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Sample records for glottic cancer t1n0m0

  1. Prospective Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Both Operable and Inoperable T1N0M0 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG0403

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    Nagata, Yasushi, E-mail: nagat@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Shibata, Taro [Japan Clinical Oncology Group Data Center, Center for Research Administration and Support, National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, Chuo (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Department of Image-Based Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Onimaru, Rikiya [Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Kozuka, Takuyo [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kunieda, Etsuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Keio University, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Tsutomu [Department of Radiology, Nihon University Itabashi Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nakagawa, Keiichi [Department of Radiology, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Hareyama, Masato [Department of Radiology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo (Japan); Takai, Yoshihiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige [Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Ishikura, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, Koshigaya Municipal Hospital, Koshigaya (Japan)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in Japan Clinical Oncology Group study 0403, the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with T1N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligibility criteria included histologically or cytologically proven NSCLC, clinical T1N0M0. Prescribed dose was 48 Gy at the isocenter in 4 fractions. The primary endpoint was the percent (%) 3-year overall survival. The threshold % 3-year survival to be rejected was set at 35% for inoperable patients, whereas the expected % 3-year survival was 80% for operable patients. Results: Between July 2004 and November 2008, 169 patients from 15 institutions were registered. One hundred inoperable and 64 operable patients (total 164) were eligible. Patients' characteristics were 122 male, 47 female; median age 78 years (range, 50-91 years); adenocarcinomas, 90; squamous cell carcinomas, 61; others, 18. Of the 100 inoperable patients, the % 3-year OS was 59.9% (95% confidence interval 49.6%-68.8%). Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were observed in 10 and 2 patients, respectively. No grade 5 toxicity was observed. Of the 64 operable patients, the % 3-year OS was 76.5% (95% confidence interval 64.0%-85.1%). Grade 3 toxicities were observed in 5 patients. No grade 4 and 5 toxicities were observed. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for stage I NSCLC is effective, with low incidences of severe toxicity. This treatment can be considered a standard treatment for inoperable stage I NSCLC. This treatment is promising as an alternative to surgery for operable stage I NSCLC.

  2. Prospective Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Both Operable and Inoperable T1N0M0 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG0403

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Shibata, Taro; Onishi, Hiroshi; Kokubo, Masaki; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Onimaru, Rikiya; Kozuka, Takuyo; Kunieda, Etsuo; Saito, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Hareyama, Masato; Takai, Yoshihiro; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Ishikura, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in Japan Clinical Oncology Group study 0403, the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with T1N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligibility criteria included histologically or cytologically proven NSCLC, clinical T1N0M0. Prescribed dose was 48 Gy at the isocenter in 4 fractions. The primary endpoint was the percent (%) 3-year overall survival. The threshold % 3-year survival to be rejected was set at 35% for inoperable patients, whereas the expected % 3-year survival was 80% for operable patients. Results: Between July 2004 and November 2008, 169 patients from 15 institutions were registered. One hundred inoperable and 64 operable patients (total 164) were eligible. Patients' characteristics were 122 male, 47 female; median age 78 years (range, 50-91 years); adenocarcinomas, 90; squamous cell carcinomas, 61; others, 18. Of the 100 inoperable patients, the % 3-year OS was 59.9% (95% confidence interval 49.6%-68.8%). Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were observed in 10 and 2 patients, respectively. No grade 5 toxicity was observed. Of the 64 operable patients, the % 3-year OS was 76.5% (95% confidence interval 64.0%-85.1%). Grade 3 toxicities were observed in 5 patients. No grade 4 and 5 toxicities were observed. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for stage I NSCLC is effective, with low incidences of severe toxicity. This treatment can be considered a standard treatment for inoperable stage I NSCLC. This treatment is promising as an alternative to surgery for operable stage I NSCLC.

  3. Hypothyroidism after radiotherapy for early glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Motoyuki; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Nozue, Masashi; Kawai, Hiroaki; Takai, Michikatsu; Kaneko, Masao; Nishi, Shigeo

    1993-01-01

    Reported is the case of a 46-year-old male with hypothyroidism after radiotherapy for early glottic cancer, T1N0M0, Stage I. Six months after 60 Co irradiation 66 Gy with the radiation field size of 5 x 5 cm was given, the clinical signs of acute hypothyroidism was presented. Retrospective CT examinations proved that over 80% of the total dose was irradiated to about 10% of whole thyroid volume. Since laboratory examinations revealed high serum level of thyrogobrin antibody, we postulated immunological mechanism was associated with the onset of hypothyroidism. (author)

  4. CT characteristics and pathological implications of early stage (T1N0M0) lung adenocarcinoma with pure ground-glass opacity

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    Jin, Xin; Zhao, Shao-hong; Wu, Jian; Wu, Chong-chong; Chang, Rui-ping; Ju, Hai-yue [Chinese PLA General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Gao, Jie; Wang, Dian-jun [Chinese PLA General Hospital, Department of Pathology, Beijing (China)

    2015-09-15

    To analyze the CT characteristics and pathological classification of early lung adenocarcinoma (T1N0M0) with pure ground-glass opacity (pGGO). Ninety-four lesions with pGGO on CT in 88 patients with T1N0M0 lung adenocarcinoma were selected from January 2010 to December 2012. All lesions were confirmed by pathology. CT appearances were analyzed including lesion location, size, density, uniformity, shape, margin, tumour-lung interface, internal and surrounding malignant signs. Lesion size and density were compared using analysis of variance, lesion size also assessed using ROC curves. Gender of patients, lesion location and CT appearances were compared using χ2-test. There were no significant differences in gender, lesion location and density with histological invasiveness (P > 0.05). The ROC curve showed that the possibility of invasive lesion was 88.73 % when diameter of lesion was more than 10.5 mm. There was a significant difference between lesion uniformity and histological invasiveness (P = 0.01). There were significant differences in margin, tumour-lung interface, air bronchogram with histological invasiveness (P = 0.02,P = 0.00,P = 0.048). The correlation index of lesion size and uniformity was r = 0.45 (P = 0.00). The lesion size and uniformity, tumour-lung interface and the air bronchogram can help predict invasive extent of early stage lung adenocarcinoma with pGGO. (orig.)

  5. Radiotherapy of early stage glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. H.; Chai, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the role of curative radiotherapy and salvage surgery in patients with T1, T2 glottic cancer. Between June 1989 and December 1994, 23 patients with early glottic cancer, 18 with T1N0M0 and 5 with T2N0M0, were treated with radiotherapy at Gyeongsang University Hospital. All patients were male. Median follow-up period was 46 months, and 100% were observed for at least 3 years. Actuarial survival rates at 5 years were 84.3% for 23 patients. The 5-year actuarial survival rates were 94.4% for T1 and 53.3% for T2 (P=0.05). The 5-year local control rates was 70.0% for T1 and 60.0% for T2 (P=0.44). Of 8 patients with treatment failure, 6 patients (75.0%) were salvaged with surgery. After surgical salvage, the 5-year local control rates were 87.2% for T1 and 80.0% for T2 (p=0.55). In early stage (Stage I and II) glottic cancer, curative radiotherapy can be a treatment of choice and surgery reserved for salvage of radiotherapy failure. (author)

  6. Radiation therapy of early glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neri, S.

    1987-01-01

    The control of early glottic cancer is equally satisfactory with either surgical resection or radiation therapy; this last method gives the patient good functional results. During the period from 1/1978 to 12/1985, 73 patients with early glottic carcinoma (T1 N0 M0) were treated in the Institute of Radiotherapy L. Galvani, University of Bologna; 45 were stage T1a (tumor limited to one vocal cord) and 28 were stage T1b (tumor of both vocal cords or involving anterior commissure); radiation treatment utilized a 60 Co machine and 5x5 cm fields; the median dose was 67.2 Gy (range 50-76) with conventional fractionation. Ten patients had local recurrence; the median time of recurrence was 13.4 months; 9/10 were treated by surgery and 2/10 died, so the overall control by radiotherapy with surgery in reserve was 100% in T1a tumers and 90.6% in T1b ones. The 5-years disease free survival rate was 93.1% in T1a tumors and 69% in T1b; lesions involving anterior commissure had the worst prognosis, independent of the dose and time-dose factor (3/10 recurrences in the group treated with TDF less than 110 and 4/18 recurrences in the group with TDF more than 110)

  7. T3 glottic cancer: an analysis of dose time-volume factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwood, A.R.; Beale, F.A.; Cummings, B.J.; Hawkins, N.V.; Keane, T.J.; Rider, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    This report analyzes dose-time-volume factors in 112 patients with T3N0M0 glottic cancer who were treated with radical radiotherapy with surgery for salvage between 1963 and 1977. 55% of the patients are alive and well 5 years following treatment; 26% died of glottic cancer and 19% died of intercurrent disease. In the 1965 to 1969 time period, 31% died of tumor as compared to 16% in the 1975 to 1977 time period. Overall local control by radiotherapy was 51%; 2/3 of the failures were surgically salvaged. 44% were locally controlled by radiotherapy in the 1965 to 1969 time period and 57% in the 1975 to 1977 time period. Analysis of dose-time-volume factors reveals that the optimal dose is greater than 1700 ret and a minimal volume of 6 x 8 cm should be used. A dose-cure curve for T3 glottic cancer is constructed and compared with the dose complication curve for the larynx and the dose-cure curve for T1N0M0 glottic cancer. A comparison of cure rates between 112 patients treated with radical radiotherapy and surgery for salvage versus 28 patients treated with combined pre-operative irradiation and surgery reveals no difference in the proportion of patients who died of glottic cancer or in the number of patients alive at 5 years following treatment

  8. Glottic cancer with subglottic extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ampil, F.L.; Menezes, C.-A.O.

    1997-01-01

    The outcomes of 27 patients with glottic cancer extending into the subglottis (GCSE) who were treated by surgery and radiation (n=17) or radiation alone (n=10) during a 13-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Since this study was nonrandomized and retrospective, the patient groups were not equally matched with regard to age (p>0.05), gender (p>0.30), or disease stage (p>0.05). The locoregional failure rate was 18±(95% CI) 20% in patients who received combined therapy and 40±31% in persons treated by radiation alone (p=0.20); the corresponding survival rates at two years were 53±24% and 42±31% (p>0.50). These findings suggest that GCSE may be better managed by a combination of surgery and radiotherapy than by the use of radiotherapy alone. (author)

  9. The impact of treatment time and smoking on local control and complications in T1 glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voet, Johannes C.M. van der; Keus, Ronald B.; Hart, Augustinus A.M.; Hilgers, Frans J.M.; Bartelink, Harry

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To define the optimal treatment regimen, patients with T1N0M0 glottic larynx carcinoma were treated with six different radiotherapy (RT) schedules. To assess the influence of patient characteristics, complication rates, and to evaluate the overall larynx preservation. Methods and Materials: Out of a consecutive series of 383 patients treated for T1N0M0 glottic larynx carcinoma between 1965 and 1992, 352 evaluable patients were treated with six different 'standard' fractionation schedules: 65 Gy (20 x 3.25 Gy), 62 Gy (20 x 3.1 Gy), 61.6 Gy (22 x 2.8 Gy), 60 Gy (25 x 2.4 Gy), 66 Gy (33 x 2 Gy) and 60 Gy (30 x 2 Gy). The median follow-up of all patients was 89 months. Patient factors analyzed included: age, sex, concurrent illness, smoking habits, tumor localization and extension, tumor differentiation, the effect of tumor biopsy or stripping of the vocal cord, and the presence of visible tumor at the start of radiotherapy. Treatment parameters evaluated were: year of treatment, beam energy, treatment planning, field size, fractionation schedule, fraction size, number of fractions, total dose, treatment time and treatment gap, the use of wedges, and neck diameter. Results: The overall 5-year actuarial locoregional control was 89%, varying between 83 and 93% for the different schedules. Univariately, local control decreased with increasing treatment time. This could not be explained by the confounding variables sex, tumor extension, and field length (p = 0.0065). Adjusted for these variables, 5-year local control percentage decreased from 95% (SE 2%) for 22-29 days to 79% (SE 6%) for treatment time ≥ 40 days. The overall complication rate (grade I-IV) at 5 years was 15.3%, and varied between the different schedules, from 7 to 17%. No relation was found between complications and treatment factors. Patients who continued smoking had a higher complication rate than those who never smoked or stopped smoking, univariately as well as adjusted for tumor extension

  10. Radiation therapy for T1,2 glottic carcinoma: impact of overall treatment time on local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yasumasa; Nagata, Yasushi; Okajima, Kaoru; Mitsumori, Michihide; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Masunaga, Shin-ichirou; Ono, Koji; Shoji, Kazuhiko; Kojima, Hisayosi

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Local control probabilities of T1,2 glottic laryngeal cancer were evaluated in relation to dose and fractionation of radiation therapy (RT). Materials and methods: Between 1975 and 1993, 96 T1N0M0 glottic cancers and 32 T2N0M0 glottic cancers were treated with definitive RT. Total RT dose was 60-66 Gy/2 Gy for most of the T1 and T2 tumors, although 10 T2 tumors were treated with hyperfractionation (72-74.4 Gy/1.2 Gy bid). Of the 128 patients, 90 T1 glottic tumors and 30 T2 glottic tumors were followed for >2 years after treatment. Multivariate analyses using the Cox proportional hazards model and a logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the significance of prognostic variables on local control. Results: The 5-year local control probability for T1 tumors was 85%, whereas that for T2 tumors was 71%. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that only overall treatment time (OTT) was a significant variable for local control. Total RT dose, normalized total doses at a fraction size of 2 Gy, and fraction size were not significant. Local control probability of T1 tumors with an OTT of 42-49 days was significantly higher than that of tumors with an OTT of >49 days (P < 0.02). Only a 1-week interruption of RT, due to holidays, significantly reduced the 5-year local control probability of T1 glottic tumors from 89 to 74% (P < 0.05). Conclusions: These results indicate that OTT is a significant prognostic factor for local control of T1 glottic tumors

  11. SU-E-T-63: Carotid Sparing Tomohelical Three Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for T1N0 Glottic Cancer

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    Hong, C; Ju, S; Ahn, Y; Oh, D; Noh, J; Chung, K; Kim, J; Han, Y; Choi, D [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We investigated the dosimetric benefit and treatment efficiency of carotid-sparing TomoHelical (TH) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for early glottic cancer. Methods: Computed tomography (CT) simulation was performed for 10 patients with early-stage (T1N0M0) glottic squamous cell carcinoma. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), carotid artery (CA), and spinal cord (SP) were delineated for each CT data set. Two-field 3DCRT (2F-3DCRT), three-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (3F-IMRT), TomoHelical-IMRT (TH-IMRT), and TH-3DCRT plans were generated, with a total prescribed dose of 67.5 Gy in 30 fractions to the PTV for each patient. In order to evaluate plan quality, dosimetric characteristics were compared in terms of the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for the PTV, V35, V50, and V63 for the CAs and in terms of the maximum dose for the SP. Additionally, treatment planning and delivery times were compared to evaluate treatment efficiency. Results: The CIs for 3F-IMRT (0.650±0.05), TH-IMRT (0.643±0.03), and TH-3DCRT (0.631±0.03) were much better than that for 2F-3DCRT (0.318±0.03). The HIs for TH-IMRT (1.053±0.01) and TH-3DCRT (1.055±0.01) were slightly better than those for 2F-3DCRT (1.062±0.01) and 3F-IMRT (1.091±0.007). 2F-3DCRT showed poor CA sparing in terms of the V35, V50, and V63 compared to 3F-IMRT, TH-IMRT, and TH-3DCRT (p<0.05), whereas there was no significant dose difference between 3F-IMRT, TH-IMRT, and TH-3DCRT (p>0.05). The maximum dose to the SP with all plans was below 45 Gy. The treatment planning times for 2F-3DCRT (5.9±0.66 min) and TH-3DCRT (7.32±0.94 min) were much lower than those for 3F-IMRT (45.51±2.76 min) and TH-IMRT (35.58±4.41 min), whereas the delivery times with all plans was below 3 minutes. Conclusion: TH-3DCRT showed excellent carotid sparing capability, comparable to that with TH-IMRT, with high treatment efficiency and short planning and

  12. Laryngeal Amyloidosis Mimicking Glottic Cancer: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Jin; Kim, Jee Young; Ahn, Kook Jin; Kim, Bum Soo; Park, Young Hak

    2010-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a slowly progressive, benign disease that is characterized by the extracellular deposition of fibrillar proteins in many different tissues and organs throughout the body. Primary amyloidosis can be subdivided into the systemic and localized forms. The localized form is less common than the systemic form and the larynx is the most frequently affected site. The importance of laryngeal amyloidosis lies in its possible confusion with glottic cancer because of the clinical feature. We report here on a case of laryngeal amyloidosis in a 47-year-old man who suffered from progressive dyspnea

  13. Laryngeal Amyloidosis Mimicking Glottic Cancer: A Case Report

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    Lee, Sun Jin; Kim, Jee Young; Ahn, Kook Jin; Kim, Bum Soo [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Hak [St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Amyloidosis is a slowly progressive, benign disease that is characterized by the extracellular deposition of fibrillar proteins in many different tissues and organs throughout the body. Primary amyloidosis can be subdivided into the systemic and localized forms. The localized form is less common than the systemic form and the larynx is the most frequently affected site. The importance of laryngeal amyloidosis lies in its possible confusion with glottic cancer because of the clinical feature. We report here on a case of laryngeal amyloidosis in a 47-year-old man who suffered from progressive dyspnea.

  14. Evaluating Post-Radiotherapy Laryngeal Function with Laryngeal Videostroboscopy in Early Stage Glottic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel E. Marciscano

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveDysphonia is common among patients with early stage glottic cancer. Laryngeal videostroboscopy (LVS has not been routinely used to assess post-radiotherapy (RT voice changes. We hypothesized that LVS would demonstrate improvement in laryngeal function after definitive RT for early-stage glottic cancer.Study designBlinded retrospective review of perceptual voice and stroboscopic parameters for patients with early glottic cancer and controls.SettingHigh-volume, single-institution academic medical center.Subjects and methodsFifteen patients underwent RT for Tis-T2N0M0 glottic cancer and were evaluated with serial LVS exams pre- and post-RT. Stroboscopic assessment included six parameters: vocal fold (VF vibration, VF mobility, erythema/edema, supraglottic compression, glottic closure, and secretions. Grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, strain (GRBAS voice perceptual scale was graded in tandem with LVS score. Assessments were grouped by time interval from RT: pre-RT, 0–4, 4–12, and >12 months post-RT.Results60 LVS exams and corresponding GRBAS assessments were reviewed. There were significant improvements in ipsilateral VF motion (P = 0.03 and vibration (P = 0.001 and significant worsening in contralateral VF motion (P < 0.001 and vibration (P = 0.008 at >12 months post-RT. Glottic closure significantly worsened, most prominent >12 months post-RT (P = 0.01. Composite GRBAS scores were significantly improved across all post-RT intervals.ConclusionLVS proved to be a robust tool for assessing pre- and post-RT laryngeal function. We observed post-RT improvement in ipsilateral VF function, a decline in contralateral VF function, and decreased glottic closure. These results demonstrate that LVS can detect meaningful changes in VF and glottic function and support its use for post-RT evaluation of glottic cancer patients.

  15. Treatment of the early-stage glottic cancer using low-temperature radiofrequency coblation

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    Bing Liu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Although the current probe design has limitations for the resection of certain tumors, low-temperature RF coblation appears to be a potentially effective method for the endoscopic resection of selected glottic cancers.

  16. Risk factors for voice quality after radiotherapy for early glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocevar-Boltezar, Irena; Zargi, Miha; Strojan, Primoz

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: In the majority of patients irradiated for early glottic cancer an abnormal voice was reported. The purpose of the study was to determine the factors influencing voice quality after radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancer. Methods: The voices of 75 male patients irradiated for T1 glottic carcinoma were assessed subjectively and objectively by acoustic analyses and aerodynamic measurements. The laryngeal function and morphology were evaluated by videolaryngostroboscopy. The data on smoking habits, the associated diseases influencing voice quality, the extent of the tumor, the type of biopsy, and the irradiation technique were collected from the medical records. The data on the factors influencing voice quality were compared for patients with a normal/near-normal voice and those with a hoarse voice. Results: Voice quality was at least slightly abnormal in 94.7% and 81.3% of patients, when assessed perceptively and objectively, respectively. Smoking after the completed treatment, more severe morphologic alterations of the vocal folds, dryness of the throat, incomplete closure of the vocal folds and functional voice disorders expressed as supraglottic activity adversely influenced the voice quality. A good correlation between the perceptive voice assessment and the acoustic analyses was established. Conclusions: After the successful irradiation for T1 glottic carcinoma, the great majority of the patients have at least a slightly hoarse voice. A better voice outcome could be achieved if radiotherapy was followed by the patient's cessation of smoking and the appropriate voice therapy.

  17. Effectiveness of Transoral Laser Microsurgery for Precancerous Lesions and Early Glottic Cancer Guided by Analysis of Voice Quality

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bahannan, A.; Slavíček, A.; Černý, L.; Vokřál, J.; Valenta, Zdeněk; Lohynská, R.; Chovanec, M.; Betka, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 6 (2014), s. 763-767 ISSN 1043-3074 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : cordectomy * voice analysis * glottic cancer * precancerous lesion * larynx Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 2.641, year: 2014

  18. Impact of initial tumor volume on radiotherapy outcome in patients with T2 glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of initial tumor volume (TV) on radiotherapy (RT) outcome in patients with T2 glottic cancer. Initial TV was calculated for 115 consecutive patients with T2 glottic cancer who had been treated with definitive RT alone at a single institution. The results showed strong correlations of TV with 3-year local tumor control (LTC) and disease-free survival (DFS). For TV ≤ 0.7 cm 3 , 3-year LTC was 83 %; for TV 0.7-3.6 cm 3 this was 70 % and for TV 3.6-17 cm 3 44 %. Analysis of total dose vs. initial TV showed that larger T2 glottic tumors with a TV of around 5 cm 3 (2-2.5 cm in diameter with 10 10 cancer cells) need an extra 6.5 Gy to achieve similar 3-year LTC rates as for small tumors with a TV of 0.5 cm 3 (∝1 cm in diameter with 10 9 cancer cells). Although classification of tumors according to TV cannot replace TNM staging in daily practice, it could represent a valuable numerical supplement for planning the optimal dose fractionation scheme for individual patients. (orig.)

  19. A screening questionnaire for voice problems after treatment of early glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogh, Christine D.L. van; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.; Boon-Kamma, Brigitte A.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Kuik, Dirk J.; Mahieu, Hans F.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: After treatment for early glottic cancer, a considerable number of patients end up with voice problems interfering with daily life activities. A 5-item screening questionnaire was designed for detection of voice impairment. The purpose of this study is to assess psychometric properties of this questionnaire in clinical practice. Methods and Materials: The questionnaire was completed by 110 controls without voice complaints and 177 patients after radiotherapy or laser surgery for early glottic cancer. Results: Based on normative data of the controls, a score of 5 or less on at least 1 of the 5 questions was considered to state overall voice impairment. Reliability of the questionnaire proved to be good. Voice impairment was reported in 44% of the patients treated with radiotherapy vs. 29% of the patients treated with endoscopic laser surgery. Conclusions: The questionnaire proved to be a reliable, valid, and feasible method to detect voice impairment in daily life. The questionnaire is easy to fill in, and interpretation is straightforward. It is useful for both radiation oncologists and otorhinolaryngologists in their follow-up of patients treated for early glottic cancer

  20. Risk of Fatal Cerebrovascular Accidents after External Beam Radiation Therapy for Early Stage Glottic Larynx Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Mitra, Nandita; Lin, Alexander; Ahn, Peter; Wan, Fei; O’Malley, Bert; Weinstein, Gregory S.; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    Background This study compared the risk of fatal cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) in patients with early stage glottic larynx cancer receiving surgery or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials Using a competing risks survival analysis, we compared the risk of death due to CVA among patients with early stage glottic larynx cancer receiving surgery or EBRT in the SEER database. Results The cumulative incidence of fatal CVA at 15 years was higher in patients receiving EBRT (2.8 %; 95% CI 2.3%–3.4%) compared to surgery (1.5 %; 95% CI 0.8 %–2.3%, p= 0.024). In multivariable competing risks regression models, EBRT remained associated with an increased risk of fatal CVA compared to surgery (adjusted HR 1.75; 95% CI 1.04–2.96, p= 0.037). Conclusion Treatment of early stage glottic larynx cancer with EBRT was associated with a small increase in the risk of late fatal CVA events relative to surgery. PMID:23595858

  1. Carotid sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy on early glottic cancer: Preliminary study

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    Choi, Hoon Sik; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Jeong, Ho Jin; Song, Jin Ho; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Park, Jung Je; Woo, Seung Hoon; Kang, Ki Mun [Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    To compare the dose distribution between carotid sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and opposed lateral field technique (LAFT), and to determine the effects of carotid sparing IMRT in early glottic cancer patients who have risk factors for atherosclerosis. Ten early glottic cancer patients were treated with carotid sparing IMRT. For each patient, the conventional LAFT plan was developed for comparison. IMRT and LAFT plans were compared in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage, conformity index, homogeneity index, and the doses to planning organ at risk volume (PRV) for carotid arteries, spinal cord and pharyngeal constrictor muscle. Recurrence was not observed in any patients during the follow-up period. V95% for PTV showed no significant difference between IMRT and LAFT plans, while V100% was significantly higher in the IMRT plan (95.5% vs. 94.6%, p = 0.005). The homogeneity index (11.6%) and conformity index (1.4) in the IMRT plan were significantly better than those in the LAFT plans (8.5% and 5.1, respectively) (p = 0.005). The median V5Gy (90.0%), V25Gy (13.5%), and V50Gy (0%) for carotid artery PRV in the IMRT plan were significantly lower than those in the LAFT plan (99.1%, 89.0%, and 77.3%, respectively) (p = 0.005). Our study suggests that carotid sparing IMRT can significantly decrease the dose to carotid arteries compared to LAFT, and it would be considered for early glottic cancer patient with high risk of atherosclerosis.

  2. The results of radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancers. Influence of radiation beam energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Michinori; Joja, Ikuo; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Kuroda, Masahiro; Hiraki, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    We analyzed the influence of various parameters on the results of radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancer by assessing the outcomes of 60 patients with this cancer who received definitive radiotherapy between 1985 and 1994. Seven patients were treated with a cobalt-60 unit, and the other 53 with a linear accelerator (26 patients at 3-MV, 10 at 6-MV, and 17 at 10-MV). Of the 17 patients treated at 10-MV, 4 also received part of their treatment with a cobalt-60 unit. The total radiation dose ranged from 56 Gy to 70 Gy (mean, 61 Gy). The total radiation dose of 51 patients (85%) was 60 Gy. The factors found to influence local control were the strength of the radiation beam energy and whether or not there was gross tumor invasion of the anterior commissure. The local control rate was 71% in the patients treated with a 10-MV linear accelerator, 56% in those treated with a 6-MV linear accelerator and, 97% in those treated with a cobalt-60 unit or a 3-MV linear accelerator (P=0.0173). The local control rate was 43% in the patients with gross anterior commissure invasion and 88% in those without (P=0.0075). We conclude that low energy photon beams are more suitable for the treatment of early glottic cancers, especially if the lesion grossly invades the anterior commissure. (author)

  3. Treatment outcome and prognostic factor of CO2 laser cordectomy for early glottic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Phil-Sang; Lee, Sang Joon

    2012-02-01

    Objectives: Laser cordectomy is very popular nowadays and become one of the treatments of choice for early glottis carcinoma. Transoral laser microsurgery has many advantages comparing conventional open surgery or radiation therapy. In this study, we examined the oncologic results of laser cordectomy for early glottic cancer and analyzed the prognostic impact on the survival of the several tumor-related and treatment-related factors. Methods: Patients who were diagnosed as early glottic squamous cell carcinoma, treated by laser cordectomy with curative intent were analyzed. Patients with preivous radiation therapy were included. From June 1988 to March 2005, 202 patients from five hospitals were analyzed (174 T1, 28 T2). Results: Five-year overall survival and disease-free survival were 98.4% and 84.9%. Twenty two patients developed local recurrence. Total laryngectomy was done in 6 patients and laryngeal preservation rate was 97%. Recurrence was higher in the patients with anterior commissure involvement (9/39) than without anterior commissure involvement (13/163). Recurrence was higher in T1b (4/15) than T1a (13/159). Previous radiation was also highly related to the recurrence (7/20 vs 15/182). Twenty patients with local recurrence after radiation therapy were treated by salvage laser cordectomy. Of them, 7 patients developed local recurrence and 5 year disease-free survival was 57%. Complication was rare with one case of hemorrhage. Tracheotomy was not necessary in all patients. Conclusions: Laser cordectomy for early glottic carcinoma showed high survival, laryngeal preservation rate and low complication rate. The prognostic factors were anterior commissure involvement, both vocal fold involvement and previous radiotherapy.

  4. Factors affecting the quality of voice in the early glottic cancer treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Jai Prakash; Baccher, Gurmit K.; Waghmare, Chaitali M.; Mallick, Indranil; Ghosh-Laskar, Sarbani; Budrukkar, Ashwini; Pai, Prathamesh; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; D'Cruz, Anil; Shrivastava, Shyam K.; Dinshaw, Ketayun A.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To prospectively analyze the objective voice quality before and after radiotherapy (RT) for early glottic cancer and to evaluate the role of different factors that may affect it. Methods: Patients with T1-T2N0M0 glottic cancer underwent voice quality assessment before treatment and after radical RT. Post-RT voice quality was compared to the voice at diagnosis and the voice of healthy individuals used as controls. A comprehensive set of voice parameters were measured. The effects of age, smoking history, T stage, anterior commissure (AC) involvement, radiation dose, fractionation and volumes on pre-treatment and post-treatment voice quality were analyzed. Results: The voice quality data of 50 patients were analyzed. Following treatment, there was a significant improvement in the majority of measured parameters. However, perturbation and HNR remained inferior compared to controls. A history of smoking, AC involvement and larger RT volumes resulted in poorer voice parameters following RT. There was no significant impact of age alone. T2 tumors had an inferior voice quality before treatment, but did not remain inferior following RT. Hypofractionated RT did not show any negative impact. Conclusions: There is a considerable improvement of voice quality following RT. Several factors may have specific effects on pre-treatment and post-treatment voice

  5. Superselective intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy for laryngeal cancer. Is it reasonable to treat glottic cancer in a similar way to supraglottic cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizaki, Tomokazu; Murono, Shigeyuki; Wakisaka, Naohiro; Kondo, Satoru; Furukawa, Mitsuru

    2006-01-01

    The standard treatment for advanced laryngeal cancer has been shifting from total laryngectomy to various organ preservation therapies such as subtotal laryngectomy and chemoradiotherapy. Robbins showed remarkable results with RADPLAT, the superselective intra-arterial infusion of supradose cisplatin (150 mg/m 2 ), against advanced head and neck cancer. However, the volume of laryngeal cancer is smaller than those of the other sites of head and neck cancers, and so a swaller less dose of cisplatin could save advanced laryngeal cancer patients. It may be reasonable to treat these subtypes of laryngeal cancer with a different modality. Thirty-five patients with laryngeal cancer were treated with tri-weekly intra-arterial infusion of cisplatin (100 mg/body). A 200 times molar excessive amount of sodium thiosulfate was intravenously infused to reduce the toxicity of cisplatin. Ten of 16 patients with glottic cancer and 10 of 19 patients with supraglottic cancer were followed for more than 2 years. Larynx preservation rate of glottic and supraglottic cancer was 80% and 70%, and progression-free survival rate was 80% and 50%, respectively. Grade III and IV toxic events were less frequent than with RADPLAT or systemic administration of a similar dose of cisplatin. Glottic and supraglottic cancers show different clinical behaviors. Our protocol with less cisplatin than RADPLAT is especially effective for glottic cancer. (author)

  6. Laser-radiation therapy for T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Gen; Hayabuchi, Naofumi; Toda, Yukihiro; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Ogo, Etuyo; Nakajima, Tadashi [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the laser-radiation combined therapy for T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer in order to preserve the larynx. The subjects consisted of 52 patients with T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer treated with laser-radiation combined therapy between 1980 and 1999. Patients ranged in age from 40-88 years, with a median of 70 years, and included 51 men and one woman. During this period, treatment was administered with different radiation devices ({sup 60}Co or 4 MV-X ray), and 40-72 Gy (median, 60Gy) of radiation therapy were administered. Tumor and treatment characteristics were correlated with local control at a median follow-up of 61 months (range 12-210 months). Concurrent chemotherapy was administered to 32 patients; 29 were treated with 5-FU and vitamin A (FAR), and 3 were treated with low-dose CDDP. Post treatment vocal function was examined in 37 patients. The voice was evaluated in terms of four parameters: maximum phonation time (MPT), mean air flow rate during phonation over a comfortable duration (MFR), fundamental frequency range of phonation (F0 range), and sound pressure level range of phonation (SPL range). The five-year cause-specific-survival rate was 98.0%, and the local control rate was 91.8%. Three of 4 patients who had locally relapsed were administered total laryngectomy as salvage therapy. One patient was administered the tracheostomy for late complication. The actuarial laryngeal preservation rate was 92.3%. We did not find any significant relationship between local relapse and extent of disease, subglottic extension, or anterior commissure involvement. Concurrent chemotherapy was not a significant prognostic factor. Laser debulking followed by radiation therapy did not change the voice significantly except the F0 range. We conclude that the laser-radiation combined therapy for T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer was effective therapy for not only preservation of the voice but also for vocal function. (author)

  7. Laser-radiation therapy for T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Gen; Hayabuchi, Naofumi; Toda, Yukihiro; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Ogo, Etuyo; Nakajima, Tadashi

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the laser-radiation combined therapy for T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer in order to preserve the larynx. The subjects consisted of 52 patients with T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer treated with laser-radiation combined therapy between 1980 and 1999. Patients ranged in age from 40-88 years, with a median of 70 years, and included 51 men and one woman. During this period, treatment was administered with different radiation devices ( 60 Co or 4 MV-X ray), and 40-72 Gy (median, 60Gy) of radiation therapy were administered. Tumor and treatment characteristics were correlated with local control at a median follow-up of 61 months (range 12-210 months). Concurrent chemotherapy was administered to 32 patients; 29 were treated with 5-FU and vitamin A (FAR), and 3 were treated with low-dose CDDP. Post treatment vocal function was examined in 37 patients. The voice was evaluated in terms of four parameters: maximum phonation time (MPT), mean air flow rate during phonation over a comfortable duration (MFR), fundamental frequency range of phonation (F0 range), and sound pressure level range of phonation (SPL range). The five-year cause-specific-survival rate was 98.0%, and the local control rate was 91.8%. Three of 4 patients who had locally relapsed were administered total laryngectomy as salvage therapy. One patient was administered the tracheostomy for late complication. The actuarial laryngeal preservation rate was 92.3%. We did not find any significant relationship between local relapse and extent of disease, subglottic extension, or anterior commissure involvement. Concurrent chemotherapy was not a significant prognostic factor. Laser debulking followed by radiation therapy did not change the voice significantly except the F0 range. We conclude that the laser-radiation combined therapy for T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer was effective therapy for not only preservation of the voice but also for vocal function. (author)

  8. Risk of fatal cerebrovascular accidents after external beam radiation therapy for early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Mitra, Nandita; Lin, Alexander; Ahn, Peter; Wan, Fei; O'Malley, Bert; Weinstein, Gregory S; Bekelman, Justin E

    2014-05-01

    This study compared the risk of fatal cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) in patients with early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer receiving surgery or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Using a competing risks survival analysis, we compared the risk of death because of CVA among patients with early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer receiving surgery or EBRT in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. The cumulative incidence of fatal CVA at 15 years was higher in patients receiving EBRT (2.8%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3% to 3.4%) compared to surgery (1.5%; 95% CI, 0.8% to 2.3%; p = .024). In multivariable competing risks regression models, EBRT remained associated with an increased risk of fatal CVA compared to surgery (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.75; 95% CI, 1.04-2.96; p = .037). Treatment for early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer with EBRT was associated with a small increase in the risk of late fatal CVA events relative to surgery. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Early glottic cancer: the influence of primary treatment on voice preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesnicar, Hotimir; Smid, Lojze; Zakotnik, Branko

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Retrospective analysis was performed to assess the influence of primary surgical or irradiation treatment on local control, survival, and final preservation of larynx in comparable groups of patients with T1N0 and T2N0 glottic cancer. Methods and Materials: Two hundred sixty-three previously untreated patients with invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the glottis (187T1 and 76T2) were treated with primary radiotherapy (159T1 and 60T2) or primary surgery (28T1 and 16T2) between January 1976 and December 1990, at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. Conventional one daily fraction of 2 Gy to doses of 60-74 Gy (median: 65 Gy) were used in 98% of primarily irradiated patients through out the observed period. To enable better comparison between the two treatment groups, primarily irradiated patients were retrospectively stratified by the criteria of suitability for primary voice-sparing operation. Several host, tumor, and treatment parameters were analyzed. Results: Only the stage of the disease significantly influenced both 10-year recurrence-free and disease-specific survival regardless primary treatment modality (p = 0.0002). In all primary irradiated patients local control was significantly better for those with overall treatment time of less than 48 days (p = 0.007). In patients suitable for voice-sparing operation, local control of primarily operated patients was similar to that of patients primarily irradiated with shorter overall treatment time, which was 93 and 88% for T1 and 67 and 64% for T2 tumors, respectively. Ultimate local control in primary surgery and radiotherapy group was 96 and 96% for T1 and 89 and 88% for T2 tumors, respectively. Equal larynx preservation of 100% in T1 and 90% in T2 patients was achieved in finally cured primarily operated patients and those patients primarily irradiated with a shorter overall treatment time. If treatment time was longer than 48 days, significantly worse final larynx preservation of 84% in T1 and 75% in

  10. Quality of life following endoscopic resection or radio-therapy for early glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahannan, Abdulrahman A.; Zabrodsky, M.; Chovanec, M.; Cerny, L.; Lohynska, R.

    2007-01-01

    To compare post treatment quality of life (QoL) of patients treated by radiotherapy or endoscopic transoral endolaryngeal surgery using two quality of life scoring tools. From May 1998 to July 2005, 48 patients (11 women and 37 men) with early glottic cancer were treated with curative radiotherapy (18 patients) or laser cordectomy (30 patients), and retrospectively evaluated using QoL questionnaires; European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) - EORTC-QoL Core Questionnaire (QLQ-C30 version 2.0) and organ specific EORTC - QLQ, Head and Neck Module (QLQ-H and N35) at the University Hospital Motol, Czech Republic. Mean follow-up was 24 months. Only patients in complete remission were enrolled in the study. The overall score calculated separately for both questionnaires was not statistically different between both groups. Statistically significant differences were found only in specific group of questions focusing on saliva production (p=0.034) and sexuality performance (p=0.002). The majority of cases treated with cordectomy were Tis lesions. In the radiotherapy group, T1 lesions predominated (p=0.0001). Patients treated with radiotherapy were significantly older than those treated with cordectomy (p=0.027), which could explain the worsened score in sexuality questions. There were no significant differences found between genders allocated either to cordectomy or radiotherapy group. The overall QoL did not differ between patients treated with cordectomy or radiotherapy, despite the fact that patients treated with radiotherapy had more advanced disease and were older. There was significantly worse saliva and sexuality question score in the radiotherapy group. (author)

  11. A predictive model for recurrence in patients with glottic cancer implemented in a mobile application for Android.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jover-Esplá, Ana Gabriela; Palazón-Bru, Antonio; Folgado-de la Rosa, David Manuel; Severá-Ferrándiz, Guillermo; Sancho-Mestre, Manuela; de Juan-Herrero, Joaquín; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco

    2018-05-01

    The existing predictive models of laryngeal cancer recurrence present limitations for clinical practice. Therefore, we constructed, internally validated and implemented in a mobile application (Android) a new model based on a points system taking into account the internationally recommended statistical methodology. This longitudinal prospective study included 189 patients with glottic cancer in 2004-2016 in a Spanish region. The main variable was time-to-recurrence, and its potential predictors were: age, gender, TNM classification, stage, smoking, alcohol consumption, and histology. A points system was developed to predict five-year risk of recurrence based on a Cox model. This was validated internally by bootstrapping, determining discrimination (C-statistics) and calibration (smooth curves). A total of 77 patients presented recurrence (40.7%) in a mean follow-up period of 3.4 ± 3.0 years. The factors in the model were: age, lymph node stage, alcohol consumption and stage. Discrimination and calibration were satisfactory. A points system was developed to obtain the probability of recurrence of laryngeal glottic cancer in five years, using five clinical variables. Our system should be validated externally in other geographical areas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Simple Carotid-Sparing Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Technique and Preliminary Experience for T1-2 Glottic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, David I.; Fuller, Clifton D.; Barker, Jerry L.; Mason, Bryan M.S.; Garcia, John A. C.; Lewin, Jan S.; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Stasney, C. Richard; Frank, Steven J.; Schwartz, David L.; Morrison, William H.; Garden, Adam S.; Ang, K. Kian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetry and feasibility of carotid-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for early glottic cancer and to report preliminary clinical experience. Methods and Materials: Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine radiotherapy (DICOM-RT) datasets from 6 T1-2 conventionally treated glottic cancer patients were used to create both conventional IMRT plans. We developed a simplified IMRT planning algorithm with three fields and limited segments. Conventional and IMRT plans were compared using generalized equivalent uniform dose and dose-volume parameters for in-field carotid arteries, target volumes, and organs at risk. We have treated 11 patients with this simplified IMRT technique. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy consistently reduced radiation dose to the carotid arteries (p < 0.05) while maintaining the clinical target volume coverage. With conventional planning, median carotid V35, V50, and V63 were 100%, 100%, and 69.0%, respectively. With IMRT planning these decreased to 2%, 0%, and 0%, respectively (p < 0.01). Radiation planning and treatment times were similar for conventional radiotherapy and IMRT. Treatment results have been excellent thus far. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy significantly reduced unnecessary radiation dose to the carotid arteries compared with conventional lateral fields while maintaining clinical target volume coverage. Further experience and longer follow-up will be required to demonstrate outcomes for cancer control and carotid artery effects.

  13. Multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of T1 glottic cancer. The role of patient preference in an homogenous patient population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinapoli, Nicola; Parrilla, Claudio; Galli, Jacopo

    2010-01-01

    To compare oncological outcome and voice quality among a uniform and well-defined subset of patients with T1 glottic carcinoma. Patients, affected by laryngeal glottic carcinoma, treated by laser CO 2 surgery or radiotherapy, have been analyzed. Overall survival and disease-free survival were calculated. In order to verify differences in functional outcomes and voice quality, all patients were interviewed during their last follow-up visit during 2009 using the VHI (Voice Handicap Index) questionnaire. The data were analyzed using the MedCalc software. A total of 143 patients were analyzed: 73 underwent surgery and 70 underwent radiotherapy. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in terms of overall survival and disease-free survival; dividing patients into stages T1a and T1b also made no difference. In order to evaluate the differences in outcomes for surgery and radiotherapy, patients were interviewed using the VHI questionnaire. Better scores for each category in the VHI were found for patients receiving radiotherapy compared to surgery (physical: p = 0.0023; functional: p < 0.0001; environmental: p < 0.001). The median VHI score for radiotherapy patients was 4, while for surgical patients it was 18 (p < 0.0001). This study confirms the well-known knowledge that results from radiotherapy and surgery in early glottic cancer treatment are equivalent. Furthermore, the role of patient preference in the treatment modality choice and the value of a multidisciplinary approach for a detailed and multi-oriented discussion with the patient are outlined. (orig.)

  14. Multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of T1 glottic cancer. The role of patient preference in an homogenous patient population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinapoli, Nicola [Catholic Univ. of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Parrilla, Claudio; Galli, Jacopo [Catholic Univ. of the Sacred Heart, Rome (IT). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngoiatry] (and others)

    2010-11-15

    To compare oncological outcome and voice quality among a uniform and well-defined subset of patients with T1 glottic carcinoma. Patients, affected by laryngeal glottic carcinoma, treated by laser CO{sub 2} surgery or radiotherapy, have been analyzed. Overall survival and disease-free survival were calculated. In order to verify differences in functional outcomes and voice quality, all patients were interviewed during their last follow-up visit during 2009 using the VHI (Voice Handicap Index) questionnaire. The data were analyzed using the MedCalc software. A total of 143 patients were analyzed: 73 underwent surgery and 70 underwent radiotherapy. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in terms of overall survival and disease-free survival; dividing patients into stages T1a and T1b also made no difference. In order to evaluate the differences in outcomes for surgery and radiotherapy, patients were interviewed using the VHI questionnaire. Better scores for each category in the VHI were found for patients receiving radiotherapy compared to surgery (physical: p = 0.0023; functional: p < 0.0001; environmental: p < 0.001). The median VHI score for radiotherapy patients was 4, while for surgical patients it was 18 (p < 0.0001). This study confirms the well-known knowledge that results from radiotherapy and surgery in early glottic cancer treatment are equivalent. Furthermore, the role of patient preference in the treatment modality choice and the value of a multidisciplinary approach for a detailed and multi-oriented discussion with the patient are outlined. (orig.)

  15. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Elderly Patients After Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery for Early-Stage Glottic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Julian C.; Kruser, Tim J.; Gondi, Vinai; Mohindra, Pranshu; Cannon, Donald M.; Harari, Paul M.; Bentzen, Søren M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Comprehensive neck radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to increase cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk in advanced-stage head-and-neck cancer. We assessed whether more limited neck RT used for early-stage (T1-T2 N0) glottic cancer is associated with increased CVD risk, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Methods and Materials: We identified patients ≥66 years of age with early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer from SEER diagnosed from 1992 to 2007. Patients treated with combined surgery and RT were excluded. Medicare CPT codes for carotid interventions, Medicare ICD-9 codes for cerebrovascular events, and SEER data for stroke as the cause of death were collected. Similarly, Medicare CPT and ICD-9 codes for peripheral vascular disease (PVD) were assessed to serve as an internal control between treatment groups. Results: A total of 1413 assessable patients (RT, n=1055; surgery, n=358) were analyzed. The actuarial 10-year risk of CVD was 56.5% (95% confidence interval 51.5%-61.5%) for the RT cohort versus 48.7% (41.1%-56.3%) in the surgery cohort (P=.27). The actuarial 10-year risk of PVD did not differ between the RT (52.7% [48.1%-57.3%]) and surgery cohorts (52.6% [45.2%-60.0%]) (P=.89). Univariate analysis showed an increased association of CVD with more recent diagnosis (P=.001) and increasing age (P=.001). On multivariate Cox analysis, increasing age (P<.001) and recent diagnosis (P=.002) remained significantly associated with a higher CVD risk, whereas the association of RT and CVD remained not statistically significant (HR=1.11 [0.91-1.37,] P=.31). Conclusions: Elderly patients with early-stage laryngeal cancer have a high burden of cerebrovascular events after surgical management or RT. RT and surgery are associated with comparable risk for subsequent CVD development after treatment in elderly patients

  16. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Elderly Patients After Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery for Early-Stage Glottic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Julian C.; Kruser, Tim J. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Gondi, Vinai [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Central Dupage Hospital Cancer Center, Warrenville, Illinois (United States); Mohindra, Pranshu; Cannon, Donald M.; Harari, Paul M. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bentzen, Søren M., E-mail: bentzen@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Comprehensive neck radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to increase cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk in advanced-stage head-and-neck cancer. We assessed whether more limited neck RT used for early-stage (T1-T2 N0) glottic cancer is associated with increased CVD risk, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Methods and Materials: We identified patients ≥66 years of age with early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer from SEER diagnosed from 1992 to 2007. Patients treated with combined surgery and RT were excluded. Medicare CPT codes for carotid interventions, Medicare ICD-9 codes for cerebrovascular events, and SEER data for stroke as the cause of death were collected. Similarly, Medicare CPT and ICD-9 codes for peripheral vascular disease (PVD) were assessed to serve as an internal control between treatment groups. Results: A total of 1413 assessable patients (RT, n=1055; surgery, n=358) were analyzed. The actuarial 10-year risk of CVD was 56.5% (95% confidence interval 51.5%-61.5%) for the RT cohort versus 48.7% (41.1%-56.3%) in the surgery cohort (P=.27). The actuarial 10-year risk of PVD did not differ between the RT (52.7% [48.1%-57.3%]) and surgery cohorts (52.6% [45.2%-60.0%]) (P=.89). Univariate analysis showed an increased association of CVD with more recent diagnosis (P=.001) and increasing age (P=.001). On multivariate Cox analysis, increasing age (P<.001) and recent diagnosis (P=.002) remained significantly associated with a higher CVD risk, whereas the association of RT and CVD remained not statistically significant (HR=1.11 [0.91-1.37,] P=.31). Conclusions: Elderly patients with early-stage laryngeal cancer have a high burden of cerebrovascular events after surgical management or RT. RT and surgery are associated with comparable risk for subsequent CVD development after treatment in elderly patients.

  17. Does pretreatment hemoglobin level affect outcome in patients with T1 glottic cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canaday, Daniel J.; Regine, William F.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Zollinger, William; Machtay, Mitchell; Lee, Jason; Schultz, Delray; Rosenthal, David I.; Rudoltz, Marc S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Recent reports have suggested that pretreatment hemoglobin (Hgb) is significantly associated with local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) in patients with T1 and T2 squamous cell carcinoma of the glottic larynx. This study evaluates the association of pretreatment Hgb level and other factors with outcome in patients limited to T1 squamous cell carcinoma of the glottic larynx treated with external beam radiation. Methods: One hundred fifty-eight patients with T1 squamous cell carcinoma of the glottic larynx were analyzed. Median follow-up was 5 years (range 2-22). Median pretreatment Hgb was 14.4 gm/dl (range 8.2-17.2). The following parameters were analyzed for their impact on LC, OS, and disease specific survival (DSS): age, gender, pretreatment Hgb, tumor grade, anterior commissure involvement, field size, total dose, dose per fraction, and overall treatment time. Results: Five year actuarial LC was 84%. Pretreatment Hgb was not a significant predictor for LC when assessed as a continuous variable (p=0.38). LC was 82% for patients with Hgb >13 vs 92% for Hgb ≤ 13 (p=0.13). No other factor was significant for LC. Five year actuarial OS was 74%. On univariate analysis, pretreatment Hgb ≤ 13 gm/dl was a significant factor for poorer OS (78% vs 68%, p=0.004), as were total dose 61 years (p=0.017). On multivariate analysis, only age >61 (p=0.014) and Hgb ≤ 13 (p=0.001) retained significance for OS. Five year actuarial DSS was 92%. Pretreatment Hgb was not a prognostic factor for DSS, nor were any other analyzed factors. Conclusion: Pretreatment Hgb is not a significant prognostic factor for LC in patients with T1 squamous cell carcinoma of the glottic larynx, but it does predict for a poorer OS without affecting DSS. This suggests that patients with lower pretreatment Hgb may have confounding medical problems which detract from their overall survival

  18. Phantom-to-clinic development of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy for early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Chuxiong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Simmons Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Chun, Stephen G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Sumer, Baran D. [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Nedzi, Lucien A.; Abdulrahman, Ramzi E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Simmons Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Yordy, John S. [Valley Radiation Therapy Center, Anchorage, AK (United States); Lee, Pam; Hrycushko, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Simmons Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Solberg, Timothy D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ahn, Chul [Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Timmerman, Robert D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Simmons Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Schwartz, David L., E-mail: david.schwartz214@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Simmons Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to commission and clinically test a robotic stereotactic delivery system (CyberKnife, Sunnyvale, CA) to treat early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer. We enrolled 15 patients with cTis-T2N0M0 carcinoma of the glottic larynx onto an institutional review board (IRB)-approved clinical trial. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) plans prescribed 45 Gy/10 fractions to the involved hemilarynx. SBRT dosimetry was compared with (1) standard carotid-sparing laryngeal intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and (2) selective hemilaryngeal IMRT. Our results demonstrate that SBRT plans improved sparing of the contralateral arytenoid (mean 20.0 Gy reduction, p <0.001), ipsilateral carotid D{sub max} (mean 20.6 Gy reduction, p <0.001), contralateral carotid D{sub max} (mean 28.1 Gy reduction, p <0.001), and thyroid D{sub mean} (mean 15.0 Gy reduction, p <0.001) relative to carotid-sparing IMRT. SBRT also modestly improved dose sparing to the contralateral arytenoid (mean 4.8 Gy reduction, p = 0.13) and spinal cord D{sub max} (mean 4.9 Gy reduction, p = 0.015) relative to selective hemilaryngeal IMRT plans. This “phantom-to-clinic” feasibility study confirmed that hypofractionated SBRT treatment for early-stage laryngeal cancer can potentially spare dose to adjacent normal tissues relative to current IMRT standards. Clinical efficacy and toxicity correlates continue to be collected through an ongoing prospective trial.

  19. Phase I/II trial of concurrent use of S-1 and radiation therapy for T2 glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Meijin; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Okamoto, Makito; Niibe, Yuzuru; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Kotani, Shouko

    2010-01-01

    A Phase I/II study of S-1 combined radiation therapy was conducted in patients with Stage II (T2N0) glottic cancer. The purpose of the Phase I study was to identify the maximum tolerated dose, the recommended dose and the dose limiting toxicity. The objectives in the phase II study were to estimate the local control and the overall survival, and the incidence of adverse events. In Phase I, S-1 was administered orally in a split-course fashion as two doses of 40 mg/m 2 , for a total daily dose of 80 mg/m 2 . The course involved a 2-week rest after a 2-week administration (Level 1) and a 1-week rest after a 3-week administration (Level 2). Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily (total 60-Gy) standard fractionation. Seven patients were enrolled in the Phase I, and 19 in the Phase II study. Mucositis was the most common toxicity encountered. All 26 patients completed radiation therapy without delay. The overall response rate was 100% (26/26) with all patients showing a complete response. One patient developed a local recurrence 28 months after the treatment. The 3-year local control and overall survival rates were 94.7 and 85.4%, respectively (limited to 22 patients from Level 2). The use of S-1 at 80 mg/m 2 per day in a split-course with 1-week rest during the course of radiation therapy was safe and effective for Stage II glottic cancer. The treatment strategy employing orally available S-1 proved to be beneficial over the conventional injection of antitumor agents for maintaining the patients' quality of life. (author)

  20. Pretreatment hemoglobin in early stage glottic cancer: red flag or red herring?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, J. Curtis; Hixson, William C.; Kim, Robert Y.; Smith, Judy W.; Mayo, Matthew S.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of pretreatment hemoglobin levels on the recurrence rate of patients with early stage glottic carcinoma treated with definitive radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Between May 1972 and December 1992, one hundred three patients with stage I or II glottic carcinoma were treated with definitive radiotherapy. The records were reviewed and analyzed for the effects of pretreatment hemoglobin and hematocrit, stage, dose per fraction (180 vs 200 cGy), treatment interruptions, and differentiation of the tumor. The majority of stage I patients were treated to a total dose of 64 to 66 Gy, and stage II patients were treated to 68 to 70 Gy. Mean and median follow up were 85 and 75 months, respectively. Results: With mean follow up of 85 months, the recurrence rate for patients with hemoglobin ≤13 g/dL was 33.3%, and patients with hemoglobin >13 g/dL was 20% (p 0.19). For stage I (n = 84), the recurrence rate with hemoglobin ≤13 g/dL and >13 g/dL was 26% and 17%, respectively (p = 0.51). For stage II patients (n = 19) with hemoglobin ≤13 g/dL and >13 g/dL, the recurrence rate was 50% and 36%, respectively (p = 0.66). Using a Fisher's exact test, the only variables showing a statistically significant prognosis for recurrence were treatment interruption and stage. The recurrence rate with a treatment interruption was 40% compared with 15% if there was no interruption (p 0.0039). The recurrence rate for stage I was 19%, and for stage II was 42% (p = 0.067). Other factors showed no significant increase in recurrence; dose per fraction (p = 0.421), grade of differentiation (p = 0.740). Conclusion: While pretreatment hemoglobin levels below 13 g/dL do not significantly affect the recurrence rates for T1N0 and T2N0 glottic carcinomas, treatment interruptions are a significant factor in the failure of these patients

  1. T1/T2 glottic cancer managed by external beam radiotherapy - the influence of pretreatment hemoglobin on local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warde, P.R.; O'Sullivan, B.; Panzarella, T.; Keane, T.J.; Gullane, P.; Payne, D.; Liu, F.-F.; McLean, M.; Waldron, J.; Cummings, B.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Pretreatment hemoglobin (Hb) level has been reported to be an important prognostic factor for local control and survival in various malignancies. However in many settings, the adverse effect of a low Hb may be related to more advanced disease and the purpose of this analysis was to assess the influence of pretreatment Hb on local control in a large series of patients with a localised cancer (T1/T2 glottic cancer, AJCC 1992) treated in a standard fashion. Materials and Methods: Between Jan 1981 and Dec 1989, 735 patients (median age 63, 657 males 78 females) with T1/T2 glottic cancer were treated with RT. The standard RT prescription was 50Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks (97% patients). Factors studied for prognostic importance for local failure included pretreatment Hb (assessed as a continuous variable) age, sex, T category, anterior commissure involvement, subglottic extension, tumour bulk (presence of visible tumour vs subclinical disease), treatment time and RT technique (Cobalt vs 6 MV). Results: With a median follow-up of 6.8 years (range 0.2 - 14.3), 131 patients have relapsed for an actuarial 5-year relapse free rate of 81.7%. The 5-year actuarial survival was 75.8%, cause specific survival - 92.4%. The median pretreatment hemoglobin level was 14.8 g/dl and was the same in all T categories. On multivariate analysis, using the Cox proportional hazards model, pretreatment Hb (p=0.001) predicted for local failure after RT. The relative risk (RR) for relapse was calculated for various Hb levels eg the RR for a Hb of 12 g/dl vs a Hb of 15 g/dl was 1.8, (95% C.I. 1.3 - 2.7). Previously noted factors including gender (p=0.0038), T category (p=0.007)) as well as tumour bulk (p=0.02) were also prognostically important for local control. Conclusions: This analysis, in a large number of similarly treated patients, indicates that pretreatment Hb is an independent prognostic factor for local control in patients with T1/T2 carcinoma of the glottis treated with

  2. T1-2 glottic cancer treated with radiotherapy and/or surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelan, Mohamed; Bojaxhiu, Beat; Dal Pra, Alan; Aebersold, Daniel M.; Elicin, Olgun [University of Bern, Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, Bern (Switzerland); Anschuetz, Lukas; Schubert, Adrian D.; Giger, Roland [University of Bern, Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, Bern (Switzerland); Behrensmeier, Frank [University of Bern, Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, Bern (Switzerland); Radiation-Oncology-Centre, Biel - Seeland - Berner Jura, Biel (Switzerland)

    2017-12-15

    The optimal treatment strategy for stage I-II glottic squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is not well-defined. This study analyzed treatment results and prognostic factors. This is a single-institution retrospective analysis of 244 patients with T1-2 glottic SCC who underwent normofractionated radiotherapy (RT) and/or surgery between 1990 and 2013. The primary endpoint was relapse-free survival (RFS). Median age was 65 years (range: 36-92 years), the majority (82%) having stage I disease. Definitive RT was used in 82% (median dose: 68 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction). Median follow-up was 59 months. The 5-year RFS rates were 83 and 75% (p = 0.05) for stage I and 62 and 50% (p = 0.47) for stage II in the RT and surgery groups, respectively. Multivariate analyses indicate T1 vs. T2 and RT vs. surgery as independent prognostic factors for RFS, with hazard ratios of 0.38 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.21-0.72) and 0.53 (95% CI: 0.30-0.99), respectively (p < 0.05). The 5-year overall and cause-specific survival rates in the whole cohort were 92 and 96%, respectively, with no significant differences between treatment groups. Anterior commissure involvement was neither a prognostic nor a predictive factor. The incidence of secondary malignancies was not significantly different between patients treated with and without RT (22 vs. 9% at 10 years, respectively, p = 0.18). Despite a possible selection bias, our series demonstrates improved RFS with RT over surgery in stage I glottic SCC. (orig.) [German] Die optimale Behandlungsstrategie fuer ein Plattenepithelkarzinom (SCC) der Stimmbaender im Stadium I-II ist nicht gut definiert. In dieser Studie wurden Behandlungsergebnisse und prognostische Faktoren untersucht. In dieser retrospektiv unizentrischen Studie wurden 244 Patienten mit einem fruehen Glottis-SCC (T1-2) zwischen 1990 und 2013 strahlentherapeutisch (RT) und/oder chirurgisch behandelt. Primaerer Endpunkt war das rezidivfreie Ueberleben (RFS). Das mediane Alter betrug 65 Jahre

  3. Results of definitive radiotherapy in T1 and T2 glottic carcinoma: Institute of Rotary Cancer Hospital experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanti, B.K.; Rath, G.K.; Tanwar, R.K.; Lal, P.; Biswal, B.M.; Tandon, D.A.; Bahadur, S.

    1996-01-01

    Early glottic carcinomas (T1 and T2) constitute only 2% of all laryngeal cancers in our data. Seventy patients were seen between 1985 and 1992. All patients were treated by cobalt-60 small field radiotherapy using a beam directed shell. The total dose delivered was 60-65Gy in 31 patients and 66-70Gy in 39 patients. The follow-up period ranged from 5 to 126 months, with a mean follow up of 37 months overall and 55 months in the surgical salvage group. Radiation therapy controlled disease in 71% (50 of 70) of patients overall; 75% with T1 and 67% with T2 lesions. Total laryngectomy as salvage surgery was performed in 70% (14 of 20) of patients whose disease recurred. Ultimate control including surgical salvage occurred in 64 (91 %) of 70 patients in the present study. The actuarial 5 year survival was 83 and 80% in T1 and T2 tumours, respectively (statistically insignificant). This report supports the policy of definitive irradiation, reserving surgical salvage for radiation failures in early laryngeal cancers. 17 refs., 2 tabs

  4. Quality of life, functional outcome, and voice handicap index in partial laryngectomy patients for early glottic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandogan Tolga

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we aim to gather information about the quality of life issues, functional outcomes and voice problems facing early glottic cancer patients treated with the surgical techniques such as laryngofissure cordectomy, fronto-lateral laryngectomy, or cricohyoidopexi. In particular, consistency of life and voice quality issues with the laryngeal tissue excised during surgery is examined. In addition, the effects of arytenoidectomy to the life and voice quality are also studied. Methods 29 male patients were enrolled voluntarily in the study. The average age was 53.9 years. Three out of 10 patients with laryngofissure cordectomy also had arytenoidectomy. 11 patients had fronto-lateral laryngectomy with Tucker reconstruction, two of which also had arytenoidectomy. There were eight patients with cricohyoidopexi and bilateral functional neck dissection. Three of these patients also had arytenoidectomy. In bilateral functional neck dissection cases, spinal accessory nerve was preserved and level V of the neck was not dissected. None of the patients had neither radiotherapy nor voice therapy. Cordectomy patients never had a temporary tracheotomy or were connected to a feeding tube. Data was collected for 13 months for the cordectomy group, 14 months for fronto-lateral laryngectomy and cricohyoidopexi groups on average post-operatively. Statistical analysis in this study was carried out using the one-way analysis of variance, and the Post-Hoc group comparisons were made after Bonferroni and Scheffé-procedures. In order to determine the effects of arytenoidectomy, a regression analysis is carried out to see if there are statistical differences in answers given to the survey questions among patients who were arytenoidectomized during their surgeries. Results There was a statistically significant difference between cordectomy and cricohyoidopexi group in answers to the University of Washington- Quality of Life- Revised survey

  5. Impact and relationship of anterior commissure and time-dose factor on the local control of T1N0 glottic cancer treated by 6 MV photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yiu-Tung

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate prognostic factors that may influence local control (LC of T1N0 glottic cancer treated by primary radiotherapy (RT with 6 MV photons. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 433 consecutive patients with T1N0 glottic cancer treated between 1983 and 2005 by RT in our institution. All patients were treated with 6 MV photons. One hundred and seventy seven (41% patients received 52.5 Gy in 23 fractions with 2.5 Gy/fraction, and 256 (59% patients received 66 Gy in 33 fractions with 2 Gy/fraction. Results The median follow-up time was 10.5 years. The 10-year LC rates were 91% and 87% for T1a and T1b respectively. Multivariate analysis showed LC rate was adversely affected by poorly differentiated histology (Hazard Ratio [HR]: 7.5, p = 0.035; involvement of anterior commissure (HR: 2.34, p = 0.011; fraction size of 2.0 Gy (HR: 2.17, p = 0.035 and tumor biologically effective dose (BED 15 (HR: 3.38, p = 0.017. Conclusions The negative impact of anterior commissure involvement could be overcome by delivering a higher tumor BED through using fraction size of > 2.0 Gy. We recommend that fraction size > 2.0 Gy should be utilized, for radiation schedules with five daily fractions each week.

  6. Evaluation of treatment results in patients with early glottic cancer (stage T 1a N 0, T 1b N 0) treated with Manchester irradiation modality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przeorek, W.; Skladowski, K.; Przeorek, C.

    2007-01-01

    Data charts of 64 patients with stage I glottic cancer treated with Manchester irradiation modality in the 1 st Radiotherapy Clinic of Msc Memorial Institute in Gliwice has been retrospectively analyzed. There were 55 males and 9 females at median age 63 years (range from 37 to 83 years). In 40 (62%) patients pathological subtype of squamous cell cancer has not been established. In 19 (30%) patients microscopic examination revealed keratinizing and in 5 (8%) nonkeratinizing type of neoplasm. In 49 (77%) patients the tumour involved only one vocal cord, in 11 (17%) both, in 3 (5%) vocal cord and commissure and 1 (1%) patient both cords and commissure. All patients were treated with 60C o machines (36 patients - 56%) or high energy photons (28 patients - 44%). Radiotherapy was conducted with so called Manchester modality with one daily fraction of 3 Gy to a total dose of 51-54 Gy. Overall treatment time varied between 21 and 23 days. Acute mucosal reaction was evaluated with the morphological-functional Dische scale as well as with the EORTC/RTOG scoring system. The criteria of treatment efficacy were: 5-year local control, 5-year survival without serious complications (3 and 4 EORTC) and 5-year survival after salvage surgery in relapsed patients. In 63 patients complete regression of the tumour was observed up to 6 months of follow-up. One patient failed at the time of radiotherapy ending. In one case distant metastases to lungs were noticed. In 6 patients local relapses were discovered of which 3 were successfully salvaged with the surgery. In one patient, 18 months after radiotherapy massive oedema of laryngeal mucosa occurred. In this case tracheostomy was needed. 5-year local control, local control after salvage surgery and survival without serious complication rates are 89%, 97% and 95% respectively. 1. Radiotherapy with Manchester modality is a safe and effective treatment of stage I glottic cancer. 2. Despite hypofractionation the risk of severe complication

  7. Radical radiotherapy for early glottic cancer: Results in a series of 1087 patients from two Italian radiation oncology centers. I. The case of T1N0 disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellai, Enrico; Frata, Paolo; Magrini, Stefano M.; Paiar, Fabiola; Barca, Raffaella; Fondelli, Simona; Polli, Caterina; Livi, Lorenzo; Bonetti, Bartolomea; Vitali, Elisabetta; De Stefani, Agostina; Buglione, Michela; Biti, Gianpaolo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate local control rates, late damage incidence, functional results, and second tumor occurrence according to the different patient, tumor, and treatment features in a large bi-institutional series of T1 glottic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 831 T1 glottic cancer cases treated consecutively with radical intent at the Florence University Radiation Oncology Department (FLO) and at the Radiation Oncology Department of University of Brescia-Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti' (BS) were studied. Actuarial cumulative local control probability (LC), disease-specific (DSS), and overall survival (OS) rates have been calculated and compared in the different clinical and therapeutic subgroups with both univariate and multivariate analysis. Types of relapse and their surgical salvage have been evaluated, along with the functional results of treatment. Late damage incidence and second tumor cumulative probability (STP) have been also calculated. Results: In the entire series, 3-, 5-, and 10-year OS was equal to 86%, 77%, and 57%, respectively. Corresponding values for LC were 86%, 84%, and 83% and for DSS 96%, 95%, and 93%, taking into account surgical salvage of relapsed cases. Eighty-seven percent of the patients were cured with function preserved. Main determinants of a worse LC at univariate analysis were: male gender, earlier treatment period, larger tumor extent, anterior commissure involvement, and the use of Cobalt 60. At multivariate analysis, only gender, tumor extent, anterior commissure involvement, and beam type retained statistical significance. Higher total doses and larger field sizes are significantly related (logistic regression) with a higher late damage incidence. Scatterplot analysis of various combinations of field dimensions and total dose showed that field dimensions >35 and 2 , together with doses of >65 Gy, offer the best local control results together with an acceptably low late damage incidence. Twenty-year STP

  8. Radical radiotherapy for early glottic cancer: Results in a series of 1087 patients from two Italian radiation oncology centers. II. The case of T2N0 disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frata, Paolo; Cellai, Enrico; Magrini, Stefano M.; Bonetti, Bartolomea; Vitali, Elisabetta; Tonoli, Sandro; Buglione, Michela; Paiar, Fabiola; Barca, Raffaella; Fondelli, Simona; Polli, Caterina; Livi, Lorenzo; Biti, Gianpaolo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate local control rates, late damage incidence, functional results, and second-tumor occurrence according to the different patient, tumor, and treatment features in a large bi-institutional series of T2 glottic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 256 T2 glottic cancer cases treated consecutively with radical intent at the Florence University Radiation Oncology Department (FLO) and at the Radiation Oncology Department of University of Brescia, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti' (BS) were studied. Cumulative probability of local control (LC), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated and compared in the different clinical and therapeutic subgroups by both univariate and multivariate analysis. Types of relapse and their surgical salvage were evaluated, along with the functional results of treatment. Late-damage incidence and second-tumor cumulative probability (STP) were also calculated. Results: In the entire series, 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year OS rates were, respectively, 73%, 59%, and 37%. Corresponding values for cumulative LC probability were 73%, 73%, and 70% and for DSS, 89%, 86%, and 85%, taking into account surgical salvage of relapsed cases. Seventy-three percent of the patients were cured with function preserved. Main determinants of a worse LC at univariate analysis were larger tumor extent and impaired cord mobility. At multivariate analysis, the same factors retained statistical significance. Twenty-year STP was 23%, with second-tumor deaths less frequent than larynx cancer deaths (20 of 256 vs. 30 of 256). Incidence of late damage was higher in the first decade of accrual (22%) than in the last decade (10%, p = 0.03); the same was true for severe late damage (9% vs. 1.8%). Conclusion: Present-day radical radiotherapy can be considered a standard treatment for T2 glottic cancer. Better results are obtained in patients with less extended disease. Late damage is relatively

  9. Compromised local control due to treatment interruptions and late treatment breaks in early glottic cancer: Population-based outcomes study supporting need for intensified treatment schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groome, Patti A.; O'Sullivan, Brian; Mackillop, William J.; Jackson, Lynda D.; Schulze, Karleen M.Math.; Irish, Jonathan C.; Warde, Padraig R.; Schneider, Ken M.; Mackenzie, Robert G.; Hodson, D. Ian; Hammond, J. Alex; Gulavita, Sunil P.P.; Eapen, Libni J.; Dixon, Peter F. M.B.; Bissett, Randy J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This population-based study describes the treatment of early glottic cancer in Ontario, Canada and assesses whether treatment variations were associated with treatment effectiveness. Methods and Materials: We studied 491 T1N0 and 213 T2N0 patients. Data abstracted from charts included age, sex, stage, treatment details, disease control, and survival. Results: The total dose ranged from 50 to 70 Gy, and the daily dose ranged from 1.9 to 2.8 Gy. In 90%, treatment duration was between 25 and 50 days. Field sizes, field reductions, beam arrangement, and beam energy varied. Late treatment breaks occurred in 13.6% of T1N0 and 27.1% of T2N0 cases. Local control was comparable to other reports for T1N0 (82% at 5 years), but was only 63.2% in T2N0. Variables associated with local failure in T1N0 were age less than 49 years (relative risk [RR], 3.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49-6.90) and >3 treatment interruption days (RR, 2.43; 95% CI, 1.00-5.91). In T2N0, these were field reduction (RR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.23-4.42) and late treatment breaks (RR, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.09-4.41). Conclusion: Some aspects of treatment for early glottic cancer were associated with worse local control. Problems with protracted treatment are of particular concern, underscoring the need for randomized studies to intensify radiotherapy

  10. Glottic ansd supraglottic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acht, M.J.J. van; Dolsma, W.V.; Hulshof, J.H.; Leer, J.W.H.; Hermans, J.

    1989-01-01

    From 1971 through 1982, 442 patients with laryngeal carcinoma were seen at the Leiden University Hospital. They were treated either with radiotherapy alone, sandwich therapy (pre- and postoperative radiotherapy) or by surgery followed by postoperative irradiation. Three hundred and sixty-six patients with glottic or supraglottic tumours could be analysed with respect to two different treatments, complications of treatment and some prognostic factors. Two endpoints of analysis were used: disease-free interval and survival to cfancer death. In patients with glottic or supraglottic carcinoma, the survival of patients with advanced disease, treated with radiotherapy only, was worse as compared to the survival of the same category of patients who were treated with sandwich therapy (p<0.005). In small supraglottic tumours, the survival with both therapy policies was equal. There was no influence on prognosis of histological differentiation of the tumour. It appeared that interruption of radiotherapy for more tah two days had an adverse effect on survival in patients with glottic carcinoma (p=0.0001). (author). 16 refs.; 4 figs.;

  11. Role of imaging in the follow-up of T2-T3 glottic cancer treated by transoral laser microsurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Filippo; Piazza, Cesare; Ravanelli, Marco; Gaggero, Giovanna; Parrinello, Giampiero; Paderno, Alberto; Perotti, Pietro; Filauro, Marta; Maroldi, Roberto; Peretti, Giorgio

    2017-10-01

    An unblinded retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was carried out on 138 patients affected by glottic pT2 and selected pT3 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) treated by transoral laser microsurgery (TLM). The entire cohort was divided into two groups: Group A included 78 "high-risk" patients (pT2 with impaired vocal cord mobility, pT3 for anterior paraglottic and/or pre-epiglottic space invasion, presence of angioembolization, perineural spread, and positive lymph nodes in the neck) who underwent postoperative surveillance by endoscopy and imaging (CT or MR), while Group B included 60 "low-risk" patients (pT2 with absence of the above-mentioned features) who underwent endoscopic follow-up alone. Aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic gain in performing combined endoscopic and radiologic surveillance in the "high-risk" group compared to endoscopy alone in the "low-risk" one. There was no significant difference in terms of overall and disease-specific survivals between the two follow-up policies in spite of their different risk profiles. The same was true for organ preservation rate, which was 81% in the "high-risk" and 89% in the "low-risk" group. In contrast, the cumulative probability of disease-free survival was 54% for Group A and 65% for Group B (p = 0.0023). Therefore, our combined endoscopy and imaging surveillance protocol allowed increasing the submucosal recurrence detection rate in "high-risk" pT2-pT3 glottic SCC to 43%. An earlier detection of submucosal recurrences made salvage surgery by TLM feasible in at least half of cases, thus closing the gap between oncologic outcomes obtained in "high-"- vs. "low-risk" patients and leading to organ preservation rates that are favorably comparable to those obtained with open-neck partial laryngectomies and non-surgical organ preservation protocols.

  12. Impact of Close and Positive Margins in Transoral Laser Microsurgery for Tis-T2 Glottic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiz, Ivana; Mazzola, Francesco; Fiz, Francesco; Marchi, Filippo; Filauro, Marta; Paderno, Alberto; Parrinello, Giampiero; Piazza, Cesare; Peretti, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) represents one of the most effective treatment strategies for Tis-T2 glottic squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). The prognostic influence of close/positive margins is still debated, and the role of narrow band imaging (NBI) in their intraoperative definition is still to be validated on large cohort of patients. This study analyzed the influence of margin status on recurrence-free survival (RFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS). We retrospectively studied 507 cases of pTis-T1b (Group A) and 127 cases of pT2 (Group B) glottic SCC. We identified the following margin status: negative ( n  = 232), close superficial ( n  = 79), close deep (CD) ( n  = 35), positive single superficial ( n  = 146), positive multiple superficial ( n  = 94), and positive deep ( n  = 48) and analyzed their impact on RFS and DSS. Close margins were defined by tumor-margin distance <1 mm. Pre-TLM margins were defined by white light in 323 patients, whereas NBI was employed in 311 patients. In Group A, DSS and RFS were reduced in positive multiple superficial and positive deep margins (DSS = 96.1 and 97%, both p  < 0.05; RFS = 72%, p  < 0.001 and 75.8%, p  < 0.01). In Group B, DSS was reduced in positive multiple superficial margins (82.4%, p  < 0.05). RFS was reduced in positive single superficial, positive multiple superficial, and positive deep margins (62.5, 41.2, and 53.3%, p  < 0.01). In the entire population, RFS was reduced in CD margins (77.1%, p  < 0.05). Use of NBI led to improvement in RFS and DSS. The study indicates that close and positive single superficial margins do not affect DSS. By contrast, all types of margin positivity predict the occurrence of relapses, albeit with different likelihood, depending on stage/margin type. CD margins should be considered as a single risk factor. Use of NBI granted better intraoperative margins definition.

  13. Impact of Close and Positive Margins in Transoral Laser Microsurgery for Tis–T2 Glottic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Fiz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionTransoral laser microsurgery (TLM represents one of the most effective treatment strategies for Tis–T2 glottic squamous cell carcinomas (SCC. The prognostic influence of close/positive margins is still debated, and the role of narrow band imaging (NBI in their intraoperative definition is still to be validated on large cohort of patients. This study analyzed the influence of margin status on recurrence-free survival (RFS and disease-specific survival (DSS.MethodsWe retrospectively studied 507 cases of pTis–T1b (Group A and 127 cases of pT2 (Group B glottic SCC. We identified the following margin status: negative (n = 232, close superficial (n = 79, close deep (CD (n = 35, positive single superficial (n = 146, positive multiple superficial (n = 94, and positive deep (n = 48 and analyzed their impact on RFS and DSS. Close margins were defined by tumor-margin distance <1 mm. Pre-TLM margins were defined by white light in 323 patients, whereas NBI was employed in 311 patients.ResultsIn Group A, DSS and RFS were reduced in positive multiple superficial and positive deep margins (DSS = 96.1 and 97%, both p < 0.05; RFS = 72%, p < 0.001 and 75.8%, p < 0.01. In Group B, DSS was reduced in positive multiple superficial margins (82.4%, p < 0.05. RFS was reduced in positive single superficial, positive multiple superficial, and positive deep margins (62.5, 41.2, and 53.3%, p < 0.01. In the entire population, RFS was reduced in CD margins (77.1%, p < 0.05. Use of NBI led to improvement in RFS and DSS.ConclusionThe study indicates that close and positive single superficial margins do not affect DSS. By contrast, all types of margin positivity predict the occurrence of relapses, albeit with different likelihood, depending on stage/margin type. CD margins should be considered as a single risk factor. Use of NBI granted better intraoperative margins definition.

  14. Single Vocal Cord Irradiation: Image Guided Intensity Modulated Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for T1a Glottic Cancer: Early Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim, E-mail: a.almamgani@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology – Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kwa, Stefan L.S.; Tans, Lisa; Moring, Michael; Fransen, Dennie; Mehilal, Robert; Verduijn, Gerda M. [Department of Radiation Oncology – Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Baatenburg de Jong, Rob J. [Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery – Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology – Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To report, from a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data, on the feasibility, outcome, toxicity, and voice-handicap index (VHI) of patients with T1a glottic cancer treated by a novel intensity modulated radiation therapy technique developed at our institution to treat only the involved vocal cord: single vocal cord irradiation (SVCI). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with T1a glottic cancer were treated by means of SVCI. Dose prescription was set to 16 × 3.63 Gy (total dose 58.08 Gy). The clinical target volume was the entire vocal cord. Setup verification was done by means of an online correction protocol using cone beam computed tomography. Data for voice quality assessment were collected prospectively at baseline, end of treatment, and 4, 6, and 12 weeks and 6, 12, and 18 months after treatment using VHI questionnaires. Results: After a median follow-up of 30 months (range, 7-50 months), the 2-year local control and overall survival rates were 100% and 90% because no single local recurrence was reported and 3 patients died because of comorbidity. All patients have completed the intended treatment schedule; no treatment interruptions and no grade 3 acute toxicity were reported. Grade 2 acute dermatitis or dysphagia was reported in only 5 patients (17%). No serious late toxicity was reported; only 1 patient developed temporary grade 2 laryngeal edema, and responded to a short-course of corticosteroid. The VHI improved significantly, from 33.5 at baseline to 9.5 and 10 at 6 weeks and 18 months, respectively (P<.001). The control group, treated to the whole larynx, had comparable local control rates (92.2% vs 100%, P=.24) but more acute toxicity (66% vs 17%, P<.0001) and higher VHI scores (23.8 and 16.7 at 6 weeks and 18 months, respectively, P<.0001). Conclusion: Single vocal cord irradiation is feasible and resulted in maximal local control rate at 2 years. The deterioration in VHI scores was slight and temporary and

  15. Incidence of and survival after glottic squamous cell carcinoma in Denmark from 1971 to 2011-A report from the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Nina Munk; Johansen, Jørgen; Kristensen, Claus Andrup

    2016-01-01

    .4 to 0.6). The 5-year DSM was 16% (15–17%) and the 5-year OS was 63% (61–64). The hazard rate of DSM adjusted for patient characteristics, tumour characteristics and waiting-time was significantly lower in the 2000s (p ...Aim To describe the incidence, disease-specific mortality (DSM), and overall survival (OS) of patients with glottic squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) in Denmark from 1971–2011 in a national population-based cohort of consecutive patients. Materials and methods All patients diagnosed with glottic SCC...... and national registries. Results In total 5132 patients with glottic SCC were included. The yearly number of new cases increased from 107 in the 1970s to 139 in the 2000s. Overall, the incidence increased from 1.9 to 2.6 per 100,000, with a more prominent increase in men (3.5 to 4.7) compared with women (0...

  16. Importance of time factor (γ/α) of linear quadratic (LQ) model for predicting laryngeal edema in irradiation treatment of early glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deore, S.M.; Fontenla, D.P.; Beitler, J.J.; Vikram, B.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: The time factor (γ/α) in the LQ model has been considered irrelevant for the late normal tissue injury (1). The failure of the LQ model to predict spinal cord injury in the CHART protocol questions the validity of this hypothesis. In this investigation, the incidence of radiation induced laryngeal edema was evaluated retrospectively in patients treated with different dose fractionation regimes for carcinoma of glottic cancer (2). The BED values of the LQ model calculated for different values of time factor (γ/α) were correlated with the incidence of radiation induced laryngeal edema. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis was carried out for 208 patients T 1 and T 2 squamous cell cancer of the vocal cord treated with radical radiotherapy during 1975-80. There were 156 patients with T 1 lesions and the remaining 52 patients had T 2 lesions. All these patients were treated with three different fractionation regimens of 60.75 Gy/ 27 F/ 39 D, 60 Gy/24 F/34 D and 50 Gy/15 F/ 22 D, using fraction sizes 2.25 Gy, 2.5 Gy and 3.33 Gy, respectively. For the minimum follow up of 4 years, the incidence of laryngeal edema was related to fraction size (see table). To investigate the importance of the time factor (γ/α) of LQ model, BED values were calculated for different values of γ/α and ∞/β = 2.0 Gy. RESULTS: As shown in the table below, the incidence of radiation induced laryngeal edema was found in 17.2% of patients with 2.25 Gy/F compared to 44.4% using 3.33 Gy/F. The TDF model failed to correlate with the incidence of laryngeal edema. The BED values of LQ model also fails to show statistically significant correlation with the incidence of late complications. However, the BED values accounting for the time factor (particularly γ/α = 1.2 Gy/day) show significant improvement in correlation with incidence of laryngeal edema. CONCLUSION: For comparable TDF values the incidence of laryngeal edema varied from 17% to 44.4%. The analysis with

  17. Endoscopic laser treatment of glottic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretti, G.; Cappiello, J.; Renaldini, G.; Antonelli, A.R.; Villanacci, V.; Marocolo, D.

    1992-01-01

    Histological diagnosis of laryngeal epithelial abnormalities may range from mucosal aberration, without risk of progressing into invasive neoplasm, to in situ or invasive carcinoma. Precise identification of epithelial abnormalities of laryngeal mucosa requires biopsy and microscopic evaluation. Random biopsies are frequently inadequate, since they are not representative for the entire lesion. Excisional Biopsy, allowing removal of lesion together with a rim of healthy tissue is ideal for both diagnosis and treatment. If completely removed, the cancer should not require further treatment; if the margins are not free of disease, re-excision or radiotherapy is considered as alternative options. Laser excision represents an extension of the clinical application of endoscopy, allowing the laryngologist to perform an accurate and bloodless surgery. Endoscopic laser treatment for selected glottic SCC (squamous cell carcinoma) has been shown to provide an excellent alternative to radiotherapy or open neck surgery in terms of cure rate and functional results. Preliminary results are presented with the purpose of stressing the role of EB with CO2 laser in diagnosis and treatment of selected glottic carcinoma. (author). 16 refs

  18. Quadrantectomy and radiotherapy (QUART) in the treatment of early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latini, P.; Checcaglini, F.; Maranzano, E.; Panizza, B.M.; Aristei, C.; Caprino, G.

    1986-01-01

    One hundred twenty nine patients with T1 N0 M0 breast cancer were selectively treated with QUART. Mean age was 50 years. Ninety-eight patients (76%) were N- and 31 (24%) were N+. N+ cases received chemotherapy or Tamoxifen if R+. Patients evaluated are 95/129 in a 3 years average follow-up (range 2-7 years). Overall actuariall survival rate at 5 years is 88.9%. Three patients died; local relapses were 3/95 and metastases 3/95. Overall treatment tolerance was satisfactory and esthetic results were good

  19. Quadrantectomy and radiotherapy (QUART) in the treatment of early breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latini, P; Checcaglini, F; Maranzano, E; Panizza, B M; Aristei, C; Caprino, G

    1986-01-01

    One hundred twenty nine patients with T1 N0 M0 breast cancer were selectively treated with QUART. Mean age was 50 years. Ninety-eight patients (76%) were N- and 31 (24%) were N+. N+ cases received chemotherapy or Tamoxifen if R+. Patients evaluated are 95/129 in a 3 years average follow-up (range 2-7 years). Overall actuariall survival rate at 5 years is 88.9%. Three patients died; local relapses were 3/95 and metastases 3/95. Overall treatment tolerance was satisfactory and esthetic results were good. 27 refs.

  20. Glottic-SubGlottic adenoid cystic carcinoma. A case report and review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant tumours of minor salivary glands are uncommon, representing only 2-4% of all head and neck cancers. In the larynx, minor salivary gland tumours rarely occur and constitute less than 1% of laryngeal neoplasm. Most of the minor salivary gland tumours arise in the subglottis; however, they can also occur in the supraglottis, in the false vocal cords, aryepiglottic folds and caudal portion of the epiglottis. The most common type of malignant minor salivary gland tumour is adenoid cystic carcinoma. Methods We present a unusual case of adenoid cystic carcinoma of glottic-subglottic region in a 61-year-old woman. Follow-up endoscopy and laryngeal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at three years after treatment showed no recurrence of the tumour. Results The diagnosis of glottic-subglottic adenoid cystic carcinoma should be considered in patients who are characterized by dyspnea, cough and stridor, but do not respond to pharmacologic approach. Conclusions Adenoid cystic carcinoma is usually a very slow growing cancer, invested by an apparently normal laryngeal mucosa, so that it can show no clear symptoms for a long time. For these reasons the increasing number of diagnostic mistakes or late diagnosis that may be fatal in some cases. PMID:24427787

  1. Radiomics analysis of DWI data to identify the rectal cancer patients qualified for local excision after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenchao; Liu, Zhenyu; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shi, Yanjie; Wang, Shou; Fang, Mengjie; Sun, Yingshi; Dong, Enqing; Tian, Jie

    2018-02-01

    The Locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients were routinely treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) firstly and received total excision afterwards. While, the LARC patients might relieve to T1N0M0/T0N0M0 stage after the CRT, which would enable the patients be qualified for local excision. However, accurate pathological TNM stage could only be obtained by the pathological examination after surgery. We aimed to conduct a Radiomics analysis of Diffusion weighted Imaging (DWI) data to identify the patients in T1N0M0/T0N0M0 stages before surgery, in hope of providing clinical surgery decision support. 223 routinely treated LARC patients in Beijing Cancer Hospital were enrolled in current study. DWI data and clinical characteristics were collected after CRT. According to the pathological TNM stage, the patients of T1N0M0 and T0N0M0 stages were labelled as 1 and the other patients were labelled as 0. The first 123 patients in chronological order were used as training set, and the rest patients as validation set. 563 image features extracted from the DWI data and clinical characteristics were used as features. Two-sample T test was conducted to pre-select the top 50% discriminating features. Least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso)-Logistic regression model was conducted to further select features and construct the classification model. Based on the 14 selected image features, the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) of 0.8781, classification Accuracy (ACC) of 0.8432 were achieved in the training set. In the validation set, AUC of 0.8707, ACC (ACC) of 0.84 were observed.

  2. Análise videolaringoestroboscópica de pacientes submetidos à radioterapia para tratamento de câncer glótico Videolaryngostroboscopic analysis of patients submitted to radiation therapy for the treatment of glottic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luís Quarteiro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Sendo a radioterapia oncologicamente adequada no tratamento do câncer precoce da laringe, é importante estudar o padrão vibratório, que é componente crítico para os resultados vocais. OBJETIVO: Analisar os achados videolaringoestroboscópicos em um grupo de pacientes submetidos à radioterapia para o tratamento do câncer glótico precoce. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo realizado através da avaliação de 20 pacientes estadiados como T1a glótico de 1995 a 2005. Um protocolo videolaringoestroboscópico foi aplicado. RESULTADOS: O fechamento glótico foi completo em 17 pacientes. A amplitude foi normal em 14 pregas vocais tratadas e em 18 pregas contralaterais. O padrão da onda vibratória mucosa foi sempre totalmente presente, normal ou discretamente diminuído em ambas as pregas vocais, com melhores resultados para a prega vocal contralateral em comparação com aqueles verificados nas pregas vocais com o tumor. A periodicidade foi sempre regular em todos os casos. A simetria e os movimentos das pregas vestibulares e das aritenoides foram normais. Houve constrição supraglótica lateral ocasional em quatro casos. O aspecto da mucosa foi edematoso em seis pacientes. Formação de bola de muco foi observada em 12 pacientes. CONCLUSÕES: O padrão vibratório foi normal ou discretamente diminuído para ambas as pregas vocais após tratamento radioterápico para câncer glótico T1a.Radiation therapy is an adequate treatment for early laryngeal cancer, and it is important to study the vocal fold vibratory pattern, which is essential for a favorable voice outcome. AIM: To analyze laryngostroboscopic findings in a group of patients who underwent radiation therapy for the treatment of early glottic cancer. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted in order to evaluate 20 patients staged as T1a glottic tumors in the period from 1995 to 2005. A laryngostroboscopic protocol was applied. RESULTS: Glottic closure was complete in 17 patients

  3. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy provides no benefit compared to radiotherapy alone for T2 glottic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanesaka, Naoto; Mikami, Ryuji; Hasegawa, Daisuke

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if chemoradiotherapy improves local control of T2 glottic squamous cell carcinoma. From 1989 to 2003, 61 patients with T2 glottic cancer were treated with radiation alone or radiation in conjunction with various chemotherapy agents. Overall survival and local control rates for all 61 patients were 83.6% and 82.0%, respectively at five years. The addition of chemotherapy offered no survival benefit or improvement in local control rates compared to radiotherapy alone. Extending treatment duration lowered local control rates, however, no survival-related prognostic factors were identified. No treatment-related late toxicity was observed. The addition of chemotherapy in patients with T2 glottic cancer treated with radiation does not improve outcomes. This validates the use of radiotherapy alone as the standard of care for patients with this disease. (author)

  4. [The application of full thicknes skin graft inpartial laryngectomy for glottic carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y G; Sun, D Z; Yang, P Z; Chen, Y L; Chen, Z P; Yang, Z K

    2016-08-05

    Objective: The aim of this study is to explore the experience and advantages of the application of full thicknes skin graft in glottic carcinoma.partial laryngectomy for glottic carcinoma. Method: One hundred and forty-three patients with glottic cancer were treated with partial laryngectomy.Among those,78 cases were repaired with full-thickness skin graft and 65 cases were repaired with sternohyoid muscular fasciae.Compared the time of extubation and the formation of granulation in laryngeal cavity after operation between the two groups. Result: In the group of full-thickness skin graft,the mean time of decannulation was 6.8 days,5 cases with growth of granulation after operation.In other group,the mean time of decannulation was 10.7 days,16 cases with growth of granulation after operation.The mean time of decannulation( t =-4.739, P skin graft in partial laryngectomy for glottic carcinoma.can shortthe time of extubation and reduce the formation of granulation. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Clinical Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery.

  5. Better survival after breast-conserving therapy compared to mastectomy when axillary node status is positive in early-stage breast cancer: a registry-based follow-up study of 6387 Norwegian women participating in screening, primarily operated between 1998 and 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann-Johnsen, Olaf Johan; Kåresen, Rolf; Schlichting, Ellen; Nygård, Jan F

    2017-07-03

    Recent registry studies on early-stage breast cancer have shown better survival rates when women underwent breast-conserving therapy (BCT) compared with mastectomy (MTX). The aim of this study is to investigate women participating in screening, in all four stages of early breast cancer (T1N0M0, T2N0M0, T1N1M0, and T2N1M0), as to whether there is a survival benefit when women undergo BCT compared to MTX. A cohort of 6387 women aged 50-69, with primary-operated breast cancer from January 1998 to December 2009, participating in screening and followed-up until the end of 2010. Life tables were calculated by stages (pT1N0M0, pT2N0M0, pT1N1M0, and pT2N1M0), surgery groups (BCT and MTX), and screening detection (first screening, later screening, or interval cancer). Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) between BCT and MTX in crude and adjusted analyses. In stage T1N1M0, women who underwent MTX had an HR of 2.91 (95% CI 1.30-6.48) for breast cancer death compared to women who underwent BCT, after adjusting for screening detection, years of diagnosis, age at diagnosis, histology, grade, and hormone receptor status. For all other TNM categories of early breast cancer, there was no difference in survival. 10-year breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) in T1N0M0 was 98% for women undergoing BCT and 96% for women undergoing MTX. 10-year BCSS in T1N1M0 was 97% for women undergoing BCT and 89% for women undergoing MTX. For women participating in screening, there is a benefit of BCT over MTX in stage T1N1M0. No such effects were observed in the other early stages of breast cancer.

  6. Treatment of early glottic squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rikimaru, Fumihide; Matsuo, Mioko; Higaki, Yuichiro; Tomita, Kichinobu

    2011-01-01

    We treat early glottic squamous cell carcinoma with chemoradiation and evaluate the effects of the chemoradiation at the dose of 30-40 Gy as an intermediate evaluation. To investigate the need for this intermediate evaluation, we retrospectively analyzed 97 patients, 92 men and 5 women aged 36 to 86 years, with glottic squamous cell carcinoma at stage I and II treated at our institution from January 2000 to May 2007. The three-year survival rate was 98% in all cases, 100% in T1a, 93% in T1b and 94% in T2. The three-year preservation rate of the larynx was 92% in all cases, 98% in T1a, 93% in T1b and 83% in T2. In the intermediate evaluation, complete response was 78% in T1a, 85% in T1b and 53% in T2. In cases of larynx preservation, the recurrence rate of the primary site was significantly higher in cases without complete response in the intermediate evaluation than in cases with complete response (p<0.05). It seemed that the not complete response case in the intermediate evaluation paid attention to a primary tumor recurrence in particular and needed careful follow-up. (author)

  7. Definitive radiotherapy for early glottic carcinoma: prognostic factors and implications for treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, Lisa S.; Greven, Kathryn M.; McGuirt, Wyman T.; Case, Douglas; Hoen, Helena M.; Raben, Milton

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment and disease-related factors were analyzed for their influence on the outcome of patients treated definitively with irradiation (RT) for early glottic carcinoma. Methods and Materials: One hundred two patients with stage T1 or T2 glottic carcinomas were treated definitively with RT from December 1983 through September 1993. Median follow-up time was 63 months. Factors analyzed for each patient included age, sex, stage, anterior commissure involvement, surgical alternative, histologic differentiation, field size, total dose, fraction size, and total treatment time. Survival analysis methods were employed to assess the effects of these factors on local control and complication rates. Results: The 5-year local control rates by stage were as follows: T1a, 92%; T1b, 80%; T2a, 94%; and T2b, 23%. By univariate analysis, factors found to have a significant impact on local control were stage, surgical alternative, fraction size, anterior commissure involvement, and overall treatment time. By multivariate analysis, stage, field size, and fraction size were the only significant factors that independently influenced local control. Conclusion: The inferior control rate for stage T2b lesions has implications for treatment. Our study supports the conclusion of reports in the literature showing that low fraction size negatively influences outcome in patients with early glottic cancer

  8. Definitive radiotherapy for early glottic carcinoma: prognostic factors and implications for treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, Lisa S.; Greven, Kathryn M.; McGuirt, Wyman T.; Case, Douglas; Hoen, Helena M.; Raben, Milton

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment and disease-related factors were analyzed for their influence on the outcome of patients treated definitively with irradiation (RT) for early glottic carcinoma. Methods and Materials: One hundred two patients with stage T1 or T2 glottic carcinomas were treated definitively with RT from December 1983 through September 1993. Median follow-up time was 63 months. Factors analyzed for each patient included age, sex, stage, anterior commissure involvement, surgical alternative, histologic differentiation, field size, total dose, fraction size, and total treatment time. Survival analysis methods were employed to assess the effects of these factors on local control and complication rates. Results: The 5-year local control rates by stage were as follows: T1a, 92%; T1b, 80%; T2a, 94%; and T2b, 23%. By univariate analysis, factors found to have a significant impact on local control were stage, surgical alternative, fraction size, anterior commissure involvement, and overall treatment time. By multivariate analysis, stage, field size, and fraction size were the only significant factors that independently influenced local control. Conclusions: The inferior control rate for stage T2b lesions has implications for treatment. Our study supports the conclusions of reports in the literature showing that low fraction size negatively influences outcome in patients with early glottic cancer

  9. Early glottic carcinoma: results of treatment by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smee, R.; Williams, J.; Fisher, R.; Bridger, G.P.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to review the results of treating early stages glottic, squamous cell carcinoma by radiotherapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney. A retrospective review was carried out of all patients seen in the department from 1967 to 1994, inclusive. To be eligible, patients had to have newly diagnosed cancer and to have been treated with curative intent by radiotherapy alone. Three hundred and sixty-nine patients satisfied the eligibility requirements. The mean follow-up time was 12.2 years (maximum: 28 years). At 5 years the actuarial local control rate was 80% (84% for stage T 1 and 72% for T 2 ). The ultimate local control rate was 96%. The overall survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 73% and 52%, respectively. The risk of nodal recurrence was much higher after persisting disease or local recurrence. Our results confirm the high cure rates achieved with this modality of treatment and are comparable with those reported in the literature. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty. Ltd

  10. 131I therapy of thyroid cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, C.; Farahati, J.

    1999-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a rare malignancy with wide inter ethnic and geographic variations. In Germany thyroid carcinoma is the 13. most frequent malignancy (2.7 new cases yearly per 100,000 inhabitants). The overall temporal incidence is increasing slightly in recent years. The most common types of cancer are papillary (60-80%) and follicular cancers (10-20%). The relevant prognostic indicators are tumor stage and distant metastases. The mean survival rates in papillary thyroid cancer usually exceed 90%, whereas in follicular thyroid cancer they amount to approximately 80%. The standard treatment procedure in differentiated papillary and follicular thyroid cancer consists of total thyroidectomy followed by adjuvant ablative therapy with radioiodine. Only in papillary thyroid cancer stage pT 1 N 0 M 0 lobectomy alone is considered to be appropriate. In patients with locally invasive differentiated thyroid cancers stage pT 4 adjuvant percutaneous radiation therapy is a treatment option. Radioiodine therapy has to be performed under the stimulative influence of TSH. Usually TSH suppressive medication with Levothyroxine has to be withdrawn approximately 4 weeks prior to radioiodine therapy. In the future, exogenous stimulation by recombinant TSH may be used instead of thyroid hormone withdrawal. It has been proved by different studies that ablative radioiodine therapy reduces the frequency of recurrences and tumor spread in patients with thyroid cancer significantly. In patients with distant metastases, up to 50% of complete responses may be achieved with radioiodine treatment

  11. A small absorbable stent for treatment of anterior glottic web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhongmakapat, Thongchai; Kantapasuantara, Kanjalak; Praneevatakul, Phurich

    2012-03-01

    A new one-stage approach for treatment of selected anterior glottic web has been successful. This case report illustrates its simplicity in microlaryngoscopy with complete lysis of the anterior glottic web by CO(2) laser. Then a small neck horizontal incision is made at the level of anterior commissure to gain exposure to thyroid cartilage. Absorbable suture is passed through the midline of thyroid cartilage below and above the anterior commissure. A knot is tied over thyroid ala. The suture acts as a tiny stent to prevent recurrence of the web. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of the glottic squamous cell carcinoma in stages T1-T2, N0: surgery versus radiotherapy: retrospective study of 50 patients attended at the Hospital Mexico in the period 2005 to 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Munoz, Angie

    2014-01-01

    Recurrence rates are compared in patients with glottic cancer in early stages, treated with surgery and/or radiotherapy. The study was composed by all patients diagnosed with glottic cancer in the Servicio de Otorrinolaringologia from Hospital Mexico, in early stages during the period 2005 to 2011. The local and locoregional recurrence rates are determined. Differences in recurrence rates are analyzed. Factors associated to higher recurrence rates are identified. Treatment with radiotherapy has had statistically a higher proportion of local recurrence than treatment with surgery [es

  13. Vocal characteristics of congenital anterior glottic webs in children: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Jay; White, Katherine; Dohar, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    This case report describes a 5-year-old girl with chronic dysphonia and high-pitched voice since birth. Vocal quality was noted to be harsh. Videostroboscopy revealed significant hyperfunction and a Type II congenital anterior glottic web. Endoscopic division of the anterior glottic web was performed with significant improvement in vocal quality and quality of life. This paper describes methods of analyzing, diagnosing, and treating anterior glottic web with a focus on quality of life. Also, unique acoustic and aerodynamic voice features are identified. No other descriptions of a voice characteristic for anterior glottic web currently exist in the literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Definitive proton beam radiation therapy for inoperable gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Susumu; Takase, Yasuhiro; Aoyagi, Hiroyuki; Orii, Kazuo; Sharma, N.; Iwasaki, Yoji; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsujii, Hiroshi.

    1991-01-01

    Proton beam radiation therapy using 250 MeV protons was carried out on two patients with early gastric cancer (T1, N0, M0). One patient was an 85-year-old man with early gastric cancer of type IIa + IIc. The other one was a 70-year-old man with early gastric cancer of type IIc. In both cases histological examination of biopsy specimens showed differential adenocarcinoma; distant metastasis was not found by other examinations. Both patients were considered inoperable due to their poor cardiac and/or respiratory functions. Therefore, it was decided to treat them by definitive proton irradiation, delivering total doses of 86 Gy and 83 Gy, respectively. In both patients, skin erythema that did not require any special treatment was found in the irradiation field. Hematobiological examinations did not show any abnormality. Although endoscopic examination at two years after irradiation in the former case and at seven months in the latter case showed persistent gastric ulcer at the site of the cancerous lesions, cancer cells were not found histologically. Therefore, we concluded that proton irradiation therapy was useful for inoperable early gastric cancers. (author)

  15. The results of radiation therapy for early glottic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Michinori; Hada, Yoshihiro; Shirane, Makoto

    2000-01-01

    To analyze various parameters affect local control, we reviewed the results of radiotherapy for early glottic carcinoma. Between 1977 and 1997, 64 patients with untreated early glottic carcinoma and four patients with recurrent early glottic carcinoma were analyzed retrospectively. All tumors were classified as follows; T1 (n=56), T2 (n=12); well differentiated (n=33), moderately (n=25), poorly (n=1), unknown (n=9); very small tumor (VST) (n=46), small tumor (ST) (n=22). All patients were treated utilizing a cobalt-60 unit to a total dose that ranged from 56 Gy to 64 Gy (mean 60 Gy). The mean treatment time was 44 days (range 38-49). The local control rates at 2 years and 5 years for all patients were 85% and 78%, respectively. On univariate analysis, tumor size (p=0.0146) and recurrent or untreated tumor (p=0.0226) affected local control. On multivariate analysis, tumor size (p=0.0273) and recurrent or untreated tumor (p=0.0495) were also significant factors that affected local control. (author)

  16. Dosimetric comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and 3-dimensional conformal therapy for the treatment of T1N0 glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekici, Kemal; Pepele, Eda K.; Yaprak, Bahaddin; Temelli, Oztun; Eraslan, Aysun F.; Kucuk, Nadir; Altınok, Ayse Y.; Sut, Pelin A.; Alpak, Ozlem D.; Colak, Cemil; Mayadagli, Alpaslan

    2016-01-01

    Various radiotherapy planning methods for T1N0 laryngeal cancer have been proposed to decrease normal tissue toxicity. We compare helical tomotherapy (HT), linac-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) techniques for T1N0 laryngeal cancer. Overall, 10 patients with T1N0 laryngeal cancer were selected and evaluated. Furthermore, 10 radiotherapy treatment plans have been created for all 10 patients, including HT, IMRT, VMAT, and 3D-CRT. IMRT, VMAT, and HT plans vs 3D-CRT plans consistently provided superior planning target volume (PTV) coverage. Similar target coverage was observed between the 3 IMRT modalities. Compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT, HT, and VMAT significantly reduced the mean dose to the carotid arteries. VMAT resulted in the lowest mean dose to the submandibular and thyroid glands. Compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT, HT, and VMAT significantly increased the maximum dose to the spinal cord It was observed that the 3 IMRT modalities studied showed superior target coverage with less variation between each plan in comparison with 3D-CRT. The 3D-CRT plans performed better at the D max of the spinal cord. Clinical investigation is warranted to determine if these treatment approaches would translate into a reduction in radiation therapy–induced toxicities.

  17. [Transanal laparoscopic radical resection with telescopic anastomosis for low rectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiyong; Chen, Gang; Du, Junfeng; Chen, Guang; Wei, Xiaojun; Cui, Wei; Yuan, Qiang; Sun, Liang; Bai, Xue; Zuo, Fuyi; Yu, Bo; Dong, Xing; Ji, Xiqing

    2015-06-01

    To assess the safety, feasibility and clinical outcome of laparoscopic radical resection for low rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis or with colostomy by stapler through transanal resection without abdominal incisions. From January 2010 to September 2014, 37 patients underwent laparoscopic radical resection for low rectal cancer through transanal resection without abdominal incisions. The tumors were 4-7 cm above the anal verge. On preoperative assessment, 26 cases were T1N0M0 and 11 were T2N0M0. For all cases, successful surgery was performed. In telescopic anastomosis group, the mean operative time was (178±21) min, with average blood loss of (76±11) ml and (13±7) lymph nodes harvested. Return of bowel function was (3.0±1.2) d and the hospital stay was (12.0±4.2) d without postoperative complications. Patients were followed up for 3-45 months. Twelve months after surgery, 94.6%(35/37) patients achieved anal function Kirwan grade 1, indicating that their anal function returned to normal. Laparoscopic radical resection for low rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis or colostomy by stapler through transanal resection without abdominal incisions is safe and feasible. Satisfactory clinical outcome can be achieved mini-invasively.

  18. Video-assisted mediastinoscopic resection compared with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in patients with esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian-Yun; Tan, Li-Jie; Feng, Ming-Xiang; Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Nan-Qing; Wang, Zhong-Lin

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the indications of radical vedio-assisted mediastinoscopic resection for esophageal cancer. The data of 109 patients with T1 esophageal cancer who underwent video-assisted mediastinoscopic resection (VAMS group) in Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University Hospital from December 2005 to December 2011 were collected in the study for comparison with the 58 patients with T1 esophageal cancer who underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS group) in Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University. The perioperative safety and survival were compared between the two groups. All operations were successful in both groups. One perioperative death was noted in the VATS group. The incidences of post-operative complications were not significantly different between these two groups, whereas the VAMS group was favorable in terms of operative time (P<0.001) and blood loss (P<0.001), and a significantly larger number of chest lymph nodes were dissected in the VATS group compared with the VAMS group (P<0.001). Long-term follow-up showed that the overall survival was not significantly different between these two groups (P=0.876). T1N0M0 esophageal cancer can be as the indication of VAMS radical resection. VAMS radical resection can be considered as the preferred option for patients with poor pulmonary and cardiac function or a history of pleural disease.

  19. Photodocumentation of the Development of Type I Posterior Glottic Stenosis after Intubation Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Scott Howard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral vocal fold immobility may result from bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis or physiologic insults to the airway such as glottic scars. The progression of mucosal injury to granulation tissue, and then posterior glottis stenosis, is an accepted theory but has not been photodocumented. This paper presents serial images from common postintubation injury to less common posterior glottic stenosis with interarytenoid synechia.

  20. Vocal changes in patients undergoing radiation therapy for glottic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, S.; Harrison, L.B.; Solomon, B.; Sessions, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    A prospective evaluation of vocal changes in patients receiving radiation therapy for T1 and T2 (AJC) glottic carcinoma was undertaken in January 1987. Vocal analysis was performed prior to radiotherapy and at specific intervals throughout the radiation treatment program. The voicing ratio was extrapolated from a sustained vowel phonation using the Visipitch interfaced with the IBM-PC. Preliminary observations suggested three distinct patterns of vocal behavior: 1. reduced voicing ratio with precipitous improvement within the course of treatment, 2. high initial voicing ratio with reduction secondary to radiation induced edema, with rapid improvement in the voicing component after the edema subsided, and 3. fluctuating voicing ratio during and following treatment. Enrollment of new patients and a 2-year follow-up of current patients was undertaken

  1. Clinical study of early laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatani, Gunji; Mori, Takanori; Udaka, Tsuyoshi; Shiomori, Teruo; Ohbuchi, Toyoaki; Suzuki, Hideaki

    2007-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed 71 consecutive cases of early laryngeal cancer (stage I or II) that had undergone primary treatment in our department between 1999 and 2004. There were 68 males and 3 females, and their ages ranged from 40 to 85 years of age (average; 67.7 years). Eight patients had the supraglottic type, 61 had the glottic type, and 2 had the subglottic type. Chemoradiotherapy was performed as the primary treatment except in the patients with glottic T1a cancer, who received radiotherapy alone. The 5-year survival rates was 91.1% for glottic cancer (T1a: 100%, T1b: 92.3%, T2: 85.8%) and 75.0% for supraglottic cancer. The local control rate of glottic cancer was 79.6% (T1a: 80.0%, T1b: 74.0%, T2: 85.2%), and significantly higher than that of supraglottic cancer (56.2%, p<0.05). The laryngeal preservation rate was 84.4% in glottic cancer (T1a: 100%, T1b: 76.9%, T2: 77.5%) and 58.3% in supraglottic cancer, and the difference between T1a and T2 glottic cancer was significant (p<0.05). Local recurrence and cervical lymph node metastasis were seen in 9 patients and 6 patients, respectively. Distant metastasis occurred in 4 patients, all of whom had the glottic type. Four patients died of their disease, and distant metastasis was the major cause of death in 3 of them. These results indicate that additional treatment should be performed in cases in which radiotherapy/chemoradiotherapy is ineffective and that both in the early stages glottic and supraglottic cancers can be successfully treated by radiotherapy/chemoradiotherapy. The results also suggested that the survival of patients with early laryngeal cancer depends on whether they develop distant metastasis. Introduction of adjuvant chemotherapy to improve their prognosis remains to be assessed. (author)

  2. Middle frontal horizontal partial laryngectomy (MFHPL: a treatment for stage T1b squamous cell carcinoma of the glottic larynx involving anterior vocal commissure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-bin Lei

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The therapeutic effect of middle frontal horizontal partial laryngectomy (MFHPL in treating stage T1b squamous cell carcinoma of the glottic larynx involving anterior vocal commissure (AVC was compared with that of the anterior frontolateral vertical partial laryngectomy (AFVPL. The feasibility and practical significance of MFHPL in clinical application was discussed in the present study. METHODS: From January 1996 to January 2010, a total of 65 patients diagnosed with stage T1bN0M0 glottic laryngeal cancer were treated with MFHPL or AFVPL. The postoperative complications, glottic reconstruction, recurrence rate, voice quality and survival rates were evaluated and compared between two treatments. RESULTS: AFVPL and MFHPL were performed in 34 and 31 patients, respectively. Flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopy revealed that in the MFHPL-treated patients the reconstructed glottis was spacious and symmetric. In contrast, AFVPL treatment resulted in irregular glottic area with poor symmetry and tubular glottis. The incidence of postoperative laryngeal stenosis significantly differed between the MFHPL- and AFVPL-treated groups (P = 0.025. No significant difference was detected in the 3- and 5-year overall- or tumor-free survival rates between two treatments. The Voice Handicap Index (VHI and maximum phonation time (MPT after surgery were 51.0±12.99 and 12.42±3.44 sec in the AFVPL-treated group; while in the MFHPL-treated patients they were 31.81±7.48 and 7.65±1.98 sec, respectively. Both differences in VHI (P = 0.012 and MPT (P = 0.024 were significant between two treatments. CONCLUSIONS: MFHPL was comparable to AFVPL with respect to postoperative complications, recurrence rate and survival rates, but possessed advantages over AFVPL in terms of the incidence of laryngeal stenosis and voice quality. Our study indicated that MFHPL has a potential value in clinical practice of treating stage T1b squamous cell carcinoma of the

  3. Radiation-induced increase in hyaluronan and fibronectin in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from breast cancer patients is suppressed by smoking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjermer, L.; Nilsson, K.; Haellgren, R.; Franzen, L.; Henriksson, R.; Sandstroem, T.; Saernstrand, B.

    1992-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was analysed from 21 patients with breast cancer, stage T 1 N 0 M 0 , who had undergone tumour resection and postoperative local irradiation (accumulated dose 56 Gy). The lavage was performed two months after radiotherapy, in the anterior part of the lingula (left side) or of the right middle lobe (right side), depending on which side had been exposed to radiation. The patients had significantly increased concentrations of fibronectin (FN) (p<0.001), hyaluronan (HA) (p<0.01) and albumin (p<0.05) in BAL fluid compared with the healthy controls (n=19). However, when the patients were separated, according to smoking history, it was obvious that the inflammatory reaction occurred entirely in the nonsmoking patient group (n=10), whilst no difference could be found between the smoking patients (n=11) and the controls. In the nonsmoking patient group, there was a sevenfold increase in BAL concentrations of FN and a threefold increase in HA. Moreover, four patients had detectable levels of procollagen III peptide in BAL, all were nonsmokers. The smoking habits of the controls had no influence on the BAL measurements. These findings indicate that smoking interferes with the radiation-induced early inflammatory connective tissue reaction of the lung. Finally, the results justify further investigation of interaction of smoking with cancer treatment, both from the view of therapy effectiveness and reduction of adverse effects. (au)

  4. Clinical assessment of tumor clearance during radiotherapy as a prognostic factor of early glottic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, T.; Ikeda, H.; Teshima, T.; Murayama, S.

    1992-01-01

    From 1967 through 1985, 358 cases of early glottic carcinoma were treated with telecobalt therapy at the Department of Radiology, Osaka University Medical School. Among 278 cases treated with 2 Gy a day, the tumor response of 262 cases at 40, 50 and 60 Gy were evaluated by direct or indirect laryngoscope. The five-year local control rates of these evaluable cases of T1 and T2 glottic carcinoma were 79% and 70%, respectively. The local control rates of T1 glottic carcinoma with tumor clearance and persistence at 40 Gy were 83% (119/143) and 64% (43/67), and those of T2 cases were 86% (18/21) and 58% (18/31), respectively. The local control rates of the cases with tumor clearance and persistence at 40 Gy were same between T1 and T2 cases. The tumor clearance rates of T1 cases were significantly higher than those of T2 cases (p [de

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Operable Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Can SBRT Be Comparable to Surgery?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Hiroshi, E-mail: honishi@yamanashi.ac.jp [School of Medicine, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [School of Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Fujino, Masaharu [School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); School of Medicine, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Gomi, Kotaro [Cancer Institute Suwa Red-Cross Hospital, Suwa (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Yuzuru [Kitasato University, Kanagawa (Japan); Takai, Yoshihiro [School of Medicine, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki (Japan); Kimura, Tomoki [School of Medicine, Kagawa University, Hiroshima (Japan); Takeda, Atsuya [Ofuna Chuo Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Ouchi, Atsushi [Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Hareyama, Masato [Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Kozuka, Takuyo [School of Cancer Institute Ariake Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Arimoto, Takuro [Kitami Red Cross Hospital, Kitami (Japan); Hara, Ryusuke [National Institute of Radiological Science, Chiba (Japan); Itami, Jun [National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Araki, Tsutomu [School of Medicine, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To review treatment outcomes for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in medically operable patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), using a Japanese multi-institutional database. Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2004, a total of 87 patients with Stage I NSCLC (median age, 74 years; T1N0M0, n = 65; T2N0M0, n = 22) who were medically operable but refused surgery were treated using SBRT alone in 14 institutions. Stereotactic three-dimensional treatment was performed using noncoplanar dynamic arcs or multiple static ports. Total dose was 45-72.5 Gy at the isocenter, administered in 3-10 fractions. Median calculated biological effective dose was 116 Gy (range, 100-141 Gy). Data were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), cumulative local control rates for T1 and T2 tumors at 5 years after SBRT were 92% and 73%, respectively. Pulmonary complications above Grade 2 arose in 1 patient (1.1%). Five-year overall survival rates for Stage IA and IB subgroups were 72% and 62%, respectively. One patient who developed local recurrences safely underwent salvage surgery. Conclusion: Stereotactic body radiotherapy is safe and promising as a radical treatment for operable Stage I NSCLC. The survival rate for SBRT is potentially comparable to that for surgery.

  6. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Operable Stage I Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Can SBRT Be Comparable to Surgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Hiroshi; Shirato, Hiroki; Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Fujino, Masaharu; Gomi, Kotaro; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Yuzuru; Takai, Yoshihiro; Kimura, Tomoki; Takeda, Atsuya; Ouchi, Atsushi; Hareyama, Masato; Kokubo, Masaki; Kozuka, Takuyo; Arimoto, Takuro; Hara, Ryusuke; Itami, Jun; Araki, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To review treatment outcomes for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in medically operable patients with Stage I non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), using a Japanese multi-institutional database. Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2004, a total of 87 patients with Stage I NSCLC (median age, 74 years; T1N0M0, n = 65; T2N0M0, n = 22) who were medically operable but refused surgery were treated using SBRT alone in 14 institutions. Stereotactic three-dimensional treatment was performed using noncoplanar dynamic arcs or multiple static ports. Total dose was 45–72.5 Gy at the isocenter, administered in 3–10 fractions. Median calculated biological effective dose was 116 Gy (range, 100–141 Gy). Data were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), cumulative local control rates for T1 and T2 tumors at 5 years after SBRT were 92% and 73%, respectively. Pulmonary complications above Grade 2 arose in 1 patient (1.1%). Five-year overall survival rates for Stage IA and IB subgroups were 72% and 62%, respectively. One patient who developed local recurrences safely underwent salvage surgery. Conclusion: Stereotactic body radiotherapy is safe and promising as a radical treatment for operable Stage I NSCLC. The survival rate for SBRT is potentially comparable to that for surgery.

  7. Predicting the local outcome of glottic squamous cell carcinoma after definitive radiation therapy: value of computed tomography-determined tumour parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermans, R.; Van den Bogaert, W.; Rijnders, A.; Doornaert, P.; Baert, A.L.

    1999-01-01

    Background and purpose: The T-classification has shortcomings in the prediction of local outcome of glottic squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) treated by definitive radiation therapy. In this regard, the value of several CT-derived tumour parameters as predictors of local outcome was investigated. Materials and methods: The pretreatment CT studies of 119 patients with glottic SCC (T1, n=61; T2, n=40; T3, n=14; T4, n=4) treated with curative intent by radiation therapy were reviewed for tumoral involvement of specific laryngeal anatomic subsites (including laryngeal cartilages). Tumour volume was calculated with the summation-of-areas technique. Actuarial (life-table) statistical analysis was done for each of the covariates; multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards model.Results: In the actuarial analysis tumour volume was significantly correlated with local recurrence rate (P=0.0062). Involvement of the cricoid cartilage (P=0.0052), anterior commissure (P=0.0203), subglottis (P=0.0481) and preepiglottic space (P=0.0134) and degree of involvement of the true vocal cord (P=0.0441) and paraglottic space at the level of the true vocal cord (P=0.0002) were also significantly correlated with local recurrence rate. In the multivariate analysis, only degree of involvement of the paraglottic space (at the level of the true vocal cord) (P=0.0001) and preepiglottic space (P=0.02) were found to be independent predictors of local recurrence. The T-category was significantly correlated with local outcome in the actuarial analysis (P=0.0001), but not in the multivariate analysis (P=0.5915). Conclusions: Several CT-derived parameters are powerful predictors of local outcome in glottic cancer treated with radiation therapy; some of these parameters are stronger linked to the local control rate than the T-classification. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The Pattern of Failure Is Distant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, Jeffrey D.; El Naqa, Issam; Drzymala, Robert E.; Trovo, Marco; Jones, Griffin; Denning, Mary Dee

    2010-01-01

    Background: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) represents a substantial paradigm shift in the treatment of patients with medically inoperable Stage I/II non-small-cell lung cancer. We reviewed our experience using either three- or five-fraction SBRT for peripheral or central tumors, respectively. Methods and Materials: A total of 91 patients signed an institutional review board-approved consent form, were treated with SBRT, and have had ≥6 months of follow-up. Patients were referred for SBRT because of underlying comorbidities (poor performance status in 31 or poor lung function in 52) or refusal of surgery (8 patients). Of the cancers, 83 were peripheral and eight were central. Peripheral cancers received a mean dose of 18 Gy x three fractions. Cancers within 2 cm of the bronchus, esophagus, or brachial plexus were treated with 9 Gy x five fractions. Results: The median follow-up duration for these patients was 18 months (range, 6-42 months). TNM staging was as follows: 58 patients with T1N0M0, 22 with T2N0M0, 2 with T3N0M0 (chest wall), and 6 with T1N0M1 cancers. The median tumor diameter was 2 cm (range, 1-5 cm). The median forced expiratory volume in 1 s was 46% (range, 17-133%) and the median carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO) was 49% (range, 15-144%). Two-year local tumor control was achieved in 86% of patients. The predominant pattern of failure was the development of distant metastasis or second lung cancer. The development of distant metastasis was the only significant prognostic factor for overall survival on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Local tumor control was shown to be high using SBRT for non-small-cell lung cancer. Overall survival is highly coerrelated with the development of distant metastasis.

  9. Radical radiotherapy for T3 laryngeal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, T.; Itami, J.; Kotaka, K.; Toriyama, M.

    1996-01-01

    From 1974 through 1992, 37 previously untreated patients with T3 laryngeal cancer (supraglottic 15, glottic 22) were treated with initial radical radiotherapy and surgery for salvage. Two-year local control rate with radiotherapy alone, ultimate voice preservation rate, and ultimate local control rate for T3 supraglottic cancer were 33%, 33%, and 60%, respectively. Corresponding figures for T3 glottic cancer were 32%, 23%, and 77%, respecitvely. Five-year cause-specific survival rate for T3 supraglottic cancer and glottic cancer were 47% and 77%, respectively. In T3 supraglottic cancer, none of the 4 patients with subglottic tumor extension attained local control by radiotherapy alone, and local-regional recurrence-free time were significantly shorter in patients with subglottic tumor extension or tracheostomy before radiotherapy. There were no serious late complications such as chondronecrosis, rupture of carotid artery attributed to radical radiotherapy, while 3 patients had severe laryngeal edema requiring total laryngectomy. (orig.) [de

  10. Decreased local control following radiation therapy alone in early-stage glottic carcinoma with anterior commissure extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zouhair, A.; Azria, D.; Coucke, P.; Matzinger, O.; Mirimanoff, R.O.; Ozsahin, M.; Bron, L.; Moeckli, R.; Do, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: to assess the patterns of failure in the treatment of early-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the glottic larynx. Patients and methods: between 1983-2000, 122 consecutive patients treated for early laryngeal cancer (UICC T1N0 and T2N0) by radical radiation therapy (RT) were retrospectively studied. Male-to-female ratio was 106: 16, and median age 62 years (35-92 years). There were 68 patients with T1a, 18 with T1b, and 36 with T2 tumors. Diagnosis was made by biopsy in 104 patients, and by laser vaporization or stripping in 18. Treatment planning consisted of three-dimensional (3-D) conformal RT in 49 (40%) patients including nine patients irradiated using arytenoid protection. A median dose of 70 Gy (60-74 Gy) was given (2 Gy/fraction) over a median period of 46 days (21-79 days). Median follow-up period was 85 months. Results: the 5-year overall, cancer-specific, and disease-free survival amounted to 80%, 94%, and 70%, respectively. 5-year local control was 83%. Median time to local recurrence in 19 patients was 13 months (5-58 months). Salvage treatment consisted of surgery in 17 patients (one patient refused salvage and one was inoperable; total laryngectomy in eleven, and partial laryngectomy or cordectomy in six patients). Six patients died because of laryngeal cancer. Univariate analyses revealed that prognostic factors negatively influencing local control were anterior commissure extension, arytenoid protection, and total RT dose < 66 Gy. Among the factors analyzed, multivariate analysis (cox model) demonstrated that anterior commissure extension, arytenoid protection, and male gender were the worst independent prognostic factors in terms of local control. Conclusion: for early-stage laryngeal cancer, outcome after RT is excellent. In case of anterior commissure extension, surgery or higher RT doses are warranted. Because of a high relapse risk, arytenoid protection should not be attempted. (orig.)

  11. Problems of concurrent radiotherapy with S-1 for T2 glottic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashino, Masaaki; Kawata, Ryo; Suzuki, Norio; Ichihara, Takahiro; Terada, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and problems of concurrent radiotherapy with S-1 for T2 glottic carcinoma. The study included 48 patients (22 patients for radiotherapy alone (RT group), 26 patients for radiotherapy concurrent with S-1 (S-1 group) who underwent initial treatment as outpatients for T2 glottic carcinoma at Osaka Medical College. Six of the 26 patients of the S-1 group were suspected to have local recurrence, but 5 of them had necrosis and one had dysplasia. Three patients suffered bilateral vocal cord paralysis and underwent tracheostomy. On the other hand, 4 of the 22 patients of the RT group suffered local recurrence and one patient suffered unilateral vocal cord paralysis. The local control rate of the S-1 group was significantly higher than that of the RT group. In the S-1 group, 5 patients with laryngeal function disorder tended to develop upper and arytenoid cartilage. The local control rate of radiotherapy for T2 glottic carcinoma was improved by concurrent S-1. In the S-1 group, there was no local recurrence, but some cases suffered laryngeal dysfunction, so efforts should be made to preserve laryngeal function. (author)

  12. Office-Based Autologous Fat Injection Laryngoplasty for Glottic Insufficiency in Patients Under 50 Years Old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao-Chun; Hung, Yi-Ting; Lin, Shu-Yi; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Chang, Shyue-Yih

    2018-04-17

    We sought to determine the outcomes of office-based autologous fat injection laryngoplasty in the treatment of patients under 50 years old with glottic insufficiency but without neurological problems or acquired organic lesions in the vocal fold. We conducted a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients under 50 years of age who underwent office-based autologous fat injection laryngoplasty for glottic insufficiency. None of the patients presented neurological problems or acquired organic lesions in the vocal fold. Videolaryngostroboscopic data, objective voice assessment, perceptual measurements of vocal quality, and subjective ratings of voice quality were evaluated before and after treatment. The 23 patients (7 men and 16 women) in this study presented significant improvements in phonatory function in terms of maximum phonation time, jitter, grade, asthenia, and Voice Handicap Index-10 (VHI-10) values at 3 months. Significant improvements in terms of jitter, noise-to-harmonic ratio, grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and the VHI-10 values were also observed at 6 months. Glottic insufficiency in younger patients without neurological problems or acquired organic lesions in the vocal fold can be treated effectively using office-based autologous fat injection laryngoplasty. Significant improvements in phonatory function were observed even 6 months after surgery. Copyright © 2018 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Voice Quality after Treatment for T1a Glottic Carcinoma - Radiotherapy Versus Laser Cordectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krengli, Marco; Policarpo, Mario; Manfredda, Irene; Aluffi, Paolo; Gambaro, Giuseppina; Panella, Massimiliano; Pia, Francesco

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the anatomic and functional outcomes and compare the voice quality in patients affected by T1a glottic carcinoma treated with curative intent with radiotherapy or laser cordectomy. Fifty-seven cases were analysed: 27 after curative radiotherapy and 30 after laser cordectomy. All patients were studied with videolaryngostroboscopy, voice analysis by narrow spectrogram, and vocal parameters (Jitter, Shimmer, noise/harmonic ratio, and diplophonia). Videolaryngostroboscopy showed severe glottic inadequacy in 25% of cases treated with radiation and insufficient compensation 'ventricular band' or 'with arytenoid hyperadduction' in 65% of cases after surgery. Severe dysphonia on the electro-acoustic analysis of voice was observed in 25% of cases after radiation and 70% after laser (p<0.001). Fundamental frequency and vocal parameters showed more favourable results in the radiation group (p<0.001). Voice assessment showed better results after radiotherapy compared with laser cordectomy. Voice outcome should be carefully considered in the treatment decision for T1 glottic carcinoma

  14. Voice Quality after Treatment for T1a Glottic Carcinoma - Radiotherapy Versus Laser Cordectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krengli, Marco; Policarpo, Mario; Manfredda, Irene; Aluffi, Paolo; Gambaro, Giuseppina; Panella, Massimiliano; Pia, Francesco [Univ. of Piemonte Orientale ' Amedeo Avogadro' , Novara (Italy). Div. of Radiotherapy

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the anatomic and functional outcomes and compare the voice quality in patients affected by T1a glottic carcinoma treated with curative intent with radiotherapy or laser cordectomy. Fifty-seven cases were analysed: 27 after curative radiotherapy and 30 after laser cordectomy. All patients were studied with videolaryngostroboscopy, voice analysis by narrow spectrogram, and vocal parameters (Jitter, Shimmer, noise/harmonic ratio, and diplophonia). Videolaryngostroboscopy showed severe glottic inadequacy in 25% of cases treated with radiation and insufficient compensation 'ventricular band' or 'with arytenoid hyperadduction' in 65% of cases after surgery. Severe dysphonia on the electro-acoustic analysis of voice was observed in 25% of cases after radiation and 70% after laser (p<0.001). Fundamental frequency and vocal parameters showed more favourable results in the radiation group (p<0.001). Voice assessment showed better results after radiotherapy compared with laser cordectomy. Voice outcome should be carefully considered in the treatment decision for T1 glottic carcinoma.

  15. Influence of fractionation and time on local control of T1 and T2 glottic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Quynh-Thu; Krieg, Richard M.; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Fu, Karen K.; Meyler, Thomas S.; Stuart, Alex A.; Phillips, Theodore L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of fraction size and overall time on local control of T1 and T2 glottic carcinoma Methods and Materials: Between 1956 and 1995, 318 consecutive patients with early glottic carcinoma (250 T1, 68 T2) were treated with definitive megavoltage radiotherapy at UCSF. Treatment was delivered using conventional fractionation at one fraction/day, 5 days/week. Minimum tumor dose ranged from 50 to 81Gy (median: 61Gy). The fraction size was 200cGy. Conclusions: Risk of tumor recurrence increased with higher T-stage, smaller fraction size, and longer overall time. Our results suggest that for optimal local control, radiotherapy for early glottic carcinoma should be completed as soon as possible, preferably within 6 weeks, using a fraction size ≥ 225cGy. Our current policy is to treat T1 and T2 vocal cord carcinomas with 225cGy/fraction/day, 5 days/week to a total dose of 63-65Gy

  16. The effect of vocal fold augmentation on cough symptoms in the presence of glottic insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litts, Juliana K; Fink, Daniel S; Clary, Matthew S

    2017-10-08

    To determine the effect of injection augmentation of the vocal folds on chronic cough symptoms in patients with glottic insufficiency. Medical records from 146 consecutive patients who underwent vocal fold injection augmentation by a fellowship-trained laryngologist between 2013 and 2015 were reviewed. Twenty-three patients (12 male) met inclusion criteria of a vocal fold augmentation injection, cough symptoms lasting more than 8 weeks, and glottic insufficiency as determined by shortened closed phase on stroboscopy. Exclusion criteria included lack of cough complaints, diagnosis of vocal fold immobility, previous history of vocal fold augmentation, and incomplete data sets. Data collected included age, gender, pre- and 1-month postinjection Cough Severity Index (CSI) scores, location of injection (unilateral or bilateral), and patient statement of percent change in symptoms that was recorded at 1-month postinjection visit. Paired t test indicated a significant decrease in CSI scores from pre- (m = 18.5) to 1-month postinjection (m = 12.1) (P = 0.004). Eighteen patients (78.2%) reported a 50% or greater improvement in cough symptoms at the 1-month postinjection visit. Injection augmentation of the vocal folds in the presence of glottic insufficiency appears to improve cough symptoms, as was reported by CSI in patients who are refractory to other medical and behavioral treatments. 4. Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Web thickness determines the therapeutic effect of endoscopic keel placement on anterior glottic web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Shi, Fang; Chen, Min; Yang, Yue; Cheng, Lei; Wu, Haitao

    2017-10-01

    This work is a retrospective analysis to investigate the critical risk factor for the therapeutic effect of endoscopic keel placement on anterior glottic web. Altogether, 36 patients with anterior glottic web undergoing endoscopic lysis and silicone keel placement were enrolled. Their voice qualities were evaluated using the voice handicap index-10 (VHI-10) questionnaire, and improved significantly 3 months after surgery (21.53 ± 3.89 vs 9.81 ± 6.68, P web recurrence during the at least 1-year follow-up. Therefore, patients were classified according to the Cohen classification or web thickness, and the recurrence rates were compared. The distribution of recurrence rates for Cohen type 1 ~ 4 were 28.6, 16.7, 33.3, and 40%, respectively. The difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.461). When classified by web thickness, only 2 of 27 (7.41%) thin type cases relapsed whereas 8 of 9 (88.9%) cases in the thick group reformed webs (P web thickness rather than the Cohen grades. Endoscopic lysis and keel placement is only effective for cases with thin glottic webs. Patients with thick webs should be treated by other means.

  18. The prognostic value of oncogenic antigen 519 (OA-519) expression and proliferative activity detected by antibody MIB-1 in node-negative breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, V; Ladekarl, M; Holm-Nielsen, P

    1995-01-01

    of invasion of skin or deep fascia (= T1N0M0 and T2N0M0). The median follow-up time was 104 months (range 5-143 months). Immunohistochemical analysis of OA-519 expression was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. The proliferative activity was estimated using a Ki-67 equivalent monoclonal...

  19. Pattern of failure in 5001 patients treated for glottic squamous cell carcinoma with curative intent - A population based study from the DAHANCA group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Nina Munk; Johansen, Jørgen; Kristensen, Claus A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe the pattern of failure in a national consecutive cohort of patients with glottic squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) treated with primary radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent over a 41-year period. Materials and methods All patients undergoing curative treatment for a glottic SCC...

  20. Effects of smoking and irradiated volume on inflammatory response in the lung of irradiated breast cancer patients evaluated with bronchoalveolar lavage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjermer, L.; Franzen, L.; Littbrand, B.; Nilsson, K.; Angstroem, T.H.; Henriksson, R.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the effects of irradiation on normal tissues in humans have been hard to obtain because most tissues are inaccessible and/or direct responses are difficult to quantify in a nondestructive manner. Pneumonitis and fibrotic lung disease are adverse effects seen in varying intensity in patients treated with radiotherapy for carcinomas of the thorax, e.g., breast cancer. In the present study the aim was to evaluate the inflammatory reaction in the underlying parenchyma following postoperative irradiation with bronchoalveolar lavage technique. Twenty-one patients with breast cancer stage T1N0M0 received radiotherapy with photons to a target dose of 56 Gy following breast conservative surgery. Nineteen healthy controls were also included. The results showed a clear elevation of neutrophils, mast cells, eosinophils, and lymphocytes in the total irradiated groups, compared to controls. When subclassifying the material according to smoking habit, it was obvious that the smokers displayed a significantly decreased inflammatory reaction, i.e., reduced levels of mast cells and lymphocytes, compared to both nonsmoking controls and patients. Eosinophils were seen in an elevated number in all irradiated patients. Radiological signs of pneumonitis were observed in three patients, all in the nonsmoking group. No correlation was found between the volume of lung irradiated and the inflammatory response. It is concluded that bronchoalveolar lavage is a suitable and sensitive method for investigating radiotherapy-induced reactions in the human lung. Furthermore, ongoing smoking during the treatment depressed the inflammatory response in the lung parenchyma induced by irradiation. The present study as well as earlier observations justify further studies concerning the possibility of interaction of smoking with cancer treatment

  1. Radiotherapy or surgery for T2N0M0 glottic carcinoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stalpers, L.J.A.; Daal, W.A.J. van; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    1989-01-01

    Decision analysis was used to evaluate the results of treatment of T 2 N 0 M 0 glottic carcinoma as presented in the literature. Based on mean values for recurrence, salvage eligibility after recurrence and salvage success, the 5-year survival after radiotherapy and surgery proved to be almost identical, 85 and 86%. If the recurrence rates and the salvage rates were varied, a marginal advantage for surgery in small tumours and a major advantage in more extended tumours was seen if only survival is considered. To take the quality of speech into account, a utility analysis was performed. A utility scale was defined ranging from 0.0 as the value for death, to 1.0 for a successfully irradiated patient with preservation of normal speech. A utility of 0.99 or less for the laryngectomized patient would favour radiotherapy over surgery for all T 2 tumours. In patients with T 2b tumours and in extreme circumstances, e.g. if failure rates of radiotherapy are extremely low, an exact assessment of patient utilities may be pivotal. Under normal circumstances radiotherapy is preferred for T 2 N 0 M 0 glottic carcinoma if both survival and the quality of speech are taken into account. (author). 39 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  2. Radiation treatment of glottic squamous cell carcinoma, Stage I and II: analysis of factors affecting prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franchin, Giovanni; Minatel, Emilio; Gobitti, Carlo; Talamini, Renato; Sartor, Giovanna; Caruso, Giuseppe; Grando, Giuseppe; Politi, Doriano; Gigante, Marco; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Trovo, Mauro G.; Barzan, Luigi

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: At least in some European Countries, there is still considerable controversy regarding the choice between surgery and radiotherapy for the treatment of patients with early laryngeal-glottic carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Two hundred and forty-six patients with laryngeal-glottic neoplasms, Stage I-II, were treated with radical radiotherapy. Before radiotherapy the patients were evaluated to determine the surgical procedure of choice. Either 66-68.4 Gy (33-38 fractions) or 63-65 Gy (28-29 fractions) of radiation therapy (RT) were administered. The overall disease free survival was determined for each subgroup of patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine significant prognostic variables. Results: Five- and 10-year overall survival rates were 83 and 72%, respectively. At a median follow-up of 6 years 204 patients are alive and disease free. No patient developed distant metastases. One patient died of a large local recurrence, 38 patients died of causes unrelated to their tumor, and 3 patients were lost to follow-up. The multivariate analysis confirmed that performance status (PS), macroscopic presentation of the lesion, and persistence of dysphonia after radiotherapy are significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: According to the multivariate analysis, the patients with PS >80 and with exophytic lesions are eligible for radical RT. The surgical procedure proposed for each patient was not found to be an independent prognostic factor

  3. Utility approach to decision-making in extended T1 and limited T2 glottic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Yda; Stiggelbout, Anne M; Hakkesteegt, Marieke M; Langeveld, Ton P M; de Jong, Rob J Baatenburg; Sjögren, Elisabeth V

    2017-04-01

    It is still undecided if endoscopic laser surgery or radiotherapy is the preferable treatment in extended T1 and limited T2 glottic tumors. Health utilities assessed from patients can aid in decision-making. Patients treated for extended T1 or limited T2 glottic carcinoma by laser surgery (n = 12) or radiotherapy (n = 14) assigned health utilities using a visual analog scale (VAS), time tradeoff (TTO) technique and scored their voice handicap using the Voice Handicap Index (VHI). VAS and TTO scores were slightly lower for the laser group compared to the radiotherapy group, however, not significantly so. The VHI showed a correlation with the VAS score, which was very low in both groups and can be considered (near) normal. Patients show no clear preference for the outcomes of laser surgery or radiotherapy from a quality of life (QOL) or voice handicap point of view. These data can now be incorporated into decision-making models. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2017 © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 779-785, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Efficacy of intermittent sub-glottic suctioning in prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia- A preliminary study of 100 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M N Vijai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Oropharyngeal colonisation followed by aspiration of contaminated secretions is the major cause for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP. Pooled secretions present in the sub-glottic area above inflated endotracheal tube cuff may be aspirated into the lower airways. It was hypothesised that intermittent suctioning of sub-glottic secretions would prevent VAP. Methods: Group I (n = 50 patients were intubated with HiLo Evac™ endotracheal (ET tube with facility for sub-glottic suctioning, and Group II (n = 50 patients were intubated with HiLo Contour™ ET tube without such facility. In the Group I, sub-glottic suctioning was performed every 2 h. Incidence of VAP, mean ventilator days, Intensive Care Unit (ICU stay and mortality were compared. Qualitative variables were reported as percentages and were compared by Chi-square test or unpaired two-tailed, Fisher′s exact test, as appropriate, to analyse the significance of difference between the two groups. Results: The two groups were similar with respect to demographic characteristics. VAP was seen in 6% of patients in Group I and 22% of patients in Group II (P = 0.021. Both early- and late-onset VAPs were significantly reduced in Group I. Both ventilator days (8.0 vs. 6.45; P = 0.001 and ICU stay (8.33 vs. 6.33; P = 0.001 on the day of onset of VAP were significantly more in the Group I. Total ventilator days were significantly less (6.52 vs. 8.32; P = 0.006 with lower incidence of mortality (36% vs. 48%; P = 0.224 in the Group I. Conclusion: Intermittent sub-glottic suctioning reduces the incidence of VAP including late-onset VAP.

  5. Efficacy of intermittent sub-glottic suctioning in prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia- A preliminary study of 100 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijai, M N; Ravi, Parli R; Setlur, Rangaraj; Vardhan, Harsh

    2016-05-01

    Oropharyngeal colonisation followed by aspiration of contaminated secretions is the major cause for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Pooled secretions present in the sub-glottic area above inflated endotracheal tube cuff may be aspirated into the lower airways. It was hypothesised that intermittent suctioning of sub-glottic secretions would prevent VAP. Group I (n = 50) patients were intubated with HiLo Evac™ endotracheal (ET) tube with facility for sub-glottic suctioning, and Group II (n = 50) patients were intubated with HiLo Contour™ ET tube without such facility. In the Group I, sub-glottic suctioning was performed every 2 h. Incidence of VAP, mean ventilator days, Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay and mortality were compared. Qualitative variables were reported as percentages and were compared by Chi-square test or unpaired two-tailed, Fisher's exact test, as appropriate, to analyse the significance of difference between the two groups. The two groups were similar with respect to demographic characteristics. VAP was seen in 6% of patients in Group I and 22% of patients in Group II (P = 0.021). Both early- and late-onset VAPs were significantly reduced in Group I. Both ventilator days (8.0 vs. 6.45; P = 0.001) and ICU stay (8.33 vs. 6.33; P = 0.001) on the day of onset of VAP were significantly more in the Group I. Total ventilator days were significantly less (6.52 vs. 8.32; P = 0.006) with lower incidence of mortality (36% vs. 48%; P = 0.224) in the Group I. Intermittent sub-glottic suctioning reduces the incidence of VAP including late-onset VAP.

  6. Radiotherapy for superficial esophageal cancer of poor risk patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagami, Yoshikazu; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Tachimori, Yuji; Kato, Hoichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Tokuue, Kouichi; Sumi, Minako; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Imai, Atsushi; Nakayama, Shuji

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The reported incidence of superficial esophageal cancer (SEC) has steadily increased in Japan as result of endoscopic examination has been become common. In Japan, treatment of SEC is endoscopical mucosal resection (EMR) for mucosal cancer or esophagectomy with 3 fields lymph nodes resection for submucosal cancer. Radiotherapy is little place for the management of SEC. Because of some reasons, we treated patients with SEC by radiotherapy alternative to surgery. Purpose of this report is to evaluate efficacy of radiotherapy for SEC. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 to 1996, eighteen patients with SEC were treated with radiotherapy at our hospital. Reasons of radiotherapy that was chosen as the primary methods of treatment were refusal of surgery in one patient, poor medical condition in 4 patients and double primary cancer in 13 patients (head and neck: 11, simultaneously: 11). No patients had indication of EMR. Diagnosis was made by endoscopy and radiography. Some patients were examined with endoscopic ultrasound. Two patients (11.1%) had tumor limited to the mucosa and 16 patients (88.9%) had tumor invaded the submucosa. Seven of these tumors (38.9%) were multicentric. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma. There were 17 male patients and one female patient. The age range was 49 years to 87 years with a median of 62 years. Stage of all patients was T1N0M0 according to UICC staging system. Ten patients underwent external radiotherapy (Ex) (50 Gy - 66 Gy) alone and 8 patients did both Ex and intracavitary radiotherapy (IC) (30-60 Gy of Ex with 5-15 Gy of IC). No patients received chemotherapy. Duration of follow-up was 6 months to 96 months with a median of 30 months. Results: The overall survival rate was 55.9% in 3-year and 14% in 5-year, and the cause-specific 5-year survival rate was 100%. Causes of death were malignant tumor other than esophageal cancer in 4 patients, intercurrent disease other than malignant tumor in 3 patients and no

  7. FADD Expression as a Prognosticator in Early-Stage Glottic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx Treated Primarily With Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrijvers, Michiel L.; Pattje, Wouter J.; Slagter-Menkema, Lorian; Mastik, Mirjam F.; Gibcus, Johan H.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wal, Jacqueline E. van der; Laan, Bernard F.A.M. vn der; Schuuring, E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We recently reported on the identification of the Fas-associated death domain (FADD) as a possible driver of the chromosome 11q13 amplicon and the association between increased FADD expression and disease-specific survival in advanced-stage laryngeal carcinoma. The aim of this study was to examine whether expression of FADD and its Ser194-phosphorylated isoform (pFADD) predicts local control in patients with early-stage glottic carcinoma primarily treated with radiotherapy only. Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemical staining for FADD and pFADD was performed on pretreatment biopsy specimens of 92 patients with T1–T2 glottic squamous cell carcinoma primarily treated with radiotherapy between 1996 and 2005. Cox regression analysis was used to correlate expression levels with local control. Results: High levels of pFADD were associated with significantly better local control (hazard ratio, 2.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.04–5.55; p = 0.040). FADD overexpression showed a trend toward better local control (hazard ratio, 3.656; 95% confidence interval, 0.853–15.663; p = 0.081). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that high pFADD expression was the best predictor of local control after radiotherapy. Conclusions: This study showed that expression of phosphorylated FADD is a new prognostic biomarker for better local control after radiotherapy in patients with early-stage glottic carcinomas.

  8. T1N0 to T2N0 Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Glottic Larynx Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G.; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report the treatment outcomes of definitive radiotherapy (RT) for early-stage squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) of the glottic larynx. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 585 patients with T1N0 to T2N0 invasive SCCA of the glottic larynx treated between 1964 and 2006 with RT alone. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up, had histologic diagnosis of invasive SCCA, and received continuous-course RT. None of these patients received chemotherapy or had elective nodal RT. The probabilities of local control (LC), ultimate LC, ultimate LC with larynx preservation, neck control, cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. Results: The median follow-up for survivors was 12 years. Five-year LC rates were as follows: T1A, 94%; T1B, 93%; T2A, 80%; and T2B, 70%. Multivariate analysis revealed that overall treatment time greater than 41 days (p = 0.001) and poorly differentiated histology (p = 0.016) adversely affected LC. Five-year rates of ultimate LC with laryngeal preservation were: T1A, 95%; T1B, 94%, T2A, 81%; and T2B, 74%. Twenty-four (4%) of 585 patients failed in the neck; only 7 neck failures (1%) were isolated. Five-year CSS and OS rates were as follows: T1A, 97% and 82%; T1B, 99% and 83%; T2A, 94% and 76%; and T2B, 90% and 78%, respectively. Ten (1.7%) patients had severe and/or fatal complications. One patient died of a radiation-induced carotid artery angiosarcoma. Conclusion: Based on our study results, RT cures a high proportion of patients with T1N0 to T2N0 glottic SCCAs and has a low rate of severe complications.

  9. Nine breast angiosarcomas after conservative treatment for breast carcinoma: a survey from French Comprehensive Cancer Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchal, Christian; Weber, Beatrice; Lafontan, Brigitte de; Resbeut, Michel; Mignotte, Herve; Pabot du Chatelard, Pierre; Cutuli, Bruno; Reme-saumon, Monique; Broussier-leroux, Agnes; Chaplain, Gilles; Lesaunier, Francois; Dilhuydy, Jean-Marie; Lagrange, Jean Leon

    1999-01-01

    Objectives: To conduct a survey of the angiosarcomas developing after breast conservation for carcinoma in the French Cancer Centers, to study the evolution of these cases in detail, and to review literature in an attempt to propose an optimal treatment scheme. Material and Methods: Eleven of the 20 French Cancer Centers agreed to research and retrospectively analyze all angiosarcomas discovered in patients previously treated by conservative treatment. The majority of the patients were node negative, T1N0M0. The mean age of the patients at the time of primary breast cancer treatment was 62.5 years, and 69 years at the diagnosis of the angiosarcoma. Results: During the last two decades, nearly 20,000 patients have been treated conservatively in these 11 centers, and only 9 cases of angiosarcoma were found. The median latency period between the treatment of the breast carcinoma and the diagnosis of the breast angiosarcoma was approximately 74 months, with a range of 57-108 months. Mastectomy was performed as the main treatment of this angiosarcoma. All recurrences after mastectomy for the angiosarcoma appeared within 16 months after the mastectomy. A median time of recurrence was found to be 7.5 months, regardless of the treatment. The angiosarcomas appeared to be very aggressive, and chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and sometimes hyperthermia could only palliate the condition for a short time. After the diagnosis of angiosarcoma, the median survival was 15.5 months, showing a particularly poor prognosis. Only 1 patient of 9 is alive without progressive disease at 32 months after salvage mastectomy for the recurrence of the angiosarcoma. Precise data obtained from 11 centers show that, of 18115 breast carcinomas treated conservatively, only 9 breast angiosarcomas are reported, which represents a prevalence of 5 cases of angiosarcoma per 10,000, which is the same prevalence for primary breast angiosarcomas occurring in healthy breasts. Conclusion: Angiosarcoma developing

  10. Laparoscopic resection of lower rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis without abdominal incisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Yong; Chen, Gang; Du, Jun-Feng; Chen, Guang; Wei, Xiao-Jun; Cui, Wei; Zuo, Fu-Yi; Yu, Bo; Dong, Xing; Ji, Xi-Qing; Yuan, Qiang

    2015-04-28

    To assess laparoscopic radical resection of lower rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis through transanal resection without abdominal incisions. From March 2010 to June 2014, 30 patients (14 men and 16 women, aged 36-78 years, mean age 59.8 years) underwent laparoscopic radical resection of lower rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis through anus-preserving transanal resection. The tumors were 5-7 cm away from the anal margin in 24 cases, and 4 cm in six cases. In preoperative assessment, there were 21 cases of T1N0M0 and nine of T2N0M0. Through the middle approach, the sigmoid mesentery was freed at the root with an ultrasonic scalpel and the roots of the inferior mesenteric artery and vein were dissected, clamped and cut. Following the total mesorectal excision principle, the rectum was separated until the anorectal ring reached 3-5 cm from the distal end of the tumor. For perineal surgery, a ring incision was made 2 cm above the dentate line, and sharp dissection was performed submucosally towards the superior direction, until the plane of the levator ani muscle, to transect the rectum. The rectum and distal sigmoid colon were removed together from the anus, followed by a telescopic anastomosis between the full thickness of the proximal colon and the mucosa and submucosal tissue of the rectum. For the present cohort of 30 cases, the mean operative time was 178 min, with an average of 13 positive lymph nodes detected. One case of postoperative anastomotic leak was observed, requiring temporary colostomy, which was closed and recovered 3 mo later. The postoperative pathology showed T1-T2N0M0 in 19 cases and T2N1M0 in 11 cases. Twelve months after surgery, 94.4% patients achieved anal function Kirwan grade 1, indicating that their anal function returned to normal. The patients were followed up for 1-36 mo, with an average of 23 mo. There was no local recurrence, and 17 patients survived for > 3 years (with a survival rate of 100%). Laparoscopic radical

  11. The Dynamics of Acute Renal Impairment Markers During a Surgery for Kidney Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Frantsiyants

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to investigate the effect of epidural block on the functional state of the kidneys in patients with localized cancer during kidney resection under the conditions of warm ischemia.Materials and methods. We examined 45 patients (25 men and 20 women with a localized kidney cancer (T1N0M0 aged 56.5±8.7 years. All the patients underwent kidney resection performed under conditions of warm ischemia (15—20 minutes. Patients were divided into 2 groups: the main group (25 subjects in which the perioperative epidural block was applied and the reference group (20 patients without the epidural block. The following parameters were tested in blood and urine using the ELISA technique: cystatin C, L-FABP, KIM-1 , IL-18, and GFR. The test was carried out 1 hour prior to surgery, 20 minutes after the warm ischemia stage, and on Days 1 and 3. Based on the baseline cystatin С level, the patients in each group were divided into 2 subgroups: subgroup 1 —cystatin C is 1000 ng/ml and lower; subgroup 2 — more than 1000 ng/ml. The statistical processing of the findings was performed using the Statistica 6.0 software based on the t-test for two independent samples. Differences were considered to be statistically significant at P<0.05.Results. It has been demonstrated that functional parameters of kidneys were recovered to the baseline values by the 3rd day after the kidney resection under the warm ischemia due to perioperative epidural block. Impairment of the tubulointerstitium and glomerular apparatus were observed in the reference group. GFR values in the patients of the main group were within normal limits by Day 3, whereas in the patients of the GFR was lower by 38.8% as compared to the baseline (P<0.05.Conclusion. The use of the perioperative epidural block in patients with localized kidney cancer who underwent the organ resection under the warm ischemia demonstrated the nephroprotective effect, while maintaining the functional

  12. Radiotherapy for laryngeal cancer in patients under 50 years old

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Wakako; Ogino, Takashi; Ebihara, Satoshi; Ikeda, Hiroshi.

    1995-01-01

    Fifty-nine cases of laryngeal cancer treated by radiotherapy at the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1962 and 1990 were analyzed retrospectively. All the patients were less than 50 years old. The median total dose of the radiation delivered to the primary tumor site was 70 Gy. The overall 5-yr survival rate and 5-yr local control rate were 88% and 72%, respectively. Five (8.5%) of the 59 patients developed late recurrence more than five yr after initial treatment, but subsequent salvage operations were successful for disease control; three patients had T1 glottic cancer, one had T2-3 glottic cancer and one had T3N1 supraglottic cancer. Since the local control rate and the 5-yr survival rate after radiotherapy are satisfactory, radiotherapy, which allows both functional and esthetic conservation, has an important role in the treatment of laryngeal cancer in adults under 50 yr of age. (author)

  13. Comparative adequacy of surgery and radiation therapy in 175 T2 glottic carcinomas: 116 cases treated with surgery and 59 with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellai, E.; Olmi, P.; Chiavacci, A.; Fallai, C.; Aulisi, L.; Bottai, G.A.; De Meester, W.

    1991-01-01

    The results were analyzed of 175 patients with glottic squamous cell carcinomas who were treated with curative purposes (1970-1986). Overall 10-year local control rates were 74% for the surgical series and 69% for the cases treated by radiation therapy. After salvage therapy 10-year survival rates were 83% and 76% respectively. The analysis of the results showed no statistically significant difference. In the group treated by radical surgery 80% local control was observed, versus 66% in the cases treated with conservative surgery. 10-year survival rate was higher in the latter group (89% versus 81%) because of better results of salvage therapy: 7 of 10 recurrences were salvaged with the second treatment. Several prognostic factors were evaluated-i.e., T extent, anterior commissure involvement, subglottic invasion, vocal cord mobility impairment, and ventricular involvement. Anterior commissure involvement was the main factor affecting out-come in the surgical series: in the presence of this factor, 64% 10-year local control was observed versus 85% in the patients without commissure involvement. This factor proved more important in the patients treated with conservative surgery (10-year control: 42 versus 88%) than in those undergoing radical surgery (78% versus 85%). Anterior commissure involvement and the number of involved subsites were found to worsen prognosis in the serial treated by radiation therapy: cases with anterior commissure involvement had 59% 10-year local control versus 83%. The cases with a deeper spread had 60% local control versus 75%. Vocal cord mobility impairment was a less important prognosis factor in both series. Our results suggest radiation therapy as a valuable method in a treatment of the small T2 laryngeal cancers which are not suitable for conservative surgery

  14. [Long term results of exclusive chemotherapy for glottic squamous cell carcinoma complete clinical responders after induction chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachin, F; Hans, S; Atlan, D; Brasnu, D; Menard, M; Laccourreye, O

    2004-06-01

    To evaluate the long-term results of exclusive chemotherapy for T1-T3N0M0 glottic squamous cell carcinoma complete clinical responders after induction chemotherapy. Between 1985 and 2000, 69 patients with glottic squamous cell carcinoma complete clinical responders after induction chemotherapy were managed with exclusive chemotherapy at our department. Chemotherapy associated platinum and fluorouracil. This retrospective analysis evaluated actuarial survival, treatment morbidity, oncologic events and laryngeal preservation. Various independent factors were tested for potential correlation with survival and local recurrence. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier actuarial survival, local control, lymph node control estimate were 83,6%, 64,8%, 98,6% respectively. Chemotherapy never resulted in death. The 10-year actuarial metachronous second primary tumors estimate was 32%. The overall laryngeal preservation rate was 98,6%. Altogether our data and the review of the literature suggest that in patients achieving a complete clinical response after and induction based chemotherapy regimen, the completion of an exclusive chemotherapy regimen appears to be a valid alternative to the conventional use of radiotherapy or chemo-radiation protocols.

  15. Factors influencing the treatment outcome for patients with T2N0 glottic carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Ichiro; Kanehira, Chihiro; Kobayashi, Masao; Aoki, Manabu; Takagi, Sayako; Shirahama, Jun; Honda, Chikara

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic factors affecting local outcomes for patients with T2N0 glottic carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy. A total of 48 patients with T2N0 squamous cell carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy between 1992 and 2005 were studied. Cumulative probability of overall survival, cause-specific survival, local control and larynx-preserving were calculated according the Kaplan-Meier method, and the prognostic significance of patient's age, number of subsites involved, impaired cord mobility, anterior commisure involved, total dose and overall treatment time were analyzed using the log-rank test in univariate analysis and Cox regression in multivariate analysis. Follow-up ranged from 13 to 141 months (median, 62 months). Five-year survivals were: overall, 95.3%; cause-specific, 97.9% and five years rates were local control, 61.4%; larynx-preserving, 76.4%. Multivariate analyses of the six parameters showed that overall treatment time significantly influenced the probability of local control, and impaired mobility and overall treatment time affected the probability of larynx-preserving. Our study showed that longer overall treatment time significantly worsened the percentage of local control and larynx-preserving for patients with T2N0 glottic carcinoma treated with definitive radiotherapy. Therefore, we suggest treating, the patients in a shorter treatment course. (author)

  16. Cordectomy by CO2 laser or radiotherapy for small T1a glottic carcinomas : Costs, local control, survival, quality of life, and voice quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goor, Kim M.; Peeters, A. Jeanne G. E.; Mahieu, Hans F.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Leemans, C. Rene; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.; van Agthoven, Michel

    Background, The clinical results of radiotherapy and endoscopic cordectomy for T1a glottic carcinoma are reported to be similar, but costs of both treatments may differ. Therefore, we retrospectively evaluated the costs, voice quality, quality of life, and clinical results of both treatments.

  17. KRAS Mutant Status, p16 and β-catenin Expression May Predict Local Recurrence in Patients Who Underwent Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery (TEMS) for Stage I Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideris, Michail; Moorhead, Jane; Diaz-Cano, Salvador; Bjarnason, Ingvar; Haji, Amyn; Papagrigoriadis, Savvas

    2016-10-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEMS) is emerging as an alternative treatment for rectal cancer Stage I. There remains a risk of local recurrence. The Aim of the study was to study the effect of biomarkers in local recurrence for Stage I rectal cancer following TEMS plus or minus radiotherapy. This is a case control study where we compared 10 early rectal cancers that had recurred, against 19 cases with no recurrence, total 29 patients (age=28.25-86.87, mean age=67.92 years, SD=14.91, Male, N=18, Female, N=11). All patients underwent TEMS for radiological Stage I rectal cancer (yT1N0M0 or yT2N0M0) established with combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endorectal ultrasound. We prospectively collected all data on tumour histology, morphological features, as well as follow-up parameters. Molecular analysis was performed to identify their status on BRAF, KRAS, p16 O 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and β-catenin. Out of 29 specimens analyzed, 19 were KRAS wild type (65.9%) and 10 mutant (34.5%). Recurrence of the tumour was noted in 10 cases (34.5%) from which 60% were pT1 (N=6) and 40% pT2 (N=4). There was a statistically significant association between KRAS mutant status and local recurrence (N=6, p=0.037). P16 expression greater than 5% (mean=10.8%, min=0, max=95) is linked with earlier recurrence within 11.70 months (N=7, p=0.004). Membranous β-catenin expression (N=12, 48%) was also related with KRAS mutant status (p=0.006) but not with survival (p>0.05). BRAF gene was found to be wild type in all cases tested (N=23). KRAS/p16/β-catenin could be used as a combined biomarker for prediction of local recurrence and stratification of the risk for further surgery. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  18. Platinum Concentration and Pathologic Response to Cisplatin-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Guancial

    Full Text Available Platinum (Pt-based chemotherapy is the standard of care for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC. However, resistance is a major limitation. Reduced intratumoral drug accumulation is an important mechanism of platinum resistance. Our group previously demonstrated a significant correlation between tissue Pt concentration and tumor response to Pt-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC in lung cancer. We hypothesized that increased Pt concentration in radical cystectomy (RC specimens would correlate with improved pathologic response to Pt-based NAC in MIBC.A cohort of 19 clinically annotated, archived, fresh frozen RC specimens from patients with MIBC treated with Pt-based NAC was identified [ypT0 (pathologic complete response, pCR, N = 4; ≤ypT1N0M0 (pathologic partial response, pPR, N = 6; ≥ypT2 (minimal pathologic response/progression, N = 9]. RC specimens from 2 patients with MIBC who did not receive NAC and 1 treated with a non-Pt containing NAC regimen were used as negative controls. Total Pt concentration in normal adjacent urothelial tissue and bladder tumors from RC specimens was measured by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.Total Pt concentration in normal urothelium differed by tumor pathologic response (P = 0.011. Specimens with pCR had the highest Pt concentrations compared to those with pPR (P = 0.0095 or no response/progression (P = 0.020. There was no significant difference in Pt levels in normal urothelium and tumor between pPR and no response/progression groups (P = 0.37; P = 0.25, respectively.Our finding of increased intracellular Pt in RC specimens with pCR following NAC for MIBC compared to those with residual disease suggests that enhanced Pt accumulation may be an important determinant of Pt sensitivity. Factors that modulate intracellular Pt concentration, such as expression of Pt transporters, warrant further investigation as predictive biomarkers of response to Pt-based NAC in MIBC.

  19. Non small cell lung cancer – Comparison between clinical and pathological staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Fernandes

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer (LC staging remains a clinical challenge as it determines the disease's prognosis and treatment. Surgery is the best option for controlling non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and the only potential cure. In this setting, lung cancer staging helps select patients who will benefit from surgery, excluding inoperable patients and including patients with resectable lesions. The aim of this study is to compare clinical staging (TNMc with pathological staging (TNMp and to evaluate diagnosis, complementary treatment and survival of these patients.This is a retrospective study that included patients with non-small cell lung cancer or with highly sus- picious lesions who had undergone surgery and were followed up in the Hospital de São João lung cancer unit between January 1999 and December 2003. It is based on clinical files and pathology reports.73.3% of this group of 60 patients were male, with median age 59.2 years. The most frequent TNMc stages were 41.7% T1N0M0 and 36.7% T2N0M0. Thoracotomy for therapeutic purpose was performed in 80% and thoracotomy for diagnostic purpose also in the remaining 20%. In 6.7% the resection was incomplete. The most frequent TNMp stages were T2N0p in 33.3%, T2N1p in 15.0% and T2N2p in 13.3%. There was a significant difference between the two staging types, with upstaging in 65.0%, down staging in 67% and only 28.3% keeping the same stage. The most frequent differences were from T1N0c to T2N0p and from T2N0c to T2N1p. The global agreement between both staging methods was 21.7%. Median global survival was 43 months.In conclusion, while clinical staging was less accurate, it did not determine important changes in therapeutic strategy and survival. For the future, we should consider using other diagnostic tools and other biological factors to complement the anatomical information that we currently use. Resumo: O estadiamento do cancro do pulmão (CP permanece um desafio clínico, sendo fundamental para

  20. A Prospective Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Incorporating a Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Prostate Cancer: Long-term Outcomes Compared With Standard Image Guided IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schild, Michael H. [Midwestern University, Glendale, Arizona (United States); Schild, Steven E., E-mail: sschild@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Wong, William W.; Vora, Sujay A.; Keole, Sameer R.; Vargas, Carlos E.; Daniels, Thomas B.; Ezzell, Gary A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Nguyen, Ba D.; Roarke, Michael C. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: This report describes the long-term outcomes of a prospective trial of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), integrating a {sup 111}In capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan-directed simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-one patients with T1N0M0 to T4N0M0 prostate cancer were enrolled, and their ProstaScint and pelvic computed tomography scans were coregistered for treatment planning. The entire prostate received 75.6 Gy in 42 fractions with IMRT, whereas regions of increased uptake on ProstaScint scans received 82 Gy as an SIB. Patients with intermediate- and high-risk disease also received 6 months and 12 months of adjuvant hormonal therapy, respectively. Results: The study enrolled 31 low-, 30 intermediate-, and 10 high-risk patients. The median follow-up was 120 months (range, 24-150 months). The 10-year biochemical control rates were 85% for the entire cohort and 84%, 84%, and 90% for patients with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk disease, respectively. The 10-year survival rate of the entire cohort was 69%. Pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level >10 ng/mL and boost volume of >10% of the prostate volume were significantly associated with poorer biochemical control and survival. The outcomes were compared with those of a cohort of 302 patients treated similarly but without the SIB and followed up for a median of 91 months (range, 6-138 months). The 5- and 10-year biochemical control rates were 86% and 61%, respectively, in patients without the SIB compared with 94% and 85%, respectively, in patients in this trial who received the SIB (P=.02). The cohort that received an SIB did not have increased toxicity. Conclusions: The described IMRT strategy, integrating multiple imaging modalities to administer 75.6 Gy to the entire prostate with a boost dose of 82 Gy, was feasible. The addition of the SIB was associated with greater biochemical control but not toxicity. Modern

  1. Results of radiotherapy for cancer of head and neck region, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Noriharu; Shinzato, Jintetsu; Watanabe, Keikichi; Habu, Kenjiro; Hirayama, Haruyuki

    1988-01-01

    A total of 110 patients with laryngeal cancer treated by radiotherapy during a period of 19 years between 1967 and 1985 were analyzed. Results were as follows; 1) Eighty-three patients (80 %) were irradiated curatively with doses given more than 40 Gy and 21 patients (20 %) were treated by postoperative irradiation. The mean age was 67.4 and the ratio of men to women was 8.1 : 1. 2) According to the primary site of laryngeal cancer undergoing a curative irradiation, glottic cancer was 70 % (58 patients), supraglottic cancer was 29 % (24 patients) and subglottic cancer was 1 % (1 patient). As for the stage classification, 22 patients was in stage I, 26 patients in stage II, 20 patients in stage III and 15 patients in stage IV. The rate of early stages (stages I and II) was 72 % in glottic cancer, but that of advanced stages (stages III and IV) was 79 % in supraglottic cancer. 3) The five-year survival rate of 21 patients who had treated by postoperative irradiation was 37 %, and that of 58 patients undergoing a curative irradiation was 32 %. The five-year survival rate of curatively irradiated patients with glottic cancer was 84 % in stage I, 48 % in stage II and 17 % in stage III and IV. In all of 21 patients with supraglottic cancer, the five-year survival rate was 15 %. 4) Eighteen patients survived more than 5 years ; 3 patients were postoperative irradiation and 15 were curative irradiation. In the curative irradiation, 12 patients were glottic cancer, and 3 were supraglottic cancer. (author)

  2. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for centrally located early-stage non-small cell lung cancer or lung metastases from the RSSearch® patient registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Joanne N.; Medbery, Clinton; Sharma, Sanjeev; Pablo, John; Kimsey, Frank; Perry, David; Muacevic, Alexander; Mahadevan, Anand

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment patterns and outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for centrally located primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or lung metastases from the RSSearch ® Patient Registry, an international, multi-center patient registry dedicated to radiosurgery and SBRT. Eligible patients included those with centrally located lung tumors clinically staged T1-T2 N0, M0, biopsy-confirmed NSCLC or lung metastases treated with SBRT between November 2004 and January 2014. Descriptive analysis was used to report patient demographics and treatment patterns. Overall survival (OS) and local control (LC) were determined using Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was reported using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. In total, 111 patients with 114 centrally located lung tumors (48 T1-T2,N0,M0 NSCLC and 66 lung metastases) were treated with SBRT at 19 academic and community-based radiotherapy centers in the US and Germany. Median follow-up was 17 months (range, 1–72). Median age was 74 years for primary NSCLC patients and 65 years for lung metastases patients (p < 0.001). SBRT dose varied from 16 – 60 Gy (median 48 Gy) delivered in 1–5 fractions (median 4 fractions). Median dose to centrally located primary NSCLC was 48 Gy compared to 37.5 Gy for lung metastases (p = 0.0001) and median BED 10 was 105.6 Gy for primary NSCLC and 93.6 Gy for lung metastases (p = 0.0005). Two-year OS for T1N0M0 and T2N0M0 NSCLC was 79 and 32.1 %, respectively (p = 0.009) and 2-year OS for lung metastases was 49.6 %. Two-year LC was 76.4 and 69.8 % for primary NSCLC and lung metastases, respectively. Toxicity was low with no Grade 3 or higher acute or late toxicities. Overall, patients with centrally located primary NSCLC were older and received higher doses of SBRT than those with lung metastases. Despite these differences, LC and OS was favorable for patients with central lung tumors treated with SBRT. Reported toxicity

  3. Changes in Peak Airflow Measurement During Maximal Cough After Vocal Fold Augmentation in Patients With Glottic Insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Gregory R; Achlatis, Efstratios; Teng, Stephanie; Fang, Yixin; Persky, Michael; Branski, Ryan C; Amin, Milan R

    2017-11-01

    Compromised cough effectiveness is correlated with dysphagia and aspiration. Glottic insufficiency likely yields decreased cough strength and effectiveness. Although vocal fold augmentation favorably affects voice and likely improves cough strength, few data exist to support this hypothesis. To assess whether vocal fold augmentation improves peak airflow measurements during maximal-effort cough following augmentation. This case series study was conducted in a tertiary, academic laryngology clinic. Participants included 14 consecutive individuals with glottic insufficiency due to vocal fold paralysis, which was diagnosed via videostrobolaryngoscopy as a component of routine clinical examination. All participants who chose to proceed with augmentation were considered for the study whether office-based or operative augmentation was planned. Postaugmentation data were collected only at the first follow-up visit, which was targeted for 14 days after augmentation but varied on the basis of participant availability. Data were collected from June 5, 2014, to October 1, 2015. Data analysis took place between October 2, 2015, and March 3, 2017. Peak airflow during maximal volitional cough was quantified before and after vocal fold augmentation. Participants performed maximal coughs, and peak expiratory flow during the maximal cough was captured according to American Thoracic Society guidelines. Among the 14 participants (7 men and 7 women), the mean (SD) age was 62 (18) years. Three types of injectable material were used for vocal fold augmentation: carboxymethylcellulose in 5 patients, hyaluronic acid in 5, and calcium hydroxylapatite in 4. Following augmentation, cough strength increased in 11 participants and decreased cough strength was observed in 3. Peak airflow measurements during maximal cough varied from a decrease of 40 L/min to an increase of 150 L/min following augmentation. When preaugmentation and postaugmentation peak airflow measurements were compared, the

  4. The Use of Cryotherapy for Papilloma and Early Laryngeal Cancers: Long-term Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, Michael S; Derakhshan, Adeeb; Milstein, Claudio F

    2015-07-01

    Retrospective chart review. To determine the efficacy of adjuvant cryotherapy in the treatment of early glottic cancer and laryngeal papillomatosis. The use of cryotherapy in conjunction with traditional modalities has recently been proposed to improve voice outcomes in patients with early laryngeal cancer as compared to pretreatment conditions. This study investigates its utility in improving oncological outcomes and decreasing recurrences of laryngeal papillomatosis. Patients with either early glottic cancer or laryngeal papillomatosis that received cryotherapy as part of their surgical regimen were investigated. All patients were seen at a large tertiary care center within a 10-year window. Demographic data were collected and all postoperative notes were reviewed. Recurrences of the laryngeal cancer were noted, as was the duration of time between successive papillomatosis operations. The charts of 54 glottic cancer and 29 papillomatosis patients that received cryotherapy were reviewed. One patient from the papillomatosis cohort was excluded from statistical analysis due to lack of follow-up. Overall, 16 (30%) of the laryngeal cancer patient experienced a malignant recurrence. The overall 5-year survival of these patients was 98% and the 5-year disease-free survival was 74%. The use of adjuvant cryotherapy in the treatment of laryngeal papillomatosis extended the duration of time between surgeries by an average of 79 days (P=.23). The use of adjuvant cryotherapy in the treatment of early glottic cancer does not improve the rate of carcinoma recurrences. Additionally, cryotherapy does not result in a statistically significant increase in the duration of disease-free period for laryngeal papillomatosis patients, although the observed increase may be clinically important. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Radical radiotherapy for T3 laryngeal cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uno, T. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy; Itami, J. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy; Kotaka, K. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy; Toriyama, M. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    1996-08-01

    From 1974 through 1992, 37 previously untreated patients with T3 laryngeal cancer (supraglottic 15, glottic 22) were treated with initial radical radiotherapy and surgery for salvage. Two-year local control rate with radiotherapy alone, ultimate voice preservation rate, and ultimate local control rate for T3 supraglottic cancer were 33%, 33%, and 60%, respectively. Corresponding figures for T3 glottic cancer were 32%, 23%, and 77%, respecitvely. Five-year cause-specific survival rate for T3 supraglottic cancer and glottic cancer were 47% and 77%, respectively. In T3 supraglottic cancer, none of the 4 patients with subglottic tumor extension attained local control by radiotherapy alone, and local-regional recurrence-free time were significantly shorter in patients with subglottic tumor extension or tracheostomy before radiotherapy. There were no serious late complications such as chondronecrosis, rupture of carotid artery attributed to radical radiotherapy, while 3 patients had severe laryngeal edema requiring total laryngectomy. (orig.) [Deutsch] Von 1974 bis 1992 wurden 37 zuvor nicht behandelte Patienten mit T3-Larynxkarzinomen (15 supraglottisch, 22 glottisch) primaer kurativ bestrahlt und, wenn erforderlich, einer Salvage-Operation unterzogen. Die Zwei-Jahres-Kontrollrate bei alleiniger Strahlentherapie, die Rate der Stimmerhaltung sowie die unter Einschluss der Operation erreichbare lokale Kontrollrate bei supraglottischen T3-Larynxkarzinomen betrugen 33%, 33% und 60%. Bei glottischen T3-Karzinomen wurden jeweils 32%, 23% und 77% erreicht. Die Fuenf-Jahres-Ueberlebensrate betrug 47% bei supraglottischen T3-Karzinomen und 77% bei den glottischen Karzinomen. Im Fall von supraglottischen Karzinomen erreichte keiner der vier Patienten mit subglottischer Tumorausdehnung eine lokale Kontrolle durch alleinige Strahlentherapie. Die lokoregionale rezidivfreie Zeit war bei den Patienten mit subglottischer Tumorausdehnung oder Tracheostomie vor Einleitung der

  6. Larynx cancer in early stages: bibliographic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umana Herrera, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    A bibliographical analysis on the subject of early laryngeal cancer (neoplams staged as Tis, T1-T2 N0) was carried out through a bibliographic review of updated articles. The anatomy, epidemiology, generalities, clinical presentation and behavior of cancer were described. The biopsy, the clinical history, the physical examination and radiodiagnostic studies are used for a correct staging and according to the stage, to select the appropriate treatment. Treatment modalities and prescription dose for this type of cancer are compared and explained. The locoregional evaluation of glottic cancer is performed by Computed Axial Tomography (CAT), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Ultrasound (US) and Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (PET/CT). CAT and NMR have shown to be more accurate in the evaluation of glottic larynx cancer compared with clinical endoscopic examination alone. CAT, NMR, US and PET/CT were clearly more sensitive and specific in the assessment of the neck that only palpation. The preservation of the voice is an important parameter in choosing a therapeutic modality. Radiotherapy has proven to be the most used and known treatment. Radiation therapy with Cobalt 60 is commonly used in Costa Rica for the treatment of early larynx cancer [es

  7. Cancro do pulmão de não pequenas células: Comparação entre o estadiamento clínico e o patológico Non small cell lung cancer: Comparison between clinical and pathological staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Fernandes

    2006-07-01

    condicionado importante alteração na estratégia terapêutica nem na sobrevida. No futuro, será necessário considerar outros meios de estadiamento, bem como factores biológicos, para além dos anatómicos actualmente usados.Lung cancer (LC staging remains a clinical challenge as it determines the disease’s prognosis and treatment. Surgery is the best option for controlling non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and the only potential cure. In this setting, lung cancer staging helps select patients who will benefit from surgery, excluding inoperable patients and including patients with resectable lesions. The aim of this study is to compare clinical staging (TNMc with pathological staging (TNMp and to evaluate diagnosis, complementary treatment and survival of these patients. This is a retrospective study that included patients with non-small cell lung cancer or with highly suspicious lesions who had undergone surgery and were followed up in the Hospital de São João lung cancer unit between January 1999 and December 2003. It is based on clinical files and pathology reports. 73.3% of this group of 60 patients were male, with median age 59.2 years. The most frequent TNMc stages were 41.7% T1N0M0 and 36.7% T2N0M0. Thoracotomy for therapeutic purpose was performed in 80% and thoracotomy for diagnostic purpose also in the remaining 20%. In 6.7% the resection was incomplete. The most frequent TNMp stages were T2N0p in 33.3%, T2N1p in 15.0% and T2N2p in 13.3%. There was a significant difference between the two staging types, with upstaging in 65.0%, down staging in 67% and only 28.3% keeping the same stage. The most frequent differences were from T1N0c to T2N0p and from T2N0c to T2N1p. The global agreement between both staging methods was 21.7%. Median global survival was 43 months. In conclusion, while clinical staging was less accurate, it did not determine important changes in therapeutic strategy and survival. For the future, we should consider using other diagnostic tools and

  8. Impact of radiation therapy fraction size on local control of early glottic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Edward; Shenouda, George; Beaudet, Marie P.; Black, Martin J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Different radiotherapy fractionation schedules were used over a 10-year period to treat patients with early squamous cell carcinoma of the vocal cords at McGill University. A retrospective analysis was performed to study the effect of fraction size on local control in this group of patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 previously untreated patients with T1 invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the true vocal cords were irradiated between January 1978 and December 1988 in the Department of Radiation Oncology at McGill University. All patients received megavoltage irradiation, 94 patients received daily fractions > 2 Gy (64 patients received 50 Gy with once-daily 2.5-Gy fractions, and 30 received 65.25 Gy in 29 fractions of 2.25 Gy each), and 32 patients were treated to a dose of 66 Gy in 33 fractions with 2 Gy/fraction. Patients' characteristics of prognostic importance were equally distributed between the two fractionation groups. Results: At a median follow-up of 84 months, the 10-year disease-free survival and overall survival were 76% and 93%, respectively. Local control for patients treated with > 2 Gy fraction was 84%, compared to 65.6% for those treated with 2-Gy fractions (p = 0.026). Among the prognostic factors tested, such as gender, age, stage, anterior and posterior commissure involvement, smoking history, and fraction size, the latter was the only significant predictor of local control for the whole group of patients in univariate (p = 0.041) and multivariate (p = 0.023) analysis. There was no observed difference in the incidence of complications between the two fraction groups. Conclusions: From the results of this retrospective review of patients treated with radiotherapy for T1 true vocal cord cancer, and within the range of total doses and overall treatment times used in our patients, it was found that fractionation schedules using daily fraction size > 2 Gy are associated with a better local control than schedules delivering 2 Gy

  9. Investigation of study items for the patterns of care study in the radiotherapy of laryngeal cancer: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Woong Ki; Ahn, Sung Ja; Kim, Il Han

    2003-01-01

    In order to develop the national guide-lines for the standardization of radiotherapy we are planning to establish a web-based, on-line data-base system for laryngeal cancer. As a first step this study was performed to accumulate the basic clinical information of laryngeal cancer and to determine the items needed for the data-base system. We analyzed the clinical data of patients who were treated under the diagnosis of laryngeal cancer from January 1998 through December 1999 in the South-west area of Korea. Eligibility criteria of the patients are as follows: 18 years or older, currently diagnosed with primary epithelial carcinoma of larynx, and no history of previous treatments for another cancers and the other laryngeal diseases. The items were developed and filled out by radiation oncologist who are members of Korean Southwest Radiation Oncology Group. SPSS v10.0 software was used for statistical analysis, Data of forty-five patients were collected. Age distribution of patients ranged from 28 to 88 years (median, 61). Laryngeal cancer occurred predominantly in males (10: t sex ratio). Twenty-eight patients (62%) had primary cancers in the glottis and 17 (38%) in the supraglottis. Most of them were diagnosed pathologically as squamous cell carcinoma (44/45, 98%). Twenty-four of 28 glottic cancer patients (86%) had AJCC (American Joint Committee on Cancer) stage l/ll, but 50% (8/16) had in supraglottic cancer patients (p=0.02). Most patients (89%) had the symptom of hoarseness. Indirect laryngoscopy was done in all patients and direct laryngoscopy was performed in 43 (98%) patients. Twenty-one of 28 (75%) glottic cancer cases and 6 of 17 (35%) supraglottic cancer cases were treated with radiation alone, respectively. The combined treatment of surgery and radiation was used in 5 (18%) glottic and 8 (47%) supraglottic patients. Chemotherapy and radiation was used in 2 (7%) glottic and 3 (18%) supraglottic patients. There was no statistically significant difference in

  10. Differentiating early malignant lung tumors from inflammatory nodules to minimize the use of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery or open biopsy to establish a diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomori, Hiroaki; Horio, Hirotoshi; Suemasu, Keiichi

    2001-01-01

    To decrease the frequency of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) biopsy being used to diagnose inflammatory nodules, we studied the clinicopathological findings of lung cancers and inflammatory nodules diagnosed by VATS or open-lung biopsy. We studied 46 lung cancers and 47 inflammatory nodules smaller than 30 mm in diameter diagnosed by VATS or open-lung biopsy. While the computed tomography (CT) findings were not significantly different between lung cancers and inflammatory nodules, N1 or N2 lung cancers more frequently showed distinct malignant features on CT than T1N0M0 lung cancers (P<0.05). A review of previous chest X-ray films revealed that those of inflammatory nodules showed new nodules more frequently and nodular enlargement less frequently than those of lung cancer (P<0.01). Of 13 lung cancers that showed nodular enlargement during a mean 15-month period, 12 were T1N0M0. Nondiagnosable small lung nodules, which had few malignant features on CT and had newly appeared on a chest X-ray film, were more likely to be inflammatory nodules than lung cancers; and even if they were lung cancers, the tumor stage was usually T1N0M0. Thus, to decrease the incidence of VATS biopsy being performed for inflammatory nodules, intensive follow-up by CT until slight nodular enlargement becomes evident could be a means of revealing nondiagnosable small lung nodules without distinct malignant findings, except for nodules found to be enlarging on a review of retrospective films. (author)

  11. Radiotherapy of locally advanced laryngeal cancer: the Gliwice Center of Oncology experience, 1990-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucha-Malecka, A.; Skladowski, K.; Wygoda, A.; Sasiadek, W.; Tarnawski, R.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of radiotherapy alone in patients with locally advanced laryngeal cancer T3 - T4, and to establish the prognostic value of the size and the location of the extra laryngeal infiltrations and of emergency tracheostomy. 296 patients with advanced squamous cell cancer of the larynx were radically treated with radiotherapy alone in Center of Oncology in Gliwice between the years 1990 and 1996. There were 221 cases of supraglottic cancer (75%) and 75 of glottic cancer (25%). The stages were as follows: supraglottic cancer: T3 - 113 (51%), T4 - 108 (49%), glottic cancer: T3 - 69 (92%), T4 - 6 (8%). Positive neck nodes were found in 100 patients with supraglottic cancer (45%), and only in 11 patients with glottic cancer (15%). In cases of extra laryngeaI invasion (T4) the pyriform recess was involved in 33%, the base of tongue and valleculae glosso-epiglotticae in 30%, the hypopharyngeal wall in 9% of cases, while a massive involvement of the larynx, the pyriform recess and the base of the tongue was found in 6% of patients. Cartilage involvement was suspected in 22% of patients. Thirty six patients (12%) underwent emergency tracheostomy. Generally, the 3-year local control rate (LC) and disease free survival rate (DSF) were 46% and 41%, respectively. The probability of LC was similar in both supraglottic and glottic cancer: 44% and 47.5% respectively. The presence of involved neck nodes significantly decreased LC and DFS rates in both groups (about 20%). For stage T4 laryngeal cancer the LC rate was correlated with the location of the extra laryngeal infiltrations. Best prognosis was connected with the suspicion of cartilage infiltration - 56% of 3-year LC rate. The worst results were noted in cases of massive infiltrations spreading from larynx through the hypopharynx - 13.5% of 3-year LC rate. Emergency tracheostomy before radiotherapy was very significantly linked to poorer treatment results. The 3-year LC rate in

  12. Prognostic value of age, subglottic, and anterior commissure involvement for early glottic carcinoma treated with CO2 laser transoral microsurgery: a retrospective, single-center cohort study of 261 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, Filippo; Bandino, Fabrizio; Olla, Aurora Marta; Chuchueva, Natalia; Gerosa, Clara; Puxeddu, Roberto

    2018-05-01

     CO 2 laser transoral microsurgery for glottic carcinoma, when indicated, has the well-established advantages of low morbidity and positive oncological outcomes. The present study aims to determine how patient age, and tumor site could negatively impact prognosis; other variables such as the status of the margins of resection, tobacco and alcohol intake, and the grade of differentiation of the tumors have been evaluated. This was a retrospective analysis on 261 patients with a glottic carcinoma who underwent CO 2 laser transoral microsurgery. The impact of different variables was calculated using univariate and multivariate analyses. The study included 248 males and 13 females. The median follow-up period was 4.3 years. Five-year disease-specific survival, recurrence-free survival, local control with laser alone, overall laryngeal preservation, and overall survival rates were 99.4, 92.2, 93.8, 97.6, and 85.5%, respectively. Equivalent results were observed in young and elderly patients. Patients with positive margins after CO 2 laser transoral microsurgery showed a reduced local control with laser alone. T2 patients with true subglottic spreading and patients with anterior commissure involvement of grade 3 (Rucci's classification) experienced worse local control rates, despite free surgical margins confirmed by histology.  CO 2 laser transoral microsurgery is an effective and reproducible single-stage modality therapy for young and elderly patients with glottic carcinoma. Superficial close margins can be managed by a careful wait-and-see policy, while positive margins should undergo surgical enlargement. In our experience, undifferentiated tumors, true subglottic extension, and anterior commissure involvement of grade 3 were associated with worse outcomes.

  13. Long-term follow-up and salvage surgery in patients with T2N0M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the glottic larynx who received concurrent chemoradiation therapy with carboplatin (CBDCA) - AUC 1.5 vs AUC 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusaka, Tohru; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Saito, Tsutomu; Katsura, Yoshihisa; Ikeda, Minoru

    2012-11-01

    Patients who received concurrent chemoradiation therapy with carboplatin were followed up on a long-term basis. In 25 patients treated with carboplatin at an AUC of 2.0 mg/ml, the complete response (CR), 10-year survival, and 10-year larynx preservation rates were 96.0%, 91.1%, and 75.2%, respectively, and the safety margin for partial laryngectomy was 4 mm from the gross tumor. To perform long-term follow-up of the therapeutic outcomes of concurrent chemoradiation therapy and salvage surgery to determine the additive and synergistic effects of anticancer drugs combined with chemoradiotherapy. Fifty male patients (aged 33-76 years) with untreated T2N0M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the glottic larynx were included. Carboplatin was intravenously administered once a week for 4 weeks. Radiotherapy was delivered by an external beam of 4 MV linac X-ray (total = 66 Gy). The AUC 1.5 combination group showed overall response, CR, 5-year survival, 10-year survival, 5-year larynx preservation, and 10-year larynx preservation rates of 100.0%, 68.0%, 83.4%, 77.0%, 75.2%, and 75.2%, respectively. The AUC 2.0 combination group showed corresponding rates of 100%, 96.0%, 95.7%, 91.1%, 82.9%, and 72.7%, respectively. The most common side effects of grade 3 or more were leukopenia, neutropenia, and mucositis (stomatitis), and all were reversible. Thirteen patients (52.0%) in the AUC 1.5 combination group and nine patients (36.0%) in the AUC 2.0 combination group required salvage surgery. Histologically, concurrent chemoradiation therapy with carboplatin caused more severe cancer tissue degeneration. Pathological examinations indicated that the safety margin for partial laryngectomy was 4 mm from the gross tumor.

  14. Can IMRT or Brachytherapy Reduce Dysphagia Associated With Chemoradiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer? The Michigan and Rotterdam Experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Levendag, Peter C.; Feng, Felix Y.; Teguh, David; Lyden, Teresa M.A.; Schmitz, Paul I.M.; Haxer, Marc; Noever, Inge; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Heijmen, Ben J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Dysphagia is a major late complication of intensive chemoradiotherapy of head and neck cancer. The initial clinical results of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), or brachytherapy, planned specifically to reduce dysphagia are presented. Patients and Methods: Previous research at Michigan University has suggested that the pharyngeal constrictors and glottic and supraglottic larynx are likely structures whose damage by chemo-RT causes dysphagia and aspiration. In a prospective Michigan trial, 36 patients with oropharyngeal (n = 31) or nasopharyngeal (n = 5) cancer underwent chemo-IMRT. IMRT cost functions included sparing noninvolved pharyngeal constrictors and the glottic and supraglottic larynx. After a review of published studies, the retropharyngeal nodes at risk were defined as the lateral, but not the medial, retropharyngeal nodes, which facilitated sparing of the swallowing structures. In Rotterdam, 77 patients with oropharyngeal cancer were treated with IMRT, three dimensional RT, or conventional RT; also one-half received brachytherapy. The dysphagia endpoints included videofluoroscopy and observer-assessed scores at Michigan and patient-reported quality-of-life instruments in both studies. Results: In both studies, the doses to the upper and middle constrictors correlated highly with the dysphagia endpoints. In addition, doses to the glottic and supraglottic larynx were significant in the Michigan series. In the Rotterdam series, brachytherapy (which reduced the doses to the swallowing structures) was the only significant factor on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The dose-response relationships for the swallowing structures found in these studies suggest that reducing their doses, using either IMRT aimed at their sparing, or brachytherapy, might achieve clinical gains in dysphagia

  15. Comparison between Radiofrequency Coblation and CO2 Laser for the Treatment of Early Glottic Carcinoma%低温等离子射频消融术与CO2激光治疗早期声门型喉癌疗效比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    双羽; 李超; 黄永望; 吴双

    2015-01-01

    radiofrequency coblation and CO 2 laser in treat‐ment of early glottic carcinoma .Methods A total of 104 patients with early glottic cancer (Tis ,T1a ,T1b ) were treated in our department from October 2007 to December 2012 .Among them 64 cases underwent radiofrequency ablation (radiofrequency group) while 40 cases underwent CO2 laser resection (CO2 laser group) .The operation time and the postoperative pain VAS scores were recorded .All of the patients were examined by electronic laryngoscopy and a‐coustic analysis in 1 week ,1 month ,3 months after surgery .Results The mean operation time of radiofrequency group was 8 .75 ± 1 .62(min)and CO2 laser group was 11 .82 ± 1 .51(min) .The radiofrequency group was better than CO2 laser group(P 0 .05) .The mucosal recovery of radiofrequency group in 1 month after surgery was better than the CO2 laser group (χ2 = 13 .842 ,P 0 .05) .All of the patients had not underwent tracheotomy .They did not have cough ,dyspnea ,severe pain ,hemoptysis ,serious compli‐cations after surgery .Conclusion Both radiofrequency coblation and CO 2 laser are safe and effective surgical meth‐ods in the treatment of early glottic carcinoma .The operation time of radiofrequency coblation is shorter than CO 2 laser surgery .The mucosal recovery in 1 month after surgery and acoustic recovery of radiofrequenay coblation are all better than that of the CO2 laser surgery .

  16. Aplicações de Gelfoam® como tratamento de emergência na insuficiência glótica em cantora Gelfoam® applications as an emergency treatment in glottic insufficiency in singer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo A. L. Pontes

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available O Gelfoam®, produto utilizado em pacientes com paralisias unilaterais de prega vocal, foi aplicado em uma cantora que apresentava insuficiência glótica por atrofia de prega vocal e que necessitava prosseguir em suas atividades profissionais com urgência. O produto foi aplicado por via percutânea e transluminar em consultório e, em seguida, foram realizadas avaliações vocais para acompanhamento e comprovação da eficácia do tratamento. Foram realizadas duas séries com intervalo de um ano, ambas com duas aplicações a cada 28 e 30 dias respectivamente. O resultado foi positivo, permitindo que a paciente retornasse às suas atividades e concluísse o trabalho durante o período em que o Gelfoam®, mesmo sofrendo absorção progressiva, permitiu coaptação glótica compatível com as exigências do uso da voz.Gelfoam® , a product referred to patients presenting unilateral vocal fold paralysis, was applied to a female singer who showed glottic insufficiency by vocal fold atrophy and who needed urgently to proceed with her professional activities. The product was applied through percutaneous and translumination viae, in clinic, and followed by vocal assessments to confirm the efficacy of the treatment. There were realized two series with one year of interval, both with two applications, respectively 28 and 30 days. The result was positive allowing the patient to return to her activities and to conclude her work during the period that Gelfoam®, that was in progressive absorption, permitted a glottic coaptation compatible with the necessities of the voice use.

  17. Eletromiografia laríngea em pacientes com disfonia e fechamento glótico incompleto Laryngeal electromyography in dysphonic patients with incomplete glottic closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi Grigoletto De Biase

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O diagnóstico de comprometimento do nervo laríngeo superior e de ramos do laríngeo recorrente demanda eletromiografia, pois as alterações à laringoscopia são inespecíficas. OBJETIVO: Avaliar eletrofisiologicamente a função dos nervos laríngeo superior e inferior por meio da atividade elétrica dos músculos por eles inervados, em pacientes com disfonia com coaptação incompleta das pregas vocais à fonação. MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo; 39 indivíduos com disfonia e fechamento glótico incompleto foram submetidos à eletromiografia dos músculos tireoaritenóideo, cricotireóideo e cricoaritenóideo lateral bilateralmente. Foram avaliadas atividade de inserção, no repouso (fibrilação, onda positiva e fasciculação e durante contração voluntária dos músculos (recrutamento, amplitude e duração do potencial e latência entre início da atividade elétrica e a sonorização. RESULTADOS: Não observamos alteração na atividade de inserção e no repouso. Nenhum paciente apresentou recrutamento alterado. A média da amplitude dos potenciais elétricos esteve compatível com a normalidade nos músculos testados, assim como a duração do potencial e o tempo de latência entre o início da atividade elétrica e a sonorização. CONCLUSÃO: Não observamos sinais de desnervação nos músculos tireoaritenóideo, cricotireóideo e cricoaritenóideo lateral bilateralmente nos pacientes estudados.The lack of specificity in laryngoscopical examination requires that the diagnosis of superior laryngeal and recurrent laryngeal nerve involvement be carried out with the aid of electromyography. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to assess the electrophysiological function of the superior and inferior laryngeal nerves by measuring the electrical activity of the muscles they innervate in dysphonic patients with incomplete closure of the vocal folds during phonation. METHOD: Thirty-nine patients with incomplete glottic closure were enrolled in a

  18. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  19. Twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Midori

    1996-01-01

    To improve the local control rate in radiotherapy for hand and neck cancer, several prospected twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy (TDRF) were conducted in Tokyo Women's Medical College. T2 glottic cancer was irradiated with 1.5 Gy/fraction, 2 fraction/day to a total dose of 72 Gy. Five cumulative local control rate was 88.2%. Locally advanced head and neck cancer was treated with TDFR and systemic chemotherapy. Response rate was 100%. Palliative radiotherapy with TDFR was done to relive from the pain and other symptoms for advanced and recurrent cases. Nine cases of 11 were relieved from the symptoms. These results was suggested the TDFR was useful to improve the local control rate. (author)

  20. Twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, Midori [Tokyo Metropolitan Hospital of Fuchu (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    To improve the local control rate in radiotherapy for hand and neck cancer, several prospected twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy (TDRF) were conducted in Tokyo Women`s Medical College. T2 glottic cancer was irradiated with 1.5 Gy/fraction, 2 fraction/day to a total dose of 72 Gy. Five cumulative local control rate was 88.2%. Locally advanced head and neck cancer was treated with TDFR and systemic chemotherapy. Response rate was 100%. Palliative radiotherapy with TDFR was done to relive from the pain and other symptoms for advanced and recurrent cases. Nine cases of 11 were relieved from the symptoms. These results was suggested the TDFR was useful to improve the local control rate. (author)

  1. Improvement of accuracy in radiotherapy for cancer of the head and neck using simplified shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Toshihiko; Chatani, Masashi; Teshima, Teruki; Hata, Kiyoshi; Izawa, Kazuo; Sasaki, Junichi

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the comparative study as to the immobilization of the portal skin with or without shell. From May 1982 through December 1982, patients with carcinoma of the pharynx or larynx were selected to investigate the immobilization during the treatment. They were treated with parallel opposing portals of 4MV X-ray (NELAC-1004) in supine position. In the group of patients without shell, 4 early glottic cancer patients were selected for the pilot study and 30 treatment data were available for comparison with the movement during the treatment. In the group of patients with shell, 4 patients with early glottic cancer were consecutively selected for this study and 44 data of the intratreatment movement were obtained. As to the pharyngeal cancer patients, 61 controlled data were obtained from 9 patients and 177 data from 21 patients treated with the use of shell. This work clearly indicates that better immobilization is obtained in the patients treated with the employment of shell (p<<0.001). To investigate the reproducibility of the treatment portals, the data were obtained from 240 sheets of verification film taken for the 28 patients with head and neck cancer throughout the course of radiotherapy. All of these patients were treated with above described shell and fixing device. Mean values of the error of reproducibility are from 1.87mm to 2.81mm with the range of 95% confidence limits from 1.49mm to 2.25mm and from 1.86. to 3.75mm, respectively. (J.P.N.)

  2. Delayed airway stenosis after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuta, Atsushi; Tatematsu, Masanori; Ishinaga, Hajime; Harada, Teruhiko; Majima, Yuichi [Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-03-01

    Seven cases of delayed airway stenosis after radiotherapy for early staged head and neck cancers during 1989 and 1999 were evaluated (aged 54-77 yrs, 6 male and a female). The cases included five glottic laryngeal cancers (T1a, T1b, and three T2), a subglottic laryngeal cancer, and an unknown origin, but strongly suspected laryngeal cancer, with neck metastasis. Radio injury was found from 3 months to 47 months after radiotherapy. {sup 60}Co for radiotherapy was used in all seven cases, although {sup 60}Co radionuclide was changed to Liniac in 1997. The total dose was 60 Gy for 3 cases, and 70 Gy for 4 cases. Tracheostomy was performed in 3 cases due to bilateral vocal cord impairment. Background, treatment, and response to radiotherapy were compared to those of 90 patients of a control group with early staged laryngeal cancer who did not fail radiation injury during the same period. As a result, radionuclide ({sup 60}Co), total dose, cervical surgery, antiinflammatory drugs, laryngeal edema during radiotherapy were risk factors. The intensity and the period of mucositis by radiotherapy was important for indicating delayed airway stenosis. (author)

  3. Delayed airway stenosis after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuta, Atsushi; Tatematsu, Masanori; Ishinaga, Hajime; Harada, Teruhiko; Majima, Yuichi

    2002-01-01

    Seven cases of delayed airway stenosis after radiotherapy for early staged head and neck cancers during 1989 and 1999 were evaluated (aged 54-77 yrs, 6 male and a female). The cases included five glottic laryngeal cancers (T1a, T1b, and three T2), a subglottic laryngeal cancer, and an unknown origin, but strongly suspected laryngeal cancer, with neck metastasis. Radio injury was found from 3 months to 47 months after radiotherapy. 60 Co for radiotherapy was used in all seven cases, although 60 Co radionuclide was changed to Liniac in 1997. The total dose was 60 Gy for 3 cases, and 70 Gy for 4 cases. Tracheostomy was performed in 3 cases due to bilateral vocal cord impairment. Background, treatment, and response to radiotherapy were compared to those of 90 patients of a control group with early staged laryngeal cancer who did not fail radiation injury during the same period. As a result, radionuclide ( 60 Co), total dose, cervical surgery, antiinflammatory drugs, laryngeal edema during radiotherapy were risk factors. The intensity and the period of mucositis by radiotherapy was important for indicating delayed airway stenosis. (author)

  4. [Hypothyroidism incidence after multimodal treatment for laryngeal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Gutiérrez, César; Luna-Ortiz, Kuauhyama; Villavicencio-Valencia, Verónica; Herrera Gómez, Angel; Téllez-Palacios, Daniela; Contreras-Buendía, Marlen

    2012-01-01

    Hypothyroidism following total laryngectomy or radiotherapy treatment for laryngeal cancer is not a rare event, especially in advanced stages. There are no reports on the incidence of hypothyroidism in patients who received chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The objective of this study is to determine the incidence of thyroid dysfunction in a group of patients with laryngeal cancer who underwent surgery as sole treatment, total laryngectomy or radiotherapy alone, and patients with combined treatment: surgery plus radiotherapy, concomitant chemoradiation therapy and chemoradiation therapy plus salvage surgery. A prospective study of patients diagnosed with laryngeal cancer whose serum TSH and T4 levels were evaluated in a serial fashion. 70 patients with laryngeal cancer were studied; the average age at diagnosis was 70.2 years. Male patients were more affected, with a men-women ratio of 3.6:1. Glottic localization was the most frequent (44%). 64% of tumors were locally advanced carcinomas and 51% received multimodal treatment. 45 patients (63%) were diagnosed with hypothyroidism; 49% of the patients with subclinical hypothyroidism, and 51% with clinical hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism is a complication following treatment for laryngeal cancer. It is recommended to evaluate the thyroid function periodically for timely detection.

  5. Clinical study of T1 and T2 laryngeal cancers. Key points for laryngeal preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasu, Takashi; Koike, Shuji; Inamura, Hiroo; Aoyagi, Masaru; Namura, Tadashi

    2004-01-01

    Between 1989 and 2003, we treated 129 patients with T1 and T2 laryngeal cancers. The purpose of this study was to estimate the management of T1 and T2 laryngeal cancers, referring to the relationship with the T classification, subtype, treatment, prognosis and laryngeal preservation. The treatment plan for T1 and T2 laryngeal cancers is fundamentally radiotherapy. To raise the laryngeal preservation rate, concurrent chemoradiotherapy by FAR therapy, carboplatin (CBDCA), docetaxel (DOC) and laser treatment was performed for the T2 cases. The 5-year survival rates of the T1 and T2 cases were 94.7% and 94.8%, respectively. The 5-year laryngeal preservation rates of the T1 and T2 cases were 97.1% and 72.3%, respectively. The 5-year survival rates of the glottic cancer and supraglottic cancer cases were 96.7% and 87.0% and the 5-year laryngeal preservation rates of these cases were 97.1% and 57.2%, respectively. Particularly in T2 supraglottic laryngeal cancer, the laryngeal preservation rate is not improved even with concurrent chemoradiotherapy by CBDCA and FAR therapy. To improve the laryngeal preservation rate in T2 supraglottic laryngeal cancer, it is necessary to consider concurrent chemoradiotherapy by DOC or hyperfractionation. (author)

  6. Clinical and histological study of radiation-resistant cancer of the larynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, K [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1979-02-01

    In its early stage, cancer of the larynx is treated mainly by irradiation. A clinical and histological study of the radiation-resistant cancer of the larynx is reported. From 1958 to 1976, 1190 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx were treated at the Department of Otolaryngology, Osaka University Hospital. Among them, 597 patients (50.2%) were treated by radiation therapy. In 180 patients who had developed local recurrence after initial irradiation, partial or total laryngectomies were performed and 5-year crude survival rates were 71.3%. Gross examination of the specimens and histological studies were performed on these cases, as well as microangiography. The majority of recurrent glottic cancers were located at the anterior commissure and had some subglottic extention. In the supraglottic cancers, marked invasion to the pre-epiglottic space, perichondritis, and edema of the arytenoids were observed. These findings suggested that the unsuccessful radiation therapy was due to the diagnostic failure of the tumor extention. Fixation of the affected vocal cords and ulcer formation were also observed. Histologically, cancer cells invaded deeply the surrounding tissues as scattered cancer nests with marked hypoxic stromal reaction. This study suggests that radiation therapy should be the initial but non-repetitive treatment of choice for earlystage laryngeal cancers.

  7. Clinical investigation of twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy for T2 laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, K.; Kaneyasu, Y.; Fukuhara, N.; Kita-Okawa, M.; Okawa, T.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/objective: To improve the local control rate while minimizing the complication rate in the treatment of T2 laryngeal cancer, we conducted a Phase II trial of twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy (TDFR) and compared the results with those of historical control treated by conventional radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Between 1966 and 1995, 126 cases with T2 laryngeal cancer were treated by radiotherapy in our department by Cobalt equipment. Median field sige was 42cm 2 . Since 1986, we started TDFR. Fifty-eight cases were treated by TDFR, among them there were 6 cases of supraglottic lesion, 49 cases of glottic, and 3 cases of subglottic. Their age ranged from 47 to 82 (mean 64), and all but 1 cases were male. They were irradiated with a fraction dose of 1.5 Gy twice a day at least 6 hours apart, 10 times a week to a total dosage of 66 - 78 Gy (mean 69Gy) in 30 to 53 days (median 43 days). Fifty-four (93 %) of the cases needed a split during radiotherapy for acute mucosal reaction. The other 68 cases were treated by conventional radiotherapy (control group). There were 8 cases of supraglottic lesion, 57 of glottic, and 3 of subglottic. Their age ranged from 33 to 86 (mean 62), and 62 cases (91 %) were male. They were irradiated with a fraction dose of 1.8 Gy (38 cases) or 2 Gy (30 cases) to a total dosage of 59 - 72Gy (mean 66 Gy) in 43 - 69 days (median 51 days). Thirteen (19 %) of the cases needed a split during radiotherapy. Acute and late reactions were graded into 4 grades and compared. Results: Five year actuarial local control rate was 79.0 % in the TDFR group and 75.6 % in the control group (n.s.). Five year actuarial survival rate was 79.7 % in the TDFR group and 77.7 % in the control group (n.s.). Five year actuarial cause-specific survival rate was 96.4 % in the TDFR group and 95.2 % in the control group (n.s.). Five year actuarial local control rate of glottic cases was 78.6 % in the TDFR group and 78.8 % in the control group (n.s.). As for

  8. Prospective, longitudinal electroglottographic study of voice recovery following accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy for T1/T2 larynx cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazi, Rehan [Head and Neck Unit, Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research, Cancer Research UK Centre for Cell and Molecular Biology, London (United Kingdom); Venkitaraman, Ramachandran; Johnson, Catherine; Prasad, Vyas; Clarke, Peter; Newbold, Kate; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Nutting, Christopher [Head and Neck Unit, Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Harrington, Kevin [Head and Neck Unit, Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research, Cancer Research UK Centre for Cell and Molecular Biology, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: kevinh@icr.ac.uk

    2008-05-15

    Background and purpose: To measure voice outcomes following accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy for larynx cancer. Materials and methods: Twenty-five patients with T1/T2 glottic cancer underwent serial electroglottographic and acoustic analysis (sustained vowel/i/ and connected speech) before radiotherapy and 1, 6 and 12 months post-treatment. Twenty-five normal subjects served as a reference control population. Results: Pre-treatment measures were significantly worse for larynx cancer patients. Median jitter (0.23% vs 0.97%, p = 0.001) and shimmer (0.62 dB vs 0.98 dB, p = 0.05) and differences in data ranges reflected greater frequency and amplitude perturbation in the larynx cancer patients. Pre-treatment Mean Phonation Time (MPT) was significantly reduced (21 s vs 14.8 s, p = 0.002) in larynx cancer patients. There was a trend towards improvement of jitter, shimmer and normalized noise energy at 12 months post-treatment. MPT improved but remained significantly worse than for normal subjects (21 s vs 16.4 s, p = 0.013). Average fundamental frequency resembled normal subjects, including improvement of the measured range (91.4-244.6 Hz in controls vs 100-201 Hz in post-treatment larynx cancer patients). Conclusions: This non-invasive technique effectively measures post-treatment vocal function in larynx cancer patients. This study demonstrated improvement of many key parameters that influence voice function over 12 months after radiotherapy.

  9. Prospective, longitudinal electroglottographic study of voice recovery following accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy for T1/T2 larynx cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazi, Rehan; Venkitaraman, Ramachandran; Johnson, Catherine; Prasad, Vyas; Clarke, Peter; Newbold, Kate; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Nutting, Christopher; Harrington, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: To measure voice outcomes following accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy for larynx cancer. Materials and methods: Twenty-five patients with T1/T2 glottic cancer underwent serial electroglottographic and acoustic analysis (sustained vowel/i/ and connected speech) before radiotherapy and 1, 6 and 12 months post-treatment. Twenty-five normal subjects served as a reference control population. Results: Pre-treatment measures were significantly worse for larynx cancer patients. Median jitter (0.23% vs 0.97%, p = 0.001) and shimmer (0.62 dB vs 0.98 dB, p = 0.05) and differences in data ranges reflected greater frequency and amplitude perturbation in the larynx cancer patients. Pre-treatment Mean Phonation Time (MPT) was significantly reduced (21 s vs 14.8 s, p = 0.002) in larynx cancer patients. There was a trend towards improvement of jitter, shimmer and normalized noise energy at 12 months post-treatment. MPT improved but remained significantly worse than for normal subjects (21 s vs 16.4 s, p = 0.013). Average fundamental frequency resembled normal subjects, including improvement of the measured range (91.4-244.6 Hz in controls vs 100-201 Hz in post-treatment larynx cancer patients). Conclusions: This non-invasive technique effectively measures post-treatment vocal function in larynx cancer patients. This study demonstrated improvement of many key parameters that influence voice function over 12 months after radiotherapy

  10. Intensity modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal cancer: the sensitivity of plan objectives and constraints to set-up uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploquin, Nicolas; Song, William; Lau, Harold; Dunscombe, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the impact of set-up uncertainty on compliance with the objectives and constraints of an intensity modulated radiation therapy protocol for early stage cancer of the oropharynx. As the convolution approach to the quantitative study of set-up uncertainties cannot accommodate either surface contours or internal inhomogeneities, both of which are highly relevant to sites in the head and neck, we have employed the more resource intensive direct simulation method. The impact of both systematic (variable from 0 to 6 mm) and random (fixed at 2 mm) set-up uncertainties on compliance with the criteria of the RTOG H-0022 protocol has been examined for eight geometrically complex structures: CTV66 (gross tumour volume and palpable lymph nodes suspicious for metastases), CTV54 (lymph node groups or surgical neck levels at risk of subclinical metastases), glottic larynx, spinal cord, brainstem, mandible and left and right parotids. In a probability-based approach, both dose-volume histograms and equivalent uniform doses were used to describe the dose distributions achieved by plans for two patients, in the presence of set-up uncertainty. The equivalent uniform dose is defined to be that dose which, when delivered uniformly to the organ of interest, will lead to the same response as the non-uniform dose under consideration. For systematic set-up uncertainties greater than 2 mm and 5 mm respectively, coverage of the CTV66 and CTV54 could be significantly compromised. Directional sensitivity was observed in both cases. Most organs at risk (except the glottic larynx which did not comply under static conditions) continued to meet the dose constraints up to 4 mm systematic uncertainty for both plans. The exception was the contra lateral parotid gland, which this protocol is specifically designed to protect. Sensitivity to systematic set-up uncertainty of 2 mm was observed for this organ at risk in both clinical plans

  11. Dor muscular em cabeça e pescoço e medidas vocais acústicas de fonte glótica Head and neck muscles pain and glottic source acoustical vocal measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luane de Moraes Boton

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar a relação entre a presença de dor na musculatura da cabeça, face, boca e pescoço envolvidos no processo fisiológico da função mastigatória e nos aspectos lateral e posterior da articulação temporomandibular (ATM e medidas vocais acústicas da fonte glótica. MÉTODO: amostra de 24 mulheres com idades entre 16 e 56 anos com queixas e sintomatologia de Disfunção Temporomandibular (DTM. Aplicação de um questionário de anamnese, exame clínico específico para verificação da presença de dor na musculatura da cabeça, face, boca e pescoço e nas ATM; avaliações otorrinolaringológica, do sistema estomatognático, audiológica e gravação digital da voz com análise vocal acústica da fonte glótica por meio do software Multi Dimensional Voice Program Advanced da KayPENTAX. Os resultados obtidos foram analisados estatisticamente pelo teste do qui-quadrado ao nível de significância de 0,05. RESULTADOS: houve significância estatística entre: ausência de dor no masseter superficial e alteração do índice de turbulência vocal (VTI; ausência de dor no aspecto posterior da ATM e alteração do coeficiente de perturbação do pitch (PPQ e alteração da variação da frequência fundamental (vf0; presença de dor no pterigóideo medial e normalidade do grau de quebra vocal (DVB. CONCLUSÃO: verificou-se que não houve relação entre as medidas de voz alteradas e a presença de dor nos músculos avaliados, mas algumas medidas alteradas se relacionaram com a ausência de dor muscular, sugerindo que outros aspectos da DTM, que não a dor, podem ocasionar alteração de medidas vocais acústicas.PURPOSE: to check the relationship between pain presence in head, face, mouth and neck muscles involved in the physiological process of chewing function and in the lateral and posterior aspects of temporomandibular joint (ATM and acoustical glottic source vocal measures. METHOD: 24 women with ages varying between 16 and

  12. Comparison of FDG PET and CT/MRI in the diagnosis of cervical lymph node metastasis of head and neck cancer: a level-by-level based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, You Jung; Kim, J. S.; Kim, S. Y.; Nam, S. Y.; Lee, W. W.; Ryu, J. S.; Yeo, J. S.; Moon, D. H.

    2002-01-01

    We compared diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET and CT/MRI for regional lymph node metastasis of head and neck cancer according to the level of cervical lymph node. Thirty-two patients (M/F=27/5, 56±10yr) with head and neck cancer (glottic cancer; 16, tongue cancer; 9, others; 7) uncerwent FDG PET and CT/MRI (29/3) within 1 month before elective surgery with neck dissection (bilateral in 21, unilateral in 11). Whole body and additional regional neck images were acquired 1 hr after injection of FDG (555 MBq). PET images were visually interpreted according to the cervical lymph node level by 2 nuclear physicians independently without CT/MRI information. The findings of PET and CT/MRI were confirmed by the surgical pathology(153 levels of 43 neck dissections). There were 32 positive levels and 121 negative levels for metastatic lymph node lesions in pathology. The diagnostic sensitivity of PET [88%(28/32)] was significantly higher than that of CT/MRI [63%(20/32)] (p=0.021), whereas the specificity of PET [93%(113/121)] was similar to that of CT/MRI [92%(111/121)] (p>0.05). FDG PET was more sensitive than conventional CT/MRI in detecting metastatic lymph node of head and neck cancer

  13. The recruitment of patients to trials in head and neck cancer: a qualitative study of the EaStER trial of treatments for early laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D W; de Salis, I; Donovan, J L; Birchall, M

    2013-08-01

    We aimed to investigate the factors contributing to poor recruitment to the EaStER trial "Early Stage glottic cancer: Endoscopic excision or Radiotherapy" feasibility study. We performed a prospective qualitative assessment of the EaStER trial at three centres to investigate barriers to recruitment and implement changes. Methods used included semi-structured interviews, focus groups and audio-recordings of recruitment encounters. First, surgeons and recruiters did not all accept the primary outcome as the rationale for the trial. Surgeons did not always adhere to the trial eligibility criteria leading to variations between centres in the numbers of "eligible" patients. Second, as both treatments were considered equally successful, recruiters and patients focused on the pragmatics of the different trial arms, favouring surgery over radiotherapy. The lack of equipoise was reflected in the way recruiters presented trial information. Third, patient views, beliefs and preferences were not fully elicited or addressed by recruiters. Fourth, in some centres, logistical issues made trial participation difficult. This qualitative research identified several major issues that explained recruitment difficulties. While there was insufficient time to address these in the EaStER trial, several factors would need to be addressed to launch further RCTs in head and neck cancer. These include the need for clear ongoing agreement among recruiting clinicians regarding details in the study protocol; an understanding of the logistical issues hindering recruitment at individual centres; and training recruiters to enable them to explain the need for randomisation and the rationale for the RCT to patients.

  14. The role of precautionary radiotherapy of the neck in NO laryngeal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baroncelli, G.; Bonetti, B.; La Face, B.; Moretti, R.

    1988-01-01

    The role of precautionary radiotherapy of the neck in laryngeal cancers (exept T1-T2 glottic and some T1 supraglottic cancers) NO at the clinical staging was investigated. Two-hundred and fifty-three patients were examined: 143 were irradiated only on T, and 110 also on the neck. Radiotherapy of the neck in the latter group was performed either by means of two large opposed fields of photon beams including T and N, or by means of fields of photon beams on T and electron beams (8x12 cm 2 average) on the neck, to quite exclude any risks for the spinal cord. The dose was 45-50 Gy (2 Gy/fraction/day; 5 fraction/week) in 4-5 weeks. A comparison of the results obtained in the two groups, in terms of survival-rate and relapse-free time, indicates that radiotherapy reduces the change of relapses on N (6.1% vs. 14.62% at 3 years; p=0.04) and improves the patient's survival chances (82.5% vs. 68.4% at 3 years; and 80.8% vs. 63.4% at 5 years). Our data were then compared with literature data on the importance of N field size in radiation treatment. As a rule, some authors enlarge the field to be treated to a total nodal neck irradiation, but their results are not significally different from those we obtained with 8x12 cm 2 field size

  15. Oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... National Cancer Institute. PDQ lip and oral cavity cancer ... September 25, 2015. www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/hp/lip- ...

  16. Cancer Statistics

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    ... What Is Cancer? Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Cancer Statistics Cancer has a major impact on society in ... success of efforts to control and manage cancer. Statistics at a Glance: The Burden of Cancer in ...

  17. Colon cancer

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    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma; Colon carcinoma ... eat may play a role in getting colon cancer. Colon cancer may be linked to a high-fat, ...

  18. Small renal masses: The molecular markers associated with outcome of patients with kidney tumors 7 cm or less

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirina, L. V.; Usynin, Y. A.; Kondakova, I. V.; Yurmazov, Z. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Pikalova, L. V.

    2016-08-01

    The investigation of molecular mechanisms of tumor cell behavior in small renal masses is required to achieve the better cancer survival. The aim of the study is to find molecular markers associated with outcome of patients with kidney tumors 7 cm or less. A homogenous group of 20 patients T1N0M0-1 (mean age 57.6 ± 2.2 years) with kidney cancer was selected for the present analysis. The content of transcription and growth factors was determined by ELISA. The levels of AKT-mTOR signaling pathway components were measured by Western blotting analysis. The molecular markers associated with unfavorable outcome of patients with kidney tumors 7 cm or less were high levels of NF-kB p50, NF-kB p65, HIF-1, HIF-2, VEGF and CAIX. AKT activation with PTEN loss also correlated with the unfavorable outcome of kidney cancer patients with tumor size 7 cm or less. It is observed that the biological features of kidney cancer could predict the outcome of patients.

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Cancer Research Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... Genomics Research Research on Causes of Cancer Cancer Diagnosis Research Cancer Prevention Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer ...

  20. Comparison of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI and PET/CT in the Evaluation of Laryngeal Cancer After Inadequate CT Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Citil, Serdal; Dogan, Serap; Atilgan, Hasan Ikbal; Menzilcioglu, Mehmet Sait; Sahin, Tuna; Abdulrezzak, Ummuhan; Duymus, Mahmut; Ozturk, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for laryngeal cancers after inadequate CT results. The study comprised 45 patients investigated for primary laryngeal cancer or recurrence-residue in which CT was considered inadequate. A mass was found in 20 patients. Dynamic MRI and PET/CT were compared for diagnosis of mass, lymph node involvement, recurrence and residue. The dynamic curves formed in dynamic MRI were investigated for diagnostic contributions. The sensitivity and specificity of the dynamic MRI, for supraglottic, glottic and subglottic location, was 100%, 80%, and 92%; 100%, 85%, and 100%, respectively. In PET/CT the sensitivity and specificity were 100% for all of those localizations. For lymph node involvement, the sensitivity of dynamic MRI and PET/CT was 100%, the specificity was 100% and 93%, respectively. For recurrence-residue, the sensitivity and specificity of dynamic MRI were 86% and 67%, respectively, with 100% sensitivity and specificity in PET/CT. The sensitivity of type A curve for detection of malignancy was 40%, and specificity was 100%. When type A and B curves were included, the sensitivity was 100%. For patients investigated for laryngeal cancer in which CT is considered inadequate, dynamic MRI or PET/CT is useful

  1. Comparison of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI and PET/CT in the Evaluation of Laryngeal Cancer After Inadequate CT Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citil, Serdal; Dogan, Serap; Atilgan, Hasan Ikbal; Menzilcioglu, Mehmet Sait; Sahin, Tuna; Abdulrezzak, Ummuhan; Duymus, Mahmut; Ozturk, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for laryngeal cancers after inadequate CT results. The study comprised 45 patients investigated for primary laryngeal cancer or recurrence-residue in which CT was considered inadequate. A mass was found in 20 patients. Dynamic MRI and PET/CT were compared for diagnosis of mass, lymph node involvement, recurrence and residue. The dynamic curves formed in dynamic MRI were investigated for diagnostic contributions. The sensitivity and specificity of the dynamic MRI, for supraglottic, glottic and subglottic location, was 100%, 80%, and 92%; 100%, 85%, and 100%, respectively. In PET/CT the sensitivity and specificity were 100% for all of those localizations. For lymph node involvement, the sensitivity of dynamic MRI and PET/CT was 100%, the specificity was 100% and 93%, respectively. For recurrence-residue, the sensitivity and specificity of dynamic MRI were 86% and 67%, respectively, with 100% sensitivity and specificity in PET/CT. The sensitivity of type A curve for detection of malignancy was 40%, and specificity was 100%. When type A and B curves were included, the sensitivity was 100%. For patients investigated for laryngeal cancer in which CT is considered inadequate, dynamic MRI or PET/CT is useful.

  2. Patient-Reported Voice and Speech Outcomes After Whole-Neck Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: Prospective Longitudinal Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Center for Cancer Biostatistics, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Felix Y.; Vineberg, Karen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Chepeha, Douglas B. [Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To describe voice and speech quality changes and their predictors in patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer treated on prospective clinical studies of organ-preserving chemotherapy–intensity modulated radiation therapy (chemo-IMRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-one patients with stage III/IV oropharyngeal cancer were treated on 2 consecutive prospective studies of definitive chemoradiation using whole-field IMRT from 2003 to 2011. Patient-reported voice and speech quality were longitudinally assessed from before treatment through 24 months using the Communication Domain of the Head and Neck Quality of Life (HNQOL-C) instrument and the Speech question of the University of Washington Quality of Life (UWQOL-S) instrument, respectively. Factors associated with patient-reported voice quality worsening from baseline and speech impairment were assessed. Results: Voice quality decreased maximally at 1 month, with 68% and 41% of patients reporting worse HNQOL-C and UWQOL-S scores compared with before treatment, and improved thereafter, recovering to baseline by 12-18 months on average. In contrast, observer-rated larynx toxicity was rare (7% at 3 months; 5% at 6 months). Among patients with mean glottic larynx (GL) dose ≤20 Gy, >20-30 Gy, >30-40 Gy, >40-50 Gy, and >50 Gy, 10%, 32%, 25%, 30%, and 63%, respectively, reported worse voice quality at 12 months compared with before treatment (P=.011). Results for speech impairment were similar. Glottic larynx dose, N stage, neck dissection, oral cavity dose, and time since chemo-IMRT were univariately associated with either voice worsening or speech impairment. On multivariate analysis, mean GL dose remained independently predictive for both voice quality worsening (8.1%/Gy) and speech impairment (4.3%/Gy). Conclusions: Voice quality worsening and speech impairment after chemo-IMRT for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were frequently reported by patients, underrecognized by clinicians, and

  3. Patient-reported voice and speech outcomes after whole-neck intensity modulated radiation therapy and chemotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer: prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M; Griffith, Kent A; Feng, Felix Y; Vineberg, Karen A; Chepeha, Douglas B; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2014-08-01

    To describe voice and speech quality changes and their predictors in patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer treated on prospective clinical studies of organ-preserving chemotherapy-intensity modulated radiation therapy (chemo-IMRT). Ninety-one patients with stage III/IV oropharyngeal cancer were treated on 2 consecutive prospective studies of definitive chemoradiation using whole-field IMRT from 2003 to 2011. Patient-reported voice and speech quality were longitudinally assessed from before treatment through 24 months using the Communication Domain of the Head and Neck Quality of Life (HNQOL-C) instrument and the Speech question of the University of Washington Quality of Life (UWQOL-S) instrument, respectively. Factors associated with patient-reported voice quality worsening from baseline and speech impairment were assessed. Voice quality decreased maximally at 1 month, with 68% and 41% of patients reporting worse HNQOL-C and UWQOL-S scores compared with before treatment, and improved thereafter, recovering to baseline by 12-18 months on average. In contrast, observer-rated larynx toxicity was rare (7% at 3 months; 5% at 6 months). Among patients with mean glottic larynx (GL) dose ≤20 Gy, >20-30 Gy, >30-40 Gy, >40-50 Gy, and >50 Gy, 10%, 32%, 25%, 30%, and 63%, respectively, reported worse voice quality at 12 months compared with before treatment (P=.011). Results for speech impairment were similar. Glottic larynx dose, N stage, neck dissection, oral cavity dose, and time since chemo-IMRT were univariately associated with either voice worsening or speech impairment. On multivariate analysis, mean GL dose remained independently predictive for both voice quality worsening (8.1%/Gy) and speech impairment (4.3%/Gy). Voice quality worsening and speech impairment after chemo-IMRT for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were frequently reported by patients, underrecognized by clinicians, and independently associated with GL dose. These findings support

  4. Patient-Reported Voice and Speech Outcomes After Whole-Neck Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: Prospective Longitudinal Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Griffith, Kent A.; Feng, Felix Y.; Vineberg, Karen A.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To describe voice and speech quality changes and their predictors in patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer treated on prospective clinical studies of organ-preserving chemotherapy–intensity modulated radiation therapy (chemo-IMRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-one patients with stage III/IV oropharyngeal cancer were treated on 2 consecutive prospective studies of definitive chemoradiation using whole-field IMRT from 2003 to 2011. Patient-reported voice and speech quality were longitudinally assessed from before treatment through 24 months using the Communication Domain of the Head and Neck Quality of Life (HNQOL-C) instrument and the Speech question of the University of Washington Quality of Life (UWQOL-S) instrument, respectively. Factors associated with patient-reported voice quality worsening from baseline and speech impairment were assessed. Results: Voice quality decreased maximally at 1 month, with 68% and 41% of patients reporting worse HNQOL-C and UWQOL-S scores compared with before treatment, and improved thereafter, recovering to baseline by 12-18 months on average. In contrast, observer-rated larynx toxicity was rare (7% at 3 months; 5% at 6 months). Among patients with mean glottic larynx (GL) dose ≤20 Gy, >20-30 Gy, >30-40 Gy, >40-50 Gy, and >50 Gy, 10%, 32%, 25%, 30%, and 63%, respectively, reported worse voice quality at 12 months compared with before treatment (P=.011). Results for speech impairment were similar. Glottic larynx dose, N stage, neck dissection, oral cavity dose, and time since chemo-IMRT were univariately associated with either voice worsening or speech impairment. On multivariate analysis, mean GL dose remained independently predictive for both voice quality worsening (8.1%/Gy) and speech impairment (4.3%/Gy). Conclusions: Voice quality worsening and speech impairment after chemo-IMRT for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were frequently reported by patients, underrecognized by clinicians, and

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver ... on Causes of Cancer Cancer Diagnosis Research Cancer Prevention Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer Treatment Research Cancer & ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver ... of Cancer Cancer Diagnosis Research Cancer Prevention Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer Treatment Research Cancer & Public Health ...

  7. Methodology to predict long-term cancer survival from short-term data using Tobacco Cancer Risk and Absolute Cancer Cure models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mould, R F; Lederman, M; Tai, P; Wong, J K M

    2002-01-01

    incorporate a parameter for a statistically cured fraction of patients C SLN , C TCR and C ACC , but because of the long follow-up range of 20-44 years, also by complete life analysis. The survival experience of those who did not die of their original cancer of the larynx was compared to the expected survival experience of a population with the same age, birth cohort and sex structure. To date it has been generally assumed for early stage disease that although for some 5-10 years after treatment the survival experience of this patient subgroup might be no different from that expected in the matched group, thereafter the death rate of this subgroup becomes lower than that of the matched group. This implies that surviving cancer patients cured of their disease tend to die of other conditions at a higher than normal rate as they become older, and therefore cancer is never totally cured. Our conclusion is that at least for cancer of the glottic larynx, the answer to the question: 'Can cancer totally be cured?' is 'Yes to at least 15-years post-treatment and also probably to 25 years.'

  8. Eyelid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Content ASCO.org Conquer Cancer Foundation ASCO Journals Donate eNews Signup f Cancer.net on Facebook t Cancer.net on Twitter q Cancer.net on YouTube g Cancer.net on Google Menu Home Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About ...

  9. Anal Cancer

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    ... to Content ASCO.org Conquer Cancer Foundation ASCO Journals Donate eNews Signup f Cancer.net on Facebook t Cancer.net on Twitter q Cancer.net on YouTube g Cancer.net on Google Menu Home Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About ...

  10. Thyroid Cancer

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    ... to Content ASCO.org Conquer Cancer Foundation ASCO Journals Donate eNews Signup f Cancer.net on Facebook t Cancer.net on Twitter q Cancer.net on YouTube g Cancer.net on Google Menu Home Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About ...

  11. Appendix Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Content ASCO.org Conquer Cancer Foundation ASCO Journals Donate eNews Signup f Cancer.net on Facebook t Cancer.net on Twitter q Cancer.net on YouTube g Cancer.net on Google Menu Home Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About ...

  12. Testicular cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Germ cell tumor; Seminoma testicular cancer; Nonseminoma testicular cancer; Testicular neoplasm ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 86. National Cancer Institute. PDQ testicular cancer treatment. Updated February 17, 2016. www.cancer. ...

  13. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

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    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... of colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  14. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

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    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... AP Photo/Herald-Mail, Kevin G. Gilbert Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer ...

  15. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

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    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  16. Prognostic role of tumor volume for radiotherapy outcome in patient with T2 laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, T.; Wygoda, A.; Skladowski, K.; Rutkowski, R.; Maciejewski, B.; Hejduk, B.; Kolosza, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Tumor volume (TV) is recognized as a prognostic factor of treatment outcome for head and neck tumors but is not routinely included in the treatment decision-making process. The purpose of the study was to define its prognostic role for patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. Material and methods: TV of 160 patients who underwent RT between 2002 and 2006 for T2 laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma were reviewed. The tumor was located in the glottis and epiglottis in 82 (51 %) and 78 (49 %) patients, respectively. TV was manually contoured on pretreatment, planning, contrast-enhanced CT scans and the volumetric measurement (cm 3 ) was calculated by the volume algorithm. Results: The median TV value was 2.01 cm 3 (range 0.15-21.68 cm 3 ). The median TV was significantly lower in patients with glottic tumors (p < 0.0001), N0 (p < 0.001), or well histopatologically differentiated tumors (p = 0.01). A significant correlation between TV, hemoglobin concentration (p < 0.01), and total dose (TD; p < 0.001) was observed. On univariate analyses, TV influenced local control (LC; p = 0.02) and overall survival (OS, p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, both age (HR 1.038, p = 0.03) and TV (HR = 1.075, p = 0.01) remained significantly related to LC and OS (age: HR 1.038, p = 0.005; TV: HR 1.097, p = 0.0001). Conclusion: Large TV worsen prognosis of patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. A large TV is more common for supraglottic, poorly differentiated tumors and may suggest higher risk of nodal spread. The routine estimation of TV prior to therapy may be essential in order to select the best treatment option for patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. (orig.)

  17. The quality of life of patients following treatment for laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwood, A.R.; Rawlinson, E.

    1983-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-nine patients have been interviewed 9 to 15 months following treatment for laryngeal cancer to determine the post treatment quality of voice and life. The patients were subdivided into 3 groups, successfully irradiated T1 and T2 patients, (89 patients), successfully irradiated T3 and T4 patients (24 patients) and those treated by surgery (16 patients). Ninety-three percent of T1 and T2 patients and 79% of T3 and T4 patients were working following treatment as compared to 44% of the surgery patients. Ninety-eight percent of the T1 and T2 and 87.5% of the T3 and T4 patients were able to use the telephone normally as compared to 12% of the surgery patients. Similarly major differences between the successfully irradiated patients and the surgically treated patients in terms of ability to live a normal social life have been noted. The patients also rated their voice in terms of volume, pitch, ability to communicate, quality, rate of speech, flow of speech and dry throat. In every parameter of rating of the voice, with the exception of dryness of the throat, the successfully irradiated patients in all stage groupings had better ratings than the surgery group. Since, in Toronto, survival in advanced glottic and supraglottic cancer is the same using radical radiation with surgery in reserve as survival with primary surgery, it is concluded in view of the superior quality of voice and life in the successfully irradiated patients that irradiation with surgery in reserve is the optimal treatment for these patients. We also concluded that the measurement of quality of life in patients with cancer of the larynx is of vital importance in determining optimal treatment and that further studies in this area are indicated

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  20. Lung Cancer Prevention

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    ... Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer ... following PDQ summaries for more information about lung cancer: Lung Cancer Screening Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment ...

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver ... Genomics Research Research on Causes of Cancer Cancer Diagnosis Research Cancer Prevention Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer ...

  2. Value of dual time point F-18 FDG-PET/CT imaging for the evaluation of prognosis and risk factors for recurrence in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Yoko, E-mail: pecampecam@yahoo.co.jp [PET Center, Kofu Neurosurgical Hospital, ZIP Code 400-0805, Sakaori 1-16-18, Kofu city, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Nambu, Atsushi, E-mail: nambu-a@gray.plala.or.jp [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, ZIP Code 409-3898, Yamanashi University Faculty of Medicine, Shimokato 1110, Chuo City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi, E-mail: honishi@yamanashi.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, ZIP Code 409-3898, Yamanashi University Faculty of Medicine, Shimokato 1110, Chuo City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Sawada, Eiichi, E-mail: e_sawaday_61674@ybb.ne.jp [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, ZIP Code 409-3898, Yamanashi University Faculty of Medicine, Shimokato 1110, Chuo City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Tominaga, Licht, E-mail: lichtt@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, ZIP Code 409-3898, Yamanashi University Faculty of Medicine, Shimokato 1110, Chuo City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Kuriyama, Kengo, E-mail: kuriyama@yamanashi.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, ZIP Code 409-3898, Yamanashi University Faculty of Medicine, Shimokato 1110, Chuo City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Komiyama, Takafumi, E-mail: takafumi-ymu@umin.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kofu Municipal Hospital, ZIP Code 400-0832, Masutsubo-cho 366, Kofu City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Marino, Kan, E-mail: marino-akrf@ych.pref.yamanashi.jp [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi Prefectural Hospital, ZIP Code 400-8506, Fujimi 1-1-1, Kofu City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Aoki, Shinichi, E-mail: aokis@yamanashi.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, ZIP Code 409-3898, Yamanashi University Faculty of Medicine, Shimokato 1110, Chuo City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); and others

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate prognostic and risk factors for recurrence after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with stage I non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), focusing on dual time point [18]F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). Materials and methods: We prospectively evaluated 57 patients with stage I NSCLC (45 T1N0M0 and 12 T2N0M0) who had undergone pretreatment FDG-PET/CT and were subsequently treated with SBRT. All patients received a whole-body PET/CT scan at 60 min and a whole-lung at 120 min after the injection. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) and retention index (RI) of the lesions were calculated. Local recurrence, regional lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and the recurrence pattern were evaluated. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were performed to evaluate prognostic factors or risk factors of recurrence. Results: During the median follow-up period of 27 months, local recurrence, regional lymph node metastasis, and distant metastasis were seen in 17 (30%), 12 (21%), and 17 (30%) of the 57 patients, respectively. The 3-year overall survival rate was 63.4%. SUV{sub max} did not affect any recurrence, DFS, OS, or CSS. RI significantly predicted higher distant metastasis (HR 47.546, p = 0.026). In contrast, RI tended to predict lower local recurrence (HR 0.175, p = 0.246) and regional lymph node metastasis (HR 0.109, p = 0.115). Conclusions: SUV{sub max} at staging FDG-PET does not predict any recurrence, DFS, OS or CSS. In contrast, higher RI predicts higher distant metastasis and tended to predict lower local or regional lymph node metastasis.

  3. A Case of Radiation Fibrosis Appearing as Mass-Like Consolidation after SBRT with Elevation of Serum CEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaro Terashima

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of radiation fibrosis appearing as mass-like consolidation, which was difficult to distinguish from local recurrence. A 72-year-old woman was diagnosed as having primary lung cancer (cT1N0M0 stage IA in the right upper lobe and was treated with SBRT of 48 Gy in 4 fractions. After 12 months, mass-like consolidation appeared around the irradiated area, and after 13 months, it had increased in size. FDG-PET revealed high uptake (SUV max=5.61 for the consolidation. CT-guided biopsy was performed, but we could not confirm the diagnosis. Considering her poor respiratory function and her age, short-interval follow-up was performed. After 15 months, the consolidation enlarged at the dorsal side, and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA became elevated (14.6 ng/mL. Serum KL-6 (436 U/mL and SP-D (204 ng/mL were also elevated. However, after 16 months, serum CEA slightly decreased. The consolidation gradually retracted on follow-up CT images. CEA, KL-6, and SP-D were also decreased by degrees. After 40 months, there is no evidence of local recurrence.

  4. Necrotising fasciitis after hysterectomy and concomitant transvaginal mesh repair in a patient with pelvic organ prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushkar, Dmitry Y; Vasilchenko, Mikhail I; Kasyan, George R

    2013-10-01

    Necrotising fasciitis is a severe form of soft tissue infection. Herein, we present an unreported complication of the transvaginal repair of a pelvic organ prolapse (POP) with trocar-guided polypropylene mesh and a concomitant hysterectomy. A 61-year-old Caucasian female who had been using an intrauterine device (IUD) for 30 years presented with a stage 3 pelvic organ prolapse. A genital ultrasound examination confirmed the presence of an IUD, but found no endometrial abnormalities. The surgical management was limited to a transvaginal hysterectomy and simultaneous anterior vaginal wall repair augmented with trocar-guided mesh. A morphological examination of the removed uterus confirmed the presence of the intrauterine device and additionally found endometrial cancer (T1N0M0), which was not revealed during the preoperative ultrasound. Within 6 days of the surgery, she developed anaerobic bilateral necrotising fasciitis on both thighs. Non-clostridial streptococci were identified in the wound. After 18 days of intensive care, the patient died of fatal coagulopathy.

  5. Metastatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metastatic cancer is cancer that spreads from its site of origin to another part of the body. Learn how cancer spreads, possible symptoms, common sites where cancer spreads, and how to find out about treatment options.

  6. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast cancer (BRCA1 or BRCA2) or a very strong family history of breast cancer, your risk of prostate cancer may be higher. Obesity. Obese men diagnosed with prostate cancer may be more likely ...

  7. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I find more information about cervical and other gynecologic cancers? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: 800-CDC-INFO or www. cdc. gov/ cancer/ gynecologic National Cancer Institute: 800-4-CANCER or www. ...

  8. Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I find more information about ovarian and other gynecologic cancers? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: 800-CDC-INFO or www. cdc. gov/ cancer/ gynecologic National Cancer Institute: 800-4-CANCER or www. ...

  9. Lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood Cancer ... to Z List of Cancers Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer ...

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Understanding Cancer What Is Cancer? Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Understanding Cancer What Is Cancer Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Causes & Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview ...

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer ... Is Cancer Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Causes & Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening Overview ...

  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers ... Cancers Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research NCI’s ...

  14. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next three ...

  15. Análise acústica da voz captada na faringe próximo à fonte glótica através de microfone acoplado ao fibrolaringoscópio Acoustic analysis of voice captured in the pharynx above the glottic source through a microphone on a laryngo-fiberscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica E. Fukuyama

    2001-01-01

    Kay Elemetrics’ Computerized Speech Lab 4300B Model. Samples of the sustained vowels /a/, /i/ and /u/ were picked up in three distinct ways. Firstly, by a common external microphone placed at 15 cm from the mouth. Secondly, a special microphone was placed on the pharynx 1.5 cm above the vocal folds. Lastly, the same special microphone was placed externally at 2 cm from the mouth. Twelve acoustic parameters regarding fundamental frequency, amplitude and noise of each and every vowel were compared statistically as to the way the voice was picked up. Results: Results show statistically significant differences between the voice picked up by the common external microphone and by the special one as regards to the fundamental frequency, frequency and amplitude variability and noise. Conclusion: The difference between the sound coming from the glottic source and the sound from the external voice shows alterations experienced by the voice during its passage through the vocal tract.

  16. Quantitative assessment of videolaryngostroboscopic images in patients with glottic pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebudek-Bogusz, Ewa; Kopczynski, Bartosz; Strumillo, Pawel; Morawska, Joanna; Wiktorowicz, Justyna; Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2017-07-01

    Digital imaging techniques enable exploration of novel visualization modalities of the vocal folds during phonation and definition of parameters, facilitating more precise diagnosis of voice disorders. Application of computer vision algorithms for analysis of videolaryngostroboscopic (VLS) images aimed at qualitative and quantitative description of phonatory vibrations. VLS examinations were conducted for 45 females, including 15 subjects with vocal nodules, 15 subjects with glottal incompetence, and 15 normophonic females. The recorded VLS images were preprocessed, the glottis area was segmented out, and the glottal cycles were identified. The glottovibrograms were built, and then the glottal area waveforms (GAW) were quantitatively described by computing the following parameters: open quotient (OQ), closing quotient (CQ), speed quotient (SQ), minimal relative glottal area (MRGA), and a new parameter termed closure difference index (CDI). Profiles of the glottal widths assessed along the glottal length differentiated the study groups (P diagnostics. Results of the performed ROC curve analysis suggest that the evaluated parameters can distinguish patients with voice disorders from normophonic subjects.

  17. Vocal fold composition and early glottic carcinoma infiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Qin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current imaging techniques provide only limited information pertaining to the extent of infiltration of laryngeal carcinomas into vocal fold tissue layers. Therefore, it is needed to seek the contribute to the body of knowledge surrounding examination and characterization in laryngeal carcinoma infiltration. Methods Excised larynges were collected from 30 male laryngectomy patients with an average age of 43.5 years (ranging 36 to 55 years and history of smoking (≥10 years exhibiting T1, T2, or subglottal (normal vocal fold carcinomas. Vocal folds were preserved via freezing or immersion in paraffin. The depth of the mucosa, submucosa, and muscular layers in both normal vocal folds and tumor tissues of afflicted vocal folds was measured. Results The average depths of the mucosa, submucosa, and muscular layers in normal vocal folds were 0.15 ± 0.06 mm, 2.30 ± 0.59 mm, and 2.87 ± 0.88 mm, respectively. Infiltration measurements of T1 tumors showed a depth of 1.62 ± 0.51 mm and 1.32 ± 0.49 mm in frozen sections and paraffin-embedded samples, respectively. Similarly, T2 tumors showed a depth of 2.87 ± 0.68 mm and 2.58 ± 0.67 mm in frozen sections and paraffin-embedded samples, respectively. T1 and T2 tumors occupied 24.8 ± 10 and 48.5 ± 15 percent of the normal vocal fold depth, respectively. Conclusion This data provides a baseline for estimating infiltration of laryngeal carcinomas in vocal fold tissue layers, of particular interest to surgeons. This information may be used to assess typical depths of infiltration, thus allowing for more appropriate selection of surgical procedures based on individual patient assessment.

  18. Urological Cancers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results. A total of 8829 cancers were diagnosed over the 15 year study period, 749 (8.4%) were Urological malignancies. The male to female ratio of the. Urological cancers was 10.7 to 1. Cancer of the prostate was the most common urological malignancy (54.6%), followed by cancer of the bladder (21.1%) and cancer of ...

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung ... need for different kinds of information about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View this ...

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer ... need for different kinds of information about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View ...

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung ... need for different kinds of information about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View this ...

  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening ... What Is Cancer Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Causes & Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening ...

  3. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening ... Is Cancer Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Causes & Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening ...

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid ... and where it is in your body The stage of the cancer, which refers to the size ...

  5. Cancer and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Infographics Cancer and Alcohol Web Features Breast Cancer Awareness Breast Cancer in Young Women Cancer and Men ... in Childhood Cancer, the Flu, and You Cervical Cancer Awareness Colorectal Cancer Awareness Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Health Disparities ...

  6. CDC's Cervical Cancer Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Infographics Cancer and Alcohol Web Features Breast Cancer Awareness Breast Cancer in Young Women Cancer and Men ... in Childhood Cancer, the Flu, and You Cervical Cancer Awareness Colorectal Cancer Awareness Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Health Disparities ...

  7. Cancer and Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Infographics Cancer and Alcohol Web Features Breast Cancer Awareness Breast Cancer in Young Women Cancer and Men ... in Childhood Cancer, the Flu, and You Cervical Cancer Awareness Colorectal Cancer Awareness Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Health Disparities ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by ... Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research NCI’s Role ...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Cancer Diagnosis Research Cancer Prevention Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer Treatment Research Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health ... Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood ...

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer Treatment Research Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancers Clinical Trials Global ... Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancer Clinical Trials Global ...

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Coping with Your Feelings During Advanced Cancer Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer and Caregivers Questions ... Talking About Advanced Cancer Coping With Your Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer ...

  12. Stages of Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... cancer cells have places where hormones can attach ( receptors ), drugs , surgery, or radiation therapy is used to ...

  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer Screening ... Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Causes & Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening ...

  14. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and ... of Cancers Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research ...

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer Treatment Research Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancers Clinical Trials ... Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancer Clinical Trials ...

  16. Stomach Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with stomach acid and helps digest protein. Stomach cancer mostly affects older people - two-thirds of people ... Smoke cigarettes Have a family history of stomach cancer It is hard to diagnose stomach cancer in ...

  17. Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is the nation's leader in cancer research. Learn more about NCI's cancer research areas, key initiatives, progress made in cancer research, and resources for researchers like research tools, specimens and data.

  18. Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunotherapy is a cancer treatment that helps your immune system fight cancer. It is a type of biological therapy. Biological therapy uses substances ... t yet use immunotherapy as often as other cancer treatments, such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. ...

  19. Uterine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is pregnant. There are different types of uterine cancer. The most common type starts in the endometrium, ... the uterus. This type is also called endometrial cancer. The symptoms of uterine cancer include Abnormal vaginal ...

  20. Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  1. Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  2. Childhood Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... toxins. In children, a genetic condition, such as Down syndrome , can sometimes increase the risk of cancer. Kids who have had chemotherapy or radiation treatment for cancer are more likely to get cancer ...

  3. Stomach Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Men, Seniors, WomenTags: cancer, gastric cancer, stomach cancer May 1, 1999 Copyright © American Academy ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ...

  4. Eye Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... and nerves. If the cancer starts inside the eyeball it's called intraocular cancer. The most common intraocular ...

  5. Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the ... your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are ...

  6. Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types ... face, neck, hands, and arms. Another type of skin cancer, melanoma, is more dangerous but less common. Anyone ...

  7. Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common cancers in the United States. Cancer Home Kidney Cancer Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Anatomy of the male urinary system (left panel) and ...

  8. Survey of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Japan by the Japan 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Narita, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Onishi, Hiroshi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To recognize the current status of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in Japan, using a nationwide survey conducted by the Japan 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group. Methods and Materials: The questionnaire was sent by mail to 117 institutions. Ninety-four institutions (80%) responded by the end of November 2005. Fifty-three institutions indicated that they have already started SBRT, and 38 institutions had been reimbursed by insurance. Results: A total of 1111 patients with histologically confirmed lung cancer were treated. Among these patients, 637 had T1N0M0 and 272 had T2N0M0 lung cancer. Metastatic lung cancer was found in 702 and histologically unconfirmed lung tumor in 291 patients. Primary liver cancer was found in 207 and metastatic liver cancer in 76 patients. The most frequent schedule used for primary lung cancer was 48Gy in 4 fractions at 22 institutions (52%), followed by 50Gy in 5 fractions at 11 institutions (26%) and 60Gy in 8 fractions at 4 institutions (10%). The tendency was the same for metastatic lung cancer. The average number of personnel involved in SBRT was 1.8 radiation oncologists, including 1.1 certified radiation oncologists, 2.8 technologists, 0.7 nurses, and 0.6 certified quality assurance personnel and 0.3 physicists. The most frequent amount of time for treatment planning was 61-120min, for quality assurance was 50-60min, and for treatment was 30min. There were 14 (0.6% of all cases) reported Grade 5 complications: 11 cases of radiation pneumonitis, 2 cases of hemoptysis, and 1 case of radiation esophagitis. Conclusion: The current status of SBRT in Japan was surveyed.

  9. Cancer Disparities - Cancer Currents Blog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blog posts on cancer health disparities research—including factors that influence disparities, disparities-related research efforts, and diversity in the cancer research workforce—from NCI Cancer Currents.

  10. Cancer Technology - Cancer Currents Blog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blog posts on technologies that affect cancer research and care—including new technologies for detecting cancer, testing treatments, storing/analyzing data, and improving patient care—from NCI Cancer Currents.

  11. Technical challenges of sparing infrahyoid swallowing organs at risk in oropharynx squamous cell cancer treated with IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morley, Lyndon; Tsang, Shirley W.S.; Breen, Stephen L.; Waldron, John N.; Maganti, Manjula; Pintilie, Melania; Dawson, Laura A.; Ringash, Jolie; Huang, Shao Hui; Kim, John

    2014-01-01

    This study reports clinical performance in the sparing of infrahyoid swallowing organs at risk (SWOARs) in oropharynx cancer intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Rates of meeting dose-volume planning goals are reported and compared with geometry-based estimates of what is achievable. This study also develops 3 measures of target-SWOAR geometry and tests their usefulness in providing geometry-based dose-volume planning goals. A total of 50 oropharynx cancer IMRT plans were reviewed. Success rates in meeting institutional dose-volume goals were determined for the glottic larynx (G), postcricoid pharynx (P), and esophagus (E). The following 3 measures of target-SWOAR geometry were investigated as methods of identifying geometry-based planning goals: presence of gross disease in neck levels 3 to 4, target-SWOAR overlap, and a 3-dimensional (3D) measure of target-SWOAR geometry. Locally advanced disease was predominant in this patient population with target volumes overlapping SWOARs in 68% to 98% of cases. Clinical rates of success in meeting dose-volume goals varied by SWOAR (16% to 82%) but compared well with estimated potentially achievable rates in most cases (14% average difference between clinical and potential). Cases grouped by the presence of levels 3 to 4 neck nodes or target-SWOAR overlap did not have significantly different SWOAR doses. Cases grouped using a 3D measure of target-SWOAR geometry differed significantly, providing useful geometry-based planning goals (e.g., mean Glottis dose <45 Gy was achieved 19%, 44%, or 81% of the time in each of 3 groups). This study describes the technical challenge of sparing SWOARs and investigates several potential methods for grouping cases to assist with treatment plan evaluation. Quantifying the 3-D relationship between the targets and SWOARs is a promising way of approaching this complex problem. Data presented in this paper may be useful to evaluate treatment plans using objective geometry

  12. Uterine Cancer: Cancer of the Uterus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subscribe To receive Publications email updates Submit Uterine cancer Cancer of the uterus (uterine cancer) is cancer ... Institute . Expand all | Collapse all What is uterine cancer? Cancer is a disease in which certain body ...

  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancers Clinical Trials Global Cancer Research Key Initiatives The RAS Initiative Cancer Moonshot℠ Immunotherapy ...

  14. Distinguishing tumor recurrence from irradiation sequelae with positron emission tomography in patients treated for larynx cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greven, K.M.; Williams, D.W. III; Keyes, J.W. Jr.; McGuirt, W.F.; Harkness, B.A.; Watson, N.E. Jr.; Raben, M.; Frazier, L.C.; Geisinger, K.R.; Capellari, J.O.

    1994-01-01

    Distinguishing persistent or recurrent tumor from postradiation edema, or soft tissue/cartilage necrosis in patients treated for carcinoma of the larynx can be difficult. Because recurrent tumor is often submucosal, multiple deep biopsies may be necessary before a diagnosis can be established. Positron emission tomography with 18F-2-fluro-2-deoxglucose (FDG) was studied for its ability to aid in this problem. Positron emission tomography (18FDG) scans were performed on 11 patients who were suspected of having persistent or recurrent tumor after radiation treatment for carcinoma of the larynx. Patients underwent thorough history and physical examinations, scans with computerized tomography, and pathologic evaluation when indicated. Standard uptake values were used to quantitate the FDG uptake in the larynx. The time between completion of radiation treatment and positron emission tomography examination ranged from 2 to 26 months with a median of 6 months. Ten patients underwent computed tomography (CT) of the larynx, which revealed edema of the larynx (six patients), glottic mass (four patients), and cervical nodes (one patient). Positron emission tomography scans revealed increased FDG uptake in the larynx in five patients and laryngectomy confirmed the presence of carcinoma in these patients. Five patients had positron emission tomography results consistent with normal tissue changes in the larynx, and one patient had increased FDG uptake in neck nodes. This patient underwent laryngectomy, and no cancer was found in the primary site, but nodes were pathologically positive. One patient had slightly elevated FDG uptake and negative biopsy results. The remaining patients have been followed for 11 to 14 months since their positron emission studies and their examinations have remained stable. In patients without tumor, average standard uptake values of the larynx ranged from 2.4 to 4.7, and in patients with tumor, the range was 4.9 to 10.7. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  15. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  16. Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaginal cancer is a rare type of cancer. It is more common in women 60 and older. You are also more likely to get it if you have had a human ... test can find abnormal cells that may be cancer. Vaginal cancer can often be cured in its ...

  17. Gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglass, H.O.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. Some of the titles are: Radiation therapy for gastric cancer; Experimental stomach cancer: Drug selection based on in vitro testing; Western surgical adjuvant trials in gastric cancers: Lessons from current trials to be applied in the future; and Chemotherapy of gastric cancer

  18. Diet and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiber and cancer; Cancer and fiber; Nitrates and cancer; Cancer and nitrates ... DIET AND BREAST CANCER The link between nutrition and breast cancer has been well studied. To reduce risk of breast cancer the American ...

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic ... grade, which refers to how abnormal the cancer cells look under a microscope. Grade provides clues about ...

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood ... A to Z List of Cancers Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic ...

  1. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... white women. Inflammatory breast tumors are frequently hormone receptor negative, which means they cannot be treated with ...

  2. Stages of Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  3. Stages of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  4. Obesity and Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... hormone therapy and for tumors that express hormone receptors . Obesity is also a risk factor for breast ...

  5. Testicular Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... undescended testicle) is a risk factor for testicular cancer. Testicular cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) ... Testicular Cancer Treatment for more information about testicular cancer. Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in men ...

  6. Voice quality after laser cordectomy and vertical hemilaryngectomy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hesham Abdelfattah

    2011-12-27

    Dec 27, 2011 ... glottic cancer usually presents with change of voice and in most patients ... phonatory mechanism adopted by the patients after surgery is the most ... average (RAP), pitch period (PPQ) and smoothed pitch perturbation ...

  7. Occupational cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, N.

    1987-01-01

    Cancer resulting from occupational exposure is now receiving major attention, focusing on identification, regulation, and control of cancer-causing agents. Such cancer can result from exposure to chemicals and ionizing and nonionizing radiation. Extended exposure (often years) and an extended latent period of perhaps decades may intervene before tumor appearance. Although the actual extent of occupational cancer is in debate, estimates have ranged from 4 to 15 per cent of all cancer

  8. Occupational cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alderson, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book aims to review the occurrence and causes of occupational cancer and is aimed at assisting medical and safety staff, management and health and safety representatives. It is presented in the following chapters: 1) Epidemiological method 2) Agents causing occupationally induced cancer, including radiation 3) Occupations associated with risk of cancer 4) Aetiology of cancer 5) Control of occupationally induced cancer, research, prevention, legislation, national and international bodies, control of specific occupational carcinogens, including irradiation. (U.K.)

  9. Macroscopic, pathologic and immunologic investigations of ten patients with carcinoma of oral cavity treated by a single large dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikuriya, Shuichi; Saito, Tsutomu; Konoeda, Koichi; Igarashi, Seishi; Hirohashi, Hitoshi

    1979-01-01

    The immunosuppressive effect of radiation has been emphasized. Although the irradiated cancer cells die gradually during the treatment, it is understood that they keep cancer specific antigenecity in that process. Another words, we assume that the immunologic capacity participates in the dying process of cancer cells by radiotherapy. We have been preferring to treat carcinoma by a single large dose irradiation method because this method does not impair the patient's immunologic capacity. On this time, we treated ten patients with carcinoma of oral cavity by this method and could obtain favorable results. 1) Ten patients with carcinoma of oral cavity classified in T1N0M0-T3N0M0 were irradiated by 4 - 10 MeV betatron electron. In seven patients, 2,500 - 3,000 rads were given at once and other three patients were irradiated with fractionated dose of 1,000 rads three times within two weeks (total 3,000 rads per two weeks). 2) Effects of a single large dose irradiation were remarkable and almost all cancer cells in these patients disappeared both macroscopically and pathologically. 3) According to the results of cellular immunity tests, numbers of peripheral lymphocytes, absolute numbers of fractionated T and B cells, and blastoid formation rate of lymphocytes stimulated by PHA in vitro were all increased and values obtained by four kinds of skin tests were also elevated after the radiations. These results indicate that the single large dose irradiation for these patients does not impair the immunologic capacity of the patients. (author)

  10. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  11. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  12. Gallbladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your gallbladder and liver to your small intestine. Cancer of the gallbladder is rare. It is more ... the abdomen It is hard to diagnose gallbladder cancer in its early stages. Sometimes doctors find it ...

  13. Nasal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the way to your throat as you breathe. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is ... be like those of infections. Doctors diagnose nasal cancer with imaging tests, lighted tube-like instruments that ...

  14. Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic information about cancer disparities in the U.S., factors that contribute to the disproportionate burden of cancer in some groups, and examples of disparities in incidence and mortality among certain populations.

  15. Thymus Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell. These cells help protect you from infections. Cancer of the thymus is rare. You are more ... Sometimes there are no symptoms. Other times, thymus cancer can cause A cough that doesn't go ...

  16. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  17. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  18. Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  19. Cancer treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000901.htm Cancer treatments To use the sharing features on this page, ... or IV. Immunotherapy Immunotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that relies on the body's ability to fight ...

  20. Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... organ in your lower abdomen that stores urine. Bladder cancer occurs in the lining of the bladder. It ... urinate Low back pain Risk factors for developing bladder cancer include smoking and exposure to certain chemicals in ...

  1. Breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can help you know how to prevent breast cancer. Breast implants, using antiperspirants, and wearing underwire bras do not increase the risk for breast cancer. There is also no evidence of a direct ...

  2. Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kind of kidney cancer called Wilms' tumor. The incidence of kidney cancer seems to be increasing. One ... doesn't go away Loss of appetite Unexplained weight loss Tiredness Fever, which usually comes and goes ( ...

  3. Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thick and show changes that look like cancer. Abnormal uterine bleeding is a common sign of EIN. Diagnosis and ... The most common symptom of endometrial cancer is abnormal uterine bleeding. For women who are premenopausal, this includes irregular ...

  4. Breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A collaborative article gives an overview of breast cancer in LICs, ... approach to the problem; therefore they are published as two separate ... attached to the diagnosis of breast cancer. ... Their founding statement in its early form is included.

  5. Cancer - vulva

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... freckle, which may be pink, red, white, or gray Skin thickening or lump Skin sore (ulcer) Other ... vulvar cancer; HPV - vulvar cancer Images Female perineal anatomy References Jhingran A, Russell AH, Seiden MV, et ...

  6. Cancer - penis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an organ that makes up part of the male reproductive system. Causes Cancer of the penis is rare. Its ... penis; Glansectomy; Partial penectomy Images Male reproductive anatomy Male reproductive system References Heinlen JE, Culkin DJ. Cancer of the ...

  7. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, ...

  8. Cancer Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The treatment of cancer using medication is called chemotherapy . Certain cancers respond well to chemo, which often can be given on an outpatient basis. Someone who is having chemotherapy may experience nausea, fatigue, hair loss, or other ...

  9. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R.; Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results

  10. Prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  11. Profiling cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciro, Marco; Bracken, Adrian P; Helin, Kristian

    2003-01-01

    In the past couple of years, several very exciting studies have demonstrated the enormous power of gene-expression profiling for cancer classification and prediction of patient survival. In addition to promising a more accurate classification of cancer and therefore better treatment of patients......, gene-expression profiling can result in the identification of novel potential targets for cancer therapy and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer....

  12. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colorectal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Colorectal Cancer Key Points Colorectal cancer is a disease in ...

  13. Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors increase or decrease the risk of lung cancer. Lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) ... following PDQ summaries for more information about lung cancer: Lung Cancer Prevention Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment ...

  14. Nutrition for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Become An Advocate Volunteer Ways To Give Lung Cancer www.lung.org > Lung Health and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > ... Cancer Learn About Lung Cancer What Is Lung Cancer Lung Cancer Basics Causes & Risk Factors Lung Cancer Staging ...

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ...

  16. Throat or larynx cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocal cord cancer; Throat cancer; Laryngeal cancer; Cancer of the glottis; Cancer of oropharynx or hypopharynx ... use tobacco are at risk of developing throat cancer. Drinking too much alcohol over a long time ...

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Coping with Cancer Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality ... Talking about Your Advanced Cancer Coping with Your Feelings During Advanced Cancer Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced ...

  18. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... can be addressed as quickly as possible. Recurrent breast cancer If the cancer does return after treatment for ...

  19. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  20. Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of skin behind the penis. You can get cancer in one or both testicles. Testicular cancer mainly affects young men between the ages of ... undescended testicle Have a family history of the cancer Symptoms include pain, swelling, or lumps in your ...

  1. Breast cancer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Cancer specialists will soon be able to compare mammograms with computerized images of breast cancer from across Europe, in a bid to improve diagnosis and treatment....The new project, known as MammoGrid, brings together computer and medical imaging experts, cancer specialists, radiologists and epidemiologists from Bristol, Oxford, Cambridge, France and Italy" (1 page).

  2. Overlap of Acute Cholecystitis with Gallstones and Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Gallbladder in an Elderly Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İhsan Yıldız

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The incidence of gallbladder cancer presenting with acute cholecystitis is 2.3%, squamous cell carcinoma is rarely seen, and overlap of acute cholecystitis and squamous cell carcinoma is a very rare condition in the literature. Presentation of Case. A 75-year-old woman was admitted to emergency service with a pain in the right upper quadrant, nausea, and vomiting. The patient was considered as having acute cholecystitis. During the exploration because Hartman’s pouch was not dissected, it was adhered to the cystic duct and had fibrotic adhesion. It could not be understood whether this adhesion was a tumor or a fibrotic tumor and thus we performed cholecystectomy with a 1 cm resection of the choledochus. Pathological examination revealed the presence of (R0, T1 N0 M0 squamous cell carcinoma with clean resection borders and there was no in tumor five dissected lymph nodes. The patient has been followed up for about two years and no clinical problem has been observed throughout the follow-up. Discussion. Acute cholecystitis with gallstones may overlap with gallbladder cancer and generally presents nonspecific symptoms. No additional imaging techniques were performed since no clinical sign except for the wall thickening was detected and no suspected malignancy such as mass was detected on USG. Squamous cell carcinoma of the gallbladder shows poor diagnosis, but since its overlap with cholecystitis presents early symptoms and thus leads to early diagnosis and effective treatment, the localization of the carcinoma is of prime importance. Conclusion. Gallbladder cancer should be kept in mind in elderly patients with acute cholecystitis.

  3. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by ... Cancers Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research NCI’s Role ...

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Biology Research Cancer Genomics Research Research on Causes of Cancer Cancer Diagnosis Research Cancer Prevention Research Screening & Early ... Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public ...

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Treatment Pediatric Supportive Care Unusual ...

  6. Childhood Cancer Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Watchdog Ratings Feedback Contact Select Page Childhood Cancer Statistics Home > Cancer Resources > Childhood Cancer Statistics Childhood Cancer Statistics – Graphs and Infographics Number of Diagnoses Incidence Rates ...

  7. Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maghfoor, Irfan; Perry, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Since tobacco smoking is the cause in vast majority of cases, the incidence of lung cancer is expected to rise in those countries with high or rising incidence of tobacco smoking. Even though population at a risk of developing lung cancer are easily identified, mass screening for lung cancer is not supported by currently available evidence. In case of non-small cell lung cancer, a cure may be possible with surgical resection followed by post-operative chemotherapy in those diagnosed at an early stage. A small minority of patients who present with locally advanced disease may also benefit from preoperative chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy to down stage the tumor to render it potentially operable. In a vast majority of patients, however, lung cancer presents at an advanced stage and a cure is not possible with currently available therapeutic strategies. Similarly small cell lung cancer confined to one hemi-thorax may be curable with a combination of chemotherapy and thoracic irradiation followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation, if complete remission is achieved at the primary site. Small cell lung cancer that is spread beyond the confines of one hemi-thorax is however, considered incurable. In this era of molecular targeted therapies, new agents are constantly undergoing pre-clinical and clinical testing with the aim of targeting the molecular pathways thought to involved in etiology and pathogenesis of lung cancer. (author)

  8. Stage Presentation, Care Patterns, and Treatment Outcomes for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Penis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, Lindsay M.; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Tward, Jonathan D., E-mail: Jonathan.Tward@hci.utah.edu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Penile squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a rare entity, with few published series on outcomes. We evaluated the stage distributions and outcomes for surgery and radiation therapy in a U.S. population database. Methods and Materials: Subjects with SCC of the penis were identified using the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program database between 1988 and 2006. Descriptive statistics were performed, and cause-specific survival (CSS) was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Comparisons of treatment modalities were analyzed using multivariate Cox regression. Subjects were staged using American Joint Committee on Cancer, sixth edition, criteria. Results: There were 2458 subjects identified. The median age was 66.8 years (range, 17-102 years). Grade 2 disease was present in 94.5% of cases. T1, T2, T3, T4, and Tx disease was present in 64.8%, 17.1%, 9.5%, 2.1%, and 6.5% of cases, respectively. N0, N1, N2, N3, and Nx disease was noted in 61.6%, 6.9%, 4.0%, 3.7%, and 23.8% of cases, respectively. M1 disease was noted in 2.5% of subjects. Individuals of white ethnicity accounted for 85.1% of cases. Lymphadenectomy was performed in 16.7% of cases. The CSS for all patients at 5 and 10 years was 80.8% and 78.6%. By multivariable analysis grades 2 and 3 disease, T3 stage, and positive lymph nodes were adverse prognostic factors for CSS. Conclusion: SCC of the penis often presents as early-stage T1, N0, M0, grade 1, or grade 2 disease. The majority of patients identified were treated with surgery, and only a small fraction of patients received radiation therapy alone or as adjuvant therapy.

  9. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... sensitive breast cancer cells contain proteins called hormone receptors that become activated when hormones bind to them. ...

  10. General Information About Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... cancer cells have places where hormones can attach ( receptors ), drugs , surgery, or radiation therapy is used to ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Endometrial Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... cancer cells have places where hormones can attach ( receptors ), drugs , surgery, or radiation therapy is used to ...

  12. Cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cairns, Linda; Aspeslagh, Sandrine; Anichini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This report covers the Immunotherapy sessions of the 2016 Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) Oncology Days meeting, which was held on 15th-17th June 2016 in Brussels, Belgium. Immunotherapy is a potential cancer treatment that uses an individual's immune system to fight the tumour....... In recent years significant advances have been made in this field in the treatment of several advanced cancers. Cancer immunotherapies include monoclonal antibodies that are designed to attack a very specific part of the cancer cell and immune checkpoint inhibitors which are molecules that stimulate...... or block the inhibition of the immune system. Other cancer immunotherapies include vaccines and T cell infusions. This report will summarise some of the research that is going on in this field and will give us an update on where we are at present....

  13. Oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, S J

    1990-01-01

    In the U.S. oral cancer accounts for 2.1% of all cancers and 1% of cancer deaths. Two to three times as many males as females are affected. Blacks have more intra-oral cancer than whites, and their incidence and mortality rates have increased in recent years. The etiologic process very likely involves several factors. The major etiologic agents are tobacco (all types) and alcoholic beverages. Herpes simplex virus, human papilloma virus, and Candida have been implicated. Host factors include poor state of dentition, nutritional aberrations, cirrhosis of liver, lichen planus, and immunologic impairmant. Cellular changes include amplification of some oncogenes, alterations in antigen expression, production of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and disturbance of keratin and involucrin production. Experimentally, cancer is readily produced on the hamster cheek pouch and rat oral mucosa. Unlike oral cancer in humans, most experimental lesions are exophytic, and they rarely metastasize.

  14. Salivary Gland Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Content ASCO.org Conquer Cancer Foundation ASCO Journals Donate eNews Signup f Cancer.net on Facebook t Cancer.net on Twitter q Cancer.net on YouTube g Cancer.net on Google Menu Home Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About ...

  15. Gallbladder Cancer Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Español ASCO.org Conquer Cancer Foundation ASCO Journals Donate eNews Signup f Cancer.net on Facebook t Cancer.net on Twitter q Cancer.net on YouTube g Cancer.net on Google Menu Home Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About ...

  16. Vulvar Cancer Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Content ASCO.org Conquer Cancer Foundation ASCO Journals Donate eNews Signup f Cancer.net on Facebook t Cancer.net on Twitter q Cancer.net on YouTube g Cancer.net on Google Menu Home Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About ...

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer ... cancer’s grade, which refers to how abnormal the cancer cells look under a microscope. Grade provides clues about ...

  18. Breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gablerová, Pavlína

    2010-01-01

    In this work the topic of breast cancer treated more generally and mainly focused on risk factors for the development. The theoretical part describes the general knowledge about breast cancer as a stage or treatment. The practical part is to have clarified the risk factors that have some bearing on the diagnosis of breast cancer. What level are involved in the probability of occurrence? Can we eliminate them? As a comparison of risk factors examined in the Czech Republic, England, Australia a...

  19. Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-03-06

    Did you know that cervical cancer rates differ by race/ethnicity and region? Or that cervical cancer can usually be prevented if precancerous cervical lesions are found by a Pap test and treated? Find out how getting regular Pap tests can save a woman's life.  Created: 3/6/2007 by National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.   Date Released: 4/25/2007.

  20. Cancer cachexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Rotovnik Kozjek

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present article presents the Slovenian multidisciplinary agreement statement on the definition, staging, clinical classification and multimodal approach to the treatment of cachexia in cancer patients. The consensus was reached during a multidisciplinary plenary session, and is based on the international definition of cancer cachexia adopted in 2011. Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial metabolic syndrome defined by an ongoing loss of skeletal muscle with or without concomitant loss of fat, which cannot be fully reversed by conventional nutritional support and leads to progressive functional impairment. Its pathophysiology is characterized by a negative energy and protein balance due to a variable combination of reduced food intake and metabolic changes. In cancer patients, the cachexia syndrome can develop progressively through various stages – from precachexia to cachexia and finally, to refractory cachexia–represent-ing a continuum of metabolic changes, clini-cal signs and symptoms. Patients can progress from precachexia to cachexia, and reverse from cachexia into precachectic stages, while (as the term itself implies, the condition of refractory or irreversible cachexia has poor therapeutic response. A clinical algorithm for recognition and treatment of cachexia in cancer patients is presented. All cancer patients should be screened for cachexia and precachexia on presentation. Patients who fulfil diagnostic criteria for cancer cachexia should have its clinical stage determined. According to phenotype / clinical stage, a multimodal approach should be adopted in the treatment of all cases of cancer cachexia. A typical multimodal management plan in cachectic patients consists of early dietary intervention, exercise, anti-inflammatory therapy and early cancer-related symptom relief. The cachexia treatment pathway should be adopted as a pathway parallel to conventional cancer treatment. Practical implementation of cancer cachexia

  1. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spera, G.

    2010-01-01

    This work is about diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of prostate cancer. The techniques used are: transrectal ultrasound, laparascopy, bone scan, chest x-ray, radiography, chemoterapy and radiotherapy

  2. Esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Ways of metastatic spreading of esophagus cancer, depending on segmental division of esophagus are considered. Classification of esophagus cancer according to morphological structure, domestic clinical classification according to stages and international classification according to TNM system are presented. Diagnosis of esophagus cancer should be complex and based on results of clinical examination of patients, radiological, endoscopic and morphological investigations. Radiological, surgical and combined (preoperative radiotherapy with successive operation) methods of treatment are used in the case of esophagus cancer. Versions of preoperative radiotherapy are given. Favourable results of applying combined surgical treatment with preoperative radiotherapy are shown

  3. Gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salek, T.

    2007-01-01

    Gastric cancer is still a major health problem and a leading cause of cancer mortality despite a worldwide decline in incidence. Primarily due to early detection of the disease, the results of treatment for gastric cancer have improved in Japan, Korea and several specialized Western centres. Surgery offers excellent long-term survival results for early gastric cancer (EGC). In the Western world, however more than 80 % of patients at diagnosis have an advanced gastric cancer with a poor prognosis. The aim of surgery is the complete removal of the tumour (UICC R0-resection), which is known to be the only proven, effective treatment modality and the most important treatmentrelated prognostic factor. The prognosis after surgical treatment of gastric cancer remains poor. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is a rising option in locally advanced gastric cancer. Adjuvant chemoradiation has been shown to be beneficial in gastric cancer patients who have undergone suboptimal surgical resection. The benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy alone seem to be very small, Untreated metastatic gastric cancer is associated with a median survival of only 3 - 4 months, but this can be increased to 8 - 10 months, associated with improved quality of life, with combination chemotherapy. Currently, no standard combination chemotherapy regimen exists, although regimens utilizing both cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, such as epirubicin/cisplatin/fluorouracil (ECF) or docetaxel/cisplatin/fluorouracil (DCF) are amongst the most active. Newer chemotherapeutic agents, including irinotecan, oxaliplatin and taxanes, show promising activity, and are currently being tested with biologics in clinical trials. (author)

  4. Endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephanie

    2002-08-01

    To provide an update for nurses involved in the care of women at risk or being treated for endometrial cancer. Review articles, research reports, and medical and nursing text-books. Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy. Although most women with endometrial cancer present with early stage disease and have an excellent chance of cure, approximately 6,600 women in the United States are expected to die from the disease in 2002. Treatment of patients with advanced or recurrent disease remains challenging, with no proven best standard of treatment. Nursing plays an important role in prevention and early detection of endometrial cancer, patient education, patient care, and rehabilitation.

  5. Prostate Cancer FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Prostate Cancer FAQs Top 10 Things You Should Know About ... prostate cancer detected? What are the symptoms of prostate cancer? If the cancer is caught at its earliest ...

  6. Cancer during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Older Adults Prevention and Healthy Living Cancer.Net Videos Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us You are here Home > Navigating Cancer Care > Dating, Sex, and Reproduction > Cancer During Pregnancy Request Permissions Cancer ...

  7. Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Skin Cancer Key Points Skin cancer is a disease ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research NCI’s Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics ... Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics ...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Treatment Pediatric Supportive Care Unusual ...

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Research Cancer Genomics Research Research on Causes of ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  11. Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Colorectal Cancer Key Points Colorectal cancer is a disease in ...

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers ... Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for ...

  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Research Cancer Genomics Research ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes ...

  14. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators ... Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists ...

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System ... The RAS Initiative Cancer Moonshot℠ Immunotherapy Progress Annual Report to the Nation Milestones in Cancer Research and ...

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with Cancer Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for ... Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support ...

  17. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 10/2017 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a rare ...

  18. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a disease in ...

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ask About Cancer Research Advanced Cancer Choices for Care Talking about Your Advanced Cancer Coping with Your ... to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical Information Advance ...

  20. Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma). Use the menu below to ...

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Caregivers Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical ... Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs ...

  2. Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Key Points Liver cancer is a ...

  3. Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... from starting. Risk-reducing surgery . General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers Survivorship Questions to Ask About Cancer Research Advanced ... Cancer Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer and Caregivers Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Managing ...

  5. Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Miguel A; Zakaria, Alan; Nizran, Parminder

    2015-12-01

    Skin cancer accounts for most malignancies across the globe. They are primarily divided into melanoma and nonmelanoma skin malignancies. Nonmelanoma skin cancer includes basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Fair skin and chronic ultraviolet B exposure are the most important risk factors. Primary prevention is achieved by avoiding sun exposure and tanning beds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cancer Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and number of cases of each type, the age of the people with cancer, and the area and time period over which the cancers were diagnosed. They also ask about specific environmental hazards or concerns in the affected area. If the review of ...

  7. Renal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corgna, E.; Betti, M.; Gatta, G.; Roila, F.; Mulder, P.H.M. de

    2007-01-01

    In Europe, renal cancer (that is neoplasia of the kidney, renal pelvis or ureter (ICD-9 189 and ICD-10 C64-C66)) ranks as the seventh most common malignancy in men amongst whom there are 29,600 new cases each year (3.5% of all cancers). Tobacco, obesity and a diet poor in vegetables are all

  8. Skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Michiko

    1992-01-01

    This chapter reviews the development of skin cancer associated with radiation, focusing on the knowledge of A-bomb radiation-induced skin cancer. Since the discovery of X radiation in 1895, acute and chronic radiation dermatitis has been the first matter of concern. Then, in 1902, skin cancer found among radiological personnel has posed a social problem. In earlier study determining the relationship between skin cancer and A-bomb radiation, there is no increase in the incidence of either skin cancer or precancerous condition during the first 20 years after A-bombing. More recent studies have showed that there is a significant correlation between the incidence of skin cancer and distance from the hypocenter; and the incidence of skin cancer is found to be remarkably increased since 1975 in the group exposed at ≤2,000 m. Excess relative risk is 2.2 at one Gy dose. The incidence of skin cancer is also found to be extremely increased with aging. Relative risk is high in younger A-bomb survivors at the time of exposure. Histologically, basal cell carcinoma is more senstitive to ionizing radiation than squamous cell carcinoma. (N.K.)

  9. Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Did you know that cervical cancer rates differ by race/ethnicity and region? Or that cervical cancer can usually be prevented if precancerous cervical lesions are found by a Pap test and treated? Find out how getting regular Pap tests can save a woman's life.

  10. Eye Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... layer of tissue underneath the retina that contains connective tissue and melanocytes, which are pigmented (colored) cells, and nourishes the inside of the eye. The choroid is the most common site for a tumor. Types of intraocular cancer The most common intraocular cancer in adults is ...

  11. Renal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corgna, Enrichetta; Betti, Maura; Gatta, Gemma; Roila, Fausto; De Mulder, Pieter H. M.

    2007-01-01

    In Europe, renal cancer (that is neoplasia of the kidney, renal pelvis or ureter (ICD-9 189 and ICD-10 C64-C66)) ranks as the seventh most common malignancy in men amongst whom there are 29,600 new cases each year (3.5% of all cancers). Tobacco, obesity and a diet poor in vegetables are all

  12. Occupational cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choril, A.C.; McCracken, W.J.; Dowd, E.C.; Stewart, Charles; Burton, D.F.; Dyer, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the experience of the Workmen's Compensation Board of Ontario in identifying cases of cancer that could be attributed to occupational hazards. Workers' claims for compensation are allowed if there is reasonable medical evidence that their cancer was caused by exposure to risk factors associated with their occupation. Details of the types of cancers associated with specific carcinogens or fields of employment are discussed. About 50% of the cases were related to exposure in particular industrial operations that functioned for relatively brief periods. The number of deaths from cancer identified as being caused by occupational factors is compared with the total for cancer from all causes in Ontario during the period 1971 through 1975. Although all workers eligible for compensation may not have been identified, the data suggest that less than 1% is presently caused by occupational factors

  13. A multicentre randomized/controlled trial of a conventional versus modestly accelerated radiotherapy in the laryngeal cancer: influence of a 1 week shortening overall time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hliniak, A.; Gwiazdowska, B.; Szutkowski, Z.; Kraszewska, E.; Kukolowicz, P.; Jarzabski, A.; Sochacka, B.; Mazurkiewicz, M.; Paprota, K.; Oliskiewicz, W.; Zadrozna, O.; Milecki, P.; Kubiak, M.; Czopkiewicz, L.; Jagas, M.; Gozdz, S.; Wieczorek, A.; Woytowicz, A.; Cisowska, B.; Magdziarz, H.; Nowakowski, S.; Kosniewski, W.; Laskosz, I.; Serafin, A.; Gradon, E.

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: To compare in a phase III study the loco-regional control, disease-free survival and overall survival induced by an accelerated regimen (AF) as compared with conventional regimen (CF) and to analyze the early and late post-radiation morbidity in both arms. Materials and methods: Patients with age≤75, WHO 0-1, suitable for a radical course of radiotherapy T1-T3, N0, M0, stage of glottic and supraglottic laryngeal cancer were randomized to either CF: 66Gy given in 33 fractions over 45 days or AF: 66Gy given in 33 fractions over 38 days (2 fractions every Thursday). A total of 395 patients were included from 05.1995 to 12.1998. Results. Early toxicity: At the end of radiotherapy patients treated with AF complained for more severe reactions than patients treated with CF. In 8 weeks after treatment completion patients treated with AF complained only for more severe pain on swallowing (P=0.027). In 4 months after treatment completion all types of toxicity except for skin teleangiectasia (P=0.001) were similar in the two groups. Loco-regional control: comparison between CF and AF showed no difference in terms of loco-regional control (P=0.37). Conclusions: The improvement in AF in terms of loco-regional control is estimated to be 3-5% in comparison with conventional regimen and is not significant. The intensity of reactions after 4 months was similar in both arms, what suggests the possibility of further shortening of the overall time by few days or enhancing the total dose within the limits of acceptable morbidity

  14. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer Aiming to Reduce Dysphagia: Early Dose-Effect Relationships for the Swallowing Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Felix Y.; Kim, Hyungjin M.; Lyden, Teresa H.; Haxer, Marc J.; Feng, Mary; Worden, Frank P.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To present initial results of a clinical trial of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) aiming to spare the swallowing structures whose dysfunction after chemoradiation is a likely cause of dysphagia and aspiration, without compromising target doses. Methods and Materials: This was a prospective, longitudinal study of 36 patients with Stage III-IV oropharyngeal (31) or nasopharyngeal (5) cancer. Definitive chemo-IMRT spared salivary glands and swallowing structures: pharyngeal constrictors (PC), glottic and supraglottic larynx (GSL), and esophagus. Lateral but not medial retropharyngeal nodes were considered at risk. Dysphagia endpoints included objective swallowing dysfunction (videofluoroscopy), and both patient-reported and observer-rated scores. Correlations between doses and changes in these endpoints from pre-therapy to 3 months after therapy were assessed. Results: Significant correlations were observed between videofluoroscopy-based aspirations and the mean doses to the PC and GSL, as well as the partial volumes of these structures receiving 50-65 Gy; the highest correlations were associated with doses to the superior PC (p = 0.005). All patients with aspirations received mean PC doses >60 Gy or PC V 65 >50%, and GSL V 50 >50%. Reduced laryngeal elevation and epiglottic inversion were correlated with mean PC and GSL doses (p 70 >50%. Worsening patient-reported liquid swallowing was correlated with mean PC (p = 0.05) and esophageal (p 0.02) doses. Only mean PC doses were correlated with worsening patient-reported solid swallowing (p = 0.04) and observer-rated swallowing scores (p = 0.04). Conclusions: These dose-volume-effect relationships provide initial IMRT optimization goals and motivate further efforts to reduce swallowing structures doses to reduce dysphagia and aspiration

  15. Breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Masayoshi

    1992-01-01

    More than 20-year follow-up of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has a crucial role in determining the relationship of radiation to the occurrence of breast cancer. In 1967, Wanebo et al have first reported 27 cases of breast cancer during the period 1950-1966 among the Adult Health Study population of A-bomb survivors. Since then, follow-up surveys for breast cancer have been made using the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort, and the incidence of breast cancer has increased year by year; that is breast cancer was identified in 231 cases by the first LSS series (1950-1969), 360 cases by the second LSS series (1950-1974), 564 cases by the third LSS series (1950-1980), and 816 cases in the fourth LSS series (1950-1085). The third LSS series have revealed a high risk for radiation-induced breast cancer in women aged 10 or less at the time of exposure (ATE). Both relative and absolute risks are found to be decreased with increasing ages ATE. Based on the above-mentioned findings and other studies on persons exposed medical radiation, radiation-induced breast cancer is characterized by the following: (1) the incidence of breast cancer is linearly increased with increasing radiation doses; (2) both relative and absolute risks for breast cancer are high in younger persons ATE; (3) age distribution of breast cancer in proximally exposed A-bomb survivors is the same as that in both distally A-bomb survivors and non-exposed persons, and there is no difference in histology between the former and latter groups. Thus, immature mammary gland cells before the age of puberty are found to be most radiosensitive. (N.K.)

  16. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Lung cancer Lung cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... cancer, childhood Additional NIH Resources (3 links) National Cancer Institute: Lung Cancer Overview National Cancer Institute: Lung Cancer Prevention ...

  17. Get Tested for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print This Topic En español Get Tested for Cervical Cancer Browse Sections The Basics Overview Cervical Cancer Cervical ... Cervical Cancer 1 of 5 sections The Basics: Cervical Cancer What is cervical cancer? Cervical cancer is cancer ...

  18. General Information about Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  19. General Information about Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Colon Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... only hormone therapy after a hysterectomy . Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). Aromatase inhibitors . Less exposure of breast ...

  3. Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... compete with androgens for binding to the androgen receptor. By competing for binding to the androgen receptor, ...

  4. Vaginal Cancer Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Vaginal Cancer Vaginal Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Vaginal Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Vaginal Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and ...

  5. Breast Cancer Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  6. Breast Cancer -- Male

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  7. Cancer world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, E.R.

    1981-01-01

    The author attempts to point out the relationships between various factors of our environment favouring disease (profession, chemicals, air pollution, nuclear power plants, ultra-violet rays etc.) respectively our ways of living (nutrition, drink, smoking), and the incidence and frequence of cancer. In his opinion, cancer is the toll man has to pay for industrialization and the destruction of the environment, and cancer therapy must begin long before the patient's treatment by changing that same einvironment. The different carcinogenous factors are discussed in detail and each chapter concludes with recommendations to those concerned and request for legislation. (MG) [de

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening Tests Research Diagnosis and Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Questions ...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Talking About Advanced Cancer Coping With Your Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer ... 1: Application Development & Submission Step 2: Application Receipt & Assignment Step 3: ...

  10. Physical Activity and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Physical Activity and Cancer On This Page What is physical activity? What is known about the relationship between physical ...

  11. Breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, L.; Krygier, G.; Castillo, C.

    2009-01-01

    This article is about the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of breast cancer. Positive diagnosis is based on clinical mammary exam, mammography, mammary ultrasonography, and histological study. Before the chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment are evaluated the risks

  12. Lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causing chemicals such as uranium, beryllium, vinyl chloride, nickel chromates, coal products, mustard gas, chloromethyl ethers, gasoline, and diesel exhaust Exposure to radon gas Family history of lung cancer ...

  13. Lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Toshio

    1982-01-01

    Based on the own experience and world literatures, contribution of radiation in the treatment of lung cancer was reviewed and discussed. Although the patients with advanced cancer were referred to radiation usually, the results of radiotherapy were superior to those by chemotherapy. Of course the radiotherapy was a local one, radiation combined with chemotherapy was highly recommended, besides systemic administration of chemotherapeutics, special methods such as bronchial arterial infusion (BAI) and chemoembolization would be more favourable in selected patients. Treatment of undifferentiated small cell carcinoma was becoming more dependent on chemotherapy, radiation showed as excellent local control as ever. To treat locally extended cancer patients with involvement of the thoracic wall and Pancoast's syndrome, external radiation alone were not successful, interstitial radiation or a single exposure with a large dose during the thoracotomy would be promising. Finally, data indicated that aged and poor risk patients in early stage of cancer might be treated by radiation instead of unjustifiable operation. (author)

  14. Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chemicals used in the manufacture of dyes, rubber, leather, textiles and paint products. Previous cancer treatment. Treatment ... instructions to avoid exposure. Choose a variety of fruits and vegetables. Choose a diet rich in a ...

  15. Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... getting it in the other one? Is my son more likely to get testicular cancer if I ... and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional ...

  16. Colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Suminori

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes colorectal cancer risk in relation to A-bomb radiation. The RERF Life Span Study has revealed the incidence of colorectal cancer to be significantly high in the group of A-bomb survivors than the control group. With regard to relative risk or excess relative risk, there is no definitive difference among sites in the colon. Risk for colon cancer is found to be linearly increased with increasing radiation doses, and in younger A-bomb survivors at the time of exposure. Risk associated with one Gy is estimated to be increased by double. There is no definitive variation between sex and between Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Excess relative risk would be increased rapidly with aging in the whole group of A-bomb survivors and with the cancer-prone age in younger A-bomb survivors at the time of exposure. (N.K.)

  17. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... possible. Research will help us better understand whether chemotherapy can benefit elderly colorectal cancer patients. Such patients often do not receive chemotherapy due to concerns about side effects. We will ...

  18. Adrenocortical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payabyab, Eden C.; Balasubramaniam, Sanjeeve; Edgerly, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    The development of new therapies has lagged behind for rare cancers without defined therapeutic targets. Adrenocortical cancer is no exception. Mitotane, an older agent considered "adrenolytic," is used both to control symptoms in advanced disease and as adjuvant therapy after surgical resection....... Molecular characterization of adrenocortical cancer has deepened our understanding of this genetically complex disease while identifying subgroups whose importance remains to be determined. Unfortunately, such studies have yet to demonstrate a therapeutic target for drug development, and to date......, no targeted therapy has achieved meaningful outcomes. Consequently, first-line therapy for metastatic disease remains a combination regimen of etoposide, doxorubicin, and cisplatinum established in a randomized clinical trial. In addition to evaluating recent studies in adrenocortical cancer, we raise one...

  19. Cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bleeding between periods, after intercourse, or after menopause Vaginal discharge that does not stop, and may be pale, ... Instructions Hysterectomy - abdominal - discharge Hysterectomy - laparoscopic - ... Images Cervical cancer Cervical neoplasia ...

  20. Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up of several layers of tissue, including muscle, connective tissue that supports the framework of the body, and an inner lining called the mucosa. Cancer is an abnormal growth of cells (the building ...

  1. Vaginal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker NF. Vulvar and vaginal cancer. In: Hacker NF, Gambone JC, Hobel CJ, eds. Hacker and Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 40. Jhingran ...

  2. Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sunlamps. There are 2 types of UV rays: UVA rays (long-wave) – UVA rays penetrate clouds and glass. They penetrate the ... to cancer. But studies have shown that both UVA and UVB damage the skin and can cause ...

  3. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... modulators and aromatase inhibitors, reduce the risk of breast cancer in women with a high risk of the disease. These medications carry a risk of side effects, so doctors reserve these medications for women who ...

  4. Cancer nanotheranostics

    CERN Document Server

    Gopinath, P; Matai, Ishita; Bhushan, Bharat; Malwal, Deepika; Sachdev, Abhay; Dubey, Poornima

    2015-01-01

    This Brief provides a clear insight of the recent advances in the field of cancer theranostics with special emphasis upon nano scale carrier molecules (polymeric, protein and lipid based) and imaging agents (organic and inorganic).

  5. Prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Balslev, Ingegerd; Logager, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data.......To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data....

  6. Stomach cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chikako

    1992-01-01

    Malignant tumors have received much attention as delayed effects of A-bomb radiation. Above all, it is of a major concern to determine how the incidence of stomach cancer, commonly observed among Japanese, is influenced by A-bomb radiation. This article focusses on the relationship between A-bomb radiation and the incidence of stomach cancer, and its histological features with a brief review of the literature. Mass screening for stomach cancer has showed in 1973 that the incidence of stomach cancer is definitely high among the heavily exposed A-bomb survivors. Since then, data analyses using the T65DR have showed it to be higher in the 100 rad exposed group than the 0 rad exposed group. On the basis of death certificates, the incidence of stomach cancer is found to be increased around 1976. When using DS86, the calculated lowest dose that produces a significantly high mortality incidence from stomach cancer is 1 Gy at the sheilding kerma and 0.5 Gy at organ absorbed dose. Histopathologically, the incidence of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma is increased with increasing radiation doses; it is significantly increased in the 1 rad exposed group. The incidence of medullary type is decreased and the incidence of scirrhous type is increased with increasing radiation doses. (N.K.)

  7. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Prostate Cancer Symptoms and Signs Prostate Cancer Basics Risk Factors ... earlier. So what are the warning signs of prostate cancer? Unfortunately, there usually aren’t any early warning ...

  8. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Prostate Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Prostate ...

  9. Basic Cancer Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Considerations How Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young Adults For Older Adults Prevention and Healthy Living Cancer.Net Videos Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog ...

  10. Cancer Terms: After Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Considerations How Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young Adults For Older Adults Prevention and Healthy Living Cancer.Net Videos Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog ...

  11. Screening for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer screening is checking for cancer in people who don't have symptoms. Screening tests can help doctors find and treat several types of cancer early, but cancer screening can have harms as well as benefits.

  12. What Is Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shareable Graphics Infographics “African-American Men and Lung Cancer” “Lung Cancer Is the Biggest Cancer Killer in Both ... starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may spread ...

  13. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... drugs is recommended. References National Cancer Institute. Prostate cancer treatment (PDQ): Stages of prostate cancer. Updated July 31, ...

  14. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  15. Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  16. Stages of Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Skip to content Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer ...

  18. Cancer and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Cancer and obesity Overweight and obesity are associated with cancer Language: ... a cancer associated with overweight and obesity. Problem Obesity is a leading cancer risk factor. What’s happening? ...

  19. Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory This directory lists professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, genetic susceptibility testing, ...

  20. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Grants Bladder Cancer Think Tank Bladder Cancer Research Network Bladder Cancer Genomics Consortium Get Involved Ways to ... us? Who we are The Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN) is a community of patients, caregivers, survivors, ...

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers Survivorship ... Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers ...

  2. Oral Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... decrease the risk of oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer. Oral cavity, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer are diseases in ... and treatment of oral cavity, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer: Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Lip and Oral ...

  3. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancers Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Treatment Pediatric Supportive Care Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Childhood Cancer ... can talk about it in a clear and supportive way. Two viewer guides are also available: for ...

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  5. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Patient Health Information News media ... and neck issues, should be consulted. Types of thyroid cancer in children: Papillary : This form of thyroid cancer ...

  6. Anaplastic thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000352.htm Anaplastic thyroid cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... of cancer of the thyroid gland. Causes Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an invasive type of thyroid cancer that ...

  7. Stephenson Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma in Oklahoma City is an NCI-designated cancer center at the forefront of NCI-supported cancer research. Learn more about the Stephenson Cancer Center's mission.

  8. Skin Cancer Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Host a Fundraising Event | About Us | Store The Skin Cancer Foundation The Skin Cancer Foundation is the ... Handbook A "Sunscreen Gene"? Skin Cancer Facts & Statistics Skin Cancer Treatment Glossary Information on medications and procedures ...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources ... Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs and Medical Information Advance Directives Using ...

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening Tests Research Diagnosis and Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis ... Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening Tests Diagnosis & Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Treatment Types ...

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment ... Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self ...

  12. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by the cancer. This blockage can cause the kidney to enlarge or stop working. Stage IIIB cervical cancer. Topics/Categories: Anatomy -- Gynecologic Cancer Types -- Cervical Cancer Staging Type: Color, ...

  13. Uterine Cancer Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Doing AMIGAS Stay Informed Cancer Home Uterine Cancer Statistics Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... the most commonly diagnosed gynecologic cancer. U.S. Cancer Statistics Data Visualizations Tool The Data Visualizations tool makes ...

  14. Cancer in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Navigating Cancer Care > For Older Adults For Older Adults A full-text transcript is available. More than ... Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young Adults For Older Adults Aging and Cancer Cancer Care Decisions for ...

  15. Breast cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... is performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  16. Stages of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  17. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  18. Chemotherapy to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses drugs to kill cancer cells. Learn how chemotherapy works against cancer, why it causes side effects, and how it is used with other cancer treatments.

  19. Lung Cancer Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Biggest Cancer Killer in Both Men and Women” Stay Informed Trends for Other Kinds of Cancer Breast Cervical Colorectal (Colon) Ovarian Prostate Skin Cancer Home Lung Cancer Trends Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  20. Cancer Surgery: Physically Removing Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the hospital for a time before going home. Your health care team will give you specific directions for your ... Cancer.Net. ... robotics, electronics. In: Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological ...

  1. More Cancer Types - SEER Cancer Stat Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Statistical Fact Sheets are summaries of common cancer types developed to provide an overview of frequently-requested cancer statistics including incidence, mortality, survival, stage, prevalence, and lifetime risk.

  2. Gynecologic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Takashi; Katsumata, Noriyuki

    2008-01-01

    Surgery and radiation therapy have been the main types of treatment for gynecologic cancer. However, chemotherapy in gynecologic oncology has recently made dramatic progress and presently is becoming the most widespread treatment. After the discovery of cisplatin in the field of chemotherapy for epithelial ovarian cancer, it has now become the leading treatment modality. According to the result of several important phase III randomized control trials (RCTs), the platinum-taxane combined therapy has now become the standard treatment regimen. Regarding endometrial cancer, Cisplatin-Adriamycin-Cyclophosphamide (CAP) therapy has been used as an effective adjuvant chemotherapy in Japan. The adjuvant chemotherapy (Adriamycin-Cisplatin therapy) for the endometrial cancer has now been recognized worldwide as the standard therapy based on the findings of a phase III RCT. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer has also been recommended as the standard therapy in Japan since 1999 based on the successful results of numerous RCTs which proved its efficacy. The chemotherapy for gynecologic cancers has been investigated and standardized based on the results of numerous clinical trials. These trials have been conducted by many clinical trial groups, such as the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG), Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG), and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) throughout the world, in addition to the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) and the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group (JGOG) in Japan. The valuable contributions of these clinical trials are helping in the development of new drug therapies, thus leading to such treatment regimens playing increasingly important and wider roles in the field of gynecologic oncology treatment in the future. (author)

  3. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is almost always due to smoking. TREATING LUNG CANCER Lung cancer treatment depends on several factors, including the ... org TARGETING CANCER CARE Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in ...

  4. Risks of Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors increase or decrease the risk of skin cancer. Skin cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) ... following PDQ summaries for more information about skin cancer: Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Genetics ...

  5. Cancer section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is presented of the program at ORNL which is concerned with the study of cancer. The studies range from those at the molecular level and the control of gene expression to those concerning cell interactions and the role of immune responses. Since the agents capable of inducing cancer are multiple, the approaches must encompass the specific characteristics of chemical carcinogens, ionizing radiation, ultraviolet radiation and viruses. The approach of the molecular biological studies is centered on the role of activation of transposable gene elements. One investigation is concerned with the study of radiation-induced myelogenous leukemia. The other radiation carcinogenesis studies fall into two major groups. First, there are investigations of various facets of the mechanisms of cancer induction. The molecular and chromosomal studies fall into this category. The second group of studies includes those that are concerned with risk estimates

  6. Cancer of the larynx: the outcomes of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy in prospective and retrospective studies. Is the meaning of conventionality the same?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hliniak, A.; Michalski, W.; Kraszewska, E.; Szutkowski, Z.; Jarzabski, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two studies on the radiotherapy of laryngeal cancer were completed at the Radiotherapy Department of the Cancer Center Warsaw at the end of 1999. One of them was a multicenter randomized clinical trial, and the second one - a retrospective study on patients treated between years 1989 and 1995. An opinion exists that the trial outcomes of the conventional arm correspond to the outcomes of everyday practice. The subject of the study was to evaluate this thesis, and to find out, whether the outcomes of prospective and retrospective studies following the same treatment protocol are comparable. Selection criteria were - age ≤75, WHO 0-1, T1, T2, T3, N0, M0 stage of glottic and supraglottic laryngeal cancer. The treatment was: 66 Gy/2 Gy/33 fraction/45 days. The prospective group had - 199 patients, and the retrospective group: 150 patients. The two groups were comparable according to the age, site, sex and mean hemoglobin level. There was a significant difference in T-stage and performance status between the two groups. Overall survival, local control and CR-response were analyzed. To eliminate the influence of the differences in T=stage and performance status, regression models were applied - Cox's for survival and local control, logit for CR-response endpoint. The protocol compliance (prospective, retrospective) was as follows - total dose: (88%, 49%), treatment time: (47%, 11%) respectively. Three-year survival for the prospective and the retrospective groups were 89% and 74%, respectively (p=0.035), CR-response rates were 96% and 75%, respectively (p<0.001). There were no significant differences in probability of local recurrence in CR patients. A better outcome of treatment was observed in the prospective study group. It is probably due to a certain 'over-selection' of patients for the prospective study and many deviations from the therapeutic protocol in the historical group. 'Conventional treatment' has the same meaning in the prospective and retrospective

  7. Cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pointreau, Y.; Ruffier Loubiere, A.; Barillot, I.; Pointreau, Y.; Denis, F.; Barillot, I.

    2010-01-01

    Cervix cancers declined in most developed countries in recent years, but remain, the third worldwide leading cause of cancer death in women. A precise staging, based on clinical exam, an abdominal and pelvic MRI, a possible PET-CT and a possible lymph node sampling is necessary to adapt the best therapeutic strategy. In France, the treatments of tumors of less than 4 cm without nodal involvement are often based on radiotherapy followed by surgery and, whereas tumors larger than 4 cm and involved nodes are treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Based on an illustrated clinical case, indications, delineation, dosimetry and complications expected with radiotherapy are demonstrated. (authors)

  8. Gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineur, L.; Jaegle, E.; Pointreau, Y.; Denis, F.

    2010-01-01

    Radio-chemotherapy Gastro-intestinal inter-group study have demonstrated a convincing local control and overall survival benefit. Oncologists and GI workshops have in the present not had a major interest in the radiotherapy treatment of gastric cancer due to a number of factors. Primary because toxicities may be severe, second physicians may have low experience in definition of clinical target volume and in third perioperative chemotherapy is widely used in this indication. In Summary this issue should be used as guides for defining appropriate radiation planning treatment for the adjuvant postoperative therapy of gastric cancer. (authors)

  9. Esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, O.; Ganem, G.; Denis, F.; Bera, G.; Pointreau, Y.; Pradier, O.; Martin, P.; Mirabel, X.

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal cancers are highly malignant tumours with often a poor prognosis, except for minimal lesions treated with surgery. Radiation therapy, or combined radiation and chemotherapy is the most used therapeutic modality, alone or before oesophagectomy. The delineation of target volumes is now more accurate owing the possibility to use routinely the new imaging techniques (mainly PET). The aim of this work is to precise the radio-anatomical particularities, the pattern of spread of esophageal cancer and the principles of 3D conformal radiotherapy illustrated with a clinical case. (authors)

  10. Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Peter E.; Spiess, Philippe E.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Greenberg, Richard E.; Herr, Harry W.; Inman, Brant A.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Lele, Subodh M.; Michalski, Jeff; Pagliaro, Lance; Pal, Sumanta K.; Patterson, Anthony; Plimack, Elizabeth R.; Pohar, Kamal S.; Porter, Michael P.; Richie, Jerome P.; Sexton, Wade J.; Shipley, William U.; Small, Eric J.; Trump, Donald L.; Wile, Geoffrey; Wilson, Timothy G.; Dwyer, Mary; Ho, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the penis represents approximately 0.5% of all cancers among men in the United States and other developed countries. Although rare, it is associated with significant disfigurement, and only half of the patients survive beyond 5 years. Proper evaluation of both the primary lesion and lymph nodes is critical, because nodal involvement is the most important factor of survival. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Penile Cancer provide recommendations on the diagnosis and management of this devastating disease based on evidence and expert consensus. PMID:23667209

  11. For Some Skin Cancers, Targeted Drug Hits the Mark

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All Cancer Types ... Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research For Some Skin Cancers, Targeted ...

  12. Pancreas cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kato, Hirotoshi; Hara, Ryusuke

    2006-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas continues to be a significant source of cancer mortality in Japan, resulting in approximately 19,000 deaths a year. It is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Japan, with a less than 5% 5-year expected survival rate. About 70-75% of patients with pancreas cancer present with locally advanced disease or distant metastases and have a median survival time of only 6 months. For unresectable pancreas cancer, the median survival time with external beam radiation (EBRT) was better than with surgical bypass or stents alone. The median survival of EBRT alone was 4 to 7 months. The median survival with combined EBRT and chemotherapy for locally unresectable tumor are 8 to 10 months and better than with the EBRT alone. Local failure of these combined therapies was still 26 to 48%. On the other hand, surgery with curative intent is undertaken in 15-20% of patients. Even after resection, the predicted 5-year survival rates are still less than 20%. Local recurrences in the pancreatic bed are seen in 50% of the patients undergoing presumed curative resection. We examined the effect of carbon ion therapy in terms of reducing the rate of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas or undergoing resection for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. (author)

  13. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... right away. He or she will do a physical exam. They will ask you about your health history and your family’s history of breast cancer. ... and Wellness Staying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food ...

  14. Nasopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleury, B.; Biston, M.C.; Montbarbon, X.; Pommier, P.

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to propose recommendations concerning the delineation of the target volume of the nasopharyngeal cancers, the planning of the treatment, and describe the expected results about the efficiency and the toxicities. Theses recommendations are based upon anatomy, natural history of theses tumors, and upon published experiences from different teams working with IMRT. (authors)

  15. Prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjær, Maria Carlsen; Andersen, Morten Heebøll; Høyer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Background Active surveillance (AS) of low-risk prostate cancer (PCa) is an accepted alternative to active treatment. However, the conventional diagnostic trans-rectal ultrasound guided biopsies (TRUS-bx) underestimate PCa aggressiveness in almost half of the cases, when compared with the surgical...... lesions. Significant cancer was defined as GS > 6 or GS 6 (3 + 3) lesions with ≥ 6 mm maximal cancer core length (MCCL). Results A total of 78 patients were included and in 21 patients a total of 22 PIRADS-score 4 or 5 lesions were detected. MRGB pathology revealed that 17 (81%) of these and 22......% of the entire AS population harbored significant cancers at AS inclusion. In eight (38%) cases, the GS was upgraded. Also, nine patients (43%) had GS 6 (3 + 3) foci with MCCL ≥ 6 mm. Conclusion In an AS cohort based on TRUS and TRUS-bx diagnostic strategies, supplemental mpMRI and in-bore MRGB were able...

  16. Lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H H; Rørth, M

    1999-01-01

    The results of the many clinical trials published in 1997 had only modest impact on the treatment results using either cytostatic agents alone or combined with radiotherapy in lung cancer. In SCLC, combination chemotherapy including platin-compounds (cisplatin, carboplatin) and the podophyllotoxins...

  17. Esophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. B.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas in esophageal cancer (EC) has changed, and focus directed towards tumors of the distal esophagus and the esophagogastric junction. The genetic events leading to EC are not fully clarified, but important risk factors have been...

  18. Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is not your period Changes in the vulvar skin, such as color changes or growths that look like a wart or ulcer You are at greater risk if you've had a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection or have a history of genital warts. Your health care provider diagnoses vulvar cancer with a physical exam ...

  19. Oropharyngeal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafond, C.; Denis, F.; Pointreau, Y.; Calais, G.; Pointreau, Y.; Debelleix, C.; Bourhis, J.; Thariat, J.

    2010-01-01

    Cancers of the oropharynx are common lesions. Their treatment often includes radiation therapy either exclusively or in combination with chemotherapy or after surgery. The definition of target volumes is made difficult by the complex anatomy of this area. The aim of this work is to clarify the principles of 3D conformal radiation illustrated by a case report. (authors)

  20. Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    You have two kidneys. They are fist-sized organs on either side of your backbone above your waist. The tubes inside filter and ... blood, taking out waste products and making urine. Kidney cancer forms in the lining of tiny tubes ...

  1. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Renner, Andrea; Niess, Hanno; Seeliger, Hendrik; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J., E-mail: christiane.bruns@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Surgery, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Klinikum Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, D-81377, Munich (Germany)

    2010-08-19

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  2. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Renner, Andrea; Niess, Hanno; Seeliger, Hendrik; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24281178

  3. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Walter Jauch

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  4. Reports on Cancer - Cancer Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interactive tools for access to statistics for a cancer site by gender, race, ethnicity, calendar year, age, state, county, stage, and histology. Statistics include incidence, mortality, prevalence, cost, risk factors, behaviors, tobacco use, and policies and are presented as graphs, tables, or maps.

  5. Surveillance of rare cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwan, Johannes Martinus

    2016-01-01

    The widespread incidence and effects of cancer have led to a growing development in cancer prevention in the form of screening and research programs and cancer registries. Because of the low number of patients with rare cancers this improvement is not applied to the same extent to all cancer

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs and Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Treatment ...

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... content Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes ... and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System Childhood Cancers Late ...

  8. Cancer and its management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tobias, Jeffrey S; Hochhauser, Daniel; Souhami, Robert L

    2010-01-01

    ... cancer, 328 19 Testicular cancer, 357 20 Thyroid and adrenal cancer, 374 v9781405170154_1_pre.qxd 28/10/09 16:01 Page vi vi Contents 21 Cancer from an unknown primary site, 388 22 Skin cancer, 393 23...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with Cancer Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers ... Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for ...

  10. Treatment Options by Stage (Endometrial Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... cancer cells have places where hormones can attach ( receptors ), drugs , surgery, or radiation therapy is used to ...

  11. Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... 4 ). This risk reduction is limited to hormone receptor –positive breast cancer; age at first full-term ...

  12. Stomach Cancer Following Hodgkin Lymphoma, Testicular Cancer and Cervical Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Ethel S; Curtis, Rochelle E; Hauptmann, Michael

    2017-01-01

    To further understand the risk of stomach cancer after fractionated high-dose radiotherapy, we pooled individual-level data from three recent stomach cancer case-control studies. These studies were nested in cohorts of five-year survivors of first primary Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), testicular cancer...... (TC) or cervical cancer (CX) from seven countries. Detailed data were abstracted from patient records and radiation doses were reconstructed to the site of the stomach cancer for cases and to the corresponding sites for matched controls. Among 327 cases and 678 controls, mean doses to the stomach were...... 15.3 Gy, 24.7 Gy and 1.9 Gy, respectively, for Hodgkin lymphoma, testicular cancer and cervical cancer survivors, with an overall mean dose of 10.3 Gy. Risk increased with increasing radiation dose to the stomach cancer site (P

  13. Cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davila Gomez, Heenry Luis; Garcia Valdes, Abel; Alvarez Castillo, Felix

    2010-01-01

    A retrospective and descriptive study was conducted to characterize the behavior of cervix cancer in a sample of 162 patients with this diagnosis during 2003-2009 in the Isla de la Juventud municipality. From the review of case reports from the National Unit of Cancer the individual medical records of Teaching General Hospital of this municipality and from the National Institute of Oncology and Radiology, as well as the deceased persons, it was possible to note that the 63% of cases were women aged 34-57 and that the 20% was in ages outside the screening program. The NIC and/or infection by HPV and smoking were the more frequent risk factors. There was predominance of large cells epidermoid non-keratinized carcinoma and the O stage or in situ. Most of patients were operated on is initial therapy. The great mortality was between fifth and sixth decades of life with a acceptable survival at 5 years

  14. [Cervix cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointreau, Y; Ruffier Loubière, A; Denis, F; Barillot, I

    2010-11-01

    Cervix cancers declined in most developed countries in recent years, but remain, the third worldwide leading cause of cancer death in women. A precise staging, based on clinical exam, an abdominal and pelvic MRI, a possible PET-CT and a possible lymph node sampling is necessary to adapt the best therapeutic strategy. In France, the treatments of tumors of less than 4 cm without nodal involvement are often based on radiotherapy followed by surgery and, whereas tumors larger than 4 cm and involved nodes are treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Based on an illustrated clinical case, indications, delineation, dosimetry and complications expected with radiotherapy are demonstrated. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. PANCREATIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The pancreatic cancer is quite common malignant tumor of gastointestinal tract and its incidence is increasing in well developed part of the world. Despite of all advanced diagnostic methods the disease is in most cases recognised too late when the tumor is not resectable.Conclusions. Only in 20–30% of patients with pancreatic cancer surgical resection is possible, and even in this group 5year survival is very low. In the patients where the tumor is not resectable, sometimes only palliative procedures are indicated and sometimes only simptomatic therapy is possible. The average survival period in this group of patients is 12–20 months. Adjuvant chemo and radiotherapy has not shown much of benefit and the prognosis is still very bad.

  16. "Cancer tumor".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronshtehn, V. A.

    The title is a phrase borrowed from a speech by a Leningrad pressman, V. E. Lvov, who called upon those attending a theoretical conference on ideological issues in astronomy held by the Leningrad Branch of the All-Union Astronomic and Geodetic Society (13 - 4 December 1948), "to make a more radical emphasis on the negative role of relativistic cosmology which is a cancer tumor disintegrating the contemporary astronomy theory, and a major ideological enemy of a materialist astronomy".

  17. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    Breast Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Metastatic Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  18. Chemo-IMRT of Oropharyngeal Cancer Aiming to Reduce Dysphagia: Swallowing Organs Late Complication Probabilities and Dosimetric Correlates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Kim, Hyungjin M.; Feng, Felix Y.; Lyden, Teresa H.; Haxer, Marc J.; Feng, Mary; Worden, Frank P.; Bradford, Carol R.; Prince, Mark E.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Assess dosimetric correlates of long-term dysphagia after chemo-intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) sparing parts of the swallowing organs. Patients and Methods: Prospective longitudinal study: weekly chemotherapy concurrent with IMRT for Stages III/IV OPC, aiming to reduce dysphagia by sparing noninvolved parts of swallowing-related organs: pharyngeal constrictors (PC), glottic and supraglottic larynx (GSL), and esophagus, as well as oral cavity and major salivary glands. Dysphagia outcomes included patient-reported Swallowing and Eating Domain scores, Observer-based (CTCAEv.2) dysphagia, and videofluoroscopy (VF), before and periodically after therapy through 2 years. Relationships between dosimetric factors and worsening (from baseline) of dysphagia through 2 years were assessed by linear mixed-effects model. Results: Seventy-three patients participated. Observer-based dysphagia was not modeled because at >6 months there were only four Grade ≥2 cases (one of whom was feeding-tube dependent). PC, GSL, and esophagus mean doses, as well as their partial volume doses (V D s), were each significantly correlated with all dysphagia outcomes. However, the V D s for each organ intercorrelated and also highly correlated with the mean doses, leaving only mean doses significant. Mean doses to each of the parts of the PCs (superior, middle, and inferior) were also significantly correlated with all dysphagia measures, with superior PCs demonstrating highest correlations. For VF-based strictures, most significant predictor was esophageal mean doses (48±17 Gy in patients with, vs 27±12 in patients without strictures, p = 0.004). Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) increased moderately with mean doses without any threshold. For increased VF-based aspirations or worsened VF summary scores, toxic doses (TDs) 50 and TD 25 were 63 Gy and 56 Gy for PC, and 56 Gy and 39 Gy for GSL, respectively. For both PC and GSL, patient

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information A to Z List of ... Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping ...

  20. Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  1. Cancer in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer is a group related diseases. In all types of cancer, some of the body's cells begin to divide ... can be benign or malignant. Benign tumorsaren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Training at NCI Funding for Cancer Training Building a Diverse Workforce Other Fellowships and Internships About ... at NCI (Intramural) Funding for Cancer Training (Extramural) Building a Diverse Workforce Other Fellowships & Internships Training Program ...

  3. Vaginal and Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAGINAL & VULVAR CANCER Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer There are five main types of cancer that affect a woman’s reproductive organs: cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal, and vulvar. As a group, they are referred ...

  4. Lung Cancer: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... professional support team today. Learn More . Find more lung cancer resources. Learn More Donate Today! What is Lung ... to Give How Your Support Helps Events Lung Cancer Awareness © Lung Cancer Alliance. The information presented in this website ...

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics ... Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws Careers Visitor Information Search Search Home About Cancer Diagnosis and Staging Diagnosis ...

  6. Working during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000834.htm Working during cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... JavaScript. Many people continue to work throughout their cancer treatment. Cancer, or the side effects of treatment, may ...

  7. After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Better Home Your Health Resources Healthcare Management After Cancer Treatment After Cancer Treatment Share Print From the day you were diagnosed ... of the questions you may have after your cancer treatment ends. Path to well being Will I need ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Trials Information A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to ...

  9. SCREENING FOR CERVICAL CANCER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Cervical cancer remains a major health concern worldwide, especially in devel- ... Important aspects of cervical cancer screening include the age at which .... High-risk types HPV (16,18) are impli- cated in the pathogenesis of cervical cancer.

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Trials Information A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about ... Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to ...

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Understanding Cancer ... Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs and Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types ...

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Resources for ... Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Deputy ...

  13. Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of breast cancer that can occur in men include Paget's disease of the nipple and inflammatory breast cancer. Inherited genes that increase breast cancer risk Some men inherit abnormal (mutated) genes from their parents that ...

  14. Cancer Nanotechnology Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Nanotechnology Plan serves as a strategic document to the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer as well as a guiding document to the cancer nanotechnology and oncology fields, as a whole.

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Trainees Funding for Cancer Training Building a Diverse Workforce About Center for Cancer Training (CCT) CCT Staff & ... Funding for Cancer Training (Extramural) Building a Diverse Workforce Training Program Contacts News & Events Press Releases Resources ...

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Treatment ... Oncologist Anthony L. Back, M.D., a national expert on doctor-patient communications, talks with one of ...

  17. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peritoneal cancer; the first panel (stage IIA) shows cancer inside both ovaries that has spread to the uterus and fallopian tube. The second panel (stage IIB) shows cancer inside both ovaries that has spread to the colon. The third ...

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NCI Resources for Trainees Funding for Cancer Training Building a Diverse Workforce About Center for Cancer Training ( ... Resources for Trainees Funding for Cancer Training (Extramural) Building a Diverse Workforce Training Program Contacts News & Events ...

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs and Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System ...

  20. Understanding your cancer prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about: Treatment Palliative care Personal matters such as finances Knowing what to expect may make it easier ... treatment. www.cancer.net/navigating-cancer-care/cancer-basics/understanding-statistics-used-guide-prognosis-and-evaluate-treatment . ...

  1. What Are Cancer Disparities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    This infographic shows the factors associated with cancer disparities, examples of how the cancer burden differs across certain population groups, and NCI actions to understand and reduce cancer disparities.

  2. Psychosocial cancer care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    family members to cancer is an increasing interest in education, ... all stages of the cancer journey and is passionate about enabling more professionals in South Africa to provide psychosocial cancer .... therapeutic support together with more.

  3. Skin Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase ... is based on the type of nonmelanoma skin cancer or other skin condition diagnosed: Basal cell carcinoma Enlarge Basal cell ...

  4. Stages of Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase ... is based on the type of nonmelanoma skin cancer or other skin condition diagnosed: Basal cell carcinoma Enlarge Basal cell ...

  5. Squamous cell cancer (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squamous cell cancer involves cancerous changes to the cells of the middle portion of the epidermal skin layer. It is ... malignant tumor, and is more aggressive than basal cell cancer, but still may be relatively slow-growing. It ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Costs and Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System ...

  7. What Is Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the head causes brain cancer or that bad people get cancer. This isn't true! Kids don't do anything wrong to get cancer. But some unhealthy habits, especially cigarette smoking or drinking too much alcohol ...

  8. Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer found early may be easier to treat. Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's health ... may do more tests, such as a biopsy. Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes be ...

  9. Stages of Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer is found early. Signs and symptoms of cervical cancer include vaginal bleeding and pelvic pain. These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by cervical cancer or by other conditions . Check with your ...

  10. Risks of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Colorectal Cancer Key Points Colorectal cancer is a disease in ...

  11. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer Order the free Anyone Can ... rarely, younger children can develop skin cancer. How can people with dark skin get skin cancer? Although ...

  12. Cancer - renal pelvis or ureter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ureter; Kidney cancer - renal pelvis; Ureter cancer Images Kidney anatomy References National Cancer Institute website. Transitional cell cancer (kidney/ureter) treatment (PDQ) - health professional version. www.cancer. ...

  13. Cervical cancer - screening and prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer cervix - screening; HPV - cervical cancer screening; Dysplasia - cervical cancer screening; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine ... Almost all cervical cancers are caused by HPV (human papilloma virus). HPV is a common virus that spreads through sexual contact. Certain ...

  14. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Media Outreach Program Cancer Reporting Fellowships Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All Press ...

  15. Types of Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    An infographic from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) describing the four broad categories of cancer research: basic research, clinical research, population-based research, and translational research.

  16. Colon cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for Cancer Training ... Media Resources Media ...

  18. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that reflect light more, such as water, sand, concrete, and areas that are painted white. The higher ... - skin - squamous cell; Skin cancer - squamous cell; Nonmelanoma skin cancer - squamous ...

  19. Prostate Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  20. Prostate Cancer Screening | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  1. Colorectal Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  2. Colorectal Cancer Screening | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  3. Bladder Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  4. Kidney Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  5. Cervical Cancer Screening | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  6. Cancer research and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1978-01-01

    An actual condition of cancer, and the basis and a future view of radiotherapy were described by adding generally established biological and biochemical knowledge to the author's research. It was described that the relapse of cancer after irradiation was induced from outside of cancerous mass, and the nature of relapsed cancerous cells group was also stated. The histological structure of cancer from a view of cell movement and radioresistant cancerous cells group were described. The differentiation of cancerous cells were described, and a study of inhibition of cancer by redifferentiation was considered. It is important to grasp characteristics and a limit of radiotherapy for cancer, to systematize and materialize reasonable therapy which uses drug and immunotherapy together with surgery, and to use radiotherapy reasonably together with redifferentiation therapy of cancerous cells by extracting characteristics and a limit of radiationtherapy from an actual condition of cancer. (Serizawa, K.)

  7. Cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubiana, M

    1999-01-01

    Over 70% of human cancers are associated with lifestyle and about half of cancer deaths could be prevented by relatively simple individual actions: no smoking, moderate consumption of alcohol, increased consumption of fruit and vegetables, avoidance of sunbathing, obesity and a too high consumption of saturated lipids. Most of these efforts would also markedly decrease the incidence of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. However, the concept of prevention is currently neither well accepted nor understood by the medical community and the general public. It is often felt that it restricts freedom, imposes a choice between pleasure and duty, and that passing judgement on lifestyle is a form of intolerance. The case of tobacco illustrates the difficulties encountered by prevention, notably among adolescents. The fight against smoking requires information, a societal approach (ban on advertising, increase in price), and a reduction of the example given by adult smoking (parents, peers, teachers, physicians, TV presenters, movie stars, have a great influence on adolescents), while tobacco cessation programs must be promoted. The various approaches should be integrated into a global program of health prevention, including health education at school from 5 to 12 years of age. The efficacy of each of the global program's components should be evaluated. Misconceptions such as overestimation of the impact of pollution on health should also be corrected. Health is created and experienced by people within the setting of their daily lives, in particular during childhood. Prevention is the responsibility of individual members of the community but also of the community as a whole.

  8. HPV and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a group of more than 200 related viruses that can cause several cancers including cervical cancer, anal cancer, and oropharyngeal cancer. Learn more about how HPV is transmitted, the different types of HPV, HPV vaccines, and HPV treatment.

  9. Breast cancer in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in situ - male; Intraductal carcinoma - male; Inflammatory breast cancer - male; Paget disease of the nipple - male; Breast cancer - male ... The cause of breast cancer in men is not clear. But there are risk factors that make breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to ...

  10. Staging of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LUNG CANCER MINI-SERIES #2 Staging of Lung Cancer Once your lung cancer is diagnosed, staging tells you and your health care provider about ... at it under a microscope. The stages of lung cancer are listed as I, II, III, and IV ...

  11. Radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, T.A.; Ajani, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings contain 33 papers grouped under the headings of: Heath memorial award lecture; Large bowel cancer; Esophageal cancer; Pancreatic, Endocrime, and Hepatobiliary cancer; Gastric cancer; Joanne Vandenberge hill award and William O. Russell lectureship in anatomic pathology; and Jeffrey A. Gottlieb memorial lecture

  12. Helicobacter pyloriand gastric cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-05-12

    May 12, 2009 ... only common but is second to lung cancer as a leading cause of cancer-related ... in the developing world,4 although cancer records are not readily available for .... gastric cancers are identified at a late stage due to lack of ...

  13. Breast Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  14. Current cancer research 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamatiadis-Smidt, H. [ed.

    1998-12-31

    Topics from the Contents: The Fight against Cancer in Germany - A Critical Review. Conditions and Structures in Research. Familial Breast Cancer - A Critical Assessment. Research without Animal Experiments. Cancer Prevention. New Approaches for Tumor Therapy. Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer. Therapy of Brain Tumors with Laser Neurosurgery. The Genome Project. (orig.)

  15. Current cancer research 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamatiadis-Smidt, H.

    1998-01-01

    Topics from the Contents: The Fight against Cancer in Germany - A Critical Review. Conditions and Structures in Research. Familial Breast Cancer - A Critical Assessment. Research without Animal Experiments. Cancer Prevention. New Approaches for Tumor Therapy. Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer. Therapy of Brain Tumors with Laser Neurosurgery. The Genome Project. (orig.)

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  17. Peralta Cancer Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The investigators in the cell biology program at PCRI have pioneered in the development of techniques for culturing human epithelial cells. The cancer diagnosis program has been concerned with researching new techniques for early diagnosis of breast cancer in women. The cancer treatment program has been concerned with applying cell biology and biochemistry advances to improve cancer management

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Understanding Cancer ...

  19. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... interactions of pregnancy-related mammotrophic factors, ligands, and receptors? What is the time course of pregnancy-related ...

  20. Treatment Options by Stage (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...