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Sample records for glucocorticoid metabolite levels

  1. Non-invasive assessment of glucocorticoid and androgen metabolite levels in cooperatively breeding Damaraland mole-rats (Fukomys damarensis).

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    Medger, Katarina; Bennett, Nigel C; Lutermann, Heike; Ganswindt, Andre

    2018-05-18

    Dominant females of cooperative breeding species often use aggression to suppress reproduction of subordinate females, resulting in subordinates experiencing stress-related increases in glucocorticoid levels, which may cause reproductive down-regulation. This would suggest a general pattern with higher glucocorticoid levels in subordinate compared to dominant individuals; however, the opposite was found in a number of cooperatively breeding species. Furthermore, breeding females of the cooperatively breeding Damaraland mole-rats (Fukomys damarensis) exhibit very high androgen concentrations during the wet season, presumably to support their breeding monopoly. Hormone analysis in Damaraland mole-rats have typically been measured using plasma and urine, but faecal analysis offers additional advantages especially for field studies on this species. The present study examines the suitability of Damaraland mole-rat faecal samples for determining glucocorticoid metabolite (fGCM) and androgen metabolite (fAM) concentrations using enzyme immunoassays. Using these assays, we further evaluated the effects of breeding status on fGCM and fAM concentrations in wild-caught and captive Damaraland mole-rats. Wild-caught breeding and non-breeding males and females exhibited no differences in fAM concentrations. Immunoreactive fGCM concentrations were only high in male breeders and comparatively low in non-breeders and breeding females. Concentrations of fAMs and fGCMs were similar in captive males and females, but fAM concentrations were elevated in captive compared to wild-caught individuals, which may be related to a higher reproductive activity due to removal from the breeding female. The relatively uniform fAM and fGCM concentrations found in wild-caught mole-rats may be explained by a stable colony structure during the dry season during which this study was conducted. Limited dispersal opportunities result in lower aggression and stress levels within a colony and as a result

  2. Relation between the level of self-mutilation and theconcentration of fecal metabolites of glucocorticoids incaptive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes

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    Cristiane S. Pizzutto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of stress in an environment, according with the behavioral and endocrine variables of primates, are increasingly being studied by a diversity of authors, and have shown that abnormal behaviors associated with increased glucocorticoids may be directly related with the impairment of their well-being. In this work were used 22 adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes, 11 males and 11 females, kept in captivity in three different institutions. All animals had their behavior registered by focal session using a 30 seconds sample interval, during six months, totaling 4,800 registries per each animal. During this period, fecal samples were collected 3 times a week for the extraction and measurement of the concentration of fecal metabolites of glucocorticoid by radioimmunoassay. Of the total observed, stereotypical behaviors represented 13,45±2.76%, and among them, self-mutilation represented 38.28±3.98 %. The animals were classified into three different scores, according with the percentage of body surface with alopecia due to self-mutilation. It was found a positive correlation of high intensity between the scores of alopecia due to the observed mutilation and the average concentrations of fecal metabolites of glucocorticoids. This result strongly suggests that this measurement of self-mutilation in a chimpanzee can be used as an important auxiliary tool to evaluate de conditions of adaptation of an animal in captivity, functioning as a direct indicator of the presence of chronic stress.

  3. The impact of age-class and social context on fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels in free-ranging male giraffes.

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    Wolf, T E; Bennett, N C; Burroughs, R; Ganswindt, A

    2018-01-01

    One of the primary sources of perceived stress is the social environment of an animal and the interactions with conspecifics. An essential component of the response to a stressor is the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, which results amongst others in a temporal increase in circulating glucocorticoid (GC) levels. Giraffes occur in a highly flexible fission-fusion social system and group compositions can change on a daily basis, with bulls establishing an age-related dominance hierarchy and showing a roaming strategy in the search for fertile females. The aim of this study was to non-invasively monitor the influence of different group compositions (mixed sex groups vs. all-male groups) on GC concentrations in free ranging giraffe bulls of different age classes. We collected fecal samples from free-ranging giraffe bulls for 12months in a South African Private Game Reserve to examine age- and social context-related patterns of fecal GC metabolite (fGCM) concentrations. We found that fGCM levels in giraffe bulls are age-class dependent, as well asassociated with changes in the social environment. Independently of the social setting, bulls of the youngest age class exhibited the highest fGCM levels compared to bulls of the other two older age-classes, with differences most pronounced when the bulls are associated in all-male groups. In contrast, an almost reversed picture appears when looking at the fGCM levels of sexually active individuals in mixed sex groups, where highest levels were found for the bulls in the oldest age-class, and the lowest for the bulls in the youngest age-class. The study stresses the importance to taking factors such asage-related status and social settings into account, when interpreting fGCM levels in free ranging giraffes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Methodological considerations for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in feathers

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    Berk, Sara A.; McGettrick, Julie R.; Hansen, Warren K.; Breuner, Creagh W.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have begun to use corticosteroid metabolites in feathers (fCORT) as a metric of stress physiology in birds. However, there remain substantial questions about how to measure fCORT most accurately. Notably, small samples contain artificially high amounts of fCORT per millimetre of feather (the small sample artefact). Furthermore, it appears that fCORT is correlated with circulating plasma corticosterone only when levels are artificially elevated by the use of corticosterone implants. Here, we used several approaches to address current methodological issues with the measurement of fCORT. First, we verified that the small sample artefact exists across species and feather types. Second, we attempted to correct for this effect by increasing the amount of methanol relative to the amount of feather during extraction. We consistently detected more fCORT per millimetre or per milligram of feather in small samples than in large samples even when we adjusted methanol:feather concentrations. We also used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify hormone metabolites present in feathers and measured the reactivity of these metabolites against the most commonly used antibody for measuring fCORT. We verified that our antibody is mainly identifying corticosterone (CORT) in feathers, but other metabolites have significant cross-reactivity. Lastly, we measured faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in house sparrows and correlated these measurements with corticosteroid metabolites deposited in concurrently grown feathers; we found no correlation between faecal glucocorticoid metabolites and fCORT. We suggest that researchers should be cautious in their interpretation of fCORT in wild birds and should seek alternative validation methods to examine species-specific relationships between environmental challenges and fCORT. PMID:27335650

  5. Environmental Enrichment Effect on Fecal Glucocorticoid Metabolites and Captive Maned Wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) Behavior.

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    Coelho, Carlyle Mendes; de Azevedo, Cristiano Schetini; Guimarães, Marcelo Alcino de Barros Vaz; Young, Robert John

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment is a technique that may reduce the stress of nonhuman animals in captivity. Stress may interfere with normal behavioral expression and affect cognitive decision making. Noninvasive hormonal studies can provide important information about the stress statuses of animals. This study evaluated the effectiveness of different environmental enrichment treatments in the diminution of fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (stress indicators) of three captive maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus). Correlations of the fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels with expressed behaviors were also determined. Results showed that environmental enrichment reduced fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels. Furthermore, interspecific and foraging enrichment items were most effective in reducing stress in two of the three wolves. No definite pattern was found between behavioral and physiological responses to stress. In conclusion, these behavioral and physiological data showed that maned wolves responded positively from an animal well being perspective to the enrichment items presented.

  6. Assessment of faecal glucocorticoid metabolite excretion in captive female fishing cats (Prionailurus viverinus) in Thailand.

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    Khonmee, Jaruwan; Vorawattanatham, Narathip; Pinyopummin, Anuchai; Thitaram, Chatchote; Somgird, Chaleamchat; Punyapornwithaya, Veerasak; Brown, Janine L

    2016-01-01

    There is little information on the endocrinology of fishing cats (Prionailurus viverinus), an endangered species in Southeast Asia, especially that pertaining to adrenal function. This study characterized faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in female fishing cats housed at Chiang Mai Night Safari to investigate seasonal and age relationships in hormone patterns. Faecal samples were collected 3 days/week for 1 year from seven females ranging in age from 4.5 to 9.6 years. A corticosterone enzyme immunoassay was validated for fishing cats by showing increases (∼60%) in faecal glucocorticoid immunoactivity above pre-treatment baseline levels within 1-2 days after an adrenocorticotrophic hormone injection. Faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations were not related to age (P > 0.05), but there was a seasonal effect, with concentrations being higher (P fishing cats, and we found that glucocorticoid metabolite production was influenced by seasonal factors, but not by age. We conclude that weather patterns should be taken into consideration in future studies of glucocorticoid activity in this endangered species, especially those studies aimed at improving captive management to create self-sustaining and healthy populations.

  7. Assessment of faecal glucocorticoid metabolite excretion in captive female fishing cats (Prionailurus viverinus) in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khonmee, Jaruwan; Vorawattanatham, Narathip; Pinyopummin, Anuchai; Thitaram, Chatchote; Somgird, Chaleamchat; Punyapornwithaya, Veerasak; Brown, Janine L.

    2016-01-01

    There is little information on the endocrinology of fishing cats (Prionailurus viverinus), an endangered species in Southeast Asia, especially that pertaining to adrenal function. This study characterized faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in female fishing cats housed at Chiang Mai Night Safari to investigate seasonal and age relationships in hormone patterns. Faecal samples were collected 3 days/week for 1 year from seven females ranging in age from 4.5 to 9.6 years. A corticosterone enzyme immunoassay was validated for fishing cats by showing increases (∼60%) in faecal glucocorticoid immunoactivity above pre-treatment baseline levels within 1–2 days after an adrenocorticotrophic hormone injection. Faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations were not related to age (P > 0.05), but there was a seasonal effect, with concentrations being higher (P < 0.05) during the winter (1.54 ± 0.04 µg/g) and rainy season (1.43 ± 0.04 µg/g) compared with the summer (1.22 ± 0.05 µg/g). Significant relationships were found between faecal glucocorticoids and rainfall (positive) and day length (negative), but not a temperature–humidity index. This is the first study to assess adrenal steroidogenic activity in female fishing cats, and we found that glucocorticoid metabolite production was influenced by seasonal factors, but not by age. We conclude that weather patterns should be taken into consideration in future studies of glucocorticoid activity in this endangered species, especially those studies aimed at improving captive management to create self-sustaining and healthy populations. PMID:27293767

  8. Environmental impact on faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations in Grevy's Zebra (Equus grevyi)

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    Yarnell, K; Walker, SL

    2017-01-01

    The non-invasive nature of faecal glucocorticoid metabolite (FGM) assessment means that sample collection is on an opportunistic basis and samples cannot always be collected immediately upon defection during field studies. Faeces that have been exposed to heat and moisturemay not accurately reflect levels of FGM. Our study exposed male (n=3) and female (n=3) Grevy's zebra (Equus grevyi) faeces to six environmental conditions to simulate a range of weather and seasonal patterns (temperate clim...

  9. Gender, season and management affect fecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations in captive goral (Naemorhedus griseus in Thailand.

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    Jaruwan Khonmee

    Full Text Available Chinese goral (Naemorhedus griseus are a threatened species in Thailand and the focus of captive breeding for possible reintroduction. However, little is known of their biology or what factors in the captive environment affect welfare. Our objective was to determine the impact of gender, season, and management on goral adrenal activity. We hypothesized that differences in fecal glucocorticoid concentrations would be related to animal density. Fecal samples were collected 3 days/week for 1 year from 63 individuals (n = 32 males, 31 females at two facilities that house the majority of goral in Thailand: Omkoi Wildlife Sanctuary (Omkoi, an off-exhibit breeding center that houses goral in individual pens (16 pens; n = 8 males, 8 females and in small family groups (8 pens; n = 8 males, 8 females; and the Chiang Mai Night Safari (NS, a zoo that maintains 31 goral (n = 17 males, 14 females in one large pen. Glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations were higher in male than female goral at Omkoi throughout the year, and there was a seasonal effect on adrenal activity (p<0.05. Goral at Omkoi and NS were used to test the effect of animal density on fecal glucocorticoid excretion of goral housed in similar-sized enclosures. Overall, the highest levels were found at NS (n = 31 adults/pen; 27 m2 per animal compared to Omkoi (n = 2 adults/pen; 400 m2 per animal (p<0.05. Overall findings support our hypothesis that animal density and aspects of the captive environment impact adrenal steroid activity in captive goral. In addition, gender and season also had significant effects on glucocorticoid metabolite production. Potential stressors pertaining to the welfare of this species were identified, which will guide future efforts to improve management and create self-sustaining and healthy populations of this threatened species.

  10. Effects of supplemental feeding and aggregation on fecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations in elk

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    Forristal, Victoria E.; Creel, Scott; Taper, Mark L.; Scurlock, Brandon M.; Cross, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Habitat modifications and supplemental feeding artificially aggregate some wildlife populations, with potential impacts upon contact and parasite transmission rates. Less well recognized, however, is how increased aggregation may affect wildlife physiology. Crowding has been shown to induce stress responses, and increased glucocorticoid (GC) concentrations can reduce immune function and increase disease susceptibility. We investigated the effects of supplemental feeding and the aggregation that it induces on behavior and fecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations (fGCM) in elk (Cervus elaphus) using observational and experimental approaches. We first compared fGCM levels of elk on supplemental feedgrounds to neighboring elk populations wintering in native habitats using data from 2003 to 2008. We then experimentally manipulated the distribution of supplemental food on feedgrounds to investigate whether more widely distributed food would result in lower rates of aggression and stress hormone levels. Contrary to some expectations that fed elk may be less stressed than unfed elk during the winter, we found that elk on feedgrounds had fecal GC levels at least 31% higher than non-feedground populations. Within feedgrounds, fGCM levels were strongly correlated with local measures of elk density (r2 = 0.81). Dispersing feed more broadly, however, did not have a detectable effect on fGCM levels or aggression rates. Our results suggest that increases in aggregation associated with winter feedgrounds affects elk physiology, and the resulting increases in fGCM levels are not likely to be mitigated by management efforts that distribute the feed more widely. Additional research is needed to assess whether these increases in fGCMs directly alter parasite transmission and disease dynamics.

  11. Assessment of pregnancy status of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) by measurement of progestagen and glucocorticoid and their metabolite concentrations in serum and feces, using enzyme immunoassay (EIA).

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    Kajaysri, Jatuporn; Nokkaew, Weerapun

    2014-03-01

    The study was to find patterns of progestagen (progesterone and its metabolite) and glucocorticoid and their metabolite concentrations in serum and feces of pregnant Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). The 5 female Asian domestic elephants were naturally mated until pregnancy. After that, blood and feces samples were collected monthly during pregnancy for progestagen, glucocorticoid and their metabolites analysis by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The results showed the serum progestagen concentration during gestation was 2.11 ± 0.60 to 18.44 ± 2.28 ng/ml. Overall, serum progestagen concentration rose from the 1st month to reach peak in the 11th month, after which it declined to its lowest level in the 22nd month of pregnancy. Fecal progestagen concentration varied from 1.18 ± 0.54 to 3.35 ± 0.45 µg/g during pregnancy. In general, fecal progestagen concentration increased from the 1st month to its highest level in the 12th month. After this, it declined reaching its lowest point in the 22nd month of pregnancy. Glucocorticoid hormones and their metabolite concentrations both in serum and feces fluctuated from low to medium throughout almost the entire pregnancy period and then rapidly increased around the last week before calving. Our study suggests that this profile of progestagen and glucocorticoid hormones and their metabolite concentration levels in serum and feces can be used to assess the pregnancy status of Asian elephants. If serum and fecal progestagen concentrations were found in very low levels and glucocorticoid and their metabolite concentrations were found in very high levels, it was indicated that the cow elephant would calve within 7 days.

  12. Fecal glucocorticoid metabolite response of captive koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) to visitor encounters.

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    Webster, Koa; Narayan, Edward; de Vos, Nicholas

    2017-04-01

    Physiological responses of wildlife species to zoo visitors should be studied to better understand how wildlife perceive human encounters. We conducted an experimental test of the effect of changes in zoo visitor encounter experiences on the glucocorticoid (GC) response of koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) in a Sydney zoo. Koalas were housed in a multiple-bay enclosure (two to three koalas per bay) for photography sessions with zoo visitors (no touching of koalas permitted by visitors). Following a one-week no-photography baseline period, photography sessions were rotated between three enclosure bays for four weeks (Intensive photography), then between five enclosure bays for an additional four weeks (Standard photography). A sixth enclosure bay was never included in the photography sessions (control bay); koalas in this bay showed no significant change in fecal cortisol metabolites (FCMs) during the course of the study. In the five experimental bays differences were seen between male and female koalas. Males had higher mean FCMs than females, and individual FCM traces showed that two male koalas that were related and of similar age responded strongly to the experimental manipulation. These two males showed a peak in FCMs at the beginning of the Intensive photography period, then a decline when photography sessions returned to the Standard protocol. No systematic pattern in response to photography sessions was observed in females. Our results demonstrate successful application of a non-invasive endocrinology tool for assessing the stress biology and welfare of captive zoo wildlife. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. How genetic data improve the interpretation of results of faecal glucocorticoid metabolite measurements in a free-living population.

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    Maik Rehnus

    Full Text Available Measurement of glucocorticoid metabolites (GCM in faeces has become a widely used and effective tool for evaluating the amount of stress experienced by animals. However, the potential sampling bias resulting from an oversampling of individuals when collecting "anonymous" (unknown sex or individual faeces has rarely been investigated. We used non-invasive genetic sampling (NIGS to investigate potential interpretation errors of GCM measurements in a free-living population of mountain hares during the mating and post-reproductive periods. Genetic data improved the interpretation of results of faecal GCM measurements. In general GCM concentrations were influenced by season. However, genetic information revealed that it was sex-dependent. Within the mating period, females had higher GCM levels than males, but individual differences were more expressed in males. In the post-reproductive period, GCM concentrations were neither influenced by sex nor individual. We also identified potential pitfalls in the interpretation of anonymous faecal samples by individual differences in GCM concentrations and resampling rates. Our study showed that sex- and individual-dependent GCM levels led to a misinterpretation of GCM values when collecting "anonymous" faeces. To accurately evaluate the amount of stress experienced by free-living animals using faecal GCM measurements, we recommend documenting individuals and their sex of the sampled population. In stress-sensitive and elusive species, such documentation can be achieved by using NIGS and for diurnal animals with sexual and individual variation in appearance or marked individuals, it can be provided by a detailed field protocol.

  14. Glucocorticoid metabolites in newborns: A marker for traffic noise related stress?

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    Lech Cantuaria, Manuella; Usermann, Jakob; Proietti, Elena

    2018-01-01

    Traffic noise has been associated with an increased risk for several non-auditory health effects, which may be explained by a noise-induced release of stress hormones (e.g. glucocorticoids). Although several studies in children and adults have indicated an increased secretion of glucocorticoids...

  15. The effect of consignment to broodmare sales on physiological stress measured by faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in pregnant Thoroughbred mares.

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    Schulman, Martin; Becker, Annet; Ganswindt, Stefanie; Guthrie, Alan; Stout, Tom; Ganswindt, Andre

    2014-01-17

    Validation of a method for the minimally-invasive measurement of physiological stress will help understanding of risk factors that may contribute to stress-associated events including recrudescence of Equid herpesvirus (EHV), which is anecdotally associated with sales consignment of pregnant Thoroughbred mares. In this study we compared two similar groups of late-gestation Thoroughbred broodmares on the same farm: a consigned Sales group (N = 8) and a non-consigned Control group (N = 6). The Sales mares were separated from their paddock companions and grouped prior to their preparation for, transport to, and return from the sales venue. Both groups were monitored by sampling at regular intervals from 5 days prior to until 14 days after the sales date (D0) to measure physiological stress in terms of changes in faecal glucocorticoid metabolite (FGM) concentrations, and for event-related viral recrudescence via daily body temperature measurements and periodic nasal swabs for PCR analysis for EHV-1 and -4 DNA. In both groups, FGM levels increased post-sales before returning to pre-sales levels. Specifically, FGM concentrations in the Sales mares were significantly higher on D + 3 and D + 10 than on D-4 and D-3 (F = 12.03, P Sales) mare showed PCR evidence of EHV-1 shedding. Using FGM to measure physiological stress was supported by the increases observed in all mares after Sales consignment, including those not consigned to the sale. Monitoring FGM levels therefore represents an appropriate, minimally-invasive method for future studies to assess the contribution of physiological stress to EHV recrudescence in horses transported to sales or equestrian events.

  16. Non-invasive monitoring of adrenocortical activity in captive African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus) by measuring faecal glucocorticoid metabolites.

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    Ozella, L; Anfossi, L; Di Nardo, F; Pessani, D

    2015-12-01

    Measurement of faecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGMs) has become a useful and widely-accepted method for the non-invasive evaluation of stress in vertebrates. In this study we assessed the adrenocortical activity of five captive African Penguins (Spheniscus demersus) by means of FGM evaluation following a biological stressor, i.e. capture and immobilization. In addition, we detected individual differences in secretion of FGMs during a stage of the normal biological cycle of penguins, namely the breeding period, without any external or induced causes of stress. Our results showed that FGM concentrations peaked 5.5-8h after the induced stress in all birds, and significantly decreased within 30 h. As predictable, the highest peak of FGMs (6591 ng/g) was reached by the youngest penguin, which was at its first experience with the stressor. This peak was 1.8-2.7-fold higher compared to those of the other animals habituated to the stimulus. For the breeding period, our results revealed that the increase in FGMs compared to ordinary levels, and the peaks of FGMs, varied widely depending on the age and mainly on the reproductive state of the animal. The bird which showed the lowest peak (2518 ng/g) was an old male that was not in a reproductive state at the time of the study. Higher FGM increases and peaks were reached by the two birds which were brooding (male: 5552%, 96,631 ng/g; female: 1438%, 22,846 ng/g) and by the youngest bird (1582%, 39,700 ng/g). The impact of the reproductive state on FGM levels was unexpected compared to that produced by the induced stress. The EIA used in this study to measure FGM levels proved to be a reliable tool for assessing individual and biologically-relevant changes in FGM concentrations in African Penguin. Moreover, this method allowed detection of physiological stress during the breeding period, and identification of individual differences in relation to the reproductive status. The increase in FGM levels as a response to capture and

  17. Meerkat close calling patterns are linked to sex, social category, season and wind, but not fecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations.

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    Jelena Mausbach

    Full Text Available It is well established that animal vocalizations can encode information regarding a sender's identity, sex, age, body size, social rank and group membership. However, the association between physiological parameters, particularly stress hormone levels, and vocal behavior is still not well understood. The cooperatively breeding African meerkats (Suricata suricatta live in family groups with despotic social hierarchies. During foraging, individuals emit close calls that help maintain group cohesion. These contact calls are acoustically distinctive and variable in rate across individuals, yet, information on which factors influence close calling behavior is missing. The aim of this study was to identify proximate factors that influence variation in call rate and acoustic structure of meerkat close calls. Specifically, we investigated whether close calling behavior is associated with sex, age and rank, or stress hormone output (i.e., measured as fecal glucocorticoid metabolite (fGCM concentrations as individual traits of the caller, as well as with environmental conditions (weather and reproductive seasonality. To disentangle the effects of these factors on vocal behavior, we analyzed sound recordings and assessed fGCM concentrations in 64 wild but habituated meerkats from 9 groups during the reproductive and non-reproductive seasons. Dominant females and one-year old males called at significantly higher rates compared to other social categories during the reproductive season. Additionally, dominant females produced close calls with the lowest mean fundamental frequencies (F0 and the longest mean pulse durations. Windy conditions were associated with significantly higher call rates during the non-reproductive season. Fecal GCM concentrations were unrelated to close calling behavior. Our findings suggest that meerkat close calling behavior conveys information regarding the sex and social category of the caller, but shows no association with f

  18. Effect of Bungee-carcass enrichment on behavior and fecal glucocorticoid metabolites in two species of zoo-housed Felids.

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    Ruskell, Amber D; Meiers, Susan T; Jenkins, Sean E; Santymire, Rachel M

    2015-01-01

    Enrichment can improve animal physiological and psychological well-being. This study sought to promote more natural felid behavior and prevent development or incidence of stereotypies through the use of a feeding enrichment. Our objectives are to use fecal glucocorticoid metabolites values and behavioral observations to quantify the effectiveness of the enrichment device for two species of large cats, Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris; n = 2) and cougar (Felis concolor; n = 2). The feeding enrichment, a white-tailed deer carcass flank securely attached to an AussieDog Products(©) Felid 120-cm bungee, was implemented twice for each individual separated by 1 month. Fecal samples were obtained from each felid and analyzed for pre- and post-enrichment fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGM) concentrations using a cortisol enzyme immunoassay. An ethogram with 12 mutual exclusive behavioral categories was utilized to record behavioral responses to the enrichment. Results demonstrate that: 1) there were no differences (P > 0.05) in FGMs for either species between pre- and post-enrichment; 2) pacing decreased (P = 0.025) and walking increased (P = 0.017) after exposure to enrichment in both cougars; and 3) tigers reduced (P = 0.025) 'other' behavioral category after the first enrichment exposure and laid down more (P = 0.025) after the second enrichment exposure. The neutral hormonal impact on the animals coupled with the behavioral changes indicates that this enrichment is successful at altering the animals' behavior without adding physiological stress to their environments. These findings, combined with the low cost and versatility of the enrichment, promote the use of this enrichment to enhance large felid enclosures. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Using fecal glucocorticoids for stress assessment in Mourning Doves

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    Washburn, Brian E.; Millspaugh, Joshua J.; Schulz, John H.; Jones, Susan B.; Mong, T.

    2003-01-01

    Fecal glucocorticoid assays provide a potentially useful, noninvasive means to study physiological responses of wildlife to various stressors. The objective of our study was to validate a method for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) feces. We validated the assay using standard procedures (e.g., parallelism, recovery of exogenous corticosterone) to demonstrate that the assay accurately and precisely measured glucocorticoid metabolites in Mourning Dove fecal extracts. We conducted adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) challenge experiments to validate the assay's ability to determine biologically important changes in fecal glucocorticoids. Fecal glucocorticoid levels increased significantly approximately 2-3 hr after administration of ACTH at 50 IU per kg body mass to wild Mourning Doves held in captivity. In contrast, fecal glucocorticoid metabolites did not increase in control birds, birds that received saline injections, or a lower dose of ACTH (1 IU per kg body mass). Variation in overall fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels may have been influenced by season and the length of time birds were held in captivity. Non-invasive fecal glucocorticoid metabolite analyses, in combination with demographic information, may have considerable utility for monitoring the effects of natural and anthropogenic disturbances on Mourning Dove populations.

  20. Faecal glucocorticoid metabolites and body temperature in Australian merino ewes (Ovis aries) during summer artificial insemination (AI) program

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    Sawyer, Gregory; Parisella, Simone

    2018-01-01

    Reproductive wastage is a key issue for sheep producers, both regionally and globally. The reproductive output of farm animals can be influenced by physiological and environmental factors. Rapid and reliable quantification of physiological stress can provide a useful tool for designing and testing on-farm management interventions to improve farm animal welfare and productivity. In this study, we quantified physiological stress non-invasively using faecal glucocorticoid metabolites-FGMs analysis and body temperature measurements of 15 superovulated donor merino ewes (Ovis aries) during participation in artificial insemination (AI) program conducted during 2015/2016 Australian summer. We hypothesized that low percentage transferable embryos in donor merino ewes will be associated positively with higher body temperature and/or higher FGMs in these ewes. Temperature humidity index (THI) was calculated and found within high thermal stress range during the two AI trials. Overall, results showed none of the factors (ewe ID, AI trial no., THI or FGMs) were significant for reduced percentage transferrable embryos, except ewe body temperature was highly significant (p = 0.014). Within AI trial comparisons showed significant positive associations between higher FGMs and body temperature with reduced transferrable embryos. These results suggest that Australian merino ewes participating in summer AI trials can experience physiological stress. Prolonged activation of the stress endocrine response and high body temperature (e.g. ensued from heat stress) could impact on ewe reproductive output. Therefore, future research should apply minimally invasive physiological tools to gather baseline information on physiological stress in merino sheep to enable the development of new farm-friendly methods of managing stress. PMID:29381759

  1. Glucocorticoid resistance in two key models of acute lymphoblastic leukemia occurs at the level of the glucocorticoid receptor.

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    Schmidt, Stefan; Irving, Julie A E; Minto, Lynne; Matheson, Elizabeth; Nicholson, Lindsay; Ploner, Andreas; Parson, Walther; Kofler, Anita; Amort, Melanie; Erdel, Martin; Hall, Andy; Kofler, Reinhard

    2006-12-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) specifically induce apoptosis in malignant lymphoblasts and are thus pivotal in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, GC-resistance is a therapeutic problem with an unclear molecular mechanism. We generated approximately 70 GC-resistant sublines from a GC-sensitive B- and a T-ALL cell line and investigated their mechanisms of resistance. In response to GCs, all GC-resistant subclones analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed a deficient up-regulation of the GC-receptor (GR) and its downstream target, GC-induced leucine zipper. This deficiency in GR up-regulation was confirmed by Western blotting and on retroviral overexpression of GR in resistant subclones GC-sensitivity was restored. All GC-resistant subclones were screened for GR mutations using denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography (DHPLC), DNA-fingerprinting, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Among the identified mutations were some previously not associated with GC resistance: A484D, P515H, L756N, Y663H, L680P, and R714W. This approach revealed three genotypes, complete loss of functional GR in the mismatch repair deficient T-ALL model, apparently normal GR genes in B-ALLs, and heterozygosity in both. In the first genotype, deficiency in GR up-regulation was fully explained by mutational events, in the second by a putative regulatory defect, and in the third by a combination thereof. In all instances, GC-resistance occurred at the level of the GR in both models.

  2. Effects of habituation, research and ecotourism on faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in wild western lowland gorillas: Implications for conservation management

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shutt, K.; Heistermann, M.; Kasim, A.; Kalousová, B.; Profousová, I.; Petrželková, Klára Judita; Fuh, T.; Dicky, J.-F.; Bopalanzognako, J.-B.; Setchell, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 172, April (2014), s. 72-79 ISSN 0006-3207 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Conservation * Ecotourism * Faecal-glucocorticoids * Habituation * Primate * Stress * Wildlife Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.762, year: 2014

  3. In vitro antiprogestational/antiglucocorticoid activity and progestin and glucocorticoid receptor binding of the putative metabolites and synthetic derivatives of CDB-2914, CDB-4124, and mifepristone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attardi, Barbara J; Burgenson, Janet; Hild, Sheri A; Reel, Jerry R

    2004-03-01

    In determining the biological profiles of various antiprogestins, it is important to assess the hormonal and antihormonal activity, selectivity, and potency of their proximal metabolites. The early metabolism of mifepristone is characterized by rapid demethylation and hydroxylation. Similar initial metabolic pathways have been proposed for CDB-2914 (CDB: Contraceptive Development Branch of NICHD) and CDB-4124, and their putative metabolites have been synthesized. We have examined the functional activities and potencies, in various cell-based assays, and relative binding affinities (RBAs) for progesterone receptors (PR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR) of the putative mono- and didemethylated metabolites of CDB-2914, CDB-4124, and mifepristone and of the 17alpha-hydroxy and aromatic A-ring derivatives of CDB-2914 and CDB-4124. The binding affinities of the monodemethylated metabolites for rabbit uterine PR and human PR-A and PR-B were similar to those of the parent compounds. Monodemethylated mifepristone bound to rabbit thymic GR with higher affinity than monodemethylated CDB-2914 or CDB-4124. T47D-CO cells were used to assess inhibition of R5020-stimulated endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity and transactivation of the PRE(2)-thymidine kinase (tk)-luciferase (LUC) reporter plasmid in transient transfections. The antiprogestational potency was as follows: mifepristone/CDB-2914/CDB-4124/monodemethylated metabolites (IC(50)'s approximately 10(-9)M) > aromatic A-ring derivatives (IC(50)'s approximately 10(-8)M) > didemethylated/17alpha-hydroxy derivatives (IC(50)'s approximately 10(-7)M). Antiglucocorticoid activity was determined by inhibition of dexamethasone-stimulated transcriptional activity in HepG2 cells. The mono- and didemethylated metabolites of CDB-2914 and CDB-4124 had less antiglucocorticoid activity (IC(50)'s approximately 10(-6)M) than monodemethylated mifepristone (IC(50) approximately 10(-8)M) or the other test compounds. At 10(-6)M in

  4. Changes in behaviour and faecal glucocorticoid levels in response to increased human activities during weekends in the pin-tailed sandgrouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Fabián; Benítez-López, Ana; Tarjuelo, Rocío; Barja, Isabel; Viñuela, Javier; García, Jesús T; Morales, Manuel B; Mougeot, Francois

    2016-12-01

    Human recreational activities are becoming increasingly widespread and frequent, a fact that may potentially exacerbate their effects on wildlife. These human-related disturbances on animals may induce behavioural and physiological changes that can ultimately affect their fitness, showing a similar anti-predator response that against natural predator or other threats. Here, we combine the use of behavioural and physiological approaches to assess the potential effect of winter human activities on a threatened farmland bird in Europe, the pin-tailed sandgrouse (Pterocles alchata). We compared before, during and after weekend variations in human activity rates, pin-tailed sandgrouse behaviour (flocking and flying behaviour, interspecific association in mixed flocks and habitat use) and faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations. Human disturbances, in particular those associated with hunting activities, peaked during weekends. Sandgrouse showed significant behavioural changes (increased sandgrouse-only flock sizes, increased proportion of birds flying and changes in habitat use) during weekends and higher faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations after the weekends compared with during or before weekends. Therefore, physiological stress levels could be modulated by behavioural adjustments such as increased flock sizes and changes in habitat use that may allow sandgrouse to cope with increased human disturbance rates during weekends. Nevertheless, temporal and spatial organization of hunting days among groups of estates might be good strategies to buffer these potential adverse effects on wintering pin-tailed sandgrouse and other steppe species of conservation concern, while preserving a socio-economically important activity such as hunting.

  5. Changes in behaviour and faecal glucocorticoid levels in response to increased human activities during weekends in the pin-tailed sandgrouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Fabián; Benítez-López, Ana; Tarjuelo, Rocío; Barja, Isabel; Viñuela, Javier; García, Jesús T.; Morales, Manuel B.; Mougeot, Francois

    2016-12-01

    Human recreational activities are becoming increasingly widespread and frequent, a fact that may potentially exacerbate their effects on wildlife. These human-related disturbances on animals may induce behavioural and physiological changes that can ultimately affect their fitness, showing a similar anti-predator response that against natural predator or other threats. Here, we combine the use of behavioural and physiological approaches to assess the potential effect of winter human activities on a threatened farmland bird in Europe, the pin-tailed sandgrouse ( Pterocles alchata). We compared before, during and after weekend variations in human activity rates, pin-tailed sandgrouse behaviour (flocking and flying behaviour, interspecific association in mixed flocks and habitat use) and faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations. Human disturbances, in particular those associated with hunting activities, peaked during weekends. Sandgrouse showed significant behavioural changes (increased sandgrouse-only flock sizes, increased proportion of birds flying and changes in habitat use) during weekends and higher faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations after the weekends compared with during or before weekends. Therefore, physiological stress levels could be modulated by behavioural adjustments such as increased flock sizes and changes in habitat use that may allow sandgrouse to cope with increased human disturbance rates during weekends. Nevertheless, temporal and spatial organization of hunting days among groups of estates might be good strategies to buffer these potential adverse effects on wintering pin-tailed sandgrouse and other steppe species of conservation concern, while preserving a socio-economically important activity such as hunting.

  6. Activation of glucocorticoid receptors increases 5-HT2A receptor levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trajkovska, Viktorija; Kirkegaard, Lisbeth; Krey, Gesa

    2009-01-01

    an effect of GR activation on 5-HT2A levels, mature organotypic hippocampal cultures were exposed to corticosterone with or without GR antagonist mifepristone and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist spironolactone. In GR under-expressing mice, hippocampal 5-HT2A receptor protein levels were decreased......Major depression is associated with both dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and serotonergic deficiency, not the least of the 5-HT2A receptor. However, how these phenomena are linked to each other, and whether a low 5-HT2A receptor level is a state or a trait marker...... of depression is unknown. In mice with altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression we investigated 5-HT2A receptor levels by Western blot and 3H-MDL100907 receptor binding. Serotonin fibre density was analyzed by stereological quantification of serotonin transporter immunopositive fibers. To establish...

  7. Monitoring stress in captive and free-ranging African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) using faecal glucocorticoid metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Weyde, L K; Martin, G B; Paris, M C J

    2016-01-15

    An understanding of stress physiology is important for species management because high levels of stress can hamper reproduction and affect an individual's ability to cope with threats to their survival, such as disease and human-wildlife conflict. A commonly used indicator of stress, faecal concentrations of cortisol metabolites (FCM), can be used to assess the impact of social, biological and environmental factors. Measurements of FCM are particularly valuable for endangered species that are logistically challenging to study and where non-invasive techniques are preferred. As the second most endangered canid in Africa, the African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) has been the focus of considerable conservation research, yet there is still little understanding of factors associated with stress, in either captive or free-ranging populations. The present study therefore aimed to determine whether stress levels differ between captive and free-ranging populations, and to detect social, biological and environmental factors that are stressful in these populations. Faecal samples were collected from 20 captive and 62 free-ranging animals. Within free-ranging populations, the sexes differed significantly, but there was no effect of social status, age or breeding period for either sex. Captive females had higher FCM concentrations than free-ranging females. In captive populations, FCM concentrations differed among zoos and with reproductive status in females, but were not related to age class or group-housing structure. In conclusion, FCM is a useful indicator of stress and should be considered an integrative aspect of management, for both in situ and ex situ African wild dog populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Local and systemic oxidative stress and glucocorticoid receptor levels in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Mian; Li, Yue; Jiang, Yujie; Lu, Guifang; Huang, Xiaomei; Guan, Kaipan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have indicated that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). OBJECTIVES: To study local and systemic oxidative stress status in COPD patients, and to clarify the relationship between local and systemic oxidative stress. METHODS: Lipid peroxide malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and GSH peroxidase (GSH-PX) levels in induced sputum and plasma, as well as glucocorticoid receptor (GR) levels in peripheral blood leukocytes were examined in 43 acute exacerbation of COPD patients (group A), 35 patients with stable COPD (group B) and 28 healthy controls (14 smokers [group C]; 14 nonsmokers [group D]). RESULTS: MDA levels in induced sputum and plasma decreased progressively in groups A to D, with significant differences between any two groups (P<0.001). GSH, SOD and GSH-PX levels in both induced sputum and plasma increased progressively in groups A to D, with significant differences between any two groups (P<0.001). GR levels in peripheral blood leukocytes decreased progressively in groups D to A (all comparisons P<0.001). Pearson analysis revealed strong correlations between MDA, GSH, SOD and GSH-PX levels in plasma and induced sputum. The activity of SOD in plasma and sputum were both positively correlated with GR levels (partial correlation coefficients 0.522 and 0.574, respectively [P<0.001]). CONCLUSIONS: Oxidative stress levels were elevated in COPD patients. There was a correlation between local and systemic oxidative status in COPD, and between decreased SOD activity and decreased GR levels in COPD patients. PMID:23457673

  9. Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of Monoamine Metabolites in the Epileptic Baboon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, C. Ákos; Patel, Mayuri; Uteshev, Victor V.

    2016-01-01

    The baboon represents a natural model for genetic generalized epilepsy and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In this retrospective study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolites and scalp electroencephalography (EEG) were evaluated in 263 baboons of a pedigreed colony. CSF monoamine abnormalities have been linked to reduced seizure thresholds, behavioral abnormalities and SUDEP in various animal models of epilepsy. The levels of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenylglycol, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and homovanillic acid in CSF samples drawn from the cisterna magna were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. These levels were compared between baboons with seizures (SZ), craniofacial trauma (CFT) and asymptomatic, control (CTL) baboons, between baboons with abnormal and normal EEG studies. We hypothesized that the CSF levels of major monoaminergic metabolites (i.e., dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine) associate with the baboons’ electroclinical status and thus can be used as clinical biomarkers applicable to seizures/epilepsy. However, despite apparent differences in metabolite levels between the groups, usually lower in SZ and CFT baboons and in baboons with abnormal EEG studies, we did not find any statistically significant differences using a logistic regression analysis. Significant correlations between the metabolite levels, especially between 5-HIAA and HVA, were preserved in all electroclinical groups. While we were not able to demonstrate significant differences in monoamine metabolites in relation to seizures or EEG markers of epilepsy, we cannot exclude the monoaminergic system as a potential source of pathogenesis in epilepsy and SUDEP. A prospective study evaluating serial CSF monoamine levels in baboons with recently witnessed seizures, and evaluation of abnormal expression and function of monoaminergic receptors and transporters within epilepsy-related brain regions, may impact the electroclinical status. PMID:26924854

  10. Fecal estrogen, progestagen and glucocorticoid metabolites during the estrous cycle and pregnancy in the giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla): evidence for delayed implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Katrina K; Roberts, Beth M; Maly, Morgan A; Vance, Carrie K; Debeachaump, Jennifer; Majors, Jackie; Riger, Peter; Decaluwe, Heather; Kouba, Andrew J

    2013-08-27

    Declining numbers of wild giant anteaters highlight the importance of sustainable captive populations. Unfortunately, captive reproductive management is limited by the lack of external physical indicators of female reproductive status and the aggressive behavior of males. We examined the endocrinology of the estrous cycle and pregnancy, and whether delayed implantation is a gestational strategy for giant anteaters as described for other xenarthrans. Feces were collected from seven captive females 3-5 times weekly and mating was recorded. Concentrations of estrogen (estrone-glucuronide, E1, and estradiol-17β, E2), progestagen (20-oxo-progestagens, P4), and glucocorticoid (GC) metabolites were examined in fecal extracts by enzyme immunoassay. Estrous cycles for nulliparous females (6 cycles, n = 2) compared to the multiparous female (6 cycles, n = 1) were shorter (47.3 +/- 4.3 days versus 62.5 +/- 2.6 days) with relatively lower luteal phase concentrations of P4 (49.4 +/- 2.9 ng/g versus 136.8 +/- 1.8 ng/g). The four remaining females had unclear ovarian activity: two females exhibited apparent luteal activity but unclear fluctuations in estrogens, while the other two females had parallel fecal P4 and estrogens concentrations. Pregnancy ranged 171-183 days with females returning to estrus post-partum as early as 60 days (n = 3, 1.8-4 years of age at mating). Delayed implantation was indicated by a biphasic elevation in fecal P4 metabolites: the initial 4-fold increase occurred for 81-105 days and was followed by a 26-fold secondary rise in P4 metabolites lasting 66-94 days prior to parturition. Fecal GC was correlated with fecal estrogens and greatest during estrus, late pregnancy, and six days prior to parturition (estrous cycle GC, 14.4-62.8 ng/g; pregnancy GC, 13.6-232.7 ng/g). Estrous cycles of giant anteaters occurred year-round, but were shorter and more intermittent in younger nulliparous animals compared to a multiparous female. A pronounced

  11. Elevated Hypothalamic Glucocorticoid Levels Are Associated With Obesity and Hyperphagia in Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefton, Charlotte; Harno, Erika; Davies, Alison; Small, Helen; Allen, Tiffany-Jayne; Wray, Jonathan R; Lawrence, Catherine B; Coll, Anthony P; White, Anne

    2016-11-01

    Glucocorticoid (Gc) excess, from endogenous overproduction in disorders of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis or exogenous medical therapy, is recognized to cause adverse metabolic side effects. The Gc receptor (GR) is widely expressed throughout the body, including brain regions such as the hypothalamus. However, the extent to which chronic Gcs affect Gc concentrations in the hypothalamus and impact on GR and target genes is unknown. To investigate this, we used a murine model of corticosterone (Cort)-induced obesity and analyzed Cort levels in the hypothalamus and expression of genes relevant to Gc action. Mice were administered Cort (75 μg/mL) or ethanol (1%, vehicle) in drinking water for 4 weeks. Cort-treated mice had increased body weight, food intake, and adiposity. As expected, Cort increased plasma Cort levels at both zeitgeber time 1 and zeitgeber time 13, ablating the diurnal rhythm. Liquid chromatography dual tandem mass spectrometry revealed a 4-fold increase in hypothalamic Cort, which correlated with circulating levels and concentrations of Cort in other brain regions. This occurred despite decreased 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (Hsd11b1) expression, the gene encoding the enzyme that regenerates active Gcs, whereas efflux transporter Abcb1 mRNA was unaltered. In addition, although Cort decreased hypothalamic GR (Nr3c1) expression 2-fold, the Gc-induced leucine zipper (Tsc22d3) mRNA increased, which indicated elevated GR activation. In keeping with the development of hyperphagia and obesity, Cort increased Agrp, but there were no changes in Pomc, Npy, or Cart mRNA in the hypothalamus. In summary, chronic Cort treatment causes chronic increases in hypothalamic Cort levels and a persistent elevation in Agrp, a mediator in the development of metabolic disturbances.

  12. Factors affecting fecal glucocorticoid levels in semi-free-ranging female mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setchell, Joanna M; Smith, Tessa; Wickings, E Jean; Knapp, Leslie A

    2008-11-01

    Subordinate female cercopithecine primates often experience decreased reproductive success in comparison with high-ranking females, with a later age at sexual maturity and first reproduction and/or longer interbirth intervals. One explanation that has traditionally been advanced to explain this is high levels of chronic social stress in subordinates, resulting from agonistic and aggressive interactions and leading to higher basal levels of glucocorticoids. We assessed the relationships among fecal cortisol levels and reproductive condition, dominance rank, degree of social support, and fertility in female mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) living in a semi-free-ranging colony in Franceville, Gabon. Lower-ranking females in this colony have a reproductive disadvantage relative to higher-ranking females, and we were interested in determining whether this relationship between dominance rank and reproductive success is mediated through stress hormones. We analyzed 340 fecal samples from 19 females, collected over a 14-month period. We found that pregnant females experienced higher fecal cortisol levels than cycling or lactating females. This is similar to results for other primate species and is likely owing to increased metabolic demands and interactions between the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, estrogen, and placental production of corticotrophin releasing hormones during pregnancy. There was no influence of dominance rank on fecal cortisol levels, suggesting that subordinate females do not suffer chronic stress. This may be because female mandrills have a stable social hierarchy, with low levels of aggression and high social support. However, we found no relationship between matriline size, as a measure of social support, and fecal cortisol levels. Subordinates may be able to avoid aggression from dominants in the large enclosure or may react only transiently to specific aggressive events, rather than continuously expecting them. Finally, we found no relationship

  13. Impact of prenatal stress on offspring glucocorticoid levels: A phylogenetic meta-analysis across 14 vertebrate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Zaneta M; Wilson, Meredith A; Kim, Andrew W; Jaeggi, Adrian V

    2018-03-21

    Prenatal exposure to maternal stress is commonly associated with variation in Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal (HPA)-axis functioning in offspring. However, the strength or consistency of this response has never been empirically evaluated across vertebrate species. Here we meta-analyzed 114 results from 39 studies across 14 vertebrate species using Bayesian phylogenetic mixed-effects models. We found a positive overall effect of prenatal stress on offspring glucocorticoids (d' = 0.43) though the 95% Highest Posterior Density Interval overlapped with 0 (-0.16-0.95). Meta-regressions of potential moderators highlighted that phylogeny and life history variables predicted relatively little variation in effect size. Experimental studies (d' = 0.64) produced stronger effects than observational ones (d' = -0.01), while prenatal stress affected glucocorticoid recovery following offspring stress exposure more strongly (d' = 0.75) than baseline levels (d' = 0.48) or glucocorticoid peak response (d' = 0.36). These findings are consistent with the argument that HPA-axis sensitivity to prenatal stress is evolutionarily ancient and occurs regardless of a species' overall life history strategy. These effects may therefore be especially important for mediating intra-specific life-history variation. In addition, these findings suggest that animal models of prenatal HPA-axis programming may be appropriate for studying similar effects in humans.

  14. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) increases pain behavior and the blood glucose level: possible involvement of glucocorticoid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Yun-Beom; Park, Soo-Hyun; Kang, Yu-Jung; Jung, Jun-Sub; Ryu, Ohk-Hyun; Choi, Moon-Gi; Choi, Seong-Soo; Suh, Hong-Won

    2013-10-01

    The possible involvement of glucocorticoid system in interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced nociception and the blood glucose level was studied in ICR mice. In the first experiment, mice were treated intrathecally (i.t.) with IL-1β (100 pg). Corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA (hypothalamus) and c-Fos mRNA (pituitary gland, spinal cord, and the adrenal gland) levels were measured at 30, 60 and 120 min after IL-1β administration. We found that i.t. injection with IL-1β increased CRH mRNA level in the hypothalamus. The IL-1β administered i.t. elevated c-Fos mRNA levels in the spinal cord, pituitary and adrenal glands. Furthermore, i.t. administration of IL-1β significantly increased the plasma corticosterone level up to 60 min. In addition, the adrenalectomy caused the reductions of the blood glucose level and pain behavior induced by IL-1β injected i.t. in normal and D-glucose-fed groups. Furthermore, intraperitoneal (i.p.) pretreatment with RU486 (100mg/kg) attenuated the blood glucose level and pain behavior induced by IL-1β administered i.t. in normal and D-glucose-fed groups. Our results suggest that IL-1β administered i.t. increases the blood glucose level and pain behavior via an activation of the glucocorticoid system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 10 CFR 26.133 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.133... § 26.133 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. Subject to the provisions of § 26.31(d)(3)(iii), licensees and other entities may specify more stringent cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites than...

  16. Serum level of hormone and metabolites in pregnant rabbit does

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Brecchia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to compare the hormones and metabolites serum levels and the reproductive performances of nulliparous (n=100 and primiparous pregnant does submitted to artificial insemination (AI 11 days post-partum. On the day of AI, all the does were weighed and the sexual receptivity was evaluated. The kits were weaned at 26 day. Blood samples were collect by punc- ture of the marginal ear vein from one day before AI until few days before the kindling and assayed for hormones and metabolites. The higher sexual receptivity and the fertility in nulliparous than in primiparous does confirmed the negative effect of lactation. Nulliparous does showed higher blood con- centration of leptine than primiparous, and in both the groups such level lowered during pregnancy, probably reflecting the reduction of the fat reserve. The insuline level increased during pregnancy in either groups as a consequence of the growing of the foetuses. In nulliparous does the cortisol, NEFA and T3 concentrations were higher than primiparous does. The glucose levels were similar in both the groups probably due to the homeostatic mechanisms controlling the glycemia. Hormonal and metabo- lite analyses represent a good tool for understanding the physiological mechanisms required to meet higher reproductive performance.

  17. Plasma-Glucocorticoids and ACTH Levels During Different Periods of Activity in the European Beaver (Castor fiber L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwińska, Joanna; Chojnowska, Katarzyna; Kamiński, Tadeusz; Bogacka, Iwona; Panasiewicz, Grzegorz; Smolińska, Nina; Kamińska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) are major components of the classic endocrine stress response. Free-living vertebrates are characterized by circannual changes in the baseline and/or stress-induced secretion of GCs and ACTH. In mammalian species, GC and ACTH levels vary seasonally but there is no consensus to the season in which animals have elevated GC and ACTH levels. The aim of our study was to determine, for the first time, the type and amount of glucocorticoids produced in free-living beaver (Castor fiber L.)--the largest rodent in Eurasia, and to find out whether stress-induced plasma GC and ACTH levels show seasonal variations. Blood samples were obtained from animals under general anesthesia in April (pregnancy in females), July (offspring rearing) and November (preparing for the winter). The adrenals of beavers produce both cortisol and corticosterone, and plasma cortisol levels were higher than corticosterone. In the current experiment, plasma cortisol concentrations in beavers were affected by the season. The highest stress-associated cortisol levels were noted in males in July during offspring rearing. Corticosterone and ACTH concentrations in beavers remained generally constant, regardless of the season and sex. In conclusion, seasonal changes were observed only in relation to stress-induced plasma cortisol levels in the beaver.

  18. Levels of central oxytocin and glucocorticoid receptor and serum adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone in mandarin voles with different levels of sociability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xufeng; Yan, Yating; Tai, Fadao; Wu, Ruiyong; Hao, Ping; Fang, Qianqian; Zhang, Shuwei

    2014-11-01

    Sociability is the prerequisite to social living. Oxytocin and the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis mediate various social behaviors across different social contexts in different rodents. We hypothesized that they also mediate levels of non-reproductive social behavior. Here we explored naturally occurring variation in sociability through a social preference test and compared central oxytocin, glucocorticoid receptors, serum adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone in mandarin voles with different levels of sociability. We found that low-social voles showed higher levels of anxiety-like behavior in open field tests, and had more serum adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone than high-social voles. High-social individuals had more glucocorticoid receptor positive neurons in the hippocampus and more oxytocin positive neurons in the paraventricular nuclei and supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus than low-social individuals. Within the same level of sociability, females had more oxytocin positive neurons in the paraventricular nuclei and supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus than males. These results indicate that naturally occurring social preferences are associated with higher levels of central oxytocin and hippocampus glucocorticoid receptor and lower levels of anxiety and serum adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 10 CFR 26.163 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.163... the Department of Health and Human Services § 26.163 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. (a... testing of specimens to determine whether they are negative for the indicated drugs and drug metabolites...

  20. Serum Reactive Oxygen Metabolite Levels Predict Severe Exacerbations of Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Keitaro; Watanabe, Masato; Sada, Mitsuru; Inui, Toshiya; Nakamura, Masuo; Honda, Kojiro; Wada, Hiroo; Mikami, Yu; Matsuzaki, Hirotaka; Horie, Masafumi; Noguchi, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Koyama, Hikari; Kogane, Toshiyuki; Kohyama, Tadashi; Takizawa, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Bronchial asthma (BA) is a chronic airway disease characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and remodeling, which are intimately linked to chronic airway inflammation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide are generated by inflammatory cells that are involved in the pathogenesis of BA. However, the role of ROS in the management of BA patients is not yet clear. We attempted to determine the role of ROS as a biomarker in the clinical setting of BA. Subjects and Methods We enrolled patients with BA from 2013 through 2015 and studied the degrees of asthma control, anti-asthma treatment, pulmonary function test results, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), serum reactive oxygen metabolite (ROM) levels, and serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Results We recruited 110 patients with BA. Serum ROM levels correlated with white blood cell (WBC) count (rs = 0.273, p = 0.004), neutrophil count (rs = 0.235, p = 0.014), CRP (rs = 0.403, p < 0.001), and IL-6 (rs = 0.339, p < 0.001). Serum ROM levels and IL-8 and CRP levels negatively correlated with %FEV1 (rs = -0.240, p = 0.012, rs = -0.362, p < 0.001, rs = -0.197, p = 0.039, respectively). Serum ROM levels were significantly higher in patients who experienced severe exacerbation within 3 months than in patients who did not (339 [302–381] vs. 376 [352–414] CARR U, p < 0.025). Receiver-operating characteristics analysis showed that ROM levels correlated significantly with the occurrence of severe exacerbation (area under the curve: 0.699, 95% CI: 0.597–0.801, p = 0.025). Conclusions Serum levels of ROM were significantly associated with the degrees of airway obstruction, WBC counts, neutrophil counts, IL-6, and severe exacerbations. This biomarker may be useful in predicting severe exacerbations of BA. PMID:27776186

  1. Glucocorticoid Signaling and Bone Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, T

    2016-11-01

    Since glucocorticoids remain an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis is the most common form of secondary osteoporosis. Fractures may occur in as many as 30-50% of patients receiving chronic glucocorticoid therapy. Under physiological conditions, glucocorticoids are required for normal bone development due to their regulation of osteoblast differentiation, possibly via the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and TSC22D3. However, serum levels of endogenous corticosterone are elevated in aged mice and glucocorticoids exert negative effects on the survival of osteoblasts and osteocytes as well as angiogenesis. Glucocorticoid treatments impair bone formation and enhance bone resorption. Excess glucocorticoids induce osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis by increasing pro-apoptotic molecules, reactive oxygen species, and endoplasmic reticulum stress and suppressing the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Autophagy protects osteocytes from glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis, but passed some threshold, the process of autophagy leads the cells to apoptosis. Excess glucocorticoids impair osteoblastogenesis by inducing Wnt antagonists, including Dkk1, Sost, and sFRP-1. However, the findings are controversial and the involvement of Wnt antagonists requires further study. Excess glucocorticoids reduce the phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3β, which enhances the degradation of β-catenin. Excess glucocorticoids have been shown to modulate the expression of miRNAs, including miR-29a, miR-34a-5p, and miR-199a-5p, which regulate the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast lineage cells. Excess glucocorticoids also enhance bone resorption by reducing OPG expression, increasing Rankl expression and reactive oxygen species, and prolonging the life span of osteoclasts; however, they also suppress the bone-degrading capacity of osteoclasts by disturbing the organization of the cytoskeleton. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG

  2. SPILANTHES ACMELLA AND PHYSICAL EXERCISE INCREASED TESTOSTERONE LEVELS AND OSTEOBLAST CELLS IN GLUCOCORTICOID-INDUCED OSTEOPOROSIS MALE MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hening Laswati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis is leading cause of secondary osteoporosis by decreasing formation activity and increasing resorption activity. Spilanthes acmella, is one of Indonesia medicinal plants that contain of polyphenol and flavonoids. Previously in vitro study showed that buthanol and water fraction from this plant have increased alkaline phosphatase that known as marker of bone formation. The objective of this study to analyze the effect of Spilanthes acmella  and physical exercise in increasing testosterone and  osteoblast cells of femoral’s trabecular glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis male mice. Method: This study using a posttest control group design, 36 male healthy mice (5 months old  were randomizely devided into 6 groups, there are : 1.Healthy control group (without induction dexamethaxone, 2.Osteoporosis groups (induction with dexamethaxone without treatment, 3.Positive control receive suspension alendronat, 4.70% Ethanol extract of Spilanthes acmella group, 5.Combination group of 70% extract ethanol of Spilanthes acmella and exercise, and 6.Exercise group  (walking using mice treadmill 10m/minute, 5-12 minutes 3 times a week. All of the intervention were given for 4 weeks. The serum levels of testosterone were determined using  immunoserology (ELISA and osteoblast cells were determined histomorphometry by light microscopy.  All statistical test were carried out using SPSS 23 and statistical significance was  set at p<0.05 for all analysis. The testosterone levels  between group were compared using Mann-Whitney test and osteoblast cells between group were compared with multiple comparison. Results: It showed that the alendronate group, combination group and the exercise group increasing testosterone level (p<0.05 from that osteoporotic group. There were also increasing osteoblast cells (p<0.05 in the alendronate group and combination group. There was no correlation between testosterone level and

  3. Effect of long-term inhalation of glucocorticoids on the level of leptin, IL-13 and IL-2 in bronchial asthmatic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jiongwei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of long-term inhalation of glucocorticoids on the level of leptin, IL-13, and IL-2 in bronchial asthmatic patient. Methods: Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect the serum IL-13 and IL-2 level in 60 healthy persons (normal control group) and 70 bronchial asthma patients untreated and 3, 6, 12 months post-treatment, meanwhile leptin was determined by radio immunoassay. Results: The serum levels of leptin, Il-13, and IL-2 in were significantly increased in patient with bronchial asthma compared with that in the normal control group. The serum levels of leptin, IL-13, and IL-2 in children with asthma were decreased gradually after inhaling glucocorticoids for 3 months (P<0.05). The treatment of inhaled glucocorticoids for 6 and 12 months can attenuate the elevation of leptin, IL-13, and IL-2 compared with that before the treatment. Conclusion: Long-term inhaled glucocorticoid is an important means for asthma, and the effects are related to the decrease of level of leptin, IL-13, and IL-2. (authors)

  4. Regulation of blood glucose level by kainic acid in mice: involvement of glucocorticoid system and non-NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chea-Ha; Park, Soo-Hyun; Sim, Yun-Beom; Kim, Sung-Su; Jung, Jun-Sub; Sharma, Naveen; Suh, Hong-Won

    2017-02-28

    Kainic acid (KA) is a well-known excitatory neurotoxic substance. In the present study, effects of KA-injected intraperitoneally (i.p.), intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or intrathecally (i.t.) on the blood glucose level were investigated in ICR mice. We found that KA administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or intrathecally (i.t.) increased the blood glucose and corticosterone levels, suggesting that KA-induced hyperglycemia appeared to be due to increased blood corticosterone level. In support of this finding, adrenalectomy causes a reduction of KA-induced hyperglycemia and neuronal cell death in CA3 regions of the hippocampus. In addition, pretreatment with i.c.v. or i.t. injection of CNQX (6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2, 3-dione; a non-NMDA receptor blocker) attenuated the i.p. and i.c.v. administered KA-induced hyperglycemia. KA administered i.c.v. caused an elevation of the blood corticosterone level whereas the plasma insulin level was reduced. Moreover, i.c.v. pretreatment with CNQX inhibited the decrease of plasma insulin level induced by KA i.c.v. injection, whereas the KA-induced plasma corticosterone level was further enhanced by CNQX pretreatment. Our results suggest that KA administered systemically or centrally produces hyperglycemia. A glucocorticoid system appears to be involved in KA-induced hyperglycemia. Furthermore, central non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors may be responsible for KA-induced hyperglycemia.

  5. Determinants of Organophosphorus Pesticide Urinary Metabolite Levels in Young Children Living in an Agricultural Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Eskenazi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorus (OP pesticides are used in agriculture and several are registered for home use. As young children age they may experience different pesticide exposures due to varying diet, behavior, and other factors. We measured six OP dialkylphosphate (DAP metabolites (three dimethyl alkylphosphates (DMAP and three diethyl alkylphosphates (DEAP in urine samples collected from ~400 children living in an agricultural community when they were 6, 12, and 24 months old. We examined bivariate associations between DAP metabolite levels and determinants such as age, diet, season, and parent occupation. To evaluate independent impacts, we then used generalized linear mixed multivariable models including interaction terms with age. The final models indicated that DMAP metabolite levels increased with age. DMAP levels were also positively associated with daily servings of produce at 6- and 24-months. Among the 6-month olds, DMAP metabolite levels were higher when samples were collected during the summer/spring versus the winter/fall months. Among the 12-month olds, DMAP and DEAP metabolites were higher when children lived ≤60 meters from an agricultural field. Among the 24-month-olds, DEAP metabolite levels were higher during the summer/spring months. Our findings suggest that there are multiple determinants of OP pesticide exposures, notably dietary intake and temporal and spatial proximity to agricultural use. The impact of these determinants varied by age and class of DAP metabolite.

  6. Regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor mRNA levels in the gills of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar during smoltification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAZURAIS D.

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of the Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR transcript was investigated in the gills of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar during the parr-smolt transformation. Sampling of parr and smolt fish was performed between December and July and in particular during the smoltification period occurring in spring. Quantification of GR transcripts revealed differences between the two groups in March and at the beginning of April. During these dates, the amounts of GR mRNA in parr gills were respectively three and two fold lower than those measured in smolts. In order to determine which factors are responsible for these differences, we studied the long-term effects of prolactin and Cortisol treatments on GR transcript in the gills of presmolt fish. The plasma levels of these two hormones respectively drop and rise during smoltification. Contrary to Cortisol long-term treatment which did not modify the amount of gill GR transcript, short-term treatment induced a significant decrease within 12 hours. Prolactin long-term treatment caused a significant increase of GR transcript abundance after 13 days of implant treatment. This result is unexpected with regard to those obtained in the smoltification analysis but is in agreement with previous studies performed in mammary gland revealing a positive control of PRL on GR in epithelial cells. Our data suggest that the regulation of the GR transcript during the parr-smolt transformation probably involves several hormonal factors.

  7. Glucocorticoid treatment earlier in childhood and adolescence show dose-response associations with diurnal cortisol levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Holm, Sara K; Uldall, Peter

    2017-01-01

    or diurnal cortisol output; however, sex-dependent group differences were observed. Specifically, female patients had a higher CAR relative to female controls, while male patients had higher daily cortisol levels compared to male controls. Notably, CAR in female patients and daily cortisol levels in male...... for males and females....

  8. Brain metabolite levels and language abilities in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, Catherine; MacMaster, Frank P; Dewey, Deborah

    2016-10-01

    Language acquisition occurs rapidly during early childhood and lays the foundation for future reading success. However, little is known about the brain-language relationships in young children. The goal of this study was to investigate relationships between brain metabolites and prereading language abilities in healthy preschool-aged children. Participants were 67 healthy children aged 3.0-5.4 years scanned on a 3T GE MR750w MRI scanner using short echo proton spectroscopy with a voxel placed in the anterior cingulate gyrus ( n  = 56) and/or near the left angular gyrus ( n  = 45). Children completed the NEPSY-II Phonological Processing and Speeded Naming subtests at the same time as their MRI scan. We calculated glutamate, glutamine, creatine/phosphocreatine, choline, inositol, and NAA concentrations, and correlated these with language skills. In the anterior cingulate, Phonological Processing Scaled Scores were significantly correlated with glutamate, creatine, and inositol concentrations. In the left angular gyrus, Speeded Naming Combined Scaled Scores showed trend correlations with choline and glutamine concentrations. For the first time, we demonstrate relationships between brain metabolites and prereading language abilities in young children. Our results show relationships between language and inositol and glutamate that may reflect glial differences underlying language function, and a relationship of language with creatine. The trend between Speeded Naming and choline is consistent with previous research in older children and adults; however, larger sample sizes are needed to confirm whether this relationship is indeed significant in young children. These findings help understand the brain basis of language, and may ultimately lead to earlier and more effective interventions for reading disabilities.

  9. Enduring, Sexually Dimorphic Impact of In Utero Exposure to Elevated Levels of Glucocorticoids on Midbrain Dopaminergic Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda E. Gillies

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid hormones (GCs released from the fetal/maternal glands during late gestation are required for normal development of mammalian organs and tissues. Accordingly, synthetic glucocorticoids have proven to be invaluable in perinatal medicine where they are widely used to accelerate fetal lung maturation when there is risk of pre-term birth and to promote infant survival. However, clinical and pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that inappropriate exposure of the developing brain to elevated levels of GCs, either as a result of clinical over-use or after stress-induced activation of the fetal/maternal adrenal cortex, is linked with significant effects on brain structure, neurological function and behaviour in later life. In order to understand the underlying neural processes, particular interest has focused on the midbrain dopaminergic systems, which are critical regulators of normal adaptive behaviours, cognitive and sensorimotor functions. Specifically, using a rodent model of GC exposure in late gestation (approximating human brain development at late second/early third trimester, we demonstrated enduring effects on the shape and volume of the ventral tegmental area (VTA and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc (origins of the mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways on the topographical organisation and size of the dopaminergic neuronal populations and astrocytes within these nuclei and on target innervation density and neurochemical markers of dopaminergic transmission (receptors, transporters, basal and amphetamine-stimulated dopamine release at striatal and prefrontal cortical sites that impact on the adult brain. The effects of antenatal GC treatment (AGT were both profound and sexually-dimorphic, not only in terms of quantitative change but also qualitatively, with several parameters affected in the opposite direction in males and females. Although such substantial neurobiological changes might presage marked

  10. Pathophysiology of Glucocorticoid Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitellius, Géraldine; Trabado, Séverine; Bouligand, Jérôme; Delemer, Brigitte; Lombès, Marc

    2018-06-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC), such as cortisol or dexamethasone, control various physiological functions, notably those involved in development, metabolism, inflammatory processes and stress, and exert most of their effects upon binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, encoded by NR3C1 gene). GC signaling follows several consecutive steps leading to target gene transactivation, including ligand binding, nuclear translocation of ligand-activated GR complexes, DNA binding, coactivator interaction and recruitment of functional transcriptional machinery. Any step may be impaired and may account for altered GC signaling. Partial or generalized glucocorticoid resistance syndrome may result in a reduced level of functional GR, a decreased hormone affinity and binding, a defect in nuclear GR translocation, a decrease or lack of DNA binding and/or post-transcriptional GR modifications. To date, 26 loss-of-function NR3C1 mutations have been reported in the context of hypertension, hirsutism, adrenal hyperplasia or metabolic disorders. These clinical signs are generally associated with biological features including hypercortisolism without negative regulatory feedback loop on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Patients had often low plasma aldosterone and renin levels despite hypertension. Only one GR gain-of-function mutation has been described associating Cushing's syndrome phenotype with normal urinary-free cortisol. Some GR polymorphisms (ER22/23EK, GR-9β) have been linked to glucocorticoid resistance and a healthier metabolic profile whereas some others seemed to be associated with GC hypersensitivity (N363S, BclI), increasing cardiovascular risk (diabetes type 2, visceral obesity). This review focuses on the earlier findings on the pathophysiology of GR signaling and presents criteria facilitating identification of novel NR3C1 mutations in selected patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glucocorticoid receptor levels in lymphocytes as markers of antidepressant response in major depressive patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Paulina Soledad; Fritsch, Rosemarie; Rojas, Romina Andrea; Jara, Pablo; Fiedler, Jenny Lucy

    2011-09-30

    Depressive patients often have altered cortisol secretion, an effect that likely derives from impaired activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), the main regulator of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Glucocorticoids reduce the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a downstream target of antidepressants. Antidepressants promote the transcriptional activity of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB), a regulator of BDNF expression. To identify potential biomarkers for the onset of antidepressant action in depressive patients, GR and phospho-CREB (pCREB) levels in lymphocytes and serum BDNF levels were repeatedly measured during the course of antidepressant treatment. Thirty-four depressed outpatients (10 male and 24 female) were treated with venlafaxine (75mg/day), and individuals exhibiting a 50% reduction in their baseline 17-Item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score by the 6th week of treatment were considered responders. Responders showed an early improvement in parallel with a rise in BDNF levels during the first two weeks of treatment. Non-responders showed increased GR levels by the third week and reduced serum BDNF by the sixth week of treatment. In contrast, venlafaxine did not affect levels of pCREB. We conclude that levels of BDNF in serum and GR levels in lymphocytes may represent biomarkers that could be used to predict responses to venlafaxine treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fecal estradiol and progesterone metabolite levels in the three-toed sloth (Bradypus variegatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mühlbauer

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to assess the possibility of measuring fecal steroid hormone metabolites as a noninvasive technique for monitoring reproductive function in the three-toed sloth, Bradypus variegatus. Levels of the estradiol (E2 and progesterone (P4 metabolites were measured by radioimmunoassay in fecal samples collected over 12 weeks from 4 captive female B. variegatus sloths. The validation of the radioimmunoassay for evaluation of fecal steroid metabolites was carried out by collecting 10 blood samples on the same day as defecation. There was a significant direct correlation between the plasma and fecal E2 and P4 levels (P < 0.05, Pearson's test, thereby validating this noninvasive technique for the study of the estrous cycle in these animals. Ovulation was detected in two sloths (SL03 and SL04 whose E2 levels reached 2237.43 and 6713.26 pg/g wet feces weight, respectively, for over four weeks, followed by an increase in P4 metabolites reaching 33.54 and 3242.68 ng/g wet feces weight, respectively. Interestingly, SL04, which presented higher levels of E2 and P4 metabolites, later gave birth to a healthy baby sloth. The results obtained indicate that this is a reliable technique for recording gonadal steroid secretion and thereby reproduction in sloths.

  13. Phthalate metabolites in Norwegian mothers and children: Levels, diurnal variation and use of personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhi, Amrit Kaur; Sabaredzovic, Azemira; Cequier, Enrique; Thomsen, Cathrine

    2017-12-01

    Exposure to phthalates has been associated with reproductive and developmental toxicity. Data on levels of these compounds in the Norwegian population is limited. In this study, urine samples were collected from 48 mothers and their children in two counties in Norway. Eleven different phthalate metabolites originating from six commonly used phthalates in consumer products were determined. Concentrations of phthalate metabolites were significantly higher in children compared to mothers except for mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP). The mothers provided several urine samples during 24hours (h) and diurnal variation showed that the concentrations in the morning urine samples (24-8h) were significantly higher than at other time-periods for most of the phthalate metabolites. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for 24-hour time-period were in the range of 0.49-0.81. These moderate to high ICCs indicate that one spot urine sample can be used to estimate the exposure to phthalates. Since a significant effect of time of day was observed, it is still advisable to standardize the collection time point to reduce the variation. For the mothers, the use of personal care products (PCPs) were less associated with morning urine samples than early day (8-12h) and evening (16-24h) urine samples. The use of perfume and hair products were positively associated with the urinary concentrations of low molecular weight phthalates. Use of shower soap and shampoo were positively associated with urinary concentration of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) metabolites. For children, face cream use was positively associated with phthalate metabolites in the morning samples, and hand soap use was negatively associated with concentration of urinary DEHP metabolites in afternoon/evening samples. Since different PCPs were associated with the urinary phthalate metabolites in different time-periods during a day, more than one spot urine sample might be required to study associations between urinary

  14. Pyometra in Bitches Induces Elevated Plasma Endotoxin and Prostaglandin F2α Metabolite Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagman R

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Endotoxemia in bitches with pyometra can cause severe systemic effects directly or via the release of inflammatory mediators. Plasma endotoxin concentrations were measured in ten bitches suffering from pyometra with moderately to severely deteriorated general condition, and in nine bitches admitted to surgery for non-infectious reasons. Endotoxin samples were taken on five occasions before, during and after surgery. In addition, urine and uterine bacteriology was performed and hematological, blood biochemical parameters, prostaglandin F2α metabolite 15-ketodihydro-PGF2α (PG-metabolite, progesterone and oestradiol (E2-17β levels were analysed. The results confirm significantly increased plasma levels of endotoxin in bitches with pyometra and support previous reports of endotoxin involvement in the pathogenesis of the disease. Plasma concentrations of PG-metabolite were elevated in pyometra bitches and provide a good indicator of endotoxin release since the concentrations were significantly correlated to the endotoxin levels and many other hematological and chemistry parameters. The γ-globulin serum protein electrophoresis fraction and analysis of PG-metabolite can be valuable in the diagnosis of endotoxin involvement if a reliable, rapid and cost-effective test for PG-metabolite analysis becomes readily available in the future. Treatment inhibiting prostaglandin biosynthesis and related compounds could be beneficial for bitches suffering from pyometra.

  15. NALP3 inflammasome up-regulation and CASP1 cleavage of the glucocorticoid receptor causes glucocorticoid resistance in leukemia cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paugh, Steven W.; Bonten, Erik J.; Savic, Daniel; Ramsey, Laura B.; Thierfelder, William E.; Gurung, Prajwal; Malireddi, R. K. Subbarao; Actis, Marcelo; Mayasundari, Anand; Min, Jaeki; Coss, David R.; Laudermilk, Lucas T.; Panetta, John C.; McCorkle, J. Robert; Fan, Yiping; Crews, Kristine R.; Stocco, Gabriele; Wilkinson, Mark R.; Ferreira, Antonio M.; Cheng, Cheng; Yang, Wenjian; Karol, Seth E.; Fernandez, Christian A.; Diouf, Barthelemy; Smith, Colton; Hicks, J. Kevin; Zanut, Alessandra; Giordanengo, Audrey; Crona, Daniel; Bianchi, Joy J.; Holmfeldt, Linda; Mullighan, Charles G.; den Boer, Monique L.; Pieters, Rob; Jeha, Sima; Dunwell, Thomas L.; Latif, Farida; Bhojwani, Deepa; Carroll, William L.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Myers, Richard M.; Guy, R. Kiplin; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Relling, Mary V.; Evans, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are universally used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and leukemia cell resistant to glucocorticoids confers a poor prognosis. To elucidate mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance, we determined the sensitivity to prednisolone of primary leukemia cells from 444 newly diagnosed ALL patients, revealing significantly higher expression of caspase 1 (CASP1) and its activator NLRP3 in glucocorticoid resistant leukemia cells, due to significantly lower somatic methylation of CASP1 and NLRP3 promoters. Over-expression of CASP1 resulted in cleavage of the glucocorticoid receptor, diminished glucocorticoid-induced transcriptional response and increased glucocorticoid resistance. Knockdown or inhibition of CASP1 significantly increased glucocorticoid receptor levels and mitigated glucocorticoid resistance in CASP1 overexpressing ALL. Our findings establish a new mechanism by which the NLRP3/CASP1 inflammasome modulates cellular levels of the glucocorticoid receptor and diminishes cell sensitivity to glucocorticoids. The broad impact on glucocorticoid transcriptional response suggests this mechanism could also modify glucocorticoid effects in other diseases. PMID:25938942

  16. Do optimally ripe blackberries contain the highest levels of metabolites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulic-Petkovsek, Maja; Koron, Darinka; Zorenc, Zala; Veberic, Robert

    2017-01-15

    Five blackberry cultivars were selected for the study ('Chester Thornless', 'Cacanska Bestrna', 'Loch Ness', 'Smoothstem' and 'Thornfree') and harvested at three different maturity stages (under-, optimal- and over-ripe). Optimally ripe and over-ripe blackberries contained significantly higher levels of total sugars compared to under-ripe fruit. 'Loch Ness' cultivar was characterized by 2.2-2.6-fold higher levels of total sugars than other cultivars and consequently, the highest sugar/acids ratio. 'Chester Thornless' stands out as the cultivar with the highest level of vitamin C in under-ripe (125.87mgkg(-1)) and optimally mature fruit (127.66mgkg(-1)). Maturity stage significantly affected the accumulation of phenolic compounds. The content of total anthocyanins increased for 43% at optimal maturity stage and cinnamic acid derivatives for 57% compared to under-ripe fruit. Over-ripe blackberries were distinguished by the highest content of total phenolics (1251-2115mg GAE kg(-1) FW) and greatest FRAP values (25.9-43.2mM TE kg(-1) FW). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Unique Automation Platform for Measuring Low Level Radioactivity in Metabolite Identification Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauser, Joel; Walles, Markus; Wolf, Thierry; Graf, Daniel; Swart, Piet

    2012-01-01

    Generation and interpretation of biotransformation data on drugs, i.e. identification of physiologically relevant metabolites, defining metabolic pathways and elucidation of metabolite structures, have become increasingly important to the drug development process. Profiling using 14C or 3H radiolabel is defined as the chromatographic separation and quantification of drug-related material in a given biological sample derived from an in vitro, preclinical in vivo or clinical study. Metabolite profiling is a very time intensive activity, particularly for preclinical in vivo or clinical studies which have defined limitations on radiation burden and exposure levels. A clear gap exists for certain studies which do not require specialized high volume automation technologies, yet these studies would still clearly benefit from automation. Use of radiolabeled compounds in preclinical and clinical ADME studies, specifically for metabolite profiling and identification are a very good example. The current lack of automation for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite profiling requires substantial capacity, personal attention and resources from laboratory scientists. To help address these challenges and improve efficiency, we have innovated, developed and implemented a novel and flexible automation platform that integrates a robotic plate handling platform, HPLC or UPLC system, mass spectrometer and an automated fraction collector. PMID:22723932

  18. A unique automation platform for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite identification studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Krauser

    Full Text Available Generation and interpretation of biotransformation data on drugs, i.e. identification of physiologically relevant metabolites, defining metabolic pathways and elucidation of metabolite structures, have become increasingly important to the drug development process. Profiling using (14C or (3H radiolabel is defined as the chromatographic separation and quantification of drug-related material in a given biological sample derived from an in vitro, preclinical in vivo or clinical study. Metabolite profiling is a very time intensive activity, particularly for preclinical in vivo or clinical studies which have defined limitations on radiation burden and exposure levels. A clear gap exists for certain studies which do not require specialized high volume automation technologies, yet these studies would still clearly benefit from automation. Use of radiolabeled compounds in preclinical and clinical ADME studies, specifically for metabolite profiling and identification are a very good example. The current lack of automation for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite profiling requires substantial capacity, personal attention and resources from laboratory scientists. To help address these challenges and improve efficiency, we have innovated, developed and implemented a novel and flexible automation platform that integrates a robotic plate handling platform, HPLC or UPLC system, mass spectrometer and an automated fraction collector.

  19. Glucocorticoid-induced hyperglycaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerards, M.C.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis contains studies on current practice, clinical implications and treatment of excess glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) stimulation, with a focus on glucocorticoid-induced hyperglycaemia (GCIH). Chapter 1 is a general introduction to the glucocorticoid hormone. In chapter 2 , we have

  20. Levels of caffeine and its metabolites among U.S. smokers and nonsmokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ram B

    2015-03-01

    Data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for the years 2009-2010 were used to estimate the levels of caffeine and 14 of its metabolite among U.S. smokers and nonsmokers after adjustments were made for other factors that affect observed caffeine levels. In this study, when adjusted for daily caffeine intake, adjusted levels (AGM) of caffeine and its metabolites were not found to be statistically significantly different between smokers and nonsmokers. AGMs for caffeine and all of its metabolites were found to be statistically significantly higher (p whites > Hispanics > non-Hispanic blacks and most of the differences were statistically significant, at least between non-Hispanic whites and non-Hispanic blacks (p < 0.01). In general, there was a statistically significant positive association between the levels of caffeine and its metabolites and body mass index as well as daily caffeine intake. However, the levels of 7-methylxanthine were negatively associated with body mass index. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Association of plasma IL-6 and Hsp70 with HRV at different levels of PAHs metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ye

    Full Text Available Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs is associated with reduced heart rate variability (HRV, a strong predictor of cardiovascular diseases, but the mechanism is not well understood.We hypothesized that PAHs might induce systemic inflammation and stress response, contributing to altered cardiac autonomic function.HRV indices were measured using a 3-channel digital Holter monitor in 800 coke oven workers. Plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 were determined using ELISA. Twelve urinary PAHs metabolites (OH-PAHs were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.We found that significant dose-dependent relationships between four urinary OH-PAHs and IL-6 (all Ptrend<0.05; and an increase in quartiles of IL-6 was significantly associated with a decrease in total power (TP and low frequency (LF (Ptrend = 0.014 and 0.006, respectively. In particular, elevated IL-6 was associated in a dose-dependent manner with decreased TP and LF in the high-PAHs metabolites groups (all Ptrend<0.05, but not in the low-PAHs metabolites groups. No significant association between Hsp70 and HRV in total population was found after multivariate adjustment. However, increased Hsp70 was significantly associated with elevated standard deviation of NN intervals (SDNN, TP and LF in the low-PAHs metabolites groups (all Ptrend<0.05. We also observed that both IL-6 and Hsp70 significantly interacted with multiple PAHs metabolites in relation to HRV.In coke oven workers, increased IL-6 was associated with a dose-response decreased HRV in the high-PAHs metabolites groups, whereas increase of Hsp70 can result in significant dose-related increase in HRV in the low-PAHs metabolites groups.

  2. Serum levels of parathyroid hormone and markers of bone metabolism in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Relationship to disease activity and glucocorticoid treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tonny Joran; Hansen, M; Madsen, J C

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of inflammatory activity and glucocorticoid (GC) treatment on serum parathyroid hormone (s-PTH) and bone metabolism in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Furthermore, in patients with active RA, to examine the PTH secretion and Ca2+ set point before and ....... The increased levels of markers of type I collagen metabolism (s-ICTP, Pyr) and s-AlbCorrCa2+ in patients with active disease and patients treated with GC may be a result of increased degradation in synovium, cartilage and bone due to the inflammatory process.......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of inflammatory activity and glucocorticoid (GC) treatment on serum parathyroid hormone (s-PTH) and bone metabolism in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Furthermore, in patients with active RA, to examine the PTH secretion and Ca2+ set point before...... groups. The levels of urine pyridinoline (Pyr) and s-albumin-corrected calcium (s-AlbCorrCa2+) were elevated in patients with active disease and patients treated with GC. S-PTH and s-phosphate were within normal ranges. S-TAP, s-ICTP, Pyr and s-AlbCorrCa2+ correlated positively with indices of disease...

  3. Urinary metabolite levels and symptoms in Filipino workers using organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucueco, M T; Espinosa, N C; Villanueva, M B; Castro, F T; Sison, S Y; Ortega, V S; Hisanaga, N

    1993-01-01

    To compare symptoms with urinary metabolite levels, 900 workers from 7 organic solvent-using industries were studied. Urinary metabolites were determined using a high performance liquid chromatograph. Urinary hippuric acid concentrations exceeding the reference value (2.5 g/g creatinine) were found in 78 (8.7%) workers. However, only 3 (0.3%) and 1 (0.1%) of the participants exceeded the reference value for mandelic (0.8 g/g creatinine) and total methylhippuric acid (1.5 g/g creatinine), respectively. The sum of the values of the ratio of measured urinary metabolite concentration to the corresponding ACGIH's biological exposure indices (BEI) [(HA/BEI of HA + MHA/BEI of MHA + MA/BEI of MA)] exceeded 1.0 in 166 (18.4%) workers. Majority of them were from the footwear manufacturing industry (63/129 or 49.2%). Questionnaire interviews were also administered to determine the prevalence of symptoms while at work (acute symptoms) or within the past 6 months (chronic symptoms). Urinary metabolite levels of individual and mixed solvents were compared with the symptoms of all workers. Analysis using Spearman's rank correlation showed in workers whose urinary hippuric acid exceeded 3.75 g/g creatine (1.5 x BEI), significant correlation between their hippuric acid levels and subjective complaints. Workers whose sum of the values of the ratio of measured urinary metabolite concentration to corresponding BEI exceeded 1.5 were selected and comparing this level with their symptoms, significant correlation was also noted in some complaints.

  4. Relationships of Cerebrospinal Fluid Monoamine Metabolite Levels With Clinical Variables in Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyung Shin; Hattori, Kotaro; Ogawa, Shintaro; Sasayama, Daimei; Ota, Miho; Teraishi, Toshiya; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    Many studies have investigated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolite levels in depressive disorders. However, their clinical significance is still unclear. We tried to determine whether CSF monoamine metabolite levels could be a state-dependent marker for major depressive disorder (MDD) based on analyses stratified by clinical variables in a relatively large sample. Subjects were 75 patients with MDD according to DSM-IV criteria and 87 healthy controls, matched for age, sex, and ethnicity (Japanese). They were recruited between May 2010 and November 2013. We measured homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol (MHPG) in CSF samples by high-performance liquid chromatography. We analyzed the relationships of the metabolite levels with age, sex, diagnosis, psychotropic medication use, and depression severity. There was a weak positive correlation between age and 5-HIAA levels in controls (ρ = 0.26, P 12) were significantly lower than those in controls (P .1), were related to depression severity. CSF 5-HIAA and HVA levels could be state-dependent markers in MDD patients. Since 5-HIAA levels greatly decrease with the use of antidepressants, HVA levels might be more useful in the clinical setting. © Copyright 2017 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  5. Effects of profession on urinary PAH metabolite levels in the US population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bian; Jia, Chunrong

    2016-01-01

    Although exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is common in both environmental and occupational settings, few studies have compared PAH exposure among people with different professions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the variations in recent PAH exposure among different occupational groups over time using national representative samples. The study population consisted of 4162 participants from the 2001 to 2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, who had both urinary PAH metabolites and occupational information. Four corresponding monohydroxy-PAH urine metabolites: naphthalene (NAP), fluorene (FLUO), phenanthrene (PHEN), and pyrene (PYR) among seven broad occupational groups were analyzed using weighted linear regression models, adjusting for creatinine levels, sociodemographic factors, smoking status, and sampling season. The overall geometric mean concentrations of NAP, FLUO, PHEN, and PYR were 6927, 477, 335, and 87 ng/L, respectively. All four PAH metabolites were elevated in the "extractive, construction, and repair (ECR)" group, with 21-42 % higher concentrations than those in the reference group of "management." Similar trends were seen in the "operators, fabricators, and laborers (OFL)" group for FLUO, PHEN, and PYR. In addition, both "service" and "support" groups had elevated FLUO. Significant (p PAH exposure. Heterogeneous distributions of urinary PAH metabolites among people with different job categories exist at the population level. The upward temporal trends in NAP and PYR warrant reduction in PAH exposure, especially among those with OFL and ECR occupations.

  6. Impacts of rising tropospheric ozone on photosynthesis and metabolite levels on field grown soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jindong; Feng, Zhaozhong; Ort, Donald R

    2014-09-01

    The response of leaf photosynthesis and metabolite profiles to ozone (O3) exposure ranging from 37 to 116 ppb was investigated in two soybean cultivars Dwight and IA3010 in the field under fully open-air conditions. Leaf photosynthesis, total non-structural carbohydrates (TNC) and total free amino acids (TAA) decreased linearly with increasing O3 levels in both cultivars with average decrease of 7% for an increase in O3 levels by 10 ppb. Ozone interacted with developmental stages and leaf ages, and caused higher damage at later reproductive stages and in older leaves. Ozone affected yield mainly via reduction of maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax) and maximum rates of electron transport (Jmax) as well as a shorter growing season due to earlier onset of canopy senescence. For all parameters investigated the critical O3 levels (∼50 ppb) for detectable damage fell within O3 levels that occur routinely in soybean fields across the US and elsewhere in the world. Strong correlations were observed in O3-induced changes among yield, photosynthesis, TNC, TAA and many metabolites. The broad range of metabolites that showed O3 dose dependent effect is consistent with multiple interaction loci and thus multiple targets for improving the tolerance of soybean to O3. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Plasma Levels of Biotin Metabolites Are Elevated in Hemodialysis Patients with Cramps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Masako; Ando, Itiro; Yagi, Shigeaki; Nishizawa, Manabu; Oguma, Shiro; Satoh, Keisuke; Sato, Hiroshi; Imai, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Patients with renal failure undergoing hemodialysis (HD) are susceptible to muscle cramps during and after HD. Muscle cramps are defined as the sudden onset of a prolonged involuntary muscle contraction accompanied by severe pain. Through HD, water-soluble vitamins are drawn out with water. Since biotin, a water-soluble vitamin, plays an essential role as one of the coenzymes in producing energy, we have hypothesized that deficiency of biotin may be responsible for HD-associated cramps. We previously reported that biotin administration ameliorated the muscle cramps, despite the elevated plasma biotin levels before HD and biotin administration, as judged by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). However, the ELISA measures not only biotin but also total avidin-binding substances (TABS) including biotin metabolites. In the present study, we determined biotin in HD patients as well as healthy controls, using a newly developed method with ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The plasma samples were collected from 28 HD patients (16 patients with cramps and 12 patients without cramps) before HD and biotin administration and from 11 controls. The results showed that the accumulation of biotin and TABS in plasma of HD patients compared to controls. Importantly, the levels of biotin metabolites, i.e. TABS subtracted by biotin, increased significantly in patients with cramps over those without cramps. Moreover, the levels of biotin metabolites were significantly higher in patients with a poor response to administered biotin, compared to those with a good response. We propose that accumulated biotin metabolites impair biotin's functions as a coenzyme.

  8. Glucocorticoid programming of intrauterine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowden, A L; Valenzuela, O A; Vaughan, O R; Jellyman, J K; Forhead, A J

    2016-07-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are important environmental and maturational signals during intrauterine development. Toward term, the maturational rise in fetal glucocorticoid receptor concentrations decreases fetal growth and induces differentiation of key tissues essential for neonatal survival. When cortisol levels rise earlier in gestation as a result of suboptimal conditions for fetal growth, the switch from tissue accretion to differentiation is initiated prematurely, which alters the phenotype that develops from the genotype inherited at conception. Although this improves the chances of survival should delivery occur, it also has functional consequences for the offspring long after birth. Glucocorticoids are, therefore, also programming signals that permanently alter tissue structure and function during intrauterine development to optimize offspring fitness. However, if the postnatal environmental conditions differ from those signaled in utero, the phenotypical outcome of early-life glucocorticoid receptor overexposure may become maladaptive and lead to physiological dysfunction in the adult. This review focuses on the role of GCs in developmental programming, primarily in farm species. It examines the factors influencing GC bioavailability in utero and the effects that GCs have on the development of fetal tissues and organ systems, both at term and earlier in gestation. It also discusses the windows of susceptibility to GC overexposure in early life together with the molecular mechanisms and long-term consequences of GC programming with particular emphasis on the cardiovascular, metabolic, and endocrine phenotype of the offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of the systemic versus inhalatory administration of synthetic glucocorticoids on the urinary steroid profile as studied by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzarino, Monica; Rossi, Francesca; Giacomelli, Laura; Botre, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) study carried out on human urine to verify whether the administration of glucocorticoids can affect the urinary steroid profile, and especially the levels of endogenous glucocorticoids, androgens and their main metabolites. Betamethasone and beclomethasone, administered either systemically (per os or i.m.) or locally (by inhalation) have been studied. The determination of the urinary levels of endogenous glucocorticoids and androgens was carried out by GC-MS in electron impact ionization mode. Data were evaluated taking into account the baseline individual variability, and compared with values obtained on a control group. Detectable differences were recorded in the steroids metabolites excretion profiles between men and women. The circadian variability of the steroid profile was the same for both sexes, showing a maximum during the morning hours. After systemic treatment with synthetic glucocorticoids, the relative urinary concentrations of corticosteroids, androgens and of their metabolites were significantly altered, recording a transient decrease of the concentration of cortisol and tetrahydrocortisol and a parallel, although less pronounced, increase of the concentration of testosterone, epitestosterone and related androgenic steroids; while no effects were recorded if the administration was by inhalation

  10. Effect of the systemic versus inhalatory administration of synthetic glucocorticoids on the urinary steroid profile as studied by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzarino, Monica [Laboratorio Antidoping, Federazione Medico Sportiva Italiana, Largo Giulio Onesti 1, 00197 Rome (Italy); Rossi, Francesca [Laboratorio Antidoping, Federazione Medico Sportiva Italiana, Largo Giulio Onesti 1, 00197 Rome (Italy); Giacomelli, Laura [Dipartimento di Scienze Chirurgiche, Universita La Sapienza, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Botre, Francesco [Laboratorio Antidoping, Federazione Medico Sportiva Italiana, Largo Giulio Onesti 1, 00197 Rome (Italy) and Dipartimento CGMIA, Universita La Sapienza, Via del Castro Laurenziano 9, 00161 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: francesco.botre@uniroma1.it

    2006-02-10

    This paper presents a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) study carried out on human urine to verify whether the administration of glucocorticoids can affect the urinary steroid profile, and especially the levels of endogenous glucocorticoids, androgens and their main metabolites. Betamethasone and beclomethasone, administered either systemically (per os or i.m.) or locally (by inhalation) have been studied. The determination of the urinary levels of endogenous glucocorticoids and androgens was carried out by GC-MS in electron impact ionization mode. Data were evaluated taking into account the baseline individual variability, and compared with values obtained on a control group. Detectable differences were recorded in the steroids metabolites excretion profiles between men and women. The circadian variability of the steroid profile was the same for both sexes, showing a maximum during the morning hours. After systemic treatment with synthetic glucocorticoids, the relative urinary concentrations of corticosteroids, androgens and of their metabolites were significantly altered, recording a transient decrease of the concentration of cortisol and tetrahydrocortisol and a parallel, although less pronounced, increase of the concentration of testosterone, epitestosterone and related androgenic steroids; while no effects were recorded if the administration was by inhalation.

  11. Fetal rat metabonome alteration by prenatal caffeine ingestion probably due to the increased circulatory glucocorticoid level and altered peripheral glucose and lipid metabolic pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yansong [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Xu, Dan [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Feng, Jianghua, E-mail: jianghua.feng@xmu.edu.cn [Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Department of Electronic Science, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China); Kou, Hao; Liang, Gai [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang; Chen, Liaobin [Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Magdalou, Jacques [UMR 7561 CNRS-Nancy Université, Faculté de Médicine, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China)

    2012-07-15

    The aims of this study were to clarify the metabonome alteration in fetal rats after prenatal caffeine ingestion and to explore the underlying mechanism pertaining to the increased fetal circulatory glucocorticoid (GC). Pregnant Wistar rats were daily intragastrically administered with different doses of caffeine (0, 20, 60 and 180 mg/kg) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20. Metabonome of fetal plasma and amniotic fluid on GD20 were analyzed by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics. Gene and protein expressions involved in the GC metabolism, glucose and lipid metabolic pathways in fetal liver and gastrocnemius were measured by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Fetal plasma metabonome were significantly altered by caffeine, which presents as the elevated α- and β‐glucose, reduced multiple lipid contents, varied apolipoprotein contents and increased levels of a number of amino acids. The metabonome of amniotic fluids showed a similar change as that in fetal plasma. Furthermore, the expressions of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11β-HSD-2) were decreased, while the level of blood GC and the expressions of 11β-HSD-1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) were increased in fetal liver and gastrocnemius. Meanwhile, the expressions of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor were decreased, while the expressions of adiponectin receptor 2, leptin receptors and AMP-activated protein kinase α2 were increased after caffeine treatment. Prenatal caffeine ingestion characteristically change the fetal metabonome, which is probably attributed to the alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic pathways induced by increased circulatory GC, activated GC metabolism and enhanced GR expression in peripheral metabolic tissues. -- Highlights: ► Prenatal caffeine ingestion altered the metabonome of IUGR fetal rats. ► Caffeine altered the glucose and lipid metabolic pathways of IUGR fetal rats. ► Prenatal caffeine

  12. Fetal rat metabonome alteration by prenatal caffeine ingestion probably due to the increased circulatory glucocorticoid level and altered peripheral glucose and lipid metabolic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yansong; Xu, Dan; Feng, Jianghua; Kou, Hao; Liang, Gai; Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang; Chen, Liaobin; Magdalou, Jacques; Wang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to clarify the metabonome alteration in fetal rats after prenatal caffeine ingestion and to explore the underlying mechanism pertaining to the increased fetal circulatory glucocorticoid (GC). Pregnant Wistar rats were daily intragastrically administered with different doses of caffeine (0, 20, 60 and 180 mg/kg) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20. Metabonome of fetal plasma and amniotic fluid on GD20 were analyzed by 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics. Gene and protein expressions involved in the GC metabolism, glucose and lipid metabolic pathways in fetal liver and gastrocnemius were measured by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Fetal plasma metabonome were significantly altered by caffeine, which presents as the elevated α- and β‐glucose, reduced multiple lipid contents, varied apolipoprotein contents and increased levels of a number of amino acids. The metabonome of amniotic fluids showed a similar change as that in fetal plasma. Furthermore, the expressions of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11β-HSD-2) were decreased, while the level of blood GC and the expressions of 11β-HSD-1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) were increased in fetal liver and gastrocnemius. Meanwhile, the expressions of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor were decreased, while the expressions of adiponectin receptor 2, leptin receptors and AMP-activated protein kinase α2 were increased after caffeine treatment. Prenatal caffeine ingestion characteristically change the fetal metabonome, which is probably attributed to the alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic pathways induced by increased circulatory GC, activated GC metabolism and enhanced GR expression in peripheral metabolic tissues. -- Highlights: ► Prenatal caffeine ingestion altered the metabonome of IUGR fetal rats. ► Caffeine altered the glucose and lipid metabolic pathways of IUGR fetal rats. ► Prenatal caffeine ingestion

  13. Developmental social isolation affects adult behavior, social interaction, and dopamine metabolite levels in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Soaleha; Amlani, Shahid; Buske, Christine; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2018-01-01

    The zebrafish is a social vertebrate and an excellent translational model for a variety of human disorders. Abnormal social behavior is a hallmark of several human brain disorders. Social behavioral problems can arise as a result of adverse early social environment. Little is known about the effects of early social isolation in adult zebrafish. We compared zebrafish that were isolated for either short (7 days) or long duration (180 days) to socially housed zebrafish, testing their behavior across ontogenesis (ages 10, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 days), and shoal cohesion and whole-brain monoamines and their metabolites in adulthood. Long social isolation increased locomotion and decreased shoal cohesion and anxiety in the open-field in adult. Additionally, both short and long social isolation reduced dopamine metabolite levels in response to social stimuli. Thus, early social isolation has lasting effects in zebrafish, and may be employed to generate zebrafish models of human neuropsychiatric conditions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. [Glucocorticoid induced osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anić, Branimir; Mayer, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Secondary osteoporosis most often develops due to glucocorticoid therapy. Glucocorticoids affect all stages of the bone remodeling cycle, its formation and resorption. Osteoblasts are primarily affected, decreasing their activity and enhancing apoptosis. Patients treated with glucocorticoids have lower bone mineral density and increased fracture risk. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis can be prevented by administering the minimal effective dose of glucocorticoids, calcium and vitamin D supplementation or, if possible, by hormone replace- ment therapy. Moreover, appropriate physical activity should be encouraged. Patients who are at higher risk for low-energy fractures (for example post-menopausal women) have to be actively treated, usually with antiresorptive drugs among which bisphosphonates are currently the first line therapy.

  15. Glucocorticoid receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Onno C; Koorneef, Lisa L; Kroon, Jan

    2018-06-01

    The glucocorticoid hormone cortisol acts throughout the body to support circadian processes and adaptation to stress. The glucocorticoid receptor is the target of cortisol and of synthetic glucocorticoids, which are used widely in the clinic. Both agonism and antagonism of the glucocorticoid receptor may be beneficial in disease, but given the wide expression of the receptor and involvement in various processes, beneficial effects are often accompanied by unwanted side effects. Selective glucocorticoid receptor modulators are ligands that induce a receptor conformation that allows activation of only a subset of downstream signaling pathways. Such molecules thereby combine agonistic and antagonistic properties. Here we discuss the mechanisms underlying selective receptor modulation and their promise in treating diseases in several organ systems where cortisol signaling plays a role. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Metabolites Identified during Varied Doses of Aspergillus Species in Zea mays Grains, and Their Correlation with Aflatoxin Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titilayo D. O. Falade

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin contamination is associated with the development of aflatoxigenic fungi such as Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus on food grains. This study was aimed at investigating metabolites produced during fungal development on maize and their correlation with aflatoxin levels. Maize cobs were harvested at R3 (milk, R4 (dough, and R5 (dent stages of maturity. Individual kernels were inoculated in petri dishes with four doses of fungal spores. Fungal colonisation, metabolite profile, and aflatoxin levels were examined. Grain colonisation decreased with kernel maturity: milk-, dough-, and dent-stage kernels by approximately 100%, 60%, and 30% respectively. Aflatoxin levels increased with dose at dough and dent stages. Polar metabolites including alanine, proline, serine, valine, inositol, iso-leucine, sucrose, fructose, trehalose, turanose, mannitol, glycerol, arabitol, inositol, myo-inositol, and some intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA—also known as citric acid or Krebs cycle were important for dose classification. Important non-polar metabolites included arachidic, palmitic, stearic, 3,4-xylylic, and margaric acids. Aflatoxin levels correlated with levels of several polar metabolites. The strongest positive and negative correlations were with arabitol (R = 0.48 and turanose and (R = −0.53, respectively. Several metabolites were interconnected with the TCA; interconnections of the metabolites with the TCA cycle varied depending upon the grain maturity.

  17. [Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons monohydroxy metabolites level in urine of general population in eight provinces of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chuanfeng; Zhang, Jing; Ding, Chunguang; Liu, Cuilan; Wang, Gang; Song, Xinkui; Huang, Hanlin; Zhu, Baoli; Shao, Hua; Zhao, Chunxiang; Han, Changcheng; Peng, Shanzhuo; Jiang, Xianlong; Yu, Shanfa; Ji, Hongrong; Zhang, Xiaoxi; Sun, Ran; Zheng, Yuxin; Yan, Huifang

    2014-02-01

    To assess the levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons monohydroxy metabolites in urine of general population in China among 8 provinces, provide the baseline of the metabolites in the general population. From 2009 to 2010, 18 120 subjects of general population aged 6-60 years old were recruited from 24 areas among 8 provinces in east, west and central areas of China mainland by cluster random sampling. The information of the living environment and health condition were collected by questionnaire and spot urine samples were collected, 4 680 urine samples were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and monohydroxy metabolites distribution in urine among groups of gender and ages were analysed. Geometric means (GM) of 2-naphthol, 1-naphthol, 3-phenanthrol and 1-hydroxypyrene concentration in urine (95%CI) were 1.85 (1.75-1.95), 1.55 (1.50-1.61), 0.57 (0.54-0.59) and 0.82 (0.78-0.85) µg/L, respectively;and median are 2.44, population were significantly different (P population aged 6-12, 13-16, 17-20, 21-30, 31-45 and 46-60 years old were 1.60, 1.56, 1.69, 2.23, 1.91 and 1.86 µg/L (χ(2) = 17.90, P population were different, it provided a basic data for the further study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons biomonitoring in the population.

  18. Glucocorticoids and fetal programming part 2: Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisiadis, Vasilis G; Matthews, Stephen G

    2014-07-01

    The lifelong health of an individual is shaped during critical periods of development. The fetus is particularly susceptible to internal and external stimuli, many of which can alter developmental trajectories and subsequent susceptibility to disease. Glucocorticoids are critical in normal development of the fetus, as they are involved in the growth and maturation of many organ systems. The surge in fetal glucocorticoid levels that occurs in most mammalian species over the last few days of pregnancy is an important developmental switch leading to fundamental changes in gene regulation in many organs, including the brain. These changes are important for the transition to postnatal life. Exposure of the fetus to increased levels of glucocorticoids, resulting from maternal stress or treatment with synthetic glucocorticoids, can lead to long-term 'programming' of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function and behaviours. Glucocorticoids act at multiple levels within the fetal brain. Growing evidence indicates that they can exert powerful effects on the epigenome, including on DNA methylation, histone acetylation and microRNA, to influence gene expression. Such influences probably represent a critical component of the 'programming' process, and might be partly responsible for the transgenerational effects of antenatal glucocorticoid exposure on neurologic, cardiovascular and metabolic function.

  19. Metabolite profiling during cold acclimation of Lolium perenne genotypes distinct in the level of frost tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocian, Aleksandra; Zwierzykowski, Zbigniew; Rapacz, Marcin; Koczyk, Grzegorz; Ciesiołka, Danuta; Kosmala, Arkadiusz

    2015-11-01

    Abiotic stresses, including low temperature, can significantly reduce plant yielding. The knowledge on the molecular basis of stress tolerance could help to improve its level in species of relatively high importance to agriculture. Unfortunately, the complex research performed so far mainly on model species and also, to some extent, on cereals does not fully cover the demands of other agricultural plants of temperate climate, including forage grasses. Two Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass) genotypes with contrasting levels of frost tolerance, the high frost tolerant (HFT) and the low frost tolerant (LFT) genotypes, were selected for comparative metabolomic research. The work focused on the analysis of leaf metabolite accumulation before and after seven separate time points of cold acclimation. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to identify amino acids (alanine, proline, glycine, glutamic and aspartic acid, serine, lysine and asparagine), carbohydrates (fructose, glucose, sucrose, raffinose and trehalose) and their derivatives (mannitol, sorbitol and inositol) accumulated in leaves in low temperature. The observed differences in the level of frost tolerance between the analysed genotypes could be partially due to the time point of cold acclimation at which the accumulation level of crucial metabolite started to increase. In the HFT genotype, earlier accumulation was observed for proline and asparagine. The increased amounts of alanine, glutamic and aspartic acids, and asparagine during cold acclimation could be involved in the regulation of photosynthesis intensity in L. perenne. Among the analysed carbohydrates, only raffinose revealed a significant association with the acclimation process in this species.

  20. Fecal glucocorticoid response to environmental stressors in green iguanas (Iguana iguana)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Timm, Jeanette; Ibsen, Ida

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of glucocorticoid metabolites in feces has been shown to be a powerful tool in evaluating well-being in vertebrates. Little is known however about the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis response to stressors, and consequent glucocorticoid excretion, in reptiles. In a longitudinal...

  1. Defining conditions where long-term glucocorticoid treatment has an acceptably low level of harm to facilitate implementation of existing recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strehl, Cindy; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; de Wit, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    literature search, breakout groups critically reviewed the evidence on the four most worrisome adverse effects of glucocorticoid therapy (osteoporosis, hyperglycaemia/diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases and infections) and presented their results to the other group members following a structured...

  2. Reduced expression of glucocorticoid-inducible genes GILZ and SGK-1: high IL-6 levels are associated with reduced hippocampal volumes in major depressive disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Frodl, T

    2012-01-01

    Neuroplasticity may have a core role in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD), a concept supported by experimental studies that found that excessive cortisol secretion and\\/or excessive production of inflammatory cytokines impairs neuronal plasticity and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The objective of this study was to examine how changes in the glucocorticoid and inflammatory systems may affect hippocampal volumes in MDD. A multimodal approach with structural neuroimaging of hippocampus and amygdala, measurement of peripheral inflammatory proteins interleukin (IL)-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP), glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA expression, and expression of glucocorticoid-inducible genes (glucocorticoid-inducible genes Leucin Zipper (GILZ) and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase-1 (SGK-1)) was used in 40 patients with MDD and 43 healthy controls (HC). Patients with MDD showed smaller hippocampal volumes and increased inflammatory proteins IL-6 and CRP compared with HC. Childhood maltreatment was associated with increased CRP. Patients with MDD, who had less expression of the glucocorticoid-inducible genes GILZ or SGK-1 had smaller hippocampal volumes. Regression analysis showed a strong positive effect of GILZ and SGK-1 mRNA expression, and further inverse effects of IL-6 concentration, on hippocampal volumes. These findings suggest that childhood maltreatment, peripheral inflammatory and glucocorticoid markers and hippocampal volume are interrelated factors in the pathophysiology of MDD. Glucocorticoid-inducible genes GILZ and SGK-1 might be promising candidate markers for hippocampal volume changes relevant for diseases like MDD. Further studies need to explore the possible clinical usefulness of such a blood biomarker, for example, for diagnosis or prediction of therapy response.

  3. DOSAGEM DE METABÓLITOS DE GLUCOCORTICOIDES E PROGESTERONA EM FEZES DE PAPAGAIO-VERDADEIRO (AMAZONA AESTIVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Junko Fujihara

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were to evaluate fecal concentrations of metabolites of glucocorticoids, measured by enzyme immunoassay with a cortisol antibody and by radioimmunoassay with a corticosterone antibody, and progesterone by radioimmunoassay with a progesterone antibody in blue-fronted parrot (Amazona aestiva after ACTH challenge. The adrenal stimulation with ACTH (25 UI/animal resulted in an increase of fecal glucocorticoids metabolites concentration, but it did not affect the concentrations of fecal progesterone metabolites. Although there were no synchronized peaks of glucocorticoid metabolites excretion measured by enzyme immunoassay and radioimmunoassay, there were two peaks of excretion, one at 2-4 hours and other at 8-10 hours. Despite the occurrence of peaks, the analysis of fecal glucocorticoids metabolites and progesterone metabolites showed no effect of group (control and treatment, moment (hours of sampling and sex.

  4. Glucocorticoids and hemopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romashko, O.O.; Berin, G.I.

    1978-01-01

    Analyzing the data of home and foreign investigators the problems of the glucocorticoid effect on blood and bone marrow of experimental (including irradiated ones) animals are discussed. Considered are a character and mechanism of the adrenal cortex hormones effect on blood formation, as well as the effect of pharmacological doses of corticosteroids on CFU, their erythropoietic effect in physiological doses on a morphological picture of bone marrow after irradiation and subsequent introduction of hormones and the hormone effect on intensity of erythropoiesis recovery in irradiated mice. Presented are the experimental data on studying the effect of endogenic hypercorticoidism and a reduced level of endogenic corticosteroids on blood-forming stem cells in the irradiated mice and the data on the ACTH injection effect on CFU migration after irradiation. Evaluated are already available data and further investigations to ground advisability and conditions of using corticosteroids as well as determining rational therapeutic effects on secretion of endogenic glucocorticoids when treating blood system diseases

  5. Inhibiting mitochondrial β-oxidation selectively reduces levels of nonenzymatic oxidative polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolites in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuck T; Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Hopperton, Kathryn E; Domenichiello, Anthony F; Masoodi, Mojgan; Bazinet, Richard P

    2014-03-01

    Schönfeld and Reiser recently hypothesized that fatty acid β-oxidation is a source of oxidative stress in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we inhibited brain mitochondrial β-oxidation with methyl palmoxirate (MEP) and measured oxidative polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) metabolites in the rat brain. Upon MEP treatment, levels of several nonenzymatic auto-oxidative PUFA metabolites were reduced with few effects on enzymatically derived metabolites. Our finding confirms the hypothesis that reduced fatty acid β-oxidation decreases oxidative stress in the brain and β-oxidation inhibitors may be a novel therapeutic approach for brain disorders associated with oxidative stress.

  6. Reference range levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the US population by measurement of urinary monohydroxy metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grainger, James; Huang, Wenlin; Patterson, Donald G.; Turner, Wayman E.; Pirkle, James; Caudill, Samuel P.; Wang, Richard Y.; Needham, Larry L.; Sampson, Eric J.

    2006-01-01

    We developed a gas chromatography isotope-dilution high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC/Id-HRMS) method for measuring 14 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolites representing seven parent PAHs in 3 mL of urine at low parts-per-trillion levels. PAH levels were determined in urine samples collected in 1999 and 2000 from approximately 2400 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and, for the first time, reference range values were calculated for these metabolites in the US population. Using this GC/ID-HRMS method, we found detectable concentrations for monohydroxy metabolite isomers of fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and chrysene, benzo[c]phenanthrene, and benz[a]anthracene. Some monohydroxy metabolite isomers of benzo[c]phenanthrene, chrysene, and benz[a]anthracene exhibited low detection frequencies that did not allow for geometric mean calculations. Our study results enabled us to establish a reference range for the targeted PAHs in the general US population

  7. Optimal glucocorticoid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debono, Miguel; Ross, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    The rhythmic regulation of human physiology and behaviour is controlled by a central endogenous clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Most tissues have peripheral clocks that oscillate in time with this central clock. How the central time keeper controls peripheral clocks is not established, however there is evidence to suggest that the cortisol rhythm is one important secondary messenger. Loss of the endogenous cortisol rhythm is associated with sleep disturbance, depression, and metabolic abnormalities. In adrenal insufficiency, current glucocorticoid replacement regimens cannot replace the normal circadian rhythm of cortisol, and patients have an increased mortality and impaired quality of life. We propose that reproducing circadian cortisol levels may improve quality of life in patients with adrenal insufficiency and we have been investigating the impact of circadian hydrocortisone replacement. Using Chronocort, a modified release preparation of hydrocortisone, we have demonstrated that it is possible to simulate the overnight rise in cortisol release and, in preliminary studies in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, control morning androgen levels. Future studies are now required to determine whether Chronocort can improve quality of life in patients with adrenal insufficiency. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Maternal glucocorticoid elevation and associated blood metabonome changes might be involved in metabolic programming of intrauterine growth retardation in rats exposed to caffeine prenatally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kou, Hao; Liu, Yansong; Liang, Gai; Huang, Jing; Hu, Jieqiong; Yan, You-e; Li, Xiaojun; Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang; Zhang, Yuanzhen; Feng, Jianghua; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that prenatal caffeine exposure causes intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), fetuses are over-exposed to high levels of maternal glucocorticoids (GC), and intrauterine metabolic programming and associated metabonome alteration that may be GC-mediated. However, whether maternal metabonomes would be altered and relevant metabolite variations might mediate the development of IUGR remained unknown. In the present studies, we examined the dose- and time-effects of caffeine on maternal metabonome, and tried to clarify the potential roles of maternal GCs and metabonome changes in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. Pregnant rats were treated with caffeine (0, 20, 60 or 180 mg/kg · d) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20, or 180 mg/kg · d caffeine from GD9. Metabonomes of maternal plasma on GD20 in the dose–effect study and on GD11, 14 and 17 in the time–course study were analyzed by 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Caffeine administration reduced maternal weight gains and elevated both maternal and fetal corticosterone (CORT) levels. A negative correlation between maternal/fetal CORT levels and fetal bodyweight was observed. The maternal metabonome alterations included attenuated metabolism of carbohydrates, enhanced lipolysis and protein breakdown, and amino acid accumulation, suggesting GC-associated metabolic effects. GC-associated metabolite variations (α/β-glucoses, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, β-hydroxybutyrate) were observed early following caffeine administration. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine exposure induced maternal GC elevation and metabonome alteration, and maternal GC and relevant discriminatory metabolites might be involved in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. - Highlights: • Prenatal caffeine exposure elevated maternal blood glucocorticoid levels. • Prenatal caffeine exposure altered maternal blood metabonomes. • Maternal metabonome

  9. Maternal glucocorticoid elevation and associated blood metabonome changes might be involved in metabolic programming of intrauterine growth retardation in rats exposed to caffeine prenatally

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kou, Hao; Liu, Yansong; Liang, Gai; Huang, Jing; Hu, Jieqiong; Yan, You-e; Li, Xiaojun [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang [Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhang, Yuanzhen [Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China); Center for Reproductive Medicine, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Feng, Jianghua, E-mail: jianghua.feng@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Electronic Science, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that prenatal caffeine exposure causes intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), fetuses are over-exposed to high levels of maternal glucocorticoids (GC), and intrauterine metabolic programming and associated metabonome alteration that may be GC-mediated. However, whether maternal metabonomes would be altered and relevant metabolite variations might mediate the development of IUGR remained unknown. In the present studies, we examined the dose- and time-effects of caffeine on maternal metabonome, and tried to clarify the potential roles of maternal GCs and metabonome changes in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. Pregnant rats were treated with caffeine (0, 20, 60 or 180 mg/kg · d) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20, or 180 mg/kg · d caffeine from GD9. Metabonomes of maternal plasma on GD20 in the dose–effect study and on GD11, 14 and 17 in the time–course study were analyzed by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Caffeine administration reduced maternal weight gains and elevated both maternal and fetal corticosterone (CORT) levels. A negative correlation between maternal/fetal CORT levels and fetal bodyweight was observed. The maternal metabonome alterations included attenuated metabolism of carbohydrates, enhanced lipolysis and protein breakdown, and amino acid accumulation, suggesting GC-associated metabolic effects. GC-associated metabolite variations (α/β-glucoses, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, β-hydroxybutyrate) were observed early following caffeine administration. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine exposure induced maternal GC elevation and metabonome alteration, and maternal GC and relevant discriminatory metabolites might be involved in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. - Highlights: • Prenatal caffeine exposure elevated maternal blood glucocorticoid levels. • Prenatal caffeine exposure altered maternal blood metabonomes. • Maternal

  10. Emodin opposes chronic unpredictable mild stress induced depressive-like behavior in mice by upregulating the levels of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Fu, Qiang; Li, Ying; Li, Shanshan; Xue, Jinsong; Ma, Shiping

    2014-10-01

    Emodin, the major active component of Rhubarb, has shown neuroprotective activity. This study is attempted to investigate whether emodin possesses beneficial effects on chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS)-induced behavioral deficits (depression-like behaviors) and explore the possible mechanisms. ICR mice were subjected to chronic unpredictable mild stress for 42 consecutive days. Then, emodin and fluoxetine (positive control drug) were administered for 21 consecutive days at the last three weeks of CUMS procedure. The classical behavioral tests: open field test (OFT), sucrose preference test (SPT), tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST) were applied to evaluate the antidepressant effects of emodin. Then plasma corticosterone concentration, hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were tested to probe the mechanisms. Our results indicated that 6 weeks of CUMS exposure induced significant depression-like behavior, with high, plasma corticosterone concentration and low hippocampal GR and BDNF expression levels. Whereas, chronic emodin (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) treatments reversed the behavioral deficiency induced by CUMS exposure. Treatment with emodin normalized the change of plasma corticosterone level, which demonstrated that emodin could partially restore CUMS-induced HPA axis impairments. Besides, hippocampal GR (mRNA and protein) and BDNF (mRNA) expressions were also up-regulated after emodin treatments. In conclusion, emodin remarkably improved depression-like behavior in CUMS mice and its antidepressant activity is mediated, at least in part, by the up-regulating GR and BDNF levels in hippocampus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabolites in vertebrate Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberg-Larsen, Hanne; Strand, Martin Frank; Krauss, Stefan; Wilson, Steven Ray

    2014-04-11

    The Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is critical in embryonic development, stem cell biology, tissue homeostasis, chemoattraction and synapse formation. Irregular HH signaling is associated with a number of disease conditions including congenital disorders and cancer. In particular, deregulation of HH signaling has been linked to skin, brain, lung, colon and pancreatic cancers. Key mediators of the HH signaling pathway are the 12-pass membrane protein Patched (PTC), the 7-pass membrane protein Smoothened (SMO) and the GLI transcription factors. PTC shares homology with the RND family of small-molecule transporters and it has been proposed that it interferes with SMO through metabolites. Although a conclusive picture is lacking, substantial efforts are made to identify and understand natural metabolites/sterols, including cholesterol, vitamin D3, oxysterols and glucocorticoides, that may be affected by, or influence the HH signaling cascade at the level of PTC and SMO. In this review we will elaborate the role of metabolites in HH signaling with a focus on oxysterols, and discuss advancements in modern analytical approaches in the field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Glucocorticoids facilitate the retention of acquired immobility during forced swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, H D; De Korte, C C; De Kloet, E R

    1985-01-01

    The adrenalectomy-induced decrease in the level of immobility during a 5 min retest period in the Porsolt swimming test could be reversed by glucocorticoids administered s.c. 15 min after the initial forced swimming exposure. The synthetic glucocorticoids dexamethasone and RU 28362 were active in

  13. Dibutyltin disrupts glucocorticoid receptor function and impairs glucocorticoid-induced suppression of cytokine production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Gumy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Organotins are highly toxic and widely distributed environmental chemicals. Dibutyltin (DBT is used as stabilizer in the production of polyvinyl chloride plastics, and it is also the major metabolite formed from tributyltin (TBT in vivo. DBT is immunotoxic, however, the responsible targets remain to be defined. Due to the importance of glucocorticoids in immune-modulation, we investigated whether DBT could interfere with glucocorticoid receptor (GR function. METHODOLOGY: We used HEK-293 cells transiently transfected with human GR as well as rat H4IIE hepatoma cells and native human macrophages and human THP-1 macrophages expressing endogenous receptor to study organotin effects on GR function. Docking of organotins was used to investigate the binding mechanism. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that nanomolar concentrations of DBT, but not other organotins tested, inhibit ligand binding to GR and its transcriptional activity. Docking analysis indicated that DBT inhibits GR activation allosterically by inserting into a site close to the steroid-binding pocket, which disrupts a key interaction between the A-ring of the glucocorticoid and the GR. DBT inhibited glucocorticoid-induced expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK and tyrosine-aminotransferase (TAT and abolished the glucocorticoid-mediated transrepression of TNF-alpha-induced NF-kappaB activity. Moreover, DBT abrogated the glucocorticoid-mediated suppression of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and TNF-alpha production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated native human macrophages and human THP-1 macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: DBT inhibits ligand binding to GR and subsequent activation of the receptor. By blocking GR activation, DBT may disturb metabolic functions and modulation of the immune system, providing an explanation for some of the toxic effects of this organotin.

  14. Are serotonin metabolite levels related to bone mineral density in patients with neuroendocrine tumours?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen Gupta, Piya; Grozinsky-Glasberg, Simona; Drake, William M; Akker, Scott A; Perry, Les; Grossman, Ashley B; Druce, Maralyn R

    2014-02-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is influenced by multiple factors. Recent studies have highlighted a possible relationship between serotonin and BMD. Patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) frequently have elevated urinary 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels, a serotonin metabolite. Evaluation of the relationship between 5-HIAA and BMD in patients with NETs may provide insights into the relationship between serotonin and BMD. One-year audit of consecutive patients with NETs within two institutions. Relationships between urinary 5-HIAA and dual X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA)-scan-measured BMD were investigated by group comparisons, correlation and regression. Of 65 patients with NETs, 19 did not participate or were excluded. Of 46 subjects evaluated (48·9% males, 63·8 ± 10·5 years, BMI 26·6 ± 4·4 kg/m(2) ) with 32 gastrointestinal, 9 pancreatic, 3 pulmonary and 2 ovarian NETs, 72·3% had the carcinoid syndrome. Median interval from diagnosis was 4·0 years (IQR 2·0-6·0); 41·3% had osteoporosis and 32·6% osteopaenia (WHO definition). The group with a higher urinary 5-HIAA had a lower hip BMD (total T-score and Z-score), confirmed on individual analysis (Spearman's rank correlation -0·41, P = 0·004; -0·44, P = 0·002, respectively); urinary 5-HIAA was not found to be an independent predictor for BMD on multiple linear regression analysis. These data of patients with NETs with higher serotonin metabolites having a lower BMD at the hip in group and individual comparisons, warrants further evaluation. Urinary 5-HIAA measurement alone cannot be used to predict future BMD. A larger cohort with prospective design including fractures as a clinical outcome will aid these data in determining whether patients with NETs should be subject to targeted osteoporosis prevention. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Brain Levels of the Neurotoxic Pyridinium Metabolite HPP+ and Extrapyramidal Symptoms in Haloperidol-Treated Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, James J.; Ashraf-Khorassani, Mehdi; Castagnoli, Neal; Sullivan, Patrick F.

    2013-01-01

    The typical antipsychotic haloperidol is a highly effective treatment for schizophrenia but its use is limited by a number of serious, and often irreversible, motor side effects. These adverse drug reactions, termed extrapyramidal syndromes (EPS), result from an unknown pathophysiological mechanism. One theory relates to the observation that the haloperidol metabolite HPP+ (4-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-[4-(4-fluorophenyl)-4-oxobutyl]-pyridinium) is structurally similar to MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium), a neurotoxin responsible for an irreversible neurodegenerative condition similar to Parkinson's disease. To determine whether HPP+ contributes to haloperidol-induced EPS, we measured brain HPP+ and haloperidol levels in strains of mice at high (C57BL/6J and NZO/HILtJ) and low (BALB/cByJ and PWK/PhJ) liability to haloperidol-induced EPS following chronic treatment (7–10 adult male mice per strain). Brain levels of HPP+ and the ratio of HPP+ to haloperidol were not significantly different between the haloperidol-sensitive and haloperidol-resistant strain groups (P = 0.50). Within each group, however, strain differences were seen (P haloperidol treatment, the findings from this study are physiologically relevant to humans. The results suggest that strain differences in steady-state HPP+ levels do not explain sensitivity to haloperidol-induced EPS in the mice we studied. PMID:24107597

  16. Reduced Levels of Nitric Oxide Metabolites in Cerebrospinal Fluid Are Associated with Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoku, Chinedu J.; Saville, William J. A.; Reed, Stephen M.; Oglesbee, Michael J.; Rajala-Schultz, Päivi J.; Stich, Roger W.

    2002-01-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a disease of horses that is primarily associated with infection with the apicomplexan Sarcocystis neurona. Infection with this parasite alone is not sufficient to induce the disease, and the mechanism of neuropathogenesis associated with EPM has not been reported. Nitric oxide (NO) functions as a neurotransmitter, a vasodilator, and an immune effector and is produced in response to several parasitic protozoa. The purpose of this work was to determine if the concentration of NO metabolites (NOx−) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is correlated with the development of EPM. CSF NOx− levels were measured before and after transport-stressed, acclimated, or dexamethasone-treated horses (n = 3 per group) were experimentally infected with S. neurona sporocysts. CSF NOx− levels were also compared between horses that were diagnosed with EPM after natural infection with S. neurona and horses that did not have clinical signs of disease or that showed no evidence of infection with the parasite (n = 105). Among the experimentally infected animals, the mean CSF NOx− levels of the transport-stressed group, which had the most severe clinical signs, was reduced after infection, while these values were found to increase after infection in the remaining groups that had less severe signs of EPM. Under natural conditions, horses with EPM (n = 65) had a lower mean CSF NOx− concentration than clinically normal horses with antibodies (Abs) against S. neurona (n = 15) in CSF, and horses that developed ataxia (n = 81) had a significantly lower mean CSF NOx− concentration than horses that did not have neurologic signs (n = 24). In conclusion, lower CSF NOx− levels were associated with clinical EPM, suggesting that measurement of CSF NOx− levels could improve the accuracy of diagnostic tests that are based upon detection of S. neurona-specific Abs in CSF alone and that reduced NO levels could be causatively related to the development

  17. Plasma levels of catecholamine metabolites predict the response to sulpiride or fluvoxamine in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, N; Yoshimura, R; Shinkai, K; Nakamura, J

    2002-09-01

    We investigated the relationships between the changes in plasma catecholamine metabolites obtained from depressed patients before and after administration of sulpiride, a benzamide compound, or fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), and between clinical responses to treatment with each of these drugs. Responders to sulpiride had significantly lower plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) levels before administration of sulpiride than did non-responders or controls (responders: 4.5 +/- 3.1 ng/ml, non-responders: 11.1 +/- 5.9 ng/ml, controls: 10.9 +/- 5.3 ng/ml). Positive relationships were observed between changes in pHVA levels and improvement rates in the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (Ham-D). In contrast, responders to fluvoxamine had significantly higher plasma free 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (pMHPG) levels before administration of fluvoxamine than did non-responders or controls (responders: 8.5 +/- 1.8 ng/ml, non-responders: 5.9 +/- 2.I ng/ml, controls: 5.2 +/- 2.9 ng/ml). Negative relationships were observed between changes in pMHPG levels and improvement rates in Ham-D. These results suggest that lower pretreatment pHVA levels and higher pretreatment levels of pMHPG might be predictors of response to sulpiride and fluvoxamine, respectively, and that sulpiride might produce a functional increase in the dopaminergic system, resulting in improvement in some depressive symptoms; fluvoxamine, on the other hand, might produce a functional decrease in the noradrenergic system via serotonergic neurons, resulting in improvement of those symptoms.

  18. Endocrine correlates of musth in free-ranging Asian elephants (Elephas maximus determined by non-invasive faecal steroid hormone metabolite measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Ghosal

    Full Text Available The occurrence of musth, a period of elevated levels of androgens and heightened sexual activity, has been well documented for the male Asian elephant (Elephas maximus. However, the relationship between androgen-dependent musth and adrenocortical function in this species is unclear. The current study is the first assessment of testicular and adrenocortical function in free-ranging male Asian elephants by measuring levels of testosterone (androgen and cortisol (glucocorticoid--a physiological indicator of stress metabolites in faeces. During musth, males expectedly showed significant elevation in faecal testosterone metabolite levels. Interestingly, glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations remained unchanged between musth and non-musth periods. This observation is contrary to that observed with wild and captive African elephant bulls and captive Asian bull elephants. Our results show that musth may not necessarily represent a stressful condition in free-ranging male Asian elephants.

  19. Increased metabolite levels of glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway in rabbit atherosclerotic arteries and hypoxic macrophage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Yamashita

    Full Text Available AIMS: Inflammation and possibly hypoxia largely affect glucose utilization in atherosclerotic arteries, which could alter many metabolic systems. However, metabolic changes in atherosclerotic plaques remain unknown. The present study aims to identify changes in metabolic systems relative to glucose uptake and hypoxia in rabbit atherosclerotic arteries and cultured macrophages. METHODS: Macrophage-rich or smooth muscle cell (SMC-rich neointima was created by balloon injury in the iliac-femoral arteries of rabbits fed with a 0.5% cholesterol diet or a conventional diet. THP-1 macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS and interferon-γ (INFγ were cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. We evaluated comprehensive arterial and macrophage metabolism by performing metabolomic analyses using capillary electrophoresis-time of flight mass spectrometry. We evaluated glucose uptake and its relationship to vascular hypoxia using (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18F-FDG and pimonidazole, a marker of hypoxia. RESULTS: The levels of many metabolites increased in the iliac-femoral arteries with macrophage-rich neointima, compared with those that were not injured and those with SMC-rich neointima (glycolysis, 4 of 9; pentose phosphate pathway, 4 of 6; tricarboxylic acid cycle, 4 of 6; nucleotides, 10 of 20. The uptake of (18F-FDG in arterial walls measured by autoradiography positively correlated with macrophage- and pimonidazole-immunopositive areas (r = 0.76, and r = 0.59 respectively; n = 69 for both; p<0.0001. Pimonidazole immunoreactivity was closely localized with the nuclear translocation of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and hexokinase II expression in macrophage-rich neointima. The levels of glycolytic (8 of 8 and pentose phosphate pathway (4 of 6 metabolites increased in LPS and INFγ stimulated macrophages under hypoxic but not normoxic condition. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 protein levels in the supernatant were closely

  20. Benzene metabolite levels in blood and bone marrow of B6C3F{sub 1} mice after low-level exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtold, W.E.; Strunk, M.R.; Thornton-Manning, J.R. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Studies at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) have explored the species-specific uptake and metabolism of benzene. Results have shown that metabolism is dependent on both dose and route of administration. Of particular interest were shifts in the major metabolic pathways as a function of exposure concentration. In these studies, B6C3F{sub 1} mice were exposed to increasing levels of benzene by either gavage or inhalation. As benzene internal dose increased, the relative amounts of muconic acid and hydroquinone decreased. In contrast, the relative amount of catechol increased with increasing exposure. These results show that the relative levels of toxic metabolites are a function of exposure level. Based on these results and assuming a linear relationship between exposure concentration and levels of bone marrow metabolites, it would be difficult to detect an elevation of any phenolic metabolites above background after occupational exposures to the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit of 1 ppm benzene.

  1. Neurochemical metabolites in prefrontal cortex in patients with mild/moderate levels in first-episode depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sozeri-Varma G

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Gülfizar Sözeri-Varma,1 Nalan Kalkan-Oğuzhanoglu,1 Muharrem Efe,1 Yilmaz Kiroglu,2 Taçlan Duman11Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Pamukkale University, Denizli, TurkeyBackground: Previous studies have determined the neurochemical metabolite abnormalities in major depressive disorder (MDD. The results of studies are inconsistent. Severity of depression may relate to neurochemical metabolic changes. The aim of this study is to investigate neurochemical metabolite levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC of patients with mild/moderate MDD.Methods: Twenty-one patients with mild MDD, 18 patients with moderate MDD, and 16 matched control subjects participated in the study. Patients had had their first episode. They had not taken treatment. The severity of depression was assessed by the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D. Levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA, choline-containing compounds (Cho, and creatine-containing compounds (Cr were measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS at 1.5 T, with an 8-cm3 single voxel placed in the right PFC.Results: The moderate MDD patients had lower NAA/Cr levels than the control group. No differences were found in neurochemical metabolite levels between the mild MDD and control groups. No correlation was found between the patients’ neurochemical metabolite levels and HAM-D scores.Conclusion: Our findings suggest that NAA/Cr levels are low in moderate-level MDD in the PFC. Neurochemical metabolite levels did not change in mild depressive disorder. Our results suggest that the severity of depression may affect neuronal function and viability. Studies are needed to confirm this finding, including studies on severely depressive patients.Keywords: major depressive disorder, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, N-acetyl aspartate, creatine, choline

  2. Switching antipsychotics to aripiprazole or blonanserin and plasma monoamine metabolites levels in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Itaru; Shiga, Tetsuya; Katsumi, Akihiko; Kanno-Nozaki, Keiko; Mashiko, Hirobumi; Niwa, Shin-Ichi; Yabe, Hirooki

    2014-03-01

    Blonanserin is a novel atypical antipsychotic drug that has efficacy equal to risperidone. We investigated the effects of aripiprazole and blonanserin on clinical symptoms and plasma levels of homovanillic acid (pHVA) and 3-methoxy-4hydroxyphenylglycol in the switching strategy of schizophrenia. Twenty two Japanese patients with schizophrenia were enrolled into this open study. The antipsychotics of all patients were switched to aripiprazole or blonanserin for the improvement of clinical symptoms or side effects. Plasma monoamine metabolites levels were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography. There were no significant effects for time (p = 0.346) or time × group interaction (p = 0.27) on the changes of positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) total score, although blonanserin decreased PANSS scores. We observed negative correlation between pHVA at baseline and the change in PANSS total score (rs = -0.450, p = 0.046). We also found positive correlation between the changes in pHVA and the changes in PANSS total (rs = 0.536, p = 0.015) and positive (rs = 0.572, p = 0.008) scores. There were no differences between blonanserin and aripiprazole in the improvement of clinical symptoms. Our results suggest that pHVA may be useful indicator for the switching strategy to aripiprazole or blonanserin in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The Regulation of Muscle Mass by Endogenous Glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Marks

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are highly conserved fundamental regulators of energy homeostasis. In response to stress in the form of perceived danger or acute inflammation, glucocorticoids are released from the adrenal gland, rapidly mobilizing energy from carbohydrate, fat and protein stores. In the case of inflammation, mobilized protein is critical for the rapid synthesis of acute phase reactants and an efficient immune response to infection. While adaptive in response to infection, chronic mobilization can lead to a p rofound depletion of energy stores. Skeletal muscle represents the major body store of protein, and can become substantially atrophied under conditions of chronic inflammation. Glucocorticoids elicit the atrophy of muscle by increasing the rate of protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy lysosome system. Protein synthesis is also suppressed at the level of translational initiation, preventing the production of new myofibrillar protein. Glucocorticoids also antagonize the action of anabolic regulators such as insulin further exacerbating the loss of protein and muscle mass. The loss of muscle mass in the context of chronic disease is a key feature of cachexia and contributes substantially to morbidity and mortality. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that glucocorticoid signaling is a common mediator of wasting, irrespective of the underlying initiator or disease state. This review will highlight fundamental mechanisms of glucocorticoid signaling and detail the mechanisms of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy. Additionally, the evidence for glucocorticoids as a driver of muscle wasting in numerous disease states will be discussed. Given the burden of wasting diseases and the nodal nature of glucocorticoid signaling, effective anti-glucocorticoid therapy would be a valuable clinical tool. Therefore, the progress and potential pitfalls in the development of glucocorticoid antagonists for muscle wasting will

  4. Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nervosa Cigarette smoking Alcohol abuse Low calcium and vitamin D, by low dietary intake or poor absorption in your gut Sedentary (inactive) lifestyle or immobility Certain medications besides glucocorticoids, including the following: excess thyroid hormone replacement the blood thinner heparin some ...

  5. Ozone effects on radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherry Belle): foliar sensitivity as related to metabolite levels and cell architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athanassious, R.

    1980-01-01

    The development of the first four leaves of radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherry Belle) was followed to determine the relationship between foliar sensitivity to ozone as related to selected soluble metabolites and leaf-cell arrangement. Although relatively high metabolite (protein, sugars, phenols) levels and compact cell arrangement may be advanced as factors contributing to the resistance of young leaves (L/sub 3,4/ of 21-day old plants) these same parameters do not explain the resistance of old leaves (L/sub 1,2/ of 30-day old plants). 16 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  6. Stress steroid levels and the short-term impact of routine dehorning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Routine dehorning procedures resulted in a short-term stress response expressed by a significant increase in fGCM levels 48 h post-dehorning, with stress steroid levels returning to pre-dehorning concentrations 72 h after the procedure. Keywords: faecal glucocorticoid metabolites, non-invasive hormone monitoring, ...

  7. Fecal glucocorticoid response to environmental stressors in green iguanas (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Timm, Jeanette A; Ibsen, Ida B; Hau, Jann; Frederiksen, Anne-Marie B; Bertelsen, Mads F

    2012-05-15

    Quantification of glucocorticoid metabolites in feces has been shown to be a powerful tool in evaluating well-being in vertebrates. Little is known however about the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to stressors, and consequent glucocorticoid excretion, in reptiles. In a longitudinal study, fecal corticosterone metabolite (FCM) levels in green iguanas (Iguana iguana) were quantified during periods of rest and exposure to hypothesized stressors. FCM quantification was combined with behavioral analysis to further contextualize the measured increases. It was shown that both daily 5-minute handling/restraint, as well as housing devoid of climbing opportunity, resulted in increased FCM excretion. Behavioral analysis suggested that the iguanas were chronically stressed by the lack of climbing opportunity, whereas handling may have induced only a transient stress response. The experimental design, using repeated periods of stressor-exposure, also revealed a facilitating effect, where the two stressors potentiated one another. Furthermore, the order of the two stressors was found to be important. The study provides insight into the functioning of the hormonal stress response in green iguanas, and to the refining of their housing and handling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Glucocorticoid-related bone changes from endogenous or exogenous glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warriner, Amy H; Saag, Kenneth G

    2013-12-01

    Glucocorticoids have a negative impact on bone through direct effects on bone cells and indirect effects on calcium absorption. Here, recent findings regarding glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, bone changes in patients with endogenous glucocorticoid derangements, and treatment of steroid-induced bone disease are reviewed. Although the majority of our understanding arises from the outcomes of patients treated with exogenous steroids, endogenous overproduction appears to be similarly destructive to bone, but these effects are reversible with cure of the underlying disease process. Additionally, there are bone changes that occur in diseases that interrupt adrenal glucocorticoid production, both in response to our inability to perfectly match glucocorticoid replacement and also related to the underlying disease process. More investigation is required to understand which patients with endogenous overproduction or underproduction of glucocorticoid would benefit from osteoporosis treatment. Better understood is the benefit that can be achieved with currently approved treatments for glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis from exogenous steroids. With growing concern of long-term use of bisphosphonates, however, further investigation into the duration of use and use in certain populations, such as children and premenopausal women, is essential. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis is a complex disease that is becoming better understood through advances in the study of exogenous and endogenous glucocorticoid exposure. Further advancement of proper treatment and prevention is on the horizon.

  9. Occurrence of fungal metabolites--fumonisins at the ng/L level in aqueous environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Bocianowski, Jan; Perczak, Adam; Goliński, Piotr

    2015-08-15

    The B-series fumonisins (FBs) are some of the most prevalent mycotoxins produced as a secondary metabolite by Fusarium species growing on cereals. For decades they have been studied extensively in food and feed products, but there is no information about their occurrence in the aquatic environment or about how these mycotoxins are transported to the surface water and the groundwater. The aim of this study was to clarify the causes of fumonisin occurrence in aquatic ecosystems by examining the relation between mycotoxin contamination of crops and their levels in the aquatic environment. Water samples were collected from drainage ditches and wells or watercourses located in agricultural areas in the Wielkopolska region, Poland. Our research conducted on an annual basis showed the seasonal variability of fumonisin B1 concentration in the analyzed water samples, with the highest concentration in the post-harvest season (September to October) at 48.2 ng L(-1), and the lowest in winter and spring at 21.9 ng L(-1). Fumonisins B2 and B3 in water samples were not detected. Cereal samples were collected in the harvest season from each agricultural area close to tested water bodies. Mycotoxins were present in all cereal samples at concentrations from 43.3 to 1055.9 ng g(-1). Our results confirm that fumonisins are transported to aquatic systems by rainwater through soil. On the basis of available literature, this is the first report concerning the presence of fumonisin B1 in different aquatic environments. To date their ecotoxicological effects are largely unknown and require further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Different levels of UV-B resistance in Vaccinium corymbosum cultivars reveal distinct backgrounds of phenylpropanoid metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengo Escobar, Ana; Magnum de Oliveira Silva, Franklin; Acevedo, Patricio; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Alberdi, Miren; Reyes-Díaz, Marjorie

    2017-09-01

    UV-B radiation induces several physiological and biochemical effects that can influence regulatory plant processes. Vaccinium corymbosum responds differently to UV-B radiation depending on the UV-B resistance of cultivars, according to their physiological and biochemical features. In this work, the effect of two levels of UV-B radiation during long-term exposure on the phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, and the expression of genes associated with flavonoid biosynthesis as well as the absolute quantification of secondary metabolites were studied in two contrasting UV-B-resistant cultivars (Legacy, resistant and Bluegold, sensitive). Multivariate analyses were performed to understand the role of phenylpropanoids in UV-B defense mechanisms. The amount of phenylpropanoid compounds was generally higher in Legacy than in Bluegold. Different expression levels of flavonoid biosynthetic genes for both cultivars were transiently induced, showing that even in longer period of UV-B exposure; plants are still adjusting their phenylpropanoids at the transcription levels. Multivariate analysis in Legacy indicated no significant correlation between gene expression and the levels of the flavonoids and phenolic acids. By contrast, in the Bluegold cultivar higher number of correlations between secondary metabolite and transcript levels was found. Taken together, the results indicated different adjustments between the cultivars for a successful UV-B acclimation. While the sensitive cultivar depends on metabolite adjustments to respond to UV-B exposure, the resistant cultivar also possesses an intrinsically higher antioxidant and UV-B screening capacity. Thus, we conclude that UV-B resistance involves not only metabolite level adjustments during the acclimation period, but also depends on the intrinsic metabolic status of the plant and metabolic features of the phenylpropanoid compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Glucocorticoid Regulation of the Vitamin D Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A.; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies indicate calcitriol has potent anti-tumor activity in different types of cancers. However, high levels of vitamin D can produce hypercalcemia in some patients. Glucocorticoids are used to ameliorate hypercalcemia and to enhance calcitriol anti-tumor activity. Calcitriol in combination with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) increased vitamin D receptor (VDR) protein levels and ligand binding in squamous cell carcinoma VII (SCC). In this study we found that both calcitriol and Dex induce VDR- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated transcription respectively, indicating both hormone receptors are active in SCC. Pre-treatment with Dex increases VDR-mediated transcription at the human CYP24A1 promoter. Whereas, pre-treatment with other steroid hormones, including dihydrotestosterone and R1881, has no effect on VDR-mediated transcription. Real-time PCR indicates treatment with Dex increases Vdr transcripts in a time-dependent manner, suggesting Dex may directly regulate expression of Vdr. Numerous putative glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) were found in the Vdr gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated GR binding at several putative GREs located within the mouse Vdr gene. However, none of the putative GREs studied increase GR-mediated transcription in luciferase reporter assays. In an attempt to identify the response element responsible for Vdr transcript regulation, future studies will continue to analyze newly identified GREs more distal from the Vdr gene promoter. PMID:20398752

  12. Are BDNF and glucocorticoid activities calibrated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanneteau, Freddy; Chao, Moses V.

    2012-01-01

    One hypothesis to account for the onset and severity of neurological disorders is the loss of trophic support. Indeed, changes in the levels and activities of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) occur in numerous neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases. A deficit promotes vulnerability whereas a gain of function facilitates recovery by enhancing survival, synapse formation and synaptic plasticity. Implementation of ‘BDNF therapies’, however, faces numerous methodological and pharmacokinetic issues. Identifying BDNF mimetics that activate the BDNF receptor or downstream targets of BDNF signaling represent an alternative approach. One mechanism that shows great promise is to study the interplay of BDNF and glucocorticoid hormones, a major class of natural steroid secreted during stress reactions and in synchrony with circadian rhythms. While small amounts of glucocorticoids support normal brain function, excess stimulation by these steroid hormones precipitate stress-related affective disorders. To date, however, because of the paucity of knowledge of underlying cellular mechanisms, deleterious effects of glucocorticoids are not prevented following extreme stress. In the present review, we will discuss the complementary roles share by BDNF and glucocorticoids in synaptic plasticity, and delineate possible signaling mechanisms mediating these effects. PMID:23022538

  13. Primary, Secondary Metabolites, H2O2, Malondialdehyde and Photosynthetic Responses of Orthosiphon stimaneus Benth. to Different Irradiance Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hafiz Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The resource availability hypothesis predicts an increase in the allocation to secondary metabolites when carbon gain is improved relative to nutrient availability, which normally occurs during periods of low irradiance. The present work was carried out to confirm this hypothesis by investigating the effects of decreasing irradiance on the production of plant secondary metabolites (flavonoids and phenolics in the herbal plant Orthosiphon stamineus, and to characterize this production by carbohydrate, H2O2, and malondialdehyde (MDA levels, net photosynthesis, leaf chlorophyll content and carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N. Four levels of irradiance (225, 500, 625 and 900 µmol/m2/s were imposed onto two-week old seedlings for 12 weeks in a randomized complete block design experiment. Peak production of total flavonoids, phenolics, soluble sugar, starch and total non-structural carbohydrate ocurred under low irradiance of 225 µmol/m2/s, and decreased with increasing irradiance. The up-regulation of secondary metabolites could be explained by the concomitant increases in H2O2 and MDA activities under low irradiance. This condition also resulted in enhanced C/N ratio signifying a reduction in nitrogen levels, which had established significant negative correlations with net photosynthesis, total biomass and total chlorophyll content, indicating the possible existence of a trade-off between growth and secondary metabolism under low irradiance with reduced nitrogen content. The competition between total chlorophyll and secondary metabolites production, as exhibited by the negative correlation coefficient under low irradiance, also suggests a sign of gradual switch of investment from chlorophyll to polyphenols production.

  14. Dietary supplementation with essence of chicken enhances daily oscillations in plasma glucocorticoid levels and behavioral adaptation to the phase-shifted environmental light–dark cycle in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adila Dilixiati

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of circadian rhythms is essential to many aspects of human health, including metabolism and neurological and psychiatric well-being. Chronic disruption of circadian clock function is implicated in increasing the risk of metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular events and development of cancers. However, there are little approaches to reinforce the function of circadian clock for prevention of these diseases. Essence of Chicken (EC is a nutritional supplement that is traditionally made by extracting water soluble substances derived from cooking the whole chicken. In this study, we found that dietary supplementation with EC enhanced circadian oscillation of glucocorticoid secretion in mice, and this was accompanied by enhancement of circadian oscillation in the adrenal expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR protein that mediates the rate-limiting step of glucocorticoid synthesis. Furthermore, EC facilitated re-entrainment of behavioral rhythm in mice when phase of the light–dark cycle was suddenly advanced. These results suggest that intake of EC has enhancement effect on circadian clock function in mice, which may contribute to sustain health and also offer new preventive strategies against circadian-related diseases.

  15. Glucocorticoids, chronic stress, and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallman, Mary F.; Pecoraro, Norman C.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Warne, James P.; Ginsberg, Abigail B.; Akana, Susan F.; Laugero, Kevin C.; Houshyar, Hani; Strack, Alison M.; Bhatnagar, Seema; Bell, Mary E.

    2006-01-01

    Glucocorticoids either inhibit or sensitize stress-induced activity in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, depending on time after their administration, the concentration of the steroids, and whether there is a concurrent stressor input. When there are high glucocorticoids together with a

  16. In vivo biochemistry: quantifying ion and metabolite levels in individual cells or cultures of yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, Clara; Ewald, Jennifer C; Lanquar, Viviane; Jones, Alexander M; Frommer, Wolf B

    2011-08-15

    Over the past decade, we have learned that cellular processes, including signalling and metabolism, are highly compartmentalized, and that relevant changes in metabolic state can occur at sub-second timescales. Moreover, we have learned that individual cells in populations, or as part of a tissue, exist in different states. If we want to understand metabolic processes and signalling better, it will be necessary to measure biochemical and biophysical responses of individual cells with high temporal and spatial resolution. Fluorescence imaging has revolutionized all aspects of biology since it has the potential to provide information on the cellular and subcellular distribution of ions and metabolites with sub-second time resolution. In the present review we summarize recent progress in quantifying ions and metabolites in populations of yeast cells as well as in individual yeast cells with the help of quantitative fluorescent indicators, namely FRET metabolite sensors. We discuss the opportunities and potential pitfalls and the controls that help preclude misinterpretation. © The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 Biochemical Society

  17. Differential metabolite levels in response to spawning-induced inappetence in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriano, Rocco C; Smith, McKenzie L; Vermeersch, Kathleen A; Dove, Alistair D M; Styczynski, Mark P

    2015-03-01

    Atlantic salmon Salmo salar undergo months-long inappetence during spawning, but it is not known whether this inappetence is a pathological state or one for which the fish are adapted. Recent work has shown that inappetent whale sharks can exhibit circulating metabolite profiles similar to ketosis known to occur in humans during starvation. In this work, metabolite profiling was used to explore differences in analyte profiles between a cohort of inappetent spawning run Atlantic salmon and captively reared animals that were fed up to and through the time of sampling. The two classes of animals were easily distinguished by their metabolite profiles. The sea-run fish had elevated ɷ-9 fatty acids relative to the domestic feeding animals, while other fatty acid concentrations were reduced. Sugar alcohols were generally elevated in inappetent animals, suggesting potentially novel metabolic responses or pathways in fish that feature these compounds. Compounds expected to indicate a pathological catabolic state were not more abundant in the sea-run fish, suggesting that the animals, while inappetent, were not stressed in an unnatural way. These findings demonstrate the power of discovery-based metabolomics for exploring biochemistry in poorly understood animal models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dexamethasone decreases plasma levels of the prochiral fenbendazole and its chiral and achiral metabolites in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, S; Small, J; Jones, D G; McKellar, Q A

    2003-07-01

    1. The effect of co-administration of either short- or long-acting formulations of DXM on hepatic function and the plasma pharmacokinetic behaviour of prochiral fenbendazole (FBZ) and its metabolites was evaluated in sheep. 2. Neither DXM treatment markedly affected any of the biochemical markers of hepatic function tested. In contrast, both formulations significantly modified the plasma pharmacokinetic behaviour of FBZ and its metabolites. 3. Plasma FBZ concentrations and the associated area under the time-concentration curves were significantly lower, although the plasma detection period was longer (72 versus 48 h) in the DXM pretreated animals compared with those given FBZ alone. 4. DXM also appeared to alter the pattern of FBZ absorption, possibly through effects on abomasal pH. The shape of the plasma concentration-time curves for oxfendazole (OFZ) and fenbendazole sulphone (FBZSO(2)) were similar to FBZ, raising the possibility that DXM treatment may have altered the liver biotransformation of the parent drug. 5. The concentrations of the (+) chiral metabolite of OFZ were significantly lower in DXM pretreated animals compared with those given FBZ alone. The trend was similar for the (-) antipode, although the differences between DXM pretreated and non-pretreated animals were not statistically significant.

  19. Mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) regulates glucocorticoid metabolism through 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 in murine gonadotrope cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Dun; Li, Xing-Wang; Lian, Qing-Quan; Lamba, Pankaj; Bernard, Daniel J.; Hardy, Dianne O.; Chen, Hai-Xiao; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2009-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and its metabolite mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) have been classified as toxicants to the reproductive system at the testis level and DEHP may also impair reproductive axis function at the pituitary levels. However, MEHP is 10-fold more potent than DEHP in toxicity and little is known about the toxicological effect of MEHP on pituitary. In this study, we demonstrated that 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2), not 11β-HSD1, is strongly expressed in murine gonadotrope LβT2 cells. Interestingly, MEHP inhibited Hsd11b2 mRNA level and 11β-HSD2 enzyme activity in LβT2 cells at as low as 10 -7 M. Corticosterone (CORT) at a concentration of 10 -6 M significantly inhibited LβT2 cell proliferation after 2-day culture, and 10 -6 M RU486, an antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (GR), reversed this inhibition. However, in the presence of 10 -5 or 10 -4 M MEHP, the minimal concentration of CORT to inhibit the proliferation of LβT2 cells was lowered to 10 -7 M, and 10 -6 M RU486 was not able to completely reverse the CORT effect. In conclusion, along with the regulation of GR, 11β-HSD2 may have a key role in glucocorticoid metabolism in LβT2 cells. MEHP may participate in the glucocorticoid metabolism in LβT2 cells through inhibition of 11β-HSD2 enzyme activity. Such perturbation may be of pathological significance as MEHP may interfere with the reproductive system at pituitary level through regulation of glucocorticoid metabolism, especially in neonates with higher risk of phthalates exposure.

  20. Variability in urinary phthalate metabolite levels across pregnancy and sensitive windows of exposure for the risk of preterm birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kelly K.; McElrath, Thomas F.; Ko, Yi-An; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Meeker, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Preterm birth is a significant public health problem, affecting over 1 in 10 live births and contributing largely to infant mortality and morbidity. Everyday exposure to environmental chemicals such as phthalates could contribute, and may be modifiable. In the present study we examine variability in phthalate exposure across gestation and identify windows of susceptibility for the relationship with preterm birth. Methods Women were recruited early in pregnancy as part of a prospective, longitudinal birth cohort at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. Urine samples were collected at up to 4 time points during gestation for phthalate measurement, and birth outcomes were recorded at delivery. From this population we selected all 130 cases of preterm birth, defined as delivery before 37 weeks completed gestation, as well as 352 random controls. Results Urinary phthalate metabolite levels were moderately variable over pregnancy, but levels measured at multiple time points were associated with increased odds of preterm birth. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) for spontaneous preterm birth were strongest in association with phthalate metabolite concentrations measured at the beginning of the third trimester (aOR for summed di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate metabolites [∑DEHP]=1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.02, 1.73). Odds ratios for placental preterm birth, defined as delivery with presentation of preeclampsia or intrauterine growth restriction, were slightly elevated in the first trimester for DEHP metabolites (aOR for ∑DEHP=1.33, 95% CI=0.99, 1.78). Conclusions Pregnant women with exposure to phthalates both early and late in pregnancy are at increased risk of delivering preterm, but mechanisms may differ based on etiology. PMID:24934852

  1. Raised urinary glucocorticoid and adrenal androgen precursors in the urine of young hypertensive patients: possible evidence for partial glucocorticoid resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, W; Yousufuddin, M; Francis, D; Gualdiero, P; Honour, J; Anker, S; Coats, A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate urinary glucocorticoid excretion profiles in a cohort of recently diagnosed young hypertensive patients.
METHODS—After excluding patients with secondary causes, 60 individuals with premature hypertension were recruited (diagnosed by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring before the age of 36 years). In addition, 30 older hypertensive controls (age of onset > 36 years, "middle aged hypertensive controls"), and 30 normal controls (age matched to the young hypertensive group) were studied. All provided 24 hour urine collections for mass spectrometry for total cortisol metabolites and total androgen metabolites by gas chromatography.
RESULTS—Among male patients, those with premature hypertension had higher total urinary excretion of cortisol metabolites (mean (SD), 13 332 (6472) µg/day) than age matched normal controls (7270 (1788) µg/day; p = 0.00001) or middle aged hypertensive controls (8315 (3565) µg/day; p = 0.002). A similar increase was seen among the female patients, although the absolute concentrations were lower. There was no significant difference between middle aged hypertensive patients and normal controls. Urinary total androgen excretion profiles in female patients also showed an unusual increase in the premature hypertension group (2958 (1672) µg/day) compared with the other groups (middle aged hypertensive controls, 1373 (748) µg/day, p = 0.0003; normal controls, 1687 (636) µg/day, p = 0.002). In all subjects, serum sodium and creatinine concentrations were within the normal range; serum potassium concentrations were found to be low before the start of treatment.
CONCLUSIONS—Individuals presenting with premature hypertension have an abnormally high excretion of glucocorticoid metabolites in the urine. While the mechanism remains uncertain, these findings are compatible with partial resistance of the glucocorticoid receptors, with a compensatory increase in cortisol and androgen

  2. Xenobiotics and the Glucocorticoid Receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliver, Linda S M

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) is present in virtually every human cell type. Representing a nuclear receptor superfamily, GR has several different isoforms essentially acting as ligand-dependent transcription factors, regulating glucocorticoid-responsive gene expression in both a positive and a negative manner. Although the natural ligand of the Glucocorticoid Receptor, glucocorticoids (GC) represent only some of the multiple ligands for GR. Xenobiotics, ubiquitous in the environment, bind to GR and are also capable of activating or repressing GR gene expression, thereby modulating GR cell and tissue-specific downstream effects in a multitude of ways that include responses to inflammatory, allergic, metabolic, neoplastic and autoimmune processes. Many xenobiotics, if inadequately metabolized by xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and not wholly eliminated, could have deleterious toxic effects with potentially lethal consequences. This review examines GR, the genomic and non-genomic actions of natural and synthetic GC and the body's handling of xenobiotic compounds, before reviewing what is presently known about GR's interactions with many of the more commonly encountered and some of the less well known GR-associated xenobiotics. GR promiscuity and crosstalk with other signaling pathways is discussed, alongside novel roles for GR that include mood disorder and addiction. A knowledge of GR interactions with xenobiotics is increasingly relevant when considering aging populations and the related prevalence of neoplastic disease, together with growing concerns around human exposure to mixtures of chemicals in the environment. Furthermore, escalating rates of obesity, Type 2 diabetes; autoimmune, allergy, addiction and mood disorder-related pathologies, require novel targeted interventions and GR appears a promising pharmacological candidate. - Highlights: • Biological impact of xenobiotics acting through Glucocorticoid Receptor. • Promiscuity of Glucocorticoid

  3. Xenobiotics and the Glucocorticoid Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulliver, Linda S M, E-mail: linda.gulliver@otago.ac.nz

    2017-03-15

    Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) is present in virtually every human cell type. Representing a nuclear receptor superfamily, GR has several different isoforms essentially acting as ligand-dependent transcription factors, regulating glucocorticoid-responsive gene expression in both a positive and a negative manner. Although the natural ligand of the Glucocorticoid Receptor, glucocorticoids (GC) represent only some of the multiple ligands for GR. Xenobiotics, ubiquitous in the environment, bind to GR and are also capable of activating or repressing GR gene expression, thereby modulating GR cell and tissue-specific downstream effects in a multitude of ways that include responses to inflammatory, allergic, metabolic, neoplastic and autoimmune processes. Many xenobiotics, if inadequately metabolized by xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and not wholly eliminated, could have deleterious toxic effects with potentially lethal consequences. This review examines GR, the genomic and non-genomic actions of natural and synthetic GC and the body's handling of xenobiotic compounds, before reviewing what is presently known about GR's interactions with many of the more commonly encountered and some of the less well known GR-associated xenobiotics. GR promiscuity and crosstalk with other signaling pathways is discussed, alongside novel roles for GR that include mood disorder and addiction. A knowledge of GR interactions with xenobiotics is increasingly relevant when considering aging populations and the related prevalence of neoplastic disease, together with growing concerns around human exposure to mixtures of chemicals in the environment. Furthermore, escalating rates of obesity, Type 2 diabetes; autoimmune, allergy, addiction and mood disorder-related pathologies, require novel targeted interventions and GR appears a promising pharmacological candidate. - Highlights: • Biological impact of xenobiotics acting through Glucocorticoid Receptor. • Promiscuity of Glucocorticoid

  4. Impact of glucocorticoid on neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruki Odaka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis is currently an area of great interest in neuroscience. It is closely linked to brain diseases, including mental disorders and neurodevelopmental disease. Both embryonic and adult neurogeneses are influenced by glucocorticoids secreted from the adrenal glands in response to a variety of stressors. Moreover, proliferation/differentiation of the neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs is affected by glucocorticoids through intracellular signaling pathways such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt, hedgehog, and Wnt. Our review presents recent evidence of the impact of glucocorticoids on NSPC behaviors and the underlying molecular mechanisms; this provides important information for understanding the pathological role of glucocorticoids on neurogenesis-associated brain diseases.

  5. Biochemical endpoints of glucocorticoid hormone action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, D.A.; Nicholson, M.L.; Guyette, W.A.; Giddings, S.J.; Mendelsohn, S.L.; Nordeen, S.K.; Lyons, R.T.

    1978-01-01

    Both the rapidly evolving metabolic effects of glucocorticoids and the more slowly developing lethal actions appear to be initiated via the synthesis of new mRNAs and proteins. The chronic suppression of cell growth may be the consequence of suppression of overall rates of protein synthesis (and probably RNA and DNA synthesis as well) that in turn may represent the cellular response to the small changes in ratios of adenine nucleotides that result from the suppression of oxidative ATP production. The inhibition of glucose transport may also play a role here to prevent a compensatory increase in glycolytic ATP production. Some other hormone actions, the decrease in the ability of cells to concentrate AIB and the increase in nuclear fragility are unrelated to, and evolve separately from, the hormonal inhibitions on energy production. Cell killing is not the result of suppression of protein synthesis, nor of hormone-induced increases in calcium uptake. While the mechanisms are unknown, the increase in nuclear fragility appears to be the earliest measure of their operation. In tumor cells resistance to lethal actions of glucocorticoids may emerge via the selection of cells with hardier membranes, that are better able to withstand the intracellular destructive events set in motion by high levels of glucocorticoids.

  6. Evaluation of Urinary Tryptophan Metabolite Levels in Non-diabetic Compared to Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Elena OLAR

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common metabolic disorders in animals. Thus, currently, it is imperative to introduce non-invasive, economical and rapid methods for the investigation of diabetes in animals. In this study, the urine samples collected from 10 non-diabetic and 10 streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were investigated by the spectrofluorimetric technique. Emission spectra for the urine samples were obtained following an excitation wavelength of 280 and 400 nm. The investigated fluorophores were mainly tryptophan metabolites, and significant differences resulted between the mean heights of the emission bands attributed to these fluorophore compounds in diabetic compared to non-diabetic rats. The shape of the spectral windings after the utilization of these two excitation wavelengths was almost similar for diabetic and non-diabetic rats; however, there were some discriminatory elements between the two types of investigated samples. In conclusion, the obtained urine fluorescence spectra allow a clear differentiation between diabetic and non-diabetic rats.

  7. Glucocorticoid receptor haplotypes conferring increased sensitivity (BclI and N363S) are associated with faster progression of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melief, Jeroen; Koper, Jan W; Endert, Erik

    2016-01-01

    As high cortisol levels are implicated in suppressed disease activity of multiple sclerosis (MS), glucocorticoid receptor (GR) polymorphisms that affect glucocorticoid (GC) sensitivity may impact on this by changing local immunomodulation or regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA...

  8. Global metabolic analyses identify key differences in metabolite levels between polymyxin-susceptible and polymyxin-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maifiah, Mohd Hafidz Mahamad; Cheah, Soon-Ee; Johnson, Matthew D; Han, Mei-Ling; Boyce, John D; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Forrest, Alan; Kaye, Keith S; Hertzog, Paul; Purcell, Anthony W; Song, Jiangning; Velkov, Tony; Creek, Darren J; Li, Jian

    2016-02-29

    Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii presents a global medical crisis and polymyxins are used as the last-line therapy. This study aimed to identify metabolic differences between polymyxin-susceptible and polymyxin-resistant A. baumannii using untargeted metabolomics. The metabolome of each A. baumannii strain was measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Multivariate and univariate statistics and pathway analyses were employed to elucidate metabolic differences between the polymyxin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii strains. Significant differences were identified between the metabolic profiles of the polymyxin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii strains. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) deficient, polymyxin-resistant 19606R showed perturbation in specific amino acid and carbohydrate metabolites, particularly pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. Levels of nucleotides were lower in the LPS-deficient 19606R. Furthermore, 19606R exhibited a shift in its glycerophospholipid profile towards increased abundance of short-chain lipids compared to the parent polymyxin-susceptible ATCC 19606. In contrast, in a pair of clinical isolates 03-149.1 (polymyxin-susceptible) and 03-149.2 (polymyxin-resistant, due to modification of lipid A), minor metabolic differences were identified. Notably, peptidoglycan biosynthesis metabolites were significantly depleted in both of the aforementioned polymyxin-resistant strains. This is the first comparative untargeted metabolomics study to show substantial differences in the metabolic profiles of the polymyxin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii.

  9. Season of sampling and season of birth influence serotonin metabolite levels in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurjen J Luykx

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animal studies have revealed seasonal patterns in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF monoamine (MA turnover. In humans, no study had systematically assessed seasonal patterns in CSF MA turnover in a large set of healthy adults. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Standardized amounts of CSF were prospectively collected from 223 healthy individuals undergoing spinal anesthesia for minor surgical procedures. The metabolites of serotonin (5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-HIAA, dopamine (homovanillic acid, HVA and norepinephrine (3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol, MPHG were measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Concentration measurements by sampling and birth dates were modeled using a non-linear quantile cosine function and locally weighted scatterplot smoothing (LOESS, span = 0.75. The cosine model showed a unimodal season of sampling 5-HIAA zenith in April and a nadir in October (p-value of the amplitude of the cosine = 0.00050, with predicted maximum (PC(max and minimum (PC(min concentrations of 173 and 108 nmol/L, respectively, implying a 60% increase from trough to peak. Season of birth showed a unimodal 5-HIAA zenith in May and a nadir in November (p = 0.00339; PC(max = 172 and PC(min = 126. The non-parametric LOESS showed a similar pattern to the cosine in both season of sampling and season of birth models, validating the cosine model. A final model including both sampling and birth months demonstrated that both sampling and birth seasons were independent predictors of 5-HIAA concentrations. CONCLUSION: In subjects without mental illness, 5-HT turnover shows circannual variation by season of sampling as well as season of birth, with peaks in spring and troughs in fall.

  10. Early paternal deprivation alters levels of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glucocorticoid receptor and serum corticosterone and adrenocorticotropin in a sex-specific way in socially monogamous mandarin voles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ruiyong; Song, Zhenzhen; Wang, Siyang; Shui, Li; Tai, Fadao; Qiao, Xufeng; He, Fengqin

    2014-01-01

    In monogamous mammals, fathers play an important role in the development of the brain and typical behavior in offspring, but the exact nature of this process is not well understood. In particular, little research has addressed whether the presence or absence of paternal care alters levels of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and basal levels of serum corticosterone (CORT) and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH). Here, we explored this concept using socially monogamous mandarin voles (Microtus mandarinus), a species in which fathers display high levels of paternal care toward their pups. Our immunohistochemical study shows that paternal deprivation (PD) significantly decreased levels of GR and BDNF protein in the CA1 and CA2/3 of the hippocampus. In the dental gyrus, decreases in GR and BDNF induced by PD were evident in females but not in males. Additionally, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results show that PD significantly upregulated levels of serum CORT and ACTH in females, but not males. These findings demonstrate that PD alters HPA axis activity in a sex-specific way. The changes in stress hormones documented here may be associated with alteration in hippocampal BDNF and GR levels. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Urinary Metabolite Levels of Flame Retardants in Electronic Cigarette Users: A Study Using the Data from NHANES 2013–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binnian Wei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating the safety of e-cigarettes and making informed judgement about developing potential standards require sufficient scientific evidence. Since e-cigarettes are highly engineered products containing plastic, glass and metal parts, and e-liquids are largely different matrices, many toxic compounds which are not typical hazards for the users of combustible tobacco products (e.g., cigarettes, could exist in e-liquids, and consequently, posing potential health risk to e-cigarette users. We combined the measurements of urinary metabolites of organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs with questionnaire data collected in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES from 2013 to 2014, and we compared adjusted geometric means (GM for each biomarker in e-cigarette users with levels in non-users and users of various tobacco products using multiple regression analyses to adjust for potential confounders. We found diphenyl phosphate (DPhP, bis(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl phosphate (BDCPP, bis(2-chloroethyl phosphate (BCEP, and dibutyl phosphate (DBUP were detected in all e-cigarette users. The adjusted GM of BCEP, the metabolite of tris(2-chloroethyl phosphate (TCEP, was 81% higher than nonusers (p = 0.0124 and significantly higher than those for both cigarette and cigar users (p < 0.05. The findings in this pilot study suggest that certain OPFRs may present in e-cigarettes as contaminants, and consequently, resulting in higher exposure levels in e-cigarette users compared to nonusers. As we only identified 14 e-cigarette users in the survey, the findings in this study need to be confirmed in future study at a larger scale. A better examination of the types and levels of FRs and their potential contamination sources in e-cigarettes is also needed.

  12. Effects of exercise on depressive behavior and striatal levels of norepinephrine, serotonin and their metabolites in sleep-deprived mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Thiago Medeiros da Costa; de Bruin, Pedro Felipe Carvalhedo; Rios, Emiliano Ricardo Vasconcelos; de Bruin, Veralice Meireles Sales

    2017-08-14

    Exercise is a promising adjunctive therapy for depressive behavior, sleep/wake abnormalities, cognition and motor dysfunction. Conversely, sleep deprivation impairs mood, cognition and functional performance. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of exercise on anxiety and depressive behavior and striatal levels of norepinephrine (NE), serotonin and its metabolites in mice submitted to 6h of total sleep deprivation (6h-TSD) and 72h of Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep deprivation (72h-REMSD). Experimental groups were: (1) mice submitted to 6h-TSD by gentle handling; (2) mice submitted to 72h-REMSD by the flower pot method; (3) exercise (treadmill for 8 weeks); (4) exercise followed by 6h-TSD; (5) exercise followed by 72h-REMSD; (6) control (home cage). Behavioral tests included the Elevated Plus Maze and tail-suspension. NE, serotonin and its metabolites were determined in the striatum using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Sleep deprivation increased depressive behavior (time of immobilization in the tail-suspension test) and previous exercise hindered it. Sleep deprivation increased striatal NE and previous exercise reduced it. Exercise only was associated with higher levels of serotonin. Furthermore, exercise reduced serotonin turnover associated with sleep deprivation. In brief, previous exercise prevented depressive behavior and reduced striatal high NE levels and serotonin turnover. The present findings confirm the effects of exercise on behavior and neurochemical alterations associated with sleep deprivation. These findings provide new avenues for understanding the mechanisms of exercise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of physical exercise on serum levels of serotonin and its metabolite in fibromyalgia: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valim, Valéria; Natour, Jamil; Xiao, Yangming; Pereira, Abraão Ferraz Alves; Lopes, Beatriz Baptista da Cunha; Pollak, Daniel Feldman; Zandonade, Eliana; Russell, Irwin Jon

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of aerobic training and stretching on serum levels of serotonin (5HT) and its main metabolite 5-hydroxindolacetic acid (5HIAA). Twenty-two women with FM were randomized into one of two exercise modalities (aerobic walking exercise or stretching exercise) to be accomplished three times a week for 20 weeks. The serum levels of 5HT and 5HIAA were evaluated before and after the exercise program by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with colorimetric detection. Within group analysis (pre-post) showed that serum levels of both 5HT and 5HIAA changed significantly in the aerobic group during the 20-week course of therapy (5HT: P = 0,03; 5HIAA: P = 0,003). In the stretching group, however, no statistically significant change was observed (5HT: P=0,491; 5HIAA: P=0,549). Between group statistical comparisons of laboratory measures disclosed that aerobic training was superior to stretching in that it significantly increased the levels of 5HIAA (F test = 6.61; P = 0.01), but the average difference between groups on the levels of 5HT did not meet significance criteria (F test = 3.42; P = 0.08). Aerobic training increases the 5HIAA and 5HT levels and it could explain why aerobic exercise can improve symptoms in fibromyalgia syndrome patient more than stretching exercise.

  14. The study of lymphocytes glucocorticoid receptor in severe head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dapei; Wang Haodan; Zhao Qihuang

    1994-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptors (GCR) of peripheral lymphocytes from 14 patients with severe head injury and 11 normal volunteers are studied by means of single point method of radioligand binding assay. All these patients receive surgical therapy and glucocorticoid of routine dosage. The results show that the GCR level of these patients is lower than that of the normal, while the plasma cortisol level is much higher. These changes correlate closely to the patients' clinical outcome. It is indicated that the GCR level can reflect the degree of stress of these patients and their response to glucocorticoid therapy. Using peripheral lymphocytes instead of the brain biopsy for the measurement of GCR can reflect the GCR changes of brain tissue, it's more convenient to get the sample and more acceptable to the patients

  15. Glucocorticoid receptor polymorphism in obesity and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majer-Łobodzińska, Agnieszka; Adamiec-Mroczek, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity plays a significant role in the etiology of obesity and is essential for glucose homeostasis, the development of hyperinsulinaemia and subsequent increased fat deposition. Several polymorphisms in the GR gene have been described, and at least three of them seem to be associated with altered glucocorticoid sensitivity and changes in glucose homeostasis, and other metabolic parameters. The N363S polymorphism has been associated with increased sensitivity to glucocorticoides, increased insulin response to dexamethasone and increased plasma glucose level. BclI polymorphism is associated with increased abdominal obesity, hyperinsulinaemia and increased insulin resistance. Another polymorphism, ER22/23EK, in contrast to the others, is associated with relative resistance to glucocoricides actions and more beneficial metabolic profile-lower insulin resistance level, decreased lower cardiovascular risk and subseuent prolongation of life time. More research is still needed to understand the mechanisms behind these associations at the molecular level.

  16. Glucocorticoid programming of neuroimmune function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David J; Spencer, Karen A

    2018-01-15

    Throughout life physiological systems strive to maintain homeostasis and these systems are susceptible to exposure to maternal or environmental perturbations, particularly during embryonic development. In some cases, these perturbations may influence genetic and physiological processes that permanently alter the functioning of these physiological systems; a process known as developmental programming. In recent years, the neuroimmune system has garnered attention for its fundamental interactions with key hormonal systems, such as the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. The ultimate product of this axis, the glucocorticoid hormones, play a key role in modulating immune responses within the periphery and the CNS as part of the physiological stress response. It is well-established that elevated glucocorticoids induced by developmental stress exert profound short and long-term physiological effects, yet there is relatively little information of how these effects are manifested within the neuroimmune system. Pre and post-natal periods are prime candidates for manipulation in order to uncover the physiological mechanisms that underlie glucocorticoid programming of neuroimmune responses. Understanding the potential programming role of glucocorticoids may be key in uncovering vulnerable windows of CNS susceptibility to stressful experiences during embryonic development and improve our use of glucocorticoids as therapeutics in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of cAMP signaling on expression of glucocorticoid receptor, Bim and Bad in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant leukemic and multiple myeloma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongli; Carlton, Michael E; Lerner, Adam; Epstein, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of cAMP signaling induces apoptosis in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant CEM leukemic and MM.1 multiple myeloma cell lines, and this effect is enhanced by dexamethasone in both glucocorticoid-sensitive cell types and in glucocorticoid-resistant CEM cells. Expression of the mRNA for the glucocorticoid receptor alpha (GR) promoters 1A3, 1B and 1C, expression of mRNA and protein for GR, and the BH3-only proapoptotic proteins, Bim and Bad, and the phosphorylation state of Bad were examined following stimulation of the cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling pathways. Expression levels of GR promoters were increased by cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling, but GR protein expression was little changed in CEM and decreased in MM.1 cells. Stimulation of these two signaling pathways induced Bim in CEM cells, induced Bad in MM.1 cells, and activated Bad, as indicated by its dephosphorylation on ser112, in both cell types. This study shows that leukemic and multiple myeloma cells, including those resistant to glucocorticoids, can be induced to undergo apoptosis by stimulating the cAMP signaling pathway, with enhancement by glucocorticoids, and the mechanism by which this occurs may be related to changes in Bim and Bad expression, and in all cases, to activation of Bad.

  18. High levels of PAH-metabolites in urine of e-waste recycling workers from Agbogbloshie, Ghana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldt, Torsten, E-mail: feldt@bni-hamburg.de [Clinical Research Unit, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Bernhard-Nocht Str. 74, 20359 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, University Hospital Düsseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Fobil, Julius N., E-mail: jfobil@ug.edu.gh [Department of Biological, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG13, Legon (Ghana); Wittsiepe, Jürgen [Department of Hygiene, Social and Environmental Medicine, Ruhr-University Bochum, Universitätsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Wilhelm, Michael, E-mail: wilhelm@hygiene.rub.de [Department of Hygiene, Social and Environmental Medicine, Ruhr-University Bochum, Universitätsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Till, Holger, E-mail: holger.till@giz.de [GIZ — Regional Coordination Unit for HIV and TB (GiZ-ReCHT), 32 Cantonment Crescent, Cantonments, Accra (Ghana); Zoufaly, Alexander [Department of Medicine, Section Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Burchard, Gerd, E-mail: gerd.burchard@bni-hamburg.de [Clinical Research Unit, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Bernhard-Nocht Str. 74, 20359 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Medicine, Section Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Göen, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.goeen@ipasum.med.uni-erlangen.de [Institute and Outpatient Clinic of Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schillerstr. 25/29, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    The informal recycling of electronic waste (e-waste) is an emerging source of environmental pollution in Africa. Among other toxins, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a major health concern for exposed individuals. In a cross-sectional study, the levels of PAH metabolites in the urine of individuals working on one of the largest e-waste recycling sites of Africa, and in controls from a suburb of Accra without direct exposure to e-waste recycling activities, were investigated. Socioeconomic data, basic health data and urine samples were collected from 72 exposed individuals and 40 controls. In the urine samples, concentrations of the hydroxylate PAH metabolites (OH-PAH) 1-hydroxyphenanthrene (1-OH-phenanthrene), the sum of 2- and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (2-/9-OH-phenanthrene), 3-hydroxyphenanthrene (3-OH-phenanthrene), 4-hydroxyphenanthrene (4-OH-phenanthrene) and 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OH-pyrene), as well as cotinine and creatinine, were determined. In the exposed group, median urinary concentrations were 0.85 μg/g creatinine for 1-OH-phenanthrene, 0.54 μg/g creatinine for 2-/9-OH-phenanthrene, 0.99 μg/g creatinine for 3-OH-phenanthrene, 0.22 μg/g creatinine for 4-OH-phenanthrene, and 1.33 μg/g creatinine for 1-OH-pyrene, all being significantly higher compared to the control group (0.55, 0.37, 0.63, 0.11 and 0.54 μg/g creatinine, respectively). Using a multivariate linear regression analysis including sex, cotinine and tobacco smoking as covariates, exposure to e-waste recycling activities was the most important determinant for PAH exposure. On physical examination, pathological findings were rare, but about two thirds of exposed individuals complained about cough, and one quarter about chest pain. In conclusion, we observed significantly higher urinary PAH metabolite concentrations in individuals who were exposed to e-waste recycling compared to controls who were not exposed to e-waste recycling activities. The impact of e-waste recycling on exposure to

  19. High levels of PAH-metabolites in urine of e-waste recycling workers from Agbogbloshie, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldt, Torsten; Fobil, Julius N.; Wittsiepe, Jürgen; Wilhelm, Michael; Till, Holger; Zoufaly, Alexander; Burchard, Gerd; Göen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The informal recycling of electronic waste (e-waste) is an emerging source of environmental pollution in Africa. Among other toxins, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a major health concern for exposed individuals. In a cross-sectional study, the levels of PAH metabolites in the urine of individuals working on one of the largest e-waste recycling sites of Africa, and in controls from a suburb of Accra without direct exposure to e-waste recycling activities, were investigated. Socioeconomic data, basic health data and urine samples were collected from 72 exposed individuals and 40 controls. In the urine samples, concentrations of the hydroxylate PAH metabolites (OH-PAH) 1-hydroxyphenanthrene (1-OH-phenanthrene), the sum of 2- and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (2-/9-OH-phenanthrene), 3-hydroxyphenanthrene (3-OH-phenanthrene), 4-hydroxyphenanthrene (4-OH-phenanthrene) and 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OH-pyrene), as well as cotinine and creatinine, were determined. In the exposed group, median urinary concentrations were 0.85 μg/g creatinine for 1-OH-phenanthrene, 0.54 μg/g creatinine for 2-/9-OH-phenanthrene, 0.99 μg/g creatinine for 3-OH-phenanthrene, 0.22 μg/g creatinine for 4-OH-phenanthrene, and 1.33 μg/g creatinine for 1-OH-pyrene, all being significantly higher compared to the control group (0.55, 0.37, 0.63, 0.11 and 0.54 μg/g creatinine, respectively). Using a multivariate linear regression analysis including sex, cotinine and tobacco smoking as covariates, exposure to e-waste recycling activities was the most important determinant for PAH exposure. On physical examination, pathological findings were rare, but about two thirds of exposed individuals complained about cough, and one quarter about chest pain. In conclusion, we observed significantly higher urinary PAH metabolite concentrations in individuals who were exposed to e-waste recycling compared to controls who were not exposed to e-waste recycling activities. The impact of e-waste recycling on exposure to

  20. Urinary Metabolite Levels of Flame Retardants in Electronic Cigarette Users: A Study Using the Data from NHANES 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Binnian; Goniewicz, Maciej L; O'Connor, Richard J; Travers, Mark J; Hyland, Andrew J

    2018-01-25

    Evaluating the safety of e-cigarettes and making informed judgement about developing potential standards require sufficient scientific evidence. Since e-cigarettes are highly engineered products containing plastic, glass and metal parts, and e-liquids are largely different matrices, many toxic compounds which are not typical hazards for the users of combustible tobacco products (e.g., cigarettes), could exist in e-liquids, and consequently, posing potential health risk to e-cigarette users. We combined the measurements of urinary metabolites of organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) with questionnaire data collected in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) from 2013 to 2014, and we compared adjusted geometric means (GM) for each biomarker in e-cigarette users with levels in non-users and users of various tobacco products using multiple regression analyses to adjust for potential confounders. We found diphenyl phosphate (DPhP), bis(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (BDCPP), bis(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (BCEP), and dibutyl phosphate (DBUP) were detected in all e-cigarette users. The adjusted GM of BCEP, the metabolite of tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), was 81% higher than nonusers ( p = 0.0124) and significantly higher than those for both cigarette and cigar users ( p users compared to nonusers. As we only identified 14 e-cigarette users in the survey, the findings in this study need to be confirmed in future study at a larger scale. A better examination of the types and levels of FRs and their potential contamination sources in e-cigarettes is also needed.

  1. Plasma cortisol and metabolite level profiles in two isogenic strains of common carp during confinement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruane, N.M.; Huisman, E.A.; Komen, J.

    2001-01-01

    A rapid increase in common carp Cyprinus carpio plasma cortisol levels was noted, in two experiments, after 30 mins of a 3 h net confinement, which was sustained while the fish were held in the nets. After release from the nets, cortisol levels returned to control values in 1 h. Plasma glucose and

  2. Investigation of radioprotective properties of synthetic antagonist of glucocorticoids RU 38 486

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sejliev, A.A.; Zvonareva, N.B.; Zhivotovskij, B.D.; Khanson, K.P.; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Leningrad

    1992-01-01

    Radioprotective properties of synthetic antiglucocorticoid RU 38 486 were investigated. It was demonstrated that this antigonist of glucocorticoids possesses radioprotective effect in vitro and in vivo systems. Radioprotective properties at molecular level exhibited in inhibition of postirradiation endonuclease activation and in prevention of internucleosome chromatin degradation. Involvement of cytosol glucocorticoid receptors in initiation of radiation-induced programmed cell death is discussed

  3. Pulsatile thyrotropin secretion in patients with Addison's disease during variable glucocorticoid therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hangaard, J; Andersen, M; Grodum, E

    1996-01-01

    , increasing significantly (P glucocorticoids, when the pulse frequency was also significantly reduced (P ... of glucocorticoids on the TSH response to TRH, our data indicate that even physiological serum levels of cortisol have an influence on endogenous TSH secretion, probably caused by regulation of the pituitary sensitivity to TRH....

  4. Serum levels of lipid metabolites in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Tivadar; Johnson, William M; Dong, Zhiqian; Maeda, Tadao; Maeda, Akiko; Sakai, Tsutomu; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi; Mieyal, John J; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a neurodegenerative disease that causes adult-onset blindness. There are 2 forms of this progressive disease: wet and dry. Currently there is no cure for AMD, but several treatment options have started to emerge making early detection critical for therapeutic success. Analysis of the eyes of Abca4(-/-)Rdh8(-/-) mice that display light-induced retinal degeneration indicates that 11-cis-retinal and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels were significantly decreased as compared with the eyes of control dark-adapted C57BL/6J mice. In addition, exposure to intense light correlated with higher levels of prostaglandin G2 in the eyes of Abca4(-/-)Rdh8(-/-) mice. Intense light exposure also lowered DHA levels in the eyes of wild-type C57BL/6J mice without discernible retinal degeneration. Analysis of human serum from patients with AMD recapitulated these dysregulated DHA levels and revealed dysregulation of arachidonic acid (AA) levels as well (∼32% increase in patients with AMD compared with average levels in healthy individuals). From these observations, we then built a statistical model that included levels of DHA and AA from human serum. This model had a 74% probability of correctly identifying patients with AMD from controls. Addition of a genetic analysis for one of the most prevalent amino acid substitutions in the age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 gene linked to AMD, Ala(69)→Ser, did not improve the statistical model. Thus, we have characterized a reliable method with the potential to detect AMD without a genetic component, paving the way for a larger-scale clinical evaluation. Our studies on mouse models along with the analysis of human serum suggest that our small molecule-based model may serve as an effective tool to estimate the risk of developing AMD. © FASEB.

  5. The metabolite generated by dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 metabolism of glucagon-like peptide-1 has no influence on plasma glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zander, M; Madsbad, S; Deacon, C F

    2006-01-01

    AIM/HYPOTHESIS: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is metabolised by the enzyme dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP-4), generating a metabolite with potential antagonistic properties. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of that metabolite on plasma glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes...... of the metabolite increased from 1+/-3 (SAL) and 2+/-6 (IB) pmol/l to 42+/-4 (LSC), 64+/-8 (IV) and 327+/-16 (HSC) pmol/l, pglucose levels at 6 h decreased from 12.4+/-1.1 (SAL) mmol/l to 10.4+/-1.1 (LSC), 8.6+/-0.6 (IB), 8.8+/-0.8 (IV) and 9.1+/-0.9 (HSC) mmol/l, p.../INTERPRETATION: At approximately similar concentrations of intact GLP-1 (IV, IB, HSC), but with widely ranging metabolite concentrations, the effect on plasma glucose levels was equal, indicating that the presence of the metabolite does not antagonise the glucose-lowering effect of GLP-1....

  6. Changes in the levels of major sulfur metabolites and free amino acids in pea cotyledons recovering from sulfur deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macnicol, P.K.; Randall, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in levels of sulfur metabolites and free amino acids were followed in cotyledons of sulfur-deficient, developing pea seeds (Pisum sativum L.) for 24 hours after resupply of sulfate, during which time the legumin mRNA levels returned almost to normal. Two recovery situations were studied: cultured seeds, with sulfate added to the medium, and seeds attached to the intact plant, with sulfate added to the roots. In both situations the levels of cysteine, glutathione, and methionine rose rapidly, glutathione exhibiting an initial lag. In attached but not cultured seeds methionine markedly overshot the level normally found in sulfur-sufficient seeds. In the cultured seed S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), but not S-methylmethionine, showed a sustained rise; in the attached seed the changes were slight. The composition of the free amino acid pool did not change substantially in either recovery situation. In the cultured seed the large rise in AdoMet level occurred equally in nonrecovering seeds. It was accompanied by 6-fold and 10-fold increases in γ-aminobutyrate and alanine, respectively. These effects are attributed to wounding resulting from excision of the seed. 35 S-labeling experiments showed that there was no significant accumulation of label in unidentified sulfur-containing amino compounds in either recovery situation. It was concluded from these results and those of other workers that, at the present level of knowledge, the most probable candidate for a signal compound, eliciting recovery of legumin mRNA level in response to sulfur-feeding, is cysteine

  7. Fructose, Glucocorticoids and Adipose Tissue: Implications for the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legeza, Balázs; Marcolongo, Paola; Gamberucci, Alessandra; Varga, Viola; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Benedetti, Angiolo; Odermatt, Alex

    2017-04-26

    The modern Western society lifestyle is characterized by a hyperenergetic, high sugar containing food intake. Sugar intake increased dramatically during the last few decades, due to the excessive consumption of high-sugar drinks and high-fructose corn syrup. Current evidence suggests that high fructose intake when combined with overeating and adiposity promotes adverse metabolic health effects including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and inflammation. Similarly, elevated glucocorticoid levels, especially the enhanced generation of active glucocorticoids in the adipose tissue due to increased 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1) activity, have been associated with metabolic diseases. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that fructose stimulates the 11β-HSD1-mediated glucocorticoid activation by enhancing the availability of its cofactor NADPH. In adipocytes, fructose was found to stimulate 11β-HSD1 expression and activity, thereby promoting the adipogenic effects of glucocorticoids. This article aims to highlight the interconnections between overwhelmed fructose metabolism, intracellular glucocorticoid activation in adipose tissue, and their metabolic effects on the progression of the metabolic syndrome.

  8. Longitudinal MRI study of cortical thickness, perfusion, and metabolite levels in major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järnum, Hanna; Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Steffensen, Elena G

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) display morphologic, functional, and metabolic brain abnormalities in limbic-cortical regions at a baseline magnetic resonance (MR) scan and whether these changes are normalized in MDD patients in remission at a follow......-acetylaspartate, myo-inositol, and glutamate levels in MDD patients compared with healthy controls at baseline. CONCLUSION: Using novel MRI techniques, we have found abnormalities in cerebral regions related to cortical-limbic pathways in MDD patients....

  9. Serum levels of lipid metabolites in age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Orban, Tivadar; Johnson, William M.; Dong, Zhiqian; Maeda, Tadao; Maeda, Akiko; Sakai, Tsutomu; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi; Mieyal, John J.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a neurodegenerative disease that causes adult-onset blindness. There are 2 forms of this progressive disease: wet and dry. Currently there is no cure for AMD, but several treatment options have started to emerge making early detection critical for therapeutic success. Analysis of the eyes of Abca4−/−Rdh8−/− mice that display light-induced retinal degeneration indicates that 11-cis-retinal and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels were significantly decrea...

  10. Glucocorticoids in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everdingen, Amalia A. van

    2002-01-01

    For 50 years, glucocorticoids (GC) are used for symptomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the last decade, results from clinical studies of treatment with GC as additional therapy to long-acting antirheumatic drugs in patients with early RA suggested also disease-modifying properties of

  11. Brain levels of high-energy phosphate metabolites and executive function in geriatric depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, David G; Joe, Elizabeth B; Jensen, J Eric; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Forester, Brent P

    2016-11-01

    Depression in late life has been associated with difficulties in cognitive processing, particularly in the domains of executive function, processing speed and memory, and increases the risk of developing dementia suggesting a neurodegenerative phenotype. Mitochondrial dysfunction is frequently an early event in neurodegenerative illnesses and may be operative in patients with late life depression. Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) allows for the quantification of bioenergetic molecules produced by mitochondria. Ten patients with late life depression and eight normal elderly controls were studied with Stroop color and interference tests, which are widely used measures of processing speed and executive function, respectively, followed by (31P) MRS 3-dimensional chemical-shift imaging measuring levels of adenosine triphosphate, phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate, and pH over the whole brain. In all subjects, gray matter phosphocreatine was positively associated with Stroop interference. Levels of white matter adenosine triphosphate were associated with Stroop interference in subjects with late life depression but not normal elderly. There was also a complementary association between white matter inorganic phosphate and Stroop interference in late life depression patients. These findings suggest two independent sources of executive function dependence on bioenergetic state in the aging brain. The dependence of executive function performance in subjects with late life depression on ATP in white matter may be associated with mitochondrial impairment and is consistent with predictions of the vascular depression hypothesis. Further research with wider neuropsychological testing targeting bioenergetic markers could help clarify the scope of these effects. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Levels of DDT and its metabolites in placenta, maternal and cord blood and their potential influence on neonatal anthropometric measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Saleh, Iman, E-mail: iman@kfshrc.edu.sa [Environmental Health Section, Biological and Medical Research Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Doush, Inaam; Alsabbaheen, Ammar [Environmental Health Section, Biological and Medical Research Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Mohamed, Gamal El Din [Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Scientific Computing Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Rabbah, Abdullah [Department of Pediatrics, King Khalid Hospital, Al-Kharj (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies of in utero exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) have shown mixed results for the harmful effects on fetal growth and development. This cross-sectional study was designed to: (1) examine the extent of DDT exposure in 1578 women, aged 28.5 {+-} 6.0 who delivered between June 2005 and 2006 in the area of Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia; and (2) assess its influence on neonatal anthropometric measurement of newly born babies. DDT and its metabolites, namely 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethylene (p,p Prime -DDE), 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane (p,p Prime -DDD) and 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2 Prime bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane (p,p Prime -DDT) were measured in cord and maternal serum as well as placenta by Gas Chromatography coupled with an Electron Capture Detector (GC/ECD). p,p Prime -DDE was detected in 28.3% of cord and 54.4% of maternal serum, reflecting past exposure, whereas the p,p Prime -DDT was only found in 0.46% cord and 1.2% maternal samples. As expected the p,p Prime -DDE cord levels (0.197 {+-} 0.961 {mu}g/L) were 2.8 times lower than the maternal levels (0.551 {+-} 1.778 {mu}g/L), and both were significantly correlated (r = 0.517) suggesting its transplacental transfer. The picture was different in placental tissues. p,p Prime -DDE and p,p Prime -DDT were detected in 84% and 99% of placental tissues, with the highest p,p Prime -DDT in placental tissues (29.62 {+-} 158.282 Micro-Sign g/kg dry wt.) compare to p,p Prime -DDE (10.167 {+-} 18.851 {mu}g/kg dry wt.). In general, the presence of DDT metabolites in our participants indicates that these chemicals are still relevant despite the fact that they have been banned or restricted in the study area for many years. Our results support the view for an association between low in utero exposure to DDT and the anthropometric development of the fetus leading to a reduction in its head circumference, crown-heel length, birth weight and birth height. Since the reduction in these

  13. Glucocorticoid receptor beta increases migration of human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeth, Lucien; Nwaneri, Assumpta C; Grabnar, Maria; Demeter, Jonathan; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea; Hinds, Terry D

    2016-05-10

    Bladder cancer is observed worldwide having been associated with a host of environmental and lifestyle risk factors. Recent investigations on anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid signaling point to a pathway that may impact bladder cancer. Here we show an inverse effect on the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoform signaling that may lead to bladder cancer. We found similar GRα expression levels in the transitional uroepithelial cancer cell lines T24 and UMUC-3. However, the T24 cells showed a significant (p bladder cancer cells. Therefore, GRβ may have a significant role in bladder cancer, and possibly serve as a therapeutic target for the disease.

  14. Quantitative analyses of schizophrenia-associated metabolites in serum: serum D-lactate levels are negatively correlated with gamma-glutamylcysteine in medicated schizophrenia patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Fukushima

    Full Text Available The serum levels of several metabolites are significantly altered in schizophrenia patients. In this study, we performed a targeted analysis of 34 candidate metabolites in schizophrenia patients (n = 25 and compared them with those in age- and gender-matched healthy subjects (n = 27. Orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis revealed that complete separation between controls and patients was achieved based on these metabolites. We found that the levels of γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-GluCys, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, D-serine, 3-hydroxybutyrate, glutathione (GSH, 5-hydroxytryptamine, threonine, and tyrosine were significantly lower, while D-lactate, tryptophan, kynurenine, and glutamate levels were significantly higher in schizophrenia patients compared to controls. Using receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and the area under curve of γ-GluCys, a precursor of GSH, and D-lactate, a terminal metabolite of methylglyoxal, were 88.00%, 81.48%, and 0.8874, and 88.00%, 77.78%, and 0.8415, respectively. In addition, serum levels of D-lactate were negatively correlated with γ-GluCys levels in patients, but not in controls. The present results suggest that oxidative stress-induced damage may be involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  15. Applicability of Commercially Available ELISA Kits for the Quantification of Faecal Immunoreactive Corticosterone Metabolites in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Kalliokoski, Otto; Teilmann, Anne Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Background: Commercially available ELISA kits are popular among investigators that quantify faecal corticosterone or cortisol metabolites (FCM) for stress assessment in animals. However, in faeces, these assays mainly detect immunoreactive glucocorticoid metabolites. Since different assays contain......: The present study was designed to investigate corticosterone (CORT) in serum and FCM levels in faeces of laboratory mice, as quantified in four different ELISA kits (DRG EIA-4164, Demeditec DEV9922, Enzo ADI-900-097 and Cayman EIA kit 500655). Assay kits were chosen based on the origin of the antibody...... assays, in both groups of mice. In faecal samples, there was no consistent positive correlation between the levels detected in the four assays and the measured concentration of FCM also differed between assays. Conclusion: Whereas commercially available CORT ELISAs are frequently successfully used...

  16. Total brain, cortical and white matter volumes in children previously treated with glucocorticoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Sara K; Madsen, Kathrine S; Vestergaard, Martin

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perinatal exposure to glucocorticoids and elevated endogenous glucocorticoid-levels during childhood can have detrimental effects on the developing brain. Here, we examined the impact of glucocorticoid-treatment during childhood on brain volumes. METHODS: Thirty children and adolescents...... with rheumatic or nephrotic disease previously treated with glucocorticoids and 30 controls matched on age, sex, and parent education underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Total cortical grey and white matter, brain, and intracranial volume, and total cortical thickness and surface area were...... were mainly driven by the children with rheumatic disease. Total cortical thickness and cortical surface area did not significantly differ between groups. We found no significant associations between glucocorticoid-treatment variables and volumetric measures. CONCLUSION: Observed smaller total brain...

  17. Glucocorticoids maintain human osteoclasts in the active mode of their resorption cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Kent; Delaissé, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    that glucocorticoids deeply modify this resorptive behavior. First, glucocorticoids gradually induce excavations with a trenchlike morphology while reducing the time-dependent increase in excavation numbers. This indicates that glucocorticoids make osteoclasts elongate the excavations they initiated rather than...... migrating to a new resorption site, as in control conditions. Second, the round excavations in control conditions contain undegraded demineralized collagen as repeatedly reported earlier, whereas the excavations with a trenchlike morphology generated under glucocorticoid exposure appear devoid of leftovers...... of demineralized collagen. This indicates that collagenolysis proceeds generally at a lower rate than demineralization under control conditions, whereas collagenolysis rates are increased up to the level of demineralization rates in the presence of glucocorticoids. Taking these observations together leads...

  18. Instructions for producing a mouse model of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, S.; Baschant, U.; Rauch, A.

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are effective drugs used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or asthma. Furthermore, they regulate various physiological processes, including bone remodeling. However, long-term high- and even low-dose glucocorticoid use is associated...... with a compromised bone quality and an increased fracture risk. At the cellular level, glucocorticoids suppress bone formation and stimulate bone resorption, which leads to loss of bone mass. To investigate the underlying mechanisms and new therapeutic strategies, the in vivo model for glucocorticoid-induced bone...... loss is widely used. This protocol outlines the common procedure that is currently used for the induction of bone loss in mice using glucocorticoids. It further provides useful hints and highlights possible pitfalls to take into account before starting an experiment....

  19. Effects of fluticasone propionate inhalation on levels of arachidonic acid metabolites in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert T. Verhoeven

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In smoking COPD patients the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid contains high numbers of inflammatory cells. These cells might produce arachidonic acid (AA metabolites, which contribute to inflammation and an increased bronchomotor tone.

  20. NAD+ metabolite levels as a function of vitamins and calorie restriction: evidence for different mechanisms of longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Peng

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NAD+ is a coenzyme for hydride transfer enzymes and a substrate for sirtuins and other NAD+-dependent ADPribose transfer enzymes. In wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae, calorie restriction accomplished by glucose limitation extends replicative lifespan in a manner that depends on Sir2 and the NAD+ salvage enzymes, nicotinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase and nicotinamidase. Though alterations in the NAD+ to nicotinamide ratio and the NAD+ to NADH ratio are anticipated by models to account for the effects of calorie restriction, the nature of a putative change in NAD+ metabolism requires analytical definition and quantification of the key metabolites. Results Hydrophilic interaction chromatography followed by tandem electrospray mass spectrometry were used to identify the 12 compounds that constitute the core NAD+ metabolome and 6 related nucleosides and nucleotides. Whereas yeast extract and nicotinic acid increase net NAD+ synthesis in a manner that can account for extended lifespan, glucose restriction does not alter NAD+ or nicotinamide levels in ways that would increase Sir2 activity. Conclusions The results constrain the possible mechanisms by which calorie restriction may regulate Sir2 and suggest that provision of vitamins and calorie restriction extend lifespan by different mechanisms.

  1. The effect of dose, dose rate, route of administration, and species on tissue and blood levels of benzene metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, R.F.; Sabourin, P.J.; Bechtold, W.E.; Griffith, W.C.; Medinsky, M.A.; Birnbaum, L.S.; Lucier, G.W.

    1989-01-01

    Studies were completed in F344/N rats and B6C3F 1 mice to determine the effect of dose, dose rate, route of administration, and rodent species on formation of total and individual benzene metabolites. Oral doses of 50 mg/kg or higher saturated the capacity for benzene metabolism in both rats and mice, resulting in an increased proportion of the administered dose being exhaled as benzene. The saturating air concentration for benzene metabolism during 6-hr exposures was between 130 and 900 ppm. At the highest exposure concentration, rats exhaled approximately half of the internal dose retained at the end of the 6-hr exposure as benzene; mice exhaled only 15% as benzene. Mice were able to convert more of the inhaled benzene to metabolites than were rats. In addition, mice metabolized more of the benzene by pathways leading to the putative toxic metabolites, benzoquinone and muconaldehyde, than did rats. In both rats and mice, the effect of increasing dose, administered orally or by inhalation, was to increase the proportion of the total metabolites that were the products of detoxification pathways relative to the products of pathways leading to putative toxic metabolites. This indicates low-affinity, high-capacity pathways for detoxification and high-affinity, low-capacity pathways leading to putative toxic metabolites. If the results of rodent studied performed at high doses were used to assess the health risk at low-dose exposures to benzene, the toxicity of benzene would be underestimated

  2. Androgen and androgen metabolite levels in serum and urine of East African chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii): comparison of EIA and LC-MS analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preis, Anna; Mugisha, Lawrence; Hauser, Barbara; Weltring, Anja; Deschner, Tobias

    2011-12-01

    The primary male androgen testosterone (T) is often used as an endocrinological marker to investigate androgen-behaviour interactions in males. In chimpanzees and bonobos, studies investigating the relationship between T levels and dominance rank or aggressive behaviour have revealed contradictory results. The immunoassays used in these studies were originally developed for the measurement of steroids in serum. Their application to non-invasively collected samples, however, can lead to methodological problems due to cross-reacting metabolites, which might occur in urine or faeces but not in blood. The overall aim of this study, therefore, is to clarify whether a T enzyme immunoassay (EIA) is an applicable method to monitor testicular function in adult male chimpanzees. To estimate the impact of cross-reacting androgens on the used T EIA, we compared the results of an EIA measurement with a set of androgen metabolite levels measured by LC-MS. In urine from male chimpanzees, cross-reactivities appear to exist mainly with T and its exclusive metabolites, 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT) and 5α-androstanediol (androstanediol). Both urinary and serum T levels of male chimpanzees were significantly higher than female T levels when measured with the T EIA, indicating a reliable measurement of testicular androgens and their exclusive metabolites with the used EIA. In urine from female chimpanzees, the comparison between LC-MS and T EIA results indicated a higher impact of cross-reactions with adrenal androgen metabolites. Therefore, the investigation of urinary T levels in female chimpanzees with a T EIA seems to be problematic. Overall our results show that a T EIA can be a reliable method to monitor testicular function in male chimpanzee urine and that LC-MS is a valuable tool for the validation of immunoassays. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fecal Glucocorticoid Analysis: Non-invasive Adrenal Monitoring in Equids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnell, Kelly; Purcell, Rebecca S; Walker, Susan L

    2016-04-25

    Adrenal activity can be assessed in the equine species by analysis of feces for corticosterone metabolites. During a potentially aversive situation, corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) is released from the hypothalamus in the brain. This stimulates the release of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) from the pituitary gland, which in turn stimulates release of glucocorticoids from the adrenal gland. In horses the glucocorticoid corticosterone is responsible for several adaptations needed to support equine flight behaviour and subsequent removal from the aversive situation. Corticosterone metabolites can be detected in the feces of horses and assessment offers a non-invasive option to evaluate long term patterns of adrenal activity. Fecal assessment offers advantages over other techniques that monitor adrenal activity including blood plasma and saliva analysis. The non-invasive nature of the method avoids sampling stress which can confound results. It also allows the opportunity for repeated sampling over time and is ideal for studies in free ranging horses. This protocol describes the enzyme linked immunoassay (EIA) used to assess feces for corticosterone, in addition to the associated biochemical validation.

  4. Overexpression of Glucocorticoid Receptor β Enhances Myogenesis and Reduces Catabolic Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Terry D; Peck, Bailey; Shek, Evan; Stroup, Steven; Hinson, Jennifer; Arthur, Susan; Marino, Joseph S

    2016-02-11

    Unlike the glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα), GR β (GRβ) has a truncated ligand-binding domain that prevents glucocorticoid binding, implicating GRα as the mediator of glucocorticoid-induced skeletal muscle loss. Because GRβ causes glucocorticoid resistance, targeting GRβ may be beneficial in impairing muscle loss as a result of GRα activity. The purpose of this study was to determine how the overexpression of GRβ affects myotube formation and dexamethasone (Dex) responsiveness. We measured GR isoform expression in C₂C12 muscle cells in response to Dex and insulin, and through four days of myotube formation. Next, lentiviral-mediated overexpression of GRβ in C₂C12 was performed, and these cells were characterized for cell fusion and myotube formation, as well as sensitivity to Dex via the expression of ubiquitin ligases. GRβ overexpression increased mRNA levels of muscle regulatory factors and enhanced proliferation in myoblasts. GRβ overexpressing myotubes had an increased fusion index. Myotubes overexpressing GRβ had lower forkhead box O3 (Foxo3a) mRNA levels and a blunted muscle atrophy F-box/Atrogen-1 (MAFbx) and muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) response to Dex. We showed that GRβ may serve as a pharmacological target for skeletal muscle growth and protection from glucocorticoid-induced catabolic signaling. Increasing GRβ levels in skeletal muscle may cause a state of glucocorticoid resistance, stabilizing muscle mass during exposure to high doses of glucocorticoids.

  5. Overexpression of Glucocorticoid Receptor β Enhances Myogenesis and Reduces Catabolic Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry D. Hinds

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Unlike the glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα, GR β (GRβ has a truncated ligand-binding domain that prevents glucocorticoid binding, implicating GRα as the mediator of glucocorticoid-induced skeletal muscle loss. Because GRβ causes glucocorticoid resistance, targeting GRβ may be beneficial in impairing muscle loss as a result of GRα activity. The purpose of this study was to determine how the overexpression of GRβ affects myotube formation and dexamethasone (Dex responsiveness. We measured GR isoform expression in C2C12 muscle cells in response to Dex and insulin, and through four days of myotube formation. Next, lentiviral-mediated overexpression of GRβ in C2C12 was performed, and these cells were characterized for cell fusion and myotube formation, as well as sensitivity to Dex via the expression of ubiquitin ligases. GRβ overexpression increased mRNA levels of muscle regulatory factors and enhanced proliferation in myoblasts. GRβ overexpressing myotubes had an increased fusion index. Myotubes overexpressing GRβ had lower forkhead box O3 (Foxo3a mRNA levels and a blunted muscle atrophy F-box/Atrogen-1 (MAFbx and muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1 response to Dex. We showed that GRβ may serve as a pharmacological target for skeletal muscle growth and protection from glucocorticoid-induced catabolic signaling. Increasing GRβ levels in skeletal muscle may cause a state of glucocorticoid resistance, stabilizing muscle mass during exposure to high doses of glucocorticoids.

  6. Glucocorticoid receptor signaling in health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadmiel, Mahita; Cidlowski, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are steroid hormones regulated in a circadian and stres-associated manner to maintain various metabolic and homeostatic functions that are necessary for life. Synthetic glucocorticoids are widely prescribed drugs for many conditions including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and inflammatory disorders of the eye. Research in the last few years has begun to unravel the profound complexity of glucocorticoid signaling and has contributed remarkably to improved therapeutic strategies. Glucocorticoids signal through the glucocorticoid receptor, a member of the superfamily of nuclear receptors, in both genomic and non-genomic ways in almost every tissue in the human body. In this review, we will provide an update on glucocorticoid receptor signaling and highlight the role of GR signaling in physiological and pathophysiological conditions in the major organ systems in the human body. PMID:23953592

  7. Phenylalanine and tyrosine levels are rate-limiting factors in production of health promoting metabolites in Vitis vinifera cv. Gamay Red cell suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manela, Neta; Oliva, Moran; Ovadia, Rinat; Sikron-Persi, Noga; Ayenew, Biruk; Fait, Aaron; Galili, Gad; Perl, Avichai; Weiss, David; Oren-Shamir, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stresses such as high light intensity and temperature cause induction of the shikimate pathway, aromatic amino acids (AAA) pathways, and of pathways downstream from AAAs. The induction leads to production of specialized metabolites that protect the cells from oxidative damage. The regulation of the diverse AAA derived pathways is still not well understood. To gain insight on that regulation, we increased AAA production in red grape Vitis vinifera cv. Gamay Red cell suspension, without inducing external stress on the cells, and characterized the metabolic effect of this induction. Increased AAA production was achieved by expressing a feedback-insensitive bacterial form of 3-deoxy- D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase enzyme (AroG (*)) of the shikimate pathway under a constitutive promoter. The presence of AroG(*) protein led to elevated levels of primary metabolites in the shikimate and AAA pathways including phenylalanine and tyrosine, and to a dramatic increase in phenylpropanoids. The AroG (*) transformed lines accumulated up to 20 and 150 fold higher levels of resveratrol and dihydroquercetin, respectively. Quercetin, formed from dihydroquercetin, and resveratrol, are health promoting metabolites that are induced due to environmental stresses. Testing the expression level of key genes along the stilbenoids, benzenoids, and phenylpropanoid pathways showed that transcription was not affected by AroG (*). This suggests that concentrations of AAAs, and of phenylalanine in particular, are rate-limiting in production of these metabolites. In contrast, increased phenylalanine production did not lead to elevated concentrations of anthocyanins, even though they are also phenylpropanoid metabolites. This suggests a control mechanism of this pathway that is independent of AAA concentration. Interestingly, total anthocyanin concentrations were slightly lower in AroG(*) cells, and the relative frequencies of the different anthocyanins changed as well.

  8. Phenylalanine and tyrosine levels are rate-limiting factors in production of health promoting metabolites in Vitis vinifera cv. Gamay Red cell suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neta eManela

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Environmental stresses such as high light intensity and temperature cause induction of the shikimate pathway, aromatic amino acids (AAA pathways, and of pathways downstream from AAAs. The induction leads to production of specialized metabolites that protect the cells from oxidative damage. The regulation of the diverse AAA derived pathways is still not well understood. To gain insight on that regulation, we increased AAA production in red grape Vitis vinifera cv. Gamay Red cell suspension, without inducing external stress on the cells, and characterized the metabolic effect of this induction. Increased AAA production was achieved by expressing a feedback-insensitive bacterial form of 3-deoxy- D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase enzyme (AroG* of the shikimate pathway under a constitutive promoter. The presence of AroG* protein led to elevated levels of primary metabolites in the shikimate and AAA pathways including phenylalanine and tyrosine, and to a dramatic increase in phenylpropanoids. The AroG* transformed lines accumulated up to 20 and 150 fold higher levels of resveratrol and dihydroquercetin, respectively. Quercetin, formed from dihydroquercetin, and resveratrol, are health promoting metabolites that are induced due to environmental stresses. Testing the expression level of key genes along the stilbenoids, benzenoids and phenylpropanoid pathways showed that transcription was not affected by AroG*. This suggests that concentrations of AAAs, and of phenylalanine in particular, are rate-limiting in production of these metabolites. In contrast, increased phenylalanine production did not lead to elevated concentrations of anthocyanins, even though they are also phenylpropanoid metabolites. This suggests a control mechanism of this pathway that is independent of AAA concentration. Interestingly, total anthocyanin concentrations were slightly lower in AroG* cells, and the relative frequencies of the different anthocyanins changed as

  9. High mobility group box 1 levels are not associated with subclinical carotid atherosclerosis in patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis but are reduced by glucocorticoids and statins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva de Souza, Alexandre; De Leeuw, Karina; Westra, Johanna; Smit, Andries J.; Van Der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Nienhuis, Hans L.A.; Bijzet, Johan; Limburg, Pieter C.; Stegeman, Coen A.; Bijl, Marc; Kallenberg, Cees G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Purpose: High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a non-histone DNA binding protein that is passively released by dying cells or actively secreted by immunocompetent cells and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is one of its receptors. Higher levels of HMGB1 have been

  10. Glucocorticoid Stress Responses of Reintroduced Tigers in Relation to Anthropogenic Disturbance in Sariska Tiger Reserve in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Subhadeep; Kumar, Vinod; Chandrasekhar, Mithileshwari; Malviya, Manjari; Ganswindt, Andre; Ramesh, Krishnamurthy; Sankar, Kalyanasundaram; Umapathy, Govindhaswamy

    2015-01-01

    Tiger (Panthera tigris), an endangered species, is under severe threat from poaching, habitat loss, prey depletion and habitat disturbance. Such factors have been reported causing local extermination of tiger populations including in one of the most important reserves in India, namely Sariska Tiger Reserve (STR) in northwestern India. Consequently, tigers were reintroduced in STR between 2008 and 2010, but inadequate breeding success was observed over the years, thus invoking an investigation to ascertain physiological correlates. In the present study, we report glucocorticoid stress responses of the reintroduced tigers in relation to anthropogenic disturbance in the STR from 2011 to 2013. We found anthropogenic disturbance such as encounter rates of livestock and humans, distance to roads and efforts to kill domestic livestock associated with an elevation in fecal glucocorticoid metabolite (fGCM) concentrations in the monitored tigers. In this regard, female tigers seem more sensitive to such disturbance than males. It was possible to discern that tiger's fGCM levels were significantly positively related to the time spent in disturbed areas. Resulting management recommendations include relocation of villages from core areas and restriction of all anthropogenic activities in the entire STR.

  11. Glucocorticoid Stress Responses of Reintroduced Tigers in Relation to Anthropogenic Disturbance in Sariska Tiger Reserve in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhadeep Bhattacharjee

    Full Text Available Tiger (Panthera tigris, an endangered species, is under severe threat from poaching, habitat loss, prey depletion and habitat disturbance. Such factors have been reported causing local extermination of tiger populations including in one of the most important reserves in India, namely Sariska Tiger Reserve (STR in northwestern India. Consequently, tigers were reintroduced in STR between 2008 and 2010, but inadequate breeding success was observed over the years, thus invoking an investigation to ascertain physiological correlates. In the present study, we report glucocorticoid stress responses of the reintroduced tigers in relation to anthropogenic disturbance in the STR from 2011 to 2013. We found anthropogenic disturbance such as encounter rates of livestock and humans, distance to roads and efforts to kill domestic livestock associated with an elevation in fecal glucocorticoid metabolite (fGCM concentrations in the monitored tigers. In this regard, female tigers seem more sensitive to such disturbance than males. It was possible to discern that tiger's fGCM levels were significantly positively related to the time spent in disturbed areas. Resulting management recommendations include relocation of villages from core areas and restriction of all anthropogenic activities in the entire STR.

  12. Glucocorticoids and inhibition of bone formation induced by skeletal unloading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halloran, B.P.; Bikle, D.D.; Cone, C.M.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1988-01-01

    Skeletal unloading or loss of normal weight bearing in the growing animal inhibits bone formation and reduces bone calcium. To determine whether the inhibition of bone formation induced by skeletal unloading is a consequence of an increase in plasma glucocorticoids and/or an increase in bone sensitivity to glucocorticoids, the authors measured plasma corticosterone throughout the day in unloaded and normally loaded rats (hindlimb elevation model) and examined the effect of adrenalectomy on the response of bone to skeletal unloading. Plasma corticosterone levels were similar in normally loaded and unloaded rats at all times. Skeletal unloading in sham-adrenalectomized animals reduced tibial and vertebral calcium by 11.5 and 11.1%, respectively, and in adrenalectomized animals by 15.3 and 20.3%, respectively. Uptake of 45 Ca and [ 3 H]proline in the tibia was reduced by 8 and 14%, respectively, in the sham-adrenalectomized animals and by 13 and 19% in the adrenalectomized animals. Bone formation and apposition rates were reduced to the same level in sham- and adrenalectomized animals. These results suggest that the inhibition of bone formation induced by skeletal unloading is not a consequence of increased plasma glucocorticoids or an increase in bone sensitivity to the glucocorticoids but, rather, point to a local mediator in bone that senses mechanical load and transmits that information to the bone-forming cells directly

  13. Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Secreting Pheochromocytoma Underlying Glucocorticoid Induced Pheochromocytoma Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil A. Geva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context. Pheochromocytomas are hormone secreting tumors of the medulla of the adrenal glands found in 0.1–0.5% of patients with hypertension. The vast majority of pheochromocytomas secrete catecholamines, but they have been occasionally shown to also secrete interleukins, calcitonin, testosterone, and in rare cases adrenocorticotropic hormone. Pheochromocytoma crisis is a life threatening event in which high levels of catecholamines cause a systemic reaction leading to organ failure. Case Description. A 70-year-old man was admitted with acute myocardial ischemia following glucocorticoid administration as part of an endocrine workup for an adrenal mass. Cardiac catheterization disclosed patent coronary arteries and he was discharged. A year later he returned with similar angina-like chest pain. During hospitalization, he suffered additional events of chest pain, shortness of breath, and palpitations following administration of glucocorticoids as preparation for intravenous contrast administration. Throughout his admission, the patient demonstrated both signs of Cushing’s syndrome and high catecholamine levels. Following stabilization of vital parameters and serum electrolytes, the adrenal mass was resected surgically and was found to harbor an adrenocorticotropic hormone secreting pheochromocytoma. This is the first documented case of adrenocorticotropic hormone secreting pheochromocytoma complicated by glucocorticoid induced pheochromocytoma crisis. Conclusion. Care should be taken when administering high doses of glucocorticoids to patients with suspected pheochromocytoma, even in a patient with concomitant Cushing’s syndrome.

  14. Plasmodium falciparum spermidine synthase inhibition results in unique perturbation-specific effects observed on transcript, protein and metabolite levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louw Abraham I

    2010-04-01

    polyamine biosynthesis was also observed. Most notably, uridine phosphorylase, adenosine deaminase, lysine decarboxylase (LDC and S-adenosylmethionine synthetase were differentially expressed at the transcript and/or protein level. Several genes in associated metabolic pathways (purine metabolism and various methyltransferases were also affected. The specific nature of the perturbation was additionally reflected by changes in polyamine metabolite levels. Conclusions This study details the malaria parasite's response to PfSpdSyn inhibition on the transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic levels. The results corroborate and significantly expand previous functional genomics studies relating to polyamine depletion in this parasite. Moreover, they confirm the role of transcriptional regulation in P. falciparum, particularly in this pathway. The findings promote this essential pathway as a target for antimalarial chemotherapeutic intervention strategies.

  15. Corticosterone stress response and plasma metabolite levels during breeding and molt in a free-living migratory songbird, the wood thrush (Hylocichla mustelina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Done, Tyler; Gow, Elizabeth A; Stutchbury, Bridget J M

    2011-04-01

    Many birds face energetic trade-offs between different life history stages, such as reproductive effort, feather molt and the non-breeding period. Little is known about how physiological measures of condition (corticosterone, plasma metabolites) in free-living birds change from nesting stages to the post-breeding molt period or whether this is influenced by prior reproductive effort. We evaluated whether corticosterone (CORT) and plasma metabolite levels vary with date, nest stage and sex in a free-living migratory songbird, the wood thrush (Hylocichla mustelina). We also tested whether (1) baseline CORT levels early in the season were predictive of subsequent reproductive success and (2) whether prior reproductive effort influenced CORT levels and blood metabolites during molt. Baseline CORT levels decreased with date during both the incubation stage and nestling stage, but did not vary significantly across stage of breeding season. Stress-induced CORT declined with date during incubation and varied significantly across breeding stage, with lower levels during feather molt. Profiles of the metabolites of β-hydroxybutyrate, glycerol, and triglyceride did not vary significantly with date or breeding stage. Only triglycerides varied significantly with sex, with females having higher levels than males. Reproductive output was highly variable (0-10 fledglings per season) but baseline CORT levels in females during the first incubation period of the season was not related to subsequent reproductive output. Prior reproductive effort, measured as the cumulative number of young hatched during the breeding season, was positively related to stress-induced CORT during molt. High reproductive effort in wood thrush appears to have physiological carry-over effects into the molt period which could potentially affect rate of molt and preparation for fall migration. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β attenuates glucocorticoid-induced suppression of myogenic differentiation in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Ma

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are the only therapy that has been demonstrated to alter the progress of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, the most common muscular dystrophy in children. However, glucocorticoids disturb skeletal muscle metabolism and hamper myogenesis and muscle regeneration. The mechanisms involved in the glucocorticoid-mediated suppression of myogenic differentiation are not fully understood. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β is considered to play a central role as a negative regulator in myogenic differentiation. Here, we showed that glucocorticoid treatment during the first 48 h in differentiation medium decreased the level of phosphorylated Ser9-GSK-3β, an inactive form of GSK-3β, suggesting that glucocorticoids affect GSK-3β activity. We then investigated whether GSK-3β inhibition could regulate glucocorticoid-mediated suppression of myogenic differentiation in vitro. Two methods were employed to inhibit GSK-3β: pharmacological inhibition with LiCl and GSK-3β gene knockdown. We found that both methods resulted in enhanced myotube formation and increased levels of muscle regulatory factors and muscle-specific protein expression. Importantly, GSK-3β inhibition attenuated glucocorticoid-induced suppression of myogenic differentiation. Collectively, these data suggest the involvement of GSK-3β in the glucocorticoid-mediated impairment of myogenic differentiation. Therefore, the inhibition of GSK-3β may be a strategy for preventing glucocorticoid-induced muscle degeneration.

  17. Radioreceptor assay for evaluation of the plasma glucocorticoid activity of natural and synthetic steroids in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, P.L.; Carter, J.P.; Graham, B.S.; Baxter, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    An assay for plasma glucocorticoid activity has been developed using specific glucocorticoid receptors. Unlike other assays for cortisol and certain synthetic corticosteroids, this radioreceptor assay measures the glucocorticoid activity of all natural and synthetic steroids. Steroids extracted from as little as 0.05 ml of plasma are incubated with 3 H-dexamethasone and cytosol receptors from cultured rat hepatoma cells. From 0.5 to 50 ng of cortisol are accurately detected. Glucocorticoid activities of adult plasmas determined by the assay correlate closely with corticoid levels obtained in the CBG-isotope and fluorometric assays. Other steroids are measured in proportion to both concentration and potency as glucocorticoids. Relative activities include: cortisol 100, dexamethasone 940, prednisolone 230, prednisone 3, estradiol 1 and androstenedione 1. A similar ranking of steroids was found using receptors from a human source (fetal lung). The assay has been useful in detecting glucocorticoid activity in unidentified medications and in measuring plasma glucocorticoid levels after administration of synthetic corticosteroids. (auth)

  18. Glucocorticoid control of gene transcription in neural tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, Maarten Christian

    2007-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones exert modulatory effects on neural function in a delayed genomic fashion. The two receptor types that can bind glucocorticoids, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), are ligand-inducible transcription factors. Therefore, changes in gene

  19. FBXW7 regulates glucocorticoid response in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia by targeting the glucocorticoid receptor for degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyukova, A; Brown, S; Papa, R; O'Brien, R; Giles, J; Trahair, T N; Dalla Pozza, L; Sutton, R; Liu, T; Haber, M; Norris, M D; Lock, R B; Sangfelt, O; Marshall, G M

    2013-04-01

    Loss of function mutation in FBXW7, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is associated with good prognosis and early glucocorticoid treatment response in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) by unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that FBXW7 targets the glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα) for ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation in a manner dependent on glycogen synthase kinase 3 β-mediated phsophorylation. FBXW7 inactivation caused elevated GRα levels, and enhanced the transcriptional response to glucocorticoids. There was significant enhancement of GR transcriptional responses in FBXW7-deficient cell lines and primary T-ALL samples, in particular, for those pro-apoptotic regulatory proteins, BIM and PUMA. Reduced FBXW7 expression or function promoted glucocorticoid sensitivity, but not sensitivity to other chemotherapeutic agents used in T-ALL. Moreover, this was a general feature of different cancer cell types. Taken together, our work defines GRα as a novel FBXW7 substrate and demonstrates that favorable patient prognosis in T-ALL is associated with FBXW7 mutations due to enhanced GRα levels and steroid sensitivity. These findings suggest that inactivation of FBXW7, a putative tumor suppressor protein, may create a synthetic lethal state in the presence of specific anticancer therapies.

  20. Despite higher glucocorticoid levels and stress responses in female rats, both sexes exhibit similar stress-induced changes in hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Henriëtte J; Novati, Arianna; Luiten, Paul G M; den Boer, Johan A; Meerlo, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Sex differences in stress reactivity may be one of the factors underlying the increased sensitivity for the development of psychopathologies in women. Particularly, an increased hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis reactivity in females may exacerbate stress-induced changes in neuronal plasticity and neurogenesis, which in turn may contribute to an increased sensitivity to psychopathology. The main aim of the present study was to examine male-female differences in stress-induced changes in different aspects of hippocampal neurogenesis, i.e. cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Both sexes were exposed to a wide variety of stressors, where after differences in HPA-axis reactivity and neurogenesis were assessed. To study the role of oestradiol in potential sex differences, ovariectomized females received low or high physiological oestradiol level replacement pellets. The results show that females in general have a higher basal and stress-induced HPA-axis activity than males, with minimal differences between the two female groups. Cell proliferation in the dorsal hippocampus was significantly higher in high oestradiol females compared to low oestradiol females and males, while doublecortin (DCX) expression as a marker of cell differentiation was significantly higher in males compared to females, independent of oestradiol level. Stress exposure did not significantly influence cell proliferation or survival of new cells, but did reduce DCX expression. In conclusion, despite the male-female differences in HPA-axis activity, the effect of repeated stress exposure on hippocampal cell differentiation was not significantly different between sexes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of chronic x-ray exposure on adrenal glucocorticoid function and adrenocorticocyte membrane potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorban', Je.M.; Topol'nikova, N.V.

    1998-01-01

    The peculiarities of adrenal glucocorticoid function and membrane potential (MP) of zona fasciculata adrenocorticocyte (ACC) in rats after chronic x-ray exposure was studied. The changes of adrenal glucocorticoid function caused by chronic x-ray exposure within a relatively small period of irradiation (1.5 months) are obscure and manifest themselves only at physiological load. With the prolongation of the period (8 and 15 months), more considerable inhibition of the adrenal glucocorticoid function and disturbances in the membrane mechanisms of ACC MP level regulation are revealed

  2. Protozoan growth rates on secondary-metabolite-producing Pseudomonas spp. correlate with high-level protozoan taxonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Annette L.; Winding, Anne; Altenburger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Different features can protect bacteria against protozoan grazing, for example large size, rapid movement, and production of secondary metabolites. Most papers dealing with these matters focus on bacteria. Here, we describe protozoan features that affect their ability to grow on secondary-metabol...

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of catecholamine metabolites in Parkinson’s disease and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann Andersen, Andreas; Binzer, Michael; Stenager, Egon

    -dyskinetic PD patients and controls. Method: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 6 age-matched controls and 16 PD patients, (11 receiving levodopa, 6 dyskinetic and 6 not receiving levodopa), was analysed for catecholamines and metabolites by HPLC with electrochemical detection. Samples were collected after overnight...

  4. NALP3 inflammasome upregulation and CASP1 cleavage of the glucocorticoid receptor cause glucocorticoid resistance in leukemia cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W. Paugh (Steven); E.J. Bonten (Erik J.); D. Savic (Daniel); L.B. Ramsey (Laura B.); W.E. Thierfelder (William E.); P. Gurung (Prajwal); R.K.S. Malireddi (R. K. Subbarao); M. Actis (Marcelo); A. Mayasundari (Anand); J. Min (Jaeki); D.R. Coss (David R.); L.T. Laudermilk (Lucas T.); J.C. Panetta (John); J.R. McCorkle (J. Robert); Y. Fan (Yiping); K.R. Crews (Kristine R.); G. Stocco (Gabriele); M.R. Wilkinson (Mark R.); A.M. Ferreira (Antonio M.); C. Cheng (Cheng); W. Yang (Wenjian); S.E. Karol (Seth E.); C.A. Fernandez (Christian A.); B. Diouf (Barthelemy); C. Smith (Colton); J.K. Hicks (J Kevin); A. Zanut (Alessandra); A. Giordanengo (Audrey); D.J. Crona; J.J. Bianchi (Joy J.); L. Holmfeldt (Linda); C.G. Mullighan (Charles); M.L. den Boer (Monique); R. Pieters (Rob); S. Jeha (Sima); T.L. Dunwell (Thomas L.); F. Latif (Farida); D. Bhojwani (Deepa); W.L. Carroll (William L.); C.-H. Pui (Ching-Hon); R.M. Myers (Richard M.); R.K. Guy (R Kiplin); T.-D. Kanneganti (Thirumala-Devi); M.V. Relling (Mary); W.E. Evans (William)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGlucocorticoids are universally used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and resistance to glucocorticoids in leukemia cells confers poor prognosis. To elucidate mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance, we determined the prednisolone sensitivity of primary leukemia

  5. Glucocorticoid receptors in anorexia nervosa and Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invitti, C; Redaelli, G; Baldi, G; Cavagnini, F

    1999-06-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa do not display cushingoid features in spite of elevated cortisol plasma levels. Whether a cortisol resistance or a reduced availability of the metabolic substrates necessary to develop the effect of glucocorticoids is responsible for this has not been established. Twenty-two patients with severe restrictive anorexia nervosa, 10 patients with active Cushing's disease, and 24 healthy volunteers without psychiatric disorders or mood alterations were investigated. Glucocorticoid receptor characteristics were examined on mononuclear leukocytes by measuring [3H]dexamethasone binding and the effect of dexamethasone on [3H]thymidine incorporation, which represents an index of DNA synthesis. The number of glucocorticoid receptors on mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) was comparable in patients with anorexia nervosa, patients with active Cushing's disease, and normal subjects (binding capacity 3.3 +/- 0.23 vs. 3.7 +/- 0.30 and 3.5 +/- 0.20 fmol/10(6) cells). Conversely, glucocorticoid receptor affinity was significantly decreased in anorexia nervosa as well as in Cushing's patients compared to control subjects (dissociation constant 4.0 +/- 0.31 and 4.1 +/- 0.34 vs. 2.9 +/- 0.29 nmol/L, p Cushing's patients compared to control subjects (p Cushing's disease. In patients with anorexia nervosa, the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into the MNL was inversely correlated with urinary free cortisol levels. These data indicate that the lack of cushingoid features in patients with anorexia nervosa is not ascribable to a reduced sensitivity to glucocorticoids but is more likely due to the paucity of metabolic substrates.

  6. A case report: Familial glucocorticoid deficiency associated with familial focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Nanik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by isolated glucocorticoid deficiency in the presence of normal plasma renin and aldosterone level. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS is a form of glomerular disease associated with proteinuria and nephritic syndrome. This is the first case of familial glucocorticoid deficiency associated with familial focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Case presentation An eight month old boy presented with increased genital pigmentation. Initial investigation revealed that he was glucocorticoid deficient and was started on hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone with a diagnosis of primary adrenal insufficiency. Later fludrocortisone was withdrawn and he was diagnosed to have isolated glucocorticoid deficiency. He later developed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis for which he underwent renal transplantation at the age of five years. Now at the age of twelve years, this boy is doing well on hydrocortisone treatment. His two siblings and a first degree cousin also had isolated glucocorticoid deficiency. One of the above two siblings died due to renal failure secondary to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Conclusion Patients with familial glucocorticoid deficiency should be carefully followed for development of features of nephrotic syndrome.

  7. Bone and glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briot, Karine

    2018-06-01

    Corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis is the most common form of secondary osteoporosis and the most frequent cause of osteoporosis in young people. Bone loss and fracture risk increase rapidly after the initiation of corticosteroid therapy and are proportional to dose and treatment duration. The increase in fracture risk is not fully assessed by bone mineral density measurement, as it is also related to impaired bone quality and increased risk of falls. Prevention should be considered in all patients beginning corticosteroid therapy, especially as the underlying inflammation in itself impairs bone quality. Bisphosphonates and teriparatide have shown efficacy in the treatment of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis. Several national and international guidelines are available to improve management of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis, which remains inadequate. Duration of anti-osteoporotic treatment should be discussed at the individual level, depending on the subject's characteristics and on the progression of the underlying inflammation. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. The prognostic value of multivoxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy determined metabolite levels in white and grey matter brain tissue for adverse outcome in term newborns following perinatal asphyxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doormaal, Pieter Jan van [University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Groningen (Netherlands); Meander Medical Center Amersfoort, Department of Radiology, PO Box 1502, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Meiners, Linda C.; Sijens, Paul E. [University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Horst, Hendrik J. ter; Veere, Christa N. van der [University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-04-15

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy can identify brain metabolic changes in perinatal asphyxia by providing ratios of metabolites, such as choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and lactate (Lact) [Cho/Cr, Lact/NAA, etc.]. The purpose of this study was to quantify the separate white and grey matter metabolites in a slab cranial to the ventricles and relate these to the outcome. A standard 2D-chemical shift imaging protocol was used for measuring a transverse volume of interest located cranial to the ventricles allowing for direct comparison of the metabolites in white and grey matter brain tissue in 24 term asphyxiated newborns aged 3 to 16 days. Cho, NAA and Lact showed significant differences between four subgroups of asphyxiated infants with more and less favourable outcomes. High levels of Cho and Lact in the grey matter differentiated non-survivors from survivors (P = 0.003 and P = 0.017, respectively). In perinatal asphyxia the levels of Cho, NAA and Lact in both white and grey matter brain tissue are affected. The levels of Cho and Lact measured in the grey matter are the most indicative of survival. It is therefore advised to include grey matter brain tissue in the region of interest examined by multivoxel MR spectroscopy. (orig.)

  9. The prognostic value of multivoxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy determined metabolite levels in white and grey matter brain tissue for adverse outcome in term newborns following perinatal asphyxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doormaal, Pieter Jan van; Meiners, Linda C.; Sijens, Paul E.; Horst, Hendrik J. ter; Veere, Christa N. van der

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy can identify brain metabolic changes in perinatal asphyxia by providing ratios of metabolites, such as choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and lactate (Lact) [Cho/Cr, Lact/NAA, etc.]. The purpose of this study was to quantify the separate white and grey matter metabolites in a slab cranial to the ventricles and relate these to the outcome. A standard 2D-chemical shift imaging protocol was used for measuring a transverse volume of interest located cranial to the ventricles allowing for direct comparison of the metabolites in white and grey matter brain tissue in 24 term asphyxiated newborns aged 3 to 16 days. Cho, NAA and Lact showed significant differences between four subgroups of asphyxiated infants with more and less favourable outcomes. High levels of Cho and Lact in the grey matter differentiated non-survivors from survivors (P = 0.003 and P = 0.017, respectively). In perinatal asphyxia the levels of Cho, NAA and Lact in both white and grey matter brain tissue are affected. The levels of Cho and Lact measured in the grey matter are the most indicative of survival. It is therefore advised to include grey matter brain tissue in the region of interest examined by multivoxel MR spectroscopy. (orig.)

  10. Optimal glucocorticoid replacement in adrenal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øksnes, Marianne; Ross, Richard; Løvås, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal insufficiency (glucocorticoid deficiency) comprises a group of rare diseases, including primary adrenal insufficiency, secondary adrenal insufficiency and congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Lifesaving glucocorticoid therapy was introduced over 60 years ago, but since then a number of advances in treatment have taken place. Specifically, little is known about short- and long-term treatment effects, and morbidity and mortality. Over the past decade, systematic cohort and registry studies have described reduced health-related quality of life, an unfavourable metabolic profile and increased mortality in patients with adrenal insufficiency, which may relate to unphysiological glucocorticoid replacement. This has led to the development of new modes of replacement that aim to mimic normal glucocorticoid physiology. Here, evidence for the inadequacy of conventional glucocorticoid therapy and recent developments in treatment are reviewed, with an emphasis on primary adrenal insufficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Glucocorticoids as mediators of developmental programming effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khulan, Batbayar; Drake, Amanda J

    2012-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to an adverse environment in early life is associated with an increased risk of cardio-metabolic and behavioral disorders in adulthood, a phenomenon termed 'early life programming'. One major hypothesis for early life programming is fetal glucocorticoid overexposure. In animal studies, prenatal glucocorticoid excess as a consequence of maternal stress or through exogenous administration to the mother or fetus is associated with programming effects on cardiovascular and metabolic systems and on the brain. These effects can be transmitted to subsequent generations. Studies in humans provide some evidence that prenatal glucocorticoid exposure may exert similar programming effects on glucose/insulin homeostasis, blood pressure and neurodevelopment. The mechanisms by which glucocorticoids mediate these effects are unclear but may include a role for epigenetic modifications. This review discusses the evidence for glucocorticoid programming in animal models and in humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Testosterone supplementation, glucocorticoid milieu and bone homeostasis in the ageing male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajdžanović, Vladimir Z; Filipović, Branko R; Šošić Jurjević, Branka T; Milošević, Verica Lj

    2017-08-01

    Male ageing is entwined with a continuous fall in free testosterone levels, which contributes to the pathogenesis of bone loss. Glucocorticoid excess, either dependent on the ageing process or iatrogenically induced, was found to additionally impair the bone structure and metabolism. Cautious testosterone supplementation in this respect may positively affect the glucocorticoid milieu and bone homeostasis, while testosterone-induced changes in the glucocorticoid output could serve as a determinant of bone-related therapeutic outcome. Namely, bone mineral content/density, the parameters of trabecular bone structure as well as bone strength are enhanced, serum calcitonin levels tend to increase, while serum osteocalcin, serum parathyroid hormone and urinary calcium decrease, all upon testosterone administration to the ageing male. In parallel, testosterone application decreases glucocorticoid secretion in the animal models of male ageing, while clinical data in this field are still inconsistent. Importantly, a physiological link exists between testosterone-induced changes in glucocorticoid levels and the tendency of bone status improvement in the ageing male. We believe that the assessment of circulating adrenocorticotropic hormone concentrations together with glucocorticoid levels, reflecting the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis feedback loop operativeness during testosterone supplementation, represents a well-balanced bone-related therapeutic update. © 2017 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  13. Glucocorticoid effects on object recognition memory require training-associated emotional arousal

    OpenAIRE

    Okuda, Shoki; Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2004-01-01

    Considerable evidence implicates glucocorticoid hormones in the regulation of memory consolidation and memory retrieval. The present experiments investigated whether the influence of these hormones on memory depends on the level of emotional arousal induced by the training experience. We investigated this issue in male Sprague–Dawley rats by examining the effects of immediate posttraining systemic injections of the glucocorticoid corticosterone on object recognition memory under two condition...

  14. Drug metabolism in human brain: high levels of cytochrome P4503A43 in brain and metabolism of anti-anxiety drug alprazolam to its active metabolite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Agarwal

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450 (P450 is a super-family of drug metabolizing enzymes. P450 enzymes have dual function; they can metabolize drugs to pharmacologically inactive metabolites facilitating their excretion or biotransform them to pharmacologically active metabolites which may have longer half-life than the parent drug. The variable pharmacological response to psychoactive drugs typically seen in population groups is often not accountable by considering dissimilarities in hepatic metabolism. Metabolism in brain specific nuclei may play a role in pharmacological modulation of drugs acting on the CNS and help explain some of the diverse response to these drugs seen in patient population. P450 enzymes are also present in brain where drug metabolism can take place and modify therapeutic action of drugs at the site of action. We have earlier demonstrated an intrinsic difference in the biotransformation of alprazolam (ALP in brain and liver, relatively more alpha-hydroxy alprazolam (alpha-OHALP is formed in brain as compared to liver. In the present study we show that recombinant CYP3A43 metabolizes ALP to both alpha-OHALP and 4-hydroxy alprazolam (4-OHALP while CYP3A4 metabolizes ALP predominantly to its inactive metabolite, 4-OHALP. The expression of CYP3A43 mRNA in human brain samples correlates with formation of relatively higher levels of alpha-OH ALP indicating that individuals who express higher levels of CYP3A43 in the brain would generate larger amounts of alpha-OHALP. Further, the expression of CYP3A43 was relatively higher in brain as compared to liver across different ethnic populations. Since CYP3A enzymes play a prominent role in the metabolism of drugs, the higher expression of CYP3A43 would generate metabolite profile of drugs differentially in human brain and thus impact the pharmacodynamics of psychoactive drugs at the site of action.

  15. Steroid receptor profiling of vinclozolin and its primary metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina-Molina, Jose-Manuel; Hillenweck, Anne; Jouanin, Isabelle; Zalko, Daniel; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Fernandez, Mariana-Fatima; Pillon, Arnaud; Nicolas, Jean-Claude; Olea, Nicolas; Balaguer, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Several pesticides and fungicides commonly used to control agricultural and indoor pests are highly suspected to display endocrine-disrupting effects in animals and humans. Endocrine disruption is mainly caused by the interference of chemicals at the level of steroid receptors: it is now well known that many of these chemicals can display estrogenic effects and/or anti-androgenic effects, but much less is known about the interaction of these compounds with other steroid receptors. Vinclozolin, a dicarboximide fungicide, like its primary metabolites 2-[[(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-carbamoyl]oxy]-2-methyl-3-butenoic acid (M1), and 3',5'-dichloro-2-hydroxy-2-methylbut-3-enanilide (M2), is known to bind androgen receptor (AR). Although vinclozolin and its metabolites were characterized as anti-androgens, relatively little is known about their effects on the function of the progesterone (PR), glucocorticoid (GR), mineralocorticoid (MR) or estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ). Objectives of the study were to determine the ability of vinclozolin and its two primary metabolites to activate AR, PR, GR, MR and ER. For this purpose, we used reporter cell lines bearing luciferase gene under the control of wild type or chimeric Gal4 fusion AR, PR, GR, MR or ERs. We confirmed that all three were antagonists for AR, whereas only M2 was found a partial agonist. Interestingly, M2 was also a PR, GR and MR antagonist (MR >> PR > GR) while vinclozolin was an MR and PR antagonist. Vinclozolin, M1 and M2 were agonists for both ERs with a lower affinity for ERβ. Although the potencies of the fungicide and its metabolites are low when compared to natural ligands, their ability to act via more than one mechanism and the potential for additive or synergistic effect must be taken into consideration in the risk assessment process

  16. Steroid receptor profiling of vinclozolin and its primary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Molina, José-Manuel; Hillenweck, Anne; Jouanin, Isabelle; Zalko, Daniel; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Fernández, Mariana-Fátima; Pillon, Arnaud; Nicolas, Jean-Claude; Olea, Nicolás; Balaguer, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    Several pesticides and fungicides commonly used to control agricultural and indoor pests are highly suspected to display endocrine-disrupting effects in animals and humans. Endocrine disruption is mainly caused by the interference of chemicals at the level of steroid receptors: it is now well known that many of these chemicals can display estrogenic effects and/or anti-androgenic effects, but much less is known about the interaction of these compounds with other steroid receptors. Vinclozolin, a dicarboximide fungicide, like its primary metabolites 2-[[(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-carbamoyl]oxy]-2-methyl-3-butenoic acid (M1), and 3',5'-dichloro-2-hydroxy-2-methylbut-3-enanilide (M2), is known to bind androgen receptor (AR). Although vinclozolin and its metabolites were characterized as anti-androgens, relatively little is known about their effects on the function of the progesterone (PR), glucocorticoid (GR), mineralocorticoid (MR) or estrogen receptors (ERalpha and ERbeta). Objectives of the study were to determine the ability of vinclozolin and its two primary metabolites to activate AR, PR, GR, MR and ER. For this purpose, we used reporter cell lines bearing luciferase gene under the control of wild type or chimeric Gal4 fusion AR, PR, GR, MR or ERs. We confirmed that all three were antagonists for AR, whereas only M2 was found a partial agonist. Interestingly, M2 was also a PR, GR and MR antagonist (MR>PR>GR) while vinclozolin was an MR and PR antagonist. Vinclozolin, M1 and M2 were agonists for both ERs with a lower affinity for ERbeta. Although the potencies of the fungicide and its metabolites are low when compared to natural ligands, their ability to act via more than one mechanism and the potential for additive or synergistic effect must be taken into consideration in the risk assessment process.

  17. How does stress affect human being—a molecular dynamic simulation study on cortisol and its glucocorticoid receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress can be either positive or negative to human beings. Under stressful conditions, the mental and physical conditions of human can be affected. There exists certain relation between stress and illness. The cortisol and other glucocorticoids bind to the same receptor, which is called glucocorticoid receptor. Some evidences indicated that cortisol molecule binding to its glucocorticoid receptor was necessary for the stress response. Up to now, the structure–function relationships between cortisol molecule and its glucocorticoid receptor have not been deliberated from the atomic-level. In order to get a detailed understanding of the structure–function relationships between the cortisol molecule and glucocorticoids receptor, we have carried out molecular dynamic (MD simulations on glucocorticoid receptor (Apo system and cortisol with its glucocorticoid receptor complex (HCY system. On the basis of molecular dynamic simulations, a couple of key residues were identified, which were crucial for the binding of cortisol molecule. The results of binding free energy calculations are in good agreement with the experiment data. Our research gives clear insights from atomic-level into the structural–functional aspects of cortisol molecule and its glucocorticoid receptor, and also provides valuable information for the design of drug which can treat stress related illnesses.

  18. SDF-1 improves wound healing ability of glucocorticoid-treated adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Toshiki; Khanh, Vuong Cat; Sato, Kazutoshi; Takeuchi, Kosuke; Carolina, Erica; Yamashita, Toshiharu; Sugaya, Hisashi; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Mishima, Hajime; Ohneda, Osamu

    2017-11-18

    Glucocorticoids cause the delayed wound healing by suppressing inflammation that is required for wound healing process. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) play an important role for wound healing by their cytokine productions including stromal derived factor 1 (SDF-1). However, it has not been clear how glucocorticoids affect the wound healing ability of AT-MSCs. In this study, we found that glucocorticoid downregulated SDF-1 expression in AT-MSCs. In addition, glucocorticoid-treated AT-MSCs induced less migration of inflammatory cells and impaired wound healing capacity compared with glucocorticoid-untreated AT-MSCs. Of note, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis-related gene expression was downregulated by glucocorticoid and PGE2 treatment rescued not only SDF-1 expression in the presence of glucocorticoid but also their wound healing capacity in vivo. Furthermore, we found SDF-1-overexpressed AT-MSCs restored wound healing capacity even after treatment of glucocorticoid. Consistent with the results obtained from glucocorticoid-treated AT-MSCs, we found that AT-MSCs isolated from steroidal osteonecrosis donors (sAT-MSCs) who received chronic glucocorticoid therapy showed less SDF-1 expression and impaired wound healing capacity compared with traumatic osteonecrosis donor-derived AT-MSCs (nAT-MSCs). Moreover, the SDF-1 level was also reduced in plasma derived from steroidal osteonecrosis donors compared with traumatic osteonecrosis donors. These results provide the evidence that concomitant application of AT-MSCs with glucocorticoid shows impaired biological modulatory effects that induce impaired wound healing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of a five-day vegetarian diet on urinary levels of antibiotics and phthalate metabolites: a pilot study with "Temple Stay" participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Kyunghee; Lim Kho, Young; Park, Yoonsuk; Choi, Kyungho

    2010-05-01

    Diet is purported to be means of exposure to many environmental contaminants. The purpose of this study is to understand the influence of dietary change on the levels of exposure to several environmental chemicals - in particular, antibiotics and phthalates. For this purpose, we examined the extent to which short-term changes in diet influenced the inadvertent exposure levels to these chemicals in an adult population. We recruited participants (n=25) of a five-day 'Temple Stay' program in Korea and collected urine samples before and after the program. We also conducted a questionnaire survey on participants' dietary patterns prior to their participation. During the program, participants followed the daily routines of Buddhist monks and maintained a vegetarian diet. Urinary levels of three antibiotics and their major metabolites, metabolites of four major phthalates, and malondialdehyde (MDA) as an oxidative stress biomarker were analyzed. The frequency and levels of detection for antibiotics and phthalates noticeably decreased during the program. Urinary MDA levels were significantly lower than before program participation (0.16 versus 0.27mg/g creatinine). Although the exposure to target compounds might be influenced by other behavioral patterns, these results suggest that even short-term changes in dietary behavior may significantly decrease inadvertent exposure to antibiotics and phthalates and hence may reduce oxidative stress levels. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Associations between five-factor model of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and plasma levels of monoamine metabolite in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenya; Miura, Itaru; Kanno-Nozaki, Keiko; Horikoshi, Sho; Mashiko, Hirobumi; Niwa, Shin-Ichi; Yabe, Hirooki

    2015-12-15

    The five-factor model of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) for schizophrenia symptoms is the most common multiple-factor model used in analyses; its use may improve evaluation of symptoms in schizophrenia patients. Plasma monoamine metabolite levels are possible indicators of clinical symptoms or response to antipsychotics in schizophrenia. We investigated the association between five-factor model components and plasma monoamine metabolites levels to explore the model's biological basis. Plasma levels of homovanillic acid (HVA), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography in 65 Japanese patients with schizophrenia. Significant negative correlation between plasma 5-HIAA levels and the depression/anxiety component was found. Furthermore, significant positive correlation was found between plasma MHPG levels and the excitement component. Plasma HVA levels were not correlated with any five-factor model component. These results suggest that the five-factor model of the PANSS may have a biological basis, and may be useful for elucidating the psychopathology of schizophrenia. Assessment using the five-factor model may enable understanding of monoaminergic dysfunction, possibly allowing more appropriate medication selection. Further studies of a larger number of first-episode schizophrenia patients are needed to confirm and extend these results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chronic Stress and Glucocorticoids: From Neuronal Plasticity to Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheela Vyas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress and stress hormones, glucocorticoids (GCs, exert widespread actions in central nervous system, ranging from the regulation of gene transcription, cellular signaling, modulation of synaptic structure, and transmission and glial function to behavior. Their actions are mediated by glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors which are nuclear receptors/transcription factors. While GCs primarily act to maintain homeostasis by inducing physiological and behavioral adaptation, prolonged exposure to stress and elevated GC levels may result in neuro- and psychopathology. There is now ample evidence for cause-effect relationships between prolonged stress, elevated GC levels, and cognitive and mood disorders while the evidence for a link between chronic stress/GC and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s (AD and Parkinson’s (PD diseases is growing. This brief review considers some of the cellular mechanisms through which stress and GC may contribute to the pathogenesis of AD and PD.

  2. Inhibition of aromatase activity by methyl sulfonyl PCB metabolites in primary culture of human mammary fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, M. van den; Heneweer, M.; Geest, M. de; Sanderson, T. [Inst. for Risk Assessment Sciences and Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands); Jong, P. de [St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Bergman, A. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    Methyl sulfonyl PCB metabolites (MeSO2-PCBs) are persistent contaminants and are ubiquitously present in humans and the environment. Lipophilicity of MeSO2- PCB metabolites is similar to the parent compounds and they have been detected in human milk, adipose, liver and lung tissue. 4- MeSO2-PCB-149 is the most abundant PCB metabolite in human adipose tissue and milk at a level of 1.5 ng/g lipids. Human blood concentration of 4-MeSO2-PCB-149 is approximately 0.03 nM. 3- MeSO2-PCB-101 is the predominant PCB metabolite in muscle and blubber in wildlife, such as otter, mink and grey seal. In the environment, they have been linked to chronic and reproductive toxicity in exposed mink. Additionaly, some MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs have been shown to be glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonists. Since approximately 60% of all breast tumors are estrogen responsive, exposure to compounds that are able to alter estrogen synthesis through interference with the aromatase enzyme, can lead to changes in estrogen levels and possibly to accelerated or inhibit breast tumor growth. Therefore, it is important to identify exogenous compounds that can alter aromatase activity in addition to those compounds which have direct interaction with the estrogen receptor (ER). Aromatase (CYP19) comprises the ubiquitous flavoprotein, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, and a unique cytochrome P450 that is exclusively expressed in estrogen producing cells. Previous studies have revealed that expression of the aromatase gene is regulated in a species- and tissue specific manner. In healthy breast tissue, the predominantly active aromatase promoter region I.4 is regulated by glucocorticoids and class I cytokines. Therefore, it is important to investigate possible aromatase inhibiting properties of MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs (as anti glucocorticoids?) in relevant human tissues. We used primary human mammary fibroblasts because of their role in breast cancer development. We compared the results in primary fibroblasts with

  3. Stabilization of glucocorticoid receptors in isolated rat hepatocytes by radioprotectants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karle, J.M.; Ridder, W.E.; Wright, N.; Olmeda, R.; Nielsen, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    Previous work has shown that glucocorticoid receptors in rat liver homogenate can be stabilized by the addition of MoO 4 plus the sulfhydryl-containing compounds dithiothreitol and WR 1065. The latter is the dephosphorylated, principal metabolite of the radioprotectant WR 2721 (or S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethanesphosphorothioic acid). The current work results from applying this knowledge to intact rat hepatocytes. Cells were isolated by collagenase perfusion and incubated in supplemented minimum essential medium at 37 0 C with various concentrations of WR 2721, WR 1065, or vehicle. Samples of these cell suspensions were analyzed at various times for steroid binding capacity by incubating homogenates (27,000 x g supernates) with 50 nM 3 H-triamcinolone acetonide in the presence or absence of excess unlabelled dexamethasone. Concentrations of 10 mM WR 2721 provided marked preservation of the binding capacity (>85% of the initial value at 5 hours) compared to control at 60% of the binding capacity. WR 1065 at 10 mM provided no such protection. This is consistent with the observation that WR 1065 does not pass cell membranes. The authors propose that supplying reducing equivalents to intracellular components such as the glucocorticoid receptor may be one mechanism of the radioprotection afforded by WR 2721

  4. Photosynthetic induction in a C4, Flaveria trinervia. I. Initial products of 14CO2 assimilation and levels of whole leaf C4 metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, B.D.; Edwards, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    Labeling patterns from 14 CO 2 pulses to leaves and whole leaf metabolite contents were examined during photosynthetic induction in Flaveria trinervia, a C 4 dicot of the NADP-malic enzyme subgroup. During the first one to two minutes of illumination, malate was the primary initial product of 14 CO 2 assimilation (about 77% of total 14 C incorporated). After about 5 minutes of illumination, the proportion of initial label to aspartate increased from 16 to 66%, and then gradually declined during the following 7 to 10 minutes of illumination. Nutrition experiments showed that the increase in 14 CO 2 partitioning to aspartate was delayed about 2.5 minutes in plants grown with limiting N, and was highly dampened in plants previously treated 10 to 12 days with ammonia as the sole N source. Measurements of C 4 leaf metabolites revealed several transients in metabolite pools during the first few minutes of illumination, and subsequently, more gradual adjustments in pool sizes. These include a large initial decrease in malate (about 1.6 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll) and a small initial decrease in pyruvate. There was a transient increase in alanine levels after 1 minute of illumination, which was followed by a gradual, prolonged decrease during the remainder of the induction period. Total leaf aspartate decreased initially, but temporarily doubled in amount between 5 and 10 minutes of illumination (after its surge as a primary product). These results are discussed in terms of a plausible sequence of metabolic events which lead to the formation of the intercellular metabolite gradients required in C 4 photosynthesis

  5. Adrenal responses of large whales: Integrating fecal aldosterone as a complementary biomarker to glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Elizabeth A; Hunt, Kathleen E; Kraus, Scott D; Rolland, Rosalind M

    2017-10-01

    Until now, physiological stress assessment of large whales has predominantly focused on adrenal glucocorticoid (GC) measures. Elevated GC concentrations in feces (fGC) are known to reflect stressful disturbances, such as fishing gear entanglement and human-generated underwater noise, in North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis). However, there can be considerable variation in GC production as a function of sex and life history stage, which may confound the interpretation of fGC levels. Additionally, GC antibodies used in immunoassays can cross-react with other fecal metabolites (i.e., non-target steroids), potentially influencing fGC data. Here, aldosterone concentrations (fALD; aldosterone and related metabolites) were measured in fecal samples from right whales (total n=315 samples), including samples from identified individuals of known life history (n=82 individual whales), to evaluate its utility as a complementary biomarker to fGC for identifying adrenal activation. Concentrations of fALD were positively correlated with fGCs in right whales (r=0.59, Pwhales, fALD concentrations showed similar patterns to those reported for fGC, with higher levels in pregnant females (35.9±7.6ng/g) followed by reproductively mature males (9.5±0.9ng/g) (Pwhales. The addition of fALD measurement as a biomarker of adrenal activation may help distinguish between intrinsic and external causes of stress hormone elevations in large whales, as well as other free-living wildlife species, providing a more comprehensive approach for associating adrenal activation with specific natural and anthropogenic stressors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Circumvention of glucocorticoid resistance in childhood leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarman, E G; Kaspers, G J L; Pieters, R; Rottier, M M A; Veerman, A J P

    2008-09-01

    In this study, we determined if in vitro resistance to prednisolone and dexamethasone could be circumvented by cortivazol or methylprednisolone, or reversed by meta-iodobenzylguanidine in pediatric lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemia. As there were strong correlations between the LC50 values (drug concentration inducing 50% leukemic cell kill, LCK) of the different glucocorticoids and median prednisolone/methylprednisolone, prednisolone/dexamethasone and prednisolone/cortivazol LC50 ratios did not differ between the leukemia subtypes, we conclude that none of the glucocorticoids had preferential anti-leukemic activity. Meta-iodobenzylguanidine however, partially reversed glucocorticoid resistance in 19% of the lymphoblastic leukemia samples.

  7. Systems-Level Annotation of a Metabolomics Data Set Reduces 25 000 Features to Fewer than 1000 Unique Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, Nathaniel G; Patti, Gary J

    2017-10-03

    When using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to perform untargeted metabolomics, it is now routine to detect tens of thousands of features from biological samples. Poor understanding of the data, however, has complicated interpretation and masked the number of unique metabolites actually being measured in an experiment. Here we place an upper bound on the number of unique metabolites detected in Escherichia coli samples analyzed with one untargeted metabolomics method. We first group multiple features arising from the same analyte, which we call "degenerate features", using a context-driven annotation approach. Surprisingly, this analysis revealed thousands of previously unreported degeneracies that reduced the number of unique analytes to ∼2961. We then applied an orthogonal approach to remove nonbiological features from the data using the 13 C-based credentialing technology. This further reduced the number of unique analytes to less than 1000. Our 90% reduction in data is 5-fold greater than previously published studies. On the basis of the results, we propose an alternative approach to untargeted metabolomics that relies on thoroughly annotated reference data sets. To this end, we introduce the creDBle database ( http://creDBle.wustl.edu ), which contains accurate mass, retention time, and MS/MS fragmentation data as well as annotations of all credentialed features.

  8. A radioreceptor assay for measurement of plasma glucocorticoid binding activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Jie

    1990-01-01

    A radioreceptor assay (RRA) for plasma glucocorticoid binding activity (GCBA) has been developed using glucocorticoid receptor in rat thymocytes. Unlike other assays for natural and certain synthetic corticosteroids, RRA measures the GCBA of all natural and synthetic GC in plasma. The range of standard curve was 0 ∼ 1.00 mg/L. The sensitivity was 0.01 mg/l. The recovery rate was 92.1%, and the intra and inter assay CV was 0.7% (n = 3) and 4.4% (n = 3) respectively. The level of corticosterone in 9 rat plasma samples was determined by RRA and CBG-isotope binding assay. There was a general correlation over a wide range between the values determined by the two assays (r = 0.95; P < 0.001). The measuring condition was described in detail

  9. A comparative study on diurnal changes in metabolite levels in the leaves of three crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species, Ananas comosus, Kalanchoë daigremontiana and K. pinnata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Song; Lin, Qin; Nose, Akihiro

    2002-02-01

    A comparative study on diurnal changes in metabolite levels associated with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in the leaves of three CAM species, Ananas comosus (pineapple), a hexose-utilizing species, and Kalanchoë daigremontiana and K. pinnata, two starch-utilizing species, were made. All three CAM species showed a typical feature of CAM with nocturnal malate increase. In the two Kalanchoë species, isocitrate levels were higher than citrate levels; the reverse was the case in pineapple. In the two Kalanchoë species, a small nocturnal citrate increase was found and K. daigremontiana showed a small nocturnal isocitrate increase. Glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P), fructose 6-phosphate (F-6-P) and glucose 1-phosphate (G-1-P) levels in the three CAM species rose rapidly during the first part of the dark period and decreased during the latter part of the dark period. The levels of the metabolites also decreased during the first 3 h of the light period, then, remained little changed through the rest of the light period. Absolute levels of G-6-P, F-6-P and G-1-P were higher in pineapple than in the two Kalanchoë species. Fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-P(2)) levels in the three CAM species increased during the dark period, then dramatically decreased during the first 3 h of the light period and remained unchanged through the rest of the light period. The extent of nocturnal F-1,6-P(2) increase was far greater in the two Kalanchoë species than in pineapple. Absolute levels of F-1,6-P(2) were higher in the two Kalanchoë species than in pineapple, especially during dark period. Diurnal changes in oxaloacetate (OAA), pyruvate (Pyr) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) levels in the three CAM species were similar.

  10. Do the interactions between glucocorticoids and sex hormones regulate the development of the Metabolic Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marià eAlemany

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome is basically a maturity-onset disease. Typically, its manifestations begin to flourish years after the initial dietary or environmental aggression began. Since most hormonal, metabolic or defense responses are practically immediate, the procrastinated response don't seem justified. Only in childhood, the damages of the metabolic syndrome appear with minimal delay. Sex affects the incidence of the metabolic syndrome, but this is more an effect of timing than absolute gender differences, females holding better than males up to menopause, when the differences between sexes tend to disappear. The metabolic syndrome is related to an immune response, countered by a permanent increase in glucocorticoids, which keep the immune system at bay but also induce insulin resistance, alter the lipid metabolism, favor fat deposition, mobilize protein and decrease androgen synthesis. Androgens limit the operation of glucocorticoids, which is also partly blocked by estrogens, since they decrease inflammation (which enhances glucocorticoid release. These facts suggest that the appearance of the metabolic syndrome symptoms depends on the strength (i.e. levels of androgens and estrogens. The predominance of glucocorticoids and the full manifestation of the syndrome in men are favored by decreased androgen activity. Low androgens can be found in infancy, maturity, advanced age, or because of their inhibition by glucocorticoids (inflammation, stress, medical treatment. Estrogens decrease inflammation and reduce the glucocorticoid response. Low estrogen (infancy, menopause again allow the predominance of glucocorticoids and the manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. It is postulated that the equilibrium between sex hormones and glucocorticoids may be a critical element in the timing of the manifestation of metabolic syndrome-related pathologies.

  11. Glucocorticoids are ineffective in alcoholic hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, E; Gluud, C

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials of glucocorticoid treatment in clinical alcoholic hepatitis, adjusting for prognostic variables and their possible interaction with therapy, because these trials have given appreciably different results. Weighted...... logistic regression analysis was applied using the summarised descriptive data (for example, % with encephalopathy, mean bilirubin value) of the treatment and control groups of 12 controlled trials that gave this information. Despite evidence of publication bias favouring glucocorticoid treatment, its...... overall effect on mortality was not statistically significant (p = 0.20)--the relative risk (steroid/control) was 0.78 (95% confidence intervals 0.51, 1.18). There was indication of interaction between glucocorticoid therapy and gender, but not encephalopathy. Thus, the effect of glucocorticoid treatment...

  12. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Labeur

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the most recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. Most effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by the intracellular GR which is present in almost every tissue and controls transcriptional activation via direct and indirect mechanisms. Nevertheless the glucocorticoid responses are tissue -and gene- specific. GR associates selectively with corticosteroid ligands produced in the adrenal gland in response to changes of humoral homeostasis. Ligand interaction with GR promotes either GR binding to genomic glucocorticoid response elements, in turn modulating gene transcription, or interaction of GR monomers with other transcription factors activated by other signalling pathways leading to transrepression. The GR regulates a broad spectrum of physiological functions, including cell differentiation, metabolism and inflammatory responses. Thus, disruption or dysregulation of GR function will result in severe impairments in the maintenance of homeostasis and the control of adaptation to stress.

  13. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shoko, E-mail: satosho@rs.tus.ac.jp [Laboratory of Nutrition, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Shirakawa, Hitoshi, E-mail: shirakah@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Nutrition, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Tomita, Shuhei, E-mail: tomita@med.tottori-u.ac.jp [Division of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan); Tohkin, Masahiro, E-mail: tohkin@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Medical Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Science, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 267-8603 (Japan); Gonzalez, Frank J., E-mail: gonzalef@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Komai, Michio, E-mail: mkomai@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Nutrition, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction.

  14. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Tomita, Shuhei; Tohkin, Masahiro; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2013-01-01

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction

  15. Changes in Urinary Phthalate Metabolite Levels Before and After the Phthalate Contamination Event and Identification of Exposure Sources in a Cohort of Taiwanese Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chian-Feng; Wang, I-Jen

    2017-08-19

    In 2011, the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration inadvertently discovered that, for decades, manufacturers had replaced expensive natural emulsifiers in food products with diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP). We wanted to compare urinary phthalate metabolite levels of children before and after the DEHP food contamination event and identify source(s) of phthalate exposure in addition to the illegal food additives. In the present study, morning urine samples were collected from a cohort of 453 children in 2010 in Taipei. After the DEHP food contamination event, there were 200 cohort children left at follow-up in 2013. The geometric means (GMs) of urinary mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (5OH-MEHP) levels before and after the event were 9.39 and 13.34 µg/g of creatinine, respectively, with no significant difference ( p = 0.093). After the DEHP food contamination event, we found that urinary phthalate metabolite levels were significantly higher in people who frequently consumed microwave-heated food and used fragrance-containing products ( p food contamination event, thus, other sources must contribute to phthalate exposure in daily life. Public awareness of approaches to reducing phthalate exposure is necessary.

  16. The Impact of Glyphosate, Its Metabolites and Impurities on Viability, ATP Level and Morphological changes in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Jarosiewicz, Paweł; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Huras, Bogumiła; Bukowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of herbicides to animals and human is an issue of worldwide concern. The present study has been undertaken to assess toxic effect of widely used pesticide—glyphosate, its metabolites: aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and methylphosphonic acid and its impurities: N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), N-methylglyphosate, hydroxymethylphosphonic acid and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We have evaluated the effect of those compounds on viability, ATP level, size (FSC-A parameter) and granulation (SSC-A parameter) of the cells studied. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to different concentrations of glyphosate, its metabolites and impurities (0.01–10 mM) for 4 and 24 h. It was found that investigated compounds caused statistically significant decrease in viability and ATP level of PBMCs. The strongest changes in cell viability and ATP level were observed after 24 h incubation of PBMCs with bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and particularly PMIDA. Moreover, all studied compounds changed cell granularity, while PMIDA and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine altered PBMCs size. It may be concluded that bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and PMIDA caused a slightly stronger damage to PBMCs than did glyphosate. Changes in the parameters studied in PBMCs were observed only at high concentrations of the compounds examined, which clearly shows that they may occur in this cell type only as a result of acute poisoning of human organism with these substances. PMID:27280764

  17. Urinary levels of N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-cysteine (AAMA), an acrylamide metabolite, in Korean children and their association with food consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Kyunghee [School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Veterinary Sciences and Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5B3 (Canada); Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Yongin University, Yongin, 449-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sungeun; Lee, Gowoon; Lee, Saeram; Jo, Areum; Kwak, Kyunghee; Kim, Dohyung; Kho, Dohyun; Lee, Sangwoo; Kim, Sunmi; Kim, Sungkyoon [School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hiuang, Yuh-Fang; Wu, Kuen-Yuh [Public Health and Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China); Choi, Kyungho, E-mail: kyungho@snu.ac.kr [School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Acrylamide (AA), a probable human carcinogen, is present in high-temperature-processed foods, and has frequently been detected in humans worldwide. In the present study, the levels of a major AA metabolite, N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-cysteine (AAMA) were measured in urine samples collected in two separate events with 3 d interval from Korean children (n = 31, 10–13 years old), and their diets were surveyed for 4 d period prior to the second urine sampling. Daily AA intake was estimated from AAMA urinary levels and the influence of food consumption on urinary AAMA levels was investigated. The concentrations of metabolite AAMA in urine ranged between 15.4 and 196.3 ng/mL, with a median level of 68.1 ng/mL, and the levels varied by day considerably even in a given child. Children who were exposed to environmental smoke at home exhibited significantly higher levels of AAMA in urine, suggesting the importance of passive smoking as a source of AA exposure among children. Median (95th percentile) values of daily AA intake in Korean children were 1.04 (2.47) μg/kg body weight/day, which is higher than those reported elsewhere. After adjustment for gender, body mass index, and smoking status of family members, the consumptions of cracker and chocolate were identified to be significantly associated with the concentrations of AAMA in urine. The result of this study will provide information useful for developing public health and safety management for AA. - Highlights: • Urinary AAMA concentrations varied over time by the changes in diet. • Consumption of cracker and chocolate were correlated with urinary AAMA levels. • Urinary AAMA levels were significantly correlated with passive smoking. • AA intake estimates among Korean children are higher than those reported elsewhere.

  18. Urinary levels of N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-cysteine (AAMA), an acrylamide metabolite, in Korean children and their association with food consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Kyunghee; Kang, Sungeun; Lee, Gowoon; Lee, Saeram; Jo, Areum; Kwak, Kyunghee; Kim, Dohyung; Kho, Dohyun; Lee, Sangwoo; Kim, Sunmi; Kim, Sungkyoon; Hiuang, Yuh-Fang; Wu, Kuen-Yuh; Choi, Kyungho

    2013-01-01

    Acrylamide (AA), a probable human carcinogen, is present in high-temperature-processed foods, and has frequently been detected in humans worldwide. In the present study, the levels of a major AA metabolite, N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-cysteine (AAMA) were measured in urine samples collected in two separate events with 3 d interval from Korean children (n = 31, 10–13 years old), and their diets were surveyed for 4 d period prior to the second urine sampling. Daily AA intake was estimated from AAMA urinary levels and the influence of food consumption on urinary AAMA levels was investigated. The concentrations of metabolite AAMA in urine ranged between 15.4 and 196.3 ng/mL, with a median level of 68.1 ng/mL, and the levels varied by day considerably even in a given child. Children who were exposed to environmental smoke at home exhibited significantly higher levels of AAMA in urine, suggesting the importance of passive smoking as a source of AA exposure among children. Median (95th percentile) values of daily AA intake in Korean children were 1.04 (2.47) μg/kg body weight/day, which is higher than those reported elsewhere. After adjustment for gender, body mass index, and smoking status of family members, the consumptions of cracker and chocolate were identified to be significantly associated with the concentrations of AAMA in urine. The result of this study will provide information useful for developing public health and safety management for AA. - Highlights: • Urinary AAMA concentrations varied over time by the changes in diet. • Consumption of cracker and chocolate were correlated with urinary AAMA levels. • Urinary AAMA levels were significantly correlated with passive smoking. • AA intake estimates among Korean children are higher than those reported elsewhere

  19. Lifetime Dependent Variation of Stress Hormone Metabolites in Feces of Two Laboratory Mouse Strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kolbe

    Full Text Available Non-invasive measurement of stress hormone metabolites in feces has become routine practice for the evaluation of distress and pain in animal experiments. Since metabolism and excretion of glucocorticoids may be variable, awareness and adequate consideration of influencing factors are essential for accurate monitoring of adrenocortical activity. Reference values are usually provided by baselines compiled prior to the experiment and by age matched controls. The comparison of stress hormone levels between animals of different ages or between studies looking at hormone levels at the beginning and at the end of a long term study might be biased by age-related effects. In this study we analyzed fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM during the lifetime of untreated female mice of the strains C57BL/6NCrl and Crl:CD1. For this purpose feces for each individual mouse were collected every two months over a period of 24 hours, at intervals of four hours, until the age of 26 months. Results of the study revealed that age of the animals had a significant impact on the level and circadian rhythm of stress hormone metabolites. Furthermore, long-term observation of mice revealed a strain specific excretion profile of FCM influenced by strong seasonal variability.

  20. Social Regulation of Leukocyte Homeostasis: The Role of Glucocorticoid Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Steve W.

    2010-01-01

    Recent small-scale genomics analyses suggest that physiologic regulation of pro-inflammatory gene expression by endogenous glucocorticoids may be compromised in individuals who experience chronic social isolation. This could potentially contribute to the elevated prevalence of inflammation-related disease previously observed in social isolates. The present study assessed the relationship between leukocyte distributional sensitivity to glucocorticoid regulation and subjective social isolation in a large population-based sample of older adults. Initial analyses confirmed that circulating neutrophil percentages were elevated, and circulating lymphocyte and monocyte percentages were suppressed, in direct proportion to circulating cortisol levels. However, leukocyte distributional sensitivity to endogenous glucocorticoids was abrogated in individuals reporting either occasional or frequent experiences of subjective social isolation. This finding held in both nonparametric univariate analyses and in multivariate linear models controlling for a variety of biological, social, behavioral, and psychological confounders. The present results suggest that social factors may alter immune cell sensitivity to physiologic regulation by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in ways that could ultimately contribute to the increased physical health risks associated with social isolation. PMID:18394861

  1. Different effects of scopolamine on learning, memory, and nitric oxide metabolite levels in hippocampal tissues of ovariectomized and Sham-operated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Azizi-Malekabadi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Different effects of scopolamine on learning, memory, and nitric oxide (NO metabolites in hippocampal tissues of ovariectomized (OVX and sham-operated rats were investigated. The animals in the Sham-Scopolamine (Sham-Sco and OVX-Scopolamine (OVX-Sco Groups were treated with 2 mg/kg scopolamine before undergoing the Morris water maze, while the animals in the Sham and OVX Groups received saline. The time latency and path length were significantly higher in both the Sham-Sco and the OVX-Sco Groups, in comparison with the Sham and OVX Groups, respectively (p<0.001. Significantly lower NO metabolite levels in the hippocampi of the Sham-Sco Group were observed, compared with the Sham Group (p<0.001, while there was no significant difference between the OVX-Sco and OVX Groups. The decreased NO level in the hippocampus may play a role in the learning and memory deficits induced by scopolamine. However, it seems that the effect of scopolamine on hippocampal NO differs between situations of presence and absence of ovarian hormones.

  2. Effects of Different Level and Source of Sulfur Supplement in Close-up diets of Dairy Cows on Blood Metabolites, Colostrums Composition and Liver Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Manidari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The 24 maltiparous Holstein dairy cows were allocated in a completely randomized design to study the effects of different level and source of sulfur supplement in close-up diets on blood metabolites, colostrums composition and liver performance. The mean body weight of the cows was 687.9 kg and the mean days until expected calving date was 21.8 d. The first treatment (T1 has contained 0.21% sulfur (DM basis, the second treatment (T2 has contained 0.41% sulfur which supplied entirely through magnesium sulfate and the third treatment (T3 has contained 0.41% sulfur which supplied through a combination of magnesium sulfate and an organic source of sulfur (Mepran. The DMI for pre-calving (P < 0.001 was affected by treatments and T2 showed the lowest DMI among treatments. Colostrums yield, protein, DM and ash significantly decreased in inorganic sulfur supplemented treatment (P < 0.05. Among the blood metabolites, calcium, copper and glucose were decreased in T2 compared with two other treatments (P < 0.05. However, BHBA, NEFA and urea were increased in T2 (P < 0.05. Urine pH was affected with different treatments (P < 0.0001. The both liver enzymes (i.e. AST and CPK were increased supplementing inorganic sulfur showing that inorganic sulfur has potential to decrease liver performance in dairy cows. The results of the present study indicate that although magnesium sulfate (inorganic source has negative effect on dairy cow health and performance, a combination of magnesium sulfate and organic source of sulfur could have positive effects on dry matter intake, blood metabolites and liver health in dairy cows.

  3. Contribution of glucocorticoids and glucocorticoid receptors to the regulation of neurodegenerative processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Sheela; Maatouk, Layal

    2013-12-01

    Isolation of glucocorticoids (GCs) from adrenal glands followed by synthesis led rapidly to their first clinical application, about 70 years ago, for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. To this day GCs are used in diseases that have an inflammatory component. However, their use is carefully monitored because of harmful side effects. GCs are also synonymous with stress and adaptation. In CNS, GC binds and activates high affinity mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and low affinity glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GR, whose expression is ubiquitous, is only activated when GC levels rise as during circadian peak and in response to stress. Numerous recent studies have yielded important and new insights on the mechanisms concerning pulsatile secretory pattern of GCs as well as various processes that tightly control their synthesis via hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis involving regulated release of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from hypothalamus and pituitary, respectively. GR modulates neuronal functions and viability through both genomic and non-genomic actions, and importantly its transcriptional regulatory activity is tightly locked with GC secretory pattern. There is increasing evidence pointing to involvement of GC-GR in neurodegenerative disorders. Patients with Alzheimer's or Parkinson's or Huntington's disease show chronically high cortisol levels suggesting changes occurring in controls of HPA axis. In experimental models of these diseases, chronic stress or GC treatment was found to exacerbate both the clinical symptoms and neurodegenerative processes. However, recent evidence also shows that GC-GR can exert neuroprotective effects. Thus, for any potential therapeutic strategies in these neurodegenerative diseases we need to understand the precise modifications both in HPA axis and in GR activity and find ways to harness their protective actions.

  4. Morphine metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christrup, Lona Louring

    1997-01-01

    , morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) and morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) are the major metabolites of morphine. The metabolism of morphine occurs not only in the liver, but may also take place in the brain and the kidneys. The glucuronides are mainly eliminated via bile and urine. Glucuronides as a rule...... are considered as highly polar metabolites unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Although morphine glucuronidation has been demonstrated in human brain tissue, the capacity is very low compared to that of the liver, indicating that the M3G and M6G concentrations observed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after...... systemic administration reflect hepatic metabolism of morphine and that the morphine glucuronides, despite their high polarity, can penetrate into the brain. Like morphine, M6G has been shown to be relatively more selective for mu-receptors than for delta- and kappa-receptors while M3G does not appear...

  5. Gestational or acute restraint in adulthood reduces levels of 5α-reduced testosterone metabolites in the hippocampus and produces behavioral inhibition of adult male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia A Walf

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Stressors, during early life or adulthood, can alter steroid-sensitive behaviors, such as exploration, anxiety, and/or cognitive processes. We investigated if exposure to acute stressors in adulthood may alter behavioral and neuroendocrine responses of male rats that were exposed to gestational stress or not. We hypothesized that rats exposed to gestational and acute stress may show behavioral inhibition, increased corticosterone, and altered androgen levels in the hippocampus. Subjects were adult, male offspring of rat dams that were restrained daily on gestational days 14-20, or did not experience this manipulation. Immediately before testing, rats were restraint-stressed for 20 minutes or not. During week 1, rats were tested in a battery of tasks, including the open field, elevated plus maze, social interaction, tailflick, pawlick, and defensive burying tasks. During week 2, rats were trained and tested 24 hours later in the inhibitory avoidance task. Plasma corticosterone and androgen levels, and hippocampal androgen levels, were measured in all subjects. Gestational and acute restraint stress increased plasma levels of corticosterone, and reduced levels of testosterone’s 5α-reduced metabolites, dihydrotestosterone and 3α-androstanediol, but not the aromatized metabolite, estradiol, in plasma or the hippocampus. Gestational and acute restraint stress reduced central entries made in the open field, and latencies to enter the shock-associated side of the inhibitory avoidance chamber during testing. Gestational stress reduced time spent interacting with a conspecific. These data suggest that gestational and acute restraint stress can have actions to produce behavioral inhibition coincident with increased corticosterone and decreased 5α-reduced androgens of adult male rats. Thus, gestational stress altered neural circuits involved in the neuroendocrine response to acute stress in early adulthood.

  6. Older mothers follow conservative strategies under predator pressure: the adaptive role of maternal glucocorticoids in yellow-bellied marmots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monclús, Raquel; Tiulim, Justin; Blumstein, Daniel T

    2011-11-01

    When the maternal environment is a good predictor of the offspring environment, maternal glucocorticoid (GC) levels might serve to pre-program offspring to express certain phenotypes or life-history characteristics that will increase their fitness. We conducted a field study to assess the effects of naturally occurring maternal GC levels on their offspring in yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris) subjected to different predator pressures. Maternal fecal corticosteroid metabolites (FCM) were positively correlated with predator pressure. Predators had both direct and indirect effects on pups. We found that older mothers with higher FCM levels had smaller and female-biased litters. Moreover, sons from older mothers with high FCM levels dispersed significantly more than those from older mothers with low FCM levels, whereas the opposite pattern was found in pups from younger mothers. These age-related effects may permit females to make adaptive decisions that increase their pups' fitness according to their current situation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Association Between Variants in Arsenic (+3 Oxidation State) Methyltranserase (AS3MT) and Urinary Metabolites of Inorganic Arsenic: Role of Exposure Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaofan; Drobná, Zuzana; Voruganti, V. Saroja; Barron, Keri; González-Horta, Carmen; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca; Ballinas-Casarrubias, Lourdes; Cerón, Roberto Hernández; Morales, Damián Viniegra; Terrazas, Francisco A. Baeza; Ishida, María C.; Gutiérrez-Torres, Daniela S.; Saunders, R. Jesse; Crandell, Jamie; Fry, Rebecca C.; Loomis, Dana; García-Vargas, Gonzalo G.; Del Razo, Luz M.; Stýblo, Miroslav; Mendez, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Variants in AS3MT, the gene encoding arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltranserase, have been shown to influence patterns of inorganic arsenic (iAs) metabolism. Several studies have suggested that capacity to metabolize iAs may vary depending on levels of iAs exposure. However, it is not known whether the influence of variants in AS3MT on iAs metabolism also vary by level of exposure. We investigated, in a population of Mexican adults exposed to drinking water As, whether associations between 7 candidate variants in AS3MT and urinary iAs metabolites were consistent with prior studies, and whether these associations varied depending on the level of exposure. Overall, associations between urinary iAs metabolites and AS3MT variants were consistent with the literature. Referent genotypes, defined as the genotype previously associated with a higher percentage of urinary dimethylated As (DMAs%), were associated with significant increases in the DMAs% and ratio of DMAs to monomethylated As (MAs), and significant reductions in MAs% and iAs%. For 3 variants, associations between genotypes and iAs metabolism were significantly stronger among subjects exposed to water As >50 versus ≤50 ppb (water As X genotype interaction P iAs exposure may influence the extent to which several AS3MT variants affect iAs metabolism. The variants most strongly associated with iAs metabolism—and perhaps with susceptibility to iAs-associated disease—may vary in settings with exposure level. PMID:27370415

  8. Nitrogen balance, microbial protein synthesis and blood metabolites in fattening of male Bali cattle fed ration with different protein levels in smallholder farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Tahuk

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Research was aimed to determine nitrogen balance, microbial protein synthesis, and blood metabolites of male Bali cattle fattening fed ration with different protein level in smallholder farms North Central Timor, Province of East Timor Tenggara, Indonesia. The cattle used were 18 heads aged 2 to 2.5 years with initial body weight of 229.86±12.46 kg. The cattle were randomly divided into three treatment groups. The T0 group was given feed the same as traditional fattening cattle practices by farmers,T1 group fed ration containing 12% crude protein (CP and 72% total digestible nutrients (TDN, andT2 group fedration containing 15% CP and 72%TDN. Cattle were fed individually for 90 days and drinkingwater ad libitum. The data were analyzedby analysis of variance.Results of research indicated the nitrogen balance, and blood urea nitrogen between T1 and T2 were relatively similar, but those were higher (P<0.05 than T0 . In contrast, microbial proteins synthesis, and blood glucose at 0, 4, and 6 hours before and after feeding were relatively similar between the groups. Blood glucose of T2 at 2 hours after intake were higher (P <0.05 than T0, but was not different with T1 . It can be concluded, that the fattening maleBali cattle fed ration containing 12% CP and 72% TDNimprovedthe nitrogen balance and blood metabolites, butit was no positive effect on the microbial proteins and N synthesis.

  9. Peripheral mechanisms contributing to the glucocorticoid hypersensitivity in proopiomelanocortin null mice treated with corticosterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Zoi; Coll, Anthony P; Kenyon, Christopher J; Morton, Nicholas M; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Seckl, Jonathan R; Chapman, Karen E

    2007-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) deficiency causes severe obesity through hyperphagia of hypothalamic origin. However, low glucocorticoid levels caused by adrenal insufficiency mitigate against insulin resistance, hyperphagia and fat accretion in Pomc−/− mice. Upon exogenous glucocorticoid replacement, corticosterone-supplemented (CORT) Pomc−/− mice show exaggerated responses, including excessive fat accumulation, hyperleptinaemia and insulin resistance. To investigate the peripheral mechanisms underlying this glucocorticoid hypersensitivity, we examined the expression levels of key determinants and targets of glucocorticoid action in adipose tissue and liver. Despite lower basal expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), which generates active glucocorticoids within cells, CORT-mediated induction of 11β-HSD1 mRNA levels was more pronounced in adipose tissues of Pomc−/− mice. Similarly, CORT treatment increased lipoprotein lipase mRNA levels in all fat depots in Pomc−/− mice, consistent with exaggerated fat accumulation. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA levels were selectively elevated in liver and retroperitoneal fat of Pomc−/− mice but were corrected by CORT in the latter depot. In liver, CORT increased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA levels specifically in Pomc−/− mice, consistent with their insulin-resistant phenotype. Furthermore, CORT induced hypertension in Pomc−/− mice, independently of adipose or liver renin–angiotensin system activation. These data suggest that CORT-inducible 11β-HSD1 expression in fat contributes to the adverse cardiometabolic effects of CORT in POMC deficiency, whereas higher GR levels may be more important in liver. PMID:17592030

  10. Immunoreactive cortisone in droppings reflect stress levels, diet and growth rate of gull-billed tern chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Noelia; Santiago-Quesada, Francisco; Masero, José A; Sánchez-Guzmán, Juan M; Möstl, Erich

    2015-03-01

    Blood levels of corticosterone have been traditionally analyzed to assess stress levels in birds; however, measuring steroid hormone metabolites in feces and droppings has gained much interest as a noninvasive technique successfully used for such purposed in vertebrates. Diet may affect these fecal metabolite levels (e.g., due to nutritional stress), however, this variable has not been taken into account in studies with chicks despite the great dietary flexibility of many avian species. In this study, we addressed for the first time this key issue and validated the technique in wild gull-billed tern chicks (Gelochelidon nilotica). Several enzyme immunoassays were used to determine the most appropriate test to measure the stress response. Subsequently, we performed an experiment in captivity to assess adrenocortical activity in gull-billed tern chicks fed with two diets: piscivorous vs. insectivorous. Finally, the relation between the chicks' growth rate and excreted immunoreactive glucocorticoid metabolites (EGMs) was also evaluated. We found the immunoreactive cortisone metabolites to be a good index of stress (as being an index of adrenocortical reactivity) in chicks of this species. Fish-fed chicks had higher levels of cortisone metabolites when comparing both concentration and total daily excreted metabolites. Within each treatment diet, cortisone metabolite levels and growth rates were negatively correlated. These findings suggest that the diet should be considered when using this technique for comparative purposes and highlight the trade-off between stress levels and chicks growth rates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Plasma cortisol and faecal cortisol metabolites concentrations in stereotypic and non-stereotypic horses: do stereotypic horses cope better with poor environmental conditions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fureix Carole

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stereotypic behaviours, i.e. repetitive behaviours induced by frustration, repeated attempts to cope and/or brain dysfunction, are intriguing as they occur in a variety of domestic and captive species without any clear adaptive function. Among the different hypotheses, the coping hypothesis predicts that stereotypic behaviours provide a way for animals in unfavourable environmental conditions to adjust. As such, they are expected to have a lower physiological stress level (glucocorticoids than non-stereotypic animals. Attempts to link stereotypic behaviours with glucocorticoids however have yielded contradictory results. Here we investigated correlates of oral and motor stereotypic behaviours and glucocorticoid levels in two large samples of domestic horses (NStudy1 = 55, NStudy2 = 58, kept in sub-optimal conditions (e.g. confinement, social isolation, and already known to experience poor welfare states. Each horse was observed in its box using focal sampling (study 1 and instantaneous scan sampling (study 2. Plasma samples (collected in study 1 but also non-invasive faecal samples (collected in both studies were retrieved in order to assess cortisol levels. Results Results showed that 1 plasma cortisol and faecal cortisol metabolites concentrations did not differ between horses displaying stereotypic behaviours and non-stereotypic horses and 2 both oral and motor stereotypic behaviour levels did not predict plasma cortisol or faecal cortisol metabolites concentrations. Conclusions Cortisol measures, collected in two large samples of horses using both plasma sampling as well as faecal sampling (the latter method minimizing bias due to a non-invasive sampling procedure, therefore do not indicate that stereotypic horses cope better, at least in terms of adrenocortical activity.

  12. Glucocorticoid stress responses of lions in relationship to group composition, human land use, and proximity to people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creel, Scott; Christianson, David; Schuette, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Large carnivore populations are in global decline, and conflicts between large carnivores and humans or their livestock contribute to low tolerance of large carnivores outside of protected areas. African lions (Panthera leo) are a conflict-prone species, and their continental range has declined by 75% in the face of human pressures. Nonetheless, large carnivore populations persist (or even grow) in some areas that are occupied by humans. Lions attain locally high density in the Olkiramatian and Shompole Group Ranches of Kenya's South Rift region, despite residence by pastoralist Maasai people and their sheep, goats, and cattle. We have previously found that these lions respond to seasonal movements of people by moving away from occupied settlements, shifting into denser habitats when people are nearby, and moving into a protected conservation area when people move into the adjacent buffer zone. Here, we examined lion stress responses to anthropogenic activities, using enzyme-linked immunoassay to measure the concentration of faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in 136 samples collected from five lion groups over 2 years. Faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations were significantly lower for lions in the conservation area than for lions in the human-settled buffer zone, and decreased significantly with increasing distance to the nearest occupied human settlement. Faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations were not detectably related to fine-scaled variation in prey or livestock density, and surprisingly, faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations were higher in the wet season, when regional prey abundance was high. Lions coexist with people and livestock on this landscape by adjusting their movements, but they nonetheless mount an appreciable stress response when conditions do not allow them to maintain adequate separation. Thus, physiological data confirm inferences from prior data on lion movements and habitat use, showing that access to undisturbed

  13. Perioperative glucocorticoids in hip and knee surgery - benefit vs. harm?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunn, T H; Kehlet, H

    2013-01-01

    with systemic glucocorticoid. Pain was reduced with high-dose systemic and local glucocorticoid, but not with low-dose systemic glucocorticoid. Systemic inflammatory markers were reduced with low-dose and high-dose systemic glucocorticoid, and with local glucocorticoid. Functional recovery was improved...... with local glucocorticoid. All studies were small-sized and none sufficiently powered to meaningfully evaluate uncommon adverse events. Most of the local administration studies had poor scientific quality (high risk of bias). Due to clinical heterogeneity and poor scientific quality, no meta......-analysis was performed. In conclusion, in addition to PONV reduction with low-dose systemic glucocorticoid, this review supports high-dose systemic glucocorticoid to ameliorate post-operative pain after hip and knee surgery. However, large-scale safety and dose-finding studies are warranted before final recommendations....

  14. Glucocorticoids and the regulation of memory in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Quervain, Dominique J. -F; Aerni, Amanda; Schelling, Gustav; Roozendaal, Benno

    Over the last decades considerable evidence has accumulated indicating that glucocorticoids - stress hormones released from the adrenal cortex - are crucially involved in the regulation of memory. Specifically, glucocorticoids have been shown to enhance memory consolidation of emotionally arousing

  15. Adverse consequences of glucocorticoid medication: psychological, cognitive, and behavioral effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Judd, L.L.; Schettler, P.J.; Brown, E.S.; Wolkowitz, O.M.; Sternberg, E.M.; Bender, B.G.; Bulloch, K.; Cidlowski, J.A.; Kloet, E.R. de; Fardet, L.; Joels, M.; Leung, D.Y.; McEwen, B.S.; Roozendaal, B.; Rossum, E.F. van; Ahn, J.; Brown, D.W.; Plitt, A.; Singh, G.

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressant medications worldwide. This article highlights the risk of clinically significant and sometimes severe psychological, cognitive, and behavioral disturbances that may be associated with glucocorticoid use, as well as

  16. Adverse Consequences of Glucocorticoid Medication : Psychological, Cognitive, and Behavioral Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Judd, Lewis L.; Schettler, Pamela J.; Brown, E. Sherwood; Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Sternberg, Esther M.; Bender, Bruce G.; Bulloch, Karen; Cidlowski, John A.; de Kloet, E. Ronald; Fardet, Laurence; Joëls, Marian; Leung, Donald Y. M.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Roozendaal, Benno; Van Rossum, Elisabeth F. C.; Ahn, Junyoung; Brown, David W.; Plitt, Aaron; Singh, Gagandeep

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressant medications worldwide. This article highlights the risk of clinically significant and sometimes severe psychological, cognitive, and behavioral disturbances that may be associated with glucocorticoid use, as well as

  17. Quantifying global-brain metabolite level changes with whole-head proton MR spectroscopy at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davitz, Matthew S; Wu, William E; Soher, Brian J; Babb, James S; Kirov, Ivan I; Huang, Jeffrey; Fatterpekar, Girish; Gonen, Oded

    2017-01-01

    To assess the sensitivity of non-localized, whole-head 1 H-MRS to an individual's serial changes in total-brain NAA, Glx, Cr and Cho concentrations - metabolite metrics often used as surrogate markers in neurological pathologies. In this prospective study, four back-to-back (single imaging session) and three serial (successive sessions) non-localizing, ~3min 1 H-MRS (TE/TR/TI=5/10 4 /940ms) scans were performed on 18 healthy young volunteers: 9 women, 9 men: 29.9±7.6 [mean±standard deviation (SD)] years old. These were analyzed by calculating a within-subject coefficient of variation (CV=SD/mean) to assess intra- and inter-scan repeatability and prediction intervals. This study was Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant. All subjects gave institutional review board-approved written, informed consent. The intra-scan CVs for the NAA, Glx, Cr and Cho were: 3.9±1.8%, 7.3±4.6%, 4.0±3.4% and 2.5±1.6%, and the corresponding inter-scan (longitudinal) values were: 7.0±3.1%, 10.6±5.6%, 7.6±3.5% and 7.0±3.9%. This method is shown to have 80% power to detect changes of 14%, 27%, 26% and 19% between two serial measurements in a given individual. Subject to the assumption that in neurological disorders NAA, Glx, Cr and Cho changes represent brain-only pathology and not muscles, bone marrow, adipose tissue or epithelial cells, this approach enables us to quantify them, thereby adding specificity to the assessment of the total disease load. This will facilitate monitoring diffuse pathologies with faster measurement, more extensive (~90% of the brain) spatial coverage and sensitivity than localized 1 H-MRS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Glucocorticoids and fetal programming part 1: Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisiadis, Vasilis G; Matthews, Stephen G

    2014-07-01

    Fetal development is a critical period for shaping the lifelong health of an individual. However, the fetus is susceptible to internal and external stimuli that can lead to adverse long-term health consequences. Glucocorticoids are an important developmental switch, driving changes in gene regulation that are necessary for normal growth and maturation. The fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is particularly susceptible to long-term programming by glucocorticoids; these effects can persist throughout the life of an organism. Dysfunction of the HPA axis as a result of fetal programming has been associated with impaired brain growth, altered behaviour and increased susceptibility to chronic disease (such as metabolic and cardiovascular disease). Moreover, the effects of glucocorticoid-mediated programming are evident in subsequent generations, and transmission of these changes can occur through both maternal and paternal lineages.

  19. Exogenous glucocorticoids and adverse cerebral effects in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsted, Sara K.; Born, A P; Paulson, Olaf B

    2011-01-01

    of the glucocorticoid receptor, which is associated with unfavorable cellular outcomes. Prenatal treatment with glucocorticoids can compromise brain growth and is associated with periventricular leukomalacia, attentions deficits and poorer cognitive performance. In the neonatal period exposure to glucocorticoids....... Glucocortioids affect several cellular structures and functions, which may explain the observed adverse effects. Glucocorticoids can impair neuronal glucose uptake, decrease excitability, cause atrophy of dendrites, compromise development of myelin-producing oligodendrocytes and disturb important cellular...

  20. Islet-cell dysfunction induced by glucocorticoid treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Raalte, Daniël H; Kwa, Kelly A A; van Genugten, Renate E

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids impair glucose tolerance by inducing insulin resistance. We investigated the dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoid treatment on islet-cell function in healthy males and studied the role of the autonomic nervous system.......Glucocorticoids impair glucose tolerance by inducing insulin resistance. We investigated the dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoid treatment on islet-cell function in healthy males and studied the role of the autonomic nervous system....

  1. 32P-postlabeling analysis of dibenz[a,j]acridine DNA adducts in mice: preliminary determination of initial genotoxic metabolites and their effect on biomarker levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, J; Schamer, M; Reilman, R; Xue, W; Warshawsky, D; Talaska, G

    1993-01-01

    N-Heterocyclic aromatics (NHA) are widely occurring environmental pollutants formed during the pyrolysis of nitrogen-containing organic chemicals. NHA are found in significant amounts in tobacco condensates, synthetic fuels, gasoline engine exhaust, and effluents from the heating of coal. Dibenz[a,j]acridine (DBA) is an example of NHA. The potency of many carcinogenic compounds is related, at least in part, to the efficiency of their biological activation. We undertook studies to determine which initial metabolites of DBA lead to the formation of high levels of carcinogen-DNA adducts in vivo. DBA and its metabolites, trans-DBA-1,2-dihydrodiol (DBA-1,2-DHD), trans-DBA-3,4-dihydrodiol (DBA-3,4-DHD), and trans-DBA-5,6-dihydrodiol (DBA-5,6-DHD), were applied to the skin of mice. DNA was isolated using enzyme-solvent extraction method. DNA was 32P-postlabeled under conditions of limiting [32P]ATP. In skin, DBA produced two distinct adducts. The same two adducts were seen when DBA-3,4-DHD was applied. In addition the total adduct level elicited by DBA-3,4-DHD was higher than that of parent compound. Two adducts were seen when DBA-5,6DHD was applied, but these were very different from adducts seen with DBA. These results suggested that activation of DBA to DNA-binding compounds in skin includes initial formation of DBA-3,4-DHD. The data support development of biomarkers for the exposure and effect of this compound, and also suggest that specific metabolic susceptibility markers might be able to predict populations at increased risk.

  2. Short-echo 3D H-1 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging of patients with glioma at 7T for characterization of differences in metabolite levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Larson, Peder; Chen, Albert P.; Lupo, Janine M.; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Kelley, Douglas; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a short echo time, 3D H-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) sequence at 7T to assess the metabolic signature of lesions for patients with glioma. Materials and Methods 29 patients with glioma were studied. MRSI data were obtained using CHESS water suppression, spectrally-selective adiabatic inversion-recovery pulses and automatically prescribed outer-volume-suppression for lipid suppression, and spin echo slice selection (TE=30ms). An interleaved flyback echo-planar trajectory was applied to shorten the total acquisition time (~10min). Relative metabolite ratios were estimated in tumor and in normal-appearing white and gray matter (NAWM, GM). Results Levels of glutamine, myo-inositol, glycine and glutathione relative to total creatine (tCr) were significantly increased in the T2 lesions for all tumor grades compared to those in the NAWM (p < 0.05), while N-acetyl aspartate to tCr were significantly decreased (p < 0.05). In grade 2 gliomas, level of total choline-containing-compounds to tCr was significantly increased (p = 0.0137), while glutamate to tCr was significantly reduced (p = 0.0012). Conclusion The improved sensitivity of MRSI and the increased number of metabolites that can be evaluated using 7T MR scanners is of interest for evaluating patients with glioma. This study has successfully demonstrated the application of a short-echo spin-echo MRSI sequence to detect characteristic differences in regions of tumor versus normal appearing brain. PMID:24935758

  3. Indagation of serum and salivary reactive oxygen metabolite and cortisol levels in chronic periodontitis and stress-induced chronic periodontitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Sudhakar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontal disease is not a conventional bacterial infection but is an inflammatory disease initiated by immune response against a group of microorganisms in susceptible hosts. There are many intriguing researches that unfold the secrets of chronic periodontitis. The current researches in chronic periodontitis are directed toward an approach that respects the scientific relationship between the various risk factors, the genetic factors, and the progression of the disease. Aim: This study aims to evaluate the cortisol and reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM concentration in serum and to find out their association in periodontal health and disease. Materials and Methods: In this study, totally thirty patients have been taken and divided into two groups of chronic periodontitis (Group I and stress-induced chronic periodontitis (Group II and evaluated the correlation between the ROM and cortisol levels in them. This is the first study, where both the levels of ROM and cortisol are checked in the serum and saliva. The analysis is done to check the association between them. Statistical Analysis: The data were statistically analyzed using software program (SPSSV 16, Pearson correlation, and paired t-test. Results: Comparison of the mean ROM levels in Group I and Group II showed that mean ROM level in Group II is highly significant than Group I. Conclusion: Our study suggests that stress can have a role in the progression of periodontal disease by increasing the cortisol and ROM levels.

  4. Indagation of serum and salivary reactive oxygen metabolite and cortisol levels in chronic periodontitis and stress-induced chronic periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, Uma; Thyagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Jeyapal, Bhagyameena; Jagadeesh, Sushuruthi; Jayakumar, Parvathee

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal disease is not a conventional bacterial infection but is an inflammatory disease initiated by immune response against a group of microorganisms in susceptible hosts. There are many intriguing researches that unfold the secrets of chronic periodontitis. The current researches in chronic periodontitis are directed toward an approach that respects the scientific relationship between the various risk factors, the genetic factors, and the progression of the disease. This study aims to evaluate the cortisol and reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) concentration in serum and to find out their association in periodontal health and disease. In this study, totally thirty patients have been taken and divided into two groups of chronic periodontitis (Group I) and stress-induced chronic periodontitis (Group II) and evaluated the correlation between the ROM and cortisol levels in them. This is the first study, where both the levels of ROM and cortisol are checked in the serum and saliva. The analysis is done to check the association between them. The data were statistically analyzed using software program (SPSSV 16), Pearson correlation, and paired t -test. Comparison of the mean ROM levels in Group I and Group II showed that mean ROM level in Group II is highly significant than Group I. Our study suggests that stress can have a role in the progression of periodontal disease by increasing the cortisol and ROM levels.

  5. Effect of switching to risperidone after unsuccessful treatment with aripiprazole on plasma monoamine metabolites level in the treatment of acute schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Itaru; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Katsumi, Akihiko; Kanno, Keiko; Watanabe, Kenya; Mashiko, Hirobumi; Niwa, Shin-Ichi

    2012-09-01

    In the treatment of acute schizophrenia, risperidone and aripiprazole are both placed the first line antipsychotics. These two antipsychotics have different pharmacological effects. We investigated the effects of risperidone on plasma levels of homovanillic acid (HVA) and 3-methoxy-4hydroxyphenylglycol after unsuccessful aripiprazole treatment in acute schizophrenia. Ten Japanese patients with acute schizophrenia were enrolled to this study. Plasma levels of monoamine metabolites were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Risperidone improved the symptoms and 4 of 10 patients were responders. Risperidone showed a tendency to decrease plasma HVA (pHVA) levels in responders (p = 0.068), but not in non-responders (p = 1.0). At baseline, pHVA levels of responders were significantly higher than that of non-responders (p = 0.033). A trend for negative correlation was found between pHVA at baseline and the changes in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale-Total (p = 0.061, r = -0.61). Our results suggest that high pHVA level before switching may predict good response to the second line antipsychotics after unsuccessful first antipsychotic treatment. If aripiprazole is not effective in acute schizophrenia, switching to risperidone may be effective and reasonable strategy for improving symptoms. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Acute and chronic glucocorticoid treatments regulate astrocyte-enriched mRNAs in multiple brain regions in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley S. Carter

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have primarily interpreted gene expression regulation by glucocorticoids in the brain in terms of impact on neurons; however, less is known about the corresponding impact of glucocorticoids on glia and specifically astrocytes in vivo. Recent microarray experiments have identified glucocorticoid-sensitive mRNAs in primary astrocyte cell culture, including a number of mRNAs that have reported astrocyte-enriched expression patterns relative to other brain cell types. Here, we have tested whether elevations of glucocorticoids regulate a subset of these mRNAs in vivo following acute and chronic corticosterone exposure in adult mice. Acute corticosterone exposure was achieved by a single injection of 10 mg/kg corticosterone, and tissue samples were harvested two hours post-injection. Chronic corticosterone exposure was achieved by administering 10 mg/mL corticosterone via drinking water for two weeks. Gene expression was then assessed in two brain regions associated with glucocorticoid action (prefrontal cortex and hippocampus by qPCR and by in situ hybridization. The majority of measured mRNAs regulated by glucocorticoids in astrocytes in vitro were similarly regulated by acute and/or chronic glucocorticoid exposure in vivo. In addition, the expression levels for mRNAs regulated in at least one corticosterone exposure condition (acute/chronic demonstrated moderate positive correlation between the two conditions by brain region. In situ hybridization analyses suggest that select mRNAs are regulated by chronic corticosterone exposure specifically in astroctyes based on (1 similar general expression patterns between corticosterone-treated and vehicle-treated animals and (2 similar expression patterns to the pan-astrocyte marker Aldh1l1. Our findings demonstrate that glucocorticoids regulate astrocyte-enriched mRNAs in vivo and suggest that glucocorticoids regulate gene expression in the brain in a cell type-dependent fashion.

  7. Effect of levels of urea and cassava chip on feed intake, rumen fermentation, blood metabolites and microbial populations in growing goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metha Wanapat

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to assess effect of levels of urea and cassava chip (CC on feed intake, rumen ecology, blood metabolites and microbial populations. Four, Thai Native X Anglo Nubian crossbred growing male goats with an average liveweight 19.0+1 kg were randomly assigned according to a 4x4 Latin square design to receive one of four diets: T1=urea at 0 % (CC=30%, T2=urea at 1% (CC=40%, T3=urea at 2% (CC = 50% and T4=urea at 3%(CC=60%, of DM basis, respectively. Elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum was offered on an ad lib basis. The results revealed that total DM intake (%BW and g/kg W0.75 and BW change were similar among treatments (p>0.05. Likewise, rumen pH, BUN, blood glucose, PCV and microbial populations were similar among treatments (p>0.05, while NH3-N increased as the urea level increased and were found highest (p<0.05 in T4 at 12.8 mg/dL. Based on this experiment, it can be concluded that a higher level of urea (3% could be used with a high level of CC in concentrate and it was good approach in exploiting the use of local feed resources for goat production.

  8. Levels of infants' urinary arsenic metabolites related to formula feeding and weaning with rice products exceeding the EU inorganic arsenic standard.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio J Signes-Pastor

    Full Text Available Early childhood inorganic arsenic (i-As exposure is of particular concern since it may adversely impact on lifetime health outcomes. Infants' urinary arsenic (As metabolites were analysed in 79 infants by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric detection (IC-ICP-MS to evaluate i-As exposure pre- and post-weaning. Levels of i-As in rice-based weaning and infants' foods were also determined to relate to urinary As levels. Higher As levels, especially of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA, were found in urine from formula fed infants compared to those breastfed. Urine from infants post-weaning consuming rice-products resulted in higher urinary MMA and DMA compared to the paired pre-weaning urine samples. The European Union (EU has regulated i-As in rice since 1st January 2016. Comparing infants' rice-based foods before and after this date, little change was found. Nearly ¾ of the rice-based products specifically marketed for infants and young children contained i-As over the 0.1 mg/kg EU limit. Efforts should be made to provide low i-As rice and rice-based products consumed by infants and young children that do not exceed the maximum i-As level to protect this vulnerable subpopulation.

  9. Influence of postnatal glucocorticoids on hippocampal-dependent learning varies with elevation patterns and administration methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claflin, Dragana I; Schmidt, Kevin D; Vallandingham, Zachary D; Kraszpulski, Michal; Hennessy, Michael B

    2017-09-01

    Recent interest in the lasting effects of early-life stress has expanded to include effects on cognitive performance. An increase in circulating glucocorticoids is induced by stress exposure and glucocorticoid effects on the hippocampus likely underlie many of the cognitive consequences. Here we review studies showing that corticosterone administered to young rats at the conclusion of the stress-hyporesponsiveness period affects later performance in hippocampally-mediated trace eyeblink conditioning. The nature and even direction of these effects varies with the elevation patterns (level, duration, temporal fluctuation) achieved by different administration methods. We present new time course data indicating that constant glucocorticoid elevations generally corresponded with hippocampus-mediated learning deficits, whereas acute, cyclical elevations corresponded with improved initial acquisition. Sensitivity was greater for males than for females. Further, changes in hippocampal neurogenesis paralleled some but not all effects. The findings demonstrate that specific patterns of glucocorticoid elevation produced by different drug administration procedures can have markedly different, sex-specific consequences on basic cognitive performance and underlying hippocampal physiology. Implications of these findings for glucocorticoid medications prescribed in childhood are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Modulation of Glucocorticoids in the Cardiovascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie G. Burford

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The collective of endocrine organs acting in homeostatic regulation—known as the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis—comprises an integration of the central nervous system as well as peripheral tissues. These organs respond to imminent or perceived threats that elicit a stress response, primarily culminating in the release of glucocorticoids into the systemic circulation by the adrenal glands. Although the secretion of glucocorticoids serves to protect and maintain homeostasis in the typical operation at baseline levels, inadequate regulation can lead to physiologic and psychologic pathologies. The cardiovascular system is especially susceptible to prolonged dysregulation of the HPA axis and glucocorticoid production. There is debate about whether cardiovascular health risks arise from the direct detrimental effects of stress axis activation or whether pathologies develop secondary to the accompanying metabolic strain of excess glucocorticoids. In this review, we will explore the emerging research that indicates stress does have direct effects on the cardiovascular system via the HPA axis activation, with emphasis on the latest research on the impact of glucocorticoids signaling in the vasculature and the heart.

  11. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Modulation of Glucocorticoids in the Cardiovascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, Natalie G; Webster, Natalia A; Cruz-Topete, Diana

    2017-10-16

    The collective of endocrine organs acting in homeostatic regulation-known as the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis-comprises an integration of the central nervous system as well as peripheral tissues. These organs respond to imminent or perceived threats that elicit a stress response, primarily culminating in the release of glucocorticoids into the systemic circulation by the adrenal glands. Although the secretion of glucocorticoids serves to protect and maintain homeostasis in the typical operation at baseline levels, inadequate regulation can lead to physiologic and psychologic pathologies. The cardiovascular system is especially susceptible to prolonged dysregulation of the HPA axis and glucocorticoid production. There is debate about whether cardiovascular health risks arise from the direct detrimental effects of stress axis activation or whether pathologies develop secondary to the accompanying metabolic strain of excess glucocorticoids. In this review, we will explore the emerging research that indicates stress does have direct effects on the cardiovascular system via the HPA axis activation, with emphasis on the latest research on the impact of glucocorticoids signaling in the vasculature and the heart.

  12. Glucocorticoids interact with the hippocampal endocannabinoid system in impairing retrieval of contextual fear memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsak, Piray; Hauer, Daniela; Campolongo, Patrizia; Schelling, Gustav; McGaugh, James L.; Roozendaal, Benno

    2012-01-01

    There is extensive evidence that glucocorticoid hormones impair the retrieval of memory of emotionally arousing experiences. Although it is known that glucocorticoid effects on memory retrieval impairment depend on rapid interactions with arousal-induced noradrenergic activity, the exact mechanism underlying this presumably nongenomically mediated glucocorticoid action remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that the hippocampal endocannabinoid system, a rapidly activated retrograde messenger system, is involved in mediating glucocorticoid effects on retrieval of contextual fear memory. Systemic administration of corticosterone (0.3–3 mg/kg) to male Sprague–Dawley rats 1 h before retention testing impaired the retrieval of contextual fear memory without impairing the retrieval of auditory fear memory or directly affecting the expression of freezing behavior. Importantly, a blockade of hippocampal CB1 receptors with AM251 prevented the impairing effect of corticosterone on retrieval of contextual fear memory, whereas the same impairing dose of corticosterone increased hippocampal levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol. We also found that antagonism of hippocampal β-adrenoceptor activity with local infusions of propranolol blocked the memory retrieval impairment induced by the CB receptor agonist WIN55,212–2. Thus, these findings strongly suggest that the endocannabinoid system plays an intermediary role in regulating rapid glucocorticoid effects on noradrenergic activity in impairing memory retrieval of emotionally arousing experiences. PMID:22331883

  13. Impact of elevated H2S on metabolite levels, activity of enzymes and expression of genes involved in cysteine metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemenschneider, A; Nikiforova, V.; Hoefgen, R; De Kok, LJ; Papenbrock, J

    The effects of elevated atmospheric hydrogen sulfide (H2S) levels (0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mu l l(-1)) have been investigated in a short-term exposure experiment (3-48 h) on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. in comparison to untreated control plants. The most pronounced effects of H2S

  14. Can volatile organic metabolites be used to simultaneously assess microbial and mite contamination level in cereal grains and coffee beans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Angelo C; Baptista, Inês; Barros, António S; Gomes, Newton C M; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide; Rocha, Silvia M

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-ToFMS) was developed for the simultaneous screening of microbial and mite contamination level in cereals and coffee beans. The proposed approach emerges as a powerful tool for the rapid assessment of the microbial contamination level (ca. 70 min versus ca. 72 to 120 h for bacteria and fungi, respectively, using conventional plate counts), and mite contamination (ca. 70 min versus ca. 24 h). A full-factorial design was performed for optimization of the SPME experimental parameters. The methodology was applied to three types of rice (rough, brown, and white rice), oat, wheat, and green and roasted coffee beans. Simultaneously, microbiological analysis of the samples (total aerobic microorganisms, moulds, and yeasts) was performed by conventional plate counts. A set of 54 volatile markers was selected among all the compounds detected by GC×GC-ToFMS. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied in order to establish a relationship between potential volatile markers and the level of microbial contamination. Methylbenzene, 3-octanone, 2-nonanone, 2-methyl-3-pentanol, 1-octen-3-ol, and 2-hexanone were associated to samples with higher microbial contamination level, especially in rough rice. Moreover, oat exhibited a high GC peak area of 2-hydroxy-6-methylbenzaldehyde, a sexual and alarm pheromone for adult mites, which in the other matrices appeared as a trace component. The number of mites detected in oat grains was correlated to the GC peak area of the pheromone. The HS-SPME/GC×GC-ToFMS methodology can be regarded as the basis for the development of a rapid and versatile method that can be applied in industry to the simultaneous assessment the level of microbiological contamination and for detection of mites in cereals grains and coffee beans.

  15. Variation of Enzyme Activities and Metabolite Levels in 24 Arabidopsis Accessions Growing in Carbon-Limited Conditions1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Joanna M.; von Korff, Maria; Altmann, Thomas; Bartzetko, Linda; Sulpice, Ronan; Gibon, Yves; Palacios, Natalia; Stitt, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Our understanding of the interaction of carbon (C) metabolism with nitrogen (N) metabolism and growth is based mainly on studies of responses to environmental treatments, and studies of mutants and transformants. Here, we investigate which metabolic parameters vary and which parameters change in a coordinated manner in 24 genetically diverse Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) accessions, grown in C-limited conditions. The accessions were grown in short days, moderate light, and high nitrate, and analyzed for rosette biomass, levels of structural components (protein, chlorophyll), total phenols and major metabolic intermediates (sugars, starch, nitrate, amino acids), and the activities of seven representative enzymes from central C and N metabolism. The largest variation was found for plant weight, reducing sugars, starch at the end of the night, and several enzyme activities. High levels of one sugar correlated with high levels of other sugars and starch, and a trend to increased amino acids, slightly lower nitrate, and higher protein. The activities of enzymes at the interface of C and N metabolism correlated with each other, but were unrelated to carbohydrates, amino acid levels, and total protein. Rosette weight was unrelated or showed a weak negative trend to sugar and amino acid contents at the end of the day in most of the accessions, and was negatively correlated with starch at the end of the night. Rosette weight was positively correlated with several enzyme activities. We propose that growth is not related to the absolute levels of starch, sugars, and amino acids; instead, it is related to flux, which is indicated by the enzymatic capacity to use these central resources. PMID:17085515

  16. Basal levels and diurnal variations of some hormones and metabolites in blood of dairy cows treated daily with rbSTin early and late lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurgen Blum

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The variations of basal value (before morning feeding at 3-4 days interval and daily pattern (on 4and 18day of treat-  ment with 8 blood collections within 24h of hormones and metabolites were studied in four dairy cows; 2 in early and  2 in late lactation, which were alternatively injected daily for a period of 21 days with 26.3 mg rbST or saline.  The rbST  injection significantly increased the basal and daily levels of GH, IGF-I in both stages of lactation. Daily levels of NEFA  were significantly increased by rbST in both stages of lactation and their variations, due to the effect of meals, were coun-  teracted by the rbST; the higher level of NEFA allowed a greater sparing of glucose, the blood level of which resulted  higher (P  blood urea level (P  ticular the high availability of glucose, determined a significantly higher blood level of insulin and T3, and lower level of  glucagon. Despite the similar GH, IGF-I and NEFA increases observed in the cows treated in early and late lactation, other  metabolic and endocrine consequences resulted more evident in late lactation. Furthermore, some of these variations  were affected by the forage meals. It can be concluded, therefore, that the changes occurring in the blood subsequent  to a rbST treatment are not equal to those which occur at the start of lactation; moreover, they are affected by the daily  feeding pattern and perhaps by the stage of  lactation. 

  17. Systems Biology of Glucocorticoids in Muscle Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and incurable muscular dystrophy of childhood. Muscle regeneration fails with...SUBJECT TERMS Duchenne Muscular dystrophy , Glucocorticoids, Systems biology, Drug mechanism 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17. LIMITATION...better targeted and more effective therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy dynamically. This MDA grant proposal is led by Dr. Eric Hoffman, and it

  18. On the retinal toxicity of intraocular glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torriglia, Alicia; Valamanesh, Fatemeh; Behar-Cohen, Francine

    2010-12-15

    Corticosteroids are hormones involved in many physiological responses such as stress, immune modulation, protein catabolism and water homeostasis. The subfamily of glucocorticoids is used systemically in the treatment of inflammatory diseases or allergic reactions. In the eye, glucocorticoides are used to treat macular edema, inflammation and neovascularization. The most commonly used glucocorticoid is triamcinolone acetonide (TA). The pharmaceutical formulation of TA is not adapted for intravitreal administration but has been selected by ophthalmologists because its very low intraocular solubility provides sustained effect. Visual benefits of intraocular TA do not clearly correlate with morpho-anatomical improvements, suggesting potential toxicity. We therefore studied, non-common, but deleterious effects of glucocorticoids on the retina. We found that the intravitreal administration of TA is beneficial in the treatment of neovascularization because it triggers cell death of endothelial cells of neovessels by a caspase-independent mechanism. However, this treatment is toxic for the retina because it induces a non-apoptotic, caspase-independent cell death related to paraptosis, mostly in the retinal pigmented epithelium cells and the Müller cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. From receptor balance to rational glucocorticoid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, E Ron

    2014-08-01

    Corticosteroids secreted as end product of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis act like a double-edged sword in the brain. The hormones coordinate appraisal processes and decision making during the initial phase of a stressful experience and promote subsequently cognitive performance underlying the management of stress adaptation. This action exerted by the steroids on the initiation and termination of the stress response is mediated by 2 related receptor systems: mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). The receptor types are unevenly distributed but colocalized in abundance in neurons of the limbic brain to enable these complementary hormone actions. This contribution starts from a historical perspective with the observation that phasic occupancy of GR during ultradian rhythmicity is needed to maintain responsiveness to corticosteroids. Then, during stress, initially MR activation enhances excitability of limbic networks that are engaged in appraisal and emotion regulation. Next, the rising hormone concentration occupies GR, resulting in reallocation of energy to limbic-cortical circuits with a role in behavioral adaptation and memory storage. Upon MR:GR imbalance, dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis occurs, which can enhance an individual's vulnerability. Imbalance is characteristic for chronic stress experience and depression but also occurs during exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids. Hence, glucocorticoid psychopathology may develop in susceptible individuals because of suppression of ultradian/circadian rhythmicity and depletion of endogenous corticosterone from brain MR. This knowledge generated from testing the balance hypothesis can be translated to a rational glucocorticoid therapy.

  20. Relating Stool Microbial Metabolite Levels, Inflammatory Markers and Dietary Behaviors to Screening Colonoscopy Findings in a Racially/Ethnically Diverse Patient Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M. Bridges

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third leading cause of cancer death for both men and women in the United States, yet it is treatable and preventable. African Americans have higher incidence of CRC than other racial/ethnic groups, however, it is unclear whether this disparity is primarily due to environmental or biological factors. Short chain fatty acids (SCFAs are metabolites produced by bacteria in the colon and are known to be inversely related to CRC progression. The aim of this study is to investigate how stool SCFA levels, markers of inflammation in stool and dietary intake relate to colonoscopy findings in a diverse patient population. Stool samples from forty-eight participants were analyzed for SCFA levels and inflammatory markers (lysozyme, secretory IgA, lactoferrin. Additionally, participants completed the National Cancer Institute’s Diet History Questionnaire II (DHQ II to report dietary intake over the past year. Subsequently, the majority of participants underwent screening colonoscopy. Our results showed that African Americans had higher total levels of SCFAs in stool than other racial/ethnic groups, significantly lower intake of non-starchy vegetables and similar inflammatory marker expression and colonoscopy outcomes, compared to others. This work is an initial exploration into the biological and clinical factors that may ultimately inform personalized screening approaches and clinical decision-making to improve colorectal cancer disparities for African Americans.

  1. Relating Stool Microbial Metabolite Levels, Inflammatory Markers and Dietary Behaviors to Screening Colonoscopy Findings in a Racially/Ethnically Diverse Patient Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Kristina M.; Diaz, Francisco J.; Wang, Zhiwen; Ahmed, Ishfaq; Sullivan, Debra K.; Umar, Shahid; Buckles, Daniel C.; Greiner, K. Allen; Hester, Christina M.

    2018-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer death for both men and women in the United States, yet it is treatable and preventable. African Americans have higher incidence of CRC than other racial/ethnic groups, however, it is unclear whether this disparity is primarily due to environmental or biological factors. Short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are metabolites produced by bacteria in the colon and are known to be inversely related to CRC progression. The aim of this study is to investigate how stool SCFA levels, markers of inflammation in stool and dietary intake relate to colonoscopy findings in a diverse patient population. Stool samples from forty-eight participants were analyzed for SCFA levels and inflammatory markers (lysozyme, secretory IgA, lactoferrin). Additionally, participants completed the National Cancer Institute’s Diet History Questionnaire II (DHQ II) to report dietary intake over the past year. Subsequently, the majority of participants underwent screening colonoscopy. Our results showed that African Americans had higher total levels of SCFAs in stool than other racial/ethnic groups, significantly lower intake of non-starchy vegetables and similar inflammatory marker expression and colonoscopy outcomes, compared to others. This work is an initial exploration into the biological and clinical factors that may ultimately inform personalized screening approaches and clinical decision-making to improve colorectal cancer disparities for African Americans. PMID:29495356

  2. Glucocorticoid effects on hippocampal protein synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlatter, L.K.

    1988-01-01

    Following subcutaneous injection of rats with 5 mg corticosterone, hippocampal slices in vitro show increased [ 35 S]-methionine labeling of a cytosolic protein with an apparent molecular weight (M r ) of 35,000 and an isoelectric point (IEP) of 6.6. This labeling is temporally consistent with a transcriptional event, and is steroid- and tissue-specific. The pear serum concentration of steroid occurs one hour or less following the injection. Maximal labeling of this protein is reached whenever serum corticosterone values are approximately 100 ng/ml. When endogenous corticosterone levels are elevated to 100 ng/ml through stressors or exogenous ACTH injections the same maximal increase in synthesis of the 35,000 M r protein is observed. Adrenalectomy prevents the observed response from occurring following stressor application or ACTH injections. Comparison of the increases observed after administration of the type 2 receptor agonist RU 28362 and aldosterone, which has a higher affinity for the type 1 receptor, shows a 50-fold greater sensitivity of the response to the type 2 receptor agonist. Synthesis of this protein following serum increases of steroid possibly correlates to the theorized function of the type 2 receptor feedback regulation. The similar protein in the liver has an IEP of 6.8 and a slightly higher M r . A second hippocampal protein with an M r of 46,000 and an IEP of 6.2 is also increased in labeling. Two additional liver proteins, one of Mr 53,000 (IEP of 6.2) and the other with an M r of 45,000 (IEP of 8.7-7.8) are increased in the liver following glucocorticoid administration

  3. Endogenous glucocorticoids exacerbate cholestasis-associated liver injury and hypercholesterolemia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Geest, Rick; Ouweneel, Amber B; van der Sluis, Ronald J; Groen, Albert K; Van Eck, Miranda; Hoekstra, Menno

    2016-09-01

    Cholestatic liver disease is characterized by a disruption of bile flow, bile acid toxicity, liver injury, and hypercholesterolemia. Relatively high secretion of glucocorticoids by the adrenals has been observed under cholestatic conditions. Here we investigated a contribution of the rise in endogenous glucocorticoids to initial stage cholestasis pathology. Adrenalectomized or sham-operated control C57BL/6 mice were given an oral dose of alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate to induce cholestasis. Adrenalectomy effectively lowered plasma corticosterone levels (18±5ng/ml vs 472±58ng/ml; Phypercholesterolemia. In conclusion, we have shown that endogenous glucocorticoids exacerbate the liver injury and hypercholesterolemia associated with acute cholestasis in mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Role and Mechanisms of Action of Glucocorticoid Involvement in Memory Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandi, Carmen

    1998-01-01

    Adrenal steroid hormones modulate learning and memory processes by interacting with specific glucocorticoid receptors at different brain areas. In this article, certain components of the physiological response to stress elicited by learning situations are proposed to form an integral aspect of the neurobiological mechanism underlying memory formation. By reviewing the work carried out in different learning models in chicks (passive avoidance learning) and rats (spatial orientation in the Morris water maze and contextual fear conditioning), a role for brain corticosterone action through the glucocorticoid receptor type on the mechanisms of memory consolidation is hypothesized. Evidence is also presented to relate post-training corticosterone levels to the strength of memory storage. Finally, the possible molecular mechanisms that might mediate the influences of glucocorticoids in synaptic plasticity subserving long-term memory formation are considered, mainly by focusing on studies implicating a steroid action through (i) glutamatergic transmission and (ii) cell adhesion molecules. PMID:9920681

  5. Changes in the Levels of Abscisic Acid and Its Metabolites in Excised Leaf Blades of Xanthium strumarium during and after Water Stress 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeevaart, Jan A. D.

    1980-01-01

    The time course of abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation during water stress and of degradation following rehydration was investigated by analyzing the levels of ABA and its metabolites phaseic acid (PA) and alkalihydrolyzable conjugated ABA in excised leaf blades of Xanthium strumarium. Initial purification was by reverse-phase, preparative, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) which did not require prior partitioning. ABA and PA were purified further by analytical HPLC with a μBondapak-NH2 column, and quantified by GLC with an electron capture detector. The ABA content of stressed leaves increased for 4 to 5 hours and then leveled off due to a balance between synthesis and degradation. Since PA accumulated at a constant rate throughout the wilting period, it was concluded that the rate of ABA synthesis decreased after the first 4 to 5 hours stress. Conjugated ABA increased at a low rate during stress. This is interpreted to indicate that free ABA was converted to the conjugated form, rather than the reverse. Following rehydration of wilted leaves, the ABA level immediately ceased increasing; it remained constant for 1 hour and then declined rapidly to the prestress level over a 2- to 3-hour period with a concomitant rise in the PA level. In contrast to the rapid disappearance of ABA after relief of stress, the high PA content of rehydrated leaves declined only slowly. The level of conjugated ABA did not change following rehydration, indicating that conjugation of ABA was irreversible. Detached Xanthium leaves that were subjected to a wilting-recovery-rewilting cycle in darkness, responded to the second wilting period by formation of the same amount of ABA as accumulated after the first stress period. PMID:16661500

  6. Changes in the Levels of Abscisic Acid and Its Metabolites in Excised Leaf Blades of Xanthium strumarium during and after Water Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeevaart, J A

    1980-10-01

    The time course of abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation during water stress and of degradation following rehydration was investigated by analyzing the levels of ABA and its metabolites phaseic acid (PA) and alkalihydrolyzable conjugated ABA in excised leaf blades of Xanthium strumarium. Initial purification was by reverse-phase, preparative, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) which did not require prior partitioning. ABA and PA were purified further by analytical HPLC with a muBondapak-NH(2) column, and quantified by GLC with an electron capture detector.The ABA content of stressed leaves increased for 4 to 5 hours and then leveled off due to a balance between synthesis and degradation. Since PA accumulated at a constant rate throughout the wilting period, it was concluded that the rate of ABA synthesis decreased after the first 4 to 5 hours stress. Conjugated ABA increased at a low rate during stress. This is interpreted to indicate that free ABA was converted to the conjugated form, rather than the reverse.Following rehydration of wilted leaves, the ABA level immediately ceased increasing; it remained constant for 1 hour and then declined rapidly to the prestress level over a 2- to 3-hour period with a concomitant rise in the PA level. In contrast to the rapid disappearance of ABA after relief of stress, the high PA content of rehydrated leaves declined only slowly. The level of conjugated ABA did not change following rehydration, indicating that conjugation of ABA was irreversible.Detached Xanthium leaves that were subjected to a wilting-recovery-rewilting cycle in darkness, responded to the second wilting period by formation of the same amount of ABA as accumulated after the first stress period.

  7. Glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphism and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheplyagina Larisa A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1 has been suggested as a candidate gene affecting juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA course and prognosis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the glucocorticoid receptor gene BclI polymorphism (rs41423247 in JIA patients, the gene's role in susceptibility to juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and its associations with JIA activity, course and bone mineralization. Methods One hundred twenty-two Caucasian children with JIA and 143 healthy ethnically matched controls were studied. We checked markers of clinical and laboratory activity: morning stiffness, Ritchie Articular Index (RAI, swollen joint count (SJC, tender joint count (TJC, physician's visual analog scale (VAS, hemoglobin level (Hb, leukocyte count (L, platelet count (Pl, Westergren erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, albumin, DAS and DAS28. Bone mineralization was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA of lumbar spine L1-L4. Assessments of bone metabolism included osteocalcin, C-terminal telopeptide (CTT, parathyroid hormone (PTH, total and ionized calcium, inorganic phosphate and total alkaline phosphatase (TAP. BclI polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results No association was observed between glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphism and the presence or absence of JIA. In girls with JIA, the presence of the G allele was associated with an unfavorable arthritis course, a younger age of onset of arthritis (p = 0.0017, and higher inflammatory activity. The higher inflammatory activity was demonstrated by the following: increased time of morning stiffness (p = 0.02, VAS (p = 0.014, RAI (p = 0.048, DAS (p = 0.035, DAS28 (p = 0.05, Pl (p = 0.003, L (p = 0.046, CRP (p = 0.01. In addition, these patients had bone metabolism disturbances as follows: decreased BA (p = 0.0001, BMC (p = 0.00007, BMD (0.005 and Z score (p = 0.002; and

  8. A zebrafish model of glucocorticoid resistance shows serotonergic modulation of the stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian eGriffiths

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available One function of glucocorticoids is to restore homeostasis after an acute stress response by providing negative feedback to stress circuits in the brain. Loss of this negative feedback leads to elevated physiological stress and may contribute to depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. We investigated the early, developmental effects of glucocorticoid signaling deficits on stress physiology and related behaviors using a mutant zebrafish, grs357, with non-functional glucocorticoid receptors. These mutants are morphologically inconspicuous and adult-viable. A previous study of adult grs357 mutants showed loss of glucocorticoid-mediated negative feedback and elevated physiological and behavioral stress markers. Already at five days post-fertilization, mutant larvae had elevated whole body cortisol, increased expression of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC, the precursor of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH, and failed to show normal suppression of stress markers after dexamethasone treatment. Mutant larvae had larger auditory-evoked startle responses compared to wildtype sibling controls (grwt, despite having lower spontaneous activity levels. Fluoxetine (Prozac treatment in mutants decreased startle responding and increased spontaneous activity, making them behaviorally similar to wildtype. This result mirrors known effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in modifying glucocorticoid signaling and alleviating stress disorders in human patients. Our results suggest that larval grs357 zebrafish can be used to study behavioral, physiological and molecular aspects of stress disorders. Most importantly, interactions between glucocorticoid and serotonin signaling appear to be highly conserved among vertebrates, suggesting deep homologies at the neural circuit level and opening up new avenues for research into psychiatric conditions.

  9. Effects of a short-term feed restriction on growth performance, blood metabolites and hepatic IGF-1 levels in growing rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A total of 144 weaned hybrid HYLA rabbits (40-day-old were randomly divided into 4 groups, to investigate the effects of the intensity of one week’s feed restriction on short- and medium-term growth performance, blood metabolites and hepatic IGF-1 in growing rabbits. Restricted groups were fed with 30% (Group L30, 50% (Group L50 70% (Group L70 of ad libitum feeding for 1 wk and then fed ad libitum until the end of the experiment (75 d of age. The control group (Group AL was fed ad libitum throughout the experiment. Total feed intake (–15.8% and feed conversion ratio (–13.2% were lower in the L50 than in the AL group (P0.05 for these parameters. Total weight gain did not significantly differ among the 4 experimental groups (38.5 g/d; P>0.05. At the end of the feed restriction period, the total serum protein level (P=0.01 was higher in restricted rabbits than AL rabbits (P0.05 throughout the experiment. In conclusion, a short-term feed restriction improves feed conversion ratio in a lasting way, transiently alters serum protein and IFG-1 levels and leads to compensatory growth in growing rabbits.

  10. Effects of inclusion levels of pelleted silvergrass (Miscanthus sinensis Andress.) in the diet on digestibility, chewing activity, ruminal fermentation and blood metabolites in breeding Japanese Black cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Keigo; Ishida, Miho; Ishida, Motohiko

    2017-03-01

    To examine the effects of inclusion levels of pelleted silvergrass (PS) in the diet on digestibility, ruminal fermentation and nutrient status of breeding Japanese Black cows, four cows were allotted to a 4 × 4 Latin square design experiment. Treatments were control fed a diet consisting of 89.4% Sudangrass hay and 10.6% soybean meal on a dry matter (DM) basis, and PS18, PS27 and PS45 fed the diet replaced with 18%, 27% and 45% of control with PS, respectively. The total digestible nutrients (TDN) content of PS was 45.6% on a DM basis. The TDN intakes were significantly decreased by increasing PS level in the diet (P ruminal fluid and serum metabolite concentrations were not significantly different among the treatments. The results suggested that including PS up to 45% in the diet did not have adverse effects on the ruminal fermentation and nutrient status in breeding Japanese Black cows at the maintenance stage. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  11. Context-dependent memory following recurrent hypoglycaemia in non-diabetic rats is mediated via glucocorticoid signalling in the dorsal hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Danielle M; O'Leary, Kelsey E; Fitzgerald, Dennis P; George, Alvin J; Vidal, Michael M; Anderson, Brian M; McNay, Ewan C

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent hypoglycaemia is primarily caused by repeated over-administration of insulin to patients with diabetes. Although cognition is impaired during hypoglycaemia, restoration of euglycaemia after recurrent hypoglycaemia is associated with improved hippocampally mediated memory. Recurrent hypoglycaemia alters glucocorticoid secretion in response to hypoglycaemia; glucocorticoids are well established to regulate hippocampal processes, suggesting a possible mechanism for recurrent hypoglycaemia modulation of subsequent cognition. We tested the hypothesis that glucocorticoids within the dorsal hippocampus might mediate the impact of recurrent hypoglycaemia on hippocampal cognitive processes. We characterised changes in the dorsal hippocampus at several time points to identify specific mechanisms affected by recurrent hypoglycaemia, using a well-validated 3 day model of recurrent hypoglycaemia either alone or with intrahippocampal delivery of glucocorticoid (mifepristone) and mineralocorticoid (spironolactone) receptor antagonists prior to each hypoglycaemic episode. Recurrent hypoglycaemia enhanced learning and also increased hippocampal expression of glucocorticoid receptors, serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1, cyclic AMP response element binding (CREB) phosphorylation, and plasma membrane levels of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors. Both hippocampus-dependent memory enhancement and the molecular changes were reversed by glucocorticoid receptor antagonist treatment. These results indicate that increased glucocorticoid signalling during recurrent hypoglycaemia produces several changes in the dorsal hippocampus that are conducive to enhanced hippocampus-dependent contextual learning. These changes appear to be adaptive, and in addition to supporting cognition may reduce damage otherwise caused by repeated exposure to severe hypoglycaemia.

  12. Maternal glucocorticoid elevation and associated blood metabonome changes might be involved in metabolic programming of intrauterine growth retardation in rats exposed to caffeine prenatally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Hao; Liu, Yansong; Liang, Gai; Huang, Jing; Hu, Jieqiong; Yan, You-e; Li, Xiaojun; Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang; Zhang, Yuanzhen; Feng, Jianghua; Wang, Hui

    2014-03-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that prenatal caffeine exposure causes intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), fetuses are over-exposed to high levels of maternal glucocorticoids (GC), and intrauterine metabolic programming and associated metabonome alteration that may be GC-mediated. However, whether maternal metabonomes would be altered and relevant metabolite variations might mediate the development of IUGR remained unknown. In the present studies, we examined the dose- and time-effects of caffeine on maternal metabonome, and tried to clarify the potential roles of maternal GCs and metabonome changes in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. Pregnant rats were treated with caffeine (0, 20, 60 or 180 mg/kg·d) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20, or 180 mg/kg·d caffeine from GD9. Metabonomes of maternal plasma on GD20 in the dose-effect study and on GD11, 14 and 17 in the time-course study were analyzed by ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Caffeine administration reduced maternal weight gains and elevated both maternal and fetal corticosterone (CORT) levels. A negative correlation between maternal/fetal CORT levels and fetal bodyweight was observed. The maternal metabonome alterations included attenuated metabolism of carbohydrates, enhanced lipolysis and protein breakdown, and amino acid accumulation, suggesting GC-associated metabolic effects. GC-associated metabolite variations (α/β-glucoses, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, β-hydroxybutyrate) were observed early following caffeine administration. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine exposure induced maternal GC elevation and metabonome alteration, and maternal GC and relevant discriminatory metabolites might be involved in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. NO Metabolites Levels in Human Red Blood Cells are Affected by Palytoxin, an Inhibitor of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carelli-Alinovi, Cristiana; Tellone, Ester; Russo, Anna Maria; Ficarra, Silvana; Pirolli, Davide; Galtieri, Antonio; Giardina, Bruno; Misiti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Palytoxin (PTX), a marine toxin, represents an increasing hazard for human health. Despite its high toxicity for biological systems, the mechanisms triggered by PTX, are not well understood. The high affinity of PTX for erythrocyte Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump is largely known, and it indicates PTX as a sensitive tool to characterize the signal transducer role for Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump. Previously, it has been reported that in red blood cells (RBC), probably via a signal transduction generated by the formation of a PTX-Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase complex, PTX alters band 3 functions and glucose metabolism. The present study addresses the question of which other signaling pathways are regulated by Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in RBC. Here it has been evidenced that PTX following its interaction with Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump, alters RBC morphology and this event is correlated to decreases by 30% in nitrites and nitrates levels, known as markers of plasma membrane eNOS activity. Orthovanadate (OV), an antagonist of PTX binding to Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump, was able to reverse the effects elicited by PTX. Finally, current investigation firstly suggests that Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump, following its interaction with PTX, triggers a signal transduction involved in NO metabolism regulation.

  14. Lactobacillus johnsonii inhibits indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and alters tryptophan metabolite levels in BioBreeding rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Ricardo; Bojilova, Lora; Potts, Anastasia H; Cameron, Evan; Gardner, Christopher; Lorca, Graciela; Gonzalez, Claudio F

    2013-04-01

    In our previous work, we found that feeding Lactobacillus johnsonii to BioBreeding diabetes-prone (BBDP) rats decreased the incidence of diabetes development. The aim of this study was to investigate host pathways affected by L. johnsonii, with specific focus on the rate-limiting enzyme of tryptophan catabolism, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Suspensions of L. johnsonii or an equal volume of vehicle were orally administered to BBDP rats. Tissue IDO was investigated using quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot, whereas tryptophan, kynurenine, and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) concentrations were quantified by HPLC and ELISA. IDO activity was also investigated using L. johnsonii culture cell-free supernatant (CFS) with affinity-purified IDO and HT-29 intestinal epithelial cells. L. johnsonii feeding resulted in a 17% reduction in serum kynurenine compared with that in vehicle-fed controls, correlating with a 1.4-fold elevation in 5-HT levels. H₂O₂ produced by L. johnsonii abolished IDO activity in vitro, and L. johnsonii feeding resulted in a 3.9-fold increase in ileum lumen H₂O₂. L. johnsonii CFS significantly reduced IDO activity in HT-29 intestinal epithelial cells (47% reduction) compared with that in vehicle-treated controls, an effect abolished by catalase treatment. These data support the role of H₂O₂ in commensal bacteria-host interactions and highlight the influence of commensal bacteria-derived H₂O₂ on host physiology.

  15. Rumen fermentation, blood metabolites, and growth performance of calves during transition from liquid to solid feed: Effects of dietary level and particle size of alfalfa hay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, M; Amanlou, H; Khorvash, M; Moshiri, B; Mirzaei, M; Khan, M A; Ghaffari, M H

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the effects of particle size (PS) and dietary level of alfalfa hay (AH) on rumen fermentation parameters, blood metabolites, eating behavior, and growth performance in dairy calves during transition from liquid to solid feed. Sixty newborn dairy calves (41 ± 2.5,kg of body weight) were used in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement with the factors dietary AH level (medium, 12.5%, or high, 25%, on DM basis) and PS (fine = 1mm or medium = 3mm, as geometric means) of AH. Hence, the dietary treatments were (1) medium level of AH with fine PS (M-FPS), (2) medium level of AH with medium PS (M-MPS), (3) high level of AH with fine PS (H-FPS), and (4) high level of AH with medium PS (H-MPS). Particle size of AH did not affect total DMI (TDMI) during the preweaning period, although TDMI was greater for calves fed MPS than in those fed FPS during the postweaning and overall periods. Calves fed MPS spent more time eating solid feed and ruminating and less time on nonnutritive oral behaviors compared with FPS calves. The dietary level of AH did not affect behavioral parameters. Average daily gain of calves was not affected by dietary treatment before weaning. During the postweaning and overall periods, average daily gain was greater in calves fed MPS than in those fed FPS at the 25% AH level, but this effect was absent with 12.5% AH. Furthermore, the rumen pH values on d 35 and 70 of the study were greater for MPS than for FPS, regardless of the dietary level of AH. Effects of AH level, PS, and their interaction did not affect blood glucose concentrations in developing calves. These results indicate that feed intake, feeding behavior, rumen fermentation parameters, and blood β-hydroxybutyrate concentration may be affected by rations differing in forage PS; thus, providing calves with MPS can improve calf performance and reduce their nonnutritive oral behaviors. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The glucocorticoid receptor in the limbic system of the human brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones (GCs) are important mediators of the stress response in mammals including humans. GCs are released from the adrenal in response to stress and affect numerous processes in the body and brain. Their levels are controlled via negative feedback exerted by GC binding to brain

  17. Differential targeting of brain stress circuits with a selective glucocorticoid receptor modulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zalachoras, I.; Houtman, R.; Atucha, E.; Devos, R.; Tijssen, A.M.I.; Hu, P.; Lockey, P.M.; Datson, N.A.; Belanoff, J.K.; Lucassen, P.J.; Joëls, M.; de Kloet, E.R.; Roozendaal, B.; Hunt, H.; Meijer, O.C.

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonism may be of considerable therapeutic value in stress-related psychopathology such as depression. However, blockade of all GR-dependent processes in the brain will lead to unnecessary and even counteractive effects, such as elevated endogenous cortisol levels.

  18. Behavioral neuroadaptation to alcohol : from glucocorticoids to histone acetylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Beracochea

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A prime mechanism that contributes to the development and maintenance of alcoholism is the dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis activity and the release of glucocorticoids (cortisol in humans and primates, corticosterone in rodents from the adrenal glands. In the brain, sustained, local elevation of glucocorticoid concentration even long after cessation of chronic alcohol consumption compromises functional integrity of a circuit including the prefrontal cortex, the hippocampus and the amygdala. These structures are implicated in learning and memory processes as well as in orchestrating neuroadaptive responses to stress and anxiety responses. Thus, potentiation of anxiety-related neuroadaptation by alcohol is characterized by an abnormally amygdala hyperactivity coupled with a hypofunction of the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. This review describes research on molecular and epigenetic mechanisms by which alcohol causes distinct region-specific adaptive changes in gene expression patterns and ultimately, leads to a variety of cognitive and behavioral impairments on prefrontal- and hippocampal-based tasks. Alcohol-induced neuroadaptations involve the dysregulation of numerous signaling cascades, leading to long-term changes in transcriptional profiles of genes, through the actions of transcription factors such as CREB (cAMP response element binding protein and chromatin remodeling due to post-translational modifications of histone proteins. We describe the role of prefrontal-hippocampus-amygdala circuit in mediating the effects of acute and chronic alcohol on learning and memory, and region-specific molecular and epigenetic mechanisms involved in this process. This review first discusses the importance of brain region-specific dysregulation of glucocorticoid concentration in the development of alcohol dependence and describes on how persistently increased glucocorticoid levels in prefrontal cortex may be involved in

  19. Interactions between levels of heat-treated soybean meal and prilled fat on growth, rumen fermentation, and blood metabolites of Holstein calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi-Bonchenari, M; Mirzaei, M; Jahani-Moghadam, M; Soltani, A; Mahjoubi, E; Patton, R A

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the interaction of RUP and fat levels on growth, rumen fermentation, and blood metabolites of Holstein calves. Forty 3-d-old calves (20 females and 20 males) with a starting BW of 40.6 ± 2.8 kg were used in a completely randomized design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Within sex treatments were: (1) high RUP and low fat (HRUP-LF); (2) low RUP and high fat (LRUP-HF); (3) high RUP and low fat (HRUP-LF); and high RUP and high fat (HRUP-HF). Low-RUP starter contained 21.5%, whereas high RUP starter contained 34.3% RUP as % of CP, whereas low fat starter contained 2.9% and high starter contained 5.8% crude fat based on DM. Isonitrogenous levels in the starter grain were maintained by replacing solvent soybean meal with heat treated soybean meal while fat levels were increased by the addition of prilled fatty acids. Calves were housed individually and had ad libitum access to water and calf starter throughout the study. All calves were weaned on d 60 of age but remained in the study until d 70 for final measurements. Overall, there was no interaction between RUP and fat levels for measured variables. Starter intake tended ( = 0.09) to be greater for calves fed low fat starter during the postweaning period, although over the whole experiment and during the preweaning period, differences in starter intake were not different. Although there were no differences for most VFA concentrations, the molar proportion of butyrate tended ( RUP ( RUP starter. However, feeding a calf starter with over 3% fat appeared to decrease starter intake as growth progressed.

  20. The obesity-associated transcription factor ETV5 modulates circulating glucocorticoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Aguilar, Ruth; Thompson, Abigail; Marchand, Nathalie; Dumont, Patrick; Woods, Stephen C.; de Launoit, Yvan; Seeley, Randy J.; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor E-twenty-six version 5 (ETV5) has been linked with obesity in genome-wide association studies. Moreover, ETV5-deficient mice (knockout; KO) have reduced body weight, lower fat mass, and are resistant to diet-induced obesity, directly linking ETV5 to the regulation of energy balance and metabolism. ETV5 is expressed in hypothalamic brain regions that regulate both metabolism and HPA axis activity, suggesting that ETV5 may also modulate HPA axis function. In order to test this possibility, plasma corticosterone levels were measured in ETV5 KO and wildtype (WT) mice before (pre-stress) and after (post-stress) a mild stressor (intraperitoneal injection). ETV5 deficiency increased both pre- and post-stress plasma corticosterone, suggesting that loss of ETV5 elevated glucocorticoid tone. Consistent with this idea, ETV5 KO mice have reduced thymus weight, suggestive of increased glucocorticoid-induced thymic involution. ETV5 deficiency also decreased the mRNA expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and vasopressin receptor 1A in the hypothalamus, without altering vasopressin, corticotropin-releasing hormone, or oxytocin mRNA expression. In order to test whether reduced MR and GR expression affected glucocorticoid negative feedback, a dexamethasone suppression test was performed. Dexamethasone reduced plasma corticosterone in both ETV5 KO and WT mice, suggesting that glucocorticoid negative feedback was unaltered by ETV5 deficiency. In summary, these data suggest that the obesity-associated transcription factor ETV5 normally acts to diminish circulating glucocorticoids. This might occur directly via ETV5 actions on HPA-regulatory brain circuitry, and/or indirectly via ETV5-induced alterations in metabolic factors that then influence the HPA axis. PMID:25813907

  1. Independent association of glucocorticoids with damage accrual in SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopoulos, Diane; Kandane-Rathnayake, Rangi; Raghunath, Sudha; Hoi, Alberta; Nikpour, Mandana; Morand, Eric F

    2016-01-01

    To determine factors associated with damage accrual in a prospective cohort of patients with SLE. Patients with SLE who attended the Lupus Clinic at Monash Health, Australia, between 2007 and 2013 were studied. Clinical variables included disease activity (Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index-2K, SLEDAI-2K), time-adjusted mean SLEDAI, cumulative glucocorticoid dose and organ damage (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index (SDI)). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with damage accrual. A total of 162 patients were observed over a median (IQR) 3.6 (2.0-4.7) years. Seventy-five per cent (n=121) of patients received glucocorticoids. Damage accrual was significantly more frequent in glucocorticoid-exposed patients (42% vs 15%, p<0.01). Higher glucocorticoid exposure was independently associated with overall damage accrual after controlling for factors including ethnicity and disease activity and was significant at time-adjusted mean doses above 4.42 mg prednisolone/day; the OR of damage accrual in patients in the highest quartile of cumulative glucocorticoid exposure was over 10. Glucocorticoid exposure was independently associated with damage accrual in glucocorticoid-related and non-glucocorticoid related domains of the SDI. Glucocorticoid use is independently associated with the accrual of damage in SLE, including in non-glucocorticoid related domains.

  2. Efficacy of Vitamin K2 for Glucocorticoid-induced Osteoporosis in Patients with Systemic Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikano, Kotaro; Kaneko, Kaichi; Kawazoe, Mai; Kaburaki, Makoto; Hasunuma, Tomoko; Kawai, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Vitamin K2 (menatetrenone) is an effective treatment for patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. We herein performed a subanalysis of patients with systemic autoimmune diseases undergoing glucocorticoid therapy in our previous prospective study. Methods Sixty patients were categorized into a group with vitamin K2 treatment (n=20, Group A) and a group without vitamin K2 treatment (n=40, Group B). All patients were treated with bisphosphonates. Results Serum levels of osteocalcin and undercarboxylated osteocalcin decreased significantly after the start of glucocorticoid therapy in both groups, while the serum osteocalcin level was significantly higher in Group A than Group B during the third (p=0.0250) and fourth weeks (p=0.0155). The serum level of the N-terminal peptide of type I procollagen, a bone formation marker, decreased during glucocorticoid therapy, but was significantly higher in Group A than Group B during the fourth week (p=0.0400). The bone mineral density and fracture rate showed no significant differences between the two groups. Conclusion Although vitamin K2 improves bone turnover markers in patients with osteoporosis on glucocorticoid therapy, it has no significant effect on the bone mineral density and fracture rate after 1.5 years of treatment.

  3. Effect of startup circuit exercise on derivatives reactive oxygen metabolites, biological antioxidant potential levels and physical fitness of adolescents boys with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Gyun; Lee, Jin-Seok

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of starup circuit exercise program on derivatives reactive oxygen metabolite (d-ROM) and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) levels and physical fitness of adolescents with intellectual disabilities, and to sugesst exercise programs to promote the health and physical development of such adolescents. Twelve students with intellectual disabilities were divided into two groups; circuit exercise group (CE group: n=6; age, 14.83±0.98 years; height, 163.83±5.78 cm; body mass, 67.08±3.32 kg; %Fat, 25.68±2.42), control group (CON group: n=6; age: 15.00±0.63 years; height, 162.33±4.41 cm; body mass, 67.50±3.62 kg; %Fat, 26.96±2.06). The CE group performed the CE program 4 times a week over a 12-week period. The CON group maintained their activities of daily living. The following were measured before and after intervention: physical fitness by before and after the completion of the training programm, and were measured and blood samples were assessed. The results of the study indicate that the 12-week CE program increased significantly physical fitness ( P <0.05). Furthermore, This study proved that the CE program improved physical fitness, and reduced the d-ROM levels, and increased the BAP levels of the adolescents with intellectual disabilities. Therefore, it may enhance the health and physical development of adolescents boys with intellectual disabilities.

  4. Safety and tolerability of high doses of glucocorticoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakić Branislava D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia includes the use of high doses of glucocorticoides (prednisone and dexamethasone, which significantly increase the success of therapy due to lymphocytolitic effect. The aim: The aim of the study was to determine tolerability of high doses of prednisone and dexamethasone in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the structure and the intensity of adverse effects, occurred after application of these medicines. Subjects and methods: In a prospective study, we analyzed adverse effects of high doses of glucocorticoides in children suffering acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated in the Institute for Child and Youth Health Care of Vojvodina, since December 2010. until October 2014, were analyzed. This study included 18 patients, aged from 2 to 15 years. Results: Hyperglycemia appeared in 89% of patients treated with prednisone and in 61% of patients treated with dexamethasone. In order to control the high blood glucose level (above 10 mmol /L, in 11% of patients insulin was used. Hypertension appeared in 28% patients treated with prednisone and dexamethasone. Antihypertensives were needed for regulation in 17% patients. Hypopotassemia and hypocalcaemia were significantly more expressed after the use of prednisone in comparison to dexamethasone. In 11% of patients, the treatment with dexamethasone caused depressive behavior, followed by agitation. Conclusion: Adverse effects of dexamethasone and prednisone, administered in high doses in children with ALL were known, expected and reversible. Adverse reactions usually disappeared spontaneously or after short-term symptomatic therapy.

  5. Glucocorticoid Availability in Colonic Inflammation of Rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ergang, Peter; Leden, Pavel; Bryndová, Jana; Žbánková, Šárka; Mikšík, Ivan; Kment, M.; Pácha, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 8 (2008), s. 2160-2167 ISSN 0163-2116 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR8576; GA ČR GA305/07/0328 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 77/2006C Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : glucocorticoids * 11beta hydroxisteroid dehydrogenase 1 Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.583, year: 2008

  6. Endogenous glucocorticoids exacerbate cholestasis-associated liver injury and hypercholesterolemia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geest, Rick van der; Ouweneel, Amber B.; Sluis, Ronald J. van der; Groen, Albert K.; Van Eck, Miranda; Hoekstra, Menno

    2016-01-01

    Cholestatic liver disease is characterized by a disruption of bile flow, bile acid toxicity, liver injury, and hypercholesterolemia. Relatively high secretion of glucocorticoids by the adrenals has been observed under cholestatic conditions. Here we investigated a contribution of the rise in endogenous glucocorticoids to initial stage cholestasis pathology. Adrenalectomized or sham-operated control C57BL/6 mice were given an oral dose of alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate to induce cholestasis. Adrenalectomy effectively lowered plasma corticosterone levels (18 ± 5 ng/ml vs 472 ± 58 ng/ml; P < 0.001) and disrupted the metabolic and anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid function. Adrenal removal did not exacerbate the cholestasis extent. In contrast, the cholestasis-associated liver injury was markedly lower in adrenalectomized mice as compared to controls as evidenced by a 84%–93% decrease in liver necrosis and plasma alanine aminotransferase and bile acid levels (P < 0.001 for all). Gene expression analysis on livers from adrenalectomized mice suggested the absence of bile acid toxicity-associated farnesoid X receptor signaling in the context of a 44% (P < 0.01) and 82% (P < 0.001) reduction in sodium/bile acid cotransporter member 1 transcript level as compared to respectively control and non-diseased mice. Adrenalectomy reduced the expression of the cholesterol synthesis gene HMG-CoA reductase by 70% (P < 0.05), which translated into a 73% lower plasma total cholesterol level (P < 0.05). Treatment of C57BL/6 mice with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-486 recapitulated the protective effect of adrenalectomy on indices of liver injury and hypercholesterolemia. In conclusion, we have shown that endogenous glucocorticoids exacerbate the liver injury and hypercholesterolemia associated with acute cholestasis in mice. - Highlights: • Cholestasis is associated with increased plasma glucocorticoid levels in mice. • Adrenalectomy lowers cholestasis-associated liver

  7. Endogenous glucocorticoids exacerbate cholestasis-associated liver injury and hypercholesterolemia in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geest, Rick van der, E-mail: r.van.der.geest@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research (Netherlands); Ouweneel, Amber B., E-mail: a.b.ouweneel@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research (Netherlands); Sluis, Ronald J. van der, E-mail: r.vandersluis@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research (Netherlands); Groen, Albert K., E-mail: a.k.groen@umcg.nl [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Van Eck, Miranda, E-mail: m.eck@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research (Netherlands); Hoekstra, Menno, E-mail: hoekstra@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research (Netherlands)

    2016-09-01

    Cholestatic liver disease is characterized by a disruption of bile flow, bile acid toxicity, liver injury, and hypercholesterolemia. Relatively high secretion of glucocorticoids by the adrenals has been observed under cholestatic conditions. Here we investigated a contribution of the rise in endogenous glucocorticoids to initial stage cholestasis pathology. Adrenalectomized or sham-operated control C57BL/6 mice were given an oral dose of alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate to induce cholestasis. Adrenalectomy effectively lowered plasma corticosterone levels (18 ± 5 ng/ml vs 472 ± 58 ng/ml; P < 0.001) and disrupted the metabolic and anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid function. Adrenal removal did not exacerbate the cholestasis extent. In contrast, the cholestasis-associated liver injury was markedly lower in adrenalectomized mice as compared to controls as evidenced by a 84%–93% decrease in liver necrosis and plasma alanine aminotransferase and bile acid levels (P < 0.001 for all). Gene expression analysis on livers from adrenalectomized mice suggested the absence of bile acid toxicity-associated farnesoid X receptor signaling in the context of a 44% (P < 0.01) and 82% (P < 0.001) reduction in sodium/bile acid cotransporter member 1 transcript level as compared to respectively control and non-diseased mice. Adrenalectomy reduced the expression of the cholesterol synthesis gene HMG-CoA reductase by 70% (P < 0.05), which translated into a 73% lower plasma total cholesterol level (P < 0.05). Treatment of C57BL/6 mice with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-486 recapitulated the protective effect of adrenalectomy on indices of liver injury and hypercholesterolemia. In conclusion, we have shown that endogenous glucocorticoids exacerbate the liver injury and hypercholesterolemia associated with acute cholestasis in mice. - Highlights: • Cholestasis is associated with increased plasma glucocorticoid levels in mice. • Adrenalectomy lowers cholestasis-associated liver

  8. Membrane-Associated Effects of Glucocorticoid on BACE1 Upregulation and Aβ Generation: Involvement of Lipid Raft-Mediated CREB Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gee Euhn; Lee, Sei-Jung; Lee, Hyun Jik; Ko, So Hee; Chae, Chang Woo; Han, Ho Jae

    2017-08-30

    Glucocorticoid has been widely accepted to induce Alzheimer's disease, but the nongenomic effect of glucocorticoid on amyloid β (Aβ) generation has yet to be studied. Here, we investigated the effect of the nongenomic pathway induced by glucocorticoid on amyloid precursor protein processing enzymes as well as Aβ production using male ICR mice and human neuroblastoma SK-N-MC cells. Mice groups exposed to restraint stress or intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ showed impaired cognition, decreased intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR) level, but elevated level of membrane GR (mGR). In this respect, we identified the mGR-dependent pathway evoked by glucocorticoid using impermeable cortisol conjugated to BSA (cortisol-BSA) on SK-N-MC cells. Cortisol-BSA augmented the expression of β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), the level of C-terminal fragment β of amyloid precursor protein (C99) and Aβ production, which were maintained even after blocking intracellular GR. We also found that cortisol-BSA enhanced the interaction between mGR and Gαs, which colocalized in the lipid raft. The subsequently activated CREB by cortisol-BSA bound to the CRE site of the BACE1 promoter increasing its expression, which was downregulated by inhibiting CBP. Consistently, blocking CBP attenuated cognitive impairment and Aβ production induced by corticosterone treatment or intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ more efficiently than inhibiting intracellular GR in mice. In conclusion, glucocorticoid couples mGR with Gαs and triggers cAMP-PKA-CREB axis dependent on the lipid raft to stimulate BACE1 upregulation and Aβ generation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been growing sharply and stress is considered as the major environment factor of AD. Glucocorticoid is the primarily responsive factor to stress and is widely known to induce AD. However, most AD patients usually have impaired genomic pathway of glucocorticoid

  9. Diets high in resistant starch increase plasma levels of trimethylamine-N-oxide, a gut microbiome metabolite associated with CVD risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeron, Nathalie; Williams, Paul T.; Lamendella, Regina; Faghihnia, Nastaran; Grube, Alyssa; Li, Xinmin; Wang, Zeneng; Knight, Rob; Jansson, Janet K.; Hazen, Stanley L.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2016-12-20

    Production of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), a biomarker of CVD risk, is dependent on intestinal microbiota, but little is known of dietary conditions promoting changes in gut microbial communities. Resistant starches (RS) alter the human microbiota. We sought to determine whether diets varying in RS and carbohydrate (CHO) content affect plasma TMAO levels. We also assessed postprandial glucose and insulin responses and plasma lipid changes to diets high and low in RS. In a cross-over trial, fifty-two men and women consumed a 2-week baseline diet (41 percentage of energy (%E) CHO, 40 % fat, 19 % protein), followed by 2-week high- and low-RS diets separated by 2-week washouts. RS diets were assigned at random within the context of higher (51–53 %E)v. lower CHO (39–40 %E) intake. Measurements were obtained in the fasting state and, for glucose and insulin, during a meal test matching the composition of the assigned diet. With lower CHO intake, plasma TMAO, carnitine, betaine andγ-butyrobetaine concentrations were higher after the high-v. low-RS diet (P<0·01 each). These metabolites were not differentially affected by highv. low RS when CHO intake was high. Although the high-RS meal reduced postprandial insulin and glucose responses when CHO intake was low (P<0·01 each), RS did not affect fasting lipids, lipoproteins, glucose or insulin irrespective of dietary CHO content. In conclusion, a lower-CHO diet high in RS was associated with higher plasma TMAO levels. These findings, together with the absence of change in fasting lipids, suggest that short-term high-RS diets do not improve markers of cardiometabolic health.

  10. Levels of metabolites of organophosphate pesticides, phthalates, and bisphenol A in pooled urine specimens from pregnant women participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xibiao; Pierik, Frank H.; Angerer, Jürgen; Meltzer, Helle Margrete; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Tiemeier, Henning; Hoppin, Jane A.; Longnecker, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about reproductive and developmental health risks of exposure to organophosphate (OP) pesticides, phthalates, and bisphenol A (BPA) among the general population are increasing. Six dialkyl phosphate (DAP) metabolites, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), BPA, and fourteen phthalate metabolites were measured in 10 pooled urine samples representing 110 pregnant women who participated in the Norwegian Mother and Child Birth Cohort (MoBa) study in 2004. Daily intakes were estimated from urinary data and compared with reference doses (RfDs) and daily tolerable intakes (TDIs). The MoBa women had a higher mean BPA concentration (4.50 μg/L) than the pregnant women in the Generation R Study (Generation R) in the Netherlands and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in the United States. The mean concentration of total DAP metabolites (24.20 μg/L) in MoBa women was higher than that in NHANES women but lower than that in Generation R women. The diethyl phthalate metabolite mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP) was the dominant phthalate metabolite in all three studies, with the mean concentrations of greater than 300 μg/L. The MoBa and Generation R women had higher mean concentrations of mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP) and mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP) than the NHANES women. The estimated average daily intakes of BPA, chlorpyrifos/chlorpyrfios-methyl and phthalates in MoBa (and the other two studies) were below the RfDs and TDIs. The higher levels of metabolites in the MoBa participants may have been from intake via pesticide residues in food (organophosphates), consumption of canned food, especially fish/seafood (BPA), and use of personal care products (selected phthalates). PMID:19394271

  11. Glucocorticoid actions on L6 muscle cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Max, S.R.; Konagaya, M.; Konagaya, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Glucocorticoids exert striking catabolic effects on skeletal muscle. The mechanism of these effects remains poorly understood. They employed L6 muscle cells in culture to ascertain whether intracellular glucocorticoid receptors are involved. Studies in vitro permit exploration of glucocorticoid effects in the absence of other hormonal influences. L6 myoblasts were induced to form differentiated myotubes by growth in 1% serum. L6 myotubes were found to possess a high-affinity, limited capacity intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (apparent K/sub D/ = 5 x 10 -10 M; B/sub max/ = 711 pmols/g protein) with ligand specificity similar to that of glucocorticoid receptors from classical glucocorticoid target tissues. Further, [ 3 H] triamcinolone acetonide specific binding to L6 cell homogenates was blocked by a glucocorticoid antagonist, RU38486 (11β-(4-dimethyl-aminophenyl)-17β-hydroxy-17α-(prop-l-ynyl)-estra-4,9-dien-3-one). Dexamethasone (10 -5 M) caused a 10-fold increase in the activity of gluatmine synthetase in L6 myotubes; this increase was prevented by RU38486. Similarly, dexamethasone (10 -5 M) caused a 20% decrease in [ 12 C] leucine incorporation into protein. This effect also was blocked by RU38486. Thus, induction of glutamine synthetase and diminution of protein synthesis by dexamethasone require intracellular glucocorticoid receptors. L6 cells should prove particularly valuable for further studies of glucocorticoid actions on skeletal muscle

  12. Familial glucocorticoid deficiency presenting with generalized hyperpigmentation in an Egyptian child: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metwalley Kotb A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Familial glucocorticoid deficiency, or hereditary unresponsiveness to adrenocorticotropic hormone, is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by glucocorticoid deficiency in the absence of mineralocorticoid deficiency. It may present in infancy or early childhood with hyperpigmentation, failure to thrive, recurrent infections, hypoglycemic attacks and convulsions that may result in coma or death. Here, we report the case of an 18-month-old Egyptian boy with familial glucocorticoid deficiency. Case presentation An 18-month-old Egyptian boy was referred to our institution for evaluation of generalized hyperpigmentation of the body associated with recurrent convulsions; one of his siblings, who had died at the age of nine months, also had generalized hyperpigmentation of the body. The initial clinical examination revealed generalized symmetrical deep hyperpigmentation of the body as well as hypotonia, normal blood pressure and normal male genitalia. He had low blood glucose and cortisol levels, normal aldosterone and high adrenocorticotropic hormone levels. Based on the above mentioned data, a provisional diagnosis of familial glucocorticoid deficiency was made, which was confirmed by a molecular genetics study. Oral hydrocortisone treatment at a dose of 10 mg/m2/day was started. The child was followed up after two months of treatment; the hyperpigmentation has lessened in comparison with his initial presentation and his blood sugar and cortisol levels were normalized. Conclusion Familial glucocorticoid deficiency is a rare, treatable disease that can be easily missed due to nonspecific presentations. The consequences of delayed diagnosis and treatment are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality.

  13. Application of LC–MS/MS for quantitative analysis of glucocorticoids and stimulants in biological fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshed Haneef

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Liquid chromatography tandem mass chromatography (LC–MS/MS is an important hyphenated technique for quantitative analysis of drugs in biological fluids. Because of high sensitivity and selectivity, LC–MS/MS has been used for pharmacokinetic studies, metabolites identification in the plasma and urine. This manuscript gives comprehensive analytical review, focusing on chromatographic separation approaches (column packing materials, column length and mobile phase as well as different acquisition modes (SIM, MRM for quantitative analysis of glucocorticoids and stimulants. This review is not meant to be exhaustive but rather to provide a general overview for detection and confirmation of target drugs using LC–MS/MS and thus useful in the doping analysis, toxicological studies as well as in pharmaceutical analysis. Keywords: LC–MS/MS, Ionization techniques, Glucocorticoids, Stimulants, Hyphenated techniques, Biological fluid

  14. Prebiotic potential of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) in Wistar rats: effects of levels of supplementation on hindgut fermentation, intestinal morphology, blood metabolites and immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Lipismita; Chaturvedi, Vishwa Bandhu; Saikumar, Guttula; Somvanshi, Ramesh; Pattanaik, Ashok Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Many studies have been conducted using purified prebiotics such as inulin or fructooligosaccharides (FOS) as nutraceuticals, but there is very little information available on the prebiotic potential of raw products rich in inulin and FOS, such as Jerusalem artichoke (JA; Helianthus tuberosus L.). The present experiment aimed to evaluate the prebiotic effects of JA tubers in rats. Seventy-two Wistar weanling rats divided into four groups were fed for 12 weeks on a basal diet fortified with pulverized JA tubers at 0 (control), 20, 40 and 60 g kg(-1) levels. Enhanced cell-mediated immunity in terms of skin indurations (P = 0.082) and CD4+ T-lymphocyte population (P = 0.002) was observed in the JA-supplemented groups compared with the control group. Blood haemoglobin (P = 0.017), glucose (P = 0.001), urea (P = 0.004) and calcium (P = 0.048) varied favourably upon inclusion of JA. An increasing trend (P = 0.059) in the length of large intestine was apparent in the JA-fed groups. The tissue mass of caecum (P = 0.069) and colon (P = 0.003) was increased in the JA-supplemented groups, accompanied by higher (P = 0.007) caecal crypt depth. The pH and ammonia concentrations of intestinal digesta decreased and those of lactate and total volatile fatty acids increased in the JA-fed groups. The results suggest that JA had beneficial effects on immunity, blood metabolites, intestinal morphometry and hindgut fermentation of rats. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Elevated Metabolites of Steroidogenesis and Amino Acid Metabolism in Preadolescent Female Children With High Urinary Bisphenol A Levels: A High-Resolution Metabolomics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Adnan; Park, Hyesook; Lee, Hye Ah; Park, Bohyun; Gwak, Hye Sun; Lee, Hye-Ra; Jee, Sun Ha; Park, Youngja H

    2017-12-01

    Health risks associated with bisphenol A (BPA) exposure are controversially highlighted by numerous studies. High-resolution metabolomics (HRM) can confirm these proposed associations and may provide a mechanistic insight into the connections between BPA exposure and metabolic perturbations. This study was aimed to identify the changes in metabolomics profile due to BPA exposure in urine and serum samples collected from female and male children (n = 18) aged 7-9. Urine was measured for BPA concentration, and the children were subsequently classified into high and low BPA groups. HRM, coupled with Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/MS, followed by multivariate statistical analysis using MetaboAnalyst 3.0, were performed on urine to discriminate metabolic profiles between high and low BPA children as well as males and females, followed by further validation of our findings in serum samples obtained from same population. Metabolic pathway analysis showed that biosynthesis of steroid hormones and 7 other pathways-amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis, phenylalanine metabolism, tryptophan metabolism, tyrosine metabolism, lysine degradation, pyruvate metabolism, and arginine biosynthesis-were affected in high BPA children. Elevated levels of metabolites associated with these pathways in urine and serum were mainly observed in female children, while these changes were negligible in male children. Our results suggest that the steroidogenesis pathway and amino acid metabolism are the main targets of perturbation by BPA in preadolescent girls. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Production of Metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    A recombinant micro-organism such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae which produces and excretes into culture medium a stilbenoid metabolite product when grown under stilbenoid production conditions, which expresses in above native levels a ABC transporter which transports said stilbenoid out of said...... micro-organism cells to the culture medium. The genome of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces an auxotrophic phenotype which is compensated by a plasmid which also expresses one or more of said enzymes constituting said metabolic pathway producing said stilbenoid, an expression product of the plasmid...

  17. Puff and bite: the relationship between the glucocorticoid stress response and anti-predator performance in checkered puffer (Sphoeroides testudineus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull, Felicia; O'Connor, Constance M; Suski, Cory D; Shultz, Aaron D; Danylchuk, Andy J; Cooke, Steven J

    2015-04-01

    Individual variation in the endocrine stress response has been linked to survival and performance in a variety of species. Here, we evaluate the relationship between the endocrine stress response and anti-predator behaviors in wild checkered puffers (Sphoeroides testudineus) captured at Eleuthera Island, Bahamas. The checkered puffer has a unique and easily measurable predator avoidance strategy, which is to inflate or 'puff' to deter potential predators. In this study, we measured baseline and stress-induced circulating glucocorticoid levels, as well as bite force, a performance measure that is relevant to both feeding and predator defence, and 'puff' performance. We found that puff performance and bite force were consistent within individuals, but generally decreased following a standardized stressor. Larger puffers were able to generate a higher bite force, and larger puffers were able to maintain a more robust puff performance following a standardized stressor relative to smaller puffers. In terms of the relationship between the glucocorticoid stress response and performance metrics, we found no relationship between post-stress glucocorticoid levels and either puff performance or bite force. However, we did find that baseline glucocorticoid levels predicted the ability of a puffer to maintain a robust puff response following a repeated stressor, and this relationship was more pronounced in larger individuals. Our work provides a novel example of how baseline glucocorticoids can predict a fitness-related anti-predator behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcriptional regulation of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene by glucocorticoid and cyclic AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, E.J.; Harrington, C.A.; Chikaraishi, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Glucocorticoid and cyclic AMP increase tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and mRNA levels in pheochromocytoma cultures. The transcriptional activity of the TH gene, as measured by nuclear run-on assay, is also increased when cultures are treated with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone or agents that increase intracellular cyclic AMP, such as forskolin and 8-BrcAMP. Both inducers effect transcriptional changes within 10 min after treatment and are maximal after 30 min for forskolin and after 60 min for dexamethasone. The 5' flanking sequences of the TH gene were fused to the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), and the hybrid gene was transfected into pheochromocytoma cultures and GH 4 pituitary cells. In both cell lines, a region of the TH gene containing bases -272 to +27 conferred induction of CAT by cyclic AMP, but not by glucocorticoid. The same results were found when a region of the TH gene containing -773 to + 27 was used. Thus, the sequences required for induction of TH by cyclic AMP are contained within 272 bases of 5' flanking sequence, but sequences sufficient for glucocorticoid regulation are not contained with 773 bases

  19. Glucocorticoids Enhance Muscle Proteolysis through a Myostatin-Dependent Pathway at the Early Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruxia; Jiao, Hongchao; Zhao, Jingpeng; Wang, Xiaojuan; Lin, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin, a member of the TGF-β superfamily of secreted proteins, is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle. It negatively regulates muscle mass and is associated with glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy. However, it remains unclear whether myostatin is involved in glucocorticoid-induced muscle protein turnover. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of myostatin in protein metabolism during dexamethasone (DEX) treatment. Protein synthesis rates and the expression of the genes for myostatin, ubiquitin-proteasome atrogin-1, MuRF1, FoxO1/3a and mTOR/p70S6K were determined. The results show that DEX decreased (Pmyostatin. DEX increased (P0.05). The phosphorylation levels of mTOR and p70S6K were decreased by DEX treatment (Pmyostatin (P 0.05). In conclusion, the present study suggests that the myostatin signalling pathway is associated with glucocorticoid-induced muscle protein catabolism at the beginning of exposure. Myostatin is not a main pathway associated with the suppression of muscle protein synthesis by glucocorticoids.

  20. Fast effects of glucocorticoids on memory-related network oscillations in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, E K; Krupka, N; Bähner, F; Both, M; Draguhn, A

    2008-05-01

    Transient or lasting increases in glucocorticoids accompany deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory formation. Recent data indicate that the formation and consolidation of declarative and spatial memory are mechanistically related to different patterns of hippocampal network oscillations. These include gamma oscillations during memory acquisition and the faster ripple oscillations (approximately 200 Hz) during subsequent memory consolidation. We therefore analysed the effects of acutely applied glucocorticoids on network activity in mouse hippocampal slices. Evoked field population spikes and paired-pulse responses were largely unaltered by corticosterone or cortisol, respectively, despite a slight increase in maximal population spike amplitude by 10 microm corticosterone. Several characteristics of sharp waves and superimposed ripple oscillations were affected by glucocorticoids, most prominently the frequency of spontaneously occurring sharp waves. At 0.1 microm, corticosterone increased this frequency, whereas maximal (10 microm) concentrations led to a reduction. In addition, gamma oscillations became slightly faster and less regular in the presence of high doses of corticosteroids. The present study describes acute effects of glucocorticoids on sharp wave-ripple complexes and gamma oscillations in mouse hippocampal slices, revealing a potential background for memory deficits in the presence of elevated levels of these hormones.

  1. Significance of glucocorticoids and their receptors in patients with nephritic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Liusong; Li Dapei; Liu Deyi; Wang Weiyue; Wang Haodan

    1996-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) in 34 patients with nephritic syndrome (NS) and 40 normal controls is investigated by radioligand binding assay. The results show that the GCR levels of NS patients are correlated well with the treatment results by glucocorticoids (GC). These patients who are sensitive to GC treatment have much higher levels of GCR than those who are not responsive to GC treatment (P<0.01) and the normal controls. The plasma ACTH and cortisol in the same subjects are also measured and the results show that NS patients have much lower levels of these two hormones than the normal controls', but no significant correlation is noted between the levels and the GC treatment effects

  2. BClI polymorphism of the glucocorticoid receptor gene is associated with increased obesity, impaired glucose metabolism and dyslipidaemia in patients with Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Roberta; Marzotti, Stefania; Berardelli, Rita; Karamouzis, Ioannis; Brozzetti, Annalisa; D'Angelo, Valentina; Mengozzi, Giulio; Mandrile, Giorgia; Giachino, Daniela; Migliaretti, Giuseppe; Bini, Vittorio; Falorni, Alberto; Ghigo, Ezio; Arvat, Emanuela

    2012-12-01

    Although glucocorticoids are essential for health, several studies have shown that glucocorticoids replacement in Addison's disease might be involved in anthropometric and metabolic impairment, with increased cardiovascular risk, namely if conventional doses are used. As the effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor, encoded by NR3C1 gene, different polymorphisms in the NR3C1 gene have been linked to altered glucocorticoid sensitivity in general population as well as in patients with obesity or metabolic syndrome. We investigated the impact of glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphisms, including the BclI, N363S and ER22/23EK variants, on anthropometric parameters (BMI and waist circumference), metabolic profile (HOMA, OGTT and serum lipids) and ACTH levels in 50 patients with Addison's disease (34 women and 16 men, age 20-82 year) under glucocorticoids replacement. Neither N363S nor ER22/23EK variants were significantly associated with anthropometric, metabolic or hormonal parameters, while patients carrying the homozygous BclI polymorphism GG (n = 4) showed higher (P Addison's disease and may contribute, along with other factors, to the increase in central adiposity, impaired glucose metabolism and dyslipidaemia. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Combined effects of CO2 enrichment, changes in diurnal light level and water stress on foliar metabolites of potato plants grown in naturally sunlit controlled environment chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato plants (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Kennebec) were grown in outdoor, naturally sunlit, soil-plant-atmosphere research (SPAR) chambers. Drought treatments were imposed at post-tuber initiation stage to assess water stress effects on leaf metabolites, and interactions with enriched CO2 concentrati...

  4. Apo-10'-lycopenoic acid, a lycopene 1 metabolite, increases sirtuin 1 mRNA and protein levels and decreases hepatic fat accumulation in ob/ob mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lycopene has been shown to be beneficial in protecting against high-fat diet-induced fatty liver. The recent demonstration that lycopene can be converted by carotene 99,10’-oxygenase into a biologically active metabolite, ALA, led us to propose that the function of lycopene can be mediated by ALA. I...

  5. The prognostic value of multivoxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy determined metabolite levels in white and grey matter brain tissue for adverse outcome in term newborns following perinatal asphyxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doormaal, Pieter Jan; Meiners, Linda C.; ter Horst, Hendrik J.; Veere, van der Christa; Sijens, Paul E.

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy can identify brain metabolic changes in perinatal asphyxia by providing ratios of metabolites, such as choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and lactate (Lact) [Cho/Cr, Lact/NAA, etc.]. The purpose of this study was to quantify the separate white and

  6. Ras-dva is a novel Pit-1- and glucocorticoid-regulated gene in the embryonic anterior pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellestad, Laura E; Porter, Tom E

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids play a role in functional differentiation of pituitary somatotrophs and lactotrophs during embryogenesis. Ras-dva was identified as a gene regulated by anterior neural fold protein-1/homeobox expressed in embryonic stem cells-1, a transcription factor known to be critical in pituitary development, and has an expression profile in the chicken embryonic pituitary gland that is consistent with in vivo regulation by glucocorticoids. The objective of this study was to characterize expression and regulation of ras-dva mRNA in the developing chicken anterior pituitary. Pituitary ras-dva mRNA levels increased during embryogenesis to a maximum on embryonic day (e) 18 and then decreased and remained low or undetectable after hatch. Ras-dva expression was highly enriched in the pituitary gland on e18 relative to other tissues examined. Glucocorticoid treatment of pituitary cells from mid- and late-stage embryos rapidly increased ras-dva mRNA, suggesting it may be a direct transcriptional target of glucocorticoids. A reporter construct driven by 4 kb of the chicken ras-dva 5'-flanking region, containing six putative pituitary-specific transcription factor-1 (Pit-1) binding sites and two potential glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding sites, was highly activated in embryonic pituitary cells and up-regulated by corticosterone. Mutagenesis of the most proximal Pit-1 site decreased promoter activity in chicken e11 pituitary cells, indicating regulation of ras-dva by Pit-1. However, mutating putative GR binding sites did not substantially reduce induction of ras-dva promoter activity by corticosterone, suggesting additional DNA elements within the 5'-flanking region are responsible for glucocorticoid regulation. We have identified ras-dva as a glucocorticoid-regulated gene that is likely expressed in cells of the Pit-1 lineage within the developing anterior pituitary gland.

  7. Constitutive differences in glucocorticoid responsiveness to stress are related to variation in aggression and anxiety-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sophie E; Zanoletti, Olivia; Guillot de Suduiraut, Isabelle; Sandi, Carmen

    2017-10-01

    Glucocorticoids coordinate responses that enable an individual to cope with stressful challenges and, additionally, mediate adaptation following cessation of a stressor. There are important individual differences in the magnitude of glucocorticoid responsiveness to stressors. However, whether individual differences in glucocorticoid responsiveness to stress are linked to different behavioral strategies in coping with social and non-social challenges is not easily studied, owing to the lack of appropriate animal models. To address this, we generated three lines of Wistar rats selectively bred for the magnitude of their glucocorticoid responses following exposure to a variety of stressors over three consecutive days at juvenility. Here, we present findings following observations of a high level of variation in glucocorticoid responsiveness to stress in outbred Wistar rats, and the strong response to selection for this trait over a few generations. When challenged with different stressful challenges, rats from the three lines differed in their coping behaviors. Strikingly, the line with high glucocorticoid responsiveness to stress displayed enhanced aggression and anxiety-like behaviors. In addition, these rats also showed alterations in the expression of genes within both central and peripheral nodes of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and enhanced reactivity to acute stress exposure. Together, these findings strongly link differences in glucocorticoid responsiveness to stress with marked differences in coping styles. The developed rat lines are thus a promising model with which to examine the relationship between variation in reactivity of the HPA axis and stress-related pathophysiology and could be employed to assess the therapeutic potential of treatments modulating stress habituation to ameliorate psychopathology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Repeated Administration of D-Amphetamine Induces Distinct Alterations in Behavior and Metabolite Levels in 129Sv and Bl6 Mouse Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taavi Vanaveski

    2018-06-01

    . Simultaneously a significant decline of hexoses, citrulline, ADMA, and kynurenine occurred. The reduced levels of kynurenine, ADMA, and citrulline likely reflect altered function of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA and NO systems caused by repeated AMPH. Altogether, 129Sv strain displays stronger sensitization toward AMPH and larger variance in metabolite levels than Bl6.

  9. Glucocorticoid: A potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiancheng; Yang, Zhouqi; Li, Wenbin; Xue, Yanru; Xu, Huiyun; Li, Jingbao; Shang, Peng

    2017-11-01

    Exposure of animals and humans to conditions of microgravity, including actual spaceflight and simulated microgravity, results in numerous negative alterations to bone structure and mechanical properties. Although there are abundant researches on bone loss in microgravity, the explicit mechanism is not completely understood. At present, it is widely accepted that the absence of mechanical stimulus plays a predominant role in bone homeostasis disorders in conditions of weightlessness. However, aside from mechanical unloading, nonmechanical factors such as various hormones, cytokines, dietary nutrition, etc. are important as well in microgravity induced bone loss. The stress-induced increase in endogenous glucocorticoid (GC) levels is inevitable in microgravity environments. Moreover, it is well known that GCs have a detrimental effect to bone health at excess concentrations. Therefore, GC plays a potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss. This review summarizeds several studies and their prospective solutions to this hypothesis.

  10. Glucocorticoids facilitate the transcription from the human cytomegalovirus major immediate early promoter in glucocorticoid receptor- and nuclear factor-I-like protein-dependent manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue-Toyoda, Maki; Kato, Kohsuke; Nagata, Kyosuke; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common and usually asymptomatic virus agent in healthy individuals. Initiation of HCMV productive infection depends on expression of the major immediate early (MIE) genes. The transcription of HCMV MIE genes is regulated by a diverse set of transcription factors. It was previously reported that productive HCMV infection is triggered probably by elevation of the plasma hydroxycorticoid level. However, it is poorly understood whether the transcription of MIE genes is directly regulated by glucocorticoid. Here, we found that the dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, facilitates the transcription of HCMV MIE genes through the MIE promoter and enhancer in a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent manner. By competitive EMSA and reporter assays, we revealed that an NF-I like protein is involved in DEX-mediated transcriptional activation of the MIE promoter. Thus, this study supports a notion that the increased level of hydroxycorticoid in the third trimester of pregnancy reactivates HCMV virus production from the latent state. - Highlights: • DEX facilitates the transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • GR is involved in DEX-dependent transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • A 17 bp repeat is responsible for the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX. • An NF-I-like protein is involved in the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX

  11. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism reverts docetaxel resistance in human prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Jan; Kroon, Jan; Puhr, M.; Buijs, J.T.; van der Horst, G.; Hemmer, D.M.; Marijt, K.A.; Hwang, M.S.; Masood, M.; Grimm, S.; Storm, Gerrit; Metselaar, Josbert Maarten; Meijer, O.C.; Culig, Z.; van der Pluijm, M.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to docetaxel is a major clinical problem in advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used in combination with docetaxel, it is unclear to what extent GCs and their receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), contribute to the chemotherapy resistance.

  12. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism reverts docetaxel resistance in human prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Jan; Puhr, Martin; Buijs, Jeroen T.; Van Der Horst, Geertje; Lemhemmer, Daniël; Marijt, Koen A.; Hwang, Ming S.; Masood, Motasim; Grimm, Stefan; Storm, Gert; Metselaar, Josbert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/244207690; Meijer, Onno C.; Culig, Zoran; Van Der Pluijm, Gabri

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to docetaxel is a major clinical problem in advanced prostate cancer (PCA). Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used in combination with docetaxel, it is unclear to what extent GCs and their receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), contribute to the chemotherapy resistance.

  13. Inflammation in Parkinson’s disease: Role of glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Trinidad eHerrero

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is a major characteristic feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Studies in PDpatients show evidence of augmented levels of potent pro-inflammatory molecules e.g. TNF-α, iNOS,IL-1β whereas in experimental Parkinsonism it has been consistently demonstrated that dopaminergicneurons are particularly vulnerable to activated glia releasing these toxic factors. Recent geneticstudies point to the role of immune system in the etiology of PD, thus in combination withenvironmental factors, both peripheral and CNS-mediated immune responses could play importantroles in onset and progression of PD. Whereas microglia, astrocytes and infiltrating T cells are knownto mediate chronic inflammation, the roles of other immune-competent cells are less well understood.Inflammation is a tightly controlled process. One major effector system of regulation is HPA axis.Glucocorticoids released from adrenal glands upon stimulation of HPA axis, in response to either cellinjury or presence of pathogen, activate their receptor, GR. GR regulates inflammation both throughdirect transcriptional action on target genes and by indirectly inhibiting transcriptional activities oftranscriptional factors such as NF-kB, AP-1 or interferon regulatory factors. In PD patients, the HPAaxis is unbalanced and the cortisol levels are significantly increased, implying a deregulation of GRfunction in immune cells. In experimental Parkinsonism, the activation of microglial GR has a crucialeffect in diminishing microglial cell activation and reducing dopaminergic degeneration. Moreover,glucocorticoids are also known to regulate human brain vasculature as well as blood brain barrierpermeability, any dysfunction in their actions may influence infiltration of cytotoxic moleculesresulting in increased vulnerability of dopamine neurons in PD. Overall, deregulation ofGR actions is likely important in dopamine neuron degeneration throughestablishment of chronic inflammation.

  14. Adrenal gland hypofunction in active polymyalgia rheumatica. effect of glucocorticoid treatment on adrenal hormones and interleukin 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Straub, Rainer H; Foppiani, Luca; Prete, Camilla; Pulsatelli, Lia; Sulli, Alberto; Boiardi, Luigi; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Giusti, Massimo; Pizzorni, Carmen; Seriolo, Bruno; Salvarani, Carlo

    2002-04-01

    To evaluate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function in patients with recent onset polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) not previously treated with glucocorticoids; and to detect possible correlations between adrenal hormone levels, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and other acute phase reactants at baseline and during 12 months of glucocorticoid treatment. Forty-one PMR patients of both sexes with recent onset disease and healthy sex and age matched controls were enrolled into a longitudinal study. Patients were monitored for serum cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), androstenedione (ASD), and clinical and laboratory measures of disease activity such as C-reactive protein and IL-6 concentrations at baseline and after 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of glucocorticoid treatment. To assess dynamic HPA axis function, serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels were evaluated in another 8 patients with recent onset PMR not treated with glucocorticoid in comparison to controls after challenge with ovine corticotropin releasing hormone (oCRH) test. In addition, serum cortisol and 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) levels were evaluated after stimulation with low dose (1 microg) intravenous ACTH. Serum cortisol and ASD levels of all PMR patients at baseline did not differ from controls. During followup, cortisol levels dipped at one and 3 months. Serum DHEAS levels in all patients were significantly lower than in controls at baseline. In female PMR patients a significant correlation was found at baseline between cortisol levels and duration of disease. Serum concentrations of IL-6 at baseline were significantly higher in PMR patients than in controls. During 12 months of glucocorticoid treatment IL-6 levels dropped significantly at one month; thereafter they remained stable and did not increase again despite tapering of the glucocorticoid dose. After oCRH stimulation, a similar cortisol response was found in patients and controls. After ACTH

  15. Glucocorticoids for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder and phobias: a novel therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Margraf, Jürgen

    2008-04-07

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and phobias belong to the most common anxiety disorders and to the most common psychiatric illnesses in general. In both disorders, aversive memories are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis and symptomatology. Previously, we have reported that elevated glucocorticoid levels inhibit memory retrieval in animals and healthy humans. We therefore hypothesized that the administration of glucocorticoids might also inhibit the retrieval of aversive memory, thereby reducing symptoms in patients with PTSD and phobias. In recent clinical studies, we found first evidence to support this hypothesis. In patients with PTSD, low-dose cortisol treatment for one month reduced symptoms of traumatic memories without causing adverse side effects. Furthermore, we found evidence for a prolonged effect of the cortisol treatment. Persistent retrieval and reconsolidation of traumatic memories is a process that keeps these memories vivid and thereby the disorder alive. By inhibiting memory retrieval, cortisol may weaken the traumatic memory trace, and thus reduce symptoms even beyond the treatment period. In patients with social phobia, we found that a single oral administration of cortisone 1 h before a socio-evaluative stressor significantly reduced self-reported fear during the anticipation-, exposure-, and recovery phase of the stressor. In subjects with spider phobia, repeated oral administration of cortisol 1 h before exposure to a spider photograph induced a progressive reduction of stimulus-induced fear. This effect was maintained when subjects were exposed to the stimulus again two days after the last cortisol administration, indicating that cortisol facilitated the extinction of phobic fear. In conclusion, by a common mechanism of reducing the retrieval of aversive memories, glucocorticoids may be suited for the treatment of PTSD as well as phobias. More studies are needed to further evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of

  16. Dominance rank causally affects personality and glucocorticoid regulation in female rhesus macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Jordan N.; Snyder-Mackler, Noah; Barreiro, Luis B.; Johnson, Zachary P.; Tung, Jenny; Wilson, Mark E.

    2017-01-01

    Low social status is frequently associated with heightened exposure to social stressors and altered glucocorticoid regulation by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Additionally, personality differences can affect how individuals behave in response to social conditions, and thus may aggravate or protect against the effects of low status on HPA function. Disentangling the relative importance of personality from the effects of the social environment on the HPA axis has been challenging, since social status can predict aspects of behavior, and both can remain stable across the lifespan. To do so here, we studied an animal model of social status and social behavior, the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). We performed two sequential experimental manipulations of dominance rank (i.e., social status) in 45 adult females, allowing us to characterize personality and glucocorticoid regulation (based on sensitivity to the exogenous glucocorticoid dexamethasone) in each individual while she occupied two different dominance ranks. We identified two behavioral characteristics, termed ‘social approachability’ and ‘boldness,’ which were highly social status-dependent. Social approachability and a third dimension, anxiousness, were also associated with cortisol dynamics in low status females, suggesting that behavioral tendencies may sensitize individuals to the effects of low status on HPA axis function. Finally, we found that improvements in dominance rank increased dexamethasone-induced acute cortisol suppression and glucocorticoid negative feedback. Our findings indicate that social status causally affects both behavioral tendencies and glucocorticoid regulation, and that some behavioral tendencies also independently affect cortisol levels, beyond the effects of rank. Together, they highlight the importance of considering personality and social status together when investigating their effects on HPA axis function. PMID:27639059

  17. Nelson`s syndrome associated with a somatic frame shift mutation in the glucocorticoid recepter gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl, M.; Stratakis, C.A.; Chrousos, G.P.; Katz, D.A.; Ali, I.U.; Oldfield, E.H. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Nelson`s syndrome is the appearance and/or progression of ACTH-secreting pituitary macroadenomas in patients who had previously undergone bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing`s disease. Extremely high plasma ACTH levels and aggressive neoplastic growth might be explained by the lack of appropriate glucocorticoid negative feedback due to defective glucocorticoid signal transduction. To study the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene in Nelson`s syndrome, DNA was extracted from pituitary adenomas and leukocytes of four patients with this condition and amplified by PCR for direct sequence analysis. In one of the tumors, a heterozygous mutation, consisting of an insertion of a thymine between complementary DNA nucleotides 1188 and 1189, was found in exon 2. This frame-shift mutation led to premature termination at amino acid residue 366 of the world-type coding sequence, excluding the expression of a functioning receptor protein from the defective allele. The mutation was not detected in the sequence of the GR gene in the patient`s leukocyte DNA, indicating a somatic origin. By lowering the receptor number in tumorous cells, this defect might have caused local resistance to negative glucocorticoid feedback similar to that caused by the presence of a null allele in a kindred with the generalized glucocorticoid resistance syndrome. P53 protein accumulation, previously reported in 60% of corticotropinomas, could not be detected in any of the four pituitary tumors examined by immunohistochemistry. We suggest that a somatic GR defect might have played a pathophysiological role in the tumorigenesis of the corticotropinoma bearing this mutation. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Glucocorticoids selectively inhibit the transcription of the interleukin 1β gene and decrease the stability of interleukin 1β mRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.W.; Tsou, A.P.; Chan, H.; Thomas, J.; Petrie, K.; Eugui, E.M.; Allison, A.C.

    1988-01-01

    Transcription of the interleukin 1β (IL-1β) gene was studied by mRNA hybridization with a cDNA probe in the human promonocytic cell line U-937. Phorbol ester and lipopolysaccharide increased the steady-state level of Il-1β mRNA. Glucocorticoids markedly decreased IL-1β mRNA levels by two mechanisms. Transcription of the IL-1 gene was inhibited, as shown by in vitro transcription assays with nuclei isolated from glucocorticoid-treated cells. Moreover, kinetic analyses and pulse-labeling of mRNAs showed that glucocorticoids selectively decrease the stability of IL-1β mRNA, without affecting the stability of β-actin and FOS mRNAs. Inhibition of the formation and effects IL-1 is a mechanism by which glucocorticoids can exert antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive effects

  19. Effect of glucocorticoid therapy upon glucose metabolism in COPD patients with acute exacerbation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Sihai; Wei Zhenggan; Huang Ming'an; Yao Jianguo; Li Hongsheng

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of glucocorticoids therapy upon glucose metabolism in COPD patients with acute exacerbation. Methods: Plasma glucose and insulin levels in COPD patients after intravenous administration of 10 mg dexamethasone daily for 5 days were determined oral with glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and insulin release test (IRT). Results: 1) The levels of basal plasma glucose and insulin were significantly higher in severe hypoxemic group than those in moderate hypoxemic group (p 2 (r = -0.5242, p < 0.05). 2) The levels of plasma glucose in intermediate and severe hypoxemic groups were remarkable higher (p < 0.05) than those in mild group. The two peak times of glucose curve were observed at one and two hour after oral glucose load. 3) After the administration of glucocorticoids, at half an hour and one hour plasma glucose levels were significantly higher than those before, the peak time of glucose levels appeared earlier and the insulin release levels were higher than they were before therapy (p < 0.05). Conclusion: COPD patients with acute exacerbation complicated with hypoxemia had problems of impaired glucose tolerance. The administration of glucocorticoids made the impairment worse

  20. Elevada concentración de metabolitos de cotinina en hijos de padres fumadores High levels of cotinine metabolite in smoker's parents children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Lazcano-Ponce

    2007-01-01

    ños, no sólo de padres fumadores sino también de padres no fumadores. Esto pone de relevancia que la exposición al HTSM no es sólo un problema de salud pública que se presenta en hogares de padres fumadores, sino que la exposición en niños mexicanos es frecuente en diversos lugares públicos. Es necesario implementar estudios adicionales en México para evaluar el impacto de intervenciones que garanticen hogares y espacios libres de humo de tabaco.INTRODUCTION: Children and adult exposure to SecondHand Smoke (SHS may occur in government offices, work and public places as well as in vehicles. Nevertheless, SHS is particularly important at home. High exposure levels in children may be the main reason to prevent parents and other family members from smoking at home. This study aims at establishing SHS levels by measuring biomakers in serum in pairs of parents and their younger than five years old children in Mexico, included in the 2000 National Health Survey. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seventy-six parents-children pairs were taken from households with non smokers adults, as well as 83 pairs with adult smokers at home. Selection was limited to the adult population in households with children under five years old. Serum samples were analyzed through liquid chromatographic. Correlation exposure models between parents-children pairs were built and stratified according to parents’ background concerning smoking. RESULTS: In the smokers group, people with more than 15ng/mL of cotinine metabolites in serum showed prevalence of 100%. Minimum quantification was 18.50 and maximum 221.5ng/mL. In adults, cotinine metabolite levels in serun were 50 times higher in smokers (107.4ng/mL, than in non smokers (1.99 ng/mL. Concerning 3-hydroxycotinine, something similar was observed (0.60 in non smokers vs. 33.50 ng/mL in smokers. A significant difference three times higher in cotinine levels (0.10 vs. 0.60ng/mL and 3-hydroxycotinine (0.06 vs. 0.19ng/mL was found in those children with, at

  1. Exogenous glucocorticoids and adverse cerebral effects in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsted, Sara K.; Born, A P; Paulson, Olaf B

    2011-01-01

    of the glucocorticoid receptor, which is associated with unfavorable cellular outcomes. Prenatal treatment with glucocorticoids can compromise brain growth and is associated with periventricular leukomalacia, attentions deficits and poorer cognitive performance. In the neonatal period exposure to glucocorticoids...... reduces neurogenesis and cerebral volume, impairs memory and increases the incidence of cerebral palsy. Cerebral effects of glucocorticoids in later childhood have been less thoroughly studied, but apparent brain atrophy, reduced size of limbic structures and neuropsychiatric symptoms have been reported....... Glucocortioids affect several cellular structures and functions, which may explain the observed adverse effects. Glucocorticoids can impair neuronal glucose uptake, decrease excitability, cause atrophy of dendrites, compromise development of myelin-producing oligodendrocytes and disturb important cellular...

  2. Effects of environmental conditions, human activity, reproduction, antler cycle and grouping on fecal glucocorticoids of free-ranging Pampas deer stags (Ozotoceros bezoarticus bezoarticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Pereira, Ricardo José; Barbanti Duarte, José Maurício; Negrão, João Alberto

    2006-01-01

    In this study, a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was validated in detecting glucocorticoids in Pampas deer feces, in order to investigate the influence of several factors on the adrenocortical function. Fecal samples, behavioral data and information concerning male grouping and antlers status were collected at a monthly basis during a 1 year period from free-ranging stags living at Emas National Park, Brazil (18 degrees S/52 degrees W). The results revealed that concentrations of fecal glucocorticoids in winter were significantly higher than those corresponding to spring and summer. In addition, dry season data presented higher levels than during the wet season. Significant difference was found between fecal levels of breeding stags in summer and nonbreeding stags, whereas no difference was observed between breeding stags in winter and nonbreeding stags. On the other hand, males from areas with frequent human disturbance exhibited higher glucocorticoid concentrations and flight distances than individuals from areas of lower human activity. Males with antlers in velvet had elevated levels compared with animals in hard antler or antler casting. Also, we found that glucocorticoid levels were higher in groups with three or more males than in groups with only one male. The flight distances showed positive correlation with fecal glucocorticoid. These data indicate that fecal glucocorticoid provides a useful approach in the evaluation of physiological effects of environment, inter-individuals relationship and human-induced stressors on free-ranging Pampas deer stags.

  3. Complicating factors in safety testing of drug metabolites: Kinetic differences between generated and preformed metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prueksaritanont, Thomayant; Lin, Jiunn H.; Baillie, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to provide a scientifically based perspective on issues surrounding the proposed toxicology testing of synthetic drug metabolites as a means of ensuring adequate nonclinical safety evaluation of drug candidates that generate metabolites considered either to be unique to humans or are present at much higher levels in humans than in preclinical species. We put forward a number of theoretical considerations and present several specific examples where the kinetic behavior of a preformed metabolite given to animals or humans differs from that of the corresponding metabolite generated endogenously from its parent. The potential ramifications of this phenomenon are that the results of toxicity testing of the preformed metabolite may be misleading and fail to characterize the true toxicological contribution of the metabolite when formed from the parent. It is anticipated that such complications would be evident in situations where (a) differences exist in the accumulation of the preformed versus generated metabolites in specific tissues, and (b) the metabolite undergoes sequential metabolism to a downstream product that is toxic, leading to differences in tissue-specific toxicity. Owing to the complex nature of this subject, there is a need to treat drug metabolite issues in safety assessment on a case-by-case basis, in which a knowledge of metabolite kinetics is employed to validate experimental paradigms that entail administration of preformed metabolites to animal models

  4. The antidepressant fluoxetine normalizes the nuclear glucocorticoid receptor evoked by psychosocial stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitić, M.; Simić, I.; Djordjević, J.; Radojčić, M. B.; Adžić, M.

    2011-12-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression and stress disorders. Glucocorticoids, key regulators of the stress response, exert diverse effects on cellular processes in the hippocampus. Beside non-genomic pathways, glucocorticoid effects are mediated through activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a ligand activated transcriptional factor that belongs to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. We analysed the GR protein levels both in the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments of the hippocampus of Wistar rats exposed to chronic psychosocial isolation stress upon chronic fluoxetine (FLU) treatment. Under chronic stress, corticosterone levels (CORT) were decreased compared to the control, and treatment with FLU did not change its level in the stressed rats. At the molecular level, FLU normalized the level of nuclear GR protein in the hippocampus of the stressed rats. Discrepancy between normalization of nuclear GR in the hippocampus and lack of normalization of HPA axis activity judged by CORT, suggests that other brain structures such as the amygdale and prefrontal cortex that also regulate HPA axis activity, seem not to be normalized by the FLU treatment used in our study.

  5. Management of glucocorticoids-induced osteoporosis: role of teriparatide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Migliaccio

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Silvia Migliaccio1, Marina Brama1, Nazzarena Malavolta21Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Medica, Policlinico Umberto I, Università degli Studi Sapienza di Roma, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Policlinico S Orsola Malpighi, Bologna, ItalyAbstract: Glucocorticoids (GC-induced osteoporosis (GIOP is the most common cause of secondary osteoporosis, which leads to an increased fracture risk in patients. The normal bone turnover depends on a balance between osteoblasts and osteoclasts activity and GC can cause a rapid bone loss, decreasing bone formation and increasing bone resorption. The decreased bone formation is mainly due to the GC-induced apoptosis of both osteoblasts and osteocytes, while the increased bone resorption is due to the increased life-span of pre-existing osteoclasts. Bisphosphonates are clearly effective in preventing and treating GIOP but anabolic therapeutic strategies are the new promising therapeutic alternative. Experimental and clinical studies indicate that teriparatide, the active (1–34 parathyroid hormone (PTH molecule, is efficacious for the treatment of GIOP, being able to induce an increase in bone mass in these patients. Intermittent administration of human PTH (1–34 stimulates bone formation by increasing osteoblast number. Additionally, human PTH (1–34 modulates the level and/or activity of locally produced growth factors and cytokines. Teriparatide has been demonstrated in several clinical studies to significantly decrease the incidence of fractures in patients affected by GIOP. It has recently received an indication for GIOP and its label indication has also been expanded.Keywords: glucocorticoids, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteoporosis, teriparatide

  6. Associations between urinary phthalate metabolites and bisphenol A levels, and serum thyroid hormones among the Korean adult population - Korean National Environmental Health Survey (KoNEHS) 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choonghee; Choi, Wookhee; Hwang, Moonyoung; Lee, Youngmee; Kim, Suejin; Yu, Seungdo; Lee, Inae; Paek, Domyung; Choi, Kyungho

    2017-04-15

    Phthalates and bisphenol A (BPA) have been used extensively in many consumer products, resulting in widespread exposure in the general population. Studies have suggested associations between exposure to phthalates and BPA, and serum thyroid hormone levels, but confirmation on larger human populations is warranted. Data obtained from nationally representative Korean adults (n=6003) recruited for the second round of the Korean National Environmental Health Survey (KoNEHS), 2012-2014, were employed. Three di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) metabolites, along with benzyl-butyl phthalate (BBzP) and di-butyl phthalate (DBP) metabolites, and BPA were measured in subjects' urine. Thyroxine (T4), total triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) were measured in serum. The associations between urinary phthalates or BPA and thyroid hormone levels were determined. Urinary phthalate metabolites were generally associated with lowered total T4 or T3, or increased TSH levels in serum. Interquartile range (IQR) increases of mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (MEOHP), and mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (MEHHP) were associated with a 3.7% increase of TSH, and a 1.7% decrease of total T4 levels, respectively. When grouped by sex, urinary MEHHP levels were inversely associated with T4 only among males. Among females, mono-benzyl phthalate (MBzP) and mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP) levels were inversely associated with TSH and T3, respectively. In addition, negative association between BPA and TSH was observed. Several phthalates and BPA exposures were associated with altered circulatory thyroid hormone levels among general Korean adult population. Considering the importance of thyroid hormones, public health implications of such alteration warrant further studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Metabolite Profiling of Red Sea Corals

    KAUST Repository

    Ortega, Jovhana Alejandra

    2016-12-01

    Looking at the metabolite profile of an organism provides insights into the metabolomic state of a cell and hence also into pathways employed. Little is known about the metabolites produced by corals and their algal symbionts. In particular, corals from the central Red Sea are understudied, but interesting study objects, as they live in one of the warmest and most saline environments and can provide clues as to the adjustment of corals to environmental change. In this study, we applied gas chromatography – mass spectrometry (GC–MS) metabolite profiling to analyze the metabolic profile of four coral species and their associated symbionts: Fungia granulosa, Acropora hemprichii, Porites lutea, and Pocillopora verrucosa. We identified and quantified 102 compounds among primary and secondary metabolites across all samples. F. granulosa and its symbiont showed a total of 59 metabolites which were similar to the 51 displayed by P. verrucosa. P. lutea and A. hemprichii both harbored 40 compounds in conjunction with their respective isolated algae. Comparing across species, 28 metabolites were exclusively present in algae, while 38 were exclusive to corals. A principal component and cluster analyses revealed that metabolite profiles clustered between corals and algae, but each species harbored a distinct catalog of metabolites. The major classes of compounds were carbohydrates and amino acids. Taken together, this study provides a first description of metabolites of Red Sea corals and their associated symbionts. As expected, the metabolites of coral hosts differ from their algal symbionts, but each host and algal species harbor a unique set of metabolites. This corroborates that host-symbiont species pairs display a fine-tuned complementary metabolism that provide insights into the specific nature of the symbiosis. Our analysis also revealed aquatic pollutants, which suggests that metabolite profiling might be used for monitoring pollution levels and assessing

  8. Impaired glucocorticoid-mediated HPA axis negative feedback induced by juvenile social isolation in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boero, Giorgia; Pisu, Maria Giuseppina; Biggio, Francesca; Muredda, Laura; Carta, Gianfranca; Banni, Sebastiano; Paci, Elena; Follesa, Paolo; Concas, Alessandra; Porcu, Patrizia; Serra, Mariangela

    2018-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that socially isolated rats at weaning showed a significant decrease in corticosterone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, associated with an enhanced response to acute stressful stimuli. Here we shown that social isolation decreased levels of total corticosterone and of its carrier corticosteroid-binding globulin, but did not influence the availability of the free active fraction of corticosterone, both under basal conditions and after acute stress exposure. Under basal conditions, social isolation increased the abundance of glucocorticoid receptors, while it decreased that of mineralocorticoid receptors. After acute stress exposure, socially isolated rats showed long-lasting corticosterone, ACTH and corticotrophin releasing hormone responses. Moreover, while in the hippocampus and hypothalamus of group-housed rats glucocorticoid receptors expression increased with time and reached a peak when corticosterone levels returned to basal values, in socially isolated rats expression of glucocorticoid receptors did not change. Finally, social isolation also affected the hypothalamic endocannabinoid system: compared to group-housed rats, basal levels of anandamide and cannabinoid receptor type 1 were increased, while basal levels of 2-arachidonoylglycerol were decreased in socially isolated rats and did not change after acute stress exposure. The present results show that social isolation in male rats alters basal HPA axis activity and impairs glucocorticoid-mediated negative feedback after acute stress. Given that social isolation is considered an animal model of several neuropsychiatric disorders, such as generalized anxiety disorder, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and schizophrenia, these data could contribute to better understand the alterations in HPA axis activity observed in these disorders. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Expression of glucocorticoid and progesterone nuclear receptor genes in archival breast cancer tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Robert A; Lea, Rod A; Curran, Joanne E; Weinstein, Stephen R; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown associations of specific nuclear receptor gene variants with sporadic breast cancer. In order to investigate these findings further, we conducted the present study to determine whether expression levels of the progesterone and glucocorticoid nuclear receptor genes vary in different breast cancer grades. RNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded archival breast tumour tissue and converted into cDNA. Sample cDNA underwent PCR using labelled primers to enable quantitation of mRNA expression. Expression data were normalized against the 18S ribosomal gene multiplex and analyzed using analysis of variance. Analysis of variance indicated a variable level of expression of both genes with regard to breast cancer grade (P = 0.00033 for glucocorticoid receptor and P = 0.023 for progesterone receptor). Statistical analysis indicated that expression of the progesterone nuclear receptor is elevated in late grade breast cancer tissue

  10. Acute thermal stressor increases glucocorticoid response but minimizes testosterone and locomotor performance in the cane toad (Rhinella marina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J Narayan

    Full Text Available Climatic warming is a global problem and acute thermal stressor in particular could be considered as a major stressor for wildlife. Cane toads (Rhinella marina have expanded their range into warmer regions of Australia and they provide a suitable model species to study the sub-lethal impacts of thermal stressor on the endocrine physiology of amphibians. Presently, there is no information to show that exposure to an acute thermal stressor could initiate a physiological stress (glucocorticoid response and secondly, the possible effects on reproductive hormones and performance. Answering these questions is important for understanding the impacts of extreme temperature on amphibians. In this study, we experimented on cane toads from Queensland, Australia by acclimating them to mildly warm temperature (25°C and then exposing to acute temperature treatments of 30°, 35° or 40°C (hypothetical acute thermal stressors. We measured acute changes in the stress hormone corticosterone and the reproductive hormone testosterone using standard capture and handling protocol and quantified the metabolites of both hormones non-invasively using urinary enzyme-immunoassays. Furthermore, we measured performance trait (i.e. righting response score in the control acclimated and the three treatment groups. Corticosterone stress responses increased in all toads during exposure to an acute thermal stressor. Furthermore, exposure to a thermal stressor also decreased testosterone levels in all toads. The duration of the righting response (seconds was longer for toads that were exposed to 40°C than to 30°, 35° or 25°C. The increased corticosterone stress response with increased intensity of the acute thermal stressor suggests that the toads perceived this treatment as a stressor. Furthermore, the results also highlight a potential trade-off with performance and reproductive hormones. Ultimately, exposure acute thermal stressors due to climatic variability could impact

  11. Acute thermal stressor increases glucocorticoid response but minimizes testosterone and locomotor performance in the cane toad (Rhinella marina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Edward J; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Climatic warming is a global problem and acute thermal stressor in particular could be considered as a major stressor for wildlife. Cane toads (Rhinella marina) have expanded their range into warmer regions of Australia and they provide a suitable model species to study the sub-lethal impacts of thermal stressor on the endocrine physiology of amphibians. Presently, there is no information to show that exposure to an acute thermal stressor could initiate a physiological stress (glucocorticoid) response and secondly, the possible effects on reproductive hormones and performance. Answering these questions is important for understanding the impacts of extreme temperature on amphibians. In this study, we experimented on cane toads from Queensland, Australia by acclimating them to mildly warm temperature (25°C) and then exposing to acute temperature treatments of 30°, 35° or 40°C (hypothetical acute thermal stressors). We measured acute changes in the stress hormone corticosterone and the reproductive hormone testosterone using standard capture and handling protocol and quantified the metabolites of both hormones non-invasively using urinary enzyme-immunoassays. Furthermore, we measured performance trait (i.e. righting response score) in the control acclimated and the three treatment groups. Corticosterone stress responses increased in all toads during exposure to an acute thermal stressor. Furthermore, exposure to a thermal stressor also decreased testosterone levels in all toads. The duration of the righting response (seconds) was longer for toads that were exposed to 40°C than to 30°, 35° or 25°C. The increased corticosterone stress response with increased intensity of the acute thermal stressor suggests that the toads perceived this treatment as a stressor. Furthermore, the results also highlight a potential trade-off with performance and reproductive hormones. Ultimately, exposure acute thermal stressors due to climatic variability could impact amphibians at

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonist-induced down-regulation of hepatic glucocorticoid receptor expression in SD rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiang; Li Ming; Sun Weiping; Bi Yan; Cai Mengyin; Liang Hua; Yu Qiuqiong; He Xiaoying; Weng Jianping

    2008-01-01

    It was reported that glucocorticoid production was inhibited by fenofibrate through suppression of type-1 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene expression in liver. The inhibition might be a negative-feedback regulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), which is quickly induced by glucocorticoid in the liver. However, it is not clear if GR expression is changed by fenofibrate-induced PPARα activation. In this study, we tested this possibility in the liver of Sprague-Dawley rats. GR expression was reduced by fenofibrate in a time- and does-dependent manner. The inhibition was observed in liver, but not in fat and muscle. The corticosterone level in the blood was increased significantly by fenofibrate. These effects of fenofibrate were abolished by PPARα inhibitor MK886, suggesting that fenofibrate activated through PPARα. In conclusion, inhibition of GR expression may represent a new molecular mechanism for the negative feedback regulation of GR activity by PPARα

  13. Glucocorticoids in the prefrontal cortex enhance memory consolidation and impair working memory by a common neural mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsegyan, Areg; Mackenzie, Scott M.; Kurose, Brian D.; McGaugh, James L.; Roozendaal, Benno

    2010-01-01

    It is well established that acute administration of adrenocortical hormones enhances the consolidation of memories of emotional experiences and, concurrently, impairs working memory. These different glucocorticoid effects on these two memory functions have generally been considered to be independently regulated processes. Here we report that a glucocorticoid receptor agonist administered into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of male Sprague-Dawley rats both enhances memory consolidation and impairs working memory. Both memory effects are mediated by activation of a membrane-bound steroid receptor and depend on noradrenergic activity within the mPFC to increase levels of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These findings provide direct evidence that glucocorticoid effects on both memory consolidation and working memory share a common neural influence within the mPFC. PMID:20810923

  14. Thyroid Storm Masked by Hemodialysis and Glucocorticoid Therapy in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Yohei; Shimizu, Yoshio; Nakata, Junichiro; Kameda, Toshiaki; Muto, Masahiro; Ohsawa, Isao; Io, Hiroaki; Hamada, Chieko; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid function test values are generally at low levels in patients with end-stage kidney disease. Life-threatening thyrotoxicosis or thyroid storm is rare, especially in hemodialysis (HD) patients, and is characterized by multisystem involvement and a high mortality rate if not immediately recognized and treated. Here, we report a female patient with severe symptomatic thyroid storm, receiving long-term HD and glucocorticoid therapy. Methimazole at a dose of 15 mg per day, β-adrenergic bloc...

  15. Modulation of central glucocorticoid receptors in short- and long-term experimental hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, Elena; Mytilinaios, Dimitrios; Calogero, Aldo E; Kamilaris, Themis C; Troupis, Theodore; Chrousos, George P; Johnson, Elizabeth O

    2015-08-01

    Hyperthyroidism is associated with a significant increase in circulating glucocorticoid levels and hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The aim of this study was to examine whether the HPA axis hyperactivity observed in hyperthyroidism may be explained by a disturbed feedback inhibition of endogenous glucocorticoids through two specific intracellular receptors in the brain: the high affinity mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the lower affinity glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Cytosolic receptor binding and gene expression was assessed in rats with short (7 days) and long standing (60 days) eu- and hyperthyroidism. Glucocorticoid receptor number and binding affinity (Kd) in the hippocampus were measured using [(3)H2]-dexamethasone radioreceptor assay. In situ hybridization was employed to examine the effects of hyperthyroidism on the GR and MR mRNA levels in the hippocampus and the pituitary. Both short- and long-term hyperthyroid rats showed pronounced reduction in the concentration of cytosolic GR in the hippocampus, without changes in binding affinity or changes in GR expression. In contrast, GR mRNA in the pituitary increased after 7 days and decreased after 60 days of thyroxin treatment. MR mRNA was moderately affected. Hyperthyroidism is associated with significant decreases in hippocampal GR levels supporting the hypothesis that hyperactivity of the HPA axis observed in experimentally induced hyperthyroidism may be attributed, at least in part, to decreased negative feedback at the level of the hippocampus. These findings further support the notion that a central locus is principally responsible for the hyperactivity of the HPA axis observed in hyperthyroidism.

  16. Expression and regulation of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper in the developing anterior pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellestad, Laura E; Malkiewicz, Stefanie A; Guthrie, H David; Welch, Glenn R; Porter, Tom E

    2009-02-01

    The expression profile of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) in the anterior pituitary during the second half of embryonic development in the chick is consistent with in vivo regulation by circulating corticosteroids. However, nothing else has been reported about the presence of GILZ in the neuroendocrine system. We sought to characterize expression and regulation of GILZ in the chicken embryonic pituitary gland and determine the effect of GILZ overexpression on anterior pituitary hormone levels. Pituitary GILZ mRNA levels increased during embryogenesis to a maximum on the day of hatch, and decreased through the first week after hatch. GILZ expression was rapidly upregulated by corticosterone in embryonic pituitary cells. To determine whether GILZ regulates hormone gene expression in the developing anterior pituitary, we overexpressed GILZ in embryonic pituitary cells and measured mRNA for the major pituitary hormones. Exogenous GILZ increased prolactin mRNA above basal levels, but not as high as that in corticosterone-treated cells, indicating that GILZ may play a small role in lactotroph differentiation. The largest effect we observed was a twofold increase in FSH beta subunit in cells transfected with GILZ but not treated with corticosterone, suggesting that GILZ may positively regulate gonadotroph development in a manner not involving glucocorticoids. In conclusion, this is the first report to characterize avian GILZ and examine its regulation in the developing neuroendocrine system. We have shown that GILZ is upregulated by glucocorticoids in the embryonic pituitary gland and may regulate expression of several pituitary hormones.

  17. Glucocorticoid exposure in preterm babies predicts saliva cortisol response to immunization at 4 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Vivette; Miles, Rachel; Matta, Simon; Modi, Neena; Stevenson, James

    2005-12-01

    Preterm babies are exposed to multiple stressors and this may have long-term effects. In particular, high levels of endogenous cortisol might have a programming effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as may administered glucocorticoids. In this study, we aimed to test the hypothesis that the level of endogenous and exogenous glucocorticoid exposure during the neonatal period predicts the saliva cortisol response to immunization at 4 mo of age. We followed 45 babies born below 32 wk gestation. We showed that their concentration of plasma cortisol during the first 4 wk was 358, 314, 231, and 195 nmol/L cortisol, respectively (geometric mean). This is four to seven times higher than fetal levels at the same gestational age range. We used routine immunization at 4 mo and 12 mo as a stressor and measured the change in saliva cortisol as the stress response. Mean circulating cortisol in the first 4 wk predicted the cortisol response at 4 but not at 12 mo. Path analysis showed that birthweight for gestational age, therapeutic antenatal steroids, and therapeutic postnatal steroids also contributed to the magnitude of the saliva cortisol response at 4 mo. This provides evidence that the magnitude of glucocorticoid exposure, both endogenous and exogenous, may have an effect on later stress responses.

  18. Addison disease in patients treated with glucocorticoid therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Acute adrenal crisis in patients with unrecognized chronic adrenocortical failure is difficult to diagnose and potentially fatal. We describe 2 patients with acute adrenal crisis whose diagnoses were hindered because of concomitant glucocorticoid treatment. Acute adrenal insufficiency is primarily a state of mineralocorticoid deficiency. Prednisolone and prednisone, the most frequently prescribed anti-inflammatory corticosteroid agents, have minimal mineralocorticoid activity. Several conditions that may be treated with pharmacological glucocorticoids are associated with an increased risk of Addison disease. An acute adrenal crisis, against which concurrent glucocorticoid therapy does not confer adequate protection, may develop in such patients.

  19. Glucocorticoids induce autophagy in rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Fan, J.; Lin, Y. S.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoidinduced osteoporosis (GIOP) is a widespread clinical complication following glucocorticoid therapy. This irreversible damage to boneforming and resorbing cells is essential in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Autophagy is a physiological process involved in the regulation of cells...... and their responses to diverse stimuli, however, the role of autophagy in glucocorticoidinduced damage to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) remains unclear. The current study confirmed that glucocorticoid administration impaired the proliferation of BMSCs. Transmission electron microscopy...... that in response to glucocorticoid administration, induced autophagy aids to maintain proliferation and prevent apoptosis of BMSCs. Thus, it is hypothesized that autophagy may be a novel target in the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis....

  20. Neuropsychiatric findings in Cushing syndrome and exogenous glucocorticoid administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkman, Monica N

    2013-09-01

    This article reviews the neuropsychiatric presentations elicited by spontaneous hypercortisolism and exogenous supraphysiologic glucocorticoids. Patients with Cushing disease and syndrome develop a depressive syndrome: irritable and depressed mood, decreased libido, disrupted sleep and cognitive decrements. Exogenous short-term glucocorticoid administration may elicit a hypomanic syndrome with mood, sleep and cognitive disruptions. Treatment options are discussed. Brain imaging and neuropsychological studies indicate elevated cortisol and other glucocorticoids are especially deleterious to hippocampus and frontal lobe. The research findings also shed light on neuropsychiatric abnormalities in conditions that have substantial subgroups exhibiting elevated and dysregulated cortisol: aging, major depressive disorder and Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Deposition of intranasal glucocorticoids--preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapiejko, Piotr; Sosnowski, Tomasz R; Sova, Jarosław; Jurkiewicz, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal glucocorticoids are the treatment of choice in the therapy of rhinitis. The differences in efficiency of particular medications proven by therapeutic index may result from differences in composition of particular formulations as well as from diverse deposition in nasal cavities. Intranasal formulations of glucocorticoids differ in volume of a single dose in addition to variety in density, viscosity and dispenser nozzle structure. The aim of this report was to analyze the deposition of most often used intranasal glucocorticoids in the nasal cavity and assessment of the usefulness of a nose model from a 3D printer reflecting anatomical features of a concrete patient. Three newest and most often used in Poland intranasal glucocorticoids were chosen to analysis; mometasone furoate (MF), fluticasone propionate (FP) and fluticasone furoate (FF). Droplet size distribution obtained from the tested formulations was determined by use of a laser aerosol spectrometer Spraytec (Malvern Instruments, UK). The model of the nasal cavity was obtained using a 3D printer. The printout was based upon a tridimensional reconstruction of nasal cavity created on the basis of digital processing of computed tomography of paranasal sinuses. The deposition of examined medications was established by a method of visualization combined with image analysis using commercial substance which colored itself intensively under the influence of water being the dominant ingredient of all tested preparations. On the basis of obtained results regions of dominating deposition of droplets of intranasal medication on the wall and septum of the nasal cavity were compared. Droplet size of aerosol of tested intranasal medications typically lies within the range of 25-150 µm. All tested medications deposited mainly on the anterior part of inferior turbinate. FP preparation deposited also on the anterior part of the middle nasal turbinate, marginally embracing a fragment of the central part of this

  2. Linoleic acid metabolite leads to steroid resistant asthma features partially through NF-?B

    OpenAIRE

    Panda, Lipsa; Gheware, Atish; Rehman, Rakhshinda; Yadav, Manish K.; Jayaraj, B. S.; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V.; Mahesh, Padukudru Anand; Ghosh, Balaram; Agrawal, Anurag; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan

    2017-01-01

    Studies have highlighted the role of nutritional and metabolic modulators in asthma pathobiology. Steroid resistance is an important clinical problem in asthma but lacks good experimental models. Linoleic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid, has been linked to asthma and glucocorticoid sensitivity. Its 12/15?lipoxygenase metabolite, 13-S-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE) induces mitochondrial dysfunction, with severe airway obstruction and neutrophilic airway inflammation. Here we show that H...

  3. Circulating cortisol-associated signature of glucocorticoid-related gene expression in subcutaneous fat of obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlatou, Maria G; Vickers, Kasey C; Varma, Sudhir; Malek, Rana; Sampson, Maureen; Remaley, Alan T; Gold, Philip W; Skarulis, Monica C; Kino, Tomoshige

    2013-05-01

    Serum cortisol concentrations fluctuate in a circadian fashion, and glucocorticoids exert strong effects on adipose tissue and induce obesity through the glucocorticoid receptor. To examine the impact of physiologic levels of circulating cortisol on subcutaneous adipose tissue, 25 overweight and obese subjects were employed, and their serum levels of morning (AM) and evening (PM) cortisol, AM/PM cortisol ratios, and 24-h urinary-free cortisol (UFC) were compared with their clinical parameters, serum cytokine levels, and mRNA expression of 93 receptor action-regulating and 93 glucocorticoid-responsive genes in abdominal subcutaneous fat. AM cortisol levels did not correlate with mRNA expression of the all genes examined, whereas PM cortisol levels, AM/PM cortisol ratios, and 24-h UFC were associated with distinct sets of these genes. Body mass index did not significantly correlate with the four cortisol parameters employed. These results suggest that physiologic levels of AM serum cortisol do not solely represent biological effects of circulating cortisol on the expression of glucocorticoid-related genes in subcutaneous adipose tissue, whereas PM levels, amplitude, and net amounts of the diurnally fluctuating serum cortisol have distinct effects. Through the genes identified in this study, glucocorticoids appear to influence intermediary metabolism, energy balance, inflammation, and local circadian rythmicity in subcutaneous fat. Our results may also explain in part the development of metabolic abnormality and obesity in subjects under stress or patients with melancholic/atypical depression who demonstrate elevated levels of PM serum cortisol. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  4. Simultaneous determination of 8 neurotransmitters and their metabolite levels in rat brain using liquid chromatography in tandem with mass spectrometry: Application to the murine Nrf2 model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnicz, Aneta; Avendaño Ortiz, José; Casas, Ana I; Freitas, Andiara E; G López, Manuela; Ruiz-Nuño, Ana

    2016-01-30

    Analysis of neurotransmitters and their metabolites is useful for the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method with protein precipitation was developed to monitor levels of adrenaline (AD), noradrenaline (NA), glutamic acid (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) in rat brain tissue. Isoprenaline was used as an internal standard (IS). Neurotransmitters and metabolites were eluted with a reverse phase column under gradient conditions through a mobile phase consisting of 0.2% formic acid water solution/acetonitrile. The compounds were detected and quantified by LC-MS/MS with positive or negative electrospray ionization, which operates in multiple-reaction monitoring mode. The method was linear or polynomial (R(2)>0.99) for AD, NA, Glu, GABA, DA, 5-HT, 5-HIAA, and MHPG in the range of 0.25-200, 0.5-200, 250-20,000, 250-20,000, 0.25-200, 10-3000, 1-50, and 1-50ng/mL, respectively. The validation assays for accuracy and precision, matrix effect, extraction recovery, stability and carry-over of the samples for neurotransmitters and metabolites were consistent with the requirements of regulatory agencies. The method enables rapid quantification of neurotransmitters and their metabolites and has been applied in the nuclear factor (erythroid 2-derived)-like 2 (Nrf2) knockout mouse model of depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of histamine H1 receptor signaling on glucocorticoid receptor activity. Role of canonical and non-canonical pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zappia, C.D.; Granja-Galeano, G.; Fernández, N.; Shayo, C.; Davio, C.; Fitzsimons, C.P.; Monczor, F.

    2015-01-01

    Histamine H1 receptor (H1R) antagonists and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) agonists are used to treat inflammatory conditions such as allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis and asthma. Consistent with the high morbidity levels of such inflammatory conditions, these receptors are the targets of a vast

  6. Adult hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor expression and dentate synaptic plasticity correlate with maternal care received by individuals early in life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hasselt, F.N.; Cornelisse, S.; Zhang, T.Y.; Meaney, M.J.; Velzing, E.H.; Krugers, H.J.; Joëls, M.

    2012-01-01

    Maternal care in mammals is the prevailing environmental influence during perinatal development. The adult rat offspring of mothers exhibiting increased levels of pup licking/grooming (LG; High LG mothers), compared to those reared by Low LG dams, show increased hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor

  7. Prescription duration and treatment episodes in oral glucocorticoid users: application of the parametric waiting time distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Kristina; Støvring, Henrik; Hallas, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    for oral glucocorticoids and to describe continuous treatment episodes using the parametric waiting time distribution. Methods: We used Danish nationwide registries to identify all prescriptions for oral glucocorticoids during 1996-2014. We applied the parametric waiting time distribution to estimate...... duration of individual prescriptions each year by estimating the 80th, 90th, 95th and 99th percentiles for the interarrival distribution. These corresponded to the time since last prescription during which 80%, 90%, 95% and 99% of users presented a new prescription for redemption. We used the Kaplan...... of the interarrival distribution to apply as prescription duration has an impact on the level of misclassification. Use of the 80th percentile provides a measure of drug exposure that is specific, while the 99th percentile provides a sensitive measure....

  8. Metabolite Profiling of Red Sea Corals

    KAUST Repository

    Ortega, Jovhana Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    that provide insights into the specific nature of the symbiosis. Our analysis also revealed aquatic pollutants, which suggests that metabolite profiling might be used for monitoring pollution levels and assessing environmental impact.

  9. Leptin and glucocorticoid signaling pathways in the hypothalamus of female and male fructose-fed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojnović-Milutinović Danijela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in leptin and glucocorticoid signaling pathways in the hypothalamus of male and female rats subjected to a fructose-enriched diet were studied. The level of expression of the key components of the leptin signaling pathway (neuropeptide Y /NPY/ and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 /SOCS3/, and the glucocorticoid signaling pathway (glucocorticoid receptor /GR/, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 /11βHSD1/ and hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase /H6PDH/ did not differ between fructose-fed rats and control animals of both genders. However, in females, a fructose-enriched diet provoked increases in the adiposity index, plasma leptin and triglyceride concentrations, and displayed a tendency to decrease the leptin receptor (ObRb protein and mRNA levels. In male rats, the fructose diet caused elevations in plasma non-esterified fatty acids and triglycerides, as well as in both plasma and hypothalamic leptin concentrations. Our results suggest that a fructose-enriched diet can induce hyperleptinemia in both female and male rats, but with a more pronounced effect on hypothalamic leptin sensitivity in females, probably contributing to the observed development of visceral adiposity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III41009

  10. Glucocorticoid treatment, immobility, and constipation are associated with nutritional risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzwiller, Jean-Pierre; Aschwanden, Josef; Iff, Samuel; Leuenberger, Michèle; Perrig, Martin; Stanga, Zeno

    2011-12-01

    The hypothesis of this clinical study was to determine whether glucocorticoid use and immobility were associated with in-hospital nutritional risk. One hundred and one patients consecutively admitted to the medical wards were enrolled. Current medical conditions, symptoms, medical history, eating and drinking habits, diagnosis, laboratory findings, medications, and anthropometrics were recorded. The Nutrition Risk Score 2002 (NRS-2002) was used as a screening instrument to identify nutritional risk. The results confirmed that glucocorticoid use and immobility are independently associated with nutritional risk determined by the NRS-2002. Constipation could be determined as an additional cofactor independently associated with nutritional risk. Glucocorticoid treatment, immobility, and constipation are associated with nutritional risk in a mixed hospitalized population. The presence of long-time glucocorticoid use, immobility, or constipation should alert the clinician to check for nutritional status, which is an important factor in mortality and morbidity.

  11. Hypersensitivity Reactions from Excipients in Systemic Glucocorticoid Formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calogiuri, Gianfranco; Garvey, Lene H; Romita, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most widely used drugs for the treatment of hypersensitivity, however these drugs themselves and the excipients contained in commercial corticosteroid formulations are able to induce severe immediate-type hypersensitivity reactions. Reactions involving excipients have been...

  12. Both mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors regulate emotional memory in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, M.; Bakker, E.H.M.; Velzing, E.; Berger, S.; Oitzl, M.; Joëls, M.; Krugers, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Corticosteroid hormones are thought to promote optimal behavioral adaptation under fearful conditions, primarily via glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). Here, we examined - using pharmacological and genetic approaches in mice - if mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) also play a role in fearful memory

  13. Association of glucocorticoid receptor polymorphisms with clinical and metabolic profiles in polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A.Rosa Maciel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate whether glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphisms are associated with clinical and metabolic profiles in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. Polycystic ovary syndrome is a complex endocrine disease that affects 5-8% of women and may be associated with metabolic syndrome, which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Cortisol action and dysregulation account for metabolic syndrome development in the general population. As glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1 polymorphisms regulate cortisol sensitivity, we hypothesized that variants of this gene may be involved in the adverse metabolic profiles of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. METHOD: Clinical, metabolic and hormonal profiles were evaluated in 97 patients with polycystic ovary syndrome who were diagnosed according to the Rotterdam criteria. The alleles of the glucocorticoid gene were genotyped. Association analyses were performed using the appropriate statistical tests. RESULTS: Obesity and metabolic syndrome were observed in 42.3% and 26.8% of patients, respectively. Body mass index was positively correlated with blood pressure, triglyceride, LDL-c, total cholesterol, glucose and insulin levels as well as HOMA-IR values and inversely correlated with HDL-c and SHBG levels. The BclI and A3669G variants were found in 24.7% and 13.4% of alleles, respectively. BclI carriers presented a lower frequency of insulin resistance compared with wild-type subjects. CONCLUSION: The BclI variant is associated with a lower frequency of insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Glucocorticoid gene polymorphism screening during treatment of the syndrome may be useful for identifying subgroups of at-risk patients who would benefit the most from personalized treatment.

  14. Glucocorticoid-like activity of propylparaben, butylparaben, diethylhexyl phthalate and tetramethrin mixtures studied in the MDA-kb2 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopčič, Ivana; Kolšek, Katra; Dolenc, Marija Sollner

    2015-01-22

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds can interfere with the endocrine organs or hormone system and cause tumors, birth defects and developmental disorders in humans. The estrogen-like activity of compounds has been widely studied but little is known concerning their possible modulation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Steroidal (synthetic and natural) and non-steroidal endocrine-active compounds commonly occur as complex mixtures in human environments. Identification of such molecular species, which are responsible for modulating the glucocorticoid receptor are necessary to fully assess their risk. We have used the MDA-kb2 cell line, which expresses endogenous glucocorticoid receptor and a stably transfected luciferase reporter gene construct, to quantify the glucocorticoid-like activity of four compounds present in products in everyday use - propylparaben (PP), butylparaben (BP), diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and tetramethrin (TM). We tested all possible combinations of these compounds at two concentrations (1 μM and 10 nM) and compared their glucocorticoid-like activity. At the concentration of 1 μM seven mixtures were identified to have glucocorticoid-like activity except: DEHP+TM, BP+TM, DEHP+PP+TM, BP+PP+TM. At the concentration of 10 nM only three mixtures have glucocorticoid modulatory activity: DEHP+PP, BP+PP, DEHP+BP+PP+TM. Identified glucocorticoid-like activities were between 1.25 and 1.51 fold at the concentration of 1 μM and between 1.23 and 1.44 fold at the concentration of 10 nM in comparison with the solvent control. Individually BP, PP, and DEHP had glucocorticoid-like activity of 1.60, 1.57 and 1.50 fold over the solvent control at the concentration of 1 μM. On the other hand PP and DEHP, at the concentration of 10nM, showed no glucocorticoid-like activity, while BP showed 1.44 fold. The assertion that individual glucocorticoid-like compounds do not produce harm because they are present at low, ineffective levels in humans may be irrelevant when we

  15. A case report of motor neuron disease in a patient showing significant level of DDTs, HCHs and organophosphate metabolites in hair as well as levels of hexane and toluene in blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanavouras, Konstantinos; Tzatzarakis, Manolis N.; Mastorodemos, Vasileios; Plaitakis, Andreas; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M.

    2011-01-01

    Motor neuron disease is a devastating neurodegenerative condition, with the majority of sporadic, non-familial cases being of unknown etiology. Several epidemiological studies have suggested that occupational exposure to chemicals may be associated with disease pathogenesis. We report the case of a patient developing progressive motor neuron disease, who was chronically exposed to pesticides and organic solvents. The patient presented with leg spasticity and developed gradually clinical signs suggestive of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which was supported by the neurophysiologic and radiological findings. Our report is an evidence based case of combined exposure to organochlorine (DDTs), organophosphate pesticides (OPs) and organic solvents as confirmed by laboratory analysis in samples of blood and hair confirming systematic exposure. The concentration of non-specific dialkylphosphates metabolites (DAPs) of OPs in hair (dimethyphopshate (DMP) 1289.4 pg/mg and diethylphosphate (DEP) 709.4 pg/mg) and of DDTs (opDDE 484.0 pg/mg, ppDDE 526.6 pg/mg, opDDD 448.4 pg/mg, ppDDD + opDDT 259.9 pg/mg and ppDDT 573.7 pg/mg) were considerably significant. Toluene and n-hexane were also detected in blood on admission at hospital and quantified (1.23 and 0.87 μg/l, respectively), while 3 months after hospitalization blood testing was found negative for toluene and n-hexane and hair analysis was provided decrease levels of HCHs, DDTs and DAPs. -- Highlights: ► Exposure to pesticides and organic solvents might be a risk factor for sporadic MND. ► We report a patient who developed progressive upper and lower motor neuron disease. ► The patient had a history of occupational exposure to pesticides and solvents. ► High DDTs’ levels and increased levels of DMP and DEP were measured in his hair. ► The patients’ exposure to chemicals might have played a role in MND development.

  16. A case report of motor neuron disease in a patient showing significant level of DDTs, HCHs and organophosphate metabolites in hair as well as levels of hexane and toluene in blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanavouras, Konstantinos [Department of Neurology, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Tzatzarakis, Manolis N. [Center of Toxicology Science and Research, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Mastorodemos, Vasileios; Plaitakis, Andreas [Department of Neurology, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Tsatsakis, Aristidis M., E-mail: aris@med.uoc.gr [Center of Toxicology Science and Research, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2011-11-15

    Motor neuron disease is a devastating neurodegenerative condition, with the majority of sporadic, non-familial cases being of unknown etiology. Several epidemiological studies have suggested that occupational exposure to chemicals may be associated with disease pathogenesis. We report the case of a patient developing progressive motor neuron disease, who was chronically exposed to pesticides and organic solvents. The patient presented with leg spasticity and developed gradually clinical signs suggestive of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which was supported by the neurophysiologic and radiological findings. Our report is an evidence based case of combined exposure to organochlorine (DDTs), organophosphate pesticides (OPs) and organic solvents as confirmed by laboratory analysis in samples of blood and hair confirming systematic exposure. The concentration of non-specific dialkylphosphates metabolites (DAPs) of OPs in hair (dimethyphopshate (DMP) 1289.4 pg/mg and diethylphosphate (DEP) 709.4 pg/mg) and of DDTs (opDDE 484.0 pg/mg, ppDDE 526.6 pg/mg, opDDD 448.4 pg/mg, ppDDD + opDDT 259.9 pg/mg and ppDDT 573.7 pg/mg) were considerably significant. Toluene and n-hexane were also detected in blood on admission at hospital and quantified (1.23 and 0.87 {mu}g/l, respectively), while 3 months after hospitalization blood testing was found negative for toluene and n-hexane and hair analysis was provided decrease levels of HCHs, DDTs and DAPs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exposure to pesticides and organic solvents might be a risk factor for sporadic MND. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report a patient who developed progressive upper and lower motor neuron disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The patient had a history of occupational exposure to pesticides and solvents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High DDTs' levels and increased levels of DMP and DEP were measured in his hair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The patients' exposure to chemicals might

  17. Altered placental development in undernourished rats: role of maternal glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chun-Hung

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Maternal undernutrition (MUN during pregnancy may lead to fetal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, which itself predisposes to adult risk of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes. IUGR may stem from insufficient maternal nutrient supply or reduced placental nutrient transfer. In addition, a critical role for maternal stress-induced glucocorticoids (GCs has been suggested to contribute to both IUGR and the ensuing risk of adult metabolic syndrome. While GC-induced fetal organ defects have been examined, there have been few studies on placental responses to MUN-induced maternal stress. Therefore, we hypothesize that 50% MUN associates with increased maternal GC levels and decreased placental HSD11B. This in turn leads to decreased placental and fetal growth, hence the need to investigate nutrient transporters. We measured maternal serum levels of corticosterone, and the placental basal and labyrinth zone expression of glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1, 11-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase B 1 (HSD11B-1 predominantly activates cortisone to cortisol and 11-dehydrocorticosterone (11-DHC to corticosterone, although can sometimes drive the opposing (inactivating reaction, and HSD11B-2 (only inactivates and converts corticosterone to 11-DHC in rodents in control and MUN rats at embryonic day 20 (E20. Moreover, we evaluated the expression of nutrient transporters for glucose (SLC2A1, SLC2A3 and amino acids (SLC38A1, 2, and 4. Our results show that MUN dams displayed significantly increased plasma corticosterone levels compared to control dams. Further, a reduction in fetal and placental weights was observed in both the mid-horn and proximal-horn positions. Notably, the placental labyrinth zone, the site of feto-maternal exchange, showed decreased expression of HSD11B1-2 in both horns, and increased HSD11B-1 in proximal-horn placentas, but no change in NR3C1. The reduced placental GCs catabolic capacity was accompanied by downregulation of SLC2A3, SLC

  18. The emerging importance of ultradian glucocorticoid rhythms within metabolic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Benjamin P; Conway-Campbell, Becky L; Lightman, Stafford L

    2018-06-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) hormones play significant roles within homeostasis and the chrono-dynamics of their regulatory role has become increasingly recognised within dysregulated GC pathology, particularly with metabolic phenotypes. Within this article, we will discuss the relevance of the ultradian homeostatic rhythm, how its dysregulation effects glucocorticoid receptor and RNA polymeraseII recruitment and may play a significant role within aberrant metabolic action. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  19. The role of glucocorticoids in sodium retention in cirrhotic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Højmark; Kristensen, Steffen Skott; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2012-01-01

    sodium retention evident in cirrhosis. The aim was to elucidate the role of glucocorticoids in sodium retention in decompensated cirrhotic patients. Methods. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was performed in nine patients with alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver. A washout....... Conclusion. These results indicate that endogenous glucocorticoids contribute to the sodium retention in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver....

  20. The Pro-inflammatory Effects of Glucocorticoids in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Erica de Almeida; Munhoz, Carolina Demarchi

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are a class of steroid hormones derived from cholesterol. Their actions are mediated by the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors, members of the superfamily of nuclear receptors, which, once bound to their ligands, act as transcription factors that can directly modulate gene expression. Through protein–protein interactions with other transcription factors, they can also regulate the activity of many genes in a composite or tethering way. Rapid non-genomic signaling was also demonstrated since glucocorticoids can act through membrane receptors and activate signal transduction pathways, such as protein kinases cascades, to modulate other transcriptions factors and activate or repress various target genes. By all these different mechanisms, glucocorticoids regulate numerous important functions in a large variety of cells, not only in the peripheral organs but also in the central nervous system during development and adulthood. In general, glucocorticoids are considered anti-inflammatory and protective agents due to their ability to inhibit gene expression of pro-inflammatory mediators and other possible damaging molecules. Nonetheless, recent studies have uncovered situations in which these hormones can act as pro-inflammatory agents depending on the dose, chronicity of exposure, and the structure/organ analyzed. In this review, we will provide an overview of the conditions under which these phenomena occur, a discussion that will serve as a basis for exploring the mechanistic foundation of glucocorticoids pro-inflammatory gene regulation in the brain. PMID:27445981

  1. Glucocorticoid-Induced Avascular Bone Necrosis: Diagnosis and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, KL; Mok, CC

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoid use is one of the most important causes of avascular bone necrosis (AVN). The pathogenesis of glucocorticoid-induced AVN is not fully understood but postulated mechanisms include fat hypertrophy, fat emboli and intravascular coagulation that cause impedance of blood supply to the bones. Data regarding the relationship between AVN and dosage, route of administration and treatment duration of glucocorticoids are conflicting, with some studies demonstrating the cumulative dose of glucocorticoid being the most important determining factor. Early recognition of this complication is essential as the prognosis is affected by the stage of the disease. Currently, there is no consensus on whether universal screening of asymptomatic AVN should be performed for long-term glucocorticoid users. A high index of suspicion should be exhibited for bone and joint pain at typical sites. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or bone scintigraphy is more sensitive than plain radiograph for diagnosing early-stage AVN. Conservative management of AVN includes rest and reduction of weight bearing. Minimization of glucocorticoid dose or a complete withdrawal of the drug should be considered if the underlying conditions allow. The efficacy of bisphosphonates in reducing the rate of collapse of femoral head in AVN is controversial. Surgical therapy of AVN includes core decompression, osteotomy, bone grafting and joint replacement. Recent advances in the treatment of AVN include the use of tantalum rod and the development of more wear resistant bearing surface in hip arthroplasty. PMID:23115605

  2. Glucocorticoid-induced avascular bone necrosis: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K L; Mok, C C

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoid use is one of the most important causes of avascular bone necrosis (AVN). The pathogenesis of glucocorticoid-induced AVN is not fully understood but postulated mechanisms include fat hypertrophy, fat emboli and intravascular coagulation that cause impedance of blood supply to the bones. Data regarding the relationship between AVN and dosage, route of administration and treatment duration of glucocorticoids are conflicting, with some studies demonstrating the cumulative dose of glucocorticoid being the most important determining factor. Early recognition of this complication is essential as the prognosis is affected by the stage of the disease. Currently, there is no consensus on whether universal screening of asymptomatic AVN should be performed for long-term glucocorticoid users. A high index of suspicion should be exhibited for bone and joint pain at typical sites. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or bone scintigraphy is more sensitive than plain radiograph for diagnosing early-stage AVN. Conservative management of AVN includes rest and reduction of weight bearing. Minimization of glucocorticoid dose or a complete withdrawal of the drug should be considered if the underlying conditions allow. The efficacy of bisphosphonates in reducing the rate of collapse of femoral head in AVN is controversial. Surgical therapy of AVN includes core decompression, osteotomy, bone grafting and joint replacement. Recent advances in the treatment of AVN include the use of tantalum rod and the development of more wear resistant bearing surface in hip arthroplasty.

  3. The effects of irradiation on the cytosol glucocorticoid receptor and concentrations of corticosterone and cyclic nucleotides in the rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Teruki; Mori, Masaki; Honke, Yoshifumi

    1983-01-01

    The effects of irradiation on both the cytosol glucocorticoid receptor and concentrations of corticosterone and cyclic nucleotides in the rat liver were investigated. The liver concentrations of corticosterone and cyclic nucleotides were measured by radioimmunoassay before and after the irradiation of 1,000 rad/l fraction. The glucocorticoid receptor in the liver cytosol was determined by the measurement of the cytosol binding to 3 H-dexamethasone. The cytosol and nuclear corticosterone levels reached a peak 1 day after the irradiation of the rat liver and declined to the control levels after 2 days. The increase in corticosterone levels may be due to the direct stimulation of the right adrenal gland and/ or the stress induced by the irradiation. The binding capacity of the glucocorticoid receptor in rat liver cytosol decreased to the minimum 1 day after the irradiation, and the recovery occurred at 4 days. The Kd value of the glucocorticoid receptor remained unchanged from 1 hour until 4 days but was high at 4 and 7 days. The distinctly increased levels of cyclic GMP in the rat liver were found from 1 hour through 7 days after the irradiation, while cyclic AMP did not change. The inversed relationship between the cytosol glucocorticoid receptor and corticosterone levels in cytosol and the nuclei indicates that the receptor-bound corticosterone in cytosol can be transferred to a nucleus and remain there in the presence of appropriate amounts of corticosterone in cytosol, after which the receptor is released from the nucleus into cytosol. The high Kd values observed 4 -- 7 days after the irradiation may be either due to the direct effect of irradiation or to the replenishment of the receptor with a low affinity. (author)

  4. Rationalization and prediction of in vivo metabolite exposures: The role of metabolite kinetics, clearance predictions and in vitro parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Justin D.; Fujioka, Yasushi; Isoherranen, Nina

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Due to growing concerns over toxic or active metabolites, significant efforts have been focused on qualitative identification of potential in vivo metabolites from in vitro data. However, limited tools are available to quantitatively predict their human exposures. Areas covered in this review Theory of clearance predictions and metabolite kinetics is reviewed together with supporting experimental data. In vitro and in vivo data of known circulating metabolites and their parent drugs was collected and the predictions of in vivo exposures of the metabolites were evaluated. What the reader will gain The theory and data reviewed will be useful in early identification of human metabolites that will circulate at significant levels in vivo and help in designing in vivo studies that focus on characterization of metabolites. It will also assist in rationalization of metabolite-to-parent ratios used as markers of specific enzyme activity. Take home message The relative importance of a metabolite in comparison to the parent compound as well as other metabolites in vivo can only be predicted using the metabolites in vitro formation and elimination clearances, and the in vivo disposition of a metabolite can only be rationalized when the elimination pathways of that metabolite are known. PMID:20557268

  5. 1H NMR-based metabolomic fingerprinting to determine metabolite levels in serrano peppers (Capsicum annum L.) grown in two different regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Martínez, Elvia; Florentino-Ramos, Elideth; Pérez-Hernández, Nury; Gerardo Zepeda-Vallejo, L; Villa-Ruano, Nemesio; Velázquez-Ponce, Manuel; García-Mendoza, Felipe; Bañuelos-Hernández, Angel E

    2017-12-01

    Chili pepper (Capsicum annuum) is the most important and emblematic condiment in Mexican food. Serrano pepper is a variety of C. annuum that is traditionally cultivated in Mexico and commercialized in local markets. The aim of this study was to describe the 1 H NMR metabolomic profiling of the aqueous phase of serrano peppers harvested from two distinct regions, in the states of Veracruz and Oaxaca, Mexico. According to the current results, aspartate citrate, lactate, leucine and sucrose were found at higher amount in the serrano peppers from Veracruz. On the other hand, acetate, formate, fumarate, malonate, phosphocholine, pyruvate and succinate showed the highest abundance in this product from Oaxaca. These are the main metabolites that distinguish one group from the other. The spectrometric method reported presently is characterized by great simplicity, robustness and reproducibility. Thus, this technique can be used for establishing reliable metabolomic fingerprints of serrano peppers grown under different environmental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Remembering under stress: different roles of autonomic arousal and glucocorticoids in memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönfeld, Pia; Ackermann, Karina; Schwabe, Lars

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that stress impairs memory retrieval. Glucocorticoids, released with a delay of several minutes in response to stressful experiences, are thought to play a key role in the stress-induced retrieval impairment. Accordingly, most studies on the impact of stress on retrieval tested memory a considerable time after stressor exposure, when glucocorticoid levels were elevated. Here, we asked how stress affects memory when retrieval takes place under stress, that is, when stress is part of the retrieval situation and glucocorticoids are not yet increased at the time of testing. To contrast stress effects on ongoing and delayed memory retrieval, 72 participants learned first neutral and emotional material. Twenty-four hours later, half of the learned material was tested either in a stressful, oral examination-like testing situation or in a standard, non-stressful free recall test. Memory for the other half of the learned material was assessed 25 min after the first, stressful or non-stressful retention test. Significant increases in blood pressure and salivary cortisol confirmed the stress induction by the first, examination-like testing situation. Retrieval performance under stress was positively correlated with the blood pressure response to the stressor but unaffected by cortisol. Conversely, retrieval performance 25 min post stress was negatively correlated with the cortisol response to the stressor, particularly for emotional items. These results suggest that the same stressor may have opposite effects on ongoing and delayed memory retrieval, depending on the presence of autonomic arousal and glucocorticoids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcriptional effects of glucocorticoid receptors in the dentate gyrus increase anxiety-related behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadège Sarrazin

    Full Text Available The Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR is a transcription factor ubiquitously expressed in the brain. Activation of brain GRs by high levels of glucocorticoid (GC hormones modifies a large variety of physiological and pathological-related behaviors. Unfortunately the specific cellular targets of GR-mediated behavioral effects of GC are still largely unknown. To address this issue, we generated a mutated form of the GR called DeltaGR. DeltaGR is a constitutively transcriptionally active form of the GR that is localized in the nuclei and activates transcription without binding to glucocorticoids. Using the tetracycline-regulated system (Tet-OFF, we developed an inducible transgenic approach that allows the expression of the DeltaGR in specific brain areas. We focused our study on a mouse line that expressed DeltaGR almost selectively in the glutamatergic neurons of the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus. This restricted expression of the DeltaGR increased anxiety-related behaviors without affecting other behaviors that could indirectly influence performance in anxiety-related tests. This behavioral phenotype was also associated with an up-regulation of the MAPK signaling pathway and Egr-1 protein in the DG. These findings identify glutamatergic neurons in the DG as one of the cellular substrate of stress-related pathologies.

  8. Glucocorticoids and Polyamine Inhibitors Synergize to Kill Human Leukemic CEM Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aaron L; Johnson, Betty H; Medh, Rheem D; Townsend, Courtney M; Thompson, E Brad

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Glucocorticoids are well-known apoptotic agents in certain classes of lymphoid cell malignancies. Reduction of intracellular polyamine levels by use of inhibitors that block polyamine synthesis slows or inhibits growth of many cells in vitro. Several such inhibitors have shown efficacy in clinical trials, though the toxicity of some compounds has limited their usefulness. We have tested the effects of combinations of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) and two polyamine inhibitors, difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and methyl glyoxal bis guanylhydrazone (MGBG), on the clonal line of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, CEM-C7-14. Dex alone kills these cells, though only after a delay of at least 24 hours. We also evaluated a partially glucocorticoid-resistant c-Myc-expressing CEM-C7-14 clone. We show that Dex downregulates ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis. Pretreatment with the ODC inhibitor DFMO, followed by addition of Dex, enhances steroid-evoked kill slightly. The combination of pretreatment with sublethal concentrations of both DFMO and the inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, MGBG, followed by addition of Dex, results in strong synergistic cell kill. Both the rapidity and extent of cell kill are enhanced compared to the effects of Dex alone. These results suggest that use of such combinations in vivo may result in apoptosis of malignant cells with lower overall toxicity. PMID:11922393

  9. Glucocorticoids and Polyamine Inhibitors Synergize to Kill Human Leukemic CEM Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron L. Miller

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are well-known apoptotic agents in certain classes of lymphoid cell malignancies. Reduction of intracellular polyamine levels by use of inhibitors that block polyamine synthesis slows or inhibits growth of many cells in vitro. Several such inhibitors have shown efficacy in clinical trials, though the toxicity of some compounds has limited their usefulness. We have tested the effects of combinations of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone. (20Dex and two polyamine inhibitors, difluoromethylornithine. (20DFMO and methyl glyoxal bis guanylhydrazone. (20MGBG, on the clonal line of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, CEM-C7-14. Dex alone kills these cells, though only after a delay of at least 24 hours. We also evaluated a partially glucocorticoid-resistant c-Myc-expressing CEM-C7-14 clone. We show that Dex downregulates ornithine decarboxylase. (20ODC, the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis. Pretreatment with the ODC inhibitor DFMO, followed by addition of Dex, enhances steroid-evoked kill slightly. The combination of pretreatment with sublethal concentrations of both DFMO and the inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, MGBG, followed by addition of Dex, results in strong synergistic cell kill. Both the rapidity and extent of cell kill are enhanced compared to the effects of Dex alone. These results suggest that use of such combinations in vivo may result in apoptosis of malignant cells with lower overall toxicity.

  10. Glucocorticoid up-regulation of high-affinity interleukin 6 receptors on human epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyers, L.; De Wit, L.; Content, J.

    1990-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a potent pleiotropic cytokine, known, among others, to stimulate immunoglobulin production by B cells and to trigger acute-phase protein synthesis by hepatocytes. Similar to IL-1, it is produced by monocytes and macrophages following an inflammatory challenge. Analysis of IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) expression on different human cell lines indicates that dexamethasone could up-regulate the number of IL-6R on one epithelial cell line (UAC) and on two hepatoma cell lines (HepG2 and Hep3B). This effect was confirmed by Scatchard analysis of binding experiments, using [ 35 S]methionine and [ 35 S]cysteine metabolically labeled IL-6. It was confirmed at the level of mRNA expression by Northern blot analysis. These results provide evidence for a link between IL-6 and glucocorticoids. They could represent an example of a system in which one role of glucocorticoids is to define more accurately the target of cytokines, and they could explain, at least partly, the frequently observed synergy between IL-6 and glucocorticoids, notably in the case of hepatocytes

  11. BDNF and glucocorticoids regulate corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) homeostasis in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanneteau, Freddy D; Lambert, W Marcus; Ismaili, Naima; Bath, Kevin G; Lee, Francis S; Garabedian, Michael J; Chao, Moses V

    2012-01-24

    Regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is critical for adaptation to environmental changes. The principle regulator of the HPA axis is corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is made in the parventricular nucleus and is an important target of negative feedback by glucocorticoids. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate CRH are not fully understood. Disruption of normal HPA axis activity is a major risk factor of neuropsychiatric disorders in which decreased expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) has been documented. To investigate the role of the GR in CRH neurons, we have targeted the deletion of the GR, specifically in the parventricular nucleus. Impairment of GR function in the parventricular nucleus resulted in an enhancement of CRH expression and an up-regulation of hypothalamic levels of BDNF and disinhibition of the HPA axis. BDNF is a stress and activity-dependent factor involved in many activities modulated by the HPA axis. Significantly, ectopic expression of BDNF in vivo increased CRH, whereas reduced expression of BDNF, or its receptor TrkB, decreased CRH expression and normal HPA functions. We find the differential regulation of CRH relies upon the cAMP response-element binding protein coactivator CRTC2, which serves as a switch for BDNF and glucocorticoids to direct the expression of CRH.

  12. Glucocorticoid effects on object recognition memory require training-associated emotional arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Shoki; Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L

    2004-01-20

    Considerable evidence implicates glucocorticoid hormones in the regulation of memory consolidation and memory retrieval. The present experiments investigated whether the influence of these hormones on memory depends on the level of emotional arousal induced by the training experience. We investigated this issue in male Sprague-Dawley rats by examining the effects of immediate posttraining systemic injections of the glucocorticoid corticosterone on object recognition memory under two conditions that differed in their training-associated emotional arousal. In rats that were not previously habituated to the experimental context, corticosterone (0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) administered immediately after a 3-min training trial enhanced 24-hr retention performance in an inverted-U shaped dose-response relationship. In contrast, corticosterone did not affect 24-hr retention of rats that received extensive prior habituation to the experimental context and, thus, had decreased novelty-induced emotional arousal during training. Additionally, immediate posttraining administration of corticosterone to nonhabituated rats, in doses that enhanced 24-hr retention, impaired object recognition performance at a 1-hr retention interval whereas corticosterone administered after training to well-habituated rats did not impair 1-hr retention. Thus, the present findings suggest that training-induced emotional arousal may be essential for glucocorticoid effects on object recognition memory.

  13. Self-assembled nanoformulation of methylprednisolone succinate with carboxylated block copolymer for local glucocorticoid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalov, Marat I; Đặng, Trinh; Petrova, Natalia V; Laikov, Alexander V; Luong, Duong; Akhmadishina, Rezeda A; Lukashkin, Andrei N; Abdullin, Timur I

    2018-04-01

    A new self-assembled formulation of methylprednisolone succinate (MPS) based on a carboxylated trifunctional block copolymer of ethylene oxide and propylene oxide (TBC-COOH) was developed. TBC-COOH and MPS associated spontaneously at increased concentrations in aqueous solutions to form almost monodisperse mixed micelles (TBC-COOH/MPS) with a hydrodynamic diameter of 19.6 nm, zeta potential of -27.8 mV and optimal weight ratio ∼1:6.3. Conditions for the effective formation of TBC-COOH/MPS were elucidated by comparing copolymers and glucocorticoids with different structure. The micellar structure of TBC-COOH/MPS persisted upon dilution, temperature fluctuations and interaction with blood serum components. TBC-COOH increased antiradical activity of MPS and promoted its intrinsic cytotoxicity in vitro attributed to enhanced cellular availability of the mixed micelles. Intracellular transportation and hydrolysis of MPS were analyzed using optimized liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with multiple reaction monitoring which showed increased level of both MPS and methylprednisolone in neuronal cells treated with the formulated glucocorticoid. Our results identify TBC-COOH/MPS as an advanced in situ prepared nanoformulation and encourage its further investigation for a potential local glucocorticoid therapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Association of Prenatal Exposure to Perfluorinated Chemicals with Glucocorticoid and Androgenic Hormones in Cord Blood Samples: The Hokkaido Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Houman; Araki, Atsuko; Itoh, Sachiko; Sasaki, Seiko; Miyashita, Chihiro; Mitsui, Takahiko; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Nonomura, Katsuya; Kishi, Reiko

    2017-01-01

    Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) disrupt cholesterol homeostasis. All steroid hormones are derived from cholesterol, and steroid hormones such as glucocorticoids and androgenic hormones mediate several vital physiologic functions. However, the in utero effects of PFCs exposure on the homeostasis of these steroid hormones are not well understood in humans. We examined the relationship between prenatal exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)/perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and cord blood levels of glucocorticoid and androgenic hormones. We conducted a hospital-based birth cohort study between July 2002 and October 2005 in Sapporo, Japan (n = 514). In total, 185 mother-infant pairs were included in the present study. Prenatal PFOS and PFOA levels in maternal serum samples were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Cord blood levels of glucocorticoid (cortisol and cortisone) and androgenic hormones [dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione] were also measured in the same way. We found a dose-response relationship of prenatal PFOS, but not PFOA, exposure with glucocorticoid levels after adjusting for potential confounders. Cortisol and cortisone concentrations were -23.98-ng/mL (95% CI: -0.47.12, -11.99; p for trend = 0.006) and -63.21-ng/mL (95% CI: -132.56, -26.72; p for trend blood. Citation: Goudarzi H, Araki A, Itoh S, Sasaki S, Miyashita C, Mitsui T, Nakazawa H, Nonomura K, Kishi R. 2017. The association of prenatal exposure to perfluorinated chemicals with glucocorticoid and androgenic hormones in cord blood samples: the Hokkaido Study. Environ Health Perspect 125:111-118; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP142.

  15. Systematic review of the clinical effect of glucocorticoids on nonhematologic malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Bruce D

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucocorticoids are often used in the treatment of nonhematologic malignancy. This review summarizes the clinical evidence of the effect of glucocorticoid therapy on nonhematologic malignancy. Methods A systematic review of clinical studies of glucocorticoid therapy in patients with nonhematologic malignancy was undertaken. Only studies having endpoints of tumor response or tumor control or survival were included. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Register/Databases, conference proceedings (ASCO, AACR, ASTRO/ASTR, ESMO, ECCO and other resources were used. Data was extracted using a standard form. There was quality assessment of each study. There was a narrative synthesis of information, with presentation of results in tables. Where appropriate, meta-analyses were performed using data from published reports and a fixed effect model. Results Fifty four randomized controlled trials (RCTs, one meta-analysis, four phase l/ll trials and four case series met the eligibility criteria. Clinical trials of glucocorticoid monotherapy in breast and prostate cancer showed modest response rates. In advanced breast cancer meta-analyses, the addition of glucocorticoids to either chemotherapy or other endocrine therapy resulted in increased response rate, but not increased survival. In GI cancer, there was one RCT each of glucocorticoids vs. supportive care and chemotherapy +/- glucocorticoids; glucocorticoid effect was neutral. The only RCT found of chemotherapy +/- glucocorticoids, in which the glucocorticoid arm did worse, was in lung cancer. In glucocorticoid monotherapy, meta-analysis found that continuous high dose glucocorticoids had a detrimental effect on survival. The only other evidence, for a detrimental effect of glucocorticoid monotherapy, was in one of the two trials in lung cancer. Conclusion Glucocorticoid monotherapy has some benefit in breast and prostate cancer. In advanced breast cancer, the addition of glucocorticoids to other

  16. Glucocorticoid regulation of astrocytic fate and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Yu

    Full Text Available Glial loss in the hippocampus has been suggested as a factor in the pathogenesis of stress-related brain disorders that are characterized by dysregulated glucocorticoid (GC secretion. However, little is known about the regulation of astrocytic fate by GC. Here, we show that astrocytes derived from the rat hippocampus undergo growth inhibition and display moderate activation of caspase 3 after exposure to GC. Importantly, the latter event, observed both in situ and in primary astrocytic cultures is not followed by either early- or late-stage apoptosis, as monitored by stage I or stage II DNA fragmentation. Thus, unlike hippocampal granule neurons, astrocytes are resistant to GC-induced apoptosis; this resistance is due to lower production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and a greater buffering capacity against the cytotoxic actions of ROS. We also show that GC influence hippocampal cell fate by inducing the expression of astrocyte-derived growth factors implicated in the control of neural precursor cell proliferation. Together, our results suggest that GC instigate a hitherto unknown dialog between astrocytes and neural progenitors, adding a new facet to understanding how GC influence the cytoarchitecture of the hippocampus.

  17. Hypoxia and Inactivity Related Physiological Changes (Constipation, Inflammation Are Not Reflected at the Level of Gut Metabolites and Butyrate Producing Microbial Community: The PlanHab Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Šket

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We explored the assembly of intestinal microbiota in healthy male participants during the run-in (5 day and experimental phases [21-day normoxic bed rest (NBR, hypoxic bedrest (HBR], and hypoxic ambulation (HAmb in a strictly controlled laboratory environment, balanced fluid, and dietary intakes, controlled circadian rhythm, microbial ambiental burden, and 24/7 medical surveillance. The fraction of inspired O2 (FiO2 and partial pressure of inspired O2 (PiO2 were 0.209 and 133.1 ± 0.3 mmHg for NBR and 0.141 ± 0.004 and 90.0 ± 0.4 mmHg for both hypoxic variants (HBR and HAmb; ~4,000 m simulated altitude, respectively. A number of parameters linked to intestinal transit spanning Bristol Stool Scale, defecation rates, zonulin, α1-antitrypsin, eosinophil derived neurotoxin, bile acids, reducing sugars, short chain fatty acids, total soluble organic carbon, water content, diet composition, and food intake were measured (167 variables. The abundance, structure, and diversity of butyrate producing microbial community were assessed using the two primary bacterial butyrate synthesis pathways, butyryl-CoA: acetate CoA-transferase (but and butyrate kinase (buk genes. Inactivity negatively affected fecal consistency and in combination with hypoxia aggravated the state of gut inflammation (p < 0.05. In contrast, gut permeability, various metabolic markers, the structure, diversity, and abundance of butyrate producing microbial community were not significantly affected. Rearrangements in the butyrate producing microbial community structure were explained by experimental setup (13.4%, experimentally structured metabolites (12.8%, and gut metabolite-immunological markers (11.9%, with 61.9% remaining unexplained. Many of the measured parameters were found to be correlated and were hence omitted from further analyses. The observed progressive increase in two immunological intestinal markers suggested that the transition from healthy physiological state toward

  18. The modulation of corticosteroid metabolism by hydrocortisone therapy in patients with hypopituitarism increases tissue glucocorticoid exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, Mark; Behan, Lucy Ann; Hannon, Mark J; Alonso, Aurora Aragon; Thompson, Christopher J; Murray, Robert D; Crabtree, Nicola; Hughes, Beverly A; Arlt, Wiebke; Agha, Amar; Toogood, Andrew A; Stewart, Paul M

    2015-11-01

    Patients with hypopituitarism have increased morbidity and mortality. There is ongoing debate about the optimum glucocorticoid (GC) replacement therapy. To assess the effect of GC replacement in hypopituitarism on corticosteroid metabolism and its impact on body composition. We assessed the urinary corticosteroid metabolite profile (using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) and body composition (clinical parameters and full body DXA) of 53 patients (19 female, median age 46 years) with hypopituitarism (33 ACTH-deficient/20 ACTH-replete) (study A). The corticosteroid metabolite profile of ten patients with ACTH deficiency was then assessed prospectively in a cross over study using three hydrocortisone (HC) dosing regimens (20/10 mg, 10/10 mg and 10/5 mg) (study B) each for 6 weeks. 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1) activity was assessed by urinary THF+5α-THF/THE. Endocrine Centres within University Teaching Hospitals in the UK and Ireland. Urinary corticosteroid metabolite profile and body composition assessment. In study A, when patients were divided into three groups - patients not receiving HC and patients receiving HC≤20 mg/day or HC>20 mg/day - patients in the group receiving the highest daily dose of HC had significantly higher waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) than the ACTH replete group. They also had significantly elevated THF+5α-THF/THE (P=0.0002) and total cortisol metabolites (P=0.015). In study B, patients on the highest HC dose had significantly elevated total cortisol metabolites and all patients on HC had elevated THF+5α-THF/THE ratios when compared to controls. In ACTH-deficient patients daily HC doses of >20 mg/day have increased WHR, THF+5α-THF/THE ratios and total cortisol metabolites. GC metabolism and induction of 11β-HSD1 may play a pivitol role in the development of the metabolically adverse hypopituitary phenotype. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  19. Tangeretin and its metabolite 4'-hydroxytetramethoxyflavone attenuate EGF-stimulated cell cycle progression in hepatocytes; role of inhibition at the level of mTOR/p70S6K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z; Surichan, S; Ruparelia, K; Arroo, R; Boarder, M R

    2011-04-01

    The mechanisms by which the dietary compound tangeretin has anticancer effects may include acting as a prodrug, forming an antiproliferative product in cancer cells. Here we show that tangeretin also inhibits cell cycle progression in hepatocytes and investigate the role of its primary metabolite 4'-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetramethoxyflavone (4'-OH-TMF) in this effect. We used epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated rat hepatocytes, with [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA as an index of progression to S-phase of the cell cycle, and Western blots for phospho-proteins involved in the cell signalling cascade. Incubation of tangeretin with microsomes expressing CYP1A, or with hepatocytes, generated a primary product we identified as 4'-OH-TMF. Low micromolar concentrations of tangeretin or 4'-OH-TMF gave a concentration-dependent inhibition of EGF-stimulated progression to S-phase while having little effect on cell viability. To determine whether time for conversion of tangeretin to an active metabolite would enhance the inhibitory effect we used long pre-incubations; this reduced the inhibitory effect, in parallel with a reduction in the concentration of tangeretin. The EGF-stimulation of hepatocyte cell cycle progression requires signalling through Akt/mTOR/p70S6K kinase cascades. The tangeretin metabolite 4'-OH-TMF selectively inhibited S6K phosphorylation in the absence of significant inhibition of upstream Akt activity, suggesting an effect at the level of mTOR. Tangeretin and 4'-OH-TMF both inhibit cell cycle progression in primary hepatocytes. The inhibition of p70S6K phosphorylation by 4'-OH-TMF raises the possibility that inhibition of the mTOR pathway may contribute to the anticancer influence of a flavonoid-rich diet. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. Tangeretin and its metabolite 4′-hydroxytetramethoxyflavone attenuate EGF-stimulated cell cycle progression in hepatocytes; role of inhibition at the level of mTOR/p70S6K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z; Surichan, S; Ruparelia, K; Arroo, R; Boarder, MR

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The mechanisms by which the dietary compound tangeretin has anticancer effects may include acting as a prodrug, forming an antiproliferative product in cancer cells. Here we show that tangeretin also inhibits cell cycle progression in hepatocytes and investigate the role of its primary metabolite 4′-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetramethoxyflavone (4′-OH-TMF) in this effect. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated rat hepatocytes, with [3H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA as an index of progression to S-phase of the cell cycle, and Western blots for phospho-proteins involved in the cell signalling cascade. KEY RESULTS Incubation of tangeretin with microsomes expressing CYP1A, or with hepatocytes, generated a primary product we identified as 4′-OH-TMF. Low micromolar concentrations of tangeretin or 4′-OH-TMF gave a concentration-dependent inhibition of EGF-stimulated progression to S-phase while having little effect on cell viability. To determine whether time for conversion of tangeretin to an active metabolite would enhance the inhibitory effect we used long pre-incubations; this reduced the inhibitory effect, in parallel with a reduction in the concentration of tangeretin. The EGF-stimulation of hepatocyte cell cycle progression requires signalling through Akt/mTOR/p70S6K kinase cascades. The tangeretin metabolite 4′-OH-TMF selectively inhibited S6K phosphorylation in the absence of significant inhibition of upstream Akt activity, suggesting an effect at the level of mTOR. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Tangeretin and 4′-OH-TMF both inhibit cell cycle progression in primary hepatocytes. The inhibition of p70S6K phosphorylation by 4′-OH-TMF raises the possibility that inhibition of the mTOR pathway may contribute to the anticancer influence of a flavonoid-rich diet. PMID:21198542

  1. High-fat diet and glucocorticoid treatment cause hyperglycemia associated with adiponectin receptor alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oller do Nascimento Cláudia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adiponectin is the most abundant plasma protein synthesized for the most part in adipose tissue, and it is an insulin-sensitive hormone, playing a central role in glucose and lipid metabolism. In addition, it increases fatty acid oxidation in the muscle and potentiates insulin inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Two adiponectin receptors have been identified: AdipoR1 is the major receptor expressed in skeletal muscle, whereas AdipoR2 is mainly expressed in liver. Consumption of high levels of dietary fat is thought to be a major factor in the promotion of obesity and insulin resistance. Excessive levels of cortisol are characterized by the symptoms of abdominal obesity, hypertension, glucose intolerance or diabetes and dyslipidemia; of note, all of these features are shared by the condition of insulin resistance. Although it has been shown that glucocorticoids inhibit adiponectin expression in vitro and in vivo, little is known about the regulation of adiponectin receptors. The link between glucocorticoids and insulin resistance may involve the adiponectin receptors and adrenalectomy might play a role not only in regulate expression and secretion of adiponectin, as well regulate the respective receptors in several tissues. Results Feeding of a high-fat diet increased serum glucose levels and decreased adiponectin and adipoR2 mRNA expression in subcutaneous and retroperitoneal adipose tissues, respectively. Moreover, it increased both adipoR1 and adipoR2 mRNA levels in muscle and adipoR2 protein levels in liver. Adrenalectomy combined with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone treatment resulted in increased glucose and insulin levels, decreased serum adiponectin levels, reduced adiponectin mRNA in epididymal adipose tissue, reduction of adipoR2 mRNA by 7-fold in muscle and reduced adipoR1 and adipoR2 protein levels in muscle. Adrenalectomy alone increased adiponectin mRNA expression 3-fold in subcutaneous adipose

  2. Glucocorticoids and Type 2 Diabetes: From Physiology to Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Di Dalmazi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the result of interaction between genetic and environmental factors, leading to heterogeneous and progressive pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Overweight and obesity are major contributors to the development of insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. The inability of β cells to secrete enough insulin produces type 2 diabetes. Abnormalities in other hormones such as reduced secretion of the incretin glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1, hyperglucagonemia, and raised concentrations of other counterregulatory hormones also contribute to insulin resistance, reduced insulin secretion, and hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes. Clinical-overt and experimental cortisol excess is associated with profound metabolic disturbances of intermediate metabolism resulting in abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, and low HDL-cholesterol levels, which can lead to diabetes. It was therefore suggested that subtle abnormalities in cortisol secretion and action are one of the missing links between insulin resistance and other features of the metabolic syndrome. The aim of this paper is to address the role of glucocorticoids on glucose homeostasis and to explain the relationship between hypercortisolism and type 2 diabetes.

  3. Reduced glucocorticoid receptor expression predicts bladder tumor recurrence and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Kawahara, Takashi; Zheng, Yichun; Netto, George J; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    To assess the levels of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression in bladder tumors because the status and its prognostic value remain largely unknown. We immunohistochemically stained for GR in bladder tumor and matched non-neoplastic bladder tissue specimens. Overall, GR was positive in 129 (87%) of 149 urothelial tumors, which was significantly (P=.026) lower than in non-neoplastic urothelium (90 [96%] of 94). Forty-two (79%) of 53 low-grade tumors vs 45 (47%) of 96 high-grade carcinomas (Pcancer-specific survival of MI tumors (P=.067). Multivariate analysis identified low GR expression as a strong predictor for recurrence of NMI tumors (P=.034). GR expression was downregulated in bladder tumors compared with nonneoplastic bladder tumors and in high-grade/MI tumors compared with low-grade/NMI tumors. Decreased expression of GR, as an independent prognosticator, predicted recurrence of NMI tumors. These results support experimental evidence suggesting an inhibitory role of GR signals in bladder cancer outgrowth. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  4. Measuring levels of biogenic amines and their metabolites in rat brain tissue using high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Min-Jung; Jeon, Ji-Hyun; Oh, Myung Sook; Hong, Seon-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    We developed a method to detect biogenic amines and their metabolites in rat brain tissue using simultaneous high-performance liquid chromatography and a photodiode array detection. Measurements were made using a Hypersil Gold C-18 column (250 × 2.1 mm, 5 µm). The mobile phase was 5 mM perchloric acid containing 5 % acetonitrile. The correlation coefficient was 0.9995-0.9999. LODs (S/N = 3) and LOQs (S/N = 10) were as follows: dopamine 0.4 and 1.3 pg, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid 8.4 and 28.0 pg, serotonin 0.4 and 1.3 pg, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid 3.4 and 11.3 pg, and homovanillic acid 8.4 and 28.0 pg. This method does not require derivatization steps, and is more sensitive than the widely used HPLC-UV method.

  5. The Sea Empress oil spill: cytochrome P450 levels, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity and bile metabolites in migrating sea trout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, D.J.; Rotchell, J.M.; Newton, L.C.

    1997-06-01

    Following concern that migrating sea trout in the Afon Tywi and Eastern Cleddau in Wales may have been exposed to oil from the Sea Empress, either directly or via their food, biomarkers of oil pollution were investigated in 14 fish from these rivers and compared with 8 fish from that of a control on the River Dee in North Wales. Sea trout 'whitling' were collected by electrofishing from the tidal limits of each river in later August/early September, 1996. The mean total cytochrome P450 content in the livers were not significantly different between fish from the Tywi (341 pmol mg -1 protein), Cleddau (212 pmol mg -1 protein) or from those caught in the Dee (121 pmol mg -1 protein). The report concludes that some individual sea trout from the rivers Tywi and Cleddau may have been exposed to oil from the Sea Empress while feeding in estuarine waters. However, by the time they were captured in these rivers, compared to control fish caught in the Dee, differences between the mean P450 content, mean EROD activity and the bile metabolite profiles were not apparent. There was no evidence that the Sea Empress oil spill had serious detrimental effects on populations of migrating sea trout in Welsh rivers. (author)

  6. The role of glucocorticoids in emotional memory reconsolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir Drexler, Shira; Wolf, Oliver T

    2017-07-01

    Glucocorticoids are secreted following exposure to stressful events. Their modulating role on memory reconsolidation, a post-retrieval process of re-stabilization, has been investigated only recently, at times with conflicting results. The goal of this review is twofold. First, to establish the modulating role of glucocorticoids on memory reconsolidation. Second, to point the potential factors and confounds that might explain the seemingly paradoxical findings. Here we review recent pharmacological studies, conducted in rodents and humans, which suggest a critical role of glucocorticoids in this post-retrieval process. In particular, the activation of glucocorticoid receptors in the amygdala and hippocampus is suggested to be involved in emotional memories reconsolidation, pointing to a similarity between post-retrieval reconsolidation and initial memory consolidation. In addition, based on the general reconsolidation literature, we suggest several factors that might play a role in determining the direction and strength of the reconsolidation effect following glucocorticoids treatment: memory-related factors, manipulation-related factors, and individual differences. We conclude that only when taking these additional factors into account can the paradox be resolved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of chlorpyrifos toxicity through a 28-day study: Cholinesterase activity, oxidative stress responses, parent compound/metabolite levels, and primary DNA damage in blood and brain tissue of adult male Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopjar, Nevenka; Žunec, Suzana; Mendaš, Gordana; Micek, Vedran; Kašuba, Vilena; Mikolić, Anja; Lovaković, Blanka Tariba; Milić, Mirta; Pavičić, Ivan; Čermak, Ana Marija Marjanović; Pizent, Alica; Lucić Vrdoljak, Ana; Želježić, Davor

    2018-01-05

    In this 28 day-study, we evaluated the effects of the insecticide chlorpyrifos orally administered to Wistar rats at doses 0.160, 0.015, and 0.010 mg/kg b. w./day. Following treatment, total cholinesterase activity and activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) were measured. Oxidative stress responses were evaluated using a battery of endpoints to establish lipid peroxidation, changes in total antioxidant capacity, level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH) level and activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. Using HPLC-UV DAD analysis, levels of the parent compound and its main metabolite 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol in plasma and brain tissue were measured. The genotoxic effect was estimated using alkaline comet assay in leukocytes and brain tissue. The exposure did not result in significant effects on total cholinesterase, AChE and BChE activity in plasma and brain tissue. Lipid peroxidation slightly increased both in plasma and brain tissue. Total antioxidant capacity, ROS and GSH levels were marginally influenced by the exposure. Treatment led to significant increases of GSH-Px activity in blood, SOD activity in erythrocytes and a slight increase of catalase activity in plasma. HPLC-UV DAD analysis revealed the presence of both the parent compound and its main metabolite in the plasma of all of the experimental animals and brain tissue of the animals treated at the two higher doses. All of the tested doses of chlorpyrifos were slightly genotoxic, both to leukocytes and brain tissue. Our results call for further research using other sensitive biomarkers of effect, along with different exposure scenarios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of proportions of dietary macronutrients on glucocorticoid metabolism in diet-induced obesity in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland H Stimson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue glucocorticoid levels in the liver and adipose tissue are regulated by regeneration of inactive glucocorticoid by 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1 and inactivation by 5alpha- and 5beta-reductases. A low carbohydrate diet increases hepatic 11beta-HSD1 and reduces glucocorticoid metabolism during weight loss in obese humans. We hypothesized that similar variations in macronutrient proportions regulate glucocorticoid metabolism in obese rats. Male Lister Hooded rats were fed an obesity-inducing ad libitum 'Western' diet (37% fat, n = 36 for 22 weeks, then randomised to continue this diet (n = 12 or to switch to either a low carbohydrate (n = 12 or a moderate carbohydrate (n = 12 diet for the final 8 weeks. A parallel lean control group were fed an ad libitum control diet (10% fat, n = 12 throughout. The low and moderate carbohydrate diets decreased hepatic 11beta-HSD1 mRNA compared with the Western diet (both 0.7+/-0.0 vs 0.9+/-0.1 AU; p<0.01, but did not alter 11beta-HSD1 in adipose tissue. 5Alpha-reductase mRNA was increased on the low carbohydrate compared with the moderate carbohydrate diet. Compared with lean controls, the Western diet decreased 11beta-HSD1 activity (1.6+/-0.1 vs 2.8+/-0.1 nmol/mcg protein/hr; p<0.001 and increased 5alpha-reductase and 5beta-reductase mRNAs (1.9+/-0.3 vs 1.0+/-0.2 and 1.6+/-0.1 vs 1.0+/-0.1 AU respectively; p<0.01 in the liver, and reduced 11beta-HSD1 mRNA and activity (both p<0.01 in adipose tissue. Although an obesity-inducing high fat diet in rats recapitulates the abnormal glucocorticoid metabolism associated with human obesity in liver (but not in adipose tissue, a low carbohydrate diet does not increase hepatic 11beta-HSD1 in obese rats as occurs in humans.

  9. Simultaneous determination of various aromatic amines and metabolites of aromatic nitro compounds in urine for low level exposure using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Tobias; Angerer, Jürgen

    2002-10-05

    A newly developed method permits the simultaneous quantitative determination of various aromatic amines (or metabolites of aromatic nitro compounds, respectively) in human urine in one analytical run. Applying this method it is possible to determine aniline, toluidines, 4-isopropylaniline, o-anisidine, 3- and 4-chloroaniline, 4-bromoaniline, aminonitrotoluenes, aminodinitrotoluenes, 3,5- and 3,4-dichloroaniline, alpha- and beta-naphtylamine and 4-aminodiphenyl. After separation from the urinary matrix by a simple liquid-liquid extraction at pH 6.2-6.4 the analytes are converted into their pentafluoropropionic acid amides. Separation and quantitative analysis is carried out by capillary gas chromatography and mass-selective detection in the single ion monitoring mode. The limits of detection were within the range from 0.05 microg/l (4-aminobiphenyl, o-anisidine, 3,5-dichloroaniline) to 2 microg/l urine (4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene). The relative standard deviation of the within-series imprecision (determined at spiked concentrations of 2.0 microg/l and 10 microg/l) was between 2.9 and 13.6% depending on analyte and concentration. The relative recovery rates were in the range of 70-121%. The analytes that do not contain a nitro function showed better performance regarding the analytical reliability criteria. In order to determine the suitability of this new method for biological monitoring we analysed 20 12-h urine samples of persons without known exposure to aromatic amines, nitroaromatics or precursors in a pilot study. In these samples various aromatic amines could be clearly identified. The general population renally excretes aniline (median: 3.5 microg/l; 95th percentile: 7.9 microg/l), o- (0.12 microg/l; 2.7 microg/l), m- (0.17 microg/l; 2.2 microg/l) and p-toluidine (0.11 microg/l; 0.43 microg/l), and o-anisidine (0.22 microg/l; 0.68 microg/l). Additionally, we found that the persons investigated also excrete 3- (<0.05 microg/l; 0.55 microg/l) and 4

  10. Sustained Interleukin-1β Exposure Modulates Multiple Steps in Glucocorticoid Receptor Signaling, Promoting Split-Resistance to the Transactivation of Prominent Anti-Inflammatory Genes by Glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Escoll

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical treatment with glucocorticoids (GC can be complicated by cytokine-induced glucocorticoid low-responsiveness (GC-resistance, GCR, a condition associated with a homogeneous reduction in the expression of GC-receptor- (GR- driven anti-inflammatory genes. However, GR level and phosphorylation changes modify the expression of individual GR-responsive genes differently. As sustained IL-1β exposure is key in the pathogenesis of several major diseases with prevalent GCR, we examined GR signaling and the mRNA expression of six GR-driven genes in cells cultured in IL-1β and afterwards challenged with GC. After a GC challenge, sustained IL-1β exposure reduced the cytoplasmic GR level, GRSer203 and GRSer211 phosphorylation, and GR nuclear translocation and led to selective GCR in the expression of the studied genes. Compared to GC alone, in a broad range of GC doses plus sustained IL-1β, FKBP51 mRNA expression was reduced by 1/3, TTP by 2/3, and IRF8 was completely knocked down. In contrast, high GC doses did not change the expression of GILZ and DUSP1, while IGFBP1 was increased by 5-fold. These effects were cytokine-selective, IL-1β dose- and IL-1R1-dependent. The integrated gain and loss of gene functions in the “split GCR” model may provide target cells with a survival advantage by conferring resistance to apoptosis, chemotherapy, and GC.

  11. Salivary cortisol day curves in assessing glucocorticoid replacement therapy in Addison's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smans, L.; Lentjes, E.G.W.M.; Hermus, A.R.; Zelissen, P.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with Addison's disease require lifelong treatment with glucocorticoids. At present, no glucocorticoid replacement therapy (GRT) can exactly mimic normal physiology. As a consequence, under- and especially overtreatment can occur. Suboptimal GRT may lead to various side effects.

  12. Adrenal Insufficiency Caused by Locally Applied Glucocorticoids-Myth or Fact?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinsen, Stina; Klose, Marianne; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh

    2015-01-01

    Case-reports have made it evident that both inhaled, percutaneous, intranasal, intraarticular and ophthalmic administered glucocorticoids have the potential to cause life threatening adrenal insufficiency. With few and sometimes conflicting data and study methodology the prevalence of adrenal...... insufficiency secondary to locally applied glucocorticoids is not clear. Adrenal insufficiency can only be correctly evaluated by a stimulation test, and has by this procedure been reported in up to 40-50% of patients treated with high-dose inhaled glucocorticoids. Medium- to low-dose inhaled glucocorticoids...... have been shown to cause adrenal suppression in 0-16% of patients. Glucocorticoid creams and nasal glucocorticoids can cause adrenal insufficiency, also when used within prescribed doses, but the frequency seems to be less than with inhaled glucocorticoids. Intraarticularly administered glucocorticoids...

  13. Treatment of frozen shoulder with subcutaneous TNF-alpha blockade compared with local glucocorticoid injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schydlowsky, Pierre; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Madsen, Ole Rintek

    2012-01-01

    We compared the effect of subcutaneous adalimumab injections with intraarticular glucocorticoid injections on frozen shoulder of 18 patients with unilateral joint involvement. Ten patients were randomised to subcutaneous injections with adalimumab and eight to intraarticular glucocorticoid inject...

  14. Psychosocial animal model of PTSD produces a long-lasting traumatic memory, an increase in general anxiety and PTSD-like glucocorticoid abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Phillip R; Fleshner, Monika; Diamond, David M

    2012-09-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized by a pathologically intense memory for a traumatic experience, persistent anxiety and physiological abnormalities, such as low baseline glucocorticoid levels and increased sensitivity to dexamethasone. We have addressed the hypothesis that rats subjected to chronic psychosocial stress would exhibit PTSD-like sequelae, including traumatic memory expression, increased anxiety and abnormal glucocorticoid responses. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a cat on two occasions separated by 10 days, in conjunction with chronic social instability. Three weeks after the second cat exposure, the rats were tested for glucocorticoid abnormalities, general anxiety and their fear-conditioned memory of the two cat exposures. Stressed rats exhibited reduced basal glucocorticoid levels, increased glucocorticoid suppression following dexamethasone administration, heightened anxiety and a robust fear memory in response to cues that were paired with the two cat exposures. The commonalities in endocrine and behavioral measures between psychosocially stressed rats and traumatized people with PTSD provide the opportunity to explore mechanisms underlying psychological trauma-induced changes in neuroendocrine systems and cognition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Osteoporosis secundaria y Osteoporosis inducida por glucocorticoides (OIG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Forero Illera

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available La osteoporosis es un problema de salud pública importante a nivel mundial, y su prevalencia está aumentando. La osteoporosis secundaria se puede producir por varias patologías y el uso de ciertos medicamentos. Los glucocorticoides son un grupo de fármacos usados extensamente en la práctica médica debido a su indiscutible utilidad. La osteoporosis inducida por glucocorticoides es un problema de salud pública. Aunque la patogénesis de la pérdida producida por los glucocorticoides en el hueso no se conoce totalmente, investigaciones recientes han proporcionado nuevas conocimientos en los mecanismos de estos fármacos a nivel celular y molecular. Diversas guías han sido propuestas por diversos grupos para el tratamiento de la OIG; desafortunadamente, las guías del tratamiento no se utilizan adecuadamente en los pacientes.

  16. Glucocorticoid receptors in monocytes in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, P; Binder, C

    1989-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor binding characteristics were investigated in 8 males with poorly controlled Type 1 diabetes mellitus and 14 healthy males. The cell type studied was monocytes, and a method for correction for heterogeneity in glucocorticoid binding in a mononuclear leucocyte population...... or with HbA1c. In conclusion, no major abnormalities in glucocorticoid receptor binding characteristics could be demonstrated in Type 1 diabetes mellitus....... was introduced. The number of receptors and the dissociation constant KD were, respectively, 13,699 and 2.93 X 10(-8) mol/l for the control group and 15,788 and 2.75 X 10(-8) mol/l for diabetics (p greater than 0.05). In diabetics, KD correlated negatively with blood glucose (r = 0.762, p less than 0...

  17. Prevalent glucocorticoid and androgen activity in US water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavreva, Diana A; George, Anuja A; Klausmeyer, Paul; Varticovski, Lyuba; Sack, Daniel; Voss, Ty C; Schiltz, R Louis; Blazer, Vicki S; Iwanowicz, Luke R; Hager, Gordon L

    2012-01-01

    Contamination of the environment with endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is a major health concern. The presence of estrogenic compounds in water and their deleterious effect are well documented. However, detection and monitoring of other classes of EDCs is limited. Here we utilize a high-throughput live cell assay based on sub-cellular relocalization of GFP-tagged glucocorticoid and androgen receptors (GFP-GR and GFP-AR), in combination with gene transcription analysis, to screen for glucocorticoid and androgen activity in water samples. We report previously unrecognized glucocorticoid activity in 27%, and androgen activity in 35% of tested water sources from 14 states in the US. Steroids of both classes impact body development, metabolism, and interfere with reproductive, endocrine, and immune systems. This prevalent contamination could negatively affect wildlife and human populations.

  18. Glucocorticoid Antagonism Reduces Insulin Resistance and Associated Lipid Abnormalities in High-Fructose-Fed Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshini, Emayavaramban; Anuradha, Carani Venkatraman

    2017-02-01

    High intake of dietary fructose causes perturbation in lipid metabolism and provokes lipid-induced insulin resistance. A rise in glucocorticoids (GCs) has recently been suggested to be involved in fructose-induced insulin resistance. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of GC blockade on lipid abnormalities in insulin-resistant mice. Insulin resistance was induced in mice by administering a high-fructose diet (HFrD) for 60 days. Mifepristone (RU486), a GC antagonist, was administered to HFrD-fed mice for the last 18 days, and the intracellular and extracellular GC levels, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation and the expression of GC-regulated genes involved in lipid metabolism were examined. HFrD elevated the intracellular GC content in both liver and adipose tissue and enhanced the GR nuclear translocation. The plasma GC level remained unchanged. The levels of free fatty acids and triglycerides in plasma were elevated, accompanied by increased plasma insulin and glucose levels and decreased hepatic glycogen content. Treatment with RU486 reduced plasma lipid levels, tissue GC levels and the expression of GC-targeted genes involved in lipid accumulation, and it improved insulin sensitivity. This study demonstrated that HFrD-induced lipid accumulation and insulin resistance are mediated by enhanced GC in liver and adipose tissue and that GC antagonism might reduce fructose-induced lipid abnormalities and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Low-dose glucocorticoids in hyperandrogenism Efecto de bajas dosis de glucocorticoides en el hiperandrogenismo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Rizzo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of low-doses of glucocorticoids on androgen and cortisol secretion during the course of the day, we evaluated clinical signs of hyperandrogenism and total, free and bioavailable testosterone, SHBG, and cortisol following two different protocols: A fourteen patients received betamethasone 0.6 mg/day (n=8 or methylprednisolone 4 mg/day (n=6, as single daily oral dose at 11.00 PM, during 30 days, B fourteen patients were evaluated under betamethasone 0.3 mg in a single daily dose at 11.00 PM during six months, 11 out of whom were re-evaluated six months later. Twenty eight women with hyperandrogenism were included and seven normal females were used as control. Blood samples were taken in follicular phase at 8 AM and 7 PM to determine SHBG, cortisol, total, free and bioavailable testosterone. In both protocols, a significant morning and evening decrease in cortisol and testosterone (pCon el objetivo de investigar el efecto de bajas dosis de glucocorticoides sobre la secreción de andrógenos y cortisol en el curso del día, evaluamos signos de hiperandrogenismo, testosterona total, libre y biodisponible y cortisol según dos protocolos diferentes: A catorce pacientes recibieron betametasona 0.6 mg/día (n= 8 o metilprednisolona 4 mg/día (n= 6 en dosis única cotidiana, a las 23 h, durante 30 días, B catorce pacientes fueron evaluadas bajo betametasona 0.3 mg en dosis única cotidiana a la 23 h, administrada durante 6 meses; de ellas, 11 pacientes fueron re-evaluadas 6 meses más tarde. Se incluyeron 28 mujeres con hiperandrogenismo y 7 controles normales. Se obtuvieron muestras de sangre en fase folicular a las 08:00 y 9:00 h para determinar SHBG, cortisol, testosterona total, libre y biodisponible. En ambos protocolos se observó una disminución significativa de cortisol y testosterona (p<0.05 a <0.01, más importante con betametasona (p<0.05. En el protocolo B, los niveles matutinos de SHBG aumentaron

  20. Glucocorticoid-induced myopathy in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eddelien, Heidi Shil; Hoffmeyer, Henrik Westy; Lund, Eva Charlotte Løbner

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are used for intensive care unit (ICU) patients on several indications. We present a patient who was admitted to the ICU due to severe respiratory failure caused by bronchospasm requiring mechanical ventilation and treated with methylprednisolone 240 mg/day in addition...... to antibiotics and bronchiolytics. When the sedation was lifted on day 10, the patient was awake but quadriplegic. Blood samples revealed elevated muscle enzymes, electromyography showed myopathy, and a muscle biopsy was performed. Glucocorticoid-induced myopathy was suspected, GC treatment was tapered...

  1. Quintupling Inhaled Glucocorticoids to Prevent Childhood Asthma Exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Daniel J; Bacharier, Leonard B; Mauger, David T; Boehmer, Susan; Beigelman, Avraham; Chmiel, James F; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Gaffin, Jonathan M; Morgan, Wayne J; Peters, Stephen P; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Sheehan, William J; Cabana, Michael D; Holguin, Fernando; Martinez, Fernando D; Pongracic, Jacqueline A; Baxi, Sachin N; Benson, Mindy; Blake, Kathryn; Covar, Ronina; Gentile, Deborah A; Israel, Elliot; Krishnan, Jerry A; Kumar, Harsha V; Lang, Jason E; Lazarus, Stephen C; Lima, John J; Long, Dayna; Ly, Ngoc; Marbin, Jyothi; Moy, James N; Myers, Ross E; Olin, J Tod; Raissy, Hengameh H; Robison, Rachel G; Ross, Kristie; Sorkness, Christine A; Lemanske, Robert F

    2018-03-08

    Asthma exacerbations occur frequently despite the regular use of asthma-controller therapies, such as inhaled glucocorticoids. Clinicians commonly increase the doses of inhaled glucocorticoids at early signs of loss of asthma control. However, data on the safety and efficacy of this strategy in children are limited. We studied 254 children, 5 to 11 years of age, who had mild-to-moderate persistent asthma and had had at least one asthma exacerbation treated with systemic glucocorticoids in the previous year. Children were treated for 48 weeks with maintenance low-dose inhaled glucocorticoids (fluticasone propionate at a dose of 44 μg per inhalation, two inhalations twice daily) and were randomly assigned to either continue the same dose (low-dose group) or use a quintupled dose (high-dose group; fluticasone at a dose of 220 μg per inhalation, two inhalations twice daily) for 7 days at the early signs of loss of asthma control ("yellow zone"). Treatment was provided in a double-blind fashion. The primary outcome was the rate of severe asthma exacerbations treated with systemic glucocorticoids. The rate of severe asthma exacerbations treated with systemic glucocorticoids did not differ significantly between groups (0.48 exacerbations per year in the high-dose group and 0.37 exacerbations per year in the low-dose group; relative rate, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.8 to 2.1; P=0.30). The time to the first exacerbation, the rate of treatment failure, symptom scores, and albuterol use during yellow-zone episodes did not differ significantly between groups. The total glucocorticoid exposure was 16% higher in the high-dose group than in the low-dose group. The difference in linear growth between the high-dose group and the low-dose group was -0.23 cm per year (P=0.06). In children with mild-to-moderate persistent asthma treated with daily inhaled glucocorticoids, quintupling the dose at the early signs of loss of asthma control did not reduce the rate of severe asthma

  2. Benefits of glucocorticoids in non-ambulant boys/men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A multicentric longitudinal study using the Performance of Upper Limb test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Marika; Fanelli, Lavinia; Mazzone, Elena Stacy; Olivieri, Giorgia; D'Amico, Adele; Messina, Sonia; Scutifero, Marianna; Battini, Roberta; Petillo, Roberta; Frosini, Silvia; Sivo, Serena; Vita, Gian Luca; Bruno, Claudio; Mongini, Tiziana; Pegoraro, Elena; De Sanctis, Roberto; Gardani, Alice; Berardinelli, Angela; Lanzillotta, Valentina; Carlesi, Adelina; Viggiano, Emanuela; Cavallaro, Filippo; Sframeli, Maria; Bello, Luca; Barp, Andrea; Bianco, Flaviana; Bonfiglio, Serena; Rolle, Enrica; Palermo, Concetta; D'Angelo, Grazia; Pini, Antonella; Iotti, Elena; Gorni, Ksenija; Baranello, Giovanni; Bertini, Enrico; Politano, Luisa; Sormani, Maria Pia; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the possible effect of glucocorticoid treatment on upper limb function in a cohort of 91 non-ambulant DMD boys and adults of age between 11 and 26 years. All 91 were assessed using the Performance of Upper Limb test. Forty-eight were still on glucocorticoid after loss of ambulation, 25 stopped steroids at the time they lost ambulation and 18 were GC naïve or had steroids while ambulant for less than a year. At baseline the total scores ranged between 0 and 74 (mean 41.20). The mean total scores were 47.92 in the glucocorticoid group, 36 in those who stopped at loss of ambulation and 30.5 in the naïve group (p < 0.001). The 12-month changes ranged between -20 and 4 (mean -4.4). The mean changes were -3.79 in the glucocorticoid group, -5.52 in those who stopped at loss of ambulation and -4.44 in the naïve group. This was more obvious in the patients between 12 and 18 years and at shoulder and elbow levels. Our findings suggest that continuing glucocorticoids throughout teenage years and adulthood after loss of ambulation appears to have a beneficial effect on upper limb function. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid receptor signaling Mecanismos moleculares de señalización del receptor de glucocorticoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Labeur

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the most recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. Most effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by the intracellular GR which is present in almost every tissue and controls transcriptional activation via direct and indirect mechanisms. Nevertheless the glucocorticoid responses are tissue -and gene- specific. GR associates selectively with corticosteroid ligands produced in the adrenal gland in response to changes of humoral homeostasis. Ligand interaction with GR promotes either GR binding to genomic glucocorticoid response elements, in turn modulating gene transcription, or interaction of GR monomers with other transcription factors activated by other signalling pathways leading to transrepression. The GR regulates a broad spectrum of physiological functions, including cell differentiation, metabolism and inflammatory responses. Thus, disruption or dysregulation of GR function will result in severe impairments in the maintenance of homeostasis and the control of adaptation to stress.Esta revisión destaca los más recientes hallazgos sobre los mecanismos moleculares del receptor de glucocorticoides (GR. La mayoría de los efectos de los glucocorticoides son mediados por los GR intracelulares presentes en casi todos los tejidos y controlan la activación transcripcional por mecanismos directos e indirectos. Las respuestas a los glucocorticoides son específicas para cada gen y tejido. Los GR se asocian en forma selectiva con ligandos producidos en la glándula adrenal, corticosteroides, en respuesta a cambios neuroendocrinos. La interacción del ligando con el GR promueve: a la unión del GR a elementos genómicos de respuesta a glucocorticoides, modulando la transcripción; b la interacción de monómeros del GR con otros factores de transcripción activados por otras vías, llevando a la transrepresión. El GR regula un amplio espectro de funciones fisiológicas, incluyendo la

  4. Transportable hyperpolarized metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiao; Bornet, Aurélien; Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Gajan, David; Rossini, Aaron J.; Emsley, Lyndon; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear spin hyperpolarization of 13C-labelled metabolites by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization can enhance the NMR signals of metabolites by several orders of magnitude, which has enabled in vivo metabolic imaging by MRI. However, because of the short lifetime of the hyperpolarized magnetization (typically <1 min), the polarization process must be carried out close to the point of use. Here we introduce a concept that markedly extends hyperpolarization lifetimes and enables the transportation of hyperpolarized metabolites. The hyperpolarized sample can thus be removed from the polarizer and stored or transported for use at remote MRI or NMR sites. We show that hyperpolarization in alanine and glycine survives 16 h storage and transport, maintaining overall polarization enhancements of up to three orders of magnitude. PMID:28072398

  5. Association between baseline vitamin D metabolite levels and long-term cardiovascular events in patients with rheumatoid arthritis from the CIMESTRA trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herly, Mette; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    event in the follow-up period, evaluated using systematic journal audits. Logistic regression models will test the hypothesis that there are more cardiovascular events in enrolled patients with a low level of vitamin D (models, based on survival analysis......INTRODUCTION: Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is increased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and among these patients, the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D is high. Moreover, low vitamin D levels have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk in healthy subjects. OBJECTIVE......: To evaluate the long-term risk of cardiovascular events in patients having low total 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at baseline compared with patients with normal levels, in an efficiently treated, closed cohort of patients with an early diagnosis of RA. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study is a prospective, closed...

  6. Progesterone attenuates airway remodeling and glucocorticoid resistance in a murine model of exposing to ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Bao, Wuping; Fei, Xia; Zhang, Yingying; Zhang, Guoqing; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Min

    2018-04-01

    Airway remodeling is a vital component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Despite the broad anti-inflammation effects of glucocorticoids, they exhibit relatively little therapeutic benefit in COPD, indicating the accelerating demands of new agents for COPD. We aim to explore the effect of progesterone on airway remodeling in a murine modeling of exposing to ozone and to further examine the potential effect of progesterone on glucocorticoid insensitivity. C57/BL6 mice were exposed to ozone for 12 times over 6 weeks, and were administered with progesterone alone or combined with budesonide (BUD) after each exposure until the 10th week. The peribronchial collagen deposition was measured. The protein levels of MMP8 and MMP9 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lungs were assessed. Western blot analysis was used to detect the levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). The expression of VEGF and histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) in the lung were determined by Immunohistochemical analyses. We observe that progesterone attenuates the peribronchial collagen deposition, as well as the expression of MMP8, MMP9, HIF-1α, VEGF, α-SMA, and GSK-3β in BALF or lung tissues. Progesterone or BUD monotherapy has no effect on HDAC2 production. Progesterone combines with BUD induce dramatically enhanced effects. Thus, these results demonstrate novel roles of progesterone for the pathogenesis and airway remodeling in COPD. Progesterone plus BUD administration exerts more significant inhibition on airway remodeling with dose-independent. Additionally, progesterone may, to some extent, improve the glucocorticoid insensitivity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Glucocorticoid stimulates expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone gene in human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, B.G.; Emanuel, R.L.; Frim, D.M.; Majzoub, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Primary cultures of purified human cytotrophoblasts have been used to examine the expression of the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) gene in placenta. The authors report here that glucocorticoids stimulate placental CRH synthesis and secretion in primary cultures of human placenta. This stimulation is in contrast to the glucocorticoid suppression of CRH expression in hypothalamus. The positive regulation of CRH by glucocorticoids suggests that the rise in CRH preceding parturition could result from the previously described rise in fetal glucocorticoids. Furthermore, this increase in placental CRH could stimulate, via adrenocorticotropic hormone, a further rise in fetal glucocorticoids, completing a positive feedback loop that would be terminated by delivery

  8. The Glucocorticoid Receptor Controls Hepatic Dyslipidemia through Hes1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemke, U.; Krones-Herzig, A.; Berriel Diaz, M.; Narvekar, P.; Ziegler, A.; Vegiopoulos, A.; Cato, A.C.B.; Bohl, S.; Klingmüller, U.; Screaton, R.A.; Müller-Decker, K.; Kersten, A.H.; Herzig, S.

    2008-01-01

    Aberrant accumulation of lipids in the liver (¿fatty liver¿ or hepatic steatosis) represents a hallmark of the metabolic syndrome and is tightly associated with obesity, type II diabetes, starvation, or glucocorticoid (GC) therapy. While fatty liver has been connected with numerous abnormalities of

  9. CINRG: Systems Biology of Glucocorticoids in Muscle Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Contract W81XWH-09-1-0726 SYSTEMS BIOLOGY OF GLUCOCORTICOIDS IN MUSCLE DISEASE Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most... muscle and enable the development of better targeted and more effective therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy dynamically. This MDA grant...common and incurable muscular dystrophy of childhood. Muscle regeneration fails with advancing age, leading to considerable fibrosis. Corticosteroid

  10. General effect of endotoxin on glucocorticoid receptors in mammalian tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stith, R.D.; McCallum, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Considering the ubiquitous nature of glucocorticoid actions and the fact that endotoxin inhibits glucocorticoid action in the liver, we proposed to examine whether endotoxin affected extrahepatic actions of glucocorticoids. Fasted C57BL/6J mice were injected intraperitoneally with endotoxin (LD50) at 0800 and were killed 6 h later. Control mice were injected with an equal volume of saline. 3 H-dexamethasone binding, measured by a new cytosol exchange assay utilizing molybdate plus dithiothreitol, in liver, kidney, skeletal muscle, spleen, lung, and heart tissue was significantly lower in treated than in control mice. The equilibrium dissociation constants were not significantly different, but the number of available binding sites in each tissue was reduced by endotoxin treatment. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity was significantly reduced in liver but not in kidney. Endotoxin treatment lowered glycogen content in liver but not in skeletal muscle. The reduction observed in the a form of liver glycogen synthase due to endotoxin was not seen in skeletal muscle glycogen synthase a. These data support the proposal that endotoxin or a mediator of its action inhibits systemic glucocorticoid action. The results also emphasize the central role of the liver in the metabolic disturbances of the endotoxin-treated mouse

  11. Uso de glucocorticoides en enfermedades alérgicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rodríguez-González

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Los glucocorticoides son análogos sintéticos de las hormonas adrenocorticales, de uso común, de gran utilidad en la práctica clínica del pediatra y se consideran la piedra angular del tratamiento farmacológico de enfermedades alérgicas.

  12. Glucocorticoid management in rheumatoid arthritis: morning or night low dose?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Paolino

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Morning symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA are linked to circadian increase of night inflammation, supported by inadequate cortisol secretion in active disease. Therefore, exogenous glucocorticoid administration in RA is recommended by EULAR and ACR from the beginning of the diagnosis, since may partially act like a “replacement therapy”. In addition, the prevention/treatment of the night up-regulation of the immune/inflammatory reaction has been shown more effective when exogenous glucocorticoid administration is managed with a night-time-release formulation. Despite a considerably higher cost than conventional prednisone (immediate release, chronotherapy with night-time-release prednisone has been recognized a cost-effective option for RA patients not on glucocorticoids who are eligible for therapy with biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs. Interestingly, since different cell populations involved in the inflammatory process are particularly activated during the night (i.e. monocytes, macrophages, other therapeutical approaches used in RA, such as conventional DMARDs and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs should follow the same concepts of glucocorticoid chronotherapy. Therefore, bedtime methotrexate chronotherapy was found to better manage RA symptoms, and several available NSAIDs (i.e. indomethacin, aceclofenac, ketoprofen, flurbiprofen, lornoxicam have been recently modified in their formulation, in order to obtain more focused night action.

  13. The effect of early administration of glucocorticoids on learning and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has been observed that steroids administered postnatally may have transient retarding effect on learning and memory functions, and that animal age and sex may modify such effects. This study aims to illustrate the effect of early administration of glucocorticoids on learning and spatial memory. Wistar rat pups were ...

  14. Chronic Glucocorticoid Hypersecretion in Cushing's Syndrome Exacerbates Cognitive Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Kathy; Forget, Helene; Cohen, Henri

    2009-01-01

    Cumulative exposure to glucocorticoid hormones (GC) over the lifespan has been associated with cognitive impairment and may contribute to physical and cognitive degeneration in aging. The objective of the present study was to examine whether the pattern of cognitive deficits in patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS), a disorder characterized by…

  15. Glucocorticoid receptor effects on the immune system and infl ammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.L.T. van den Akker (Erica)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThomas Addison’s discovery in the mid-1800s that the adrenal cortex was essential for survival preceded by nearly a century the demonstration that this gland produced at least two distinct hormones, each essential for normal life. How glucocorticoids sustained life remained a mystery for

  16. Postreactivation glucocorticoids impair recall of established fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wen-Hui; Blundell, Jacqueline; Han, Jie; Greene, Robert W; Powell, Craig M

    2006-09-13

    Pavlovian fear conditioning provides one of the best rodent models of acquired anxiety disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder. Injection of a variety of drugs after training in fear-conditioning paradigms can impair consolidation of fear memories. Indeed, early clinical trials suggest that immediate administration of such drugs after a traumatic event may decrease the risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder in humans (Pitman et al., 2002; Vaiva et al., 2003). The use of such a treatment is limited by the difficulty of treating every patient at risk and by the difficulty in predicting which patients will experience chronic adverse consequences. Recent clinical trials suggest that administration of glucocorticoids may have a beneficial effect on established posttraumatic stress disorder (Aerni et al., 2004) and specific phobia (Soravia et al., 2006). Conversely, glucocorticoid administration after training is known to enhance memory consolidation (McGaugh and Roozendaal, 2002; Roozendaal, 2002). From a clinical perspective, enhancement of a fear memory or a reactivated fear memory would not be desirable. We report here that when glucocorticoids are administered immediately after reactivation of a contextual fear memory, subsequent recall is significantly diminished. Additional experiments support the interpretation that glucocorticoids not only decrease fear memory retrieval but, in addition, augment consolidation of fear memory extinction rather than decreasing reconsolidation. These findings provide a rodent model for a potential treatment of established acquired anxiety disorders in humans, as suggested by others (Aerni et al., 2004; Schelling et al., 2004), based on a mechanism of enhanced extinction.

  17. Association between baseline vitamin D metabolite levels and long-term cardiovascular events in patients with rheumatoid arthritis from the CIMESTRA trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herly, Mette; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    written consent at baseline. To disseminate comprehension of factors of prognostic importance to cardiovascular outcome in RA, we will attempt to have a first draft ready no later than 1 year after the adjudication process has finished. If low vitamin D levels can predict cardiovascular events in RA......INTRODUCTION: Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is increased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and among these patients, the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D is high. Moreover, low vitamin D levels have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk in healthy subjects. OBJECTIVE...... event in the follow-up period, evaluated using systematic journal audits. Logistic regression models will test the hypothesis that there are more cardiovascular events in enrolled patients with a low level of vitamin D (

  18. Hydrogen sulfide regulates the levels of key metabolites and antioxidant defense system to counteract oxidative stress in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) plants exposed to high zinc regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Cengiz; Ashraf, Muhammad; Akram, Nudrat Aisha

    2018-02-21

    In the present experiment, we aimed to test the impact of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) on growth, key oxidant such as hydrogen peroxide, mineral elements, and antioxidative defense in Capia-type red sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) plants subjected to high concentration of zinc (Zn). A factorial experiment was designed with two Zn levels (0.05 and 0.5 mM) and 0.2 mM sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) as a donor of H 2 S supplied in combination plus nutrient solution through the root zone. High level of Zn led to reduce dry mass, chlorophyll pigments, fruit yield, leaf maximum fluorescence, and relative water content, but enhanced endogenous hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), free proline, malondialdehyde (MDA), electrolyte leakage (EL), H 2 S, as well as the activities of peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes. Exogenously applied NaHS significantly enhanced plant growth, fruit yield, water status, the levels of H 2 S and proline as well as the activities of different antioxidant enzymes, while it significantly suppressed EL, MDA, and H 2 O 2 contents in the pepper plants receiving low level Zn. NaHS application to the control plants did not significantly change all these parameters tested except the dry matter which increased significantly. High Zn regime led to increase intrinsic Zn levels in the leaves and roots, but it lowered leaf nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and iron (Fe) concentrations. However, NaHS reduces the Zn conc. and enhances Fe and N in leaf and root organs. It can be concluded that NaHS can mitigate the harmful effects of Zn on plant growth particularly by lowering the concentrations of H 2 O 2 , Zn, EL, and MDA, and enhancing the activities of enzymatic antioxidants and levels of essential nutrients in pepper plants.

  19. Anti-Apoptotic Protein Bcl-xL Expression in the Midbrain Raphe Region Is Sensitive to Stress and Glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkina, Galina T; Kalinina, Tatyana S; Bulygina, Veta V; Lanshakov, Dmitry A; Babluk, Ekaterina V; Dygalo, Nikolay N

    2015-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic proteins are suggested to be important for the normal health of neurons and synapses as well as for resilience to stress. In order to determine whether stressful events may influence the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL in the midbrain and specifically in the midbrain serotonergic (5-HT) neurons involved in neurobehavioral responses to adverse stimuli, adult male rats were subjected to short-term or chronic forced swim stress. A short-term stress rapidly increased the midbrain bcl-xl mRNA levels and significantly elevated Bcl-xL immunoreactivity in the midbrain 5-HT cells. Stress-induced increase in glucocorticoid secretion was implicated in the observed effect. The levels of bcl-xl mRNA were decreased after stress when glucocorticoid elevation was inhibited by metyrapone (MET, 150 mg/kg), and this decrease was attenuated by glucocorticoid replacement with dexamethasone (DEX; 0.2 mg/kg). Both short-term stress and acute DEX administration, in parallel with Bcl-xL, caused a significant increase in tph2 mRNA levels and slightly enhanced tryptophan hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the midbrain. The increasing effect on the bcl-xl expression was specific to the short-term stress. Forced swim repeated daily for 2 weeks led to a decrease in bcl-xl mRNA in the midbrain without any effects on the Bcl-xL protein expression in the 5-HT neurons. In chronically stressed animals, an increase in tph2 gene expression was not associated with any changes in tryptophan hydroxylase protein levels. Our findings are the first to demonstrate that both short-term stress and acute glucocorticoid exposures induce Bcl-xL protein expression in the midbrain 5-HT neurons concomitantly with the activation of the 5-HT synthesis pathway in these neurons.

  20. Anti-Apoptotic Protein Bcl-xL Expression in the Midbrain Raphe Region Is Sensitive to Stress and Glucocorticoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina T Shishkina

    Full Text Available Anti-apoptotic proteins are suggested to be important for the normal health of neurons and synapses as well as for resilience to stress. In order to determine whether stressful events may influence the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL in the midbrain and specifically in the midbrain serotonergic (5-HT neurons involved in neurobehavioral responses to adverse stimuli, adult male rats were subjected to short-term or chronic forced swim stress. A short-term stress rapidly increased the midbrain bcl-xl mRNA levels and significantly elevated Bcl-xL immunoreactivity in the midbrain 5-HT cells. Stress-induced increase in glucocorticoid secretion was implicated in the observed effect. The levels of bcl-xl mRNA were decreased after stress when glucocorticoid elevation was inhibited by metyrapone (MET, 150 mg/kg, and this decrease was attenuated by glucocorticoid replacement with dexamethasone (DEX; 0.2 mg/kg. Both short-term stress and acute DEX administration, in parallel with Bcl-xL, caused a significant increase in tph2 mRNA levels and slightly enhanced tryptophan hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the midbrain. The increasing effect on the bcl-xl expression was specific to the short-term stress. Forced swim repeated daily for 2 weeks led to a decrease in bcl-xl mRNA in the midbrain without any effects on the Bcl-xL protein expression in the 5-HT neurons. In chronically stressed animals, an increase in tph2 gene expression was not associated with any changes in tryptophan hydroxylase protein levels. Our findings are the first to demonstrate that both short-term stress and acute glucocorticoid exposures induce Bcl-xL protein expression in the midbrain 5-HT neurons concomitantly with the activation of the 5-HT synthesis pathway in these neurons.

  1. Applying 1H NMR Spectroscopy to Detect Changes in the Urinary Metabolite Levels of Chinese Half-Pipe Snowboarders after Different Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqiu Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring physical training is important for the health and performance of athletes, and real-time assessment of fatigue is crucial to improve training efficiency. The relationship between key biomarkers and exercise has been reported. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of different levels of training exercises on the urine metabolome. 1H NMR-based metabolomics analysis was performed on urine samples from half-pipe snowboarders, and spectral profiles were subjected to PCA and PLS-DA. Our results show that metabolic profiles varied during different stages of exercises. Lactate, alanine, trimethylamine, malonate, taurine, and glycine levels decreased while TMAO and phenylalanine levels increased in the stage with higher amount and intensity of exercise. Although the amount of exercise was reduced in subsequent stage, no significant variations of metabolic profile were found. Metabolic changes induced by training level were analyzed with related metabolic pathway. Studying metabolome changes can provide a better understanding of the physiology of athletes and could aid in adjusting training.

  2. Effect of different NADH oxidase levels on glucose metabolism by Lactococus lactis : kinetics of intracellular metabolite pools determined by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neves, A.R.; Ramos, A.; Costa, H.; Swam, van I.I.; Hugenholtz, J.; Kleerebezem, M.; Vos, de W.M.; Santos, H.

    2002-01-01

    Three isogenic strains of Lactococcus lactis with different levels of H2O-forming NADH oxidase activity were used to study the effect of oxygen on glucose metabolism: the parent strain L. lactis MG1363, a NOX- strain harboring a deletion of the gene coding for H2O-forming NADH oxidase, and a NOX

  3. The significance of the glucocorticoid receptor measurement in the treatment of acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haodan

    1992-01-01

    We studied the method of measuring the glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) using whole peripheral leukocytes, and measured the GCR level of 20 healthy and 50 cases of acute leukemia. The Kd values were 5.51 ± 2.01 nmol/L and 5.38 ± 1.21 nmol/L. The normal R 0 value (x-bar ± s) was 6878 ±1563 sites/cell, and had no co-relationship with the serum level of total cortisol. The relationship between the GCR level and the effect of chemotherapy and short-term prognosis was also studied. The low affinitive binding sites of glucocorticoid hormone were for the first time observed in 9 normal persons and 5 cases of acute leukemia in the normal subjects, the Kd values were 0.8224±0.241 μmol/L and the R 0 values were 3614.43±1233.33 f mole/10 7 cells. In the leukemic patients, the Kd values were 1.067±0.456 μmol/L and the R 0 values were 3488.94 ± 2272.56 f mole/10 7 cells. The Scatchard curves were obviously of the concave

  4. microRNA-379 couples glucocorticoid hormones to dysfunctional lipid homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guia, Roldan M; Rose, Adam J; Sommerfeld, Anke; Seibert, Oksana; Strzoda, Daniela; Zota, Annika; Feuchter, Yvonne; Krones-Herzig, Anja; Sijmonsma, Tjeerd; Kirilov, Milen; Sticht, Carsten; Gretz, Norbert; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje; Diederichs, Sven; Klöting, Nora; Blüher, Matthias; Berriel Diaz, Mauricio; Herzig, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, glucocorticoids (GCs) and their intracellular receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), represent critical checkpoints in the endocrine control of energy homeostasis. Indeed, aberrant GC action is linked to severe metabolic stress conditions as seen in Cushing's syndrome, GC therapy and certain components of the Metabolic Syndrome, including obesity and insulin resistance. Here, we identify the hepatic induction of the mammalian conserved microRNA (miR)-379/410 genomic cluster as a key component of GC/GR-driven metabolic dysfunction. Particularly, miR-379 was up-regulated in mouse models of hyperglucocorticoidemia and obesity as well as human liver in a GC/GR-dependent manner. Hepatocyte-specific silencing of miR-379 substantially reduced circulating very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-associated triglyceride (TG) levels in healthy mice and normalized aberrant lipid profiles in metabolically challenged animals, mediated through miR-379 effects on key receptors in hepatic TG re-uptake. As hepatic miR-379 levels were also correlated with GC and TG levels in human obese patients, the identification of a GC/GR-controlled miRNA cluster not only defines a novel layer of hormone-dependent metabolic control but also paves the way to alternative miRNA-based therapeutic approaches in metabolic dysfunction. PMID:25510864

  5. Why glucocorticoid withdrawal may sometimes be as dangerous as the treatment itself

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinsen, Stina; Baslund, Bo; Klose, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid therapy is widely used, but withdrawal from glucocorticoids comes with a potential life-threatening risk of adrenal insufficiency. Recent case reports document that adrenal crisis after glucocorticoid withdrawal remains a serious problem in clinical practice. Partly due...... to difficulties in inter-study comparison the true prevalence of glucocorticoid-induced adrenal insufficiency is unknown, but it might be somewhere between 46 and 100% 24h after glucocorticoid withdrawal, 26-49% after approximately one week, and some patients show prolonged suppression lasting months to years....... Adrenal insufficiency might therefore be underdiagnosed in clinical practice. Clinical data do not permit accurate estimates of a lower limit of glucocorticoid dose and duration of treatment, where adrenal insufficiency will not occur. Due to individual variation, neither the glucocorticoid dose nor...

  6. Preadmission Use of Glucocorticoids and 30-Day Mortality After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundbøll, Jens; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Schmidt, Morten; Dekkers, Olaf M; Christiansen, Christian F; Pedersen, Lars; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2016-03-01

    The prognostic impact of glucocorticoids on stroke mortality remains uncertain. We, therefore, examined whether preadmission use of glucocorticoids is associated with short-term mortality after ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study using medical registries in Denmark. We identified all patients with a first-time inpatient diagnosis of stroke between 2004 and 2012. We categorized glucocorticoid use as current use (last prescription redemption ≤90 days before admission), former use, and nonuse. Current use was further classified as new or long-term use. We used Cox regression to compute 30-day mortality rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), controlling for confounders. We identified 100 042 patients with a first-time stroke. Of these, 83 735 patients had ischemic stroke, 11 779 had ICH, and 4528 had SAH. Absolute mortality risk was higher for current users compared with nonusers for ischemic stroke (19.5% versus 10.2%), ICH (46.5% versus 34.4%), and SAH (35.0% versus 23.2%). For ischemic stroke, the adjusted 30-day mortality rate ratio was increased among current users compared with nonusers (1.58, 95% CI: 1.46-1.71), driven by the effect of glucocorticoids among new users (1.80, 95% CI: 1.62-1.99). Current users had a more modest increase in the adjusted 30-day mortality rate ratio for hemorrhagic stroke (1.26, 95% CI: 1.09-1.45 for ICH and 1.40, 95% CI: 1.01-1.93 for SAH) compared with nonusers. Former use was not substantially associated with mortality. Preadmission use of glucocorticoids was associated with increased 30-day mortality among patients with ischemic stroke, ICH, and SAH. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Secondary metabolites from Ganoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baby, Sabulal; Johnson, Anil John; Govindan, Balaji

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma is a genus of medicinal mushrooms. This review deals with secondary metabolites isolated from Ganoderma and their biological significance. Phytochemical studies over the last 40years led to the isolation of 431 secondary metabolites from various Ganoderma species. The major secondary compounds isolated are (a) C30 lanostanes (ganoderic acids), (b) C30 lanostanes (aldehydes, alcohols, esters, glycosides, lactones, ketones), (c) C27 lanostanes (lucidenic acids), (d) C27 lanostanes (alcohols, lactones, esters), (e) C24, C25 lanostanes (f) C30 pentacyclic triterpenes, (g) meroterpenoids, (h) farnesyl hydroquinones (meroterpenoids), (i) C15 sesquiterpenoids, (j) steroids, (k) alkaloids, (l) prenyl hydroquinone (m) benzofurans, (n) benzopyran-4-one derivatives and (o) benzenoid derivatives. Ganoderma lucidum is the species extensively studied for its secondary metabolites and biological activities. Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma colossum, Ganoderma sinense, Ganoderma cochlear, Ganoderma tsugae, Ganoderma amboinense, Ganoderma orbiforme, Ganoderma resinaceum, Ganoderma hainanense, Ganoderma concinna, Ganoderma pfeifferi, Ganoderma neo-japonicum, Ganoderma tropicum, Ganoderma australe, Ganoderma carnosum, Ganoderma fornicatum, Ganoderma lipsiense (synonym G. applanatum), Ganoderma mastoporum, Ganoderma theaecolum, Ganoderma boninense, Ganoderma capense and Ganoderma annulare are the other Ganoderma species subjected to phytochemical studies. Further phytochemical studies on Ganoderma could lead to the discovery of hitherto unknown biologically active secondary metabolites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Block of glucocorticoid synthesis during re-activation inhibits extinction of an established fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Jacqueline; Blaiss, Cory A; Lagace, Diane C; Eisch, Amelia J; Powell, Craig M

    2011-05-01

    The pharmacology of traumatic memory extinction has not been fully characterized despite its potential as a therapeutic target for established, acquired anxiety disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Here we examine the role of endogenous glucocorticoids in traumatic memory extinction. Male C57BL/6J mice were injected with corticosterone (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or metyrapone (50 mg/kg, s.c.) during re-activation of a contextual fear memory, and compared to vehicle groups (N=10-12 per group). To ensure that metyrapone was blocking corticosterone synthesis, we measured corticosterone levels following re-activation of a fear memory in metyrapone- and vehicle-treated animals. Corticosterone administration following extinction trials caused a long-lasting inhibition of the original fear memory trace. In contrast, blockade of corticosteroid synthesis with metyrapone prior to extinction trials enhanced retrieval and prevented extinction of context-dependent fear responses in mice. Further behavioral analysis suggested that the metyrapone enhancement of retrieval and prevention of extinction were not due to non-specific alterations in locomotor or anxiety-like behavior. In addition, the inhibition of extinction by metyrapone was rescued by exogenous administration of corticosterone following extinction trials. Finally, we confirmed that the rise in corticosterone during re-activation of a contextual fear memory was blocked by metyrapone. We demonstrate that extinction of a classical contextual fear memory is dependent on endogenous glucocorticoid synthesis during re-activation of a fear memory. Our data suggest that decreased glucocorticoids during fear memory re-activation may contribute to the inability to extinguish a fear memory, thus contributing to one of the core symptoms of PTSD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Salivary cortisol day curves in assessing glucocorticoid replacement therapy in Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smans, Lisanne; Lentjes, Eef; Hermus, Ad; Zelissen, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Patients with Addison's disease require lifelong treatment with glucocorticoids. At present, no glucocorticoid replacement therapy (GRT) can exactly mimic normal physiology. As a consequence, under- and especially overtreatment can occur. Suboptimal GRT may lead to various side effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of salivary cortisol day curves (SCDC) in the individual adjustment of GRT in order to approach normal cortisol levels as closely as possible, reduce over- and underreplacement and study the short-term effects on quality of life (QoL). Twenty patients with Addison's disease were included in this prospective study. A SCDC was obtained and compared to normal controls; general and disease specific QoL-questionnaires were completed. Based on SCDC assessment of over- and undertreatment (calculated as duration (h) × magnitude (nmol/L) at different time points, glucocorticoid dose and regime were adjusted. After 4 weeks SCDC and QoL assessment were repeated and the effect of adjusting GRT was analysed. At baseline, underreplacement was present in 3 and overreplacement in 18 patients; total calculated overreplacement was 32.8 h.nmol/L. Overreplacement decreased significantly to 13.3 h. nmol/L (p =0.005) after adjustment of GRT. Overreplacement was found particularly in the afternoon and evening. After reducing overreplacement in the evening, complaints about sleep disturbances significantly decreased. Individual adjustment of GRT based on SCDC to approach normal cortisol concentrations during the day can reduce overreplacement, especially in the evening. This can lead to a reduction of sleep disturbances and fatigue in patients with Addison's disease. A SCDC is a simple and patient-friendly tool for adjusting GRT and can be useful in the follow-up of patients with Addison's disease.

  10. Expression of glucocorticoid receptor and glucose transporter-1 during placental development in the diabetic rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Demir

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In various tissues, glucocorticoids (GCs are known to downregulate glucose transport systems; however, their effects on glucose transporters (GLUTs in the placenta of a diabetic rat are unknown. Glucocorticoid hormone action within the cell is regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. Thus, this study was designed to investigate the relationship between GR and glucose transporter expression in the placenta of the diabetic rat. Our immunohistochemical results indicated that GR and glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT 1 are expressed ubiquitously in the trophoblast and endothelial cells of the labyrinthine zone, where maternal fetal transport takes place in the rat placenta. Expression of GR in the junctional zone of the rat placenta was detected in giant cells, and in some spongiotrophoblast cells, but not in the glycogen cells. GLUT 1 was present, especially in glycogen cells during early pregnancy, and in the spongiotrophoblast cells of the junctional zone during late pregnancy. Amounts of GR and GLUT 1 protein were increased towards the end of gestation both in the control and the diabetic placenta. However, at days 17 and 19 of gestation, only the placental GR protein was significantly increased in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats compared to control rats. Diabetes led to a significant decrease in placental weight at gestation day 15. In contrast, at gestational days 17 and 21, the weights of the diabetic placenta were significantly increased as compared with the controls. Moreover, diabetes induced fetus intrauterine growth retardation at gestational days 13, 17 and 21. In conclusion, the localization pattern of GR and GLUT 1 proteins in the same cell types led us to believe that there might be a relationship between GR and GLUT 1 expressions at the cellular level. GLUT 1 does not play a pivotal role in diabetic pregnancies. However, placental growth abnormalities during diabetic pregnancy may be related to the amount of GR

  11. Eight hours of nocturnal 915 MHz radiofrequency identification (RFID) exposure reduces urinary levels of melatonin and its metabolite via pineal arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase activity in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Sun; Paik, Man-Jeong; Lee, Yu Hee; Lee, Yun-Sil; Choi, Hyung Do; Pack, Jeong-Ki; Kim, Nam; Ahn, Young Hwan

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of whole-body exposure to the 915 MHz radiofrequency identification (RFID) on melatonin biosynthesis and the activity of rat pineal arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT). Rats were exposed to RFID (whole-body specific absorption rate, 4 W/kg) for 8 h/day, 5 days/week, for weeks during the nighttime. Total volume of urine excreted during a 24-h period was collected after RFID exposure. Urinary melatonin and 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate (6-OHMS) was measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. AANAT enzyme activity was measured using liquid biphasic dif-13 fusion assay. Protein levels and mRNA expression of AANAT was 14 measured by Western blot and reverse transcription polymerase 15 chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, respectively. Eight hours of nocturnal RFID exposure caused a significant reduction in both urinary melatonin (p = 0. 003) and 6-OHMS (p = 0. 026). Activity, protein levels, and mRNA expression of AANAT were suppressed by exposure to RFID (p RFID exposure can cause reductions in the levels of both urinary melatonin and 6-OHMS, possibly due to decreased melatonin biosynthesis via suppression of Aanat gene transcription in the rat pineal gland.

  12. Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper expression is associated with response to treatment and immunoregulation in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Saeed; Ebadpour, Mohammad Reza; Sedighi, Sima; Saeedi, Mohsen; Memarian, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder in which cytokine balance is disturbed. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are shown to balance immune response by transcriptional regulation of glucocorticoid receptor target genes such as Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) which has been introduced as an endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator. In the present study, we assessed the expression of GILZ in association with interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukine-10 (IL-10), and B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) plasma levels in SLE patients. A total of 40 female patients (18 under treatment and 22 newly diagnosed) were recruited in this study. Real-time RT PCR was conducted to quantify the mRNA expression of GILZ. The plasma levels of IFN-γ, IL-10, and BLyS were evaluated using ELISA method. GILZ was overexpressed among under treatment SLE patients. The mRNA expression of GILZ was significantly correlated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score. IFN-γ and BLyS were downregulated in response to therapies with negative correlations to GILZ. Moreover, IL-10 was upregulated among treated patients. The levels of IFN-γ and BLyS were correlated with the severity of disease, while IL-10 was negatively correlated with SLEDAI score. GILZ could be introduced as one of the acting molecules in mediating the regulatory effects of GCs on producing pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in SLE.

  13. Glucocorticoids inhibit glucose transport and glutamate uptake in hippocampal astrocytes: implications for glucocorticoid neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgin, C E; Ha, T P; Packan, D R; Tombaugh, G C; Yang, S H; Horner, H C; Sapolsky, R M

    1991-10-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs), the adrenal steroid hormones secreted during stress, can damage the hippocampus and impair its capacity to survive coincident neurological insults. This GC endangerment of the hippocampus is energetic in nature, as it can be prevented when neurons are supplemented with additional energy substrates. This energetic endangerment might arise from the ability of GCs to inhibit glucose transport into both hippocampal neurons and astrocytes. The present study explores the GC inhibition in astrocytes. (1) GCs inhibited glucose transport approximately 15-30% in both primary and secondary hippocampal astrocyte cultures. (2) The parameters of inhibition agreed with the mechanisms of GC inhibition of glucose transport in peripheral tissues: A minimum of 4 h of GC exposure were required, and the effect was steroid specific (i.e., it was not triggered by estrogen, progesterone, or testosterone) and tissue specific (i.e., it was not triggered by GCs in cerebellar or cortical cultures). (3) Similar GC treatment caused a decrease in astrocyte survival during hypoglycemia and a decrease in the affinity of glutamate uptake. This latter observation suggests that GCs might impair the ability of astrocytes to aid neurons during times of neurologic crisis (i.e., by impairing their ability to remove damaging glutamate from the synapse).

  14. Glucocorticoid impairs growth of kidney outer medulla and accelerates loop of Henle differentiation and urinary concentrating capacity in rat kidney development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubbe, Jane; Madsen, Kirsten; Nielsen, Finn Thomsen

    2006-01-01

    In the rat, urinary concentrating ability develops progressively during the third postnatal (P) week and nearly reaches adult level at weaning (P21) governed by a rise in circulating glucocorticoid. Elevated extracellular osmolality can lead to growth arrest of epithelial cells. We tested...

  15. 12/15 Lipoxygenase regulation of colorectal tumorigenesis is determined by the relative tumor levels of its metabolite 12-HETE and 13-HODE in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jian; Jiang, Li; Wang, Yinqiu; Yao, Bing; Yang, Shilin; Zhang, Bixiang; Zhang, Ming-Zhi

    2015-02-20

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The arachidonic acid (AA) pathway and linoleic acid (LA) pathway have been implicated as important contributors to CRC development and growth. Human 15-lipoxygenase 1 (15-LOX-1) converts LA to anti-tumor 13-S-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HODE)and 15-LOX-2 converts AA to 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE). In addition, human 12-LOX metabolizes AA to pro-tumor 12-HETE. In rodents, the function of 12-LOX and 15-LOX-1 and 15-LOX-2 is carried out by a single enzyme, 12/15-LOX. As a result, conflicting conclusions concerning the role of 12-LOX and 15-LOX have been obtained in animal studies. In the present studies, we determined that PD146176, a selective 15-LOX-1 inhibitor, markedly suppressed 13-HODE generation in human colon cancer HCA-7 cells and HCA-7 tumors, in association with increased tumor growth. In contrast, PD146176 treatment led to decreases in 12-HETE generation in mouse colon cancer MC38 cells and MC38 tumors, in association with tumor inhibition. Surprisingly, deletion of host 12/15-LOX alone led to increased MC38 tumor growth, in association with decreased tumor 13-HODE levels, possibly due to inhibition of 12/15-LOX activity in stroma. Therefore, the effect of 12/15-LOX on colorectal tumorigenesis in mouse models could be affected by tumor cell type (human or mouse), relative 12/15 LOX activity in tumor cells and stroma as well as the relative tumor 13-HODE and 12-HETE levels.

  16. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Andrew D. [Horticultural Sciences Department and; Henry, Christopher S. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, email:; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637; Fiehn, Oliver [Genome Center, University of California, Davis, California 95616, email:; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie [Microbiology and Cell Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, email: ,

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms.

  17. Analyses of fecal and hair glucocorticoids to evaluate short- and long-term stress and recovery of Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus) removed from bile farms in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, K D; McShea, W J; Van Deelen, T R; Bacon, H J; Liu, F; Putman, S; Zhu, X; Brown, J L

    2013-05-01

    Demand for traditional Chinese medicines has given rise to the practice of maintaining Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus) in captivity to harvest bile. We evaluated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity in Asiatic black bears on a bile farm in China by measuring cortisol in hair. We also monitored hair and fecal glucocorticoid metabolites as bears acclimated to improved husbandry at the Animals Asia Foundation China Bear Rescue Center (CBRC) after removal from other bile farms. Fecal samples were collected twice weekly for ~1 year, and hair was obtained from bears upon arrival at the CBRC and again ≥163 days later. Paired hair samples showed declines in cortisol concentrations of 12-88% in 38 of 45 (84%, pbears after arrival and acclimation at the rehabilitation facility. Concentrations of cortisol in hair from bears on the bile farm were similar to initial concentrations upon arrival at the CBRC but were higher than those collected after bears had been at the CBRC for ≥163 days. Fecal glucocorticoid concentrations varied across months and were highest in April and declined through December, possibly reflecting seasonal patterns, responses to the arrival and socialization of new bears at the CBRC, and/or annual metabolic change. Data from segmental analysis of hair supports the first of these explanations. Our findings indicate that bears produced elevated concentrations of glucocorticoids on bile farms, and that activity of the HPA axis declined following relocation. Thus, hair cortisol analyses are particularly well suited to long-term, retrospective assessments of glucocorticoids in ursids. By contrast, fecal measures were not clearly associated with rehabilitation, but rather reflected more subtle endocrine changes, possibly related to seasonality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quadrupling Inhaled Glucocorticoid Dose to Abort Asthma Exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeever, Tricia; Mortimer, Kevin; Wilson, Andrew; Walker, Samantha; Brightling, Christopher; Skeggs, Andrew; Pavord, Ian; Price, David; Duley, Lelia; Thomas, Mike; Bradshaw, Lucy; Higgins, Bernard; Haydock, Rebecca; Mitchell, Eleanor; Devereux, Graham; Harrison, Timothy

    2018-03-08

    Asthma exacerbations are frightening for patients and are occasionally fatal. We tested the concept that a plan for patients to manage their asthma (self-management plan), which included a temporary quadrupling of the dose of inhaled glucocorticoids when asthma control started to deteriorate, would reduce the incidence of severe asthma exacerbations among adults and adolescents with asthma. We conducted a pragmatic, unblinded, randomized trial involving adults and adolescents with asthma who were receiving inhaled glucocorticoids, with or without add-on therapy, and who had had at least one exacerbation in the previous 12 months. We compared a self-management plan that included an increase in the dose of inhaled glucocorticoids by a factor of 4 (quadrupling group) with the same plan without such an increase (non-quadrupling group), over a period of 12 months. The primary outcome was the time to a first severe asthma exacerbation, defined as treatment with systemic glucocorticoids or an unscheduled health care consultation for asthma. A total of 1922 participants underwent randomization, of whom 1871 were included in the primary analysis. The number of participants who had a severe asthma exacerbation in the year after randomization was 420 (45%) in the quadrupling group as compared with 484 (52%) in the non-quadrupling group, with an adjusted hazard ratio for the time to a first severe exacerbation of 0.81 (95% confidence interval, 0.71 to 0.92; P=0.002). The rate of adverse effects, which were related primarily to local effects of inhaled glucocorticoids, was higher in the quadrupling group than in the non-quadrupling group. In this trial involving adults and adolescents with asthma, a personalized self-management plan that included a temporary quadrupling of the dose of inhaled glucocorticoids when asthma control started to deteriorate resulted in fewer severe asthma exacerbations than a plan in which the dose was not increased. (Funded by the Health Technology

  19. Effect of Two Different Levels of Fiber on Feed Intake, Average Daily Gain, Feed Efficiency and Ruminal Metabolites of Holstein Calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Salary Neya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to determine the effect of feeding alfalfa hay and starter fiber level on feed intake and performance of Holstein dairy calves, using thirty two male calves in a completely randomized design assigned to four diets in a 2×2 factorial arrangement. The experimental treatments were as follow: T1: starter with low fiber and without alfalfa hay, T2: starter with low fiber along with alfalfa hay, T3: starter with high fiber and without alfalfa hay and T4: starter with high fiber along with alfalfa hay. Results showed feed intake was not significantly different in pre-weaning and throughout the study but after weaning there was significant difference among treatments. Average daily gain of calves was not significantly different during pre-weaning period but during post-weaning and throughout the study there was significant difference among treatments for this trait. Feed efficiency was not significantly different among treatments in pre-weaning and post-weaning periods but it was significantly different during throughout the study. The results of this experiment showed adding fiber to dairy calves ration through both starter concentrate and alfalfa hay may reduce their performance.

  20. of Several Organophosphorus Insecticide Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell L. Carr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraoxonase (PON1 is a calcium dependent enzyme that is capable of hydrolyzing organophosphate anticholinesterases. PON1 activity is present in most mammals and previous research established that PON1 activity differs depending on the species. These studies mainly used the organophosphate substrate paraoxon, the active metabolite of the insecticide parathion. Using serum PON1 from different mammalian species, we compared the hydrolysis of paraoxon with the hydrolysis of the active metabolites (oxons of two additional organophosphorus insecticides, methyl parathion and chlorpyrifos. Paraoxon hydrolysis was greater than that of methyl paraoxon, but the level of activity between species displayed a similar pattern. Regardless of the species tested, the hydrolysis of chlorpyrifos-oxon was significantly greater than that of paraoxon or methyl paraoxon. These data indicate that chlorpyrifos-oxon is a better substrate for PON1 regardless of the species. The pattern of species differences in PON1 activity varied with the change in substrate to chlorpyrifos-oxon from paraoxon or methyl paraoxon. For example, the sex difference observed here and reported elsewhere in the literature for rat PON1 hydrolysis of paraoxon was not present when chlorpyrifos-oxon was the substrate.

  1. The transcriptomics of glucocorticoid receptor signaling in developing zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinushan Nesan

    Full Text Available Cortisol is the primary corticosteroid in teleosts that is released in response to stressor activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal axis. The target tissue action of this hormone is primarily mediated by the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR, a ligand-bound transcription factor. In developing zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos, GR transcripts and cortisol are maternally deposited into the oocyte prior to fertilization and influence early embryogenesis. To better understand of the molecular mechanisms involved, we investigated changes in the developmental transcriptome prior to hatch, in response to morpholino oligonucleotide knockdown of GR using the Agilent zebrafish microarray platform. A total of 1313 and 836 mRNA transcripts were significantly changed at 24 and 36 hours post fertilization (hpf, respectively. Functional analysis revealed numerous developmental processes under GR regulation, including neurogenesis, eye development, skeletal and cardiac muscle formation. Together, this study underscores a critical role for glucocorticoid signaling in programming molecular events essential for zebrafish development.

  2. Effect of glucocorticoids and gamma radiation on epidermal Langerhans cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belsito, D.V.; Baer, R.L.; Thorbecke, G.J.; Gigli, I.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of 750 rads of gamma radiation on the rate of return of epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) following suppressive doses of topical glucorticoids was studied in guinea pigs. Gamma radiation alone had no effect on the LC as assessed by staining for cell membrane ATPase activity and Ia antigen. It did, however, delay the expected return of Ia but not ATPase surface markers on the LC after perturbation with glucocorticoids. The delayed return of surface Ia antigen is possibly related to a radiation-induced defect in the production of a required lymphokine and/or in intracellular Ia transport. Although our data do not rule out a cytolytic effect of steroids on the LC, they do strongly suggest that, at least in part, glucocorticoids act on the LC by altering cell surface characteristics

  3. Gastroprotective role of glucocorticoids during NSAID-induced gastropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filaretova, Ludmila

    2013-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) make significant contributions to gastric ulcer disease which remains widespread. Although several factors have been postulated as pathogenic elements of the gastric injury induced by NSAIDs, it is, however believed that prostaglandin deficiency plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of this injury. During prostaglandin deficiency, other defensive mechanisms might operate to attenuate NSAID-induced gastropathy. According to our results, NSAIDs, similar to stress, induce an increase in glucocorticoid production that in turn helps the gastric mucosa to resist the harmful actions of these drugs. In this article, we review our experimental data suggesting that glucocorticoids may play a role as natural defensive factors in maintaining the integrity of the gastric mucosa during NSAID therapy and might operate to attenuate NSAID-induced gastropathy.

  4. Localization of glucocorticoid receptor mRNA in the male rat brain by in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronsson, M.; Fuxe, K.; Dong, Y.; Agnati, L.F.; Okret, S.; Gustafsson, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The localization and distribution of mRNA encoding the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was investigated in tissue sections of the adult male rat brain by in situ hybridization and RNA blot analysis. GR mRNA levels were measured by quantitative autoradiography with 35S- and 32P-labeled RNA probes, respectively. Strong labeling was observed within the pyramidal nerve cells of the CA1 and CA2 areas of the hippocampal formation, in the granular cells of the dentate gyrus, in the parvocellular nerve cells of the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, and in the cells of the arcuate nucleus, especially the parvocellular part. Moderate labeling of a large number of nerve cells was observed within layers II, III, and VI of the neocortex and in many thalamic nuclei, especially the anterior and ventral nuclear groups as well as several midline nuclei. Within the cerebellar cortex, strong labeling was observed all over the granular layer. In the lower brainstem, strong labeling was found within the entire locus coeruleus and within the mesencephalic raphe nuclei rich in noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine cell bodies, respectively. A close correlation was found between the distribution of GR mRNA and the distribution of previously described GR immunoreactivity. These studies open the possibility of obtaining additional information on in vivo regulation of GR synthesis and how the brain may alter its sensitivity to circulating glucocorticoids

  5. Elucidation and modulation of glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhart, K.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis deals with the elucidation of the synergistic effect of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone and the metabolic modulator 2-deoxyglucose on apoptosis induction in two in vitro model systems of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. 2-deoxyglucose accelerated the kinetics of, and increased the sensitivity to, glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis in two leukemia cell lines. In primary lymphocytes from healthy donors, in contrast, 2-deoxyglucose and dexamethasone did not act synergistically on apoptosis induction. To elucidate the molecular basis of the synergistic effect, glycolysis by means of glucose uptake, lactate production, ATP levels, glucose transporter and hexokinase expression and mitochondrial oxygen consumption was analyzed in treated vs. untreated cells. The study revealed a downregulation of gene expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1 and hexokinase 2 (HK2), release of HK2 from the outer mitochondrial membrane, as well as reduced glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, the analysis of the mitochondrial proteome by 2 dimensional differential gel electrophoresis after treatment with 2-deoxyglucose and dexamethasone revealed the regulation of several interesting candidate proteins involved in treatment related apoptosis. (author)

  6. Ovarian hormones modify anxiety behavior and glucocorticoid receptors after chronic social isolation stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Ortolaza, Dinah L; Doreste-Mendez, Raura J; Alvarado-Torres, John K; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn

    2017-06-15

    Chronic social isolation could lead to a disruption in the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis, resulting in anxiety and depressive-like behaviors but cycling estrogens could modify these behaviors. The aim of this study was to determine if changes in ovarian hormones during the normal cycle could interact with social isolation to alter anxiety and depressive-like behaviors. In parallel, we examined the expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin in the hippocampus and hypothalamus of Sprague Dawley normal cycling female rats. We assigned rats to either isolated or paired housing for 8 weeks. To assess anxiety and depressive-like behaviors, we used the open field test and forced swim test, respectively. Female rats were tested at either diestrus, estrus, or proestrus stage of the estrous cycle. After behaviors, rats were perfused and brains collected. Brain sections containing hippocampus and hypothalamus were analyzed using immunohistochemistry for synaptophysin and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) levels. We found an increase in depressive-like behaviors for isolated animals compared to paired housed rats, regardless of the estrous cycle stage. Interestingly, we found a decrease in anxiety behaviors in females in the estrus stage accompanied by a decrease in GR expression in hippocampal DG and CA3. However, no changes in synaptophysin were observed in any of the areas of studied. Our results support the beneficial effects of circulating ovarian hormones in anxiety, possibly by decreasing GR expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Glucocorticoids activate the ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic system in skeletal muscle during fasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, S. S.; Goldberg, A. L.; Goldberger, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are essential for the increase in protein breakdown in skeletal muscle normally seen during fasting. To determine which proteolytic pathway(s) are activated upon fasting, leg muscles from fed and fasted normal rats were incubated under conditions that block or activate different proteolytic systems. After food deprivation (1 day), the nonlysosomal ATP-dependent process increased by 250%, as shown in experiments involving depletion of muscle ATP. Also, the maximal capacity of the lysosomal process increased 60-100%, but no changes occurred in the Ca(2+)-dependent or the residual energy-independent proteolytic processes. In muscles from fasted normal and adrenalectomized (ADX) rats, the protein breakdown sensitive to inhibitors of the lysosomal or Ca(2+)-dependent pathways did not differ. However, the ATP-dependent process was 30% slower in muscles from fasted ADX rats. Administering dexamethasone to these animals or incubating their muscles with dexamethasone reversed this defect. During fasting, when the ATP-dependent process rises, muscles show a two- to threefold increase in levels of ubiquitin (Ub) mRNA. However, muscles of ADX animals failed to show this response. Injecting dexamethasone into the fasted ADX animals increased muscle Ub mRNA within 6 h. Thus glucocorticoids activate the ATP-Ub-dependent proteolytic pathway in fasting apparently by enhancing the expression of components of this system such as Ub.

  8. Type 1 plaminogen activator inhibitor gene: Functional analysis and glucocorticoid regulation of its promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zonneveld, A.J.; Curriden, S.A.; Loskutoff, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 is an important component of the fibrinolytic system and its biosynthesis is subject to complex regulation. To study this regulation at the level of transcription, the authors have identified and sequenced the promoter of the human plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene. Nuclease protection experiments were performed by using endothelial cell mRNA and the transcription initiation (cap) site was established. Sequence analysis of the 5' flanking region of the gene revealed a perfect TATA box at position -28 to position -23, the conserved distance from the cap site. Comparative functional studies with the firefly luciferase gene as a reporter gene showed that fragments derived from this 5' flanking region exhibited high promoter activity when transfected into bovine aortic endothelial cells and mouse Ltk - fibroblasts but were inactive when introduced into HeLa cells. These studies indicate that the fragments contain the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 promoter and that it is expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Although the fragments were also silent in rat FTO2B hepatoma cells, their promoter activity could be induced up to 40-fold with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. Promoter deletion mapping experiments and studies involving the fusion of promoter fragments to a heterologous gene indicated that dexamethasone induction is mediated by a glucocorticoid responsive element with enhancer-like properties located within the region between nucleotides -305 and +75 of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene

  9. Probing Dominant Negative Behavior of Glucocorticoid Receptor β through a Hybrid Structural and Biochemical Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jungki; Perera, Lalith; Krahn, Juno M.; Jewell, Christine M.; Moon, Andrea F.; Cidlowski, John A.; Pedersen, Lars C.

    2018-02-05

    ABSTRACT

    Glucocorticoid receptor β (GRβ) is associated with glucocorticoid resistance via dominant negative regulation of GRα. To better understand how GRβ functions as a dominant negative inhibitor of GRα at a molecular level, we determined the crystal structure of the ligand binding domain of GRβ complexed with the antagonist RU-486. The structure reveals that GRβ binds RU-486 in the same ligand binding pocket as GRα, and the unique C-terminal amino acids of GRβ are mostly disordered. Binding energy analysis suggests that these C-terminal residues of GRβ do not contribute to RU-486 binding. Intriguingly, the GRβ/RU-486 complex binds corepressor peptide with affinity similar to that of a GRα/RU-486 complex, despite the lack of helix 12. Our biophysical and biochemical analyses reveal that in the presence of RU-486, GRβ is found in a conformation that favors corepressor binding, potentially antagonizing GRα function. This study thus presents an unexpected molecular mechanism by which GRβ could repress transcription.

  10. Hepatocyte growth factor limits autoimmune neuroinflammation via glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper expression in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkhoucha, Mahdia; Molnarfi, Nicolas; Dunand-Sauthier, Isabelle; Merkler, Doron; Schneiter, Gregory; Bruscoli, Stefano; Riccardi, Carlo; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Reith, Walter; Santiago-Raber, Marie-Laure; Lalive, Patrice H

    2014-09-15

    Autoimmune neuroinflammation, including multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a prototype for T cell-mediated autoimmunity, is believed to result from immune tolerance dysfunction leading to demyelination and substantial neurodegeneration. We previously showed that CNS-restricted expression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a potent neuroprotective factor