosslinks in mandibular collagen suggests that there is a lower rate of cross-link maturation. This means that mandibular collagen is relatively immature and thus more readily undergoes degradation and turnover. The greater rate of remodeling in mandibular collagen likely renders more flexibility to the bone and leaves it more suited to constant exercise. As reviewed here, it is important in clinical dentistry to understand the distinctive features of the bones of the jaw.

  20. Evaluation of humoral and cellular immune responses to a DNA vaccine encoding chicken type II collagen for rheumatoid arthritis in normal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhao; Juan, Long; Song, Yun; Zhijian, Zhang; Jing, Jin; Kun, Yu; Yuna, Hao; Dongfa, Dai; Lili, Ding; Liuxin, Tan; Fei, Liang; Nan, Liu; Fang, Yuan; Yuying, Sun; Yongzhi, Xi

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in the development of effective therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is finding a method for the specific inhibition of the inflammatory disease processes without the induction of generalized immunosuppression. Of note, the development of therapeutic DNA vaccines and boosters that may restore immunological tolerance remains a high priority. pcDNA-CCOL2A1 is a therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding chicken type II collagen(CCII). This vaccine was developed by our laboratory and has been shown to exhibit efficacy comparable to that of the current "gold standard" treatment, methotrexate (MTX). Here, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with anti-CII IgG antibodies, quantified the expression levels of Th1, Th2, and Th3 cytokines, and performed flow cytometric analyses of different T-cell subsets, including Th1, Th2, Th17, Tc, Ts, Treg, and CD4(+)CD29(+)T cells to systemically evaluate humoral and cellular immune responses to pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine in normal rats. Similar to our observations at maximum dosage of 3 mg/kg, vaccination of normal rats with 300 μg/kg pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine did not induce the production of anti-CII IgG. Furthermore, no significant changes were observed in the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12(IL-23p40), monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, regulated on activation in normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) or anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 in vaccinated normal rats relative to that in controls(P > 0.05). However, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β levels were significantly increased on days 10 and 14, while interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were significantly decreased on days 28 and 35 after vaccination(P 0.05), with the exception of Treg cells, which were significantly

  1. Effects of soy-soluble fiber and flaxseed gum on the glycemic and insulinemic responses to glucose solutions and dairy products in healthy adult males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Marco M C; Goff, H Douglas; Kisch, Julie A; Coulson, Alex; Wright, Amanda J

    2013-01-01

    Soy-soluble polysaccharides and flaxseed gum are underutilized dietary fibers of interest to the food industry. However, because the ability of soluble fibers to modulate postprandial glucose and insulin metabolism has been related to their viscous effects, the utility of these and other low-viscosity soluble fibers remains unproven. The objective of this study was to examine the associations between soy-soluble polysaccharides and flaxseed gum concentration, product viscosity, and the postprandial glycemic and insulinemic responses in the context of glucose solutions as well as fluid and gelled dairy products. Twelve healthy males participated in a randomized crossover postprandial study in which they visited the laboratory following overnight fasts on 11 occasions to consume one of 11 study treatments, each consisting of 50 g available carbohydrates. The study treatments included a glucose reference (in duplicate), glucose solutions containing soy-soluble polysaccharides (6%), flaxseed gum (0.7%), or guar gum (0.23%), all matched for an apparent viscosity of 61 mPa·s at 50 s⁻¹, as well as dairy-based beverages and puddings with 0% or 1% soluble fiber added. Blood samples were collected at fasting and up to 2 hours postprandially for determination of glucose and insulin concentrations. Area under the curve (AUC), peak concentration, and time-to-peak values as well as glycemic index (GI) and insulinemic index (II) were calculated. Fiber fortification of a 50 g glucose solution had no effect on postprandial blood glucose or insulin levels, even at a high concentration (i.e., 6% soy-soluble polysaccharides). Glucose AUC and GI values for the dairy-based beverage (p glucose reference. Glucose AUC and GI values for the soy-soluble polysaccharide-fortified dairy products (p glucose reference. No significant differences were observed between the fiber-fortified fluid and gelled dairy-based study treatments and no significant differences were observed in terms of the

  2. The non-phagocytic route of collagen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H; Ingvarsen, Signe; Jürgensen, Henrik J

    2011-01-01

    The degradation of collagens, the most abundant proteins of the extracellular matrix, is involved in numerous physiological and pathological conditions including cancer invasion. An important turnover pathway involves cellular internalization and degradation of large, soluble collagen fragments......, generated by initial cleavage of the insoluble collagen fibers. We have previously observed that in primary mouse fibroblasts, this endocytosis of collagen fragments is dependent on the receptor urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP)/Endo180. Others have identified additional...... mechanisms of collagen uptake, with different associated receptors, in other cell types. These receptors include β1-integrins, being responsible for collagen phagocytosis, and the mannose receptor. We have now utilized a newly developed monoclonal antibody against uPARAP/Endo180, which down...

  3. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrosimone, K. M.; Jin, M.; Poston, B.; Liu, P.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) 21 days aft...

  4. Resistant starch and arabinoxylan augment SCFA absorption, but affect postprandial glucose and insulin responses differently - CORRIGENDUM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Anne Krog; Theil, Peter Kappel; Hedemann, Mette Skou

    2015-01-01

    The effects of increased colonic fermentation of dietary fibres (DF) on net portal flux (NPF) of carbohydrate-derived metabolites (glucose, SCFA and especially butyrate), hormones (insulin, C-peptide, GLP-1, GIP) and NEFA were studied in a healthy catheterised pig model. Six 59 ± 3.8 kg pigs were...... fitted with catheters in the mesenteric artery, the portal and hepatic vein, and a flowprobe around the portal vein and included in a double 3x3 crossover design with three daily feedings (at 9.00, 14.00 and 19.00 hours). Fasting and 5 hours postprandial blood samples were collected after 7 days...... adaptation to each diet. The pigs were fed a low DF western style control diet (WSD) and two high DF diets; an arabinoxylan (AXD) and a resistant starch (RSD) enriched diet. The NPF of insulin was lower (P = 0.04) in AXD fed pigs (4.6 nmol/h) compared to RSD fed pigs (10.5 nmol/h), despite the lowest NPF...

  5. Effect of sepsis on VLDL kinetics: responses in basal state and during glucose infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, R.R.; Shaw, J.H.; Durkot, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of gram-negative sepsis on the kinetics and oxidation of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) fatty acids was assessed in conscious dogs in the normal state and 24 h after infusion of live Escherichia coli. VLDL, labeled with [2- 3 H]glycerol and [1- 14 C]palmitic acid, was used to trace VLDL kinetics and oxidation, and [1- 13 C]palmitic acid bound to albumin was infused simultaneously to quantify kinetics and oxidation of free fatty acid (FFA) in plasma. Sepsis caused a fivefold increase in the rate of VLDL production (RaVLDL). In the control dogs, the direct oxidation of VLDL-fatty acids was not an important contributor to their overall energy metabolism, but in dogs with sepsis, 17% of the total rate of CO2 production could be accounted for by VLDL-fatty acid oxidation. When glucose was infused into dogs with insulin and glucagon levels clamped at basal levels (by means of infusion of somatostatin and replacement of the hormones), RaVLDL increased significantly in the control dogs, but it did not increase further in dogs with sepsis. The authors conclude that the increase in triglyceride concentration in fasting dogs with gram-negative sepsis is the result of an increase in VLDL production and that the fatty acids in VLDL can serve as an important source of energy in sepsis

  6. Alizarin Complexone Functionalized Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles: A Smart System Integrating Glucose-Responsive Double-Drugs Release and Real-Time Monitoring Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhen; He, Dinggeng; Cai, Linli; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Yang, Xue; Li, Liling; Li, Siqi; Su, Xiaoya

    2016-04-06

    The outstanding progress of nanoparticles-based delivery systems capable of releasing hypoglycemic drugs in response to glucose has dramatically changed the outlook of diabetes management. However, the developed glucose-responsive systems have not offered real-time monitoring capabilities for accurate quantifying hypoglycemic drugs released. In this study, we present a multifunctional delivery system that integrates both delivery and monitoring issues using glucose-triggered competitive binding scheme on alizarin complexone (ALC) functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN). In this system, ALC is modified on the surface of MSN as the signal reporter. Gluconated insulin (G-Ins) is then introduced onto MSN-ALC via benzene-1,4-diboronic acid (BA) mediated esterification reaction, where G-Ins not only blocks drugs inside the mesopores but also works as a hypoglycemic drug. In the absence of glucose, the sandwich-type boronate ester structure formed by BA binding to the diols of ALC and G-Ins remains intact, resulting in an fluorescence emission peak at 570 nm and blockage of pores. Following a competitive binding, the presence of glucose cause the dissociation of boronate ester between ALC and BA, which lead to the pores opening and disappearance of fluorescence. As proof of concept, rosiglitazone maleate (RSM), an insulin-sensitizing agent, was doped into the MSN to form a multifunctional MSN (RSM@MSN-ALC-BA-Ins), integrating with double-drugs loading, glucose-responsive performance, and real-time monitoring capability. It has been demonstrated that the glucose-responsive release behaviors of insulin and RSM in buffer or in human serum can be quantified in real-time through evaluating the changes of fluorescence signal. We believe that this developed multifunctional system can shed light on the invention of a new generation of smart nanoformulations for optical diagnosis, individualized treatment, and noninvasive monitoring of diabetes management.

  7. Development of the insulin secretion mechanism in fetal and neonatal rat pancreatic B-cells: response to glucose, K+, theophylline, and carbamylcholine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Mendonça

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied the development of the insulin secretion mechanism in the pancreas of fetal (19- and 21-day-old, neonatal (3-day-old, and adult (90-day-old rats in response to stimulation with 8.3 or 16.7 mM glucose, 30 mM K+, 5 mM theophylline (Theo and 200 µM carbamylcholine (Cch. No effect of glucose or high K+ was observed on the pancreas from 19-day-old fetuses, whereas Theo and Cch significantly increased insulin secretion at this age (82 and 127% above basal levels, respectively. High K+ also failed to alter the insulin secretion in the pancreas from 21-day-old fetuses, whereas 8.3 mM and 16.7 mM glucose significantly stimulated insulin release by 41 and 54% above basal levels, respectively. Similar results were obtained with Theo and Cch. A more marked effect of glucose on insulin secretion was observed in the pancreas of 3-day-old rats, reaching 84 and 179% above basal levels with 8.3 mM and 16.7 mM glucose, respectively. At this age, both Theo and Cch increased insulin secretion to close to two-times basal levels. In islets from adult rats, 8.3 mM and 16.7 mM glucose, Theo, and Cch increased the insulin release by 104, 193, 318 and 396% above basal levels, respectively. These data indicate that pancreatic B-cells from 19-day-old fetuses were already sensitive to stimuli that use either cAMP or IP3 and DAG as second messengers, but insensitive to stimuli such as glucose and high K+ that induce membrane depolarization. The greater effect of glucose on insulin secretion during the neonatal period indicates that this period is crucial for the maturation of the glucose-sensing mechanism in B-cells.

  8. Fructose intervention for 12 weeks does not impair glycemic control or incretin hormone responses during oral glucose or mixed meal tests in obese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matikainen, N; Söderlund, S; Björnson, E; Bogl, L H; Pietiläinen, K H; Hakkarainen, A; Lundbom, N; Eliasson, B; Räsänen, S M; Rivellese, A; Patti, L; Prinster, A; Riccardi, G; Després, J-P; Alméras, N; Holst, J J; Deacon, C F; Borén, J; Taskinen, M-R

    2017-06-01

    Incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are affected early on in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Epidemiologic studies consistently link high fructose consumption to insulin resistance but whether fructose consumption impairs the incretin response remains unknown. As many as 66 obese (BMI 26-40 kg/m 2 ) male subjects consumed fructose-sweetened beverages containing 75 g fructose/day for 12 weeks while continuing their usual lifestyle. Glucose, insulin, GLP-1 and GIP were measured during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and triglycerides (TG), GLP-1, GIP and PYY during a mixed meal test before and after fructose intervention. Fructose intervention did not worsen glucose and insulin responses during OGTT, and GLP-1 and GIP responses during OGTT and fat-rich meal were unchanged. Postprandial TG response increased significantly, p = 0.004, and we observed small but significant increases in weight and liver fat content, but not in visceral or subcutaneous fat depots. However, even the subgroups who gained weight or liver fat during fructose intervention did not worsen their glucose, insulin, GLP-1 or PYY responses. A minor increase in GIP response during OGTT occurred in subjects who gained liver fat (p = 0.049). In obese males with features of metabolic syndrome, 12 weeks fructose intervention 75 g/day did not change glucose, insulin, GLP-1 or GIP responses during OGTT or GLP-1, GIP or PYY responses during a mixed meal. Therefore, fructose intake, even accompanied with mild weight gain, increases in liver fat and worsening of postprandial TG profile, does not impair glucose tolerance or gut incretin response to oral glucose or mixed meal challenge. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University

  9. Responsive Boronic Acid-Decorated (Co)polymers: From Glucose Sensors to Autonomous Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancoillie, Gertjan; Hoogenboom, Richard

    2016-10-19

    Boronic acid-containing (co)polymers have fascinated researchers for decades, garnering attention for their unique responsiveness toward 1,2- and 1,3-diols, including saccharides and nucleotides. The applications of materials that exert this property are manifold including sensing, but also self-regulated drug delivery systems through responsive membranes or micelles. In this review, some of the main applications of boronic acid containing (co)polymers are discussed focusing on the role of the boronic acid group in the response mechanism. We hope that this summary, which highlights the importance and potential of boronic acid-decorated polymeric materials, will inspire further research within this interesting field of responsive polymers and polymeric materials.

  10. Responsive Boronic Acid-Decorated (Copolymers: From Glucose Sensors to Autonomous Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertjan Vancoillie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Boronic acid-containing (copolymers have fascinated researchers for decades, garnering attention for their unique responsiveness toward 1,2- and 1,3-diols, including saccharides and nucleotides. The applications of materials that exert this property are manifold including sensing, but also self-regulated drug delivery systems through responsive membranes or micelles. In this review, some of the main applications of boronic acid containing (copolymers are discussed focusing on the role of the boronic acid group in the response mechanism. We hope that this summary, which highlights the importance and potential of boronic acid-decorated polymeric materials, will inspire further research within this interesting field of responsive polymers and polymeric materials.

  11. Collagen metabolism in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M H; Jensen, L T; Andersen, T

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of obesity, fat distribution and weight loss on collagen turnover using serum concentrations of the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (S-PICP) and the aminoterminal propeptide of type III pro-collagen (S-PIIINP) as markers for collagen turnover...... (r = 0.37; P = 0.004), height (r = 0.27; P = 0.04), waist circumference (r = 0.35; P = 0.007), as well as with WHR (r = 0.33; P = 0.01) and was inversely correlated to age (r = -0.40; P = 0.002). Compared with randomly selected controls from a large pool of healthy volunteers, the obese patients had...... restriction (P obesity and associated with body fat distribution, suggesting...

  12. Serum progranulin concentrations are not responsive during oral lipid tolerance test and oral glucose tolerance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, A; Leszczak, S; Ober, I; Schäffler, A; Karrasch, T

    2015-07-01

    The postprandial regulation of progranulin by oral uptake of lipids and carbohydrates in healthy individuals has not yet been investigated. The regulation of progranulin in 2 large cohorts of healthy volunteers during oral lipid tolerance test (OLTT; n=100) and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; n=100) was analyzed. One hundred healthy volunteers underwent OLTT and OGTT in an outpatient setting. Venous blood was drawn at 0 hours (h) (fasting) and at 2, 4, and 6 h in OLTT or 1 and 2 h in OGTT. A novel OLTT solution completely free of carbohydrates and protein was applied. Subjects were characterized by anthropometric and laboratory parameters. Serum concentrations of progranulin were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Circulating progranulin levels remained unchanged during OLTT and OGTT. Fasting progranulin levels ranged between 31.3±8.7 and 40.6±7.7 ng/ml and were not different in subgroups addressing BMI, gender, family history, smoking habits, and hormonal contraception. There was a reciprocal correlation of progranulin with HDL (negative) and LDL cholesterol levels (positive). In healthy adults, fasting and postprandial circulating progranulin levels are not different in BMI subgroups. Oral uptake of carbohydrates and lipids does not influence circulating progranulin levels in a short-term manner. A postprandial and short-term regulation of this adipokine is absent, at least in healthy subjects. There is a negative correlation of progranulin with HDL cholesterol, but a positive correlation with LDL cholesterol. This reciprocal association might be of physiological importance for an individual's atherosclerotic risk. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Protective effects of antioxidants on high Glucose-induced malfunctions in human glomerular mesangial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini R

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Altered functions of mesangial cells induced by high glucose concentrations are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. We therefore investigated the effect of high glucose (39.2 mM alone and in combination with taurine (500 µM or vitamin E (100 µM in serum free medium (RPMI 1640 on the proliferative growth response and turnover of type IV collagen by human glomerular mesangial cells (GMC. The results showed that the high glucose level decreases the proliferation of the GMC which is reversed by taurine and vitamin E. In order to control the osmotic effects of high glucose, the GMC were also cultured in the presence of manitol. Manitol had no effect on the proliferation of GMC. Furthermore, the results showed that addition of vitamin E or taurine to media containing high glucose could reverse and normalize the collagen turn-over by the cultured mesangial cells. These results suggest that taurie and vitamin E may function as endogenous agents in the kidney to limit the development of glomerulosclerosis in diabetic renal disease.

  14. Collagen Homeostasis and Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, S Peter; Heinemeier, Katja M; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system and its collagen rich tissue is important for ensuring architecture of skeletal muscle, energy storage in tendon and ligaments, joint surface protection, and for ensuring the transfer of muscular forces into resulting limb movement. Structure of tendon is stable...... inactivity or immobilization of the human body will conversely result in a dramatic loss in tendon stiffness and collagen synthesis. This illustrates the importance of regular mechanical load in order to preserve the stabilizing role of the connective tissue for the overall function of the musculoskeletal...

  15. Effects of Acute Ingestion of Native Banana Starch on Glycemic Response Evaluated by Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Obese and Lean Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Jiménez-Domínguez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An abnormal glycemic profile, including postprandial glycemia and acute glucose spikes, precedes the onset of overt diabetes in obese subjects. Previous studies have shown the beneficial effects of chronic native banana starch (NBS supplementation. In this study, we examined the effects of acute ingestion of NBS on glycemic profiles by means of continuous glucose monitoring in obese and lean subjects. In a crossover study, obese and lean subjects consumed beverages containing either 38.3 g of NBS or 38.3 g of digestible corn starch (DCS twice daily during 4 days. On day 5, a 3-h meal tolerance test (MTT was performed to evaluate glucose and insulin responses. After 1 week of washout period, treatments were inverted. NBS supplementation reduced the 48-h glycemia AUC in lean, obese, and in the combined group of lean and obese subjects in comparison with DCS. Postprandial glucose and insulin responses at MTT were reduced after NBS in comparison with DCS in all groups. However, no changes were observed in glycemic variability (GV indexes between groups. In conclusion, acute NBS supplementation improved postprandial glucose and insulin responses in obese and lean subjects during 48 h of everyday life and at MTT. Further research to elucidate the mechanism behind these changes is required.

  16. The pathophysiology of diabetes involves a defective amplification of the late-phase insulin response to glucose by glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide-regardless of etiology and phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina; Knop, F K; Krarup, T

    2003-01-01

    diabetic patients. We studied (six in each group): 1) patients with diabetes mellitus secondary to chronic pancreatitis; 2) lean type 2 diabetic patients (body mass index ... incretin hormone, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), is seen in these patients. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate plasma insulin and C-peptide responses to GLP-1 and GIP in five groups of diabetic patients with etiology and phenotype distinct from the obese type 2...

  17. [The genetics of collagen diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, J; Maroteaux, P; Frezal, J

    1986-01-01

    Heritable disorders of collagen include Ehler-Danlos syndromes (11 types are actually known), Larsen syndrome and osteogenesis imperfecta. Their clinical, genetic and biochemical features are reviewed. Marfan syndrome is closely related to heritable disorders of collagen.

  18. Mechanism-based population modelling for assessment of L-cell function based on total GLP-1 response following an oral glucose tolerance test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jonas B.; Jusko, William J.; Gao, Wei

    2011-01-01

    was to build a mechanism-based population model that describes the time course of total GLP-1 and provides indices for capability of secretion in each subject. The goal was thus to model the secretion of GLP-1, and not its effect on insulin production. Single 75 g doses of glucose were administered orally......GLP-1 is an insulinotropic hormone that synergistically with glucose gives rise to an increased insulin response. Its secretion is increased following a meal and it is thus of interest to describe the secretion of this hormone following an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The aim of this study....... The individual estimates of absorption rate constants were used in the model for GLP-1 secretion. Estimation of parameters was performed using the FOCE method with interaction implemented in NONMEM VI. The final transit/indirect-response model obtained for GLP-1 production following an OGTT included two...

  19. GLP-1 Response to Oral Glucose is Reduced in Pre-diabetes, Screen-detected Type 2 Diabetes, and Obesity and Influenced by Sex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færch, Kristine; Torekov, Signe S; Vistisen, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    concentrations of glucose, insulin and GLP-1 during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were analyzed in individuals with normal glucose tolerance (NGT, n=774), pre-diabetes (n=523) or screen-detected type 2 diabetes (n=163) who attended the Danish ADDITION-PRO study (n=1,462). Compared with individuals...... with NGT, women with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes had 25% lower GLP-1 response to an OGTT, and both men and women with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes had 16-21% lower 120-min GLP-1 concentrations independent of age and obesity. Obese and overweight individuals had 20% reduced GLP-1 response to oral...

  20. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrosimone, K M; Jin, M; Poston, B; Liu, P

    2015-10-20

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) 21 days after the first injection. These mice typically develop disease 26 to 35 days after the initial injection. C57BL/6J mice are resistant to arthritis induced by type II bovine collagen, but can develop arthritis when immunized with type II chicken collagen in CFA, and receive a boost of type II chicken collagen in IFA 21 days after the first injection. The concentration of heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37RA (MT) in CFA also differs for each strain. DBA/1J mice develop arthritis with 1 mg/ml MT, while C57BL/6J mice require and 3-4 mg/ml MT in order to develop arthritis. CIA develops slowly in C57BL/6J mice and cases of arthritis are mild when compared to DBA/1J mice. This protocol describes immunization of DBA/1J mice with type II bovine collagen and the immunization of C57BL/6J mice with type II chicken collagen.

  1. Difference in postprandial GLP-1 response despite similar glucose kinetics after consumption of wheat breads with different particle size in healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eelderink, Coby; Noort, Martijn W J; Sozer, Nesli

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Underlying mechanisms of the beneficial health effects of low glycemic index starchy foods are not fully elucidated yet. We varied the wheat particle size to obtain fiber-rich breads with a high and low glycemic response and investigated the differences in postprandial glucose kinetics...... and metabolic response after their consumption. METHODS: Ten healthy male volunteers participated in a randomized, crossover study, consuming (13)C-enriched breads with different structures; a control bread (CB) made from wheat flour combined with wheat bran, and a kernel bread (KB) where 85 % of flour...... in a difference in glucose response and kinetics, but in a pronounced difference in GLP-1 response. Thus, changing the processing conditions of wheat for baking bread can influence the metabolic response beyond glycemia and may therefore influence health....

  2. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) affects the initial response to intravenous glucose: a randomised placebo-controlled cross-over study in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinisch, B B; Vila, G; Resl, M; Riedl, M; Dieplinger, B; Mueller, T; Luger, A; Pacini, G; Clodi, M

    2012-05-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a hormone released from cardiomyocytes in response to cell stretching and elevated in heart failure. Recent observations indicate a distinct connection between chronic heart failure and diabetes mellitus. This study investigated the role of BNP on glucose metabolism. Ten healthy volunteers (25 ± 1 years; BMI 23 ± 1 kg/m(2); fasting glucose 4.6 ± 0.1 mmol/l) were recruited to a participant-blinded investigator-open placebo-controlled cross-over study, performed at a university medical centre. They were randomly assigned (sequentially numbered opaque sealed envelopes) to receive either placebo or 3 pmol kg(-1) min(-1) BNP-32 intravenously during 4 h on study day 1 or 2. One hour after beginning the BNP/placebo infusion, a 3 h intravenous glucose tolerance test (0.33 g/kg glucose + 0.03 U/kg insulin at 20 min) was performed. Plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide were frequently measured. Ten volunteers per group were analysed. BNP increased the initial glucose distribution volume (13 ± 1% body weight vs 11 ± 1%, p < 0.002), leading to an overall reduction in glucose concentration (p < 0.001), particularly during the initial 20 min of the test (p = 0.001), accompanied by a reduction in the initial C-peptide levels (1.42 ± 0.13 vs 1.62 ± 0.10 nmol/l, p = 0.015). BNP had no impact on beta cell function, insulin clearance or insulin sensitivity and induced no adverse effects. Intravenous administration of BNP increases glucose initial distribution volume and lowers plasma glucose concentrations following a glucose load, without affecting beta cell function or insulin sensitivity. These data support the theory that BNP has no diabetogenic properties, but improves metabolic status in men, and suggest new questions regarding BNP-induced differences in glucose availability and signalling in various organs/tissues. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01324739 The study was funded by Jubilée Fonds of the Austrian National Bank (OeNB-Fonds).

  3. Rheology of Heterotypic Collagen Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piechocka, I.K.; van Oosten, A.S.G.; Breuls, R.G.M.; Koenderink, G.H.

    2011-01-01

    Collagen fibrils are the main structural element of connective tissues. In many tissues, these fibrils contain two fibrillar collagens (types I and V) in a ratio that changes during tissue development, regeneration, and various diseases. Here we investigate the influence of collagen composition on

  4. cAMP response element binding protein (CREB activates transcription via two distinct genetic elements of the human glucose-6-phosphatase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Luisa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of glucose-6-phosphatase to glucose, the final step in the gluconeogenic and glycogenolytic pathways. Expression of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene is induced by glucocorticoids and elevated levels of intracellular cAMP. The effect of cAMP in regulating glucose-6-phosphatase gene transcription was corroborated by the identification of two genetic motifs CRE1 and CRE2 in the human and murine glucose-6-phosphatase gene promoter that resemble cAMP response elements (CRE. Results The cAMP response element is a point of convergence for many extracellular and intracellular signals, including cAMP, calcium, and neurotrophins. The major CRE binding protein CREB, a member of the basic region leucine zipper (bZIP family of transcription factors, requires phosphorylation to become a biologically active transcriptional activator. Since unphosphorylated CREB is transcriptionally silent simple overexpression studies cannot be performed to test the biological role of CRE-like sequences of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. The use of a constitutively active CREB2/CREB fusion protein allowed us to uncouple the investigation of target genes of CREB from the variety of signaling pathways that lead to an activation of CREB. Here, we show that this constitutively active CREB2/CREB fusion protein strikingly enhanced reporter gene transcription mediated by either CRE1 or CRE2 derived from the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. Likewise, reporter gene transcription was enhanced following expression of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA in the nucleus of transfected cells. In contrast, activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2, known to compete with CREB for binding to the canonical CRE sequence 5'-TGACGTCA-3', did not transactivate reporter genes containing CRE1, CRE2, or both CREs derived from the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. Conclusions Using a constitutively active CREB2

  5. Glycoprotein VI/Fc receptor γ chain-independent tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of murine platelets by collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvis, Gavin E.; Best, Denise; Watson, Steve P.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the ability of collagen to induce signalling and functional responses in suspensions of murine platelets deficient in the FcRγ (Fc receptor γ) chain, which lack the collagen receptor GPVI (glycoprotein VI). In the absence of the FcRγ chain, collagen induced a unique pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation which was potentiated by the thromboxane analogue U46619. Immunoprecipitation studies indicated that neither collagen alone nor the combination of collagen plus U46619 induc...

  6. The postprandial glucose response to some varieties of commercially available gluten-free pasta: a comparison between healthy and celiac subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchetti, T; Saturni, L; Turco, I; Ferretti, G

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the present paper is to evaluate the post-prandial response to some varieties of gluten free (GF) pasta that are commonly consumed in Italy. The glycaemic responses were compared with a glucose standard in healthy subjects and gluten-free diet celiac subjects. Subjects were served portions of the test foods and a standard food (glucose), on separate occasions, each containing 50 g available carbohydrates. Capillary blood glucose was measured from finger-prick samples in fasted subjects and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 minutes after the consumption of each test food. For each type of pasta, the glycaemic index (GI) was calculated by expressing the incremental area under the blood glucose curve as a percentage of each subject's average incremental area under the blood glucose curve (AUC) for the standard food. Gluten free pasta exhibited a range of GI values from 46 to 66. The glycaemic load (GL) and glycaemic profile (GP) were also calculated. A higher GI value was observed in pasta containing rice flour as the main ingredient. Lower values were observed in pasta obtained using corn or a mixture of corn and rice flour as the main ingredients. The results were confirmed in celiac subjects. The information presented in this paper may be useful in helping celiac people to select low-GI pasta.

  7. Pancreatic beta cells from db/db mice show cell-specific [Ca2+]i and NADH responses to glucose but not to alpha-ketoisocaproic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Larsson-Nyrén, Gerd; Lindström, Per

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We recently showed that timing and magnitude of the glucose-induced cytoplasmic calcium [Ca2+]i response are reproducible and specific for the individual beta cell. We now wanted to identify which step(s) of stimulus-secretion coupling determine the cell specificity of the [Ca2+]i resp...

  8. Pancreatic Endoderm-Derived From Diabetic Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Generates Glucose-Responsive Insulin-Secreting Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaei, Bahareh; Shamsara, Mehdi; Amirabad, Leila Mohammadi; Massumi, Mohammad; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-10-01

    Human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can potentially serve as an invaluable source for cell replacement therapy and allow the creation of patient- and disease-specific stem cells without the controversial use of embryos and avoids any immunological incompatibility. The generation of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells from pluripotent stem cells in vitro provides an unprecedented cell source for personal drug discovery and cell transplantation therapy in diabetes. A new five-step protocol was introduced in this study, effectively induced hiPSCs to differentiate into glucose-responsive insulin-producing cells. This process mimics in vivo pancreatic organogenesis by directing cells through stages resembling definitive endoderm, primitive gut-tube endoderm, posterior foregut, pancreatic endoderm, and endocrine precursor. Each stage of differentiation were characterized by stage-specific markers. The produced cells exhibited many properties of functional β-cells, including expression of critical β-cells transcription factors, the potency to secrete C-peptide in response to high levels of glucose and the presence of mature endocrine secretory granules. This high efficient differentiation protocol, established in this study, yielded 79.18% insulin-secreting cells which were responsive to glucose five times higher than the basal level. These hiPSCs-derived glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells might provide a promising approach for the treatment of type I diabetes mellitus. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2616-2625, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Slowly and rapidly digestible starchy foods can elicit a similar glycemic response because of differential tissue glucose uptake in healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eelderink, C.; Schepers, M.; Preston, T.; Vonk, R.J.; Oudhuis, L.; Priebe, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previously we observed that the consumption of pasta and bread resulted in a similar glycemic response, despite a slower intestinal influx rate of glucose from the pasta. Underlying mechanisms of this effect were not clear. Objective: The objective was to investigate the differences in

  10. Metabolic regulation of collagen gel contraction by porcine aortic valvular interstitial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Peter I.; Qu, Xin; Geiszler, Andrew M.; Nagrath, Deepak; Harmancey, Romain; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2014-01-01

    Despite a high incidence of calcific aortic valve disease in metabolic syndrome, there is little information about the fundamental metabolism of heart valves. Cell metabolism is a first responder to chemical and mechanical stimuli, but it is unknown how such signals employed in valve tissue engineering impact valvular interstitial cell (VIC) biology and valvular disease pathogenesis. In this study porcine aortic VICs were seeded into three-dimensional collagen gels and analysed for gel contraction, lactate production and glucose consumption in response to manipulation of metabolic substrates, including glucose, galactose, pyruvate and glutamine. Cell viability was also assessed in two-dimensional culture. We found that gel contraction was sensitive to metabolic manipulation, particularly in nutrient-depleted medium. Contraction was optimal at an intermediate glucose concentration (2 g l−1) with less contraction with excess (4.5 g l−1) or reduced glucose (1 g l−1). Substitution with galactose delayed contraction and decreased lactate production. In low sugar concentrations, pyruvate depletion reduced contraction. Glutamine depletion reduced cell metabolism and viability. Our results suggest that nutrient depletion and manipulation of metabolic substrates impacts the viability, metabolism and contractile behaviour of VICs. Particularly, hyperglycaemic conditions can reduce VIC interaction with and remodelling of the extracellular matrix. These results begin to link VIC metabolism and macroscopic behaviour such as cell–matrix interaction. PMID:25320066

  11. Different apoptotic responses of human and bovine pericytes to fluctuating glucose levels and protective role of thiamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltramo, Elena; Berrone, Elena; Tarallo, Sonia; Porta, Massimo

    2009-09-01

    Vascular cells in diabetes are subjected to daily fluctuations from high to low glucose. We aimed at investigating whether pulsed exposure to different glucose concentrations influences apoptosis in human retinal pericytes (HRP) versus bovine retinal pericytes (BRP), with consequences on the onset of diabetic retinopathy, and the possible protective role of thiamine. BRP and HRP (wild-type and immortalized) were grown in physiological/high glucose for 7 days, and then returned to physiological glucose for another 24, 48 or 72 h. Cells were also kept intermittently at 48-h intervals in high/normal glucose for 8 days, with/without thiamine/benfotiamine. Apoptosis was determined through ELISA, TUNEL, Bcl-2, Bax and p53 expression/concentration. Continuous exposure to high glucose increased apoptosis in BRP, but not HRP. BRP apoptosis normalized within 24 h of physiological glucose re-entry, while HRP apoptosis increased within 24-48 h of re-entry. Intermittent exposure to high glucose increased apoptosis in HRP and BRP. Bcl-2/Bax results were consistent with DNA fragmentation, while p53 was unchanged. Thiamine and benfotiamine countered intermittent high glucose-induced apoptosis. Human pericytes are less prone to apoptosis induced by persistently high glucose than bovine cells. However, while BRP recover after returning to physiological levels, HRP are more vulnerable to both downwardly fluctuating glucose levels and intermittent exposure. These findings reinforce the hypotheses that (1) glycaemic fluctuations play a role in the development of diabetic retinopathy and (2) species-specific models are needed. Thiamine and benfotiamine prevent human pericyte apoptosis, indicating this vitamin as an inexpensive approach to the prevention and/or treatment of diabetic complications.

  12. Glucose Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Glucose Sensing is the eleventh volume in the popular series Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, edited by Drs. Chris D. Geddes and Joseph R. Lakowicz. This volume incorporates authoritative analytical fluorescence-based glucose sensing reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. Glucose Sensing is an essential reference for any lab working in the analytical fluorescence glucose sensing field. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of glucose sensing, and diabetes care & management, will find this volume an invaluable resource. Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy Volume 11, Glucose Sensing Chapters include: Implantable Sensors for Interstitial Fluid Smart Tattoo Glucose Sensors Optical Enzyme-based Glucose Biosensors Plasmonic Glucose Sens...

  13. Zinc transporter ZIP14 functions in hepatic zinc, iron and glucose homeostasis during the innate immune response (endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolunay Beker Aydemir

    Full Text Available ZIP14 (slc39A14 is a zinc transporter induced in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli. ZIP14 induction accompanies the reduction in serum zinc (hypozincemia of acute inflammation. ZIP14 can transport Zn(2+ and non-transferrin-bound Fe(2+ in vitro. Using a Zip14(-/- mouse model we demonstrated that ZIP14 was essential for control of phosphatase PTP1B activity and phosphorylation of c-Met during liver regeneration. In the current studies, a global screening of ZIP transporter gene expression in response to LPS-induced endotoxemia was conducted. Following LPS, Zip14 was the most highly up-regulated Zip transcript in liver, but also in white adipose tissue and muscle. Using ZIP14(-/- mice we show that ZIP14 contributes to zinc absorption from the gastrointestinal tract directly or indirectly as zinc absorption was decreased in the KOs. In contrast, Zip14(-/- mice absorbed more iron. The Zip14 KO mice did not exhibit hypozincemia following LPS, but do have hypoferremia. Livers of Zip14-/- mice had increased transcript abundance for hepcidin, divalent metal transporter-1, ferritin and transferrin receptor-1 and greater accumulation of iron. The Zip14(-/- phenotype included greater body fat, hypoglycemia and higher insulin levels, as well as increased liver glucose and greater phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and increased GLUT2, SREBP-1c and FASN expression. The Zip14 KO mice exhibited decreased circulating IL-6 with increased hepatic SOCS-3 following LPS, suggesting SOCS-3 inhibited insulin signaling which produced the hypoglycemia in this genotype. The results are consistent with ZIP14 ablation yielding abnormal labile zinc pools which lead to increased SOCS-3 production through G-coupled receptor activation and increased cAMP production as well as signaled by increased pSTAT3 via the IL-6 receptor, which inhibits IRS 1/2 phosphorylation. Our data show the role of ZIP14 in the hepatocyte is multi-functional since zinc and iron trafficking are

  14. Collagen turnover after tibial fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joerring, S; Krogsgaard, M; Wilbek, H

    1994-01-01

    Collagen turnover after tibial fractures was examined in 16 patients with fracture of the tibial diaphysis and in 8 patients with fracture in the tibial condyle area by measuring sequential changes in serological markers of turnover of types I and III collagen for up to 26 weeks after fracture....... The markers were the carboxy-terminal extension peptide of type I procollagen (PICP), the amino-terminal extension peptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP), and the pyridinoline cross-linked carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP). The latter is a new serum marker of degradation of type I...... collagen. A group comparison showed characteristic sequential changes in the turnover of types I and III collagen in fractures of the tibial diaphysis and tibial condyles. The turnover of type III collagen reached a maximum after 2 weeks in both groups. The synthesis of type I collagen reached a maximum...

  15. Ginkgolide B Suppresses TLR4-Mediated Inflammatory Response by Inhibiting the Phosphorylation of JAK2/STAT3 and p38 MAPK in High Glucose-Treated HUVECs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Ginkgolide B is a Ginkgo biloba leaf extract that has been identified as a natural platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR antagonist. We investigated the effect of ginkgolide B on high glucose-induced TLR4 activation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Methods. Protein expression was analyzed by immunoblotting. Small-interfering RNA (siRNA was used to knock down PAFR and TLR4 expression. Results. Ginkgolide B suppressed the expression of TLR4 and MyD88 that was induced by high glucose. Ginkgolide B also reduced the levels of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1, interleukin-6, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1. Further, we examined the association between PAFR and TLR4 by coimmunoprecipitation. The result showed that high glucose treatment caused the binding of PAFR and TLR4, whereas ginkgolide B abolished this binding. The functional analysis indicated that PAFR siRNA treatment reduced TLR4 expression, and TLR4 siRNA treatment decreased PAFR expression in high glucose-treated HUVECs, further supporting the coimmunoprecipitation data. Ginkgolide B inhibited the phosphorylation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK. Conclusion. Ginkgolide B exerted protective effects by inhibiting the TLR4-mediated inflammatory response in high glucose-treated endothelial cells. The mechanism of action of ginkgolide B might be associated with inhibition of the JAK2/STAT3 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation.

  16. Type VI collagen turnover-related peptides-novel serological biomarkers of muscle mass and anabolic response to loading in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedergaard, Anders; Sun, Shu; Karsdal, Morten A; Henriksen, Kim; Kjær, Michael; Lou, Yunyun; He, Yi; Zheng, Qinlong; Suetta, Charlotte

    2013-12-01

    Immobilization-induced loss of muscle mass is a complex phenomenon with several parallels to sarcopenic and cachectic muscle loss. Muscle is a large organ with a protein turnover that is orders of magnitude larger than most other tissues. Thus, we hypothesize that muscle loss and regain is reflected by peptide biomarkers derived from type VI collagen processing released in the circulation. In order to test this hypothesis, we set out to develop an ELISA assay against an type VI collagen N-terminal globular domain epitope (IC6) and measured the levels of IC6 and an MMP-generated degradation fragment of collagen 6, (C6M) in a human immobilization-remobilization study setup with young (n = 11) and old (n = 9) men. They were subjected to 2 weeks of unilateral lower limb immobilization followed by 4 weeks of remobilization including thrice weekly resistance training, using the contralateral leg as internal controls. Subjects were sampled for strength, quadriceps muscle volume and blood at baseline (PRE), post-immobilization (2W), and post-remobilization (4W). Blood were subsequently analyzed for levels of the C6M and IC6 biomarkers. We subsequently tested if there was any correlation between C6M, IC6, or the C6M/IC6 ratio and muscle mass or strength at baseline. We also tested whether there was any relation between these biomarkers and changes in muscle mass or strength with immobilization or remobilization. The model produced significant loss of muscle mass and strength in the immobilized leg. This loss was bigger in young subjects than in elderly, but whereas the young recovered almost fully, the elderly had limited regrowth of muscle. We found a significant correlation between IC6 and muscle mass at baseline in young subjects (R (2) = 0.6563, p = 0.0045), but none in the elderly. We also found a significant correlation between C6M measured at the 4W time point and the change in muscle mass during remobilization, again only manifesting in the young

  17. A Study of the Insulin and the C-Peptide Responses to Oral Glucose Load in Nondiabetic and Diabetic Subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myung Chul; Choi, Sung Jae; Kim, Eung Jin; Koh, Chang Soon; Min, Hun Ki [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1977-03-15

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the significance of the insulin and the C-peptide response to oral glucose loads in normal and diabetic subjects and to establish the effects of the obesity. In this study, the authors have measured plasma insulin and C-peptide by means of radioimmunoassay in 10 nonobese normal, 5 obese normal, 13 nonobese moderate diabetic patients, 9 obese moderate diabetic patients and 9 severe diabetic patients. The results obtained were as follows; 1) In 10 nonobese normal subjects, the plasma insulin level at fasting state and at 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after oral glucose loads were 15.7+-3.4, 48.3+-9.8, 40.4+-6.7, 37.4+-6.5 and 26.0+-4.2 uU/ml (Mean+-S.E.) and C-peptide were 1.9+-0.3, 3.9+-0.6, 6.3+-0.6, 5.7+-0.5 and 4.0+-0.5 ng/ml. The change of C-peptide was found to go almost parallel with that of insulin and the insulin value reaches to the highest level at 30 min whereas C-peptide reaches to its peak at 60 min.. 2) The plasma insulin level in 5 obese normal subjects were 38.9+-12.3, 59.5+-12.3, 59.2+-17.1, 56.1+-20.0 and 48.4+-17.2 uU/ml and the C-peptide were 5.5+-0.4, 6.8+-0.5, 7.9+-0.8, 7.9+-0.8 and 7.8+-2.0 ng/ml. The insulin response appeared to be greater than nonobese normal subjects. 3) In 13 nonobese moderate diabetic patients, the plasma insulin levels were 27.1+-4.9, 44.1+-6.0, 37.3+-6.6, 35.5+-8.1 and 34.7+-10.7 uU/ml and the C-peptide levels were 2.7+-0.4, 4.9+-0.7, 6.5+-0.5, 7.0+-0.3 and 6.7+-1.0 ng/ml. There was little significance compared to nonobese normal groups but delayed pattern is noted. 4) In 9 obese moderated diabetic patients, the plasma insulin levels were 22.1+-7.9, 80.0+-19.3, 108.0+-27.0, 62.0+-17.6 and 55.5+-10.l uU/ml and the C-peptide levels were 5.2+-0.4, 8.0+-1.0, 10.4+-1.6, 10.4+-1.7 and 10.1+-1.0 ng/ml and its response was also greater than that of nonobese moderate diabetic patients. 5) The plasma insulin concentrations in 9 severe diabetic subjects were 8.0+-3.8, 12.1+-3.5, 16.8+-4.6, 19

  18. Fucoidan as an inhibitor of thermally induced collagen glycation examined by acetate electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielesz, Anna; Paluch, Jadwiga

    2014-08-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation (Maillard reaction) in vitro could be a simple method to obtain glycoconjugates for studying their biological properties. Hence, fucoidan was retained by acetate electrophoresis indicating a strong interaction with the protein. A loss of colour in fucoidan bands was found for samples incubated with collagen as compared with samples of free fucoidan. Also under in vitro conditions at 100°C - simulating a sudden burn incident - fucoidan binds with collagen as a result of the Maillard reaction. In contrast, the colour of the fucoidan bands intensified for samples incubated with collagen, with the addition of glucose. Electrophoretic analyses were carried out after heating the samples to a temperature simulating a burn incident. The bands were found to intensify for samples incubated with collagen during a 30-day-long incubation. Thus, spontaneous in vitro glycation - i.e. without the addition of glucose - was confirmed. This process is highly intensified both by the temperature and time of incubation. For a sample incubated in vitro in a fucoidan solution containing glucose, glycation was confirmed in a preliminary FTIR and acetate electrophoresis examinations, occurring in collagen obtained from chicken skins. In particular, a new band emerging around 1746 cm(-1) was observed for above samples, as was its increasing intensity, as compared with samples without the addition of glucose. In the collagen glycation assay, while glucose reacts with collagen and forms cross-linked aggregates, fucoidan decreases the process of aggregation and recovery of native collagen. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Electrophoretic mobility patterns of collagen following laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Lawrence S.; Moazami, Nader; Pocsidio, Joanne O.; Oz, Mehmet C.; LoGerfo, Paul; Treat, Michael R.

    1991-06-01

    Clinical application of laser vascular anastomosis in inhibited by a lack of understanding of its mechanism. Whether tissue fusion results from covalent or non-covalent bonding of collagen and other structural proteins is unknown. We compared electrophoretic mobility of collagen in laser treated and untreated specimens of rat tail tendon (>90% type I collagen) and rabbit aorta. Welding was performed, using tissue shrinkage as the clinical endpoint, using the 808 nm diode laser (power density 14 watts/cm2) and topical indocyanine green dye (max absorption 805 nm). Collagen was extracted with 8 M urea (denaturing), 0.5 M acetic acid (non-denaturing) and acetic acid/pepsin (cleaves non- helical protein). Mobility patterns on gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) after urea or acetic acid extraction were identical in the lasered and control tendon and vessel (confirmed by optical densitometry), revealing no evidence of formation of novel covalent bonds. Alpha and beta band intensity was diminished in pepsin incubated lasered specimens compared with controls (optical density ratio 0.00 +/- 9 tendon, 0.65 +/- 0.12 aorta), indicating the presence of denatured collagen. With the laser parameters used, collagen is denatured without formation of covalent bonds, suggesting that non-covalent interaction between denatured collagen molecules may be responsible for the weld. Based on this mechanism, welding parameters can be chosen which produce collagen denaturation without cell death.

  20. SAD-A potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion as a mediator of glucagon-like peptide 1 response in pancreatic β cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jia; Lilley, Brendan N; Pan, Y Albert; Faruque, Omar; Liu, Xiaolei; Zhang, Weiping; Sanes, Joshua R; Han, Xiao; Shi, Yuguang

    2013-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by defective glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β cells, which can be restored by glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), an incretin hormone commonly used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, molecular mechanisms by which GLP-1 affects glucose responsiveness in islet β cells remain poorly understood. Here we investigated a role of SAD-A, an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-related kinase, in regulating GSIS in mice with conditional SAD-A deletion. We show that selective deletion of SAD-A in pancreas impaired incretin's effect on GSIS, leading to glucose intolerance. Conversely, overexpression of SAD-A significantly enhanced GSIS and further potentiated GLP-1's effect on GSIS from isolated mouse islets. In support of SAD-A as a mediator of incretin response, SAD-A is expressed exclusively in pancreas and brain, the primary targeting tissues of GLP-1 action. Additionally, SAD-A kinase is activated in response to stimulation by GLP-1 through cyclic AMP (cAMP)/Ca(2+)-dependent signaling pathways in islet β cells. Furthermore, we identified Thr443 as a key autoinhibitory phosphorylation site which mediates SAD-A's effect on incretin response in islet β cells. Consequently, ablation of Thr443 significantly enhanced GLP-1's effect on GSIS from isolated mouse islets. Together, these findings identified SAD-A kinase as a pancreas-specific mediator of incretin response in islet β cells.

  1. Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals altered transcriptional response of ADH-genes to glucose stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhlberg, Anders; Elbing, Karin; Andrade-Garda, José Manuel; Sjögreen, Björn; Forootan, Amin; Kubista, Mikael

    2008-04-16

    The large sensitivity, high reproducibility and essentially unlimited dynamic range of real-time PCR to measure gene expression in complex samples provides the opportunity for powerful multivariate and multiway studies of biological phenomena. In multiway studies samples are characterized by their expression profiles to monitor changes over time, effect of treatment, drug dosage etc. Here we perform a multiway study of the temporal response of four yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different glucose uptake rates upon altered metabolic conditions. We measured the expression of 18 genes as function of time after addition of glucose to four strains of yeast grown in ethanol. The data are analyzed by matrix-augmented PCA, which is a generalization of PCA for 3-way data, and the results are confirmed by hierarchical clustering and clustering by Kohonen self-organizing map. Our approach identifies gene groups that respond similarly to the change of nutrient, and genes that behave differently in mutant strains. Of particular interest is our finding that ADH4 and ADH6 show a behavior typical of glucose-induced genes, while ADH3 and ADH5 are repressed after glucose addition. Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling is a powerful technique which can be utilized to characterize functions of new genes by, for example, comparing their temporal response after perturbation in different genetic variants of the studied subject. The technique also identifies genes that show perturbed expression in specific strains.

  2. Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals altered transcriptional response of ADH-genes to glucose stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade-Garda José

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The large sensitivity, high reproducibility and essentially unlimited dynamic range of real-time PCR to measure gene expression in complex samples provides the opportunity for powerful multivariate and multiway studies of biological phenomena. In multiway studies samples are characterized by their expression profiles to monitor changes over time, effect of treatment, drug dosage etc. Here we perform a multiway study of the temporal response of four yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different glucose uptake rates upon altered metabolic conditions. Results We measured the expression of 18 genes as function of time after addition of glucose to four strains of yeast grown in ethanol. The data are analyzed by matrix-augmented PCA, which is a generalization of PCA for 3-way data, and the results are confirmed by hierarchical clustering and clustering by Kohonen self-organizing map. Our approach identifies gene groups that respond similarly to the change of nutrient, and genes that behave differently in mutant strains. Of particular interest is our finding that ADH4 and ADH6 show a behavior typical of glucose-induced genes, while ADH3 and ADH5 are repressed after glucose addition. Conclusion Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling is a powerful technique which can be utilized to characterize functions of new genes by, for example, comparing their temporal response after perturbation in different genetic variants of the studied subject. The technique also identifies genes that show perturbed expression in specific strains.

  3. Gastric emptying of orally administered glucose solutions and incretin hormone responses are unaffected by laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usinger, Lotte; Hansen, Katrine B; Kristiansen, Viggo B

    2011-01-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) provides weight loss in obese individuals and is associated with improved glucose homeostasis and resolution of type 2 diabetes. However, in most available reports, potentially inappropriate methodology has been applied when measuring the impact...

  4. Effect of whey on blood glucose and insulin responses to composite breakfast and lunch meals in type 2 diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frid, Anders H; Nilsson, Mikael; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    glycemic index (GI) with whey proteins may increase insulin secretion and improve blood glucose control in type 2 diabetic subjects. DESIGN: Fourteen diet-treated subjects with type 2 diabetes were served a high-GI breakfast (white bread) and subsequent high-GI lunch (mashed potatoes with meatballs...... insulin release and reduces postprandial blood glucose excursion after a lunch meal consisting of mashed potatoes and meatballs in type 2 diabetic subjects....

  5. Collagen macromolecular drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine collagen for use as a macromolecular drug delivery system by determining the mechanism of release through a matrix. Collagen membranes varying in porosity, crosslinking density, structure and crosslinker were fabricated. Collagen characterized by infrared spectroscopy and solution viscosity was determined to be pure and native. The collagen membranes were determined to possess native vs. non-native quaternary structure and porous vs. dense aggregate membranes by electron microscopy. Collagen monolithic devices containing a model macromolecule (inulin) were fabricated. In vitro release rates were found to be linear with respect to t 1/2 and were affected by crosslinking density, crosslinker and structure. The biodegradation of the collagen matrix was also examined. In vivo biocompatibility, degradation and 14 C-inulin release rates were evaluated subcutaneously in rats

  6. Dynamics of Nampt/visfatin and high molecular weight adiponectin in response to oral glucose load in obese and lean women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlütürk, Uğur; Harmanci, Ayla; Yildiz, Bülent Okan; Bayraktar, Miyase

    2010-04-01

    High molecular weight adiponectin (HMWA) is the active circulating form of adiponectin. Nampt/visfatin is the enzyme secreted from adipocytes in an active form and is one of the putative regulators of insulin secretion. To investigate the dynamics of total adiponectin (TA), HMWA and Nampt/visfatin in obese and lean women during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). We studied normal glucose-tolerant (NGT), age-matched, 30 obese and 30 lean women. All subjects underwent a standard 75 g, 2-h OGTT, and area under the curve (AUC) during OGTT for glucose, insulin, Nampt/visfatin, TA and HMWA was calculated. Body fat mass was assessed by bioimpedance analysis. Results Obese women had significantly higher basal and AUC values for insulin and Nampt/visfatin, whereas basal and AUC-HMWA were significantly lower in this group. Alternatively, obese and lean groups had similar basal and AUC values for glucose and TA. Basal insulin levels were negatively correlated with HMWA levels, but not with basal Nampt/visfatin. AUC-insulin was correlated positively with AUC-visfatin, and negatively with AUC-HMWA. Total and truncal body fat mass showed positive correlation with basal and AUC-visfatin, and negative correlation with basal and AUC-HMWA. In the NGT state, obese women have higher Nampt/visfatin and lower HMWA levels, both basally and in response to oral glucose challenge. The dynamics of Nampt/visfatin and HMWA during OGTT appear to be linked with insulin and adiposity. Counter-regulatory adaptations in HMWA and Nampt/visfatin might have an impact on suggested adipoinsular axis, contributing to maintenance of normal glucose tolerance.

  7. LARP6 Meets Collagen mRNA: Specific Regulation of Type I Collagen Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Type I collagen is the most abundant structural protein in all vertebrates, but its constitutive rate of synthesis is low due to long half-life of the protein (60–70 days. However, several hundred fold increased production of type I collagen is often seen in reparative or reactive fibrosis. The mechanism which is responsible for this dramatic upregulation is complex, including multiple levels of regulation. However, posttranscriptional regulation evidently plays a predominant role. Posttranscriptional regulation comprises processing, transport, stabilization and translation of mRNAs and is executed by RNA binding proteins. There are about 800 RNA binding proteins, but only one, La ribonucleoprotein domain family member 6 (LARP6, is specifically involved in type I collagen regulation. In the 5′untranslated region (5’UTR of mRNAs encoding for type I and type III collagens there is an evolutionally conserved stem-loop (SL structure; this structure is not found in any other mRNA, including any other collagen mRNA. LARP6 binds to the 5′SL in sequence specific manner to regulate stability of collagen mRNAs and their translatability. Here, we will review current understanding of how is LARP6 involved in posttranscriptional regulation of collagen mRNAs. We will also discuss how other proteins recruited by LARP6, including nonmuscle myosin, vimentin, serine threonine kinase receptor associated protein (STRAP, 25 kD FK506 binding protein (FKBP25 and RNA helicase A (RHA, contribute to this process.

  8. Endosperm and whole grain rye breads are characterized by low post-prandial insulin response and a beneficial blood glucose profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Östman Elin M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rye products have previously been shown to induce comparatively low post-prandial insulin responses; irrespectively of their glycaemic indices (GI. However, the mechanism behind this lowered insulin demand remains unknown. An improved insulin economy might contribute to the benefits seen in epidemiological studies with whole grain diets on metabolic risk factors and weight regulation. The objective of this study was to explore the mechanism for a reduced post-prandial insulin demand with rye products. Methods 12 healthy subjects were given flour based rye products made from endosperm, whole grain or bran, produced with different methods (baking, simulated sour-dough baking and boiling as breakfasts in random order in a cross-over design. White wheat bread (WWB was used as a reference. Blood glucose, serum insulin, plasma ghrelin and subjective satiety were measured during 180 minutes. To evaluate the course of post-meal glycaemia, a measure of the glycaemic profile (GP was introduced defined as the duration for the incremental post-prandial blood glucose response divided with the blood glucose incremental peak (min/mM. Results The study shows that whole grain rye breads and endosperm rye products induced significantly (p Conclusion Our study shows that endosperm and wholegrain rye products induce low acute insulinaemic responses and improved glycaemic profiles. The results also suggest that the rye products possess beneficial appetite regulating properties. Further studies are needed to identify the unknown property or bioactive component(s responsible for these beneficial metabolic features of rye.

  9. Collagens - structure, function and biosynthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Gelse, K; Poschl, E; Aigner, T

    2003-01-01

    The extracellular matrix represents a complex alloy of variable members of diverse protein families defining structural integrity and various physiological functions. The most abundant family is the collagens with more than 20 different collagen types identified so far. Collagens are centrally involved in the formation of fibrillar and microfibrillar networks of the extracellular matrix, basement membranes as well as other structures of the extracellular matrix. This review focuses on the dis...

  10. Effects of dietary energy allowance and decline in dry matter intake during the dry period on responses to glucose and insulin in transition dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salin, S; Vanhatalo, A; Elo, K; Taponen, J; Boston, R C; Kokkonen, T

    2017-07-01

    We assessed whether high energy intake during the early dry period [144% of metabolizable energy (ME) requirements/d] followed by a gradual restriction of energy intake in the close-up dry period (119% of ME/d; HEI) impaired whole-body insulin sensitivity compared with a controlled energy intake (100% of ME/d; CEI) throughout the 6-wk dry period. Multiparous Ayrshire dairy cows (n = 16) were blocked by body weight, body condition score, and expected date of parturition and were used in a randomized complete block design until 10 d after parturition. Cows were fed either HEI or CEI diets based on grass silage during the first 3 wk of the dry period and grass silage supplemented with a commercial concentrate (30% of ME intake) during the final 3 wk of gestation. After calving, all cows were fed grass silage ad libitum and an increasing amount of commercial concentrate (maximum 9 kg at d 10 postpartum). Intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTT) and intravenous insulin challenges were performed -10 ± 5 d (n = 15) and +10 ± 1 d (n = 14) relative to parturition. Following glucose injection, we did not find any treatment effects on glucose and insulin responses. The prepartal nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) response of the HEI group was blunted, basal NEFA and the decrement of NEFA were smaller, and the area under the response curve (AUC) of NEFA was less negative in HEI cows than in CEI cows. The NEFA response reversed after parturition; the NEFA AUC of the HEI group was more negative than that of the CEI group. We did not find similar responses after insulin injection. Across the treatments, NEFA AUC correlated strongly with the basal NEFA concentration during the IVGTT pre- and postpartum. Calculated and model-based indices characterizing the overall glucose tolerance and β-cell function and the insulin sensitivity were higher after parturition than during the dry period. Consistent with the lower basal insulin, the acute insulin release after the glucose infusion

  11. Peroxidase enzymes regulate collagen extracellular matrix biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Rayner, Timothy E; Borowicz, Romana A; Greenwood, John E; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase are heme-containing enzymes often physically associated with fibrotic tissue and cancer in various organs, without any direct involvement in promoting fibroblast recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) biosynthesis at these sites. We report herein novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes possess a well-conserved profibrogenic capacity to stimulate the migration of fibroblastic cells and promote their ability to secrete collagenous proteins to generate a functional ECM both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured fibroblasts show that these cells are capable of rapidly binding and internalizing both myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase. Peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl 4-hydroxylase-dependent manner that does not require ascorbic acid. This response was blocked by the irreversible myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-amino-benzoic acid hydrazide, indicating peroxidase catalytic activity is essential for collagen biosynthesis. These results suggest that peroxidase enzymes, such as myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase, may play a fundamental role in regulating the recruitment of fibroblast and the biosynthesis of collagen ECM at sites of normal tissue repair and fibrosis, with enormous implications for many disease states where infiltrating inflammatory cells deposit peroxidases. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Roles of p300 and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein in high glucose-induced hypoxia-inducible factor 1α inactivation under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lingtao; Yang, Minlie; Zhao, Tianlan; Lv, Guozhong

    2017-05-01

    Given the high prevalence of diabetes and burn injuries worldwide, it is essential to dissect the underlying mechanism of delayed burn wound healing in diabetes patients, especially the high glucose-induced hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1)-mediated transcription defects. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were cultured with low or high concentrations of glucose. HIF-1α-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) transcription was measured by luciferase assay. Immunofluorescence staining was carried out to visualize cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB) localization. Immunoprecipitation was carried out to characterize the association between HIF-1α/p300/CREB. To test whether p300, CREB or p300+CREB co-overexpression was sufficient to rescue the HIF-1-mediated transcription defect after high glucose exposure, p300, CREB or p300+CREB co-overexpression were engineered, and VEGF expression was quantified. Finally, in vitro angiogenesis assay was carried out to test whether the high glucose-induced angiogenesis defect is rescuable by p300 and CREB co-overexpression. Chronic high glucose treatment resulted in impaired HIF-1-induced VEGF transcription and CREB exclusion from the nucleus. P300 or CREB overexpression alone cannot rescue high glucose-induced HIF-1α transcription defects. In contrast, co-overexpression of p300 and CREB dramatically ameliorated high glucose-induced impairment of HIF-1-mediated VEGF transcription, as well as in vitro angiogenesis. Finally, we showed that co-overexpression of p300 and CREB rectifies the dissociation of HIF-1α-p300-CREB protein complex in chronic high glucose-treated cells. Both p300 and CREB are required for the function integrity of HIF-1α transcription machinery and subsequent angiogenesis, suggesting future studies to improve burn wound healing might be directed to optimization of the interaction between p300, CREB and HIF-1α. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes

  13. The pathophysiology of diabetes involves a defective amplification of the late-phase insulin response to glucose by glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide-regardless of etiology and phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina; Knop, F K; Krarup, T

    2003-01-01

    [maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY)3]; and 5) newly diagnosed type 1 diabetic patients. All participants underwent three hyperglycemic clamps (2 h, 15 mM) with continuous infusion of saline, 1 pmol GLP-1 (7-36)amide/kg body weight.min or 4 pmol GIP pmol/kg body weight.min. The early-phase (0-20 min......The effect of the insulinotropic incretin hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), is preserved in typical middle-aged, obese, insulin-resistant type 2 diabetic patients, whereas a defective amplification of the so-called late-phase plasma insulin response (20-120 min) to glucose by the other...... incretin hormone, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), is seen in these patients. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate plasma insulin and C-peptide responses to GLP-1 and GIP in five groups of diabetic patients with etiology and phenotype distinct from the obese type 2...

  14. Calcineurin Aβ regulates NADPH oxidase (Nox) expression and activity via nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) in response to high glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Clintoria R; Gooch, Jennifer L

    2014-02-21

    Hypertrophy is an adaptive response that enables organs to appropriately meet increased functional demands. Previously, we reported that calcineurin (Cn) is required for glomerular and whole kidney hypertrophy in diabetic rodents (Gooch, J. L., Barnes, J. L., Garcia, S., and Abboud, H. E. (2003). Calcineurin is activated in diabetes and is required for glomerular hypertrophy and ECM accumulation. Am. J. Physiol. Renal Physiol. 284, F144-F154; Reddy, R. N., Knotts, T. L., Roberts, B. R., Molkentin, J. D., Price, S. R., and Gooch, J. L. (2011). Calcineurin Aβ is required for hypertrophy but not matrix expansion in the diabetic kidney. J. Cell Mol. Med. 15, 414-422). Because studies have also implicated the reactive oxygen species-generating enzymes NADPH oxidases (Nox) in diabetic kidney responses, we tested the hypothesis that Nox and Cn cooperate in a common signaling pathway. First, we examined the role of the two main isoforms of Cn in hypertrophic signaling. Using primary kidney cells lacking a catalytic subunit of Cn (CnAα(-/-) or CnAβ(-/-)), we found that high glucose selectively activates CnAβ, whereas CnAα is constitutively active. Furthermore, CnAβ but not CnAα mediates hypertrophy. Next, we found that chronic reactive oxygen species generation in response to high glucose is attenuated in CnAβ(-/-) cells, suggesting that Cn is upstream of Nox. Consistent with this, loss of CnAβ reduces basal expression and blocks high glucose induction of Nox2 and Nox4. Inhibition of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), a CnAβ-regulated transcription factor, decreases Nox2 and Nox4 expression, whereas NFAT overexpression increases Nox2 and Nox4, indicating that the CnAβ/NFAT pathway modulates Nox. These data reveal that the CnAβ/NFAT pathway regulates Nox and plays an important role in high glucose-mediated hypertrophic responses in the kidney.

  15. c-Jun amino-terminal kinase-1 mediates glucose-responsive upregulation of the RNA editing enzyme ADAR2 in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    Full Text Available A-to-I RNA editing catalyzed by the two main members of the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR family, ADAR1 and ADAR2, represents a RNA-based recoding mechanism implicated in a variety of cellular processes. Previously we have demonstrated that the expression of ADAR2 in pancreatic islet β-cells is responsive to the metabolic cues and ADAR2 deficiency affects regulated cellular exocytosis. To investigate the molecular mechanism by which ADAR2 is metabolically regulated, we found that in cultured β-cells and primary islets, the stress-activated protein kinase JNK1 mediates the upregulation of ADAR2 in response to changes of the nutritional state. In parallel with glucose induction of ADAR2 expression, JNK phosphorylation was concurrently increased in insulin-secreting INS-1 β-cells. Pharmacological inhibition of JNKs or siRNA knockdown of the expression of JNK1 prominently suppressed glucose-augmented ADAR2 expression, resulting in decreased efficiency of ADAR2 auto-editing. Consistently, the mRNA expression of Adar2 was selectively reduced in the islets from JNK1 null mice in comparison with that of wild-type littermates or JNK2 null mice, and ablation of JNK1 diminished high-fat diet-induced Adar2 expression in the islets from JNK1 null mice. Furthermore, promoter analysis of the mouse Adar2 gene identified a glucose-responsive region and revealed the transcription factor c-Jun as a driver of Adar2 transcription. Taken together, these results demonstrate that JNK1 serves as a crucial component in mediating glucose-responsive upregulation of ADAR2 expression in pancreatic β-cells. Thus, the JNK1 pathway may be functionally linked to the nutrient-sensing actions of ADAR2-mediated RNA editing in professional secretory cells.

  16. Extracts of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. attenuate the inflammatory response in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Huang, Mingqing; Zhang, Yuqin; Li, Huang; Zheng, Haiyin; Yu, Lishuang; Chu, Kedan; Lin, Yu; Chen, Lidian

    2016-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is considered a serious public health problem, which is commonly treated with traditional Chinese or herbal medicine. The present study evaluated the effects of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. extraction (BCBE) on a type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Wistar rats with CIA received either 125 or 500 mg/kg BCBE, after which, paw swelling was markedly suppressed compared with in the model group. In addition, BCBE significantly ameliorated pathological joint alterations, including synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone destruction. The protein and mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)‑6, IL‑8, tumor necrosis factor‑α and nuclear factor‑κB in synovial tissue were determined by immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis and reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that the expression levels of these factors were significantly downregulated in the BCBE‑treated group compared with in the model group. These results indicated that BCBE may exert an inhibitory effect on the CIA rat model, and its therapeutic potential is associated with its anti-inflammatory action.

  17. Plasma glucose and insulin response to two oral nutrition supplements in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhmann, Maureen B; Smith, Kristen N; Schwartz, Sherwyn L; Haller, Stacie K; Irvin, Sarah; Cohen, Sarah S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical trial was to compare the glucose usage of two oral nutritional supplement (ONS) products and to assess whether a diabetes-specific formulation provides improved glucose stabilization and management compared with a standard formula. A total of 12 subjects with type 2 diabetes (7 males and 5 females) completed a randomized, cross-over design trial. Each subject consumed isocaloric amounts of either the standard ONS or the diabetes-specific formula ONS on different dates, 1 week apart. Glucose and insulin measures were recorded at baseline, and 10, 20, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210 and 240 min after the beverage was consumed and then used to calculate area under the curve (AUC) for each subject. The mean glucose AUC was lower in the diabetes-specific ONS group than in the standard group (p1), but there was not a significant difference observed for mean insulin AUC (p=0.068). A sensitivity analysis of the mean insulin AUC measures was performed by removing a potential outlier from the analysis, and this resulted in a significant difference between the groups (p=0.012). First-phase insulin measures and an insulinogenic index calculated for the beverages showed no significant differences. On the basis of the results of this trial of 12 subjects, the diabetes-specific ONS appears to provide better glucose maintenance in persons with type 2 diabetes when compared to the standard formula ONS. NCT02612675.

  18. Influence of phase separation on the anaerobic digestion of glucose-II stability, and kinetic responses to shock loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, A; Breure, A M; Van Andel, J G; Van Deursen, A

    1982-01-01

    A mineral medium, containing 1% (w/v) glucose as the main carbon source, was subjected to one-phase and to two-phase anaerobic digestion processes under comparable conditions. The one-phase system consisted of an anaerobic up-flow reactor containing both acidogenic as well as methanogenic populations. The two-phase system consisted of an acid reactor and a methane reactor connected in series allowing sequential acidogenesis and methanogenesis of the glucose. After maximum turnover rates of glucose had been attained in both systems, by gradually increasing feed supply rate, both systems were switched to the batch mode and subjected to shock loadings with glucose or fatty acids. Maximum specific turnover rates of fatty acids in the one-phase process averaged 0.39 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)-g biomass/sup -1/ d/sup -1/ and 2.23 g g/sup -1/ d/sup -1/ for the methane reactor of the two-phase system. Charging the one-phase system with doses of glucose resulted mainly in an accumulation of propionate which was degraded relatively slowly. It was concluded that interspecies hydrogen transfer may become rate limiting at high loading rates, stimulating formation of propionate. Therefore a two-phase system, as compared with a one-phase digestion process for easily hydrolyzable carbohyrates, was characterized as being essentially the more stable.

  19. Responses of plasma glucose and nonesterified fatty acids to intravenous insulin tolerance tests in dairy cows during a 670-day lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marett, L C; Auldist, M J; Wales, W J; Macmillan, K L; Dunshea, F R; Leury, B J

    2017-04-01

    The metabolic response of dairy cows undergoing an extended lactation to an insulin tolerance test (ITT) was investigated. Twelve multiparous Holstein-Friesian cows that calved in late winter in a pasture-based system were managed for a 670-d lactation by delaying rebreeding. Four 5-wk experimental periods commenced at approximately 73, 217, 422, and 520 d in milk (DIM). Cows were offered a diet of perennial ryegrass (73 and 422 DIM) or pasture hay and silage (217 and 520 DIM) supplemented with 1 kg dry matter (DM) of grain (control; CON) or 6 kg DM of grain (GRN). Daily energy intake was approximately 160 and 215 MJ of metabolizable energy/cow for CON and GRN, respectively. At all other times, cows were managed as a single herd and grazed pasture supplemented with grain to an estimated daily intake of 180 MJ of metabolizable energy/cow. Cows were fitted with a jugular catheter during the final week of each experimental period. An ITT using 0.12 IU of insulin/kg of body weight (BW) was conducted on each cow at approximately 100, 250, 460, and 560 DIM. Cows in the GRN treatment had greater milk yield, milk solids yield, and BW than cows in the CON treatment. Within treatment, individual cow responses to the ITT were highly variable. Plasma glucose and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations declined at all stages of lactation. The clearance rate of plasma glucose was slower before 300 DIM than after 300 DIM, which indicates greater inhibition of hepatic glucose synthesis and uptake of glucose by insulin-dependent tissues later in the lactation. The clearance rate, area under the curve, and recovery of plasma NEFA were greatest at 100 DIM, indicating greater responsiveness to the antilipolytic effect of insulin in early lactation, but also greater lipolytic responsiveness. The variation in response to the ITT was mostly a result of DIM rather than diet. However, the plasma NEFA response showed interactions between diet and DIM, indicating that energy intake

  20. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to FRUIT UP® and a reduction of post-prandial blood glucose responses pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2015-01-01

    on the scientific substantiation of a health claim related to FRUIT UP® and a reduction of post-prandial blood glucose responses. The Panel considers that the food, FRUIT UP®, and the food (i.e. glucose, sucrose) that FRUIT UP® should replace in foods or beverages are both sufficiently characterised in relation...... between the consumption of FRUIT UP® and a reduction of post-prandial glycaemic responses over and above the well-established effect of fructose on reducing post-prandial glycaemic responses when replacing glucose in foods....

  1. Collagen Conduit Versus Microsurgical Neurorrhaphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel; Sørensen, Allan Ibsen; Viñeta, Joaquin Fores

    2013-01-01

    To compare repair of acute lacerations of mixed sensory-motor nerves in humans using a collagen tube versus conventional repair.......To compare repair of acute lacerations of mixed sensory-motor nerves in humans using a collagen tube versus conventional repair....

  2. A Study of the Insulin and the C-Peptide Responses to Oral Glucose Load in Nondiabetic and Diabetic Subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Chul; Choi, Sung Jae; Kim, Eung Jin; Koh, Chang Soon; Min, Hun Ki

    1977-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the significance of the insulin and the C-peptide response to oral glucose loads in normal and diabetic subjects and to establish the effects of the obesity. In this study, the authors have measured plasma insulin and C-peptide by means of radioimmunoassay in 10 nonobese normal, 5 obese normal, 13 nonobese moderate diabetic patients, 9 obese moderate diabetic patients and 9 severe diabetic patients. The results obtained were as follows; 1) In 10 nonobese normal subjects, the plasma insulin level at fasting state and at 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after oral glucose loads were 15.7±3.4, 48.3±9.8, 40.4±6.7, 37.4±6.5 and 26.0±4.2 uU/ml (Mean±S.E.) and C-peptide were 1.9±0.3, 3.9±0.6, 6.3±0.6, 5.7±0.5 and 4.0±0.5 ng/ml. The change of C-peptide was found to go almost parallel with that of insulin and the insulin value reaches to the highest level at 30 min whereas C-peptide reaches to its peak at 60 min.. 2) The plasma insulin level in 5 obese normal subjects were 38.9±12.3, 59.5±12.3, 59.2±17.1, 56.1±20.0 and 48.4±17.2 uU/ml and the C-peptide were 5.5±0.4, 6.8±0.5, 7.9±0.8, 7.9±0.8 and 7.8±2.0 ng/ml. The insulin response appeared to be greater than nonobese normal subjects. 3) In 13 nonobese moderate diabetic patients, the plasma insulin levels were 27.1±4.9, 44.1±6.0, 37.3±6.6, 35.5±8.1 and 34.7±10.7 uU/ml and the C-peptide levels were 2.7±0.4, 4.9±0.7, 6.5±0.5, 7.0±0.3 and 6.7±1.0 ng/ml. There was little significance compared to nonobese normal groups but delayed pattern is noted. 4) In 9 obese moderated diabetic patients, the plasma insulin levels were 22.1±7.9, 80.0±19.3, 108.0±27.0, 62.0±17.6 and 55.5±10.l uU/ml and the C-peptide levels were 5.2±0.4, 8.0±1.0, 10.4±1.6, 10.4±1.7 and 10.1±1.0 ng/ml and its response was also greater than that of nonobese moderate diabetic patients. 5) The plasma insulin concentrations in 9 severe diabetic subjects were 8.0±3.8, 12.1±3.5, 16.8±4.6, 19

  3. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mikkel Bring

    2016-01-01

    was to investigate how the blood glucose level affects the glucagon and insulin responses to GIP in healthy subjects (Study 1) and patients with Type 2 diabetes (Study 2), and more specifically to investigate the effects of GIP and GLP-1 at low blood glucose in patients with Type 1 diabetes without endogenous...... as his own control. Interventions were intravenous administration of hormones GIP, GLP-1 and placebo (saline) during different blood glucose levels maintained (clamped) at a certain level. The end-points were plasma concentrations of glucagon and insulin as well as the amount of glucose used to clamp...... the blood glucose levels. In Study 3, we also used stable glucose isotopes to estimate the endogenous glucose production and assessed symptoms and cognitive function during hypoglycaemia. The results from the three studies indicate that GIP has effects on insulin and glucagon responses highly dependent upon...

  4. Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mikkel B; Calanna, Salvatore; Holst, Jens Juul

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have clinically relevant disturbances in the effects of the hormone glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the importance of the prevailing plasma glucose levels for the effect of GIP on responses......: During fasting glycemia (plasma glucose ∼8 mmol/L), GIP elicited significant increments in both insulin and glucagon levels, resulting in neutral effects on plasma glucose. During insulin-induced hypoglycemia (plasma glucose ∼3 mmol/L), GIP elicited a minor early-phase insulin response and increased...... glucagon levels during the initial 30 minutes, resulting in less glucose needed to be infused to maintain the clamp (29 ± 8 vs 49 ± 12 mg × kg(-1), P glucose ∼12 mmol/L), GIP augmented insulin secretion throughout the clamp, with slightly less glucagon...

  5. Dynamic interplay between the collagen scaffold and tumor evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeblad, Mikala; Rasch, Morten G; Weaver, Valerie M

    2010-01-01

    and remodeling of the ECM network regulate tissue tension, generate pathways for migration, and release ECM protein fragments to direct normal developmental processes such as branching morphogenesis. Collagens are major components of the ECM of which basement membrane type IV and interstitial matrix type I...... are the most prevalent. Here we discuss how abnormal expression, proteolysis and structure of these collagens influence cellular functions to elicit multiple effects on tumors, including proliferation, initiation, invasion, metastasis, and therapy response....

  6. Activation of the transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein by glucose leads to increased pancreatic beta cell differentiation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soggia, A; Flosseau, K; Ravassard, P; Szinnai, G; Scharfmann, R; Guillemain, G

    2012-10-01

    Pancreatic cell development is a tightly controlled process. Although information is available regarding the mesodermal signals that control pancreatic development, little is known about the role of environmental factors such as nutrients, including glucose, on pancreatic development. We previously showed that glucose and its metabolism through the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP) promote pancreatic endocrine cell differentiation. Here, we analysed the role of the transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) in this process. This transcription factor is activated by glucose, and has been recently described as a target of the HBP. We used an in vitro bioassay in which pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cells develop from rat embryonic pancreas in a way that mimics in vivo pancreatic development. Using this model, gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments were undertaken. ChREBP was produced in the endocrine lineage during pancreatic development, its abundance increasing with differentiation. When rat embryonic pancreases were cultured in the presence of glucose or xylitol, the production of ChREBP targets was induced. Concomitantly, beta cell differentiation was enhanced. On the other hand, when embryonic pancreases were cultured with inhibitors decreasing ChREBP activity or an adenovirus producing a dominant-negative ChREBP, beta cell differentiation was reduced, indicating that ChREBP activity was necessary for proper beta cell differentiation. Interestingly, adenovirus producing a dominant-negative ChREBP also reduced the positive effect of N-acetylglucosamine, a substrate of the HBP acting on beta cell differentiation. Our work supports the idea that glucose, through the transcription factor ChREBP, controls beta cell differentiation from pancreatic progenitors.

  7. An acute bout of whole body passive hyperthermia increases plasma leptin, but does not alter glucose or insulin responses in obese type 2 diabetics and healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Eric; Newmire, Dan E; Crandall, Craig G; Hooper, Philip L; Ben-Ezra, Vic

    2016-07-01

    Acute and chronic hyperthermic treatments in diabetic animal models repeatedly improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that an acute 1h bout of hyperthermic treatment improves glucose, insulin, and leptin responses to an oral glucose challenge (OGTT) in obese type 2 diabetics and healthy humans. Nine obese (45±7.1% fat mass) type 2 diabetics (T2DM: 50.1±12y, 7.5±1.8% HbA1c) absent of insulin therapy and nine similar aged (41.1±13.7y) healthy non-obese controls (HC: 33.4±7.8% fat mass, Pwhole body passive hyperthermia treatment via head-out hot water immersion (1h resting in 39.4±0.4°C water) that increased internal temperature above baseline by ∆1.6±0.4°C or a control resting condition. Twenty-four hours post treatments, a 75g OGTT was administered to evaluate changes in plasma glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and leptin concentrations. Hyperthermia itself did not alter area under the curve for plasma glucose, insulin, or C-peptide during the OGTT in either group. Fasting absolute and normalized (kg·fat mass) plasma leptin was significantly increased (P<0.01) only after the hyperthermic exposure by 17% in T2DM and 24% in HC groups (P<0.001) when compared to the control condition. These data indicate that an acute hyperthermic treatment does not improve glucose tolerance 24h post treatment in moderate metabolic controlled obese T2DM or HC individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of fitness on glucose, insulin and cortisol responses to diets varying in starch and fat content in Thoroughbred horses with recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finno, C J; McKenzie, E; Valberg, S J; Pagan, J

    2010-11-01

    Recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis (RER) occurs in fit, nervous Thoroughbreds fed high nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC) diets. Clinical signs are diminished by feeding low NSC, high fat diets; however, the mechanism is unclear. To determine if the glucose, insulin and cortisol response to isocaloric diets varying in fat and NSC availability differ in fit vs. unfit Thoroughbreds with RER. Four fit (10 weeks treadmill training) RER Thoroughbred mares were exercised and fed 3 isocaloric (121 MJ/day) diets in a 5 day/diet block design. Two high NSC concentrates, sweet feed (SF) and a processed pelleted feed (PL) and a low starch high fat feed (FAT) were used. After 24 h of rest and a 12 h fast, horses ate half their daily concentrate. Blood sampled for [glucose], [insulin] and [cortisol] was obtained before, immediately after and at 30-60 min intervals for 420 min. After 3-6 months detraining period, the block design was repeated. Results for SF and PL were similar. Regardless of diet, cortisol was higher in fit vs. unfit horses. Fit horses on SF/PL had higher post prandial [insulin] and insulin:glucose ratio than unfit horses. FAT resulted in lower post prandial [glucose] and [insulin] vs. SF/PL. Higher [insulin] in fit vs. unfit horses was not seen on the FAT diet. Increased post prandial [glucose], [insulin] and [cortisol] induced by high NSC, but not high fat, feeds are enhanced by fitness in RER horses. This combination may trigger rhabdomyolysis through increased excitability in RER Thoroughbreds. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  9. Comparative proteomic analysis of normal and collagen IX null mouse cartilage reveals altered extracellular matrix composition and novel components of the collagen IX interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachvogel, Bent; Zaucke, Frank; Dave, Keyur; Norris, Emma L; Stermann, Jacek; Dayakli, Münire; Koch, Manuel; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Bateman, John F; Wilson, Richard

    2013-05-10

    , whereas matrilin-4 was verified as a novel collagen IX-binding protein. Furthermore, changes in TGFβ-induced protein βig-h3 and fibronectin abundance were found in the collagen IX knock-out but not associated with COMP ablation, indicating specific involvement in the abnormal collagen IX null cartilage. In addition, the more widespread expression of collagen XII in the collagen IX-deficient cartilage suggests an attempted compensatory response to the absence of collagen IX. Our differential proteomic analysis of cartilage is a novel approach to identify candidate matrix protein interactions in vivo, underpinning further analysis of mutant cartilage lacking other matrix components or harboring disease-causing mutations.

  10. Postchallenge responses of nitrotyrosine and TNF-alpha during 75-g oral glucose tolerance test are associated with the presence of coronary artery diseases in patients with prediabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Chih-Sheng

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meta-analysis has demonstrated an exponential relationship between 2-hr postchallenge hyperglycemia and coronary artery disease (CAD. Pulsatile hyperglycemia can acutely increase proinflammatory cytokines by oxidative stress. We hypothesized that postchallenge proinflammatory and nitrosative responses after 75 g oral glucose tolerance tests (75 g-OGTT might be associated with CAD in patients without previously recognized type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Methods Serial changes of plasma glucose (PG, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and nitrotyrosine levels were analyzed during 75 g-OGTT in 120 patients (81 male; age 62 ± 11 years before coronary angiography. Patients were classified as normal (NGT; 42%, impaired (IGT; 34% and diabetic (T2DM; 24% glucose tolerance by 75 g-OGTT. Results Postchallenge hyperglycemia elicited TNF-α, IL-6 and nitrotyrosine levels time-dependently, and 2-hr median levels of TNF-α (7.1 versus 6.4 pg/ml; P μmol/l; P P Conclusions These results highlight postchallenge proinflammatory and nitrosative responses by 75 g-OGTT, rather than hyperglycemia per se, are associated with CAD in patients without previous recognized diabetes.

  11. The Effect of Specific Oral Nutritional Supplements Compared to Tea with Sugar on Gastric Emptying Time, Blood Glucose Level, and Hunger Response in Healthy Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Evangeline Bela

    2017-09-01

    Methods: This study was a clinical, parallel, random allocation, and single-blind trial. This study was conducted at Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital, Jakarta. The subjects were 12 healthy adults divided into 2 groups: intervention group (n = 6 and control group (n = 6. Patients in the intervention group received 200 mL S-ONS (200 kcal, 18% protein, 20% fat and 62% carbohydrate and control group received 200 mL of tea with 10 grams of sugar (40 kcal. Gastric volume was measured using 2D-sonography every 30 minutes. Blood glucose level was measured using blood peripheral sample. Hunger response was measured using visual analog scale (VAS. Results: Gastric emptying time in the intervention group was <90 minutes, and in the control group <60 minutes. Blood glucose level was increased in the intervention group and decreased in control group. Hunger response was decreased in intervention group and increased in control group. Conclusion: Gastric emptying time after either drinking S-ONS and drinking tea with sugar in healthy adults subjects were less than 2 hours. Patients receiving S-ONS had significantly higher blood glucose level and were less hungry than the control group.

  12. Effect of sitagliptin on blood glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who are treatment naive or poorly responsive to existing antidiabetic drugs: the JAMP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakura, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Naotake; Sasamoto, Kazuo; Ohashi, Hiroshi; Hasumi, Sumiko; Ujihara, Noriko; Kasahara, Tadasu; Tomonaga, Osamu; Nunome, Hideo; Honda, Masashi; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the ameliorating effect of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, on blood glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were previously untreated with or who have a poor responsive to existing antidiabetic drugs. Sitagliptin (50 mg/day) was added on to the pre-existing therapy for type 2 diabetes and changes in the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level after 3 months of treatment were compared with the baseline and performed exploratory analysis. HbA1c levels were significantly decreased after 1 month of treatment compared to baseline, with a mean change in HbA1c level from baseline of -0.73% (range, -0.80 to -0.67) in the entire study population at 3 months. Patients who received a medium dose of glimepiride showed the least improvement in HbA1c levels. The percentage of patients who achieved an HbA1c level of blood glucose level of type 2 diabetes mellitus who were previously untreated with, or poorly responsive to, existing antidiabetic drugs. Thus, sitagliptin is expected to be useful in this patient group. However, the additional administration of sitagliptin in patients treated with medium-dose glimepiride only slightly improved blood glucose control when corrected for baseline HbA1c level.

  13. Epicutaneous Immunization with Type II Collagen Inhibits both Onset and Progression of Chronic Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Strid, Jessica; Tan, Lee Aun; Strobel, Stephan; Londei, Marco; Callard, Robin

    2007-01-01

    Epicutaneous immunization is a potential non-invasive technique for antigen-specific immune-modulation. Topical application of protein antigens to barrier-disrupted skin induces potent antigen-specific immunity with a strong Th2-bias. In this study, we investigate whether the autoimmune inflammatory response of chronic collagen-induced arthritis (CCIA) in DBA/1-TCR-beta Tg mice can be modified by epicutaneous immunization. We show that epicutaneous immunization with type II collagen (CII) inh...

  14. Insulin Sensitivity and Plasma Glucose Response to Aerobic Exercise in Pregnant Women at Risk for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embaby, Heba; Elsayed, Enas; Fawzy, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the common complications that occur during pregnancy. Early intervention is essential to prevent the development of the disease in the non-pregnant state but also helpful in preventing the occurrence of GDM. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of aerobic exercises on insulin sensitivity and fasting plasma glucose level in pregnant women with risk for gestational diabetes mellitus. Forty multigravidae women between 20-24 weeks of gestation with risk for GDM were randomly selected (age range was 25-35 years), body mass index ranged from 30-35 kg/m 2 . Women were divided into two equal groups: intervention group (A), which followed an aerobic exercise program in the form of walking on treadmill, three times weekly until the end of 37 weeks of gestation in addition to diet control. Control group (B) which received diet control with usual care given by obstetricians and midwives. Evaluation of the women in both groups was carried out before and after treatment program through assessment of fasting blood glucose and insulin levels. There was a highly statistically significance decrease in fasting blood glucose level, fasting insulin level in both groups where the p value was 0.0001 favoring group (A). Moderate intensity of aerobic exercises were effective in reducing fasting blood glucose level and fasting insulin level in pregnant women with risk for gestational diabetes mellitus.

  15. Endogenous glucose production increases in response to metformin treatment in the glycogen-depleted state in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Marie H; Højlund, Kurt; Hother-Nielsen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    with or without prior treatment with 1 g metformin twice daily. Participants were recruited from the Pharmacogenomics Biobank of the University of Southern Denmark. Treatment allocation was generated by the Good Clinical Practice Unit, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. Variables of whole-body glucose...

  16. Response of HT115, a highly invasive human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line, to sodium butyrate treatment and glucose deprivation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štokrová, Jitka; Sovová, Vlasta; Šloncová, Eva; Kučerová, Dana; Tuháčková, Zdena; Korb, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 3 (2005), s. 793-799 ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK5020115 Keywords : HT115 cells * sodium butyrate * glucose deprivation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.681, year: 2005

  17. Metabolic response to MMS-mediated DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is dependent on the glucose concentration in the medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanovic, Ana; Walther, Thomas; Loret, Marie Odile; Holzwarth, Jinda; Kitanovic, Igor; Bonowski, Felix; Van Bui, Ngoc; Francois, Jean Marie; Wölfl, Stefan

    2009-06-01

    Maintenance and adaptation of energy metabolism could play an important role in the cellular ability to respond to DNA damage. A large number of studies suggest that the sensitivity of cells to oxidants and oxidative stress depends on the activity of cellular metabolism and is dependent on the glucose concentration. In fact, yeast cells that utilize fermentative carbon sources and hence rely mainly on glycolysis for energy appear to be more sensitive to oxidative stress. Here we show that treatment of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing on a glucose-rich medium with the DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) triggers a rapid inhibition of respiration and enhances reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which is accompanied by a strong suppression of glycolysis. Further, diminished activity of pyruvate kinase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase upon MMS treatment leads to a diversion of glucose carbon to glycerol, trehalose and glycogen accumulation and an increased flux through the pentose-phosphate pathway. Such conditions finally result in a significant decline in the ATP level and energy charge. These effects are dependent on the glucose concentration in the medium. Our results clearly demonstrate that calorie restriction reduces MMS toxicity through increased respiration and reduced ROS accumulation, enhancing the survival and recovery of cells.

  18. Exenatide augments first- and second-phase insulin secretion in response to intravenous glucose in subjects with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehse, Frauke; Trautmann, Michael; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    CONTEXT: First-phase insulin secretion (within 10 min after a sudden rise in plasma glucose) is reduced in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). The incretin mimetic exenatide has glucoregulatory activities in DM2, including glucose-dependent enhancement of insulin secretion. OBJECTIVE: The objective...... of the study was to determine whether exenatide can restore a more normal pattern of insulin secretion in subjects with DM2. DESIGN: Fasted subjects received iv insulin infusion to reach plasma glucose 4.4-5.6 mmol/liter. Subjects received iv exenatide (DM2) or saline (DM2 and healthy volunteers), followed...... by iv glucose challenge. PATIENTS: Thirteen evaluable DM2 subjects were included in the study: 11 males, two females; age, 56 +/- 7 yr; body mass index, 31.7 +/- 2.4 kg/m2; hemoglobin A1c, 6.6 +/- 0.7% (mean +/- sd) treated with diet/exercise (n = 1), metformin (n = 10), or acarbose (n = 2). Controls...

  19. Investigation of the influence of UV irradiation on collagen thin films by AFM imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stylianou, Andreas; Yova, Dido; Alexandratou, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    Collagen is the major fibrous extracellular matrix protein and due to its unique properties, it has been widely used as biomaterial, scaffold and cell-substrate. The aim of the paper was to use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in order to investigate well-characterized collagen thin films after ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation. The films were also used as in vitro culturing substrates in order to investigate the UV-induced alterations to fibroblasts. A special attention was given in the alteration on collagen D-periodicity. For short irradiation times, spectroscopy (fluorescence/absorption) studies demonstrated that photodegradation took place and AFM imaging showed alterations in surface roughness. Also, it was highlighted that UV-irradiation had different effects when it was applied on collagen solution than on films. Concerning fibroblast culturing, it was shown that fibroblast behavior was affected after UV irradiation of both collagen solution and films. Furthermore, after a long irradiation time, collagen fibrils were deformed revealing that collagen fibrils are consisting of multiple shells and D-periodicity occurred on both outer and inner shells. The clarification of the effects of UV light on collagen and the induced modifications of cell behavior on UV-irradiated collagen-based surfaces will contribute to the better understanding of cell–matrix interactions in the nanoscale and will assist in the appropriate use of UV light for sterilizing and photo-cross-linking applications. - Highlights: • Collagen thin films were formed and exposed in UV irradiation. • Collagen thin films were formed from UV-irradiated collagen solution. • Nanocharacterization of collagen thin films by AFM • Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy studies on collagen films • Investigation of fibroblast response on collagen films

  20. Investigation of the influence of UV irradiation on collagen thin films by AFM imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stylianou, Andreas, E-mail: styliand@mail.ntua.gr; Yova, Dido; Alexandratou, Eleni

    2014-12-01

    Collagen is the major fibrous extracellular matrix protein and due to its unique properties, it has been widely used as biomaterial, scaffold and cell-substrate. The aim of the paper was to use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in order to investigate well-characterized collagen thin films after ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation. The films were also used as in vitro culturing substrates in order to investigate the UV-induced alterations to fibroblasts. A special attention was given in the alteration on collagen D-periodicity. For short irradiation times, spectroscopy (fluorescence/absorption) studies demonstrated that photodegradation took place and AFM imaging showed alterations in surface roughness. Also, it was highlighted that UV-irradiation had different effects when it was applied on collagen solution than on films. Concerning fibroblast culturing, it was shown that fibroblast behavior was affected after UV irradiation of both collagen solution and films. Furthermore, after a long irradiation time, collagen fibrils were deformed revealing that collagen fibrils are consisting of multiple shells and D-periodicity occurred on both outer and inner shells. The clarification of the effects of UV light on collagen and the induced modifications of cell behavior on UV-irradiated collagen-based surfaces will contribute to the better understanding of cell–matrix interactions in the nanoscale and will assist in the appropriate use of UV light for sterilizing and photo-cross-linking applications. - Highlights: • Collagen thin films were formed and exposed in UV irradiation. • Collagen thin films were formed from UV-irradiated collagen solution. • Nanocharacterization of collagen thin films by AFM • Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy studies on collagen films • Investigation of fibroblast response on collagen films.

  1. Associations between postprandial insulin and blood glucose responses, appetite sensations and energy intake in normal weight and overweight individuals: a meta-analysis of test meal studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flint, Anne; Gregersen, Nikolaj T.; Gluud, Lise L.

    2007-01-01

    is unclear whether postprandial blood glucose or insulin exerts a regulatory function in short-term appetite regulation in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate, by use of meta-analysis, the role of blood glucose and insulin in short-term appetite sensation and energy intake (EI......) in normal weight and overweight participants. Data from seven test meal studies were used, including 136 healthy participants (ALL) (92 normal weight (NW) and 44 overweight or obese (OW)). All meals were served as breakfasts after an overnight fast, and appetite sensations and blood samples were obtained...... frequently in the postprandial period. Finally, an ad libitum lunch was served. Data were analysed by fixed effects study level (SL) meta-regression analysis and individual participant data (IPD) regression analysis, using STATA software. In SL analysis, postprandial insulin response was associated...

  2. A time course study of glucose levels and innate immune response in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) after exposure to clove oil-eugenol derived anaesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahi, A; Guardiola, F A; Esteban, M A

    2018-06-01

    Clove oil is used as an anaesthetic for many species of fish worldwide; however, relatively few studies have assessed its effects on the innate immune response on these species. The present work aimed to investigate the effects of clove oil-eugenol derived anaesthetic on some humoral and cellular immune response in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.). To compare with an unexposed control group, fish were exposed to 55 ppm clove oil for 5 min, before being sampled at 1, 24 and 48 h post-exposure. Serum glucose level was also measured to obtain information on the fish physiological response after clove oil anaesthesia. One hour after exposure the haemolytic complement activity of fish was lower than in the unexposed group. By contrast, the leucocyte peroxidase activity in head-kidney was significantly stimulated 24 h after exposure to clove oil-eugenol. The rest of innate immune parameters evaluated and the glucose levels not were affected by clove oil exposure at any sampling point. Overall, the use of clove oil at 55 ppm as anaesthetic did not seem to alter the innate immune response and neither did it trigger a stress response. The use of clove oil-eugenol derived had become common practice in aquaculture, and its use with gilthead seabream can be considered safe as it does not cause immunodepression in anesthetized fish. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The exaggerated glucagon-like peptide-1 response is important for the improved β-cell function and glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nils B; Dirksen, Carsten; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N

    2013-01-01

    β-cell function is improved in patients with type 2 diabetes in response to an oral glucose stimulus after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. This has been linked to an exaggerated glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion, but causality has not been established. The aim of this study...... consisted of two experimental days, allowing a meal test with infusion of saline or Ex-9 in random order. After RYGB, glucose tolerance improved, β-cell glucose sensitivity (β-GS) doubled, the GLP-1 response greatly increased and glucagon secretion was augmented. GLP-1R blockade did not affect β......-cell function and meal-induced glucagon release before the operation, but did impair glucose tolerance. After RYGB, β-GS decreased to preoperative levels, glucagon secretion increased and glucose tolerance was impaired by Ex-9 infusion. Thus, the exaggerated effect of GLP-1 after RYGB is of major importance...

  4. Double thermal transitions of type I collagen in acidic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Lingrong; Chen, Mingmao; Zhang, Qiqing

    2013-01-01

    Contributed equally to this work. To further understand the origin of the double thermal transitions of collagen in acidic solution induced by heating, the denaturation of acidic soluble collagen was investigated by micro-differential scanning calorimeter (micro-DSC), circular dichroism (CD), dynamic laser light scattering (DLLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and two-dimensional (2D) synchronous fluorescence spectrum. Micro-DSC experiments revealed that the collagen exhibited double thermal transitions, which were located within 31-37 °C (minor thermal transition, T(s) ∼ 33 °C) and 37-55 °C (major thermal transition, T(m) ∼ 40 °C), respectively. The CD spectra suggested that the thermal denaturation of collagen resulted in transition from polyproline II type structure to unordered structure. The DLLS results showed that there were mainly two kinds of collagen fibrillar aggregates with different sizes in acidic solution and the larger fibrillar aggregates (T(p2) = 40 °C) had better heat resistance than the smaller one (T(p1) = 33 °C). TEM revealed that the depolymerization of collagen fibrils occurred and the periodic cross-striations of collagen gradually disappeared with increasing temperature. The 2D fluorescence correlation spectra were also applied to investigate the thermal responses of tyrosine and phenylalanine residues at the molecular level. Finally, we could draw the conclusion that (1) the minor thermal transition was mainly due to the defibrillation of the smaller collagen fibrillar aggregates and the unfolding of a little part of triple helices; (2) the major thermal transition primarily arose from the defibrillation of the larger collagen fibrillar aggregates and the complete denaturation of the majority part of triple helices.

  5. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Liang; Xiaoran Li; Bin Wang; Bing Chen; Yannan Zhao; Jie Sun; Yan Zhuang; Jiajia Shi; He Shen; Zhijun Zhang; Jianwu Dai

    2016-01-01

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of ...

  6. Local and systemic response to intramammary lipopolysaccharide challenge during long-term manipulated plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernay, M C M B; Wellnitz, O; Kreipe, L; van Dorland, H A; Bruckmaier, R M

    2012-05-01

    The metabolic load during periods of high milk production in dairy cows causes a variety of changes of metabolite blood concentrations including dramatically decreased glucose levels. These changes supposedly impair the immune system. The goal of this study was, therefore, to evaluate adaptations of the cow's immune system in response to an intramammary lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation during a 3-d modification of plasma glucose and insulin induced by different clamp infusions. Seventeen midlactating dairy cows received a hypoglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp induced by insulin infusion (HypoG; n=5), a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp induced by insulin and glucose infusion (EuG; n=6), or infusion of saline solution (NaCl; n=6) for 56 h. At 48 h of infusion, 2 udder quarters were challenged with 200 μg of Escherichia coli LPS. At 48 h of infusion (immediately before LPS challenge), tumor necrosis factor α, lactoferrin, and serum amyloid A (SAA) mRNA abundance was increased in HypoG and Il-1β mRNA abundance was decreased in EuG. After LPS challenge, plasma glucose concentration did not decrease, although plasma insulin increased simultaneously in all groups either due to enhanced endogenous release (NaCl) or due to increased insulin infusion rate (HypoG; EuG). Plasma cortisol, rectal temperatures, and milk somatic cell count of challenged quarters increased, whereas plasma nonesterified fatty acid concentrations were similarly decreased across treatments. In mammary biopsies, increased mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor α, IL-1β, IL-8, and IL-10, and SAA were observed in LPS-treated quarters of all groups, with a more pronounced increase in IL-1β, IL-10, and SAA expression in EuG. Nuclear factor-κB mRNA expression was upregulated in NaCl and EuG but not in HypoG in response to LPS. Lactoferrin, toll-like receptor 4, and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression was increased in LPS-treated quarters of EuG only, and 5-lipoxygenase mRNA expression was decreased

  7. Retrospective analysis of insulin responses to standard dosed oral glucose tests (OGTs) via naso-gastric tubing towards definition of an objective cut-off value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnken, Tobias; Delarocque, Julien; Schumacher, Svenja; Huber, Korinna; Feige, Karsten

    2018-01-19

    Insulin dysregulation (ID) with basal or postprandial hyperinsulinemia is one of the key findings in horses and ponies suffering from the equine metabolic syndrome (EMS). Assessment of ID can easily be performed in clinical settings by the use of oral glucose challenge tests. Oral glucose test (OGT) performed with 1 g/kg bodyweight (BW) glucose administered via naso-gastric tube allows the exact administration of a defined glucose dosage in a short time. However, reliable cut-off values have not been available so far. Therefore, the aim of the study was to describe variations in insulin response to OGT via naso-gastric tubing and to provide a clinical useful cut-off value for ID when using the insulin quantification performed with an equine-optimized insulin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data visualization revealed no clear separation in the serum insulin concentration of insulin sensitive and insulin dysregulated horses during OGT. Therefore, a model based clustering method was used to circumvent the use of an arbitrary limit for categorization. This method considered all data-points for the classification, taking into account the individual insulin trajectory during the OGT. With this method two clusters were differentiated, one with low and one with high insulin responses during OGT. The cluster of individuals with low insulin response was consistently detected, independently of the initialization parameters of the algorithm. In this cluster the 97.5% quantile of insulin is 110 µLU/mL at 120 min. We suggest using this insulin concentration of 110 µLU/mL as a cut-off value for samples obtained at 120 min in OGT. OGT performed with 1 g/kg BW glucose and administration via naso-gastric tubing can easily be performed under clinical settings. Application of the cut-off value of 110 µLU/mL at 120 min allows assessment of ID in horses.

  8. Acute metabolic and endocrine responses induced by glucose and fructose in healthy young subjects: A double-blinded, randomized, crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenwen; Li, Jie; Shi, Jiahui; Yang, Bo; Tang, Jun; Truby, Helen; Li, Duo

    2018-04-01

    A rise in fructose consumption has been implicated in the etiology of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Serum uric acid (UA) elevates after fructose ingestion, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the impact of fructose ingestion on nitric oxide (NO) has not yet been confirmed. The aim of this study was to investigate the postprandial metabolic and endocrine responses following an acute ingestion of fructose and glucose in healthy subjects. This was a double-blinded, randomized, crossover postprandial trial. Eighteen healthy young subjects (9 males and 9 females) with a mean age of 23.6 ± 2.3 years and mean BMI of 20.2 ± 1.5 kg/m 2 completed the experiment that was conducted in Hangzhou, China. Volunteers were randomized to two groups (A and B): after an 8-h overnight fast, volunteers either ingested 300 mL of 25% glucose (group A) or fructose (group B) solution at 0830 within 5 min. After a one-week washout period, volunteers were crossed over to receive the alternate test solution. Blood pressure was measured at 0 h, 1 h, 2 h and 3 h and venous blood was drawn at 0 h, 0.5 h, 1 h, 2 h and 3 h after ingestion of the test solution. Eighteen subjects completed the study. Serum NO level tended to be lower at 1 h (59.40 ± 3.10 μmol/L and 68.1 ± 3.40 μmol/L, respectively, p ≤ 0.05) and 2 h (62.70 ± 3.10 μmol/L and 70.10 ± 3.50 μmol/L, respectively, p ≤ 0.05) after fructose ingestion than after glucose. The 3-h AUC (area under curve) of NO was significantly lower after fructose ingestion than after glucose (p ≤ 0.05). UA level was higher at 1 h (512.17 ± 17.74 μmol/L and 372.11 ± 17.41 μmol/L, respectively, p ≤ 0.01) and 2 h (440.22 ± 16.07 μmol/L and 357.39 ± 14.80 μmol/L, respectively, p ≤ 0.05) after fructose ingestion than after glucose. The 3-h AUC of UA was significantly higher after fructose ingestion than after glucose (p ≤ 0.01). Correlation

  9. Theobromine does not affect postprandial lipid metabolism and duodenal gene expression, but has unfavorable effects on postprandial glucose and insulin responses in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolders, Lotte; Mensink, Ronald P; Boekschoten, Mark V; de Ridder, Rogier J J; Plat, Jogchum

    2018-04-01

    Chocolate consumption is associated with a decreased risk for CVD. Theobromine, a compound in cocoa, may explain these effects as it favorably affected fasting serum lipids. However, long-term effects of theobromine on postprandial metabolism as well as underlying mechanisms have never been studied. The objective was to evaluate the effects of 4-week theobromine consumption (500 mg/day) on fasting and postprandial lipid, lipoprotein and glucose metabolism, and duodenal gene expression. In a randomized, double-blind crossover study, 44 healthy men and women, with low baseline HDL-C concentrations consumed 500 mg theobromine or placebo daily. After 4-weeks, fasting blood was sampled and subjects participated in a 4-h postprandial test. Blood was sampled frequently for analysis of lipid and glucose metabolism. In a subgroup of 10 men, 5 h after meal consumption duodenal biopsies were taken for microarray analysis. 4-weeks theobromine consumption lowered fasting LDL-C (-0.21 mmol/L; P = 0.006), and apoB100 (-0.04 g/L; P = 0.022), tended to increase HDL-C (0.03 mmol/L; P = 0.088) and increased hsCRP (1.2 mg/L; P = 0.017) concentrations. Fasting apoA-I, TAG, FFA, glucose and insulin concentrations were unchanged. In the postprandial phase, theobromine consumption increased glucose (P = 0.026), insulin (P = 0.011) and FFA (P = 0.003) concentrations, while lipids and (apo)lipoproteins were unchanged. In duodenal biopsies, microarray analysis showed no consistent changes in expression of genes, pathways or gene sets related to lipid, cholesterol or glucose metabolism. It is not likely that the potential beneficial effects of cocoa on CVD can be ascribed to theobromine. Although theobromine lowers serum LDL-C concentrations, it did not change fasting HDL-C, apoA-I, or postprandial lipid concentrations and duodenal gene expression, and unfavorably affected postprandial glucose and insulin responses. This trial was registered on clinicaltrials.gov under

  10. Arterial extracellular matrix: a mechanobiological study of the contributions and interactions of elastin and collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ming-Jay; Turcotte, Raphaël; Lin, Charles P; Zhang, Yanhang

    2014-06-17

    The complex network structure of elastin and collagen extracellular matrix (ECM) forms the primary load bearing components in the arterial wall. The structural and mechanobiological interactions between elastin and collagen are important for properly functioning arteries. Here, we examined the elastin and collagen organization, realignment, and recruitment by coupling mechanical loading and multiphoton imaging. Two-photon excitation fluorescence and second harmonic generation methods were performed with a multiphoton video-rate microscope to capture real time changes to the elastin and collagen structure during biaxial deformation. Enzymatic removal of elastin was performed to assess the structural changes of the remaining collagen structure. Quantitative analysis of the structural changes to elastin and collagen was made using a combination of two-dimensional fast Fourier transform and fractal analysis, which allows for a more complete understanding of structural changes. Our study provides new quantitative evidence, to our knowledge on the sequential engagement of different arterial ECM components in response to mechanical loading. The adventitial collagen exists as large wavy bundles of fibers that exhibit fiber engagement after 20% strain. The medial collagen is engaged throughout the stretching process, and prominent elastic fiber engagement is observed up to 20% strain after which the engagement plateaus. The fiber orientation distribution functions show remarkably different changes in the ECM structure in response to mechanical loading. The medial collagen shows an evident preferred circumferential distribution, however the fiber families of adventitial collagen are obscured by their waviness at no or low mechanical strains. Collagen fibers in both layers exhibit significant realignment in response to unequal biaxial loading. The elastic fibers are much more uniformly distributed and remained relatively unchanged due to loading. Removal of elastin produces

  11. Modulation of cellular radiation responses by 2-deoxy-D-glucose and other glycolytic inhibitors: Implications for cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kalia Vijay; Prabhakara S; Narayanan Vidya

    2009-01-01

    Background: 2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), a glycolytic inhibitor, was observed earlier to increase DNA, chromosomal, and cellular damage in tumor cells, by inhibiting energy-dependent repair processes. Lonidamine (LND) selectively inhibits glycolysis in cancer cells. It damages the condensed mitochondria in these cells, impairing thereby the activity of hexokinase (predominantly attached to the outer mitochondrial membranes). It inhibits repair of radiation-induced potentially lethal cellular da...

  12. Effect of an aqueous Russian tarragon extract on glucose tolerance in response to an oral dextrose load in non-diabetic men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Bloomer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Richard J Bloomer1, Robert E Canale1, Ivo Pischel21Cardiorespiratory/Metabolic Laboratory, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, USA; 2PhytoLab GmbH & Co. KG, Vestenbergsgreuth, GermanyBackground: Russian tarragon extracts have been reported to have anti-diabetic activity in animals. This pilot study aimed to investigate the acute effects of an aqueous extract of Russian tarragon (RT on serum glucose and insulin in response to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT.Methods: Using a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design, 12 non-diabetic men reported to the lab on 2 different mornings separated by 1 to 2 weeks, and ingested 75 g of dextrose in solution. Fifteen minutes before ingestion, subjects ingested either 2 g of RT or a placebo. Blood samples were collected before ingestion of the RT and placebo, and at 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 minutes post ingestion of the dextrose load. Samples were assayed for serum glucose and insulin.Results: For serum glucose, no condition (P = 0.19 or condition × time (P = 0.99 effect was noted. A time effect was noted (P < 0.0001, with values at 15 and 30 minutes higher than pre-ingestion (P < 0.05. No area under the curve (AUC effect (P = 0.54 was noted, although a 4.5% reduction in AUC was observed for RT (569 ± 92 mg · dL−1 · 75 min−1 vs placebo (596 ± 123 mg · dL−1 · 75 min−1. Similar findings were noted for serum insulin, with no condition (P = 0.24 or condition × time (P = 0.98 effect noted. A time effect was noted (P < 0.0001, with values at 15, 30, and 45 minutes higher than pre-ingestion (P < 0.05. No AUC effect (P = 0.53 was noted, although a 17.4% reduction in AUC was observed for RT (114 ± 22 µIU · mL−1 · 75 min−1 vs placebo (138 ± 30 µIU · mL−1 · 75 min−1. Approximately two-thirds of subjects ingesting the RT experienced attenuation in both the glucose and insulin response to the OGTT.Conclusion: These data indicate that acute ingestion of RT results in a slight

  13. Insulin, glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate responses to a medium-chain triglyceride-based sports supplement: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R. Wood

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a current trend in endurance sports to move athletes towards a low-carbohydrate diet or use periods of low carbohydrate consumption to increase both health and performance. As a result, a market is developing for sports supplements to provide nutritional support during training and racing for athletes who follow a low-carbohydrate lifestyle. PHAT FIBRE (PF is a powdered sports supplement that includes medium-chain triglycerides suspended in a digestion-resistant carbohydrate and is tailored to the needs of low-carb athletes. Eleven healthy participants were administered 25 g of PF after an overnight fast. After 30 minutes, median blood glucose increased by 6 mg/dl from 94 mg/dl to 100 mg/dl (p = 0.002. At the same time points, median blood beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB increased from 0.3 mmol/L to 0.5 mmol/L. The increase in BHB was significant (p = 0.02 after excluding one outlier who had elevated levels of fasting BHB. Insulin levels did not change significantly at any point during the study. In a single participant, a revised formulation of PF (PFv2 produced a 0.6 mmol/L increase in BHB with no effect on blood glucose. These data suggest that PF can provide a source of energy for the low-carb athlete by supporting ketone production without negatively impacting insulin or blood glucose levels.

  14. Absence of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Adipocytes Causes Systemic Insulin Resistance and Impairs Glucose Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Vijayakumar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Lower adipose-ChREBP and de novo lipogenesis (DNL are associated with insulin resistance in humans. Here, we generated adipose-specific ChREBP knockout (AdChREBP KO mice with negligible sucrose-induced DNL in adipose tissue (AT. Chow-fed AdChREBP KO mice are insulin resistant with impaired insulin action in the liver, muscle, and AT and increased AT inflammation. HFD-fed AdChREBP KO mice are also more insulin resistant than controls. Surprisingly, adipocytes lacking ChREBP display a cell-autonomous reduction in insulin-stimulated glucose transport that is mediated by impaired Glut4 translocation and exocytosis, not lower Glut4 levels. AdChREBP KO mice have lower levels of palmitic acid esters of hydroxy stearic acids (PAHSAs in serum, and AT. 9-PAHSA supplementation completely rescues their insulin resistance and AT inflammation. 9-PAHSA also normalizes impaired glucose transport and Glut4 exocytosis in ChREBP KO adipocytes. Thus, loss of adipose-ChREBP is sufficient to cause insulin resistance, potentially by regulating AT glucose transport and flux through specific lipogenic pathways.

  15. Imaging of a glucose analog, calcium and NADH in neurons and astrocytes: dynamic responses to depolarization and sensitivity to pioglitazone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancani, Tristano; Anderson, Katie L.; Porter, Nada M.; Thibault, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal Ca2+ dyshomeostasis associated with cognitive impairment and mediated by changes in several Ca2+ sources has been seen in animal models of both aging and diabetes. In the periphery, dysregulation of intracellular Ca2+ signals may contribute to the development of insulin resistance. In the brain, while it is well-established that type 2 diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for the development of dementia in the elderly, it is not clear whether Ca2+ dysregulation might also affect insulin sensitivity and glucose utilization. Here we present a combination of imaging techniques testing the disappearance of the fluorescent glucose analog 2-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-2-deoxyglucose (2-NBDG) as an indication of glycolytic activity in neurons and astrocytes. Our work shows that glucose utilization at rest is greater in neurons compared to astrocytes, and ceases upon activation in neurons with little change in astrocytes. Pretreatment of hippocampal cultures with pioglitazone, a drug used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, significantly reduced glycolytic activity in neurons and enhanced it in astrocytes. This series of experiments, including FURA-2 and NADH imaging, provides results that are consistent with the idea that Ca2+ levels may rapidly alter glycolytic activity, and that downstream events beyond Ca2+ dysregulation with aging, may alter cellular metabolism in the brain. PMID:21978418

  16. Transcription factor Nrf1 is topologically repartitioned across membranes to enable target gene transactivation through its acidic glucose-responsive domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiguo; Ren, Yonggang; Li, Shaojun; Hayes, John D

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-bound Nrf1 transcription factor regulates critical homeostatic and developmental genes. The conserved N-terminal homology box 1 (NHB1) sequence in Nrf1 targets the cap'n'collar (CNC) basic basic-region leucine zipper (bZIP) factor to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but it is unknown how its activity is controlled topologically within membranes. Herein, we report a hitherto unknown mechanism by which the transactivation activity of Nrf1 is controlled through its membrane-topology. Thus after Nrf1 is anchored within ER membranes, its acidic transactivation domains (TADs), including the Asn/Ser/Thr-rich (NST) glycodomain situated between acidic domain 1 (AD1) and AD2, are transiently translocated into the lumen of the ER, where NST is glycosylated in the presence of glucose to yield an inactive 120-kDa Nrf1 glycoprotein. Subsequently, portions of the TADs partially repartition across membranes into the cyto/nucleoplasmic compartments, whereupon an active 95-kDa form of Nrf1 accumulates, a process that is more obvious in glucose-deprived cells and may involve deglycosylation. The repartitioning of Nrf1 out of membranes is monitored within this protein by its acidic-hydrophobic amphipathic glucose-responsive domains, particularly the Neh5L subdomain within AD1. Therefore, the membrane-topological organization of Nrf1 dictates its post-translational modifications (i.e. glycosylation, the putative deglycosylation and selective proteolysis), which together control its ability to transactivate target genes.

  17. Pancreatic beta-cell responses to GLP-1 after near-normalization of blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Meena; Højberg, Patricia V; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2010-01-01

    glucose (BG) using insulin (mean diurnal BG: 6.4+/-0.3 mmol/l; HbA(1)c: 6.6+/-0.3%). Nine matched healthy subjects acted as controls. In controls, area-under-curve (AUC) for amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin were higher with GLP-1 than saline (PAUC amylin/C-peptide ratio was similar on both......This study investigated the effects of strict glycaemic control on beta-cell function in nine obese subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), using graded glucose infusions together with infusions of saline or GLP-1 before (HbA(1)c: 8.0+/-0.4%) and after four weeks of near-normalization of blood...... amylin/C-peptide ratios rose to control levels. Near-normoglycaemia tended to reduce AUC proinsulin/C-peptide ratio, which was significant (P=0.04) with GLP-1, but still higher than with saline (P=0.004). In conclusion, amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin responses to glucose were unaffected by four weeks...

  18. Pancreatic ß-cell responses to GLP-1 after near-normalization of blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Meena; Højberg, Patricia; Deacon, Carolyn F.

    2010-01-01

    glucose (BG) using insulin (mean diurnal BG: 6.4+/-0.3 mmol/l; HbA(1)c: 6.6+/-0.3%). Nine matched healthy subjects acted as controls. In controls, area-under-curve (AUC) for amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin were higher with GLP-1 than saline (PAUC amylin/C-peptide ratio was similar on both......This study investigated the effects of strict glycaemic control on beta-cell function in nine obese subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), using graded glucose infusions together with infusions of saline or GLP-1 before (HbA(1)c: 8.0+/-0.4%) and after four weeks of near-normalization of blood...... amylin/C-peptide ratios rose to control levels. Near-normoglycaemia tended to reduce AUC proinsulin/C-peptide ratio, which was significant (P=0.04) with GLP-1, but still higher than with saline (P=0.004). In conclusion, amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin responses to glucose were unaffected by four weeks...

  19. Adaptive metabolic response to 4 weeks of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption in healthy, lightly active individuals and chronic high glucose availability in primary human myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor, Francesco; Jackson, Matthew J; Squillace, Cesare; Shepherd, Anthony; Moore, Jonathan P; Ayer, Donald E; Kubis, Hans-Peter

    2013-04-01

    Chronic sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Hyperglycaemia contributes to metabolic alterations observed in T2DM, such as reduced oxidative capacity and elevated glycolytic and lipogenic enzyme expressions in skeletal muscle tissue. We aimed to investigate the metabolic alterations induced by SSB supplementation in healthy individuals and to compare these with the effects of chronic hyperglycaemia on primary muscle cell cultures. Lightly active, healthy, lean subjects (n = 11) with sporadic soft drink consumption underwent a 4-week SSB supplementation (140 ± 15 g/day, ~2 g glucose/kg body weight/day, glucose syrup). Before and after the intervention, body composition, respiratory exchange ratio (RER), insulin sensitivity, muscle metabolic gene and protein expression were assessed. Adaptive responses to hyperglycaemia (7 days, 15 mM) were tested in primary human myotubes. SSB supplementation increased fat mass (+1.0 kg, P < 0.05), fasting RER (+0.12, P < 0.05), fasting glucose (+0.3 mmol/L, P < 0.05) and muscle GAPDH mRNA expressions (+0.94 AU, P < 0.05). PGC1α mRNA was reduced (-0.20 AU, P < 0.05). Trends were found for insulin resistance (+0.16 mU/L, P = 0.09), and MondoA protein levels (+1.58 AU, P = 0.08). Primary myotubes showed elevations in GAPDH, ACC, MondoA and TXNIP protein expressions (P < 0.05). Four weeks of SSB supplementation in healthy individuals shifted substrate metabolism towards carbohydrates, increasing glycolytic and lipogenic gene expression and reducing mitochondrial markers. Glucose-sensing protein MondoA might contribute to this shift, although further in vivo evidence is needed to corroborate this.

  20. Intact pituitary function is decisive for the catabolic response to TNF-α: studies of protein, glucose and fatty acid metabolism in hypopituitary and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Ermina; Møller, Andreas B; Jørgensen, Jens O L; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Jessen, Niels; Olesen, Jonas F; Pedersen, Steen B; Nielsen, Thomas S; Møller, Niels

    2015-02-01

    TNF-α generates inflammatory responses and insulin resistance, lipolysis, and protein breakdown. It is unclear whether these changes depend on intact hypothalamo-pituitary stress hormone responses to trigger the release of cortisol and growth hormone. To define differential effects of TNF-α on glucose, protein, and lipid metabolism in hypopituitary patients (without intact hypothalamo-pituitary axis) and healthy controls. Randomized, placebo controlled, single-blinded. Setting, Participants, and Intervention: We studied eight hypopituitary (HP) patients and eight matched control subjects [control volunteers (CTR)] twice during 4-h basal and 2-h hyperinsulinemic clamp conditions with isotope dilution during infusion of saline or TNF-α(12 ng/kg/h) for 6 h. Phenylalanine, urea, palmitate, and glucose fluxes and fat biopsies in basal and clamp periods. TNF-α infusion significantly increased cortisol and GH levels in CTR but not in HP. TNF-α increased phenylalanine fluxes in both groups, with the increase being significantly greater in CTR, and raised urea flux by 40 % in CTR without any alteration in HP. Endogenous glucose production (EGP) was elevated in CTR compared to HP after TNF-α administration, whereas insulin sensitivity remained similarly unaffected in both groups. TNF-α increased whole body palmitate fluxes and decreased palmitate specific activity in CTR, but not in HP without statistical difference between groups. We did not detect significant effects TNF-α on lipase expression or regulation in fat. TNF-α increased both urea and amino acid fluxes and EGP significantly more in CTR compared to HP, suggesting that increases in endogenous cortisol and GH release are significant components of the metabolic response to TNF-α.

  1. Dessert formulation using sucralose and dextrin affects favorably postprandial response to glucose, insulin, and C-peptide in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyri, Konstantina; Sotiropoulos, Alexios; Psarou, Eirini; Papazafiropoulou, Athanasia; Zampelas, Antonios; Kapsokefalou, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Dessert compositions may conform to diabetic diet when it contains low sugar or artificial sweetener to replace sugar. However, it is still questionable whether glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients is improved by the use of diet-conforming dessert compositions. To compare, in type 2 diabetes patients, the glycemic, insulin, and C-peptide responses to seven modified dessert compositions for diabetics (D-dessert) with the response to seven similar desserts of non-modified composition, used as control desserts (C-dessert). Seventy type 2 diabetes patients were allocated to seven groups of ten. On three occasions, each patient received either the meal which consisted of bread and cheese, or the meal and D-dessert, or the meal and the respective C-dessert. Differences in postprandial glucose, insulin, and C-peptide were evaluated using analysis of repeated measures at 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after consumption. D-cake and D-pastry cream resulted in lower glucose levels (8.81 ± 0.32 mmol/l and 8.67 ± 0.36 mmol/l, respectively) and D-strawberry jelly in lower insulin levels (16.46 ± 2.66 μU/ml) than the respective C-desserts (9.99 ± 0.32 mmol/l for C-cake, 9.28 ± 0.36 mmol/l for C-pastry cream, and 27.42 ± 2.66 μU/ml for C-strawberry jelly) (p pastry cream increased glucose to a lesser extent than C-pastry cream (p < 0.05). Similar effects were reported for D-milk dessert, D-millefeuille, and D-chocolate on glucose, insulin, and C-peptide at specific timepoints. D-crème caramel showed no effect. Some desserts formulated with sugar substitutes and soluble fiber may have a favorable effect on postprandial levels of glucose, insulin, and C-peptide in type 2 diabetic patients.

  2. Energy expenditure, body composition and insulin response to glucose in male twins discordant for the Trp64Arg polymorphism of the β3-adrenergic receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Christiansen, Christian; Bjørnsbo, K.S.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: The tryptophan to arginine change in position 64 (Trp64Arg) polymorphism of the beta3-adrenergic receptor (beta3AR) gene has been associated with an increased prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In this, decreased rates of energy expenditure and impaired insulin...... and environmental background, the Trp64Arg polymorphism of the beta3AR gene is associated with lower fat mass, fasting insulin levels and an appropriate insulin response to glucose. Thus, heterozygosity for the Trp64Arg variant is unlikely to increase the risk of obesity, insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes....

  3. Semisolid meal enriched in oat bran decreases plasma glucose and insulin levels, but does not change gastrointestinal peptide responses or short-term appetite in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juvonen, Kristiina R.; Salmenkallio-Marttila, Marjatta; Lyly, Marika

    2011-01-01

    types and amounts of DF exert are still poorly understood. METHODS AND RESULTS: We investigated the effects of wheat and oat brans alone and as combination in semisolid food matrix on postprandial appetite profile and gastrointestinal (GI) hormonal responses. Twenty healthy, normal-weight subjects (5...... including 5 g wheat bran DF + 5 g oat bran DF. Blood samples were drawn before and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120 and 180 min after the test meals to determine plasma glucose, ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY) and serum insulin concentrations. Subjective profiles of appetite were assessed using visual analogue scales (VAS...

  4. Upregulation of Glucose Uptake and Hexokinase Activity of Primary Human CD4+ T Cells in Response to Infection with HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Kavanagh Williamson

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of primary CD4+ T cells with HIV-1 coincides with an increase in glycolysis. We investigated the expression of glucose transporters (GLUT and glycolytic enzymes in human CD4+ T cells in response to infection with HIV-1. We demonstrate the co-expression of GLUT1, GLUT3, GLUT4, and GLUT6 in human CD4+ T cells after activation, and their concerted overexpression in HIV-1 infected cells. The investigation of glycolytic enzymes demonstrated activation-dependent expression of hexokinases HK1 and HK2 in human CD4+ T cells, and a highly significant increase in cellular hexokinase enzyme activity in response to infection with HIV-1. HIV-1 infected CD4+ T cells showed a marked increase in expression of HK1, as well as the functionally related voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC protein, but not HK2. The elevation of GLUT, HK1, and VDAC expression in HIV-1 infected cells mirrored replication kinetics and was dependent on virus replication, as evidenced by the use of reverse transcription inhibitors. Finally, we demonstrated that the upregulation of HK1 in HIV-1 infected CD4+ T cells is independent of the viral accessory proteins Vpu, Vif, Nef, and Vpr. Though these data are consistent with HIV-1 dependency on CD4+ T cell glucose metabolism, a cellular response mechanism to infection cannot be ruled out.

  5. PHAGOCYTOSIS AND REMODELING OF COLLAGEN MATRICES

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, Leah C.; Dice, J Fred.; Lee, Kyongbum; Kaplan, David L.

    2007-01-01

    The biodegradation of collagen and the deposition of new collagen-based extracellular matrices are of central importance in tissue remodeling and function. Similarly, for collagen-based biomaterials used in tissue engineering, the degradation of collagen scaffolds with accompanying cellular infiltration and generation of new extracellular matrix is critical for integration of in vitro grown tissues in vivo. In earlier studies we observed significant impact of collagen structure on primary lun...

  6. Collagen esterification enhances the function and survival of pancreatic β cells in 2D and 3D culture systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Jae Hyung [Regenerative Medicine Research Center, Dalim Tissen Co., LTD., 383-93, Yonnam-Dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yang Hee [Regenerative Medicine Research Center, Dalim Tissen Co., LTD., 383-93, Yonnam-Dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Asan Institute for Life Science, 388-1 Pungnap-2 Dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seong Hee; Lee, Song [Asan Institute for Life Science, 388-1 Pungnap-2 Dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Si-Nae [Regenerative Medicine Research Center, Dalim Tissen Co., LTD., 383-93, Yonnam-Dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shim, In Kyong, E-mail: shimiink@gmail.com [Asan Institute for Life Science, 388-1 Pungnap-2 Dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Song Cheol, E-mail: drksc@amc.seoul.kr [Asan Institute for Life Science, 388-1 Pungnap-2 Dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine & Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap-2 Dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-07

    Collagen, one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), may play a role in the survival of pancreatic islet cells. In addition, chemical modifications that change the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification have been shown to increase the adhesion and proliferation of various cell types. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the effects of native collagen (NC) and esterified collagen (EC) on β cell function and survival. After isolation by the collagenase digestion technique, rat islets were cultured with NC and EC in 2 dimensional (2D) and 3 dimensional (3D) environments for a long-term duration in vitro. The cells were assessed for islet adhesion, morphology, viability, glucose-induced insulin secretion, and mRNA expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Islet cells attached tightly in the NC group, but islet cell viability was similar in both the NC and EC groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was higher in the EC group than in the NC group in both 2D and 3D culture. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of glucokinase in the EC group were higher than those in the NC group and were associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Finally, SEM observation confirmed that islets had more intact component cells on EC sponges than on NC sponges. These results indicate that modification of collagen may offer opportunities to improve function and viability of islet cells. - Highlights: • We changed the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen improved survival in both 2D and 3D culture. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin release. • High levels of glucokinase mRNA may be associated with increased insulin release.

  7. Collagen esterification enhances the function and survival of pancreatic β cells in 2D and 3D culture systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yang Hee; Jeong, Seong Hee; Lee, Song; Park, Si-Nae; Shim, In Kyong; Kim, Song Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Collagen, one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), may play a role in the survival of pancreatic islet cells. In addition, chemical modifications that change the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification have been shown to increase the adhesion and proliferation of various cell types. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the effects of native collagen (NC) and esterified collagen (EC) on β cell function and survival. After isolation by the collagenase digestion technique, rat islets were cultured with NC and EC in 2 dimensional (2D) and 3 dimensional (3D) environments for a long-term duration in vitro. The cells were assessed for islet adhesion, morphology, viability, glucose-induced insulin secretion, and mRNA expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Islet cells attached tightly in the NC group, but islet cell viability was similar in both the NC and EC groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was higher in the EC group than in the NC group in both 2D and 3D culture. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of glucokinase in the EC group were higher than those in the NC group and were associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Finally, SEM observation confirmed that islets had more intact component cells on EC sponges than on NC sponges. These results indicate that modification of collagen may offer opportunities to improve function and viability of islet cells. - Highlights: • We changed the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen improved survival in both 2D and 3D culture. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin release. • High levels of glucokinase mRNA may be associated with increased insulin release

  8. Fibrillar, fibril-associated and basement membrane collagens of the arterial wall: architecture, elasticity and remodeling under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osidak, M S; Osidak, E O; Akhmanova, M A; Domogatsky, S P; Domogatskaya, A S

    2015-01-01

    The ability of a human artery to pass through 150 million liters of blood sustaining 2 billion pulsations of blood pressure with minor deterioration depends on unique construction of the arterial wall. Viscoelastic properties of this construction enable to re-seal the occuring damages apparently without direct immediate participance of the constituent cells. Collagen structures are considered to be the elements that determine the mechanoelastic properties of the wall in parallel with elastin responsible for elasticity and resilience. Collagen scaffold architecture is the function-dependent dynamic arrangement of a dozen different collagen types composing three distinct interacting forms inside the extracellular matrix of the wall. Tightly packed molecules of collagen types I, III, V provide high tensile strength along collagen fibrils but toughness of the collagen scaffold as a whole depends on molecular bonds between distinct fibrils. Apart of other macromolecules in the extracellular matrix (ECM), collagen-specific interlinks involve microfilaments of collagen type VI, meshwork-organized collagen type VIII, and FACIT collagen type XIV. Basement membrane collagen types IV, XV, XVIII and cell-associated collagen XIII enable transmission of mechanical signals between cells and whole artery matrix. Collagen scaffold undergoes continuous remodeling by decomposition promoted with MMPs and reconstitution from newly produced collagen molecules. Pulsatile stress-strain load modulates both collagen synthesis and MMP-dependent collagen degradation. In this way the ECM structure becomes adoptive to mechanical challenges. The mechanoelastic properties of the arterial wall are changed in atherosclerosis concomitantly with collagen turnover both type-specific and dependent on the structure. Improving the feedback could be another approach to restore sufficient blood circulation.

  9. Effects of agave nectar versus sucrose on weight gain, adiposity, blood glucose, insulin, and lipid responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Shirin; Holloway, Brittany; Nemoseck, Tricia; Cole, Sarah; Petrisko, Yumi; Hong, Mee Young; Kern, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Agave nectar is a fructose-rich liquid sweetener derived from a plant, and is often promoted as a low glycemic alternative to refined sugar. However, little scientific research has been conducted in animals or humans to determine its metabolic and/or health effects. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of agave nectar versus sucrose on weight gain, adiposity, fasting plasma blood glucose, insulin, and lipid levels. Eighteen (n=18) male ICR mice (33.8±1.6 g) were divided into two groups (n=6 for agave nectar and n=12 for sucrose) and provided free access to one of two diets of equal energy densities differing only in a portion of the carbohydrate provided. Diets contained 20% carbohydrate (by weight of total diet) from either raw agave nectar or sucrose. Epididymal fat pads were excised, and blood was collected after 34 days. Weight gain (4.3±2.2 vs. 8.4±3.4 g), fat pad weights (0.95±0.54 vs. 1.75±0.66 g), plasma glucose (77.8±12.2 vs. 111.0±27.9 mg/dL), and insulin (0.61±0.29 vs. 1.46±0.81 ng/mL) were significantly lower (P≤.05) for agave nectar-fed mice compared to sucrose-fed mice respectively. No statistically significant differences in total cholesterol or triglycerides were detected. These results suggest that in comparison to sucrose, agave nectar may have a positive influence on weight gain and glucose control. However, more research with a larger sample of animals and/or with human subjects is warranted.

  10. Changes in type I collagen following laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, L S; Moazami, N; Pocsidio, J; Oz, M C; LoGerfo, P; Treat, M R

    1992-01-01

    Selection of ideal laser parameters for tissue welding is inhibited by poor understanding of the mechanism. We investigated structural changes in collagen molecules extracted from rat tail tendon (> 90% type I collagen) after tissue welding using an 808 nm diode laser and indocyanine green dye applied to the weld site. Mobility patterns on SDS-PAGE were identical in the lasered and untreated tendon extracts with urea or acetic acid. Pepsin incubation after acetic acid extraction revealed a reduction of collagen alpha and beta bands in lasered compared with untreated specimens. Circular dichroism studies of rat tail tendon showed absence of helical structure in collagen from lasered tendon. No evidence for covalent bonding was present in laser-treated tissues. Collagen molecules are denatured by the laser wavelength and parameters used in this study. No significant amount of helical structure is regenerated on cooling. We conclude that non-covalent interactions between denatured collagen molecules may be responsible for the creation of tissue welding.

  11. From micelles to fibers: balancing self-assembling and random coiling domains in pH-responsive silk-collagen-like protein-based polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beun, L.H.; Storm, I.M.; Werten, M.W.T.; Wolf, de F.A.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Vries, de R.J.

    2014-01-01

    We study the self-assembly of genetically engineered protein-based triblock copolymers consisting of a central pH-responsive silk-like middle block (SHn, where SH is a silk-like octapeptide, (GA)3GH and n is the number of repeats) flanked by hydrophilic random coil outer blocks (C2). Our previous

  12. Measurement of the quadratic hyperpolarizability of the collagen triple helix and application to second harmonic imaging of natural and biomimetic collagenous tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniset-Besseau, A.; Strupler, M.; Duboisset, J.; De Sa Peixoto, P.; Benichou, E.; Fligny, C.; Tharaux, P.-L.; Mosser, G.; Brevet, P.-F.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2009-09-01

    Collagen is a major protein of the extracellular matrix that is characterized by triple helical domains. It plays a central role in the formation of fibrillar and microfibrillar networks, basement membranes, as well as other structures of the connective tissue. Remarkably, fibrillar collagen exhibits efficient Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) so that SHG microscopy proved to be a sensitive tool to probe the three-dimensional architecture of fibrillar collagen and to assess the progression of fibrotic pathologies. We obtained sensitive and reproducible measurements of the fibrosis extent, but we needed quantitative data at the molecular level to further process SHG images. We therefore performed Hyper- Rayleigh Scattering (HRS) experiments and measured a second order hyperpolarisability of 1.25 10-27 esu for rat-tail type I collagen. This value is surprisingly large considering that collagen presents no strong harmonophore in its aminoacid sequence. In order to get insight into the physical origin of this nonlinear process, we performed HRS measurements after denaturation of the collagen triple helix and for a collagen-like short model peptide [(Pro-Pro- Gly)10]3. It showed that the collagen large nonlinear response originates in the tight alignment of a large number of weakly efficient harmonophores, presumably the peptide bonds, resulting in a coherent amplification of the nonlinear signal along the triple helix. To illustrate this mechanism, we successfully recorded SHG images in collagenous biomimetic matrices.

  13. Multi-input and -output logic circuits based on bioelectrocatalysis with horseradish peroxidase and glucose oxidase immobilized in multi-responsive copolymer films on electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xue; Lian, Wenjing; Zhang, Jiannan; Liu, Hongyun

    2016-06-15

    Herein, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N,N'-dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate) copolymer films were polymerized on electrode surface with a simple one-step method, and the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was embedded in the films simultaneously, which were designated as P(NiPAAm-co-DMEM)-HRP. The films exhibited a reversible structure change with the external stimuli, such as pH, CO2, temperature and SO4(2-), causing the cyclic voltammetric (CV) response of electroactive K3Fe(CN)6 at the film electrodes to display the corresponding multi-stimuli sensitive ON-OFF behavior. Based on the switchable CV property of the system and the electrochemical reduction of H2O2 catalyzed by HRP in the films and mediated by Fe(CN)6(3-) in solution, a 5-input/3-output logic gate was established. To further increase the complexity of the logic system, another enzyme glucose oxidase (GOD) was added into the films, designated as P(NiPAAm-co-DMEM)-HRP-GOD. In the presence of oxygen, the oxidation of glucose in the solution was catalyzed by GOD in the films, and the produced H2O2 in situ was recognized and electrocatalytically reduced by HRP and mediated by Fe(CN)6(3-). Based on the bienzyme films, a cascaded or concatenated 4-input/3-output logic gate system was proposed. The present work combined the multi-responsive interface with bioelectrocatalysis to construct cascaded logic circuits, which might open a new avenue to develop biocomputing elements with more sophisticated functions and design novel glucose biosensors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pancreatic beta-cell responses to GLP-1 after near-normalization of blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmar, Meena; Højberg, Patricia V; Deacon, Carolyn F; Hare, Kristine; Holst, Jens J; Madsbad, Sten

    2010-02-25

    This study investigated the effects of strict glycaemic control on beta-cell function in nine obese subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), using graded glucose infusions together with infusions of saline or GLP-1 before (HbA(1)c: 8.0+/-0.4%) and after four weeks of near-normalization of blood glucose (BG) using insulin (mean diurnal BG: 6.4+/-0.3 mmol/l; HbA(1)c: 6.6+/-0.3%). Nine matched healthy subjects acted as controls. In controls, area-under-curve (AUC) for amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin were higher with GLP-1 than saline (PAUC amylin/C-peptide ratio was similar on both days, while AUC proinsulin/C-peptide ratio was higher with GLP-1 (P=0.02). In the patients, amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin AUCs were unaltered by near-normoglycaemia per se. Proinsulin responses to GLP-1 were unchanged, but amylin and C-peptide AUCs increased (PAUC amylin/C-peptide ratios rose to control levels. Near-normoglycaemia tended to reduce AUC proinsulin/C-peptide ratio, which was significant (P=0.04) with GLP-1, but still higher than with saline (P=0.004). In conclusion, amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin responses to glucose were unaffected by four weeks of near-normoglycaemia, whereas GLP-1 increased amylin and C-peptide secretion and amylin/C-peptide ratio. Near-normoglycaemia reduced proinsulin/C-peptide ratio during stimulation with GLP-1, suggesting that strict glycaemic control might ameliorate some of the disturbances in beta-cell function characterizing T2DM. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Short-Term Effects of Lupin vs. Whey Supplementation on Glucose and Insulin Responses to a Standardized Meal in a Randomized Cross-Over Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopen, Kathrin; Ewald, Ann C; Johannes, Bernd W; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rittweger, Jörn; Frings-Meuthen, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Background: Whey protein is known to reduce postprandial glycaemia in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lupin as a vegetable source of protein could be considered as an alternative, as the percentage of vegetarian and vegan consumers is raising. The present study compares the acute glycemic effects of whey and lupin in healthy volunteers following a carbohydrate-rich reference meal. Methods In cross-over design, three standardized meals (reference meal; reference meal + whey; reference meal + lupin) were provided to 12 healthy male and female volunteers, aged between 23 and 33, in a balanced, randomized order. Volunteers' blood glucose and insulin concentrations were analyzed at baseline and at seven time points following the ingestion of the meals. Results: The supplementation of whey or lupin significantly blunted the postprandial increase in blood glucose concentrations compared to the reference meal ( p AUC whey-lupin = 8%, 0-60 min area under the curve (0-60 min AUC), p = 0.937], with a blunting effect of -46% by whey ( p = 0.005, 0-60 min AUC) and of -54% by lupin ( p AUC). When comparing whey and lupin data only, the insulin increase was found to be more pronounced for whey protein than for lupin supplementation (Δ AUC whey-lupin = 39%, 0-60 min AUC, p = 0.022). However, when comparing the insulin response of each supplementation to the one of the reference meal, no differences could be detected (whey p = 0.259, 0-60 min AUC; lupin p = 0.275, 0-60 min AUC). Conclusions: Results suggest that lupin and whey can both lower the increase of postprandial blood glucose concentrations to a comparable extent, implying the usability of lupin to reduce postprandial glycaemia. However, the insulin response following the supplementations to a carbohydrate-rich meal seems to differ for these two protein sources.

  16. Effects of a Bioavailable Arabinoxylan-enriched White Bread Flour on Postprandial Glucose Response in Normoglycemic Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulia Falchi, Anna; Grecchi, Ilaria; Muggia, Chiara; Palladini, Giuseppina; Perlini, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    The beneficial effects of soluble fibers on carbohydrate metabolism are well documented. In this regard, we tested an arabinoxylan-enriched white bread flour, obtained by a patented process by which the bran extracted from the milling process is enzymatically hydrolyzed in order to separate the soluble fraction fiber from the insoluble fiber. We recruited 24 healthy normoglycemic volunteers [Age 34-61 ± 12.5 y; Body Mass Index (BMI) 22.1 ± 2.5 kg/m(2); Waist circumference (WC) 84.43 ± 8.0 cm; Fat Mass (FM) 22.7 ± 8.0%] attending the Dietetics Outpatient Clinic of the Internal Medicine Department at IRCCS Policlinico S. Matteo Foundation, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. Subjects acutely consumed arabinoxylan-enriched white bread (weight: 100 g) or isoenergetic control breads, in a double-blind crossover study design. Plasma glucose levels were measured just before bread administration and 30 minutes afterwards. The 30-minute peak postprandial glucose concentrations after arabinoxylan-enriched meals were significantly lower than after the control meal (107±4.6 mg/dL vs. 121 ± 5.2 mg/dL; p consumption of arabinoxylan-enriched bread will benefit patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  17. Observations on morphologic changes in the aging and degenerating human disc: Secondary collagen alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanley Edward N

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the annulus, collagen fibers that make up the lamellae have a wavy, planar crimped pattern. This crimping plays a role in disc biomechanical function by allowing collagen fibers to stretch during compression. The relationship between morphologic changes in the aging/degenerating disc and collagen crimping have not been explored. Methods Ultrastructural studies were performed on annulus tissue from 29 control (normal donors (aged newborn to 79 years and surgical specimens from 49 patients (aged 16 to 77 years. Light microscopy and specialized image analysis to visualize crimping was performed on additional control and surgical specimens. Human intervertebral disc tissue from the annulus was obtained in a prospective morphologic study of the annulus. Studies were approved by the authors' Human Subjects Institutional Review Board. Results Three types of morphologic changes were found to alter the crimping morphology of collagen: 1 encircling layers of unusual matrix disrupted the lamellar collagen architecture; 2 collagen fibers were reduced in amount, and 3 collagen was absent in regions with focal matrix loss. Conclusions Although proteoglycan loss is well recognized as playing a role in the decreased shock absorber function of the aging/degenerating disc, collagen changes have received little attention. This study suggests that important stretch responses of collagen made possible by collagen crimping may be markedly altered by morphologic changes during aging/degeneration and may contribute to the early tissue changes involved in annular tears.

  18. Increased muscle glucose uptake after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ploug, Thorkil; Galbo, Henrik

    1985-01-01

    responsiveness of glucose uptake was noted only in controls. Analysis of intracellular glucose-6-phosphate, glucose, glycogen synthesis, and glucose transport suggested that the exercise effect on responsiveness might be due to enhancement of glucose disposal. After electrical stimulation of diabetic...... of glucose. At maximal insulin concentrations, the enhancing effect of exercise on glucose uptake may involve enhancement of glucose disposal, an effect that is probably less in muscle from diabetic rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)......It has recently been shown that insulin sensitivity of skeletal muscle glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis is increased after a single exercise session. The present study was designed to determine whether insulin is necessary during exercise for development of these changes found after exercise...

  19. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blunt the response of Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related peptide (NPY/AgRP) glucose inhibited (GI) neurons to decreased glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Lihong; Sheng, Zhenyu; Potian, Joseph; Deak, Adam; Rohowsky-Kochan, Christine; Routh, Vanessa H

    2016-10-01

    A population of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons which co-express Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) are inhibited at physiological levels of brain glucose and activated when glucose levels decline (e.g. glucose-inhibited or GI neurons). Fasting enhances the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibits the enhanced activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose following a fast. Mice which express green fluorescent protein (GFP) on their NPY promoter were used to identify NPY/AgRP neurons. Fasting for 24h and LPS injection decreased blood glucose levels. As we have found previously, fasting increased c-fos expression in NPY/AgRP neurons and increased the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. As we predicted, LPS blunted these effects of fasting at the 24h time point. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blocked the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. These data suggest that LPS and TNFα may alter glucose and energy homeostasis, in part, due to changes in the glucose sensitivity of NPY/AgRP neurons. Interestingly, our findings also suggest that NPY/AgRP-GI neurons use a distinct mechanism to sense changes in extracellular glucose as compared to our previous studies of GI neurons in the adjacent ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Prolonged inorganic arsenite exposure suppresses insulin-stimulated AKT S473 phosphorylation and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes: Involvement of the adaptive antioxidant response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Qiang; Woods, Courtney G.; Yarborough, Kathy; Liu, Huiyu; Sun, Guifan; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In 3T3-L1 adipocytes iAs 3+ decreases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. → iAs 3+ attenuates insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT S473. → iAs 3+ activates the cellular adaptive oxidative stress response. → iAs 3+ impairs insulin-stimulated ROS signaling. → iAs 3+ decreases expression of adipogenic genes and GLUT4. -- Abstract: There is growing evidence that chronic exposure of humans to inorganic arsenic, a potent environmental oxidative stressor, is associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). One critical feature of T2D is insulin resistance in peripheral tissues, especially in mature adipocytes, the hallmark of which is decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU). Despite the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), they have been recognized as a second messenger serving an intracellular signaling role for insulin action. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a central transcription factor regulating cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress. This study proposes that in response to arsenic exposure, the NRF2-mediated adaptive induction of endogenous antioxidant enzymes blunts insulin-stimulated ROS signaling and thus impairs ISGU. Exposure of differentiated 3T3-L1 cells to low-level (up to 2 μM) inorganic arsenite (iAs 3+ ) led to decreased ISGU in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Concomitant to the impairment of ISGU, iAs 3+ exposure significantly attenuated insulin-stimulated intracellular ROS accumulation and AKT S473 phosphorylation, which could be attributed to the activation of NRF2 and induction of a battery of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. In addition, prolonged iAs 3+ exposure of 3T3-L1 adipocytes resulted in significant induction of inflammatory response genes and decreased expression of adipogenic genes and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), suggesting chronic inflammation and reduction in GLUT4 expression may also be involved in arsenic-induced insulin resistance in

  1. Prolonged inorganic arsenite exposure suppresses insulin-stimulated AKT S473 phosphorylation and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes: Involvement of the adaptive antioxidant response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Peng [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Qiang; Woods, Courtney G.; Yarborough, Kathy; Liu, Huiyu [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Sun, Guifan [School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Andersen, Melvin E. [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Pi, Jingbo, E-mail: jpi@thehamner.org [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} In 3T3-L1 adipocytes iAs{sup 3+} decreases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} attenuates insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT S473. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} activates the cellular adaptive oxidative stress response. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} impairs insulin-stimulated ROS signaling. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} decreases expression of adipogenic genes and GLUT4. -- Abstract: There is growing evidence that chronic exposure of humans to inorganic arsenic, a potent environmental oxidative stressor, is associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). One critical feature of T2D is insulin resistance in peripheral tissues, especially in mature adipocytes, the hallmark of which is decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU). Despite the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), they have been recognized as a second messenger serving an intracellular signaling role for insulin action. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a central transcription factor regulating cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress. This study proposes that in response to arsenic exposure, the NRF2-mediated adaptive induction of endogenous antioxidant enzymes blunts insulin-stimulated ROS signaling and thus impairs ISGU. Exposure of differentiated 3T3-L1 cells to low-level (up to 2 {mu}M) inorganic arsenite (iAs{sup 3+}) led to decreased ISGU in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Concomitant to the impairment of ISGU, iAs{sup 3+} exposure significantly attenuated insulin-stimulated intracellular ROS accumulation and AKT S473 phosphorylation, which could be attributed to the activation of NRF2 and induction of a battery of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. In addition, prolonged iAs{sup 3+} exposure of 3T3-L1 adipocytes resulted in significant induction of inflammatory response genes and decreased expression of adipogenic genes and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), suggesting chronic inflammation and reduction in GLUT4

  2. The mechanism of collagen cross-linking in diabetes: a puzzle nearing resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, V M; Glomb, M; Elgawish, A; Sell, D R

    1996-07-01

    Considerable interest has been focused in recent years on the mechanism of collagen cross-linking by high glucose in vitro and in vivo. Experiments in both diabetic humans and in animals have shown that over time collagen becomes less soluble, less digestible by collagenase, more stable to heat-induced denaturation, and more glycated. In addition, collagen becomes more modified by advanced products of the Maillard reaction, i.e., immunoreactive advanced glycation end products and the glycoxidation markers carboxymethyllysine and pentosidine. Mechanistic studies have shown that collagen cross-linking in vitro can be uncoupled from glycation by the use of antioxidants and chelating agents. Experiments in the authors' laboratory revealed that approximately 50% of carboxymethyllysine formed in vitro originates from pathways other than oxidation of Amadori products, i.e., most likely the oxidation of Schiff base-linked glucose. In addition, the increase in thermal stability of rat tail tendons exposed to high glucose in vitro or in vivo was found to strongly depend on H2O2 formation. The final missing piece of the puzzle is that of the structure of the major cross-link. We speculate that it is a nonfluorescent nonultraviolet active cross-link between two lysine residues, which includes a fragmentation product of glucose linked in a nonreducible bond labile to both strong acids and bases.

  3. Pulsed addition of HMF and furfural to batch-grown xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in different physiological responses in glucose and xylose consumption phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass generates a number of undesired degradation products that can inhibit microbial metabolism. Two of these compounds, the furan aldehydes 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and 2-furaldehyde (furfural), have been shown to be an impediment for viable ethanol production. In the present study, HMF and furfural were pulse-added during either the glucose or the xylose consumption phase in order to dissect the effects of these inhibitors on energy state, redox metabolism, and gene expression of xylose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results Pulsed addition of 3.9 g L-1 HMF and 1.2 g L-1 furfural during either the glucose or the xylose consumption phase resulted in distinct physiological responses. Addition of furan aldehydes in the glucose consumption phase was followed by a decrease in the specific growth rate and the glycerol yield, whereas the acetate yield increased 7.3-fold, suggesting that NAD(P)H for furan aldehyde conversion was generated by acetate synthesis. No change in the intracellular levels of NAD(P)H was observed 1 hour after pulsing, whereas the intracellular concentration of ATP increased by 58%. An investigation of the response at transcriptional level revealed changes known to be correlated with perturbations in the specific growth rate, such as protein and nucleotide biosynthesis. Addition of furan aldehydes during the xylose consumption phase brought about an increase in the glycerol and acetate yields, whereas the xylitol yield was severely reduced. The intracellular concentrations of NADH and NADPH decreased by 58 and 85%, respectively, hence suggesting that HMF and furfural drained the cells of reducing power. The intracellular concentration of ATP was reduced by 42% 1 hour after pulsing of inhibitors, suggesting that energy-requiring repair or maintenance processes were activated. Transcriptome profiling showed that NADPH-requiring processes such as amino acid biosynthesis and sulfate and

  4. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A A A Listen En Español Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose) Hyperglycemia is the technical term for high ... function (data) { $('#survey-errors').remove(); $('.survey-form .form-group .survey-alert-wrap').remove(); if (data.submitSurveyResponse.success == ' ...

  5. Enhanced stabilization of collagen by furfural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Usha, Ramamoorthy; Mohan, Ranganathan; Sundaresan, Raja; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2014-04-01

    Furfural (2-furancarboxaldehyde), a product derived from plant pentosans, has been investigated for its interaction with collagen. Introduction of furfural during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. Collagen films treated with furfural exhibited higher denaturation temperature (Td) (pFurfural and furfural treated collagen films did not have any cytotoxic effect. Rheological characterization showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity with increasing shear rate for treated collagen. Circular dichroism (CD) studies indicated that the furfural did not have any impact on triple helical structure of collagen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of furfural treated collagen exhibited small sized porous structure in comparison with untreated collagen. Thus this study provides an alternate ecologically safe crosslinking agent for improving the stability of collagen for biomedical and industrial applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Post-stress recovery of pituitary-adrenal hormones and glucose, but not the response during exposure to the stressor, is a marker of stress intensity in highly stressful situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Cristina; Belda, Xavier; Armario, Antonio

    2002-02-01

    Acute immobilization in male rats elicited the same ACTH, corticosterone and glucose response as foot shock when measured immediately after stress. However, post-stress recovery of plasma ACTH, corticosterone and glucose levels were delayed in immobilized versus shocked rats. Similarly, stress-induced anorexia was much greater in the former animals. All these data suggest that post-stress speed of recovery of some physiological variables is positively related to stressor intensity and could be used to evaluate it.

  7. Lower glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) response but similar glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glycaemic, and insulinaemic response to ancient wheat compared to modern wheat depends on processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakhøj, S; Flint, A.; Holst, Jens Juul

    2003-01-01

    with honey-salt added, leavening crushed whole grain, and conventional leavening with yeast added. Bread made from modern wheat was prepared by conventional leavening with yeast added. SUBJECTS: A total of 11 healthy young men. RESULTS: The postprandial GIP response was significantly (P... by the Einkorn breads processed with honey-salt leavening and by using crushed whole grain bread compared to the yeast leavened bread made from modern wheat or from Einkorn. No significant differences were found in the responses of GLP-1, insulin or glucose. CONCLUSION: Einkorn honey-salt leavened and Einkorn...... whole grain bread elicit a reduced gastrointestinal response of GIP compared to conventional yeast bread. No differences were found in the glycaemic, insulinaemic and GLP-1 responses. Processing of starchy foods such as wheat may be a powerful tool to modify the postprandial GIP response....

  8. Extraction Optimization and Characterization of Collagen from Yellow Pike Conger Swimbladder with Acid-Hydro-Exctraction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandy Djailani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Swim bladder is one of marine potential byproducts for alternative source of collagen. This study aimedto optimize hydro-extraction and characterized collagen. Extraction optimization of collagen was determinedusing Box-behnken design response surface method with three variables: CH3COOH concentration, soakingtime and extraction time to yield response. Hydro-extraction collagen was characterization based on theamino acid content, SDS-PAGE, FT-IR and DSC. Acording to the result, the concentration had significantlyinfluence yield. Optimum extraction conditions were variable combinations of acetic acid concentration of0.1 M, for 1 h and hydro-extraction time of 1 h to produce the highest yield 63.35%. collagen was classifiedas type I collagen by amino acid content, electrophoresis patterns and fourier transform infrared (FTIRspectra. The glass transition of collagen was 67.23oC, showed high thermal stability that can be applied tothe cosmetics industry and nutraceutical.

  9. Prolonged inorganic arsenite exposure suppresses insulin-stimulated AKT S473 phosphorylation and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes: involvement of the adaptive antioxidant response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Qiang; Woods, Courtney G; Yarborough, Kathy; Liu, Huiyu; Sun, Guifan; Andersen, Melvin E; Pi, Jingbo

    2011-04-08

    There is growing evidence that chronic exposure of humans to inorganic arsenic, a potent environmental oxidative stressor, is associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). One critical feature of T2D is insulin resistance in peripheral tissues, especially in mature adipocytes, the hallmark of which is decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU). Despite the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), they have been recognized as a second messenger serving an intracellular signaling role for insulin action. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a central transcription factor regulating cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress. This study proposes that in response to arsenic exposure, the NRF2-mediated adaptive induction of endogenous antioxidant enzymes blunts insulin-stimulated ROS signaling and thus impairs ISGU. Exposure of differentiated 3T3-L1 cells to low-level (up to 2 μM) inorganic arsenite (iAs³(+)) led to decreased ISGU in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Concomitant to the impairment of ISGU, iAs³(+) exposure significantly attenuated insulin-stimulated intracellular ROS accumulation and AKT S473 phosphorylation, which could be attributed to the activation of NRF2 and induction of a battery of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. In addition, prolonged iAs³(+) exposure of 3T3-L1 adipocytes resulted in significant induction of inflammatory response genes and decreased expression of adipogenic genes and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), suggesting chronic inflammation and reduction in GLUT4 expression may also be involved in arsenic-induced insulin resistance in adipocytes. Taken together our studies suggest that prolonged low-level iAs³(+) exposure activates the cellular adaptive oxidative stress response, which impairs insulin-stimulated ROS signaling that is involved in ISGU, and thus causes insulin resistance in adipocytes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Age on Blood Glucose and Plasma Insulin, Glucagon, Ghrelin, CCK, GIP, and GLP-1 Responses to Whey Protein Ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Giezenaar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein-rich supplements are used widely to prevent and manage undernutrition in older people. We have previously shown that healthy older, compared to younger, adults have less suppression of energy intake by whey protein—although the effects of age on appetite-related gut hormones are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the acute effects of whey protein loads on blood glucose and plasma gut hormone concentrations in older and younger adults. Sixteen healthy older (eight men, eight women; mean ± SEM: age: 72 ± 1 years; body mass index: 25 ± 1 kg/m2 and 16 younger (eight men, eight women; 24 ± 1 years; 23 ± 0.4 kg/m2 adults were studied on three occasions in which they ingested 30 g (120 kcal or 70 g (280 kcal whey protein, or a flavored-water control drink (~2 kcal. At regular intervals over 180 min, blood glucose and plasma insulin, glucagon, ghrelin, cholecystokinin (CCK, gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP, and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 concentrations were measured. Plasma ghrelin was dose-dependently suppressed and insulin, glucagon, CCK, GIP, and GLP-1 concentrations were dose-dependently increased by the whey protein ingestion, while blood glucose concentrations were comparable during all study days. The stimulation of plasma CCK and GIP concentrations was greater in older than younger adults. In conclusion, orally ingested whey protein resulted in load-dependent gut hormone responses, which were greater for plasma CCK and GIP in older compared to younger adults.

  11. Generation of glucose-responsive functional islets with a three-dimensional structure from mouse fetal pancreatic cells and iPS cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Saito

    Full Text Available Islets of Langerhans are a pancreatic endocrine compartment consisting of insulin-producing β cells together with several other hormone-producing cells. While some insulin-producing cells or immature pancreatic cells have been generated in vitro from ES and iPS cells, islets with proper functions and a three-dimensional (3D structure have never been successfully produced. To test whether islets can be formed in vitro, we first examined the potential of mouse fetal pancreatic cells. We found that E16.5 pancreatic cells, just before forming islets, were able to develop cell aggregates consisting of β cells surrounded by glucagon-producing α cells, a structure similar to murine adult islets. Moreover, the transplantation of these cells improved blood glucose levels in hyperglycemic mice. These results indicate that functional islets are formed in vitro from fetal pancreatic cells at a specific developmental stage. By adopting these culture conditions to the differentiation of mouse iPS cells, we developed a two-step system to generate islets, i.e. immature pancreatic cells were first produced from iPS cells, and then transferred to culture conditions that allowed the formation of islets from fetal pancreatic cells. The islets exhibited distinct 3D structural features similar to adult pancreatic islets and secreted insulin in response to glucose concentrations. Transplantation of the islets improved blood glucose levels in hyperglycemic mice. In conclusion, the two-step culture system allows the generation of functional islets with a 3D structure from iPS cells.

  12. Fracture mechanics of collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene B; Mulder, Hindrik; Kovanen, Vuokko

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are important load-bearing structures, which are frequently injured in both sports and work. Type I collagen fibrils are the primary components of tendons and carry most of the mechanical loads experienced by the tissue, however, knowledge of how load is transmitted between and within...... fibrils is limited. The presence of covalent enzymatic cross-links between collagen molecules is an important factor that has been shown to influence mechanical behavior of the tendons. To improve our understanding of how molecular bonds translate into tendon mechanics, we used an atomic force microscopy...... technique to measure the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils loaded to failure. Fibrils from human patellar tendons, rat-tail tendons (RTTs), NaBH₄ reduced RTTs, and tail tendons of Zucker diabetic fat rats were tested. We found a characteristic three-phase stress-strain behavior in the human...

  13. From mechanical loading to collagen synthesis, structural changes and function in human tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, M; Langberg, H; Heinemeier, K

    2009-01-01

    The adaptive response of connective tissue to loading requires increased synthesis and turnover of matrix proteins, with special emphasis on collagen. Collagen formation and degradation in the tendon increases with both acute and chronic loading, and data suggest that a gender difference exists...

  14. Hemodynamic and renal implications of sodium-glucose cotransporter- 2 inhibitors in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor Jorge, Alberto

    2016-11-01

    In DM2, there is increased expression of the proximal glucose transporter SGLT2. The increased glucose reabsorption from the urine to the proximal tubule and subsequently to the bloodstream, has three direct effects on the prognosis of patients with DM2: a) it increases the daily glucose load by raising the renal threshold for glucose, thus augmenting requirements for oral antidiabetics and insulin. This progressive increase occurs throughout the course of the disease and in parallel with the increase in renal mass (renal hypertrophy); b) because of the greater glucose reabsorption, glycosuria is lower than the level corresponding to glycaemia, decreasing the stimulus on the tubuloglomerular feedback system of the distal nephron. As a result, the glomerular vasodilation caused by hyperglycaemia is not arrested, maintaining glomerular hyperfiltration, and c) the excess glucose transported to the proximal tubular cells modifies their redox status, increasing local production of glycosylating products and activating local production of proinflammatory and profibrotic proliferative mediators. These mediators are responsible for the direct free radical damage to proximal tubular cells, for increased SGLT2 expression, increased production of collagen IV and extracellular matrix, and activation of monocyte/macrophages able to cause endothelial injury. The use of SGLT2 inhibitors not only reduces the reabsorption of glucose from the glomerular filtrate back into the circulationthus improving metabolic control in diabetesbut also restores tubuloglomerular feedback by increasing glycosuria and distal urinary flow. However, the most notable effect is due to inhibition of glucose entry to the proximal tubular cells. Glycosuria is toxic to the kidney: it harms glucosetransporting cells, that is, the proximal cells, which contain SGLT2. In animal models, SGLT2 inhibition reduces local production of oxygen-free radicals, the formation of mesangial matrix and collagen IV

  15. Change in the amount of epsilon-hexosyllysine, UV absorbance, and fluorescence of collagen with age in different animal species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miksik, I.; Deyl, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Skin and aorta collagen specimens of Wistar rats, white mice, beagle dogs, cats, horses, and human necropsies of different ages were examined with respect to the content of glycated products. The data presented show that (a) glycation and accumulation of the chromophore(s) are comparable in collagen samples from different species of comparable age; (b) glycation and pigmented accumulation increase markedly during the first 5-10 years of age; (c) the extent of glycation is different in different tissues (in particular, glycation of aortal collagen is about twice that of skin collagen); and (d) collagen pigmentation as followed by fluorescence is comparable in aortal and skin collagen (except below 10 years); pigmentation measured by absorbance at 350 nm is, on the contrary, lower in aortal than in skin collagen. Based on the assumption of constant blood glucose level during the life span, it appears feasible to conclude that the degree of nonenzymatic collagen glycation reflects the time period for which the protein was exposed to the action of sugars. This period, because of increased cross-linking, is likely to be extended in older animals. Other factors, such as differences in collagen turnover between different tissues and the intensity of the removal process of the glycated products, should be taken into consideration as well

  16. Collagen like peptide bioconjugates for targeted drug delivery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tianzhi

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in mammals, and there has been long-standing interest in understanding and controlling collagen assembly in the design of new materials. Collagen-like peptides (CLP), also known as collagen-mimetic peptides (CMP), are short synthetic peptides which mimic the triple helical conformation of native collagens. In the past few decades, collagen like peptides and their conjugated hybrids have become a new class of biomaterials that possesses unique structures and properties. In addition to traditional applications of using CLPs to decipher the role of different amino acid residues and tripeptide motifs in stabilizing the collagen triple helix and mimicking collagen fibril formation, with the introduction of specific interactions including electrostatic interactions, pi-pi stacking interaction and metal-ligand coordination, a variety of artificial collagen-like peptides with well-defined sequences have been designed to create higher order assemblies with specific biological functions. The CLPs have also been widely used as bioactive domains or physical cross-linkers to fabricate hydrogels, which have shown potential to improve cell adhesion, proliferation and ECM macromolecule production. Despite this widespread use, the utilization of CLPs as domains in stimuli responsive bioconjugates represents a relatively new area for the development of functional polymeric materials. In this work, a new class of thermoresponsive diblock conjugates, containing collagen-like peptides and a thermoresponsive polymer, namely poly(diethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate) (PDEGMEMA), is introduced. The CLP domain maintains its triple helix conformation after conjugation with the polymer. The engineered LCST of these conjugates has enabled temperature-induced assembly under aqueous conditions, at physiologically relevant temperatures, into well-defined vesicles with diameters of approximately 50-200 nm. The formation of nanostructures was driven by

  17. Oxidative Stress-Responsive Apoptosis Inducing Protein (ORAIP) Plays a Critical Role in High Glucose-Induced Apoptosis in Rat Cardiac Myocytes and Murine Pancreatic β-Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Takako; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Murayama, Kimie; Okumura, Ko; Seko, Yoshinori

    2017-10-18

    We previously identified a novel apoptosis-inducing humoral factor in the conditioned medium of hypoxic/reoxygenated-cardiac myocytes. We named this novel post-translationally-modified secreted-form of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A Oxidative stress-Responsive Apoptosis-Inducing Protein (ORAIP). We confirmed that myocardial ischemia/reperfusion markedly increased plasma ORAIP levels and rat myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury was clearly suppressed by neutralizing anti-ORAIP monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in vivo. In this study, to investigate the mechanism of cell injury of cardiac myocytes and pancreatic β-cells involved in diabetes mellitus (DM), we analyzed plasma ORAIP levels in DM model rats and the role of ORAIP in high glucose-induced apoptosis of cardiac myocytes in vitro. We also examined whether recombinant-ORAIP induces apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells. Plasma ORAIP levels in DM rats during diabetic phase were about 18 times elevated as compared with non-diabetic phase. High glucose induced massive apoptosis in cardiac myocytes (66.2 ± 2.2%), which was 78% suppressed by neutralizing anti-ORAIP mAb in vitro. Furthermore, recombinant-ORAIP clearly induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells in vitro. These findings strongly suggested that ORAIP plays a pivotal role in hyperglycemia-induced myocardial injury and pancreatic β-cell injury in DM. ORAIP will be a biomarker and a critical therapeutic target for cardiac injury and progression of DM itself.

  18. Effects of 2-deoxy-D-glucose, oligomycin and theophylline on in vitro glycerol metabolism in rat adipose tissue: response to insulin and epinephrine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez, M C; Herrera, E [Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Catedra de Fisiologia General

    1976-01-01

    The effects of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG), oligomycin and theophylline on the in vitro production and metabolism of glycerol and its response to insulin and epinephrine were studied in epididymal fat pads from fed rats. 2-DG failed to affect basic or epinephrine-stimulated glycerol production but decreased the uptake of 1-/sup 14/C-glycerol by the tissue and its conversion to glyceride-glycerol. Oligomycin also failed to affect the basic production of glycerol, but it inhibited the affect of epinephrine on this parameter as well as the uptake and utilization of 1-/sup 14/C-glycerol. Theophylline enhanced the production of glycerol by the tissue, and this effect was not further augmented by epinephrine. Theophylline also inhibited the uptake and utilization of 1-/sup 14/C-glycerol; the most pronounced effect of theophylline was observed in the formation of /sup 14/C-fatty acids from 1-/sup 14/C-glycerol in the presence of glucose. Insulin, but not epinephrine, decreased the inhibitory effect of theophylline on glycerol utilization. It is concluded that these compounds affect the ability of adipose tissue to metabolize glycerol more intensely than the ability to release it through lipolysis. The pathway for glycerol utilization in adipose tissue appears to be more sensitive to changes in the availability of ATP than the mechanisms for the release of glycerol from the tissue.

  19. Resistant starch intake at breakfast affects postprandial responses in type 2 diabetics and enhances the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide--insulin relationship following a second meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, Stacey; Rebry, Rachel M; Tetlow, Ian J; Emes, Michael J; McKeown, Bruce; Graham, Terry E

    2013-12-01

    Resistant starch (RS) consumption can modulate postprandial metabolic responses, but its effects on carbohydrate (CHO) handling in type 2 diabetics (T2D) are unclear. It was hypothesized that a bagel high in RS would improve glucose and insulin homeostasis following the 1st meal, regardless of the amount of available CHO, and that in association with incretins, the effects would carry over to a 2nd meal. Using a randomized crossover design, 12 T2D ingested four different bagel treatments (their 1st meal) determined by available CHO and the weight or amount of bagel consumed: treatment A, without RS (50 g of available CHO); treatment B, with RS (same total CHO as in A); treatment C, with RS (same available CHO as in A); and treatment D, with the same RS as in B and available CHO as in A and C. A standard 2nd meal was ingested 3 h later. Following the first meal, B elicited a lower glucose incremental area under the curve (iAUC) than C (P portion of the available CHO, while ingesting more RS influenced the GIP-insulin axis following the 2nd meal.

  20. Collagen crosslinks in chondromalacia of the patella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väätäinen, U; Kiviranta, I; Jaroma, H; Arokosi, J; Tammi, M; Kovanen, V

    1998-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine collagen concentration and collagen crosslinks in cartilage samples from chondromalacia of the patella. To study the extracellular matrix alterations associated to chondromalacia, we determined the concentration of collagen (hydroxyproline) and its hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline crosslinks from chondromalacia foci of the patellae in 12 patients and 7 controls from apparently normal cadavers. The structure of the collagen network in 8 samples of grades II-IV chondromalacia was examined under polarized light microscopy. The full-thickness cartilage samples taken with a surgical knife from chondromalacia lesions did not show changes in collagen, hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline concentration as compared with the controls. Polarized light microscopy showed decreased birefringence in the superficial cartilage of chondromalacia lesions, indicating disorganization or disappearance of collagen fibers in this zone. It is concluded that the collagen network shows gradual disorganization with the severity of chondromalacia lesion of the patella without changes in the concentration or crosslinks of collagen.

  1. Effects of gender, body weight, and blood glucose dynamics on the growth hormone response to the glucagon stimulation test in patients with pituitary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jessica R; Utz, Andrea L; Devin, Jessica K

    2016-02-01

    Body weight blunts the growth hormone (GH) response to provocative stimuli. The appropriate GH cut-off to confirm GH deficiency in obese and overweight patients undergoing the glucagon stimulation test (GST) has recently been questioned. We hypothesized that the peak GH would be inversely related to the nadir blood glucose (BG) after glucagon and that this may be a mechanism influencing peak GH in overweight patients. This retrospective study examined effects of gender, body weight, and BG dynamics on GH response to GST in patients evaluated in our Pituitary Center. Adult patients who underwent GST from September 2009-2014 were included. Continuous variable comparisons were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-test and categorical data by Fisher's Exact Test. Spearman correlation was used to determine associations between continuous variables. 42 patients (N=28, 66.7% female) had sufficient data for analysis. Obese patients (N=26) had a reduced GH response, summarized as GH area under the curve (AUC) (p=0.03 vs. non-obese patients) and higher BG during GST, summarized as AUC (pAUC (rs=-0.45; p=0.01), peak GH response (rs=-0.42; p=0.02) and nadir BG (rs=0.48; pAUC (rs=-0.38; p=0.03) and peak GH (rs=-0.37; p=0.04) such that patients (N=32) with higher nadir BG had lower peak GH in response to glucagon. Obese patients, particularly women, do not respond as robustly to glucagon stimulation. These data suggest that there exists an altered BG profile during GST in obese individuals, and that a less robust hypoglycemic stimulus may contribute to an impaired GH response. We suggest measuring BG levels during glucagon stimulation testing to assist with clinical interpretation of GH dynamics. The diagnostic accuracy of the GST in patients with known disorders in glucose metabolism and those taking anti-diabetic medications deserves further study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of food form on food intake and postprandial appetite sensations, glucose and endocrine responses, and energy expenditure in resistance trained v. sedentary older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolzan, John W.; Leidy, Heather J.; Mattes, Richard D.; Campbell, Wayne W.

    2013-01-01

    Limited research has suggested that the food form of nutritional supplements (FFNS) and resistance training (RT) influence ingestive behaviour and energy balance in older adults. The effects of the FFNS and RT on acute appetitive, endocrine and metabolic responses are not adequately documented. The present study assessed the effects of the FFNS and RT on postprandial appetite sensations (hunger and fullness), endocrine responses (plasma insulin, cholecystokinin, ghrelin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)), metabolism (glucose, energy expenditure and RER) and food intake (satiation) in older adults. On separate days, eighteen sedentary (Sed) and sixteen RT healthy adults (age 62–84 years) consumed 12·5% of their energy need as an isoenergetic- and macronutrient-matched solid or beverage. Postprandial responses were assessed over 4 h. No RT × FFNS interactions were observed for any parameter. Fasting cholecystokinin was higher in the RT v. Sed group (Pingestive behaviour. The appetitive and endocrine responses suggested the solid-promoted satiety; however, the FFNS did not alter subsequent food intake. PMID:21492495

  3. Inelastic behaviour of collagen networks in cell–matrix interactions and mechanosensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Hamid; Arora, Pamma D.; Simmons, Craig A.; Janmey, Paul A.; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of extracellular matrix proteins strongly influence cell-induced tension in the matrix, which in turn influences cell function. Despite progress on the impact of elastic behaviour of matrix proteins on cell–matrix interactions, little is known about the influence of inelastic behaviour, especially at the large and slow deformations that characterize cell-induced matrix remodelling. We found that collagen matrices exhibit deformation rate-dependent behaviour, which leads to a transition from pronounced elastic behaviour at fast deformations to substantially inelastic behaviour at slow deformations (1 μm min−1, similar to cell-mediated deformation). With slow deformations, the inelastic behaviour of floating gels was sensitive to collagen concentration, whereas attached gels exhibited similar inelastic behaviour independent of collagen concentration. The presence of an underlying rigid support had a similar effect on cell–matrix interactions: cell-induced deformation and remodelling were similar on 1 or 3 mg ml−1 attached collagen gels while deformations were two- to fourfold smaller in floating gels of high compared with low collagen concentration. In cross-linked collagen matrices, which did not exhibit inelastic behaviour, cells did not respond to the presence of the underlying rigid foundation. These data indicate that at the slow rates of collagen compaction generated by fibroblasts, the inelastic responses of collagen gels, which are influenced by collagen concentration and the presence of an underlying rigid foundation, are important determinants of cell–matrix interactions and mechanosensation. PMID:25392399

  4. A collagen-based scaffold delivering exogenous microrna-29B to modulate extracellular matrix remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Michael; Browne, Shane; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Pandit, Abhay

    2014-04-01

    Directing appropriate extracellular matrix remodeling is a key aim of regenerative medicine strategies. Thus, antifibrotic interfering RNA (RNAi) therapy with exogenous microRNA (miR)-29B was proposed as a method to modulate extracellular matrix remodeling following cutaneous injury. It was hypothesized that delivery of miR-29B from a collagen scaffold will efficiently modulate the extracellular matrix remodeling response and reduce maladaptive remodeling such as aggressive deposition of collagen type I after injury. The release of RNA from the scaffold was assessed and its ability to silence collagen type I and collagen type III expression was evaluated in vitro. When primary fibroblasts were cultured with scaffolds doped with miR-29B, reduced levels of collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA expression were observed for up to 2 weeks of culture. When the scaffolds were applied to full thickness wounds in vivo, reduced wound contraction, improved collagen type III/I ratios and a significantly higher matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8: tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 ratio were detected when the scaffolds were functionalized with miR-29B. Furthermore, these effects were significantly influenced by the dose of miR-29B in the collagen scaffold (0.5 versus 5 μg). This study shows a potential of combining exogenous miRs with collagen scaffolds to improve extracellular matrix remodeling following injury.

  5. Lack of collagen XVIII/endostatin exacerbates immune-mediated glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamano, Yuki; Okude, Takashi; Shirai, Ryota; Sato, Ikumi; Kimura, Ryota; Ogawa, Makoto; Ueda, Yoshihiko; Yokosuka, Osamu; Kalluri, Raghu; Ueda, Shiro

    2010-09-01

    Collagen XVIII is a component of the highly specialized extracellular matrix associated with basement membranes of epithelia and endothelia. In the normal kidney, collagen XVIII is distributed throughout glomerular and tubular basement membranes, mesangial matrix, and Bowman's capsule. Proteolytic cleavage within its C-terminal domain releases the fragment endostatin, which has antiangiogenic properties. Because damage to the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) accompanies immune-mediated renal injury, we investigated the role of collagen XVIII/endostatin in this disorder. We induced anti-GBM glomerulonephritis in collagen XVIII alpha1-null and wild-type mice and compared the resulting matrix accumulation, inflammation, and capillary rarefaction. Anti-GBM disease upregulated collagen XVIII/endostatin expression within the GBM and Bowman's capsule of wild-type mice. Collagen XVIII/endostatin-deficient mice developed more severe glomerular and tubulointerstitial injury than wild-type mice. Collagen XVIII/endostatin deficiency altered matrix remodeling, enhanced the inflammatory response, and promoted capillary rarefaction and vascular endothelial cell damage, but did not affect endothelial proliferation. Supplementing collagen XVIII-deficient mice with exogenous endostatin did not affect the progression of anti-GBM disease. Taken together, these results suggest that collagen XVIII/endostatin preserves the integrity of the extracellular matrix and capillaries in the kidney, protecting against progressive glomerulonephritis.

  6. Collagen synthesis in rat gingiva during tooth movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisson, M.; Gianelly, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    The response of the gingiva to an increased interdental space was studied by creating a diastema between the central incisors of rats and analyzing autoradiographically the incorporation of H3 proline in the gingiva to detect increased collagen production. In addition, conventional histologic methods were used to determine changes in the gingival architecture. The results indicate that the gingiva responds to an increased space in at least two ways. One is the production of more collagen fibers. The other involves the reorientation of the existing fibers in a horizontal plane as the gingival papilla becomes flattened

  7. Collagenous mucosal inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh J

    2005-07-01

    Collagenous mucosal inflammatory diseases involve the columnar-lined gastric and intestinal mucosa and have become recognized increasingly as a significant cause of symptomatic morbidity, particularly in middle-aged and elderly women, especially with watery diarrhea. Still, mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this diarrhea remain poorly understood and require further elucidation. The prognosis and long-term outcome of these disorders has been documented only to a limited extent. Recent clinical and pathologic studies have indicated that collagenous mucosal inflammatory disease is a more extensive pathologic process that concomitantly may involve several sites in the gastric and intestinal mucosa. The dominant pathologic lesion is a distinct subepithelial hyaline-like deposit that has histochemical and ultrastructural features of collagen overlying a microscopically defined inflammatory process. An intimate relationship with other autoimmune connective tissue disorders is evident, particularly celiac disease. This is intriguing because these collagenous disorders have not been shown to be gluten dependent. Collagenous mucosal inflammatory disorders may represent a relatively unique but generalized inflammatory response to a multitude of causes, including celiac disease, along with a diverse group of pharmacologic agents. Some recent reports have documented treatment success but histopathologic reversal has been more difficult to substantiate owing to the focal, sometimes extensive nature, of this pathologic process.

  8. Building blocks of Collagen based biomaterial devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Building blocks of Collagen based biomaterial devices. Collagen as a protein. Collagen in tissues and organs. Stabilizing and cross linking agents. Immunogenicity. Hosts (drugs). Controlled release mechanisms of hosts. Biodegradability, workability into devices ...

  9. Differences in maintenance of mean blood glucose (BG and their association with response to “recognizing hunger”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciampolini M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mario Ciampolini1, Massimiliano Sifone21Preventive Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Università di Firenze, Florence, Italy; 2Department of Statistics, Università di Firenze, Florence, ItalyBackground: Meals begin and end subjectively. We trained healthy subjects to recognize initial hunger as a preprandial target for meal consumption, and to create a “recognizing hunger” or initial hunger meal pattern.Objective: Training subjects to “recognize hunger” lowers blood glucose (BG and improves energy balance, and lowers metabolic risks and bodyweight. A minority may have low BG and low metabolic risks at recruitment, but the others may recover this favorable condition by training.Methods: In a 7-day food diary, subjects reported their preprandial BG measurements; BG and energy availability by blood were assessed at the lowest BG during the day, and diary-mean BG thus characterized the individual meal pattern (daily energy intake. We analyzed the same diaries of a recent paper on a global, randomized comparison of subjects trained in “recognizing hunger” with control subjects. This time, we checked whether subjects who had maintained low BG (LBG subgroup at recruitment were able to decrease mean BG and metabolic risk factors during “hunger recognition” like those who presented high BG (HBG subgroup.Results: At recruitment, the BG means of 120 investigated subjects were within mean confidence limits of ± 3.84 mg/dL, and we could stratify subjects in ten small strata of which each significantly differed by mean BG. Mean BG was stable in each control subject over five months; the mean absolute change being 6.0 ± 4.6 mg/dL. Only three out of 34 trained subjects who had lower mean BG than 81.8 mg/dL significantly decreased mean BG, whereas 41 out of 55 subjects whose mean BG was greater than 81.8 mg/dL significantly decreased mean BG after training (P < 0.0001. At recruitment, the LBG subgroup showed significantly lower

  10. Anorectic response to the trichothecene T-2 toxin correspond to plasma elevations of the satiety hormone glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and peptide YY3-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Kun; Zhang, Hua; Yue, Jianming; Gu, Wei; Gu, Chao; Zhang, Haibin; Wu, Wenda

    2018-04-22

    T-2 toxin, a potent type A trichothecene mycotoxin, is produced by various Fusarium species and can negatively impact animal and human health. Although anorexia induction is a common hallmark of T-2 toxin-induced toxicity, the underlying mechanisms for this adverse effect are not fully understood. The goal of this study was to determine the roles of two gut satiety hormones, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and Peptide YY 3-36 (PYY 3-36 ) in anorexia induction by T-2 toxin. Elevations of plasma GIP and PYY 3-36 markedly corresponded to anorexia induction following oral exposure to T-2 toxin using a nocturnal mouse anorexia model. Direct administration of exogenous GIP and PYY 3-36 similarly induced anorectic responses. Furthermore, the GIP receptor antagonist Pro3GIP dose-dependently attenuated both GIP- and T-2 toxin-induced anorectic responses. Pretreatment with NPY2 receptor antagonist JNJ-31020028 induced a dose-dependent attenuation of both PYY 3-36 - and T-2 toxin-induced anorectic responses. To summarize, these findings suggest that both GIP and PYY 3-36 might be critical mediators of anorexia induction by T-2 toxin. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Neuroscience of glucose homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    La Fleur, S E; Fliers, E; Kalsbeek, A

    2014-01-01

    Plasma glucose concentrations are homeostatically regulated and maintained within strict boundaries. Several mechanisms are in place to increase glucose output when glucose levels in the circulation drop as a result of glucose utilization, or to decrease glucose output and increase tissue glucose

  12. Engineering a collagen matrix that replicates the biological properties of native extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kwangwoo; Sakai, Yuuki; Funamoto, Seiichi; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Kishida, Akio

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to replicate the function of native tissues that can be used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The key to such replication is the preparation of an artificial collagen matrix that possesses a structure resembling that of the extracellular matrix. We, therefore, prepared a collagen matrix by fibrillogenesis in a NaCl/Na(2)HPO(4) aqueous solution using a dialysis cassette and investigated its biological behavior in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro cell adhesion and proliferation did not show any significant differences. The degradation rate in the living body could be controlled according to the preparation condition, where the collagen matrix with high water content (F-collagen matrix, >98%) showed fast degradation and collagen matrix with lower water content (T-collagen matrix, >80%) showed no degradation for 8 weeks. The degradation did not affect the inflammatory response at all and relatively faster wound healing response was observed. Comparing this result with that of collagen gel and decellularized cornea, it can be concluded that the structural factor is very important and no cell abnormal behavior would be observed for quaternary structured collagen matrix.

  13. Decreased insulin secretory response of pancreatic islets during culture in the presence of low glucose is associated with diminished 45Ca2+ net uptake, NADPH/NADP+ and GSH/GSSG ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verspohl, E.J.; Kaiser, P.; Wahl, M.; Ammon, H.P.T.

    1988-01-01

    In isolated rat pancreatic islets maintained at a physiologic glucose concentration (5.6 mM) the effect of glucose on parameters which are known to be involved in the insulin secretion coupling such as NADPH, reduced glutathione (GSH), 86 Rb + efflux, and 45 Ca ++ net uptake were investigated. The insulinotropic effect of 16.7 mM glucose was decreased with the period of culturing during the first 14 days being significant after 2 days though in control experiments both protein content and ATP levels per islet were not affected and insulin content was only slightly decreased. Both NADPH and GSH decreased with time of culture. 86 Rb + efflux which is decreased by enhancing the glucose concentration from 3 to 5.6 mM in freshly isolated islets was not affected by culturing whatsoever, even not after 14 days of culture when there was not longer any insulin responsiveness to glucose. The 45 Ca ++ net uptake was decreased during culturing. The data indicate (1) that the diminished glucose-stimulated release of insulin during culturing is not due to cell loss or simple energy disturbances, (2) that more likely it is the result of a diminished 45 Ca ++ net uptake as a consequence of the inability of islet cells to maintain proper NADPH and GSH levels, and (3) that potassium ( 86 Rb + ) efflux may not be related to changes of NADPH and GSH

  14. Replacement of glycaemic carbohydrates by inulin-type fructans from chicory (oligofructose, inulin) reduces the postprandial blood glucose and insulin response to foods: report of two double-blind, randomized, controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightowler, Helen; Thondre, Sangeetha; Holz, Anja; Theis, Stephan

    2018-04-01

    Inulin-type fructans are recognized as prebiotic dietary fibres and classified as non-digestible carbohydrates that do not contribute to glycaemia. The aim of the present studies was to investigate the glycaemic response (GR) and insulinaemic response (IR) to foods in which sucrose was partially replaced by inulin or oligofructose from chicory. In a double-blind, randomized, controlled cross-over design, 40-42 healthy adults consumed a yogurt drink containing oligofructose or fruit jelly containing inulin and the respective full-sugar variants. Capillary blood glucose and insulin were measured in fasted participants and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after starting to drink/eat. For each test food, the incremental area under the curve (iAUC) for glucose and insulin was calculated and the GR and IR determined. Consumption of a yogurt drink with oligofructose which was 20% reduced in sugars significantly lowered the glycaemic response compared to the full-sugar reference (iAUC 120min 31.9 and 37.3 mmol/L/min, respectively; p inulin and containing 30% less sugars than the full-sugar variant likewise resulted in a significantly reduced blood glucose response (iAUC 120min 53.7 and 63.7 mmol/L/min, respectively; p inulin-type fructans (p inulin or oligofructose from chicory may be an effective strategy to reduce the postprandial blood glucose response to foods.

  15. Collagens--structure, function, and biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelse, K; Pöschl, E; Aigner, T

    2003-11-28

    The extracellular matrix represents a complex alloy of variable members of diverse protein families defining structural integrity and various physiological functions. The most abundant family is the collagens with more than 20 different collagen types identified so far. Collagens are centrally involved in the formation of fibrillar and microfibrillar networks of the extracellular matrix, basement membranes as well as other structures of the extracellular matrix. This review focuses on the distribution and function of various collagen types in different tissues. It introduces their basic structural subunits and points out major steps in the biosynthesis and supramolecular processing of fibrillar collagens as prototypical members of this protein family. A final outlook indicates the importance of different collagen types not only for the understanding of collagen-related diseases, but also as a basis for the therapeutical use of members of this protein family discussed in other chapters of this issue.

  16. Quantitative Characterization of Collagen in the Fibrotic Capsule Surrounding Implanted Polymeric Microparticles through Second Harmonic Generation Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akilbekova, Dana; Bratlie, Kaitlin M

    2015-01-01

    The collagenous capsule formed around an implant will ultimately determine the nature of its in vivo fate. To provide a better understanding of how surface modifications can alter the collagen orientation and composition in the fibrotic capsule, we used second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to evaluate collagen organization and structure generated in mice subcutaneously injected with chemically functionalized polystyrene particles. SHG is sensitive to the orientation of a molecule, making it a powerful tool for measuring the alignment of collagen fibers. Additionally, SHG arises from the second order susceptibility of the interrogated molecule in response to the electric field. Variation in these tensor components distinguishes different molecular sources of SHG, providing collagen type specificity. Here, we demonstrated the ability of SHG to differentiate collagen type I and type III quantitatively and used this method to examine fibrous capsules of implanted polystyrene particles. Data presented in this work shows a wide range of collagen fiber orientations and collagen compositions in response to surface functionalized polystyrene particles. Dimethylamino functionalized particles were able to form a thin collagenous matrix resembling healthy skin. These findings have the potential to improve the fundamental understanding of how material properties influence collagen organization and composition quantitatively.

  17. Quantitative Characterization of Collagen in the Fibrotic Capsule Surrounding Implanted Polymeric Microparticles through Second Harmonic Generation Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Akilbekova

    Full Text Available The collagenous capsule formed around an implant will ultimately determine the nature of its in vivo fate. To provide a better understanding of how surface modifications can alter the collagen orientation and composition in the fibrotic capsule, we used second harmonic generation (SHG microscopy to evaluate collagen organization and structure generated in mice subcutaneously injected with chemically functionalized polystyrene particles. SHG is sensitive to the orientation of a molecule, making it a powerful tool for measuring the alignment of collagen fibers. Additionally, SHG arises from the second order susceptibility of the interrogated molecule in response to the electric field. Variation in these tensor components distinguishes different molecular sources of SHG, providing collagen type specificity. Here, we demonstrated the ability of SHG to differentiate collagen type I and type III quantitatively and used this method to examine fibrous capsules of implanted polystyrene particles. Data presented in this work shows a wide range of collagen fiber orientations and collagen compositions in response to surface functionalized polystyrene particles. Dimethylamino functionalized particles were able to form a thin collagenous matrix resembling healthy skin. These findings have the potential to improve the fundamental understanding of how material properties influence collagen organization and composition quantitatively.

  18. Collagen cross linking: Current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas K Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus is a common ectatic disorder occurring in more than 1 in 1,000 individuals. The condition typically starts in adolescence and early adulthood. It is a disease with an uncertain cause and its progression is unpredictable, but in extreme cases, vision deteriorates and can require corneal transplant surgery. Corneal collagen cross-linking (CCL with riboflavin (C3R is a recent treatment option that can enhance the rigidity of the cornea and prevent disease progression. Since its inception, the procedure has evolved with newer instrumentation, surgical techniques, and is also now performed for expanded indications other than keratoconus. With increasing experience, newer guidelines regarding optimization of patient selection, the spectrum of complications and their management, and combination procedures are being described. This article in conjunction with the others in this issue, will try and explore the uses of collagen cross-linking (CXL in its current form.

  19. Common variants in the hERG (KCNH2) voltage-gated potassium channel are associated with altered fasting and glucose-stimulated plasma incretin and glucagon responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrechtsen, Line; Mahendran, Yuvaraj; Jonsson, Anna

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with long QT syndrome due to rare loss-of-function mutations in the human ether-á-go-go-related gene (hERG) have prolonged QT interval, risk of arrhythmias, increased secretion of insulin and incretins and impaired glucagon response to hypoglycemia. This is caused by a dysfun......BACKGROUND: Patients with long QT syndrome due to rare loss-of-function mutations in the human ether-á-go-go-related gene (hERG) have prolonged QT interval, risk of arrhythmias, increased secretion of insulin and incretins and impaired glucagon response to hypoglycemia. This is caused...... by a dysfunctional Kv11.1 voltage-gated potassium channel. Based on these findings in patients with rare variants in hERG, we hypothesized that common variants in hERG may also lead to alterations in glucose homeostasis. Subsequently, we aimed to evaluate the effect of two common gain-of-function variants in hERG...... in hERG on QT-interval and circulation levels of incretins, insulin and glucagon. The Danish population-based Inter99 cohort (n = 5895) was used to assess the effect of common variants on QT-interval. The Danish ADDITION-PRO cohort was used (n = 1329) to study genetic associations with levels of GLP-1...

  20. Edaravone protects against oxygen-glucose-serum deprivation/restoration-induced apoptosis in spinal cord astrocytes by inhibiting integrated stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Dai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously found that oxygen-glucose-serum deprivation/restoration (OGSD/R induces apoptosis of spinal cord astrocytes, possibly via caspase-12 and the integrated stress response, which involves protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK, eukaryotic initiation factor 2-alpha (eIF2α and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4. We hypothesized that edaravone, a low molecular weight, lipophilic free radical scavenger, would reduce OGSD/R-induced apoptosis of spinal cord astrocytes. To test this, we established primary cultures of rat astrocytes, and exposed them to 8 hours/6 hours of OGSD/R with or without edaravone (0.1, 1, 10, 100 μM treatment. We found that 100 μM of edaravone significantly suppressed astrocyte apoptosis and inhibited the release of reactive oxygen species. It also inhibited the activation of caspase-12 and caspase-3, and reduced the expression of homologous CCAAT/enhancer binding protein, phosphorylated (p-PERK, p-eIF2α, and ATF4. These results point to a new use of an established drug in the prevention of OGSD/R-mediated spinal cord astrocyte apoptosis via the integrated stress response.

  1. Tumor response to ionizing radiation and combined 2-deoxy-D-glucose application in EATC tumor bearing mice: monitoring of tumor size and microscopic observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latz, D.; Thonke, A.; Jueling-Pohlit, L.; Pohlit, W.

    1993-01-01

    The present study deals with the changes induced by two fractionation schedules (5x9 Gy and 10x4.5 Gy; 30 MeV-electrons) of ionizing radiations and 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose (2-DG) application on EATC tumor bearing swiss albino mice. The monitoring of tumor response was carried out by means of calliper measurement on the macroscopic level and by histopathological examination of tumor preparations stained with hematoxiline and eosine on the microscopic level. The tumor material was assessed at suitable intervals after treatment by killing the animals. The tumor response was analysed in the histological preparations and the thickness of the tumor band was determined quantitatively by an ocularmicrometric technique. Tumor damage was most extensive in the combined treated animals (5x9 Gy + 2-DG). Only in this group local tumor control was achievable. The histological analysis of tumor preparations revealed additional data about treatment-induced changes in the tumor compared to the measurement of the tumor volume with mechanical callipers. We also found that the treatment outcome could be predicted from the histopathological analysis. It is concluded that studies involving histopathological examinations may give some insight into the way cancer is controlled by radiotherapy and may be of value in prognosis and selection of treatment in patients. (orig.) [de

  2. Neuroserpin Protects Rat Neurons and Microglia-Mediated Inflammatory Response Against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation- and Reoxygenation Treatments in an In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelian Yang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Neuroserpin (NSP is known for its neuroprotective role in cerebral ischemic animal models and patients. Our laboratory conducted a series of investigations on the neuroprotection of NSP in different cells in the brain. In the present study, we further observe the effects of NSP on neurons and microglia-mediated inflammatory response following oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD, and explore possible mechanisms related to neuroprotection of OGD in the central nervous system (CNS. Methods: Neurons and microglia from neonatal rats were treated with OGD followed by reoxygenation (OGD/R. To confirm the effects of NSP, the neuronal survival, neuronal apoptosis, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release were measured in cultured neurons. Furthermore, the levels of IL-1β and nitric oxide (NO release were also detected in cultured microglia. The possible mechanisms for the neuroprotective effect of NSP were explored using Western blot analysis. Results: NSP administration can reverse abnormal variations in neurons and microglia-mediated inflammatory response induced by OGD/R processes. The neuronal survival rate, neuronal apoptosis rate, and LDH release were significantly improved by NSP administration in neurons. Simultaneously, the release of IL-1β and NO were significantly reduced by NSP in microglia. Western blot showed that the expression of ERK, P38, and JNK was upregulated in microglia by the OGD/R treatment, and these effects were significantly inhibited by NSP. Conclusion: These data verified the neuroprotective effects of NSP on neurons and microglia-mediated inflammatory response. Inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways might play a potential role in NSP neuroprotection on microglia-mediated inflammatory response, which needs further verification.

  3. Blood-Brain Glucose Transfer: Repression in Chronic Hyperglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjedde, Albert; Crone, Christian

    1981-10-01

    Diabetic patients with increased plasma glucose concentrations may develop cerebral symptoms of hypoglycemia when their plasma glucose is rapidly lowered to normal concentrations. The symptoms may indicate insufficient transport of glucose from blood to brain. In rats with chronic hyperglycemia the maximum glucose transport capacity of the blood-brain barrier decreased from 400 to 290 micromoles per 100 grams per minute. When plasma glucose was lowered to normal values, the glucose transport rate into brain was 20 percent below normal. This suggests that repressive changes of the glucose transport mechanism occur in brain endothelial cells in response to increased plasma glucose.

  4. Primary pulmonary lymphoma-role of fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in the initial staging and evaluating response to treatment - case reports and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Dhanapathi, Halanaik; Nazar, Aftab Hasan; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Primary pulmonary lymphoma (PPL) is an uncommon entity of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which accounts for <1% of all cases of lymphoma. We present two rare cases of PPL of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, which underwent 18 fluorine fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography for initial staging and response evaluation after chemotherapy

  5. Dynamics of Cancer Cell near Collagen Fiber Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihan; Sun, Bo

    Cell migration is an integrated process that is important in life. Migration is essential for embryonic development as well as homeostatic processes such as wound healing and immune responses. When cell migrates through connective extracellular matrix (ECM), it applies cellular traction force to ECM and senses the rigidity of their local environment. We used human breast cancer cell (MDA-MB-231) which is highly invasive and applies strong traction force to ECM. As cancer cell applies traction force to type I collage-based ECM, it deforms collagen fibers near the surface. Patterns of deforming collagen fibers are significantly different with pairs of cancer cells compared to a single cancer cell. While a pair of cancer cells within 60 um creates aligned collagen fiber chains between them permanently, a single cancer cell does not form any fiber chains. In this experiment we measured a cellular response and an interaction between a pair of cells through the chain. Finally, we analyzed correlation of directions between cancer cell migration and the collagen chain alignment.

  6. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of [ 3 H]serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of 125 I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF

  7. Use of collagen film as a dural substitute: preliminary animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, R L; Christiansen, D; Zazanis, G A; Silver, F H

    1991-02-01

    Cadaver grafts, laminated metallic materials, and synthetic fabrics have been evaluated as dural substitutes. Use of cadaver tissues is limited by fear of transmission of infectious disease while use of synthetic materials is associated with implant encapsulation and foreign body reactions. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of collagen film as a dural substitute. Collagen films prepared from bovine skin were used to replace the dura of rabbits and histological observations were made at 16, 28, 42, and 56 days postimplantation. Controls consisted of dura that was removed and then reattached. Control dura showed no signs of inflammation or adhesion to underlying tissue at 16 and 28 days postimplantation. By 56 days postimplantation, extensive connective tissue deposition was observed in close proximity to adjacent bone as well as pia arachnoid adhesions. Implanted collagen film behaved in a similar manner to control dura showing minimal inflammatory response at all time periods. At 56 days postimplantation collagen film appeared strongly infiltrated by connective tissue cells that deposited new collagen. The results of this study suggest that a reconstituted type I collagen film crosslinked with cyanamide acts as a temporary barrier preventing loss of fluid and adhesion formation. It is replaced after approximately 2 months with host collagen with limited inflammatory and fibrotic complications. Further studies are needed to completely characterize the new connective tissue formed as well as long-term biocompatibility and functioning of a reconstituted collagen dural substitute.

  8. Prominent Vascularization Capacity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Collagen-Gold Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Shu-Chen; Chen, Hui-Jye; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Yang, Yi-Chin; Tang, Cheng-Ming; Chu, Mei-Yun; Lin, Pei-Ying; Fu, Ru-Huei; Kung, Mei-Lang; Chen, Yun-Wen; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Hung, Huey-Shan

    2016-10-26

    The ideal characteristics of surface modification on the vascular graft for clinical application would be with excellent hemocompatibility, endothelialization capacity, and antirestenosis ability. Here, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle (θ) measurement, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to evaluate the chemical and mechanical properties of collagen-gold nanocomposites (collagen+Au) with 17.4, 43.5, and 174 ppm of Au and suggested that the collagen+Au with 43.5 ppm of Au had better biomechanical properties and thermal stability than pure collagen. Besides, stromal-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) at 50 ng/mL promoted the migration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on collagen+Au material through the α5β3 integrin/endothelial oxide synthase (eNOS)/metalloproteinase (MMP) signaling pathway which can be abolished by the knockdown of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The potentiality of collagen+Au with MSCs for vascular regeneration was evaluated by our in vivo rat model system. Artery tissues isolated from an implanted collagen+Au-coated catheter with MSCs expressed substantial CD-31 and α-SMA, displayed higher antifibrotic ability, antithrombotic activity, as well as anti-inflammatory response than all other materials. Our results indicated that the implantation of collagen+Au-coated catheters with MSCs could be a promising strategy for vascular regeneration.

  9. Age-related changes in human tendo calcaneus collagen fibrils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargon, Mustafa F.; Ozlu, Korhan; Oken, Fuad

    2005-01-01

    The ruptures of tendo calcaneus often occur between the age group of 30-45 years as described by several text books. It is also described that some diseases and drugs are said to be responsible in the etiology; however, there are no studies related with the detailed histological structure of collagen fibrils found in the tendon in the age groups of humans. In view there of, this study was aimed to obtain further information on the etiology and to find an answer regarding the frequency the ruptures occurring between the age of 30-45 years in human. In the study, the biopsy specimen taken from 28 patients age (1-68) years who had undergone surgery due to tendo calcaneus ruptures or acilloplasty operations were examined by transmission electron microscope. All the specimens were prepared according to routine electronic microscope tissue preparation technique. The patients were divided into 7 age groups (1-9, 10-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, >60 years) and there were 4 patients in each group. The transverse diameters of collagen fibers were measured from the ultra thin sections and statistical analysis of the results were performed. The study was carried out in the electron microscopy laboratory of the Anatomy Department of Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey between January 2004 and September 2004. The diameters of the collagen fibers were higher in the 20-29 year-old groups compared to other groups and it showed a statistically significant difference. In patients who were in the 30-39 year old group or older, the diameters of the collagen fibers were lesser than the 20-29 year-old group. However, an increase was observed in the collagen fibril concentration of these groups. In examination of the specimens of patients who were under 20-year old, the diameter of the collagen fibers were less than 20-29 year -old group. The electron microscopic appearance of the tissue sample of a one year-old patient had a specific organization and in this patient, both the

  10. Coping with an exogenous glucose overload: glucose kinetics of rainbow trout during graded swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kevin; Weber, Jean-Michel

    2016-03-15

    This study examines how chronically hyperglycemic rainbow trout modulate glucose kinetics in response to graded exercise up to critical swimming speed (Ucrit), with or without exogenous glucose supply. Our goals were 1) to quantify the rates of hepatic glucose production (Ra glucose) and disposal (Rd glucose) during graded swimming, 2) to determine how exogenous glucose affects the changes in glucose fluxes caused by exercise, and 3) to establish whether exogenous glucose modifies Ucrit or the cost of transport. Results show that graded swimming causes no change in Ra and Rd glucose at speeds below 2.5 body lengths per second (BL/s), but that glucose fluxes may be stimulated at the highest speeds. Excellent glucoregulation is also achieved at all exercise intensities. When exogenous glucose is supplied during exercise, trout suppress hepatic production from 16.4 ± 1.6 to 4.1 ± 1.7 μmol·kg(-1)·min(-1) and boost glucose disposal to 40.1 ± 13 μmol·kg(-1)·min(-1). These responses limit the effects of exogenous glucose to a 2.5-fold increase in glycemia, whereas fish showing no modulation of fluxes would reach dangerous levels of 114 mM of blood glucose. Exogenous glucose reduces metabolic rate by 16% and, therefore, causes total cost of transport to decrease accordingly. High glucose availability does not improve Ucrit because the fish are unable to take advantage of this extra fuel during maximal exercise and rely on tissue glycogen instead. In conclusion, trout have a remarkable ability to adjust glucose fluxes that allows them to cope with the cumulative stresses of a glucose overload and graded exercise. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum chaperone glucose regulated protein 170-Pokemon complexes elicit a robust antitumor immune response in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bangqing; Xian, Ronghua; Wu, Xianqu; Jing, Junjie; Chen, Kangning; Liu, Guojun; Zhou, Zhenhua

    2012-07-01

    Previous evidence suggested that the stress protein grp170 can function as a highly efficient molecular chaperone, binding to large protein substrates and acting as a potent vaccine against specific tumors when purified from the same tumor. In addition, Pokemon can be found in almost all malignant tumor cells and is regarded to be a promising candidate for the treatment of tumors. However, the potential of the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex has not been well described. In the present study, the natural chaperone complex between grp170 and the Pokemon was formed by heat shock, and its immunogenicity was detected by ELISPOT and (51)Cr-release assays in vitro and by tumor bearing models in vivo. Our results demonstrated that the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex could elicit T cell responses as determined by ELISPOT and (51)Cr-release assays. In addition, immunized C57BL/6 mice were challenged with subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of Lewis cancer cells to induce primary tumors. Treatment of mice with the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex also significantly inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the life span of tumor-bearing mice. Our results indicated that the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex might represent a powerful approach to tumor immunotherapy and have significant potential for clinical application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Collagen fibrillogenesis: fibronectin, integrins, and minor collagens as organizers and nucleators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadler, Karl E; Hill, Adele; Canty-Laird, Elizabeth G

    2008-10-01

    Collagens are triple helical proteins that occur in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and at the cell-ECM interface. There are more than 30 collagens and collagen-related proteins but the most abundant are collagens I and II that exist as D-periodic (where D = 67 nm) fibrils. The fibrils are of broad biomedical importance and have central roles in embryogenesis, arthritis, tissue repair, fibrosis, tumor invasion, and cardiovascular disease. Collagens I and II spontaneously form fibrils in vitro, which shows that collagen fibrillogenesis is a selfassembly process. However, the situation in vivo is not that simple; collagen I-containing fibrils do not form in the absence of fibronectin, fibronectin-binding and collagen-binding integrins, and collagen V. Likewise, the thin collagen II-containing fibrils in cartilage do not form in the absence of collagen XI. Thus, in vivo, cellular mechanisms are in place to control what is otherwise a protein self-assembly process. This review puts forward a working hypothesis for how fibronectin and integrins (the organizers) determine the site of fibril assembly, and collagens V and XI (the nucleators) initiate collagen fibrillogenesis.

  13. Genetic variation of fasting glucose and changes in glycemia in response to 2-year weight-loss diet intervention: the POUNDS Lost trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiange; Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yan; Rood, Jennifer; Bray, George A.; Sacks, Frank M.; Qi, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Weight loss intervention through diet modification has been widely used to improve obesity-related hyperglycemia; however, little is known about whether genetic variation modifies the intervention effect. We examined the interaction between weight-loss diets and genetic variation of fasting glucose on changes in glycemic traits in a dietary intervention trial. Research Design and Methods The Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS LOST) trial is a randomized, controlled 2-year weight-loss trial. We assessed overall genetic variation of fasting glucose by calculating a genetic risk score (GRS) based on 14 fasting glucose-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms, and examined the progression in fasting glucose and insulin levels, and insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity in 733 adults from this trial. Results The GRS was associated with 6-month changes in fasting glucose (Pfasting insulin (P=0.042), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, P=0.009) and insulin sensitivity (HOMA-S, P=0.043). We observed significant interaction between the GRS and dietary fat on 6-month changes in fasting glucose, HOMA-IR and HOMA-S after multivariable adjustment (P-interaction=0.007, 0.045, and 0.028, respectively). After further adjustment for weight loss, the interaction remained significant on change in fasting glucose (P=0.015). In the high-fat diet group, participants in the highest GRS tertile showed increased fasting glucose, whereas participants in the lowest tertile showed decreased fasting glucose (P-trend<0.001); in contrast, the genetic association was not significant in the low-fat diet group (P-trend=0.087). Conclusions Our data suggest that participants with a higher genetic risk may benefit more by eating a low-fat diet to improve glucose metabolism. PMID:27113490

  14. A novel functional role of collagen glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgensen, Henrik J; Madsen, Daniel H; Ingvarsen, Signe

    2011-01-01

    Collagens make up the most abundant component of interstitial extracellular matrices and basement membranes. Collagen remodeling is a crucial process in many normal physiological events and in several pathological conditions. Some collagen subtypes contain specific carbohydrate side chains......, the function of which is poorly known. The endocytic collagen receptor urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP)/Endo180 plays an important role in matrix remodeling through its ability to internalize collagen for lysosomal degradation. uPARAP/Endo180 is a member of the mannose...... receptor protein family. These proteins all include a fibronectin type II domain and a series of C-type lectin-like domains, of which only a minor part possess carbohydrate recognition activity. At least two of the family members, uPARAP/Endo180 and the mannose receptor, interact with collagens...

  15. TNFα altered inflammatory responses, impaired health and productivity, but did not affect glucose or lipid metabolism in early-lactation dairy cows.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yuan

    Full Text Available Inflammation may be a major contributing factor to peripartum metabolic disorders in dairy cattle. We tested whether administering an inflammatory cytokine, recombinant bovine tumor necrosis factor-α (rbTNFα, affects milk production, metabolism, and health during this period. Thirty-three Holstein cows (9 primiparous and 24 multiparous were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments at parturition. Treatments were 0 (Control, 1.5, or 3.0 µg/kg body weight rbTNFα, which were administered once daily by subcutaneous injection for the first 7 days of lactation. Statistical contrasts were used to evaluate the treatment and dose effects of rbTNFα administration. Plasma TNFα concentrations at 16 h post-administration tended to be increased (P0.10 was detected; rbTNFα treatments increased (P0.10 by rbTNFα administration, but 6 out of 16 measured eicosanoids changed (P0.10 by rbTNFα treatment. Glucose turnover rate was unaffected (P=0.18 by rbTNFα administration. The higher dose of rbTNFα tended to increase the risk of cows developing one or more health disorders (P=0.08. Taken together, these results indicate that administration of rbTNFα daily for the first 7 days of lactation altered inflammatory responses, impaired milk production and health, but did not significantly affect liver triglyceride accumulation or nutrient metabolism in dairy cows.

  16. Fructose:Glucose Ratios—A Study of Sugar Self-Administration and Associated Neural and Physiological Responses in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnneMarie Levy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study explored whether different ratios of fructose (F and glucose (G in sugar can engender significant differences in self-administration and associated neurobiological and physiological responses in male Sprague-Dawley rats. In Experiment 1, animals self-administered pellets containing 55% F + 45% G or 30% F + 70% G, and Fos immunoreactivity was assessed in hypothalamic regions regulating food intake and reward. In Experiment 2, rats self-administered solutions of 55% F + 42% G (high fructose corn syrup (HFCS, 50% F + 50% G (sucrose or saccharin, and mRNA of the dopamine 2 (D2R and mu-opioid (MOR receptor genes were assessed in striatal regions involved in addictive behaviors. Finally, in Experiment 3, rats self-administered HFCS and sucrose in their home cages, and hepatic fatty acids were quantified. It was found that higher fructose ratios engendered lower self-administration, lower Fos expression in the lateral hypothalamus/arcuate nucleus, reduced D2R and increased MOR mRNA in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens core, respectively, as well as elevated omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the liver. These data indicate that a higher ratio of fructose may enhance the reinforcing effects of sugar and possibly lead to neurobiological and physiological alterations associated with addictive and metabolic disorders.

  17. Fructose:glucose ratios--a study of sugar self-administration and associated neural and physiological responses in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, AnneMarie; Marshall, Paul; Zhou, Yan; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Kent, Katrina; Daniels, Stephen; Shore, Ari; Downs, Tiana; Fernandes, Maria Fernanda; Mutch, David M; Leri, Francesco

    2015-05-22

    This study explored whether different ratios of fructose (F) and glucose (G) in sugar can engender significant differences in self-administration and associated neurobiological and physiological responses in male Sprague-Dawley rats. In Experiment 1, animals self-administered pellets containing 55% F + 45% G or 30% F + 70% G, and Fos immunoreactivity was assessed in hypothalamic regions regulating food intake and reward. In Experiment 2, rats self-administered solutions of 55% F + 42% G (high fructose corn syrup (HFCS)), 50% F + 50% G (sucrose) or saccharin, and mRNA of the dopamine 2 (D2R) and mu-opioid (MOR) receptor genes were assessed in striatal regions involved in addictive behaviors. Finally, in Experiment 3, rats self-administered HFCS and sucrose in their home cages, and hepatic fatty acids were quantified. It was found that higher fructose ratios engendered lower self-administration, lower Fos expression in the lateral hypothalamus/arcuate nucleus, reduced D2R and increased MOR mRNA in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens core, respectively, as well as elevated omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the liver. These data indicate that a higher ratio of fructose may enhance the reinforcing effects of sugar and possibly lead to neurobiological and physiological alterations associated with addictive and metabolic disorders.

  18. Two pear glutathione S-transferases genes are regulated during fruit development and involved in response to salicylic acid, auxin, and glucose signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Yan Shi

    Full Text Available Two genes encoding putative glutathione S-transferase proteins were isolated from pear (Pyrus pyrifolia and designated PpGST1 and PpGST2. The deduced PpGST1 and PpGST2 proteins contain conserved Glutathione S-transferase N-terminal domain (GST_N and Glutathione S-transferase, C-terminal domain (GST_C. Using PCR amplification technique, the genomic clones corresponding to PpGST1 and PpGST2 were isolated and shown to contain two introns and a singal intron respectively with typical GT/AG boundaries defining the splice junctions. Phylogenetic analysis clearly demonstrated that PpGST1 belonged to Phi class of GST superfamilies and had high homology with apple MdGST, while PpGST2 was classified into the Tau class of GST superfamilies. The expression of PpGST1 and PpGST2 genes was developmentally regulated in fruit. Further study demonstrated that PpGST1 and PpGST2 expression was remarkably induced by glucose, salicylic acid (SA and indole-3-aceticacid (IAA treatments in pear fruit, and in diseased fruit. These data suggested that PpGST1 and PpGST2 might be involved in response to sugar, SA, and IAA signaling during fruit development of pear.

  19. Effect of radiation on rat skin collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogami, Akira

    1980-01-01

    I. Albino male rats were exposed for 16 weeks to ultraviolet light (UVL) which has principle emission at 305 nm. There were no significant changes between control and UVL-exposed skins in the total hydroxyproline content. However, a little increase of citrate-soluble collagen, a little decrease of insoluble collagen and a decrease of aldehyde content in soluble collagen were observed with UVL exposure. Total acid glycosaminoglycan in skin increased 30% or more from control. These results show that the effect of UVL on rat skin in vivo was merely inflammation phenomenon and that the 'aging' process of skin was not caused in our experimental conditions. II. The effects of radiation on the solubility of rat skin collagen were examined under various conditions. 1) When intact rats were exposed to a single dose of radiation from 43 kVp X-ray source, the solubility in skin collagen did not change at 4,000 R dosage, while in irradiation of 40,000 R a decreased solubility in collagen was observed. When rats were given 400 R a week for 12 weeks, there was no changes in the solubility of collagen during experimental period. 2) In vitro exposure to skins, an irradiation of 40,000 R from 43 kVp X-ray source caused a decrease in the solubility of collagen. While an irradiation of 40,000 R of dosage from 200 kVp X-ray source resulted in the increase in soluble collagen and the decrease in insoluble collagen. 3) When intact rats were given a single dose of 40,000 R from 60 Co- gamma -ray, insoluble collagen decreased in both young and adult rats. Similar changes in collagen solubility were observed in vitro gamma -irradiation. (author)

  20. Alginate-Collagen Fibril Composite Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Baniasadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on the synthesis and the mechanical characterization of an alginate-collagen fibril composite hydrogel. Native type I collagen fibrils were used to synthesize the fibrous composite hydrogel. We characterized the mechanical properties of the fabricated fibrous hydrogel using tensile testing; rheometry and atomic force microscope (AFM-based nanoindentation experiments. The results show that addition of type I collagen fibrils improves the rheological and indentation properties of the hydrogel.

  1. Routes towards Novel Collagen-Like Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian V. Golser

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Collagen plays a major role in providing mechanical support within the extracellular matrix and thus has long been used for various biomedical purposes. Exemplary, it is able to replace damaged tissues without causing adverse reactions in the receiving patient. Today’s collagen grafts mostly are made of decellularized and otherwise processed animal tissue and therefore carry the risk of unwanted side effects and limited mechanical strength, which makes them unsuitable for some applications e.g., within tissue engineering. In order to improve collagen-based biomaterials, recent advances have been made to process soluble collagen through nature-inspired silk-like spinning processes and to overcome the difficulties in providing adequate amounts of source material by manufacturing collagen-like proteins through biotechnological methods and peptide synthesis. Since these methods also open up possibilities to incorporate additional functional domains into the collagen, we discuss one of the best-performing collagen-like type of proteins, which already have additional functional domains in the natural blueprint, the marine mussel byssus collagens, providing inspiration for novel biomaterials based on collagen-silk hybrid proteins.

  2. Glucose and cardiovascular risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, M.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; Mudde, A. H.

    2002-01-01

    The American Diabetes Association and the World Health Organisation have recently redefined the spectrum of abnormal glucose tolerance. The criteria for diabetes mellitus were sharpened and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) were classified as intermediate stages

  3. Endocrine and metabolic effects of consuming fructose- and glucose-sweetened beverages with meals in obese men and women: influence of insulin resistance on plasma triglyceride responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teff, Karen L; Grudziak, Joanne; Townsend, Raymond R; Dunn, Tamara N; Grant, Ryan W; Adams, Sean H; Keim, Nancy L; Cummings, Bethany P; Stanhope, Kimber L; Havel, Peter J

    2009-05-01

    Compared with glucose-sweetened beverages, consumption of fructose-sweetened beverages with meals elevates postprandial plasma triglycerides and lowers 24-h insulin and leptin profiles in normal-weight women. The effects of fructose, compared with glucose, ingestion on metabolic profiles in obese subjects has not been studied. The objective of the study was to compare the effects of fructose- and glucose-sweetened beverages consumed with meals on hormones and metabolic substrates in obese subjects. The study had a within-subject design conducted in the clinical and translational research center. Participants included 17 obese men (n = 9) and women (n = 8), with a body mass index greater than 30 kg/m(2). Subjects were studied under two conditions involving ingestion of mixed nutrient meals with either glucose-sweetened beverages or fructose-sweetened beverages. The beverages provided 30% of total kilocalories. Blood samples were collected over 24 h. Area under the curve (24 h AUC) for glucose, lactate, insulin, leptin, ghrelin, uric acid, triglycerides (TGs), and free fatty acids was measured. Compared with glucose-sweetened beverages, fructose consumption was associated with lower AUCs for insulin (1052.6 +/- 135.1 vs. 549.2 +/- 79.7 muU/ml per 23 h, P glucose consumption. Increases of TGs were augmented in obese subjects with insulin resistance, suggesting that fructose consumption may exacerbate an already adverse metabolic profile present in many obese subjects.

  4. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Enhances Antiviral Response through Downregulation of NADPH Sensor HSCARG and Upregulation of NF-κB Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Wu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD-deficient cells are highly susceptible to viral infection. This study examined the mechanism underlying this phenomenon by measuring the expression of antiviral genes—tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and GTPase myxovirus resistance 1 (MX1—in G6PD-knockdown cells upon human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E and enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection. Molecular analysis revealed that the promoter activities of TNF-α and MX1 were downregulated in G6PD-knockdown cells, and that the IκB degradation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB were decreased. The HSCARG protein, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH sensor and negative regulator of NF-κB, was upregulated in G6PD-knockdown cells with decreased NADPH/NADP+ ratio. Treatment of G6PD-knockdown cells with siRNA against HSCARG enhanced the DNA binding activity of NF-κB and the expression of TNF-α and MX1, but suppressed the expression of viral genes; however, the overexpression of HSCARG inhibited the antiviral response. Exogenous G6PD or IDH1 expression inhibited the expression of HSCARG, resulting in increased expression of TNF-α and MX1 and reduced viral gene expression upon virus infection. Our findings suggest that the increased susceptibility of the G6PD-knockdown cells to viral infection was due to impaired NF-κB signaling and antiviral response mediated by HSCARG.

  5. Decorin core protein (decoron) shape complements collagen fibril surface structure and mediates its binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgel, Joseph P R O; Eid, Aya; Antipova, Olga; Bella, Jordi; Scott, John E

    2009-09-15

    Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM). With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein) and binding sites in the d and e(1) bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e(1) bands). This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  6. Decorin core protein (decoron shape complements collagen fibril surface structure and mediates its binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P R O Orgel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM. With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein and binding sites in the d and e(1 bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e(1 bands. This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  7. Entrapment of cultured pancreas islets in three-dimensional collagen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, S H; Peshwa, M V; Sutherland, D E; Hu, W S

    1992-01-01

    In vitro culture of islets of Langerhans decreases their immunogenicity, presumably by eliminating passenger leukocytes and other Ia+ presenting cells within the islets. Islets cultivated in petri dishes either at 37 degrees C or at 25 degrees C gradually disintegrate during culture in a time-dependent manner which is related to the free-floating condition of the islets. Also, a fraction of the islets disperse as single cells and beta-cell aggregates or adhere to the bottom of the culture dishes. Thus, the retrieval rate of transplantable islets is dampened due to their disintegration and spontaneous dispersion in conventional petri dish cultures. Entrapment of freshly harvested islets of Langerhans in a three-dimensional collagen matrix was studied as an alternative method for islet cultivation. The contraction of collagen fibrils during in vitro culture counteracts the dispersion of islets and helps in maintaining their integrity while in culture. It was observed that the entrapped islets maintain satisfactory morphology, viability, and capability of glucose-dependent insulin secretion for over 2 wk. The oxygen consumption rate and glucose metabolism of these islets was not deranged when entrapped in collagen. Also, the retrieval of islets is easier and more efficient than that observed in conventional culture systems. Our results indicate that culture of islets in three-dimensional collagen gels can potentially develop into an ideal system applicable to clinical transplantation of cultured islets or beta-cell aggregates.

  8. Porous, Dexamethasone-loaded polyurethane coatings extend performance window of implantable glucose sensors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo-Heligon, Suzana G; Brown, Nga L; Reichert, William M; Klitzman, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Continuous glucose sensors offer the promise of tight glycemic control for insulin dependent diabetics; however, utilization of such systems has been hindered by issues of tissue compatibility. Here we report on the in vivo performance of implanted glucose sensors coated with Dexamethasone-loaded (Dex-loaded) porous coatings employed to mediate the tissue-sensor interface. Two animal studies were conducted to (1) characterize the tissue modifying effects of the porous Dex-loaded coatings deployed on sensor surrogate implants and (2) investigate the effects of the same coatings on the in vivo performance of Medtronic MiniMed SOF-SENSOR™ glucose sensors. The tissue response to implants was evaluated by quantifying macrophage infiltration, blood vessel formation, and collagen density around implants. Sensor function was assessed by measuring changes in sensor sensitivity and time lag, calculating the Mean Absolute Relative Difference (MARD) for each sensor treatment, and performing functional glucose challenge test at relevant time points. Implants treated with porous Dex-loaded coatings diminished inflammation and enhanced vascularization of the tissue surrounding the implants. Functional sensors with Dex-loaded porous coatings showed enhanced sensor sensitivity over a 21-day period when compared to controls. Enhanced sensor sensitivity was accompanied with an increase in sensor signal lag and MARD score. These results indicate that Dex-loaded porous coatings were able to elicit an attenuated tissue response, and that such tissue microenvironment could be conducive towards extending the performance window of glucose sensors in vivo. In the present article, a coating to extend the functionality of implantable glucose sensors in vivo was developed. Our study showed that the delivery of an anti-inflammatory agent with the presentation of micro-sized topographical cues from coatings may lead to improved long-term glucose sensor function in vivo. We believe that

  9. Laser welding and collagen crosslinks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, K.M.; Last, J.A. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Medicine; Small, W. IV; Maitland, D.J.; Heredia, N.J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-02-20

    Strength and stability of laser-welded tissue may be influenced, in part, by effects of laser exposure on collagen crosslinking. We therefore studied effects of diode laser exposure (805 nm, 1-8 watts, 30 seconds) + indocyanine green dye (ICG) on calf tail tendon collagen crosslinks. Effect of ICG dye alone on crosslink content prior to laser exposure was investigated; unexpectedly, we found that ICG-treated tissue had significantly increased DHLNL and OHP, but not HLNL. Laser exposure after ICG application reduced elevated DHLNL and OHP crosslink content down to their native levels. The monohydroxylated crosslink HLNL was inversely correlated with laser output (p<0.01 by linear regression analysis). DHLNL content was highly correlated with content of its maturational product, OHP, suggesting that precursor-product relations are maintained. We conclude that: (1)ICG alone induces DHLNL and OHP crosslink formation; (2)subsequent laser exposure reduces the ICG-induced crosslinks down to native levels; (3)excessive diode laser exposure destroys normally occurring HLNL crosslinks.

  10. Modern collagen wound dressings: function and purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Cynthia Ann; Simman, Richard

    2010-09-01

    Collagen, which is produced by fibroblasts, is the most abundant protein in the human body. A natural structural protein, collagen is involved in all 3 phases of the wound-healing cascade. It stimulates cellular migration and contributes to new tissue development. Because of their chemotactic properties on wound fibroblasts, collagen dressings encourage the deposition and organization of newly formed collagen, creating an environment that fosters healing. Collagen-based biomaterials stimulate and recruit specific cells, such as macrophages and fibroblasts, along the healing cascade to enhance and influence wound healing. These biomaterials can provide moisture or absorption, depending on the delivery system. Collagen dressings are easy to apply and remove and are conformable. Collagen dressings are usually formulated with bovine, avian, or porcine collagen. Oxidized regenerated cellulose, a plant-based material, has been combined with collagen to produce a dressing capable of binding to and protecting growth factors by binding and inactivating matrix metalloproteinases in the wound environment. The increased understanding of the biochemical processes involved in chronic wound healing allows the design of wound care products aimed at correcting imbalances in the wound microenvironment. Traditional advanced wound care products tend to address the wound's macroenvironment, including moist wound environment control, fluid management, and controlled transpiration of wound fluids. The newer class of biomaterials and wound-healing agents, such as collagen and growth factors, targets specific defects in the chronic wound environment. In vitro laboratory data point to the possibility that these agents benefit the wound healing process at a biochemical level. Considerable evidence has indicated that collagen-based dressings may be capable of stimulating healing by manipulating wound biochemistry.

  11. Metabolomic analysis reveals amino-acid responses to an oral glucose tolerance test in women with prior history of gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bentley-Lewis, MD, MBA, MMSc

    2014-06-01

    Conclusions: Greater change in metabolite levels after a glucose challenge was significantly associated with a longer duration of breastfeeding and higher BMI. Further exploration of these preliminary observations and closer examination of the specific pathways implicated are warranted.

  12. Preserved glucagon-like peptide-1 responses to oral glucose, but reduced incretin effect, insulin secretion and sensitivity in young Asians with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yeow, Toh Peng; Pacini, Giovanni; Tura, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    are scarce. We examined the insulin resistance, β-cell function (BC), glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 hormone and incretin effect in Asian YT2DM. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This case-control study recruited 25 Asian YT2DM and 15 healthy controls, matched for gender, ethnicity and body mass index. Serum......OBJECTIVE: Youth onset type 2 diabetes mellitus (YT2DM) is a globally rising phenomenon with substantial Asians representation. The understanding of its pathophysiology is derived largely from studies in the obese African-American and Caucasian populations, while studies on incretin effect...... glucose, insulin, C peptide and GLP-1 were sampled during 2-hour oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) and 1-hour intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTTs). Insulin sensitivity was derived from the Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI), Oral Glucose Insulin Sensitivity Index (OGIS...

  13. Collagenous sprue: Don't forget connective tissue in chronic diarrhea evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Busto-Bea

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Collagenous sprue is a rare disease of the small bowel characterized by mucosal atrophy and excessive subepithelial collagen deposition. The etiology remains unclear and the diagnosis is based upon patient's clinical picture and anatomopathological findings. Clinically, collagenous sprue is characterized by persistent diarrhoea, severe malabsorption, multiple nutrient deficiencies and progressive weight loss. Differential diagnosis includes celiac disease, which is mandatory to rule out because of their frequent association. Gluten-free diet is the first therapeutic step, but it usually is not effective. However, recent studies show high success rates with immunomodulators, mainly corticosteroids. We report the case of a patient presenting with chronic diarrhea and severe malabsorption who was diagnosed with collagenous sprue, with no response to gluten free diet, but with excellent response to budesonida.

  14. A mathematical model of brain glucose homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Hidenori

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological fact that a stable level of brain glucose is more important than that of blood glucose suggests that the ultimate goal of the glucose-insulin-glucagon (GIG regulatory system may be homeostasis of glucose concentration in the brain rather than in the circulation. Methods In order to demonstrate the relationship between brain glucose homeostasis and blood hyperglycemia in diabetes, a brain-oriented mathematical model was developed by considering the brain as the controlled object while the remaining body as the actuator. After approximating the body compartmentally, the concentration dynamics of glucose, as well as those of insulin and glucagon, are described in each compartment. The brain-endocrine crosstalk, which regula