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Sample records for glossitis

  1. Prevalence and heritability of psoriasis and benign migratory glossitis in one Brazilian population*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Maria Augusta; Gonzaga, Heron Fernando de Sousa; Tomimori, Jane; Picciani, Bruna Lavinas Sayed; Barbosa, Calógeras Antônio

    2017-01-01

    Background An oral condition associated to psoriasis is benign migratory glossitis. The review of the literature does not show any publication about heritability in both soriasis and benign migratory glossitis and prevalence of psoriasis in the Brazilian population. Objective This research was carried out in order to determine the prevalence of psoriasis and benign migratory glossitis in the Brazilian population from a Brazilian sample, as well as the heritability in these conditions. Methods Six thousand patients were studied from the records of the outpatient dermatology department. The sample had 129 patients with cutaneous psoriasis, 399 with benign migratory glossitis without psoriasis and a control group with 5,472 patients. After data collection, the statistical analysis was made using Woolf, Chi-square and Falconer tests. Results The prevalence of psoriasis was 2.15% and the benign migratory glossitis was 7.0%. The prevalence of benign migratory glossitis in the psoriasis group was high (16.3%), and that was statistically significant. Family history in the psoriasis group was 38% for the condition itself and 2,75% for benign migratory glossitis and in the benign migratory glossitis group was 17.54% for the condition itself and 1.5% for psoriasis. The study of heritability was 38.8% for psoriasis and 36.6% for benign migratory glossitis, both with medium heritability. Study limitations This study was only in the state of São Paulo. Conclusion This is the first publication that quantifies how much of these conditions have a genetic background and how important the environmental factors are in triggering them. PMID:29364438

  2. A study to determine the association between tobacco smoking habit and oral candidal infection in median rhomboid glossitis by cytologic and histopathologic methods

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    Anitha Bojan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the association, if any, between tobacco smoking and candidal infection in median rhomboid glossitis (MRG and to histopathologically evaluate the presence of dysplastic changes in it. Study design: Hospital-based study consisting of 100 subjects who satisfied the clinical criteria of MRG- Smears and swabs were collected to ascertain the presence of Candida and sub-typing was done utilizing the CHROMagar technique. Biopsy and histopathological examination was done to determine the presence or absence of dysplasia of the lesional tissue. Results: All the subjects were male and had the habit of smoking- Smears and swabs taken from glossal lesion of 60 subjects′ showed 100% candidal positivity. Tissue section from 31 subjects showed histological picture consistent with MRG and 23 (74% showed dysplastic changes. Conclusion: MRG is a Candida-associated lesion and the tobacco-smoking habit in our cohort may play an important role in increasing the candidal colonization. As some of our cases exhibited mild epithelial dysplasia, both candidal colonization and smoking habits may have contributed to the dysplastic changes.

  3. Glossite rombóide mediana associada a candidíase esofagiana: uma possível relação etiológica com a Candida albicans Median rhomboid glossitis associated with esophagic candidiasis: a possible etiologic relation with Candida albicans

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    Rubens Marcelo Souza Leite

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available A glossite rombóide mediana é doença inflamatória que ocorre na superfície da língua. Apresenta-se como placa avermelhada ou vermelho-esbranquiçada no dorso da língua, na localização mediana. A etiologia é desconhecida. Acredita-se que possa haver relação com a má formação dos arcos branquiais durante a embriogênese. Fatores infecciosos relacionados à Candida albicans também são aventados. Os autores apresentam o caso clínico de uma paciente de 60 anos, com glossite rombóide mediana associada a esofagite candidiásica, ambas responsivas ao tratamento com itraconazol e fluconazol oral. Discute-se se a cândida não seria um dos fatores implicados na etiologia da doença lingual.Median rhomboid glossitis is an inflammatory disease involving the surface of the tongue. It develops clinically as an erythematous or white-erythematous area on the dorsal median surface of the tongue. Etiologic factors are unknown. One of the possible etiologic theories suggests a relation between median rhomboid glossitis and malformation of bronchial arches during embriogenesis. Candida albicans as an infectious etiologic factor has also been suggested. The study presents the case of a 60-year-old patient with median rhomboid glossitis associated with esophagic candidiasis. Both pathologies responded well to therapy with oral itraconazole and fluconazole. The authors argue in favor of the possibility of an etiologic relation between Candida albicans and median rhomboid glossitis .

  4. nutritional status of patients in a long-stay hospital for people

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pantothenic acid, vitamin D and copper were encountered. The serum copper and caeruloplasmin ..... Theoretically, a biotin deficiency may result in scaly desquamation, lassitude, hair loss, depression, anorexia and glossitis." Because of the.

  5. Use of Adelavin 9 in the field of oto-rhino-pharyngo-laryngology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Seiichiro; Miyoshi, Yasuro; Sakakura, Yasuo; Majima, Yuichi; Yamagiwa, Mikikazu

    1976-01-01

    Adelavin 9 was employed to 27 patients with radiomucositis. Markedly effective, 2 patients; effective, 10; slightly effective, 9; ineffective, 5; obscure, 1. Adelavin 9 was employed to 7 patients with apthous stomatitis and glossitis. Markedly effective, 1; effective, 3; slightly effective, 2; ineffective, 1. In radiomucositis, the effect was frequently seen with the administration of 10 - 20 times. In apthous stomatitis and glossitis, the effect was frequently seen with the administration of 5 - 10 times. There was no side effect in the administration of Adelavin 9. (Ichikawa, K.)

  6. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of tongue disorders among patients attending the oral medicine clinic at a tertiary hospital .... Burning tongue was diagnosed more frequently in patients over 70 years (n=3, 3.6%) while squamous cell carcinoma and atrophic glossitis (3.6% each) were only .... extremes of age and people with poor nutrition (12,.

  7. The investigation of Helicobacter pylori in the dental biofilm and saliva samples of children with dyspeptic complaints

    OpenAIRE

    Aksit B?cak, Damla; Akyuz, Serap; K?ratl?, Binnur; Usta, Merve; Urganci, Nafiye; Alev, Burcin; Yarat, Aysen; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2017-01-01

    Background The oral cavity can be an extra-gastric reservoir for Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori). This can play a role in the pathogenesis of halitosis, glossitis, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, and dental caries. The present study was conducted to detect the presence of H.pylori within the dental biofilm and in saliva samples collected from children suffering from dyspepsia and children without any gastrointestinal complaints. Associations with gastric infection, halitosis, and some oral para...

  8. Oral manifestations of anemia in HIV/AIDS patients without ARV treatment

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    Wahyu Hidayat

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS is  a set of symptoms caused by decreases of the immune system that was infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Blood disorders often found in patient with HIV and associated with HIV infection. Mostly found disorders is anemia of chronic disease. The prevalence of anemia in HIV/AIDS patients reaches 70%. Oral manifestations of anemia are atrophy of the papillae on tongue, glossodynia, pallor, angular cheilitis, glossitis, aphthous ulcers/erosive lesions, candidiasis, and geographic tongue. There are many publications that uses anemia as indicator to determine the prognosis of HIV infection, thus the description of oral manifestation of anemia in the non-ARV HIV/AIDS patients is a necessity. The purpose of this study was to describe the oral manifestation of anemia in the non-ARV HIV/AIDS patients. Methods: The methods used were purposive random sampling. Samples were new HIV/AIDS patients who have not got antiretroviral (ARV treatment. The study included 40 patients in Teratai Clinic Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung. Results: Oral manifestations of anemia were found amongst non-ARV HIV/AIDS patients, which were candidiasis in  37 patients, glossodynia in 28 patients, glossitis in 10 patients, and angular cheilitis in 1 patient. Conclusion: From the study found that oral manifestations of anemia that found in non-ARV HIV/AIDS patients were candidiasis, glossodynia, glossitis and angular cheilitis. HIV/AIDS patients with anemia needed to treat more intensive for better prognosis and quality of life. Keywords: Anemia, HIV/AIDS, Candidiasis, Glossitis, Glossodynia

  9. Laser in dentistry: Biostimulation and surgery

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    Barzè, Franco; Palmieri, Beniamino; Scalise, Lorenzo; Rottigni, Valentina

    2012-09-01

    Laser therapy has achieved an important rule in cosmetic dentistry especially in the treatment of several complications such as leukoplakia, oral lichen planus, glossitis, oral mucositis, labial herpes virus, stomatitis, frenulum and oral hemangioma. In our study we enrolled 40 patients affected by these diseases to treat them with a new infrared dental laser demonstrating that it is extremely safe and effective in pain and postoperative discomforts reduction.

  10. Prevalence of oral alterations in infants seen at the public pediatric dental clinics from Ponta Grossa - PR, Brazil

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    BALDANI Márcia Helena

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was carried out in order to determine the prevalence of oral alterations among 200 infants aged 0 to 24 months (108 males and 92 females, who were seen at public pediatric dental clinics from Ponta Grossa - PR, Brazil. The infants were examined during routine appointments. The data were analyzed and the results revealed that 21.00% of the children had oral conditions, which were more frequent among children aged 0 to 3 months (26.98%. The most prevalent condition was the inclusion cyst (35.71%, followed by benign migratory glossitis (23.81% and candidiasis (11.90%. The prevalence of inclusion cysts was higher among females (10.87%, and the benign migratory glossitis was more frequently seen in males (6.48%. No tumors were found. With regard to the management of the conditions, it was noticed that no treatment was required in 76.19% of the cases. These findings are in agreement with those reported in the literature, and it was concluded that most of the oral conditions in infants are benign and do not require any treatment. In spite of that, health professionals (dentists and pediatricians must be aware of those alterations in order to tranquilize the children's parents and to detect the need for any intervention.

  11. Common tongue conditions in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reamy, Brian V; Derby, Richard; Bunt, Christopher W

    2010-03-01

    Although easily examined, abnormalities of the tongue can present a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma for physicians. Recognition and diagnosis require a thorough history, including onset and duration, antecedent symptoms, and tobacco and alcohol use. Examination of tongue morphology and a careful assessment for lymphadenopathy are also important. Geographic tongue, fissured tongue, and hairy tongue are the most common tongue problems and do not require treatment. Median rhomboid glossitis is usually associated with a candidal infection and responds to topical antifungals. Atrophic glossitis is often linked to an underlying nutritional deficiency of iron, folic acid, vitamin B12, riboflavin, or niacin and resolves with correction of the underlying condition. Oral hairy leukoplakia, which can be a marker for underlying immunodeficiency, is caused by the Epstein-Barr virus and is treated with oral antivirals. Tongue growths usually require biopsy to differentiate benign lesions (e.g., granular cell tumors, fibromas, lymphoepithelial cysts) from premalignant leukoplakia or squamous cell carcinoma. Burning mouth syndrome often involves the tongue and has responded to treatment with alpha-lipoic acid, clonazepam, and cognitive behavior therapy in controlled trials. Several trials have also confirmed the effectiveness of surgical division of tongue-tie (ankyloglossia), in the context of optimizing the success of breastfeeding compared with education alone. Tongue lesions of unclear etiology may require biopsy or referral to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, head and neck surgeon, or a dentist experienced in oral pathology.

  12. Polyvalent immunoglobulins with vitamin D3 and vitamin B12 in the treatment of Sjogren's syndrome in a vegetarian with stomatitis, glossodynia, xerostomia, and elevated antinuclear antibodies: Case report
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuny, Clemens; Vaerst, Barbara; Gabrielpillai, Jennis; Tahtali, Aykut; Balster, Sven; Lissner, Reinhard; Woodcock, Barry G

    2018-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome, involving sicca symptoms with xerostomia, stomatitis, and considerable pain is a difficult-to-treat autoimmune disease where the treatment options are limited and, as in the case of methotrexate, have a low therapeutic index. This case report concerns a male patient, aged 75 years and vegetarian, with Sjogren's syndrome subsequently confirmed by salivary gland biopsy. Serum antinuclear antibodies (ANA) were elevated (1 : 320). Low serum vitamin B12 and iron levels could be improved after 20 days using vitamin B12 and iron oral supplements. Despite symptomatic treatment, xerostomia, glossitis, and glossodynia were still present, at times marked, after 12 months when the ANA titer was unchanged. Following treatment with an anti-inflammatory polyvalent immunoglobulin formulation (Lactobin®N, 7 g daily), a bovine colostrum concentrate given orally in combination with oral vitamin D3 (2,000 IU daily), sicca symptoms and xerostomia progressively decreased and at day 750 were confined to occasional and minor glossitis of the upper lip. This case report demonstrates the satisfactory control of Sjogren's syndrome using oral polyvalent immunoglobulins with vitamin D3. In contrast to treatment options involving antimalarial drugs and methotrexate, there are no safety issues in patients tolerant to milk products.
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  13. Dental and oropharyngeal lesions in rats with chronic acid reflux esophagitis.

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    Shimazu, Rintaro; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Minesaki, Akimichi; Kuratomi, Yuichiro

    2018-06-01

    In this study, we evaluated pathological changes in the tooth and pharynx of GERD rats to elucidate the association between gastric acid reflux and oral and pharyngeal diseases. An experimental rat model of chronic acid reflux esophagitis was surgically created. The oral cavities were observed histologically every 2 weeks until 20 weeks after surgery. At 10 weeks after surgery, molar crown heights in GERD rats were shorter than that in control rats, and inflammatory cell infiltration by gastric acid reflux was found in the periodontal mucosa of GERD rats. Furthermore, dental erosion progressed in GERD rats at 20 weeks after surgery, and enamel erosion and dentin exposure were observed. During the same period, inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in the mucosa of the posterior part of the tongue. These findings suggest that gastric acid reflux may be one of the exacerbating factors of dental erosion, periodontitis and glossitis. We investigated oral changes in an experimental rat model of GERD and observed development of dental erosion, periodontitis and glossitis. Our findings suggested chronic gastric acid reflux may be involved in the pathogenesis of oral disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. B-12 vitamin metabolism disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabriciova, K.; Bzduch, V.; Behulova, D.; Skodova, J.; Holesova, D.; Ostrozlikova, M.; Schmidtova, K.; Kozich, V.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin B-12 – cobalamin (Cbl) is a water soluble vitamin, which is synthesized by lower organisms. It cannot be synthesized by plants and higher organisms. Problem in the metabolic pathway of Cbl can be caused by its deficiency or by the deficiency of its last metabolites – adenosylcobalamin and methylcobalamin. Both reasons are presented by errors in the homocysteine and methylmalonyl-coenzyme A metabolism. Clinical symptoms of the Cbl metabolism disorders are: different neurological disorders, changes in haematological status (megaloblastic anemia, pancytopenia), symptoms of gastrointestinal tract (glossitis, loss of appetite, diarrhea) and changes in the immune system. In the article the authors describe the causes of Cbl metabolism disorders, its different diagnosis and treatment. They introduce the group of patients with these disorders, who were taken care of in the I st Paediatric Department of University Children Hospital for the last 5 years. (author)

  15. Prosthodontic Management of Xerostomic Patient: A Technical Modification

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    Haraswarupa Gurkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Xerostomia is often a contributing factor in both minor and serious health problems. It can affect nutrition and dental as well as psychological health. Common problems faced by such patients are glossitis, mucositis, angular cheilitis, dysgeusia, and difficulty in chewing and swallowing. One of the major problems associated with xerostomic patients is the poor tolerance and retention of removable dental prostheses because of thin dry atrophic mucosa and lack of a saliva film. This paper describes a new technique of incorporating a salivary reservoir in the maxillary complete denture. The salivary reservoir fabricated by this technique provided good lubrication of the oral tissues and was easily cleansed by the wearer and was fabricated from routine denture materials.

  16. Zinc Deficiency with Acrodermatitis Enteropathica-like Eruption After Pancreaticoduodenectomy

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    Hsin-Hsien Yu

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD is the standard operation for periampullary lesions. Most reports have focused on the clinical outcome, complications and tumor recurrence after PD. Few studies have focused on the nutritional sequelae that result from the extended resection of the upper gastrointestinal tract and disruption of the normal physiologic process of digestion. Zinc is absorbed mainly in the duodenum and proximal jejunum, which are removed during PD. Herein, we report two patients who experienced zinc deficiency with acrodermatitis enteropathica-like eruption, alopecia, glossitis and nail dystrophy after PD. The lesions improved dramatically after supplementation with zinc sulfate, pancreatic enzyme and diet instructions. No symptoms related to zinc deficiency were noted on follow-up after nutritional instructions had been given to the patients.

  17. A Clinicopathologic Study of Oral Changes in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, Gastritis, and Ulcerative Colitis.

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    Vinesh, E; Masthan, Kmk; Kumar, M Sathish; Jeyapriya, S Marytresa; Babu, Aravindha; Thinakaran, Meera

    2016-11-01

    The aim and objectives of this study are to identify oral changes in certain gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, namely gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), ulcerative colitis, gastritis, and to evaluate these oral symptoms as indicators for assessing GI disorders. In this study, the oral manifestations of various GI disorders were assessed in a varying age group of 250 patients in Government Stanley Medical College and Hospital, Chennai. Out of 250 patients, 142 were affected by GERD, 99 were affected by gastritis, and 9 patients were affected by ulcerative colitis. Of these patients, 177 were males and 73 were females. Evaluation of patients with gastritis revealed that 66.7% affected with gingivitis, 19.2% with dental erosion on the palatal and lingual aspects of maxillary and mandibular teeth predominantly in the anterior region, 10.1% with periodontitis, 2% with gingival erythema. Among the patients with GERD, 44% of the cases showed dental erosion, 25.5% periodontitis, 9.9% gingivitis, 5.7% gingival erythema, 2.8% palatal erythema, 2.1% gingival ulcers, glossitis 2%, 1.4% floor of the mouth erythema, and 0.7% erythema of the tongue. Patients with ulcerative colitis showed 44.4% of gingival erythema, 33.3% of dental erosions, and 22.2% of gingival ulcers and periodontitis. In our study of 250 patients, oral manifestations were observed in 88% of the patients. Both soft tissue and hard tissue changes were evident. There was a high correlation between various GI disease and dental erosion, erythema at various sites of the oral cavity, oral ulcers, gingivitis, periodontitis, and glossitis. Careful evaluation of oral cavity may unveil many GI disorders and help the patient by providing early diagnosis, which further facilitates the prognosis.

  18. Orofacial manifestations of hematological disorders: Anemia and hemostatic disorders

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    Titilope A Adeyemo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to review the literature and identify orofacial manifestations of hematological diseases, with particular reference to anemias and disorders of hemostasis. A computerized literature search using MEDLINE was conducted for published articles on orofacial manifestations of hematological diseases, with emphasis on anemia. Mesh phrases used in the search were: oral diseases AND anaemia; orofacial diseases AND anaemia; orofacial lesions AND anaemia; orofacial manifestations AND disorders of haemostasis. The Boolean operator "AND" was used to combine and narrow the searches. Anemic disorders associated with orofacial signs and symptoms include iron deficiency anemia, Plummer-Vinson syndrome, megaloblastic anemia, sickle cell anemia, thalassaemia and aplastic anemia. The manifestations include conjunctiva and facial pallor, atrophic glossitis, angular stomatitis, dysphagia, magenta tongue, midfacial overgrowth, osteoclerosis, osteomyelitis and paraesthesia/anesthesia of the mental nerve. Orofacial petechiae, conjunctivae hemorrhage, nose-bleeding, spontaneous and post-traumatic gingival hemorrhage and prolonged post-extraction bleeding are common orofacial manifestations of inherited hemostatic disorders such as von Willebrand′s disease and hemophilia. A wide array of anemic and hemostatic disorders encountered in internal medicine has manifestations in the oral cavity and the facial region. Most of these manifestations are non-specific, but should alert the hematologist and the dental surgeon to the possibilities of a concurrent disease of hemopoiesis or hemostasis or a latent one that may subsequently manifest itself.

  19. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in a brazilian military police population.

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    Araújo, Viviani-Silva; Godinho, Eliane-Lopes; Farias, Lucyana-Conceição; Marques-Silva, Luciano; Santos, Sérgio-Henrique-Sousa; Rodrigues-Neto, João-Felício; Ferreira, Raquel-Conceição; De-Paula, Alfredo-Maurício-Batista; Martins, Andréa-Maria-Eleutério-de Barros-Lima; Sena-Guimarães, André-Luiz

    2015-04-01

    Data obtained from oral health surveys are very important for identifying disease-susceptible groups and for developing dental care and prevention programs. So, the purpose of the current article was to investigate the prevalence of oral mucosa lesions (OMLs) in a population of Brazilian police. Interviews and oral cavity examinations were performed on a sample of 395 police officers who were randomly selected by the calibrated researcher. The number of individuals was obtained by a sample calculation using the finite population correction. The diagnostic criteria were based on the WHO (1997) criteria and adapted to Brazilian surveys. In total, 8.61% of the population presented some OML. Traumatic injuries and benign migratory glossitis (BMG) were the most prevalent lesions. The prevalence of potentially malignant disorders was lower than among the Brazilian population.The most prevalent lesion among the police officers was related to trauma. Patients dissatisfied with oral health had a higher risk of presenting OMLs. Key words:Mouth disease, mouth mucosa, military personnel, public health, oral pathology, oral leukoplakia.

  20. Eagle syndrome. A narrative review

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    Heber Arbildo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Painful disorders in the maxillofacial region are common in dental practice. Most of these conditions are not properly diagnosed because of inadequate knowledge of craniofacial and cervico-pharyngeal syndromes such as Eagle Syndrome. The aim of this review is to describe the general aspects, diagnosis and treatment of Eagle syndrome. Eagle syndrome or stylohyoid syndrome was first described by Watt W. Eagle in 1937. It was defined as orofacial pain related to the elongation of the styloid process and ligament stylohyoid calcification. The condition is accompanied by symptoms such as dysphonia, dysphagia, sore throat, glossitis, earache, tonsillitis, facial pain, headache, pain in the temporomandibular joint and inability to perform lateral movements of the neck. Diagnosis and treatment of Eagle syndrome based on symptoms and radiographic examination of the patient will determine the need for surgical or nonsurgical treatment. Eagle syndrome is a complex disorder demanding a thorough knowledge of its signs and symptoms to make a correct diagnosis and provide an appropriate subsequent treatment. Disseminating information about this syndrome among medical-dental professionals is essential to provide adequate dental care to patients.

  1. Thyroid disorders and radio iodine therapy: dental perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batra, Arika; Krishnan, Manu; Tiwari, Brijesh; Singh, Sanjana; Sharma, Anu

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid disorders; hyper/hypothyroidism/thyroiditis/neoplasms are widely prevalent endocrine disorders. Oral manifestations of hyperthyroidism are increased susceptibility to caries, periodontal disease, maxillary/mandibular osteoporosis, premature shedding of deciduous teeth and early eruption of permanent teeth, sjogren and burning mouth syndromes. Undiagnosed/untreated hyperthyroidism often precipitates as 'Thyroid storm' during a stressful episode of surgical intervention/trauma. Hypothyroidism shows macroglossia, micrognathia, dysgeusia, thick lips, delayed eruption of teeth, poor periodontal health, enamel hypoplasia, anterior open bite, delayed wound healing and subnormal growth of jaws. Its congenital variant has underdeveloped mandible/overdeveloped maxilla, shortening of skull base and flaring of nostrils. Stomatodynia predominates in subacute thyroiditis. Radioactive iodine ( 131 I) is a common mode of therapy for thyrotoxicosis and carcinomas; where its beta radiations cause destruction of thyroid follicles. Since all forms of iodine are actively taken up by the salivary glands, salivary dysfunction is a consequent of 131 I therapy. It usually presents as xerostomia, mucositis, stomatitis, glossitis and dysguesia. Though reversible and dose-dependent to some extent, damage to bone marrow and gonads are also reported. It follows that thyroid disorders and its therapy with radio iodine show wide ranging side effects: both dental and general. In this context, this paper explains a novel method to evaluate these changes through salivary biochemistry, dental indices and periodontal markers. (author)

  2. Oral Manifestations in Pediatric Patients with Coeliac Disease – A Review Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, Viviana Marisa Pereira; Coelho, Ana Sofia; Veloso e Silva, Diana Maria; de Andrade, David José Casimiro

    2017-01-01

    Background: Coeliac disease is a chronic enteropathy that remains a challenge for the clinician, due to its atypical manifestations and etiopathogenic complexity. Objective: This article intends to describe the oral characteristics of Coeliac Disease in children in order to facilitate their management in the dental office. Methods: A review of the literature was performed electronically in PubMed (PubMed Central, and MEDLINE) for articles published in English from 2000 to April of 2017. The article is also based on the authors' clinical experience with children with coeliac disease. The searched keywords were “coeliac disease “,”oral manifestations “, “dental enamel defects”, “recurrent aphthous stomatitis” and “oral aphthous ulcers”. Results: There are some oral manifestations which are strictly related to coeliac disease: dental enamel defects, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, delayed tooth eruption, multiple caries, angular cheilitis, atrophic glossitis, dry mouth and burning tongue. Conclusion: The complete knowledge of the oral manifestations of coeliac disease can trigger an effective change in the quality of life of the patients with this disease. PMID:29238414

  3. Manifestaciones clínicas bucales detectadas en pacientes con giardiasis

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    Juan Carlos Quintana Díaz

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio de la posible relación existente entre la giardiasis y la aparición de manifestaciones bucales en un grupo de pacientes mayores de 16 años, a los que se les diagnosticó esta afección mediante el drenaje biliar. Se asevera que la malabsorción producida por este parásito hace que se origine un déficit de vitaminas, proteínas, carbohidratos y grasas, que según varios autores y nosostros, son la causa de las alteraciones bucales encontradas. De los 50 pacientes con giardiasis estudiados, el 46 % correspondió al sexo masculino y el 54 % al femenino, las manifestaciones bucales encontradas fueron: aftas, glositis y queilitis en un total del 52 % de los casos examinados.A study on the possible relationship existing between giardiasis and the appereance of oral manifestations in a group of patients over 16, who were diagnosed this affection by biliary drainage, was conducted. It is affirmed that the malabsorption produced by this parasite provokes a deficit of vitamins, proteins, carbohydrates and fats, that in some authora' opinions and in our own, causes the oral alterations found. Of the 50 patients with giardiasis studied, 46 % were males and 54 % females. The oral manifestations detected in 52 % of the cases examined were: aphthas, glossitis, and cheilitis.

  4. Seneciosis in cattle associated with photosensitization

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    Paula R. Giaretta

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Senecio spp. poisoning is the main cause of cattle mortality in the central region of Rio Grande do Sul. This paper reports an outbreak of seneciosis in cattle with high prevalence of photosensitization, where 83 out of 162 cows (51.3% presented this clinical sign. The outbreak occurred in September 2013, affecting adult cows that were held in a 205 hectare-pasture from April to October 2013 with abundant Senecio brasiliensis infestation. Main clinical signs were weight loss, excessive lacrimation or mucopurulent ocular discharge, nasal serous discharge, ventral diphteric glossitis, crusts in the nose, teats, dorsum of ears, and vulva. Liver biopsy was performed in all the cows under risk; the histopathological findings in the liver biopsies consisted of fibrosis, megalocytosis, and biliary ductal proliferation and were present in 73.4% of the biopsied animals. Six cows had increased serum activity of gamma glutamyl transferase. Three affected cows were necropsied. The main necropsy findings were a hard liver, distended gall bladder, edema of the mesentery and abomasum. Liver histological changes in the necropsied cows were similar to those of the biopsied livers. Spongiosis was detected in the brain of necropsied cows and is characteristic of hepatic encephalopathy.

  5. The prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in patients visiting a dental school in Southern India

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    Mathew Anuna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in Manipal, Karnataka State, India. A total of 1190 subjects who visited the department of oral medicine and radiology for diagnosis of various oral complaints over a period of 3 months were interviewed and clinically examined for oral mucosal lesions. The result showed the presence of one or more mucosal lesions in (41.2% of the population. Fordyce′s condition was observed most frequently (6.55% followed by frictional keratosis (5.79%, fissured tongue (5.71%, leukoedema (3.78%, smoker′s palate (2.77%, recurrent aphthae, oral submucous fibrosis (2.01%, oral malignancies (1.76%, leukoplakia (1.59%, median rhomboid glossitis (1.50%, candidiasis (1.3%, lichen planus (1.20%, varices (1.17%, traumatic ulcer and oral hairy leukoplakia (1.008%, denture stomatitis, geographic tongue, betel chewer′s mucosa and irritational fibroma (0.84%, herpes labialis, angular cheilitis (0.58%, and mucocele (0.16%. Mucosal lesions like tobacco-related lesions (leukoplakia, smoker′s palate, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral malignancies were more prevalent among men than among women. Denture stomatitis, herpes labialis, and angular cheilitis occurred more frequently in the female population.

  6. Plummer-Vinson syndrome

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    Novacek Gottfried

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plummer-Vinson or Paterson-Kelly syndrome presents as a classical triad of dysphagia, iron-deficiency anemia and esophageal webs. Exact data about epidemiology of the syndrome are not available; the syndrome is extremely rare. Most of the patients are white middle-aged women, in the fourth to seventh decade of life but the syndrome has also been described in children and adolescents. The dysphagia is usually painless and intermittent or progressive over years, limited to solids and sometimes associated with weight loss. Symptoms resulting from anemia (weakness, pallor, fatigue, tachycardia may dominate the clinical picture. Additional features are glossitis, angular cheilitis and koilonychia. Enlargement of the spleen and thyroid may also be observed. One of the most important clinical aspects of Plummer-Vinson syndrome is the association with upper alimentary tract cancers. Etiopathogenesis of Plummer-Vinson syndrome is unknown. The most important possible etiological factor is iron deficiency. Other possible factors include malnutrition, genetic predisposition or autoimmune processes. Plummer-Vinson syndrome can be treated effectively with iron supplementation and mechanical dilation. In case of significant obstruction of the esophageal lumen by esophageal web and persistent dysphagia despite iron supplementation, rupture and dilation of the web are necessary. Since Plummer-Vinson syndrome is associated with an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the pharynx and the esophagus, the patients should be followed closely.

  7. Oral Manifestations in Pediatric Patients with Coeliac Disease - A Review Article.

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    Macho, Viviana Marisa Pereira; Coelho, Ana Sofia; Veloso E Silva, Diana Maria; de Andrade, David José Casimiro

    2017-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic enteropathy that remains a challenge for the clinician, due to its atypical manifestations and etiopathogenic complexity. This article intends to describe the oral characteristics of Coeliac Disease in children in order to facilitate their management in the dental office. A review of the literature was performed electronically in PubMed (PubMed Central, and MEDLINE) for articles published in English from 2000 to April of 2017. The article is also based on the authors' clinical experience with children with coeliac disease. The searched keywords were "coeliac disease ","oral manifestations ", "dental enamel defects", "recurrent aphthous stomatitis" and "oral aphthous ulcers". There are some oral manifestations which are strictly related to coeliac disease: dental enamel defects, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, delayed tooth eruption, multiple caries, angular cheilitis, atrophic glossitis, dry mouth and burning tongue. The complete knowledge of the oral manifestations of coeliac disease can trigger an effective change in the quality of life of the patients with this disease.

  8. Oral manifestations of hospitalized cirrhotics at shaikh zayed hospital, lahore: a pilot study

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    Ijaz, S.; Ijaz, T.Q.; Butt, A.K.

    2006-01-01

    In Pakistan cirrhosis has reached alarming proportions due to spread of HCV and HBV viruses. Some of the oral manifestations of cirrhosis have been found to exhibit geographically variability. There is no research available on the oral health of these patients in Pakistan and their specific oral problems are not known. This study examined a cohort of cirrhotic patients admitted at Shaikh Zayed hospital Lahore to assess their oral health status and needs. Materials and methods: Thirty consecutive patients admitted with diagnosis of cirrhosis were examined for oral health status. Extra oral examination included any visible lesions or abnormalities on the face, head or neck region, lymph node enlargement and TMJ dysfunction. Intra oral examination included measurement of caries (DMFT) and periodontal disease level (CPITN), oral mucosal lesions, prosthetic status and prosthetic needs of the patients. All findings were recorded on the standard WHO oral health survey form. The oral health of this cohort was poor compared to the general population. Xerostomia (20%), papillary atrophy (100%), oral Melanosis (90%), petechieal hemorrhages (26%) and glossitis (53%) were found prevalent in the sample. Two females had oral lichen planus and one of the patients had oral ulceration. DMFT score (Mean=5.7) was not different from national average (Mean=8.02). Periodontal disease was more severe than general population. Less than 21% of the sample wore prostheses and over 50% needed one. TMJ dysfunction was common but fewer patient complained of the condition that the number of patients with clinical signs. Conclusions: Oral health of cirrhotic population is worse than general population and they have significant oral health needs. Further research is required to investigate this relationship. Effective oral health education of patients and physicians is required to reduce the burden of oral disease thus improving quality of life for these patients. (author)

  9. Assessment of Candidal carriage in patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus

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    RS Lamichhane

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is generally acknowledged that patients with diabetes mellitus are more susceptible to fungal infections, particularly with Candida albicans. Oral infection by Candida can result in a number of clinical lesions, including median rhomboid glossitis (central papillary atrophy, denture stomatitis, squamous cell carcinoma, Radiation therapy, immunocompromised status, etc. Different studies have shown that patients with diabetes mellitus have increased frequency of oral candidal carriage and increased risk of candidiasis, which is related to poor metabolic control, neutrophil dysfunction, reduced salivary flow, high glucose concentration in blood and saliva and in medications.Materials and Methods: Subjects of both the groups were given 10 ml of sterile normal saline and asked to rinse the mouth for one minute. The subjects were then asked to return the oral rinse in a sterile clean, broad-mouthed container which was capped, labelled and taken to the laboratory. The samples were then inoculated onto the culture medium (Sabouraud’s dextrose agar with Chloramphenicol with minimal delay (within 6-8 hours of collection of oral rinse. Candidal colonies were counted and compared with non-diabetics.Results: Statistically significant increase in colony forming units (p=0.0324 were obtainedin patients with diabetes mellitus.Conclusion: The results indicate significant increase in colonization and carriage of candida in the oral cavity among diabetics when compared with non-diabetics. However, further research using larger samples is required which may lend credibility to the suggestion of increased candidal CFUs in diabetics serving as a surrogate marker of serum glucose levels.Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2015 Vol. 5, 733-738

  10. Characterization of Metarhizium viride Mycosis in Veiled Chameleons (Chamaeleo calyptratus), Panther Chameleons (Furcifer pardalis), and Inland Bearded Dragons (Pogona vitticeps).

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    Schmidt, Volker; Klasen, Linus; Schneider, Juliane; Hübel, Jens; Pees, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Metarhizium viride has been associated with fatal systemic mycoses in chameleons, but subsequent data on mycoses caused by this fungus in reptiles are lacking. The aim of this investigation was therefore to obtain information on the presence of M. viride in reptiles kept as pets in captivity and its association with clinical signs and pathological findings as well as improvement of diagnostic procedures. Beside 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) (small subunit [SSU]) and internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS-1), a fragment of the large subunit (LSU) of 28S rDNA, including domain 1 (D1) and D2, was sequenced for the identification of the fungus and phylogenetic analysis. Cultural isolation and histopathological examinations as well as the pattern of antifungal drug resistance, determined by using agar diffusion testing, were additionally used for comparison of the isolates. In total, 20 isolates from eight inland bearded dragons ( Pogona vitticeps ), six veiled chameleons ( Chamaeleo calyptratus ), and six panther chameleons ( Furcifer pardalis ) were examined. Most of the lizards suffered from fungal glossitis, stomatitis, and pharyngitis or died due to visceral mycosis. Treatment with different antifungal drugs according to resistance patterns in all three different lizard species was unsuccessful. Sequence analysis resulted in four different genotypes of M. viride based on differences in the LSU fragment, whereas the SSU and ITS-1 were identical in all isolates. Sequence analysis of the SSU fragment revealed the first presentation of a valid large fragment of the SSU of M. viride According to statistical analysis, genotypes did not correlate with differences in pathogenicity, antifungal susceptibility, or species specificity. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in dental patients with tobacco smoking, chewing, and mixed habits: A cross-sectional study in South India

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    Prashant B Patil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A variety of oral mucosal lesions and conditions are associated with the habit of smoking and chewing tobacco, and many of these carry a potential risk for the development of cancer. There have been no studies that report the prevalence of habits and associated oral changes in the population in Dharwad region, of Karnataka, south India. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based, cross-sectional study was carried out at SDM Dental College (Dharwad, Karnataka. A total of 2400 subjects (1200 subjects with and 1200 subjects without habits attending the dental hospital were interviewed and examined by trained professionals to assess any oral mucosal changes. Results: Oral mucosal lesions were found in 322 (26.8% subjects who had tobacco smoking and chewing habits as compared to 34 (2.8% subjects without those habits. Oral leukoplakia (8.2% and oral submucous fibrosis (OSF (7.1% were the prevalent oral mucosal lesions found in subjects who had those habits, while the other lesions (1.7% namely; oral candidiasis, median rhomboid glossitis, recurrent apthous ulcer, frictional keratosis, and oral lichen planus (0.9% were frequently reported among individuals without those habits. The odds of developing oral lesions in subjects with tobacco habits was nearly 11.92 times that of abstainers (odds ratio, OR = 11.92, 95% confidence intervals, CI = 10.61-14.59%. Conclusion: The study showed that the risk of the development of oral lesions associated with tobacco smoking, chewing, or both is quite high. Males who had one or more of these habits showed more frequent oral changes than females. The study reinforces the association of OSF with gutkha and areca nut chewing, and leukoplakia, erythroplakia, and oral cancer with tobacco smoking, chewing, or mixed habits.

  12. Prevalence of oral soft tissue lesions and medical assessment of geriatric outpatients in North India

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    Sameer Rastogi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral health reflects overall well-being for the elderly population. Compromised oral health may be a risk factor for systemic diseases commonly occurring in old age. Oral health evaluation should be an integral part of the physical examination, and dentistry is essential to qualify geriatric patient care. Aim: To determine the prevalence of oral soft tissue lesions and systemic diseases in institutionalized geriatric population in North India. Materials and Methods: Geriatric patients were clinically evaluated using a standard questionnaire and assessed for known medical illnesses and prevalence of oral soft tissue lesions. Four hundred patients (71% males and 29% females with age ranging from 60 to 100 years were considered in the study group. Twenty-two (33.8% patients were edentulous and seven patients (10.8% were denture wearers. Forty-four (67.69% patients reported with tobacco habits. Results: Most prevalent medical illness reported was diminished vision (15.5%, followed by hypertension (10% and diabetes mellitus (6.25%. Several oral soft tissue lesions were reported among the study population. The most prevalent lesions were leukoplakia (12%, smoker′s melanosis (10%, smoker′s palate (9%, pigmentation on tongue (6%, frictional keratosis (5%, lichen planus (3%, denture stomatitis (2.5%, aphthous ulcers (2%, angular chelitis (1.5%, oral submucous fibrosis (1.5%, melanotic macule (1.5%, candidiasis (1.5%, irritation fibroma (1%, geographic tongue (1%, median rhomboid glossitis (1%, and traumatic ulcer (1%. Conclusion: The findings observed in this population are important and can have a determinant effect on the overall quality of life in this population. This information is a crucial prerequisite for health awareness programs involving the community health workers, oral physicians, and medical professionals.

  13. The investigation of Helicobacter pylori in the dental biofilm and saliva samples of children with dyspeptic complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksit Bıcak, Damla; Akyuz, Serap; Kıratlı, Binnur; Usta, Merve; Urganci, Nafiye; Alev, Burcin; Yarat, Aysen; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2017-03-21

    The oral cavity can be an extra-gastric reservoir for Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori). This can play a role in the pathogenesis of halitosis, glossitis, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, and dental caries. The present study was conducted to detect the presence of H.pylori within the dental biofilm and in saliva samples collected from children suffering from dyspepsia and children without any gastrointestinal complaints. Associations with gastric infection, halitosis, and some oral parameters were also evaluated. Seventy children (aged between 5-16) with dyspepsia were selected for the study group and control group composed of 30 healthy children without dyspepsia were also included in the study. After detailed oral and clinical examinations for oral parameters, saliva, and supragingival dental biofilm samples were collected for 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA genes detection by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The presence of gastric H.pylori was evaluated in endoscopic biopsy specimens histopathologically. Halitosis was evaluated by benzoyl-DL-arginine-naphthylamid (BANA) test. Salivary S.mutans and Lactobacilli sp. counts were also carried out by commercial kits. H.pylori was histopathologically detected amongst 83% of the children with the dyspeptic condition. The detection rate of this bacteria in dental biofilm and saliva samples and halitosis were found relatively higher in the dyspeptic children rather than the control group (p pylori (p > 0.05). In the gastric H.pylori positive group with dyspepsia, DMFT/S and dmft/s numbers and plaque indices were found higher than the control group (p pylori negative group with dyspepsia were found higher than the control group (p pylori positive and negative groups (p > 0.05). Comparing to those with negative for both genes, in children whose dental biofilm and saliva samples were positive for both 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA genes, significantly higher results for halitosis, and DMFS numbers and significantly

  14. A Genomic Approach to Unravel Host-Pathogen Interaction in Chelonians: The Example of Testudinid Herpesvirus 3.

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    Francesco C Origgi

    Full Text Available We report the first de novo sequence assembly and analysis of the genome of Testudinid herpesvirus 3 (TeHV3, one of the most pathogenic chelonian herpesviruses. The genome of TeHV3 is at least 150,080 nucleotides long, is arranged in a type D configuration and comprises at least 102 open reading frames extensively co-linear with those of Human herpesvirus 1. Consistently, the phylogenetic analysis positions TeHV3 among the Alphaherpesvirinae, closely associated with Chelonid herpesvirus 5, a Scutavirus. To date, there has been limited genetic characterization of TeHVs and a resolution beyond the genotype was not feasible because of the lack of informative DNA sequences. To exemplify the potential benefits of the novel genomic information provided by this first whole genome analysis, we selected the glycoprotein B (gB gene, for detailed comparison among different TeHV3 isolates. The rationale for selecting gB is that it encodes for a well-conserved protein among herpesviruses but is coupled with a relevant antigenicity and is consequently prone to accumulate single nucleotide polymorphisms. These features were considered critical for an ideal phylogenetic marker to investigate the potential existence of distinct TeHV3 genogroups and their associated pathology. Fifteen captive tortoises presumptively diagnosed to be infected with TeHVs or carrying compatible lesions on the basis of either the presence of intranuclear inclusions (presumptively infected and/or diphtheronecrotic stomatitis-glossitis or pneumonia (compatible lesions were selected for the study. Viral isolation, TeHV identification, phylogenetic analysis and pathological characterization of the associated lesions, were performed. Our results revealed 1 the existence of at least two distinct TeHV3 genogroups apparently associated with different pathologies in tortoises and 2 the first evidence for a putative homologous recombination event having occurred in a chelonian herpesvirus. This

  15. Mood disorder with mixed, psychotic features due to vitamin b12 deficiency in an adolescent: case report

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    Tufan Ali

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vitamin B12 is one of the essential vitamins affecting various systems of the body. Reports of psychiatric disorders due to its deficiency mostly focus on middle aged and elderly patients. Here we report a case of vitamin B 12 deficiency in a 16-year old, male adolescent who presented with mixed mood disorder symptoms with psychotic features. Chief complaints were “irritability, regressive behavior, apathy, crying and truancy” which lasted for a year. Premorbid personality was unremarkable with no substance use/exposure or infections. No stressors were present. The patient was not vegetarian. Past medical history and family history was normal. Neurological examination revealed glossitis, ataxia, rigidity in both shoulders, cog-wheel rigidity in the left elbow, bilateral problems of coordination in cerebellar examination, reduced swinging of the arms and masked face. Romberg’s sign was present. Laboratory evaluations were normal. Endoscopy and biopsy revealed atrophy of the gastric mucosa with Helicobacter Pylori colonization. Schilling test was suggestive of malabsorbtion. He was diagnosed with Mood disorder with Mixed, Psychotic Features due to Vitamin B12 Deficiency and risperidone 0.5 mg/day and intramuscular vitamin B12 500 mcg/day were started along with referral for treatment of Helicobacter pylori. A visit on the second week revealed no psychotic features. Romberg’s sign was negative and cerebellar tests were normal. Extrapyramidal symptoms were reduced while Vitamin B12 levels were elevated. Risperidone was stopped and parenteral Vitamin B12 treatment was continued with monthly injections for 3 months. Follow-up endoscopy and biopsy at the first month demonstrated eradication of H. pylori. He was followed monthly for another 6 months and psychiatric symptoms did not recur at the time of last evaluation. Despite limitations, this case may underline the observation that mood disorders with psychotic features

  16. A Genomic Approach to Unravel Host-Pathogen Interaction in Chelonians: The Example of Testudinid Herpesvirus 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Origgi, Francesco C.; Tecilla, Marco; Pilo, Paola; Aloisio, Fabio; Otten, Patricia; Aguilar-Bultet, Lisandra; Sattler, Ursula; Roccabianca, Paola; Romero, Carlos H.; Bloom, David C.; Jacobson, Elliott R.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first de novo sequence assembly and analysis of the genome of Testudinid herpesvirus 3 (TeHV3), one of the most pathogenic chelonian herpesviruses. The genome of TeHV3 is at least 150,080 nucleotides long, is arranged in a type D configuration and comprises at least 102 open reading frames extensively co-linear with those of Human herpesvirus 1. Consistently, the phylogenetic analysis positions TeHV3 among the Alphaherpesvirinae, closely associated with Chelonid herpesvirus 5, a Scutavirus. To date, there has been limited genetic characterization of TeHVs and a resolution beyond the genotype was not feasible because of the lack of informative DNA sequences. To exemplify the potential benefits of the novel genomic information provided by this first whole genome analysis, we selected the glycoprotein B (gB) gene, for detailed comparison among different TeHV3 isolates. The rationale for selecting gB is that it encodes for a well-conserved protein among herpesviruses but is coupled with a relevant antigenicity and is consequently prone to accumulate single nucleotide polymorphisms. These features were considered critical for an ideal phylogenetic marker to investigate the potential existence of distinct TeHV3 genogroups and their associated pathology. Fifteen captive tortoises presumptively diagnosed to be infected with TeHVs or carrying compatible lesions on the basis of either the presence of intranuclear inclusions (presumptively infected) and/or diphtheronecrotic stomatitis-glossitis or pneumonia (compatible lesions) were selected for the study. Viral isolation, TeHV identification, phylogenetic analysis and pathological characterization of the associated lesions, were performed. Our results revealed 1) the existence of at least two distinct TeHV3 genogroups apparently associated with different pathologies in tortoises and 2) the first evidence for a putative homologous recombination event having occurred in a chelonian herpesvirus. This novel

  17. Nutritional status, hypertension, proteinuria and glycosuria amongst the women of rural Bangladesh

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    Shaila Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Methods and materials – A rural community was purposively selected in Sreepur thana of which four villages were selected randomly. The total population of all age groups was 14,165 and the eligible reproductive aged females were 3,820 based on age between 15 and 45 years. Sample size was estimated at 573 (15% of the eligible participants depending on the availability of time and logistic support. The study design was to use a questionnaire related to age, education, family income, housing and sanitation. Height (ht, weight (wt and blood pressure (BP were measured. Urine protein was estimated. Clinical examinations noted the presence of anemia, jaundice, edema, ring-worm, scabies, goiter, xerophthalmia and gum bleeding. Body mass index (BMI was calculated to determine their obesity or wasting. Results – Overall, 501 volunteered and the response rate was 87.4%. Of these participants, 30.3% were illiterate. Almost all of them had supply of tube-well water and 68% had sanitary latrines. Their mean (±SD age was 30.2 (±2.9y, wt was 46 (±8.5kg, ht was 149 (±5cm and BMI was 20.5 (±3.5. The poor women had significantly lower BMI than the rich [20.0 (2.93 vs. 21.2 (4.1, (p<0.05]. Their mean (±SD systolic and diastolic blood pressure were 116 (±17 and 73 (±12 mmHg, respectively. The prevalence of hypertension, proteinuria and glycosuria were 16.6, 10.4 and 2.6%, respectively. The frequencies of proteinuria and ring-worm were significantly higher among the poor than among the rich social class (both cases p<0.05. Regarding nutritional deficiency, about half of the rural women (52% had some form of signs relating to Vit-A deficiency and 65% had signs of Vit-B complex deficiency either in the form of glossitis or of angular stomatitis or both. Conclusions – Despite time and logistic constraint, the study revealed that most of the rural women had a poor nutritional status (80% had BMI<23.0. The prevalence of hypertension and glycosuria were also

  18. Functioning glucagonoma associated with primary hyperparathyroidism: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 or incidental association?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdas, Enrico; Mariotti, Stefano; Pomata, Mariano; Aste, Nicola; Pilloni, Luca; Nicolosi, Angelo; Licheri, Sergio; Cappai, Antonello; Mastinu, Marco; Cetani, Filomena; Pardi, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is commonly based on clinical criteria, and confirmed by genetic testing. In patients without known MEN1-related germline mutations, the possibility of a casual association between two or more endocrine tumors cannot be excluded and subsequent management may be difficult to plan. We describe a very uncommon case of functioning glucagonoma associated with primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) in which genetic testing failed to detect germline mutations of MEN-1 and other known genes responsible for MEN1. The patient, a 65-year old woman, had been suffering for more than 1 year from weakness, progressive weight loss, angular cheilitis, glossitis and, more recently, skin rashes on the perineum, perioral skin and groin folds. After multidisciplinary investigations, functioning glucagonoma and asymptomatic pHPT were diagnosed and, since family history was negative, sporadic MEN1 was suspected. However, genetic testing revealed neither MEN-1 nor other gene mutations responsible for rarer cases of MEN1 (CDKN1B/p27 and other cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes CDKN1A/p15, CDKN2C/p18, CDKN2B/p21). The patient underwent distal splenopancreatectomy and at the 4-month follow-up she showed complete remission of symptoms. Six months later, a thyroid nodule, suspected to be a malignant neoplasia, and two hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands were detected respectively by ultrasound with fine needle aspiration cytology and 99m Tc-sestamibi scan with SPECT acquisition. Total thyroidectomy was performed, whereas selective parathyroidectomy was preferred to a more extensive procedure because the diagnosis of MEN1 was not supported by genetic analysis and intraoperative intact parathyroid hormone had revealed “adenoma-like” kinetics after the second parathyroid resection. Thirty-nine and 25 months after respectively the first and the second operation, the patient is well and shows no signs or symptoms of recurrence. Despite

  19. Oral Soft Tissue Pathologies among Diabetic Patients in Rasht- 2005

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    H Hassannia

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes can affect organs including the oral mucosa. There is a disagreement about the prevalence of oral mucosal disease in diabetic patients. We therefore decided to investigate more about that. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of soft tissue pathologies by assessing burning mouth and xerostomia in diabetic patients on the basis of type of diabetes and control status of diabetes. Methods: This descriptive, analytic study was done by visiting 486 known diabetic patients who were referred to the Endocrine Clinic in summer of 2005. Their demographic information with history of systemic diseases accompanied by the amount of HbAIC and duration of disease was recorded in their questionnaire. Diagnosis of oral lesions was done by clinical examination. Burning mouth was assessed by visual analog scale in persons who suffered and subjective xerostomia was evaluated by standard questionnaire. Data collection was done by software SPSS 10, and statistical analysis was done by X2 and logistic regression test. Results: In this study, 34 patients were type I and 434 were type II patients with mean age of 47.84±9.77 years. Frequency of all candidasis lesions was 15.4% which included denture stomatitis 5.3%, angular cheilitis 4.1%, median rhomboid glossitis 1.5%and papillary atrophy of tongue 4.5%. Frequency of non-candidal lesions was 20.1%, which included fissured tongue 10.5%, geographic tongue 7.9% and lichen planus 1.7%. 6.2% of patients suffered from glossodyna. 15.6% of patients had xerestomia. By logistical regression test, we found that type of diabetes affects denture stomatitis, angular cheilitis, tongue atrophy and amount of HbA1c. Conclusion: All of the pathologies were greater in type I than type II diabetes patients. Level of HbA1c had an important role in appearance of oral lesions and level changes can cause problems in the mouth. Thus, patients should maintain their oral hygiene and control their glucose

  20. Functioning glucagonoma associated with primary hyperparathyroidism: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 or incidental association?

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    Erdas Enrico

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1 is commonly based on clinical criteria, and confirmed by genetic testing. In patients without known MEN1-related germline mutations, the possibility of a casual association between two or more endocrine tumors cannot be excluded and subsequent management may be difficult to plan. We describe a very uncommon case of functioning glucagonoma associated with primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT in which genetic testing failed to detect germline mutations of MEN-1 and other known genes responsible for MEN1. Case presentation The patient, a 65-year old woman, had been suffering for more than 1 year from weakness, progressive weight loss, angular cheilitis, glossitis and, more recently, skin rashes on the perineum, perioral skin and groin folds. After multidisciplinary investigations, functioning glucagonoma and asymptomatic pHPT were diagnosed and, since family history was negative, sporadic MEN1 was suspected. However, genetic testing revealed neither MEN-1 nor other gene mutations responsible for rarer cases of MEN1 (CDKN1B/p27 and other cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes CDKN1A/p15, CDKN2C/p18, CDKN2B/p21. The patient underwent distal splenopancreatectomy and at the 4-month follow-up she showed complete remission of symptoms. Six months later, a thyroid nodule, suspected to be a malignant neoplasia, and two hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands were detected respectively by ultrasound with fine needle aspiration cytology and 99mTc-sestamibi scan with SPECT acquisition. Total thyroidectomy was performed, whereas selective parathyroidectomy was preferred to a more extensive procedure because the diagnosis of MEN1 was not supported by genetic analysis and intraoperative intact parathyroid hormone had revealed “adenoma-like” kinetics after the second parathyroid resection. Thirty-nine and 25 months after respectively the first and the second operation, the patient is well

  1. Papillary atrophy of the tongue and nutritional status of hospitalized alcoholics Glossite atrófica e estado nutricional de alcoolistas hospitalizados

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    Selma Freire de Carvalho da Cunha

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atrophy of the papillae, mucosa, and dorsum of the tongue are considered classical signs of nutritional deficiencies. OBJECTIVE: To assess the nutritional status of hospitalized alcoholics with or without papillary atrophy of the tongue. METHODS: This study was performed with 21 hospitalized alcoholics divided into Atrophic Glossitis Group (n=13 and Normal Tongue Group (n=8. Healthy, non-alcoholic volunteers composed the Control Group (n=8. Anthropometry and bioelectric impedance were performed, and serum vitamins A, E, and B12 were determined. RESULTS: There were no statistical differences in relation to age (46.7±8.7 vs. 46.8±15.8 years or gender (92.3% vs. 87.5% male, respectively. Control Group volunteers were also paired in relation to age (47.5±3.1 years and male predominance (62.5%. In relation to hospitalized alcoholics without atrophic lesions of the tongue and Control Group, patients with papillary atrophy showed lower BMI (18.6 ± 2,5 vs 23.8 ± 3.5 vs 26.7 ± 3,6 kg/m² and body fat content 7.6 ± 3.5 vs 13.3 ± 6.5 vs 19.5 ± 4,9 kg. When compared with the Control Group, alcoholic patients with or without papillary atrophy of the tongue showed lower values of red blood cells (10.8 ± 2.2 vs 11.8 ± 2.2 vs 14.5 ± 1,6g/dL and albumin (3.6 ± 0.9 vs 3.6 ± 0.8 vs 4.4 ± 0.2g/dL. The seric levels of vitamins A, E, and B12 were similar amongst the groups. CONCLUSION: Hospitalized alcoholics with papillary atrophy of the tongue had lower BMI and fat body stores than controls, without associated hypovitaminosis.FUNDAMENTOS: A deficiência crônica de nutrientes pode levar à hipotrofia das papilas e da mucosa e do dorso da língua, considerada um sinal clássico de subnutrição protéico-energética. OBJETIVO: O objetivo do presente estudo é comparar o estado nutricional, incluindo as dosagens dos níveis séricos de vitaminas A, E e B12 em pacientes alcoolistas com ou sem alterações tróficas das papilas linguais. M