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Sample records for glucose minimal model

  1. Stable-label intravenous glucose tolerance test minimal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avogaro, A.; Bristow, J.D.; Bier, D.M.; Cobelli, C.; Toffolo, G.

    1989-01-01

    The minimal model approach to estimating insulin sensitivity (Sl) and glucose effectiveness in promoting its own disposition at basal insulin (SG) is a powerful tool that has been underutilized given its potential applications. In part, this has been due to its inability to separate insulin and glucose effects on peripheral uptake from their effects on hepatic glucose inflow. Prior enhancements, with radiotracer labeling of the dosage, permit this separation but are unsuitable for use in pregnancy and childhood. In this study, we labeled the intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) dosage with [6,6- 2 H 2 ]glucose, [2- 2 H]glucose, or both stable isotopically labeled glucose tracers and modeled glucose kinetics in six postabsorptive, nonobese adults. As previously found with the radiotracer model, the tracer-estimated S*l derived from the stable-label IVGTT was greater than Sl in each case except one, and the tracer-estimated SG* was less than SG in each instance. More importantly, however, the stable-label IVGTT estimated each parameter with an average precision of +/- 5% (range 3-9%) compared to average precisions of +/- 74% (range 7-309%) for SG and +/- 22% (range 3-72%) for Sl. In addition, because of the different metabolic fates of the two deuterated tracers, there were minor differences in basal insulin-derived measures of glucose effectiveness, but these differences were negligible for parameters describing insulin-stimulated processes. In conclusion, the stable-label IVGTT is a simple, highly precise means of assessing insulin sensitivity and glucose effectiveness at basal insulin that can be used to measure these parameters in individuals of all ages, including children and pregnant women

  2. Optimal blood glucose level control using dynamic programming based on minimal Bergman model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettian Anggita Sari, Maria; Hartono

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to simulate the glucose dynamic and the insulin kinetic of diabetic patient. The model used in this research is a non-linear Minimal Bergman model. Optimal control theory is then applied to formulate the problem in order to determine the optimal dose of insulin in the treatment of diabetes mellitus such that the glucose level is in the normal range for some specific time range. The optimization problem is solved using dynamic programming. The result shows that dynamic programming is quite reliable to represent the interaction between glucose and insulin levels in diabetes mellitus patient.

  3. A comparison between the minimal model and the glucose clamp in the assessment of insulin sensitivity across the spectrum of glucose tolerance. Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, M F; Anderson, R L; Laws, A; Watanabe, R M; Kades, W W; Chen, Y D; Sands, R E; Pei, D; Savage, P J; Bergman, R N

    1994-09-01

    An insulin-modified frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGTT) with minimal model analysis was compared with the glucose clamp in 11 subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 20 with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and 24 with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). The insulin sensitivity index (SI) was calculated from FSIGTT using 22- and 12-sample protocols (SI(22) and SI(12), respectively). Insulin sensitivity from the clamp was expressed as SI(clamp) and SIP(clamp). Minimal model parameters were similar when calculated with SI(22) and SI(12). SI could not be distinguished from 0 in approximately 50% of diabetic patients with either protocol. SI(22) correlated significantly with SI(clamp) in the whole group (r = 0.62), and in the NGT (r = 0.53), IGT (r = 0.48), and NIDDM (r = 0.41) groups (P SIP(clamp) were expressed in the same units, SI(22) was 66 +/- 5% (mean +/- SE) and 50 +/- 8% lower than SI(clamp) and SIP(clamp), respectively. Thus, minimal model analysis of the insulin-modified FSIGTT provides estimates of insulin sensitivity that correlate significantly with those from the glucose clamp. The correlation was weaker, however, in NIDDM. The insulin-modified FSIGTT can be used as a simple test for assessment of insulin sensitivity in population studies involving nondiabetic subjects. Additional studies are needed before using this test routinely in patients with NIDDM.

  4. Application of the Oral Minimal Model to Korean Subjects with Normal Glucose Tolerance and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hyuk Lim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe oral minimal model is a simple, useful tool for the assessment of β-cell function and insulin sensitivity across the spectrum of glucose tolerance, including normal glucose tolerance (NGT, prediabetes, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in humans.MethodsPlasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide levels were measured during a 180-minute, 75-g oral glucose tolerance test in 24 Korean subjects with NGT (n=10 and T2DM (n=14. The parameters in the computational model were estimated, and the indexes for insulin sensitivity and β-cell function were compared between the NGT and T2DM groups.ResultsThe insulin sensitivity index was lower in the T2DM group than the NGT group. The basal index of β-cell responsivity, basal hepatic insulin extraction ratio, and post-glucose challenge hepatic insulin extraction ratio were not different between the NGT and T2DM groups. The dynamic, static, and total β-cell responsivity indexes were significantly lower in the T2DM group than the NGT group. The dynamic, static, and total disposition indexes were also significantly lower in the T2DM group than the NGT group.ConclusionThe oral minimal model can be reproducibly applied to evaluate β-cell function and insulin sensitivity in Koreans.

  5. A population-based Bayesian approach to the minimal model of glucose and insulin homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Emil; Højbjerre, Malene

    2005-01-01

    -posed estimation problem, where the reconstruction most often has been done by non-linear least squares techniques separately for each entity. The minmal model was originally specified for a single individual and does not combine several individuals with the advantage of estimating the metabolic portrait...... to a population-based model. The estimation of the parameters are efficiently implemented in a Bayesian approach where posterior inference is made through the use of Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. Hereby we obtain a powerful and flexible modelling framework for regularizing the ill-posed estimation problem...

  6. The minimal non-minimal standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bij, J.J. van der

    2006-01-01

    In this Letter I discuss a class of extensions of the standard model that have a minimal number of possible parameters, but can in principle explain dark matter and inflation. It is pointed out that the so-called new minimal standard model contains a large number of parameters that can be put to zero, without affecting the renormalizability of the model. With the extra restrictions one might call it the minimal (new) non-minimal standard model (MNMSM). A few hidden discrete variables are present. It is argued that the inflaton should be higher-dimensional. Experimental consequences for the LHC and the ILC are discussed

  7. The minimally tuned minimal supersymmetric standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essig, Rouven; Fortin, Jean-Francois

    2008-01-01

    The regions in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with the minimal amount of fine-tuning of electroweak symmetry breaking are presented for general messenger scale. No a priori relations among the soft supersymmetry breaking parameters are assumed and fine-tuning is minimized with respect to all the important parameters which affect electroweak symmetry breaking. The superpartner spectra in the minimally tuned region of parameter space are quite distinctive with large stop mixing at the low scale and negative squark soft masses at the high scale. The minimal amount of tuning increases enormously for a Higgs mass beyond roughly 120 GeV

  8. Minimal model holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaberdiel, Matthias R; Gopakumar, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    We review the duality relating 2D W N minimal model conformal field theories, in a large-N ’t Hooft like limit, to higher spin gravitational theories on AdS 3 . This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Higher spin theories and holography’. (review)

  9. Minimal conformal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmboldt, Alexander; Humbert, Pascal; Lindner, Manfred; Smirnov, Juri [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The gauge hierarchy problem is one of the crucial drawbacks of the standard model of particle physics (SM) and thus has triggered model building over the last decades. Its most famous solution is the introduction of low-scale supersymmetry. However, without any significant signs of supersymmetric particles at the LHC to date, it makes sense to devise alternative mechanisms to remedy the hierarchy problem. One such mechanism is based on classically scale-invariant extensions of the SM, in which both the electroweak symmetry and the (anomalous) scale symmetry are broken radiatively via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Apart from giving an introduction to classically scale-invariant models, the talk presents our results on obtaining a theoretically consistent minimal extension of the SM, which reproduces the correct low-scale phenomenology.

  10. Minimal dilaton model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oda Kin-ya

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Both the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC have reported the observation of the particle of mass around 125 GeV which is consistent to the Standard Model (SM Higgs boson, but with an excess of events beyond the SM expectation in the diphoton decay channel at each of them. There still remains room for a logical possibility that we are not seeing the SM Higgs but something else. Here we introduce the minimal dilaton model in which the LHC signals are explained by an extra singlet scalar of the mass around 125 GeV that slightly mixes with the SM Higgs heavier than 600 GeV. When this scalar has a vacuum expectation value well beyond the electroweak scale, it can be identified as a linearly realized version of a dilaton field. Though the current experimental constraints from the Higgs search disfavors such a region, the singlet scalar model itself still provides a viable alternative to the SM Higgs in interpreting its search results.

  11. Evaluation of Postprandial Glucose Excursion Using a Novel Minimally Invasive Glucose Area-Under-the-Curve Monitoring System

    OpenAIRE

    Kuranuki, Sachi; Sato, Toshiyuki; Okada, Seiki; Hosoya, Samiko; Seko, Akinobu; Sugihara, Kaya; Nakamura, Teiji

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To develop a minimally invasive interstitial fluid extraction technology (MIET) to monitor postprandial glucose area under the curve (AUC) without blood sampling, we evaluated the accuracy of glucose AUC measured by MIET and compared with that by blood sampling after food intake. Methods: Interstitial fluid glucose AUC (IG-AUC) following consumption of 6 different types of foods was measured by MIET. MIET consisted of stamping microneedle arrays, placing hydrogel patches on the are...

  12. Evaluation of postprandial glucose excursion using a novel minimally invasive glucose area-under-the-curve monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranuki, Sachi; Sato, Toshiyuki; Okada, Seiki; Hosoya, Samiko; Seko, Akinobu; Sugihara, Kaya; Nakamura, Teiji

    2013-01-01

    To develop a minimally invasive interstitial fluid extraction technology (MIET) to monitor postprandial glucose area under the curve (AUC) without blood sampling, we evaluated the accuracy of glucose AUC measured by MIET and compared with that by blood sampling after food intake. Interstitial fluid glucose AUC (IG-AUC) following consumption of 6 different types of foods was measured by MIET. MIET consisted of stamping microneedle arrays, placing hydrogel patches on the areas, and calculating IG-AUC based on glucose levels in the hydrogels. Glycemic index (GI) was determined using IG-AUC and reference AUC measured by blood sampling. IG-AUC strongly correlated with reference AUC (R = 0.91), and GI determined using IG-AUC showed good correlation with that determined by reference AUC (R = 0.88). IG-AUC obtained by MIET can accurately predict the postprandial glucose excursion without blood sampling. In addition, feasibility of GI measurement by MIET was confirmed.

  13. Integrated model of insulin and glucose kinetics describing both hepatic glucose and pancreatic insulin regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlandsen, Mogens; Martinussen, Christoffer; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg

    2018-01-01

    AbstractBackground and objectives Modeling of glucose kinetics has to a large extent been based on models with plasma insulin as a known forcing function. Furthermore, population-based statistical methods for parameter estimation in these models have mainly addressed random inter-individual varia......AbstractBackground and objectives Modeling of glucose kinetics has to a large extent been based on models with plasma insulin as a known forcing function. Furthermore, population-based statistical methods for parameter estimation in these models have mainly addressed random inter......-individual variations and not intra-individual variations in the parameters. Here we present an integrated whole-body model of glucose and insulin kinetics which extends the well-known two-compartment glucose minimal model. The population-based estimation technique allow for quantification of both random inter......- and intra-individual variation in selected parameters using simultaneous data series on glucose and insulin. Methods We extend the two-compartment glucose model into a whole-body model for both glucose and insulin using a simple model for the pancreas compartment which includes feedback of glucose on both...

  14. Minimal models of multidimensional computations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey D Fitzgerald

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The multidimensional computations performed by many biological systems are often characterized with limited information about the correlations between inputs and outputs. Given this limitation, our approach is to construct the maximum noise entropy response function of the system, leading to a closed-form and minimally biased model consistent with a given set of constraints on the input/output moments; the result is equivalent to conditional random field models from machine learning. For systems with binary outputs, such as neurons encoding sensory stimuli, the maximum noise entropy models are logistic functions whose arguments depend on the constraints. A constraint on the average output turns the binary maximum noise entropy models into minimum mutual information models, allowing for the calculation of the information content of the constraints and an information theoretic characterization of the system's computations. We use this approach to analyze the nonlinear input/output functions in macaque retina and thalamus; although these systems have been previously shown to be responsive to two input dimensions, the functional form of the response function in this reduced space had not been unambiguously identified. A second order model based on the logistic function is found to be both necessary and sufficient to accurately describe the neural responses to naturalistic stimuli, accounting for an average of 93% of the mutual information with a small number of parameters. Thus, despite the fact that the stimulus is highly non-Gaussian, the vast majority of the information in the neural responses is related to first and second order correlations. Our results suggest a principled and unbiased way to model multidimensional computations and determine the statistics of the inputs that are being encoded in the outputs.

  15. Evaluation of Postprandial Glucose Excursion Using a Novel Minimally Invasive Glucose Area-Under-the-Curve Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachi Kuranuki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a minimally invasive interstitial fluid extraction technology (MIET to monitor postprandial glucose area under the curve (AUC without blood sampling, we evaluated the accuracy of glucose AUC measured by MIET and compared with that by blood sampling after food intake. Methods: Interstitial fluid glucose AUC (IG-AUC following consumption of 6 different types of foods was measured by MIET. MIET consisted of stamping microneedle arrays, placing hydrogel patches on the areas, and calculating IG-AUC based on glucose levels in the hydrogels. Glycemic index (GI was determined using IG-AUC and reference AUC measured by blood sampling. Results: IG-AUC strongly correlated with reference AUC (R = 0.91, and GI determined using IG-AUC showed good correlation with that determined by reference AUC (R = 0.88. Conclusions: IG-AUC obtained by MIET can accurately predict the postprandial glucose excursion without blood sampling. In addition, feasibility of GI measurement by MIET was confirmed.

  16. Glucose transport machinery reconstituted in cell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jesper S; Elbing, Karin; Thompson, James R; Malmstadt, Noah; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2015-02-11

    Here we demonstrate the production of a functioning cell model by formation of giant vesicles reconstituted with the GLUT1 glucose transporter and a glucose oxidase and hydrogen peroxidase linked fluorescent reporter internally. Hence, a simplified artificial cell is formed that is able to take up glucose and process it.

  17. A mathematical model of brain glucose homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Hidenori

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological fact that a stable level of brain glucose is more important than that of blood glucose suggests that the ultimate goal of the glucose-insulin-glucagon (GIG regulatory system may be homeostasis of glucose concentration in the brain rather than in the circulation. Methods In order to demonstrate the relationship between brain glucose homeostasis and blood hyperglycemia in diabetes, a brain-oriented mathematical model was developed by considering the brain as the controlled object while the remaining body as the actuator. After approximating the body compartmentally, the concentration dynamics of glucose, as well as those of insulin and glucagon, are described in each compartment. The brain-endocrine crosstalk, which regulates blood glucose level for brain glucose homeostasis together with the peripheral interactions among glucose, insulin and glucagon, is modeled as a proportional feedback control of brain glucose. Correlated to the brain, long-term effects of psychological stress and effects of blood-brain-barrier (BBB adaptation to dysglycemia on the generation of hyperglycemia are also taken into account in the model. Results It is shown that simulation profiles obtained from the model are qualitatively or partially quantitatively consistent with clinical data, concerning the GIG regulatory system responses to bolus glucose, stepwise and continuous glucose infusion. Simulations also revealed that both stress and BBB adaptation contribute to the generation of hyperglycemia. Conclusion Simulations of the model of a healthy person under long-term severe stress demonstrated that feedback control of brain glucose concentration results in elevation of blood glucose level. In this paper, we try to suggest that hyperglycemia in diabetes may be a normal outcome of brain glucose homeostasis.

  18. A data driven nonlinear stochastic model for blood glucose dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Holt, Tim A; Khovanova, Natalia

    2016-03-01

    The development of adequate mathematical models for blood glucose dynamics may improve early diagnosis and control of diabetes mellitus (DM). We have developed a stochastic nonlinear second order differential equation to describe the response of blood glucose concentration to food intake using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) data. A variational Bayesian learning scheme was applied to define the number and values of the system's parameters by iterative optimisation of free energy. The model has the minimal order and number of parameters to successfully describe blood glucose dynamics in people with and without DM. The model accounts for the nonlinearity and stochasticity of the underlying glucose-insulin dynamic process. Being data-driven, it takes full advantage of available CGM data and, at the same time, reflects the intrinsic characteristics of the glucose-insulin system without detailed knowledge of the physiological mechanisms. We have shown that the dynamics of some postprandial blood glucose excursions can be described by a reduced (linear) model, previously seen in the literature. A comprehensive analysis demonstrates that deterministic system parameters belong to different ranges for diabetes and controls. Implications for clinical practice are discussed. This is the first study introducing a continuous data-driven nonlinear stochastic model capable of describing both DM and non-DM profiles. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Minimalism in Inflation Model Building

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia; Dvali, Gia; Riotto, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we demand that a successfull inflationary scenario should follow from a model entirely motivated by particle physics considerations. We show that such a connection is indeed possible within the framework of concrete supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories where the doublet-triplet splitting problem is naturally solved. The Fayet-Iliopoulos D-term of a gauge $U(1)_{\\xi}$ symmetry, which plays a crucial role in the solution of the doublet-triplet splitting problem, simultaneously provides a built-in inflationary slope protected from dangerous supergravity corrections.

  20. Minimalism in inflation model building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvali, Gia; Riotto, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we demand that a successful inflationary scenario should follow from a model entirely motivated by particle physics considerations. We show that such a connection is indeed possible within the framework of concrete supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories where the doublet-triplet splitting problem is naturally solved. The Fayet-Iliopoulos D-term of a gauge U(1)ξ symmetry, which plays a crucial role in the solution of the doublet-triplet splitting problem, simultaneously provides a built-in inflationary slope protected from dangerous supergravity corrections.

  1. An Integrated Glucose Sensor with an All-Solid-State Sodium Ion-Selective Electrode for a Minimally Invasive Glucose Monitoring System

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    Junko Kojima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We developed a minimally invasive glucose monitoring system that uses a microneedle to permeate the skin surface and a small hydrogel to accumulate interstitial fluid glucose. The measurement of glucose and sodium ion levels in the hydrogel is required for estimating glucose levels in blood; therefore, we developed a small, enzyme-fixed glucose sensor with a high-selectivity, all-solid-state, sodium ion-selective electrode (ISE integrated into its design. The glucose sensor immobilized glucose oxidase showed a good correlation between the glucose levels in the hydrogels and the reference glucose levels (r > 0.99, and exhibited a good precision (coefficient of variation = 2.9%, 0.6 mg/dL. In the design of the sodium ISEs, we used the insertion material Na0.33MnO2 as the inner contact layer and DD16C5 exhibiting high Na+/K+ selectivity as the ionophore. The developed sodium ISE exhibited high selectivity (\\( \\log \\,k^{pot}_{Na,K} = -2.8\\ and good potential stability. The sodium ISE could measure 0.4 mM (10−3.4 M sodium ion levels in the hydrogels containing 268 mM (10−0.57 M KCl. The small integrated sensor (ϕ < 10 mm detected glucose and sodium ions in hydrogels simultaneously within 1 min, and it exhibited sufficient performance for use as a minimally invasive glucose monitoring system.

  2. Comparison of Glucose Area Under the Curve Measured Using Minimally Invasive Interstitial Fluid Extraction Technology with Continuous Glucose Monitoring System in Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Uemura, Mei

    2017-01-01

    Background: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is reported to be a useful technique, but difficult or inconvenient for some patients and institutions. We are developing a glucose area under the curve (AUC) monitoring system without blood sampling using a minimally invasive interstitial fluid extraction technology (MIET). Here we evaluated the accuracy of interstitial fluid glucose (IG) AUC measured by MIET in patients with diabetes for an extended time interval and the potency of detecting h...

  3. Comparison of Glucose Area Under the Curve Measured Using Minimally Invasive Interstitial Fluid Extraction Technology with Continuous Glucose Monitoring System in Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mei Uemura; Yutaka Yano; Toshinari Suzuki; Taro Yasuma; Toshiyuki Sato; Aya Morimoto; Samiko Hosoya; Chihiro Suminaka; Hiromu Nakajima; Esteban C. Gabazza; Yoshiyuki Takei

    2017-01-01

    Background Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is reported to be a useful technique, but difficult or inconvenient for some patients and institutions. We are developing a glucose area under the curve (AUC) monitoring system without blood sampling using a minimally invasive interstitial fluid extraction technology (MIET). Here we evaluated the accuracy of interstitial fluid glucose (IG) AUC measured by MIET in patients with diabetes for an extended time interval and the potency of detecting hy...

  4. A Generalized Random Regret Minimization Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chorus, C.G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents, discusses and tests a generalized Random Regret Minimization (G-RRM) model. The G-RRM model is created by replacing a fixed constant in the attribute-specific regret functions of the RRM model, by a regret-weight variable. Depending on the value of the regret-weights, the G-RRM

  5. Quantitative Rates of Brain Glucose Metabolism Distinguish Minimally Conscious from Vegetative State Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Johan; Kupers, Ron; Rodell, Anders

    2015-01-01

    of these patients. However, no quantitative comparisons of cerebral glucose metabolism in VS/UWS and MCS have yet been reported. We calculated the regional and whole-brain CMRglc of 41 patients in the states of VS/UWS (n=14), MCS (n=21) or emergence from MCS (EMCS, n=6), and healthy volunteers (n=29). Global......The differentiation of the vegetative or unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) from the minimally conscious state (MCS) is an important clinical issue. The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) declines when consciousness is lost, and may reveal the residual cognitive function...... these results reveal a significant correlation between whole-brain energy metabolism and level of consciousness, suggesting that quantitative values of CMRglc reveal consciousness in severely brain-injured patients.Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism advance online publication, 8 October 2014; doi:10...

  6. Modular invariance of N=2 minimal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidenius, J.

    1991-01-01

    We prove modular covariance of one-point functions at one loop in the diagonal N=2 minimal superconformal models. We use the recently derived general formalism for computing arbitrary conformal blocks in these models. Our result should be sufficient to guarantee modular covariance at arbitrary genus. It is thus an important check on the general formalism which is not manifestly modular covariant. (orig.)

  7. Matrix factorizations, minimal models and Massey products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, Johanna; Omer, Harun

    2006-01-01

    We present a method to compute the full non-linear deformations of matrix factorizations for ADE minimal models. This method is based on the calculation of higher products in the cohomology, called Massey products. The algorithm yields a polynomial ring whose vanishing relations encode the obstructions of the deformations of the D-branes characterized by these matrix factorizations. This coincides with the critical locus of the effective superpotential which can be computed by integrating these relations. Our results for the effective superpotential are in agreement with those obtained from solving the A-infinity relations. We point out a relation to the superpotentials of Kazama-Suzuki models. We will illustrate our findings by various examples, putting emphasis on the E 6 minimal model

  8. Quantitative rates of brain glucose metabolism distinguish minimally conscious from vegetative state patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stender, Johan; Kupers, Ron; Rodell, Anders; Thibaut, Aurore; Chatelle, Camille; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Gejl, Michael; Bernard, Claire; Hustinx, Roland; Laureys, Steven; Gjedde, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The differentiation of the vegetative or unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) from the minimally conscious state (MCS) is an important clinical issue. The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) declines when consciousness is lost, and may reveal the residual cognitive function of these patients. However, no quantitative comparisons of cerebral glucose metabolism in VS/UWS and MCS have yet been reported. We calculated the regional and whole-brain CMRglc of 41 patients in the states of VS/UWS (n=14), MCS (n=21) or emergence from MCS (EMCS, n=6), and healthy volunteers (n=29). Global cortical CMRglc in VS/UWS and MCS averaged 42% and 55% of normal, respectively. Differences between VS/UWS and MCS were most pronounced in the frontoparietal cortex, at 42% and 60% of normal. In brainstem and thalamus, metabolism declined equally in the two conditions. In EMCS, metabolic rates were indistinguishable from those of MCS. Ordinal logistic regression predicted that patients are likely to emerge into MCS at CMRglc above 45% of normal. Receiver-operating characteristics showed that patients in MCS and VS/UWS can be differentiated with 82% accuracy, based on cortical metabolism. Together these results reveal a significant correlation between whole-brain energy metabolism and level of consciousness, suggesting that quantitative values of CMRglc reveal consciousness in severely brain-injured patients.

  9. Measurement of glucose area under the curve using minimally invasive interstitial fluid extraction technology: evaluation of glucose monitoring concepts without blood sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toshiyuki; Okada, Seiki; Hagino, Kei; Asakura, Yoshihiro; Kikkawa, Yasuo; Kojima, Junko; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Maekawa, Yasunori; Isobe, Kazuki; Koike, Reona; Nakajima, Hiromu; Asano, Kaoru

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring postprandial hyperglycemia is crucial in treating diabetes, although its dynamics make accurate monitoring difficult. We developed a new technology for monitoring postprandial hyperglycemia using interstitial fluid (ISF) extraction technology without blood sampling. The glucose area under the curve (AUC) using this system was measured as accumulated ISF glucose (IG) with simultaneous calibration with sodium ions. The objective of this study was to evaluate this technological concept in healthy individuals. Minimally invasive ISF extraction technology (MIET) comprises two steps: pretreatment with microneedles and ISF accumulation over a specific time by contact with a solvent. The correlation between glucose and sodium ion levels using MIET was evaluated in 12 subjects with stable blood glucose (BG) levels during fasting. BG and IG time courses were evaluated in three subjects to confirm their relationship while BG was fluctuating. Furthermore, the accuracy of glucose AUC measurements by MIET was evaluated several hours after a meal in 30 subjects. A high correlation was observed between glucose and sodium ion levels when BG levels were stable (R=0.87), indicating that sodium ion is a good internal standard for calibration. The variation in IG and BG with MIET was similar, indicating that IG is an adequate substitute for BG. Finally, we showed a strong correlation (R=0.92) between IG-AUC and BG-AUC after a meal. These findings validate the adequacy of glucose AUC measurements using MIET. Monitoring glucose using MIET without blood sampling may be beneficial to patients with diabetes.

  10. Periodical cicadas: A minimal automaton model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de O. Cardozo, Giovano; de A. M. M. Silvestre, Daniel; Colato, Alexandre

    2007-08-01

    The Magicicada spp. life cycles with its prime periods and highly synchronized emergence have defied reasonable scientific explanation since its discovery. During the last decade several models and explanations for this phenomenon appeared in the literature along with a great deal of discussion. Despite this considerable effort, there is no final conclusion about this long standing biological problem. Here, we construct a minimal automaton model without predation/parasitism which reproduces some of these aspects. Our results point towards competition between different strains with limited dispersal threshold as the main factor leading to the emergence of prime numbered life cycles.

  11. Minimal model for spoof acoustoelastic surface states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Christensen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Similar to textured perfect electric conductors for electromagnetic waves sustaining artificial or spoof surface plasmons we present an equivalent phenomena for the case of sound. Aided by a minimal model that is able to capture the complex wave interaction of elastic cavity modes and airborne sound radiation in perfect rigid panels, we construct designer acoustoelastic surface waves that are entirely controlled by the geometrical environment. Comparisons to results obtained by full-wave simulations confirm the feasibility of the model and we demonstrate illustrative examples such as resonant transmissions and waveguiding to show a few examples of many where spoof elastic surface waves are useful.

  12. Fusion algebras of logarithmic minimal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, Joergen; Pearce, Paul A

    2007-01-01

    We present explicit conjectures for the chiral fusion algebras of the logarithmic minimal models LM(p,p') considering Virasoro representations with no enlarged or extended symmetry algebra. The generators of fusion are countably infinite in number but the ensuing fusion rules are quasi-rational in the sense that the fusion of a finite number of representations decomposes into a finite direct sum of representations. The fusion rules are commutative, associative and exhibit an sl(2) structure but require so-called Kac representations which are typically reducible yet indecomposable representations of rank 1. In particular, the identity of the fundamental fusion algebra p ≠ 1 is a reducible yet indecomposable Kac representation of rank 1. We make detailed comparisons of our fusion rules with the results of Gaberdiel and Kausch for p = 1 and with Eberle and Flohr for (p, p') = (2, 5) corresponding to the logarithmic Yang-Lee model. In the latter case, we confirm the appearance of indecomposable representations of rank 3. We also find that closure of a fundamental fusion algebra is achieved without the introduction of indecomposable representations of rank higher than 3. The conjectured fusion rules are supported, within our lattice approach, by extensive numerical studies of the associated integrable lattice models. Details of our lattice findings and numerical results will be presented elsewhere. The agreement of our fusion rules with the previous fusion rules lends considerable support for the identification of the logarithmic minimal models LM(p,p') with the augmented c p,p' (minimal) models defined algebraically

  13. The minimal curvaton-Higgs model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enqvist, Kari [Helsinki Univ. and Helsinki Institute of Physics (Finland). Physics Dept.; Lerner, Rose N. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Helsinki Univ. and Helsinki Institute of Physics (Finland). Physics Dept.; Takahashi, Tomo [Saga Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2013-10-15

    We present the first full study of the minimal curvaton-Higgs (MCH) model, which is a minimal interpretation of the curvaton scenario with one real scalar coupled to the standard model Higgs boson. The standard model coupling allows the dynamics of the model to be determined in detail, including effects from the thermal background and from radiative corrections to the potential. The relevant mechanisms for curvaton decay are incomplete non-perturbative decay (delayed by thermal blocking), followed by decay via a dimension-5 non-renormalisable operator. To avoid spoiling the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis, we find the ''bare'' curvaton mass to be m{sub {sigma}}{>=}8 x 10{sup 4} GeV. To match observational data from Planck there is an upper limit on the curvaton-higgs coupling g, between 10{sup -3} and 10{sup -2}, depending on the mass. This is due to interactions with the thermal background. We find that typically non-Gaussianities are small but that if f{sub NL} is observed in the near future then m{sub {sigma}}model, the lower bound on m{sub {sigma}} can increase substantially. The parameter space may also be affected once the baryogenesis mechanism is specified.

  14. The minimal curvaton-Higgs model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enqvist, Kari; Lerner, Rose N.; Helsinki Univ. and Helsinki Institute of Physics; Takahashi, Tomo

    2013-10-01

    We present the first full study of the minimal curvaton-Higgs (MCH) model, which is a minimal interpretation of the curvaton scenario with one real scalar coupled to the standard model Higgs boson. The standard model coupling allows the dynamics of the model to be determined in detail, including effects from the thermal background and from radiative corrections to the potential. The relevant mechanisms for curvaton decay are incomplete non-perturbative decay (delayed by thermal blocking), followed by decay via a dimension-5 non-renormalisable operator. To avoid spoiling the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis, we find the ''bare'' curvaton mass to be m σ ≥8 x 10 4 GeV. To match observational data from Planck there is an upper limit on the curvaton-higgs coupling g, between 10 -3 and 10 -2 , depending on the mass. This is due to interactions with the thermal background. We find that typically non-Gaussianities are small but that if f NL is observed in the near future then m σ 9 GeV, depending on Hubble scale during inflation. In a thermal dark matter model, the lower bound on m σ can increase substantially. The parameter space may also be affected once the baryogenesis mechanism is specified.

  15. Minimalism

    CERN Document Server

    Obendorf, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    The notion of Minimalism is proposed as a theoretical tool supporting a more differentiated understanding of reduction and thus forms a standpoint that allows definition of aspects of simplicity. This book traces the development of minimalism, defines the four types of minimalism in interaction design, and looks at how to apply it.

  16. Random defect lines in conformal minimal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeng, M.; Ludwig, A.W.W.

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the effect of adding quenched disorder along a defect line in the 2D conformal minimal models using replicas. The disorder is realized by a random applied magnetic field in the Ising model, by fluctuations in the ferromagnetic bond coupling in the tricritical Ising model and tricritical three-state Potts model (the phi 12 operator), etc. We find that for the Ising model, the defect renormalizes to two decoupled half-planes without disorder, but that for all other models, the defect renormalizes to a disorder-dominated fixed point. Its critical properties are studied with an expansion in ε∝1/m for the mth Virasoro minimal model. The decay exponents X N =((N)/(2))1-((9(3N-4))/(4(m+1) 2 ))+O((3)/(m+1)) 3 of the Nth moment of the two-point function of phi 12 along the defect are obtained to 2-loop order, exhibiting multifractal behavior. This leads to a typical decay exponent X typ =((1)/(2))1+((9)/((m+1) 2 ))+O((3)/(m+1)) 3 . One-point functions are seen to have a non-self-averaging amplitude. The boundary entropy is larger than that of the pure system by order 1/m 3 . As a byproduct of our calculations, we also obtain to 2-loop order the exponent X-tilde N =N1-((2)/(9π 2 ))(3N-4)(q-2) 2 +O(q-2) 3 of the Nth moment of the energy operator in the q-state Potts model with bulk bond disorder

  17. From topological strings to minimal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, Omar; Wu, Jian-Feng

    2015-01-01

    We glue four refined topological vertices to obtain the building block of 5D U(2) quiver instanton partition functions. We take the 4D limit of the result to obtain the building block of 4D instanton partition functions which, using the AGT correspondence, are identified with Virasoro conformal blocks. We show that there is a choice of the parameters of the topological vertices that we start with, as well as the parameters and the intermediate states involved in the gluing procedure, such that we obtain Virasoro minimal model conformal blocks.

  18. From topological strings to minimal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, Omar [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne,Royal Parade, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Wu, Jian-Feng [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Henan University,Minglun Street, Kaifeng city, Henan (China); Beijing Institute of Theoretical Physics and Mathematics,3rd Shangdi Street, Beijing (China)

    2015-07-24

    We glue four refined topological vertices to obtain the building block of 5D U(2) quiver instanton partition functions. We take the 4D limit of the result to obtain the building block of 4D instanton partition functions which, using the AGT correspondence, are identified with Virasoro conformal blocks. We show that there is a choice of the parameters of the topological vertices that we start with, as well as the parameters and the intermediate states involved in the gluing procedure, such that we obtain Virasoro minimal model conformal blocks.

  19. Flocking with minimal cooperativity: the panic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkiewicz, Kevin R; Eaves, Joel D

    2014-01-01

    We present a two-dimensional lattice model of self-propelled spins that can change direction only upon collision with another spin. We show that even with ballistic motion and minimal cooperativity, these spins display robust flocking behavior at nearly all densities, forming long bands of stripes. The structural transition in this system is not a thermodynamic phase transition, but it can still be characterized by an order parameter, and we demonstrate that if this parameter is studied as a dynamical variable rather than a steady-state observable, we can extract a detailed picture of how the flocking mechanism varies with density.

  20. Minimal models for axion and neutrino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.H. Ahn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The PQ mechanism resolving the strong CP problem and the seesaw mechanism explaining the smallness of neutrino masses may be related in a way that the PQ symmetry breaking scale and the seesaw scale arise from a common origin. Depending on how the PQ symmetry and the seesaw mechanism are realized, one has different predictions on the color and electromagnetic anomalies which could be tested in the future axion dark matter search experiments. Motivated by this, we construct various PQ seesaw models which are minimally extended from the (non- supersymmetric Standard Model and thus set up different benchmark points on the axion–photon–photon coupling in comparison with the standard KSVZ and DFSZ models.

  1. Evolution of a minimal parallel programming model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusk, Ewing; Butler, Ralph; Pieper, Steven C.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we take a historical approach to our presentation of self-scheduled task parallelism, a programming model with its origins in early irregular and nondeterministic computations encountered in automated theorem proving and logic programming. We show how an extremely simple task model has evolved into a system, asynchronous dynamic load balancing (ADLB), and a scalable implementation capable of supporting sophisticated applications on today’s (and tomorrow’s) largest supercomputers; and we illustrate the use of ADLB with a Green’s function Monte Carlo application, a modern, mature nuclear physics code in production use. Our lesson is that by surrendering a certain amount of generality and thus applicability, a minimal programming model (in terms of its basic concepts and the size of its application programmer interface) can achieve extreme scalability without introducing complexity.

  2. Glucose reactivity with filling materials as a limitation for using the glucose leakage model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shemesh, H.; Souza, E.M.; Wu, M.K.; Wesselink, P.R.

    2008-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the reactivity of different endodontic materials and sealers with glucose and to asses the reliability of the glucose leakage model in measuring penetration of glucose through these materials. Methodology Ten uniform discs (radius 5 mm, thickness 2 mm) were made of each of the

  3. Comparison of Glucose Area Under the Curve Measured Using Minimally Invasive Interstitial Fluid Extraction Technology with Continuous Glucose Monitoring System in Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Mei; Yano, Yutaka; Suzuki, Toshinari; Yasuma, Taro; Sato, Toshiyuki; Morimoto, Aya; Hosoya, Samiko; Suminaka, Chihiro; Nakajima, Hiromu; Gabazza, Esteban C; Takei, Yoshiyuki

    2017-08-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is reported to be a useful technique, but difficult or inconvenient for some patients and institutions. We are developing a glucose area under the curve (AUC) monitoring system without blood sampling using a minimally invasive interstitial fluid extraction technology (MIET). Here we evaluated the accuracy of interstitial fluid glucose (IG) AUC measured by MIET in patients with diabetes for an extended time interval and the potency of detecting hyperglycemia using CGM data as a reference. Thirty-eight inpatients with diabetes undergoing CGM were enrolled. MIET comprised a pretreatment step using a plastic microneedle array and glucose accumulation step with a hydrogel patch, which was placed on two sites from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM or from 10:00 PM to 6:00 AM. IG AUC was calculated by accumulated glucose extracted by hydrogel patches using sodium ion as standard. A significant correlation was observed between the predicted AUC by MIET and CGM in daytime (r=0.76) and nighttime (r=0.82). The optimal cutoff for the IG AUC value of MIET to predict hyperglycemia over 200 mg/dL measured by CGM for 8 hours was 1,067.3 mg·hr/dL with 88.2% sensitivity and 81.5% specificity. We showed that 8-hour IG AUC levels using MIET were valuable in estimating the blood glucose AUC without blood sampling. The results also supported the concept of using this technique for evaluating glucose excursion and for screening hyperglycemia during 8 hours in patients with diabetes at any time of day. Copyright © 2017 Korean Diabetes Association

  4. Comparison of Glucose Area Under the Curve Measured Using Minimally Invasive Interstitial Fluid Extraction Technology with Continuous Glucose Monitoring System in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Uemura

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundContinuous glucose monitoring (CGM is reported to be a useful technique, but difficult or inconvenient for some patients and institutions. We are developing a glucose area under the curve (AUC monitoring system without blood sampling using a minimally invasive interstitial fluid extraction technology (MIET. Here we evaluated the accuracy of interstitial fluid glucose (IG AUC measured by MIET in patients with diabetes for an extended time interval and the potency of detecting hyperglycemia using CGM data as a reference.MethodsThirty-eight inpatients with diabetes undergoing CGM were enrolled. MIET comprised a pretreatment step using a plastic microneedle array and glucose accumulation step with a hydrogel patch, which was placed on two sites from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM or from 10:00 PM to 6:00 AM. IG AUC was calculated by accumulated glucose extracted by hydrogel patches using sodium ion as standard. ResultsA significant correlation was observed between the predicted AUC by MIET and CGM in daytime (r=0.76 and nighttime (r=0.82. The optimal cutoff for the IG AUC value of MIET to predict hyperglycemia over 200 mg/dL measured by CGM for 8 hours was 1,067.3 mg·hr/dL with 88.2% sensitivity and 81.5% specificity.ConclusionWe showed that 8-hour IG AUC levels using MIET were valuable in estimating the blood glucose AUC without blood sampling. The results also supported the concept of using this technique for evaluating glucose excursion and for screening hyperglycemia during 8 hours in patients with diabetes at any time of day.

  5. Correlation Functions in Holographic Minimal Models

    CERN Document Server

    Papadodimas, Kyriakos

    2012-01-01

    We compute exact three and four point functions in the W_N minimal models that were recently conjectured to be dual to a higher spin theory in AdS_3. The boundary theory has a large number of light operators that are not only invisible in the bulk but grow exponentially with N even at small conformal dimensions. Nevertheless, we provide evidence that this theory can be understood in a 1/N expansion since our correlators look like free-field correlators corrected by a power series in 1/N . However, on examining these corrections we find that the four point function of the two bulk scalar fields is corrected at leading order in 1/N through the contribution of one of the additional light operators in an OPE channel. This suggests that, to correctly reproduce even tree-level correlators on the boundary, the bulk theory needs to be modified by the inclusion of additional fields. As a technical by-product of our analysis, we describe two separate methods -- including a Coulomb gas type free-field formalism -- that ...

  6. Metabolic network analysis of Bacillus clausii on minimal and semirich medium using C-13-Labeled glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Torben; Christensen, Bjarke; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    or zero flux through PEP carboxykinase was estimated, indicating that the latter enzyme was not active during growth on glucose. The uptake of the amino acids in a semirich medium containing 15 of the 20 amino acids normally present in proteins was estimated using fully labeled glucose in batch...

  7. Likelihood analysis of the minimal AMSB model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagnaschi, E.; Weiglein, G. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Borsato, M.; Chobanova, V.; Lucio, M.; Santos, D.M. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Sakurai, K. [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, University of Durham, Science Laboratories, Department of Physics, Durham (United Kingdom); University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Buchmueller, O.; Citron, M.; Costa, J.C.; Richards, A. [Imperial College, High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, London (United Kingdom); Cavanaugh, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); University of Illinois at Chicago, Physics Department, Chicago, IL (United States); De Roeck, A. [Experimental Physics Department, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Antwerp University, Wilrijk (Belgium); Dolan, M.J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, Melbourne (Australia); Ellis, J.R. [King' s College London, Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); CERN, Theoretical Physics Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Flaecher, H. [University of Bristol, H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Bristol (United Kingdom); Heinemeyer, S. [Campus of International Excellence UAM+CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM-CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Cantabria (Spain); Isidori, G. [Physik-Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland); Luo, F. [Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Olive, K.A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-04-15

    We perform a likelihood analysis of the minimal anomaly-mediated supersymmetry-breaking (mAMSB) model using constraints from cosmology and accelerator experiments. We find that either a wino-like or a Higgsino-like neutralino LSP, χ{sup 0}{sub 1}, may provide the cold dark matter (DM), both with similar likelihoods. The upper limit on the DM density from Planck and other experiments enforces m{sub χ{sup 0}{sub 1}} 0) but the scalar mass m{sub 0} is poorly constrained. In the wino-LSP case, m{sub 3/2} is constrained to about 900 TeV and m{sub χ{sup 0}{sub 1}} to 2.9 ± 0.1 TeV, whereas in the Higgsino-LSP case m{sub 3/2} has just a lower limit >or similar 650 TeV (>or similar 480 TeV) and m{sub χ{sup 0}{sub 1}} is constrained to 1.12 (1.13) ± 0.02 TeV in the μ > 0 (μ < 0) scenario. In neither case can the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, (g-2){sub μ}, be improved significantly relative to its Standard Model (SM) value, nor do flavour measurements constrain the model significantly, and there are poor prospects for discovering supersymmetric particles at the LHC, though there are some prospects for direct DM detection. On the other hand, if the χ{sup 0}{sub 1} contributes only a fraction of the cold DM density, future LHC E{sub T}-based searches for gluinos, squarks and heavier chargino and neutralino states as well as disappearing track searches in the wino-like LSP region will be relevant, and interference effects enable BR(B{sub s,d} → μ{sup +}μ{sup -}) to agree with the data better than in the SM in the case of wino-like DM with μ > 0. (orig.)

  8. Discussion on the establishment of blood glucose fluctuation animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Liu Gai; Jing-Ru Zhao; Xiao-Long Chen

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To provide the experimental basis for the in vivo study of blood glucose fluctuation injury mechanism, through intraperitoneal injection of glucose to establish blood glucose fluctuation animal models and to simulate blood glucose fluctuation of patients with diabetes.METHODS: Rats were randomly divided into four groups: normal control group(NC), normal fluctuation group(NF), diabetes mellitus group(DM)and diabetes fluctuation group(DF). Diabetic models were induced through intraperitone...

  9. AGT, Burge pairs and minimal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bershtein, M.; Foda, O.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the AGT correspondence in the context of the conformal field theory M p,p ′ ⊗M H , where M p,p ′ is the minimal model based on the Virasoro algebra V p,p ′ labeled by two co-prime integers {p,p ′ }, 1

  10. AGT, Burge pairs and minimal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bershtein, M. [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics,Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Institute for Information Transmission Problems,Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research University Higher School of Economics, International Laboratory of Representation Theory and Mathematical Physics, Independent University of Moscow, Moscow (Russian Federation); Foda, O. [Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne,Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2014-06-30

    We consider the AGT correspondence in the context of the conformal field theory M{sup p,p{sup ′}}⊗M{sup H}, where M{sup p,p{sup ′}} is the minimal model based on the Virasoro algebra V{sup p,p{sup ′}} labeled by two co-prime integers {p,p"′}, 1

  11. Engineering glucose oxidase to minimize the influence of oxygen on sensor response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horaguchi, Yohei; Saito, Shoko; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Tsugawa, Wakako; Ferri, Stefano; Sode, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Glucose oxidase (GOx) is an important industrial enzyme and is recognized as the gold standard for monitoring blood glucose. However, due to its inherent oxidase property, the presence of oxygen affects electrochemical measurements of venous blood glucose employing artificial electron mediators. We therefore attempted to engineer Penicillium amagasakiense-derived GOx into a dehydrogenase by focusing on the amino acid residues predicted to interact with oxygen. Our rational amino acid substitution approach resulted in the construction of the Ser114Ala/Phe355Leu mutant, which has an 11-fold decrease in oxidase activity and 2.8-fold increase in dehydrogenase activity compared with wild-type GOx. As a result, the dehydrogenase/oxidase activity ratio of the engineered enzyme was 32-fold greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. The enzyme sensor constructed with Ser114Ala/Phe355Leu was considerably less affected by oxygen than the wild-type GOx-based sensor at lower glucose concentrations

  12. Minimal and non-minimal standard models: Universality of radiative corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passarino, G.

    1991-01-01

    The possibility of describing electroweak processes by means of models with a non-minimal Higgs sector is analyzed. The renormalization procedure which leads to a set of fitting equations for the bare parameters of the lagrangian is first reviewed for the minimal standard model. A solution of the fitting equations is obtained, which correctly includes large higher-order corrections. Predictions for physical observables, notably the W boson mass and the Z O partial widths, are discussed in detail. Finally the extension to non-minimal models is described under the assumption that new physics will appear only inside the vector boson self-energies and the concept of universality of radiative corrections is introduced, showing that to a large extent they are insensitive to the details of the enlarged Higgs sector. Consequences for the bounds on the top quark mass are also discussed. (orig.)

  13. Biophysically realistic minimal model of dopamine neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprisan, Sorinel

    2008-03-01

    We proposed and studied a new biophysically relevant computational model of dopaminergic neurons. Midbrain dopamine neurons are involved in motivation and the control of movement, and have been implicated in various pathologies such as Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and drug abuse. The model we developed is a single-compartment Hodgkin-Huxley (HH)-type parallel conductance membrane model. The model captures the essential mechanisms underlying the slow oscillatory potentials and plateau potential oscillations. The main currents involved are: 1) a voltage-dependent fast calcium current, 2) a small conductance potassium current that is modulated by the cytosolic concentration of calcium, and 3) a slow voltage-activated potassium current. We developed multidimensional bifurcation diagrams and extracted the effective domains of sustained oscillations. The model includes a calcium balance due to the fundamental importance of calcium influx as proved by simultaneous electrophysiological and calcium imaging procedure. Although there are significant evidences to suggest a partially electrogenic calcium pump, all previous models considered only elecrtogenic pumps. We investigated the effect of the electrogenic calcium pump on the bifurcation diagram of the model and compared our findings against the experimental results.

  14. Spontaneous parity violation and minimal Higgs models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez, H.; Martins Simoes, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a model for the spontaneous breaking of parity with two Higgs doublets and two neutral Higgs singlets which are even and odd under D-parity. The condition υ R >>υ L can be satisfied without introducing bidoublets, and it is induced by the breaking of D-parity through the vacuum expectation value of the odd Higgs singlet. Examples of left-right symmetric and mirror fermions models in grand unified theories are presented. (orig.)

  15. Modelling of glucose-insulin-glucagon pharmacodynamics in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg; Haidar, A.

    The purpose is to build a simulation model of the glucoregulatory system in man. We estimate individual human parameters of a physiological glucose-insulin-glucagon model. We report posterior probability distributions and correlations of model parameters....

  16. Minimal composite Higgs models at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carena, Marcela; Da Rold, Leandro; Pontón, Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    We consider composite Higgs models where the Higgs is a pseudo-Nambu Goldstone boson arising from the spontaneous breaking of an approximate global symmetry by some underlying strong dynamics. We focus on the SO(5) → SO(4) symmetry breaking pattern, assuming the "partial compositeness" paradigm. We study the consequences on Higgs physics of the fermionic representations produced by the strong dynamics, that mix with the Standard Model (SM) degrees of freedom. We consider models based on the lowest-dimensional representations of SO(5) that allow for the custodial protection of the coupling, i.e. the 5, 10 and 14. We find a generic suppression of the gluon fusion process, while the Higgs branching fractions can be enhanced or suppressed compared to the SM. Interestingly, a precise measurement of the Higgs boson couplings can distinguish between different realizations in the fermionic sector, thus providing crucial information about the nature of the UV dynamics.

  17. Minimal composite Higgs models at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carena, Marcela; Rold, Leandro Da; Pontón, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We consider composite Higgs models where the Higgs is a pseudo-Nambu Goldstone boson arising from the spontaneous breaking of an approximate global symmetry by some underlying strong dynamics. We focus on the SO(5)→SO(4) symmetry breaking pattern, assuming the “partial compositeness" paradigm. We study the consequences on Higgs physics of the fermionic representations produced by the strong dynamics, that mix with the Standard Model (SM) degrees of freedom. We consider models based on the lowest-dimensional representations of SO(5) that allow for the custodial protection of the Zb-barb coupling, i.e. the 5, 10 and 14. We find a generic suppression of the gluon fusion process, while the Higgs branching fractions can be enhanced or suppressed compared to the SM. Interestingly, a precise measurement of the Higgs boson couplings can distinguish between different realizations in the fermionic sector, thus providing crucial information about the nature of the UV dynamics.

  18. A minimal physical model for crawling cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiribocchi, Adriano; Tjhung, Elsen; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E.

    Cell motility in higher organisms (eukaryotes) is fundamental to biological functions such as wound healing or immune response, and is also implicated in diseases such as cancer. For cells crawling on solid surfaces, considerable insights into motility have been gained from experiments replicating such motion in vitro. Such experiments show that crawling uses a combination of actin treadmilling (polymerization), which pushes the front of a cell forward, and myosin-induced stress (contractility), which retracts the rear. We present a simplified physical model of a crawling cell, consisting of a droplet of active polar fluid with contractility throughout, but treadmilling connected to a thin layer near the supporting wall. The model shows a variety of shapes and/or motility regimes, some closely resembling cases seen experimentally. Our work supports the view that cellular motility exploits autonomous physical mechanisms whose operation does not need continuous regulatory effort.

  19. Strong Sector in non-minimal SUSY model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantini Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the squark sector of a supersymmetric theory with an extended Higgs sector. We give the mass matrices of stop and sbottom, comparing the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM case and the non-minimal case. We discuss the impact of the extra superfields on the decay channels of the stop searched at the LHC.

  20. The dispersionless Lax equations and topological minimal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krichever, I.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that perturbed rings of the primary chiral fields of the topological minimal models coincide with some particular solutions of the dispersionless Lax equations. The exact formulae for the tree level partition functions, of A n topological minimal models are found. The Virasoro constraints for the analogue of the τ-function of the dispersionless Lax equation corresponding to these models are proved. (orig.)

  1. Non-minimal supersymmetric models. LHC phenomenolgy and model discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Manuel Ernst

    2015-12-18

    It is generally agreed upon the fact that the Standard Model of particle physics can only be viewed as an effective theory that needs to be extended as it leaves some essential questions unanswered. The exact realization of the necessary extension is subject to discussion. Supersymmetry is among the most promising approaches to physics beyond the Standard Model as it can simultaneously solve the hierarchy problem and provide an explanation for the dark matter abundance in the universe. Despite further virtues like gauge coupling unification and radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, minimal supersymmetric models cannot be the ultimate answer to the open questions of the Standard Model as they still do not incorporate neutrino masses and are besides heavily constrained by LHC data. This does, however, not derogate the beauty of the concept of supersymmetry. It is therefore time to explore non-minimal supersymmetric models which are able to close these gaps, review their consistency, test them against experimental data and provide prospects for future experiments. The goal of this thesis is to contribute to this process by exploring an extraordinarily well motivated class of models which bases upon a left-right symmetric gauge group. While relaxing the tension with LHC data, those models automatically include the ingredients for neutrino masses. We start with a left-right supersymmetric model at the TeV scale in which scalar SU(2){sub R} triplets are responsible for the breaking of left-right symmetry as well as for the generation of neutrino masses. Although a tachyonic doubly-charged scalar is present at tree-level in this kind of models, we show by performing the first complete one-loop evaluation that it gains a real mass at the loop level. The constraints on the predicted additional charged gauge bosons are then evaluated using LHC data, and we find that we can explain small excesses in the data of which the current LHC run will reveal if they are actual new

  2. Mathematical model of glucose-insulin homeostasis in healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombarte, Mercedes; Lupo, Maela; Campetelli, German; Basualdo, Marta; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2013-10-01

    According to the World Health Organization there are over 220 million people in the world with diabetes and 3.4 million people died in 2004 as a consequence of this pathology. Development of an artificial pancreas would allow to restore control of blood glucose by coupling an infusion pump to a continuous glucose sensor in the blood. The design of such a device requires the development and application of mathematical models which represent the gluco-regulatory system. Models developed by other research groups describe very well the gluco-regulatory system but have a large number of mathematical equations and require complex methodologies for the estimation of its parameters. In this work we propose a mathematical model to study the homeostasis of glucose and insulin in healthy rats. The proposed model consists of three differential equations and 8 parameters that describe the variation of: blood glucose concentration, blood insulin concentration and amount of glucose in the intestine. All parameters were obtained by setting functions to the values of glucose and insulin in blood obtained after oral glucose administration. In vivo and in silico validations were performed. Additionally, a qualitative analysis has been done to verify the aforementioned model. We have shown that this model has a single, biologically consistent equilibrium point. This model is a first step in the development of a mathematical model for the type I diabetic rat. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Inflationary models with non-minimally derivative coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Nan; Fei, Qin; Gong, Yungui; Gao, Qing

    2016-01-01

    We derive the general formulae for the scalar and tensor spectral tilts to the second order for the inflationary models with non-minimally derivative coupling without taking the high friction limit. The non-minimally kinetic coupling to Einstein tensor brings the energy scale in the inflationary models down to be sub-Planckian. In the high friction limit, the Lyth bound is modified with an extra suppression factor, so that the field excursion of the inflaton is sub-Planckian. The inflationary models with non-minimally derivative coupling are more consistent with observations in the high friction limit. In particular, with the help of the non-minimally derivative coupling, the quartic power law potential is consistent with the observational constraint at 95% CL. (paper)

  4. Predictive models of glucose control: roles for glucose-sensing neurones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosse, C.; Gonzalez, A.; Burdakov, D.

    2018-01-01

    The brain can be viewed as a sophisticated control module for stabilizing blood glucose. A review of classical behavioural evidence indicates that central circuits add predictive (feedforward/anticipatory) control to the reactive (feedback/compensatory) control by peripheral organs. The brain/cephalic control is constructed and engaged, via associative learning, by sensory cues predicting energy intake or expenditure (e.g. sight, smell, taste, sound). This allows rapidly measurable sensory information (rather than slowly generated internal feedback signals, e.g. digested nutrients) to control food selection, glucose supply for fight-or-flight responses or preparedness for digestion/absorption. Predictive control is therefore useful for preventing large glucose fluctuations. We review emerging roles in predictive control of two classes of widely projecting hypothalamic neurones, orexin/hypocretin (ORX) and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) cells. Evidence is cited that ORX neurones (i) are activated by sensory cues (e.g. taste, sound), (ii) drive hepatic production, and muscle uptake, of glucose, via sympathetic nerves, (iii) stimulate wakefulness and exploration via global brain projections and (iv) are glucose-inhibited. MCH neurones are (i) glucose-excited, (ii) innervate learning and reward centres to promote synaptic plasticity, learning and memory and (iii) are critical for learning associations useful for predictive control (e.g. using taste to predict nutrient value of food). This evidence is unified into a model for predictive glucose control. During associative learning, inputs from some glucose-excited neurones may promote connections between the ‘fast’ senses and reward circuits, constructing neural shortcuts for efficient action selection. In turn, glucose-inhibited neurones may engage locomotion/exploration and coordinate the required fuel supply. Feedback inhibition of the latter neurones by glucose would ensure that glucose fluxes they

  5. Predictive models of glucose control: roles for glucose-sensing neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosse, C; Gonzalez, A; Burdakov, D

    2015-01-01

    The brain can be viewed as a sophisticated control module for stabilizing blood glucose. A review of classical behavioural evidence indicates that central circuits add predictive (feedforward/anticipatory) control to the reactive (feedback/compensatory) control by peripheral organs. The brain/cephalic control is constructed and engaged, via associative learning, by sensory cues predicting energy intake or expenditure (e.g. sight, smell, taste, sound). This allows rapidly measurable sensory information (rather than slowly generated internal feedback signals, e.g. digested nutrients) to control food selection, glucose supply for fight-or-flight responses or preparedness for digestion/absorption. Predictive control is therefore useful for preventing large glucose fluctuations. We review emerging roles in predictive control of two classes of widely projecting hypothalamic neurones, orexin/hypocretin (ORX) and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) cells. Evidence is cited that ORX neurones (i) are activated by sensory cues (e.g. taste, sound), (ii) drive hepatic production, and muscle uptake, of glucose, via sympathetic nerves, (iii) stimulate wakefulness and exploration via global brain projections and (iv) are glucose-inhibited. MCH neurones are (i) glucose-excited, (ii) innervate learning and reward centres to promote synaptic plasticity, learning and memory and (iii) are critical for learning associations useful for predictive control (e.g. using taste to predict nutrient value of food). This evidence is unified into a model for predictive glucose control. During associative learning, inputs from some glucose-excited neurones may promote connections between the 'fast' senses and reward circuits, constructing neural shortcuts for efficient action selection. In turn, glucose-inhibited neurones may engage locomotion/exploration and coordinate the required fuel supply. Feedback inhibition of the latter neurones by glucose would ensure that glucose fluxes they stimulate

  6. Effect and Modeling of Glucose Inhibition and In Situ Glucose Removal During Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Pretreated Wheat Straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andric, Pavle; Meyer, Anne S.; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2010-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass is known to be product-inhibited by glucose. In this study, the effects on cellulolytic glucose yields of glucose inhibition and in situ glucose removal were examined and modeled during extended treatment of heat-pretreated wheat straw......, during 96 h of reaction. When glucose was removed by dialysis during the enzymatic hydrolysis, the cellulose conversion rates and glucose yields increased. In fact, with dialytic in situ glucose removal, the rate of enzyme-catalyzed glucose release during 48-72 h of reaction recovered from 20......-40% to become approximate to 70% of the rate recorded during 6-24 h of reaction. Although Michaelis-Menten kinetics do not suffice to model the kinetics of the complex multi-enzymatic degradation of cellulose, the data for the glucose inhibition were surprisingly well described by simple Michaelis...

  7. Automated economic analysis model for hazardous waste minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmavaram, S.; Mount, J.B.; Donahue, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    The US Army has established a policy of achieving a 50 percent reduction in hazardous waste generation by the end of 1992. To assist the Army in reaching this goal, the Environmental Division of the US Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (USACERL) designed the Economic Analysis Model for Hazardous Waste Minimization (EAHWM). The EAHWM was designed to allow the user to evaluate the life cycle costs for various techniques used in hazardous waste minimization and to compare them to the life cycle costs of current operating practices. The program was developed in C language on an IBM compatible PC and is consistent with other pertinent models for performing economic analyses. The potential hierarchical minimization categories used in EAHWM include source reduction, recovery and/or reuse, and treatment. Although treatment is no longer an acceptable minimization option, its use is widespread and has therefore been addressed in the model. The model allows for economic analysis for minimization of the Army's six most important hazardous waste streams. These include, solvents, paint stripping wastes, metal plating wastes, industrial waste-sludges, used oils, and batteries and battery electrolytes. The EAHWM also includes a general application which can be used to calculate and compare the life cycle costs for minimization alternatives of any waste stream, hazardous or non-hazardous. The EAHWM has been fully tested and implemented in more than 60 Army installations in the United States

  8. Analytical modeling of glucose biosensors based on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourasl, Ali H; Ahmadi, Mohammad Taghi; Rahmani, Meisam; Chin, Huei Chaeng; Lim, Cheng Siong; Ismail, Razali; Tan, Michael Loong Peng

    2014-01-15

    In recent years, carbon nanotubes have received widespread attention as promising carbon-based nanoelectronic devices. Due to their exceptional physical, chemical, and electrical properties, namely a high surface-to-volume ratio, their enhanced electron transfer properties, and their high thermal conductivity, carbon nanotubes can be used effectively as electrochemical sensors. The integration of carbon nanotubes with a functional group provides a good and solid support for the immobilization of enzymes. The determination of glucose levels using biosensors, particularly in the medical diagnostics and food industries, is gaining mass appeal. Glucose biosensors detect the glucose molecule by catalyzing glucose to gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of oxygen. This action provides high accuracy and a quick detection rate. In this paper, a single-wall carbon nanotube field-effect transistor biosensor for glucose detection is analytically modeled. In the proposed model, the glucose concentration is presented as a function of gate voltage. Subsequently, the proposed model is compared with existing experimental data. A good consensus between the model and the experimental data is reported. The simulated data demonstrate that the analytical model can be employed with an electrochemical glucose sensor to predict the behavior of the sensing mechanism in biosensors.

  9. Null-polygonal minimal surfaces in AdS4 from perturbed W minimal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatsuda, Yasuyuki; Ito, Katsushi; Satoh, Yuji

    2012-11-01

    We study the null-polygonal minimal surfaces in AdS 4 , which correspond to the gluon scattering amplitudes/Wilson loops in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling. The area of the minimal surfaces with n cusps is characterized by the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz (TBA) integral equations or the Y-system of the homogeneous sine-Gordon model, which is regarded as the SU(n-4) 4 /U(1) n-5 generalized parafermion theory perturbed by the weight-zero adjoint operators. Based on the relation to the TBA systems of the perturbed W minimal models, we solve the TBA equations by using the conformal perturbation theory, and obtain the analytic expansion of the remainder function around the UV/regular-polygonal limit for n = 6 and 7. We compare the rescaled remainder function for n=6 with the two-loop one, to observe that they are close to each other similarly to the AdS 3 case.

  10. Null-polygonal minimal surfaces in AdS{sub 4} from perturbed W minimal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsuda, Yasuyuki [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ito, Katsushi [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Satoh, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Physics

    2012-11-15

    We study the null-polygonal minimal surfaces in AdS{sub 4}, which correspond to the gluon scattering amplitudes/Wilson loops in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling. The area of the minimal surfaces with n cusps is characterized by the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz (TBA) integral equations or the Y-system of the homogeneous sine-Gordon model, which is regarded as the SU(n-4){sub 4}/U(1){sup n-5} generalized parafermion theory perturbed by the weight-zero adjoint operators. Based on the relation to the TBA systems of the perturbed W minimal models, we solve the TBA equations by using the conformal perturbation theory, and obtain the analytic expansion of the remainder function around the UV/regular-polygonal limit for n = 6 and 7. We compare the rescaled remainder function for n=6 with the two-loop one, to observe that they are close to each other similarly to the AdS{sub 3} case.

  11. Glucose intolerance in a xenotransplantation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Kirsten; Buschard, Karsten; Gram, Dorte X.

    2006-01-01

    Xenotransplantation holds the promise of replacing failing human organs with organs of animal origin. Transplantation of pancreatic islets from pigs to humans might restore glucose homeostasis and offer diabetic patients considerable improvement in their quality of life. The alpha-gal epitope...... beta-cell function (p islet xenotransplantation....

  12. Altered cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in patients with liver disease and minimal encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, A.H.; Yap, E.W.; Rhoades, H.M.; Wong, W.H.

    1991-01-01

    We measured CBF and the CMRglc in normal controls and in patients with severe liver disease and evidence for minimal hepatic encephalopathy using positron emission tomography. Regions were defined in frontal, temporal, parietal, and visual cortex; the thalamus; the caudate; the cerebellum; and the white matter along with a whole-slice value obtained at the level of the thalamus. There was no difference in whole-slice CBF and CMRglc values. Individual regional values were normalized to the whole-slice value and subjected to a two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. When normalized CBF and CMRglc values for regions were compared between groups, significant differences were demonstrated (F = 5.650, p = 0.00014 and F = 4.58, p = 0.0073, respectively). These pattern differences were due to higher CBF and CMRglc in the cerebellum, thalamus, and caudate in patients and lower values in the cortex. Standardized coefficients extracted from a discriminant function analysis permitted correct group assignment for 95.5% of the CBF studies and for 92.9% of the CMRglc studies. The similarity of the altered pattern of cerebral metabolism and flow in our patients to that seen in rats subjected to portacaval shunts or ammonia infusions suggests that this toxin may alter flow and metabolism and that this, in turn, causes the clinical expression of encephalopathy

  13. A random regret minimization model of travel choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chorus, C.G.; Arentze, T.A.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents an alternative to Random Utility-Maximization models of travel choice. Our Random Regret-Minimization model is rooted in Regret Theory and provides several useful features for travel demand analysis. Firstly, it allows for the possibility that choices between travel

  14. Dark matter, constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model, and lattice QCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giedt, Joel; Thomas, Anthony W; Young, Ross D

    2009-11-13

    Recent lattice measurements have given accurate estimates of the quark condensates in the proton. We use these results to significantly improve the dark matter predictions in benchmark models within the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. The predicted spin-independent cross sections are at least an order of magnitude smaller than previously suggested and our results have significant consequences for dark matter searches.

  15. Perturbed Yukawa textures in the minimal seesaw model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rink, Thomas; Schmitz, Kai [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK),69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-03-29

    We revisit the minimal seesaw model, i.e., the type-I seesaw mechanism involving only two right-handed neutrinos. This model represents an important minimal benchmark scenario for future experimental updates on neutrino oscillations. It features four real parameters that cannot be fixed by the current data: two CP-violating phases, δ and σ, as well as one complex parameter, z, that is experimentally inaccessible at low energies. The parameter z controls the structure of the neutrino Yukawa matrix at high energies, which is why it may be regarded as a label or index for all UV completions of the minimal seesaw model. The fact that z encompasses only two real degrees of freedom allows us to systematically scan the minimal seesaw model over all of its possible UV completions. In doing so, we address the following question: suppose δ and σ should be measured at particular values in the future — to what extent is one then still able to realize approximate textures in the neutrino Yukawa matrix? Our analysis, thus, generalizes previous studies of the minimal seesaw model based on the assumption of exact texture zeros. In particular, our study allows us to assess the theoretical uncertainty inherent to the common texture ansatz. One of our main results is that a normal light-neutrino mass hierarchy is, in fact, still consistent with a two-zero Yukawa texture, provided that the two texture zeros receive corrections at the level of O(10 %). While our numerical results pertain to the minimal seesaw model only, our general procedure appears to be applicable to other neutrino mass models as well.

  16. Using LSTMs to learn physiological models of blood glucose behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshekarian, Sadegh; Bunescu, Razvan; Marling, Cindy; Schwartz, Frank

    2017-07-01

    For people with type 1 diabetes, good blood glucose control is essential to keeping serious disease complications at bay. This entails carefully monitoring blood glucose levels and taking corrective steps whenever they are too high or too low. If blood glucose levels could be accurately predicted, patients could take proactive steps to prevent blood glucose excursions from occurring. However, accurate predictions require complex physiological models of blood glucose behavior. Factors such as insulin boluses, carbohydrate intake, and exercise influence blood glucose in ways that are difficult to capture through manually engineered equations. In this paper, we describe a recursive neural network (RNN) approach that uses long short-term memory (LSTM) units to learn a physiological model of blood glucose. When trained on raw data from real patients, the LSTM networks (LSTMs) obtain results that are competitive with a previous state-of-the-art model based on manually engineered physiological equations. The RNN approach can incorporate arbitrary physiological parameters without the need for sophisticated manual engineering, thus holding the promise of further improvements in prediction accuracy.

  17. Optimal blood glucose control in diabetes mellitus treatment using dynamic programming based on Ackerman’s linear model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradanti, Paskalia; Hartono

    2018-03-01

    Determination of insulin injection dose in diabetes mellitus treatment can be considered as an optimal control problem. This article is aimed to simulate optimal blood glucose control for patient with diabetes mellitus. The blood glucose regulation of diabetic patient is represented by Ackerman’s Linear Model. This problem is then solved using dynamic programming method. The desired blood glucose level is obtained by minimizing the performance index in Lagrange form. The results show that dynamic programming based on Ackerman’s Linear Model is quite good to solve the problem.

  18. Minimal quantization of two-dimensional models with chiral anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, N.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional gauge models with chiral anomalies - ''left-handed'' QED and the chiral Schwinger model, are quantized consistently in the frames of the minimal quantization method. The choice of the cone time as a physical time for system of quantization is motivated. The well-known mass spectrum is found but with a fixed value of the regularization parameter a=2. Such a unique solution is obtained due to the strong requirement of consistency of the minimal quantization that reflects in the physically motivated choice of the time axis

  19. Two-Higgs-doublet models with Minimal Flavour Violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlucci, Maria Valentina

    2010-01-01

    The tree-level flavour-changing neutral currents in the two-Higgs-doublet models can be suppressed by protecting the breaking of either flavour or flavour-blind symmetries, but only the first choice, implemented by the application of the Minimal Flavour Violation hypothesis, is stable under quantum corrections. Moreover, a two-Higgs-doublet model with Minimal Flavour Violation enriched with flavour-blind phases can explain the anomalies recently found in the ΔF = 2 transitions, namely the large CP-violating phase in B s mixing and the tension between ε K and S ψKS .

  20. A minimally invasive system for glucose area under the curve measurement using interstitial fluid extraction technology: evaluation of the accuracy and usefulness with oral glucose tolerance tests in subjects with and without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Kazuhiko; Hirota, Yushi; Hashimoto, Naoko; Ogawa, Wataru; Sato, Toshiyuki; Okada, Seiki; Hagino, Kei; Asakura, Yoshihiro; Kikkawa, Yasuo; Kojima, Junko; Maekawa, Yasunori; Nakajima, Hiromu

    2012-06-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the importance of managing postprandial hyperglycemia, but adequate monitoring of postprandial glucose remains difficult because of wide variations in levels. We have therefore developed a minimally invasive system to monitor postprandial glucose area under the curve (AUC). This system involves no blood sampling and uses interstitial fluid glucose (IG) AUC (IG-AUC) as a surrogate marker of postprandial glucose. This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of this system by comparing data with the findings of oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) in subjects with and without diabetes. The glucose AUC monitoring system was validated by OGTTs in 37 subjects with and 10 subjects without diabetes. A plastic microneedle array was stamped on the forearm to extract IG. A hydrogel patch was then placed on the pretreated area to accumulate IG. Glucose and sodium ion concentrations in the hydrogel were measured to calculate IG-AUC at 2-h postload glucose. Plasma glucose (PG) levels were measured every 30 min to calculate reference PG-AUC. IG-AUC correlated strongly with reference PG-AUC (r=0.93) over a wide range. The level of correlation between IG-AUC and maximum PG level was also high (r=0.86). The painless nature of the technique was confirmed by the response of patients to questionnaires. The glucose AUC monitoring system using IG provided good estimates of reference PG-AUC and maximum PG level during OGTTs in subjects with and without diabetes. This system provides easy-to-use monitoring of glucose AUC, which is a good indicator of postprandial glucose.

  1. Model Arrhenius untuk Pendugaan Laju Respirasi Brokoli Terolah Minimal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Imamah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Minimally processed broccoli are perishable product because it still has some metabolism process during the storage period. One of the metabolism process is respiration. Respiration rate is varied depend on the commodity and storage temperature. The purpose of this research are: to review the respiration pattern of minimally processed broccoli during storage period, to study the effect of storage temperature to respiration rate, and to review the correlation between respiration rate and temperature based on Arrhenius model. Broccoli from farming organization “Agro Segar” was processed minimally and then measure the respiration rate. Closed system method is used to measure O2 and CO2 concentration. Minimally processed broccoli is stored at a temperature of 0oC, 5oC, 10oC and 15oC. The experimental design used was completely randomized design of the factors to analyze the rate of respiration. The result shows that broccoli is a climacteric vegetable. It is indicated by the increasing of O2 consumption and CO2 production during senescence phase. The respiration rate increase as high as the increasing of temperature storage. Models Arrhenius can describe correlation between respiration rate and temperature with R2 = 0.953-0.947. The constant value of activation energy (Eai and pre-exponential factor (Roi from Arrhenius model can be used to predict the respiration rate of minimally processed broccoli in every storage temperature

  2. Minimal Self-Models and the Free Energy Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub eLimanowski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The term "minimal phenomenal selfhood" describes the basic, pre-reflective experience of being a self (Blanke & Metzinger, 2009. Theoretical accounts of the minimal self have long recognized the importance and the ambivalence of the body as both part of the physical world, and the enabling condition for being in this world (Gallagher, 2005; Grafton, 2009. A recent account of minimal phenomenal selfhood (MPS, Metzinger, 2004a centers on the consideration that minimal selfhood emerges as the result of basic self-modeling mechanisms, thereby being founded on pre-reflective bodily processes. The free energy principle (FEP, Friston, 2010 is a novel unified theory of cortical function that builds upon the imperative that self-organizing systems entail hierarchical generative models of the causes of their sensory input, which are optimized by minimizing free energy as an approximation of the log-likelihood of the model. The implementation of the FEP via predictive coding mechanisms and in particular the active inference principle emphasizes the role of embodiment for predictive self-modeling, which has been appreciated in recent publications. In this review, we provide an overview of these conceptions and illustrate thereby the potential power of the FEP in explaining the mechanisms underlying minimal selfhood and its key constituents, multisensory integration, interoception, agency, perspective, and the experience of mineness. We conclude that the conceptualization of MPS can be well mapped onto a hierarchical generative model furnished by the free energy principle and may constitute the basis for higher-level, cognitive forms of self-referral, as well as the understanding of other minds.

  3. Oscillatory dynamics of an intravenous glucose tolerance test model with delay interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiangyun; Kuang, Yang; Makroglou, Athena; Mokshagundam, Sriprakash; Li, Jiaxu

    2017-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has become prevalent pandemic disease in view of the modern life style. Both diabetic population and health expenses grow rapidly according to American Diabetes Association. Detecting the potential onset of T2DM is an essential focal point in the research of diabetes mellitus. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) is an effective protocol to determine the insulin sensitivity, glucose effectiveness, and pancreatic β-cell functionality, through the analysis and parameter estimation of a proper differential equation model. Delay differential equations have been used to study the complex physiological phenomena including the glucose and insulin regulations. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to model the time delay in IVGTT modeling. This novel approach uses two parameters to simulate not only both discrete time delay and distributed time delay in the past interval, but also the time delay distributed in a past sub-interval. Normally, larger time delay, either a discrete or a distributed delay, will destabilize the system. However, we find that time delay over a sub-interval might not. We present analytically some basic model properties, which are desirable biologically and mathematically. We show that this relatively simple model provides good fit to fluctuating patient data sets and reveals some intriguing dynamics. Moreover, our numerical simulation results indicate that our model may remove the defect in well known Minimal Model, which often overestimates the glucose effectiveness index.

  4. Charged and neutral minimal supersymmetric standard model Higgs ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 759–763. Charged and neutral minimal supersymmetric standard model Higgs boson decays and measurement of tan β at the compact linear collider. E CONIAVITIS and A FERRARI∗. Department of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Uppsala University, 75121 Uppsala, Sweden. ∗E-mail: ferrari@tsl.uu.se. Abstract.

  5. A Minimal Cognitive Model for Translating and Post-editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaeffer, Moritz; Carl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the coordination of reading (input) and writing (output) activities in from-scratch translation and post-editing. We segment logged eye movements and keylogging data into minimal units of reading and writing activity and model the process of post-editing and from-scratch t...

  6. Lorentz Invariant Spectrum of Minimal Chiral Schwinger Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Wan; Kim, Seung-Kook; Kim, Won-Tae; Park, Young-Jai; Kim, Kee Yong; Kim, Yongduk

    We study the Lorentz transformation of the minimal chiral Schwinger model in terms of the alternative action. We automatically obtain a chiral constraint, which is equivalent to the frame constraint introduced by McCabe, in order to solve the frame problem in phase space. As a result we obtain the Lorentz invariant spectrum in any moving frame by choosing a frame parameter.

  7. A Mechanistic Model of Intermittent Gastric Emptying and Glucose-Insulin Dynamics following a Meal Containing Milk Components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priska Stahel

    Full Text Available To support decision-making around diet selection choices to manage glycemia following a meal, a novel mechanistic model of intermittent gastric emptying and plasma glucose-insulin dynamics was developed. Model development was guided by postprandial timecourses of plasma glucose, insulin and the gastric emptying marker acetaminophen in infant calves fed meals of 2 or 4 L milk replacer. Assigning a fast, slow or zero first-order gastric emptying rate to each interval between plasma samples fit acetaminophen curves with prediction errors equal to 9% of the mean observed acetaminophen concentration. Those gastric emptying parameters were applied to glucose appearance in conjunction with minimal models of glucose disposal and insulin dynamics to describe postprandial glycemia and insulinemia. The final model contains 20 parameters, 8 of which can be obtained by direct measurement and 12 by fitting to observations. The minimal model of intestinal glucose delivery contains 2 gastric emptying parameters and a third parameter describing the time lag between emptying and appearance of glucose in plasma. Sensitivity analysis of the aggregate model revealed that gastric emptying rate influences area under the plasma insulin curve but has little effect on area under the plasma glucose curve. This result indicates that pancreatic responsiveness is influenced by gastric emptying rate as a consequence of the quasi-exponential relationship between plasma glucose concentration and pancreatic insulin release. The fitted aggregate model was able to reproduce the multiple postprandial rises and falls in plasma glucose concentration observed in calves consuming a normal-sized meal containing milk components.

  8. The electroweak phase transition in minimal supergravity models

    CERN Document Server

    Nanopoulos, Dimitri V

    1994-01-01

    We have explored the electroweak phase transition in minimal supergravity models by extending previous analysis of the one-loop Higgs potential to include finite temperature effects. Minimal supergravity is characterized by two higgs doublets at the electroweak scale, gauge coupling unification, and universal soft-SUSY breaking at the unification scale. We have searched for the allowed parameter space that avoids washout of baryon number via unsuppressed anomalous Electroweak sphaleron processes after the phase transition. This requirement imposes strong constraints on the Higgs sector. With respect to weak scale baryogenesis, we find that the generic MSSM is {\\it not} phenomenologically acceptable, and show that the additional experimental and consistency constraints of minimal supergravity restricts the mass of the lightest CP-even Higgs even further to $m_h\\lsim 32\\GeV$ (at one loop), also in conflict with experiment. Thus, if supergravity is to allow for baryogenesis via any other mechanism above the weak...

  9. Brain glucose metabolism in an animal model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detka, J; Kurek, A; Kucharczyk, M; Głombik, K; Basta-Kaim, A; Kubera, M; Lasoń, W; Budziszewska, B

    2015-06-04

    An increasing number of data support the involvement of disturbances in glucose metabolism in the pathogenesis of depression. We previously reported that glucose and glycogen concentrations in brain structures important for depression are higher in a prenatal stress model of depression when compared with control animals. A marked rise in the concentrations of these carbohydrates and glucose transporters were evident in prenatally stressed animals subjected to acute stress and glucose loading in adulthood. To determine whether elevated levels of brain glucose are associated with a change in its metabolism in this model, we assessed key glycolytic enzymes (hexokinase, phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase), products of glycolysis, i.e., pyruvate and lactate, and two selected enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (pyruvate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Additionally, we assessed glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, a key enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Prenatal stress increased the levels of phosphofructokinase, an important glycolytic enzyme, in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. However, prenatal stress had no effect on hexokinase or pyruvate kinase levels. The lactate concentration was elevated in prenatally stressed rats in the frontal cortex, and pyruvate levels remained unchanged. Among the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, prenatal stress decreased the level of pyruvate dehydrogenase in the hippocampus, but it had no effect on α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase. Like in the case of glucose and its transporters, also in the present study, differences in markers of glucose metabolism between control animals and those subjected to prenatal stress were not observed under basal conditions but in rats subjected to acute stress and glucose load in adulthood. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was not reduced by prenatal stress but was found to be even higher in animals exposed to

  10. Rational Design of Glucose-Responsive Insulin Using Pharmacokinetic Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakh, Naveed A; Bisker, Gili; Lee, Michael A; Gong, Xun; Strano, Michael S

    2017-11-01

    A glucose responsive insulin (GRI) is a therapeutic that modulates its potency, concentration, or dosing of insulin in relation to a patient's dynamic glucose concentration, thereby approximating aspects of a normally functioning pancreas. Current GRI design lacks a theoretical basis on which to base fundamental design parameters such as glucose reactivity, dissociation constant or potency, and in vivo efficacy. In this work, an approach to mathematically model the relevant parameter space for effective GRIs is induced, and design rules for linking GRI performance to therapeutic benefit are developed. Well-developed pharmacokinetic models of human glucose and insulin metabolism coupled to a kinetic model representation of a freely circulating GRI are used to determine the desired kinetic parameters and dosing for optimal glycemic control. The model examines a subcutaneous dose of GRI with kinetic parameters in an optimal range that results in successful glycemic control within prescribed constraints over a 24 h period. Additionally, it is demonstrated that the modeling approach can find GRI parameters that enable stable glucose levels that persist through a skipped meal. The results provide a framework for exploring the parameter space of GRIs, potentially without extensive, iterative in vivo animal testing. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Bayesian model discrimination for glucose-insulin homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Emil; Brooks, Stephen P.; Højbjerre, Malene

    In this paper we analyse a set of experimental data on a number of healthy and diabetic patients and discuss a variety of models for describing the physiological processes involved in glucose absorption and insulin secretion within the human body. We adopt a Bayesian approach which facilitates...... as parameter uncertainty. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are used, combining Metropolis Hastings, reversible jump and simulated tempering updates to provide rapidly mixing chains so as to provide robust inference. We demonstrate the methodology for both healthy and type II diabetic populations concluding...... that whilst both populations are well modelled by a common insulin model, their glucose dynamics differ considerably....

  12. ATLAS Z Excess in Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Terada, Takahiro

    2015-06-01

    Recently the ATLAS collaboration reported a 3 sigma excess in the search for the events containing a dilepton pair from a Z boson and large missing transverse energy. Although the excess is not sufficiently significant yet, it is quite tempting to explain this excess by a well-motivated model beyond the standard model. In this paper we study a possibility of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) for this excess. Especially, we focus on the MSSM spectrum where the sfermions are heavier than the gauginos and Higgsinos. We show that the excess can be explained by the reasonable MSSM mass spectrum.

  13. Toda theories, W-algebras, and minimal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, P.; Spence, B.

    1991-01-01

    We discuss the classical W-algebra symmetries of Toda field theories in terms of the pseudo-differential Lax operator associated with the Toda Lax pair. We then show how the W-algebra transformations can be understood as the non-abelian gauge transformations which preserve the form of the Lax pair. This provides a new understanding of the W-algebras, and we discuss their closure and co-cycle structure using this approach. The quantum Lax operator is investigated, and we show that this operator, which generates the quantum W-algebra currents, is conserved in the conformally extended Toda theories. The W-algebra minimal model primary fields are shown to arise naturally in these theories, leading to the conjecture that the conformally extended Toda theories provide a lagrangian formulation of the W-algebra minimal models. (orig.)

  14. On relevant boundary perturbations of unitary minimal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recknagel, A.; Roggenkamp, D.; Schomerus, V.

    2000-01-01

    We consider unitary Virasoro minimal models on the disk with Cardy boundary conditions and discuss deformations by certain relevant boundary operators, analogous to tachyon condensation in string theory. Concentrating on the least relevant boundary field, we can perform a perturbative analysis of renormalization group fixed points. We find that the systems always flow towards stable fixed points which admit no further (non-trivial) relevant perturbations. The new conformal boundary conditions are in general given by superpositions of 'pure' Cardy boundary conditions

  15. Constrained convex minimization via model-based excessive gap

    OpenAIRE

    Tran Dinh, Quoc; Cevher, Volkan

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a model-based excessive gap technique to analyze first-order primal- dual methods for constrained convex minimization. As a result, we construct new primal-dual methods with optimal convergence rates on the objective residual and the primal feasibility gap of their iterates separately. Through a dual smoothing and prox-function selection strategy, our framework subsumes the augmented Lagrangian, and alternating methods as special cases, where our rates apply.

  16. Phenomenological study of in the minimal model at LHC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K M Balasubramaniam

    2017-10-05

    Oct 5, 2017 ... Phenomenological study of Z in the minimal B − L model at LHC ... The phenomenological study of neutral heavy gauge boson (Z. B−L) of the ...... JHEP10(2015)076, arXiv:1506.06767 [hep-ph] ... [15] ATLAS Collaboration: G Aad et al, Phys. Rev. D 90(5) ... [19] C W Chiang, N D Christensen, G J Ding and T.

  17. On radiative gauge symmetry breaking in the minimal supersymmetric model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamberini, G.; Ridolfi, G.; Zwirner, F.

    1990-01-01

    We present a critical reappraisal of radiative gauge symmetry breaking in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. We show that a naive use of the renormalization group improved tree-level potential can lead to incorrect conclusions. We specify the conditions under which the above method gives reliable results, by performing a comparison with the results obtained from the full one-loop potential. We also point out how the stability constraint and the conditions for the absence of charge- and colour-breaking minima should be applied. Finally, we comment on the uncertainties affecting the model predictions for physical observables, in particular for the top quark mass. (orig.)

  18. Predictions for mt and MW in minimal supersymmetric models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, O.; Ellis, J.R.; Flaecher, H.; Isidori, G.

    2009-12-01

    Using a frequentist analysis of experimental constraints within two versions of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model, we derive the predictions for the top quark mass, m t , and the W boson mass, m W . We find that the supersymmetric predictions for both m t and m W , obtained by incorporating all the relevant experimental information and state-of-the-art theoretical predictions, are highly compatible with the experimental values with small remaining uncertainties, yielding an improvement compared to the case of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  19. The minimal linear σ model for the Goldstone Higgs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feruglio, F.; Gavela, M.B.; Kanshin, K.; Machado, P.A.N.; Rigolin, S.; Saa, S.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the minimal SO(5) linear σ-model, a complete renormalizable Lagrangian -including gauge bosons and fermions- is considered, with the symmetry softly broken to SO(4). The scalar sector describes both the electroweak Higgs doublet and the singlet σ. Varying the σ mass would allow to sweep from the regime of perturbative ultraviolet completion to the non-linear one assumed in models in which the Higgs particle is a low-energy remnant of some strong dynamics. We analyze the phenomenological implications and constraints from precision observables and LHC data. Furthermore, we derive the d≤6 effective Lagrangian in the limit of heavy exotic fermions.

  20. Newton's constant from a minimal length: additional models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahlmann, Hanno

    2011-01-01

    We follow arguments of Verlinde (2010 arXiv:1001.0785 [hep-th]) and Klinkhamer (2010 arXiv:1006.2094 [hep-th]), and construct two models of the microscopic theory of a holographic screen that allow for the thermodynamical derivation of Newton's law, with Newton's constant expressed in terms of a minimal length scale l contained in the area spectrum of the microscopic theory. One of the models is loosely related to the quantum structure of surfaces and isolated horizons in loop quantum gravity. Our investigation shows that the conclusions reached by Klinkhamer regarding the new length scale l seem to be generic in all their qualitative aspects.

  1. ABC Algorithm based Fuzzy Modeling of Optical Glucose Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SARACOGLU, O. G.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a modeling approach based on the use of fuzzy reasoning mechanism to define a measured data set obtained from an optical sensing circuit. For this purpose, we implemented a simple but effective an in vitro optical sensor to measure glucose content of an aqueous solution. Measured data contain analog voltages representing the absorbance values of three wavelengths measured from an RGB LED in different glucose concentrations. To achieve a desired model performance, the parameters of the fuzzy models are optimized by using the artificial bee colony (ABC algorithm. The modeling results presented in this paper indicate that the fuzzy model optimized by the algorithm provide a successful modeling performance having the minimum mean squared error (MSE of 0.0013 which are in clearly good agreement with the measurements.

  2. Mathematical modeling of the glucose-insulin system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palumbo, Pasquale; Ditlevsen, Susanne; Bertuzzi, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    of pancreatic insulin production, with a oarser/finer level of detail ranging over cellular and subcellular scales, to short-term organ/tissue models accounting for the intra-venous and the oral glucose tolerance tests as well as for the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, to total-body, long-term diabetes...

  3. Minimal extension of the standard model scalar sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, Donal; Wise, Mark B.; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The minimal extension of the scalar sector of the standard model contains an additional real scalar field with no gauge quantum numbers. Such a field does not couple to the quarks and leptons directly but rather through its mixing with the standard model Higgs field. We examine the phenomenology of this model focusing on the region of parameter space where the new scalar particle is significantly lighter than the usual Higgs scalar and has small mixing with it. In this region of parameter space most of the properties of the additional scalar particle are independent of the details of the scalar potential. Furthermore the properties of the scalar that is mostly the standard model Higgs can be drastically modified since its dominant branching ratio may be to a pair of the new lighter scalars

  4. Viability of minimal left–right models with discrete symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Dekens

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We provide a systematic study of minimal left–right models that are invariant under P, C, and/or CP transformations. Due to the high amount of symmetry such models are quite predictive in the amount and pattern of CP violation they can produce or accommodate at lower energies. Using current experimental constraints some of the models can already be excluded. For this purpose we provide an overview of the experimental constraints on the different left–right symmetric models, considering bounds from colliders, meson-mixing and low-energy observables, such as beta decay and electric dipole moments. The features of the various Yukawa and Higgs sectors are discussed in detail. In particular, we give the Higgs potentials for each case, discuss the possible vacua and investigate the amount of fine-tuning present in these potentials. It turns out that all left–right models with P, C, and/or CP symmetry have a high degree of fine-tuning, unless supplemented with mechanisms to suppress certain parameters. The models that are symmetric under both P and C are not in accordance with present observations, whereas the models with either P, C, or CP symmetry cannot be excluded by data yet. To further constrain and discriminate between the models measurements of B-meson observables at LHCb and B-factories will be especially important, while measurements of the EDMs of light nuclei in particular could provide complementary tests of the LRMs.

  5. Phenomenology of non-minimal supersymmetric models at linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porto, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    The focus of this thesis is on the phenomenology of several non-minimal supersymmetric models in the context of future linear colliders (LCs). Extensions of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) may accommodate the observed Higgs boson mass at about 125 GeV in a more natural way than the MSSM, with a richer phenomenology. We consider both F-term extensions of the MSSM, as for instance the non-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM), as well as D-terms extensions arising at low energies from gauge extended supersymmetric models. The NMSSM offers a solution to the μ-problem with an additional gauge singlet supermultiplet. The enlarged neutralino sector of the NMSSM can be accurately studied at a LC and used to distinguish the model from the MSSM. We show that exploiting the power of the polarised beams of a LC can be used to reconstruct the neutralino and chargino sector and eventually distinguish the NMSSM even considering challenging scenarios that resemble the MSSM. Non-decoupling D-terms extensions of the MSSM can raise the tree-level Higgs mass with respect to the MSSM. This is done through additional contributions to the Higgs quartic potential, effectively generated by an extended gauge group. We study how this can happen and we show how these additional non-decoupling D-terms affect the SM-like Higgs boson couplings to fermions and gauge bosons. We estimate how the deviations from the SM couplings can be spotted at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and at the International Linear Collider (ILC), showing how the ILC would be suitable for the model identication. Since our results prove that a linear collider is a fundamental machine for studying supersymmetry phenomenology at a high level of precision, we argue that also a thorough comprehension of the physics at the interaction point (IP) of a LC is needed. Therefore, we finally consider the possibility of observing intense electromagnetic field effects and nonlinear quantum electrodynamics

  6. Chemical kinetic model uncertainty minimization through laminar flame speed measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Okjoo; Veloo, Peter S.; Sheen, David A.; Tao, Yujie; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Wang, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Laminar flame speed measurements were carried for mixture of air with eight C3-4 hydrocarbons (propene, propane, 1,3-butadiene, 1-butene, 2-butene, iso-butene, n-butane, and iso-butane) at the room temperature and ambient pressure. Along with C1-2 hydrocarbon data reported in a recent study, the entire dataset was used to demonstrate how laminar flame speed data can be utilized to explore and minimize the uncertainties in a reaction model for foundation fuels. The USC Mech II kinetic model was chosen as a case study. The method of uncertainty minimization using polynomial chaos expansions (MUM-PCE) (D.A. Sheen and H. Wang, Combust. Flame 2011, 158, 2358–2374) was employed to constrain the model uncertainty for laminar flame speed predictions. Results demonstrate that a reaction model constrained only by the laminar flame speed values of methane/air flames notably reduces the uncertainty in the predictions of the laminar flame speeds of C3 and C4 alkanes, because the key chemical pathways of all of these flames are similar to each other. The uncertainty in model predictions for flames of unsaturated C3-4 hydrocarbons remain significant without considering fuel specific laminar flames speeds in the constraining target data set, because the secondary rate controlling reaction steps are different from those in the saturated alkanes. It is shown that the constraints provided by the laminar flame speeds of the foundation fuels could reduce notably the uncertainties in the predictions of laminar flame speeds of C4 alcohol/air mixtures. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that an accurate prediction of the laminar flame speed of a particular C4 alcohol/air mixture is better achieved through measurements for key molecular intermediates formed during the pyrolysis and oxidation of the parent fuel. PMID:27890938

  7. A novel minimal invasive mouse model of extracorporeal circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shuhua; Tang, Menglin; Du, Lei; Gong, Lina; Xu, Jin; Chen, Youwen; Wang, Yabo; Lin, Ke; An, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) is necessary for conventional cardiac surgery and life support, but it often triggers systemic inflammation that can significantly damage tissue. Studies of ECC have been limited to large animals because of the complexity of the surgical procedures involved, which has hampered detailed understanding of ECC-induced injury. Here we describe a minimally invasive mouse model of ECC that may allow more extensive mechanistic studies. The right carotid artery and external jugular vein of anesthetized adult male C57BL/6 mice were cannulated to allow blood flow through a 1/32-inch external tube. All animals (n = 20) survived 30 min ECC and subsequent 60 min observation. Blood analysis after ECC showed significant increases in levels of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and neutrophil elastase in plasma, lung, and renal tissues, as well as increases in plasma creatinine and cystatin C and decreases in the oxygenation index. Histopathology showed that ECC induced the expected lung inflammation, which included alveolar congestion, hemorrhage, neutrophil infiltration, and alveolar wall thickening; in renal tissue, ECC induced intracytoplasmic vacuolization, acute tubular necrosis, and epithelial swelling. Our results suggest that this novel, minimally invasive mouse model can recapitulate many of the clinical features of ECC-induced systemic inflammatory response and organ injury.

  8. A Novel Minimal Invasive Mouse Model of Extracorporeal Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal circulation (ECC is necessary for conventional cardiac surgery and life support, but it often triggers systemic inflammation that can significantly damage tissue. Studies of ECC have been limited to large animals because of the complexity of the surgical procedures involved, which has hampered detailed understanding of ECC-induced injury. Here we describe a minimally invasive mouse model of ECC that may allow more extensive mechanistic studies. The right carotid artery and external jugular vein of anesthetized adult male C57BL/6 mice were cannulated to allow blood flow through a 1/32-inch external tube. All animals (n=20 survived 30 min ECC and subsequent 60 min observation. Blood analysis after ECC showed significant increases in levels of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and neutrophil elastase in plasma, lung, and renal tissues, as well as increases in plasma creatinine and cystatin C and decreases in the oxygenation index. Histopathology showed that ECC induced the expected lung inflammation, which included alveolar congestion, hemorrhage, neutrophil infiltration, and alveolar wall thickening; in renal tissue, ECC induced intracytoplasmic vacuolization, acute tubular necrosis, and epithelial swelling. Our results suggest that this novel, minimally invasive mouse model can recapitulate many of the clinical features of ECC-induced systemic inflammatory response and organ injury.

  9. A minimal model for two-component dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esch, Sonja; Klasen, Michael; Yaguna, Carlos E.

    2014-01-01

    We propose and study a new minimal model for two-component dark matter. The model contains only three additional fields, one fermion and two scalars, all singlets under the Standard Model gauge group. Two of these fields, one fermion and one scalar, are odd under a Z_2 symmetry that renders them simultaneously stable. Thus, both particles contribute to the observed dark matter density. This model resembles the union of the singlet scalar and the singlet fermionic models but it contains some new features of its own. We analyze in some detail its dark matter phenomenology. Regarding the relic density, the main novelty is the possible annihilation of one dark matter particle into the other, which can affect the predicted relic density in a significant way. Regarding dark matter detection, we identify a new contribution that can lead either to an enhancement or to a suppression of the spin-independent cross section for the scalar dark matter particle. Finally, we define a set of five benchmarks models compatible with all present bounds and examine their direct detection prospects at planned experiments. A generic feature of this model is that both particles give rise to observable signals in 1-ton direct detection experiments. In fact, such experiments will be able to probe even a subdominant dark matter component at the percent level.

  10. Neutron electric dipole moment in the minimal supersymmetric standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inui, T.; Mimura, Y.; Sakai, N.; Sasaki, T.

    1995-01-01

    The neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) due to the single quark EDM and to the transition EDM is calculated in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. Assuming that the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix at the grand unification scale is the only source of CP violation, complex phases are induced in the parameters of soft supersymmetry breaking at low energies. The chargino one-loop diagram is found to give the dominant contribution of the order of 10 -27 similar 10 -29 e.cm for the quark EDM, assuming the light chargino mass and the universal scalar mass to be 50 GeV and 100 GeV, respectively. Therefore the neutron EDM in this class of model is difficult to measure experimentally. The gluino one-loop diagram also contributes due to the flavor changing gluino coupling. The transition EDM is found to give dominant contributions for certain parameter regions. (orig.)

  11. A minimal model of predator-swarm interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuxin; Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    2014-05-06

    We propose a minimal model of predator-swarm interactions which captures many of the essential dynamics observed in nature. Different outcomes are observed depending on the predator strength. For a 'weak' predator, the swarm is able to escape the predator completely. As the strength is increased, the predator is able to catch up with the swarm as a whole, but the individual prey is able to escape by 'confusing' the predator: the prey forms a ring with the predator at the centre. For higher predator strength, complex chasing dynamics are observed which can become chaotic. For even higher strength, the predator is able to successfully capture the prey. Our model is simple enough to be amenable to a full mathematical analysis, which is used to predict the shape of the swarm as well as the resulting predator-prey dynamics as a function of model parameters. We show that, as the predator strength is increased, there is a transition (owing to a Hopf bifurcation) from confusion state to chasing dynamics, and we compute the threshold analytically. Our analysis indicates that the swarming behaviour is not helpful in avoiding the predator, suggesting that there are other reasons why the species may swarm. The complex shape of the swarm in our model during the chasing dynamics is similar to the shape of a flock of sheep avoiding a shepherd.

  12. Neutral current in reduced minimal 3-3-1 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu Thi Ngoc Huyen; Hoang Ngoc Long; Tran Thanh Lam; Vo Quoc Phong

    2014-01-01

    This work is devoted for gauge boson sector of the recently proposed model based on SU(3) C ⊗SU(3) L ⊗ U(1) X group with minimal content of leptons and Higgs. The limits on the masses of the bilepton gauge bosons and on the mixing angle among the neutral ones are deduced. Using the Fritzsch anzats on quark mixing, we show that the third family of quarks should be different from the first two. We obtain a lower bound on mass of the new heavy neutral gauge boson as 4.032 TeV. Using data on branching decay rates of the Z boson, we can fix the limit to the Z and Z' mixing angle φ as - 0.001 ≤ φ ≤ 0.0003. (author)

  13. The Friedberg-Lee symmetry and minimal seesaw model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xiaogang; Liao Wei

    2009-01-01

    The Friedberg-Lee (FL) symmetry is generated by a transformation of a fermionic field q to q+ξz. This symmetry puts very restrictive constraints on allowed terms in a Lagrangian. Applying this symmetry to N fermionic fields, we find that the number of independent fields is reduced to N-1 if the fields have gauge interaction or the transformation is a local one. Using this property, we find that a seesaw model originally with three generations of left- and right-handed neutrinos, with the left-handed neutrinos unaffected but the right-handed neutrinos transformed under the local FL translation, is reduced to an effective theory of minimal seesaw which has only two right-handed neutrinos. The symmetry predicts that one of the light neutrino masses must be zero.

  14. Higgs decays to dark matter: Beyond the minimal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospelov, Maxim; Ritz, Adam

    2011-01-01

    We examine the interplay between Higgs mediation of dark-matter annihilation and scattering on one hand and the invisible Higgs decay width on the other, in a generic class of models utilizing the Higgs portal. We find that, while the invisible width of the Higgs to dark matter is now constrained for a minimal singlet scalar dark matter particle by experiments such as XENON100, this conclusion is not robust within more generic examples of Higgs mediation. We present a survey of simple dark matter scenarios with m DM h /2 and Higgs portal mediation, where direct-detection signatures are suppressed, while the Higgs width is still dominated by decays to dark matter.

  15. Designing a model to minimize inequities in hemodialysis facilities distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa M. Salgado

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Portugal has an uneven, city-centered bias in the distribution of hemodialysis centers found to contribute to health care inequities. A model has been developed with the aim of minimizing access inequity through the identification of the best possible localization of new hemodialysis facilities. The model was designed under the assumption that individuals from different geographic areas, ceteris paribus, present the same likelihood of requiring hemodialysis in the future. Distances to reach the closest hemodialysis facility were calculated for every municipality lacking one. Regions were scored by aggregating weights of the “individual burden”, defined as the burden for an individual living in a region lacking a hemodialysis center to reach one as often as needed, and the “population burden”, defined as the burden for the total population living in such a region. The model revealed that the average travelling distance for inhabitants in municipalities without a hemodialysis center is 32 km and that 145,551 inhabitants (1.5% live more than 60 min away from a hemodialysis center, while 1,393,770 (13.8% live 30-60 min away. Multivariate analysis showed that the current localization of hemodialysis facilities is associated with major urban areas. The model developed recommends 12 locations for establishing hemodialysis centers that would result in drastically reduced travel for 34 other municipalities, leaving only six (34,800 people with over 60 min of travel. The application of this model should facilitate the planning of future hemodialysis services as it takes into consideration the potential impact of travel time for individuals in need of dialysis, as well as the logistic arrangements required to transport all patients with end-stage renal disease. The model is applicable in any country and health care planners can opt to weigh these two elements differently in the model according to their priorities.

  16. An AdS3 dual for minimal model CFTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaberdiel, Matthias R.; Gopakumar, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    We propose a duality between the 2d W N minimal models in the large N't Hooft limit, and a family of higher spin theories on AdS 3 . The 2d conformal field theories (CFTs) can be described as Wess-Zumino-Witten coset models, and include, for N=2, the usual Virasoro unitary series. The dual bulk theory contains, in addition to the massless higher spin fields, two complex scalars (of equal mass). The mass is directly related to the 't Hooft coupling constant of the dual CFT. We give convincing evidence that the spectra of the two theories match precisely for all values of the 't Hooft coupling. We also show that the renormalization group flows in the 2d CFT agree exactly with the usual AdS/CFT prediction of the gravity theory. Our proposal is in many ways analogous to the Klebanov-Polyakov conjecture for an AdS 4 dual for the singlet sector of large N vector models.

  17. Minimal Z' models: present bounds and early LHC reach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvioni, Ennio; Zwirner, Fabio; Villadoro, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    We consider 'minimal' Z' models, whose phenomenology is controlled by only three parameters beyond the Standard Model ones: the Z' mass and two effective coupling constants. They encompass many popular models motivated by grand unification, as well as many arising in other theoretical contexts. This parameterization takes also into account both mass and kinetic mixing effects, which we show to be sizable in some cases. After discussing the interplay between the bounds from electroweak precision tests and recent direct searches at the Tevatron, we extend our analysis to estimate the early LHC discovery potential. We consider a center-of-mass energy from 7 towards 10 TeV and an integrated luminosity from 50 to several hundred pb -1 , taking all existing bounds into account. We find that the LHC will start exploring virgin land in parameter space for M Z' around 700 GeV, with lower masses still excluded by the Tevatron and higher masses still excluded by electroweak precision tests. Increasing the energy up to 10 TeV, the LHC will start probing a wider range of Z' masses and couplings, although several hundred pb -1 will be needed to explore the regions of couplings favored by grand unification and to overcome the Tevatron bounds in the mass region around 250 GeV.

  18. A minimal model for multiple epidemics and immunity spreading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sneppen

    Full Text Available Pathogens and parasites are ubiquitous in the living world, being limited only by availability of suitable hosts. The ability to transmit a particular disease depends on competing infections as well as on the status of host immunity. Multiple diseases compete for the same resource and their fate is coupled to each other. Such couplings have many facets, for example cross-immunization between related influenza strains, mutual inhibition by killing the host, or possible even a mutual catalytic effect if host immunity is impaired. We here introduce a minimal model for an unlimited number of unrelated pathogens whose interaction is simplified to simple mutual exclusion. The model incorporates an ongoing development of host immunity to past diseases, while leaving the system open for emergence of new diseases. The model exhibits a rich dynamical behavior with interacting infection waves, leaving broad trails of immunization in the host population. This obtained immunization pattern depends only on the system size and on the mutation rate that initiates new diseases.

  19. A minimal model for multiple epidemics and immunity spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneppen, Kim; Trusina, Ala; Jensen, Mogens H; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2010-10-18

    Pathogens and parasites are ubiquitous in the living world, being limited only by availability of suitable hosts. The ability to transmit a particular disease depends on competing infections as well as on the status of host immunity. Multiple diseases compete for the same resource and their fate is coupled to each other. Such couplings have many facets, for example cross-immunization between related influenza strains, mutual inhibition by killing the host, or possible even a mutual catalytic effect if host immunity is impaired. We here introduce a minimal model for an unlimited number of unrelated pathogens whose interaction is simplified to simple mutual exclusion. The model incorporates an ongoing development of host immunity to past diseases, while leaving the system open for emergence of new diseases. The model exhibits a rich dynamical behavior with interacting infection waves, leaving broad trails of immunization in the host population. This obtained immunization pattern depends only on the system size and on the mutation rate that initiates new diseases.

  20. Atomistic minimal model for estimating profile of electrodeposited nanopatterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharpour Hassankiadeh, Somayeh; Sadeghi, Ali

    2018-06-01

    We develop a computationally efficient and methodologically simple approach to realize molecular dynamics simulations of electrodeposition. Our minimal model takes into account the nontrivial electric field due a sharp electrode tip to perform simulations of the controllable coating of a thin layer on a surface with an atomic precision. On the atomic scale a highly site-selective electrodeposition of ions and charged particles by means of the sharp tip of a scanning probe microscope is possible. A better understanding of the microscopic process, obtained mainly from atomistic simulations, helps us to enhance the quality of this nanopatterning technique and to make it applicable in fabrication of nanowires and nanocontacts. In the limit of screened inter-particle interactions, it is feasible to run very fast simulations of the electrodeposition process within the framework of the proposed model and thus to investigate how the shape of the overlayer depends on the tip-sample geometry and dielectric properties, electrolyte viscosity, etc. Our calculation results reveal that the sharpness of the profile of a nano-scale deposited overlayer is dictated by the normal-to-sample surface component of the electric field underneath the tip.

  1. Validation of transport models using additive flux minimization technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankin, A. Y.; Kruger, S. E. [Tech-X Corporation, 5621 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Groebner, R. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Hakim, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Kritz, A. H.; Rafiq, T. [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    A new additive flux minimization technique is proposed for carrying out the verification and validation (V and V) of anomalous transport models. In this approach, the plasma profiles are computed in time dependent predictive simulations in which an additional effective diffusivity is varied. The goal is to obtain an optimal match between the computed and experimental profile. This new technique has several advantages over traditional V and V methods for transport models in tokamaks and takes advantage of uncertainty quantification methods developed by the applied math community. As a demonstration of its efficiency, the technique is applied to the hypothesis that the paleoclassical density transport dominates in the plasma edge region in DIII-D tokamak discharges. A simplified version of the paleoclassical model that utilizes the Spitzer resistivity for the parallel neoclassical resistivity and neglects the trapped particle effects is tested in this paper. It is shown that a contribution to density transport, in addition to the paleoclassical density transport, is needed in order to describe the experimental profiles. It is found that more additional diffusivity is needed at the top of the H-mode pedestal, and almost no additional diffusivity is needed at the pedestal bottom. The implementation of this V and V technique uses the FACETS::Core transport solver and the DAKOTA toolkit for design optimization and uncertainty quantification. The FACETS::Core solver is used for advancing the plasma density profiles. The DAKOTA toolkit is used for the optimization of plasma profiles and the computation of the additional diffusivity that is required for the predicted density profile to match the experimental profile.

  2. Validation of transport models using additive flux minimization technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankin, A. Y.; Kruger, S. E.; Groebner, R. J.; Hakim, A.; Kritz, A. H.; Rafiq, T.

    2013-01-01

    A new additive flux minimization technique is proposed for carrying out the verification and validation (V and V) of anomalous transport models. In this approach, the plasma profiles are computed in time dependent predictive simulations in which an additional effective diffusivity is varied. The goal is to obtain an optimal match between the computed and experimental profile. This new technique has several advantages over traditional V and V methods for transport models in tokamaks and takes advantage of uncertainty quantification methods developed by the applied math community. As a demonstration of its efficiency, the technique is applied to the hypothesis that the paleoclassical density transport dominates in the plasma edge region in DIII-D tokamak discharges. A simplified version of the paleoclassical model that utilizes the Spitzer resistivity for the parallel neoclassical resistivity and neglects the trapped particle effects is tested in this paper. It is shown that a contribution to density transport, in addition to the paleoclassical density transport, is needed in order to describe the experimental profiles. It is found that more additional diffusivity is needed at the top of the H-mode pedestal, and almost no additional diffusivity is needed at the pedestal bottom. The implementation of this V and V technique uses the FACETS::Core transport solver and the DAKOTA toolkit for design optimization and uncertainty quantification. The FACETS::Core solver is used for advancing the plasma density profiles. The DAKOTA toolkit is used for the optimization of plasma profiles and the computation of the additional diffusivity that is required for the predicted density profile to match the experimental profile

  3. Effect of cholera toxin administered supraspinally or spinally on the blood glucose level in pain and d-glucose fed animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Yun-Beom; Park, Soo-Hyun; Kang, Yu-Jung; Kim, Sung-Su; Kim, Chea-Ha; Kim, Su-Jin; Jung, Jun-Sub; Ryu, Ohk-Hyun; Choi, Moon-Gi; Choi, Seong-Soo; Suh, Hong-Won

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, the effect of intrathecal (i.t.) or intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration with cholera toxin (CTX) on the blood glucose level was examined in ICR mice. The i.t. treatment with CTX alone for 24 h dose-dependently increased the blood glucose level. However, i.c.v. treatment with CTX for 24 h did not affect the blood glucose level. When mice were orally fed with D-glucose (2 g/kg), the blood glucose level reached to a maximum level at 30 min and almost returned to the control level at 120 min after D-glucose feeding. I.c.v. pretreatment with CTX increased the blood glucose level in a potentiative manner, whereas i.t. pretreatment with CTX increased the blood glucose level in an additive manner in a D-glucose fed group. In addition, the blood glucose level was increased in formalin-induced pain animal model. I.c.v. pretreatment with CTX enhanced the blood glucose level in a potentiative manner in formalin-induced pain animal model. On the other hand, i.t. pretreatment with CTX increased the blood glucose level in an additive manner in formalin-induced pain animal model. Our results suggest that CTX administered supraspinally or spinally differentially modulates the regulation of the blood glucose level in D-glucose fed model as well as in formalin-induced pain model.

  4. Minimal models on Riemann surfaces: The partition functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, O.

    1990-01-01

    The Coulomb gas representation of the A n series of c=1-6/[m(m+1)], m≥3, minimal models is extended to compact Riemann surfaces of genus g>1. An integral representation of the partition functions, for any m and g is obtained as the difference of two gaussian correlation functions of a background charge, (background charge on sphere) x (1-g), and screening charges integrated over the surface. The coupling constant x (compacitification radius) 2 of the gaussian expressions are, as on the torus, m(m+1), and m/(m+1). The partition functions obtained are modular invariant, have the correct conformal anomaly and - restricting the propagation of states to a single handle - one can verify explicitly the decoupling of the null states. On the other hand, they are given in terms of coupled surface integrals, and it remains to show how they degenerate consistently to those on lower-genus surfaces. In this work, this is clear only at the lattice level, where no screening charges appear. (orig.)

  5. Minimal models on Riemann surfaces: The partition functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O. (Katholieke Univ. Nijmegen (Netherlands). Inst. voor Theoretische Fysica)

    1990-06-04

    The Coulomb gas representation of the A{sub n} series of c=1-6/(m(m+1)), m{ge}3, minimal models is extended to compact Riemann surfaces of genus g>1. An integral representation of the partition functions, for any m and g is obtained as the difference of two gaussian correlation functions of a background charge, (background charge on sphere) x (1-g), and screening charges integrated over the surface. The coupling constant x (compacitification radius){sup 2} of the gaussian expressions are, as on the torus, m(m+1), and m/(m+1). The partition functions obtained are modular invariant, have the correct conformal anomaly and - restricting the propagation of states to a single handle - one can verify explicitly the decoupling of the null states. On the other hand, they are given in terms of coupled surface integrals, and it remains to show how they degenerate consistently to those on lower-genus surfaces. In this work, this is clear only at the lattice level, where no screening charges appear. (orig.).

  6. Investigating multiple solutions in the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allanach, B.C. [DAMTP, CMS, University of Cambridge,Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); George, Damien P. [DAMTP, CMS, University of Cambridge,Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge,JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Nachman, Benjamin [SLAC, Stanford University,2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    Recent work has shown that the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM) can possess several distinct solutions for certain values of its parameters. The extra solutions were not previously found by public supersymmetric spectrum generators because fixed point iteration (the algorithm used by the generators) is unstable in the neighbourhood of these solutions. The existence of the additional solutions calls into question the robustness of exclusion limits derived from collider experiments and cosmological observations upon the CMSSM, because limits were only placed on one of the solutions. Here, we map the CMSSM by exploring its multi-dimensional parameter space using the shooting method, which is not subject to the stability issues which can plague fixed point iteration. We are able to find multiple solutions where in all previous literature only one was found. The multiple solutions are of two distinct classes. One class, close to the border of bad electroweak symmetry breaking, is disfavoured by LEP2 searches for neutralinos and charginos. The other class has sparticles that are heavy enough to evade the LEP2 bounds. Chargino masses may differ by up to around 10% between the different solutions, whereas other sparticle masses differ at the sub-percent level. The prediction for the dark matter relic density can vary by a hundred percent or more between the different solutions, so analyses employing the dark matter constraint are incomplete without their inclusion.

  7. Electroweak precision observables in the minimal supersymmetric standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemeyer, S.; Hollik, W.; Weiglein, G.

    2006-01-01

    The current status of electroweak precision observables in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) is reviewed. We focus in particular on the W boson mass, M W , the effective leptonic weak mixing angle, sin 2 θ eff , the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon (g-2) μ , and the lightest CP-even MSSM Higgs boson mass, m h . We summarize the current experimental situation and the status of the theoretical evaluations. An estimate of the current theoretical uncertainties from unknown higher-order corrections and from the experimental errors of the input parameters is given. We discuss future prospects for both the experimental accuracies and the precision of the theoretical predictions. Confronting the precision data with the theory predictions within the unconstrained MSSM and within specific SUSY-breaking scenarios, we analyse how well the data are described by the theory. The mSUGRA scenario with cosmological constraints yields a very good fit to the data, showing a clear preference for a relatively light mass scale of the SUSY particles. The constraints on the parameter space from the precision data are discussed, and it is shown that the prospective accuracy at the next generation of colliders will enhance the sensitivity of the precision tests very significantly

  8. A Model of Self-Monitoring Blood Glucose Measurement Error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettoretti, Martina; Facchinetti, Andrea; Sparacino, Giovanni; Cobelli, Claudio

    2017-07-01

    A reliable model of the probability density function (PDF) of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) measurement error would be important for several applications in diabetes, like testing in silico insulin therapies. In the literature, the PDF of SMBG error is usually described by a Gaussian function, whose symmetry and simplicity are unable to properly describe the variability of experimental data. Here, we propose a new methodology to derive more realistic models of SMBG error PDF. The blood glucose range is divided into zones where error (absolute or relative) presents a constant standard deviation (SD). In each zone, a suitable PDF model is fitted by maximum-likelihood to experimental data. Model validation is performed by goodness-of-fit tests. The method is tested on two databases collected by the One Touch Ultra 2 (OTU2; Lifescan Inc, Milpitas, CA) and the Bayer Contour Next USB (BCN; Bayer HealthCare LLC, Diabetes Care, Whippany, NJ). In both cases, skew-normal and exponential models are used to describe the distribution of errors and outliers, respectively. Two zones were identified: zone 1 with constant SD absolute error; zone 2 with constant SD relative error. Goodness-of-fit tests confirmed that identified PDF models are valid and superior to Gaussian models used so far in the literature. The proposed methodology allows to derive realistic models of SMBG error PDF. These models can be used in several investigations of present interest in the scientific community, for example, to perform in silico clinical trials to compare SMBG-based with nonadjunctive CGM-based insulin treatments.

  9. Application of a minimal glacier model to Hansbreen, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Oerlemans

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hansbreen is a well studied tidewater glacier in the southwestern part of Svalbard, currently about 16 km long. Since the end of the 19th century it has been retreating over a distance of 2.7 km. In this paper the global dynamics of Hansbreen are studied with a minimal glacier model, in which the ice mechanics are strongly parameterised and a simple law for iceberg calving is used. The model is calibrated by reconstructing a climate history in such a way that observed and simulated glacier length match. In addition, the calving law is tuned to reproduce the observed mean calving flux for the period 2000–2008.

    Equilibrium states are studied for a wide range of values of the equilibrium line altitude. The dynamics of the glacier are strongly nonlinear. The height-mass balance feedback and the water depth-calving flux feedback give rise to cusp catastrophes in the system.

    For the present climatic conditions Hansbreen cannot survive. Depending on the imposed climate change scenario, in AD 2100 Hansbreen is predicted to have a length between 10 and 12 km. The corresponding decrease in ice volume (relative to the volume in AD 2000 is 45 to 65%.

    Finally the late-Holocene history of Hansbreen is considered. We quote evidence from dated peat samples that Hansbreen did not exist during the Holocene Climatic Optimum. We speculate that at the end of the mid-Holocene Climatic Optimum Hansbreen could advance because the glacier bed was at least 50 m higher than today, and because the tributary glaciers on the western side may have supplied a significant amount of mass to the main stream. The excavation of the overdeepening and the formation of the shoal at the glacier terminus probably took place during the Little Ice Age.

  10. Using Glucose Tolerance Tests to Model Insulin Secretion and Clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Shannon

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the studies described in this paper is to develop theoretically and to validate experimentally mathematical compartment models which can be used to predict plasma insulin levels in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. In the case of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM, the C-peptide levels in the plasma were measured as part of routine glucose tolerance tests in order to estimate the prehepatic insulin secretion rates. In the case of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM, a radioactive labelled insulin was used to measure the absorption rate of insulin after a subcutaneous injection of insulin. Both models gave close fits between theoretical estimates and experimental data, and, unlike other models, it is not necessary to seed these models with initial estimates.

  11. A comprehensive compartmental model of blood glucose regulation for healthy and type 2 diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidi, O; Kwok, K E; Gopaluni, R B; Knop, F K

    2016-09-01

    We have expanded a former compartmental model of blood glucose regulation for healthy and type 2 diabetic subjects. The former model was a detailed physiological model which considered the interactions of three substances, glucose, insulin and glucagon on regulating the blood sugar. The main drawback of the former model was its restriction on the route of glucose entrance to the body which was limited to the intravenous glucose injection. To handle the oral glucose intake, we have added a model of glucose absorption in the gastrointestinal tract to the former model to address the resultant variations of blood glucose concentrations following an oral glucose intake. Another model representing the incretins production in the gastrointestinal tract along with their hormonal effects on boosting pancreatic insulin production is also added to the former model. We have used two sets of clinical data obtained during oral glucose tolerance test and isoglycemic intravenous glucose infusion test from both type 2 diabetic and healthy subjects to estimate the model parameters and to validate the model results. The estimation of model parameters is accomplished through solving a nonlinear optimization problem. The results show acceptable precision of the estimated model parameters and demonstrate the capability of the model in accurate prediction of the body response during the clinical studies.

  12. AGT, N-Burge partitions and WN minimal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belavin, Vladimir; Foda, Omar; Santachiara, Raoul

    2015-01-01

    Let B N,n p, p ′ , H be a conformal block, with n consecutive channels χ ι , ι=1,⋯,n, in the conformal field theory M N p, p ′ × M H , where M N p, p ′ is a W N minimal model, generated by chiral spin-2, ⋯, spin-N currents, and labeled by two co-prime integers p and p ′ , 1

  13. Higgs boson masses in a non-minimal supersymmetric model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiesi, Alessandro

    2002-01-01

    A study of the neutral Higgs spectrum in a general Z 3 -breaking Next to Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) is reported in several significant contexts. Particular attention has been devoted to the upper bound on lightest Higgs boson. In the CP-conserving case we show that the extra terms involved in the general Z 3 -breaking superpotential do not affect the upper bound which remains unchanged: it is ∼ 136 GeV when tan β = 2.7. The Spontaneous CP Violation scenario in the Z 3 -breaking NMSSM can occur at tree-level. When the phases of the fields are small the spectrum shows the lightest Higgs particle to be an almost singlet CP-odd. The second lightest particle, a doublet almost-CP-even state, still manifests the upper bound of the CP-conserving case. When the CP-violating phases are large the lightest particle is a doublet with no definite CP parity and its mass shows the usual upper bound at ∼ 136 GeV. The large number of parameters involved in the effective potential can be significantly reduced in the Infrared Quasi Fixed Point (IRQFP) resulting after solving the Renormalization Group (RG) equations assuming universality for the soft SUSY breaking masses. In the Z 3 -breaking NMSSM, unlike the Z 3 -conserving NMSSM, it is possible to find a Higgs spectrum which is still compatible with both experiment and universality at the unification scale. Because in the IRQFP regime tan β ∼ 1.8 and the stop mixing parameter is reduced then the upper bound on the lightest Higgs boson turns out to be ∼ 121 GeV. This result is compatible with experimental data coming from LEPII and might be one of the next predictions to be tested at hadron collider experiments. (author)

  14. The application of the random regret minimization model to drivers’ choice of crash avoidance maneuvers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    This study explores the plausibility of regret minimization as behavioral paradigm underlying the choice of crash avoidance maneuvers. Alternatively to previous studies that considered utility maximization, this study applies the random regret minimization (RRM) model while assuming that drivers ...

  15. The application of the random regret minimization model to drivers’ choice of crash avoidance maneuvers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the plausibility of regret minimization as behavioral paradigm underlying the choice of crash avoidance maneuvers. Alternatively to previous studies that considered utility maximization, this study applies the random regret minimization (RRM) model while assuming that drivers ...

  16. Search for Minimal Standard Model and Minimal Supersymmetric Model Higgs Bosons in e+ e- Collisions with the OPAL detector at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganel, Ofer

    1993-06-01

    When LEP machine was turned on in August 1989, a new era had opened. For the first time, direct, model-independent searches for Higgs boson could be carried out. The Minimal Standard Model Higgs boson is expected to be produced in e + e - collisions via the H o Z o . The Minimal Supersymmetric Model Higgs boson are expected to be produced in the analogous e + e - -> h o Z o process or in pairs via the process e + e - -> h o A o . In this thesis we describe the search for Higgs bosons within the framework of the Minimal Standard Model and the Minimal Supersymmetric Model, using the data accumulated by the OPAL detector at LEP in the 1989, 1990, 1991 and part of the 1992 running periods at and around the Z o pole. An MInimal Supersymmetric Model Higgs boson generator is described as well as its use in several different searches. As a result of this work, the Minimal Standard Model Higgs boson mass is bounded from below by 54.2 GeV/c 2 at 95% C.L. This is, at present, the highest such bound. A novel method of overcoming the m τ and m s dependence of Minimal Supersymmetric Higgs boson production and decay introduced by one-loop radiative corrections is used to obtain model-independent exclusion. The thesis describes also an algorithm for off line identification of calorimeter noise in the OPAL detector. (author)

  17. Modelling glucose and water dynamics in human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenendaal, W.; Schmidt, K.H.; Basum, von G.; Riel, van N.A.W.; Hilbers, P.A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Glucose is heterogeneously distributed in the different physiological compartments in the human skin. Therefore, for the development of a noninvasive measurement method, both a good quantification of the different compartments of human skin and an understanding of glucose transport

  18. A comprehensive compartmental model of blood glucose regulation for healthy and type 2 diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vahidi, O; Kwok, K E; Gopaluni, R B

    2016-01-01

    We have expanded a former compartmental model of blood glucose regulation for healthy and type 2 diabetic subjects. The former model was a detailed physiological model which considered the interactions of three substances, glucose, insulin and glucagon on regulating the blood sugar. The main...... variations of blood glucose concentrations following an oral glucose intake. Another model representing the incretins production in the gastrointestinal tract along with their hormonal effects on boosting pancreatic insulin production is also added to the former model. We have used two sets of clinical data...... obtained during oral glucose tolerance test and isoglycemic intravenous glucose infusion test from both type 2 diabetic and healthy subjects to estimate the model parameters and to validate the model results. The estimation of model parameters is accomplished through solving a nonlinear optimization...

  19. Modeling error and apparent isotope discrimination confound estimation of endogenous glucose production during euglycemic glucose clamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finegood, D.T.; Bergman, R.N.; Vranic, M.

    1988-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that conventional tracer methods applied to euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic glucose clamps result in substantially negative estimates for the rate of endogenous glucose production, particularly during the first half of 180-min clamps. We also showed that addition of tracer to the exogenous glucose infusate resulted in nonnegative endogenous glucose production (Ra) estimates. In this study, we investigated the underlying cause of negative estimates of Ra from conventional clamp/tracer methods and the reason for the difference in estimates when tracer is added to the exogenous glucose infusate. We performed euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic (300-microU/ml) clamps in normal dogs without (cold GINF protocol, n = 6) or with (hot GINF protocol, n = 6) tracer (D-[3-3H]glucose) added to the exogenous glucose infusate. In the hot GINF protocol, sufficient tracer was added to the exogenous glucose infusate such that arterial plasma specific activity (SAa) did not change from basal through the clamp period (P greater than .05). In the cold GINF studies, plasma SAa fell 81 +/- 2% from the basal level by the 3rd h of clamping. We observed a significant, transient, positive venous-arterial difference in specific activity (SAv-SAa difference) during the cold GINF studies. The SAv-SAa difference reached a peak of 27 +/- 6% at 30 min and diminished to a plateau of 7 +/- 1% between 70 and 180 min. We also observed a positive but constant SAv-SAa difference (4.6 +/- 0.2% between 10 and 180 min) during the hot GINF studies

  20. The modulatory role of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone administered spinally in the regulation of blood glucose level in d-glucose-fed and restraint stress mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Yun-Beom; Park, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Su; Lim, Su-Min; Jung, Jun-Sub; Suh, Hong-Won

    2014-08-01

    Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is known as a regulator of the blood glucose homeostasis and food intake. In the present study, the possible roles of α-MSH located in the spinal cord in the regulation of the blood glucose level were investigated in d-glucose-fed and immobilization stress (IMO) mouse models. We found in the present study that intrathecal (i.t.) injection with α-MSH alone did not affect the blood glucose level. However, i.t. administration with α-MSH reduced the blood glucose level in d-glucose-fed model. The plasma insulin level was increased in d-glucose-fed model and was further increased by α-MSH, whereas α-MSH did not affect plasma corticosterone level in d-glucose-fed model. In addition, i.t. administration with glucagon alone enhanced blood glucose level and, i.t. injection with glucagon also increased the blood glucose level in d-glucose-fed model. In contrasted to results observed in d-glucose-fed model, i.t. treatment with α-MSH caused enhancement of the blood glucose level in IMO model. The plasma insulin level was increased in IMO model. The increased plasma insulin level by IMO was reduced by i.t. treatment with α-MSH, whereas i.t. pretreatment with α-MSH did not affect plasma corticosterone level in IMO model. Taken together, although spinally located α-MSH itself does not alter the blood glucose level, our results suggest that the activation of α-MSH system located in the spinal cord play important modulatory roles for the reduction of the blood glucose level in d-glucose fed model whereas α-MSH is responsible for the up-regulation of the blood glucose level in IMO model. The enhancement of insulin release may be responsible for modulatory action of α-MSH in down-regulation of the blood glucose in d-glucose fed model whereas reduction of insulin release may be responsible for modulatory action of α-MSH in up-regulation of the blood glucose in IMO model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MSSM (Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model) Dark Matter Without Prejudice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gainer, James S.

    2009-01-01

    Recently we examined a large number of points in a 19-dimensional parameter subspace of the CP-conserving MSSM with Minimal Flavor Violation. We determined whether each of these points satisfied existing theoretical, experimental, and observational constraints. Here we discuss the properties of the parameter space points allowed by existing data that are relevant for dark matter searches.

  2. Semimechanistic model describing gastric emptying and glucose absorption in healthy subjects and patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alskär, Oskar; Bagger, Jonatan I; Røge, Rikke M.

    2016-01-01

    The integrated glucose-insulin (IGI) model is a previously published semimechanistic model that describes plasma glucose and insulin concentrations after glucose challenges. The aim of this work was to use knowledge of physiology to improve the IGI model's description of glucose absorption and ga...... model provides a better description and improves the understanding of dynamic glucose tests involving oral glucose....... and gastric emptying after tests with varying glucose doses. The developed model's performance was compared to empirical models. To develop our model, data from oral and intravenous glucose challenges in patients with type 2 diabetes and healthy control subjects were used together with present knowledge...... glucose absorption was superior to linear absorption regardless of the gastric emptying model applied. The semiphysiological model developed performed better than previously published empirical models and allows better understanding of the mechanisms underlying glucose absorption. In conclusion, our new...

  3. Depletion of norepinephrine of the central nervous system Down-regulates the blood glucose level in d-glucose-fed and restraint stress models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Su; Lee, Jae-Ryeong; Sharma, Naveen; Suh, Hong-Won

    2016-05-04

    DSP-4[N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride] is a neurotoxin that depletes norepinephrine. The catecholaminergic system has been implicated in the regulation of blood glucose level. In the present study, the effect of DSP-4 administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or intrathecally (i.t.) on blood glucose level was examined in d-glucose-fed and restraint stress mice models. Mice were pretreated once i.c.v. or i.t. with DSP-4 (10-40μg) for 3days, and d-glucose (2g/kg) was fed orally. Blood glucose level was measured 0 (prior to glucose feeding or restraint stress), 30, 60, and 120min after d-glucose feeding or restraint stress. The i.c.v. or i.t. pretreatment with DSP-4 attenuated blood glucose level in the d-glucose-fed model. Plasma corticosterone level was downregulated in the d-glucose-fed model, whereas plasma insulin level increased in the d-glucose-fed group. The i.c.v. or i.t. pretreatment with DSP-4 reversed the downregulation of plasma corticosterone induced by feeding d-glucose. In addition, the d-glucose-induced increase in plasma insulin was attenuated by the DSP-4 pretreatment. Furthermore, i.c.v. or i.t. pretreatment with DSP-4 reduced restraint stress-induced increases in blood glucose levels. Restraint stress increased plasma corticosterone and insulin levels. The i.c.v. pretreatment with DSP-4 attenuated restraint stress-induced plasma corticosterone and insulin levels. Our results suggest that depleting norepinephrine at the supraspinal and spinal levels appears to be responsible for downregulating blood glucose levels in both d-glucose-fed and restraint stress models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of turtle oil on insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in insulin resistant cell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Jing; Tian Yaping; Guo Duo

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of turtle oil on insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in an insulin-resistant (IR) cell model which was established by the way of high concentration of insulin induction with HepG 2 cell in vitro culture. The IR cells were treated by turtle oil, the glucose consumption and 3 H-D-glucose incorporation rate in IR cells were detected by the way of glucose oxidase and 3 H-D-glucose incorporation assay respectively. The state of cell proliferation was tested by MTT method. The results showed that the incorporation rate of 3 H-D-glucose in IR cells was significantly lower than that in the control cells(P 3 H-D-glucose incorporation rate in either IR cells or control cells was increased with the increase of insulin concentration. Moreover, the 3 H-D-glucose incorporation rate of IR cells increased slower than that of control cells. The MTT assay showed that turtle oil can promote the proliferation of IR cell and control cell. The glucose uptake and glucose consumption in IR cell which treated with turtle oil was significantly increase than that in the control cells (P<0.05). Turtle oil can improve the insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in the IR cell model. (authors)

  5. Computer Simulation Model to Train Medical Personnel on Glucose Clamp Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghoul, Pooya; Boulet, Benoit; Tardif, Annie; Haidar, Ahmad

    2017-10-01

    A glucose clamp procedure is the most reliable way to quantify insulin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, but skilled and trained research personnel are required to frequently adjust the glucose infusion rate. A computer environment that simulates glucose clamp experiments can be used for efficient personnel training and development and testing of algorithms for automated glucose clamps. We built 17 virtual healthy subjects (mean age, 25±6 years; mean body mass index, 22.2±3 kg/m 2 ), each comprising a mathematical model of glucose regulation and a unique set of parameters. Each virtual subject simulates plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in response to intravenous insulin and glucose infusions. Each virtual subject provides a unique response, and its parameters were estimated from combined intravenous glucose tolerance test-hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp data using the Bayesian approach. The virtual subjects were validated by comparing their simulated predictions against data from 12 healthy individuals who underwent a hyperglycemic glucose clamp procedure. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were predicted by the virtual subjects in response to glucose infusions determined by a trained research staff performing a simulated hyperglycemic clamp experiment. The total amount of glucose infusion was indifferent between the simulated and the real subjects (85±18 g vs. 83±23 g; p=NS) as well as plasma insulin levels (63±20 mU/L vs. 58±16 mU/L; p=NS). The virtual subjects can reliably predict glucose needs and plasma insulin profiles during hyperglycemic glucose clamp conditions. These virtual subjects can be used to train personnel to make glucose infusion adjustments during clamp experiments. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Stable 1-Norm Error Minimization Based Linear Predictors for Speech Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacobello, Daniele; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm

    2014-01-01

    In linear prediction of speech, the 1-norm error minimization criterion has been shown to provide a valid alternative to the 2-norm minimization criterion. However, unlike 2-norm minimization, 1-norm minimization does not guarantee the stability of the corresponding all-pole filter and can generate...... saturations when this is used to synthesize speech. In this paper, we introduce two new methods to obtain intrinsically stable predictors with the 1-norm minimization. The first method is based on constraining the roots of the predictor to lie within the unit circle by reducing the numerical range...... based linear prediction for modeling and coding of speech....

  7. Model for Simulating Fasting Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes and the Effect of Adherence to Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aradóttir, Tinna Björk; Boiroux, Dimitri; Bengtsson, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    trial results where a dose guidance algorithm was used. We investigate sources of variance and through simulations evaluate the contribution of adherence to variance and dose guidance quality. The results suggest that the model for simulation of T2D patients is sufficient for simulating fasting glucose......The primary goal of this paper is to predict fasting glucose levels in type 2 diabetes (T2D) in long-acting insulin treatment. The paper presents a model for simulating insulin-glucose dynamics in T2D patients. The model combines a physiological model of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and an endogenous...... insulin production model in T2D. We include a review of sources of variance in fasting glucose values in long-acting insulin treatment, with respect to dose guidance algorithms. We use the model to simulate fasting glucose levels in T2D long-acting insulin treatment and compare the results with clinical...

  8. Endogenous glucose production from infancy to adulthood: a non-linear regression model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huidekoper, Hidde H.; Ackermans, Mariëtte T.; Ruiter, An F. C.; Sauerwein, Hans P.; Wijburg, Frits A.

    2014-01-01

    To construct a regression model for endogenous glucose production (EGP) as a function of age, and compare this with glucose supplementation using commonly used dextrose-based saline solutions at fluid maintenance rate in children. A model was constructed based on EGP data, as quantified by

  9. Non stationary nucleation: the model with minimal environment

    OpenAIRE

    Kurasov, Victor

    2013-01-01

    A new model to calculate the rate of nucleation is formulated. This model is based on the classical nucleation theory but considers also vapor depletion around the formed embryo. As the result the free energy has to be recalculated which brings a new expression for the nucleation rate.

  10. process setting models for the minimization of costs defectives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    determine the mean setting so as to minimise the total loss through under-limit complaints and loss of sales and goodwill as well as over-limit losses through excess materials and rework costs. Models are developed for the two types of setting of the mean so that the minimum costs of losses are achieved. Also, a model is ...

  11. Steam consumption minimization model in a multiple evaporation effect in a sugar plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villada, Fernando; Valencia, Jaime A; Moreno, German; Murillo, J. Joaquin

    1992-01-01

    In this work, a mathematical model to minimize the steam consumption in a multiple effect evaporation system is shown. The model is based in the dynamic programming technique and the results are tested in a Colombian sugar mill

  12. A minimal model for a slow pacemaking neuron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, D.G.; Kuznetsov, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We have constructed a phenomenological model for slow pacemaking neurons. ► The model implements a nonlinearity introduced by an ion-dependent current. ► The new nonlinear dependence allows for differentiating responses to various stimuli. ► We discuss implications of our results for a broad class of neurons. - Abstract: We have constructed a phenomenological model for slow pacemaking neurons. These are neurons that generate very regular periodic oscillations of the membrane potential. Many of these neurons also differentially respond to various types of stimulation. The model is based on FitzHugh–Nagumo (FHN) oscillator and implements a nonlinearity introduced by a current that depends on an ion concentration. The comparison with the original FHN oscillator has shown that the new nonlinear dependence allows for differentiating responses to various stimuli. We discuss implications of our results for a broad class of neurons.

  13. An artificial pancreas provided a novel model of blood glucose level variability in beagles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munekage, Masaya; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Takezaki, Yuka; Tamura, Takahiko; Namikawa, Tsutomu; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Although the effects on prognosis of blood glucose level variability have gained increasing attention, it is unclear whether blood glucose level variability itself or the manifestation of pathological conditions that worsen prognosis. Then, previous reports have not been published on variability models of perioperative blood glucose levels. The aim of this study is to establish a novel variability model of blood glucose concentration using an artificial pancreas. We maintained six healthy, male beagles. After anesthesia induction, a 20-G venous catheter was inserted in the right femoral vein and an artificial pancreas (STG-22, Nikkiso Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) was connected for continuous blood glucose monitoring and glucose management. After achieving muscle relaxation, total pancreatectomy was performed. After 1 h of stabilization, automatic blood glucose control was initiated using the artificial pancreas. Blood glucose level varied for 8 h, alternating between the target blood glucose values of 170 and 70 mg/dL. Eight hours later, the experiment was concluded. Total pancreatectomy was performed for 62 ± 13 min. Blood glucose swings were achieved 9.8 ± 2.3 times. The average blood glucose level was 128.1 ± 5.1 mg/dL with an SD of 44.6 ± 3.9 mg/dL. The potassium levels after stabilization and at the end of the experiment were 3.5 ± 0.3 and 3.1 ± 0.5 mmol/L, respectively. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that an artificial pancreas contributed to the establishment of a novel variability model of blood glucose levels in beagles.

  14. Kinetic and stoichiometric modelling of acidogenic fermentation of glucose and fructose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, F.J.; Villasenor, J.; Infantes, D.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a model based on Monod equation for the description of the acidogenic fermentation of glucose and fructose as the main substrates contained in the winery wastewater was developed. The data used for calibration and validation of the model parameters were obtained from an acidogenic mixed culture fermenting glucose and fructose in a batch reactor at 35 o C and pH 5. The calibrated model accurately describes the experimental results from biomass growth, substrate consumption and fermentation products generation. The results showed that the microorganisms growth rate and biomass yield were higher when glucose was used as substrate: μ max-Glucose = 0.163 h -1 , μ max-Fructose = 0.108 h -1 , Y x-Glucose = 0.027 g VSS per mmol Glucose and Y x-Fructose 0.017 g VSS per mmol Fructose. Regarding to the fermentation products, the acetic acid was the main fermentation product obtained in both fermentations, followed by lactic and butyric acid. Comparing glucose and fructose fermentations, the main difference was the yield of butyric acid in both fermentations, 0.249 mol per mol Glucose and 0.131 mol per mol Fructose since the other acids concentration were quite similar. In the case of the H 2 production, it was 0.76 mol H 2 per mol Glucose while 0.85 was the yield in fructose fermentation. -- Highlights: → Acidogenic fermentation of glucose and fructose was studied. → A model describing the kinetics and stoichiometry of the fermentation was developed. → The model developed predicted accurately the substrate, products and biomass profiles along the fermentation process. → The microorganisms growth rate was higher in the glucose fermentation. → The fructose fermentation presented higher hydrogen yields.

  15. Sneutrino warm inflation in the minimal supersymmetric model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Berera, Arjun

    2005-01-01

    The model of RH neutrino fields coupled to the MSSM is shown to yield a large parameter regime of warm inflation. In the strong dissipative regime, it is shown that inflation, driven by a single sneutrino field, occurs with all field amplitudes below the Planck scale. Analysis is also made of leptogenesis, neutrino mass generation and gravitino constraints. A new warm inflation scenario is purposed in which one scalar field drives a period of warm inflation and a second field drives a subsequent phase of reheating. Such a model is able to reduce the final temperature after inflation, thus helping to mitigate gravitino constraints

  16. Patchiness in a minimal nutrient – phytoplankton model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mean-field model without the diffusion and advection terms shows both bistability and limit-cycle oscillations as a few parameters such as the input rate of nutrients and the maximum feeding rate of zooplankton are changed. If the parameter values are chosen from the limit-cycle oscillation region, the corresponding ...

  17. Gamma-ray excess and the minimal dark matter model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerr, Michael; Fileviez Perez, Pavel; Smirnov, Juri

    2015-10-01

    We point out that the gamma-ray excesses in the galactic center and in the dwarf galaxy Reticulum II can both be well explained within the simplest dark matter model. We find that the corresponding region of parameter space will be tested by direct and indirect dark matter searches in the near future.

  18. A minimal model of self-sustaining turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Vaughan L.; Gayme, Dennice F.; Farrell, Brian F.; Ioannou, Petros J.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we examine the turbulence maintained in a Restricted Nonlinear (RNL) model of plane Couette flow. This model is a computationally efficient approximation of the second order statistical state dynamics obtained by partitioning the flow into a streamwise averaged mean flow and perturbations about that mean, a closure referred to herein as the RNL ∞ model. The RNL model investigated here employs a single member of the infinite ensemble that comprises the covariance of the RNL ∞ dynamics. The RNL system has previously been shown to support self-sustaining turbulence with a mean flow and structural features that are consistent with direct numerical simulations (DNS). Regardless of the number of streamwise Fourier components used in the simulation, the RNL system’s self-sustaining turbulent state is supported by a small number of streamwise varying modes. Remarkably, further truncation of the RNL system’s support to as few as one streamwise varying mode can suffice to sustain the turbulent state. The close correspondence between RNL simulations and DNS that has been previously demonstrated along with the results presented here suggest that the fundamental mechanisms underlying wall-turbulence can be analyzed using these highly simplified RNL systems

  19. The Minimal Model of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank; Andersen, Morten; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2011-01-01

    -physiological values of the parameters are needed in order to achieve local instability of the fixed point. Small changes inphysiologically relevant parameters cause the system to be globally stable using the analytical criteria. All simulations show a globally stable fixed point, ruling out periodic solutions even...... are modeled as a system of three coupled, nonlinear differential equations. Experimental data shows the circadian as well as the ultradian rhythm. This paper focuses on the ultradian rhythm. The ultradian rhythm can mathematically be explained by oscillating solutions. Oscillating solutions to an ODE emerges...... from an unstable fixed point with complex eigenvalues with a positive real parts and a non-zero imaginary parts. The first part of the paper describes the general considerations to be obeyed for a mathematical model of the HPA axis. In this paper we only include the most widely accepted mechanisms...

  20. Identifiability and error minimization of receptor model parameters with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delforge, J.; Syrota, A.; Mazoyer, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    The identifiability problem and the general framework for experimental design optimization are presented. The methodology is applied to the problem of the receptor-ligand model parameter estimation with dynamic positron emission tomography data. The first attempts to identify the model parameters from data obtained with a single tracer injection led to disappointing numerical results. The possibility of improving parameter estimation using a new experimental design combining an injection of the labelled ligand and an injection of the cold ligand (displacement experiment) has been investigated. However, this second protocol led to two very different numerical solutions and it was necessary to demonstrate which solution was biologically valid. This has been possible by using a third protocol including both a displacement and a co-injection experiment. (authors). 16 refs.; 14 figs

  1. Random resistor network model of minimal conductivity in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheianov, Vadim V; Fal'ko, Vladimir I; Altshuler, Boris L; Aleiner, Igor L

    2007-10-26

    Transport in undoped graphene is related to percolating current patterns in the networks of n- and p-type regions reflecting the strong bipolar charge density fluctuations. Finite transparency of the p-n junctions is vital in establishing the macroscopic conductivity. We propose a random resistor network model to analyze scaling dependencies of the conductance on the doping and disorder, the quantum magnetoresistance and the corresponding dephasing rate.

  2. Switching Adaptability in Human-Inspired Sidesteps: A Minimal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Yuki; Tanabe, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    Humans can adapt to abruptly changing situations by coordinating redundant components, even in bipedality. Conventional adaptability has been reproduced by various computational approaches, such as optimal control, neural oscillator, and reinforcement learning; however, the adaptability in bipedal locomotion necessary for biological and social activities, such as unpredicted direction change in chase-and-escape, is unknown due to the dynamically unstable multi-link closed-loop system. Here we propose a switching adaptation model for performing bipedal locomotion by improving autonomous distributed control, where autonomous actuators interact without central control and switch the roles for propulsion, balancing, and leg swing. Our switching mobility model achieved direction change at any time using only three actuators, although it showed higher motor costs than comparable models without direction change. Our method of evaluating such adaptation at any time should be utilized as a prerequisite for understanding universal motor control. The proposed algorithm may simply explain and predict the adaptation mechanism in human bipedality to coordinate the actuator functions within and between limbs.

  3. A grey box model of glucose fermentation and syntrophic oxidation in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Los Ángeles Fernandez, Maria; de Los Ángeles Sanromán, Maria; Marks, Stanislaw; Makinia, Jacek; Gonzalez Del Campo, Araceli; Rodrigo, Manuel; Fernandez, Francisco Jesus

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the fermentative and oxidative processes taking place in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) fed with glucose were studied and modeled. The model accounting for the bioelectrochemical processes was based on ordinary, Monod-type differential equations. The model parameters were estimated using experimental results obtained from three H-type MFCs operated at open or closed circuits and fed with glucose or ethanol. The experimental results demonstrate that similar fermentation processes were carried out under open and closed circuit operation, with the most important fermentation products being ethanol (with a yield of 1.81molmol(-1) glucose) and lactic acid (with a yield of 1.36molmol(-1) glucose). A peak in the electricity generation was obtained when glucose and fermentation products coexisted in the liquid bulk. However, almost 90% of the electricity produced came from the oxidation of ethanol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Phytanic acid stimulates glucose uptake in a model of skeletal muscles, the primary porcine myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Che, Brita Ngum; Oksbjerg, Niels; Hellgren, Lars

    2013-01-01

    and tritiated 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG) was used to measure glucose uptake, in relation to PA and 2-DOG exposure times and also in relation to PA and insulin concentrations. The MIXED procedure model of SAS was used for statistical analysis of data. RESULTS: PA increased glucose uptake by approximately 35...

  5. Toward a Kinetic Model for Acrylamide Formation in a Glucose-Asparagine Reaction System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, J.J.; Loon, W.A.M.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Ruck, A.L.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A kinetic model for the formation of acrylamide in a glucose-asparagine reaction system is pro-posed. Equimolar solutions (0.2 M) of glucose and asparagine were heated at different tempera-tures (120-200 C) at pH 6.8. Besides the reactants, acrylamide, fructose, and melanoidins were quantified after

  6. A composite computational model of liver glucose homeostasis. I. Building the composite model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetherington, J; Sumner, T; Seymour, R M; Li, L; Rey, M Varela; Yamaji, S; Saffrey, P; Margoninski, O; Bogle, I D L; Finkelstein, A; Warner, A

    2012-04-07

    A computational model of the glucagon/insulin-driven liver glucohomeostasis function, focusing on the buffering of glucose into glycogen, has been developed. The model exemplifies an 'engineering' approach to modelling in systems biology, and was produced by linking together seven component models of separate aspects of the physiology. The component models use a variety of modelling paradigms and degrees of simplification. Model parameters were determined by an iterative hybrid of fitting to high-scale physiological data, and determination from small-scale in vitro experiments or molecular biological techniques. The component models were not originally designed for inclusion within such a composite model, but were integrated, with modification, using our published modelling software and computational frameworks. This approach facilitates the development of large and complex composite models, although, inevitably, some compromises must be made when composing the individual models. Composite models of this form have not previously been demonstrated.

  7. Exploring a minimal two-component p53 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Tingzhe; Zhu, Feng; Shen, Pingping; Yuan, Ruoshi; Xu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 coordinates many attributes of cellular processes via interlocked feedback loops. To understand the biological implications of feedback loops in a p53 system, a two-component model which encompasses essential feedback loops was constructed and further explored. Diverse bifurcation properties, such as bistability and oscillation, emerge by manipulating the feedback strength. The p53-mediated MDM2 induction dictates the bifurcation patterns. We first identified irradiation dichotomy in p53 models and further proposed that bistability and oscillation can behave in a coordinated manner. Further sensitivity analysis revealed that p53 basal production and MDM2-mediated p53 degradation, which are central to cellular control, are most sensitive processes. Also, we identified that the much more significant variations in amplitude of p53 pulses observed in experiments can be derived from overall amplitude parameter sensitivity. The combined approach with bifurcation analysis, stochastic simulation and sampling-based sensitivity analysis not only gives crucial insights into the dynamics of the p53 system, but also creates a fertile ground for understanding the regulatory patterns of other biological networks

  8. Radiative breaking of the minimal supersymmetric left–right model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuchika Okada

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We study a variation to the SUSY Left–Right symmetric model based on the gauge group SU(3c×SU(2L×SU(2R×U(1BL. Beyond the quark and lepton superfields we only introduce a second Higgs bidoublet to produce realistic fermion mass matrices. This model does not include any SU(2R triplets. We calculate renormalization group evolutions of soft SUSY parameters at the one-loop level down to low energy. We find that an SU(2R slepton doublet acquires a negative mass squared at low energies, so that the breaking of SU(2R×U(1BL→U(1Y is realized by a non-zero vacuum expectation value of a right-handed sneutrino. Small neutrino masses are produced through neutrino mixings with gauginos. Mass limits on the SU(2R×U(1BL sector are obtained by direct search results at the LHC as well as lepton-gaugino mixing bounds from the LEP precision data.

  9. A minimal model of burst-noise induced bistability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Falk

    Full Text Available We investigate the influence of intrinsic noise on stable states of a one-dimensional dynamical system that shows in its deterministic version a saddle-node bifurcation between monostable and bistable behaviour. The system is a modified version of the Schlögl model, which is a chemical reaction system with only one type of molecule. The strength of the intrinsic noise is varied without changing the deterministic description by introducing bursts in the autocatalytic production step. We study the transitions between monostable and bistable behavior in this system by evaluating the number of maxima of the stationary probability distribution. We find that changing the size of bursts can destroy and even induce saddle-node bifurcations. This means that a bursty production of molecules can qualitatively change the dynamics of a chemical reaction system even when the deterministic description remains unchanged.

  10. Human Inferences about Sequences: A Minimal Transition Probability Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Meyniel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain constantly infers the causes of the inputs it receives and uses these inferences to generate statistical expectations about future observations. Experimental evidence for these expectations and their violations include explicit reports, sequential effects on reaction times, and mismatch or surprise signals recorded in electrophysiology and functional MRI. Here, we explore the hypothesis that the brain acts as a near-optimal inference device that constantly attempts to infer the time-varying matrix of transition probabilities between the stimuli it receives, even when those stimuli are in fact fully unpredictable. This parsimonious Bayesian model, with a single free parameter, accounts for a broad range of findings on surprise signals, sequential effects and the perception of randomness. Notably, it explains the pervasive asymmetry between repetitions and alternations encountered in those studies. Our analysis suggests that a neural machinery for inferring transition probabilities lies at the core of human sequence knowledge.

  11. Mathematical Modelling of Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide and Glucagon-like Peptide-1 following Ingestion of Glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røge, Rikke M; Bagger, Jonatan I; Alskär, Oskar

    2017-01-01

    The incretin hormones, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), play an important role in glucose homeostasis by potentiating glucose-induced insulin secretion. Furthermore, GLP-1 has been reported to play a role in glucose homeostasis by inhibiting ...

  12. The regulatory system for diabetes mellitus: Modeling rates of glucose infusions and insulin injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A.

    2016-08-01

    Novel mathematical models with open and closed-loop control for type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus were developed to improve understanding of the glucose-insulin regulatory system. A hybrid impulsive glucose-insulin model with different frequencies of glucose infusions and insulin injections was analyzed, and the existence and uniqueness of the positive periodic solution for type 1 diabetes, which is globally asymptotically stable, was studied analytically. Moreover, permanence of the system for type 2 diabetes was demonstrated which showed that the glucose concentration level is uniformly bounded above and below. To investigate how to prevent hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia being caused by this system, we developed a model involving periodic intakes of glucose with insulin injections applied only when the blood glucose level reached a given critical glucose threshold. In addition, our numerical analysis revealed that the period, the frequency and the dose of glucose infusions and insulin injections are crucial for insulin therapies, and the results provide clinical strategies for insulin-administration practices.

  13. The use of 18F-Fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET as a non-invasive pharmacodynamic biomarker to determine the minimally pharmacologically active dose of AZD8835, a novel PI3Kα inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Maynard

    Full Text Available The phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K, AKT and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signal transduction pathway is frequently de-regulated and activated in human cancer and is an important therapeutic target. AZD8835 is a PI3K inhibitor, with selectivity against PI3K α and δ isoforms, which is currently in Phase 1 clinical trials. 18F-Fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET is a non-invasive pharmacodynamic imaging biomarker that has become an integral part of drug development. It has been used widely with PI3K inhibitors both clinically and pre-clinically because of the role of the PI3K pathway in glucose metabolism. In this study we investigated the potential of 18F-FDG PET as a non-invasive pharmacodynamic biomarker for AZD8835. We sought to understand if 18F-FDG PET could determine the minimally effective dose of AZD8835 and correlate with other pharmacodynamic biomarkers for validation of its use in clinical development. 18F-FDG PET scans were performed in nude mice in the BT474C breast xenograft model. Mice were fasted prior to imaging and static 18F-FDG PET was performed. Treatment groups received AZD8835 by oral gavage at a dose volume of 10ml/kg. Treatment groups received either 3, 6, 12.5, 25 or 50mg/kg AZD8835. Tumour growth was monitored throughout the study, and at the end of the imaging procedure, tumours were taken and a full pharmacodynamic analysis was performed.Results showed that AZD8835 reduced 18F-FDG uptake at a dose of 12.5, 25 and 50mg/kg with no significant reduction at doses of 3 and 6mg/kg. These results were consistent with other pharmacodynamics biomarkers measured and show 18F-FDG PET as a sensitive biomarker with the ability to determine the minimal effective dose of AZD8835.Our pre-clinical studies support the use of 18F-FDG PET imaging as a sensitive and non- invasive pharmacodynamic biomarker (understanding the role of PI3K signalling in glucose uptake for AZD8835 with a decrease in 18

  14. A minimal rupture cascade model for living cell plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzi, Stefano; Laperrousaz, Bastien; Perez-Reche, Francisco J.; Nicolini, Franck E.; Maguer Satta, Véronique; Arneodo, Alain; Argoul, Françoise

    2018-05-01

    Under physiological and pathological conditions, cells experience large forces and deformations that often exceed the linear viscoelastic regime. Here we drive CD34+ cells isolated from healthy and leukemic bone marrows in the highly nonlinear elasto-plastic regime, by poking their perinuclear region with a sharp AFM cantilever tip. We use the wavelet transform mathematical microscope to identify singular events in the force-indentation curves induced by local rupture events in the cytoskeleton (CSK). We distinguish two types of rupture events, brittle failures likely corresponding to irreversible ruptures in a stiff and highly cross-linked CSK and ductile failures resulting from dynamic cross-linker unbindings during plastic deformation without loss of CSK integrity. We propose a stochastic multiplicative cascade model of mechanical ruptures that reproduces quantitatively the experimental distributions of the energy released during these events, and provides some mathematical and mechanistic understanding of the robustness of the log-normal statistics observed in both brittle and ductile situations. We also show that brittle failures are relatively more prominent in leukemia than in healthy cells suggesting their greater fragility.

  15. Analysis of NIF experiments with the minimal energy implosion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, B., E-mail: bcheng@lanl.gov; Kwan, T. J. T.; Wang, Y. M.; Merrill, F. E.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Cerjan, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We apply a recently developed analytical model of implosion and thermonuclear burn to fusion capsule experiments performed at the National Ignition Facility that used low-foot and high-foot laser pulse formats. Our theoretical predictions are consistent with the experimental data. Our studies, together with neutron image analysis, reveal that the adiabats of the cold fuel in both low-foot and high-foot experiments are similar. That is, the cold deuterium-tritium shells in those experiments are all in a high adiabat state at the time of peak implosion velocity. The major difference between low-foot and high-foot capsule experiments is the growth of the shock-induced instabilities developed at the material interfaces which lead to fuel mixing with ablator material. Furthermore, we have compared the NIF capsules performance with the ignition criteria and analyzed the alpha particle heating in the NIF experiments. Our analysis shows that alpha heating was appreciable only in the high-foot experiments.

  16. Analysis of NIF experiments with the minimal energy implosion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, B.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Wang, Y. M.; Merrill, F. E.; Batha, S. H.; Cerjan, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    We apply a recently developed analytical model of implosion and thermonuclear burn to fusion capsule experiments performed at the National Ignition Facility that used low-foot and high-foot laser pulse formats. Our theoretical predictions are consistent with the experimental data. Our studies, together with neutron image analysis, reveal that the adiabats of the cold fuel in both low-foot and high-foot experiments are similar. That is, the cold deuterium-tritium shells in those experiments are all in a high adiabat state at the time of peak implosion velocity. The major difference between low-foot and high-foot capsule experiments is the growth of the shock-induced instabilities developed at the material interfaces which lead to fuel mixing with ablator material. Furthermore, we have compared the NIF capsules performance with the ignition criteria and analyzed the alpha particle heating in the NIF experiments. Our analysis shows that alpha heating was appreciable only in the high-foot experiments

  17. A minimal unified model of disease trajectories captures hallmarks of multiple sclerosis

    KAUST Repository

    Kannan, Venkateshan; Kiani, Narsis A.; Piehl, Fredrik; Tegner, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease targeting the central nervous system (CNS) causing demyelination and neurodegeneration leading to accumulation of neurological disability. Here we present a minimal, computational model involving

  18. Model of Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation in PC12 Cells and Detection of HSP70 Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinting; Yang, Le; Shao, Yankun

    2018-01-01

    Objective: PC12 cell was used to set up a ischemia model by OGD and detected HSP70 protein. Methods: Use of PC12 cells induced by NGF stimulation into nerve cells, oxygen and glucose deprivation to build the nerve cells of oxygen and glucose deprivation model; using Western blot analysis of PC12 cells into neuron-like cells and oxygen-glucose deprivation model established. Results: The application of a final concentration of 50 ng / ml of NGF in DMEM complete mediumPC12 cells showed a typical neuronal morphology with the increase in cell culture time. NGF culture time showed a positive correlation, the establishment of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) training environment, the OGD after nerve element appears different degrees of damage, OGD can effectively induce the expression of HSP70. Conclusion: PC12 cell transformed into cells by NGF; the cell model of OGD was established.

  19. Parsimonious model for blood glucose level monitoring in type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang; Ma, Yan Fen; Wen, Jing Xiao; DU, Yan Fang; Li, Chun Lin; Li, Guang Wei

    2014-07-01

    To establish the parsimonious model for blood glucose monitoring in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving oral hypoglycemic agent treatment. One hundred and fifty-nine adult Chinese type 2 diabetes patients were randomized to receive rapid-acting or sustained-release gliclazide therapy for 12 weeks. Their blood glucose levels were measured at 10 time points in a 24 h period before and after treatment, and the 24 h mean blood glucose levels were measured. Contribution of blood glucose levels to the mean blood glucose level and HbA1c was assessed by multiple regression analysis. The correlation coefficients of blood glucose level measured at 10 time points to the daily MBG were 0.58-0.74 and 0.59-0.79, respectively, before and after treatment (Pblood glucose levels measured at 6 of the 10 time points could explain 95% and 97% of the changes in MBG before and after treatment. The three blood glucose levels, which were measured at fasting, 2 h after breakfast and before dinner, of the 10 time points could explain 84% and 86% of the changes in MBG before and after treatment, but could only explain 36% and 26% of the changes in HbA1c before and after treatment, and they had a poorer correlation with the HbA1c than with the 24 h MBG. The blood glucose levels measured at fasting, 2 h after breakfast and before dinner truly reflected the change 24 h blood glucose level, suggesting that they are appropriate for the self-monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetes patients receiving oral anti-diabetes therapy. Copyright © 2014 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  20. Implementation and automated validation of the minimal Z' model in FeynRules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basso, L.; Christensen, N.D.; Duhr, C.; Fuks, B.; Speckner, C.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a well-known class of U(1) gauge models, the 'minimal' Z' models, in FeynRules. We also describe a new automated validation tool for FeynRules models which is controlled by a web interface and allows the user to run a complete set of 2 → 2 processes on different matrix element generators, different gauges, and compare between them all. If existing, the comparison with independent implementations is also possible. This tool has been used to validate our implementation of the 'minimal' Z' models. (authors)

  1. Job shop scheduling model for non-identic machine with fixed delivery time to minimize tardiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuma, K. K.; Maruf, A.

    2016-02-01

    Scheduling non-identic machines problem with low utilization characteristic and fixed delivery time are frequent in manufacture industry. This paper propose a mathematical model to minimize total tardiness for non-identic machines in job shop environment. This model will be categorized as an integer linier programming model and using branch and bound algorithm as the solver method. We will use fixed delivery time as main constraint and different processing time to process a job. The result of this proposed model shows that the utilization of production machines can be increase with minimal tardiness using fixed delivery time as constraint.

  2. Minimal Adequate Model of Unemployment Duration in the Post-Crisis Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Čabla

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Unemployment is one of the leading economic problems in a developed world. The aim of this paper is to identify the differences in unemployment duration in different strata in the post-crisis Czech Republic via building a minimal adequate model, and to quantify the differences. Data from Labour Force Surveys are used and since they are interval censored in nature, proper metodology must be used. The minimal adequate model is built through the accelerated failure time modelling, maximum likelihood estimates and likelihood ratio tests. Variables at the beginning are sex, marital status, age, education, municipality size and number of persons in a household, containing altogether 29 model parameters. The minimal adequate model contains 5 parameters and differences are found between men and women, the youngest category and the rest and the university educated and the rest. The estimated expected values, variances, medians, modes and 90th percentiles are provided for all subgroups.

  3. Likelihood analysis of the next-to-minimal supergravity motivated model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balazs, Csaba; Carter, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    In anticipation of data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the potential discovery of supersymmetry, we calculate the odds of the next-to-minimal version of the popular supergravity motivated model (NmSuGra) being discovered at the LHC to be 4:3 (57%). We also demonstrate that viable regions of the NmSuGra parameter space outside the LHC reach can be covered by upgraded versions of dark matter direct detection experiments, such as super-CDMS, at 99% confidence level. Due to the similarities of the models, we expect very similar results for the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM).

  4. Multiresponse kinetic modelling of Maillard reaction and caramelisation in a heated glucose/wheat flour system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocadağlı, Tolgahan; Gökmen, Vural

    2016-11-15

    The study describes the kinetics of the formation and degradation of α-dicarbonyl compounds in glucose/wheat flour system heated under low moisture conditions. Changes in the concentrations of glucose, fructose, individual free amino acids, lysine and arginine residues, glucosone, 1-deoxyglucosone, 3-deoxyglucosone, 3,4-dideoxyglucosone, 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural, glyoxal, methylglyoxal and diacetyl concentrations were determined to form a multiresponse kinetic model for isomerisation and degradation reactions of glucose. Degradation of Amadori product mainly produced 1-deoxyglucosone. Formation of 3-deoxyglucosone proceeded directly from glucose and also Amadori product degradation. Glyoxal formation was predominant from glucosone while methylglyoxal and diacetyl originated from 1-deoxyglucosone. Formation of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural from fructose was found to be a key step. Multi-response kinetic modelling of Maillard reaction and caramelisation simultaneously indicated quantitatively predominant parallel and consecutive pathways and rate limiting steps by estimating the reaction rate constants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Disposable Tear Glucose Biosensor—Part 2: System Integration and Model Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Belle, Jeffrey T.; Bishop, Daniel K.; Vossler, Stephen R.; Patel, Dharmendra R.; Cook, Curtiss B.

    2010-01-01

    Background We presented a concept for a tear glucose sensor system in an article by Bishop and colleagues in this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology. A unique solution to collect tear fluid and measure glucose was developed. Individual components were selected, tested, and optimized, and system error modeling was performed. Further data on prototype testing are now provided. Methods An integrated fluidics portion of the prototype was designed, cast, and tested. A sensor was created using screen-printed sensors integrated with a silicone rubber fluidics system and absorbent polyurethane foam. A simulated eye surface was prepared using fluid-saturated poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) sheets, and the disposable prototype was tested for both reproducibility at 0, 200, and 400 μM glucose (n = 7) and dynamic range of glucose detection from 0 to 1000 μM glucose. Results From the replicated runs, an established relative standard deviation of 15.8% was calculated at 200 μM and a lower limit of detection was calculated at 43.4 μM. A linear dynamic range was demonstrated from 0 to 1000 μM with an R2 of 99.56%. The previously developed model predicted a 14.9% variation. This compares to the observed variance of 15.8% measured at 200 μM glucose. Conclusion With the newly designed fluidics component, an integrated tear glucose prototype was assembled and tested. Testing of this integrated prototype demonstrated a satisfactory lower limit of detection for measuring glucose concentration in tears and was reproducible across a physiological sampling range. The next step in the device design process will be initial animal studies to evaluate the current prototype for factors such as eye irritation, ease of use, and correlation with blood glucose. PMID:20307390

  6. A disposable tear glucose biosensor-part 2: system integration and model validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Belle, Jeffrey T; Bishop, Daniel K; Vossler, Stephen R; Patel, Dharmendra R; Cook, Curtiss B

    2010-03-01

    We presented a concept for a tear glucose sensor system in an article by Bishop and colleagues in this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology. A unique solution to collect tear fluid and measure glucose was developed. Individual components were selected, tested, and optimized, and system error modeling was performed. Further data on prototype testing are now provided. An integrated fluidics portion of the prototype was designed, cast, and tested. A sensor was created using screen-printed sensors integrated with a silicone rubber fluidics system and absorbent polyurethane foam. A simulated eye surface was prepared using fluid-saturated poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) sheets, and the disposable prototype was tested for both reproducibility at 0, 200, and 400 microM glucose (n = 7) and dynamic range of glucose detection from 0 to 1000 microM glucose. From the replicated runs, an established relative standard deviation of 15.8% was calculated at 200 microM and a lower limit of detection was calculated at 43.4 microM. A linear dynamic range was demonstrated from 0 to 1000 microM with an R(2) of 99.56%. The previously developed model predicted a 14.9% variation. This compares to the observed variance of 15.8% measured at 200 microM glucose. With the newly designed fluidics component, an integrated tear glucose prototype was assembled and tested. Testing of this integrated prototype demonstrated a satisfactory lower limit of detection for measuring glucose concentration in tears and was reproducible across a physiological sampling range. The next step in the device design process will be initial animal studies to evaluate the current prototype for factors such as eye irritation, ease of use, and correlation with blood glucose. (c) 2010 Diabetes Technology Society.

  7. Triviality bound on lightest Higgs mass in next to minimal supersymmetric model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, S.R.; Mamta; Dutta, Sukanta

    1998-01-01

    We study the implication of triviality on Higgs sector in next to minimal supersymmetric model (NMSSM) using variational field theory. It is shown that the mass of the lightest Higgs boson in NMSSM has an upper bound ∼ 10 M w which is of the same order as that in the standard model. (author)

  8. Surface states of a system of Dirac fermions: A minimal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V. A.; Enaldiev, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    A brief survey is given of theoretical works on surface states (SSs) in Dirac materials. Within the formalism of envelope wave functions and boundary conditions for these functions, a minimal model is formulated that analytically describes surface and edge states of various (topological and nontopological) types in several systems with Dirac fermions (DFs). The applicability conditions of this model are discussed.

  9. Non-minimal Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory and the composite Fermion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoal, Ricardo C.; Helayel Neto, Jose A.

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic field redefinition in Jain's composite fermion model for the fractional quantum Hall effect is shown to be effective described by a mean-field approximation of a model containing a Maxwell-Chern-Simons gauge field nominally coupled to matter. Also an explicit non-relativistic limit of the non-minimal (2+1) D Dirac's equation is derived. (author)

  10. Random regret minimization : Exploration of a new choice model for environmental and resource economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiene, M.; Boeri, M.; Chorus, C.G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces the discrete choice model-paradigm of Random Regret Minimization (RRM) to the field of environmental and resource economics. The RRM-approach has been very recently developed in the context of travel demand modelling and presents a tractable, regret-based alternative to the

  11. Surface states of a system of Dirac fermions: A minimal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, V. A., E-mail: volkov.v.a@gmail.com; Enaldiev, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotel’nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-15

    A brief survey is given of theoretical works on surface states (SSs) in Dirac materials. Within the formalism of envelope wave functions and boundary conditions for these functions, a minimal model is formulated that analytically describes surface and edge states of various (topological and nontopological) types in several systems with Dirac fermions (DFs). The applicability conditions of this model are discussed.

  12. Neutral Higgs bosons in the standard model and in the minimal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    assumed to be CP invariant. Finally, we discuss an alternative MSSM scenario including. CP violation in the Higgs sector. Keywords. Higgs bosons; standard model; minimal supersymmetric model; searches at LEP. 1. Introduction. One of the challenges in high-energy particle physics is the discovery of Higgs bosons.

  13. Application of mathematical models to metronomic chemotherapy: What can be inferred from minimal parameterized models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledzewicz, Urszula; Schättler, Heinz

    2017-08-10

    Metronomic chemotherapy refers to the frequent administration of chemotherapy at relatively low, minimally toxic doses without prolonged treatment interruptions. Different from conventional or maximum-tolerated-dose chemotherapy which aims at an eradication of all malignant cells, in a metronomic dosing the goal often lies in the long-term management of the disease when eradication proves elusive. Mathematical modeling and subsequent analysis (theoretical as well as numerical) have become an increasingly more valuable tool (in silico) both for determining conditions under which specific treatment strategies should be preferred and for numerically optimizing treatment regimens. While elaborate, computationally-driven patient specific schemes that would optimize the timing and drug dose levels are still a part of the future, such procedures may become instrumental in making chemotherapy effective in situations where it currently fails. Ideally, mathematical modeling and analysis will develop into an additional decision making tool in the complicated process that is the determination of efficient chemotherapy regimens. In this article, we review some of the results that have been obtained about metronomic chemotherapy from mathematical models and what they infer about the structure of optimal treatment regimens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Glucose concentration in capillary blood of dairy cows obtained by a minimally invasive lancet technique and determined with three different hand-held devices

    OpenAIRE

    Mair, B.; Drillich, M.; Klein-J?bstl, D.; Kanz, P.; Borchardt, S.; Meyer, L.; Schwendenwein, I.; Iwersen, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dairy cows have a massive demand for glucose at the onset of lactation. A poor adaption to this period leads to an excessive negative energy balance with an increased risk for ketosis and impaired animal health and production. Besides the measurement of ketones, analysing the glucose concentration in blood is reported as helpful instrument for diagnosis and differentiation of ketosis. Monitoring metabolic parameters requires multiple blood sampling. In other species, new blood samp...

  15. A non-minimally coupled quintom dark energy model on the warped DGP brane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozari, K; Azizi, T; Setare, M R; Behrouz, N

    2009-01-01

    We construct a quintom dark energy model with two non-minimally coupled scalar fields, one quintessence and the other phantom field, confined to the warped Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP) brane. We show that this model accounts for crossing of the phantom divide line in appropriate subspaces of the model parameter space. This crossing occurs for both normal and self-accelerating branches of this DGP-inspired setup.

  16. Minimal time spiking in various ChR2-controlled neuron models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Vincent; Thieullen, Michèle; Trélat, Emmanuel

    2018-02-01

    We use conductance based neuron models, and the mathematical modeling of optogenetics to define controlled neuron models and we address the minimal time control of these affine systems for the first spike from equilibrium. We apply tools of geometric optimal control theory to study singular extremals, and we implement a direct method to compute optimal controls. When the system is too large to theoretically investigate the existence of singular optimal controls, we observe numerically the optimal bang-bang controls.

  17. Multi-objective optimization model of CNC machining to minimize processing time and environmental impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Aulia; Rosyidi, Cucuk Nur; Jauhari, Wakhid Ahmad

    2017-11-01

    Minimizing processing time in a production system can increase the efficiency of a manufacturing company. Processing time are influenced by application of modern technology and machining parameter. Application of modern technology can be apply by use of CNC machining, one of the machining process can be done with a CNC machining is turning. However, the machining parameters not only affect the processing time but also affect the environmental impact. Hence, optimization model is needed to optimize the machining parameters to minimize the processing time and environmental impact. This research developed a multi-objective optimization to minimize the processing time and environmental impact in CNC turning process which will result in optimal decision variables of cutting speed and feed rate. Environmental impact is converted from environmental burden through the use of eco-indicator 99. The model were solved by using OptQuest optimization software from Oracle Crystal Ball.

  18. A golden A5 model of leptons with a minimal NLO correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, Iain K.; King, Stephen F.; Stuart, Alexander J.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new A 5 model of leptons which corrects the LO predictions of Golden Ratio mixing via a minimal NLO Majorana mass correction which completely breaks the original Klein symmetry of the neutrino mass matrix. The minimal nature of the NLO correction leads to a restricted and correlated range of the mixing angles allowing agreement within the one sigma range of recent global fits following the reactor angle measurement by Daya Bay and RENO. The minimal NLO correction also preserves the LO inverse neutrino mass sum rule leading to a neutrino mass spectrum that extends into the quasi-degenerate region allowing the model to be accessible to the current and future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

  19. A Minimal Model to Explore the Influence of Distant Modes on Mode-Coupling Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Sebastian; Hoffmann, Norbert

    2010-09-01

    The phenomenon of mode-coupling instability is one of the most frequently explored mechanisms to explain self-excited oscillation in sliding systems with friction. A mode coupling instability is usually due to the coupling of two modes. However, further modes can have an important influence on the coupling of two modes. This work extends a well-known minimal model to describe mode-coupling instabilities in order to explore the influence of a distant mode on the classical mode-coupling pattern. This work suggests a new minimal model. The model is explored and it is shown that a third mode can have significant influence on the classical mode-coupling instabilities where two modes are coupling. Different phenomena are analysed and it is pointed out that distant modes can only be ignored in very special cases and that the onset friction-induced oscillations can even be very sensitive to minimal variation of a distant mode. Due to the chosen academic minimal-model and the abandonment of a complex Finite-Element model the insight stays rather phenomenological but a better understanding of the mode-coupling mechnanism can be gained.

  20. Bounds on the Higgs mass in the standard model and the minimal supersymmetric standard model

    CERN Document Server

    Quiros, M.

    1995-01-01

    Depending on the Higgs-boson and top-quark masses, M_H and M_t, the effective potential of the {\\bf Standard Model} can develop a non-standard minimum for values of the field much larger than the weak scale. In those cases the standard minimum becomes metastable and the possibility of decay to the non-standard one arises. Comparison of the decay rate to the non-standard minimum at finite (and zero) temperature with the corresponding expansion rate of the Universe allows to identify the region, in the (M_H, M_t) plane, where the Higgs field is sitting at the standard electroweak minimum. In the {\\bf Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model}, approximate analytical expressions for the Higgs mass spectrum and couplings are worked out, providing an excellent approximation to the numerical results which include all next-to-leading-log corrections. An appropriate treatment of squark decoupling allows to consider large values of the stop and/or sbottom mixing parameters and thus fix a reliable upper bound on the mass o...

  1. Scattering matrices for Φ1,2 perturbed conformal minimal models in absence of kink states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koubek, A.; Martins, M.J.; Mussardo, G.

    1991-05-01

    We determine the spectrum and the factorizable S-matrices of the massive excitations of the nonunitary minimal models M 2,2n+1 perturbed by the operator Φ 1,2 . These models present no kinks as asymptotic states, as follows from the reduction of the Zhiber-Mikhailov-Shabat model with respect to the quantum group SL(2) q found by Smirnov. We also give the whole set of S-matrices of the nonunitary minimal model M 2,9 perturbed by the operator Φ 1,4 , which is related to a RSOS reduction for the Φ 1.2 operator of the unitary model M 8,9 . The thermodynamical Bethe ansatz and the truncated conformal space approach are applied to these scattering theories in order to support their interpretation. (orig.)

  2. Personalized State-space Modeling of Glucose Dynamics for Type 1 Diabetes Using Continuously Monitored Glucose, Insulin Dose, and Meal Intake: An Extended Kalman Filter Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qian; Molenaar, Peter; Harsh, Saurabh; Freeman, Kenneth; Xie, Jinyu; Gold, Carol; Rovine, Mike; Ulbrecht, Jan

    2014-01-01

    An essential component of any artificial pancreas is on the prediction of blood glucose levels as a function of exogenous and endogenous perturbations such as insulin dose, meal intake, and physical activity and emotional tone under natural living conditions. In this article, we present a new data-driven state-space dynamic model with time-varying coefficients that are used to explicitly quantify the time-varying patient-specific effects of insulin dose and meal intake on blood glucose fluctu...

  3. Modelling the growth and ethanol production of Brettanomyces bruxellensis at different glucose concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Uscanga, M G; Garcia-Alvarado, Y; Gomez-Rodriguez, J; Phister, T; Delia, M L; Strehaiano, P

    2011-08-01

    To study the effect of glucose concentrations on the growth by Brettanomyces bruxellensis yeast strain in batch experiments and develop a mathematical model for kinetic behaviour analysis of yeast growing in batch culture. A Matlab algorithm was developed for the estimation of model parameters. Glucose fermentation by B. bruxellensis was studied by varying its concentration (5, 9.3, 13.8, 16.5, 17.6 and 21.4%). The increase in substrate concentration up to a certain limit was accompanied by an increase in ethanol and biomass production; at a substrate concentration of 50-138 g l(-1), the ethanol and biomass production were 24, 59 and 6.3, 11.4 g l(-1), respectively. However, an increase in glucose concentration to 165 g l(-1) led to a drastic decrease in product formation and substrate utilization. The model successfully simulated the batch kinetic observed in all cases. The confidence intervals were also estimated at each phase at a 0.95 probability level in a t-Student distribution for f degrees of freedom. The maximum ethanol and biomass yields were obtained with an initial glucose concentration of 138 g l(-1). These experiments illustrate the importance of using a mathematical model applied to kinetic behaviour on glucose concentration by B. bruxellensis. © 2011 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. An approach to gauge hierarchy in the minimal SU(5) model of grand unification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghose, P.

    1982-08-01

    It is shown that if all mass generation through spontaneous symmetry breaking is predominantly caused by scalar loops in the minimal SU(5) model of grand unification, it is possible to have an arbitrarily large gauge hierarchy msub(x) >> msub(w) with all Higgs bosons superheavy. No fine tuning is necessary in every order. (author)

  5. Esscher transforms and the minimal entropy martingale measure for exponential Lévy models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubalek, Friedrich; Sgarra, C.

    In this paper we offer a systematic survey and comparison of the Esscher martingale transform for linear processes, the Esscher martingale transform for exponential processes, and the minimal entropy martingale measure for exponential lévy models and present some new results in order to give...

  6. Minimal representations of supersymmetry and 1D N-extended σ-models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toppan, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the minimal representations of the 1D N-Extended Supersymmetry algebra (the Z 2 -graded symmetry algebra of the Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics) linearly realized on a finite number of fields depending on a real parameter t, the time. Their knowledge allows to construct one-dimensional sigma-models with extended off-shell supersymmetries without using superfields (author)

  7. Intracerebroventricular Kainic Acid-Induced Damage Affects Blood Glucose Level in d-glucose-fed Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chea-Ha; Hong, Jae-Seung

    2015-03-01

    We have previously reported that the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of kainic acid (KA) results in significant neuronal damage on the hippocampal CA3 region. In this study, we examined possible changes in the blood glucose level after i.c.v. pretreatment with KA. The blood glucose level was elevated at 30 min, began to decrease at 60 min and returned to normal at 120 min after D-glucose-feeding. We found that the blood glucose level in the KA-pretreated group was higher than in the saline-pretreated group. The up-regulation of the blood glucose level in the KA-pretreated group was still present even after 1~4 weeks. The plasma corticosterone and insulin levels were slightly higher in the KA-treated group. Corticosterone levels decreased whereas insulin levels were elevated when mice were fed with D-glucose. The i.c.v. pretreatment with KA for 24 hr caused a significant reversal of D-glucose-induced down-regulation of corticosterone level. However, the insulin level was enhanced in the KA-pretreated group compared to the vehicle-treated group when mice were fed with D-glucose. These results suggest that KA-induced alterations of the blood glucose level are related to cell death in the CA3 region whereas the up-regulation of blood glucose level in the KA-pretreated group appears to be due to a reversal of D-glucose feeding-induced down-regulation of corticosterone level.

  8. A kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, S.I.F.S.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction is proposed based on an approach called multiresponse kinetic modelling. Special attention was paid to reactants, intermediates and end products: -fructose, N-(1-deoxy--fructos-1-yl)-glycine (DFG), 1-deoxy-2,3-hexodiulose and

  9. Glucose deficit triggers tau pathology and synaptic dysfunction in a tauopathy mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretti, E; Li, J-G; Di Meco, A; Praticò, D

    2017-01-31

    Clinical investigations have highlighted a biological link between reduced brain glucose metabolism and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies showed that glucose deprivation may influence amyloid beta formation in vivo but no data are available on the effect that this condition might have on tau protein metabolism. In the current paper, we investigated the effect of glucose deficit on tau phosphorylation, memory and learning, and synaptic function in a transgenic mouse model of tauopathy, the h-tau mice. Compared with controls, h-tau mice with brain glucose deficit showed significant memory impairments, reduction of synaptic long-term potentiation, increased tau phosphorylation, which was mediated by the activation of P38 MAPK Kinase pathway. We believe our studies demonstrate for the first time that reduced glucose availability in the central nervous system directly triggers behavioral deficits by promoting the development of tau neuropathology and synaptic dysfunction. Since restoring brain glucose levels and metabolism could afford the opportunity to positively influence the entire AD phenotype, this approach should be considered as a novel and viable therapy for preventing and/or halting the disease progression.

  10. Effects of glucose on the formation of PhIP in a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skog, K; Jägerstad, M

    1991-12-01

    The effect of glucose on the formation of the food mutagen PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine) was studied in a model system. When a mixture of creatine (0.9 mmol), phenylalanine (0.9 mmol) and glucose (0.45 mmol) was heated in diethylene glycol and water (3 ml, 5:1) for 10 min at 180 or 225 degrees C several mutagens were produced. Identification by HPLC, UV absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry revealed the presence of PhIP as well as 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline and minor amounts of 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline. Heating the system without glucose produced PhIP as a single mutagen, but in considerably lower amount. An inhibiting effect of glucose in high concentrations was demonstrated. When glucose was added in more than or equimolar amounts of the other two reactants, the formation of mutagens was markedly reduced. Tyrosine heated under the same conditions, with creatine and glucose, showed mutagenic activity. However, no PhIP nor any other known food mutagen was identified from the tyrosine mixture.

  11. The Endocannabinoid System Affects Myocardial Glucose Metabolism in the DOCA-Salt Model of Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Polak

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Recent interest in the use of cannabinoids as therapeutic agents has revealed the involvement of the endogenous cannabinoid system (ECS in the regulation of the cardiovascular system in hypertension. Abnormalities in glucose metabolism and insulin action are commonly detected in hypertensive animals. Thus, potential antihypertensive drugs should be investigated with respect to modulation of glucose homeostasis. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the ECS activation after chronic fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor (URB597 administration on plasma glucose and insulin concentrations as well as parameters of myocardial glucose metabolism in the deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA-salt hypertensive rats, an animal model of secondary hypertension. Methods: Hypertension was induced by DOCA (25mg/kg injections and addition of 1% NaCl in the drinking water for six weeks. Chronic activation of the ECS was performed by URB597 (1mg/kg injections for two weeks. We examined fasting plasma levels of insulin (ELISA, glucose and intramyocardial glycogen (colorimetric method. Expressions of glucose transporters (GLUT1, 4 and selected proteins engaged in GLUT translocation as well as glucose metabolism were determined using Western blotting. Results: Hypertension induced hypoinsulinemia with concomitant lack of significant changes in glycemia, reduced intramyocardial glycogen content and increased pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH expression in the cardiac muscle. Importantly, chronic URB597 administration in the hypertensive rats increased insulin concentration, elevated plasmalemmal GLUT1 and GLUT4 expression and concomitantly improved myocardial glycogen storage. Conclusion: Chronic administration of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH inhibitor has potential protective properties on myocardial glucose metabolism in hypertension.

  12. CP asymmetry in tau slepton decay in the minimal supersymmetric standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Weimin; Du Dongsheng

    2002-01-01

    We investigate CP violation asymmetry in the decay of a tau slepton into a tau neutrino and a chargino in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. The new source of CP violation is the complex mixing in the tau slepton sector. The rate asymmetry between the decays of the tau slepton and its CP conjugate process can be of the order of 10 -3 in some region of the parameter space of the minimal supergravity scenario, which will possibly be detectable in near-future collider experiments

  13. A minimal spatial cell lineage model of epithelium: tissue stratification and multi-stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Wei-Ting; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2018-05-01

    A minimal model which includes spatial and cell lineage dynamics for stratified epithelia is presented. The dependence of tissue steady state on cell differentiation models, cell proliferation rate, cell differentiation rate, and other parameters are studied numerically and analytically. Our minimal model shows some important features. First, we find that morphogen or mechanical stress mediated interaction is necessary to maintain a healthy stratified epithelium. Furthermore, comparing with tissues in which cell differentiation can take place only during cell division, tissues in which cell division and cell differentiation are decoupled can achieve relatively higher degree of stratification. Finally, our model also shows that in the presence of short-range interactions, it is possible for a tissue to have multiple steady states. The relation between our results and tissue morphogenesis or lesion is discussed.

  14. A Minimal Supersymmetric Model of Particle Physics and the Early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Buchmüller, W; Kamada, K; Schmitz, K

    2014-01-01

    We consider a minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model, with right-handed neutrinos and local $B$$-$$L$, the difference between baryon and lepton number, a symmetry which is spontaneously broken at the scale of grand unification. To a large extent, the parameters of the model are determined by gauge and Yukawa couplings of quarks and leptons. We show that this minimal model can successfully account for the earliest phases of the cosmological evolution: Inflation is driven by the energy density of a false vacuum of unbroken $B$$-$$L$ symmetry, which ends in tachyonic preheating, i.e.\\ the decay of the false vacuum, followed by a matter dominated phase with heavy $B$$-$$L$ Higgs bosons. Nonthermal and thermal processes produce an abundance of heavy neutrinos whose decays generate primordial entropy, baryon asymmetry via leptogenesis and dark matter consisting of gravitinos or nonthermal WIMPs. The model predicts relations between neutrino and superparticle masses and a characteristic spectrum of g...

  15. Analytical model for real time, noninvasive estimation of blood glucose level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhyapak, Anoop; Sidley, Matthew; Venkataraman, Jayanti

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents an analytical model to estimate blood glucose level from measurements made non-invasively and in real time by an antenna strapped to a patient's wrist. Some promising success has been shown by the RIT ETA Lab research group that an antenna's resonant frequency can track, in real time, changes in glucose concentration. Based on an in-vitro study of blood samples of diabetic patients, the paper presents a modified Cole-Cole model that incorporates a factor to represent the change in glucose level. A calibration technique using the input impedance technique is discussed and the results show a good estimation as compared to the glucose meter readings. An alternate calibration methodology has been developed that is based on the shift in the antenna resonant frequency using an equivalent circuit model containing a shunt capacitor to represent the shift in resonant frequency with changing glucose levels. Work under progress is the optimization of the technique with a larger sample of patients.

  16. BRST cohomology ring in 2D gravity coupled to minimal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, H.; Sarmadi, M.H.

    1992-08-01

    The ring structure of Lian-Zuckerman states for (q,p) minimal models coupled to gravity is shown to be R=R 0 xC[w,w -1 ] where R 0 is the ring of ghost number zero operators generated by two elements and w is an operator of ghost number -1. Some examples are discussed in detail. For these models the currents are also discussed and their algebra is shown to contain the Virasoro algebra. (author). 21 refs

  17. Matching allele dynamics and coevolution in a minimal predator-prey replicator model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardanyes, Josep; Sole, Ricard V.

    2008-01-01

    A minimal Lotka-Volterra type predator-prey model describing coevolutionary traits among entities with a strength of interaction influenced by a pair of haploid diallelic loci is studied with a deterministic time continuous model. We show a Hopf bifurcation governing the transition from evolutionary stasis to periodic Red Queen dynamics. If predator genotypes differ in their predation efficiency the more efficient genotype asymptotically achieves lower stationary concentrations

  18. Reactor design for minimizing product inhibition during enzymatic lignocellulose hydrolysis: I. Significance and mechanism of cellobiose and glucose inhibition on cellulolytic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andric, Pavle; Meyer, Anne S.; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Achievement of efficient enzymatic degradation of cellulose to glucose is one of the main prerequisites and one of the main challenges in the biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to liquid fuels and other valuable products. The specific inhibitory interferences by cellobiose and glucose...... on enzyme-catalyzed cellulose hydrolysis reactions impose significant limitations on the efficiency of lignocellulose conversion especially at high-biomass dry matter conditions. To provide the base for selecting the optimal reactor conditions, this paper reviews the reaction kinetics, mechanisms......, and significance of this product inhibition, notably the cellobiose and glucose inhibition, on enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis. Particular emphasis is put on the distinct complexity of cellulose as a substrate, the multi-enzymatic nature of the cellulolytic degradation, and the particular features of cellulase...

  19. Personalized State-space Modeling of Glucose Dynamics for Type 1 Diabetes Using Continuously Monitored Glucose, Insulin Dose, and Meal Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Peter; Harsh, Saurabh; Freeman, Kenneth; Xie, Jinyu; Gold, Carol; Rovine, Mike; Ulbrecht, Jan

    2014-01-01

    An essential component of any artificial pancreas is on the prediction of blood glucose levels as a function of exogenous and endogenous perturbations such as insulin dose, meal intake, and physical activity and emotional tone under natural living conditions. In this article, we present a new data-driven state-space dynamic model with time-varying coefficients that are used to explicitly quantify the time-varying patient-specific effects of insulin dose and meal intake on blood glucose fluctuations. Using the 3-variate time series of glucose level, insulin dose, and meal intake of an individual type 1 diabetic subject, we apply an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to estimate time-varying coefficients of the patient-specific state-space model. We evaluate our empirical modeling using (1) the FDA-approved UVa/Padova simulator with 30 virtual patients and (2) clinical data of 5 type 1 diabetic patients under natural living conditions. Compared to a forgetting-factor-based recursive ARX model of the same order, the EKF model predictions have higher fit, and significantly better temporal gain and J index and thus are superior in early detection of upward and downward trends in glucose. The EKF based state-space model developed in this article is particularly suitable for model-based state-feedback control designs since the Kalman filter estimates the state variable of the glucose dynamics based on the measured glucose time series. In addition, since the model parameters are estimated in real time, this model is also suitable for adaptive control. PMID:24876585

  20. Personalized State-space Modeling of Glucose Dynamics for Type 1 Diabetes Using Continuously Monitored Glucose, Insulin Dose, and Meal Intake: An Extended Kalman Filter Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Molenaar, Peter; Harsh, Saurabh; Freeman, Kenneth; Xie, Jinyu; Gold, Carol; Rovine, Mike; Ulbrecht, Jan

    2014-03-01

    An essential component of any artificial pancreas is on the prediction of blood glucose levels as a function of exogenous and endogenous perturbations such as insulin dose, meal intake, and physical activity and emotional tone under natural living conditions. In this article, we present a new data-driven state-space dynamic model with time-varying coefficients that are used to explicitly quantify the time-varying patient-specific effects of insulin dose and meal intake on blood glucose fluctuations. Using the 3-variate time series of glucose level, insulin dose, and meal intake of an individual type 1 diabetic subject, we apply an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to estimate time-varying coefficients of the patient-specific state-space model. We evaluate our empirical modeling using (1) the FDA-approved UVa/Padova simulator with 30 virtual patients and (2) clinical data of 5 type 1 diabetic patients under natural living conditions. Compared to a forgetting-factor-based recursive ARX model of the same order, the EKF model predictions have higher fit, and significantly better temporal gain and J index and thus are superior in early detection of upward and downward trends in glucose. The EKF based state-space model developed in this article is particularly suitable for model-based state-feedback control designs since the Kalman filter estimates the state variable of the glucose dynamics based on the measured glucose time series. In addition, since the model parameters are estimated in real time, this model is also suitable for adaptive control. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  1. Model-Based Quantification of the Systemic Interplay between Glucose and Fatty Acids in the Postprandial State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sips, Fianne L P; Nyman, Elin; Adiels, Martin; Hilbers, Peter A J; Strålfors, Peter; van Riel, Natal A W; Cedersund, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    In metabolic diseases such as Type 2 Diabetes and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, the systemic regulation of postprandial metabolite concentrations is disturbed. To understand this dysregulation, a quantitative and temporal understanding of systemic postprandial metabolite handling is needed. Of particular interest is the intertwined regulation of glucose and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), due to the association between disturbed NEFA metabolism and insulin resistance. However, postprandial glucose metabolism is characterized by a dynamic interplay of simultaneously responding regulatory mechanisms, which have proven difficult to measure directly. Therefore, we propose a mathematical modelling approach to untangle the systemic interplay between glucose and NEFA in the postprandial period. The developed model integrates data of both the perturbation of glucose metabolism by NEFA as measured under clamp conditions, and postprandial time-series of glucose, insulin, and NEFA. The model can describe independent data not used for fitting, and perturbations of NEFA metabolism result in an increased insulin, but not glucose, response, demonstrating that glucose homeostasis is maintained. Finally, the model is used to show that NEFA may mediate up to 30-45% of the postprandial increase in insulin-dependent glucose uptake at two hours after a glucose meal. In conclusion, the presented model can quantify the systemic interactions of glucose and NEFA in the postprandial state, and may therefore provide a new method to evaluate the disturbance of this interplay in metabolic disease.

  2. Model-Based Quantification of the Systemic Interplay between Glucose and Fatty Acids in the Postprandial State.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fianne L P Sips

    Full Text Available In metabolic diseases such as Type 2 Diabetes and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, the systemic regulation of postprandial metabolite concentrations is disturbed. To understand this dysregulation, a quantitative and temporal understanding of systemic postprandial metabolite handling is needed. Of particular interest is the intertwined regulation of glucose and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA, due to the association between disturbed NEFA metabolism and insulin resistance. However, postprandial glucose metabolism is characterized by a dynamic interplay of simultaneously responding regulatory mechanisms, which have proven difficult to measure directly. Therefore, we propose a mathematical modelling approach to untangle the systemic interplay between glucose and NEFA in the postprandial period. The developed model integrates data of both the perturbation of glucose metabolism by NEFA as measured under clamp conditions, and postprandial time-series of glucose, insulin, and NEFA. The model can describe independent data not used for fitting, and perturbations of NEFA metabolism result in an increased insulin, but not glucose, response, demonstrating that glucose homeostasis is maintained. Finally, the model is used to show that NEFA may mediate up to 30-45% of the postprandial increase in insulin-dependent glucose uptake at two hours after a glucose meal. In conclusion, the presented model can quantify the systemic interactions of glucose and NEFA in the postprandial state, and may therefore provide a new method to evaluate the disturbance of this interplay in metabolic disease.

  3. On exotic supersymmetries of the φ1,3 deformation of minimal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadiri, A.; Saidi, E.H.; Zerouaoui, S.J.; Sedra, M.B.

    1994-07-01

    Using algebraic and field theoretical methods, we study the fractional spin symmetries of the φ 1,3 deformation of minimal models. The particular example of the D=2 three state tricritical Potts model is examined in detail. Various models based on subalgebras and appropriate discrete automorphism groups of the two dimensional fractional spin algebra are obtained. General features such as superspace and superfield representations, the U q (sl 2 ) symmetry, the spontaneous exotic supersymmetry breaking, relations with the N=2 Landau Ginzburg models as well as other things are discussed. (author). 24 refs

  4. Structural differences of matrix metalloproteinases. Homology modeling and energy minimization of enzyme-substrate complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terp, G E; Christensen, I T; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2000-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases are extracellular enzymes taking part in the remodeling of extracellular matrix. The structures of the catalytic domain of MMP1, MMP3, MMP7 and MMP8 are known, but structures of enzymes belonging to this family still remain to be determined. A general approach...... to the homology modeling of matrix metalloproteinases, exemplified by the modeling of MMP2, MMP9, MMP12 and MMP14 is described. The models were refined using an energy minimization procedure developed for matrix metalloproteinases. This procedure includes incorporation of parameters for zinc and calcium ions...... in the AMBER 4.1 force field, applying a non-bonded approach and a full ion charge representation. Energy minimization of the apoenzymes yielded structures with distorted active sites, while reliable three-dimensional structures of the enzymes containing a substrate in active site were obtained. The structural...

  5. Multi objective optimization model for minimizing production cost and environmental impact in CNC turning process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widhiarso, Wahyu; Rosyidi, Cucuk Nur

    2018-02-01

    Minimizing production cost in a manufacturing company will increase the profit of the company. The cutting parameters will affect total processing time which then will affect the production cost of machining process. Besides affecting the production cost and processing time, the cutting parameters will also affect the environment. An optimization model is needed to determine the optimum cutting parameters. In this paper, we develop an optimization model to minimize the production cost and the environmental impact in CNC turning process. The model is used a multi objective optimization. Cutting speed and feed rate are served as the decision variables. Constraints considered are cutting speed, feed rate, cutting force, output power, and surface roughness. The environmental impact is converted from the environmental burden by using eco-indicator 99. Numerical example is given to show the implementation of the model and solved using OptQuest of Oracle Crystal Ball software. The results of optimization indicate that the model can be used to optimize the cutting parameters to minimize the production cost and the environmental impact.

  6. Experimental type II diabetes and related models of impaired glucose metabolism differentially regulate glucose transporters at the proximal tubule brush border membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichger, Havovi; Cleasby, Mark E; Srai, Surjit K; Unwin, Robert J; Debnam, Edward S; Marks, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? Although SGLT2 inhibitors represent a promising treatment for patients suffering from diabetic nephropathy, the influence of metabolic disruption on the expression and function of glucose transporters is largely unknown. What is the main finding and its importance? In vivo models of metabolic disruption (Goto-Kakizaki type II diabetic rat and junk-food diet) demonstrate increased expression of SGLT1, SGLT2 and GLUT2 in the proximal tubule brush border. In the type II diabetic model, this is accompanied by increased SGLT- and GLUT-mediated glucose uptake. A fasted model of metabolic disruption (high-fat diet) demonstrated increased GLUT2 expression only. The differential alterations of glucose transporters in response to varying metabolic stress offer insight into the therapeutic value of inhibitors. SGLT2 inhibitors are now in clinical use to reduce hyperglycaemia in type II diabetes. However, renal glucose reabsorption across the brush border membrane (BBM) is not completely understood in diabetes. Increased consumption of a Western diet is strongly linked to type II diabetes. This study aimed to investigate the adaptations that occur in renal glucose transporters in response to experimental models of diet-induced insulin resistance. The study used Goto-Kakizaki type II diabetic rats and normal rats rendered insulin resistant using junk-food or high-fat diets. Levels of protein kinase C-βI (PKC-βI), GLUT2, SGLT1 and SGLT2 were determined by Western blotting of purified renal BBM. GLUT- and SGLT-mediated d-[(3) H]glucose uptake by BBM vesicles was measured in the presence and absence of the SGLT inhibitor phlorizin. GLUT- and SGLT-mediated glucose transport was elevated in type II diabetic rats, accompanied by increased expression of GLUT2, its upstream regulator PKC-βI and SGLT1 protein. Junk-food and high-fat diet feeding also caused higher membrane expression of GLUT2 and its upstream regulator PKC

  7. Reconstruction and logical modeling of glucose repression signaling pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Ana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the presence of high levels of glucose leads to an array of down-regulatory effects known as glucose repression. This process is complex due to the presence of feedback loops and crosstalk between different pathways, complicating the use of intuitive approaches to analyze the system. Results We established a logical model of yeast glucose repression, formalized as a hypergraph. The model was constructed based on verified regulatory interactions and it includes 50 gene transcripts, 22 proteins, 5 metabolites and 118 hyperedges. We computed the logical steady states of all nodes in the network in order to simulate wildtype and deletion mutant responses to different sugar availabilities. Evaluation of the model predictive power was achieved by comparing changes in the logical state of gene nodes with transcriptome data. Overall, we observed 71% true predictions, and analyzed sources of errors and discrepancies for the remaining. Conclusion Though the binary nature of logical (Boolean models entails inherent limitations, our model constitutes a primary tool for storing regulatory knowledge, searching for incoherencies in hypotheses and evaluating the effect of deleting regulatory elements involved in glucose repression.

  8. Enhanced neuronal glucose transporter expression reveals metabolic choice in a HD Drosophila model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Marie Thérèse; Alegría, Karin; Garrido-Gerter, Pamela; Barros, Luis Felipe; Liévens, Jean-Charles

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by toxic insertions of polyglutamine residues in the Huntingtin protein and characterized by progressive deterioration of cognitive and motor functions. Altered brain glucose metabolism has long been suggested and a possible link has been proposed in HD. However, the precise function of glucose transporters was not yet determined. Here, we report the effects of the specifically-neuronal human glucose transporter expression in neurons of a Drosophila model carrying the exon 1 of the human huntingtin gene with 93 glutamine repeats (HQ93). We demonstrated that overexpression of the human glucose transporter in neurons ameliorated significantly the status of HD flies by increasing their lifespan, reducing their locomotor deficits and rescuing eye neurodegeneration. Then, we investigated whether increasing the major pathways of glucose catabolism, glycolysis and pentose-phosphate pathway (PPP) impacts HD. To mimic increased glycolytic flux, we overexpressed phosphofructokinase (PFK) which catalyzes an irreversible step in glycolysis. Overexpression of PFK did not affect HQ93 fly survival, but protected from photoreceptor loss. Overexpression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the key enzyme of the PPP, extended significantly the lifespan of HD flies and rescued eye neurodegeneration. Since G6PD is able to synthesize NADPH involved in cell survival by maintenance of the redox state, we showed that tolerance to experimental oxidative stress was enhanced in flies co-expressing HQ93 and G6PD. Additionally overexpressions of hGluT3, G6PD or PFK were able to circumvent mitochondrial deficits induced by specific silencing of genes necessary for mitochondrial homeostasis. Our study confirms the involvement of bioenergetic deficits in HD course; they can be rescued by specific expression of a glucose transporter in neurons. Finally, the PPP and, to a lesser extent, the glycolysis seem to mediate the hGluT3

  9. Enhanced neuronal glucose transporter expression reveals metabolic choice in a HD Drosophila model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Thérèse Besson

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by toxic insertions of polyglutamine residues in the Huntingtin protein and characterized by progressive deterioration of cognitive and motor functions. Altered brain glucose metabolism has long been suggested and a possible link has been proposed in HD. However, the precise function of glucose transporters was not yet determined. Here, we report the effects of the specifically-neuronal human glucose transporter expression in neurons of a Drosophila model carrying the exon 1 of the human huntingtin gene with 93 glutamine repeats (HQ93. We demonstrated that overexpression of the human glucose transporter in neurons ameliorated significantly the status of HD flies by increasing their lifespan, reducing their locomotor deficits and rescuing eye neurodegeneration. Then, we investigated whether increasing the major pathways of glucose catabolism, glycolysis and pentose-phosphate pathway (PPP impacts HD. To mimic increased glycolytic flux, we overexpressed phosphofructokinase (PFK which catalyzes an irreversible step in glycolysis. Overexpression of PFK did not affect HQ93 fly survival, but protected from photoreceptor loss. Overexpression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, the key enzyme of the PPP, extended significantly the lifespan of HD flies and rescued eye neurodegeneration. Since G6PD is able to synthesize NADPH involved in cell survival by maintenance of the redox state, we showed that tolerance to experimental oxidative stress was enhanced in flies co-expressing HQ93 and G6PD. Additionally overexpressions of hGluT3, G6PD or PFK were able to circumvent mitochondrial deficits induced by specific silencing of genes necessary for mitochondrial homeostasis. Our study confirms the involvement of bioenergetic deficits in HD course; they can be rescued by specific expression of a glucose transporter in neurons. Finally, the PPP and, to a lesser extent, the glycolysis seem to

  10. Model of the Glucose-Insulin-Glucagon Dynamics after Subcutaneous Administration of a Glucagon Rescue Bolus in Healthy Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg; Haidar, Ahmad

    In healthy individuals, insulin and glucagon work in a complex fashion to maintain blood glucose levels within a narrow range. This regulation is distorted in patients with diabetes. The hepatic glucose response due to an elevated glucagon level depends on the current insulin concentration and thus...... endogenous glucose production (EGP) can not be modelled without knowledge of the concentration of both hormones in plasma. Furthermore, literature suggests an upper limit to EGP irrespective of glucagon levels. We build a simulation model of the glucose-insulin-glucagon dynamics in man including saturation...... effect of EGP. Ten healthy subjects received a 1 mg subcutaneous (SC) glucagon bolus (GlucaGen®). Plasma samples were collected until 300 minutes post dose and analyzed for glucagon, insulin, and glucose concentrations. All observations were used to fit a physiological model of the glucose...

  11. Mixed-order phase transition in a minimal, diffusion-based spin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronczak, Agata; Fronczak, Piotr

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we exactly solve, within the grand canonical ensemble, a minimal spin model with the hybrid phase transition. We call the model diffusion based because its Hamiltonian can be recovered from a simple dynamic procedure, which can be seen as an equilibrium statistical mechanics representation of a biased random walk. We outline the derivation of the phase diagram of the model, in which the triple point has the hallmarks of the hybrid transition: discontinuity in the average magnetization and algebraically diverging susceptibilities. At this point, two second-order transition curves meet in equilibrium with the first-order curve, resulting in a prototypical mixed-order behavior.

  12. Parallel-Batch Scheduling with Two Models of Deterioration to Minimize the Makespan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuixia Miao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the bounded parallel-batch scheduling with two models of deterioration, in which the processing time of the first model is pj=aj+αt and of the second model is pj=a+αjt. The objective is to minimize the makespan. We present O(n log n time algorithms for the single-machine problems, respectively. And we propose fully polynomial time approximation schemes to solve the identical-parallel-machine problem and uniform-parallel-machine problem, respectively.

  13. Neutrino CP violation and sign of baryon asymmetry in the minimal seesaw model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yusuke; Takagi, Kenta; Tanimoto, Morimitsu

    2018-03-01

    We discuss the correlation between the CP violating Dirac phase of the lepton mixing matrix and the cosmological baryon asymmetry based on the leptogenesis in the minimal seesaw model with two right-handed Majorana neutrinos and the trimaximal mixing for neutrino flavors. The sign of the CP violating Dirac phase at low energy is fixed by the observed cosmological baryon asymmetry since there is only one phase parameter in the model. According to the recent T2K and NOνA data of the CP violation, the Dirac neutrino mass matrix of our model is fixed only for the normal hierarchy of neutrino masses.

  14. Minimal Z′ models and the 125 GeV Higgs boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basso, L.

    2013-01-01

    The 1-loop renormalization group equations for the minimal Z ′ models encompassing a type-I seesaw mechanism are studied in the light of the 125 GeV Higgs boson observation. This model is taken as a benchmark for the general case of singlet extensions of the standard model. The most important result is that negative scalar mixing angles are favored with respect to positive values. Further, a minimum value for the latter exists, as well as a maximum value for the masses of the heavy neutrinos, depending on the vacuum expectation value of the singlet scalar

  15. Phase-locking regions in a forced model of slow insulin and glucose oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturis, Jeppe; Knudsen, Carsten; O'Meara, Niall M.

    1995-01-01

    We present a detailed numerical investigation of the phase-locking regions in a forced model of slow oscillations in human insulin secretion and blood glucose concentration. The bifurcation structures of period 2pi and 4pi tongues are mapped out and found to be qualitatively identical to those...

  16. Phase-locking regions in a forced model of slow insulin and glucose oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturis, J.; Knudsen, C.; O'Meara, N.M.

    1996-01-01

    We present a detailed numerical investigation of the phase-locking regions in a forced model of slow oscillations in human insulin secretion and blood glucose concentration. The bifurcation structures of period 2pi and 4pi tongues are mapped out and found to be qualitatively identical to those...

  17. Consumer preferences for alternative fuel vehicles: Comparing a utility maximization and a regret minimization model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chorus, Caspar G.; Koetse, Mark J.; Hoen, Anco

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a utility-based and a regret-based model of consumer preferences for alternative fuel vehicles, based on a large-scale stated choice-experiment held among company car leasers in The Netherlands. Estimation and application of random utility maximization and random regret minimization discrete choice models shows that while the two models achieve almost identical fit with the data and differ only marginally in terms of predictive ability, they generate rather different choice probability-simulations and policy implications. The most eye-catching difference between the two models is that the random regret minimization model accommodates a compromise-effect, as it assigns relatively high choice probabilities to alternative fuel vehicles that perform reasonably well on each dimension instead of having a strong performance on some dimensions and a poor performance on others. - Highlights: • Utility- and regret-based models of preferences for alternative fuel vehicles. • Estimation based on stated choice-experiment among Dutch company car leasers. • Models generate rather different choice probabilities and policy implications. • Regret-based model accommodates a compromise-effect

  18. Glucose concentration in capillary blood of dairy cows obtained by a minimally invasive lancet technique and determined with three different hand-held devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, B; Drillich, M; Klein-Jöbstl, D; Kanz, P; Borchardt, S; Meyer, L; Schwendenwein, I; Iwersen, M

    2016-02-24

    Dairy cows have a massive demand for glucose at the onset of lactation. A poor adaption to this period leads to an excessive negative energy balance with an increased risk for ketosis and impaired animal health and production. Besides the measurement of ketones, analysing the glucose concentration in blood is reported as helpful instrument for diagnosis and differentiation of ketosis. Monitoring metabolic parameters requires multiple blood sampling. In other species, new blood sampling techniques have been introduced in which small amounts of blood are rapidly analysed using electronic hand-held devices. The objective of this study was to evaluate the suitability of capillary blood for blood glucose measurement in dairy cows using the hand-held devices FreeStyle Precision (FSP, Abbott), GlucoMen LX Plus (GLX, A. Menarini) and the WellionVet GLUCO CALEA, (WGC, MED TRUST). In total, 240 capillary blood samples were obtained from dry and fresh lactating Holstein-Friesian cows. Blood was collected from the skin of the exterior vulva by using a lancet. For method comparison, additional blood samples were taken from a coccygeal vessel and analyzed in a laboratory. Glucose concentrations measured by a standard laboratory method were defined as the criterion standard. The Pearson correlation coefficients between the glucose concentrations analyzed in capillary blood with the devices and the reference were 73% for the FSP, 81% for the GLX and 41% for the WGC. Bland-Altman plots showed biases of -18.8 mg/dL for the FSP, -11.2 mg/dL for the GLX and +20.82 mg/dL for the WGC. The optimized threshold determined by a Receiver Operating Characteristics analysis to detect hyperglycemia using the FSP was 43 mg/dL with a sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of 76 and 80%. Using the GLX and WGC optimized thresholds were 49 mg/dL (Se = 92%, Sp = 85%) and 95 mg/dL (Se = 39%, Sp = 92%). The results of this study demonstrate good performance characteristics for the GLX

  19. Mathematical model of the glucose-insulin regulatory system: From the bursting electrical activity in pancreatic β-cells to the glucose dynamics in the whole body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyungreem; Kang, Hyuk; Choi, M. Y.; Kim, Jinwoong; Lee, Myung-Shik

    2012-10-01

    A theoretical approach to the glucose-insulin regulatory system is presented. By means of integrated mathematical modeling and extensive numerical simulations, we probe the cell-level dynamics of the membrane potential, intracellular Ca2+ concentration, and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells, together with the whole-body level glucose-insulin dynamics in the liver, brain, muscle, and adipose tissues. In particular, the three oscillatory modes of insulin secretion are reproduced successfully. Such comprehensive mathematical modeling may provide a theoretical basis for the simultaneous assessment of the β-cell function and insulin resistance in clinical examination.

  20. Investigation of a New Spectrophotometric Method for the analysis of carbohydrates using glucose as model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Z.; Ali, A.; Shah, N.U.; Khan, K.M.

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrates are biomolecule of significant importance. Its analysis is of prime importance in the clinical investigations, delivery of medicines and quality control operations of food and fuel products. Based on its importance a novel spectrophotometric method was investigated for the trace analysis of carbohydrates using glucose as model carbohydrate. This method is based on glucosazation followed by oxidation of the glucosazone with acidified iron (III) chloride. Oxidation of the glucsazone is necessary for enhancing the color intensity and optimum conditions were investigated for the process. All the absorbance measurements were carried out using 390 nm as gamma max. The ratio of the reactants was 1: 1.5: 0.1 mole for the glucose, phenyl hydrazine and iron (III) chloride. This method was used for the analysis of carbohydrates in real samples from plants, industrial products, blood and urine using glucose as reference. (author)

  1. Precision electroweak tests of the minimal and flipped SU(5) supergravity models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, J.L.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Park, G.T.; Pois, H.; Yuan, K. (Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Texas A M University, College Station, Texas 77843-4242 (United States) Astroparticle Physics Group, Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), The Woodlands, Texas 77381 (United States))

    1993-10-01

    We explore the one-loop electroweak radiative corrections in the minimal SU(5) and the no-scale flipped SU(5) supergravity models via explicit calculation of vacuum polarization contributions to the [epsilon][sub 1,2,3] parameters. Experimentally, [epsilon][sub 1,2,3] are obtained from a global fit to the CERN LEP observables, and [ital M][sub [ital W

  2. A minimally-resolved immersed boundary model for reaction-diffusion problems

    OpenAIRE

    Pal Singh Bhalla, A; Griffith, BE; Patankar, NA; Donev, A

    2013-01-01

    We develop an immersed boundary approach to modeling reaction-diffusion processes in dispersions of reactive spherical particles, from the diffusion-limited to the reaction-limited setting. We represent each reactive particle with a minimally-resolved "blob" using many fewer degrees of freedom per particle than standard discretization approaches. More complicated or more highly resolved particle shapes can be built out of a collection of reactive blobs. We demonstrate numerically that the blo...

  3. Neurophysiological model of tinnitus: dependence of the minimal masking level on treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastreboff, P J; Hazell, J W; Graham, R L

    1994-11-01

    Validity of the neurophysiological model of tinnitus (Jastreboff, 1990), outlined in this paper, was tested on data from multicenter trial of tinnitus masking (Hazell et al., 1985). Minimal masking level, intensity match of tinnitus, and the threshold of hearing have been evaluated on a total of 382 patients before and after 6 months of treatment with maskers, hearing aids, or combination devices. The data has been divided into categories depending on treatment outcome and type of approach used. Results of analysis revealed that: i) the psychoacoustical description of tinnitus does not possess a predictive value for the outcome of the treatment; ii) minimal masking level changed significantly depending on the treatment outcome, decreasing on average by 5.3 dB in patients reporting improvement, and increasing by 4.9 dB in those whose tinnitus remained the same or worsened; iii) 73.9% of patients reporting improvement had their minimal masking level decreased as compared with 50.5% for patients not showing improvement, which is at the level of random change; iv) the type of device used has no significant impact on the treatment outcome and minimal masking level change; v) intensity match and threshold of hearing did not exhibit any significant changes which can be related to treatment outcome. These results are fully consistent with the neurophysiological interpretation of mechanisms involved in the phenomenon of tinnitus and its alleviation.

  4. On SW-minimal models and N=1 supersymmetric quantum Toda-field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallwitz, S.

    1994-04-01

    Integrable N=1 supersymmetric Toda-field theories are determined by a contragredient simple Super-Lie-Algebra (SSLS) with purely fermionic lowering and raising operators. For the SSLA's Osp(3/2) and D(2/1;α) we construct explicitly the higher spin conserved currents and obtain free field representations of the super W-algebras SW(3/2,2) and SW(3/2,3/2,2). In constructing the corresponding series of minimal models using covariant vertex operators, we find a necessary restriction on the Cartan matrix of the SSLA, also for the general case. Within this framework, this restriction claims that there be a minimum of one non-vanishing element on the diagonal of the Cartan matrix. This condition is without parallel in bosonic conformal field theory. As a consequence only two series of SSLA's yield minimal models, namely Osp(2n/2n-1) and Osp(2n/2n+1). Subsequently some general aspects of degenerate representations of SW-algebras, notably the fusion rules, are investigated. As an application we discuss minimal models of SW(3/2, 2), which were constructed with independent methods, in this framework. Covariant formulation is used throughout this paper. (orig.)

  5. A mathematical model for predicting glucose levels in critically-ill patients: the PIGnOLI model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongheng Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Glycemic control is of paramount importance in the intensive care unit. Presently, several BG control algorithms have been developed for clinical trials, but they are mostly based on experts’ opinion and consensus. There are no validated models predicting how glucose levels will change after initiating of insulin infusion in critically ill patients. The study aimed to develop an equation for initial insulin dose setting.Methods. A large critical care database was employed for the study. Linear regression model fitting was employed. Retested blood glucose was used as the independent variable. Insulin rate was forced into the model. Multivariable fractional polynomials and interaction terms were used to explore the complex relationships among covariates. The overall fit of the model was examined by using residuals and adjusted R-squared values. Regression diagnostics were used to explore the influence of outliers on the model.Main Results. A total of 6,487 ICU admissions requiring insulin pump therapy were identified. The dataset was randomly split into two subsets at 7 to 3 ratio. The initial model comprised fractional polynomials and interactions terms. However, this model was not stable by excluding several outliers. I fitted a simple linear model without interaction. The selected prediction model (Predicting Glucose Levels in ICU, PIGnOLI included variables of initial blood glucose, insulin rate, PO volume, total parental nutrition, body mass index (BMI, lactate, congestive heart failure, renal failure, liver disease, time interval of BS recheck, dextrose rate. Insulin rate was significantly associated with blood glucose reduction (coefficient: −0.52, 95% CI [−1.03, −0.01]. The parsimonious model was well validated with the validation subset, with an adjusted R-squared value of 0.8259.Conclusion. The study developed the PIGnOLI model for the initial insulin dose setting. Furthermore, experimental study is

  6. A Novel EPO Receptor Agonist Improves Glucose Tolerance via Glucose Uptake in Skeletal Muscle in a Mouse Model of Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Scully

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients treated with recombinant human Epo demonstrate an improvement in insulin sensitivity. We aimed to investigate whether CNTO 530, a novel Epo receptor agonist, could affect glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. A single administration of CNTO 530 significantly and dose-dependently reduced the area under the curve in a glucose tolerance test in diet-induced obese and diabetic mice after 14, 21, and 28 days. HOMA analysis suggested an improvement in insulin sensitivity, and this effect was confirmed by a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Uptake of 14C-2-deoxy-D-glucose indicated that animals dosed with CNTO 530 transported more glucose into skeletal muscle and heart relative to control animals. In conclusion, CNTO530 has a profound effect on glucose tolerance in insulin-resistant rodents likely because of improving peripheral insulin sensitivity. This effect was observed with epoetin-α and darbepoetin-α, suggesting this is a class effect, but the effect with these compounds relative to CNTO530 was decreased in duration and magnitude.

  7. Predictions for m{sub t} and M{sub W} in minimal supersymmetric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmueller, O. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). High Energy Physics Group; Cavanaugh, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Roeck, A. de [European Lab. for Particle Physics (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Wilrijk (Belgium); Ellis, J.R. [European Lab. for Particle Physics (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Flaecher, H. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Heinemeyer, S. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Isidori, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. for Advanced Study; Olive, K.A. [Minnesota Univ., Minnesota, MN (United States). William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute; Ronga, F.J. [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland). Institute for Particle Physics; Weiglein, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Using a frequentist analysis of experimental constraints within two versions of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model, we derive the predictions for the top quark mass, m{sub t}, and the W boson mass, m{sub W}. We find that the supersymmetric predictions for both m{sub t} and m{sub W}, obtained by incorporating all the relevant experimental information and state-of-the-art theoretical predictions, are highly compatible with the experimental values with small remaining uncertainties, yielding an improvement compared to the case of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  8. Phenomenology of minimal Z’ models: from the LHC to the GUT scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Accomando Elena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a class of minimal abelian extensions of the Standard Model with an extra neutral gauge boson Z′ at the TeV scale. In these scenarios an extended scalar sector and heavy right-handed neutrinos are naturally envisaged. We present some of their striking signatures at the Large Hadron Collider, the most interesting arising from a Z′ decaying to heavy neutrino pairs as well as a heavy scalar decaying to two Standard Model Higgses. Using renormalisation group methods, we characterise the high energy behaviours of these extensions and exploit the constraints imposed by the embedding into a wider GUT scenario.

  9. Minimal $R+R^2$ Supergravity Models of Inflation Coupled to Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, S

    2014-01-01

    The supersymmetric extension of "Starobinsky" $R+\\alpha R^2$ models of inflation is particularly simple in the "new minimal" formalism of supergravity, where the inflaton has no scalar superpartners. This paper is devoted to matter couplings in such supergravity models. We show how in the new minimal formalism matter coupling presents certain features absent in other formalisms. In particular, for the large class of matter couplings considered in this paper, matter must possess an R-symmetry, which is gauged by the vector field which becomes dynamical in the "new minimal" completion of the $R+\\alpha R^2$ theory. Thus, in the dual formulation of the theory, where the gauge vector is part of a massive vector multiplet, the inflaton is the superpartner of the massive vector of a nonlinearly realized R-symmetry. The F-term potential of this theory is of no-scale type, while the inflaton potential is given by the D-term of the gauged R-symmetry. The absolute minimum of the potential is always exactly supersymmetri...

  10. Model of the Glucose-Insulin-Glucagon Dynamics after Subcutaneous Administration of a Glucagon Rescue Bolus in Healthy Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg; Haidar, Ahmad; Bysted, Britta V.; Knudsen, Carsten B.; Madsen, Henrik; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, insulin and glucagon work in a complex fashion to maintain blood glucose levels within a narrow range. This regulation is distorted in patients with diabetes. The hepatic glucose response due to an elevated glucagon level depends on the current insulin concentration and thus endogenous glucose production (EGP) can not be modelled without knowledge of the concentration of both hormones in plasma. Furthermore, literature suggests an upper limit to EGP irrespective of glu...

  11. Interpretation of metabolic memory phenomenon using a physiological systems model: What drives oxidative stress following glucose normalization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronova, Veronika; Zhudenkov, Kirill; Helmlinger, Gabriel; Peskov, Kirill

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is generally associated with oxidative stress, which plays a key role in diabetes-related complications. A complex, quantitative relationship has been established between glucose levels and oxidative stress, both in vitro and in vivo. For example, oxidative stress is known to persist after glucose normalization, a phenomenon described as metabolic memory. Also, uncontrolled glucose levels appear to be more detrimental to patients with diabetes (non-constant glucose levels) vs. patients with high, constant glucose levels. The objective of the current study was to delineate the mechanisms underlying such behaviors, using a mechanistic physiological systems modeling approach that captures and integrates essential underlying pathophysiological processes. The proposed model was based on a system of ordinary differential equations. It describes the interplay between reactive oxygen species production potential (ROS), ROS-induced cell alterations, and subsequent adaptation mechanisms. Model parameters were calibrated using different sources of experimental information, including ROS production in cell cultures exposed to various concentration profiles of constant and oscillating glucose levels. The model adequately reproduced the ROS excess generation after glucose normalization. Such behavior appeared to be driven by positive feedback regulations between ROS and ROS-induced cell alterations. The further oxidative stress-related detrimental effect as induced by unstable glucose levels can be explained by inability of cells to adapt to dynamic environment. Cell adaptation to instable high glucose declines during glucose normalization phases, and further glucose increase promotes similar or higher oxidative stress. In contrast, gradual ROS production potential decrease, driven by adaptation, is observed in cells exposed to constant high glucose.

  12. Molecular Weight Dependent Glucose Lowering Effect of Low Molecular Weight Chitosan Oligosaccharide (GO2KA1 on Postprandial Blood Glucose Level in SD Rats Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Apostolidis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This research investigated the effect of enzymatically digested low molecular weight (MW chitosan oligosaccharide on type 2 diabetes prevention. Three different chitosan oligosaccharide samples with varying MW were evaluated in vitro for inhibition of rat small intestinal α-glucosidase and porcine pancreatic α-amylase (GO2KA1; 10,000 Da. The in vitro results showed that all tested samples had similar rat α-glucosidase inhibitory and porcine α-amylase inhibitory activity. Based on these observations, we decided to further investigate the effect of all three samples at a dose of 0.1 g/kg, on reducing postprandial blood glucose levels in Sprague-Dawley (SD rat model after sucrose loading test. In the animal trial, all tested samples had postprandial blood glucose reduction effect, when compared to control, however GO2KA1 supplementation had the strongest effect. The glucose peak (Cmax for GO2KA1 and control was 152 mg/dL and 193 mg/dL, respectively. The area under the blood glucose-time curve (AUC for GO2KA1 and control was 262 h mg/dL and 305 h mg/dL, respectively. Furthermore, the time of peak plasma concentration of blood glucose (Tmax for GO2KA1 was significantly delayed (0.9 h compared to control (0.5 h. These results suggest that GO2KA1 could have a beneficial effect for blood glucose management relevant to diabetes prevention in normal and pre-diabetic individuals. The suggested mechanism of action is via inhibition of the carbohydrate hydrolysis enzyme α-glucosidase and since GO2KA1 (MW < 1000 Da had higher in vivo effect, we hypothesize that it is more readily absorbed and might exert further biological effect once it is absorbed in the blood stream, relevant to blood glucose management.

  13. On the topology of the inflaton field in minimal supergravity models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrara, Sergio [Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN,CH 1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati,Via Enrico Fermi 40, I-00044, Frascati (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California,Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Fré, Pietro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Torino, INFN - Sezione di Torino,via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Sorin, Alexander S. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics,and Veksler and Baldin Laboratory of High Energy Physics,Joint Institute for Nuclear Research,141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-14

    We consider global issues in minimal supergravity models where a single field inflaton potential emerges. In a particular case we reproduce the Starobinsky model and its description dual to a certain formulation of R+R{sup 2} supergravity. For definiteness we confine our analysis to spaces at constant curvature, either vanishing or negative. Five distinct models arise, two flat models with respectively a quadratic and a quartic potential and three based on the ((SU(1,1))/(U(1))) space where its distinct isometries, elliptic, hyperbolic and parabolic are gauged. Fayet-Iliopoulos terms are introduced in a geometric way and they turn out to be a crucial ingredient in order to describe the de Sitter inflationary phase of the Starobinsky model.

  14. On the topology of the inflaton field in minimal supergravity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Sergio; Fré, Pietro; Sorin, Alexander S.

    2014-04-01

    We consider global issues in minimal supergravity models where a single field inflaton potential emerges. In a particular case we reproduce the Starobinsky model and its description dual to a certain formulation of R + R 2 supergravity. For definiteness we confine our analysis to spaces at constant curvature, either vanishing or negative. Five distinct models arise, two flat models with respectively a quadratic and a quartic potential and three based on the space where its distinct isometries, elliptic, hyperbolic and parabolic are gauged. Fayet-Iliopoulos terms are introduced in a geometric way and they turn out to be a crucial ingredient in order to describe the de Sitter inflationary phase of the Starobinsky model.

  15. On the Topology of the Inflaton Field in Minimal Supergravity Models

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Sergio; Sorin, Alexander S

    2014-01-01

    We consider global issues in minimal supergravity models where a single field inflaton potential emerges. In a particular case we reproduce the Starobinsky model and its description dual to a certain formulation of R+R^2 supergravity. For definiteness we confine our analysis to spaces at constant curvature, either vanishing or negative. Five distinct models arise, two flat models with respectively a quadratic and a quartic potential and three based on the SU(1,1)/U(1) space where its distinct isometries, elliptic, hyperbolic and parabolic are gauged. Fayet-Iliopoulos terms are introduced in a geometric way and they turn out to be a crucial ingredient in order to describe the de Sitter inflationary phase of the Starobinsky model.

  16. A minimal unified model of disease trajectories captures hallmarks of multiple sclerosis

    KAUST Repository

    Kannan, Venkateshan

    2017-03-29

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease targeting the central nervous system (CNS) causing demyelination and neurodegeneration leading to accumulation of neurological disability. Here we present a minimal, computational model involving the immune system and CNS that generates the principal subtypes of the disease observed in patients. The model captures several key features of MS, especially those that distinguish the chronic progressive phase from that of the relapse-remitting. In addition, a rare subtype of the disease, progressive relapsing MS naturally emerges from the model. The model posits the existence of two key thresholds, one in the immune system and the other in the CNS, that separate dynamically distinct behavior of the model. Exploring the two-dimensional space of these thresholds, we obtain multiple phases of disease evolution and these shows greater variation than the clinical classification of MS, thus capturing the heterogeneity that is manifested in patients.

  17. Minimal Camera Networks for 3D Image Based Modeling of Cultural Heritage Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsadik, Bashar; Gerke, Markus; Vosselman, George; Daham, Afrah; Jasim, Luma

    2014-01-01

    3D modeling of cultural heritage objects like artifacts, statues and buildings is nowadays an important tool for virtual museums, preservation and restoration. In this paper, we introduce a method to automatically design a minimal imaging network for the 3D modeling of cultural heritage objects. This becomes important for reducing the image capture time and processing when documenting large and complex sites. Moreover, such a minimal camera network design is desirable for imaging non-digitally documented artifacts in museums and other archeological sites to avoid disturbing the visitors for a long time and/or moving delicate precious objects to complete the documentation task. The developed method is tested on the Iraqi famous statue “Lamassu”. Lamassu is a human-headed winged bull of over 4.25 m in height from the era of Ashurnasirpal II (883–859 BC). Close-range photogrammetry is used for the 3D modeling task where a dense ordered imaging network of 45 high resolution images were captured around Lamassu with an object sample distance of 1 mm. These images constitute a dense network and the aim of our study was to apply our method to reduce the number of images for the 3D modeling and at the same time preserve pre-defined point accuracy. Temporary control points were fixed evenly on the body of Lamassu and measured by using a total station for the external validation and scaling purpose. Two network filtering methods are implemented and three different software packages are used to investigate the efficiency of the image orientation and modeling of the statue in the filtered (reduced) image networks. Internal and external validation results prove that minimal image networks can provide highly accurate records and efficiency in terms of visualization, completeness, processing time (>60% reduction) and the final accuracy of 1 mm. PMID:24670718

  18. Minimal camera networks for 3D image based modeling of cultural heritage objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsadik, Bashar; Gerke, Markus; Vosselman, George; Daham, Afrah; Jasim, Luma

    2014-03-25

    3D modeling of cultural heritage objects like artifacts, statues and buildings is nowadays an important tool for virtual museums, preservation and restoration. In this paper, we introduce a method to automatically design a minimal imaging network for the 3D modeling of cultural heritage objects. This becomes important for reducing the image capture time and processing when documenting large and complex sites. Moreover, such a minimal camera network design is desirable for imaging non-digitally documented artifacts in museums and other archeological sites to avoid disturbing the visitors for a long time and/or moving delicate precious objects to complete the documentation task. The developed method is tested on the Iraqi famous statue "Lamassu". Lamassu is a human-headed winged bull of over 4.25 m in height from the era of Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BC). Close-range photogrammetry is used for the 3D modeling task where a dense ordered imaging network of 45 high resolution images were captured around Lamassu with an object sample distance of 1 mm. These images constitute a dense network and the aim of our study was to apply our method to reduce the number of images for the 3D modeling and at the same time preserve pre-defined point accuracy. Temporary control points were fixed evenly on the body of Lamassu and measured by using a total station for the external validation and scaling purpose. Two network filtering methods are implemented and three different software packages are used to investigate the efficiency of the image orientation and modeling of the statue in the filtered (reduced) image networks. Internal and external validation results prove that minimal image networks can provide highly accurate records and efficiency in terms of visualization, completeness, processing time (>60% reduction) and the final accuracy of 1 mm.

  19. Sculpting proteins interactively: continual energy minimization embedded in a graphical modeling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surles, M C; Richardson, J S; Richardson, D C; Brooks, F P

    1994-02-01

    We describe a new paradigm for modeling proteins in interactive computer graphics systems--continual maintenance of a physically valid representation, combined with direct user control and visualization. This is achieved by a fast algorithm for energy minimization, capable of real-time performance on all atoms of a small protein, plus graphically specified user tugs. The modeling system, called Sculpt, rigidly constrains bond lengths, bond angles, and planar groups (similar to existing interactive modeling programs), while it applies elastic restraints to minimize the potential energy due to torsions, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals and electrostatic interactions (similar to existing batch minimization programs), and user-specified springs. The graphical interface can show bad and/or favorable contacts, and individual energy terms can be turned on or off to determine their effects and interactions. Sculpt finds a local minimum of the total energy that satisfies all the constraints using an augmented Lagrange-multiplier method; calculation time increases only linearly with the number of atoms because the matrix of constraint gradients is sparse and banded. On a 100-MHz MIPS R4000 processor (Silicon Graphics Indigo), Sculpt achieves 11 updates per second on a 20-residue fragment and 2 updates per second on an 80-residue protein, using all atoms except non-H-bonding hydrogens, and without electrostatic interactions. Applications of Sculpt are described: to reverse the direction of bundle packing in a designed 4-helix bundle protein, to fold up a 2-stranded beta-ribbon into an approximate beta-barrel, and to design the sequence and conformation of a 30-residue peptide that mimics one partner of a protein subunit interaction. Computer models that are both interactive and physically realistic (within the limitations of a given force field) have 2 significant advantages: (1) they make feasible the modeling of very large changes (such as needed for de novo design), and

  20. A Minimal Path Searching Approach for Active Shape Model (ASM)-based Segmentation of the Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shengwen; Fei, Baowei

    2009-03-27

    We are developing a minimal path searching method for active shape model (ASM)-based segmentation for detection of lung boundaries on digital radiographs. With the conventional ASM method, the position and shape parameters of the model points are iteratively refined and the target points are updated by the least Mahalanobis distance criterion. We propose an improved searching strategy that extends the searching points in a fan-shape region instead of along the normal direction. A minimal path (MP) deformable model is applied to drive the searching procedure. A statistical shape prior model is incorporated into the segmentation. In order to keep the smoothness of the shape, a smooth constraint is employed to the deformable model. To quantitatively assess the ASM-MP segmentation, we compare the automatic segmentation with manual segmentation for 72 lung digitized radiographs. The distance error between the ASM-MP and manual segmentation is 1.75 ± 0.33 pixels, while the error is 1.99 ± 0.45 pixels for the ASM. Our results demonstrate that our ASM-MP method can accurately segment the lung on digital radiographs.

  1. A minimal path searching approach for active shape model (ASM)-based segmentation of the lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shengwen; Fei, Baowei

    2009-02-01

    We are developing a minimal path searching method for active shape model (ASM)-based segmentation for detection of lung boundaries on digital radiographs. With the conventional ASM method, the position and shape parameters of the model points are iteratively refined and the target points are updated by the least Mahalanobis distance criterion. We propose an improved searching strategy that extends the searching points in a fan-shape region instead of along the normal direction. A minimal path (MP) deformable model is applied to drive the searching procedure. A statistical shape prior model is incorporated into the segmentation. In order to keep the smoothness of the shape, a smooth constraint is employed to the deformable model. To quantitatively assess the ASM-MP segmentation, we compare the automatic segmentation with manual segmentation for 72 lung digitized radiographs. The distance error between the ASM-MP and manual segmentation is 1.75 +/- 0.33 pixels, while the error is 1.99 +/- 0.45 pixels for the ASM. Our results demonstrate that our ASM-MP method can accurately segment the lung on digital radiographs.

  2. Glucose Oxidase Biosensor Modeling and Predictors Optimization by Machine Learning Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Navarro, Felix F; Stilianova-Stoytcheva, Margarita; Renteria-Gutierrez, Livier; Belanche-Muñoz, Lluís A; Flores-Rios, Brenda L; Ibarra-Esquer, Jorge E

    2016-10-26

    Biosensors are small analytical devices incorporating a biological recognition element and a physico-chemical transducer to convert a biological signal into an electrical reading. Nowadays, their technological appeal resides in their fast performance, high sensitivity and continuous measuring capabilities; however, a full understanding is still under research. This paper aims to contribute to this growing field of biotechnology, with a focus on Glucose-Oxidase Biosensor (GOB) modeling through statistical learning methods from a regression perspective. We model the amperometric response of a GOB with dependent variables under different conditions, such as temperature, benzoquinone, pH and glucose concentrations, by means of several machine learning algorithms. Since the sensitivity of a GOB response is strongly related to these dependent variables, their interactions should be optimized to maximize the output signal, for which a genetic algorithm and simulated annealing are used. We report a model that shows a good generalization error and is consistent with the optimization.

  3. Glucose Oxidase Biosensor Modeling and Predictors Optimization by Machine Learning Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix F. Gonzalez-Navarro

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors are small analytical devices incorporating a biological recognition element and a physico-chemical transducer to convert a biological signal into an electrical reading. Nowadays, their technological appeal resides in their fast performance, high sensitivity and continuous measuring capabilities; however, a full understanding is still under research. This paper aims to contribute to this growing field of biotechnology, with a focus on Glucose-Oxidase Biosensor (GOB modeling through statistical learning methods from a regression perspective. We model the amperometric response of a GOB with dependent variables under different conditions, such as temperature, benzoquinone, pH and glucose concentrations, by means of several machine learning algorithms. Since the sensitivity of a GOB response is strongly related to these dependent variables, their interactions should be optimized to maximize the output signal, for which a genetic algorithm and simulated annealing are used. We report a model that shows a good generalization error and is consistent with the optimization.

  4. Searching for beyond the minimal supersymmetric standard model at the laboratory and in the sky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju Min

    2010-09-15

    We study the collider signals as well as Dark Matter candidates in supersymmetric models. We show that the collider signatures from a supersymmetric Grand Unification model based on the SO(10) gauge group can be distinguishable from those from the (constrained) minimal supersymmetric Standard Model, even though they share some common features. The N=2 supersymmetry has the characteristically distinct phenomenology, due to the Dirac nature of gauginos, as well as the extra adjoint scalars. We compute the cold Dark Matter relic density including a class of one-loop corrections. Finally, we discuss the detectability of neutralino Dark Matter candidate of the SO(10) model by the direct and indirect Dark Matter search experiments. (orig.)

  5. Searching for beyond the minimal supersymmetric standard model at the laboratory and in the sky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ju Min

    2010-09-01

    We study the collider signals as well as Dark Matter candidates in supersymmetric models. We show that the collider signatures from a supersymmetric Grand Unification model based on the SO(10) gauge group can be distinguishable from those from the (constrained) minimal supersymmetric Standard Model, even though they share some common features. The N=2 supersymmetry has the characteristically distinct phenomenology, due to the Dirac nature of gauginos, as well as the extra adjoint scalars. We compute the cold Dark Matter relic density including a class of one-loop corrections. Finally, we discuss the detectability of neutralino Dark Matter candidate of the SO(10) model by the direct and indirect Dark Matter search experiments. (orig.)

  6. Inverse modelling and pulsating torque minimization of salient pole non-sinusoidal synchronous machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait-gougam, Y.; Ibtiouen, R.; Touhami, O. [Laboratoire de Recherche en Electrotechnique, Ecole Nationale Polytechnique, BP 182, El-Harrach 16200 (Algeria); Louis, J.-P.; Gabsi, M. [Systemes et Applications des Technologies de l' Information et de l' Energie (SATIE), CNRS UMR 8029, Ecole Normale Superieure de Cachan, 61 Avenue du President Wilson, 94235 Cachan Cedex (France)

    2008-01-15

    Sinusoidal motor's mathematical models are usually obtained using classical d-q transformation in the case of salient pole synchronous motors having sinusoidal field distribution. In this paper, a new inverse modelling for synchronous motors is presented. This modelling is derived from the properties of constant torque curves in the Concordia's reference frame. It takes into account the non-sinusoidal field distribution; EMF, self and mutual inductances having non-sinusoidal variations with respect to the angular rotor position. Both copper losses and torque ripples are minimized by adapted currents waveforms calculated from this model. Experimental evaluation was carried out on a DSP-controlled PMSM drive platform. Test results obtained demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in reducing torque ripple. (author)

  7. A minimal supersymmetric model of particle physics and the early universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, W.; Domcke, V.; Kamada, K.; Schmitz, K.

    2013-11-01

    We consider a minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model, with right-handed neutrinos and local B-L, the difference between baryon and lepton number, a symmetry which is spontaneously broken at the scale of grand unification. To a large extent, the parameters of the model are determined by gauge and Yukawa couplings of quarks and leptons. We show that this minimal model can successfully account for the earliest phases of the cosmological evolution: Inflation is driven by the energy density of a false vacuum of unbroken B-L symmetry, which ends in tachyonic preheating, i.e. the decay of the false vacuum, followed by a matter dominated phase with heavy B-L Higgs bosons. Nonthermal and thermal processes produce an abundance of heavy neutrinos whose decays generate primordial entropy, baryon asymmetry via leptogenesis and dark matter consisting of gravitinos or nonthermal WIMPs. The model predicts relations between neutrino and superparticle masses and a characteristic spectrum of gravitational waves.

  8. A minimal supersymmetric model of particle physics and the early universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmueller, W.; Domcke, V.; Kamada, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Schmitz, K. [Tokyo Univ., Kashiwa (Japan). Kavli IPMU, TODIAS

    2013-11-15

    We consider a minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model, with right-handed neutrinos and local B-L, the difference between baryon and lepton number, a symmetry which is spontaneously broken at the scale of grand unification. To a large extent, the parameters of the model are determined by gauge and Yukawa couplings of quarks and leptons. We show that this minimal model can successfully account for the earliest phases of the cosmological evolution: Inflation is driven by the energy density of a false vacuum of unbroken B-L symmetry, which ends in tachyonic preheating, i.e. the decay of the false vacuum, followed by a matter dominated phase with heavy B-L Higgs bosons. Nonthermal and thermal processes produce an abundance of heavy neutrinos whose decays generate primordial entropy, baryon asymmetry via leptogenesis and dark matter consisting of gravitinos or nonthermal WIMPs. The model predicts relations between neutrino and superparticle masses and a characteristic spectrum of gravitational waves.

  9. Long-term feeding of red algae (Gelidium amansii ameliorates glucose and lipid metabolism in a high fructose diet-impaired glucose tolerance rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hshuan-Chen Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the effect of Gelidium amansii (GA on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in rats with high fructose (HF diet (57.1% w/w. Five-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a HF diet to induce glucose intolerance and hyperlipidemia. The experiment was divided into three groups: (1 control diet group (Con; (2 HF diet group (HF; and (3 HF with GA diet group (HF + 5% GA. The rats were fed the experimental diets and drinking water ad libitum for 23 weeks. The results showed that GA significantly decreased retroperitoneal fat mass weight of HF diet-fed rats. Supplementation of GA caused a decrease in plasma glucose, insulin, tumor necrosis factor-α, and leptin. HF diet increased hepatic lipid content. However, intake of GA reduced the accumulation of hepatic lipids including total cholesterol (TC and triglyceride contents. GA elevated the excretion of fecal lipids and bile acid in HF diet-fed rats. Furthermore, GA significantly decreased plasma TC, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein plus very low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and TC/high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio in HF diet-fed rats. HF diet induced an in plasma glucose and an impaired glucose tolerance, but GA supplementation decreased homeostasis model assessment equation-insulin resistance and improved impairment of glucose tolerance. Taken together, these results indicate that supplementation of GA can improve the impairment of glucose and lipid metabolism in an HF diet-fed rat model.

  10. Long-term feeding of red algae (Gelidium amansii) ameliorates glucose and lipid metabolism in a high fructose diet-impaired glucose tolerance rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hshuan-Chen; Chang, Chun-Ju; Yang, Tsung-Han; Chiang, Meng-Tsan

    2017-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of Gelidium amansii (GA) on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in rats with high fructose (HF) diet (57.1% w/w). Five-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a HF diet to induce glucose intolerance and hyperlipidemia. The experiment was divided into three groups: (1) control diet group (Con); (2) HF diet group (HF); and (3) HF with GA diet group (HF + 5% GA). The rats were fed the experimental diets and drinking water ad libitum for 23 weeks. The results showed that GA significantly decreased retroperitoneal fat mass weight of HF diet-fed rats. Supplementation of GA caused a decrease in plasma glucose, insulin, tumor necrosis factor-α, and leptin. HF diet increased hepatic lipid content. However, intake of GA reduced the accumulation of hepatic lipids including total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride contents. GA elevated the excretion of fecal lipids and bile acid in HF diet-fed rats. Furthermore, GA significantly decreased plasma TC, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein plus very low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and TC/high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio in HF diet-fed rats. HF diet induced an in plasma glucose and an impaired glucose tolerance, but GA supplementation decreased homeostasis model assessment equation-insulin resistance and improved impairment of glucose tolerance. Taken together, these results indicate that supplementation of GA can improve the impairment of glucose and lipid metabolism in an HF diet-fed rat model. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Diagnostic Accuracies of Glycated Hemoglobin, Fructosamine, and Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance in Predicting Impaired Fasting Glucose, Impaired Glucose Tolerance, or New Onset Diabetes After Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosettenstein, Kerri; Viecelli, Andrea; Yong, Kenneth; Nguyen, Hung Do; Chakera, Aron; Chan, Doris; Dogra, Gursharan; Lim, Ee Mun; Wong, Germaine; Lim, Wai H

    2016-07-01

    New onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) is associated with a 3-fold greater risk of cardiovascular disease events, with early identification and treatment potentially attenuating this risk. The optimal screening test to identify those with NODAT remains unclear, and the aim of this study was to examine the diagnostic accuracies of 4 screening tests in identifying impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and NODAT. This is a single-center prospective cohort study of 83 nondiabetic kidney transplant recipients between 2008 and 2011. Oral glucose tolerance test was considered the gold standard in identifying IFG/IGT or NODAT. Diagnostic accuracies of random blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HBA1c), fructosamine, and Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance in predicting IFG/IGT or NODAT were assessed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Forty (48%) recipients had IFG/IGT or NODAT. Compared with HBA1c with adjusted area under the curve (AUC) of 0.88 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.77-0.93), fructosamine was the most accurate test with adjusted AUC of 0.92 (95% CI, 0.83-0.96). The adjusted AUCs of random blood glucose and Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance in identifying IFG/IGT were between 0.81 and 0.85. Restricting to identifying IGT/NODAT using 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (n = 66), fructosamine was the most accurate diagnostic test with adjusted AUC of 0.93 (95% CI, 0.84-0.99), but not statistically different to HBA1c with adjusted AUC of 0.88 (95% CI, 0.76-0.96). Although HBA1c is an acceptable and widely used screening test in detecting IFG/IGT or NODAT, fructosamine may be a more accurate diagnostic test but this needs to be further examined in larger cohorts.

  12. Energetics of glucose metabolism: a phenomenological approach to metabolic network modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederichs, Frank

    2010-08-12

    A new formalism to describe metabolic fluxes as well as membrane transport processes was developed. The new flux equations are comparable to other phenomenological laws. Michaelis-Menten like expressions, as well as flux equations of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, can be regarded as special cases of these new equations. For metabolic network modeling, variable conductances and driving forces are required to enable pathway control and to allow a rapid response to perturbations. When applied to oxidative phosphorylation, results of simulations show that whole oxidative phosphorylation cannot be described as a two-flux-system according to nonequilibrium thermodynamics, although all coupled reactions per se fulfill the equations of this theory. Simulations show that activation of ATP-coupled load reactions plus glucose oxidation is brought about by an increase of only two different conductances: a [Ca(2+)] dependent increase of cytosolic load conductances, and an increase of phosphofructokinase conductance by [AMP], which in turn becomes increased through [ADP] generation by those load reactions. In ventricular myocytes, this feedback mechanism is sufficient to increase cellular power output and O(2) consumption several fold, without any appreciable impairment of energetic parameters. Glucose oxidation proceeds near maximal power output, since transformed input and output conductances are nearly equal, yielding an efficiency of about 0.5. This conductance matching is fulfilled also by glucose oxidation of β-cells. But, as a price for the metabolic mechanism of glucose recognition, β-cells have only a limited capability to increase their power output.

  13. Model Identification using Continuous Glucose Monitoring Data for Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiroux, Dimitri; Hagdrup, Morten; Mahmoudi, Zeinab

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses model identification of continuous-discrete nonlinear models for people with type 1 diabetes using sampled data from a continuous glucose monitor (CGM). We compare five identification techniques: least squares, weighted least squares, Huber regression, maximum likelihood...... with extended Kalman filter and maximum likelihood with unscented Kalman filter. We perform the identification on a 24-hour simulation of a stochastic differential equation (SDE) version of the Medtronic Virtual Patient (MVP) model including process and output noise. We compare the fits with the actual CGM......, such as parameter tracking, population modeling and handling of outliers....

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Interacting Glucose-Sensing Mechanisms and Electrical Activity Underlying Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Riz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal L-cells sense glucose and other nutrients, and in response release glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1, peptide YY and other hormones with anti-diabetic and weight-reducing effects. The stimulus-secretion pathway in L-cells is still poorly understood, although it is known that GLP-1 secreting cells use sodium-glucose co-transporters (SGLT and ATP-sensitive K+-channels (K(ATP-channels to sense intestinal glucose levels. Electrical activity then transduces glucose sensing to Ca2+-stimulated exocytosis. This particular glucose-sensing arrangement with glucose triggering both a depolarizing SGLT current as well as leading to closure of the hyperpolarizing K(ATP current is of more general interest for our understanding of glucose-sensing cells. To dissect the interactions of these two glucose-sensing mechanisms, we build a mathematical model of electrical activity underlying GLP-1 secretion. Two sets of model parameters are presented: one set represents primary mouse colonic L-cells; the other set is based on data from the GLP-1 secreting GLUTag cell line. The model is then used to obtain insight into the differences in glucose-sensing between primary L-cells and GLUTag cells. Our results illuminate how the two glucose-sensing mechanisms interact, and suggest that the depolarizing effect of SGLT currents is modulated by K(ATP-channel activity. Based on our simulations, we propose that primary L-cells encode the glucose signal as changes in action potential amplitude, whereas GLUTag cells rely mainly on frequency modulation. The model should be useful for further basic, pharmacological and theoretical investigations of the cellular signals underlying endogenous GLP-1 and peptide YY release.

  15. Robust Least-Squares Support Vector Machine With Minimization of Mean and Variance of Modeling Error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinjiang; Liu, Wenbo; Zhou, Chuang; Huang, Minghui

    2017-06-13

    The least-squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) is a popular data-driven modeling method and has been successfully applied to a wide range of applications. However, it has some disadvantages, including being ineffective at handling non-Gaussian noise as well as being sensitive to outliers. In this paper, a robust LS-SVM method is proposed and is shown to have more reliable performance when modeling a nonlinear system under conditions where Gaussian or non-Gaussian noise is present. The construction of a new objective function allows for a reduction of the mean of the modeling error as well as the minimization of its variance, and it does not constrain the mean of the modeling error to zero. This differs from the traditional LS-SVM, which uses a worst-case scenario approach in order to minimize the modeling error and constrains the mean of the modeling error to zero. In doing so, the proposed method takes the modeling error distribution information into consideration and is thus less conservative and more robust in regards to random noise. A solving method is then developed in order to determine the optimal parameters for the proposed robust LS-SVM. An additional analysis indicates that the proposed LS-SVM gives a smaller weight to a large-error training sample and a larger weight to a small-error training sample, and is thus more robust than the traditional LS-SVM. The effectiveness of the proposed robust LS-SVM is demonstrated using both artificial and real life cases.

  16. The quantum group structure of 2D gravity and minimal models. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervais, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    On the unit circle, an infinite family of chiral operators is constructed, whose exchange algebra is given by the universal R-matrix of the quantum group SL(2) q . This establishes the precise connection between the chiral algebra of two dimensional gravity or minimal models and this quantum group. The method is to relate the monodromy properties of the operator differential equations satisfied by the generalized vertex operators with the exchange algebra of SL(2) q . The formulae so derived, which generalize an earlier particular case worked out by Babelon, are remarkably compact and may be entirely written in terms of 'q-deformed' factorials and binomial coefficients. (orig.)

  17. Connecting Dirac and Majorana neutrino mass matrices in the minimal left-right symmetric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemevšek, Miha; Senjanović, Goran; Tello, Vladimir

    2013-04-12

    Probing the origin of neutrino mass by disentangling the seesaw mechanism is one of the central issues of particle physics. We address it in the minimal left-right symmetric model and show how the knowledge of light and heavy neutrino masses and mixings suffices to determine their Dirac Yukawa couplings. This in turn allows one to make predictions for a number of high and low energy phenomena, such as decays of heavy neutrinos, neutrinoless double beta decay, electric dipole moments of charged leptons, and neutrino transition moments. We also discuss a way of reconstructing the neutrino Dirac Yukawa couplings at colliders such as the LHC.

  18. Adiabatic density perturbations and matter generation from the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enqvist, Kari; Kasuya, Shinta; Mazumdar, Anupam

    2003-03-07

    We propose that the inflaton is coupled to ordinary matter only gravitationally and that it decays into a completely hidden sector. In this scenario both baryonic and dark matter originate from the decay of a flat direction of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, which is shown to generate the desired adiabatic perturbation spectrum via the curvaton mechanism. The requirement that the energy density along the flat direction dominates over the inflaton decay products fixes the flat direction almost uniquely. The present residual energy density in the hidden sector is typically shown to be small.

  19. Casimir effect at finite temperature for pure-photon sector of the minimal Standard Model Extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, A.F., E-mail: alesandroferreira@fisica.ufmt.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, 78060-900, Cuiabá, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road Victoria, BC (Canada); Khanna, Faqir C., E-mail: khannaf@uvic.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2016-12-15

    Dynamics between particles is governed by Lorentz and CPT symmetry. There is a violation of Parity (P) and CP symmetry at low levels. The unified theory, that includes particle physics and quantum gravity, may be expected to be covariant with Lorentz and CPT symmetry. At high enough energies, will the unified theory display violation of any symmetry? The Standard Model Extension (SME), with Lorentz and CPT violating terms, has been suggested to include particle dynamics. The minimal SME in the pure photon sector is considered in order to calculate the Casimir effect at finite temperature.

  20. Right-handed quark mixings in minimal left-right symmetric model with general CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yue; Ji Xiangdong; An Haipeng; Mohapatra, R. N.

    2007-01-01

    We solve systematically for the right-handed quark mixings in the minimal left-right symmetric model which generally has both explicit and spontaneous CP violations. The leading-order result has the same hierarchical structure as the left-handed Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing, but with additional CP phases originating from a spontaneous CP-violating phase in the Higgs vacuum expectation values. We explore the phenomenology entailed by the new right-handed mixing matrix, particularly the bounds on the mass of W R and the CP phase of the Higgs vacuum expectation values

  1. Fock model and Segal-Bargmann transform for minimal representations of Hermitian Lie groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilgert, Joachim; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Möllers, Jan

    2012-01-01

    For any Hermitian Lie group G of tube type we construct a Fock model of its minimal representation. The Fock space is defined on the minimal nilpotent K_C-orbit X in p_C and the L^2-inner product involves a K-Bessel function as density. Here K is a maximal compact subgroup of G, and g......_C=k_C+p_C is a complexified Cartan decomposition. In this realization the space of k-finite vectors consists of holomorphic polynomials on X. The reproducing kernel of the Fock space is calculated explicitly in terms of an I-Bessel function. We further find an explicit formula of a generalized Segal-Bargmann transform which...... intertwines the Schroedinger and Fock model. Its kernel involves the same I-Bessel function. Using the Segal--Bargmann transform we also determine the integral kernel of the unitary inversion operator in the Schroedinger model which is given by a J-Bessel function....

  2. Simulated lumbar minimally invasive surgery educational model with didactic and technical components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitale, Rohan; Ghobrial, George M; Lobel, Darlene; Harrop, James

    2013-10-01

    The learning and development of technical skills are paramount for neurosurgical trainees. External influences and a need for maximizing efficiency and proficiency have encouraged advancements in simulator-based learning models. To confirm the importance of establishing an educational curriculum for teaching minimally invasive techniques of pedicle screw placement using a computer-enhanced physical model of percutaneous pedicle screw placement with simultaneous didactic and technical components. A 2-hour educational curriculum was created to educate neurosurgical residents on anatomy, pathophysiology, and technical aspects associated with image-guided pedicle screw placement. Predidactic and postdidactic practical and written scores were analyzed and compared. Scores were calculated for each participant on the basis of the optimal pedicle screw starting point and trajectory for both fluoroscopy and computed tomographic navigation. Eight trainees participated in this module. Average mean scores on the written didactic test improved from 78% to 100%. The technical component scores for fluoroscopic guidance improved from 58.8 to 52.9. Technical score for computed tomography-navigated guidance also improved from 28.3 to 26.6. Didactic and technical quantitative scores with a simulator-based educational curriculum improved objectively measured resident performance. A minimally invasive spine simulation model and curriculum may serve a valuable function in the education of neurosurgical residents and outcomes for patients.

  3. Flaxion: a minimal extension to solve puzzles in the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ema, Yohei [Department of Physics,The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 133-0033 (Japan); Hamaguchi, Koichi; Moroi, Takeo; Nakayama, Kazunori [Department of Physics,The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 133-0033 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU),University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan)

    2017-01-23

    We propose a minimal extension of the standard model which includes only one additional complex scalar field, flavon, with flavor-dependent global U(1) symmetry. It not only explains the hierarchical flavor structure in the quark and lepton sector (including neutrino sector), but also solves the strong CP problem by identifying the CP-odd component of the flavon as the QCD axion, which we call flaxion. Furthermore, the flaxion model solves the cosmological puzzles in the standard model, i.e., origin of dark matter, baryon asymmetry of the universe, and inflation. We show that the radial component of the flavon can play the role of inflaton without isocurvature nor domain wall problems. The dark matter abundance can be explained by the flaxion coherent oscillation, while the baryon asymmetry of the universe is generated through leptogenesis.

  4. Dark matter constraints in the minimal and nonminimal supersymmetric standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, A.

    1998-01-01

    We determine the allowed parameter space and the particle spectra of the minimal SUSY standard model (MSSM) and nonminimal SUSY standard model (NMSSM) imposing correct electroweak gauge symmetry breaking and recent experimental constraints. The parameters of the models are evolved with the SUSY renormalization group equations assuming universality at the grand unified scale. Applying the new unbounded from below constraints we can exclude the lightest SUSY particle singlinos and light scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs singlets of the NMSSM. This exclusion removes the experimental possibility to distinguish between the MSSM and NMSSM via the recently proposed search for an additional cascade produced in the decay of the B-ino into the LSP singlino. Furthermore, the effects of the dark matter condition for the MSSM and NMSSM are investigated and the differences concerning the parameter space, the SUSY particle, and Higgs sector are discussed. thinsp copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  5. Mathematical models for a batch scheduling problem to minimize earliness and tardiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basar Ogun

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Today’s manufacturing facilities are challenged by highly customized products and just in time manufacturing and delivery of these products. In this study, a batch scheduling problem is addressed to provide on-time completion of customer orders in the environment of lean manufacturing. The problem is to optimize partitioning of product components into batches and scheduling of the resulting batches where each customer order is received as a set of products made of various components. Design/methodology/approach: Three different mathematical models for minimization of total earliness and tardiness of customer orders are developed to provide on-time completion of customer orders and also, to avoid from inventory of final products. The first model is a non-linear integer programming model while the second is a linearized version of the first. Finally, to solve larger sized instances of the problem, an alternative linear integer model is presented. Findings: Computational study using a suit set of test instances showed that the alternative linear integer model is able to solve all test instances in varying sizes within quite shorter computer times comparing to the other two models. It was also showed that the alternative model can solve moderate sized real-world problems. Originality/value: The problem under study differentiates from existing batch scheduling problems in the literature since it includes new circumstances which may arise in real-world applications. This research, also, contributes the literature of batch scheduling problem by presenting new optimization models.

  6. Model-Based Analysis and Efficient Operation of a Glucose Isomerization Reactor Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadakis, Emmanouil; Madsen, Ulrich; Pedersen, Sven

    2015-01-01

    efficiency. The objective of this study is the application of the developed framework on an industrial case study of a glucose isomerization (GI) reactor plant that is part of a corn refinery, with the objective to improve the productivity of the process. Therefore, a multi-scale reactor model...... is developedfor use as a building block for the GI reactor plant simulation. An optimal operation strategy is proposed on the basis of the simulation results...

  7. Complex functionality with minimal computation: Promise and pitfalls of reduced-tracer ocean biogeochemistry models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Eric D.; Dunne, John P.; Gnanadesikan, Anand; Slater, Richard D.; Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Dufour, Carolina O.; de Souza, Gregory F.; Bianchi, Daniele; Claret, Mariona; Rodgers, Keith B.; Marvasti, Seyedehsafoura Sedigh

    2015-12-01

    Earth System Models increasingly include ocean biogeochemistry models in order to predict changes in ocean carbon storage, hypoxia, and biological productivity under climate change. However, state-of-the-art ocean biogeochemical models include many advected tracers, that significantly increase the computational resources required, forcing a trade-off with spatial resolution. Here, we compare a state-of-the art model with 30 prognostic tracers (TOPAZ) with two reduced-tracer models, one with 6 tracers (BLING), and the other with 3 tracers (miniBLING). The reduced-tracer models employ parameterized, implicit biological functions, which nonetheless capture many of the most important processes resolved by TOPAZ. All three are embedded in the same coupled climate model. Despite the large difference in tracer number, the absence of tracers for living organic matter is shown to have a minimal impact on the transport of nutrient elements, and the three models produce similar mean annual preindustrial distributions of macronutrients, oxygen, and carbon. Significant differences do exist among the models, in particular the seasonal cycle of biomass and export production, but it does not appear that these are necessary consequences of the reduced tracer number. With increasing CO2, changes in dissolved oxygen and anthropogenic carbon uptake are very similar across the different models. Thus, while the reduced-tracer models do not explicitly resolve the diversity and internal dynamics of marine ecosystems, we demonstrate that such models are applicable to a broad suite of major biogeochemical concerns, including anthropogenic change. These results are very promising for the further development and application of reduced-tracer biogeochemical models that incorporate "sub-ecosystem-scale" parameterizations.

  8. Model-based closed-loop glucose control in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe; Boiroux, Dimitri; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine

    2013-01-01

    To improve type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) management, we developed a model predictive control (MPC) algorithm for closed-loop (CL) glucose control based on a linear second-order deterministic-stochastic model. The deterministic part of the model is specified by three patient-specific parameters......: insulin sensitivity factor, insulin action time, and basal insulin infusion rate. The stochastic part is identical for all patients but identified from data from a single patient. Results of the first clinical feasibility test of the algorithm are presented....

  9. A predictive model of suitability for minimally invasive parathyroid surgery in the treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism [corrected].

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Dara O

    2012-05-01

    Improved preoperative localizing studies have facilitated minimally invasive approaches in the treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). Success depends on the ability to reliably select patients who have PHPT due to single-gland disease. We propose a model encompassing preoperative clinical, biochemical, and imaging studies to predict a patient\\'s suitability for minimally invasive surgery.

  10. Minimally Disruptive Medicine: A Pragmatically Comprehensive Model for Delivering Care to Patients with Multiple Chronic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron L. Leppin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing proportion of healthcare resources in the United States are directed toward an expanding group of complex and multimorbid patients. Federal stakeholders have called for new models of care to meet the needs of these patients. Minimally Disruptive Medicine (MDM is a theory-based, patient-centered, and context-sensitive approach to care that focuses on achieving patient goals for life and health while imposing the smallest possible treatment burden on patients’ lives. The MDM Care Model is designed to be pragmatically comprehensive, meaning that it aims to address any and all factors that impact the implementation and effectiveness of care for patients with multiple chronic conditions. It comprises core activities that map to an underlying and testable theoretical framework. This encourages refinement and future study. Here, we present the conceptual rationale for and a practical approach to minimally disruptive care for patients with multiple chronic conditions. We introduce some of the specific tools and strategies that can be used to identify the right care for these patients and to put it into practice.

  11. A Minimal Model Describing Hexapedal Interlimb Coordination: The Tegotae-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Owaki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Insects exhibit adaptive and versatile locomotion despite their minimal neural computing. Such locomotor patterns are generated via coordination between leg movements, i.e., an interlimb coordination, which is largely controlled in a distributed manner by neural circuits located in thoracic ganglia. However, the mechanism responsible for the interlimb coordination still remains elusive. Understanding this mechanism will help us to elucidate the fundamental control principle of animals' agile locomotion and to realize robots with legs that are truly adaptive and could not be developed solely by conventional control theories. This study aims at providing a “minimal" model of the interlimb coordination mechanism underlying hexapedal locomotion, in the hope that a single control principle could satisfactorily reproduce various aspects of insect locomotion. To this end, we introduce a novel concept we named “Tegotae,” a Japanese concept describing the extent to which a perceived reaction matches an expectation. By using the Tegotae-based approach, we show that a surprisingly systematic design of local sensory feedback mechanisms essential for the interlimb coordination can be realized. We also use a hexapod robot we developed to show that our mathematical model of the interlimb coordination mechanism satisfactorily reproduces various insects' gait patterns.

  12. Predictive performance for population models using stochastic differential equations applied on data from an oral glucose tolerance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Jonas B; Overgaard, Rune V; Madsen, Henrik; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Ingwersen, Steen H

    2010-02-01

    Several articles have investigated stochastic differential equations (SDEs) in PK/PD models, but few have quantitatively investigated the benefits to predictive performance of models based on real data. Estimation of first phase insulin secretion which reflects beta-cell function using models of the OGTT is a difficult problem in need of further investigation. The present work aimed at investigating the power of SDEs to predict the first phase insulin secretion (AIR (0-8)) in the IVGTT based on parameters obtained from the minimal model of the OGTT, published by Breda et al. (Diabetes 50(1):150-158, 2001). In total 174 subjects underwent both an OGTT and a tolbutamide modified IVGTT. Estimation of parameters in the oral minimal model (OMM) was performed using the FOCE-method in NONMEM VI on insulin and C-peptide measurements. The suggested SDE models were based on a continuous AR(1) process, i.e. the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, and the extended Kalman filter was implemented in order to estimate the parameters of the models. Inclusion of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) process caused improved description of the variation in the data as measured by the autocorrelation function (ACF) of one-step prediction errors. A main result was that application of SDE models improved the correlation between the individual first phase indexes obtained from OGTT and AIR (0-8) (r = 0.36 to r = 0.49 and r = 0.32 to r = 0.47 with C-peptide and insulin measurements, respectively). In addition to the increased correlation also the properties of the indexes obtained using the SDE models more correctly assessed the properties of the first phase indexes obtained from the IVGTT. In general it is concluded that the presented SDE approach not only caused autocorrelation of errors to decrease but also improved estimation of clinical measures obtained from the glucose tolerance tests. Since, the estimation time of extended models was not heavily increased compared to basic models, the applied method

  13. Warm inflation with an oscillatory inflaton in the non-minimal kinetic coupling model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodarzi, Parviz; Sadjadi, H.M.

    2017-01-01

    In the cold inflation scenario, the slow roll inflation and reheating via coherent rapid oscillation, are usually considered as two distinct eras. When the slow roll ends, a rapid oscillation phase begins and the inflaton decays to relativistic particles reheating the Universe. In another model dubbed warm inflation, the rapid oscillation phase is suppressed, and we are left with only a slow roll period during which the reheating occurs. Instead, in this paper, we propose a new picture for inflation in which the slow roll era is suppressed and only the rapid oscillation phase exists. Radiation generation during this era is taken into account, so we have warm inflation with an oscillatory inflaton. To provide enough e-folds, we employ the non-minimal derivative coupling model. We study the cosmological perturbations and compute the temperature at the end of warm oscillatory inflation. (orig.)

  14. A minimal model of epithelial tissue dynamics and its application to the corneal epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkes, Silke; Matoz-Fernandez, Daniel; Kostanjevec, Kaja; Coburn, Luke; Sknepnek, Rastko; Collinson, J. Martin; Martens, Kirsten

    Epithelial cell sheets are characterized by a complex interplay of active drivers, including cell motility, cell division and extrusion. Here we construct a particle-based minimal model tissue with only division/death dynamics and show that it always corresponds to a liquid state with a single dynamic time scale set by the division rate, and that no glassy phase is possible. Building on this, we construct an in-silico model of the mammalian corneal epithelium as such a tissue confined to a hemisphere bordered by the limbal stem cell zone. With added cell motility dynamics we are able to explain the steady-state spiral migration on the cornea, including the central vortex defect, and quantitatively compare it to eyes obtained from mice that are X-inactivation mosaic for LacZ.

  15. Warm inflation with an oscillatory inflaton in the non-minimal kinetic coupling model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodarzi, Parviz [University of Ayatollah Ozma Borujerdi, Department of Science, Boroujerd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadjadi, H.M. [University of Tehran, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    In the cold inflation scenario, the slow roll inflation and reheating via coherent rapid oscillation, are usually considered as two distinct eras. When the slow roll ends, a rapid oscillation phase begins and the inflaton decays to relativistic particles reheating the Universe. In another model dubbed warm inflation, the rapid oscillation phase is suppressed, and we are left with only a slow roll period during which the reheating occurs. Instead, in this paper, we propose a new picture for inflation in which the slow roll era is suppressed and only the rapid oscillation phase exists. Radiation generation during this era is taken into account, so we have warm inflation with an oscillatory inflaton. To provide enough e-folds, we employ the non-minimal derivative coupling model. We study the cosmological perturbations and compute the temperature at the end of warm oscillatory inflation. (orig.)

  16. Horizontal, anomalous U(1) symmetry for the more minimal supersymmetric standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A.E.; Wright, D.

    1997-01-01

    We construct explicit examples with a horizontal, open-quotes anomalousclose quotes U(1) gauge group, which, in a supersymmetric extension of the standard model, reproduce qualitative features of the fermion spectrum and CKM matrix, and suppress FCNC and proton decay rates without the imposition of global symmetries. We review the motivation for such open-quotes moreclose quotes minimal supersymmetric standard models and their predictions for the sparticle spectrum. There is a mass hierarchy in the scalar sector which is the inverse of the fermion mass hierarchy. We show in detail why ΔS=2 FCNCs are greatly suppressed when compared with naive estimates for nondegenerate squarks. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  17. Dynamics of symmetry breaking during quantum real-time evolution in a minimal model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyl, Markus; Vojta, Matthias

    2014-10-31

    One necessary criterion for the thermalization of a nonequilibrium quantum many-particle system is ergodicity. It is, however, not sufficient in cases where the asymptotic long-time state lies in a symmetry-broken phase but the initial state of nonequilibrium time evolution is fully symmetric with respect to this symmetry. In equilibrium, one particular symmetry-broken state is chosen as a result of an infinitesimal symmetry-breaking perturbation. From a dynamical point of view the question is: Can such an infinitesimal perturbation be sufficient for the system to establish a nonvanishing order during quantum real-time evolution? We study this question analytically for a minimal model system that can be associated with symmetry breaking, the ferromagnetic Kondo model. We show that after a quantum quench from a completely symmetric state the system is able to break its symmetry dynamically and discuss how these features can be observed experimentally.

  18. Minimal models from W-constrained hierarchies via the Kontsevich-Miwa transform

    CERN Document Server

    Gato-Rivera, Beatriz

    1992-01-01

    A direct relation between the conformal formalism for 2d-quantum gravity and the W-constrained KP hierarchy is found, without the need to invoke intermediate matrix model technology. The Kontsevich-Miwa transform of the KP hierarchy is used to establish an identification between W constraints on the KP tau function and decoupling equations corresponding to Virasoro null vectors. The Kontsevich-Miwa transform maps the $W^{(l)}$-constrained KP hierarchy to the $(p^\\prime,p)$ minimal model, with the tau function being given by the correlator of a product of (dressed) $(l,1)$ (or $(1,l)$) operators, provided the Miwa parameter $n_i$ and the free parameter (an abstract $bc$ spin) present in the constraints are expressed through the ratio $p^\\prime/p$ and the level $l$.

  19. Spreading Speed, Traveling Waves, and Minimal Domain Size in Impulsive Reaction–Diffusion Models

    KAUST Repository

    Lewis, Mark A.

    2012-08-15

    How growth, mortality, and dispersal in a species affect the species\\' spread and persistence constitutes a central problem in spatial ecology. We propose impulsive reaction-diffusion equation models for species with distinct reproductive and dispersal stages. These models can describe a seasonal birth pulse plus nonlinear mortality and dispersal throughout the year. Alternatively, they can describe seasonal harvesting, plus nonlinear birth and mortality as well as dispersal throughout the year. The population dynamics in the seasonal pulse is described by a discrete map that gives the density of the population at the end of a pulse as a possibly nonmonotone function of the density of the population at the beginning of the pulse. The dynamics in the dispersal stage is governed by a nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation in a bounded or unbounded domain. We develop a spatially explicit theoretical framework that links species vital rates (mortality or fecundity) and dispersal characteristics with species\\' spreading speeds, traveling wave speeds, as well as minimal domain size for species persistence. We provide an explicit formula for the spreading speed in terms of model parameters, and show that the spreading speed can be characterized as the slowest speed of a class of traveling wave solutions. We also give an explicit formula for the minimal domain size using model parameters. Our results show how the diffusion coefficient, and the combination of discrete- and continuous-time growth and mortality determine the spread and persistence dynamics of the population in a wide variety of ecological scenarios. Numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the theoretical results. © 2012 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  20. On the Higgs-like boson in the minimal supersymmetric 3-3-1 model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, J. G.; Pires, C. A. de S.; da Silva, P. S. Rodrigues; Siqueira, Clarissa

    2018-03-01

    It is imperative that any proposal of new physics beyond the standard model possesses a Higgs-like boson with 125 GeV of mass and couplings with the standard particles that recover the branching ratios and signal strengths as measured by CMS and ATLAS. We address this issue within the supersymmetric version of the minimal 3-3-1 model. For this we develop the Higgs potential with focus on the lightest Higgs provided by the model. Our proposal is to verify if it recovers the properties of the Standard Model Higgs. With respect to its mass, we calculate it up to one loop level by taking into account all contributions provided by the model. In regard to its couplings, we restrict our investigation to couplings of the Higgs-like boson with the standard particles, only. We then calculate the dominant branching ratios and the respective signal strengths and confront our results with the recent measurements of CMS and ATLAS. As distinctive aspects, we remark that our Higgs-like boson intermediates flavor changing neutral processes and has as signature the decay t → h+c. We calculate its branching ratio and compare it with current bounds. We also show that the Higgs potential of the model is stable for the region of parameter space employed in our calculations.

  1. Minimization and parameter estimation for seminorm regularization models with I-divergence constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teuber, T; Steidl, G; Chan, R H

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the minimization of seminorms ‖L · ‖ on R n under the constraint of a bounded I-divergence D(b, H · ) for rather general linear operators H and L. The I-divergence is also known as Kullback–Leibler divergence and appears in many models in imaging science, in particular when dealing with Poisson data but also in the case of multiplicative Gamma noise. Often H represents, e.g., a linear blur operator and L is some discrete derivative or frame analysis operator. A central part of this paper consists in proving relations between the parameters of I-divergence constrained and penalized problems. To solve the I-divergence constrained problem, we consider various first-order primal–dual algorithms which reduce the problem to the solution of certain proximal minimization problems in each iteration step. One of these proximation problems is an I-divergence constrained least-squares problem which can be solved based on Morozov’s discrepancy principle by a Newton method. We prove that these algorithms produce not only a sequence of vectors which converges to a minimizer of the constrained problem but also a sequence of parameters which converges to a regularization parameter so that the corresponding penalized problem has the same solution. Furthermore, we derive a rule for automatically setting the constraint parameter for data corrupted by multiplicative Gamma noise. The performance of the various algorithms is finally demonstrated for different image restoration tasks both for images corrupted by Poisson noise and multiplicative Gamma noise. (paper)

  2. Defective glycolysis and the use of 2-deoxy-D-glucose in polycystic kidney disease: from animal models to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magistroni, Riccardo; Boletta, Alessandra

    2017-08-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited renal disease characterized by bilateral renal cyst formation. ADPKD is one of the most common rare disorders, accounting for ~10% of all patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ADPKD is a chronic disorder in which the gradual expansion of cysts that form in a minority of nephrons eventually causes loss of renal function due to the compression and degeneration of the surrounding normal parenchyma. Numerous deranged pathways have been identified in the cyst-lining epithelia, prompting the design of potential therapies. Several of these potential treatments have proved effective in slowing down disease progression in pre-clinical animal studies, while only one has subsequently been proven to effectively slow down disease progression in patients, and it has recently been approved for therapy in Europe, Canada and Japan. Among the affected cellular functions and pathways, recent investigations have described metabolic derangement in ADPKD as a major trait offering additional opportunities for targeted therapies. In particular, increased aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) has been described as a prominent feature of ADPKD kidneys and its inhibition using the glucose analogue 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) proved effective in slowing down disease progression in preclinical models of the disease. At the same time, previous clinical experiences have been reported with 2DG, showing that this compound is well tolerated in humans with minimal and reversible side effects. In this work, we review the literature and speculate that 2DG could be a good candidate for a clinical trial in humans affected by ADPKD.

  3. A signal processing application for evaluating self-monitoring blood glucose strategies in a software agent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanle; Paranjape, Raman

    2015-07-01

    We propose the signal processing technique of calculating a cross-correlation function and an average deviation between the continuous blood glucose and the interpolation of limited blood glucose samples to evaluate blood glucose monitoring frequency in a self-aware patient software agent model. The diabetic patient software agent model [1] is a 24-h circadian, self-aware, stochastic model of a diabetic patient's blood glucose levels in a software agent environment. The purpose of this work is to apply a signal processing technique to assist patients and physicians in understanding the extent of a patient's illness using a limited number of blood glucose samples. A second purpose of this work is to determine an appropriate blood glucose monitoring frequency in order to have a minimum number of samples taken that still provide a good understanding of the patient's blood glucose levels. For society in general, the monitoring cost of diabetes is an extremely important issue, and these costs can vary tremendously depending on monitoring approaches and monitoring frequencies. Due to the cost and discomfort associated with blood glucose monitoring, today, patients expect monitoring frequencies specific to their health profile. The proposed method quantitatively assesses various monitoring protocols (from 6 times per day to 1 time per week) in nine predefined categories of patient agents in terms of risk factors of health status and age. Simulation results show that sampling 6 times per day is excessive, and not necessary for understanding the dynamics of the continuous signal in the experiments. In addition, patient agents in certain conditions only need to sample their blood glucose 1 time per week to have a good understanding of the characteristics of their blood glucose. Finally, an evaluation scenario is developed to visualize this concept, in which appropriate monitoring frequencies are shown based on the particular conditions of patient agents. This base line can

  4. Autoregressive Modeling of Drift and Random Error to Characterize a Continuous Intravascular Glucose Monitoring Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tony; Dickson, Jennifer L; Geoffrey Chase, J

    2018-01-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices have been effective in managing diabetes and offer potential benefits for use in the intensive care unit (ICU). Use of CGM devices in the ICU has been limited, primarily due to the higher point accuracy errors over currently used traditional intermittent blood glucose (BG) measures. General models of CGM errors, including drift and random errors, are lacking, but would enable better design of protocols to utilize these devices. This article presents an autoregressive (AR) based modeling method that separately characterizes the drift and random noise of the GlySure CGM sensor (GlySure Limited, Oxfordshire, UK). Clinical sensor data (n = 33) and reference measurements were used to generate 2 AR models to describe sensor drift and noise. These models were used to generate 100 Monte Carlo simulations based on reference blood glucose measurements. These were then compared to the original CGM clinical data using mean absolute relative difference (MARD) and a Trend Compass. The point accuracy MARD was very similar between simulated and clinical data (9.6% vs 9.9%). A Trend Compass was used to assess trend accuracy, and found simulated and clinical sensor profiles were similar (simulated trend index 11.4° vs clinical trend index 10.9°). The model and method accurately represents cohort sensor behavior over patients, providing a general modeling approach to any such sensor by separately characterizing each type of error that can arise in the data. Overall, it enables better protocol design based on accurate expected CGM sensor behavior, as well as enabling the analysis of what level of each type of sensor error would be necessary to obtain desired glycemic control safety and performance with a given protocol.

  5. Minimal agent based model for financial markets II. Statistical properties of the linear and multiplicative dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfi, V.; Cristelli, M.; Pietronero, L.; Zaccaria, A.

    2009-02-01

    We present a detailed study of the statistical properties of the Agent Based Model introduced in paper I [Eur. Phys. J. B, DOI: 10.1140/epjb/e2009-00028-4] and of its generalization to the multiplicative dynamics. The aim of the model is to consider the minimal elements for the understanding of the origin of the stylized facts and their self-organization. The key elements are fundamentalist agents, chartist agents, herding dynamics and price behavior. The first two elements correspond to the competition between stability and instability tendencies in the market. The herding behavior governs the possibility of the agents to change strategy and it is a crucial element of this class of models. We consider a linear approximation for the price dynamics which permits a simple interpretation of the model dynamics and, for many properties, it is possible to derive analytical results. The generalized non linear dynamics results to be extremely more sensible to the parameter space and much more difficult to analyze and control. The main results for the nature and self-organization of the stylized facts are, however, very similar in the two cases. The main peculiarity of the non linear dynamics is an enhancement of the fluctuations and a more marked evidence of the stylized facts. We will also discuss some modifications of the model to introduce more realistic elements with respect to the real markets.

  6. Multiple travelling-wave solutions in a minimal model for cell motility

    KAUST Repository

    Kimpton, L. S.

    2012-07-11

    Two-phase flow models have been used previously to model cell motility. In order to reduce the complexity inherent with describing the many physical processes, we formulate a minimal model. Here we demonstrate that even the simplest 1D, two-phase, poroviscous, reactive flow model displays various types of behaviour relevant to cell crawling. We present stability analyses that show that an asymmetric perturbation is required to cause a spatially uniform, stationary strip of cytoplasm to move, which is relevant to cell polarization. Our numerical simulations identify qualitatively distinct families of travellingwave solutions that coexist at certain parameter values. Within each family, the crawling speed of the strip has a bell-shaped dependence on the adhesion strength. The model captures the experimentally observed behaviour that cells crawl quickest at intermediate adhesion strengths, when the substrate is neither too sticky nor too slippy. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of an Empirical Model for Optimization of Machining Parameters to Minimize Power Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant Garg, Girish; Garg, Suman; Sangwan, K. S.

    2018-04-01

    The manufacturing sector consumes huge energy demand and the machine tools used in this sector have very less energy efficiency. Selection of the optimum machining parameters for machine tools is significant for energy saving and for reduction of environmental emission. In this work an empirical model is developed to minimize the power consumption using response surface methodology. The experiments are performed on a lathe machine tool during the turning of AISI 6061 Aluminum with coated tungsten inserts. The relationship between the power consumption and machining parameters is adequately modeled. This model is used for formulation of minimum power consumption criterion as a function of optimal machining parameters using desirability function approach. The influence of machining parameters on the energy consumption has been found using the analysis of variance. The validation of the developed empirical model is proved using the confirmation experiments. The results indicate that the developed model is effective and has potential to be adopted by the industry for minimum power consumption of machine tools.

  8. Construct Validity of Fresh Frozen Human Cadaver as a Training Model in Minimal Access Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macafee, David; Pranesh, Nagarajan; Horgan, Alan F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The construct validity of fresh human cadaver as a training tool has not been established previously. The aims of this study were to investigate the construct validity of fresh frozen human cadaver as a method of training in minimal access surgery and determine if novices can be rapidly trained using this model to a safe level of performance. Methods: Junior surgical trainees, novices (cadavers. Expert laparoscopists (>100 laparoscopic procedures) performed 3 repetitions of identical tasks. Performances were scored using a validated, objective Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills scale. Scores for 3 consecutive repetitions were compared between experts and novices to determine construct validity. Furthermore, to determine if the novices reached a safe level, a trimmed mean of the experts score was used to define a benchmark. Mann-Whitney U test was used for construct validity analysis and 1-sample t test to compare performances of the novice group with the benchmark safe score. Results: Ten novices and 2 experts were recruited. Four out of 5 tasks (nondominant to dominant hand transfer; simulated appendicectomy; intracorporeal and extracorporeal knot tying) showed construct validity. Novices’ scores became comparable to benchmark scores between the eighth and tenth repetition. Conclusion: Minimal access surgical training using fresh frozen human cadavers appears to have construct validity. The laparoscopic skills of novices can be accelerated through to a safe level within 8 to 10 repetitions. PMID:23318058

  9. Develop of a model to minimize and to treat waste coming from the chemical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon Hernandez, M.

    2000-01-01

    They were investigated and proposed alternative of minimization and treatment of waste organic type coming from chemical laboratories, considering as alternative the disposition for the drainage, the chemical treatment of the waste, the disposition in sanitary fillers, the creation of a cellar to recycle material, the incineration, the distillation and the possibility to establish an agreement with the company Cements INCSA to discard the materials in the oven to cements of this enterprise. the methodology had as first stage the summary of information about the production of residuals for Investigation Center or Academic Unit. For this they were considered the laboratories of investigation of the CICA, CELEQ, CIPRONA, LAYAFA, and the laboratories of teaching of the sections of Organic Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Physicochemical, Pharmacognosy, Drugs Analysis, Physicopharmacy, Histology and Physiology. Additionally, you considers the office of purveyor of the Microbiology School. Subsequently one carries out an analysis of costs to determine which waste constituted most of the waste generated by the University, as for cost and volume. Then, they were carried out classifications of the materials according to chemical approaches, classification of the NFPA and for data of combustion heats. Once carried out this classification and established the current situation of the laboratories considered as for handling and treatment of waste, they proceeded to evaluate and select treatment options and disposition of waste considering advantages and disadvantages as for implementation possibility and cost stops this way a minimization model and treatment that it can be implemented in the University to settle down [es

  10. The browning value changes and spectral analysis on the Maillard reaction product from glucose and methionine model system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Baarri, A. N.; Legowo, A. M.; Widayat

    2018-01-01

    D-glucose has been understood to provide the various effect on the reactivity in Maillard reaction resulting in the changes in physical performance of food product. Therefore this research was done to analyse physical appearance of Maillard reaction product made of D-glucose and methionine as a model system. The changes in browning value and spectral analysis model system were determined. The glucose-methionine model system was produced through the heating treatment at 50°C and RH 70% for 24 hours. The data were collected for every three hour using spectrophotometer. As result, browning value was elevated with the increase of heating time and remarkably high if compare to the D-glucose only. Furthermore, the spectral analysis showed that methionine turned the pattern of peak appearance. As conclusion, methionine raised the browning value and changed the pattern of spectral analysis in Maillard reaction model system.

  11. A model of type 2 diabetes in the guinea pig using sequential diet-induced glucose intolerance and streptozotocin treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackart, David F.; Richardson, Michael A.; DiLisio, James E.; Pulford, Bruce; Basaraba, Randall J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type 2 diabetes is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among noncommunicable diseases, and additional animal models that more closely replicate the pathogenesis of human type 2 diabetes are needed. The goal of this study was to develop a model of type 2 diabetes in guinea pigs, in which diet-induced glucose intolerance precedes β-cell cytotoxicity, two processes that are crucial to the development of human type 2 diabetes. Guinea pigs developed impaired glucose tolerance after 8 weeks of feeding on a high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet, as determined by oral glucose challenge. Diet-induced glucose intolerance was accompanied by β-cell hyperplasia, compensatory hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia with hepatocellular steatosis. Streptozotocin (STZ) treatment alone was ineffective at inducing diabetic hyperglycemia in guinea pigs, which failed to develop sustained glucose intolerance or fasting hyperglycemia and returned to euglycemia within 21 days after treatment. However, when high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet-fed guinea pigs were treated with STZ, glucose intolerance and fasting hyperglycemia persisted beyond 21 days post-STZ treatment. Guinea pigs with diet-induced glucose intolerance subsequently treated with STZ demonstrated an insulin-secretory capacity consistent with insulin-independent diabetes. This insulin-independent state was confirmed by response to oral antihyperglycemic drugs, metformin and glipizide, which resolved glucose intolerance and extended survival compared with guinea pigs with uncontrolled diabetes. In this study, we have developed a model of sequential glucose intolerance and β-cell loss, through high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet and extensive optimization of STZ treatment in the guinea pig, which closely resembles human type 2 diabetes. This model will prove useful in the study of insulin-independent diabetes pathogenesis with or without comorbidities, where the guinea pig serves as a relevant model species. PMID:28093504

  12. A model of type 2 diabetes in the guinea pig using sequential diet-induced glucose intolerance and streptozotocin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podell, Brendan K; Ackart, David F; Richardson, Michael A; DiLisio, James E; Pulford, Bruce; Basaraba, Randall J

    2017-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among noncommunicable diseases, and additional animal models that more closely replicate the pathogenesis of human type 2 diabetes are needed. The goal of this study was to develop a model of type 2 diabetes in guinea pigs, in which diet-induced glucose intolerance precedes β-cell cytotoxicity, two processes that are crucial to the development of human type 2 diabetes. Guinea pigs developed impaired glucose tolerance after 8 weeks of feeding on a high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet, as determined by oral glucose challenge. Diet-induced glucose intolerance was accompanied by β-cell hyperplasia, compensatory hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia with hepatocellular steatosis. Streptozotocin (STZ) treatment alone was ineffective at inducing diabetic hyperglycemia in guinea pigs, which failed to develop sustained glucose intolerance or fasting hyperglycemia and returned to euglycemia within 21 days after treatment. However, when high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet-fed guinea pigs were treated with STZ, glucose intolerance and fasting hyperglycemia persisted beyond 21 days post-STZ treatment. Guinea pigs with diet-induced glucose intolerance subsequently treated with STZ demonstrated an insulin-secretory capacity consistent with insulin-independent diabetes. This insulin-independent state was confirmed by response to oral antihyperglycemic drugs, metformin and glipizide, which resolved glucose intolerance and extended survival compared with guinea pigs with uncontrolled diabetes. In this study, we have developed a model of sequential glucose intolerance and β-cell loss, through high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet and extensive optimization of STZ treatment in the guinea pig, which closely resembles human type 2 diabetes. This model will prove useful in the study of insulin-independent diabetes pathogenesis with or without comorbidities, where the guinea pig serves as a relevant model species. © 2017. Published by

  13. Targeting the minimal supersymmetric standard model with the compact muon solenoid experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bein, Samuel Louis

    An interpretation of CMS searches for evidence of supersymmetry in the context of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) is given. It is found that supersymmetric particles with color charge are excluded in the mass range below about 400 GeV, but neutral and weakly-charged sparticles remain non-excluded in all mass ranges. Discussion of the non-excluded regions of the model parameter space is given, including details on the strengths and weaknesses of existing searches, and recommendations for future analysis strategies. Advancements in the modeling of events arising from quantum chromodynamics and electroweak boson production, which are major backgrounds in searches for new physics at the LHC, are also presented. These methods have been implemented as components of CMS searches for supersymmetry in proton-proton collisions resulting in purely hadronic events (i.e., events with no identified leptons) at a center of momentum energy of 13 TeV. These searches, interpreted in the context of simplified models, exclude supersymmetric gluons (gluinos) up to masses of 1400 to 1600 GeV, depending on the model considered, and exclude scalar top quarks with masses up to about 800 GeV, assuming a massless lightest supersymmetric particle. A search for non-excluded supersymmetry models is also presented, which uses multivariate discriminants to isolate potential signal candidate events. The search achieves sensitivity to new physics models in background-dominated kinematic regions not typically considered by analyses, and rules out supersymmetry models that survived 7 and 8 TeV searches performed by CMS.

  14. Insulin sensitivity of hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism in animal models of hepatic steatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefhorst, Aldo

    2006-01-01

    De lever is betrokken bij de regulatie van zowel het koolhydraat als het vet metabolisme. De lever slaat glucose op als glycogeen, scheidt glucose uit, kan glucose maken uit bijvoorbeeld melkzuur en aminozuren (‘gluconeogenese’), zet glucose om in vet (‘de novo lipogenese’), verbrandt vetzuren in de

  15. Glucose and Fat Metabolism in Acromegaly: From Mice Models to Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal, Jakob; List, Edward O; Jørgensen, Jens Otto L; Berryman, Darlene E

    2016-01-01

    Patients with active acromegaly are frequently insulin resistant, glucose intolerant, and at risk for developing overt type 2 diabetes. At the same time, these patients have a relatively lean phenotype associated with mobilization and oxidation of free fatty acids. These features are reversed by curative surgical removal of the growth hormone (GH)-producing adenoma. Mouse models of acromegaly share many of these characteristics, including a lean phenotype and proneness to type 2 diabetes. There are, however, also species differences with respect to oxidation rates of glucose and fat as well as the specific mechanisms underlying GH-induced insulin resistance. The impact of acromegaly treatment on insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance depends on the treatment modality (e.g. somatostatin analogs also suppress insulin secretion, whereas the GH antagonist restores insulin sensitivity). The interplay between animal research and clinical studies has proven useful in the field of acromegaly and should be continued in order to understand the metabolic actions of GH. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Large-Scale Patterns in a Minimal Cognitive Flocking Model: Incidental Leaders, Nematic Patterns, and Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberis, Lucas; Peruani, Fernando

    2016-12-01

    We study a minimal cognitive flocking model, which assumes that the moving entities navigate using the available instantaneous visual information exclusively. The model consists of active particles, with no memory, that interact by a short-ranged, position-based, attractive force, which acts inside a vision cone (VC), and lack velocity-velocity alignment. We show that this active system can exhibit—due to the VC that breaks Newton's third law—various complex, large-scale, self-organized patterns. Depending on parameter values, we observe the emergence of aggregates or millinglike patterns, the formation of moving—locally polar—files with particles at the front of these structures acting as effective leaders, and the self-organization of particles into macroscopic nematic structures leading to long-ranged nematic order. Combining simulations and nonlinear field equations, we show that position-based active models, as the one analyzed here, represent a new class of active systems fundamentally different from other active systems, including velocity-alignment-based flocking systems. The reported results are of prime importance in the study, interpretation, and modeling of collective motion patterns in living and nonliving active systems.

  17. Supergravity contributions to inflation in models with non-minimal coupling to gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Kumar; Dutta, Koushik [Theory Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Saltlake, Kolkata 700064 (India); Domcke, Valerie, E-mail: kumar.das@saha.ac.in, E-mail: valerie.domcke@apc.univ-paris7.fr, E-mail: koushik.dutta@saha.ac.in [AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Paris Centre for Cosmological Physics (PCCP), Université Paris Diderot, 75013 Paris (France)

    2017-03-01

    This paper provides a systematic study of supergravity contributions relevant for inflationary model building in Jordan frame supergravity. In this framework, canonical kinetic terms in the Jordan frame result in the separation of the Jordan frame scalar potential into a tree-level term and a supergravity contribution which is potentially dangerous for sustaining inflation. We show that if the vacuum energy necessary for driving inflation originates dominantly from the F-term of an auxiliary field (i.e. not the inflaton), the supergravity corrections to the Jordan frame scalar potential are generically suppressed. Moreover, these supergravity contributions identically vanish if the superpotential vanishes along the inflationary trajectory. On the other hand, if the F-term associated with the inflaton dominates the vacuum energy, the supergravity contributions are generically comparable to the globally supersymmetric contributions. In addition, the non-minimal coupling to gravity inherent to Jordan frame supergravity significantly impacts the inflationary model depending on the size and sign of this coupling. We discuss the phenomenology of some representative inflationary models, and point out the relation to the recently much discussed cosmological 'attractor' models.

  18. Supergravity contributions to inflation in models with non-minimal coupling to gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Kumar; Dutta, Koushik; Domcke, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides a systematic study of supergravity contributions relevant for inflationary model building in Jordan frame supergravity. In this framework, canonical kinetic terms in the Jordan frame result in the separation of the Jordan frame scalar potential into a tree-level term and a supergravity contribution which is potentially dangerous for sustaining inflation. We show that if the vacuum energy necessary for driving inflation originates dominantly from the F-term of an auxiliary field (i.e. not the inflaton), the supergravity corrections to the Jordan frame scalar potential are generically suppressed. Moreover, these supergravity contributions identically vanish if the superpotential vanishes along the inflationary trajectory. On the other hand, if the F-term associated with the inflaton dominates the vacuum energy, the supergravity contributions are generically comparable to the globally supersymmetric contributions. In addition, the non-minimal coupling to gravity inherent to Jordan frame supergravity significantly impacts the inflationary model depending on the size and sign of this coupling. We discuss the phenomenology of some representative inflationary models, and point out the relation to the recently much discussed cosmological 'attractor' models.

  19. Bulk-boundary correlators in the hermitian matrix model and minimal Liouville gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgine, Jean-Emile; Ishiki, Goro; Rim, Chaiho

    2012-01-01

    We construct the one matrix model (MM) correlators corresponding to the general bulk-boundary correlation numbers of the minimal Liouville gravity (LG) on the disc. To find agreement between both discrete and continuous approach, we investigate the resonance transformation mixing boundary and bulk couplings. It leads to consider two sectors, depending on whether the matter part of the LG correlator is vanishing due to the fusion rules. In the vanishing case, we determine the explicit transformation of the boundary couplings at the first order in bulk couplings. In the non-vanishing case, no bulk-boundary resonance is involved and only the first order of pure boundary resonances have to be considered. Those are encoded in the matrix polynomials determined in our previous paper. We checked the agreement for the bulk-boundary correlators of MM and LG in several non-trivial cases. In this process, we developed an alternative method to derive the boundary resonance encoding polynomials.

  20. Sterile neutrino in a minimal three-generation see-saw model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sterile neutrino in a minimal three-generation see-saw model. Table 1. Relevant right-handed fermion and scalar fields and their transformation properties. Here we have defined Y. I3R· (B–L)/2. SU´2µL ¢U´1µI3R ¢U´1µB L. SU´2µL ¢UY ´1µ. Le ·Lµ Lτ. Seµ. 2R ν R. (1,1/2, 1). (1,0). 1. 1 ν·R. (1,1/2, 1). (1,0). 1. 1. ντR. (1, 1/2, 1).

  1. Modification of Schrödinger-Newton equation due to braneworld models with minimal length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Anha; Dey, Sanjib; Faizal, Mir; Hou, Chenguang; Zhao, Qin

    2017-07-01

    We study the correction of the energy spectrum of a gravitational quantum well due to the combined effect of the braneworld model with infinite extra dimensions and generalized uncertainty principle. The correction terms arise from a natural deformation of a semiclassical theory of quantum gravity governed by the Schrödinger-Newton equation based on a minimal length framework. The two fold correction in the energy yields new values of the spectrum, which are closer to the values obtained in the GRANIT experiment. This raises the possibility that the combined theory of the semiclassical quantum gravity and the generalized uncertainty principle may provide an intermediate theory between the semiclassical and the full theory of quantum gravity. We also prepare a schematic experimental set-up which may guide to the understanding of the phenomena in the laboratory.

  2. From b → sγ to the LSP detection rates in minimal string unification models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, S.; Masiero, A.; Shafi, Q.

    1997-04-01

    We exploit the measured branching ratio for b → sγ to derive lower limits on the sparticle and Higgs masses in the minimal string unification models. For the LSP ('bino'), chargino and the lightest Higgs, these turn out to be 50, 90 and 75 GeV respectively. Taking account of the upper bounds on the mass spectrum from the LSP relic abundance, we estimate the direct detection rate for the latter to vary from 10 -1 to 10 -4 events/kg/day. The muon flux, produced by neutrinos from the annihilating LSP's, varies in the range 10 -2 - 10 -9 muons/m 2 /day. (author). 26 refs, 9 figs

  3. Electroweak symmetry breaking and collider signatures in the next-to-minimal composite Higgs model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehoff, Christoph; Stangl, Peter; Straub, David M.

    2017-04-01

    We conduct a detailed numerical analysis of the composite pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone Higgs model based on the next-to-minimal coset SO(6)/SO(5) ≅ SU(4)/Sp(4), featuring an additional SM singlet scalar in the spectrum, which we allow to mix with the Higgs boson. We identify regions in parameter space compatible with all current exper-imental constraints, including radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, flavour physics, and direct searches at colliders. We find the additional scalar, with a mass predicted to be below a TeV, to be virtually unconstrained by current LHC data, but potentially in reach of run 2 searches. Promising indirect searches include rare semi-leptonic B decays, CP violation in B s mixing, and the electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  4. Electroweak symmetry breaking and collider signatures in the next-to-minimal composite Higgs model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niehoff, Christoph; Stangl, Peter; Straub, David M. [Excellence Cluster Universe, TUM,Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-04-20

    We conduct a detailed numerical analysis of the composite pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone Higgs model based on the next-to-minimal coset SO(6)/SO(5)≅SU(4)/Sp(4), featuring an additional SM singlet scalar in the spectrum, which we allow to mix with the Higgs boson. We identify regions in parameter space compatible with all current experimental constraints, including radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, flavour physics, and direct searches at colliders. We find the additional scalar, with a mass predicted to be below a TeV, to be virtually unconstrained by current LHC data, but potentially in reach of run 2 searches. Promising indirect searches include rare semi-leptonic B decays, C P violation in B{sub s} mixing, and the electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  5. Non-unitary neutrino mixing and CP violation in the minimal inverse seesaw model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinsky, Michal; Ohlsson, Tommy; Xing, Zhi-zhong; Zhang He

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simplified version of the inverse seesaw model, in which only two pairs of the gauge-singlet neutrinos are introduced, to interpret the observed neutrino mass hierarchy and lepton flavor mixing at or below the TeV scale. This 'minimal' inverse seesaw scenario (MISS) is technically natural and experimentally testable. In particular, we show that the effective parameters describing the non-unitary neutrino mixing matrix are strongly correlated in the MISS, and thus, their upper bounds can be constrained by current experimental data in a more restrictive way. The Jarlskog invariants of non-unitary CP violation are calculated, and the discovery potential of such new CP-violating effects in the near detector of a neutrino factory is discussed.

  6. Higgs phenomenology in the minimal S U (3 )L×U (1 )X model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hiroshi; Okada, Nobuchika; Orikasa, Yuta; Yagyu, Kei

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the phenomenology of a model based on the S U (3 )c×S U (3 )L×U (1 )X gauge theory, the so-called 331 model. In particular, we focus on the Higgs sector of the model which is composed of three S U (3 )L triplet Higgs fields and is the minimal form for realizing a phenomenologically acceptable scenario. After the spontaneous symmetry breaking S U (3 )L×U (1 )X→S U (2 )L×U (1 )Y , our Higgs sector effectively becomes that with two S U (2 )L doublet scalar fields, in which the first- and the second-generation quarks couple to a different Higgs doublet from that which couples to the third-generation quarks. This structure causes the flavor-changing neutral current mediated by Higgs bosons at the tree level. By taking an alignment limit of the mass matrix for the C P -even Higgs bosons, which is naturally realized in the case with the breaking scale of S U (3 )L×U (1 )X much larger than that of S U (2 )L×U (1 )Y, we can avoid current constraints from flavor experiments such as the B0-B¯ 0 mixing even for the Higgs bosons masses that are O (100 ) GeV . In this allowed parameter space, we clarify that a characteristic deviation in quark Yukawa couplings of the Standard Model-like Higgs boson is predicted, which has a different pattern from that seen in two Higgs doublet models with a softly broken Z2 symmetry. We also find that the flavor-violating decay modes of the extra Higgs boson, e.g., H /A →t c and H±→t s , can be dominant, and they yield the important signature to distinguish our model from the two Higgs doublet models.

  7. The human hepatocyte cell lines IHH and HepaRG: models to study glucose, lipid and lipoprotein metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanez, Carolina Huaman; Caron, Sandrine; Briand, Olivier; Dehondt, Hélène; Duplan, Isabelle; Kuipers, Folkert; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Clavey, Véronique; Staels, Bart

    2012-07-01

    Metabolic diseases reach epidemic proportions. A better knowledge of the associated alterations in the metabolic pathways in the liver is necessary. These studies need in vitro human cell models. Several human hepatoma models are used, but the response of many metabolic pathways to physiological stimuli is often lost. Here, we characterize two human hepatocyte cell lines, IHH and HepaRG, by analysing the expression and regulation of genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. Our results show that the glycolysis pathway is activated by glucose and insulin in both lines. Gluconeogenesis gene expression is induced by forskolin in IHH cells and inhibited by insulin in both cell lines. The lipogenic pathway is regulated by insulin in IHH cells. Finally, both cell lines secrete apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins, an effect promoted by increasing glucose concentrations. These two human cell lines are thus interesting models to study the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism.

  8. Phenomenological study of the minimal R-symmetric supersymmetric standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diessner, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The Standard Model (SM) of particle physics gives a comprehensive description of numerous phenomena concerning the fundamental components of nature. Still, open questions and a clouded understanding of the underlying structure remain. Supersymmetry is a well motivated extension that may account for the observed density of dark matter in the universe and solve the hierarchy problem of the SM. The minimal supersymmetric extension of the SM (MSSM) provides solutions to these challenges. Furthermore, it predicts new particles in reach of current experiments. However, the model has its own theoretical challenges and is under fire from measurements provided by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Nevertheless, the concept of supersymmetry has an elegance which not only shines in the MSSM. Hence, it is also of interest to examine non-minimal supersymmetric models. They have benefits similar to the MSSM and may solve its shortcomings. R-symmetry is the only global symmetry allowed that does not commutate with supersymmetry and Lorentz symmetry. Thus, extending a supersymmetric model with R-symmetry is a theoretically well motivated endeavor to achieve the complete symmetry content of a field theory. Such a model provides a natural explanation for non-discovery in the early runs of the LHC and leads to further predictions distinct from those of the MSSM. The work described in this thesis contributes to the effort by studying the minimal R-symmetric supersymmetric extension of the SM (MRSSM). Important aspects of its physics and the dependence of observables on the parameter space of the MRSSM are investigated. The discovery of a scalar particle compatible with the Higgs boson of the SM at the LHC was announced in 2012. It is the first and crucial task of this thesis to understand the underlying mechanisms leading to the correct Higgs boson mass prediction in the MRSSM. Then, the relevant regions of parameter space are investigated and it is shown that they are also in agreement

  9. Phenomenological study of the minimal R-symmetric supersymmetric standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diessner, Philip

    2016-10-20

    The Standard Model (SM) of particle physics gives a comprehensive description of numerous phenomena concerning the fundamental components of nature. Still, open questions and a clouded understanding of the underlying structure remain. Supersymmetry is a well motivated extension that may account for the observed density of dark matter in the universe and solve the hierarchy problem of the SM. The minimal supersymmetric extension of the SM (MSSM) provides solutions to these challenges. Furthermore, it predicts new particles in reach of current experiments. However, the model has its own theoretical challenges and is under fire from measurements provided by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Nevertheless, the concept of supersymmetry has an elegance which not only shines in the MSSM. Hence, it is also of interest to examine non-minimal supersymmetric models. They have benefits similar to the MSSM and may solve its shortcomings. R-symmetry is the only global symmetry allowed that does not commutate with supersymmetry and Lorentz symmetry. Thus, extending a supersymmetric model with R-symmetry is a theoretically well motivated endeavor to achieve the complete symmetry content of a field theory. Such a model provides a natural explanation for non-discovery in the early runs of the LHC and leads to further predictions distinct from those of the MSSM. The work described in this thesis contributes to the effort by studying the minimal R-symmetric supersymmetric extension of the SM (MRSSM). Important aspects of its physics and the dependence of observables on the parameter space of the MRSSM are investigated. The discovery of a scalar particle compatible with the Higgs boson of the SM at the LHC was announced in 2012. It is the first and crucial task of this thesis to understand the underlying mechanisms leading to the correct Higgs boson mass prediction in the MRSSM. Then, the relevant regions of parameter space are investigated and it is shown that they are also in agreement

  10. Deformable three-dimensional model architecture for interactive augmented reality in minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemuri, Anant S; Wu, Jungle Chi-Hsiang; Liu, Kai-Che; Wu, Hurng-Sheng

    2012-12-01

    Surgical procedures have undergone considerable advancement during the last few decades. More recently, the availability of some imaging methods intraoperatively has added a new dimension to minimally invasive techniques. Augmented reality in surgery has been a topic of intense interest and research. Augmented reality involves usage of computer vision algorithms on video from endoscopic cameras or cameras mounted in the operating room to provide the surgeon additional information that he or she otherwise would have to recognize intuitively. One of the techniques combines a virtual preoperative model of the patient with the endoscope camera using natural or artificial landmarks to provide an augmented reality view in the operating room. The authors' approach is to provide this with the least number of changes to the operating room. Software architecture is presented to provide interactive adjustment in the registration of a three-dimensional (3D) model and endoscope video. Augmented reality including adrenalectomy, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, and retrocaval ureter and pancreas was used to perform 12 surgeries. The general feedback from the surgeons has been very positive not only in terms of deciding the positions for inserting points but also in knowing the least change in anatomy. The approach involves providing a deformable 3D model architecture and its application to the operating room. A 3D model with a deformable structure is needed to show the shape change of soft tissue during the surgery. The software architecture to provide interactive adjustment in registration of the 3D model and endoscope video with adjustability of every 3D model is presented.

  11. Big data modeling to predict platelet usage and minimize wastage in a tertiary care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Leying; Tian, Xiaoying; Gombar, Saurabh; Zemek, Allison J; Krishnan, Gomathi; Scott, Robert; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian; Tibshirani, Robert J; Pham, Tho D

    2017-10-24

    Maintaining a robust blood product supply is an essential requirement to guarantee optimal patient care in modern health care systems. However, daily blood product use is difficult to anticipate. Platelet products are the most variable in daily usage, have short shelf lives, and are also the most expensive to produce, test, and store. Due to the combination of absolute need, uncertain daily demand, and short shelf life, platelet products are frequently wasted due to expiration. Our aim is to build and validate a statistical model to forecast future platelet demand and thereby reduce wastage. We have investigated platelet usage patterns at our institution, and specifically interrogated the relationship between platelet usage and aggregated hospital-wide patient data over a recent consecutive 29-mo period. Using a convex statistical formulation, we have found that platelet usage is highly dependent on weekday/weekend pattern, number of patients with various abnormal complete blood count measurements, and location-specific hospital census data. We incorporated these relationships in a mathematical model to guide collection and ordering strategy. This model minimizes waste due to expiration while avoiding shortages; the number of remaining platelet units at the end of any day stays above 10 in our model during the same period. Compared with historical expiration rates during the same period, our model reduces the expiration rate from 10.5 to 3.2%. Extrapolating our results to the ∼2 million units of platelets transfused annually within the United States, if implemented successfully, our model can potentially save ∼80 million dollars in health care costs.

  12. Natural PQ symmetry in the 3-3-1 model with a minimal scalar sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, Bruce Lehmann Sanchez; Garcia, Juan Carlos Montero

    2011-01-01

    Full text: In the framework of a 3-3-1 model with a minimal scalar sector we make a detailed study concerning the implementation of the PQ symmetry in order to solve the strong CP problem. For the original version of the model, with only two scalar triplets, we show that the entire Lagrangian is invariant under a PQ-like symmetry but no axion is produced since an U(1) subgroup remains unbroken. Although in this case the strong CP problem can still be solved, the solution is largely disfavored since three quark states are left massless to all orders in perturbation theory. The addition of a third scalar triplet removes the massless quark states but the resulting axion is visible. In order to become realistic the model must be extended to account for massive quarks and invisible axion. We show that the addition of a scalar singlet together with a ZN discrete gauge symmetry can successfully accomplish these tasks and protect the axion field against quantum gravitational effects. To make sure that the protecting discrete gauge symmetry is anomaly free we use a discrete version of the Green-Schwarz mechanism. (author)

  13. Top quark electric dipole moment in a minimal supersymmetric standard model extension with vectorlike multiplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Tarek; Nath, Pran

    2010-01-01

    The electric dipole moment (EDM) of the top quark is calculated in a model with a vector like multiplet which mixes with the third generation in an extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. Such mixings allow for new CP violating phases. Including these new CP phases, the EDM of the top in this class of models is computed. The top EDM arises from loops involving the exchange of the W, the Z as well as from the exchange involving the charginos, the neutralinos, the gluino, and the vector like multiplet and their superpartners. The analysis of the EDM of the top is more complicated than for the light quarks because the mass of the external fermion, in this case the top quark mass cannot be ignored relative to the masses inside the loops. A numerical analysis is presented and it is shown that the top EDM could be close to 10 -19 ecm consistent with the current limits on the EDM of the electron, the neutron and on atomic EDMs. A top EDM of size 10 -19 ecm could be accessible in collider experiments such as the International Linear Collider.

  14. Minimal see-saw model predicting best fit lepton mixing angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Stephen F.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss a minimal predictive see-saw model in which the right-handed neutrino mainly responsible for the atmospheric neutrino mass has couplings to (ν e ,ν μ ,ν τ ) proportional to (0,1,1) and the right-handed neutrino mainly responsible for the solar neutrino mass has couplings to (ν e ,ν μ ,ν τ ) proportional to (1,4,2), with a relative phase η=−2π/5. We show how these patterns of couplings could arise from an A 4 family symmetry model of leptons, together with Z 3 and Z 5 symmetries which fix η=−2π/5 up to a discrete phase choice. The PMNS matrix is then completely determined by one remaining parameter which is used to fix the neutrino mass ratio m 2 /m 3 . The model predicts the lepton mixing angles θ 12 ≈34 ∘ ,θ 23 ≈41 ∘ ,θ 13 ≈9.5 ∘ , which exactly coincide with the current best fit values for a normal neutrino mass hierarchy, together with the distinctive prediction for the CP violating oscillation phase δ≈106 ∘

  15. A specific pharmacophore model of sodium-dependent glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chunlei; Zhu, Xiaoyun; Huang, Dandan; Zan, Xin; Yang, Baowei; Li, Ying; Du, Xiaoyong; Qian, Hai; Huang, Wenlong

    2012-06-01

    Sodium-dependent glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) plays a pivotal role in maintaining glucose equilibrium in the human body, emerging as one of the most promising targets for the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2. Pharmacophore models of SGLT2 inhibitors have been generated with a training set of 25 SGLT2 inhibitors using Discovery Studio V2.1. The best hypothesis (Hypo1(SGLT2)) contains one hydrogen bond donor, five excluded volumes, one ring aromatic and three hydrophobic features, and has a correlation coefficient of 0.955, cost difference of 68.76, RMSD of 0.85. This model was validated by test set, Fischer randomization test and decoy set methods. The specificity of Hypo1(SGLT2) was evaluated. The pharmacophore features of Hypo1(SGLT2) were different from the best pharmacophore model (Hypo1(SGLT1)) of SGLT1 inhibitors we developed. Moreover, Hypo1(SGLT2) could effectively distinguish selective inhibitors of SGLT2 from those of SGLT1. These results indicate that a highly predictive and specific pharmacophore model of SGLT2 inhibitors has been successfully obtained. Then Hypo1(SGLT2) was used as a 3D query to screen databases including NCI and Maybridge for identifying new inhibitors of SGLT2. The hit compounds were subsequently subjected to filtering by Lipinski's rule of five. And several compounds selected from the top ranked hits have been suggested for further experimental assay studies.

  16. An acute rat in vivo screening model to predict compounds that alter blood glucose and/or insulin regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brott, David A; Diamond, Melody; Campbell, Pam; Zuvich, Andy; Cheatham, Letitia; Bentley, Patricia; Gorko, Mary Ann; Fikes, James; Saye, JoAnne

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced glucose dysregulation and insulin resistance have been associated with weight gain and potential induction and/or exacerbation of diabetes mellitus in the clinic suggesting they may be safety biomarkers when developing antipsychotics. Glucose and insulin have also been suggested as potential efficacy biomarkers for some oncology compounds. The objective of this study was to qualify a medium throughput rat in vivo acute Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test (IVGTT) for predicting compounds that will induce altered blood glucose and/or insulin levels. Acute and sub-chronic studies were performed to qualify an acute IVGTT model. Double cannulated male rats (Han-Wistar and Sprague-Dawley) were administered vehicle, olanzapine, aripiprazole or other compounds at t=-44min for acute studies and at time=-44min on the last day of dosing for sub-chronic studies, treated with dextrose (time=0min; i.v.) and blood collected using an automated Culex® system for glucose and insulin analysis (time=-45, -1, 2, 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120, 150 and 180min). Olanzapine significantly increased glucose and insulin area under the curve (AUC) values while aripiprazole AUC values were similar to control, in both acute and sub-chronic studies. All atypical antipsychotics evaluated were consistent with literature references of clinical weight gain. As efficacy biomarkers, insulin AUC but not glucose AUC values were increased with a compound known to have insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) activity, compared to control treatment. These studies qualified the medium throughput acute IVGTT model to more quickly screen compounds for 1) safety - the potential to elicit glucose dysregulation and/or insulin resistance and 2) efficacy - as a surrogate for compounds affecting the glucose and/or insulin regulatory pathways. These data demonstrate that the same in vivo rat model and assays can be used to predict both clinical safety and efficacy of compounds. © 2013.

  17. Local cerebral glucose utilization in the beagle puppy model of intraventricular hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ment, L.R.; Stewart, W.B.; Duncan, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    Local cerebral glucose utilization has been measured by means of carbon-14( 14 C)-autoradiography with 2-deoxyglucose in the newborn beagle puppy model of intraventricular hemorrhage. Our studies demonstrate gray matter/white matter differentiation of uptake of 14 C-2-deoxyglucose in the control pups, as would be expected from adult animal studies. However, there is a marked homogeneity of 14 C-2-deoxyglucose uptake in all brain regions in the puppies with intraventricular hemorrhage, possibly indicating a loss of the known coupling between cerebral blood flow and metabolism in this neuropathological condition

  18. Long-Term Feeding of Chitosan Ameliorates Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in a High-Fructose-Diet-Impaired Rat Model of Glucose Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shing-Hwa Liu

    2015-12-01

    of glucose and lipid metabolism in a HF-diet-fed rat model.

  19. Kinetics of color development in glucose/Amino Acid model systems at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paola Echavarría

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of temperature on the color development of melanoidins formed from a single combination of glucose with amino acid. The selected amino acid, commonly found in apple juice and highly reactive in the Maillard reaction, were asparagine (Asn, aspartic acid (Asp and glutamic acid (Glu. For this, the color development was evaluated by measuring browning at 420 nm and color measurements by spectrophotometry and colorimetry methods. The effect of temperature on the color intensity, the absorption of melanoidins were also measured at different wavelengths (280, 325, 405. The value of melanoidins formed from all model systems was located on a dominant wavelength of 325 nm, the ultra violet zone of the diagram. A first-order kinetic model was applied to L* and the evolution of color difference ΔE*. In addition, a*, b* values, significantly differences were found in the glucose/aspartic acid model system in the brown-red zone. Therefore, the color development of the melanoidins was influenced by the type of amino acid and temperature, and it is thought that the a* and b* values can be used to explain the differences among the amino acid in the color development of melanoidins.

  20. Modeling the Error of the Medtronic Paradigm Veo Enlite Glucose Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Lyvia; Ramkissoon, Charrise M; Facchinetti, Andrea; Leal, Yenny; Vehi, Josep

    2017-06-12

    Continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) are prone to inaccuracy due to time lags, sensor drift, calibration errors, and measurement noise. The aim of this study is to derive the model of the error of the second generation Medtronic Paradigm Veo Enlite (ENL) sensor and compare it with the Dexcom SEVEN PLUS (7P), G4 PLATINUM (G4P), and advanced G4 for Artificial Pancreas studies (G4AP) systems. An enhanced methodology to a previously employed technique was utilized to dissect the sensor error into several components. The dataset used included 37 inpatient sessions in 10 subjects with type 1 diabetes (T1D), in which CGMs were worn in parallel and blood glucose (BG) samples were analyzed every 15 ± 5 min Calibration error and sensor drift of the ENL sensor was best described by a linear relationship related to the gain and offset. The mean time lag estimated by the model is 9.4 ± 6.5 min. The overall average mean absolute relative difference (MARD) of the ENL sensor was 11.68 ± 5.07% Calibration error had the highest contribution to total error in the ENL sensor. This was also reported in the 7P, G4P, and G4AP. The model of the ENL sensor error will be useful to test the in silico performance of CGM-based applications, i.e., the artificial pancreas, employing this kind of sensor.

  1. Model-based minimization algorithm of a supercritical helium loop consumption subject to operational constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, F.; Bonnay, P.; Girard, A.; Hoa, C.; Lacroix, B.; Le Coz, Q.; Nicollet, S.; Poncet, J.-M.; Zani, L.

    2017-12-01

    Supercritical helium loops at 4.2 K are the baseline cooling strategy of tokamaks superconducting magnets (JT-60SA, ITER, DEMO, etc.). This loops work with cryogenic circulators that force a supercritical helium flow through the superconducting magnets in order that the temperature stay below the working range all along their length. This paper shows that a supercritical helium loop associated with a saturated liquid helium bath can satisfy temperature constraints in different ways (playing on bath temperature and on the supercritical flow), but that only one is optimal from an energy point of view (every Watt consumed at 4.2 K consumes at least 220 W of electrical power). To find the optimal operational conditions, an algorithm capable of minimizing an objective function (energy consumption at 5 bar, 5 K) subject to constraints has been written. This algorithm works with a supercritical loop model realized with the Simcryogenics [2] library. This article describes the model used and the results of constrained optimization. It will be possible to see that the changes in operating point on the temperature of the magnet (e.g. in case of a change in the plasma configuration) involves large changes on the cryodistribution optimal operating point. Recommendations will be made to ensure that the energetic consumption is kept as low as possible despite the changing operating point. This work is partially supported by EUROfusion Consortium through the Euratom Research and Training Program 20142018 under Grant 633053.

  2. On the gauged Kaehler isometry in minimal supergravity models of inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrara, S.; Fre, P.; Sorin, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we address the question how to discriminate whether the gauged isometry group G Σ of the Kaehler manifold Σ that produces a D-type inflaton potential in a Minimal Supergravity Model is elliptic, hyperbolic or parabolic. We show that the classification of isometries of symmetric cosets can be extended to non symmetric Σ.s if these manifolds satisfy additional mathematical restrictions. The classification criteria established in the mathematical literature are coherent with simple criteria formulated in terms of the asymptotic behavior of the Kaehler potential K(C) = 2 J(C) where the real scalar field C encodes the inflaton field. As a by product of our analysis we show that phenomenologically admissible potentials for the description of inflation and in particular α-attractors are mostly obtained from the gauging of a parabolic isometry, this being, in particular the case of the Starobinsky model. Yet at least one exception exists of an elliptic α-attractor, so that neither type of isometry can be a priori excluded. The requirement of regularity of the manifold Σ poses instead strong constraints on the α-attractors and reduces their space considerably. Curiously there is a unique integrable α-attractor corresponding to a particular value of this parameter. (Copyright copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Model-Based Closed-Loop Glucose Control in Type 1 Diabetes: The DiaCon Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe; Boiroux, Dimitri; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine

    2013-01-01

    Background: To improve type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) management, we developed a model predictive control (MPC) algorithm for closed-loop (CL) glucose control based on a linear second-order deterministic-stochastic model. The deterministic part of the model is specified by three patient-specific......Background: To improve type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) management, we developed a model predictive control (MPC) algorithm for closed-loop (CL) glucose control based on a linear second-order deterministic-stochastic model. The deterministic part of the model is specified by three patient...... crossover studies. Study 1 compared CL with open-loop (OL) control. Study 2 compared glucose control after CL initiation in the euglycemic (CL-Eu) and hyperglycemic (CL-Hyper) ranges, respectively. Patients were studied from 22:00–07:00 on two separate nights. Results: Each study included six T1DM patients...

  4. Knowledge-based and model-based hybrid methodology for comprehensive waste minimization in electroplating plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Keqin

    1999-11-01

    The electroplating industry of over 10,000 planting plants nationwide is one of the major waste generators in the industry. Large quantities of wastewater, spent solvents, spent process solutions, and sludge are the major wastes generated daily in plants, which costs the industry tremendously for waste treatment and disposal and hinders the further development of the industry. It becomes, therefore, an urgent need for the industry to identify technically most effective and economically most attractive methodologies and technologies to minimize the waste, while the production competitiveness can be still maintained. This dissertation aims at developing a novel WM methodology using artificial intelligence, fuzzy logic, and fundamental knowledge in chemical engineering, and an intelligent decision support tool. The WM methodology consists of two parts: the heuristic knowledge-based qualitative WM decision analysis and support methodology and fundamental knowledge-based quantitative process analysis methodology for waste reduction. In the former, a large number of WM strategies are represented as fuzzy rules. This becomes the main part of the knowledge base in the decision support tool, WMEP-Advisor. In the latter, various first-principles-based process dynamic models are developed. These models can characterize all three major types of operations in an electroplating plant, i.e., cleaning, rinsing, and plating. This development allows us to perform a thorough process analysis on bath efficiency, chemical consumption, wastewater generation, sludge generation, etc. Additional models are developed for quantifying drag-out and evaporation that are critical for waste reduction. The models are validated through numerous industrial experiments in a typical plating line of an industrial partner. The unique contribution of this research is that it is the first time for the electroplating industry to (i) use systematically available WM strategies, (ii) know quantitatively and

  5. Minimization of required model runs in the Random Mixing approach to inverse groundwater flow and transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerning, Sebastian; Bardossy, Andras; du Plessis, Jaco

    2017-04-01

    Most geostatistical inverse groundwater flow and transport modelling approaches utilize a numerical solver to minimize the discrepancy between observed and simulated hydraulic heads and/or hydraulic concentration values. The optimization procedure often requires many model runs, which for complex models lead to long run times. Random Mixing is a promising new geostatistical technique for inverse modelling. The method is an extension of the gradual deformation approach. It works by finding a field which preserves the covariance structure and maintains observed hydraulic conductivities. This field is perturbed by mixing it with new fields that fulfill the homogeneous conditions. This mixing is expressed as an optimization problem which aims to minimize the difference between the observed and simulated hydraulic heads and/or concentration values. To preserve the spatial structure, the mixing weights must lie on the unit hyper-sphere. We present a modification to the Random Mixing algorithm which significantly reduces the number of model runs required. The approach involves taking n equally spaced points on the unit circle as weights for mixing conditional random fields. Each of these mixtures provides a solution to the forward model at the conditioning locations. For each of the locations the solutions are then interpolated around the circle to provide solutions for additional mixing weights at very low computational cost. The interpolated solutions are used to search for a mixture which maximally reduces the objective function. This is in contrast to other approaches which evaluate the objective function for the n mixtures and then interpolate the obtained values. Keeping the mixture on the unit circle makes it easy to generate equidistant sampling points in the space; however, this means that only two fields are mixed at a time. Once the optimal mixture for two fields has been found, they are combined to form the input to the next iteration of the algorithm. This

  6. Effects of xylitol on blood glucose, glucose tolerance, serum insulin and lipid profile in a type 2 diabetes model of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Shahidul; Indrajit, Mitesh

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to examine the antidiabetic effects of xylitol in a type 2 diabetes rat model. Six-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: normal control (NC), diabetic control (DBC) and xylitol (XYL). Diabetes was induced only in the DBC and XYL animal groups by feeding them a 10% fructose solution for 2 weeks followed by an injection (i.p.) of streptozotocin (40 mg/kg body weight). One week after the streptozotocin injection, the animals with a nonfasting blood glucose level of >300 mg/dl were considered to be diabetic. The XYL group was fed further with a 10% xylitol solution, whereas the NC and DBC groups were supplied with normal drinking water. After 5 weeks of intervention, food and fluid intake, body weight, blood glucose, serum fructosamine and most of the serum lipids were significantly decreased, and serum insulin concentration and glucose tolerance ability was significantly increased in the XYL group compared to the DBC group. Liver weight, liver glycogen and serum triglycerides were not influenced by feeding with xylitol. The data of this study suggest that xylitol can be used not only as a sugar substitute but also as a supplement to antidiabetic food and other food products. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Modeling the relative impact of capsular tissue effects on implanted glucose sensor time lag and signal attenuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Matthew T; Yuan, Fan; Reichert, William M

    2010-10-01

    Little is known mechanistically about why implanted glucose sensors lag behind blood glucose levels in both the time to peak sensor response and the magnitude of peak sensor response. A mathematical model of glucose transport from capillaries through surrounding tissue to the sensor surface was constructed to address how different aspects of the tissue affect glucose transport to an implanted sensor. Physiologically relevant values of capsule diffusion coefficient, capsule porosity, cellular glucose consumption, capsule thickness, and subcutaneous vessel density were used as inputs to create simulated sensor traces that mimic experimental instances of time lag and concentration attenuation relative to a given blood glucose profile. Using logarithmic sensitivity analysis, each parameter was analyzed to study the effect of these variables on both lag and attenuation. Results identify capsule thickness as the strongest determinant of sensor time lag, while subcutaneous vessel density and capsule porosity had the largest effects on attenuation of glucose that reaches the sensor surface. These findings provide mechanistic insight for the rational design of sensor modifications that may alleviate the deleterious consequences of tissue effects on implanted sensor performance.

  8. Multiple-Input Subject-Specific Modeling of Plasma Glucose Concentration for Feedforward Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotz, Kaylee; Cinar, Ali; Mei, Yong; Roggendorf, Amy; Littlejohn, Elizabeth; Quinn, Laurie; Rollins, Derrick K

    2014-11-26

    The ability to accurately develop subject-specific, input causation models, for blood glucose concentration (BGC) for large input sets can have a significant impact on tightening control for insulin dependent diabetes. More specifically, for Type 1 diabetics (T1Ds), it can lead to an effective artificial pancreas (i.e., an automatic control system that delivers exogenous insulin) under extreme changes in critical disturbances. These disturbances include food consumption, activity variations, and physiological stress changes. Thus, this paper presents a free-living, outpatient, multiple-input, modeling method for BGC with strong causation attributes that is stable and guards against overfitting to provide an effective modeling approach for feedforward control (FFC). This approach is a Wiener block-oriented methodology, which has unique attributes for meeting critical requirements for effective, long-term, FFC.

  9. Assessment of Model Predictive and Adaptive Glucose Control Strategies for People with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiroux, Dimitri; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Schmidt, Signe

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses overnight blood glucose stabilization in people with type 1 diabetes using a Model Predictive Controller (MPC). We use a control strategy based on an adaptive ARMAX model in which we use a Recursive Extended Least Squares (RELS) method to estimate parameters of the stochastic...... and reduce the risk of hypoglycemia. We test our control strategies on a virtual clinic of 100 randomly generated patients with a representative inter-subject variability. This virtual clinic is based on the Hovorka model. We consider the case where only half of the meal bolus is administered at mealtime......, and the case where the insulin sensitivity varies during the night. The simulation results demonstrate that the adaptive control strategy can reduce the risks of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia during the night....

  10. A generic model for glucose production from various cellulose sources by a commercial cellulase complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drissen, R.E.T.; Maas, R.H.W.; Maarel, M.J.E.C. van der; Kabel, M.A.; Schols, H.A.; Tramper, J.; Beeftink, H.H.

    2007-01-01

    The kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis by commercially available Cellubrix were described mathematically, with Avicel and wheat straw as substrates. It was demonstrated that hydrolysis could be described by three reactions: direct glucose formation and indirect glucose formation via cellobiose.

  11. Insulin sensitivity of hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism in animal models of hepatic steatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Grefhorst, Aldo

    2006-01-01

    De lever is betrokken bij de regulatie van zowel het koolhydraat als het vet metabolisme. De lever slaat glucose op als glycogeen, scheidt glucose uit, kan glucose maken uit bijvoorbeeld melkzuur en aminozuren (‘gluconeogenese’), zet glucose om in vet (‘de novo lipogenese’), verbrandt vetzuren in de beta-oxidatie (levert energie voor de gluconeogenese) en scheidt triglycerides uit in de circulatie in ‘very low density lipoprotein’ (VLDL) deeltjes. Insuline remt de glucoseproductie door de lev...

  12. Dihydrotestosterone deteriorates cardiac insulin signaling and glucose transport in the rat model of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepavčević, Snežana; Vojnović Milutinović, Danijela; Macut, Djuro; Žakula, Zorica; Nikolić, Marina; Božić-Antić, Ivana; Romić, Snježana; Bjekić-Macut, Jelica; Matić, Gordana; Korićanac, Goran

    2014-05-01

    It is supposed that women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are prone to develop cardiovascular disease as a consequence of multiple risk factors that are mostly related to the state of insulin resistance and consequent hyperinsulinemia. In the present study, we evaluated insulin signaling and glucose transporters (GLUT) in cardiac cells of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treated female rats as an animal model of PCOS. Expression of proteins involved in cardiac insulin signaling pathways and glucose transporters, as well as their phosphorylation or intracellular localization were studied by Western blot analysis in DHT-treated and control rats. Treatment with DHT resulted in increased body mass, absolute mass of the heart, elevated plasma insulin concentration, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. At the molecular level, DHT treatment did not change protein expression of cardiac insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate 1, while phosphorylation of the substrate at serine 307 was increased. Unexpectedly, although expression of downstream Akt kinase and its phosphorylation at threonine 308 were not altered, phosphorylation of Akt at serine 473 was increased in the heart of DHT-treated rats. In contrast, expression and phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 were decreased. Plasma membrane contents of GLUT1 and GLUT4 were decreased, as well as the expression of GLUT4 in cardiac cells at the end of androgen treatment. The obtained results provide evidence for alterations in expression and especially in functional characteristics of insulin signaling molecules and glucose transporters in the heart of DHT-treated rats with PCOS, indicating impaired cardiac insulin action. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. On the Gauged Kahler Isometry in Minimal Supergravity Models of Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Sergio; Sorin, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we address the question how to discriminate whether the gauged isometry group G_Sigma of the Kahler manifold Sigma that produces a D-type inflaton potential in a Minimal Supergravity Model is elliptic, hyperbolic or parabolic. We show that the classification of isometries of symmetric cosets can be extended to non symmetric Sigma.s if these manifolds satisfy additional mathematical restrictions. The classification criteria established in the mathematical literature are coherent with simple criteria formulated in terms of the asymptotic behavior of the Kahler potential K(C) = 2 J(C) where the real scalar field C encodes the inflaton field. As a by product of our analysis we show that all phenomenologically admissible potentials for the description of inflation and in particular alpha-attractors are mostly obtained from the gauging of a parabolic isometry. The requirement of regularity of the manifold Sigma poses strong constraints on the alpha-attractors and reduces their space considerably. Curi...

  14. On approximate reasoning and minimal models for the development of robust outdoor vehicle navigation schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pin, F.G.

    1993-11-01

    Outdoor sensor-based operation of autonomous robots has revealed to be an extremely challenging problem, mainly because of the difficulties encountered when attempting to represent the many uncertainties which are always present in the real world. These uncertainties are primarily due to sensor imprecisions and unpredictability of the environment, i.e., lack of full knowledge of the environment characteristics and dynamics. Two basic principles, or philosophies, and their associated methodologies are proposed in an attempt to remedy some of these difficulties. The first principle is based on the concept of ``minimal model`` for accomplishing given tasks and proposes to utilize only the minimum level of information and precision necessary to accomplish elemental functions of complex tasks. This approach diverges completely from the direction taken by most artificial vision studies which conventionally call for crisp and detailed analysis of every available component in the perception data. The paper will first review the basic concepts of this approach and will discuss its pragmatic feasibility when embodied in a behaviorist framework. The second principle which is proposed deals with implicit representation of uncertainties using Fuzzy Set Theory-based approximations and approximate reasoning, rather than explicit (crisp) representation through calculation and conventional propagation techniques. A framework which merges these principles and approaches is presented, and its application to the problem of sensor-based outdoor navigation of a mobile robot is discussed. Results of navigation experiments with a real car in actual outdoor environments are also discussed to illustrate the feasibility of the overall concept.

  15. On approximate reasoning and minimal models for the development of robust outdoor vehicle navigation schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.

    1993-01-01

    Outdoor sensor-based operation of autonomous robots has revealed to be an extremely challenging problem, mainly because of the difficulties encountered when attempting to represent the many uncertainties which are always present in the real world. These uncertainties are primarily due to sensor imprecisions and unpredictability of the environment, i.e., lack of full knowledge of the environment characteristics and dynamics. Two basic principles, or philosophies, and their associated methodologies are proposed in an attempt to remedy some of these difficulties. The first principle is based on the concept of ''minimal model'' for accomplishing given tasks and proposes to utilize only the minimum level of information and precision necessary to accomplish elemental functions of complex tasks. This approach diverges completely from the direction taken by most artificial vision studies which conventionally call for crisp and detailed analysis of every available component in the perception data. The paper will first review the basic concepts of this approach and will discuss its pragmatic feasibility when embodied in a behaviorist framework. The second principle which is proposed deals with implicit representation of uncertainties using Fuzzy Set Theory-based approximations and approximate reasoning, rather than explicit (crisp) representation through calculation and conventional propagation techniques. A framework which merges these principles and approaches is presented, and its application to the problem of sensor-based outdoor navigation of a mobile robot is discussed. Results of navigation experiments with a real car in actual outdoor environments are also discussed to illustrate the feasibility of the overall concept

  16. An analytical model to predict and minimize the residual stress of laser cladding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamanna, N.; Crouch, R.; Kabir, I. R.; Naher, S.

    2018-02-01

    Laser cladding is one of the advanced thermal techniques used to repair or modify the surface properties of high-value components such as tools, military and aerospace parts. Unfortunately, tensile residual stresses generate in the thermally treated area of this process. This work focuses on to investigate the key factors for the formation of tensile residual stress and how to minimize it in the clad when using dissimilar substrate and clad materials. To predict the tensile residual stress, a one-dimensional analytical model has been adopted. Four cladding materials (Al2O3, TiC, TiO2, ZrO2) on the H13 tool steel substrate and a range of preheating temperatures of the substrate, from 300 to 1200 K, have been investigated. Thermal strain and Young's modulus are found to be the key factors of formation of tensile residual stresses. Additionally, it is found that using a preheating temperature of the substrate immediately before laser cladding showed the reduction of residual stress.

  17. Minimal flavor violation in the lepton sector of the Randall-Sundrum model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Muchun; Yu Haibo

    2009-01-01

    We propose a realization of Minimal Flavor Violation in the lepton sector of the Randall-Sundrum model. With the MFV assumption, the only source of flavor violation are the 5D Yukawa couplings, and the usual two independent sources of flavor violation are related. In the limit of massless neutrinos, the bulk mass matrices and 5D Yukawa matrices are simultaneously diagonalized, and hence the absence of FCNCs. In the case of massive neutrinos, the contributions to FCNCs in the charged lepton sector are highly suppressed, due to the smallness of neutrino masses. In addition, the MFV assumption also allows suppressing one-loop charged current contributions to flavor changing processes by reducing the size of the Yukawa couplings, which is not possible in the generic anarchical case. We found that the first KK mass scale as low as ∼3 TeV can be allowed. In both cases, we present a set of numerical results that give rise to realistic lepton masses and mixing angles. Mild hierarchy in the 5D Yukawa matrix of O(25) in our numerical example is required to be consistent with two large and one small mixing angles. This tuning could be improved by having a more thorough search of the parameter space

  18. The calculation of sparticle and Higgs decays in the minimal and next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard models: SOFTSUSY4.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allanach, B. C.; Cridge, T.

    2017-11-01

    We describe a major extension of the SOFTSUSY spectrum calculator to include the calculation of the decays, branching ratios and lifetimes of sparticles into lighter sparticles, covering the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model (NMSSM) as well as the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). This document acts as a manual for the new version of SOFTSUSY, which includes the calculation of sparticle decays. We present a comprehensive collection of explicit expressions used by the program for the various partial widths of the different decay modes in the appendix. Program Files doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/5hhwwmp43g.1 Licensing provisions: GPLv3 Programming language:C++, fortran Nature of problem: Calculating supersymmetric particle partial decay widths in the MSSM or the NMSSM, given the parameters and spectrum which have already been calculated by SOFTSUSY. Solution method: Analytic expressions for tree-level 2 body decays and loop-level decays and one-dimensional numerical integration for 3 body decays. Restrictions: Decays are calculated in the real R -parity conserving MSSM or the real R -parity conserving NMSSM only. No additional charge-parity violation (CPV) relative to the Standard Model (SM). Sfermion mixing has only been accounted for in the third generation of sfermions in the decay calculation. Decays in the MSSM are 2-body and 3-body, whereas decays in the NMSSM are 2-body only. Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes. Reasons for the new version: Significantly extended functionality. The decay rates and branching ratios of sparticles are particularly useful for collider searches. Decays calculated in the NMSSM will be a particularly useful check of the other programs in the literature, of which there are few. Summary of revisions: Addition of the calculation of sparticle and Higgs decays. All 2-body and important 3-body tree-level decays, including phenomenologically important loop-level decays (notably, Higgs decays to

  19. Intralipid minimizes hepatocytes injury after anoxia-reoxygenation in an ex vivo rat liver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Michaela; Nuyens, Vincent; Boogaerts, Jean G

    2007-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is a determinant in liver injury occurring during surgical procedures, ischemic states, and multiple organ failure. The pre-existing nutritional status of the liver, i.e., fasting, might contribute to the extent of tissue injury. This study investigated whether Intralipid, a solution containing soybean oil, egg phospholipids, and glycerol, could protect ex vivo perfused livers of fasting rats from anoxia-reoxygenation injury. The portal vein was cannulated, and the liver was removed and perfused in a closed ex vivo system. Isolated livers were perfused with glucose 5.5 and 15 mM, and two different concentrations of Intralipid, i.e., 0.5:100 and 1:100 (v/v) Intralipid 10%:medium (n = 5 in each group). The experiment consisted of perfusion for 15 min, warm anoxia for 60 min, and reoxygenation during 60 min. Hepatic enzymes, potassium, glucose, lactate, bilirubin, dienes, trienes, and cytochrome-c were analyzed in perfusate samples. The proportion of glycogen in hepatocytes was determined in biopsies. Intralipid attenuated transaminases, lactate dehydrogenase, potassium, diene, and triene release in the perfusate (dose-dependant) during the reoxygenation phase when compared with glucose-treated groups. The concentration of cytochrome-c in the medium was the highest in the 5.5-mM glucose group. The glycogen content was low in all livers at the start of the experiment. Intralipid presents, under the present experimental conditions, a better protective effect than glucose in anoxia-reoxygenation injury of the rat liver.

  20. Minimal Super Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antola, M.; Di Chiara, S.; Sannino, F.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce novel extensions of the Standard Model featuring a supersymmetric technicolor sector (supertechnicolor). As the first minimal conformal supertechnicolor model we consider N=4 Super Yang-Mills which breaks to N=1 via the electroweak interactions. This is a well defined, economical......, between unparticle physics and Minimal Walking Technicolor. We consider also other N =1 extensions of the Minimal Walking Technicolor model. The new models allow all the standard model matter fields to acquire a mass....

  1. Scalar dark matter explanation of the DAMPE data in the minimal left-right symmetric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Junjie; Guo, Xiaofei; Shang, Liangliang; Wang, Fei; Wu, Peiwen; Zu, Lei

    2018-03-01

    The left-right symmetric model (LRSM) is an attractive extension of the Standard Model (SM) that can address the origin of parity violation in the SM electroweak interactions, generate tiny neutrino masses, accommodate dark matter (DM) candidates, and provide a natural framework for baryogenesis through leptogenesis. In this work, we utilize the minimal LRSM to study the recently reported DAMPE results of the cosmic e+e- spectrum, which exhibits a tentative peak around 1.4 TeV, while satisfying the current neutrino data. We propose to explain the DAMPE peak with a complex scalar DM χ in two scenarios: (1) χ χ*→H1++H1-→ℓi+ℓi+ℓj-ℓj- , and (2) χ χ*→Hk++Hk-→ℓi+ℓi+ℓj-ℓj- accompanied by χ χ*→H1+H1-→ℓi+νℓiℓj-νℓj , with ℓi,j=e , μ , τ and k =1 , 2. We fit the theoretical prediction of the e+e- spectrum to relevant experimental data to determine the scalar mass spectrum favored by the DAMPE excess. We also consider various constraints from theoretical principles and collider experiments, as well as DM relic density and direct search experiments. We find that there is ample parameter space to interpret the DAMPE data while also passing the constraints. On the other hand, our explanations usually imply the existence of other new physics at an energy scale ranging from 107 to 1011 GeV . Collider tests of our explanations are also discussed.

  2. KDT501, a derivative from hops, normalizes glucose metabolism and body weight in rodent models of diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veera R Konda

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We developed KDT501, a novel substituted 1,3-cyclopentadione chemically derived from hop extracts, and evaluated it in various in vitro and in vivo models of diabetes and insulin sensitivity. METHODS: KDT501 was evaluated for anti-inflammatory effects in monocyte/macrophage cells; agonistic activity for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR; lipogenesis and gene expression profile in human subcutaneous adipocytes. Body composition, glucose, insulin sensitivity, and lipids were assessed in diet-induced obesity (DIO mice and Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF rats after oral administration. RESULTS: KDT501 mediated lipogenesis in 3T3L1 and human subcutaneous adipocytes; however, the gene expression profile of KDT501 differed from that of the full PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone, suggesting that KDT501 has pleiotropic biological activities. In addition, KDT501 showed only modest, partial PPARγ agonist activity and exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in monocytes/macrophages that were not observed with rosiglitazone. In a DIO mouse model, oral administration of KDT501 significantly reduced fed blood glucose, glucose/insulin AUC following an oral glucose bolus, and body fat. In ZDF rats, oral administration of KDT501 significantly reduced fed glucose, fasting plasma glucose, and glucose AUC after an oral glucose bolus. Significant, dose-dependent reductions of plasma hemoglobin A1c, weight gain, total cholesterol, and triglycerides were also observed in animals receiving KDT501. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that KDT501 produces a unique anti-diabetic profile that is distinct in its spectrum of pharmacological effects and biological mechanism from both metformin and pioglitazone. KDT501 may thus constitute a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes and associated conditions.

  3. Mathematical model and minimal measurement system for optimal control of heated humidifiers in neonatal ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verta, Antonella; Schena, Emiliano; Silvestri, Sergio

    2010-06-01

    The control of thermo-hygrometric conditions of gas delivered in neonatal mechanical ventilation appears to be a particularly difficult task, mainly due to the vast number of parameters to be monitored and the control strategies of heated humidifiers to be adopted. In the present paper, we describe the heat and fluid exchange occurring in a heated humidifier in mathematical terms; we analyze the sensitivity of the relative humidity of outlet gas as a function of thermo-hygrometric and fluid-dynamic parameters of delivered gas; we propose a control strategy that will enable the stability of outlet gas thermo-hygrometric conditions. The mathematical model is represented by a hyper-surface containing the functional relations between the input variables, which must be measured, and the output variables, which have to remain constant. Model sensitivity analysis shows that heated humidifier efficacy and stability of outlet gas thermo-hygrometric conditions are principally influenced by four parameters: liquid surface temperature, gas flow rate, inlet gas temperature and inlet gas relative humidity. The theoretical model has been experimentally validated in typical working conditions of neonatal applications. The control strategy has been implemented by a minimal measurement system composed of three thermometers, a humidity sensor, and a flow rate sensor, and based on the theoretical model. Outlet relative humidity, contained in the range 90+/-4% and 94+/-4%, corresponding with temperature variations in the range 28+/-2 degrees C and 38+/-2 degrees C respectively, has been obtained in the whole flow rate range typical of neonatal ventilation from 1 to 10 L/min. We conclude that in order to obtain the stability of the thermo-hygrometric conditions of the delivered gas mixture: (a) a control strategy with a more complex measurement system must be implemented (i.e. providing more input variables); (b) and the gas may also need to be pre-warmed before entering the humidifying

  4. Effect of minimal enteral feeding on recovery in a methotrexate-induced gastrointestinal mucositis rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiken, Nicoline S. S.; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.; Havinga, Rick; Groen, Albert K.; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    Patients suffering from gastrointestinal mucositis often receive parenteral nutrition as nutritional support. However, the absence of enteral nutrition might not be beneficial for the intestine. We aimed to determine the feasibility of minimal enteral feeding (MEF) administration in a methotrexate

  5. Continuous-time interval model identification of blood glucose dynamics for type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchsteiger, Harald; Johansson, Rolf; Renard, Eric; del Re, Luigi

    2014-07-01

    While good physiological models of the glucose metabolism in type 1 diabetic patients are well known, their parameterisation is difficult. The high intra-patient variability observed is a further major obstacle. This holds for data-based models too, so that no good patient-specific models are available. Against this background, this paper proposes the use of interval models to cover the different metabolic conditions. The control-oriented models contain a carbohydrate and insulin sensitivity factor to be used for insulin bolus calculators directly. Available clinical measurements were sampled on an irregular schedule which prompts the use of continuous-time identification, also for the direct estimation of the clinically interpretable factors mentioned above. An identification method is derived and applied to real data from 28 diabetic patients. Model estimation was done on a clinical data-set, whereas validation results shown were done on an out-of-clinic, everyday life data-set. The results show that the interval model approach allows a much more regular estimation of the parameters and avoids physiologically incompatible parameter estimates.

  6. One loop corrections to the lightest Higgs mass in the minimal η model with a heavy Z'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comelli, D.

    1992-06-01

    We have evaluated the one loop correction to the bound on the lightest Higgs mass valid in the minimal, E 6 based, supersymmetric η model in the presence of a 'heavy' Z', M z' ≥1 TeV. The dominant contribution from the fermion sfermion sector increases the 108 GeV tree level value by an amount that depends on the top mass in a way that is largely reminescent of minimal SUSY models. For M t ≤150 GeV, Msub(t tilde)=1 TeV, the 'light' Higgs mass is always ≤130 GeV. (orig.)

  7. Simulation of the effect of hydrogen bonds on water activity of glucose and dextran using the Veytsman model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito, Francesca; Veytsman, Boris; Painter, Paul; Kokini, Jozef L

    2015-03-06

    Carbohydrates exhibit either van der Waals and ionic interactions or strong hydrogen bonding interactions. The prominence and large number of hydrogen bonds results in major contributions to phase behavior. A thermodynamic framework that accounts for hydrogen bonding interactions is therefore necessary. We have developed an extension of the thermodynamic model based on the Veytsman association theory to predict the contribution of hydrogen bonds to the behavior of glucose-water and dextran-water systems and we have calculated the free energy of mixing and its derivative leading to chemical potential and water activity. We compared our calculations with experimental data of water activity for glucose and dextran and found excellent agreement far superior to the Flory-Huggins theory. The validation of our calculations using experimental data demonstrated the validity of the Veytsman model in properly accounting for the hydrogen bonding interactions and successfully predicting water activity of glucose and dextran. Our calculations of the concentration of hydrogen bonds using the Veytsman model were instrumental in our ability to explain the difference between glucose and dextran and the role that hydrogen bonds play in contributing to these differences. The miscibility predictions showed that the Veytsman model is also able to correctly describe the phase behavior of glucose and dextran. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Predictive performance for population models using stochastic differential equations applied on data from an oral glucose tolerance test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jonas Bech; Overgaard, R.V.; Madsen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Several articles have investigated stochastic differential equations (SDEs) in PK/PD models, but few have quantitatively investigated the benefits to predictive performance of models based on real data. Estimation of first phase insulin secretion which reflects beta-cell function using models of ...... obtained from the glucose tolerance tests. Since, the estimation time of extended models was not heavily increased compared to basic models, the applied method is concluded to have high relevance not only in theory but also in practice....

  9. Improving groundwater management in rural India using simple modeling tools with minimal data requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysey, S. M.; Oblinger, J. A.; Ravindranath, R.; Guha, C.

    2008-12-01

    shortly after the start of the monsoon and villager water use is small compared to the other fluxes. Groundwater fluxes were accounted for by conceptualizing the contributing areas upstream and downstream of the reservoir as one dimensional flow tubes. This description of the flow system allows for the definition of physically-based parameters making the model useful for investigating WHS infiltration under a variety of management scenarios. To address concerns regarding the uniqueness of the model parameters, 10,000 independent model calibrations were performed using randomly selected starting parameters. Based on this Monte Carlo analysis, it was found that the mean volume of water contributed by the WHS to infiltration over the study period (Sept.-Dec., 2007) was 48.1x103m3 with a 95% confidence interval of 43.7-53.7x103m3. This volume represents 17-21% of the total natural groundwater recharge contributed by the entire watershed, which was determined independently using a surface water balance. Despite the fact that the model is easy to use and requires minimal data, the results obtained provide a powerful quantitative starting point for managing groundwater withdrawals in the dry season.

  10. The minimal SUSY B−L model: simultaneous Wilson lines and string thresholds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deen, Rehan; Ovrut, Burt A. [Department of Physics, University of Pennsylvania,209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6396 (United States); Purves, Austin [Department of Physics, University of Pennsylvania,209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6396 (United States); Department of Physics, Manhattanville College,2900 Purchase Street, Purchase, NY 10577 (United States)

    2016-07-08

    In previous work, we presented a statistical scan over the soft supersymmetry breaking parameters of the minimal SUSY B−L model. For specificity of calculation, unification of the gauge parameters was enforced by allowing the two ℤ{sub 3}×ℤ{sub 3} Wilson lines to have mass scales separated by approximately an order of magnitude. This introduced an additional “left-right” sector below the unification scale. In this paper, for three important reasons, we modify our previous analysis by demanding that the mass scales of the two Wilson lines be simultaneous and equal to an “average unification” mass 〈M{sub U}〉. The present analysis is 1) more “natural” than the previous calculations, which were only valid in a very specific region of the Calabi-Yau moduli space, 2) the theory is conceptually simpler in that the left-right sector has been removed and 3) in the present analysis the lack of gauge unification is due to threshold effects — particularly heavy string thresholds, which we calculate statistically in detail. As in our previous work, the theory is renormalization group evolved from 〈M{sub U}〉 to the electroweak scale — being subjected, sequentially, to the requirement of radiative B−L and electroweak symmetry breaking, the present experimental lower bounds on the B−L vector boson and sparticle masses, as well as the lightest neutral Higgs mass of ∼125 GeV. The subspace of soft supersymmetry breaking masses that satisfies all such constraints is presented and shown to be substantial.

  11. Modelling the glucose-insulin-glucagon dynamics after subcutaneous administration of native glucagon and a novel glucagon analogue in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Boye Knudsen, Carsten; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    Zealand Pharma has invented a glucagon analogue, ZP-GA-1, with increased stability in liquid formulation for treatment of hypoglycemia. A pharmacodynamic (PD) model is needed to compare ZP-GA-1 with marketed glucagon. We aim to develop a model of the complex glucose-insulin-glucagon dynamics based...... on physiology and data....

  12. Identification of individualised empirical models of carbohydrate and insulin effects on T1DM blood glucose dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cescon, Marzia; Johansson, Rolf; Renard, Eric; Maran, Alberto

    2014-07-01

    One of the main limiting factors in improving glucose control for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) subjects is the lack of a precise description of meal and insulin intake effects on blood glucose. Knowing the magnitude and duration of such effects would be useful not only for patients and physicians, but also for the development of a controller targeting glycaemia regulation. Therefore, in this paper we focus on estimating low-complexity yet physiologically sound and individualised multi-input single-output (MISO) models of the glucose metabolism in T1DM able to reflect the basic dynamical features of the glucose-insulin metabolic system in response to a meal intake or an insulin injection. The models are continuous-time second-order transfer functions relating the amount of carbohydrate of a meal and the insulin units of the accordingly administered dose (inputs) to plasma glucose evolution (output) and consist of few parameters clinically relevant to be estimated. The estimation strategy is continuous-time data-driven system identification and exploits a database in which meals and insulin boluses are separated in time, allowing the unique identification of the model parameters.

  13. Self-Averaging Property of Minimal Investment Risk of Mean-Variance Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzato, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    In portfolio optimization problems, the minimum expected investment risk is not always smaller than the expected minimal investment risk. That is, using a well-known approach from operations research, it is possible to derive a strategy that minimizes the expected investment risk, but this strategy does not always result in the best rate of return on assets. Prior to making investment decisions, it is important to an investor to know the potential minimal investment risk (or the expected minimal investment risk) and to determine the strategy that will maximize the return on assets. We use the self-averaging property to analyze the potential minimal investment risk and the concentrated investment level for the strategy that gives the best rate of return. We compare the results from our method with the results obtained by the operations research approach and with those obtained by a numerical simulation using the optimal portfolio. The results of our method and the numerical simulation are in agreement, but they differ from that of the operations research approach.

  14. Self-Averaging Property of Minimal Investment Risk of Mean-Variance Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Shinzato

    Full Text Available In portfolio optimization problems, the minimum expected investment risk is not always smaller than the expected minimal investment risk. That is, using a well-known approach from operations research, it is possible to derive a strategy that minimizes the expected investment risk, but this strategy does not always result in the best rate of return on assets. Prior to making investment decisions, it is important to an investor to know the potential minimal investment risk (or the expected minimal investment risk and to determine the strategy that will maximize the return on assets. We use the self-averaging property to analyze the potential minimal investment risk and the concentrated investment level for the strategy that gives the best rate of return. We compare the results from our method with the results obtained by the operations research approach and with those obtained by a numerical simulation using the optimal portfolio. The results of our method and the numerical simulation are in agreement, but they differ from that of the operations research approach.

  15. Hepatic glucose output in humans measured with labeled glucose to reduce negative errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, J.C.; Brown, G.; Matthews, D.R.; Turner, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Steele and others have suggested that minimizing changes in glucose specific activity when estimating hepatic glucose output (HGO) during glucose infusions could reduce non-steady-state errors. This approach was assessed in nondiabetic and type II diabetic subjects during constant low dose [27 mumol.kg ideal body wt (IBW)-1.min-1] glucose infusion followed by a 12 mmol/l hyperglycemic clamp. Eight subjects had paired tests with and without labeled infusions. Labeled infusion was used to compare HGO in 11 nondiabetic and 15 diabetic subjects. Whereas unlabeled infusions produced negative values for endogenous glucose output, labeled infusions largely eliminated this error and reduced the dependence of the Steele model on the pool fraction in the paired tests. By use of labeled infusions, 11 nondiabetic subjects suppressed HGO from 10.2 +/- 0.6 (SE) fasting to 0.8 +/- 0.9 mumol.kg IBW-1.min-1 after 90 min of glucose infusion and to -1.9 +/- 0.5 mumol.kg IBW-1.min-1 after 90 min of a 12 mmol/l glucose clamp, but 15 diabetic subjects suppressed only partially from 13.0 +/- 0.9 fasting to 5.7 +/- 1.2 at the end of the glucose infusion and 5.6 +/- 1.0 mumol.kg IBW-1.min-1 in the clamp (P = 0.02, 0.002, and less than 0.001, respectively)

  16. A novel method for oxygen glucose deprivation model in organotypic spinal cord slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Jie; Ding, Xiao-Yan; Xiang, Li; Zhao, Feng; Huang, Sheng-Li

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to establish a model to closely mimic spinal cord hypoxic-ischemic injury with high production and high reproducibility. Fourteen-day cultured organotypic spinal cord slices were divided into 4 groups: control (Ctrl), oxygen glucose deprived for 30min (OGD 30min), OGD 60min, and OGD 120min. The Ctrl slices were incubated with 1ml propidium iodide (PI) solution (5μg/ml) for 30min. The OGD groups were incubated with 1ml glucose-free DMEM/F12 medium and 5μl PI solution (1mg/ml) for 30min, 60min and 120min, respectively. Positive control slice was fixed by 4% paraformaldehyde for 20min. The culture medium in each group was then collected and the Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) level in the medium was tested using Multi-Analyte ELISArray kits. Structure and refraction of the spinal cord slices were observed by light microscope. Fluorescence intensity of PI was examined by fluorescence microscopy and was tested by IPP Software. Morphology of astrocytes was observed by immunofluorescence histochemistry. Caspase 3 and caspase 3 active in different groups were tested by Western blot. In the OGD groups, the refraction of spinal cord slices decreased and the structure was unclear. The changes of refraction and structure in the OGD 120min group were similar to that in the positive control slice. Astrocyte morphology changed significantly. With the increase of OGD time, processes became thick and twisted, and nuclear condensations became more apparent. Obvious changes in morphology were observed in the OGD 60min group, and normal morphology disappeared in the OGD 120min group. Fluorescence intensity of PI increased along with the extension of OGD time. The difference was significant between 30min and 60min, but not significant between 60min and 120min. The intensity at OGD 120min was close to that in the positive control. Compare with the Ctrl group, the OGD groups had significantly higher LDH levels and caspase 3 active/caspase 3 ratios. The values increased

  17. Dimethyl amiloride improves glucose homeostasis in mouse models of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardana, Subhadra C; Head, W Steven; Piston, David W

    2008-06-01

    Dimethyl amiloride (DMA) enhances insulin secretion in the pancreatic beta-cell. DMA also enhances time-dependent potentiation (TDP) and enables TDP to occur in situations where it is normally absent. As we have demonstrated before, these effects are mediated in part through inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), resulting in increased availability of arginine. Thus both DMA and arginine have the potential to correct the secretory defect in diabetes by enabling or enhancing TDP. In the current study we have demonstrated the ability of these agents to improve blood glucose homeostasis in three mouse models of type 2 diabetes. The pattern of TDP under different conditions indicates that inhibition of NOS is not the only mechanism through which DMA exerts its positive effects. Thus we also have explored another possible mechanism through which DMA enables/enhances TDP, via the activation of mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase.

  18. Extending minimal repair models for repairable systems: A comparison of dynamic and heterogeneous extensions of a nonhomogeneous Poisson process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asfaw, Zeytu Gashaw; Lindqvist, Bo Henry

    2015-01-01

    For many applications of repairable systems, the minimal repair assumption, which leads to nonhomogeneous Poisson processes (NHPP), is not adequate. We review and study two extensions of the NHPP, the dynamic NHPP and the heterogeneous NHPP. Both extensions are motivated by specific aspects of potential applications. It has long been known, however, that the two paradigms are essentially indistinguishable in an analysis of failure data. We investigate the connection between the two approaches for extending NHPP models, both theoretically and numerically in a data example and a simulation study. - Highlights: • Review of dynamic extension of a minimal repair model (LEYP), introduced by Le Gat. • Derivation of likelihood function and comparison to NHPP model with heterogeneity. • Likelihood functions and conditional intensities are similar for the models. • ML estimation is considered for both models using a power law baseline. • A simulation study illustrates and confirms findings of the theoretical study

  19. Solar system tests for realistic f(T) models with non-minimal torsion-matter coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Rui-Hui; Zhai, Xiang-Hua; Li, Xin-Zhou [Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai United Center for Astrophysics (SUCA), Shanghai (China)

    2017-08-15

    In the previous paper, we have constructed two f(T) models with non-minimal torsion-matter coupling extension, which are successful in describing the evolution history of the Universe including the radiation-dominated era, the matter-dominated era, and the present accelerating expansion. Meantime, the significant advantage of these models is that they could avoid the cosmological constant problem of ΛCDM. However, the non-minimal coupling between matter and torsion will affect the tests of the Solar system. In this paper, we study the effects of the Solar system in these models, including the gravitation redshift, geodetic effect and perihelion precession. We find that Model I can pass all three of the Solar system tests. For Model II, the parameter is constrained by the uncertainties of the planets' estimated perihelion precessions. (orig.)

  20. Mixed model of dietary fat effect on postprandial glucose-insulin metabolism from carbohydrates in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto Noguchi, Claudia Cecilia; Kunikane, Noriaki; Hashimoto, Shogo; Furutani, Eiko

    2015-08-01

    In this study we introduce an extension of a previously developed model of glucose-insulin metabolism in type 1 diabetes (T1D) from carbohydrates that includes the effect of dietary fat on postprandial glycemia. We include two compartments that represent plasma triglyceride and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration, in addition to a mathematical representation of delayed gastric emptying and insulin resistance, which are the most well-known effects of dietary fat metabolism. Simulation results show that postprandial glucose as well as lipid levels in our model approximates clinical data from T1D patients.

  1. Minimal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dierkes, Ulrich; Sauvigny, Friedrich; Jakob, Ruben; Kuster, Albrecht

    2010-01-01

    Minimal Surfaces is the first volume of a three volume treatise on minimal surfaces (Grundlehren Nr. 339-341). Each volume can be read and studied independently of the others. The central theme is boundary value problems for minimal surfaces. The treatise is a substantially revised and extended version of the monograph Minimal Surfaces I, II (Grundlehren Nr. 295 & 296). The first volume begins with an exposition of basic ideas of the theory of surfaces in three-dimensional Euclidean space, followed by an introduction of minimal surfaces as stationary points of area, or equivalently

  2. Fermilab Tevatron and CERN LEP II probes of minimal and string-motivated supergravity models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, H.; Gunion, J.F.; Kao, C.; Pois, H.

    1995-01-01

    We explore the ability of the Fermilab Tevatron to probe minimal supersymmetry with high-energy-scale boundary conditions motivated by supersymmetry breaking in the context of minimal and string-motivated supergravity theory. A number of boundary condition possibilities are considered: dilatonlike string boundary conditions applied at the standard GUT unification scale or alternatively at the string scale; and extreme (''no-scale'') minimal supergravity boundary conditions imposed at the GUT scale or string scale. For numerous specific cases within each scenario the sparticle spectra are computed and then fed into ISAGET 7.07 so that explicit signatures can be examined in detail. We find that, for some of the boundary condition choices, large regions of parameter space can be explored via same-sign dilepton and isolated trilepton signals. For other choices, the mass reach of Tevatron collider experiments is much more limited. We also compare the mass reach of Tevatron experiments with the corresponding reach at CERN LEP 200

  3. The analytic solution of the firm's cost-minimization problem with box constraints and the Cobb-Douglas model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayón, L.; Grau, J. M.; Ruiz, M. M.; Suárez, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the most well-known problems in the field of Microeconomics is the Firm's Cost-Minimization Problem. In this paper we establish the analytical expression for the cost function using the Cobb-Douglas model and considering maximum constraints for the inputs. Moreover we prove that it belongs to the class C1.

  4. Effect of Cholera Toxin Administered Supraspinally or Spinally on the Blood Glucose Level in Pain and D-Glucose Fed Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Sim, Yun-Beom; Park, Soo-Hyun; Kang, Yu-Jung; Kim, Sung-Su; Kim, Chea-Ha; Kim, Su-Jin; Jung, Jun-Sub; Ryu, Ohk-Hyun; Choi, Moon-Gi; Choi, Seong-Soo; Suh, Hong-Won

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of intrathecal (i.t.) or intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration with cholera toxin (CTX) on the blood glucose level was examined in ICR mice. The i.t. treatment with CTX alone for 24 h dose-dependently increased the blood glucose level. However, i.c.v. treatment with CTX for 24 h did not affect the blood glucose level. When mice were orally fed with D-glucose (2 g/kg), the blood glucose level reached to a maximum level at 30 min and almost returned to...

  5. Glucose and Lipid Dysmetabolism in a Rat Model of Prediabetes Induced by a High-Sucrose Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgeiro, Ana; Cerqueira, Manuela G.; Varela-Rodríguez, Bárbara M.; Nunes, Sara; Neto, Paula; Pereira, Frederico C.; Reis, Flávio; Carvalho, Eugénia

    2017-01-01

    Glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity are key features of type 2 diabetes mellitus, but their molecular nature during the early stages of the disease remains to be elucidated. We aimed to characterize glucose and lipid metabolism in insulin-target organs (liver, skeletal muscle, and white adipose tissue) in a rat model treated with a high-sucrose (HSu) diet. Two groups of 16-week-old male Wistar rats underwent a 9-week protocol: HSu diet (n = 10)—received 35% of sucrose in drinking water; Control (n = 12)—received vehicle (water). Body weight, food, and beverage consumption were monitored and glucose, insulin, and lipid profiles were measured. Serum and liver triglyceride concentrations, as well as the expression of genes and proteins involved in lipid biosynthesis were assessed. The insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis were also measured in freshly isolated adipocytes. Even in the absence of obesity, this rat model already presented the main features of prediabetes, with fasting normoglycemia but reduced glucose tolerance, postprandial hyperglycemia, compensatory hyperinsulinemia, as well as decreased insulin sensitivity (resistance) and hypertriglyceridemia. In addition, impaired hepatic function, including altered gluconeogenic and lipogenic pathways, as well as increased expression of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase 1 and fatty acid synthase in the liver, were observed, suggesting that liver glucose and lipid dysmetabolism may play a major role at this stage of the disease. PMID:28635632

  6. AGT, N-Burge partitions and W{sub N} minimal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belavin, Vladimir [I.E. Tamm Department of Theoretical Physics, P N Lebedev Physical Institute,Leninsky Avenue 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Department of Quantum Physics, Institute for Information Transmission Problems,Bolshoy Karetny per. 19, 127994 Moscow (Russian Federation); Foda, Omar [Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne,Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Santachiara, Raoul [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Modèles Statistiques, Université Paris-Sud,CNRS UMR 8626, Bat. 100, 91405 Orsay cedex (France)

    2015-10-12

    Let B{sub N,n} {sup p,} {sup p{sup ′,}} {sup H} be a conformal block, with n consecutive channels χ{sub ι}, ι=1,⋯,n, in the conformal field theory M{sub N} {sup p,} {sup p{sup ′}} × M{sup H}, where M{sub N} {sup p,} {sup p{sup ′}} is a W{sub N} minimal model, generated by chiral spin-2, ⋯, spin-N currents, and labeled by two co-prime integers p and p{sup ′}, 1

  7. Glucose effectiveness is a critical pathogenic factor leading to glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes: An ignored hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, F P; Henriksen, J E; Rantzau, C; Beck-Nielsen, H

    2018-02-16

    Although the ability of glucose to mediate its own in vivo metabolism is long documented, the quantitative measurement of whole body glucose-mediated glucose disposal at basal insulin levels (glucose effectiveness [GE]), followed the introduction of the Minimal Model intravenous glucose tolerance test technique. A literature review, combined with our own studies, of the role of GE in glucose metabolism in normal and "at risk" individuals, was undertaken to determine GE's contribution to glucose homeostasis. GE accounts for ~45% to 65% of glucose disposal in man. A negative association between GE and insulin meditated glucose disposal (Si), is present in normal subjects without a family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus but is absent in normoglycaemic "at risk" relatives with a positive family history of diabetes mellitus. Intracellular GE disposal is mediated by mass action of glucose through the skeletal muscle membrane via facilitated Glut 4 transporters. However, GE is frequently forgotten as a significant contributor to the development of glucose intolerance in "at risk" individuals. Only limited studies have examined the role of a lower GE in such normoglycemic subjects with preexisting mild insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction. These studies demonstrate that in "at risk" individuals, an initial low GE is a key contributor and predictor of future glucose intolerance, whereas an initial raised GE is protective against future glucose intolerance. In "at risk" individuals, a low GE and genetically determined vulnerable β-cell function are more critical determinants of future glucose intolerance than their preexisting insulin-resistant state. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility upgrades project - A model for waste minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, M.L.; Durrer, R.E.; Kennicott, M.A.

    1996-07-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility, constructed in 1952, is currently undergoing a major, multi-year construction project. Many of the operations required under this project (i.e., design, demolition, decontamination, construction, and waste management) mimic the processes required of a large scale decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) job and are identical to the requirements of any of several upgrades projects anticipated for LANL and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. For these reasons the CMR Upgrades Project is seen as an ideal model facility - to test the application, and measure the success of - waste minimization techniques which could be brought to bear on any of the similar projects. The purpose of this paper will be to discuss the past, present, and anticipated waste minimization applications at the facility and will focus on the development and execution of the project's open-quotes Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention Strategic Plan.close quotes

  9. Model studies on acrylamide generation from glucose/asparagine in aqueous glycerol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Rikke Susanne Vingborg; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Granby, Kit

    2007-01-01

    Acrylamide formation from asparagine and glucose in different ratios in neutral glycerol/water mixtures was found to increase with decreasing water activity (0.33......Acrylamide formation from asparagine and glucose in different ratios in neutral glycerol/water mixtures was found to increase with decreasing water activity (0.33...

  10. Validation of a Simulation Model Describing the Glucose-Insulin-Glucagon Pharmacodynamics in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Ranjan, Ajenthen; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg

    Currently, no consensus exists on a model describing endogenous glucose production (EGP) as a function of glucagon concentrations. Reliable simulations to determine the glucagon dose preventing or treating hypoglycemia or to tune a dual-hormone artificial pancreas control algorithm need a validat...

  11. Non-minimally coupled quintessence dark energy model with a cubic galileon term: a dynamical system analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Somnath; Mukherjee, Pradip; Roy, Amit Singha; Saha, Anirban

    2018-03-01

    We consider a scalar field which is generally non-minimally coupled to gravity and has a characteristic cubic Galilean-like term and a generic self-interaction, as a candidate of a Dark Energy model. The system is dynamically analyzed and novel fixed points with perturbative stability are demonstrated. Evolution of the system is numerically studied near a novel fixed point which owes its existence to the Galileon character of the model. It turns out that demanding the stability of this novel fixed point puts a strong restriction on the allowed non-minimal coupling and the choice of the self-interaction. The evolution of the equation of state parameter is studied, which shows that our model predicts an accelerated universe throughout and the phantom limit is only approached closely but never crossed. Our result thus extends the findings of Coley, Dynamical systems and cosmology. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston (2013) for more general NMC than linear and quadratic couplings.

  12. Effects of CDP-choline on neurologic deficits and cerebral glucose metabolism in a rat model of cerebral ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakihana, M.; Fukuda, N.; Suno, M.; Nagaoka, A.

    1988-02-01

    The effects of cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) on neurologic deficits and cerebral glucose metabolism were studied in a rat model of transient cerebral ischemia. Cerebral ischemia was induced by occluding both common carotid arteries for 20 or 30 minutes 24 hours after the vertebral arteries were permanently occluded by electrocautery. CDP-choline was administered intraperitoneally twice daily for 4 days after reestablishing carotid blood flow. CDP-choline at two dosages (50 and 250 mg/kg) shortened the time required for recovery of spontaneous motor activity in a dose-related manner; recovery time was measured early after reperfusion. Neurologic signs were observed for 10 days. High-dose CDP-choline improved neurologic signs in the rats within 20-30 minutes of ischemia. When cerebral glucose metabolism was assessed on Day 4, increases in the levels of glucose and pyruvate were accompanied by decreases in the synthesis of labeled acetylcholine from uniformly labeled (/sup 14/C)glucose measured in the cerebral cortex of rats with 30 minutes of ischemia. High-dose CDP-choline also attenuated changes in these variables. CDP-(1,2-/sup 14/C)choline injected intravenously 10 minutes after reperfusion was used for membrane lipid biosynthesis. These results indicate that CDP-choline has beneficial effects on brain dysfunction induced by cerebral ischemia, which may be due in part to the restorative effects of CDP-choline on disturbed cerebral glucose metabolism, probably by stimulating phospholipid biosynthesis.

  13. Effects of CDP-choline on neurologic deficits and cerebral glucose metabolism in a rat model of cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakihana, M.; Fukuda, N.; Suno, M.; Nagaoka, A.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) on neurologic deficits and cerebral glucose metabolism were studied in a rat model of transient cerebral ischemia. Cerebral ischemia was induced by occluding both common carotid arteries for 20 or 30 minutes 24 hours after the vertebral arteries were permanently occluded by electrocautery. CDP-choline was administered intraperitoneally twice daily for 4 days after reestablishing carotid blood flow. CDP-choline at two dosages (50 and 250 mg/kg) shortened the time required for recovery of spontaneous motor activity in a dose-related manner; recovery time was measured early after reperfusion. Neurologic signs were observed for 10 days. High-dose CDP-choline improved neurologic signs in the rats within 20-30 minutes of ischemia. When cerebral glucose metabolism was assessed on Day 4, increases in the levels of glucose and pyruvate were accompanied by decreases in the synthesis of labeled acetylcholine from uniformly labeled [ 14 C]glucose measured in the cerebral cortex of rats with 30 minutes of ischemia. High-dose CDP-choline also attenuated changes in these variables. CDP-[1,2- 14 C]choline injected intravenously 10 minutes after reperfusion was used for membrane lipid biosynthesis. These results indicate that CDP-choline has beneficial effects on brain dysfunction induced by cerebral ischemia, which may be due in part to the restorative effects of CDP-choline on disturbed cerebral glucose metabolism, probably by stimulating phospholipid biosynthesis

  14. Human TP53 polymorphism (rs1042522) modelled in mouse does not affect glucose metabolism and body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiling, Erwin; Speksnijder, Ewoud N; Pronk, Amanda C M; van den Berg, Sjoerd A A; Neggers, Silvia J W; Rietbroek, Ilma; van Steeg, Harry; Dollé, Martijn E T

    2014-02-13

    Variation in TP53 has been associated with cancer. The pro-allele of a TP53 polymorphism in codon 72 (rs1042522) has been associated with longevity. Recently, we showed that the same allele might be involved in preservation of glucose metabolism, body composition and blood pressure during ageing. Here, we assessed glucose tolerance and body composition in mice carrying the human polymorphism. Our data do not support the previous findings in humans, suggesting that this polymorphism does not play a major role in development of glucose metabolism and body composition during ageing. Alternatively, the mouse model may not be suitable to validate these rs1042522-associated traits up to the age tested.

  15. Rheology and density of glucose syrup and honey : Determining their suitability for usage in analogue and fluid dynamic models of geological processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.

    Analogue models of lithospheric deformation and fluid dynamic models of mantle flow mostly use some kind of syrup such as honey or glucose syrup to simulate the low-viscosity sub-lithospheric mantle. This paper describes detailed rheological tests and density measurements of three brands of glucose

  16. Arsenate-induced maternal glucose intolerance and neural tube defects in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Denise S.; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Mitchell, Laura E.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological studies have linked environmental arsenic (As) exposure to increased type 2 diabetes risk. Periconceptional hyperglycemia is a significant risk factor for neural tube defects (NTDs), the second most common structural birth defect. A suspected teratogen, arsenic (As) induces NTDs in laboratory animals. Objectives: We investigated whether maternal glucose homeostasis disruption was responsible for arsenate-induced NTDs in a well-established dosing regimen used in studies of arsenic's teratogenicity in early neurodevelopment. Methods: We evaluated maternal intraperitoneal (IP) exposure to As 9.6 mg/kg (as sodium arsenate) in LM/Bc/Fnn mice for teratogenicity and disruption of maternal plasma glucose and insulin levels. Selected compounds (insulin pellet, sodium selenate (SS), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), L-methionine (L-Met), N-tert-Butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN)) were investigated for their potential to mitigate arsenate's effects. Results: Arsenate caused significant glucose elevation during an IP glucose tolerance test (IPGTT). Insulin levels were not different between arsenate and control dams before (arsenate, 0.55 ng/dl; control, 0.48 ng/dl) or after glucose challenge (arsenate, 1.09 ng/dl; control, 0.81 ng/dl). HOMA-IR index was higher for arsenate (3.9) vs control (2.5) dams (p = 0.0260). Arsenate caused NTDs (100%, p < 0.0001). Insulin pellet and NAC were the most successful rescue agents, reducing NTD rates to 45% and 35%. Conclusions: IPGTT, insulin assay, and HOMA-IR results suggest a modest failure of glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin resistance characteristic of glucose intolerance. Insulin's success in preventing arsenate-induced NTDs provides evidence that these arsenate-induced NTDs are secondary to elevated maternal glucose. The NAC rescue, which did not restore maternal glucose or insulin levels, suggests oxidative disruption plays a role.

  17. Qualitative analysis of cosmological models in Brans-Dicke theory, solutions from non-minimal coupling and viscous universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero Filho, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Using dynamical system theory we investigate homogeneous and isotropic models in Brans-Dicke theory for perfect fluids with general equation of state and arbitrary ω. Phase diagrams are drawn on the Poincare sphere which permits a qualitative analysis of the models. Based on this analysis we construct a method for generating classes of solutions in Brans-Dicke theory. The same technique is used for studying models arising from non-minimal coupling of electromagnetism with gravity. In addition, viscous fluids are considered and non-singular solutions with bulk viscosity are found. (author)

  18. A new mathematical model for single machine batch scheduling problem for minimizing maximum lateness with deteriorating jobs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zeraatkar Moghaddam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a mathematical model for the problem of minimizing the maximum lateness on a single machine when the deteriorated jobs are delivered to each customer in various size batches. In reality, this issue may happen within a supply chain in which delivering goods to customers entails cost. Under such situation, keeping completed jobs to deliver in batches may result in reducing delivery costs. In literature review of batch scheduling, minimizing the maximum lateness is known as NP-Hard problem; therefore the present issue aiming at minimizing the costs of delivering, in addition to the aforementioned objective function, remains an NP-Hard problem. In order to solve the proposed model, a Simulation annealing meta-heuristic is used, where the parameters are calibrated by Taguchi approach and the results are compared to the global optimal values generated by Lingo 10 software. Furthermore, in order to check the efficiency of proposed method to solve larger scales of problem, a lower bound is generated. The results are also analyzed based on the effective factors of the problem. Computational study validates the efficiency and the accuracy of the presented model.

  19. Revitalization model of tapioca industry through environmental awareness reinforcement for minimizing water body contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banowati, E.; Indriyanti, D. R.; Juhadi

    2018-03-01

    Tapioca industry in Margoyoso District is a household industry which positively contributes to the growth of the region's economy as it is able to absorb 6,61% of productive age populationor absorb 3,300 workers.On the other hand, the industry impacts contamination of river water in the form of pollutants dissolved materials and particulates into water bodies so that the quality of water decreases even does not work anymore in accordance with the allocation for irrigation or run off of agriculture. The purpose of this research is to: strengthen environmental awareness; calculate the success of the reinforcement action and minimize water body contamination. The research was conducted in two villages of tapioca industry center in Margoyoso district - Pati Regency Administration Area. The determination coefficient of R Square is 0.802 which indicates a successful effort of 80.2%. Regression equation Y = 34.097 + 0.608 X. Industrial entrepreneur's concern increased on 8.45 from total indicator or position to 70.72 so that the gradual effort showed success to minimize water contamination of Suwatu River. The business community of tapioca should build installation of wastewater treatment.

  20. Minimization of energy consumption in HVAC systems with data-driven models and an interior-point method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusiak, Andrew; Xu, Guanglin; Zhang, Zijun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the energy saving of HVAC systems with a data-driven approach. • We conduct an in-depth analysis of the topology of developed Neural Network based HVAC model. • We apply interior-point method to solving a Neural Network based HVAC optimization model. • The uncertain building occupancy is incorporated in the minimization of HVAC energy consumption. • A significant potential of saving HVAC energy is discovered. - Abstract: In this paper, a data-driven approach is applied to minimize energy consumption of a heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system while maintaining the thermal comfort of a building with uncertain occupancy level. The uncertainty of arrival and departure rate of occupants is modeled by the Poisson and uniform distributions, respectively. The internal heating gain is calculated from the stochastic process of the building occupancy. Based on the observed and simulated data, a multilayer perceptron algorithm is employed to model and simulate the HVAC system. The data-driven models accurately predict future performance of the HVAC system based on the control settings and the observed historical information. An optimization model is formulated and solved with the interior-point method. The optimization results are compared with the results produced by the simulation models

  1. Glucose Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Glucose Sensing is the eleventh volume in the popular series Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, edited by Drs. Chris D. Geddes and Joseph R. Lakowicz. This volume incorporates authoritative analytical fluorescence-based glucose sensing reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. Glucose Sensing is an essential reference for any lab working in the analytical fluorescence glucose sensing field. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of glucose sensing, and diabetes care & management, will find this volume an invaluable resource. Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy Volume 11, Glucose Sensing Chapters include: Implantable Sensors for Interstitial Fluid Smart Tattoo Glucose Sensors Optical Enzyme-based Glucose Biosensors Plasmonic Glucose Sens...

  2. Hexachlorobenzene impairs glucose metabolism in a rat model of porphyria cutanea tarda: a mechanistic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzetti, Marta Blanca; Taira, Maria Cristina; Lelli, Sandra Marcela; Viale, Leonor Carmen San Martin de [Departamento de Quimica Biologica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, C1428BGA, Ciudad Autonoma Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dascal, Eduardo; Basabe, Juan Carlos [Centro de Investigaciones Endocrinologicas (CEDIE). Hospital de Ninos, Dr. Ricardo Gutierrez, C1425EDF, Ciudad Autonoma Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2004-01-01

    Hexachlobenzene (HCB), one of the most persistent environmental pollutants, induces porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT). The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of HCB on some aspects of glucose metabolism, particularly those related to its neosynthesis in vivo. For this purpose, a time-course study on gluconeogenic enzymes, pyruvate carboxylase (PC), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) and on pyruvate kinase (PK), a glycolytic enzyme, was carried out. Plasma glucose and insulin levels, hepatic glycogen, tryptophan contents, and the pancreatic insulin secretion pattern stimulated by glucose were investigated. Oxidative stress and heme pathway parameters were also evaluated. HCB treatment decreased PC, PEPCK, and G-6-Pase activities. The effect was observed at an early time point and grew as the treatment progressed. Loss of 60, 56, and 37%, respectively, was noted at the end of the treatment when a considerable amount of porphyrins had accumulated in the liver as a result of drastic blockage of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D) (95% inhibition). The plasma glucose level was reduced (one-third loss), while storage of hepatic glucose was stimulated in a time-dependent way by HCB treatment. A decay in the normal plasma insulin level was observed as fungicide intoxication progressed (twice to four times lower). However, normal insulin secretion of perifused pancreatic Langerhans islets stimulated by glucose during the 3rd and 6th weeks of treatment did not prove to be significantly affected. HCB promoted a time-dependent increase in urinary chemiluminiscence (fourfold) and hepatic malondialdehide (MDA) content (fivefold), while the liver tryptophan level was only raised at the longest intoxication times. These results would suggest that HCB treatment does not cause a primary alteration in the mechanism of pancreatic insulin secretion and that the changes induced by the fungicide on insulin levels would be an adaptative

  3. A comparison of the probability distribution of observed substorm magnitude with that predicted by a minimal substorm model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Morley

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We compare the probability distributions of substorm magnetic bay magnitudes from observations and a minimal substorm model. The observed distribution was derived previously and independently using the IL index from the IMAGE magnetometer network. The model distribution is derived from a synthetic AL index time series created using real solar wind data and a minimal substorm model, which was previously shown to reproduce observed substorm waiting times. There are two free parameters in the model which scale the contributions to AL from the directly-driven DP2 electrojet and loading-unloading DP1 electrojet, respectively. In a limited region of the 2-D parameter space of the model, the probability distribution of modelled substorm bay magnitudes is not significantly different to the observed distribution. The ranges of the two parameters giving acceptable (95% confidence level agreement are consistent with expectations using results from other studies. The approximately linear relationship between the two free parameters over these ranges implies that the substorm magnitude simply scales linearly with the solar wind power input at the time of substorm onset.

  4. The reliability, accuracy and minimal detectable difference of a multi-segment kinematic model of the foot-shoe complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Chris; Paul, Gunther; Thewlis, Dominic

    2013-04-01

    Kinematic models are commonly used to quantify foot and ankle kinematics, yet no marker sets or models have been proven reliable or accurate when wearing shoes. Further, the minimal detectable difference of a developed model is often not reported. We present a kinematic model that is reliable, accurate and sensitive to describe the kinematics of the foot-shoe complex and lower leg during walking gait. In order to achieve this, a new marker set was established, consisting of 25 markers applied on the shoe and skin surface, which informed a four segment kinematic model of the foot-shoe complex and lower leg. Three independent experiments were conducted to determine the reliability, accuracy and minimal detectable difference of the marker set and model. Inter-rater reliability of marker placement on the shoe was proven to be good to excellent (ICC=0.75-0.98) indicating that markers could be applied reliably between raters. Intra-rater reliability was better for the experienced rater (ICC=0.68-0.99) than the inexperienced rater (ICC=0.38-0.97). The accuracy of marker placement along each axis was <6.7 mm for all markers studied. Minimal detectable difference (MDD90) thresholds were defined for each joint; tibiocalcaneal joint--MDD90=2.17-9.36°, tarsometatarsal joint--MDD90=1.03-9.29° and the metatarsophalangeal joint--MDD90=1.75-9.12°. These thresholds proposed are specific for the description of shod motion, and can be used in future research designed at comparing between different footwear. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cost Minimization Model of Gas Transmission Line for Indonesian SIJ Pipeline Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Septoratno Siregar

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of Indonesian SIJ gas pipeline network is being discussed here. Optimum pipe diameters together with the corresponding pressure distribution are obtained from minimization of total cost function consisting of investment and operating costs and subjects to some physical (Panhandle A and Panhandle B equations constraints. Iteration technique based on Generalized Steepest-Descent and fourth order Runge-Kutta method are used here. The resulting diameters from this continuous optimization are then rounded to the closest available discrete sizes. We have also calculated toll fee along each segment and safety factor of the network by determining the pipe wall thickness, using ANSI B31.8 standard. Sensitivity analysis of toll fee for variation of flow rates is shown here. The result will gives the diameter and compressor size and compressor location that feasible to use for the SIJ pipeline project. The Result also indicates that the east route cost relatively less expensive than the west cost.

  6. Nanosilver induces minimal lung toxicity or inflammation in a subacute murine inhalation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Shaughnessy Patrick T

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing interest in the environmental and health consequences of silver nanoparticles as the use of this material becomes widespread. Although human exposure to nanosilver is increasing, only a few studies address possible toxic effect of inhaled nanosilver. The objective of this study was to determine whether very small commercially available nanosilver induces pulmonary toxicity in mice following inhalation exposure. Results In this study, mice were exposed sub-acutely by inhalation to well-characterized nanosilver (3.3 mg/m3, 4 hours/day, 10 days, 5 ± 2 nm primary size. Toxicity was assessed by enumeration of total and differential cells, determination of total protein, lactate dehydrogenase activity and inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Lungs were evaluated for histopathologic changes and the presence of silver. In contrast to published in vitro studies, minimal inflammatory response or toxicity was found following exposure to nanosilver in our in vivo study. The median retained dose of nanosilver in the lungs measured by inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES was 31 μg/g lung (dry weight immediately after the final exposure, 10 μg/g following exposure and a 3-wk rest period and zero in sham-exposed controls. Dissolution studies showed that nanosilver did not dissolve in solutions mimicking the intracellular or extracellular milieu. Conclusions Mice exposed to nanosilver showed minimal pulmonary inflammation or cytotoxicity following sub-acute exposures. However, longer term exposures with higher lung burdens of nanosilver are needed to ensure that there are no chronic effects and to evaluate possible translocation to other organs.

  7. Predictive Control of the Blood Glucose Level in Type I Diabetic Patient Using Delay Differential Equation Wang Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esna-Ashari, Mojgan; Zekri, Maryam; Askari, Masood; Khalili, Noushin

    2017-01-01

    Because of increasing risk of diabetes, the measurement along with control of blood sugar has been of great importance in recent decades. In type I diabetes, because of the lack of insulin secretion, the cells cannot absorb glucose leading to low level of glucose. To control blood glucose (BG), the insulin must be injected to the body. This paper proposes a method for BG level regulation in type I diabetes. The control strategy is based on nonlinear model predictive control. The aim of the proposed controller optimized with genetics algorithms is to measure BG level each time and predict it for the next time interval. This merit causes a less amount of control effort, which is the rate of insulin delivered to the patient body. Consequently, this method can decrease the risk of hypoglycemia, a lethal phenomenon in regulating BG level in diabetes caused by a low BG level. Two delay differential equation models, namely Wang model and Enhanced Wang model, are applied as controller model and plant, respectively. The simulation results exhibit an acceptable performance of the proposed controller in meal disturbance rejection and robustness against parameter changes. As a result, if the nutrition of the person decreases instantly, the hypoglycemia will not happen. Furthermore, comparing this method with other works, it was shown that the new method outperforms previous studies.

  8. Minimal duality breaking in the Kallen-Lehman approach to 3D Ising model: A numerical test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astorino, Marco; Canfora, Fabrizio; Martinez, Cristian; Parisi, Luca

    2008-01-01

    A Kallen-Lehman approach to 3D Ising model is analyzed numerically both at low and high temperatures. It is shown that, even assuming a minimal duality breaking, one can fix three parameters of the model to get a very good agreement with the Monte Carlo results at high temperatures. With the same parameters the agreement is satisfactory both at low and near critical temperatures. How to improve the agreement with Monte Carlo results by introducing a more general duality breaking is shortly discussed

  9. Design and Modelling of Sustainable Bioethanol Supply Chain by Minimizing the Total Ecological Footprint in Life Cycle Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Jingzheng; Manzardo, Alessandro; Toniolo, Sara

    2013-01-01

    manners in bioethanol systems, this study developed a model for designing the most sustainable bioethanol supply chain by minimizing the total ecological footprint under some prerequisite constraints including satisfying the goal of the stakeholders', the limitation of resources and energy, the capacity......The purpose of this paper is to develop a model for designing the most sustainable bioethanol supply chain. Taking into consideration of the possibility of multiple-feedstock, multiple transportation modes, multiple alternative technologies, multiple transport patterns and multiple waste disposal...

  10. A Stochastic Integer Programming Model for Minimizing Cost in the Use of Rain Water Collectors for Firefighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. Rivera-Morales

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a stochastic integer programming optimization model to determine the optimal location and number of rain water collectors (RWCs for forest firefighting. The objective is to minimize expected total cost to control forest fires. The model is tested using a real case and several additional realistic scenarios. The impact on the solution of varying the limit on the number of RWCs, the RWC water capacity, the aircraft capacity, the water demands, and the aircraft operating cost is explored. Some observations are that the objective value improves with larger RWCs and with the use of aircraft with greater capacity.

  11. A Parsimonious Model of the Rabbit Action Potential Elucidates the Minimal Physiological Requirements for Alternans and Spiral Wave Breakup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Richard A; Pathmanathan, Pras

    2016-10-01

    Elucidating the underlying mechanisms of fatal cardiac arrhythmias requires a tight integration of electrophysiological experiments, models, and theory. Existing models of transmembrane action potential (AP) are complex (resulting in over parameterization) and varied (leading to dissimilar predictions). Thus, simpler models are needed to elucidate the "minimal physiological requirements" to reproduce significant observable phenomena using as few parameters as possible. Moreover, models have been derived from experimental studies from a variety of species under a range of environmental conditions (for example, all existing rabbit AP models incorporate a formulation of the rapid sodium current, INa, based on 30 year old data from chick embryo cell aggregates). Here we develop a simple "parsimonious" rabbit AP model that is mathematically identifiable (i.e., not over parameterized) by combining a novel Hodgkin-Huxley formulation of INa with a phenomenological model of repolarization similar to the voltage dependent, time-independent rectifying outward potassium current (IK). The model was calibrated using the following experimental data sets measured from the same species (rabbit) under physiological conditions: dynamic current-voltage (I-V) relationships during the AP upstroke; rapid recovery of AP excitability during the relative refractory period; and steady-state INa inactivation via voltage clamp. Simulations reproduced several important "emergent" phenomena including cellular alternans at rates > 250 bpm as observed in rabbit myocytes, reentrant spiral waves as observed on the surface of the rabbit heart, and spiral wave breakup. Model variants were studied which elucidated the minimal requirements for alternans and spiral wave break up, namely the kinetics of INa inactivation and the non-linear rectification of IK.The simplicity of the model, and the fact that its parameters have physiological meaning, make it ideal for engendering generalizable mechanistic

  12. Cofilin Inhibition Restores Neuronal Cell Death in Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation Model of Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madineni, Anusha; Alhadidi, Qasim; Shah, Zahoor A

    2016-03-01

    Ischemia is a condition associated with decreased blood supply to the brain, eventually leading to death of neurons. It is associated with a diverse cascade of responses involving both degenerative and regenerative mechanisms. At the cellular level, the changes are initiated prominently in the neuronal cytoskeleton. Cofilin, a cytoskeletal actin severing protein, is known to be involved in the early stages of apoptotic cell death. Evidence supports its intervention in the progression of disease states like Alzheimer's and ischemic kidney disease. In the present study, we have hypothesized the possible involvement of cofilin in ischemia. Using PC12 cells and mouse primary cultures of cortical neurons, we investigated the potential role of cofilin in ischemia in two different in vitro ischemic models: chemical induced oxidative stress and oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R). The expression profile studies demonstrated a decrease in phosphocofilin levels in all models of ischemia, implying stress-induced cofilin activation. Furthermore, calcineurin and slingshot 1L (SSH) phosphatases were found to be the signaling mediators of the cofilin activation. In primary cultures of cortical neurons, cofilin was found to be significantly activated after 1 h of OGD. To delineate the role of activated cofilin in ischemia, we knocked down cofilin by small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique and tested the impact of cofilin silencing on neuronal viability. Cofilin siRNA-treated neurons showed a significant reduction of cofilin levels in all treatment groups (control, OGD, and OGD/R). Additionally, cofilin siRNA-reduced cofilin mitochondrial translocation and caspase 3 cleavage, with a concomitant increase in neuronal viability. These results strongly support the active role of cofilin in ischemia-induced neuronal degeneration and apoptosis. We believe that targeting this protein mediator has a potential for therapeutic intervention in ischemic brain injury and stroke.

  13. Minimal variance hedging of natural gas derivatives in exponential Lévy models: Theory and empirical performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewald, Christian-Oliver; Nawar, Roy; Siu, Tak Kuen

    2013-01-01

    We consider the problem of hedging European options written on natural gas futures, in a market where prices of traded assets exhibit jumps, by trading in the underlying asset. We provide a general expression for the hedging strategy which minimizes the variance of the terminal hedging error, in terms of stochastic integral representations of the payoffs of the options involved. This formula is then applied to compute hedge ratios for common options in various models with jumps, leading to easily computable expressions. As a benchmark we take the standard Black–Scholes and Merton delta hedges. We show that in natural gas option markets minimal variance hedging with underlying consistently outperform the benchmarks by quite a margin. - Highlights: ► We derive hedging strategies for European type options written on natural gas futures. ► These are tested empirically using Henry Hub natural gas futures and options data. ► We find that our hedges systematically outperform classical benchmarks

  14. A new minimal-stress freely-moving rat model for preclinical studies on intranasal administration of CNS drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jasper; Suidgeest, Ernst; van der Graaf, Piet Hein; Danhof, Meindert; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2009-08-01

    To develop a new minimal-stress model for intranasal administration in freely moving rats and to evaluate in this model the brain distribution of acetaminophen following intranasal versus intravenous administration. Male Wistar rats received one intranasal cannula, an intra-cerebral microdialysis probe, and two blood cannulas for drug administration and serial blood sampling respectively. To evaluate this novel model, the following experiments were conducted. 1) Evans Blue was administered to verify the selectivity of intranasal exposure. 2) During a 1 min infusion 10, 20, or 40 microl saline was administered intranasally or 250 microl intravenously. Corticosterone plasma concentrations over time were compared as biomarkers for stress. 3) 200 microg of the model drug acetaminophen was given in identical setup and plasma, and brain pharmacokinetics were determined. In 96% of the rats, only the targeted nasal cavity was deeply colored. Corticosterone plasma concentrations were not influenced, neither by route nor volume of administration. Pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen were identical after intravenous and intranasal administration, although the Cmax in microdialysates was reached a little earlier following intravenous administration. A new minimal-stress model for intranasal administration in freely moving rats has been successfully developed and allows direct comparison with intravenous administration.

  15. Glucose oxidation is critical for CD4+ T cell activation in a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yiming; Choi, Seung-Chul; Xu, Zhiwei; Zeumer, Leilani; Kanda, Nathalie; Croker, Byron P.; Morel, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that CD4+ T cells from B6.Sle1.Sle2.Sle3 (TC) lupus mice and patients present a high cellular metabolism, and a treatment combining 2-deoxyglucose (2DG), which inhibits glucose metabolism, and metformin, which inhibits oxygen consumption, normalized lupus T cell functions in vitro and reverted disease in mice. We obtained similar results with B6.lpr mice, another model of lupus, and showed that a continuous treatment is required to maintain the beneficial effect of metabolic inhibitors. Further, we investigated the relative roles of glucose oxidation and pyruvate reduction into lactate in this process.. Treatments of TC mice with either 2DG or metformin were sufficient to prevent autoimmune activation, while their combination was necessary to reverse the process. Treatment of TC mice with dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of lactate production, failed to effectively prevent or reverse autoimmune pathology. In vitro, CD4+ T cell activation upregulated the expression of genes that favor oxidative phosphorylation. Blocking glucose oxidation inhibited both IFNγ and IL-17 production, which could not be achieved by blocking pyruvate reduction. Overall, our data shows that targeting glucose oxidation is required to prevent or reverse lupus development in mice, which cannot be achieved by simply targeting the pyruvate-lactate conversion. PMID:26608911

  16. A Gibbs Energy Minimization Approach for Modeling of Chemical Reactions in a Basic Oxygen Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruskopf, Ari; Visuri, Ville-Valtteri

    2017-12-01

    In modern steelmaking, the decarburization of hot metal is converted into steel primarily in converter processes, such as the basic oxygen furnace. The objective of this work was to develop a new mathematical model for top blown steel converter, which accounts for the complex reaction equilibria in the impact zone, also known as the hot spot, as well as the associated mass and heat transport. An in-house computer code of the model has been developed in Matlab. The main assumption of the model is that all reactions take place in a specified reaction zone. The mass transfer between the reaction volume, bulk slag, and metal determine the reaction rates for the species. The thermodynamic equilibrium is calculated using the partitioning of Gibbs energy (PGE) method. The activity model for the liquid metal is the unified interaction parameter model and for the liquid slag the modified quasichemical model (MQM). The MQM was validated by calculating iso-activity lines for the liquid slag components. The PGE method together with the MQM was validated by calculating liquidus lines for solid components. The results were compared with measurements from literature. The full chemical reaction model was validated by comparing the metal and slag compositions to measurements from industrial scale converter. The predictions were found to be in good agreement with the measured values. Furthermore, the accuracy of the model was found to compare favorably with the models proposed in the literature. The real-time capability of the proposed model was confirmed in test calculations.

  17. Modelling the Relative Contribution of Fasting and Post-Prandial Plasma Glucose to HbA1c in Healthy and Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollerton, Richard L.; Luzio, Steven D.; Owens, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is regarded as the gold standard of glucose homeostasis assessment in diabetes. There has been much discussion in recent medical literature of experimental results concerning the relative contribution of fasting and post-prandial glucose levels to the value of HbA1c. A mathematical model of haemoglobin glycation is…

  18. A Singlet Extension of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model: Towards a More Natural Solution to the Little Hierarchy Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de la Puente, Alejandro [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2012-05-01

    In this work, I present a generalization of the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM), with an explicit μ-term and a supersymmetric mass for the singlet superfield, as a route to alleviating the little hierarchy problem of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). I analyze two limiting cases of the model, characterized by the size of the supersymmetric mass for the singlet superfield. The small and large limits of this mass parameter are studied, and I find that I can generate masses for the lightest neutral Higgs boson up to 140 GeV with top squarks below the TeV scale, all couplings perturbative up to the gauge unification scale, and with no need to fine tune parameters in the scalar potential. This model, which I call the S-MSSM is also embedded in a gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking scheme. I find that even with a minimal embedding of the S-MSSM into a gauge mediated scheme, the mass for the lightest Higgs boson can easily be above 114 GeV, while keeping the top squarks below the TeV scale. Furthermore, I also study the forward-backward asymmetry in the t¯t system within the framework of the S-MSSM. For this purpose, non-renormalizable couplings between the first and third generation of quarks to scalars are introduced. The two limiting cases of the S-MSSM, characterized by the size of the supersymmetric mass for the singlet superfield is analyzed, and I find that in the region of small singlet supersymmetric mass a large asymmetry can be obtained while being consistent with constraints arising from flavor physics, quark masses and top quark decays.

  19. Use of systems pharmacology modeling to elucidate the operating characteristics of SGLT1 and SGLT2 in renal glucose reabsorption in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yasong; Griffen, Steven C; Boulton, David W; Leil, Tarek A

    2014-01-01

    In the kidney, glucose in glomerular filtrate is reabsorbed primarily by sodium-glucose cotransporters 1 (SGLT1) and 2 (SGLT2) along the proximal tubules. SGLT2 has been characterized as a high capacity, low affinity pathway responsible for reabsorption of the majority of filtered glucose in the early part of proximal tubules, and SGLT1 reabsorbs the residual glucose in the distal part. Inhibition of SGLT2 is a viable mechanism for removing glucose from the body and improving glycemic control in patients with diabetes. Despite demonstrating high levels (in excess of 80%) of inhibition of glucose transport by SGLT2 in vitro, potent SGLT2 inhibitors, e.g., dapagliflozin and canagliflozin, inhibit renal glucose reabsorption by only 30-50% in clinical studies. Hypotheses for this apparent paradox are mostly focused on the compensatory effect of SGLT1. The paradox has been explained and the role of SGLT1 demonstrated in the mouse, but direct data in humans are lacking. To further explore the roles of SGLT1/2 in renal glucose reabsorption in humans, we developed a systems pharmacology model with emphasis on SGLT1/2 mediated glucose reabsorption and the effects of SGLT2 inhibition. The model was calibrated using robust clinical data in the absence or presence of dapagliflozin (DeFronzo et al., 2013), and evaluated against clinical data from the literature (Mogensen, 1971; Wolf et al., 2009; Polidori et al., 2013). The model adequately described all four data sets. Simulations using the model clarified the operating characteristics of SGLT1/2 in humans in the healthy and diabetic state with or without SGLT2 inhibition. The modeling and simulations support our proposition that the apparent moderate, 30-50% inhibition of renal glucose reabsorption observed with potent SGLT2 inhibitors is a combined result of two physiological determinants: SGLT1 compensation and residual SGLT2 activity. This model will enable in silico inferences and predictions related to SGLT1/2 modulation.

  20. Strategic planning for minimizing CO2 emissions using LP model based on forecasted energy demand by PSO Algorithm and ANN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousefi, M.; Omid, M.; Rafiee, Sh. [Department of Agricultural Machinery Engineering, University of Tehran, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaderi, S. F. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Iran's primary energy consumption (PEC) was modeled as a linear function of five socioeconomic and meteorological explanatory variables using particle swarm optimization (PSO) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) techniques. Results revealed that ANN outperforms PSO model to predict test data. However, PSO technique is simple and provided us with a closed form expression to forecast PEC. Energy demand was forecasted by PSO and ANN using represented scenario. Finally, adapting about 10% renewable energy revealed that based on the developed linear programming (LP) model under minimum CO2 emissions, Iran will emit about 2520 million metric tons CO2 in 2025. The LP model indicated that maximum possible development of hydropower, geothermal and wind energy resources will satisfy the aim of minimization of CO2 emissions. Therefore, the main strategic policy in order to reduce CO2 emissions would be exploitation of these resources.

  1. Modified Higgs boson phenomenology from gauge or gaugino mediation in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrissey, David E.; Pierce, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    In the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model (NMSSM), the presence of light pseudoscalars can have a dramatic effect on the decays of the standard model-like Higgs boson. These pseudoscalars are naturally light if supersymmetry breaking preserves an approximate U(1) R symmetry, spontaneously broken when the Higgs bosons take on their expectation values. We investigate two classes of theories that possess such an approximate U(1) R at the mediation scale: modifications of gauge and gaugino mediation. In the models we consider, we find two disjoint classes of phenomenologically allowed parameter regions. One of these regions corresponds to a limit where the singlet of the NMSSM largely decouples. The other can give rise to a standard model-like Higgs boson with dominant branching into light pseudoscalars.

  2. A Comprehensive Mathematical Programming Model for Minimizing Costs in A Multiple-Item Reverse Supply Chain with Sensitivity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoudi Hoda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available These instructions give you guidelines for preparing papers for IFAC conferences. A reverse supply chain is configured by a sequence of elements forming a continuous process to treat return-products until they are properly recovered or disposed. The activities in a reverse supply chain include collection, cleaning, disassembly, test and sorting, storage, transport, and recovery operations. This paper presents a mathematical programming model with the objective of minimizing the total costs of reverse supply chain including transportation, fixed opening, operation, maintenance and remanufacturing costs of centers. The proposed model considers the design of a multi-layer, multi-product reverse supply chain that consists of returning, disassembly, processing, recycling, remanufacturing, materials and distribution centers. This integer linear programming model is solved by using Lingo 9 software and the results are reported. Finally, a sensitivity analysis of the proposed model is also presented.

  3. Strategic planning for minimizing CO2 emissions using LP model based on forecasted energy demand by PSO Algorithm and ANN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousefi, M.; Omid, M.; Rafiee, Sh. [Department of Agricultural Machinery Engineering, University of Tehran, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaderi, S.F. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Iran's primary energy consumption (PEC) was modeled as a linear function of five socioeconomic and meteorological explanatory variables using particle swarm optimization (PSO) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) techniques. Results revealed that ANN outperforms PSO model to predict test data. However, PSO technique is simple and provided us with a closed form expression to forecast PEC. Energy demand was forecasted by PSO and ANN using represented scenario. Finally, adapting about 10% renewable energy revealed that based on the developed linear programming (LP) model under minimum CO2 emissions, Iran will emit about 2520 million metric tons CO2 in 2025. The LP model indicated that maximum possible development of hydropower, geothermal and wind energy resources will satisfy the aim of minimization of CO2 emissions. Therefore, the main strategic policy in order to reduce CO2 emissions would be exploitation of these resources.

  4. PDX-MI: Minimal Information for Patient-Derived Tumor Xenograft Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meehan, Terrence F.; Conte, Nathalie; Goldstein, Theodore; Inghirami, Giorgio; Murakami, Mark A.; Brabetz, Sebastian; Gu, Zhiping; Wiser, Jeffrey A.; Dunn, Patrick; Begley, Dale A.; Krupke, Debra M.; Bertotti, Andrea; Bruna, Alejandra; Brush, Matthew H.; Byrne, Annette T.; Caldas, Carlos; Christie, Amanda L.; Clark, Dominic A.; Dowst, Heidi; Dry, Jonathan R.; Doroshow, James H.; Duchamp, Olivier; Evrard, Yvonne A.; Ferretti, Stephane; Frese, Kristopher K.; Goodwin, Neal C.; Greenawalt, Danielle; Haendel, Melissa A.; Hermans, Els; Houghton, Peter J.; Jonkers, Jos; Kemper, Kristel; Khor, Tin O.; Lewis, Michael T.; Lloyd, K. C. Kent; Mason, Jeremy; Medico, Enzo; Neuhauser, Steven B.; Olson, James M.; Peeper, Daniel S.; Rueda, Oscar M.; Seong, Je Kyung; Trusolino, Livio; Vinolo, Emilie; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Weinstock, David M.; Welm, Alana; Weroha, S. John; Amant, Frédéric; Pfister, Stefan M.; Kool, Marcel; Parkinson, Helen; Butte, Atul J.; Bult, Carol J.

    2017-01-01

    Patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX) mouse models have emerged as an important oncology research platform to study tumor evolution, mechanisms of drug response and resistance, and tailoring chemotherapeutic approaches for individual patients. The lack of robust standards for reporting on PDX models

  5. Discrete-State and Continuous Models of Recognition Memory: Testing Core Properties under Minimal Assumptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellen, David; Klauer, Karl Christoph

    2014-01-01

    A classic discussion in the recognition-memory literature concerns the question of whether recognition judgments are better described by continuous or discrete processes. These two hypotheses are instantiated by the signal detection theory model (SDT) and the 2-high-threshold model, respectively. Their comparison has almost invariably relied on…

  6. Codeswitching and Generative Grammar: A Critique of the MLF Model and Some Remarks on "Modified Minimalism"

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacSwan, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an empirical and theoretical critique of the Matrix Language Frame (MLF) model (Myers-Scotton, 1993; Myers-Scotton and Jake, 2001), and includes a response to Jake, Myers-Scotton and Gross's (2002) (JMSG) critique of MacSwan (1999, 2000) and reactions to their revision of the MLF model as a "modified minimalist approach." The…

  7. Automatic parameter estimation of multicompartmental neuron models via minimization of trace error with control adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookings, Ted; Goeritz, Marie L; Marder, Eve

    2014-11-01

    We describe a new technique to fit conductance-based neuron models to intracellular voltage traces from isolated biological neurons. The biological neurons are recorded in current-clamp with pink (1/f) noise injected to perturb the activity of the neuron. The new algorithm finds a set of parameters that allows a multicompartmental model neuron to match the recorded voltage trace. Attempting to match a recorded voltage trace directly has a well-known problem: mismatch in the timing of action potentials between biological and model neuron is inevitable and results in poor phenomenological match between the model and data. Our approach avoids this by applying a weak control adjustment to the model to promote alignment during the fitting procedure. This approach is closely related to the control theoretic concept of a Luenberger observer. We tested this approach on synthetic data and on data recorded from an anterior gastric receptor neuron from the stomatogastric ganglion of the crab Cancer borealis. To test the flexibility of this approach, the synthetic data were constructed with conductance models that were different from the ones used in the fitting model. For both synthetic and biological data, the resultant models had good spike-timing accuracy. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  8. UPAYA PENCAPAIAN STANDAR KETUNTASAN BELAJAR MINIMAL (SKBM MELALUI PEMBELAJARAN KOOPERATIF MODEL STUDENT TEAM ACHIEVEMENT DIVISION (STAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcholish Arifin Handoyono

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to increase the minimum mastery standard in automotive electrical systems repairing matter with subject applying Student Team Achievement Division (STAD model cooperative learning. This study used a classroom action research whitch was conducted in two cyles, each eycle consisted of four phases: planning, implementation, observation, dan reflection. The data were analyzed descriptively. The result proved that teaching learning process using STAD model cooperative learning increased the minimum mastery standard of students. Before applying STAD model cooperative learning, none passed the minimum mastery standard. After applying STAD model cooperative learning, there are advancement in term of the number of students passing the standard 48,48% in the first cycle and 87,88% in the second cycle. The average score reached 71,48 and 81,83 in the first and the second cycle. Therefore, this study concludes that STAD cooperative model increased the minimum mastery standard in automotive electrical systems repairing subject.

  9. Dynamic flux balance modeling of microbial co-cultures for efficient batch fermentation of glucose and xylose mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, Timothy J; Henson, Michael A

    2011-02-01

    Sequential uptake of pentose and hexose sugars that compose lignocellulosic biomass limits the ability of pure microbial cultures to efficiently produce value-added bioproducts. In this work, we used dynamic flux balance modeling to examine the capability of mixed cultures of substrate-selective microbes to improve the utilization of glucose/xylose mixtures and to convert these mixed substrates into products. Co-culture simulations of Escherichia coli strains ALS1008 and ZSC113, engineered for glucose and xylose only uptake respectively, indicated that improvements in batch substrate consumption observed in previous experimental studies resulted primarily from an increase in ZSC113 xylose uptake relative to wild-type E. coli. The E. coli strain ZSC113 engineered for the elimination of glucose uptake was computationally co-cultured with wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which can only metabolize glucose, to determine if the co-culture was capable of enhanced ethanol production compared to pure cultures of wild-type E. coli and the S. cerevisiae strain RWB218 engineered for combined glucose and xylose uptake. Under the simplifying assumption that both microbes grow optimally under common environmental conditions, optimization of the strain inoculum and the aerobic to anaerobic switching time produced an almost twofold increase in ethanol productivity over the pure cultures. To examine the effect of reduced strain growth rates at non-optimal pH and temperature values, a break even analysis was performed to determine possible reductions in individual strain substrate uptake rates that resulted in the same predicted ethanol productivity as the best pure culture. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A Disposable Tear Glucose Biosensor-Part 4: Preliminary Animal Model Study Assessing Efficacy, Safety, and Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Belle, Jeffrey T; Engelschall, Erica; Lan, Kenneth; Shah, Pankti; Saez, Neil; Maxwell, Stephanie; Adamson, Teagan; Abou-Eid, Michelle; McAferty, Kenyon; Patel, Dharmendra R; Cook, Curtiss B

    2014-01-01

    A prototype tear glucose (TG) sensor was tested in New Zealand white rabbits to assess eye irritation, blood glucose (BG) and TG lag time, and correlation with BG. A total of 4 animals were used. Eye irritation was monitored by Lissamine green dye and analyzed using image analysis software. Lag time was correlated with an oral glucose load while recording TG and BG readings. Correlation between TG and BG were plotted against one another to form a correlation diagram, using a Yellow Springs Instrument (YSI) and self-monitoring of blood glucose as the reference measurements. Finally, TG levels were calculated using analytically derived expressions. From repeated testing carried over the course of 12 months, little to no eye irritation was detected. TG fluctuations over time visually appeared to trace the same pattern as BG with an average lag times of 13 minutes. TG levels calculated from the device current measurements ranged from 4 to 20 mg/dL and correlated linearly with BG levels of 75-160 mg/dL (TG = 0.1723 BG = 7.9448 mg/dL; R 2 = .7544). The first steps were taken toward preliminary development of a sensor for self-monitoring of tear glucose (SMTG). No conjunctival irritation in any of the animals was noted. Lag time between TG and BG was found to be noticeable, but a quantitative modeling to correlate lag time in this study is unnecessary. Measured currents from the sensors and the calculated TG showed promising correlation to BG levels. Previous analytical bench marking showed BG and TG levels consistent with other literature. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  11. Genetic models rule out a major role of beta cell glycogen in the control of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir-Coll, Joan; Duran, Jordi; Slebe, Felipe; García-Rocha, Mar; Gomis, Ramon; Gasa, Rosa; Guinovart, Joan J

    2016-05-01

    Glycogen accumulation occurs in beta cells of diabetic patients and has been proposed to partly mediate glucotoxicity-induced beta cell dysfunction. However, the role of glycogen metabolism in beta cell function and its contribution to diabetes pathophysiology remain poorly understood. We investigated the function of beta cell glycogen by studying glucose homeostasis in mice with (1) defective glycogen synthesis in the pancreas; and (2) excessive glycogen accumulation in beta cells. Conditional deletion of the Gys1 gene and overexpression of protein targeting to glycogen (PTG) was accomplished by Cre-lox recombination using pancreas-specific Cre lines. Glucose homeostasis was assessed by determining fasting glycaemia, insulinaemia and glucose tolerance. Beta cell mass was determined by morphometry. Glycogen was detected histologically by periodic acid-Schiff's reagent staining. Isolated islets were used for the determination of glycogen and insulin content, insulin secretion, immunoblots and gene expression assays. Gys1 knockout (Gys1 (KO)) mice did not exhibit differences in glucose tolerance or basal glycaemia and insulinaemia relative to controls. Insulin secretion and gene expression in isolated islets was also indistinguishable between Gys1 (KO) and controls. Conversely, despite effective glycogen overaccumulation in islets, mice with PTG overexpression (PTG(OE)) presented similar glucose tolerance to controls. However, under fasting conditions they exhibited lower glycaemia and higher insulinaemia. Importantly, neither young nor aged PTG(OE) mice showed differences in beta cell mass relative to age-matched controls. Finally, a high-fat diet did not reveal a beta cell-autonomous phenotype in either model. Glycogen metabolism is not required for the maintenance of beta cell function. Glycogen accumulation in beta cells alone is not sufficient to trigger the dysfunction or loss of these cells, or progression to diabetes.

  12. Possible evolution of a bouncing universe in cosmological models with non-minimally coupled scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozdeeva, Ekaterina O.; Vernov, Sergey Yu.; Skugoreva, Maria A.; Toporensky, Alexey V.

    2016-01-01

    We explore dynamics of cosmological models with bounce solutions evolving on a spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker background. We consider cosmological models that contain the Hilbert-Einstein curvature term, the induced gravity term with a negative coupled constant, and even polynomial potentials of the scalar field. Bounce solutions with non-monotonic Hubble parameters have been obtained and analyzed. The case when the scalar field has the conformal coupling and the Higgs-like potential with an opposite sign is studied in detail. In this model the evolution of the Hubble parameter of the bounce solution essentially depends on the sign of the cosmological constant.

  13. Higgs bosons in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellwanger, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    We review possible properties of Higgs bosons in the NMSSM, which allow to discriminate this model from the MSSM: masses of mostly standard-model-like Higgs bosons at or above 140 GeV, or enhanced branching fractions into two photons, or Higgs-to-Higgs decays. In the case of a standard-model-like Higgs boson above 140 GeV, it is necessarily accompanied by a lighter state with a large gauge singlet component. Examples for such scenarios are presented. Available studies on Higgs-to-Higgs decays are discussed according to the various Higgs production modes, light Higgs masses and decay channels. (orig.)

  14. Impact of the reg1 mutation glycocen accumulation and glucose consumption rates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells based on a macrokinetic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha-Leão M.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In S. cerevisiae, catabolite repression controls glycogen accumulation and glucose consumption. Glycogen is responsible for stress resistance, and its accumulation in derepression conditions results in a yeast with good quality. In yeast cells, catabolite repression also named glucose effect takes place at the transcriptional levels, decreasing enzyme respiration and causing the cells to enter a fermentative metabolism, low cell mass yield and yeast with poor quality. Since glucose is always present in molasses the glucose effect occurs in industrial media. A quantitative characterization of cell growth, substrate consumption and glycogen formation was undertaken based on an unstructured macrokinetic model for a reg1/hex2 mutant, capable of the respiration while growing on glucose, and its isogenic repressible strain (REG1/HEX2. The results show that the estimated value to maximum specific glycogen accumulation rate (muG,MAX is eight times greater in the reg1/hex2 mutant than its isogenic strain, and the glucose affinity constant (K SS is fifth times greater in reg1/hex2 mutant than in its isogenic strain with less glucose uptake by the former channeling glucose into cell mass growth and glycogen accumulation simultaneously. This approach may be one more tool to improve the glucose removal in yeast production. Thus, disruption of the REG1/HEX2 gene may constitute an important strategy for producing commercial yeast.

  15. Multiple travelling-wave solutions in a minimal model for cell motility

    KAUST Repository

    Kimpton, L. S.; Whiteley, J. P.; Waters, S. L.; King, J. R.; Oliver, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    -phase, poroviscous, reactive flow model displays various types of behaviour relevant to cell crawling. We present stability analyses that show that an asymmetric perturbation is required to cause a spatially uniform, stationary strip of cytoplasm to move, which

  16. An orbital-overlap model for minimal work functions of cesiated metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Sharon H; Bargatin, Igor; Howe, Roger T; Voss, Johannes; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a model for the effect of cesium adsorbates on the work function of transition metal surfaces. The model builds on the classical point-dipole equation by adding exponential terms that characterize the degree of orbital overlap between the 6s states of neighboring cesium adsorbates and its effect on the strength and orientation of electric dipoles along the adsorbate-substrate interface. The new model improves upon earlier models in terms of agreement with the work function-coverage curves obtained via first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. All the cesiated metal surfaces have optimal coverages between 0.6 and 0.8 monolayers, in accordance with experimental data. Of all the cesiated metal surfaces that we have considered, tungsten has the lowest minimum work function, also in accordance with experiments.

  17. Vector Control Using Series Iron Loss Model of Induction, Motors and Power Loss Minimization

    OpenAIRE

    Kheldoun Aissa; Khodja Djalal Eddine

    2009-01-01

    The iron loss is a source of detuning in vector controlled induction motor drives if the classical rotor vector controller is used for decoupling. In fact, the field orientation will not be satisfied and the output torque will not truck the reference torque mostly used by Loss Model Controllers (LMCs). In addition, this component of loss, among others, may be excessive if the vector controlled induction motor is driving light loads. In this paper, the series iron loss model ...

  18. Model-based decision making in early clinical development: minimizing the impact of a blood pressure adverse event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroh, Mark; Addy, Carol; Wu, Yunhui; Stoch, S Aubrey; Pourkavoos, Nazaneen; Groff, Michelle; Xu, Yang; Wagner, John; Gottesdiener, Keith; Shadle, Craig; Wang, Hong; Manser, Kimberly; Winchell, Gregory A; Stone, Julie A

    2009-03-01

    We describe how modeling and simulation guided program decisions following a randomized placebo-controlled single-rising oral dose first-in-man trial of compound A where an undesired transient blood pressure (BP) elevation occurred in fasted healthy young adult males. We proposed a lumped-parameter pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model that captured important aspects of the BP homeostasis mechanism. Four conceptual units characterized the feedback PD model: a sinusoidal BP set point, an effect compartment, a linear effect model, and a system response. To explore approaches for minimizing the BP increase, we coupled the PD model to a modified PK model to guide oral controlled-release (CR) development. The proposed PK/PD model captured the central tendency of the observed data. The simulated BP response obtained with theoretical release rate profiles suggested some amelioration of the peak BP response with CR. This triggered subsequent CR formulation development; we used actual dissolution data from these candidate CR formulations in the PK/PD model to confirm a potential benefit in the peak BP response. Though this paradigm has yet to be tested in the clinic, our model-based approach provided a common rational framework to more fully utilize the limited available information for advancing the program.

  19. Minimal Regge model for meson--baryon scattering: duality, SU(3) and phase-modified absorptive cuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egli, S.E.

    1975-10-01

    A model is presented which incorporates economically all of the modifications to simple SU(3)-symmetric dual Regge pole theory which are required by existing data on 0 -1 / 2 + → -1 / 2 + processes. The basic assumptions are no-exotics duality, minimally broken SU(3) symmetry, and absorptive Regge cuts phase-modified by the Ringland prescription. First it is described qualitatively how these assumptions suffice for the description of all measured reactions, and then the results of a detailed fit to 1987 data points are presented for 18 different reactions. (auth)

  20. Dynamical analysis for a scalar-tensor model with Gauss-Bonnet and non-minimal couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granda, L.N.; Jimenez, D.F. [Universidad del Valle, Departamento de Fisica, Cali (Colombia)

    2017-10-15

    We study the autonomous system for a scalar-tensor model of dark energy with Gauss-Bonnet and non-minimal couplings. The critical points describe important stable asymptotic scenarios including quintessence, phantom and de Sitter attractor solutions. Two functional forms for the coupling functions and the scalar potential are considered: power-law and exponential functions of the scalar field. For the exponential functions the existence of stable quintessence, phantom or de Sitter solutions, allows for an asymptotic behavior where the effective Newtonian coupling becomes constant. The phantom solutions could be realized without appealing to ghost degrees of freedom. Transient inflationary and radiation-dominated phases can also be described. (orig.)

  1. High-precision predictions for the light CP-even Higgs boson mass of the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, T; Heinemeyer, S; Hollik, W; Rzehak, H; Weiglein, G

    2014-04-11

    For the interpretation of the signal discovered in the Higgs searches at the LHC it will be crucial in particular to discriminate between the minimal Higgs sector realized in the standard model (SM) and its most commonly studied extension, the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). The measured mass value, having already reached the level of a precision observable with an experimental accuracy of about 500 MeV, plays an important role in this context. In the MSSM the mass of the light CP-even Higgs boson, Mh, can directly be predicted from the other parameters of the model. The accuracy of this prediction should at least match the one of the experimental result. The relatively high mass value of about 126 GeV has led to many investigations where the scalar top quarks are in the multi-TeV range. We improve the prediction for Mh in the MSSM by combining the existing fixed-order result, comprising the full one-loop and leading and subleading two-loop corrections, with a resummation of the leading and subleading logarithmic contributions from the scalar top sector to all orders. In this way for the first time a high-precision prediction for the mass of the light CP-even Higgs boson in the MSSM is possible all the way up to the multi-TeV region of the relevant supersymmetric particles. The results are included in the code FEYNHIGGS.

  2. Ranking periodic ordering models on the basis of minimizing total inventory cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadali Keramati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to provide proper policies for inventory under uncertain conditions by comparing different inventory policies. To review the efficiency of these algorithms it is necessary to specify the area in which each of them is applied. Therefore, each of the models has been reviewed under different forms of retailing and they are ranked in terms of their expenses. According to the high values of inventories and their impacts on the costs of the companies, the ranking of various models using the simulation annealing algorithm are presented, which indicates that the proposed model of this paper could perform better than other alternative ones. The results also indicate that the suggested algorithm could save from 4 to 29 percent on costs of inventories.

  3. Solvable lattice models with minimal and nonunitary critical behaviour in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riggs, H.; Chicago Univ., IL

    1989-01-01

    The exact local height probabilities found by Forrester and Baxter for a series of solvable lattice models in two dimensions are written in terms of nonunitary Virasoro characters and modifications of unitary A 1 (1) affine Lie algebra characters directly related to nonunitary but rational-level A 1 (1) characters. The relation between these results and a rational-level GKO decomposition is given. The off-critical lattice origin of the Virasoro characters and the role of the embedding diagram null vectors in the CTM eigenspace is described. Suggestions for the definition of rational and nonunitary models corresponding to arbitrary G/H cosets are given. (orig.)

  4. ARRA: Reconfiguring Power Systems to Minimize Cascading Failures - Models and Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, Ian [Iowa State University; Hiskens, Ian [Unversity of Michigan; Linderoth, Jeffrey [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Wright, Stephen [University of Wisconsin-Madison

    2013-12-16

    Building on models of electrical power systems, and on powerful mathematical techniques including optimization, model predictive control, and simluation, this project investigated important issues related to the stable operation of power grids. A topic of particular focus was cascading failures of the power grid: simulation, quantification, mitigation, and control. We also analyzed the vulnerability of networks to component failures, and the design of networks that are responsive to and robust to such failures. Numerous other related topics were investigated, including energy hubs and cascading stall of induction machines

  5. Bihormonal model predictive control of blood glucose in people with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batora, Vladimir; Tarnik, Marian; Murgas, Jan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a bihormonal control system that controls blood glucose in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). We use insulin together with glucagon to mitigate the negative effects of hyper- and hypoglycemia. The system consists of a Kalman filter, a micro-bolus insulin and glucagon...

  6. Farnesoid X Receptor Deficiency Improves Glucose Homeostasis in Mouse Models of Obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prawitt, Janne; Abdelkarim, Mouaadh; Stroeve, Johanna H. M.; Popescu, Iuliana; Duez, Helene; Velagapudi, Vidya R.; Dumont, Julie; Bouchaert, Emmanuel; van Dijk, Theo H.; Lucas, Anthony; Dorchies, Emilie; Daoudi, Mehdi; Lestavel, Sophie; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Oresic, Matej; Cariou, Bertrand; Kuipers, Folkert; Caron, Sandrine; Staels, Bart

    OBJECTIVE-Bile acids (BA) participate in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis acting through different signaling pathways. The nuclear BA receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates pathways in BA, lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, which become dysregulated in obesity. However, the role

  7. Effect of sulfonylureas administered centrally on the blood glucose level in immobilization stress model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Naveen; Sim, Yun-Beom; Park, Soo-Hyun; Lim, Su-Min; Kim, Sung-Su; Jung, Jun-Sub; Hong, Jae-Seung; Suh, Hong-Won

    2015-05-01

    Sulfonylureas are widely used as an antidiabetic drug. In the present study, the effects of sulfonylurea administered supraspinally on immobilization stress-induced blood glucose level were studied in ICR mice. Mice were once enforced into immobilization stress for 30 min and returned to the cage. The blood glucose level was measured 30, 60, and 120 min after immobilization stress initiation. We found that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection with 30 µg of glyburide, glipizide, glimepiride or tolazamide attenuated the increased blood glucose level induced by immobilization stress. Immobilization stress causes an elevation of the blood corticosterone and insulin levels. Sulfonylureas pretreated i.c.v. caused a further elevation of the blood corticosterone level when mice were forced into the stress. In addition, sulfonylureas pretreated i.c.v. alone caused an elevation of the plasma insulin level. Furthermore, immobilization stress-induced insulin level was reduced by i.c.v. pretreated sulfonylureas. Our results suggest that lowering effect of sulfonylureas administered supraspinally against immobilization stress-induced increase of the blood glucose level appears to be primarily mediated via elevation of the plasma insulin level.

  8. Minimal hidden sector models for CoGeNT/DAMA events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, James M.; Frey, Andrew R.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by recent attempts to reconcile hints of direct dark matter detection by the CoGeNT and DAMA experiments, we construct simple particle physics models that can accommodate the constraints. We point out challenges for building reasonable models and identify the most promising scenarios for getting isospin violation and inelasticity, as indicated by some phenomenological studies. If inelastic scattering is demanded, we need two new light gauge bosons, one of which kinetically mixes with the standard model hypercharge and has mass <2 GeV, and another which couples to baryon number and has mass 6.8±(0.1/0.2) GeV. Their interference gives the desired amount of isospin violation. The dark matter is nearly Dirac, but with small Majorana masses induced by spontaneous symmetry breaking, so that the gauge boson couplings become exactly off-diagonal in the mass basis, and the small mass splitting needed for inelasticity is simultaneously produced. If only elastic scattering is demanded, then an alternative model, with interference between the kinetically mixed gauge boson and a hidden sector scalar Higgs, is adequate to give the required isospin violation. In both cases, the light kinetically mixed gauge boson is in the range of interest for currently running fixed target experiments.

  9. A computational model for determining the minimal cost expansion alternatives in transmission systems planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, L.M.V.G.; Pereira, M.V.F.; Nunes, A.

    1989-01-01

    A computational model for determining an economical transmission expansion plan, based in the decomposition techniques is presented. The algorithm was used in the Brazilian South System and was able to find an optimal solution, with a low computational resource. Some expansions of this methodology are been investigated: the probabilistic one and the expansion with financier restriction. (C.G.C.). 4 refs, 7 figs

  10. Minimizing bias in biomass allometry: Model selection and log transformation of data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph Mascaro; undefined undefined; Flint Hughes; Amanda Uowolo; Stefan A. Schnitzer

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear regression is increasingly used to develop allometric equations for forest biomass estimation (i.e., as opposed to the raditional approach of log-transformation followed by linear regression). Most statistical software packages, however, assume additive errors by default, violating a key assumption of allometric theory and possibly producing spurious models....

  11. New tools for characterizing swarming systems: A comparison of minimal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huepe, Cristián; Aldana, Maximino

    2008-05-01

    We compare three simple models that reproduce qualitatively the emergent swarming behavior of bird flocks, fish schools, and other groups of self-propelled agents by using a new set of diagnosis tools related to the agents’ spatial distribution. Two of these correspond in fact to different implementations of the same model, which had been previously confused in the literature. All models appear to undergo a very similar order-to-disorder phase transition as the noise level is increased if we only compare the standard order parameter, which measures the degree of agent alignment. When considering our novel quantities, however, their properties are clearly distinguished, unveiling previously unreported qualitative characteristics that help determine which model best captures the main features of realistic swarms. Additionally, we analyze the agent clustering in space, finding that the distribution of cluster sizes is typically exponential at high noise, and approaches a power-law as the noise level is reduced. This trend is sometimes reversed at noise levels close to the phase transition, suggesting a non-trivial critical behavior that could be verified experimentally. Finally, we study a bi-stable regime that develops under certain conditions in large systems. By computing the probability distributions of our new quantities, we distinguish the properties of each of the coexisting metastable states. Our study suggests new experimental analyses that could be carried out to characterize real biological swarms.

  12. The minimal extension of the Standard Model with S3 symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.E.; Lin, C.; Yang, Y.W.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the two Higgs-doublet extension of the standard electroweak model with S 3 symmetry is presented. The flavour changing neutral Higgs interaction are automatically absent. A permutation symmetry breaking scheme is discussed. The correction to the Bjorken's approximation and the CP-violation factor J are given within this scheme

  13. Modeling Optimal Scheduling for Pumping System to Minimize Operation Cost and Enhance Operation Reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Luo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional pump scheduling models neglect the operation reliability which directly relates with the unscheduled maintenance cost and the wear cost during the operation. Just for this, based on the assumption that the vibration directly relates with the operation reliability and the degree of wear, it could express the operation reliability as the normalization of the vibration level. The characteristic of the vibration with the operation point was studied, it could be concluded that idealized flow versus vibration plot should be a distinct bathtub shape. There is a narrow sweet spot (80 to 100 percent BEP to obtain low vibration levels in this shape, and the vibration also follows similar law with the square of the rotation speed without resonance phenomena. Then, the operation reliability could be modeled as the function of the capacity and rotation speed of the pump and add this function to the traditional model to form the new. And contrast with the tradition method, the result shown that the new model could fix the result produced by the traditional, make the pump operate in low vibration, then the operation reliability could increase and the maintenance cost could decrease.

  14. Recent Result from E821 Experiment on Muon g-2 and Unconstrained Minimal Supersymemtric Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Komine, S; Yamaguchi, M; Komine, Shinji; Moroi, Takeo; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2001-01-01

    Recently, the E821 experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory announced their latest result of their muon g-2 measurement which is about 2.6-\\sigma away from the standard model prediction. Taking this result seriously, we examine the possibility to explain this discrepancy by the supersymmetric contribution. Our analysis is performed in the framework of the unconstrained supersymmetric standard model which has free seven parameters relevant to muon g-2. We found that, in the case of large \\tan\\beta, sparticle masses are allowed to be large in the region where the SUSY contribution to the muon g-2 is large enough, and hence the conventional SUSY search may fail even at the LHC. On the contrary, to explain the discrepancy in the case of small \\tan\\beta, we found that (i) sleptons and SU(2)_L gauginos should be light, and (ii) negative search for the Higgs boson severely constrains the model in the framework of the mSUGRA and gauge-mediated model.

  15. Sympathetic overactivity precedes metabolic dysfunction in a fructose model of glucose intolerance in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, Katia De; Senador, Danielle D.; Mostarda, Cristiano; Irigoyen, Maria C.

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of high levels of fructose in humans and animals leads to metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunction. There are questions as to the role of the autonomic changes in the time course of fructose-induced dysfunction. C57/BL male mice were given tap water or fructose water (100 g/l) to drink for up to 2 mo. Groups were control (C), 15-day fructose (F15), and 60-day fructose (F60). Light-dark patterns of arterial pressure (AP) and heart rate (HR), and their respective variabilities were measured. Plasma glucose, lipids, insulin, leptin, resistin, adiponectin, and glucose tolerance were quantified. Fructose increased systolic AP (SAP) at 15 and 60 days during both light (F15: 123 ± 2 and F60: 118 ± 2 mmHg) and dark periods (F15: 136 ± 4 and F60: 136 ± 5 mmHg) compared with controls (light: 111 ± 2 and dark: 117 ± 2 mmHg). SAP variance (VAR) and the low-frequency component (LF) were increased in F15 (>60% and >80%) and F60 (>170% and >140%) compared with C. Cardiac sympatho-vagal balance was enhanced, while baroreflex function was attenuated in fructose groups. Metabolic parameters were unchanged in F15. However, F60 showed significant increases in plasma glucose (26%), cholesterol (44%), triglycerides (22%), insulin (95%), and leptin (63%), as well as glucose intolerance. LF of SAP was positively correlated with SAP. Plasma leptin was correlated with triglycerides, insulin, and glucose tolerance. Results show that increased sympathetic modulation of vessels and heart preceded metabolic dysfunction in fructose-consuming mice. Data suggest that changes in autonomic modulation may be an initiating mechanism underlying the cluster of symptoms associated with cardiometabolic disease. PMID:22319048

  16. Development of a nonlinear model for the prediction of response times of glucose affinity sensors using concanavalin A and dextran and the development of a differential osmotic glucose affinity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Louis G.

    With the increasing prevalence of diabetes in the United States and worldwide, blood glucose monitoring must be accurate and reliable. Current enzymatic sensors have numerous disadvantages that make them unreliable and unfavorable among patients. Recent research in glucose affinity sensors correct some of the problems that enzymatic sensors experience. Dextran and concanavalin A are two of the more common components used in glucose affinity sensors. When these sensors were first explored, a model was derived to predict the response time of a glucose affinity sensor using concanavalin A and dextran. However, the model assumed the system was linear and fell short of calculating times representative of the response times determined through experimental tests with the sensors. In this work, a new model that uses the Stokes-Einstein Equation to demonstrate the nonlinear behavior of the glucose affinity assay was developed to predict the response times of similar glucose affinity sensors. In addition to the device tested by the original linear model, additional devices were identified and tested with the proposed model. The nonlinear model was designed to accommodate the many different variations between systems. The proposed model was able to accurately calculate response times for sensors using the concanavalin A-dextran affinity assay with respect to the experimentally reported times by the independent research groups. Parameter studies using the nonlinear model were able to identify possible setbacks that could compromise the response of thesystem. Specifically, the model showed that the improper use of asymmetrical membranes could increase the response time by as little as 20% or more as the device is miniaturized. The model also demonstrated that systems using the concanavalin Adextran assay would experience higher response times in the hypoglycemic range. This work attempted to replicate and improve an osmotic glucose affinity sensor. The system was designed to

  17. Taxonomic minimalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattle, A J; Oliver, I

    1994-12-01

    Biological surveys are in increasing demand while taxonomic resources continue to decline. How much formal taxonomy is required to get the job done? The answer depends on the kind of job but it is possible that taxonomic minimalism, especially (1) the use of higher taxonomic ranks, (2) the use of morphospecies rather than species (as identified by Latin binomials), and (3) the involvement of taxonomic specialists only for training and verification, may offer advantages for biodiversity assessment, environmental monitoring and ecological research. As such, formal taxonomy remains central to the process of biological inventory and survey but resources may be allocated more efficiently. For example, if formal Identification is not required, resources may be concentrated on replication and increasing sample sizes. Taxonomic minimalism may also facilitate the inclusion in these activities of important but neglected groups, especially among the invertebrates, and perhaps even microorganisms. Copyright © 1994. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. A model for flexible tools used in minimally invasive medical virtual environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Francisco; Luzon, M Victoria; Pop, Serban R; Hughes, Chris J; John, Nigel W; Torres, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Within the limits of current technology, many applications of a virtual environment will trade-off accuracy for speed. This is not an acceptable compromise in a medical training application where both are essential. Efficient algorithms must therefore be developed. The purpose of this project is the development and validation of a novel physics-based real time tool manipulation model, which is easy to integrate into any medical virtual environment that requires support for the insertion of long flexible tools into complex geometries. This encompasses medical specialities such as vascular interventional radiology, endoscopy, and laparoscopy, where training, prototyping of new instruments/tools and mission rehearsal can all be facilitated by using an immersive medical virtual environment. Our model recognises and uses accurately patient specific data and adapts to the geometrical complexity of the vessel in real time.

  19. Minimizing the wintertime low bias of Northern Hemisphere carbon monoxide in global model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Olaf; Schultz, Martin G.; Bouarar, Idir; Clark, Hannah; Huijnen, Vincent; Gaudel, Audrey; George, Maya; Clerbaux, Cathy

    2015-04-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a product of incomplete combustion and is also produced from oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere. It is of interest as an indirect greenhouse gas and an air pollutant causing health effects and is thus subject to emission restrictions. CO acts as a major sink for the OH radical and as a precursor for tropospheric ozone and affects the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere as well as regional air quality. Despite the developments in the global modelling of chemistry and of the parameterization of the physical processes, CO concentrations remain underestimated during NH winter by most state-of-the-art chemical transport models. The resulting model bias can in principle originate from either an underestimation of CO sources or an overestimation of its sinks. We address both the role of sources and sinks with a series of MOZART chemistry transport model sensitivity simulations for the year 2008 and compare our results to observational data from ground-based stations, satellite observations, and from MOZAIC tropospheric profile measurements on passenger aircraft. Our base case simulation using the MACCity emission inventory (Granier et al. 2011) underestimates the near-surface Northern Hemispheric CO mixing ratios by more than 20 ppb from December to April with a maximal bias of 40 ppb in January. The bias is strongest for the European region (up to 75 ppb in January). From our sensitivity studies the mismatch between observed and modelled atmospheric CO concentrations can be explained by a combination of the following emission inventory shortcuts: (i) missing anthropogenic wintertime CO emissions from traffic or other combustion processes, (ii) missing anthropogenic VOC emissions, (iii) an exaggerated downward trend in the RCP8.5 scenario underlying the MACCity inventory, (iv) a lack of knowledge about the seasonality of emissions. Deficiencies in the parameterization of the dry deposition velocities can also lead to

  20. COMPUTATIONAL MODELS USED FOR MINIMIZING THE NEGATIVE IMPACT OF ENERGY ON THE ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oprea D.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Optimizing energy system is a problem that is extensively studied for many years by scientists. This problem can be studied from different views and using different computer programs. The work is characterized by one of the following calculation methods used in Europe for modelling, power system optimization. This method shall be based on reduce action of energy system on environment. Computer program used and characterized in this article is GEMIS.

  1. The ring structure of chiral operators for minimal models coupled to 2D gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmadi, M.H.

    1992-09-01

    The BRST cohomology ring for (p,q) models coupled to gravity is discussed. In addition to the generators of the ghost number zero ring, the existence of a generator of ghost number - 1 and its inverse is proved and used to construct the entire ring. Some comments are made regarding the algebra of the vector fields on the ring and the supersymmetric extension. (author). 13 refs

  2. Impaired brain glymphatic flow in a rodent model of chronic liver disease and minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Lythgoe, Mark; Hosford, Patrick; Arias, Natalia; Gallego-Duran, Rocio; Hadjihambi, Anna; Jalan, Rajiv; Gourine, Alexander; Habtesion, Abeba; Davies, Nathan; Harrison, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal function is exquisitely sensitive to alterations in extracellular environment. In patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE), accumulation of metabolic waste products and noxious substances in the interstitial fluid of the brain may contribute to neuronal dysfunction and cognitive impairment. In a rat model of chronic liver disease, we used an emerging dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI technique to assess the efficacy of the glymphatic system, which facilitates clearance of solutes from t...

  3. Determinants of [13N]ammonia kinetics in hepatic PET experiments: a minimal recirculatory model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Michael; Roelsgaard, Klaus; Bender, Dirk; Keiding, Susanne

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was the development of a modelling approach for the analysis of the systemic kinetics of the tracer nitrogen-13 ammonia administered for dynamic liver scanning. The radioactive half-life of this tracer is 9.8 min, which limits the time span in which data are available in a positron emission tomography experimental setting. A circulatory pharmacokinetic model was applied to the metabolism of ammonia in anaesthetised pigs, which incorporated data from serial measurements of [ 13 N]ammonia and [ 13 N]metabolite activity in arterial and portal venous blood together with blood flow rates through the portal vein and through the hepatic artery obtained over 20 min after intravenous injection of [ 13 N]ammonia. Model analysis showed that up to 20 min after injection the time course of [ 13 N]ammonia concentration in arterial blood is primarily determined by distribution kinetics (steady-state volume of distribution 1,856±531 ml kg -1 ). Simultaneous fitting of arterial ammonia and metabolite blood concentrations allowed for estimation of the hepatic [ 13 N]ammonia clearance (10.25±1.84 ml min -1 kg -1 ), which accounted for the formation of the circulating metabolites. (orig.)

  4. A computer model simulating human glucose absorption and metabolism in health and metabolic disease states [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Naftalin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A computer model designed to simulate integrated glucose-dependent changes in splanchnic blood flow with small intestinal glucose absorption, hormonal and incretin circulation and hepatic and systemic metabolism in health and metabolic diseases e.g. non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, (NAFLD, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, (NASH and type 2 diabetes mellitus, (T2DM demonstrates how when glucagon-like peptide-1, (GLP-1 is synchronously released into the splanchnic blood during intestinal glucose absorption, it stimulates superior mesenteric arterial (SMA blood flow and by increasing passive intestinal glucose absorption, harmonizes absorption with its distribution and metabolism. GLP-1 also synergises insulin-dependent net hepatic glucose uptake (NHGU. When GLP-1 secretion is deficient post-prandial SMA blood flow is not increased and as NHGU is also reduced, hyperglycaemia follows. Portal venous glucose concentration is also raised, thereby retarding the passive component of intestinal glucose absorption.   Increased pre-hepatic sinusoidal resistance combined with portal hypertension leading to opening of intrahepatic portosystemic collateral vessels are NASH-related mechanical defects that alter the balance between splanchnic and systemic distributions of glucose, hormones and incretins.The model reveals the latent contribution of portosystemic shunting in development of metabolic disease. This diverts splanchnic blood content away from the hepatic sinuses to the systemic circulation, particularly during the glucose absorptive phase of digestion, resulting in inappropriate increases in insulin-dependent systemic glucose metabolism.  This hastens onset of hypoglycaemia and thence hyperglucagonaemia. The model reveals that low rates of GLP-1 secretion, frequently associated with T2DM and NASH, may be also be caused by splanchnic hypoglycaemia, rather than to intrinsic loss of incretin secretory capacity. These findings may have therapeutic

  5. A chemo-electro-mechanical model for simulation of responsive deformation of glucose-sensitive hydrogels with the effect of enzyme catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Luo, Rongmo; Birgersson, Erik; Lam, Khin Yong

    2009-02-01

    A multi-effect-coupling glucose-stimulus (MECglu) model is developed and solved numerically for the swelling behavior of soft smart hydrogels responding to changes in the environmental glucose concentration. The model considers the effect of the glucose oxidation reaction catalyzed by enzymes including glucose oxidase and catalase. It is composed of the Nernst-Planck equation for the mobile species in the solvent, the Poisson equation for the electric potential, and a nonlinear mechanical equation for the large deformations of the hydrogel that arise due to the conversion of chemical energy to mechanical. Based on the theory of the chemo-electro-mechanical-coupled fields, the formulation of the fixed charge groups bound onto the cross-linked polymer network is associated with the change of the ambient solution pH. The MECglu model is validated by comparison between the steady-state computation and experimental equilibrium swelling curves, and good agreement is obtained. A parameter study is then conducted by steady-state simulations to ascertain the impact of various solvent parameters on the responsive swelling behavior of the hydrogel. One key parameter is the glucose concentration, which is varied within the range of practical physiological glucose concentrations from 0 to 16.5 mM (300 mg/ml) to support the design and optimization of an insulin delivery system based on a glucose-sensitive hydrogel with immobilized glucose oxidase and catalase. The influence of oxygen and glucose concentrations in the solvent is then further studied for the distributive profiles of reacting and diffusive species concentrations, the electric potential, the displacement, as well as the swelling ratio of the glucose-sensitive hydrogel.

  6. Incorrect modeling of the failure process of minimally repaired systems under random conditions: The effect on the maintenance costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulcini, Gianpaolo

    2015-01-01

    This note investigates the effect of the incorrect modeling of the failure process of minimally repaired systems that operates under random environmental conditions on the costs of a periodic replacement maintenance. The motivation of this paper is given by a recently published paper, where a wrong formulation of the expected cost for unit time under a periodic replacement policy is obtained. This wrong formulation is due to the incorrect assumption that the intensity function of minimally repaired systems that operate under random conditions has the same functional form as the failure rate of the first failure time. This produced an incorrect optimization of the replacement maintenance. Thus, in this note the conceptual differences between the intensity function and the failure rate of the first failure time are first highlighted. Then, the correct expressions of the expected cost and of the optimal replacement period are provided. Finally, a real application is used to measure how severe can be the economical consequences caused by the incorrect modeling of the failure process.

  7. Constrained minimization problems for the reproduction number in meta-population models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghotanyan, Gayane; Feng, Zhilan; Glasser, John W; Hill, Andrew N

    2018-02-14

    The basic reproduction number ([Formula: see text]) can be considerably higher in an SIR model with heterogeneous mixing compared to that from a corresponding model with homogeneous mixing. For example, in the case of measles, mumps and rubella in San Diego, CA, Glasser et al. (Lancet Infect Dis 16(5):599-605, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(16)00004-9 ), reported an increase of 70% in [Formula: see text] when heterogeneity was accounted for. Meta-population models with simple heterogeneous mixing functions, e.g., proportionate mixing, have been employed to identify optimal vaccination strategies using an approach based on the gradient of the effective reproduction number ([Formula: see text]), which consists of partial derivatives of [Formula: see text] with respect to the proportions immune [Formula: see text] in sub-groups i (Feng et al. in J Theor Biol 386:177-187, 2015.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtbi.2015.09.006 ; Math Biosci 287:93-104, 2017.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mbs.2016.09.013 ). These papers consider cases in which an optimal vaccination strategy exists. However, in general, the optimal solution identified using the gradient may not be feasible for some parameter values (i.e., vaccination coverages outside the unit interval). In this paper, we derive the analytic conditions under which the optimal solution is feasible. Explicit expressions for the optimal solutions in the case of [Formula: see text] sub-populations are obtained, and the bounds for optimal solutions are derived for [Formula: see text] sub-populations. This is done for general mixing functions and examples of proportionate and preferential mixing are presented. Of special significance is the result that for general mixing schemes, both [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] are bounded below and above by their corresponding expressions when mixing is proportionate and isolated, respectively.

  8. Minimally invasive lung volume reduction treated with bronchi occlusion emphysema model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Dayong; Shen Liming; Shen Junkang; Jin Yiqi; Chen Lei; Huang Xianchen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of the coil-and-glue method for the reduction of lung volume in rabbit emphysema model. Methods: Sixteen rabbits of emphysema model were divided into the occlusion group(n=10), in which both anterior bronchi were occluded using the coil-and- glue method, and the control group (n=6). The maximal static pressure of airway (P max ), peak expiratory flow (PEF), end-expiratory volume (EEV) and pressure of oxygen (PO 2 ) were measured at ante- emphysema, post-emphysema, 1 week and 4 week after occlusion respectively. The expectoration (or migration) of coil and collapse of lung were also investigated. Results: P max was (20.0±1.3) and (17.1± 1.4) cm H 2 O (1 cm H 2 O=0.098 kPa) in the occlusion group at ante-emphysema and post-emphysema respectively. P max was (19.2±1.4) cm H 2 O in the occlusion group in the 1 week after the occlusion, while (17.1±1.5)cm H 2 O in the control group (F=6.68, P max was (19.2±1.4) cm H 2 O in the occlusion group, while (16.6±1.2) cm H 2 O in the control group (F=12.10, P max , in the 1 week and 4 week after occlusion were higher than those at post-emphysema (P<0.01, respectively); EEV at post-emphysema was higher than that at ante-emphysema (P<0.01). Conclusion: Coil-and-glue occlusion method for lung volume reduction in rabbit emphysema model can improve the pulmonary function, which can be relatively long lasting. (authors)

  9. Minimal spin-3/2 dark matter in a simple s-channel model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khojali, Mohammed Omer; Goyal, Ashok; Kumar, Mukesh; Cornell, Alan S. [University of the Witwatersrand, Wits, National Institute for Theoretical Physics, School of Physics and Mandelstam Institute for Theoretical Physics, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2017-01-15

    We consider a spin-3/2 fermionic dark matter candidate (DM) interacting with Standard Model fermions through a vector mediator in the s-channel. We find that for pure vector couplings almost the entire parameter space of the DM and mediator mass consistent with the observed relic density is ruled out by the direct detection observations through DM-nucleon elastic scattering cross sections. In contrast, for pure axial-vector coupling, the most stringent constraints are obtained from monojet searches at the Large Hadron Collider. (orig.)

  10. A whole-body model for glycogen regulation reveals a critical role for substrate cycling in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Xu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Timely, and sometimes rapid, metabolic adaptation to changes in food supply is critical for survival as an organism moves from the fasted to the fed state, and vice versa. These transitions necessitate major metabolic changes to maintain energy homeostasis as the source of blood glucose moves away from ingested carbohydrates, through hepatic glycogen stores, towards gluconeogenesis. The integration of hepatic glycogen regulation with extra-hepatic energetics is a key aspect of these adaptive mechanisms. Here we use computational modeling to explore hepatic glycogen regulation under fed and fasting conditions in the context of a whole-body model. The model was validated against previous experimental results concerning glycogen phosphorylase a (active and glycogen synthase a dynamics. The model qualitatively reproduced physiological changes that occur during transition from the fed to the fasted state. Analysis of the model reveals a critical role for the inhibition of glycogen synthase phosphatase by glycogen phosphorylase a. This negative regulation leads to high levels of glycogen synthase activity during fasting conditions, which in turn increases substrate (futile cycling, priming the system for a rapid response once an external source of glucose is restored. This work demonstrates that a mechanistic understanding of the design principles used by metabolic control circuits to maintain homeostasis can benefit from the incorporation of mathematical descriptions of these networks into "whole-body" contextual models that mimic in vivo conditions.

  11. Fresh Kills leachate treatment and minimization study: Volume 2, Modeling, monitoring and evaluation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillos, J.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    1993-09-01

    The New York City Department of Sanitation is developing a comprehensive landfill leachate management plan for the Fresh Kills landfill, located on the western shore of Staten Island, New York. The 3000-acre facility, owned and operated by the City of New York, has been developed into four distinct mounds that correspond to areas designated as Sections 1/9, 2/8, 3/4 and 6/7. In developing a comprehensive leachate management plan, the estimating leachate flow rates is important in designing appropriate treatment alternatives to reduce the offsite migration that pollutes both surface water and groundwater resources.Estimating the leachate flow rates from Sections 1/9 and 6/7 was given priority using an available model, hydrologic evaluation of landfill performance (HELP), and a new model, flow investigation for landfill leachate (FILL). The field-scale analysis for leachate flow included data collection of the leachate mound-level from piezometers and monitoring wells installed on-site, for six months period. From the leachate mound-head contours and flow-gradients, Leachate flow rates were computed using Darcy`s Law.

  12. A variation reduction allocation model for quality improvement to minimize investment and quality costs by considering suppliers’ learning curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosyidi, C. N.; Jauhari, WA; Suhardi, B.; Hamada, K.

    2016-02-01

    Quality improvement must be performed in a company to maintain its product competitiveness in the market. The goal of such improvement is to increase the customer satisfaction and the profitability of the company. In current practice, a company needs several suppliers to provide the components in assembly process of a final product. Hence quality improvement of the final product must involve the suppliers. In this paper, an optimization model to allocate the variance reduction is developed. Variation reduction is an important term in quality improvement for both manufacturer and suppliers. To improve suppliers’ components quality, the manufacturer must invest an amount of their financial resources in learning process of the suppliers. The objective function of the model is to minimize the total cost consists of investment cost, and quality costs for both internal and external quality costs. The Learning curve will determine how the employee of the suppliers will respond to the learning processes in reducing the variance of the component.

  13. Non-standard charged Higgs decay at the LHC in Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandyopadhyay, Priyotosh [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi”, Università del Salento and INFN-Lecce,Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Huitu, Katri [Department of Physics, and Helsinki Institute of Physics,P.O.B 64 (Gustaf Hällströmin katu 2), FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Niyogi, Saurabh [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences,CIT Campus, Chennai (India)

    2016-07-04

    We consider next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model (NMSSM) which has a gauge singlet superfield. In the scale invariant superpotential we do not have the mass terms and the whole Lagrangian has an additional Z{sub 3} symmetry. This model can have light scalar and/or pseudoscalar allowed by the recent data from LHC and the old data from LEP. We investigate the situation where a relatively light charged Higgs can decay to such a singlet-like pseudoscalar and a W{sup ±} boson giving rise to a final state containing τ and/or b-jets and lepton(s). Such decays evade the recent bounds on charged Higgs from the LHC, and according to our PYTHIA-FastJet based simulation can be probed with 10 fb{sup −1} at the LHC center of mass energy of 13 and 14 TeV.

  14. Radiative Corrections to e+e-→ Zh at Future Higgs Factory in the Minimal Dilaton Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heng Zhao-Xia; Li Dong-Wei; Zhou Hai-Jing

    2015-01-01

    The minimal dilaton model (MDM) extends the Standard Model by one singlet scalar called dilaton and one top quark partner called t'. In this work we investigate the t'-induced radiative correction to the Higgs-strahlung production process e + e − → Zh at future Higgs factory. We first present the analytical calculations in detail and show how to handle the ultraviolet divergence. Then we calculate the correction numerically by considering the constraints from precision electroweak data. We find that, for sinθ L = 0.2 and m t' = 1200 GeV, the correction is 0.26% and 2.1% for √s e + e - - 240 GeV, 1 TeV respectively, and a larger value can be achieved as sin θ L increases. (physics of elementary particles and fields)

  15. The Integration of Production-Distribution on Newspapers Supply Chain for Cost Minimization using Analytic Models: Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febriana Aqidawati, Era; Sutopo, Wahyudi; Hisjam, Muh.

    2018-03-01

    Newspapers are products with special characteristics which are perishable, have a shorter range of time between the production and distribution, zero inventory, and decreasing sales value along with increasing in time. Generally, the problem of production and distribution in the paper supply chain is the integration of production planning and distribution to minimize the total cost. The approach used in this article to solve the problem is using an analytical model. In this article, several parameters and constraints have been considered in the calculation of the total cost of the integration of production and distribution of newspapers during the determined time horizon. This model can be used by production and marketing managers as decision support in determining the optimal quantity of production and distribution in order to obtain minimum cost so that company's competitiveness level can be increased.

  16. An enhanced model for minimizing fuel consumption under block-queuing in a drive-through service system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, C.H.; Berglin, J. [University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States). Dept. of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems

    2004-05-01

    We present a new model for determining the optimal block-size under block-queuing in a simple, single-channel queue at a drive-through service facility. With block-queuing, a queue is partitioned into an active section and a passive section, where drivers are asked to turn off their engines until the active section clears. Our model prescribes a block-size, i.e., a maximum number of vehicles in the active section, which minimizes the expected amount of fuel consumed in the queue. It can assess the effects of the traffic intensity, the service-time variance, and the proportion of compliant drivers in the passive section on the optimal block- size and on fuel consumption in the queue. (author)

  17. All possible lightest supersymmetric particles in proton hexality violating minimal supergravity models and their signals at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grab, Sebastian

    2009-08-01

    The most widely studied supersymmetric scenario is the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with more than a hundred free parameters. However for detailed phenomenological studies, the minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) model, a restricted and well-motivated framework for the MSSM, is more convenient. In this model, lepton- and baryon-number violating interactions are suppressed by a discrete symmetry, R-parity or proton-hexality, to keep the proton stable. However, it is sufficient to forbid only lepton- or baryon-number violation. We thus extend mSUGRA models by adding a proton-hexality violating operator at the grand unification scale. This can change the supersymmetric spectrum leading on the one hand to a sneutrino, smuon or squark as the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP). On the other hand, a wide parameter region is reopened, where the scalar tau (stau) is the LSP. We investigate in detail the conditions leading to non-neutralino LSP scenarios. We take into account the restrictions from neutrino masses, the muon anomalous magnetic moment, b→sγ, and other precision measurements. We furthermore investigate existing restrictions from direct searches at LEP, the Tevatron, and the CERN p anti p collider. It is vital to know the nature of the LSP, since supersymmetric particles normally cascade decay down to the LSP at collider experiments. We present typical LHC signatures for sneutrino LSP scenarios. Promising signatures are high-p T muons and jets, like-sign muon events and detached vertices from long lived taus. We also classify the stau LSP decays and describe their dependence on the mSUGRA parameters. We then exploit our results for resonant single slepton production at the LHC. We find novel signatures with like-sign muon and three- and four-muon final states. Finally, we perform a detailed analysis for single slepton production in association with a single top quark. We show that the signal can be distinguished from the background at the LHC

  18. Self-tolerance in a minimal model of the idiotypic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Robert; Werner, Benjamin; Behn, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of self-tolerance in the frame of a minimalistic model of the idiotypic network. A node of this network represents a population of B-lymphocytes of the same idiotype, which is encoded by a bit string. The links of the network connect nodes with (nearly) complementary strings. The population of a node survives if the number of occupied neighbors is not too small and not too large. There is an influx of lymphocytes with random idiotype from the bone marrow. Previous investigations have shown that this system evolves toward highly organized architectures, where the nodes can be classified into groups according to their statistical properties. The building principles of these architectures can be analytically described and the statistical results of simulations agree very well with results of a modular mean-field theory. In this paper, we present simulation results for the case that one or several nodes, playing the role of self, are permanently occupied. These self nodes influence their linked neighbors, the autoreactive clones, but are themselves not affected by idiotypic interactions. We observe that the group structure of the architecture is very similar to the case without self antigen, but organized such that the neighbors of the self are only weakly occupied, thus providing self-tolerance. We also treat this situation in mean-field theory, which give results in good agreement with data from simulation. The model supports the view that autoreactive clones, which naturally occur also in healthy organisms are controlled by anti-idiotypic interactions, and could be helpful to understand network aspects of autoimmune disorders.

  19. Novel model of neuronal bioenergetics: postsynaptic utilization of glucose but not lactate correlates positively with Ca2+ signalling in cultured mouse glutamatergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Lasse K; Obel, Linea F; Walls, Anne B; Schousboe, Arne; Faek, Sevan A A; Jajo, Farah S; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2012-04-05

    We have previously investigated the relative roles of extracellular glucose and lactate as fuels for glutamatergic neurons during synaptic activity. The conclusion from these studies was that cultured glutamatergic neurons utilize glucose rather than lactate during NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate)-induced synaptic activity and that lactate alone is not able to support neurotransmitter glutamate homoeostasis. Subsequently, a model was proposed to explain these results at the cellular level. In brief, the intermittent rises in intracellular Ca2+ during activation cause influx of Ca2+ into the mitochondrial matrix thus activating the tricarboxylic acid cycle dehydrogenases. This will lead to a lower activity of the MASH (malate-aspartate shuttle), which in turn will result in anaerobic glycolysis and lactate production rather than lactate utilization. In the present work, we have investigated the effect of an ionomycin-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ (i.e. independent of synaptic activity) on neuronal energy metabolism employing 13C-labelled glucose and lactate and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis of labelling in glutamate, alanine and lactate. The results demonstrate that glucose utilization is positively correlated with intracellular Ca2+ whereas lactate utilization is not. This result lends further support for a significant role of glucose in neuronal bioenergetics and that Ca2+ signalling may control the switch between glucose and lactate utilization during synaptic activity. Based on the results, we propose a compartmentalized CiMASH (Ca2+-induced limitation of the MASH) model that includes intracellular compartmentation of glucose and lactate metabolism. We define pre- and post-synaptic compartments metabolizing glucose and glucose plus lactate respectively in which the latter displays a positive correlation between oxidative metabolism of glucose and Ca2+ signalling.

  20. Unaltered lactate and glucose transporter levels in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puchades, Maja; Sogn, Carl Johan; Maehlen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Metabolic impairment contributes to development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in degeneration of nigral dopamine neurons. Also, in PD there are alterations in glucose metabolism in nigro-striatal pathways, and increased cerebral lactate levels have...... of MCT1, MCT2 and GLUT1 is not changed following dopaminergic neurodegeneration. This is in contrast to findings in other neurodegenerative disease, such as mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, where there are large alterations in MCT levels....

  1. Hybrid neural network model for simulating sorbitol synthesis by glucose-fructose oxidoreductase in Zymomonas mobilis CP4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravo S.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid neural network model for simulating the process of enzymatic reduction of fructose to sorbitol process catalyzed by glucose-fructose oxidoreductase in Zymomonas mobilis CP4 is presented. Data used to derive and validate the model was obtained from experiments carried out under different conditions of pH, temperature and concentrations of both substrates (glucose and fructose involved in the reaction. Sonicated and lyophilized cells were used as source of the enzyme. The optimal pH for sorbitol synthesis at 30º C is 6.5. For a value of pH of 6, the optimal temperature is 35º C. The neural network in the model computes the value of the kinetic relationship. The hybrid neural network model is able to simulate changes in the substrates and product concentrations during sorbitol synthesis under pH and temperature conditions ranging between 5 and 7.5 and 25 and 40º C, respectively. Under these conditions the rate of sorbitol synthesis shows important differences. Values computed using the hybrid neural network model have an average error of 1.7·10-3 mole.

  2. A glucose model based on support vector regression for the prediction of hypoglycemic events under free-living conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georga, Eleni I; Protopappas, Vasilios C; Ardigò, Diego; Polyzos, Demosthenes; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2013-08-01

    The prevention of hypoglycemic events is of paramount importance in the daily management of insulin-treated diabetes. The use of short-term prediction algorithms of the subcutaneous (s.c.) glucose concentration may contribute significantly toward this direction. The literature suggests that, although the recent glucose profile is a prominent predictor of hypoglycemia, the overall patient's context greatly impacts its accurate estimation. The objective of this study is to evaluate the performance of a support vector for regression (SVR) s.c. glucose method on hypoglycemia prediction. We extend our SVR model to predict separately the nocturnal events during sleep and the non-nocturnal (i.e., diurnal) ones over 30-min and 60-min horizons using information on recent glucose profile, meals, insulin intake, and physical activities for a hypoglycemic threshold of 70 mg/dL. We also introduce herein additional variables accounting for recurrent nocturnal hypoglycemia due to antecedent hypoglycemia, exercise, and sleep. SVR predictions are compared with those from two other machine learning techniques. The method is assessed on a dataset of 15 patients with type 1 diabetes under free-living conditions. Nocturnal hypoglycemic events are predicted with 94% sensitivity for both horizons and with time lags of 5.43 min and 4.57 min, respectively. As concerns the diurnal events, when physical activities are not considered, the sensitivity is 92% and 96% for a 30-min and 60-min horizon, respectively, with both time lags being less than 5 min. However, when such information is introduced, the diurnal sensitivity decreases by 8% and 3%, respectively. Both nocturnal and diurnal predictions show a high (>90%) precision. Results suggest that hypoglycemia prediction using SVR can be accurate and performs better in most diurnal and nocturnal cases compared with other techniques. It is advised that the problem of hypoglycemia prediction should be handled differently for nocturnal

  3. Transcutaneous Intraluminal Impedance Measurement for Minimally Invasive Monitoring of Gastric Motility: Validation in Acute Canine Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Poscente

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous intraluminal impedance measurement (TIIM is a new method to cutaneously measure gastric contractions by assessing the attenuation dynamics of a small oscillating voltage emitted by a battery-powered ingestible capsule retained in the stomach. In the present study, we investigated whether TIIM can reliably assess gastric motility in acute canine models. Methods. Eight mongrel dogs were randomly divided into 2 groups: half received an active TIIM pill and half received an identically sized sham capsule. After 24-hour fasting and transoral administration of the pill (active or sham, two force transducers (FT were sutured onto the antral serosa at laparotomy. After closure, three standard cutaneous electrodes were placed on the abdomen, registering the transluminally emitted voltage. Thirty-minute baseline recordings were followed by pharmacological induction of gastric contractions using neostigmine IV and another 30-minute recording. Normalized one-minute baseline and post-neostigmine gastric motility indices (GMIs were calculated and Pearson correlation coefficients (PCCs between cutaneous and FT GMIs were obtained. Statistically significant GMI PCCs were seen in both baseline and post-neostigmine states. There were no significant GMI PCCs in the sham capsule test. Further chronic animal studies of this novel long-term gastric motility measurement technique are needed before testing it on humans.

  4. Minimal type-I seesaw model with maximally restricted texture zeros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiros, D. M.; Felipe, R. G.; Joaquim, F. R.

    2018-06-01

    In the context of Standard Model (SM) extensions, the seesaw mechanism provides the most natural explanation for the smallness of neutrino masses. In this work we consider the most economical type-I seesaw realization in which two right-handed neutrinos are added to the SM field content. For the sake of predictability, we impose the maximum number of texture zeros in the lepton Yukawa and mass matrices. All possible patterns are analyzed in the light of the most recent neutrino oscillation data, and predictions for leptonic C P violation are presented. We conclude that, in the charged-lepton mass basis, eight different texture combinations are compatible with neutrino data at 1 σ , all of them for an inverted-hierarchical neutrino mass spectrum. Four of these cases predict a C P -violating Dirac phase close to 3 π /2 , which is around the current best-fit value from the global analysis of neutrino oscillation data. If one further reduces the number of free parameters by considering three equal elements in the Dirac neutrino Yukawa coupling matrix, several texture combinations are still compatible with data but only at 3 σ . For all viable textures, the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is computed in the context of thermal leptogenesis, assuming (mildly) hierarchical heavy Majorana neutrino masses M1 ,2. It is shown that the flavored regime is ruled out, while the unflavored one requires M1˜1014 GeV .

  5. A minimal model of the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability: its genesis and predictability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ou, Hsien-Wang [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Palisades, NY (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Through a box model of the subpolar North Atlantic, we examine the genesis and predictability of the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability (AMV), posited as a linear perturbation sustained by the stochastic atmosphere. Postulating a density-dependent thermohaline circulation (THC), the latter would strongly differentiate the thermal and saline damping, and facilitate a negative feedback between the two fields. This negative feedback preferentially suppresses the low-frequency thermal variance to render a broad multidecadal peak bounded by the thermal and saline damping time. We offer this ''differential variance suppression'' as an alternative paradigm of the AMV in place of the ''damped oscillation'' - the latter generally not allowed by the deterministic dynamics and in any event bears no relation to the thermal peak. With the validated dynamics, we then assess the AMV predictability based on the relative entropy - a difference of the forecast and climatological probability distributions, which decays through both error growth and dynamical damping. Since the stochastic forcing is mainly in the surface heat flux, the thermal noise grows rapidly and together with its climatological variance limited by the THC-aided thermal damping, they strongly curtail the thermal predictability. The latter may be prolonged if the initial thermal and saline anomalies are of the same sign, but even rare events of less than 1% chance of occurrence yield a predictable time that is well short of a decade; we contend therefore that the AMV is in effect unpredictable. (orig.)

  6. Mechanisms of self-organization and finite size effects in a minimal agent based model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfi, V; Cristelli, M; Pietronero, L; Zaccaria, A

    2009-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the self-organization phenomenon in which the stylized facts originate from finite size effects with respect to the number of agents considered and disappear in the limit of an infinite population. By introducing the possibility that agents can enter or leave the market depending on the behavior of the price, it is possible to show that the system self-organizes in a regime with a finite number of agents which corresponds to the stylized facts. The mechanism for entering or leaving the market is based on the idea that a too stable market is unappealing for traders, while the presence of price movements attracts agents to enter and speculate on the market. We show that this mechanism is also compatible with the idea that agents are scared by a noisy and risky market at shorter timescales. We also show that the mechanism for self-organization is robust with respect to variations of the exit/entry rules and that the attempt to trigger the system to self-organize in a region without stylized facts leads to an unrealistic dynamics. We study the self-organization in a specific agent based model but we believe that the basic ideas should be of general validity

  7. Minimizing EIT image artefacts from mesh variability in finite element models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Andy; Lionheart, William R B

    2011-07-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) solves an inverse problem to estimate the conductivity distribution within a body from electrical simulation and measurements at the body surface, where the inverse problem is based on a solution of Laplace's equation in the body. Most commonly, a finite element model (FEM) is used, largely because of its ability to describe irregular body shapes. In this paper, we show that simulated variations in the positions of internal nodes within a FEM can result in serious image artefacts in the reconstructed images. Such variations occur when designing FEM meshes to conform to conductivity targets, but the effects may also be seen in other applications of absolute and difference EIT. We explore the hypothesis that these artefacts result from changes in the projection of the anisotropic conductivity tensor onto the FEM system matrix, which introduces anisotropic components into the simulated voltages, which cannot be reconstructed onto an isotropic image, and appear as artefacts. The magnitude of the anisotropic effect is analysed for a small regular FEM, and shown to be proportional to the relative node movement as a fraction of element size. In order to address this problem, we show that it is possible to incorporate a FEM node movement component into the formulation of the inverse problem. These results suggest that it is important to consider artefacts due to FEM mesh geometry in EIT image reconstruction.

  8. Minimally-invasive Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis of model ancient copper alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walaszek, Damian [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre, Żwirki i Wigury 101, 02-089 Warszawa (Poland); Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Senn, Marianne; Wichser, Adrian [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Faller, Markus [Laboratory for Jointing Technology and Corrosion, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Wagner, Barbara; Bulska, Ewa [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre, Żwirki i Wigury 101, 02-089 Warszawa (Poland); Ulrich, Andrea [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)

    2014-09-01

    This work describes an evaluation of a strategy for multi-elemental analysis of typical ancient bronzes (copper, lead bronze and tin bronze) by means of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS).The samples originating from archeological experiments on ancient metal smelting processes using direct reduction in a ‘bloomery’ furnace as well as historical casting techniques were investigated with the use of the previously proposed analytical procedure, including metallurgical observation and preliminary visual estimation of the homogeneity of the samples. The results of LA-ICPMS analysis were compared to the results of bulk composition obtained by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) after acid digestion. These results were coherent for most of the elements confirming the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure, however the reliability of the quantitative information about the content of the most heterogeneously distributed elements was also discussed in more detail. - Highlights: • The previously proposed procedure was evaluated by analysis of model copper alloys. • The LA-ICPMS results were comparable to the obtained by means of XRF and ICPMS. • LA-ICPMS results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure.

  9. Bs0–B-bars0 mixing within minimal flavor-violating two-Higgs-doublet models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Qin; Li, Pei-Fu; Li, Xin-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    In the “Higgs basis” for a generic 2HDM, only one scalar doublet gets a nonzero vacuum expectation value and, under the criterion of minimal flavor violation, the other one is fixed to be either color-singlet or color-octet, which are named as the type-III and type-C models, respectively. In this paper, the charged-Higgs effects of these two models on B s 0 –B -bar s 0 mixing are studied. First of all, we perform a complete one-loop computation of the electro-weak corrections to the amplitudes of B s 0 –B -bar s 0 mixing. Together with the up-to-date experimental measurements, a detailed phenomenological analysis is then performed in the cases of both real and complex Yukawa couplings of charged scalars to quarks. The spaces of model parameters allowed by the current experimental data on B s 0 –B -bar s 0 mixing are obtained and the differences between type-III and type-C models are investigated, which is helpful to distinguish between these two models

  10. [Establishment of oxygen and glucose deprive model of in vitro cultured hippocampal neuron and effect of ligustrazine on intracellular Ca+ level in model neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hai-tong; Wang, Yu; Yang, Jie-hong

    2007-03-01

    To establish the oxygen and glucose deprive (OGD) model in cultured hippocampal neuron and study the effect of ligustrazine on intracellular Ca2+ level in the model neurons. The OGD model was established in cultured hippocampal neuron, and the intracellular Ca2+ level in it was detected by laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM). The OGD model was successfully established in cultured hippocampal neurons; the intracellular Ca2+ level in the OGD model group was significantly higher than that in the blank control group (P neuron, which could be antagonized by ligustrazine, indicating that ligustrazine has a protective effect on hippocampal neuron from hypoxic-ischemic injury.

  11. Effects of Everyday Life Events on Glucose, Insulin, and Glucagon Dynamics in Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion–Treated Type 1 Diabetes: Collection of Clinical Data for Glucose Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe; Finan, Daniel Aaron; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine

    2012-01-01

    metabolism, we designed and conducted a clinical study.Methods: Patients with insulin pump–treated T1D were recruited to perform everyday life events on two separate days. During the study, patients wore their insulin pumps and, in addition, a continuous glucose monitor and an activity monitor to estimate...

  12. Cross-Validation of a Glucose-Insulin-Glucagon Pharmacodynamics Model for Simulation using Data from Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Ranjan, Ajenthen; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg

    2017-01-01

    three PD model test fits in each of the seven subjects. Thus, we successfully validated the PD model by leave-one-out cross-validation in seven out of eight T1D patients. Conclusions: The PD model accurately simulates glucose excursions based on plasma insulin and glucagon concentrations. The reported...... for concentrations of glucagon, insulin, and glucose. We fitted pharmacokinetic (PK) models to insulin and glucagon data using maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori estimation methods. Similarly, we fitted a pharmacodynamic (PD) model to glucose data. The PD model included multiplicative effects of insulin...... and glucagon on EGP. Bias and precision of PD model test fits were assessed by mean predictive error (MPE) and mean absolute predictive error (MAPE). Results: Assuming constant variables in a subject across nonoutlier visits and using thresholds of ±15% MPE and 20% MAPE, we accepted at least one and at most...

  13. The eternal quest for optimal balance between maximizing pleasure and minimizing harm: the compensatory health beliefs model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabia, Marjorie; Knäuper, Bärbel; Miquelon, Paule

    2006-02-01

    Particularly in the health domain, humans thrive to reach an equilibrium between maximizing pleasure and minimizing harm. We propose that a cognitive strategy people employ to reach this equilibrium is the activation of Compensatory Health Beliefs (CHBs). CHBs are beliefs that the negative effects of an unhealthy behaviour can be compensated for, or "neutralized," by engaging in another, healthy behaviour. "I can eat this piece of cake now because I will exercise this evening" is an example of such beliefs. Our theoretical framework aims at explaining why people create CHBs and how they employ CHBs to regulate their health behaviours. The model extends current health behaviour models by explicitly integrating the motivational conflict that emerges from the interplay between affective states (i.e., cravings or desires) and motivation (i.e., health goals). As predicted by the model, previous research has shown that holding CHBs hinder an individual's success at positive health behaviour change, and may explain why many people fail to adhere to behaviour change programs such as dieting or exercising. Moreover, future research using the model and implications for possible interventions are discussed.

  14. Solving the 3d Ising Model with the Conformal Bootstrap II. c-Minimization and Precise Critical Exponents

    CERN Document Server

    El-Showk, Sheer; Poland, David; Rychkov, Slava; Simmons-Duffin, David; Vichi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    We use the conformal bootstrap to perform a precision study of the operator spectrum of the critical 3d Ising model. We conjecture that the 3d Ising spectrum minimizes the central charge c in the space of unitary solutions to crossing symmetry. Because extremal solutions to crossing symmetry are uniquely determined, we are able to precisely reconstruct the first several Z2-even operator dimensions and their OPE coefficients. We observe that a sharp transition in the operator spectrum occurs at the 3d Ising dimension Delta_sigma=0.518154(15), and find strong numerical evidence that operators decouple from the spectrum as one approaches the 3d Ising point. We compare this behavior to the analogous situation in 2d, where the disappearance of operators can be understood in terms of degenerate Virasoro representations.

  15. Ruled Laguerre minimal surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Skopenkov, Mikhail

    2011-10-30

    A Laguerre minimal surface is an immersed surface in ℝ 3 being an extremal of the functional ∫ (H 2/K-1)dA. In the present paper, we prove that the only ruled Laguerre minimal surfaces are up to isometry the surfaces ℝ (φλ) = (Aφ, Bφ, Cφ + D cos 2φ) + λ(sin φ, cos φ, 0), where A,B,C,D ε ℝ are fixed. To achieve invariance under Laguerre transformations, we also derive all Laguerre minimal surfaces that are enveloped by a family of cones. The methodology is based on the isotropic model of Laguerre geometry. In this model a Laguerre minimal surface enveloped by a family of cones corresponds to a graph of a biharmonic function carrying a family of isotropic circles. We classify such functions by showing that the top view of the family of circles is a pencil. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Glucose allostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stumvoll, Michael; Tataranni, P Antonio; Stefan, Norbert

    2003-01-01

    individuals with normal glucose tolerance, normoglycemia can always be maintained by compensatorily increasing AIR in response to decreasing M (and vice versa). This has been mathematically described by the hyperbolic relationship between AIR and M and referred to as glucose homeostasis, with glucose......In many organisms, normoglycemia is achieved by a tight coupling of nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion in the pancreatic beta-cell (acute insulin response [AIR]) and the metabolic action of insulin to stimulate glucose disposal (insulin action [M]). It is widely accepted that in healthy...... concentration assumed to remain constant along the hyperbola. Conceivably, glucose is one of the signals stimulating AIR in response to decreasing M. Hypothetically, as with any normally functioning feed-forward system, AIR should not fully compensate for worsening M, since this would remove the stimulus...

  17. Cell motility in models of wounded human skin is improved by Gap27 despite raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Catherine S.; Berends, Rebecca F. [Department of Life Sciences, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom); Flint, David J. [Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 161 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G4 0RE (United Kingdom); Martin, Patricia E.M., E-mail: Patricia.Martin@gcu.ac.uk [Department of Life Sciences, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    Reducing Cx43 expression stimulates skin wound healing. This is mimicked in models when Cx43 function is blocked by the connexin mimetic peptide Gap27. IGF-I also stimulates wound healing with IGFBP-5 attenuating its actions. Further, the IGF-I to IGFBP-5 ratio is altered in diabetic skin, where wound closure is impaired. We investigated whether Gap27 remains effective in augmenting scrape-wound closure in human skin wound models simulating diabetes-induced changes, using culture conditions with raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5. Gap27 increased scrape-wound closure in normal glucose and insulin (NGI) and to a lesser extent in high glucose and insulin (HGI). IGF-I enhanced scrape-wound closure in keratinocytes whereas IGFBP-5 inhibited this response. Gap27 overcame the inhibitory effects of IGFBP-5 on IGF-I activity. Connexin-mediated communication (CMC) was reduced in HGI, despite raised Cx43, and Gap27 significantly decreased CMC in NGI and HGI. IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect CMC. IGF-I increased keratinocyte proliferation in NGI, and Gap27 increased proliferation in NGI to a greater extent than in HGI. We conclude that IGF-I and Gap27 stimulate scrape-wound closure by independent mechanisms with Gap27 inhibiting Cx43 function. Gap27 can enhance wound closure in diabetic conditions, irrespective of the IGF-I:IGFBP-5 balance. - Highlights: ► Human organotypic and keratinocyte ‘diabetic’ skin models were used to demonstrate the ability of Gap27 to improve scrape-wound closure. ► Gap27 enhanced scrape-wound closure by reducing Cx43-mediated communication, whereas IGFBP-5 retarded cell migration. ► IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect connexin-mediated pathways. ► Gap27 can override altered glucose, insulin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-5 in ‘diabetic’ skin models and thus has therapeutic potential.

  18. Concentration of Rutin Model Solutions from Their Mixtures with Glucose Using Ultrafiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid S. Saleh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Separation of polyphenolic phytochemical compounds from their mixtures with sugars is necessary to produce an added-value sugar-reduced extract with high biological activity from fruit juice processing industry waste streams. The separation characteristics of a binary mixture of rutin and glucose using a Pellicon-2 regenerated cellulose ultrafiltration membrane with an area of 0.1 m2 having nominal MWCO of 1,000 Da were investigated, to demonstrate the separation of phenolic compounds from sugars. The effects of the operating variables–transmembrane pressure, feed solution temperature and pH, initial feed concentration and feed flow rate–on the permeate flux and enrichment of rutin, were determined. The permeate flux increased with the increase in transmembrane pressure up to a certain limit and after that the flux remained more or less constant. The optimum transmembrane pressure was within 4–5 bar. The flux increased with the increase in feed solution temperature because of reduced feed viscosity, and better solubility. The concentration of rutin was optimum at lower temperature (30ºC, with an enrichment factor of 1.3. The effect of pH on permeate flux was less obvious. Lowering the feed solution pH increased the retention of rutin and the optimum separation was obtained within pH 3–4. The permeate flux decreased with the increase in feed concentration of rutin (concentration range 0.1–0.5 g/L. The enrichment of rutin was significant in the glucose concentration range 0.35–0.5 g/L. The feed flow rate had a significant effect on the flux and separation characteristics. Higher cross-flow through the membrane reduced the fouling by providing a shear force to sweep away deposited materials from the membrane surface. At high feed flow rate, more rutin was retained by the membrane with less sugar permeating through. The optimum feed flow rate was 1.5 L/min. For the separation of rutin (in the retentate and glucose (in the permeate, the

  19. Glucose metabolism via the pentose phosphate pathway, glycolysis and Krebs cycle in an orthotopic mouse model of human brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Cho, Steve K; Rakheja, Dinesh; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Kapur, Payal; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Jindal, Ashish; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Good, Levi B; Raisanen, Jack; Sun, Xiankai; Mickey, Bruce; Choi, Changho; Takahashi, Masaya; Togao, Osamu; Pascual, Juan M; Deberardinis, Ralph J; Maher, Elizabeth A; Malloy, Craig R; Bachoo, Robert M

    2012-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that increased flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is required to support the metabolic demands of rapid malignant cell growth. Using orthotopic mouse models of human glioblastoma (GBM) and renal cell carcinoma metastatic to brain, we estimated the activity of the PPP relative to glycolysis by infusing [1,2-(13) C(2) ]glucose. The [3-(13) C]lactate/[2,3-(13) C(2) ]lactate ratio was similar for both the GBM and brain metastasis and their respective surrounding brains (GBM, 0.197 ± 0.011 and 0.195 ± 0.033, respectively (p = 1); metastasis: 0.126 and 0.119 ± 0.033, respectively). This suggests that the rate of glycolysis is significantly greater than the PPP flux in these tumors, and that the PPP flux into the lactate pool is similar in both tumors. Remarkably, (13) C-(13) C coupling was observed in molecules derived from Krebs cycle intermediates in both tumor types, denoting glucose oxidation. In the renal cell carcinoma, in contrast with GBM, (13) C multiplets of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) differed from its precursor glutamate, suggesting that GABA did not derive from a common glutamate precursor pool. In addition, the orthotopic renal tumor, the patient's primary renal mass and brain metastasis were all strongly immunopositive for the 67-kDa isoform of glutamate decarboxylase, as were 84% of tumors on a renal cell carcinoma tissue microarray of the same histology, suggesting that GABA synthesis is cell autonomous in at least a subset of renal cell carcinomas. Taken together, these data demonstrate that (13) C-labeled glucose can be used in orthotopic mouse models to study tumor metabolism in vivo and to ascertain new metabolic targets for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Natural Peccei-Quinn symmetry in the 3-3-1 model with a minimal scalar sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero, J. C.; Sanchez-Vega, B. L.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of a 3-3-1 model with a minimal scalar sector we make a detailed study concerning the implementation of the Peccei-Quinn symmetry in order to solve the strong CP problem. For the original version of the model, with only two scalar triplets, we show that the entire Lagrangian is invariant under a Peccei-Quinn-like symmetry but no axion is produced since a U(1) subgroup remains unbroken. Although in this case the strong CP problem can still be solved, the solution is largely disfavored since three quark states are left massless to all orders in perturbation theory. The addition of a third scalar triplet removes the massless quark states but the resulting axion is visible. In order to become realistic the model must be extended to account for massive quarks and an invisible axion. We show that the addition of a scalar singlet together with a Z N discrete gauge symmetry can successfully accomplish these tasks and protect the axion field against quantum gravitational effects. To make sure that the protecting discrete gauge symmetry is anomaly-free we use a discrete version of the Green-Schwarz mechanism.