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Sample records for globus pallidus

  1. Neurokinin-1 receptor activation in globus pallidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The undecapeptide substance P has been demonstrated to modulate neuronal activity in a number of brain regions by acting on neurokinin-1 receptors. Anatomical studies revealed a moderate level of neurokinin-1 receptor in rat globus pallidus. To determine the electrophysiological effects of neurokinin-1 receptor activation in globus pallidus, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in the present study. Under current-clamp recordings, neurokinin-1 receptor agonist, [Sar9, Met(O211] substance P (SM-SP at 1 μM, depolarized globus pallidus neurons and increased their firing rate. Consistently, SM-SP induced an inward current under voltage-clamp recording. The depolarization evoked by SM-SP persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin, glutamate and GABA receptor antagonists, indicating its direct postsynaptic effects. The neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, SR140333B, could block SM-SP-induced depolarization. Further experiments showed that suppression of potassium conductance was the predominant ionic mechanism of SM-SP-induced depolarization. To determine if neurokinin-1 receptor activation exerts any effects on GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission, the action of SM-SP on synaptic currents was studied. SM-SP significantly increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents, but only induced a transient increase in the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents. No change was observed in both spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents. Based on the direct excitatory effects of SM-SP on pallidal neurons, we hypothesize that neurokinin-1 receptor activation in globus pallidus may be involved in the beneficial effect of substance P in Parkinson’s disease.

  2. Changes in globus pallidus with (pre)term kernicterus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Govaert (Paul); R.M.C. Swarte (Renate); S.G.F. Robben (Simon); I.F.M. de Coo (René); N. Weisglas-Kuperus (Nynke); M. Sinaasappel (Maarten); J. Barkovich (James); Y.B. de Rijke (Yolanda); M.H. Lequin (Maarten)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: We report serial magnetic resonance (MR) and sonographic behavior of globus pallidus in 5 preterm and 3 term infants with kernicterus and describe the clinical context in very low birth weight preterm infants. On the basis of this information, we suggest

  3. Major Cognitive Changes and Micrographia following Globus Pallidus Infarct

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    Sarah Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Importance. Globus pallidus (GP lesions are well known to cause motor deficits but are less commonly—and perhaps not conclusively—associated with cognitive problems. Observations. We present a 45-year-old male with no significant neurological or psychological problems who after suffering a GP infarct was subsequently found to have substantial cognitive problems and micrographia. Formal neuropsychological testing was not possible due to lack of patient follow-up. Conclusions and Relevance. Despite the conflicting literature on the association of GP lesions and cognitive deficits, our patient demonstrated significant neuropsychological changes following his stroke. In addition, evidence of micrographia likely adds to the literature on the localization of this finding. Our case thus suggests that neuropsychological testing may be beneficial after GP strokes.

  4. Clinical significance of the globus pallidus signal intensity ratio in patients with liver cirrhosis

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    Iwasa, Motoh; Kawamura, Noriko; Hiranuma, Kiyohiko [Kuwana Municipal Hospital, Mie (Japan)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    The object of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of the globus pallidus signal intensity ratio for the subclinical detection of hepatic encephalopathy. This study comprised 25 patients with liver cirrhosis without overt hepatic encephalopathy. There was a high frequency (56%) of patients exhibiting increased signal in the globus pallidus. The pallidal signal was related to the severity of the liver disease. The auditory brain stem reaction was not correlated with the pallidal intensity and laboratory parameters. During the follow-up study, 3 out of 5 patients presenting overt hepatic encephalopathy showed strong pallidal signals. The results of this investigation suggest that abnormal globus pallidus signal may constitute a useful method for the subclinical detection of hepatic encepalopathy. (author)

  5. Clinical significance of the globus pallidus signal intensity ratio in patients with liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasa, Motoh; Kawamura, Noriko; Hiranuma, Kiyohiko

    1996-01-01

    The object of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of the globus pallidus signal intensity ratio for the subclinical detection of hepatic encephalopathy. This study comprised 25 patients with liver cirrhosis without overt hepatic encephalopathy. There was a high frequency (56%) of patients exhibiting increased signal in the globus pallidus. The pallidal signal was related to the severity of the liver disease. The auditory brain stem reaction was not correlated with the pallidal intensity and laboratory parameters. During the follow-up study, 3 out of 5 patients presenting overt hepatic encephalopathy showed strong pallidal signals. The results of this investigation suggest that abnormal globus pallidus signal may constitute a useful method for the subclinical detection of hepatic encepalopathy. (author)

  6. Bilateral haemorrhagic infarction of the globus pallidus after cocaine and alcohol intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Dimitri; Brunel, Hervé; Gaillard, Nicolas

    2009-06-01

    Cocaine is a risk factor for both ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke. We present the case of a 31-year-old man with bilateral ischemia of the globus pallidus after excessive alcohol and intranasal cocaine use. Drug-related globus pallidus infarctions are most often associated with heroin. Bilateral basal ganglia infarcts after the use of cocaine, without concurrent heroin use, have never been reported. In our patient, transient cardiac arrhythmia or respiratory dysfunction related to cocaine and/or ethanol use were the most likely causes of cerebral hypoperfusion.

  7. Motor function in a patient with bilateral lesions of the globus pallidus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaxma, R; vanBoxtel, A; Brouwer, WH; Goeken, LNH; vanderGon, JJD; Colebatch, JG; Martin, A; Brooks, DJ; Noth, J; Marsden, CD

    1995-01-01

    This study describes the long-term motor deficits of a patient who, after a toxic encephalopathy, sustained extensive bilateral damage to both segments of the globus pallidus (GP) and the right substantia nigra (SN). There were no signs of lesions of the pyramidal tracts or of other motor

  8. Are Subthalamicus Nucleus, Internal, Globus Pallidus and Thalamus Involved in Thinking?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Minks, E.; Jurák, Pavel; Chládek, Jan; Hummelová, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 86, e4 (2015), s. 46 ISSN 0022-3050. [Annual Meeting of the Association-of-British-Neurologists (ABN). 10.09.2015, London] Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Subthalamicus Nucleus * Globus Pallidus * Involving Thinking Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  9. Kernicterus with abnormal high-signal changes bilaterally in the globus pallidus: A case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Culleton, S

    2018-04-01

    Kernicterus is a relatively rare consequence of hyperbilirubinemia. There is an important role for MRI imaging for this entity in the appropriate clinical context as there are distinct signal changes in the globus pallidus. A case report and image findings are presented

  10. Hyperintense globus pallidus on T1-weighted MR imaging in acute kernicterus: is it common or rare?

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    Coskun, Abdulhakim; Yikilmaz, Ali; Karahan, Okkes Ibrahim; Manav, Ali [Erciyes University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Kayseri (Turkey); Kumandas, Sefer [Erciyes University Medical School, Department of Neuropediatry, Kayseri (Turkey); Akcakus, Mustafa [Erciyes University Medical School, Department of Neonatalogy, Kayseri (Turkey)

    2005-06-01

    Globus pallidus involvement is a well-known magnetic resonance (MR) imaging finding of acute kernicterus. However, it is not clear how early the involvement of globus pallidus occurs and whether or not it is seen in every case. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the globus pallidus involvement in 13 neonates with acute kernicterus by MR imaging. Thirteen neonates who were admitted with jaundice, encephalopathy and indirect hyperbilirubinemia (mean, 37.0 mg/dl) were prospectively evaluated with cranial MR imaging. Pathological signal changes were noted concerning the globus pallidus. Eight of the 13 patients demonstrated bilateral, symmetric increased signal intensity in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted MR imaging. These lesions were not apparent on T2-weighted images. Multiple parenchymal punctuate T1 hyperintense lesions were detected in one patient without globus pallidus involvement. This appearance was consistent with hemorrhage. The MR imaging findings of the other four patients showed no evidence of abnormality. The symmetric involvement of globus pallidus seen as hyperintense on T1-weighted MR imaging is a common and characteristic finding of acute kernicterus. (orig.)

  11. Hyperintense globus pallidus on T1-weighted MR imaging in acute kernicterus: is it common or rare?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coskun, Abdulhakim; Yikilmaz, Ali; Karahan, Okkes Ibrahim; Manav, Ali; Kumandas, Sefer; Akcakus, Mustafa

    2005-01-01

    Globus pallidus involvement is a well-known magnetic resonance (MR) imaging finding of acute kernicterus. However, it is not clear how early the involvement of globus pallidus occurs and whether or not it is seen in every case. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the globus pallidus involvement in 13 neonates with acute kernicterus by MR imaging. Thirteen neonates who were admitted with jaundice, encephalopathy and indirect hyperbilirubinemia (mean, 37.0 mg/dl) were prospectively evaluated with cranial MR imaging. Pathological signal changes were noted concerning the globus pallidus. Eight of the 13 patients demonstrated bilateral, symmetric increased signal intensity in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted MR imaging. These lesions were not apparent on T2-weighted images. Multiple parenchymal punctuate T1 hyperintense lesions were detected in one patient without globus pallidus involvement. This appearance was consistent with hemorrhage. The MR imaging findings of the other four patients showed no evidence of abnormality. The symmetric involvement of globus pallidus seen as hyperintense on T1-weighted MR imaging is a common and characteristic finding of acute kernicterus. (orig.)

  12. Neurobehavioural Changes in a Patient with Bilateral Lesions of the Globus Pallidus

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    R. Haaxma

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has characterized the long-term neurobehavioural changes in a woman who, following the intake of an unidentified substance, sustained subtotal bilateral lesions of the globus pallidus and small lesions at selective sites adjacent to it. Associated with these lesions was a significantly reduced blood flow in multiple frontal cortical regions, most prominently in area 10, the anterior cingulate and the supplementary motor cortex. Her cognitive deficits were generally consistent with those found in patients with frontal lobe dysfunction but some deficits, i.e. in visual memory and learning, were more compatible with temporal lobe dysfunction. Incapacitating personality or obsessive compulsive changes as reported by others with similar lesions were absent and she could live independently. The cognitive changes are consistent with the view that the globus pallidus has important functions in mediating how internal representations of stimulus input are converted into various forms of action, for example, in planning solutions to problems and in working memory.

  13. Frontal lobe syndrome from bilateral globus pallidus lesions a complication of Wernicke's encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Arruda, Walter Oleschko

    1991-01-01

    A 38 year-old man developed the classical clinical picture of Wernicke's encephalopathy as a consequence of prolonged total parenteral nutrition. As a late complication he developed a frontal lobe syndrome. Bilateral globus pallidus lesions were observed in the CT-scan examination. Some aspects related to the cortical syndromes caused by subcortical lesions are discussed. Relata-se um caso de encefalopatia de Wernicke que ocorreu em paciente masculino de 38 anos, como complicação de alimen...

  14. Globus Pallidus Interna Deep Brain Stimulation in a Patient with Medically Intractable Meige Syndrome

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    Dae-Woong Bae

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Medical therapies in patients with Meige syndrome, including botulinum toxin injection, have been limited because of incomplete response or adverse side effects. We evaluated a patient with Meige syndrome who was successfully treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS in the globus pallidus interna (GPi. This case report and other previous reports suggest that bilateral GPi DBS may be an effective treatment for medically refractory Meige syndrome, without significant adverse effects.

  15. Adenosine A2A Receptor Modulates the Activity of Globus Pallidus Neurons in Rats

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    Hui-Ling Diao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The globus pallidus is a central nucleus in the basal ganglia motor control circuit. Morphological studies have revealed the expression of adenosine A2A receptors in the globus pallidus. To determine the modulation of adenosine A2A receptors on the activity of pallidal neurons in both normal and parkinsonian rats, in vivo electrophysiological and behavioral tests were performed in the present study. The extracellular single unit recordings showed that micro-pressure administration of adenosine A2A receptor agonist, CGS21680, regulated the pallidal firing activity. GABAergic neurotransmission was involved in CGS21680-induced modulation of pallidal neurons via a PKA pathway. Furthermore, application of two adenosine A2A receptor antagonists, KW6002 or SCH442416, mainly increased the spontaneous firing of pallidal neurons, suggesting that endogenous adenosine system modulates the activity of pallidal neurons through adenosine A2A receptors. Finally, elevated body swing test (EBST showed that intrapallidal microinjection of adenosine A2A receptor agonist/antagonist induced ipsilateral/contralateral-biased swing, respectively. In addition, the electrophysiological and behavioral findings also revealed that activation of dopamine D2 receptors by quinpirole strengthened KW6002/SCH442416-induced excitation of pallidal activity. Co-application of quinpirole with KW6002 or SCH442416 alleviated biased swing in hemi-parkinsonian rats. Based on the present findings, we concluded that pallidal adenosine A2A receptors may be potentially useful in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  16. Deep Brain Stimulation of the internal globus pallidus in refractory Tourette Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, A Y J M; Duits, A A; Plantinga, B R; Leentjens, A F G; Oosterloo, M; Visser-Vandewalle, V; Temel, Y; Ackermans, L

    2016-03-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation in psychiatric disorders is becoming an increasingly performed surgery. At present, seven different targets have been stimulated in Tourette Syndrome, including the internal globus pallidus. We describe the effects on tics and comorbid behavioral disorders of Deep Brain Stimulation of the anterior internal globus pallidus in five patients with refractory Tourette Syndrome. This study was performed as an open label study with follow-up assessment between 12 and 38 months. Patients were evaluated twice, one month before surgery and at long-term follow-up. Primary outcome was tic severity, assessed by several scales. Secondary outcomes were comorbid behavioral disorders, mood and cognition. The final position of the active contacts of the implanted electrodes was investigated and side effects were reported. Three males and two females were included with a mean age of 41.6 years (SD 9.7). The total post-operative score on the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale was significantly lower than the pre-operative score (42.2±4.8 versus 12.8±3.8, P=0.043). There was also a significant reduction on the modified Rush Video-Based Tic Rating Scale (13.0±2.0 versus 7.0±1.6, P=0.041) and in the total number of video-rated tics (259.6±107.3 versus 49.6±24.8, P=0.043). No significant difference on the secondary outcomes was found, however, there was an improvement on an individual level for obsessive-compulsive behavior. The final position of the active contacts was variable in our sample and no relationship between position and stimulation effects could be established. Our study suggests that Deep Brain Stimulation of the anterior internal globus pallidus is effective in reducing tic severity, and possibly also obsessive-compulsive behavior, in refractory Tourette patients without serious adverse events or side-effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The globus pallidus sends reward-related signals to the lateral habenula.

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    Hong, Simon; Hikosaka, Okihide

    2008-11-26

    As a major output station of the basal ganglia, the globus pallidus internal segment (GPi) projects to the thalamus and brainstem nuclei thereby controlling motor behavior. A less well known fact is that the GPi also projects to the lateral habenula (LHb) which is often associated with the limbic system. Using the monkey performing a saccade task with positionally biased reward outcomes, we found that antidromically identified LHb-projecting neurons were distributed mainly in the dorsal and ventral borders of the GPi and that their activity was strongly modulated by expected reward outcomes. A majority of them were excited by the no-reward-predicting target and inhibited by the reward-predicting target. These reward-dependent modulations were similar to those in LHb neurons but started earlier than those in LHb neurons. These results suggest that GPi may initiate reward-related signals through its effects on the LHb, which then influences the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems.

  18. Left globus pallidus abnormality in never-medicated patients with schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early, T.S.; Reiman, E.M.; Raichle, M.E.; Spitznagel, E.L.

    1987-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder characterized by onset in young adulthood, the occurrence of hallucinations and delusions, and the development of enduring psychosocial disability. The pathophysiology of this disorder remains unknown. Studies of cerebral blood flow and metabolism designed to identify brain abnormalities in schizophrenia have been limited by inadequate methods of anatomical localization and the possibility of persistent medication effects. The authors have now used positron emission tomography and a validated method of anatomical localization in an attempt to identify abnormalities of regional cerebral blood flow in newly diagnosed never-medicated patients with schizophrenia. An exploratory study of 5 patients and 10 normal control subjects identified abnormally high blood flow in the left globus pallidus of patients with schizophrenia. A replication study of 5 additional patients and 10 additional control subjects confirmed this finding. No other abnormalities were found

  19. Globus pallidus high-signal lesions: A predominant MRI finding in children with neurofibromatosis type 1

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    Arif Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lesions of the brain, recognized as unidentified bright objects (UBOs, are commonly observed as areas of increased T2-weighted signal intensity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. Identification of these lesions is not currently encompassed in the National Institute of Health (NIH diagnostic criteria for NF1. Objective: We aimed to determine the prevalence of UBOs in children with NF1 and identify areas of the brain that are commonly affected by these lesions, allowing us to evaluate whether UBOs should be included in the diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of NF1. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the cranial MRI scans of 22 children who had been diagnosed with sporadic or familial NF1 in accordance with the criteria established by NIH. UBOs were present in 81% of the children with NF1. Results: These lesions have a predilection for specific areas of the brain, including the globus pallidus (72%, cerebellum (66%, brainstem (27% and cerebral hemispheres (16%. The prevalence of UBOs identified varied significantly with age and sex; they were infrequent in children less than 4 years of age but were common in those aged between 4 and 12 years of age. UBOs were more commonly seen in males (66.6% compared with females (33.3%. Repeat MRI scan on a subset of these patients with UBOs did not show any significant changes despite a worsening in clinical symptoms. Conclusion and Discussion: We have shown that UBOs are a common finding in children with NF1, and are most prevalent between the ages of 4 and 12 years. Many sites of the brain are affected by these lesions, most notably the globus pallidus and the cerebellum. Further research must be conducted to elucidate the significance of UBOs in patients with NF1 and whether these lesions have any utility in the clinical detection of NF1.

  20. Parvalbumin+ Neurons and Npas1+ Neurons Are Distinct Neuron Classes in the Mouse External Globus Pallidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Vivian M; Hegeman, Daniel J; Cui, Qiaoling; Kelver, Daniel A; Fiske, Michael P; Glajch, Kelly E; Pitt, Jason E; Huang, Tina Y; Justice, Nicholas J; Chan, C Savio

    2015-08-26

    Compelling evidence suggests that pathological activity of the external globus pallidus (GPe), a nucleus in the basal ganglia, contributes to the motor symptoms of a variety of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Recent studies have challenged the idea that the GPe comprises a single, homogenous population of neurons that serves as a simple relay in the indirect pathway. However, we still lack a full understanding of the diversity of the neurons that make up the GPe. Specifically, a more precise classification scheme is needed to better describe the fundamental biology and function of different GPe neuron classes. To this end, we generated a novel multicistronic BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenic mouse line under the regulatory elements of the Npas1 gene. Using a combinatorial transgenic and immunohistochemical approach, we discovered that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons in the GPe represent two nonoverlapping cell classes, amounting to 55% and 27% of the total GPe neuron population, respectively. These two genetically identified cell classes projected primarily to the subthalamic nucleus and to the striatum, respectively. Additionally, parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons were distinct in their autonomous and driven firing characteristics, their expression of intrinsic ion conductances, and their responsiveness to chronic 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. In summary, our data argue that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons are two distinct functional classes of GPe neurons. This work revises our understanding of the GPe, and provides the foundation for future studies of its function and dysfunction. Until recently, the heterogeneity of the constituent neurons within the external globus pallidus (GPe) was not fully appreciated. We addressed this knowledge gap by discovering two principal GPe neuron classes, which were identified by their nonoverlapping expression of the

  1. Parvalbumin+ Neurons and Npas1+ Neurons Are Distinct Neuron Classes in the Mouse External Globus Pallidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Vivian M.; Hegeman, Daniel J.; Cui, Qiaoling; Kelver, Daniel A.; Fiske, Michael P.; Glajch, Kelly E.; Pitt, Jason E.; Huang, Tina Y.; Justice, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that pathological activity of the external globus pallidus (GPe), a nucleus in the basal ganglia, contributes to the motor symptoms of a variety of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Recent studies have challenged the idea that the GPe comprises a single, homogenous population of neurons that serves as a simple relay in the indirect pathway. However, we still lack a full understanding of the diversity of the neurons that make up the GPe. Specifically, a more precise classification scheme is needed to better describe the fundamental biology and function of different GPe neuron classes. To this end, we generated a novel multicistronic BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenic mouse line under the regulatory elements of the Npas1 gene. Using a combinatorial transgenic and immunohistochemical approach, we discovered that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons in the GPe represent two nonoverlapping cell classes, amounting to 55% and 27% of the total GPe neuron population, respectively. These two genetically identified cell classes projected primarily to the subthalamic nucleus and to the striatum, respectively. Additionally, parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons were distinct in their autonomous and driven firing characteristics, their expression of intrinsic ion conductances, and their responsiveness to chronic 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. In summary, our data argue that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons are two distinct functional classes of GPe neurons. This work revises our understanding of the GPe, and provides the foundation for future studies of its function and dysfunction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Until recently, the heterogeneity of the constituent neurons within the external globus pallidus (GPe) was not fully appreciated. We addressed this knowledge gap by discovering two principal GPe neuron classes, which were identified by their nonoverlapping

  2. New MRI findings in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: high signal in the globus pallidus on T 1-weighted images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priester, J.A. de; Wilmink, J.T.; Jansen, G.H.; Kruijk, J.R. de

    1999-01-01

    We report a 49-year-old woman with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). In addition to typical high-signal lesions on proton-density and T 2-weighted images there was high signal in the globus pallidus bilaterally on T 1-weighted images. The latter feature has not been described previously and probably due to deposition of prion protein, as found at autopsy. (orig.)

  3. New MRI findings in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: high signal in the globus pallidus on T 1-weighted images

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    Priester, J.A. de; Wilmink, J.T. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands); Jansen, G.H. [Department of Neuropathology, University Hospital Utrecht (Netherlands); Kruijk, J.R. de [Department of Neurology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands)

    1999-04-01

    We report a 49-year-old woman with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). In addition to typical high-signal lesions on proton-density and T 2-weighted images there was high signal in the globus pallidus bilaterally on T 1-weighted images. The latter feature has not been described previously and probably due to deposition of prion protein, as found at autopsy. (orig.) With 3 figs., 11 refs.

  4. Globus pallidus MR signal abnormalities in children with chronic liver disease and/or porto-systemic shunting

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    Hanquinet, Sylviane; Anooshiravani, Mehrak; Merlini, Laura [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Morice, Claire; Cousin, Vladimir; McLin, Valerie A. [University Hospital of Geneva, Swiss Center for Liver Disease in Children, Geneva (Switzerland); Courvoisier, Delphine S. [University Hospital of Geneva, Division of Quality of Care, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-10-15

    Detection of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy in children is difficult. We aimed to assess the changes in imaging of the central nervous system in children with chronic liver disease using MR imaging, diffusion, and {sup 1}H -spectroscopy. Forty three children with chronic liver disease and/or porto-systemic shunting (111.4±56.9 months) and 24 controls (72.0±51.8 months) underwent brain MRI/spectroscopy on a 1.5T to examine T1, T2, ADC, Cho/Cr, ml/Cr, Glx/Cr ratio spectroscopy in the globus pallidus. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the ratios of globus pallidus/putamen T1 signal: isointense (i), hyperintense (h), much more hyperintense (h+). The relationship with clinical and biological data was analyzed. T1 signal intensity and ml/Cr were significantly different between controls and group h+ (p=0.001). ADC did not differ significantly between groups. Age correlated strongly with the presence of a T1 signal ratio (p > 0.001). There was no correlation between imaging findings and biological parameters. In children with chronic liver disease and/or porto-systemic shunting, the presence of a hyperintense T1 signal in the globus pallidus correlated strongly with age. Biological and clinical parameters were not predictive of these changes. MRI may become a useful screening tool for hepatic encephalopathy in children. (orig.)

  5. Globus pallidus MR signal abnormalities in children with chronic liver disease and/or porto-systemic shunting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanquinet, Sylviane; Anooshiravani, Mehrak; Merlini, Laura; Morice, Claire; Cousin, Vladimir; McLin, Valerie A.; Courvoisier, Delphine S.

    2017-01-01

    Detection of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy in children is difficult. We aimed to assess the changes in imaging of the central nervous system in children with chronic liver disease using MR imaging, diffusion, and "1H -spectroscopy. Forty three children with chronic liver disease and/or porto-systemic shunting (111.4±56.9 months) and 24 controls (72.0±51.8 months) underwent brain MRI/spectroscopy on a 1.5T to examine T1, T2, ADC, Cho/Cr, ml/Cr, Glx/Cr ratio spectroscopy in the globus pallidus. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the ratios of globus pallidus/putamen T1 signal: isointense (i), hyperintense (h), much more hyperintense (h+). The relationship with clinical and biological data was analyzed. T1 signal intensity and ml/Cr were significantly different between controls and group h+ (p=0.001). ADC did not differ significantly between groups. Age correlated strongly with the presence of a T1 signal ratio (p > 0.001). There was no correlation between imaging findings and biological parameters. In children with chronic liver disease and/or porto-systemic shunting, the presence of a hyperintense T1 signal in the globus pallidus correlated strongly with age. Biological and clinical parameters were not predictive of these changes. MRI may become a useful screening tool for hepatic encephalopathy in children. (orig.)

  6. Modeling Laterality of the Globus Pallidus Internus in Patients With Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharim, Justin; Yazdi, Daniel; Baohan, Amy; Behnke, Eric; Pouratian, Nader

    2017-04-01

    Neurosurgical interventions such as deep brain stimulation surgery of the globus pallidus internus (GPi) play an important role in the treatment of medically refractory Parkinson's disease (PD), and require high targeting accuracy. Variability in the laterality of the GPi across patients with PD has not been well characterized. The aim of this report is to identify factors that may contribute to differences in position of the motor region of GPi. The charts and operative reports of 101 PD patients following deep brain stimulation surgery (70 males, aged 11-78 years) representing 201 GPi were retrospectively reviewed. Data extracted for each subject include age, gender, anterior and posterior commissures (AC-PC) distance, and third ventricular width. Multiple linear regression, stepwise regression, and relative importance of regressors analysis were performed to assess the predictive ability of these variables on GPi laterality. Multiple linear regression for target vs. third ventricular width, gender, AC-PC distance, and age were significant for normalized linear regression coefficients of 0.333 (p laterality of 0.19 mm per mm of ventricular width, 0.11 mm per mm of AC-PC distance, 0.017 mm per year in age, and 0.54 mm increase for male gender. This variability highlights the limitations of indirect targeting alone, and argues for the continued use of MRI as well as intraoperative physiological testing to account for such factors that contribute to patient-specific variability in GPi localization. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  7. Childhood Laryngeal Dystonia Following Bilateral Globus Pallidus Abnormality: A Case Study and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Saeedi Borujeni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Dystonia is a disorder of movement caused by various etiologies. Laryngeal dystonia is caused by the spasm of laryngeal muscles. It is a disorder caused by vocal fold movement in which excessive adduction or abduction of the vocal folds occurs during speech. The pathophysiology of this type of dystonia is not fully known. Some researchers have suggested that basal ganglia structures and their connections with cortical areas have been involved in the pathogenesis of dystonia. Case Report:In this paper a 7.5-year-old boy suffering from laryngeal dystonia with bilateral lesions in Globus Pallidus is presented. The patient also suffered from swallowing problems, monotone voice, vocal tremor, hypersensitivity of gag reflex, and stuttering. Drug treatment failed to cure him; therefore, he was referred to rehabilitation therapy.  Conclusion:In conclusion, special attention should be brought upon laryngeal dystonia, especially in patients showing Extra-pyramidal symptoms and/or abnormalities of the basal ganglia. In children, laryngeal dystonia may be potentially fatal. Lack of consideration for this condition during rehabilitation therapy can lead to serious consequences for a child.

  8. Optimal MRI methods for direct stereotactic targeting of the subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Gorman, Ruth L.; Shmueli, Karin; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Selway, Richard P.; Samuel, Michael; Lythgoe, David J.; Shahidiani, Asal; Wastling, Stephen J.; Footman, Michelle; Jarosz, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Reliable identification of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus interna (GPi) is critical for deep brain stimulation (DBS) of these structures. The purpose of this study was to compare the visibility of the STN and GPi with various MRI techniques and to assess the suitability of each technique for direct stereotactic targeting. MR images were acquired from nine volunteers with T2- and proton density-weighted (PD-W) fast spin echo, susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), phase-sensitive inversion recovery and quantitative T1, T2 and T2 * mapping sequences. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) for the STN and GPi were calculated for all sequences. Targeting errors on SWI were evaluated on magnetic susceptibility maps. The sequences demonstrating the best conspicuity of DBS target structures (SWI and T2*) were then applied to ten patients with movement disorders, and the CNRs for these techniques were assessed. SWI offers the highest CNR for the STN, but standard PD-W images provide the best CNR for the pallidum. Susceptibility maps indicated that the GPi margins may be shifted slightly on SWI, although no shifts were seen for the STN. SWI may improve the visibility of the STN on pre-operative MRI, potentially improving the accuracy of direct stereotactic targeting. (orig.)

  9. Properties of Neurons in External Globus Pallidus Can Support Optimal Action Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacz, Rafal; Martin Moraud, Eduardo; Abdi, Azzedine; Magill, Peter J.; Baufreton, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The external globus pallidus (GPe) is a key nucleus within basal ganglia circuits that are thought to be involved in action selection. A class of computational models assumes that, during action selection, the basal ganglia compute for all actions available in a given context the probabilities that they should be selected. These models suggest that a network of GPe and subthalamic nucleus (STN) neurons computes the normalization term in Bayes’ equation. In order to perform such computation, the GPe needs to send feedback to the STN equal to a particular function of the activity of STN neurons. However, the complex form of this function makes it unlikely that individual GPe neurons, or even a single GPe cell type, could compute it. Here, we demonstrate how this function could be computed within a network containing two types of GABAergic GPe projection neuron, so-called ‘prototypic’ and ‘arkypallidal’ neurons, that have different response properties in vivo and distinct connections. We compare our model predictions with the experimentally-reported connectivity and input-output functions (f-I curves) of the two populations of GPe neurons. We show that, together, these dichotomous cell types fulfil the requirements necessary to compute the function needed for optimal action selection. We conclude that, by virtue of their distinct response properties and connectivities, a network of arkypallidal and prototypic GPe neurons comprises a neural substrate capable of supporting the computation of the posterior probabilities of actions. PMID:27389780

  10. Long-Term Clinical Outcome of Internal Globus Pallidus Deep Brain Stimulation for Dystonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Ran Park

    Full Text Available GPi (Internal globus pallidus DBS (deep brain stimulation is recognized as a safe, reliable, reversible and adjustable treatment in patients with medically refractory dystonia.This report describes the long-term clinical outcome of 36 patients implanted with GPi DBS at the Neurosurgery Department of Seoul National University Hospital.Nine patients with a known genetic cause, 12 patients with acquired dystonia, and 15 patients with isolated dystonia without a known genetic cause were included. When categorized by phenomenology, 29 patients had generalized, 5 patients had segmental, and 2 patients had multifocal dystonia. Patients were assessed preoperatively and at defined follow-up examinations postoperatively, using the Burke-Fahn-Marsden dystonia rating scale (BFMDRS for movement and functional disability assessment. The mean follow-up duration was 47 months (range, 12-84.The mean movement scores significantly decreased from 44.88 points preoperatively to 26.45 points at 60-month follow up (N = 19, P = 0.006. The mean disability score was also decreased over time, from 11.54 points preoperatively to 8.26 points at 60-month follow up, despite no statistical significance (N = 19, P = 0.073. When analyzed the movement and disability improvement rates at 12-month follow up point, no significant difference was noted according to etiology, disease duration, age at surgery, age of onset, and phenomenology. However, the patients with DYT-1 dystonia and isolated dystonia without a known genetic cause showed marked improvement.GPi DBS is a safe and efficient therapeutic method for treatment of dystonia patients to improve both movement and disability. However, this study has some limitations caused by the retrospective design with small sample size in a single-center.

  11. Deep brain stimulation of the antero-medial globus pallidus interna for Tourette syndrome.

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    Perminder S Sachdev

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously reported the results of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS of the antero-medial globus pallidus interna (GPi for severe Tourette Syndrome (TS in 11 patients. We extend this case series to 17 patients and a longer follow-up to a maximum of 46 months. METHODS: 17 patients (14 male; mean age 29.1 years, range 17-51 years with severe and medically intractable TS were implanted with Medtronic quadripolar electrodes bilaterally in the antero-medial GPi. The primary outcome measure was the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS. Secondary outcome measures included the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Gilles de la Tourette Quality of Life Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning. Follow up was at one month, three months and finally at a mean 24.1 months (range 8-46 months following surgery. RESULTS: Overall, there was a 48.3% reduction in motor tics and a 41.3% reduction in phonic tics at one month, and this improvement was maintained at final follow-up. 12 out of 17 (70.6% patients had a>50% reduction in YGTSS score at final follow up. Only 8 patients required ongoing pharmacotherapy for tics post-surgery. Patients improved significantly on all secondary measures. Adverse consequences included lead breakage in 4 patients, infection (1, transient anxiety (2, dizziness (1, poor balance (1 and worsening of stuttering (1. CONCLUSIONS: This case series provides further support that antero-medial GPi DBS is an effective and well tolerated treatment for a subgroup of severe TS, with benefits sustained up to 4 years.

  12. Simulating the Effects of Short-Term Synaptic Plasticity on Postsynaptic Dynamics in the Globus Pallidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran eBrody

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The rat globus pallidus (GP is one of the nuclei of the basal ganglia and plays an important role in a variety of motor and cognitive processes. In vivo studies have shown that repetitive stimulation evokes complex modulations of GP activity. In vitro and computational studies have suggested that short-term synaptic plasticity (STP could be one of the underlying mechanisms. The current study used simplified single compartment modeling to explore the possible effect of STP on the activity of GP neurons during low and high frequency stimulation. To do this we constructed a model of a GP neuron connected to a small network of neurons from the three major input sources to GP neurons: striatum (Str, subthalamic nucleus (STN and GP collaterals. All synapses were implemented with a kinetic model of STP. The in vitro recordings of responses to low frequency repetitive stimulation were highly reconstructed, including rate changes and locking to the stimulus. Mainly involved were fast forms of plasticity which have been found at these synapses. . The simulations were qualitatively compared to a data set previously recorded in vitro in our lab. Reconstructions of experimental responses to high frequency stimulation required adding slower forms of plasticity to the STN and GP collateral synapses, as well as adding metabotropic receptors to the STN-GP synapses. These finding suggest the existence of as yet unreported slower short-term dynamics in the GP. The computational model made additional predictions about GP activity during low and high frequency stimulation that may further our understanding of the mechanisms underlying repetative stimulation of the GP.

  13. Prototypic and Arkypallidal Neurons in the Dopamine-Intact External Globus Pallidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Azzedine; Mallet, Nicolas; Mohamed, Foad Y.; Sharott, Andrew; Dodson, Paul D.; Nakamura, Kouichi C.; Suri, Sana; Avery, Sophie V.; Larvin, Joseph T.; Garas, Farid N.; Garas, Shady N.; Vinciati, Federica; Morin, Stéphanie; Bezard, Erwan

    2015-01-01

    Studies in dopamine-depleted rats indicate that the external globus pallidus (GPe) contains two main types of GABAergic projection cell; so-called “prototypic” and “arkypallidal” neurons. Here, we used correlative anatomical and electrophysiological approaches in rats to determine whether and how this dichotomous organization applies to the dopamine-intact GPe. Prototypic neurons coexpressed the transcription factors Nkx2-1 and Lhx6, comprised approximately two-thirds of all GPe neurons, and were the major GPe cell type innervating the subthalamic nucleus (STN). In contrast, arkypallidal neurons expressed the transcription factor FoxP2, constituted just over one-fourth of GPe neurons, and innervated the striatum but not STN. In anesthetized dopamine-intact rats, molecularly identified prototypic neurons fired at relatively high rates and with high regularity, regardless of brain state (slow-wave activity or spontaneous activation). On average, arkypallidal neurons fired at lower rates and regularities than prototypic neurons, and the two cell types could be further distinguished by the temporal coupling of their firing to ongoing cortical oscillations. Complementing the activity differences observed in vivo, the autonomous firing of identified arkypallidal neurons in vitro was slower and more variable than that of prototypic neurons, which tallied with arkypallidal neurons displaying lower amplitudes of a “persistent” sodium current important for such pacemaking. Arkypallidal neurons also exhibited weaker driven and rebound firing compared with prototypic neurons. In conclusion, our data support the concept that a dichotomous functional organization, as actioned by arkypallidal and prototypic neurons with specialized molecular, structural, and physiological properties, is fundamental to the operations of the dopamine-intact GPe. PMID:25926446

  14. Altered neuronal activity in the primary motor cortex and globus pallidus after dopamine depletion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Li, Min; Geng, Xiwen; Song, Zhimin; Albers, H Elliott; Yang, Maoquan; Zhang, Xiao; Xie, Jinlu; Qu, Qingyang; He, Tingting

    2015-01-15

    The involvement of dopamine (DA) neuron loss in the etiology of Parkinson's disease has been well documented. The neural mechanisms underlying the effects of DA loss and the resultant motor dysfunction remain unknown. To gain insights into how loss of DA disrupts the electrical processes in the cortico-subcortical network, the present study explores the effects of DA neuron depletion on electrical activity in the primary motor cortex (M1), on the external and the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPe and GPi respectively), and on their temporal relationships. Comparison of local field potentials (LFPs) in these brain regions from unilateral hemispheric DA neuron depleted rats and neurologically intact rats revealed that the spectrum power of LFPs in 12-70Hz (for M1, and GPe) and in 25-40Hz (for GPi) was significantly greater in the DA depleted rats than that in the control group. These changes were associated with a shortening of latency in LFP activities between M1 and GPe, from several hundred milliseconds in the intact animals to close to zero in the DA depleted animals. LFP oscillations in M1 were significantly more synchronized with those in GPe in the DA depleted rats compared with those in the control rats. By contrast, the synchronization of oscillation in LFP activities between M1 and GPi did not differ between the DA depleted and intact rats. Not surprisingly, rats that had DA neuron depletion spent more time along the ladder compared with the control rats. These data suggest that enhanced oscillatory activity and increased synchronization of LFPs may contribute to movement impairment in the rat model of Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mean diffusivity of globus pallidus associated with verbal creativity measured by divergent thinking and creativity‐related temperaments in young healthy adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nouchi, Rui; Sassa, Yuko; Kotozaki, Yuka; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Iizuka, Kunio; Nakagawa, Seishu; Nagase, Tomomi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent investigations revealed mean diffusivity (MD) in gray matter and white matter areas is correlated with individual cognitive differences in healthy subjects and show unique properties and sensitivity that other neuroimaging tools donot have. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the MD in the dopaminergic system is associated with individual differences in verbal creativity measured by divergent thinking (VCDT) and novelty seeking based on prior studies suggesting associations between these and dopaminergic functions. We examined this issue in a large sample of right‐handed healthy young adults. We used analyses of MD and a psychological measure of VCDT, as well as personality measures of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Our results revealed associations between higher VCDT and lower MD in the bilateral globus pallidus. Furthermore, not only higher novelty seeking, but also lower harm avoidance, higher self‐directedness, and higher self‐transcendence were robustly associated with lower MD in the right globus pallidus, whereas higher persistence was associated with lower MD in the left globus pallidus. These personality variables were also associated with VCDT. The globus pallidus receives the dopaminergic input from the substantia nigra and plays a key role in motivation which is critically linked to dopamine. These results suggested the MD in the globus pallidus, underlie the association between VCDT and multiple personalities in TCI including novelty seeking. Hum Brain Mapp 36:1808–1827, 2015. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25627674

  16. Neuronal firing in the globus pallidus internus and the ventrolateral thalamus related to parkinsonian motor symptoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hai; ZHUANG Ping; ZHANG Yu-qing; LI Jian-yu; LI Yong-jie

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been proposed that parkinsonian motor signs result from hyperactivity in the output nucleus of the basal ganglia, which suppress the motor thalamus and cortical areas. This study aimed to explore the neuronal activity in the globus pallidus internus (GPi) and the ventrolateral thalamic nuclear group (ventral oral posterior/ventral intermediate, Vop/Vim) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD).Methods Twenty patients with PD who underwent neurosurgery were studied. Microelectrode recording was performed in the GPi (n=10) and the Vop/Vim (n=10) intraoperatively. Electromyography (EMG) contralateral to the surgery was simultaneously performed. Single unit analysis was carried out. The interspike intervals (ISI) and coefficient of variation (CV) of ISI were calculated. Histograms of ISI were constructed. A unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) was used to assess the clinical outcome of surgery.Results Three hundred and sixty-three neurons were obtained from 20 trajectories. Of 175 GPi neurons, there were 15.4% with tremor frequency, 69.2% with tonic firing, and 15.4% with irregular discharge. Of 188 thalamic neurons, there were 46.8% with tremor frequency, 22.9% with tonic firing, and 30.3% with irregular discharge. The numbers of three patterns of neuron in GPi and Vop/Vim were significantly different (P <0.001). ISI analysis revealed that mean firing rate of the three patterns of GPi neurons was (80.9±63.9) Hz (n=78), which was higher than similar neurons with 62.9 Hz in a normal primate. For the Vop/Vim group, ISI revealed that mean firing rate of the three patterns of neurons (n=95) was (23.2±17.1) Hz which was lower than similar neurons with 30 Hz in the motor thalamus of normal primates. UPDRS indicated that the clinical outcome of pallidotomy was (64.3±9.5)%, (83.4±19.1)% and (63.4±36.3)%, and clinical outcome of thalamotomy was (92.2±12.9)%, (68.0±25.2)% and (44.3±27.2)% for tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia, respectively

  17. Reversibility of hyperintense globus pallidus on T 1-weighted MRI following surgery for a portosystemic shunt in an 8-year-old girl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Shinji; Sera, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Mituhiro; Ohshiro, Hajime; Uchino, Shinichiro; Seguchi, Sasa; Endo, Fumio

    1999-01-01

    An 8-year-old Japanese girl with a portosystemic shunt had shown hyperammonaemia since she was 3 years of age. MRI of her brain showed bilateral hyperintense globus pallidus. A portosystemic shunt was evident on US and angiography. She underwent surgical banding of the shunt, after which the lesion and clinical symptoms disappeared. (orig.)

  18. High Signal Intensity in the Dentate Nucleus and Globus Pallidus on Unenhanced T1-Weighted MR Images: Comparison between Gadobutrol and Linear Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, F G; Watterson, C T; Weiss, S; Austin, M; Mirocha, J; Prasad, R; Wang, J

    2018-02-01

    In view of the recent observations that gadolinium deposits in brain tissue after intravenous injection, our aim of this study was to compare signal changes in the globus pallidus and dentate nucleus on unenhanced T1-weighted MR images in patients receiving serial doses of gadobutrol, a macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agent, with those seen in patients receiving linear gadolinium-based contrast agents. This was a retrospective analysis of on-site patients with brain tumors. Fifty-nine patients received only gadobutrol, and 60 patients received only linear gadolinium-based contrast agents. Linear gadolinium-based contrast agents included gadoversetamide, gadobenate dimeglumine, and gadodiamide. T1 signal intensity in the globus pallidus, dentate nucleus, and pons was measured on the precontrast portions of patients' first and seventh brain MRIs. Ratios of signal intensity comparing the globus pallidus with the pons (globus pallidus/pons) and dentate nucleus with the pons (dentate nucleus/pons) were calculated. Changes in the above signal intensity ratios were compared within the gadobutrol and linear agent groups, as well as between groups. The dentate nucleus/pons signal ratio increased in the linear gadolinium-based contrast agent group ( t = 4.215, P linear gadolinium-based contrast agent group ( t = 2.931, P linear gadolinium-based contrast agents. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  19. Distinct Developmental Origins Manifest in the Specialized Encoding of Movement by Adult Neurons of the External Globus Pallidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Paul D.; Larvin, Joseph T.; Duffell, James M.; Garas, Farid N.; Doig, Natalie M.; Kessaris, Nicoletta; Duguid, Ian C.; Bogacz, Rafal; Butt, Simon J.B.; Magill, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Transcriptional codes initiated during brain development are ultimately realized in adulthood as distinct cell types performing specialized roles in behavior. Focusing on the mouse external globus pallidus (GPe), we demonstrate that the potential contributions of two GABAergic GPe cell types to voluntary action are fated from early life to be distinct. Prototypic GPe neurons derive from the medial ganglionic eminence of the embryonic subpallium and express the transcription factor Nkx2-1. These neurons fire at high rates during alert rest, and encode movements through heterogeneous firing rate changes, with many neurons decreasing their activity. In contrast, arkypallidal GPe neurons originate from lateral/caudal ganglionic eminences, express the transcription factor FoxP2, fire at low rates during rest, and encode movements with robust increases in firing. We conclude that developmental diversity positions prototypic and arkypallidal neurons to fulfil distinct roles in behavior via their disparate regulation of GABA release onto different basal ganglia targets. PMID:25843402

  20. Effect of subthalamic nucleus or globus pallidus interna stimulation on oculomotor function in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridley, Jared; Adams, Gareth; Sun, Ping; York, Michelle; Atassi, Farah; Lai, Eugene; Simpson, Richard; Viswanathan, Ashwin; Yoshor, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of either the globus pallidus interna (GPi) or subthalamic nucleus (STN) is similarly effective for treating somatomotor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD), but differences in how stimulation of each target affects oculomotor function are poorly understood. We sought to determine if stimulation of the STN, but not the GPi, affects oculomotor function in PD patients. Nineteen PD patients with DBS implants (8 bilateral GPi, 9 bilateral STN and 2 unilateral STN) were studied. Testing was performed with stimulation on, then off. Somatomotor function was tested using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor exam. For oculomotor testing, patients performed pro- and antisaccade tasks while monitored with an infrared eye tracker. Saccadic latency, saccadic intrusions, and square-wave jerks (SWJs) were measured for each trial. As expected, UPDRS motor scores improved with both GPi and STN stimulation. With GPi stimulation, there was no significant difference in oculomotor function with stimulation on or off. However, with STN stimulation on, there was a significant increase in the mean number of SWJs/s, as well as a significant decrease in latency for both pro- and antisaccade tasks. Stimulation of either GPi or STN had similar effects on somatomotor function, but only STN stimulation significantly altered oculomotor function. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. T1 Shortening in the Globus Pallidus after Multiple Administrations of Gadobutrol: Assessment with a Multidynamic Multiecho Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Koung Mi; Choi, Seung Hong; Hwang, Moonjung; Yun, Tae Jin; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Sohn, Chul-Ho

    2018-04-01

    Purpose To determine the association between the administration of the macrocyclic contrast medium gadobutrol and T1 relaxation time in the brains of patients with normal renal function by using multidynamic multiecho (MDME) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequences. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this retrospective study, and the need to obtain written informed consent was waived. This study included 46 patients (revealed by an electronic medical record search) who had received one or more gadobutrol injections and a maximum of one MR imaging contrast medium injection other than gadobutrol before MDME sequence acquisition. One radiologist performed quantitative analyses of regions of interest on quantitative T1 maps twice to cover the normal-appearing globus pallidus (GP), frontal white matter, frontal cortex, and thalamus. The number of administrations and the cumulative dose of gadobutrol, age, intervals between administrations, sex, and treatment were investigated. Univariable and multivariable linear regression analyses of the T1 values in four brain regions and the GP-to-thalamus signal intensity (SI) ratio were performed. P values of less than the Bonferroni-corrected value of .01 were considered to indicate significant differences. Results Intraobserver reproducibility was good to excellent (intraclass correlation coefficients, 0.62-0.81). Because of high multicollinearity between the number of gadobutrol administrations and accumulated dose (r = 0.96, P .01). Conclusion Multiple exposures to gadobutrol are associated with T1 shortening in the GP. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  2. Gadolinium deposition within the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus after repeated administrations of gadolinium-based contrast agents - current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojanov, Dragan [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia); Center for Radiology, Nis (Serbia); Aracki-Trenkic, Aleksandra [Center for Radiology, Nis (Serbia); Benedeto-Stojanov, Daniela [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia)

    2016-05-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) have been used clinically since 1988 for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI). Generally, GBCAs are considered to have an excellent safety profile. However, GBCA administration has been associated with increased occurrence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in patients with severely compromised renal function, and several studies have shown evidence of gadolinium deposition in specific brain structures, the globus pallidus and dentate nucleus, in patients with normal renal function. Gadolinium deposition in the brain following repeated CE-MRI scans has been demonstrated in patients using T1-weighted unenhanced MRI and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Additionally, rodent studies with controlled GBCA administration also resulted in neural gadolinium deposits. Repeated GBCA use is associated with gadolinium deposition in the brain. This is especially true with the use of less-stable, linear GBCAs. In spite of increasing evidence of gadolinium deposits in the brains of patients after multiple GBCA administrations, the clinical significance of these deposits continues to be unclear. Here, we discuss the current state of scientific evidence surrounding gadolinium deposition in the brain following GBCA use, and the potential clinical significance of gadolinium deposition. There is considerable need for further research, both to understand the mechanism by which gadolinium deposition in the brain occurs and how it affects the patients in which it occurs. (orig.)

  3. Serial 1H-MRS of thalamus during deep brain stimulation of bilateral globus pallidus internus for primary generalized dystonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, Mikhail F.; Iseki, Hiroshi; Takakura, Kintomo; Ochiai, Taku; Taira, Takaomi; Hori, Tomokatsu; Ono, Yuko; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Muragaki, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    The physiological mechanisms of deep brain stimulation (DBS) are not completely clear. Our understanding of them may be facilitated with the use of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS). Serial 1 H-MRS of both thalami was performed during the course of DBS of bilateral globus pallidus internus in a patient with primary generalized dystonia. Two days after microelectrode implantation, a pulse frequency of 185 Hz was applied for stimulation. It resulted in relief of symptoms and a decrease of Burke-Fahn-Marsden dystonia rating scale (BFMDRS) scores, and was accompanied by a prominent increase of N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/choline-containing compounds (Cho) ratio, a mild increase of NAA/creatine (Cr) ratio, and a moderate decrease of Cho/Cr ratio. Two weeks later, for a search of the optimal stimulation mode, the pulse frequency was switched to 60 Hz, which resulted in clinical deterioration and significant increase of BFMDRS scores. At that time, all investigated 1 H-MRS-detected metabolic parameters had nearly returned to the pretreatment levels. Use of serial 1 H-MRS investigations of various brain structures during DBS in cases of movement disorders permits detailed evaluation of the treatment response, has a potential for its possible prediction, and may facilitate understanding of the physiological mechanisms of stimulation. (orig.)

  4. High and low frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus induce prolonged changes in subthalamic and globus pallidus neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagar eLavian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available High frequency stimulation (HFS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN is widely used to treat the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease but the mechanism of this therapy is unclear. Using a rat brain slice preparation maintaining the connectivity between the STN and one of its target nuclei, the globus pallidus (GP, we investigated the effects of high and low frequency stimulation (HFS 100 Hz, LFS 10 Hz on activity of single neurons in the STN and GP. Both HFS and LFS caused changes in firing frequency and pattern of subthalamic and pallidal neurons. These changes were of synaptic origin, as they were abolished by glutamate and GABA antagonists. Both HFS and LFS also induced a long-lasting reduction in firing frequency in STN neurons possibly contending a direct causal link between HFS and the outcome DBS. In the GP both HFS and LFS induced either a long-lasting depression, or less frequently, a long-lasting excitation. Thus, in addition to the intrinsic activation of the stimulated neurons, long-lasting stimulation of the STN may trigger prolonged biochemical processes.

  5. The Impact of Stimulation Induced Short Term Synaptic Plasticity on Firing Patterns in the Globus Pallidus of the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenia eBugaysen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrical stimulation in the globus pallidus (GP leads to complex modulations of neuronal activity in the stimulated nucleus. Multiple in-vivo studies have demonstrated the modulation of both firing rates and patterns during and immediately following the GP stimulation. Previous in-vitro studies, together with computational studies, have suggested the involvement of short-term synaptic plasticity (STP during the stimulation. The aim of the current study was to explore in-vitro the effects of STP on neuronal activity of GP neurons during local repetitive stimulation. We recorded synaptic potentials and assessed the modulations of spontaneous firing in a postsynaptic neuron in acute brain slices via a whole-cell pipette. Low-frequency repetitive stimulation locked the firing of the neuron to the stimulus. However, high-frequency repetitive stimulation in the GP generated a biphasic modulation of the firing frequency consisting of inhibitory and excitatory phases. Using blockers of synaptic transmission, we show that GABAergic synapses mediated the inhibitory and glutamatergic synapses the excitatory part of the response. Furthermore, we report that at high stimulation frequencies both types of synapses undergo short-term depression leading to a time dependent modulation of the neuronal firing. These findings indicate that STP modulates the dynamic responses of pallidal activity during electrical stimulation, and may contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism underlying deep brain stimulation (DBS like protocols.

  6. Comparison of Globus Pallidus Interna and Subthalamic Nucleus in Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson Disease: An Institutional Experience and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shazia Mirza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS has revolutionized the lives of patients of Parkinson disease, offering therapeutic options to those not benefiting entirely from medications alone. With its proven track record of outperforming the best medical management, the goal is to unlock the full potential of this therapy. Currently, the Globus Pallidus Interna (GPi and Subthalamic Nucleus (STN are both viable targets for DBS, and the choice of site should focus on the constellation of symptoms, both motor and nonmotor, which are key determinants to quality of life. Our article sheds light on the specific advantages and drawbacks of the two sites, highlighting the need for matching the inherent properties of a target with specific desired effects in patients. UT Southwestern Medical Center has a robust and constantly evolving DBS program and the narrative from our center provides invaluable insight into the practical realities of DBS. The ultimate decision in selecting a DBS target is complex, ideally made by a multidisciplinary team, tailored towards each patient’s profile and their expectations, by drawing upon scientific evidence coupled with experience. Ongoing research is expanding our knowledge base, which should be dynamically incorporated into an institute’s DBS paradigm to ensure that patients receive the optimal therapy.

  7. Transgenic Mouse Lines Subdivide External Segment of the Globus Pallidus (GPe) Neurons and Reveal Distinct GPe Output Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastro, Kevin J.; Bouchard, Rachel S.; Holt, Hiromi A. K.

    2014-01-01

    Cell-type diversity in the brain enables the assembly of complex neural circuits, whose organization and patterns of activity give rise to brain function. However, the identification of distinct neuronal populations within a given brain region is often complicated by a lack of objective criteria to distinguish one neuronal population from another. In the external segment of the globus pallidus (GPe), neuronal populations have been defined using molecular, anatomical, and electrophysiological criteria, but these classification schemes are often not generalizable across preparations and lack consistency even within the same preparation. Here, we present a novel use of existing transgenic mouse lines, Lim homeobox 6 (Lhx6)–Cre and parvalbumin (PV)–Cre, to define genetically distinct cell populations in the GPe that differ molecularly, anatomically, and electrophysiologically. Lhx6–GPe neurons, which do not express PV, are concentrated in the medial portion of the GPe. They have lower spontaneous firing rates, narrower dynamic ranges, and make stronger projections to the striatum and substantia nigra pars compacta compared with PV–GPe neurons. In contrast, PV–GPe neurons are more concentrated in the lateral portions of the GPe. They have narrower action potentials, deeper afterhyperpolarizations, and make stronger projections to the subthalamic nucleus and parafascicular nucleus of the thalamus. These electrophysiological and anatomical differences suggest that Lhx6–GPe and PV–GPe neurons participate in different circuits with the potential to contribute to different aspects of motor function and dysfunction in disease. PMID:24501350

  8. Seizure-induced damage to substantia nigra and globus pallidus is accompanied by pronounced intra- and extracellular acidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inamura, K.; Smith, M.L.; Hansen, A.J.; Siesjoe, B.K.

    1989-01-01

    Status epilepticus of greater than 30-min duration in rats gives rise to a conspicuous lesion in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNPR) and globus pallidus (GP). The objective of the present study was to explore whether the lesion, which encompasses necrosis of both neurons and glial cells, is related to intra- and extracellular acidosis. Using the flurothyl model previously described to produce seizures, we assessed regional pH values with the autoradiographic 5,5-dimethyl[2-14C]oxazolidine-2,4-dione technique. Regional pH values were assessed in animals with continuous seizures for 20 and 60 min, as well as in those allowed to recover for 30 and 120 min after seizure periods of 20 or 60 min. In additional animals, changes in extracellular fluid pH (pHe) were measured with ion-selective microelectrodes, and extracellular fluid (ECF) volume was calculated from the diffusion profile for electrophoretically administered tetramethylammonium. In structures such as the neocortex and the hippocampus, which show intense metabolic activation during seizures, status epilepticus of 20- and 60-min duration was accompanied by a reduction of the composite tissue pH (pHt) of 0.2-0.3 unit. Recovery of pHt was observed upon termination of seizures. In SNPR and in GP, the acidosis was marked to excessive after 20 and 60 min of seizures (delta pHt approximately 0.6 after 60 min)

  9. High-frequency stimulation of the globus pallidus interna nucleus modulates GFRα1 gene expression in the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Duncun Xun Kiat; Tan, Yong Chee; Tan, Jiayi; Too, Heng Phon; Ng, Wai Hoe

    2014-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Although the efficacy of DBS is clear, its precise molecular mechanism remains unknown. The glial cell line derived factor (GDNF) family of ligands has been shown to confer neuroprotective effects on dopaminergic neurons, and putaminal infusion of GDNF have been investigated in PD patients with promising results. Despite the potential therapeutic role of GDNF in alleviating motor symptoms, there is no data on the effects of electrical stimulation on GDNF-family receptor (GFR) expression in the basal ganglia structures. Here, we report the effects of electrical stimulation on GFRα1 isoforms, particularly GFRα1a and GFRα1b. Wistar rats underwent 2 hours of high frequency stimulation (HFS) at the globus pallidus interna nucleus. A control group was subjected to a similar procedure but without stimulation. The HFS group, sacrificed 24 hours after treatment, had a threefold decrease in mRNA expression level of GFRα1b (p=0.037), but the expression level reverted to normal 72 hours after stimulation. Our preliminary data reveal the acute effects of HFS on splice isoforms of GFRα1, and suggest that HFS may modulate the splice isoforms of GFRα1a and GFRα1b to varying degrees. Going forward, elucidating the interactions between HFS and GFR may shed new insights into the complexity of GDNF signaling in the nervous system and lead to better design of clinical trials using these signaling pathways to halt disease progression in PD and other neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Aberrant resting-state corticostriatal functional connectivity in cirrhotic patients with hyperintense globus pallidus on T1-weighted MR imaging.

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    Xi-Qi Zhu

    Full Text Available Neurobiological and neuroimaging studies have emphasized the structural and functional alterations in the striatum of cirrhotic patients, but alterations in the functional connections between the striatum and other brain regions have not yet been explored. Of note, manganese accumulation in the nervous system, frequently reflected by hyperintensity at the bilateral globus pallidus (GP on T1-weighted imaging, has been considered a factor affecting the striatal and cortical functions in hepatic decompensation. We employed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to analyze the temporal correlation between the striatum and the remaining brain regions using seed-based correlation analyses. The two-sample t-test was conducted to detect the differences in corticostriatal connectivity between 44 cirrhotic patients with hyperintensity at the bilateral GP and 20 healthy controls. Decreased connectivity of the caudate was detected in the anterior/middle cingulate gyrus, and increased connectivity of the caudate was found in the left motor cortex. A reduction in functional connectivity was found between the putamen and several regions, including the anterior cingulate gyrus, right insular lobe, inferior frontal gyrus, left parahippocampal gyrus, and anterior lobe of the right cerebellum; increased connectivity was detected between the putamen and right middle temporal gyrus. There were significant correlations between the corticostriatal connectivity and neuropsychological performances in the patient group, but not between the striatal connectivity and GP signal intensity. These alterations in the corticostriatal functional connectivity suggested the abnormalities in the intrinsic brain functional organiztion among the cirrhotic patients with manganese deposition, and may be associated with development of metabolic encephalopathy. The manganese deposition in nervous system, however, can not be an independent factor predicting the resting

  11. The emergence of two anti-phase oscillatory neural populations in a computational model of the Parkinsonian globus pallidus

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    Robert John Merrison-Hort

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Experiments in rodent models of Parkinson's Disease have demonstrated a prominent increase of oscillatory firing patterns in neurons within the Parkinsonian globus pallidus (GP which may underlie some of the motor symptoms of the disease. There are two main pathways from the cortex to GP: via the striatum and via the subthalamic nucleus (STN, but it is not known how these inputs sculpt the pathological pallidal firing patterns. To study this we developed a novel neural network model of conductance-based spiking pallidal neurons with cortex-modulated input from STN neurons. Our results support the hypothesis that entrainment occurs primarily via the subthalamic pathway. We find that as a result of the interplay between excitatory input from the STN and mutual inhibitory coupling between GP neurons, a homogeneous population of GP neurons demonstrates a self-organising dynamical behaviour where two groups of neurons emerge: one spiking in-phase with the cortical rhythm and the other in anti-phase. This finding mirrors what is seen in recordings from the GP of rodents that have had Parkinsonism induced via brain lesions. Our model also includes downregulation of Hyperpolarization-activated Cyclic Nucleotide-gated (HCN channels in response to burst firing of GP neurons, since this has been suggested as a possible mechanism for the emergence of Parkinsonian activity. We found that the downregulation of HCN channels provides even better correspondence with experimental data but that it is not essential in order for the two groups of oscillatory neurons to appear. We discuss how the influence of inhibitory striatal input will strengthen our results.

  12. Meta-analysis comparing deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus and subthalamic nucleus to treat advanced Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Li, Weina; Tan, Changhong; Liu, Xi; Wang, Xin; Gui, Yuejiang; Qin, Lu; Deng, Fen; Hu, Changlin; Chen, Lifen

    2014-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the surgical procedure of choice for patients with advanced Parkinson disease (PD). The globus pallidus internus (GPi) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) are commonly targeted by this procedure. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to compare the efficacy of DBS in each region. MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Knowledge, and the Cochrane Library were searched for English-language studies published before April 2013. of studies investigating the efficacy and clinical outcomes of DBS of the GPi and STN for PD were analyzed. Six eligible trials containing a total of 563 patients were included in the analysis. Deep brain stimulation of the GPi or STN equally improved motor function, measured by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Section III (UPDRSIII) (motor section, for patients in on- and off-medication phases), within 1 year postsurgery. The change score for the on-medication phase was 0.68 (95% CI - 2.12 to 3.47, p > 0.05; 5 studies, 518 patients) and for the off-medication phase was 1.83 (95% CI - 3.12 to 6.77, p > 0.05; 5 studies, 518 patients). The UPDRS Section II (activities of daily living) scores for patients on medication improved equally in both DBS groups (p = 0.97). STN DBS allowed medication dosages to be reduced more than GPi DBS (95% CI 129.27-316.64, p < 0.00001; 5 studies, 540 patients). Psychiatric symptoms, measured by Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd edition scores, showed greater improvement from baseline after GPi DBS than after STN DBS (standardized mean difference -2.28, 95% CI -3.73 to -0.84, p = 0.002; 3 studies, 382 patients). GPi and STN DBS improve motor function and activities of daily living for PD patients. Differences in therapeutic efficacy for PD were not observed between the 2 procedures. STN DBS allowed greater reduction in medication for patients, whereas GPi DBS provided greater relief from psychiatric symptoms. An understanding of other symptomatic aspects of targeting each region and long

  13. Increasing signal intensity within the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1W magnetic resonance images in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: correlation with cumulative dose of a macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agent, gadobutrol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojanov, Dragan A. [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia); Clinical Center Nis, Center for Radiology, Nis (Serbia); Aracki-Trenkic, Aleksandra [Clinical Center Nis, Center for Radiology, Nis (Serbia); Vojinovic, Slobodan; Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia); Clinical Center Nis, Clinic for Neurology, Nis (Serbia); Benedeto-Stojanov, Daniela [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia)

    2016-03-15

    To evaluate correlation between cumulative dose of gadobutrol and signal intensity (SI) within dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted images in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Dentate nucleus-to-pons and globus pallidus-to-thalamus SI ratios, and renal and liver functions, were evaluated after multiple intravenous administrations of 0.1 mmol/kg gadobutrol at 27, 96-98, and 168 weeks. We compared SI ratios based on the number of administrations, total amount of gadobutrol administered, and time between injections. Globus pallidus-to-thalamus (p = 0.025) and dentate nucleus-to-pons (p < 0.001) SI ratios increased after multiple gadobutrol administrations, correlated with the number of administrations (ρ = 0.263, p = 0.046, respectively) and depended on the length of administration (p = 0.017, p = 0.037, respectively). Patients receiving gadobutrol at 27 weeks showed the greatest increase in both SI ratios (p = 0.006; p = 0.014, respectively, versus 96-98 weeks). GGT increased at the end of the study (p = 0.004). In patients with RRMS, SI within the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus increased on unenhanced T1-weighted images after multiple gadobutrol injections. Administration of the same total amount of gadobutrol over a shorter period caused greater SI increase. (orig.)

  14. Immediate recovery of neurological function in response to deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus internus in a patient with idiopathic camptocormia

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    I. Madrazo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Camptocormia is a major disabling abnormality characterized by severe forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine. We report here on the effectiveness of deep brain stimulation (DBS for the management of a case of untreatable idiopathic camptocormia. The patient, a 51-year-old male, with an 11-year-long history of radicular pain. Camptocormia symptomatology initiated 4 years ago. Preoperative muscle electrodiagnostic testing was within normal limits. Myopathy was ruled out. In the standing position myokymic discharges were recorded. Under local anesthesia and stereotactic control, electrodes for DBS were placed bilaterally in the globus pallidus internus. Patient's symptoms disappeared immediately following DBS. This response cannot be attributed to the surgical procedure itself. When stimulators were turned “off” accidentally, the patient returned immediately to his pre-surgery condition. Erect posture and walking were restored when stimulators were back “on”.

  15. Increased signal intensities in the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted images: evidence in children undergoing multiple gadolinium MRI exams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Houchun H.; Pokorney, Amber; Towbin, Richard B.; Miller, Jeffrey H. [Phoenix Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Recent reports have suggested residual gadolinium deposition in the brain in subjects undergoing multiple contrast-enhanced MRI exams. These findings have raised some concerns regarding gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) usage and retention in brain tissues. To summarize findings of hyperintense brain structures on precontrast T1-weighted images in 21 children undergoing multiple GBCA MRI exams. This retrospective study involved 21 patients, each of whom received multiple MRI examinations (range: 5-37 exams) with GBCA over the course of their medical treatment (duration from first to most recent exam: 1.2-12.9 years). The patients were between 0.9 and 14.4 years of age at the time of their first GBCA exam. Regions of interest were drawn in the dentate nucleus and the globus pallidus on 2-D fast spin echo images acquired at 1.5 T. The signal intensities of these two structures were normalized by that of the corpus callosum genu. Signal intensity ratios from these patients were compared to control patients of similar ages who have never received GBCA. Signal intensity ratios increased between the first and the most recent MRI exam in all 21 patients receiving GBCA, with an increase of 18.6%±12.7% (range: 0.5% to 47.5%) for the dentate nucleus and 12.4%±7.4% (range: -1.2% to 33.7%) for the globus pallidus (P<0.0001). Signal intensity ratios were also higher in GBCA patients than in controls (P<0.01). The degree of signal intensity enhancement did not correlate with statistical significance to the cumulative number or volume of GBCA administrations each patient received, the patient's age or the elapsed time between the first and most recent GBCA MRI exams. These results in children are consistent with recent findings in adults, suggesting possible gadolinium deposition in the brain. (orig.)

  16. Signal intensity at unenhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance in the globus pallidus and dentate nucleus after serial administrations of a macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agent in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi Espagnet, Maria Camilla; Bernardi, Bruno; Figa-Talamanca, Lorenzo [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, IRCCS, Neuroradiology Unit, Imaging Department, Rome (Italy); Pasquini, Luca [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, IRCCS, Neuroradiology Unit, Imaging Department, Rome (Italy); University Sapienza, Neuroradiology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Sant' Andrea, Rome (Italy); Toma, Paolo [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, IRCCS, Department of Imaging, Rome (Italy); Napolitano, Antonio [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, IRCCS, Enterprise Risk Management, Medical Physics Department, Rome (Italy)

    2017-09-15

    Few studies have been conducted on the relations between T1-weighted signal intensity changes in the pediatric brain following gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) exposure. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of multiple administrations of a macrocyclic GBCA on signal intensity in the globus pallidus and dentate nucleus of the pediatric brain on unenhanced T1-weighted MR images. This retrospective study included 50 patients, mean age: 8 years (standard deviation: 4.8 years), with normal renal function exposed to ≥6 administrations of the same macrocyclic GBCA (gadoterate meglumine) and a control group of 59 age-matched GBCA-naive patients. The globus pallidus-to-thalamus signal intensity ratio and dentate nucleus-to-pons signal intensity ratio were calculated from unenhanced T1-weighted images for both patients and controls. A mixed linear model was used to evaluate the effects on signal intensity ratios of the number of GBCA administrations, the time interval between administrations, age, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. T-test analyses were performed to compare signal intensity ratio differences between successive administrations and baseline MR signal intensity ratios in patients compared to controls. P-values were considered significant if <0.05. A significant effect of the number of GBCA administrations on relative signal intensities globus pallidus-to-thalamus (F[8]=3.09; P=0.002) and dentate nucleus-to-pons (F[8]=2.36; P=0.021) was found. The relative signal intensities were higher at last MR examination than at baseline (P<0.001). Quantitative analysis evaluation of globus pallidus:thalamus and dentate nucleus:pons of the pediatric brain demonstrated an increase after serial administrations of macrocyclic GBCA. Further research is necessary to fully understand GBCA pharmacokinetic in children. (orig.)

  17. Holmes’ Tremor with Shoulder Pain Treated by Deep Brain Stimulation of Unilateral Ventral Intermediate Thalamic Nucleus and Globus Pallidus Internus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Aydın

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old male was admitted with severe right arm and hand tremors after a thalamic hemorrhage caused by a traffic accident. He was also suffering from agonizing pain in his right shoulder that manifested after the tremor. Neurologic examination revealed a disabling, severe, and irregular kinetic and postural tremor in the right arm during target-directed movements. There was also an irregular ipsilateral rest tremor and dystonic movements in the distal part of the right arm. The amplitude was moderate at rest and extremely high during kinetic and intentional movements. The patient underwent left globus pallidum internus and ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. The patient improved by more than 80% as rated by the Fahn-Tolosa-Marin Tremor Rating Scale and Visual Analog Scale six months after surgery.

  18. Signal intensity change on unenhanced T1-weighted images in dentate nucleus and globus pallidus after multiple administrations of gadoxetate disodium: an intraindividual comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conte, Giorgio; Minotti, Marta; De Piano, Francesca [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Postgraduation School in Radiodiagnostics, Milan (Italy); Preda, Lorenzo [Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Department of Clinical-Surgical Diagnostic and Pediatric Sciences, Pavia (Italy); National Center of Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO Foundation), Division of Radiology, Pavia (Italy); Cocorocchio, Emilia; Ferrucci, Pier Francesco [European Institute of Oncology, Melanoma and Sarcoma Medical Oncology Division, Milan (Italy); Raimondi, Sara [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Milan (Italy); Giannitto, Caterina; Petralia, Giuseppe [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Bellomi, Massimo [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Oncology and Haematology/Oncology Department, Milan (Italy)

    2017-10-15

    To investigate whether there is an increased signal intensity (SI) of dentate nucleus (DN) and globus pallidus (GP) on unenhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in patients who had undergone multiple administrations of gadoxetate disodium. We retrospectively included stage III melanoma patients, who had been previously enrolled in a trial of adjuvant therapy and who had undergone whole-body contrast-enhanced MRIs with gadoxetate disodium every three months for their follow-up. The SI ratios of DN-to-pons and GP-to-thalamus on unenhanced T1-weighted images were calculated. The difference in SI ratios between the first and the last MRI examinations was assessed and a linear mixed model was performed to detect how SI ratios varied with the number of administrations. Eighteen patients were included in our study. The number of gadoxetate disodium administrations ranged from 2 to 18. Paired t-test did not show any significant difference in DN-to-pons (p=0.21) and GP-to-thalamus (p=0.09) SI ratios by the end of the study. DN-to-pons SI ratio and GP-to-thalamus SI ratio did not significantly increase with increasing the number of administrations (p=0.14 and p=0.06, respectively). Multiple administrations of gadoxetate disodium are not associated with increased SI in DN and GP in the brain. (orig.)

  19. Systemic blockade of dopamine D2-like receptors increases high-voltage spindles in the globus pallidus and motor cortex of freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Ge, Shun-Nan; Zhang, Jia-Rui; Chen, Lei; Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Heng, Li-Jun; Zhao, Tian-Zhi; Li, Wei-Xin; Jia, Dong; Zhu, Jun-Ling; Gao, Guo-Dong

    2013-01-01

    High-voltage spindles (HVSs) have been reported to appear spontaneously and widely in the cortical-basal ganglia networks of rats. Our previous study showed that dopamine depletion can significantly increase the power and coherence of HVSs in the globus pallidus (GP) and motor cortex of freely moving rats. However, it is unclear whether dopamine regulates HVS activity by acting on dopamine D₁-like receptors or D₂-like receptors. We employed local-field potential and electrocorticogram methods to simultaneously record the oscillatory activities in the GP and primary motor cortex (M1) in freely moving rats following systemic administration of dopamine receptor antagonists or saline. The results showed that the dopamine D₂-like receptor antagonists, raclopride and haloperidol, significantly increased the number and duration of HVSs, and the relative power associated with HVS activity in the GP and M1 cortex. Coherence values for HVS activity between the GP and M1 cortex area were also significantly increased by dopamine D₂-like receptor antagonists. On the contrary, the selective dopamine D₁-like receptor antagonist, SCH23390, had no significant effect on the number, duration, or relative power of HVSs, or HVS-related coherence between M1 and GP. In conclusion, dopamine D₂-like receptors, but not D₁-like receptors, were involved in HVS regulation. This supports the important role of dopamine D₂-like receptors in the regulation of HVSs. An siRNA knock-down experiment on the striatum confirmed our conclusion.

  20. Cognition and Depression Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Globus Pallidus Pars Internus in Parkinson's Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Hannah L; Folley, Bradley S; Berry, David T R; Segerstrom, Suzanne C; Han, Dong Y; Anderson-Mooney, Amelia J; Walls, Brittany D; van Horne, Craig

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common, degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. Individuals experience predominantly extrapyramidal symptoms including resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, gait abnormalities, cognitive impairment, depression, and neurobehavioral concerns. Cognitive impairments associated with PD are diverse, including difficulty with attention, processing speed, executive functioning, memory recall, visuospatial functions, word-retrieval, and naming. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or globus pallidus internus (GPi) is FDA approved and has been shown to be effective in reducing motor symptoms of PD. Studies have found that stimulating STN and GPi are equally effective at improving motor symptoms and dyskinesias; however, there has been discrepancy as to whether the cognitive, behavioral, and mood symptoms are affected differently between the two targets. The present study used random-effects meta-analytic models along with a novel p-curve analytic procedure to compare the potential cognitive and emotional impairments associated with STN-DBS in the current literature to those associated with GPi-DBS. Forty-one articles were reviewed with an aggregated sample size of 1622 patients. Following STN-DBS, small declines were found in psychomotor speed, memory, attention, executive functions, and overall cognition; and moderate declines were found in both semantic and phonemic fluency. However, GPi-DBS resulted in fewer neurocognitive declines than STN-DBS (small declines in attention and small-moderate declines in verbal fluency). With regards to its effect on depression symptomatology, both GPi-DBS and STN-DBS resulted in lower levels of depressive symptoms post-surgery. From a neurocognitive standpoint, both GPi-DBS and STN-DBS produce subtle cognitive declines but appears to be relatively well tolerated.

  1. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Internal Globus Pallidus Improves Response Initiation and Proactive Inhibition in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin Pan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Impulse control disorder is not uncommon in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD who are treated with dopamine replacement therapy and subthalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS. Internal globus pallidus (GPi-DBS is increasingly used, but its role in inhibitory control has rarely been explored. In this study, we evaluated the effect of GPi-DBS on inhibitory control in PD patients.Methods: A stop-signal paradigm was used to test response initiation, proactive inhibition, and reactive inhibition. The subjects enrolled in the experiment were 27 patients with PD, of whom 13 had received only drug treatment and 14 had received bilateral GPi-DBS in addition to conventional medical treatment and 15 healthy individuals.Results: Our results revealed that with GPi-DBS on, patients with PD showed significantly faster responses than the other groups in trials where it was certain that no stop signal would be presented. Proactive inhibition was significantly different in the surgical patients with GPi-DBS on versus when GPi-DBS was off, in surgical patients with GPi-DBS on versus drug-treated patients, and in healthy controls versus drug-treated patients. Correlation analyses revealed that when GPi-DBS was on, there was a statistically significant moderate positive relationship between proactive inhibition and dopaminergic medication.Conclusion: GPi-DBS may lead to an increase in response initiation speed and improve the dysfunctional proactive inhibitory control observed in PD patients. Our results may help us to understand the role of the GPi in cortical-basal ganglia circuits.

  2. Systemic blockade of dopamine D2-like receptors increases high-voltage spindles in the globus pallidus and motor cortex of freely moving rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yang

    Full Text Available High-voltage spindles (HVSs have been reported to appear spontaneously and widely in the cortical-basal ganglia networks of rats. Our previous study showed that dopamine depletion can significantly increase the power and coherence of HVSs in the globus pallidus (GP and motor cortex of freely moving rats. However, it is unclear whether dopamine regulates HVS activity by acting on dopamine D₁-like receptors or D₂-like receptors. We employed local-field potential and electrocorticogram methods to simultaneously record the oscillatory activities in the GP and primary motor cortex (M1 in freely moving rats following systemic administration of dopamine receptor antagonists or saline. The results showed that the dopamine D₂-like receptor antagonists, raclopride and haloperidol, significantly increased the number and duration of HVSs, and the relative power associated with HVS activity in the GP and M1 cortex. Coherence values for HVS activity between the GP and M1 cortex area were also significantly increased by dopamine D₂-like receptor antagonists. On the contrary, the selective dopamine D₁-like receptor antagonist, SCH23390, had no significant effect on the number, duration, or relative power of HVSs, or HVS-related coherence between M1 and GP. In conclusion, dopamine D₂-like receptors, but not D₁-like receptors, were involved in HVS regulation. This supports the important role of dopamine D₂-like receptors in the regulation of HVSs. An siRNA knock-down experiment on the striatum confirmed our conclusion.

  3. Visualization of the internal globus pallidus: sequence and orientation for deep brain stimulation using a standard installation protocol at 3.0 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nölte, Ingo S; Gerigk, Lars; Al-Zghloul, Mansour; Groden, Christoph; Kerl, Hans U

    2012-03-01

    Deep-brain stimulation (DBS) of the internal globus pallidus (GPi) has shown remarkable therapeutic benefits for treatment-resistant neurological disorders including dystonia and Parkinson's disease (PD). The success of the DBS is critically dependent on the reliable visualization of the GPi. The aim of the study was to evaluate promising 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods for pre-stereotactic visualization of the GPi using a standard installation protocol. MRI at 3.0 T of nine healthy individuals and of one patient with PD was acquired (FLAIR, T1-MPRAGE, T2-SPACE, T2*-FLASH2D, susceptibility-weighted imaging mapping (SWI)). Image quality and visualization of the GPi for each sequence were assessed by two neuroradiologists independently using a 6-point scale. Axial, coronal, and sagittal planes of the T2*-FLASH2D images were compared. Inter-rater reliability, contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) for the GPi were determined. For illustration, axial T2*-FLASH2D images were fused with a section schema of the Schaltenbrand-Wahren stereotactic atlas. The GPi was best and reliably visualized in axial and to a lesser degree on coronal T2*-FLASH2D images. No major artifacts in the GPi were observed in any of the sequences. SWI offered a significantly higher CNR for the GPi compared to standard T2-weighted imaging using the standard parameters. The fusion of the axial T2*-FLASH2D images and the atlas projected the GPi clearly in the boundaries of the section schema. Using a standard installation protocol at 3.0 T T2*-FLASH2D imaging (particularly axial view) provides optimal and reliable delineation of the GPi.

  4. Dopamine depletion increases the power and coherence of high-voltage spindles in the globus pallidus and motor cortex of freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shunnan; Yang, Chen; Li, Min; Li, Jiang; Chang, Xiaozan; Fu, Jian; Chen, Lei; Chang, Chongwang; Wang, Xuelian; Zhu, Junling; Gao, Guodong

    2012-07-17

    Studies on patients with Parkinson's disease and in animal models have observed enhanced synchronization of oscillations in several frequency bands within and between the cortical-basal ganglia (BG) structures. Recent research has also shown that synchronization of high-voltage spindles (HVSs) in the cortex, striatum and substantia nigra pars reticulate is increased by dopamine depletion. However, more evidence is needed to determine whether HVS activity in the whole cortex-BG network represents homologous alteration following dopamine depletion. As the globus pallidus (GP) is in a central position to propagate and synchronize oscillations in the cortical-BG circuits, we employed local-field potentials and electrocorticogram to simultaneously record oscillations in the GP and primary (M1) and secondary (M2) motor cortices on freely moving 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned and control rats. Results showed that HVS episodes recorded from GP, and M2 and M1 cortex areas were more numerous and longer in 6-OHDA lesioned rats compared to controls. Relative power associated with HVS activity in the GP, and M2 and M1 cortices of 6-OHDA lesioned rats was significantly greater than that for control rats. Coherence values for HVS activity between the GP, and M2 and M1 cortex areas were significantly increased by dopamine depletion. Time lag between the M1 cortex HVS and GP HVS was significantly shorter for dopamine depleted than normal rats. Findings indicate a crucial rule for dopamine in the regulation of HVS activity in the whole cortical-BG circuit, and suggest a close relationship between abnormally synchronized HVS oscillations in the cortex-BG network and Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Globus Pallidus Internus in Patients with Intractable Tourette Syndrome: A 1-year Follow-up Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hua Zhang; Jian-Yu Li; Yu-Qing Zhang; Yong-Jie Li

    2016-01-01

    Background:Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been a promising treatment for patients with refractory Tourette syndrome (TS) for more than a decade.Despite successful DBS treatment of TS in more than 100 patients worldwide,studies with a large patient sample and long-term follow-up assessments are still scarce.Accordingly,we investigated the clinical efficacy and safety of globus pallidus internus (GPi) DBS in the treatment of intractable TS in 24 patients with a l-year follow-up assessment.Methods:Bilateral/unilateral GPi-DBS was performed in 24 patients with TS.We evaluated symptoms of tics and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) through the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) and Yale-Brown Obsessive-compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS).We used the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised in China (WAIS-RC) to evaluate the safety of the treatment.We conducted follow-up assessments of all patients for at least 12 months (12-99 months).Results:Symptoms of tics and OCD were significantly relieved at a 12-month follow-up assessment.The mean YGTSS score was 74.04 ± 11.52,49.83 ± 10.91,32.58 ± 7.97,and 31.21 ± 8.87 at baseline,3,6,and 12 months,respectively.The mean YGTSS scores obtained at the follow-up assessments were significantly different from the baseline (P < 0.05).The improvement in motor tics was superior to that in phonic tics.The mean Y-BOCS scores were 21.61 ± 4.97,18 ± 4.58,14.39 ± 3.99,and 13.78 ± 4.56 at baseline,3,6,and 12 months,respectively (P < 0.05).We observed a remarkable improvement in psychiatric comorbidities,such as OCD and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder,after the procedure.WAIS-RC scores were comparable before and after the operation.There were no severe postoperative complications.Conclusion:GPi-DBS appears to comprehensively alleviate tic symptoms and psychiatric comorbidities in patients with TS,thus significantly improving patients' quality of life.

  6. Gadolinium Accumulation in the Deep Cerebellar Nuclei and Globus Pallidus After Exposure to Linear but Not Macrocyclic Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents in a Retrospective Pig Study With High Similarity to Clinical Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyken, Janina; Frenzel, Thomas; Lohrke, Jessica; Jost, Gregor; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the gadolinium (Gd) concentration in different brain areas in a pig cohort that received repeated administration of Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs) at standard doses over several years, comparable with a clinical setting. Brain tissue was collected from 13 Göttingen mini pigs that had received repeated intravenous injections of gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA; Magnevist) and/or gadobutrol (Gadovist). The animals have been included in several preclinical imaging studies since 2008 and received cumulative Gd doses ranging from 7 to 129 mmol per animal over an extended period. Two animals with no history of administration of GBCA were included as controls. Brain autopsies were performed not earlier than 8 and not later than 38 months after the last GBCA application. Tissues from multiple brain areas including cerebellar and cerebral deep nuclei, cerebellar and cerebral cortex, and pons were analyzed for Gd using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Of the 13 animals, 8 received up to 48 injections of gadobutrol and Gd-DTPA and 5 received up to 29 injections of gadobutrol only. In animals that had received both Gd-DTPA and gadobutrol, a median (interquartile range) Gd concentration of 1.0 nmol/g tissue (0.44-1.42) was measured in the cerebellar nuclei and 0.53 nmol/g (0.29-0.62) in the globus pallidus. The Gd concentration in these areas in gadobutrol-only animals was 50-fold lower with median concentrations of 0.02 nmol/g (0.01-0.02) for cerebellar nuclei and 0.01 nmol/g (0.01-0.01) for globus pallidus and was comparable with control animals with no GBCA history. Accordingly, in animals that received both GBCAs, the amount of residual Gd correlated with the administered dose of Gd-DTPA (P ≤ 0.002) but not with the total Gd dose, consisting of Gd-DTPA and gadobutrol. The Gd concentration in cortical tissue and in the pons was very low (≤0.07 nmol/g tissue) in all animals analyzed. Multiple exposure

  7. Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guideline on Subthalamic Nucleus and Globus Pallidus Internus Deep Brain Stimulation for the Treatment of Patients With Parkinson's Disease: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rughani, Anand; Schwalb, Jason M; Sidiropoulos, Christos; Pilitsis, Julie; Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Sweet, Jennifer A; Mittal, Sandeep; Espay, Alberto J; Martinez, Jorge Gonzalez; Abosch, Aviva; Eskandar, Emad; Gross, Robert; Alterman, Ron; Hamani, Clement

    2018-06-01

    Is bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) more, less, or as effective as bilateral globus pallidus internus deep brain stimulation (GPi DBS) in treating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, as measured by improvements in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, part III (UPDRS-III) scores? Given that bilateral STN DBS is at least as effective as bilateral GPi DBS in treating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (as measured by improvements in UPDRS-III scores), consideration can be given to the selection of either target in patients undergoing surgery to treat motor symptoms. (Level I). Is bilateral STN DBS more, less, or as effective as bilateral GPi DBS in allowing reduction of dopaminergic medication in Parkinson's disease? When the main goal of surgery is reduction of dopaminergic medications in a patient with Parkinson's disease, then bilateral STN DBS should be performed instead of GPi DBS. (Level I). Is bilateral STN DBS more, less, or as effective as bilateral GPi DBS in treating dyskinesias associated with Parkinson's disease? There is insufficient evidence to make a generalizable recommendation regarding the target selection for reduction of dyskinesias. However, when the reduction of medication is not anticipated and there is a goal to reduce the severity of "on" medication dyskinesias, the GPi should be targeted. (Level I). Is bilateral STN DBS more, less, or as effective as bilateral GPi DBS in improving quality of life measures in Parkinson's disease? When considering improvements in quality of life in a patient undergoing DBS for Parkinson's disease, there is no basis to recommend bilateral DBS in 1 target over the other. (Level I). Is bilateral STN DBS associated with greater, lesser, or a similar impact on neurocognitive function than bilateral GPi DBS in Parkinson disease? If there is significant concern about cognitive decline, particularly in regards to processing speed and working memory in a patient undergoing DBS

  8. Management of Globus Pharyngeus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kortequee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Globus pharyngeus is a common ENT condition. This paper reviews the current evidence on globus and gives a rational guide to the management of patients with globus. The aetiology of globus is still unclear though most ENT surgeons believe that reflux whether acidic or not plays a significant role. Though proton pump inhibitors are used extensively in practice, there is little evidence to support their efficacy. Most patients with globus can be discharged after simple office investigations. The role of pepsin-induced laryngeal injury is an exciting concept that needs further study. Given the benign nature of globus pharyngeus, in most cases, reassurance rather than treatment or extensive investigation with rigid oesophagoscopy or contrast swallows is all that is needed. We need more research into the aetiology of globus.

  9. Correlation between Relaxometry and Diffusion Tensor Imaging in the Globus Pallidus of Huntington's Disease Patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syka, Michael; Keller, J.; Klempíř, J.; Rulseh, A. M.; Roth, J.; Jech, R.; Voříšek, Ivan; Vymazal, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2015), e0118907 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/2378 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : basal ganglia * gray-matter * human brain Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015

  10. Involvement of the subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus internus in attention

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bocková, M.; Chládek, Jan; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Baláž, M.; Rektor, I.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 8 (2011), s. 1235-1245 ISSN 0300-9564 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200650801; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : basal ganglia * ERP * ERD/S * attention * DBS Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.730, year: 2011

  11. Mossbauer and SQUID Characterization of Iron in Human Tissue: Case of Globus Pallidus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miglierini, M.; Boca, R.; Kopáni, M.; Lančok, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 1 (2014), s. 240-241 ISSN 0587-4246 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/0035 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : FERRITIN Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; The oretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2014

  12. Supersensitivity of GABAergic systems induced within rat substantia nigra and globus pallidus by haloperidol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, J.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The supersensitivity was demonstrated by an increase in the responsiveness of individual neurons within these brain regions to microiontophoretically-applied GABA and by an up regulation of GABA binding sites. Rates received haloperidol for 30 days in their feed and were then withdrawn from treatment for 48 hrs. 3 H-GABA binding was found to be significantly elevated with the SN R (55%) and GP (42%). Scatchard analysis of 3 H-muscimol binding isotherms indicated that the number (B max ) of high affinity binding sites within the GP was significantly increased (32%); within the SN R , significant increases were detected in the B max of both high (23%) and low (58%) affinity 3 H-muscimol binding sites. After CHAL treatment, signs of dopaminergic supersensitivity within the basal ganglia were also observed. Spontaneous locomotor activity and apomorphine-induced stereotyped behavior were increased and specific 3 H-spiroperidol binding was elevated within the striatum (60%) and GP (236%)

  13. Tonic and phasic changes in anteromedial globus pallidus activity in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelashvili, Michal; Smeets, Anouk Y J M; Bronfeld, Maya; Zeef, Dagmar H; Leentjens, Albert F G; van Kranen-Mastenbroek, Vivianne; Janssen, Marcus L F; Temel, Yasin; Ackermans, Linda; Bar-Gad, Izhar

    2017-07-01

    Tourette syndrome is a hyperkinetic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by tics. Assess the neuronal changes in the associative/limbic GP associated with Tourette syndrome. Neurophysiological recordings were performed from the anterior (associative/limbic) GPe and GPi of 8 awake patients during DBS electrode implantation surgeries. The baseline firing rate of the neurons was low in a state-dependent manner in both segments of the GP. Tic-dependent transient rate changes were found in the activity of individual neurons of both segments around the time of the tic. Neither oscillatory activity of individual neurons nor correlations in their interactions were observed. The results demonstrate the involvement of the associative/limbic pathway in the underlying pathophysiology of Tourette syndrome and point to tonic and phasic modulations of basal ganglia output as a key mechanisms underlying the abnormal state of the disorder and the expression of individual tics, respectively. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  14. Malignant Neuroleptic Syndrome following Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery of Globus Pallidus Pars Internus in Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Meen Lee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a rare but potentially lethal outcome caused by sudden discontinuation or dose reduction of dopaminergic agents. We report an extremely rare case of NMS after deep brain stimulation (DBS surgery in a cerebral palsy (CP patient without the withdrawal of dopaminergic agents. A 19-year-old girl with CP was admitted for DBS due to medically refractory dystonia and rigidity. Dopaminergic agents were not stopped preoperatively. DBS was performed uneventfully under monitored anesthesia. Dopaminergic medication was continued during the postoperative period. She manifested spasticity and muscle rigidity, and was high fever resistant to anti-pyretic drugs at 2 h postoperative. At postoperative 20 h, she suffered cardiac arrest and expired, despite vigorous cardiopulmonary resuscitation. NMS should be considered for hyperthermia and severe spasticity in CP patients after DBS surgery, irrespective of continued dopaminergic medication.

  15. Efficient digital implementation of a conductance-based globus pallidus neuron and the dynamics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuangming; Wei, Xile; Deng, Bin; Liu, Chen; Li, Huiyan; Wang, Jiang

    2018-03-01

    Balance between biological plausibility of dynamical activities and computational efficiency is one of challenging problems in computational neuroscience and neural system engineering. This paper proposes a set of efficient methods for the hardware realization of the conductance-based neuron model with relevant dynamics, targeting reproducing the biological behaviors with low-cost implementation on digital programmable platform, which can be applied in wide range of conductance-based neuron models. Modified GP neuron models for efficient hardware implementation are presented to reproduce reliable pallidal dynamics, which decode the information of basal ganglia and regulate the movement disorder related voluntary activities. Implementation results on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) demonstrate that the proposed techniques and models can reduce the resource cost significantly and reproduce the biological dynamics accurately. Besides, the biological behaviors with weak network coupling are explored on the proposed platform, and theoretical analysis is also made for the investigation of biological characteristics of the structured pallidal oscillator and network. The implementation techniques provide an essential step towards the large-scale neural network to explore the dynamical mechanisms in real time. Furthermore, the proposed methodology enables the FPGA-based system a powerful platform for the investigation on neurodegenerative diseases and real-time control of bio-inspired neuro-robotics.

  16. Gastropharyngeal and gastroesophageal reflux in globus and hoarseness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, C. F.; van Leeuwen, J. A.; Mathus-Vliegen, L. M.; Devriese, P. P.; Semin, A.; Tan, J.; Schouwenburg, P. F.

    2000-01-01

    The role of gastropharyngeal reflux in patients with globus pharyngeus and hoarseness remains unclear. To evaluate patients with complaints of globus, hoarseness, or globus and hoarseness combined for the presence of gastropharyngeal and gastroesophageal reflux. Prospective clinical cohort study of

  17. Globus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications Library En Español Digestive Health Matters Medical Definitions Links Books of Interest Video Corner Clinical Corner Survey Corner News Medical and Treatment News Events Press Releases Commentary For Media Research Research Awards Research Grants Funding Research Clinical Trials & ...

  18. Globus File Transfer Services | High-Performance Computing | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    installed on the systems at both ends of the data transfer. The NREL endpoint is nrel#globus. Click Login on the Globus web site. On the login page select "Globus ID" as the login method and click Login to the Globus website. From the Manage Data drop down menu, select Transfer Files. Then click Get

  19. Application experiences with the Globus toolkit.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunett, S.

    1998-06-09

    The Globus grid toolkit is a collection of software components designed to support the development of applications for high-performance distributed computing environments, or ''computational grids'' [14]. The Globus toolkit is an implementation of a ''bag of services'' architecture, which provides application and tool developers not with a monolithic system but rather with a set of stand-alone services. Each Globus component provides a basic service, such as authentication, resource allocation, information, communication, fault detection, and remote data access. Different applications and tools can combine these services in different ways to construct ''grid-enabled'' systems. The Globus toolkit has been used to construct the Globus Ubiquitous Supercomputing Testbed, or GUSTO: a large-scale testbed spanning 20 sites and included over 4000 compute nodes for a total compute power of over 2 TFLOPS. Over the past six months, we and others have used this testbed to conduct a variety of application experiments, including multi-user collaborative environments (tele-immersion), computational steering, distributed supercomputing, and high throughput computing. The goal of this paper is to review what has been learned from these experiments regarding the effectiveness of the toolkit approach. To this end, we describe two of the application experiments in detail, noting what worked well and what worked less well. The two applications are a distributed supercomputing application, SF-Express, in which multiple supercomputers are harnessed to perform large distributed interactive simulations; and a tele-immersion application, CAVERNsoft, in which the focus is on connecting multiple people to a distributed simulated world.

  20. OGSA Globus Toolkits evaluation activity at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, D; Foster, D; Kalyaev, V; Kryukov, A; Lamanna, M; Pose, V; Rocha, R; Wang, C

    2004-01-01

    An Open Grid Service Architecture (OGSA) Globus Toolkit 3 (GT3) evaluation group is active at CERN since GT3 was available in early beta version (Spring 2003). This activity focuses on the evaluation of the technology as promised by the OGSA/OGSI paradigm and on GT3 in particular. The goal is to study this new technology and its implications with the goal to provide useful input for the large grid initiatives active in the LHC Computing Grid (LCG) project. A particular effort has been devoted to investigate performance and deployment issues, having in mind the LCG requirements, in particular scalability and robustness.

  1. Radiologic evaluation of the globus symptom using videotape recorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myeong Jin; Chung, Tae Sub; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Suh, Jung Ho; Chang, Tae Young; Park, In Yong

    1988-01-01

    The authors examined barium swallow in 213 patients with globus symptom and 79 patients with vague gastric problems without globus symptom. Abnormal findings were more frequently detected on videorecording than on conventional esophagogram. Radiologic findings were transient cricopharyngeal indentation (CPI), residual barium collection and delayed clearing from hypopharynx (RB), laryngeal penetration of barium, barium retention in vallecula and or pyriform sinuses. Among them residual barium in hypopharynx was more frequently detected in patients with globus symptom than in patients without globus symptom. Globus symptom was more frequent in adult women, but age and sex difference did not affect the incidence of the abnormal radiologic findings. Cricopharyngeal indentation was most frequently seen at the level of C5-6 interspace and had a tendency of moving upward gradually during the indentation in about half of the cases. Most of the CPI was seen in early phase of swallowing and was visible within 1 sec. Residual barium collection was mostly seen in C6 or C6-7 level. RB had no cause and effect relationship with CPI, and it was not secondary result of obstructive effect of CPI. The authors think that videotape recording can be a useful method for evaluation of globus symptom. The residual barium collection in hypopharynx can be a significant finding in globus symptom

  2. Epiglottic cyst as an etiological factor of globus sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Bahtiyar; Karahatay, Serdar; Gerek, Mustafa

    2015-09-01

    Globus is a subjective complaint that describes a sensation of a lump or a foreign body in the throat. Despite being a well-known and common clinical condition, the etiological factors have not been definitely elucidated yet. The study was set up to ascertain the relationship between epiglottic cysts and globus sensation. All patients undergoing investigation and treatments for globus sensation were included in the study. Patients with epiglottic cysts but no other possible causes of globus sensation were constituted the series of patients. Patients were asked to assess the levels of complaint before and after the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser excisions of the cysts. Epiglottic cysts were found in 10 (5.4%) of the 182 patients. Three of these 10 patients who had concomitant diseases or conditions that may cause globus sensation and one patient who refused the surgery were excluded from the study. All the remaining six patients reported relief of the globus sensation after the CO2 laser excisions of the cysts. Our results, obtained from this limited series, indicated that epiglottic cysts may be considered as one of the etiological factors of globus sensation.

  3. Reclassification of Geobacillus pallidus (Scholz et al. 1988) Banat et al. 2004 as Aeribacillus pallidus gen. nov., comb. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miñana-Galbis, David; Pinzón, Dora L; Lorén, J Gaspar; Manresa, Angels; Oliart-Ros, Rosa M

    2010-07-01

    Although Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus, two genera of thermophilic bacteria close to the genus Bacillus, have only been described recently, the number of species in these genera has increased rapidly. Four thermophilic, lipolytic strains (DR01, DR02, DR03 and DR04) isolated from a hot spring in Veracruz (Mexico), which could not be identified phenotypically, were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Three strains were identified as belonging to the genus Anoxybacillus, but strain DR03 was identified as Geobacillus pallidus. This result led us to perform a phylogenetic analysis of the genera Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus based on 16S rRNA gene sequences from all the type strains of these genera. Phylogenetic trees showed three major clusters, Anoxybacillus-Geobacillus tepidamans, Geobacillus sensu stricto and Geobacillus pallidus, while the 16S rRNA gene sequences of G. pallidus (DR03 and the type strain) showed low similarity to sequences of Anoxybacillus (92.5-95.1 %) and Geobacillus (92.8-94.5 %) species, as well as to Bacillus subtilis (92.2-92.4 %). In addition, G. pallidus could be differentiated from Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus on the basis of DNA G+C content and fatty acid and polar lipid profiles. From these results, it is proposed that Geobacillus pallidus should be classified in a novel genus, for which we propose the name Aeribacillus, as Aeribacillus pallidus gen. nov., comb. nov. The type strain of Aeribacillus pallidus is H12(T) (=ATCC 51176(T) =DSM 3670(T) =LMG 19006(T)).

  4. A GridFTP transport driver for Globus XIO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettimuthu, R.; Wantao, L.; Link, J.; Bresnahan, J.

    2008-01-01

    GridFTP is a high-performance, reliable data transfer protocol optimized for high-bandwidth wide-area networks. Based on the Internet FTP protocol, it defines extensions for high-performance operation and security. The Globus implementation of GridFTP provides a modular and extensible data transfer system architecture suitable for wide area and high-performance environments. GridFTP is the de facto standard in projects requiring secure, robust, high-speed bulk data transport. For example, the high energy physics community is basing its entire tiered data movement infrastructure for the Large Hadron Collider computing Grid on GridFTP; the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory routinely uses GridFTP to move 1 TB a day during production runs; and GridFTP is the recommended data transfer mechanism to maximize data transfer rates on the TeraGrid. Commonly used GridFTP clients include globus-url-copy, uberftp, and the Globus Reliable File Transfer service. In this paper, we present a Globus XIO based client to GridFTP that provides a simple Open/Close/Read/Write (OCRW) interface to the users. Such a client greatly eases the addition of GridFTP support to third-party programs, such as SRB and MPICH-G2. Further, this client provides an easier and familiar interface for applications to efficiently access remote files. We compare the performance of this client with that of globus-url-copy on multiple endpoints in the TeraGrid infrastructure. We perform both memory-to-memory and disk-to-disk transfers and show that the performance of this OCRW client is comparable to that of globus-url-copy. We also show that our GridFTP client significantly outperforms the GPFS WAN on the TeraGrid.

  5. Globus Platform-as-a-Service for Collaborative Science Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, Rachana; Chard, Kyle; Foster, Ian; Tuecke, Steven

    2015-02-01

    Globus, developed as Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) for research data management, also provides APIs that constitute a flexible and powerful Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) to which developers can outsource data management activities such as transfer and sharing, as well as identity, profile and group management. By providing these frequently important but always challenging capabilities as a service, accessible over the network, Globus PaaS streamlines web application development and makes it easy for individuals, teams, and institutions to create collaborative applications such as science gateways for science communities. We introduce the capabilities of this platform and review representative applications.

  6. Globus Identity, Access, and Data Management: Platform Services for Collaborative Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, R.; Foster, I.; Wagner, R.

    2016-12-01

    Globus is software-as-a-service for research data management, developed at, and operated by, the University of Chicago. Globus, accessible at www.globus.org, provides high speed, secure file transfer; file sharing directly from existing storage systems; and data publication to institutional repositories. 40,000 registered users have used Globus to transfer tens of billions of files totaling hundreds of petabytes between more than 10,000 storage systems within campuses and national laboratories in the US and internationally. Web, command line, and REST interfaces support both interactive use and integration into applications and infrastructures. An important component of the Globus system is its foundational identity and access management (IAM) platform service, Globus Auth. Both Globus research data management and other applications use Globus Auth for brokering authentication and authorization interactions between end-users, identity providers, resource servers (services), and a range of clients, including web, mobile, and desktop applications, and other services. Compliant with important standards such as OAuth, OpenID, and SAML, Globus Auth provides mechanisms required for an extensible, integrated ecosystem of services and clients for the research and education community. It underpins projects such as the US National Science Foundation's XSEDE system, NCAR's Research Data Archive, and the DOE Systems Biology Knowledge Base. Current work is extending Globus services to be compliant with FEDRAMP standards for security assessment, authorization, and monitoring for cloud services. We will present Globus IAM solutions and give examples of Globus use in various projects for federated access to resources. We will also describe how Globus Auth and Globus research data management capabilities enable rapid development and low-cost operations of secure data sharing platforms that leverage Globus services and integrate them with local policy and security.

  7. Deploying HEP applications using Xen and Globus Virtual Workspaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, A; Desmarais, R; Gable, I; Grundy, D; P-Brown, D; Seuster, R; Vanderster, D C; Sobie, R; Charbonneau, A; Enge, R

    2008-01-01

    The deployment of HEP applications in heterogeneous grid environments can be challenging because many of the applications are dependent on specific OS versions and have a large number of complex software dependencies. Virtual machine monitors such as Xen could be used to package HEP applications, complete with their execution environments, to run on resources that do not meet their operating system requirements. Our previous work has shown HEP applications running within Xen suffer little or no performance penalty as a result of virtualization. However, a practical strategy is required for remotely deploying, booting, and controlling virtual machines on a remote cluster. One tool that promises to overcome the deployment hurdles using standard grid technology is the Globus Virtual Workspaces project. We describe strategies for the deployment of Xen virtual machines using Globus Virtual Workspace middleware that simplify the deployment of HEP applications

  8. Monitoring the grid with the Globus Toolkit MDS4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schopf, Jennifer M; Pearlman, Laura; Miller, Neill; Kesselman, Carl; Foster, Ian; D'Arcy, Mike; Chervenak, Ann

    2006-01-01

    The Globus Toolkit Monitoring and Discovery System (MDS4) defines and implements mechanisms for service and resource discovery and monitoring in distributed environments. MDS4 is distinguished from previous similar systems by its extensive use of interfaces and behaviors defined in the WS-Resource Framework and WS-Notification specifications, and by its deep integration into essentially every component of the Globus Toolkit. We describe the MDS4 architecture and the Web service interfaces and behaviors that allow users to discover resources and services, monitor resource and service states, receive updates on current status, and visualize monitoring results. We present two current deployments to provide insights into the functionality that can be achieved via the use of these mechanisms

  9. New results from Globus-M spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, V.K.

    2002-01-01

    New results from Globus-M spherical tokamak (ST) are presented. Reported are the achievements of high plasma current of 0.36 MA and high toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T. Plasma column stability in Globus-M is conserved at low edge safety factors and high plasma densities. Achieved lowest safety factor was q(cyl) 19 m -3 . New methods of density increase are discussed. Low-density boarder of operational space is investigated. Runaway electrons properties and conditions of their generation are investigated. Results look promising for STs. Plasma-wall interaction study was performed. Silicon probes were installed into vacuum vessel. They were exposed to boronization, first, and then deposited film interacted with plasma. Discussed are film properties. Briefly described are new diagnostic tools installed on tokamak. Status and preliminary results obtained with auxiliary heating systems are shown. (author)

  10. [Use of high frequency cinematography in diagnosis of globus sensation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberty, J; Oelerich, M

    1996-09-01

    Globus pharyngis is a frequent symptom in patients who consult an otolaryngologist. In many cases, routine diagnostic work-up including history, clinical examination, and barium swallow fail to revealing the underlying pathogenesis. In a retrospective study, we present 51 selected patients suffering from globus pharyngis of unknown origin who were investigated by high-speed cineradiography in a standardized manner. Twenty-four of the patients enrolled in the study (47.1%) showed functional and/or structural swallowing disorders. In 13 cases (25.5%) dyskinesias of the superior esophagus sphincter muscle were found. Five of these patients (9.8%) also had an inconstant hypopharyngeal diverticulum. Six cases (11.8%) showed laryngeal penetration or tracheal aspiration. In four cases (7.8%) functional disorders of pharyngeal, and in three cases (5.9%) functional disorders of oral bolus transport were found. Furthermore one hypopharyngeal web (1.9%) and two benign tumors (3.9%) were detected. In many cases, varying combinations of these findings occurred. Using high-speed cineradiography for evaluation of globus pharyngis results in an increased incidence of pathologic findings, and thus is an important method for interdisciplinary diagnostic work up of patients suffering from this symptom.

  11. Globus Online: Climate Data Management for Small Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, R.; Foster, I.

    2013-12-01

    Large and highly distributed climate data demands new approaches to data organization and lifecycle management. We need, in particular, catalogs that can allow researchers to track the location and properties of large numbers of data files, and management tools that can allow researchers to update data properties and organization during their research, move data among different locations, and invoke analysis computations on data--all as easily as if they were working with small numbers of files on their desktop computer. Both catalogs and management tools often need to be able to scale to extremely large quantities of data. When developing solutions to these problems, it is important to distinguish between the needs of (a) large communities, for whom the ability to organize published data is crucial (e.g., by implementing formal data publication processes, assigning DOIs, recording definitive metadata, providing for versioning), and (b) individual researchers and small teams, who are more frequently concerned with tracking the diverse data and computations involved in what highly dynamic and iterative research processes. Key requirements in the latter case include automated data registration and metadata extraction, ease of update, close-to-zero management overheads (e.g., no local software install); and flexible, user-managed sharing support, allowing read and write privileges within small groups. We describe here how new capabilities provided by the Globus Online system address the needs of the latter group of climate scientists, providing for the rapid creation and establishment of lightweight individual- or team-specific catalogs; the definition of logical groupings of data elements, called datasets; the evolution of catalogs, dataset definitions, and associated metadata over time, to track changes in data properties and organization as a result of research processes; and the manipulation of data referenced by catalog entries (e.g., replication of a dataset to

  12. Characterization of Thermophilic Halotolerant Aeribacillus pallidus TD1 from Tao Dam Hot Spring, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somchai Santiwatanakul

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial strain TD1 was isolated from Tao Dam hot spring in Thailand. Strain TD1 was Gram positive, rod-shaped, aerobic, motile, and endospore forming. The cell was 2.0–40 mm in length and about 0.4 mm in diameter. The optimum growth occurred at 55–60 °C and at pH 7–8. Strain TD1 was able to grow on medium containing up to 10% NaCl. The DNA G+C content was 38.9 mol%. The cellular fatty acid content was mainly C16:0, which comprised 25.04% of the total amount of cellular fatty acid. 16S rDNA showed 99% identity to Aeribacillus pallidus DSM 3670T. Bayesian tree analysis strongly supported the idea that strain TD1 is affiliated with genus Aeribacillus, as Aeribacillus pallidus strain TD1. Although the 16S rDNA of A. pallidus strain TD1 is similar to that of A. pallidus DSM 3670T, some physiological properties and the cellular fatty acid profiles differ significantly. A. pallidus strain TD1 can produce extracellular pectate lyase, which has not been reported elsewhere for other bacterial strains in the genus Aeribacillus. A. pallidus strain TD1 may be a good candidate as a pectate lyase producer, which may have useful industrial applications.

  13. Characterization of thermophilic halotolerant Aeribacillus pallidus TD1 from Tao Dam Hot Spring, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasawong, Montri; Areekit, Supatra; Pakpitchareon, Arda; Santiwatanakul, Somchai; Chansiri, Kosum

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial strain TD1 was isolated from Tao Dam hot spring in Thailand. Strain TD1 was Gram positive, rod-shaped, aerobic, motile, and endospore forming. The cell was 2.0-40 μm in length and about 0.4 μm in diameter. The optimum growth occurred at 55-60 °C and at pH 7-8. Strain TD1 was able to grow on medium containing up to 10% NaCl. The DNA G+C content was 38.9 mol%. The cellular fatty acid content was mainly C(16:0), which comprised 25.04% of the total amount of cellular fatty acid. 16S rDNA showed 99% identity to Aeribacillus pallidus DSM 3670(T). Bayesian tree analysis strongly supported the idea that strain TD1 is affiliated with genus Aeribacillus, as Aeribacillus pallidus strain TD1. Although the 16S rDNA of A. pallidus strain TD1 is similar to that of A. pallidus DSM 3670(T), some physiological properties and the cellular fatty acid profiles differ significantly. A. pallidus strain TD1 can produce extracellular pectate lyase, which has not been reported elsewhere for other bacterial strains in the genus Aeribacillus. A. pallidus strain TD1 may be a good candidate as a pectate lyase producer, which may have useful industrial applications.

  14. New results from the Globus-M spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, V.K.; Ananiev, A.S.; Amoskov, V.M.

    2003-01-01

    New results from the Globus-M spherical tokamak are presented. High plasma current of 0.36 MA, high toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T and other important plasma characteristics were achieved. Described are the operational space and plasma stability limits in the OH regime. The factors limiting operational space (MHD instabilities, runaway electrons, etc.) are discussed. New experiments on plasma fuelling are described. First results of experiments with a coaxial plasma gun injector are presented. Initial results of a plasma - wall interaction study are outlined. First results obtained with new diagnostic tools installed on the tokamak are presented. An auxiliary heating system test was performed. Preliminary results of simulations and experiments are given. (author)

  15. The increased risk of globus pharyngeus in patients with chronic thyroiditis: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahatay, S; Ayan, A; Aydin, U; Ince, S; Emer, O; Alagoz, E

    2015-12-01

    A correlation between globus pharyngeus and thyroid gland inflammation has been mentioned in previous studies. However, the potential risk of globus pharyngeus in chronic thyroiditis patients has not been shown so far. The aim of this study is to investigate a possible association between chronic thyroiditis and globus pharyngeus. The study was performed in an ultrasound (US) center of a tertiary health care institution. Ninety-two patients who were under examination for suspected thyroid pathologies or undergoing follow-up for a previously diagnosed thyroid disease were enrolled in the study. The patients were divided into two groups according to the existence of globus symptoms. Subsequently, all patients underwent high-resolution thyroid ultrasounds. The patients whose ultrasound findings were suggestive of chronic thyroiditis constituted the second subgroup. The demographic data of the patients and other ultrasound findings including the volume of the thyroid glands and nodules, if any, were noted as well. Sixty-seven female (73%) and 25 male (27%) patients were enrolled in the study. Thirty-two (35%) of the 92 patients constituted the globus pharyngeus group according to their responses to the questionnaire and the US findings were concordant with chronic thyroiditis in 36 (39%) patients. The correlation between chronic thyroiditis and globus sensation was significant (p = 0.004), and the odds ratio was calculated as 3.7 (95% CI = 1.5-9.11). Other parameters including age, sex, thyroid volume and nodule status were not significantly related to globus pharyngeus in this particular patient series. In the presented study, the risk of globus pharyngeus occurrence was calculated as 3.7-fold higher in patients with chronic thyroiditis. Being a preliminary report, it is necessary to confirm this finding and understand the pathophysiological mechanism via further investigations with a larger patient series.

  16. Structural and biochemical characterization of a nitrilase from the thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus pallidus RAPc8

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Williamson, DS

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available . In common with the plant nitrilases, the recombinant G. pallidus RAPc8 enzyme produced both acid and amide products from nitrile substrates. Electron microscopy and image classification showed complexes having crescentlike, “c-shaped”, circular and “figure...

  17. Esophageal Sensorimotor Function and Psychological Factors Each Contribute to Symptom Severity in Globus Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel, Nathalie; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Arts, Joris; Caenepeel, Philip; Tack, Jan; Pauwels, Ans

    2016-10-01

    Altered upper esophageal sphincter (UES) and esophageal body (EB) sensorimotor function and psychosocial factors may both be involved in symptom generation in globus, but their common impact is not yet assessed. The aim of the study is (1) to compare UES and EB sensitivity and compliance of globus patients with healthy controls (HC); (2) to study the association of globus symptom severity (GSS) with UES and EB sensitivity and compliance, UES motor function and psychosocial factors. In 58 globus patients, GSS, somatization, and anxiety disorders were determined using validated questionnaires. In 26 HC and 42/58 patients, UES and EB sensitivity and compliance were assessed twice using barostat measurements. UES function of 27 globus patients was evaluated using high-resolution manometry. Bivariate correlations and a general linear model tested the association of these factors with GSS. UES and EB compliance did not differ between globus patients and HC. Upon repeated distension, UES habituation was seen in both groups, whereas EB sensitization (23.3±1.3 vs. 19.5±1.5 mm Hg, Pdisorder (t=3.04, P=0.004), and post-traumatic stress severity (ρ=0.40, P=0.005) were associated with GSS. UES compliance and somatization were independently associated with GSS. A trend (P=0.061) was found for the association of GSS with change in EB compliance. UES compliance, change in EB compliance, and somatization explain 40% of the variance in GSS. This indicates that globus is a complex disorder of the brain-gut axis rather than a "psychosomatic" disorder or a peripheral esophageal disorder.

  18. GeoDataspaces: Simplifying Data Management Tasks with Globus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, T.; Chard, K.; Tchoua, R. B.; Foster, I.

    2014-12-01

    Data and its management are central to modern scientific enterprise. Typically, geoscientists rely on observations and model output data from several disparate sources (file systems, RDBMS, spreadsheets, remote data sources). Integrated data management solutions that provide intuitive semantics and uniform interfaces, irrespective of the kind of data source are, however, lacking. Consequently, geoscientists are left to conduct low-level and time-consuming data management tasks, individually, and repeatedly for discovering each data source, often resulting in errors in handling. In this talk we will describe how the EarthCube GeoDataspace project is improving this situation for seismologists, hydrologists, and space scientists by simplifying some of the existing data management tasks that arise when developing computational models. We will demonstrate a GeoDataspace, bootstrapped with "geounits", which are self-contained metadata packages that provide complete description of all data elements associated with a model run, including input/output and parameter files, model executable and any associated libraries. Geounits link raw and derived data as well as associating provenance information describing how data was derived. We will discuss challenges in establishing geounits and describe machine learning and human annotation approaches that can be used for extracting and associating ad hoc and unstructured scientific metadata hidden in binary formats with data resources and models. We will show how geounits can improve search and discoverability of data associated with model runs. To support this model, we will describe efforts related towards creating a scalable metadata catalog that helps to maintain, search and discover geounits within the Globus network of accessible endpoints. This talk will focus on the issue of creating comprehensive personal inventories of data assets for computational geoscientists, and describe a publishing mechanism, which can be used to

  19. Association between swallow perception and esophageal bolus clearance in patients with globus sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Lin; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai

    2013-04-01

    Globus sensation is common, but its pathogenesis is not yet clear. Our purpose was to investigate subjective perception of swallowing and esophageal motility by combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and manometry (MII-EM) for patients with globus sensation. Combined MII-EM was performed for 25 globus patients and 15 healthy controls. Swallows were abnormal if hypocontractivity or simultaneous contractions occurred. Esophageal bolus transit was incomplete if bolus exit was not found at one or more of all measurement sites. Perception of each swallow was assessed by use of a standardized scoring system, and was enhanced if the score was >1. Few globus patients reported enhanced perception during viscous or solid swallows. Incomplete bolus transit and enhanced perception occurred similarly between viscous and solid boluses. Agreement between enhanced perception and proximal bolus clearance was greater during solid swallows (κ = 0.45, 95 % CI: 0.32-0.58) than during viscous swallows (κ = 0.13, 95 % CI: 0-0.25) (P perception and total bolus clearance was greater during solid swallows (κ = 0.46, 95 % CI: 0.34-0.58) than during viscous swallows (κ = 0.11, 95 % CI: 0-0.22) (P perception is uncommon in patients with globus sensation, although there is a significant association between enhanced esophageal perception and solid bolus clearance. Application of a solid bolus may help better delineation of the interrelationship between the subjective perception of bolus passage and the objective measurement of bolus clearance.

  20. Globus Nexus: A Platform-as-a-Service Provider of Research Identity, Profile, and Group Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chard, Kyle; Lidman, Mattias; McCollam, Brendan; Bryan, Josh; Ananthakrishnan, Rachana; Tuecke, Steven; Foster, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Globus Nexus is a professionally hosted Platform-as-a-Service that provides identity, profile and group management functionality for the research community. Many collaborative e-Science applications need to manage large numbers of user identities, profiles, and groups. However, developing and maintaining such capabilities is often challenging given the complexity of modern security protocols and requirements for scalable, robust, and highly available implementations. By outsourcing this functionality to Globus Nexus, developers can leverage best-practice implementations without incurring development and operations overhead. Users benefit from enhanced capabilities such as identity federation, flexible profile management, and user-oriented group management. In this paper we present Globus Nexus, describe its capabilities and architecture, summarize how several e-Science applications leverage these capabilities, and present results that characterize its scalability, reliability, and availability.

  1. The role of transnasal oesophagoscopy in the management of globus pharyngeus and non-progressive dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyaolu, L N; Jemah, A; Stew, B; Ingrams, D R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transnasal oesophagoscopy is a relatively new method of examining the upper aerodigestive tract via the nasal passage as an outpatient procedure without the need for sedation. It has been shown to be a well tolerated, safe and accurate technique, that can therefore be used in the investigation of patients thought to have globus pharyngeus and other non sinister causes of dysphagia. Methods A total of 150 consecutive patients undergoing transnasal oesophagoscopy were analysed retrospectively. Results The main indications for this procedure were non-progressive dysphagia (n=68, 45%) and globus pharyngeus (n=60, 40%). Transnasal oesophagoscopy was normal in 65% of patients and 42% of patients were discharged from clinic at the same appointment with no further investigation. The most common positive findings were laryngeal erythema (13%) and oesophagitis (10%). Conclusions Transnasal oesophagoscopy is a useful adjunct to the management of patients with the symptoms of globus pharyngeus and non-progressive dysphagia.

  2. Globus Nexus: A Platform-as-a-Service provider of research identity, profile, and group management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chard, Kyle; Lidman, Mattias; McCollam, Brendan; Bryan, Josh; Ananthakrishnan, Rachana; Tuecke, Steven; Foster, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Globus Nexus is a professionally hosted Platform-as-a-Service that provides identity, profile and group management functionality for the research community. Many collaborative e-Science applications need to manage large numbers of user identities, profiles, and groups. However, developing and maintaining such capabilities is often challenging given the complexity of modern security protocols and requirements for scalable, robust, and highly available implementations. By outsourcing this functionality to Globus Nexus, developers can leverage best-practice implementations without incurring development and operations overhead. Users benefit from enhanced capabilities such as identity federation, flexible profile management, and user-oriented group management. In this paper we present Globus Nexus, describe its capabilities and architecture, summarize how several e-Science applications leverage these capabilities, and present results that characterize its scalability, reliability, and availability.

  3. Production and characterization of a new antibacterial peptide obtained from Aeribacillus pallidus SAT4

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad, Syed Aun; Ahmed, Safia

    2015-01-01

    A novel thermophilic bacterial strain of the genus Aeribacillus was isolated from Thar Dessert Pakistan. This strain showed significant antibacterial activity against Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The strain coded as ‘SAT4’ resembled with Aeribacillus pallidus in the morphological, biochemical and molecular tests. The production of antibacterial metabolites by SAT4 was optimized. These active metabolites were precipitated by 50% ammonium sulphate and p...

  4. Characterization and emulsifying property of a novel bioemulsifier by Aeribacillus pallidus YM-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, C; Li, Z; Su, J; Zhang, R; Liu, C; Zhao, M

    2012-07-01

      Biosurfactants and bioemulsifiers commonly have the advantages of biodegradability, low toxicity, selectivity and biocompatibility over chemically synthesized surfactants. The goal of the study is to present a novel bioemulsifier with great application potential.   Aeribacillus pallidus YM-1, isolated from crude oil contaminated soil, was found to produce a novel high molecular bioemulsifier with an emulsification index of 60 ± 1% without remarkable surface tension reduction (45·7 ± 0·1 mN m(-1) ). The number-average molecular weight was determined as 526 369 Da by gel permeation chromatography analysis. Bioemulsifier was subjected to FT-IR and a complex of carbohydrates (41·1%), lipids (47·6%) and proteins (11·3%) was determined.   The bioemulsifier of A. pallidus YM-1 was isolated from the glucose-based culture medium and characterized with the help of chemical analytical techniques. The bioemulsifier exhibited a promising emulsifying property for biotechnology application potential in bioremediation and microbial enhanced oil recovery.   This is the first report of the bioemulsifier production by A. pallidus. The potential emulsifying activity of the bioemulsifier in the present study may be explored in various biotechnological and industrial applications. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Biofilm characteristics and evaluation of the sanitation procedures of thermophilic Aeribacillus pallidus E334 biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Tugba; Karaca, Basar; Ozel, Beste Piril; Ozcan, Birgul; Cokmus, Cumhur; Coleri Cihan, Arzu

    2017-04-01

    The ability of Aeribacillus pallidus E334 to produce pellicle and form a biofilm was studied. Optimal biofilm formation occurred at 60 °C, pH 7.5 and 1.5% NaCl. Extra polymeric substances (EPS) were composed of proteins and eDNA (21.4 kb). E334 formed biofilm on many surfaces, but mostly preferred polypropylene and glass. Using CLSM analysis, the network-like structure of the EPS was observed. The A. pallidus biofilm had a novel eDNA content. DNaseI susceptibility (86.8% removal) of eDNA revealed its importance in mature biofilms, but the purified eDNA was resistant to DNaseI, probably due to its extended folding outside the matrix. Among 15 cleaning agents, biofilms could be removed with alkaline protease and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). The removal of cells from polypropylene and biomass on glass was achieved with combined SDS/alkaline protease treatment. Strong A. pallidus biofilms could cause risks for industrial processes and abiotic surfaces must be taken into consideration in terms of sanitation procedures.

  6. More than Just Fun and Games: BSG and Glo-Bus as Strategic Education Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karriker, Joy H.; Aaron, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    Simulations like the BSG and Glo-Bus allow students the opportunity to practice their integrated, strategic management skills in a relatively risk-free environment or "live case." We review these games and address their strengths, along with the challenges associated with their classroom application. Because of their sound designs and…

  7. Pathophysiology and treatment of patients with globus sensation ―from the viewpoint of esophageal motility dysfunction―

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Noriaki; Tsutsui, Hideaki; Kusunoki, Hiroaki; Hata, Jiro; Haruma, Ken

    2014-01-01

    "Globus sensation" is often described as the sensation of a lump in the throat associated with dry swallowing or the need for dry swallowing, which disappears completely during eating or drinking and for which no organic cause can be established. Due to the uncertain etiology of "globus sensation", it remains difficult to establish standard treatment strategies for affected patients. Lately most attention has been focused on gastroesophageal reflux disease and several reports have indicated that there is a close relationship between esophageal acid reflux and globus sensation. Nowadays, empirical therapy with a high dose of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is considered to be indicated for patients with globus sensation, after excluding organic diseases such as pharyngeal cancer, Zenker's diverticulum, or thyroid enlargement. If patients are nonresponsive to PPI therapy, evaluation of esophageal motility should be done. In our recent study, 47.9% had abnormal esophageal motility, with the most common esophageal motility abnormality being an ineffective esophageal motility in PPI-resistant patients with globus sensation. This suggests that prokinetics alone or adding prokinetics to PPI should be the treatment to be considered, although few studies have investigated the efficacy of prokinetics in the treatment of patients with globus sensation. If patients without any esophageal motility dysfunctions are nonresponsive to PPI therapy, either cognitive-behavioral therapy, anti-depressants, or gabapentin could be helpful, although further well-designed, randomized controlled large-scale studies will be necessary to determine the effectiveness of each treatment strategy on patients with globus sensation. PMID:26081369

  8. A prospective cohort-study of 122 adult patients presenting to an otolaryngologist's office with globus pharyngeus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Eva Rye; Schnack, Didde Traerup; Ravn, Andreas Tomaas

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the epidemiology of globus pharyngeus in adult patients presenting to the otolaryngologist's office. Also the predictors of persisting symptoms, prevalence of anxiety and the effect of clinical assessment were analyzed. DESIGN: This was a prospective cohort study. Follow......-up was done using a postal questionnaire. SETTING: One otolaryngologists' office comprising three medical doctors. PARTICIPANTS: 122 consecutive globus patients presenting to one otolaryngology office in a one-year period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Globus incidence, gender- and age-distribution, predictors...... of persisting symptoms and the patient's health related concerns. RESULTS: 3.8% of first-time visits were regarding globus. The mean age was 48 years [range 20-88 y] and a female predominance was found (ratio 1.49). 84% experienced anxiety, mainly due to fear of cancer. The most common pathological findings...

  9. Plasma heating and fuelling in the Globus-M spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, V.K.; Barsukov, A.G.; Belyakov, V.A.

    2005-01-01

    The results of the last two years of plasma investigations at Globus-M are presented. Described are improvements helping to achieve high performance OH plasmas, which are used as the target for auxiliary heating and fuelling experiments. Increased energy content, high beta poloidal and good confinement are reported. Experiments on NBI plasma heating with a wide range of plasma parameters were performed. Some results are presented and analyzed. Experiments on RF plasma heating in the frequency range of fundamental ion cyclotron harmonics are described. In some experiments which were performed for the first time in spherical tokamaks, promising results were achieved. Noticeable ion heating was recorded at low launched power and a high concentration of hydrogen minority in deuterium plasmas. Simulations of RF wave absorption are briefly discussed. Described also are modification of the plasma gun and test-stand experiments. Fuelling experiments performed at Globus-M are discussed. (author)

  10. Videofluoroscopy of the pharynx and esophagus in patients with globus pharyngis. Comparison with static radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schober, E.; Schima, W.; Pokieser, P.

    1995-01-01

    The symptom is associated with a multitude of pharyngoesophageal abnormalities. Our study compares the diagnostic yield of videofluoroscopy to that of static radiography in patients suffering from globus pharnygis. A total of 150 consecutive patients complaining of a lump in the throat, but without evidence of dysphagia, were studied in a standardized fashion with both methods. Videofluoroscopy combined with static radiography revealed morphological or functional abnormalities in 75% of our patients. The combination of the two methods yielded significantly more abnormalities in the pharynx and esophagus than videofluoroscopy or static radiography alone. Esophageal motor disorders, pharyngoesophageal sphincter dysfunction and pharyngeal residue of contrast material proved to be the most common abnormalities. In conclusion, videofluoroscopy combined with static radiography is mandatory in the radiological assessment of patients suffering from the globus sensation. (orig.) [de

  11. Using Globus GridFTP to Transfer and Share Big Data | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer, and Mark Wance, Guest Writer; photo by Richard Frederickson, Staff Photographer Transferring big data, such as the genomics data delivered to customers from the Center for Cancer Research Sequencing Facility (CCR SF), has been difficult in the past because the transfer systems have not kept pace with the size of the data. However, the situation is changing as a result of the Globus GridFTP project.

  12. Integration of Globus Online with the ATLAS PanDA Workload Management System

    CERN Document Server

    Contreras, C; The ATLAS collaboration; Maeno, T; Nilsson, P; Potekhin, M

    2012-01-01

    The PanDA Workload Management System is the basis for distributed production and analysis for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. In this role, it relies on sophisticated dynamic data movement facilities developed in ATLAS. In certain scenarios, such as small research teams in ATLAS Tier-3 sites and non-ATLAS Virtual Organizations, the overhead of installation and operation of these components makes their use not very cost effective. Globus Online is an emerging new tool from the Globus Alliance, which already proved popular within the research community. It provides the users with fast and robust file transfer capabilities that can also be managed from a Web interface, and in addition to grid sites, can have individual workstations and laptops serving as data transmission endpoints. We will describe the integration of the Globus Online functionality into the PanDA suite of software, in order to give more flexibility in choosing the method of data transfer to ATLAS Tier-3 and OSG users.

  13. Integration of Globus Online with the ATLAS PanDA Workload Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras, C; Deng, W; Maeno, T; Potekhin, M; Nilsson, P

    2012-01-01

    The PanDA Workload Management System is the basis for distributed production and analysis for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. In this role, it relies on sophisticated dynamic data movement facilities developed in ATLAS. In certain scenarios, such as small research teams in ATLAS Tier-3 sites and non-ATLAS Virtual Organizations, the overhead of installation and operation of these components makes their use not very cost effective. Globus Online is an emerging new tool from the Globus Alliance, which already proved popular within the research community. It provides the users with fast and robust file transfer capabilities that can also be managed from a Web interface, and in addition to grid sites, can have individual workstations and laptops serving as data transmission endpoints. We will describe the integration of the Globus Online functionality into the PanDA suite of software, in order to give more flexibility in choosing the method of data transfer to ATLAS Tier-3 and Open Science Grid (OSG) users.

  14. Plasma jet source parameter optimisation and experiments on injection into Globus-M spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, V.K.; Petrov, Yu.V.; Sakharov, N.V.; Semenov, A.A.; Voronin, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    Results of theoretical and experimental research on the plasma sources and injection of plasma and gas jet produced by the modified source into tokamak Globus-M are presented. An experimental test stand was developed for investigation of intense plasma jet generation. Optimisation of pulsed coaxial accelerator parameters by means of analytical calculations is performed with the aim of achieving the highest flow velocity at limited coaxial electrode length and discharge current. The optimal parameters of power supply to generate a plasma jet with minimal impurity contamination and maximum flow velocity were determined. A comparison of experimental and calculation results is made. Plasma jet parameters are measured, such as: impurity species content, pressure distribution across the jet, flow velocity, plasma density, etc. Experiments on the interaction of a higher kinetic energy plasma jet with the magnetic field and plasma of the Globus-M tokamak were performed. Experimental results on plasma and gas jet injection into different Globus-M discharge phases are presented and discussed. Results are presented on the investigation of plasma jet injection as the source for discharge breakdown, plasma current startup and initial density rise. (author)

  15. Role of transnasal flexible laryngo-oesophagoscopy (TNFLO) in investigating patients with globus symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, H; Coates, M; Masterson, L; Chan, W Y; Hassan, Y; Nassif, R

    2017-12-01

    To explore the rationale for investigating patients presenting with globus symptoms. In this regard, we also assess the efficacy and safety of transnasal flexible laryngo-oesophagoscopy (TNFLO). A prospective study in a head and neck cancer centre of patients with persistent globus symptoms with normal flexible nasoendoscopy/indirect mirror laryngoscopy and failure of first-line medical treatment. The role of TNFLO in investigating these patients was assessed. A total of 218 patients were recruited in this study. Positive findings included upper aerodigestive cancers in two patients, other pathologies included reflux (four patients), cricopharyngeus-related pathologies (19 patients), candida (five patients). There were only five re-referrals of patients who were discharged following normal examination with TNFLO. In nine patients, TNFLO could not be completed and they went on to have other diagnostic procedures CONCLUSION: This article is the largest to date in the UK to assess the role of TNFLO in investigating patients with globus symptoms. TNFLO is equal to rigid endoscopy as a diagnostic tool. However, it is superior in terms of image clarity, ability to record video images and safety. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Production and properties of two novel exopolysaccharides synthesized by a thermophilic bacterium Aeribacillus pallidus 418.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenkova, Nadja; Vassilev, Spasen; Panchev, Ivan; Anzelmo, Gianluca; Tomova, Iva; Nicolaus, Barbara; Kuncheva, Margarita; Petrov, Kaloyan; Kambourova, Margarita

    2013-09-01

    Synthesis of innovative exocellular polysaccharides (EPSs) was reported for few thermophilic microorganisms as one of the mechanisms for surviving at high temperature. Thermophilic aerobic spore-forming bacteria able to produce exopolysaccharides were isolated from hydrothermal springs in Bulgaria. They were referred to four species, such as Aeribacillus pallidus, Geobacillus toebii, Brevibacillus thermoruber, and Anoxybacillus kestanbolensis. The highest production was established for the strain 418, whose phylogenetic and phenotypic properties referred it to the species A. pallidus. Maltose and NH4Cl were observed to be correspondingly the best carbon and nitrogen sources and production yield was increased more than twofold in the process of culture condition optimization. After purification of the polymer fraction, a presence of two different EPSs, electroneutral EPS 1 and negatively charged EPS 2, in a relative weight ratio 3:2.2 was established. They were heteropolysaccharides consisting of unusual high variety of sugars (six for EPS 1 and seven for EPS 2). Six of the sugars were common for both EPSs. The main sugar in EPS 1 was mannose (69.3 %); smaller quantities of glucose (11.2 %), galactosamine (6.3 %), glucosamine (5.4 %), galactose (4.7 %), and ribose (2.9 %) were also identified. The main sugar in EPS 2 was also mannose (33.9 %), followed by galactose (17.9 %), glucose (15.5 %), galactosamine (11.7 %), glucosamine (8.1 %), ribose (5.3 %), and arabinose (4.9 %). Both polymers showed high molecular weight and high thermostability.

  17. DNA-binding properties of the Bacillus subtilis and Aeribacillus pallidus AC6 σ(D) proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevim, Elif; Gaballa, Ahmed; Beldüz, A Osman; Helmann, John D

    2011-01-01

    σ(D) proteins from Aeribacillus pallidus AC6 and Bacillus subtilis bound specifically, albeit weakly, to promoter DNA even in the absence of core RNA polymerase. Binding required a conserved CG motif within the -10 element, and this motif is known to be recognized by σ region 2.4 and critical for promoter activity.

  18. DNA-Binding Properties of the Bacillus subtilis and Aeribacillus pallidus AC6 σD Proteins▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevim, Elif; Gaballa, Ahmed; Beldüz, A. Osman; Helmann, John D.

    2011-01-01

    σD proteins from Aeribacillus pallidus AC6 and Bacillus subtilis bound specifically, albeit weakly, to promoter DNA even in the absence of core RNA polymerase. Binding required a conserved CG motif within the −10 element, and this motif is known to be recognized by σ region 2.4 and critical for promoter activity. PMID:21097624

  19. Genome Sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus Strain GS3372, an Endospore-Forming Bacterium Isolated in a Deep Geothermal Reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Sevasti Filippidou; Marion Jaussi; Thomas Junier; Tina Wunderlin; Nicole Jeanneret; Simona Regenspurg; Po-E Li; Chien-Chi Lo; Shannon Johnson; Kim McMurry; Cheryl D. Gleasner; Momchilo Vuyisich; Patrick S. Chain; Pilar Junier

    2015-01-01

    The genome of strain GS3372 is the first publicly available strain of Aeribacillus pallidus. This endospore-forming thermophilic strain was isolated from a deep geothermal reservoir. The availability of this genome can contribute to the clarification of the taxonomy of the closely related Anoxybacillus, Geobacillus, and Aeribacillus genera.

  20. DNA-Binding Properties of the Bacillus subtilis and Aeribacillus pallidus AC6 σD Proteins▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sevim, Elif; Gaballa, Ahmed; Beldüz, A. Osman; Helmann, John D.

    2010-01-01

    σD proteins from Aeribacillus pallidus AC6 and Bacillus subtilis bound specifically, albeit weakly, to promoter DNA even in the absence of core RNA polymerase. Binding required a conserved CG motif within the −10 element, and this motif is known to be recognized by σ region 2.4 and critical for promoter activity.

  1. Genome Sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus Strain GS3372, an Endospore-Forming Bacterium Isolated in a Deep Geothermal Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Jaussi, Marion; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Jeanneret, Nicole; Regenspurg, Simona; Li, Po-E; Lo, Chien-Chi; Johnson, Shannon; McMurry, Kim; Gleasner, Cheryl D; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Chain, Patrick S; Junier, Pilar

    2015-08-27

    The genome of strain GS3372 is the first publicly available strain of Aeribacillus pallidus. This endospore-forming thermophilic strain was isolated from a deep geothermal reservoir. The availability of this genome can contribute to the clarification of the taxonomy of the closely related Anoxybacillus, Geobacillus, and Aeribacillus genera. Copyright © 2015 Filippidou et al.

  2. Diet, digestion, and food preferences of Galapagos land iguanas. [Conolophus pallidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, K.A.; Tracy, C.R.; Porter, W.P.

    1984-01-01

    The choice of food types and the length of time food passed through the gastrointestinal tract were determined in free-ranging Conolophus pallidus on Isla Santa Fe, Galapogos throughout the year. Natural foods were analyzed for energy, percent cellulose, percent nitrogen, and calcium as indices of the quality of food. Foods of highest quality were found to be among the preferred foods, but not all preferred foods were of high quality with respect to the nutrients measured. Passage time of food through the gastrointestinal tract, digestive efficiency, and digestion of cellulose were determined on captive Conolophus subcristatus. Ability to digest cellulose and digestive efficiency varied among five caged iguanas. Intra- and interspecific variabilities in digestive capacities result from variability in ecological factors, and interspecific variability among iguanines probably reflects differences in colic anatomy and the ability to absorb nutrients from the hindgut. 23 references, 4 tables.

  3. [Detection of a higher incidence of pathologic somatic findings in globus sensation by use of high frequency cinematography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannig, C; Wuttge-Hannig, A; Bockmeyer, M

    1987-07-01

    Since December 1984 303 patients have undergone examination in our Multidisciplinary Consultation Service for Swallowing Disorders; 117 of them were suffering from typical globus symptoms. We were able to increase the yield of detection of organic lesions by use of the technique of 35 mm film cineradiography with a rate of 50 frames/s. Frame-by-frame analysis and computer-assisted evaluation showed that 80% of the patients with globus symptoms suffered from one or more underlying organic diseases, which could often be treated later with success. We found an increased incidence of early hypopharyngeal diverticula, webs, and motility disorders of the upper esophageal sphincter often associated with gastro-esophageal reflux or weakness of the pharyngeal wall. Cineradiography proved to be a very important tool in the analysis of the pharyngeal swallow in globus pharyngis.

  4. High kinetic energy plasma jet generation and its injection into the Globus-M spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronin, A.V.; Gusev, V.K.; Petrov, Yu.V.; Sakharov, N.V.; Abramova, K.B.; Sklyarova, E.M.; Tolstyakov, S.Yu.

    2005-01-01

    Progress in the theoretical and experimental development of the plasma jet source and injection of hydrogen plasma and neutral gas jets into the Globus-M spherical tokamak is discussed. An experimental test bed is described for investigation of intense plasma jets that are generated by a double-stage plasma gun consisting of an intense source for neutral gas production and a conventional pulsed coaxial accelerator. A procedure for optimizing the accelerator parameters so as to achieve the maximum possible flow velocity with a limited discharge current and a reasonable length of the coaxial electrodes is presented. The calculations are compared with experiment. Plasma jet parameters, among them pressure distribution across the jet, flow velocity, plasma density, etc, were measured. Plasma jets with densities of up to 10 22 m -3 , total numbers of accelerated particles (1-5) x 10 19 , and flow velocities of 50-100 km s -1 were successfully injected into the plasma column of the Globus-M tokamak. Interferometric and Thomson scattering measurements confirmed deep jet penetration and a fast density rise ( 19 to 1 x 10 19 ) did not result in plasma degradation

  5. Rikkunshito improves globus sensation in patients with proton-pump inhibitor-refractory laryngopharyngeal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokashiki, Ryoji; Okamoto, Isaku; Funato, Nobutoshi; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2013-08-21

    To investigate the effect of rikkunshito on laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) symptoms and gastric emptying in patients with proton-pump inhibitor (PPI)-refractory LPR. In total, 22 patients with LPR were enrolled. Following a 2-wk treatment with PPI monotherapy, PPI-refractory LPR patients were randomly divided into two treatment groups (rikkunshito alone or rikkunshito plus the PPI, lansoprazole). LPR symptoms were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) score, gastrointestinal symptoms were assessed using the gastrointestinal symptom rating scale (GSRS), and gastric emptying was assessed using the radio-opaque marker method prior to and 4 wk following treatments. The 4-wk treatment with rikkunshito alone and with rikkunshito plus the PPI significantly decreased the globus sensation VAS scores. The VAS score for sore throat was significantly decreased following treatment with rikkunshito plus PPI but not by rikkunshito alone. Neither treatment significantly changed the GSRS scores. Rikkunshito improved delayed gastric emptying. We found a significant positive correlation between improvements in globus sensation and in gastric emptying (r² = 0.4582, P sensation in patients with PPI-refractory LPR, in part, because of stimulation of gastric emptying. Thus, rikkunshito is an effective treatment for PPI-refractory LPR.

  6. Envenomation by neotropical Opisthoglyphous colubrid Thamnodynastes cf. pallidus Linné, 1758 (Serpentes:Colubridae in Venezuela Envenenamiento por la colubrida opistoglifa Thamnodynastes cf. pallidus Linné, 1758 (Serpentes:Colubridae en Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fresnel Diaz

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of a "non-venomous" snake bite in a herpetologist observed at the Sciences Faculty of the Universidad de los Andes (Mérida, Venezuela. The patient was bitten on the middle finger of the left hand, and shows signs of pronounced local manifestations of envenomation such as bleeding from the tooth imprint, swelling and warmth. He was treated with local care, analgesics, and steroids. He was dismissed from the hospital and observed at home during five days with marked improvement of envenomation. The snake was brought to the medical consult and identified as a Thamnodynastes cf. pallidus specimen. This report represents the first T. pallidus accident described in a human.Se reporta un caso de una mordedura de serpiente "no venenosa", en un herpetólogo observado en la Facultad de Ciencias de la Universidad de los Andes (Mérida, Venezuela. El paciente fue mordido en el dedo medio de la mano izquierda, mostrando pronunciados signos locales de sangramiento por la impronta ocasionada por los dientes de la serpiente, edema y calor local. El paciente fue tratado con cuidados locales, analgésicos y esteroides. Fue dado de alta del hospital y observado en el hogar durante 5 días, con marcada mejoría del envenenamiento. La serpiente fue traída a la consulta médica e identificada como un espécimen de Thamnodynastes cf. pallidus. Este es el primer caso humano descrito, ocasionado por un T. pallidus.

  7. A multilevel approach to examining cephalopod growth using Octopus pallidus as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmens, Jayson; Doubleday, Zoë; Hoyle, Kate; Pecl, Gretta

    2011-08-15

    Many aspects of octopus growth dynamics are poorly understood, particularly in relation to sub-adult or adult growth, muscle fibre dynamics and repro-somatic investment. The growth of 5 month old Octopus pallidus cultured in the laboratory was investigated under three temperature regimes over a 12 week period: seasonally increasing temperatures (14-18°C); seasonally decreasing temperatures (18-14°C); and a constant temperature mid-way between seasonal peaks (16°C). Differences in somatic growth at the whole-animal level, muscle tissue structure and rate of gonad development were investigated. Continuous exponential growth was observed, both at a group and at an individual level, and there was no detectable effect of temperature on whole-animal growth rate. Juvenile growth rate (from 1 to 156 days) was also monitored prior to the controlled experiment; exponential growth was observed, but at a significantly faster rate than in the older experimental animals, suggesting that O. pallidus exhibit a double-exponential two-phase growth pattern. There was considerable variability in size-at-age even between individuals growing under identical thermal regimes. Animals exposed to seasonally decreasing temperatures exhibited a higher rate of gonad development compared with animals exposed to increasing temperatures; however, this did not coincide with a detectable decline in somatic growth rate or mantle condition. The ongoing production of new mitochondria-poor and mitochondria-rich muscle fibres (hyperplasia) was observed, indicated by a decreased or stable mean muscle fibre diameter concurrent with an increase in whole-body size. Animals from both seasonal temperature regimes demonstrated higher rates of new mitochondria-rich fibre generation relative to those from the constant temperature regime, but this difference was not reflected in a difference in growth rate at the whole-body level. This is the first study to record ongoing hyperplasia in the muscle tissue of an

  8. Suitability of the alkalistable carbonic anhydrase from a polyextremophilic bacterium Aeribacillus pallidus TSHB1 in biomimetic carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Himadri; Satyanarayana, T

    2016-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) was produced from the polyextremophilic (halotolerant, moderately thermophilic and alkaliphilic) bacterium Aeribacillus pallidus TSHB1 isolated from water and sediment samples of Choti Anhoni hot spring of Pipariya, Madhya Pradesh (India), is being reported to be suitable for carbon sequestration. Growth and CA production were inhibited at higher CO2 concentration (5-10 %). Under optimized culture variables (tryptone 0.8 %, yeast extract 0.08 %, glucose 1 %, micronutrient solution 1 %, inoculums size 1.10 %, agitation 200 at pH 8, and temperature 55 °C), 3.7-fold higher CA production was attained than that under unoptimized conditions. The zymogram analysis of the partially purified CA revealed an activity band corresponding to 32 kDa. The enzyme is stable in the pH range between 8.0 and 11.0 with T 1/2 of 40, 15, and 8 min at 60, 70, and 80 °C, respectively. The CA of A. pallidus displayed a marked enhancement in the rate of CaCO3 precipitation from aqueous CO2. The CA-aided formation of CaCO3 was 42.5 mg mg(-1) protein. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of rhomboid calcite crystals. This is the first report on the production and applicability of CA from the polyextremophilic A. pallidus in carbon sequestration.

  9. Production and characterization of a new antibacterial peptide obtained from Aeribacillus pallidus SAT4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Aun Muhammad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel thermophilic bacterial strain of the genus Aeribacillus was isolated from Thar Dessert Pakistan. This strain showed significant antibacterial activity against Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The strain coded as ‘SAT4’ resembled with Aeribacillus pallidus in the morphological, biochemical and molecular tests. The production of antibacterial metabolites by SAT4 was optimized. These active metabolites were precipitated by 50% ammonium sulphate and purified through sephadex G-75 gel permeation chromatography and reverse phase HPLC. The molecular weight of 37 kDa was examined by SDS-PAGE. The structural elucidation of the purified product was studied by FTIR, 1H and 13C NMR. The X-ray diffractions study showed that the crystals belonged to the primitive orthorhombic lattice (a = 12.137, b = 13.421, c = 14.097 Å and 3D structure (proposed name: Aeritracin was determined. This new peptide antibacterial molecule can get a position in pharmaceutical and biotechnological industrial research.

  10. Physiological and ecological consequences of sleeping-site selection by the Galapagos land iguana (Conolophus pallidus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, K.A.; Tracy, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    Field observations and biophysical models were combined to analyze sleeping-site selection by Galapagos land iguanas (Conolophus pallidus). Iguanas slept in different kinds of sleeping sites during different seasons. In the coolest season (garua), adult land iguanas were found in sleeping sites that were warmer than the coolest sites available. This may be because the garua season (cool, overcast, and foggy) is a time when environmental conditions mitigate against rapid warm-up in the mornings, so lizards may regulate nighttime body temperatures so that it is easier to warm up to preferred daytime body temperatures. In the warmest season, adult iguanas were found in the coolest sleeping sites available. This observation is consistent with hypotheses of voluntary hypothermia, which can be advantageous in energy conservation and in avoiding detrimental effects associated with maintenance of constant body temperatures throughout the day and night. Juvenile iguanas were found sleeping in rock crevices regardless of the ambient thermal environments. Such sites are likely to be important as refugia for this life stage, which, unlike the adult stage, is vulnerable to predation. It was concluded that selection of sleeping sites is a process that may help in avoidance of predation, optimization of body temperature at the end of the sleeping period, and reduction of metabolic costs during sleeping. The importance of some of these factors may change with the thermal milieu (e.g., season).

  11. Role of urea in the postprandial urine concentration cycle of the insectivorous bat Antrozous pallidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, John E

    2004-02-01

    Insectivorous bats, which feed once daily, produce maximally concentrated urine only after feeding. The role of urea as an osmolyte in this process was investigated in pallid bats (Antrozous pallidus) in the laboratory. Following a 24-h fast, plasma and urine were sampled before and 2 h after feeding in postprandial (PP) animals and before and 2 h after similar treatment without feeding in nonfed (NF) animals. Food consumption by PP animals and handling of NF animals had no effect on blood water content as measured by hematocrit and plasma oncotic pressure. Food consumption increased both plasma osmolality (P(osm)) and plasma urea (P(urea)) by as much as 15%. Food consumption also increased urine osmolality (U(osm)) and urine urea (U(urea)) by 50-100%. Feeding increased U(osm) regardless of changes in P(osm), and elevation of U(osm) resulted primarily from increased U(urea). In NF bats, P(osm) and P(urea) were unchanged, while U(osm) and U(urea) increased by as much as 25%. Again, increased U(osm) resulted primarily from increased U(urea). The PP urine concentration cycle of pallid bats resulted from increased urea excretion in response to apparent rapid urea synthesis. Bats rapidly metabolized protein and excreted urea following feeding when body water was most plentiful.

  12. Production and characterization of a new antibacterial peptide obtained from Aeribacillus pallidus SAT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Syed Aun; Ahmed, Safia

    2015-12-01

    A novel thermophilic bacterial strain of the genus Aeribacillus was isolated from Thar Dessert Pakistan. This strain showed significant antibacterial activity against Micrococcus luteus , Staphylococcus aureus , and Pseudomonas aerugin osa. The strain coded as 'SAT4' resembled with Aeribacillus pallidus in the morphological, biochemical and molecular tests. The production of antibacterial metabolites by SAT4 was optimized. These active metabolites were precipitated by 50% ammonium sulphate and purified through sephadex G-75 gel permeation chromatography and reverse phase HPLC. The molecular weight of 37 kDa was examined by SDS-PAGE. The structural elucidation of the purified product was studied by FTIR, 1 H and 13 C NMR. The X-ray diffractions study showed that the crystals belonged to the primitive orthorhombic lattice ( a  = 12.137, b  = 13.421, c  = 14.097 Å) and 3D structure (proposed name: Aeritracin) was determined. This new peptide antibacterial molecule can get a position in pharmaceutical and biotechnological industrial research.

  13. Characterization of a novel protease from Aeribacillus pallidus strain VP3 with potential biotechnological interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechri, Sondes; Ben Elhoul Berrouina, Mouna; Omrane Benmrad, Maroua; Zaraî Jaouadi, Nadia; Rekik, Hatem; Moujehed, Emna; Chebbi, Alif; Sayadi, Sami; Chamkha, Mohamed; Bejar, Samir; Jaouadi, Bassem

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates the purification and physico-chemical characterization of an extracellular protease from the Aeribacillus pallidus strain VP3 previously isolated from a geothermal oil-field (Sfax, Tunisia). The maximum protease activity recorded after 22h of incubation at 45°C was 3000U/ml. Pure enzyme, designated as SPVP, was obtained after ammonium sulfate fractionation (40-60%)-dialysis followed by heat-treatment (70°C for 30min) and UNO Q-6 FPLC anion-exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme is a monomer of molecular mass about 29kDa. The sequence of the 25 NH 2 -terminal residues of SPVP showed a high homology with those of Bacillus proteases. The almost complete inhibition by PMSF and DIFP confirmed that SPVP is a member of serine protease family. Its optima of pH and temperature were pH 10 and 60°C, respectively. Its half-life times at 70 and 80°C were 8 and 4h, respectively. Its catalytic efficiency was higher than those of SAPCG, Alcalase Ultra 2.5L, and Thermolysin type X. SPVP exhibited excellent stability to detergents and wash performance analysis revealed that it could remove blood-stains effectively and high resistance against organic solvents. These properties make SPVP a potential candidate for applications in detergent formulations and non-aqueous peptide biocatalysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Seasonal shifts in body temperature and use of microhabitats by Galapagos land iguanas (Conolophus pallidus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, K.; Tracy, C.R.; Porter, W.P.

    1983-06-01

    Seasonal differences in the body temperatures (T/sub b/) of free-ranging Galapagos land iguanas (Conolophus pallidus) were detected by temperature sensitive telemetry transmitters. Midday T/sub b/'s of iguanas average 4.4/sup 0/C lower in the Garua (cool) season than in the Hot season. Measured T/sub b/'s and those predicted from biophysical models permitted the following conclusions: (1) lower T/sub b/'s during the Garua season represent an active shift in thermoregulation by the iguanas rather than a passive result of a cooler season; (2) the average midday T/sub b/ selected by the iguanas in either season is the T/sub b/ that allows maintenance of a constant T/sub b/ for the longest possible portion of the day; (3) by exploiting the warmer microclimate created by a cliff face, the iguanas are able to maintain a constant T/sub b/ for a full hour longer than they could elsewhere in their home range. Census data demonstrated that the iguanas exploited the warmer microclimate created by the cliff extensively during the Garua season, and the cliff face was visited by the iguanas relatively infrequently during the Hot season. Thus, the exploitation of the microclimate created by the cliff results in seasonal differences in the pattern of space utilization within the home ranges of the iguanas. Within the Garua season the iguanas moved away from the cliff more often on sunny days than during cloudy days. It is concluded that the physical environment is an important determinant of patterns of space utilization both within and between seasons.

  15. Recrystallized graphite utilization as the first wall material in Globus-M spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, V.; Novokhatsky, A.N.; Petrov, Y.V.; Sakharov, N.V.; Terukov, E.I.; Trapeznikova, I.N.; Denisov, E.A.; Kurdumov, A.A.; Kompaniec, T.N.; Lebedev, V.M.; Litunovstkii, N.V.; Mazul, I.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Globus-M spherical tokamak, built at A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute in 1999 is the first Russian spherical tokamak and has the broad area of research in controlled fusion [1]. Besides small aspect ratio (A=1.5) the distinguishing feature of the tokamak is the powerful energy supply system and auxiliary heating, which give opportunity to reach high specific power deposition up to few W/cm 3 . The utmost plasma current density and B/R ratio among spherical tokamaks allow operation in the range of high plasma densities ∼ 10 20 m -3 . This feature results in big power density loads to the first wall due to small plasma-wall spacing. The area of the first wall amour was gradually increased during few years since 2003, and nowadays reaches almost 90% of the inner vessel surface faced to plasma. Plasma facing protecting tiles are manufactured from recrystallized graphite doped by different elements (Ti, Si, B). Additionally the plasma facing surface was protected by films deposited during boronization. The tendency of short time and long time scale plasma parameters variation are discussed including the plasma performance improvement with increase of protected area. Technology of tiles preparation before installation into the tokamak vessel is briefly described, as well as technology of plasma facing armor preparation before the plasma experiments. Few protecting tiles doped by different elements which were exposed to plasma fluxes of dissimilar power densities for a long time were extracted from the vacuum vessel. The analysis of tiles material (RGT-91) to hold (accumulate) deuterium was made. The distribution of absorbed deuterium concentration along poloidal coordinate was measured. The elementary composition of the films deposited on the tiles was studied by Rutherford back scattering technique and by nuclear resonance reaction method. Other modern methods of surface and structural analysis of material exposed to prolonged

  16. Recrystallized graphite utilization as the first wall material in Globus-M spherical tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusev, V.; Novokhatsky, A.N.; Petrov, Y.V.; Sakharov, N.V.; Terukov, E.I.; Trapeznikova, I.N. [A.F. IOFFE Physico-technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Denisov, E.A.; Kurdumov, A.A.; Kompaniec, T.N. [St. Petersburg State Univ., Research Institute of Physics (Russian Federation); Lebedev, V.M. [B.P. Konstantinov Nuclear Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Science, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Litunovstkii, N.V. [D.V. Efremov Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mazul, I. [Development of Plasma Facing Materials and Components Laboratory, EFREMOV INSTITUTE, St Petersbourg (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Globus-M spherical tokamak, built at A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute in 1999 is the first Russian spherical tokamak and has the broad area of research in controlled fusion [1]. Besides small aspect ratio (A=1.5) the distinguishing feature of the tokamak is the powerful energy supply system and auxiliary heating, which give opportunity to reach high specific power deposition up to few W/cm{sup 3}. The utmost plasma current density and B/R ratio among spherical tokamaks allow operation in the range of high plasma densities {approx} 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}. This feature results in big power density loads to the first wall due to small plasma-wall spacing. The area of the first wall amour was gradually increased during few years since 2003, and nowadays reaches almost 90% of the inner vessel surface faced to plasma. Plasma facing protecting tiles are manufactured from recrystallized graphite doped by different elements (Ti, Si, B). Additionally the plasma facing surface was protected by films deposited during boronization. The tendency of short time and long time scale plasma parameters variation are discussed including the plasma performance improvement with increase of protected area. Technology of tiles preparation before installation into the tokamak vessel is briefly described, as well as technology of plasma facing armor preparation before the plasma experiments. Few protecting tiles doped by different elements which were exposed to plasma fluxes of dissimilar power densities for a long time were extracted from the vacuum vessel. The analysis of tiles material (RGT-91) to hold (accumulate) deuterium was made. The distribution of absorbed deuterium concentration along poloidal coordinate was measured. The elementary composition of the films deposited on the tiles was studied by Rutherford back scattering technique and by nuclear resonance reaction method. Other modern methods of surface and structural analysis of material

  17. A case study for cloud based high throughput analysis of NGS data using the globus genomics system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krithika Bhuvaneshwar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS technologies produce massive amounts of data requiring a powerful computational infrastructure, high quality bioinformatics software, and skilled personnel to operate the tools. We present a case study of a practical solution to this data management and analysis challenge that simplifies terabyte scale data handling and provides advanced tools for NGS data analysis. These capabilities are implemented using the “Globus Genomics” system, which is an enhanced Galaxy workflow system made available as a service that offers users the capability to process and transfer data easily, reliably and quickly to address end-to-endNGS analysis requirements. The Globus Genomics system is built on Amazon's cloud computing infrastructure. The system takes advantage of elastic scaling of compute resources to run multiple workflows in parallel and it also helps meet the scale-out analysis needs of modern translational genomics research.

  18. Pathological bolus exposure may define gastro-esophageal reflux better than pathological acid exposure in patients with globus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, Dong Hyun; Kim, Beom Jin; Son, Hee Jung; Kim, Jae J; Rhee, Jong Chul; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2012-01-01

    Conventionally, pathological acid exposure (PAE), defined by acid reflux only, is used to identify gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, weak acid reflux or non-acid reflux also induces reflux symptoms. Defining abnormal reflux based on all reflux episodes may better identify GERD and would be more useful among patients with atypical GERD symptoms, such as globus. Impedance-pHmetry results of 31 globus patients, off acid suppressants, were analysed. A median of 24 episodes of reflux were observed. Of the reflux episodes, 54% were non-acid reflux and 50% reached the proximal extent. PAE was observed in 6 patients (19%). For 5 patients (16%) without PAE, there was evidence of increased bolus exposure compared to normal controls (an intraesophageal bolus exposure for more than 1.4% of the recording time, defined as pathological bolus exposure, PBE). When GERD was defined by PAE or esophagitis, the prevalence of GERD was 29%. When GERD was defined by PBE, PAE or esophagitis, the prevalence was 42%. PBE identified 13% of the patients who otherwise would have been missed. A significant proportion of patients without PAE had evidence of PBE. PBE may be a more useful definition for identifying patients with abnormal increase in reflux in patients with globus. Further studies are warranted.

  19. Plasma formation and first OH experiments in GLOBUS-M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, V.K.; Aleksandrov, S.V.; Burtseva, T.A.

    2001-01-01

    The paper reports results of experimental campaigns on plasma ohmic heating, performed during 1999-2000 on the spherical tokamak Globus-M. Later experimental results with tokamak fed by thyristor rectifiers are presented in detail. The toroidal magnetic field and plasma pulse duration in these experiments were significantly increased. The method of stray magnetic field compensation is described. The technology of vacuum vessel conditioning, including boronization of the vessel performed at the end of the experiments, is briefly discussed. Also discussed is the influence of ECR preioniziation on the breakdown conditions. Experimental data on plasma column formation and current ramp-up in different regimes of operation with the magnetic flux of the central solenoid (CS) limited to ∼100 mVs are presented. Ramp-up of the plasma current of 0.25 MA for the time interval ∼0.03 s with about 0.02 s flat-top at the toroidal field (TF) strength of 0.35 T allows the conclusion that power supplies, control system and wall conditioning work well. The same conclusion can be drawn from observation of plasma density behavior the density is completely controlled with external gas puff and the influence of the wall is negligible after boronization. The magnetic flux consumption efficiency is discussed. The results of magnetic equilibrium simulations are presented and compared with experiment. (author)

  20. Continuous cultivation of a thermophilic bacterium Aeribacillus pallidus 418 for production of an exopolysaccharide applicable in cosmetic creams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenkova, N; Panchev, I; Vassilev, S; Kuncheva, M; Dobreva, S; Kambourova, M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of continuous cultivation approach for exopolysaccharide (EPS) production by a thermophilic micro-organism and the potential of the synthesized EPS for application in cosmetic industry. Study on the ability of Aeribacillus pallidus 418, isolated as a good EPS producer, to synthesize the polymer in continuous cultures showed higher production in comparison with batch cultures. The degree of the EPS in the precipitate after continuous cultivation significantly increased. Non-Newtonian pseudoplastic and thixotropic behaviour of EPS determines the ability of the received cream to become more fluid after increasing time of application on the skin. This study demonstrates a highly efficient way for production of EPS from a continuous growth culture of A. pallidus 418 that have many advantages and can outperform batch culture by eliminating time for cleaning and sterilization of the vessel and the comparatively long lag phases before the organisms enter a brief period of high productivity. The valuable physico-chemical properties of the synthesized EPS influenced positively the properties of a commercial cream. EPSs from thermophilic micro-organisms are of special interest due to the advantages of the thermophilic processes and nonpathogenic nature of the polymer molecules. However, their industrial application is hindered by the comparatively low biomass and correspondingly EPS yield. Suggested continuous approach for EPS could have an enormous economic potential for an industrial scale production of thermophilic EPSs. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Study of Globus-M Tokamak Poloidal System and Plasma Position Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokuka, V. N.; Korenev, P. S.; Mitrishkin, Yu. V.; Pavlova, E. A.; Patrov, M. I.; Khayrutdinov, R. R.

    2017-12-01

    In order to provide efficient performance of tokamaks with vertically elongated plasma position, control systems for limited and diverted plasma configuration are required. The accuracy, stability, speed of response, and reliability of plasma position control as well as plasma shape and current control depend on the performance of the control system. Therefore, the problem of the development of such systems is an important and actual task in modern tokamaks. In this study, the measured signals from the magnetic loops and Rogowski coils are used to reconstruct the plasma equilibrium, for which linear models in small deviations are constructed. We apply methods of the H∞-optimization theory to the synthesize control system for vertical and horizontal position of plasma capable to working with structural uncertainty of the models of the plant. These systems are applied to the plasma-physical DINA code which is configured for the tokamak Globus-M plasma. The testing of the developed systems applied to the DINA code with Heaviside step functions have revealed the complex dynamics of plasma magnetic configurations. Being close to the bifurcation point in the parameter space of unstable plasma has made it possible to detect an abrupt change in the X-point position from the top to the bottom and vice versa. Development of the methods for reconstruction of plasma magnetic configurations and experience in designing plasma control systems with feedback for tokamaks provided an opportunity to synthesize new digital controllers for plasma vertical and horizontal position stabilization. It also allowed us to test the synthesized digital controllers in the closed loop of the control system with the DINA code as a nonlinear model of plasma.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus Strain 8m3, a Thermophilic Hydrocarbon-Oxidizing Bacterium Isolated from the Dagang Oil Field (China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltaraus, Andrey B; Sokolova, Diyana S; Grouzdev, Denis S; Ivanov, Timophey M; Malakho, Sophia G; Korshunova, Alena V; Rozanov, Aleksey S; Tourova, Tatiyana P; Nazina, Tamara N

    2016-06-09

    The draft genome sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus strain 8m3, a thermophilic aerobic oil-oxidizing bacterium isolated from production water from the Dagang high-temperature oil field, China, is presented here. The genome is annotated to provide insights into the genomic and phenotypic diversity of the genus Aeribacillus. Copyright © 2016 Poltaraus et al.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus Strain 8m3, a Thermophilic Hydrocarbon-Oxidizing Bacterium Isolated from the Dagang Oil Field (China)

    OpenAIRE

    Poltaraus, Andrey B.; Sokolova, Diyana S.; Grouzdev, Denis S.; Ivanov, Timophey M.; Malakho, Sophia G.; Korshunova, Alena V.; Rozanov, Aleksey S.; Tourova, Tatiyana P.; Nazina, Tamara N.

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus strain 8m3, a thermophilic aerobic oil-oxidizing bacterium isolated from production water from the Dagang high-temperature oil field, China, is presented here. The genome is annotated to provide insights into the genomic and phenotypic diversity of the genus Aeribacillus.

  4. Concurrent Presentation of Burning Mouth Syndrome and Globus Pharyngis in Enugu, Nigeria: A Ten-year Clinical Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwuneke, Felix; Akpe, James; Okoye, Linda; Ekwueme, Christian; Obiakor, Anthonia; Amobi, Emmanuel; Egbunike, Doris

    2014-01-01

    To review 22 patients with globus pharyngis among a group of 39 patients who presented with burning mouth syndrome and to highlight the clinical presentation and treatment outcome of these oropharyngeal symptoms, often ignored by practicing oral surgeons. We carried out a retrospective review of 39 patients with burning mouth syndrome seen at oral surgery units of three specialist hospitals in Enugu, Nigeria between 2001 and 2010. The focus was on the 22 of these patients with burning mouth syndrome and globus pharyngis (the persistent sensation of having phlegm, a pill or some other sort of obstruction in the throat when there is none). Relevant information included patients' oral habits and dental status, past medical history, sociodemographic data, onset of symptoms and treatment outcome. Amongst the 22 patients, 8 (36.4%) were males while 14 (63.6%) were females, giving a male to female ratio of 1:1.8. Of the 8 male patients, 3 (37.5%) were retrenched workers, 2 (25%) were drug addicts, 2 (25%) had a history of psychiatric problems and 1 (12.5%) had post-radiation therapy due to diagnosis of adenocystic carcinoma. Amongst the 14 female patients, 6 (42.8%) were divorcees, 3 (21.4%) were unemployed and unmarried, 2 (14.3%) had menopausal problems, 2 (14.3%) had dental prostheses and 1 (7.2%) had a history of mental disorder. Globus pharyngis can present at the same time in some individuals with burning mouth syndrome. The emotional aetiological factor in this unusual ailment calls for proper examinations and a multidisciplinary approach in the management of patients who presented with burning mouth syndrome, especially with a history of depression.

  5. End-To-End Solution for Integrated Workload and Data Management using GlideinWMS and Globus Online

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mhashilkar, Parag; Miller, Zachary; Weiss, Cathrin; Kettimuthu, Rajkumar; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Holzman, Burt; Duan, Xi; Lacinski, Lukasz

    2012-01-01

    Grid computing has enabled scientific communities to effectively share computing resources distributed over many independent sites. Several such communities, or Virtual Organizations (VO), in the Open Science Grid and the European Grid Infrastructure use the GlideinWMS system to run complex application work-flows. GlideinWMS is a pilot-based workload management system (WMS) that creates an on-demand, dynamically-sized overlay Condor batch system on Grid resources. While the WMS addresses the management of compute resources, however, data management in the Grid is still the responsibility of the VO. In general, large VOs have resources to develop complex custom solutions, while small VOs would rather push this responsibility to the infrastructure. The latter requires a tight integration of the WMS and the data management layers, an approach still not common in modern Grids. In this paper we describe a solution developed to address this shortcoming in the context of Center for Enabling Distributed Peta-scale Science (CEDPS) by integrating GlideinWMS with Globus Online (GO). Globus Online is a fast, reliable file transfer service that makes it easy for any user to move data. The solution eliminates the need for the users to provide custom data transfer solutions in the application by making this functionality part of the GlideinWMS infrastructure. To achieve this, GlideinWMS uses the file transfer plug-in architecture of Condor. The paper describes the system architecture and how this solution can be extended to support data transfer services other than Globus Online when used with Condor or GlideinWMS.

  6. The quaternary structure of the amidase from Geobacillus pallidus RAPc8 is revealed by its crystal packing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Kimani, Serah W.; Cowan, Donald A.; Sayed, Muhammed F.-R.; Sewell, B. Trevor

    2006-01-01

    The amidase from G. pallidus RAPc8, a moderate thermophile, converts amides to the corresponding acids and ammonia and has application as an industrial catalyst. RAPc8 amidase has been cloned, expressed and purified, and then crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The amidase from Geobacillus pallidus RAPc8, a moderate thermophile, is a member of the nitrilase enzyme superfamily. It converts amides to the corresponding acids and ammonia and has application as an industrial catalyst. RAPc8 amidase has been cloned and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and has been purified by heat treatment and a number of chromatographic steps. The enzyme was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals produced in the presence of 1.2 M sodium citrate, 400 mM NaCl, 100 mM sodium acetate pH 5.6 were selected for X-ray diffraction studies. A data set having acceptable statistics to 1.96 Å resolution was collected under cryoconditions using an in-house X-ray source. The space group was determined to be primitive cubic P4 2 32, with unit-cell parameter a = 130.49 (±0.05) Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the backbone of the hypothetical protein PH0642 from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PDB code 1j31) with all non-identical side chains substituted with alanine as a probe. There is one subunit per asymmetric unit. The subunits are packed as trimers of dimers with D3 point-group symmetry around the threefold axis in such a way that the dimer interface seen in the homologues is preserved

  7. Enhanced energy efficiency by means of low temperature differences. Subcritical CO{sub 2} cascade in Globus Handelshof Saarbruecken-Guedingen; Hohe Energieeffizienz durch kleine Temperaturdifferenzen. Unterkritische CO{sub 2}-Kaskade im Globus Handelshof Saarbruecken-Guedingen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Wolfgang [Wolfgang Schmid Pressebuero fuer Technische Gebaeudeausruestung, Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Green coldness is on the advance for the most German grocery chains. Especially, in the course of the R22 exit, more and more shopping centers opt for natural refrigerants or for a cascade solution with CO{sub 2} for the deep freezing and R404a for a normal refrigeration and air conditioning. Elektro-Kaeltebau Moersch GmbH (Saarburg, Federal Republic of Germany) is one of the green refrigeration system builders from the first hour in the implementation of energy-efficient and climate friendly refrigeration plants in the food sector. One of the current projects is the incorporation of a CO{sub 2}/R404A cascade during the operation in the Globus Handelshof in Saarbruecken-Guedingen (Federal Republic of Germany).

  8. Videofluoroscopy of the pharynx and esophagus in patients with globus pharyngis. Comparison with static radiography; Die radiologische Abklaerung des Globus pharyngis. Vergleich der diagnostischen Wertigkeit von konventionellem Roentgen mit der Videokinematographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schober, E. [Abt. Roentgen fuer Konservative Faecher, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Schima, W. [Abt. Roentgen fuer Konservative Faecher, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Pokieser, P. [Abt. Roentgen fuer Chirurgische Faecher, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    1995-10-01

    The symptom is associated with a multitude of pharyngoesophageal abnormalities. Our study compares the diagnostic yield of videofluoroscopy to that of static radiography in patients suffering from globus pharnygis. A total of 150 consecutive patients complaining of a lump in the throat, but without evidence of dysphagia, were studied in a standardized fashion with both methods. Videofluoroscopy combined with static radiography revealed morphological or functional abnormalities in 75% of our patients. The combination of the two methods yielded significantly more abnormalities in the pharynx and esophagus than videofluoroscopy or static radiography alone. Esophageal motor disorders, pharyngoesophageal sphincter dysfunction and pharyngeal residue of contrast material proved to be the most common abnormalities. In conclusion, videofluoroscopy combined with static radiography is mandatory in the radiological assessment of patients suffering from the globus sensation. (orig.) [Deutsch] Unsere Studie vergleicht die diagnostische Wertigkeit des konventionellen Roentgens mit jener der Videokineamtographie von Pharynx und Oesophagus bei der Abklaerung des Globusgefuehls. Wir haben 150 konsekutive Patienten mit Globusgefuehl, jedoch ohne Dysphagie mit beiden Methoden nach einem standardisierten Protokoll untersucht. Mittels der Kombination von konventionellem Roentgen mit der Videokinematographie fanden sich bei 75% der Patienten pathologische Veraenderungen. Durch die Kombination beider Methoden konnten signifikant mehr morphologische und funktionelle Stoerungen des Pharynx sowie Oesophagus aufgezeigt werden, als mit der alleinigen konventionellen Technik oder der alleinigen Videokinematographie. Die haeufigsten pathologischen Veraenderungen in unserem Kollektiv waren Oesophagusmotilitaetsstoerungen, eine Dyskinesie des pharyngooesophagealen Sphinkters sowie eine abnorme pharyngeale Kontrastmittelretention. Unsere Ergebnisse belegen eindeutig, dass die radiologische

  9. Hypothalamic projections to the ventral medulla oblongata in the rat, with special reference to the nucleus raphe pallidus: a study using autoradiographic and HRP techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoya, Yasuhiko

    1985-10-07

    Hypothalamic descending projections to the medullary ventral surface were studied autoradiographically in the rat. A small amount of (/sup 3/H)leucine was injected unilaterally into various parts of the hypothalamus by air pressure. Abundant and characteristic terminal labelings were observed bilaterally in the nucleus raphe pallidus, the ventral surface to the pyramidal tract and the nucleus interfascicularis hypoglossi, after injections into the dorsal posterior hypothalamic area caudal to the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus. Conspicuous, but less numerous labelings were observed in the nucleus raphe obscurus and the ipsilateral raphe magnus. After an injection of (/sup 3/H)leucine into the hypothalamus and injections of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the spinal cord in the same animal, silver grains were densely distributed around HRP-labeled neurons in the nucleus raphe pallidus including the nucleus interfascicularis hypoglossi. The present results suggest that the dorsal posterior hypothalamic area projects directly to the spinal-projecting neurons of the nucleus raphe pallidus. 53 refs.; 9 figs.

  10. Axial complex and associated structures of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus pallidus (Sars, G.O. 1871) (Echinodermata: Echinoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezhova, Olga Vladimirovna; Malakhov, Vladimir Vasil'yevich; Egorova, Ekaterina Alekseevna

    2018-06-01

    Studies of echinoid microscopic anatomy over the last two centuries have created a number of inaccuracies and mistakes that have accumulated in the descriptions of the intricate organization of the coelomic system of Echinoidea. To clarify the situation, we reconstructed the axial complex and radial complex of the echinoid Strongylocentrotus pallidus. The water ring is located between the perivisceral coelom and the perioral coelom. The oral haemal ring lies between the coelothelia of the water-vascular, perivisceral, and perioral rings. The axial part of the axial organ communicates with the oral haemal ring in interradius CD, but the axial coelom does not form the axocoelomic perihaemal ring. The ventral intestinal haemal vessel originates from the oral haemal ring in radius A, and then branches into a network of capillaries, from which the dorsal intestinal vessel starts. The pericardial coelom envelopes the pericardial part of the axial organ, the lacunae of which communicate with the haemocoel of the body wall and with the axial part of the axial organ. The genital haemal ring and the dorsal intestinal vessel communicate with the axial organ. The genital coelom passes in the CD interradius on the side opposite to the hindgut. There is a somatocoelomic perihaemal ring, which sends a pair of coelomic outgrowths into each radius, accompanied by a radial haemal vessel in the oral part. The mistakes and inaccuracies of early descriptions of the echinoid axial complex are listed. The axial complex and associated structures of sea urchins are compared with other eleutherozoans. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Numerical study of the elastic-plastic cyclic deformation of the ''GLOBUS-M'' compact tokamak central solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykov, V.; Kavin, A.; Krivchenkov, Y.; Panin, A.

    1996-01-01

    The ''GLOBUS-M'' is a compact resistive tokamak with a central solenoid (CS) wound around the inner portion of the toroidal field coils. The magnetic field at the solenoid axis amounts to 8.3 T. The CS incorporates two layers of conductor (CuCr copper alloy) baked into insulation. The solenoid is designed to sustain 80,000 energizing. During each loading cycle the solenoid is subjected to the radial forces accompanied with the vertical compression. The most loaded region has been considered and modeled with the use of 2D axisymmetric finite element (FE) model. The model includes two conductor turns baked into insulation compound, copper cooling tubes and solder. The stress analysis shows that there is some plastic deformation in the copper tube and solder during loading and there is some back plastic deformation in the solder during unloading. The reloading does not cause any change in the solenoid stress-strain state in comparison with the case of loading. The number of cycles to failure has been simulated for all metallic components of the solenoid

  12. An Extended Design of the "Grid-Enabled SEE++ System" Based on Globus Toolkit 4 and gLite Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Schreiner, W.; Buchberger, M.; Kaltofen, T.

    2006-01-01

    "Grid-Enabled SEE++" based on the SEE++ software system for the biomechanical 3D simulation of the human eye and its muscles. SEE++ simulates the common eye muscle surgery techniques in a graphic interactive way that is familiar to an experienced surgeon. The goal of "Grid-Enabled SEE++" is to adapt and to extend SEE++ in several steps and to develop an efficient grid-based tool for "Evidence Based Medicine", which supports the surgeons in choosing optimal surgery techniques for the treatments of different syndromes of strabismus. In our previous work, we combined the SEE++ software with the Globus (pre-Web Service) middleware and developed a parallel version of the simulation of the "Hess-Lancaster test" (typical medical examination). By this, we demonstrated how a noticeable speedup can be achieved in SEE++ by the exploitation of the computational power of the Grid. Furthermore, we reported the prototype implementation of a medical database component for "Grid-Enabled SEE++". Finally, we designed a so calle...

  13. Low-frequency stimulation of the external globus palladium produces anti-epileptogenic and anti-ictogenic actions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hui; Kuang, Yi-fang; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yi; Xu, Zheng-hao; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Shi-hong; Ding, Mei-ping; Chen, Zhong

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the anti-epileptic effects of deep brain stimulation targeting the external globus palladium (GPe) in rats. For inducing amygdala kindling and deep brain stimulation, bipolar stainless-steel electrodes were implanted in SD rats into right basolateral amygdala and right GPe, respectively. The effects of deep brain stimulation were evaluated in the amygdala kindling model, maximal electroshock model (MES) and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) model. Moreover, the background EEGs in the amygdala and GPe were recorded. Low-frequency stimulation (0.1 ms, 1 Hz, 15 min) at the GPe slowed the progression of seizure stages and shortened the after-discharge duration (ADD) during kindling acquisition. Furthermore, low-frequency stimulation significantly decreased the incidence of generalized seizures, suppressed the average stage, and shortened the cumulative ADD and generalized seizure duration in fully kindled rats. In addition, low-frequency stimulation significantly suppressed the average stage of MES-induced seizures and increased the latency to generalized seizures in the PTZ model. High-frequency stimulation (0.1 ms, 130 Hz, 5 min) at the GPe had no anti-epileptic effect and even aggravated epileptogenesis induced by amygdala kindling. EEG analysis showed that low-frequency stimulation at the GPe reversed the increase in delta power, whereas high-frequency stimulation at the GPe had no such effect. Low-frequency stimulation, but not high-frequency stimulation, at the GPe exerts therapeutic effect on temporal lobe epilepsy and tonic-colonic generalized seizures, which may be due to interference with delta rhythms. The results suggest that modulation of GPe activity using low-frequency stimulation or drugs may be a promising epilepsy treatment.

  14. "Zolotoi globus" dostalsja "Vaviljonu"

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Kuldse Gloobuse auhinna draamakategoorias sai mängufilm "Paabel" ("Babel") : režissöör Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu : Ameerika Ühendriigid - Mehhiko, 2006. Ka teised Golden Globe filmiauhinna saajad

  15. Biochemical and microbiological evidence for fermentative digestion in free-living land iguanas (Conolophus pallidus) and marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) on the Galápagos archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Roderick I; Rycyk, Mathew; Ruemmler, Rebecca L; Aminov, Rustam I; Wikelski, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Herbivorous lizards are potentially capable of high digestive efficiency, but the presence of an indigenous microbial population has been implied from measurements of activity rather than directly studied. This study is the first to provide direct biochemical and microbiological evidence for fermentative digestion in free-living land iguanas (Conolophus pallidus) and marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) from the Galapagos archipelago. In marine iguanas, the stomach and large capacious colon contained ca. 32% and 60%, respectively, of the weight of total gut content. Total volatile fatty acid concentration was ca. 150 and 180 mM, respectively, for marine and land iguanas. Molar proportions of acetate, propionate, and butyrate (80.3%, 9.5%, and 3.5%) in land iguana fecal samples were similar to those for marine iguanas. Examination of fecal samples using confocal and transmission electron microscopy, as well as cultivable counts, revealed a dense and diverse population of bacteria, with spores prominent. Total culturable counts of anaerobes (2.22x10(8) g(-1) wet weight of fecal material) outnumbered aerobes on average by a factor of ca. 700. Combined, these results strongly support the contention that these unique herbivorous lizards are largely dependent on the presence and metabolic activities of a resident bacterial population in order to hydrolyze and ferment plant polymers that are indigestible to the host.

  16. Utility of thermo-alkali-stable γ-CA from polyextremophilic bacterium Aeribacillus pallidus TSHB1 in biomimetic sequestration of CO2 and as a virtual peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Himadri; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2017-04-01

    Aeribacillus pallidus TSHB1 polyextremophilic bacterium produces a γ-carbonic anhydrase (ApCA), which is a homotrimeric biocatalyst with a subunit molecular mass of 32 ± 2 kDa. The enzyme is stable in the pH range between 8.0 and 11.0 and thus alkali-stable and moderately thermostable with T 1/2 values of 40 ± 1, 15 ± 1, and 8 ± 0.5 min at 60, 70, and 80 °C, respectively. Activation energy for irreversible inactivation "E d " of carbonic anhydrase is 67.119 kJ mol -1 . The enzyme is stable in the presence of various flue gas contaminants such as SO 3 2- ,SO 4 2- , and NO 3 - and cations Mg 2+ , Mn 2+ , Ca 2+ , and Ba 2+ . Fluorescence studies in the presence of N-bromosuccinimide and fluorescence quenching using KI and acrylamide revealed the importance of tryptophan residues in maintaining the structural integrity of the enzyme. ApCA is more efficient than the commercially available bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) in CO 2 sequestration. The enzyme was successfully used in biomineralization of CO 2 from flue gas. Replacement of active site Zn 2+ with Mn 2+ enabled ApCA to function as a peroxidase which exhibited alkali-stability and moderate thermostability like ApCA.

  17. Purification and biochemical characterization of a novel thermostable serine alkaline protease from Aeribacillus pallidus C10: a potential additive for detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Vildan; Baltaci, Mustafa Ozkan; Ozgencli, Ilknur; Sisecioglu, Melda; Adiguzel, Ahmet; Adiguzel, Gulsah

    2017-12-01

    An extracellular thermostable alkaline serine protease enzyme from Aeribacillus pallidus C10 (GenBank No: KC333049), was purified 4.85 and 17. 32-fold with a yield of 26.9 and 19.56%, respectively, through DE52 anion exchange and Probond affinity chromatography. The molecular mass of the enzyme was determined through sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), with approximately 38.35 kDa. The enzyme exhibited optimum activity at pH 9 and at temperature 60 °C. It was determined that the enzyme had remained stable at the range of pH 7.0-10.0, and that it had preserved more than 80% of its activity at a broad temperature range (20-80 °C). The enzyme activity was found to retain more than 70% and 55% in the presence of organic solvents and commercial detergents, respectively. In addition, it was observed that the enzyme activity had increased in the presence of 5% SDS. K M and V max values were calculated as 0.197 mg/mL and 7.29 μmol.mL - 1 .min - 1 , respectively.

  18. Localization of Basal Ganglia and Thalamic Damage in Dyskinetic Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravamuthan, Bhooma R; Waugh, Jeff L

    2016-01-01

    Dyskinetic cerebral palsy affects 15%-20% of patients with cerebral palsy. Basal ganglia injury is associated with dyskinetic cerebral palsy, but the patterns of injury within the basal ganglia predisposing to dyskinetic cerebral palsy are unknown, making treatment difficult. For example, deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus interna improves dystonia in only 40% of patients with dyskinetic cerebral palsy. Basal ganglia injury heterogeneity may explain this variability. To investigate this, we conducted a qualitative systematic review of basal ganglia and thalamic damage in dyskinetic cerebral palsy. Reviews and articles primarily addressing genetic or toxic causes of cerebral palsy were excluded yielding 22 studies (304 subjects). Thirteen studies specified the involved basal ganglia nuclei (subthalamic nucleus, caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, or lentiform nuclei, comprised by the putamen and globus pallidus). Studies investigating the lentiform nuclei (without distinguishing between the putamen and globus pallidus) showed that all subjects (19 of 19) had lentiform nuclei damage. Studies simultaneously but independently investigating the putamen and globus pallidus also showed that all subjects (35 of 35) had lentiform nuclei damage (i.e., putamen or globus pallidus damage); this was followed in frequency by damage to the putamen alone (70 of 101, 69%), the subthalamic nucleus (17 of 25, 68%), the thalamus (88 of 142, 62%), the globus pallidus (7/35, 20%), and the caudate (6 of 47, 13%). Globus pallidus damage was almost always coincident with putaminal damage. Noting consistent involvement of the lentiform nuclei in dyskinetic cerebral palsy, these results could suggest two groups of patients with dyskinetic cerebral palsy: those with putamen-predominant damage and those with panlenticular damage involving both the putamen and the globus pallidus. Differentiating between these groups could help predict response to therapies such as deep brain

  19. Analýza marketingové strategie společnosti GLOBUS ČR se zaměřením na nepotravinářskou část sortimentu

    OpenAIRE

    Falcmanová, Klára

    2012-01-01

    The bachelor's thesis is about the analysis of the marketing environment in retail in the Czech Republic. The thesis is concentrated on the influence of marketing environment on GLOBUS ČR and its marketing strategy. The first chapter is theoretical and describes marketing environment and marketing mix, SWOT analysis and market segmentation. In the second chapter are defined the forms and possibilities of marketing communication in the retail environment. The third chapter is practical and the...

  20. Thalamic involvement in a patient with kernicterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Yueksel [Department of Pediatrics, Marmara University School of Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey); Ekinci, Gazanfer [Department of Radiology, Marmara University School of Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2002-07-01

    We report the MR imaging findings of a 16-month-old boy with dyskinetic cerebral palsy resulting from kernicterus. T2-weighted images showed symmetric bilateral hyperintensity in the thalamus in addition to the globus pallidus. (orig.)

  1. Structural Findings in the Brain MRI of Patients with Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Davoudi

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The white matter and globus pallidus were the most common affected regions in brain following acute CO poisoning. Signal abnormalities and restricted diffusion in MRI were correlated with duration of exposure to CO but not with the carboxyhemoglobin levels.

  2. Simultaneous Activation of Multiple Memory Systems during Learning: Insights from Electrophysiology and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    autonomic and pain functions, and facilitating/inhibiting voluntary movements. The external segment of the globus pallidus (globus pallidus externa, GPe...or less responsive to pain stimuli. 1.2.4. Other cortico-basal ganglia loops Alexander, Strick and colleagues have additionally defined a number of... orofacial loop and loops through inferotemporal and posterior parietal cortical areas have also been defined. 1.2.5. Interactions between loops Once

  3. Altered effective connectivity network of the basal ganglia in low-grade hepatic encephalopathy: a resting-state fMRI study with Granger causality analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongfeng Qi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The basal ganglia often show abnormal metabolism and intracranial hemodynamics in cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE. Little is known about how the basal ganglia affect other brain system and is affected by other brain regions in HE. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the effective connectivity network associated with the basal ganglia is disturbed in HE patients by using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty five low-grade HE patients and thirty five age- and gender- matched healthy controls participated in the rs-fMRI scans. The effective connectivity networks associated with the globus pallidus, the primarily affected region within basal ganglia in HE, were characterized by using the Granger causality analysis and compared between HE patients and healthy controls. Pearson correlation analysis was performed between the abnormal effective connectivity and venous blood ammonia levels and neuropsychological performances of all HE patients. Compared with the healthy controls, patients with low-grade HE demonstrated mutually decreased influence between the globus pallidus and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, cuneus, bi-directionally increased influence between the globus pallidus and the precuneus, and either decreased or increased influence from and to the globus pallidus in many other frontal, temporal, parietal gyri, and cerebellum. Pearson correlation analyses revealed that the blood ammonia levels in HE patients negatively correlated with effective connectivity from the globus pallidus to ACC, and positively correlated with that from the globus pallidus to precuneus; and the number connectivity test scores in patients negatively correlated with the effective connectivity from the globus pallidus to ACC, and from superior frontal gyrus to globus pallidus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Low-grade HE patients had disrupted effective

  4. Brain MR imaging in patients with hepatic cirrhosis: relationship between high intensity signal in basal ganglia on T1-weighted images and elemental concentrations in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, H.; Sato, M.; Yoshikawa, A.; Kimura, M.; Sonomura, T.; Terada, M.; Kishi, K.

    1997-01-01

    In patients with hepatic cirrhosis, the globus pallidus and putamen show high intensity on T1-weighted MRI. While the causes of this high signal have been thought to include paramagnetic substances, especially manganese, no evidence for this has been presented. Autopsy in four cases of hepatic cirrhosis permitted measurement of metal concentrations in brain and histopathological examination. In three cases the globus pallidus showed high intensity on T1-weighted images. Mean manganese concentrations in globus pallidus, putamen and frontal white matter were 3.03 ± 0.38, 2.12 ± 0.37, and 1.38 ± 0.24 (μg/g wet weight), respectively, being approximately four- to almost ten-fold the normal values. Copper concentrations in globus pallidus and putamen were also high, 50 % more than normal. Calcium, iron, zinc and magnesium concentrations were all normal. The fourth case showed no abnormal intensity in the basal ganglia and brain metal concentrations were all normal. Histopathologically, cases with showing high signal remarkable atrophy, necrosis, and deciduation of nerve cells and proliferation of glial cells and microglia in globus pallidus. These findings were similar to those in chronic manganese poisoning. On T1-weighted images, copper deposition shows no abnormal intensity. It is therefore inferred that deposition of highly concentrations of manganese may caused high signal on T1-weighted images and nerve cell death in the globus pallidus. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs

  5. MRI of bilirubin encephalopathy (kernicterus: A case series of 4 patients from Sub-Saharan Africa, May 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getachew Assefa Neknek, MD

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings in patients with chronic kernicterus are bilateral and symmetric T2-weighted hyperintensities in the globus pallidus. We report 4 cases of infants with clinical, laboratory, and MRI findings of kernicterus in this case series. This is the first MRI report of kernicterus in Ethiopia. Awareness of the disease is raised in this report, and the role of magnetic resonance in detecting signal abnormalities associated with kernicterus in the globus pallidi is underscored. We recommend MRI to be part of the investigation in neonates with jaundice. Keywords: Kernicterus, Globus pallidus, MRI

  6. Cranial MRI in hepatic disease; Relationship between MR imaging and clinical symptoms and laboratory analysis of liver function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, Masakazu; Kamitani, Toshiaki; Kamakura, Keiko; Nagata, Naokazu; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro (National Defense Medical Coll., Tokorozawa, Saitama (Japan))

    1993-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging studies on 12 cases with hepatic disease were performed. In 11 adult patients with chronic hepatic failure, T[sub 1]-weighted images demonstrated increased signal in the globus pallidus in 7 patients (63.6%) and in some parts of the cerebral peduncles in 6 patients (54.5%), in the substantia innominata in 4 patients (36.3%). There might be some correlation between the abnormality of MR imaging and clinical symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy. There was a significant correlation between the intensity of the signal and Fischer's ratio of amino acid analysis. In one patient with Wilson's disease, who developed symptoms of central nervous system, T[sub 1]-weighted images demonstrated increased signal in the globus pallidus. After treatment of D-penicillamine, the signal of the globus pallidus decreased. (author).

  7. Endorphin mediation of post-ictal effects of kindled seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, J E; Belluzzi, J D

    1982-12-16

    Brief electrical stimulation of the enkephalin-rich globus pallidus at 1-h intervals produced kindled, clonic seizures in rats as rapidly as similar stimulation of the amygdala. Massing the kindling trials at 10-min intervals inhibited the occurrence of subsequent seizures, especially following globus pallidus stimulation. Naloxone (20 mg/kg), an opiate receptor antagonist, reversed this post-ictal inhibition of seizures following massed trials, but had no effect on seizures kindled at 1-h intervals. Thus, endorphin-released during seizures do not appear to mediate the production of kindled seizures, but do appear to mediate the transient posts ictal inhibition of seizures.

  8. Effects of stereotactic neurosurgery on postural instability and gait in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Maaike; Esselink, Rianne A. J.; Munneke, Marten; Limousin-Dowsey, Patricia; Speelman, Hans D.; Bloem, Bastiaan R.

    2004-01-01

    Postural instability and gait disability (PIGD) are disabling signs of Parkinson's disease. Stereotactic surgery aimed at the internal globus pallidus (GPi) or subthalamic nucleus (STN) might improve PIGD, but the precise effects remain unclear. We performed a systematic review of studies that

  9. Selective peripheral denervation: comparison with pallidal stimulation and literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Contarino, Maria Fiorella; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Bosch, D. Andries; Schuurman, P. Richard; Speelman, Johannes D.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with cervical dystonia who are non-responders to Botulinum toxin qualify for surgery. Selective peripheral denervation (Bertrand's procedure, SPD) and deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus (GPi-DBS) are available surgical options. Although peripheral denervation has potential

  10. Deep brain stimulation for dystonia: patient selection and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, J. D.; Contarino, M. F.; Schuurman, P. R.; Tijssen, M. A. J.; de Bie, R. M. A.

    2010-01-01

    In a literature survey, 341 patients with primary and 109 with secondary dystonias treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) were identified. In general, the outcomes for primary dystonias were more favourable compared to the secondary forms. For

  11. Deep brain stimulation for dystonia : Patient selection and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, J. D.; Contarino, M. F.; Schuurman, P. R.; Tijssen, M. A. J.; de Bie, R. M. A.

    In a literature survey, 341 patients with primary and 109 with secondary dystonias treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) were identified. In general, the outcomes for primary dystonias were more favourable compared to the secondary forms. For

  12. Microstructural Changes within the Basal Ganglia Differ between Parkinson Disease Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagae, Lidia M; Honce, Justin M; Tanabe, Jody; Shelton, Erika; Sillau, Stefan H; Berman, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the substantia nigra has shown promise in detecting and quantifying neurodegeneration in Parkinson disease (PD). It remains unknown, however, whether differences in microstructural changes within the basal ganglia underlie PD motor subtypes. We investigated microstructural changes within the basal ganglia of mild to moderately affected PD patients using DTI and sought to determine if microstructural changes differ between the tremor dominant (TD) and postural instability/gait difficulty (PIGD) subtypes. Fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, radial, and axial diffusivity were obtained from bilateral caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and substantia nigra of 21 PD patients (12 TD and 9 PIGD) and 20 age-matched healthy controls. T-tests and ANOVA methods were used to compare PD patients, subtypes, and controls, and Spearman correlations tested for relationships between DTI and clinical measures. We found our cohort of PD patients had reduced fractional anisotropy within the substantia nigra and increased mean and radial diffusivity within the substantia nigra and globus pallidus compared to controls, and that changes within those structures were largely driven by the PIGD subtype. Across all PD patients fractional anisotropy within the substantia nigra correlated with disease stage, while in PIGD patients increased diffusivity within the globus pallidus correlated with disease stage and motor severity. We conclude that PIGD patients have more severely affected microstructural changes within the substantia nigra compared to TD, and that microstructural changes within the globus pallidus may be particularly relevant for the manifestation of the PIGD subtype.

  13. Frequency-selectivity of a thalamocortical relay neuron during Parkinson's disease and deep brain stimulation: a computational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cagnan, Hayriye; Cagnan, H.; Meijer, Hil Gaétan Ellart; van Gils, Stephanus A.; Krupa, M.; Heida, Tjitske; Rudolph, Michelle; Wadman, Wyse J.; Martens, Hubert C.F.

    2009-01-01

    In this computational study, we investigated (i) the functional importance of correlated basal ganglia (BG) activity associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) motor symptoms by analysing the effects of globus pallidus internum (GPi) bursting frequency and synchrony on a thalamocortical (TC) relay

  14. Demyelination of subcortical nuclei in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krutenkova, E; Aitmagambetova, G; Khodanovich, M; Yarnykh, V; Bowen, J; Gangadharan, B; Henson, L; Mayadev, A; Repovic, P; Qian, P

    2016-01-01

    Myelin containing in basal ganglia in multiple sclerosis patients was evaluated using new noninvasive quantitative MRI method fast whole brain macromolecular proton fraction mapping. Myelin level in globus pallidus and putamen significantly decreased in multiple sclerosis patients as compared with healthy control subjects but not in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus. (paper)

  15. Demyelination of subcortical nuclei in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutenkova, E.; Aitmagambetova, G.; Khodanovich, M.; Bowen, J.; Gangadharan, B.; Henson, L.; Mayadev, A.; Repovic, P.; Qian, P.; Yarnykh, V.

    2016-02-01

    Myelin containing in basal ganglia in multiple sclerosis patients was evaluated using new noninvasive quantitative MRI method fast whole brain macromolecular proton fraction mapping. Myelin level in globus pallidus and putamen significantly decreased in multiple sclerosis patients as compared with healthy control subjects but not in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus.

  16. A randomized double-blind crossover trial comparing subthalamic and pallidal deep brain stimulation for dystonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjerling, Lisbeth; Hjermind, Lena E; Jespersen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Object The authors' aim was to compare the subthalamic nucleus (STN) with the globus pallidus internus (GPi) as a stimulation target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) for medically refractory dystonia. Methods In a prospective double-blind crossover study, electrodes were bilaterally implanted in ...

  17. Improvement of both dystonia and tics with 60 Hz pallidal deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwynn, Nelson; Tagliati, Michele; Alterman, Ron L; Limotai, Natlada; Zeilman, Pamela; Malaty, Irene A; Foote, Kelly D; Morishita, Takashi; Okun, Michael S

    2012-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation has been utilized in both dystonia and in medication refractory Tourette syndrome. We present an interesting case of a patient with a mixture of disabling dystonia and Tourette syndrome whose coexistent dystonia and tics were successfully treated with 60 Hz-stimulation of the globus pallidus region.

  18. Brain CT scan in acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We, En-Huei

    1986-01-01

    The brain CT findings in 19 patients with acute carbon monoxide poisoning was analysed and the emphasis was placed on the relationship between CT findings and prognosis. Five had a normal manifestation in CT ; eight had the findings of ovoid or patchy low density area in globus pallidus, bilateral or unlateral, during the second day to fifth week after poisoning, and the low density areas were decreasing and blurring in edge in follow up and at last disappeared during 3 - 14 weeks in three cases of them ; nine showed the appearance of diffuse low density of white matter and of globus pallidus in some of them ; two had an appearance of brain atrophy. The pathology of CT findings mentioned above may be brain edema, necrosis, malacia and degeneration in gray matter and globus pallidus. The result suggested the cases with normal CT manifestation, cerebral edema and decreasing and disappearing low density area had a good prognosis, in contrary, the cases with persistant low density in globus pallidus had a poorer prognosis. (author)

  19. Psychiatric and social outcome after deep brain stimulation for advanced Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boel, Judith A.; Odekerken, Vincent J. J.; Geurtsen, Gert J.; Schmand, Ben A.; Cath, Danielle C.; Figee, Martijn; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; de Haan, Rob J.; Schuurman, P. Richard; de Bie, Rob M. A.; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Staal, Michael

    BackgroundThe aim of this study was to assess psychiatric and social outcome 12 months after bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) and subthalamic nucleus (STN) for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). MethodsWe randomly assigned patients to receive GPi DBS

  20. Psychiatric and social outcome after deep brain stimulation for advanced Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boel, J.A.; Odekerken, V.J.J.; Geurtsen, G.J.; Schmand, B.A.; Cath, D.C.; Figee, M.; van den Munckhof, P.; de Haan, R.J.; Schuurman, P.R.; de Bie, R.M.A.

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess psychiatric and social outcome 12 months after bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) and subthalamic nucleus (STN) for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: We randomly assigned patients to receive GPi

  1. Psychiatric and social outcome after deep brain stimulation for advanced Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boel, Judith A.; Odekerken, Vincent J. J.; Geurtsen, Gert J.; Schmand, Ben A.; Cath, Danielle C.; Figee, Martijn; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; de Haan, Rob J.; Schuurman, P. Richard; de Bie, Rob M. A.; van Laar, Teus; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Mosch, Arne; Hoffmann, Carel F. E.; Nijssen, Peter C. G.; Beute, Guus N.; van Vugt, Jeroen P. P.; Lenders, Mathieu W. P. M.; Contarino, M. Fiorella; Bour, Lo J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess psychiatric and social outcome 12 months after bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) and subthalamic nucleus (STN) for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). We randomly assigned patients to receive GPi DBS (n = 65) or STN

  2. Psychiatric and social outcome after deep brain stimulation for advanced Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boel, Judith A; Odekerken, Vincent J J; Geurtsen, Gert J; Schmand, Ben A; Cath, Danielle C; Figee, Martijn; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; de Haan, Rob J; Schuurman, P Richard; de Bie, Rob M A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess psychiatric and social outcome 12 months after bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) and subthalamic nucleus (STN) for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: We randomly assigned patients to receive GPi

  3. Diagnostic value of conventional MRI combined with DTI for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifang Yan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (NHB is a common clinical disease and can cause bilirubin encephalopathy in severe cases. It is now widely accepted that increased signal intensity in the globus pallidus on MR T1WI is an important sign of neonatal bilirubin encephalopathy. And brain diffusion tensor imaging (DTI has not been used extensively to study hyperbilirubinemia (HB. So we compared newborns with different hyperbilirubinemia of different severities and healthy newborns in order to determine the relationships among MRI signal intensities, serum bilirubin levels, and the molecular changes in brain water diffusion in hyperbilirubinemia. Methods: Seventy-three newborns with hyperbilirubinemia were grouped into three groups: the mild increase group (M, 27 cases, the moderate increase group (O, 28 cases, and the severe group (S, 18 cases. The groups were based on serum bilirubin levels. We performed cranial MRI in these newborns, as well as 29 healthy full-term infants (group N. We compared and analyzed the mean signal values for the globus pallidus and the relationship between the bilirubin level and the score on the neonatal behavioral neurological assessment. Fifteen, 10, and 10 patients in groups M, O + S, and N were successfully examined using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. We assessed the relationships among the signal from the globus pallidus, fractional anisotropy (FA, and average diffusion coefficient (DCav of the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC. Results: There were significant differences in the mean signal value of bilateral globus pallidus between group O/S and group N [p = 0.029 and 0.000 (left, 0.038 and 0.000 (right]. There were no significant differences in bilateral FA or DCav values between the patient groups and group N. The bilateral PLIC-FA and DCav values were significantly different between the patient groups and group N (P = 0.014 and 0.047, respectively. Conclusions: Increased signal intensity

  4. Hallervorden-Spatz disease: 2 cases of siblings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jong Gi; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1994-01-01

    We report two patients with Hallervorden-Spatz disease, who were diagnosed by same MR findings of marked low signal intensity in the globus and substantia nigra. They presented with ataxic and spastic gait, intention tremor, delayed mental development, and dysarthria. They were 7 year-old male and 8 year-old female siblings, who were healthy until 3 years of age when they suffered from progressive symptoms. T2-weighted images showed marked low signal intensity in the globus pallidus and substantia nigra indicating an increased iron deposition, and it might suggest Hallervorden-Spatz disease

  5. Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy: neuroradiological studies in 11 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farina, L.; Bruzzone, M.G.; D`Incerti, L.; Savoiardo, M. [Department of Neuroradiology, Istituto Nazionale Neurologico C. Besta, Milan (Italy); Nardocci, N.; Zorzi, G. [Department of Child Neurology, Istituto Nazionale Neurologico C. Besta, Milan (Italy); Verga, L.; Morbin, M. [Department of Neuropathology, Istituto Nazionale, Neurologico C. Besta, Milan (Italy)

    1999-05-01

    We report the imaging findings in 11 patients with infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy. Ten patients underwent 15 MRI examinations; one patient had only CT. Of the ten patients who underwent MRI, eight had cerebellar atrophy and mildly increased signal from the cerebellar cortex on T2-weighted images. With T2 weighting there was slightly increased signal from the dentate nuclei in two patients and from the posterior periventricular white matter in three. We saw four patients with a thin optic chiasm. The only two brothers in the series had markedly low signal from the globus pallidus and substantia nigra on 1.5 T T2-weighted images, as seen in Hallervorden-Spatz disease (HSD). Abnormalities of the globus pallidus may be related to a protracted course of the disease. However, an overlap with HSD should be considered. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 28 refs.

  6. Iron as a risk factor in neurological diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galazka-Friedman, Jolanta

    2008-02-01

    In this review the properties of iron in various human brain structures (e.g. Substantia nigra, globus pallidus, hippocampus) were analyzed to assess the possibility of initiation of oxidative stress leading to such diseases as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease, and progressive supranuclear palsy. Our own studies with the use of Mössbauer spectroscopy, electron microscopy and enzyme-linked immuno-absorbent assay (ELISA) were confronted with other methods used in other laboratories. Our results suggest that hippocampus is the most fragile for oxidative stress structure in human brain (the death of nervous cells in hippocampus leads to Alzheimer’s disease). Changes in iron metabolism were also found in substantia nigra (the death of nervous cells of this structure produces Parkinson’s disease) and in globus pallidus (neurodegeneration of this structure causes progressive supranuclear palsy).

  7. Iron as a risk factor in neurological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galazka-Friedman, Jolanta

    2008-01-01

    In this review the properties of iron in various human brain structures (e.g. Substantia nigra, globus pallidus, hippocampus) were analyzed to assess the possibility of initiation of oxidative stress leading to such diseases as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, and progressive supranuclear palsy. Our own studies with the use of Moessbauer spectroscopy, electron microscopy and enzyme-linked immuno-absorbent assay (ELISA) were confronted with other methods used in other laboratories. Our results suggest that hippocampus is the most fragile for oxidative stress structure in human brain (the death of nervous cells in hippocampus leads to Alzheimer's disease). Changes in iron metabolism were also found in substantia nigra (the death of nervous cells of this structure produces Parkinson's disease) and in globus pallidus (neurodegeneration of this structure causes progressive supranuclear palsy).

  8. Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy: neuroradiological studies in 11 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, L.; Bruzzone, M.G.; D'Incerti, L.; Savoiardo, M.; Nardocci, N.; Zorzi, G.; Verga, L.; Morbin, M.

    1999-01-01

    We report the imaging findings in 11 patients with infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy. Ten patients underwent 15 MRI examinations; one patient had only CT. Of the ten patients who underwent MRI, eight had cerebellar atrophy and mildly increased signal from the cerebellar cortex on T2-weighted images. With T2 weighting there was slightly increased signal from the dentate nuclei in two patients and from the posterior periventricular white matter in three. We saw four patients with a thin optic chiasm. The only two brothers in the series had markedly low signal from the globus pallidus and substantia nigra on 1.5 T T2-weighted images, as seen in Hallervorden-Spatz disease (HSD). Abnormalities of the globus pallidus may be related to a protracted course of the disease. However, an overlap with HSD should be considered. (orig.)

  9. Brain MRI changes in chronic liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skehan, S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Norris, S. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Hegarty, J. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Owens, A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); MacErlaine, D. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    1997-08-01

    Cirrhotic patients are known to have abnormally high signal principally in the globus pallidus on non-contrast T1-weighted MRI. The purpose of this study was to relate MR changes to clinical and pathological features of chronic liver disease. We confirmed abnormally high signal in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted images in 25 of 28 patients with chronic liver disease, showing that it also occurs in patients who have not yet progressed to cirrhosis. Changes were seen in patients both with and without clinical portosystemic shunting. This abnormality is not responsible for hepatic encephalopathy. Cholestatic disease was more likely to produce marked changes than non-cholestatic disease. No statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the severity of liver disease and the degree of MR abnormality. However, marked improvement in MR appearances was seen after successful liver transplantation. (orig.). With 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Hemiballismus: Study of a case using positron emission tomography with 18fluoro-2-deoxyglucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinsky, R.M.; Greenberg, M.; Di Chiro, G.; Baker, M.; Hallett, M.

    1989-01-01

    A 64-year-old man had right-sided persistent hemiballismus. Cerebral computed tomography (CT) and 0.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no abnormalities, but 1.5-T MRI showed decreased signal intensity of the putamina, greater on the left than on the right. The subthalamic area was normal on CT and MRI. Positron emission tomography with 18fluoro2-deoxyglucose showed marked hypometabolism of the left putamen (60% of the right) and hypermetabolism of the left parietal lobe (138% of the right). The decreased metabolism of the left putamen may indicate a reduction in neuronal firing. The pathophysiology of the hemiballismus in this case may be loss of tonic inhibition of the lateral globus pallidus from the putamen, leading in turn to greater inhibition of the subthalamic nucleus, less excitation of the medial globus pallidus, and less inhibition of the thalamus and motor cortex, and thus allowing expression of the ballistic movements

  11. Functional neuroanatomy of the basal ganglia as studied by dual-probe microdialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, William T.

    1998-01-01

    Dual probe microdialysis was employed in intact rat brain to investigate the effect of intrastriatal perfusion with selective dopamine D 1 and D 2 receptor agonists and with c-fos antisense oligonucleotide on (a) local GABA release in the striatum; (b) the internal segment of the globus pallidus and the substantia nigra pars reticulata, which is the output site of the strionigral GABA pathway; and (c) the external segment of the globus pallidus, which is the output site of the striopallidal GABA pathway. The data provide functional in vivo evidence for a selective dopamine D 1 receptor-mediated activation of the direct strionigral GABA pathway and a selective dopamine D 2 receptor inhibition of the indirect striopallidal GABA pathway and provides a neuronal substrate for parallel processing in the basal ganglia regulation of motor function. Taken together, these findings offer new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of dopamine-linked disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and schizophrenia

  12. Brain MRI changes in chronic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skehan, S.; Norris, S.; Hegarty, J.; Owens, A.; MacErlaine, D.

    1997-01-01

    Cirrhotic patients are known to have abnormally high signal principally in the globus pallidus on non-contrast T1-weighted MRI. The purpose of this study was to relate MR changes to clinical and pathological features of chronic liver disease. We confirmed abnormally high signal in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted images in 25 of 28 patients with chronic liver disease, showing that it also occurs in patients who have not yet progressed to cirrhosis. Changes were seen in patients both with and without clinical portosystemic shunting. This abnormality is not responsible for hepatic encephalopathy. Cholestatic disease was more likely to produce marked changes than non-cholestatic disease. No statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the severity of liver disease and the degree of MR abnormality. However, marked improvement in MR appearances was seen after successful liver transplantation. (orig.). With 3 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Diagnostic value of low-field MRI for acute poisoning brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Lianrong; He Qinyi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of low-field MIR in diagnosis of acute CO poisoning brain injury. Methods: The brain MIR and clinical data of 110 patients with acute CO poisoning brain injury confirmed by clinical examination were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Long T1 and T2 signal intensity was showed on MRI in cerebral hemispheres and globus pallidus symmetrically. There were three basic types of MIR manifestations, white matter of brain type, globus pallidus type and brain mixed type. Conclusions: MRI could be used for confirming the degree and range of acute CO poisoning brain injury. It has important clinical value in the diagnosis, staging and prognosis of patients with acute CO poisoning brain injury. (authors)

  14. Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification Presented with Impulse Control Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Sahin, Cem; Levent, Mustafa; Akbaba, Gulhan; Kara, Bilge; Yeniceri, Emine Nese; Inanc, Betul Battaloglu

    2015-01-01

    Primary familial brain calcification (PFBC), also referred to as Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification (IBGC) or “Fahr’s disease,” is a clinical condition characterized by symmetric and bilateral calcification of globus pallidus and also basal ganglions, cerebellar nuclei, and other deep cortical structures. It could be accompanied by parathyroid disorder and other metabolic disturbances. The clinical features are dysfunction of the calcified anatomic localization. IBGC most commonly present...

  15. Studies on the clinical significance of pallidal high intensity of T1-weighted MR imaging in patients with liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morino, Koutaro

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the clinical significances of signals in cirrhotic patients with special relation to subclinical hepatic encephalopathy. MRI was carried out in 30 patients with liver cirrhosis in the abscence of hepatic encephalopathy greater than grade II, and in 20 healthy subjects. Signal intensity of the globus pallidus was standardized to GP index. GP index=100 x (signal intensity of the globus pallidus - signal intensity of the putamen)/(signal intensity of the globus pallidus + signal intensity of the putamen). Normal value of GP index obtained in healthy subjects was -0.66∼4.70. Twenty seven of 30 cirrhotic patients showed GP index higher than the normal range. GP index correlated significantly with the blood manganese concentration. This observation suggested that the pallidal high intensity signals were brought about by the deposition of Mn in the globus pallidus. GP index correlated significantly with the central conduction time (CCT) measured by somatosensory evoked potentials. GP index and CCT may reflect the similar pathophysiological changes of the brain in patients with liver cirrhosis. Multivariate analysis revealed that GP index was explained well by the presence of portal systemic shunts and by preceding histories of hepatic encephalopathy but not by the present grade of the liver parenchymal damage. For the earlier diagnosis of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy, GP index showed an excellent parameter similar to those of somatosensory evoked potentials and psychometric tests. GP index is favorable than electrophysiological methods in terms of its non-invasiveness to the patients and simplicity of the examination technique. (K.H.)

  16. Studies on the clinical significance of pallidal high intensity of T{sub 1}-weighted MR imaging in patients with liver cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morino, Koutaro [Gifu Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-03-01

    We investigated the clinical significances of signals in cirrhotic patients with special relation to subclinical hepatic encephalopathy. MRI was carried out in 30 patients with liver cirrhosis in the abscence of hepatic encephalopathy greater than grade II, and in 20 healthy subjects. Signal intensity of the globus pallidus was standardized to GP index. GP index=100 x (signal intensity of the globus pallidus - signal intensity of the putamen)/(signal intensity of the globus pallidus + signal intensity of the putamen). Normal value of GP index obtained in healthy subjects was -0.66{approx}4.70. Twenty seven of 30 cirrhotic patients showed GP index higher than the normal range. GP index correlated significantly with the blood manganese concentration. This observation suggested that the pallidal high intensity signals were brought about by the deposition of Mn in the globus pallidus. GP index correlated significantly with the central conduction time (CCT) measured by somatosensory evoked potentials. GP index and CCT may reflect the similar pathophysiological changes of the brain in patients with liver cirrhosis. Multivariate analysis revealed that GP index was explained well by the presence of portal systemic shunts and by preceding histories of hepatic encephalopathy but not by the present grade of the liver parenchymal damage. For the earlier diagnosis of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy, GP index showed an excellent parameter similar to those of somatosensory evoked potentials and psychometric tests. GP index is favorable than electrophysiological methods in terms of its non-invasiveness to the patients and simplicity of the examination technique. (K.H.)

  17. Anaesthesia for a patient with Deep Brain Stimulator: Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj mala

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulator (DBS devices are used for unilateral or bilateral stimulation of thalamus, subthalamus and globus pallidus to treat movement disorders. DBS can interfere with domestic and medical equipment such as electrocardiography (ECG, slow wave diathermy, electrocautery, peripheral nerve stimulators, pacemakers, external and implantable cardioverters and defibrillators. This case report describes a patient with such a device who presented for bilateral (B/L cataract surgery.

  18. Using Globus to Transfer and Share Big Data | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer, and Mark Wance, Guest Writer; photo by Richard Frederickson, Staff Photographer Editor's note: This article was updated April 30, 2018. Transferring big data, such as the genomics data delivered to customers from the Center for Cancer Research Sequencing Facility (CCR SF), has been difficult in the past because the transfer systems have not kept

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of functional connectivity in Parkinson disease in the resting brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xian; Liu Bo; Luo Xiaodong; Li Ningna; Chen Zhiguang; Chen Jun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate functional connectivity changes in Parkinson disease in the resting brain using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Nine patients with Parkinson disease and eight age-matched healthy volunteers were entered into the study. The bilateral globus pallidus were chosen as seed points, the functional MR data acquired in the resting state were processed to investigate functional connectivity in PD patients and the results were compared with those of the controls. Results: In age-matched healthy controls, there are regions which had functional connectivity with bilateral globus pallidus, including bilateral temporal poles, bilateral hippocampus, bilateral thalami, posterior cingulate cortex, right middle occipital gyms and right superior parietal gyms. In PD patients, brain regions including bilateral cerebellum, left hippocampus, bilateral superior temporal gyri, left inferior frontal gyrus, left middle frontal gyrus, left precentral gyrus, left inferior parietal gyrus and left superior parietal gyrus, had functional connectivity with bilateral globus pallidus. Compared to healthy controls, increased functional connectivity in bilateral cerebellum, bilateral temporal lobes, left frontal lobe and left parietal lobe, and decreased functional connectivity in bilateral thalami were observed in PD patients. Conclusion: Abnormal changes of brain functional connectivity exists in Parkinson's disease in the resting state. (authors)

  20. MRI findings of the brain after gas explosion and its relationship with post-traumatic stress disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Ruifeng; Jin Yilong; Li Huabing; Li Shufeng; Tian Shuwen; Li Haixue; Chen Yanhui; Wang Tianliang; Ma Lin; Ren Zijing; Ma Lin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate MR findings and dynamic changes of the brain after gas explosion, and to evaluate the relationship between MR findings and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Methods: Forty-nine survivors of a gas explosion (group A) were examined with brain MRI within 1 to 3 days, and serial MR follow-up examinations were also performed. Forty miners not under the ground that day were assigned as group B, and 40 staff working on the ground as group C. The signal intensity values of hippocampus and globus pallidus on T 2 WI were measured in the three groups and F test was performed by using SPSS 13.0. The relationship between signal intensity values of hippocampus/globus pallidus and PTSD was explored, and the relationship between ADC values of hippocampus and PTSD was also investigated. Results: In group A, slight low signal on T 1 WI and high signal on T 2 WI were detected on initial MRI in hippocarnpus (33 cases), globus pallidus (12 cases), cortex (10 cases), and midbrain (2 cases), respectively. On follow-up MRI at 2 months, lesions in hippocampus disappeared (25 cases) or remained slight high signal on T 2 WI (8 cases), lesions in globus pallidus disappeared (3 cases, 5 sides) or showed shrinkage and encephalomalacia (9 cases), cortical lesions resulted in encephalomalacia in 2 cases and returned normal in the others, and lesions in the midbrain showed encephalomalacia. For comparison of T 2 signal intensity values in hippocampus and globus pallidus, there was significant difference between group A and group B (P 0.05). In group A, the T 2 signal intensities of PTSD and non- PTSD were 455 ± 37 and 462 ± 53 in the left hippocampus, and 458 ± 36 and 460 ± 43 in the right hippocampus on 1 to 3 days, and the T 2 signal intensities of PTSD and non-PTSD were 438 ± 29 and 424 ± 37 in the left hippocampus, and 442 ± 31 and 430 ± 32 in the right hippocampus at 2 months. The T 2 signal intensities of PTSD and non-PTSD were 361 ± 35 and 366 ± 63

  1. MR measurement of the basal ganglia volume in the tourette syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Kaibing; Li Guiping; Yang Bo; Feng Gansheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the volume of the basal ganglia in patients with Tourette syndrome (TS) and the normal volunteers and to explore the underlying anatomical basis of TS. Methods: Thirty-one cases of TS (TS subjects), 31 gender and age-matched subjects (the control subjects) were examined on a 3.0 T MRI system. The volume of the caudate nucleus, globus pallidus, putamen of the two sides and the brain volume were measured with volume analysis software, and the data were normalized according to the individual brain volume. Statistical analysis was performed using t test to compare between the TS subjects and the controls. Results: The volume of the both sides of the caudate nucleus, putamen and globus pallidus of TS subjects were (4.11 ±0.12) and (3.76 ±0.11), (2.28 ±0.12) and (2.35 ±0.28), (4.98 ±0.20) and (4.89 ±0.31) cm 3 , while they were (4.88 ±0.19) and (4.30 ±0.12), (2.28 ±0.12) and (2.35 ±0.28), (4.98 ±0.20) and (4.89 ±0.31) cm 3 in the controls, respectively. There were significant differences in the bilateral caudate nucleus and globus pallidus between the TS subjects and control subjects (t=2.97, 1.74, 3.72, 3.93, P<0.05), but there were no significant differences of the volume in the bilateral putamen between the TS and control subjects (t=0.47, 1.31, P>0.05). The volume was not significantly different between the left and right caudate nucleus in the TS subjects (t=1.81, P>0.05), but the left volume of the caudate nucleus was bigger in the control subjects compared with the right volume, however, there was significant difference between the bilateral caudate nucleus in the control subjects (t=2.34, P<0.05). There were no differences of volume between the bilateral globus pallidus and putamen in both the TS and control subjects (t=1.12, 1.44, 1.68, 0.38, P>0.05). Conclusion: The abnormal volume of caudate nucleus, putamen, and the globus pallidus may be involved in the pathogenesis of TS. (authors)

  2. Pattern approach to MR imaging in patients with end-stage hepatic failure: a proposal for a new disease entity 'hepatic encephalopathy continuum'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ho Kyun [Catholic University of Daegu, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea); Lee, Hui Joong; Lee, Wonho; Kim, Yong Sun [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea); Jang, Han Won [Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea); Byun, Kyung Hwan [Pochon CHA University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kumi CHA Hospital, Kumi (Korea)

    2008-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and the characteristics of MR images of patients with end-stage hepatic failure. We reviewed the MR findings and clinical features of 31 consecutive patients (20 men, 11 women=31, mean age 58.7 years) who had been diagnosed with clinical hepatic encephalopathy. Associations between the lesion locations on each MR sequence were analyzed using a binominal test. The clinical and MR findings were compared in relation to the etiology and clinical status. The most frequently involved site, seen as high signal intensity on T2-W images, was the corpus callosum (20 patients), followed by the dentate nucleus (16 patients) and the globus pallidus (13 patients). Significant associations were seen between the pallidus and the crus cerebri, between the crus cerebri and the red nucleus, between the crus cerebri and the dentate nucleus, and between the red nucleus and the dentate nucleus on the T2-W and DW images (P<0.004). The crus cerebri, red nucleus, and dentate nucleus were involved concurrently with the corpus callosum more frequently in hepatic encephalopathy grades 3 and 4. Concurrent involvement of the globus pallidus-crus cerebri-red nucleus-dentate nucleus axis was the main MR pattern in end-stage hepatic encephalopathy, which connected with various areas of the brain. We hypothesize that these overlapping MR features could be regarded as an entity denoted as the 'hepatic encephalopathy continuum'. (orig.)

  3. Pattern approach to MR imaging in patients with end-stage hepatic failure: a proposal for a new disease entity ''hepatic encephalopathy continuum''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Kyun; Lee, Hui Joong; Lee, Wonho; Kim, Yong Sun; Jang, Han Won; Byun, Kyung Hwan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and the characteristics of MR images of patients with end-stage hepatic failure. We reviewed the MR findings and clinical features of 31 consecutive patients (20 men, 11 women=31, mean age 58.7 years) who had been diagnosed with clinical hepatic encephalopathy. Associations between the lesion locations on each MR sequence were analyzed using a binominal test. The clinical and MR findings were compared in relation to the etiology and clinical status. The most frequently involved site, seen as high signal intensity on T2-W images, was the corpus callosum (20 patients), followed by the dentate nucleus (16 patients) and the globus pallidus (13 patients). Significant associations were seen between the pallidus and the crus cerebri, between the crus cerebri and the red nucleus, between the crus cerebri and the dentate nucleus, and between the red nucleus and the dentate nucleus on the T2-W and DW images (P<0.004). The crus cerebri, red nucleus, and dentate nucleus were involved concurrently with the corpus callosum more frequently in hepatic encephalopathy grades 3 and 4. Concurrent involvement of the globus pallidus-crus cerebri-red nucleus-dentate nucleus axis was the main MR pattern in end-stage hepatic encephalopathy, which connected with various areas of the brain. We hypothesize that these overlapping MR features could be regarded as an entity denoted as the ''hepatic encephalopathy continuum''. (orig.)

  4. Comparative imaging study on monkeys with hemi-parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Yu Xiaoping; Mao Jun; Liu Sheng; Wang Xiaoyi; Peng Guangchun; Wang Ruiwen

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the imaging appearance of experimental Parkinson's disease (PD) and to evaluate the different medical imaging exams on PD. Methods: CT, MRI, SPECT (dopamine transporter imaging and regional cerebral blood flow imaging, DAT imaging and rCBF imaging), and PET (glucose metabolism imaging) were performed on 8 monkeys before and after the infusion of MPTP into unilateral internal carotid artery to develop hemi-Parkinsonism models. Results: Hemi-Parkinsonism models were successfully induced on all 8 monkeys. On DAT imaging, the uptake values of the lesioned striatums decreased obviously after the MPTP treatment and were lower than that of the contralateral ones. The glucose metabolic rates of the lesioned striatums and thalamus in PD models were lower, compared to that of the healthy monkeys and that of the contralateral sides of themselves. Neither DAT nor glucose metabolism abnormalities was found on both the contralateral sides of the healthy and PD monkeys. On MRI images before MPTP treatment, only 4 of 8 PD models showed hypointense in bilateral globus pallidus. No abnormal MRI findings occurred in the first 2 months after injection of MPTP. At tile third month, hypointense appeared in globus pallidus of three monkeys. Enlarged hyposignal region in globus pallidus were found in three models. Of the above 6 monkeys, two appeared hypointense in putamina. Substantia nigra demonstrated no abnormalities before and after MPTP treatment. All rCBF and CT images were normal. Conclusion: The decreased density of DAT and decreased glucose metabolism on experimental PD can be showed early by DAT imaging and glucose metabolism imaging, MRI can show abnormal signal in the basal ganglia of PD but it is later than DAT and glucose metabolism imaging. CT and rCBF find no abnormality on PD

  5. Hyperintensity of basal ganglia on T{sub 1}-weighted images in patients with liver cirrhosis. Correlation with hepatic encephalopathy and liver function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hiroko; Kita, Keisuke; Mizobata, Toshiharu; Kimura, Masashi; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Kishi, Kazushi; Tanaka, Kayo; Sato, Morio; Yamada, Ryosaku [Wakayama Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    Brain MR imaging was performed in 38 liver cirrhosis (LC) patients and 9 normal volunteers. On T{sub 1}-weighted images, the signal intensity of globus pallidus (S1) and frontal white matter (S2) was measured and S1/S2 ratio was explored. We examined the relationship between S1/S2 ratio and liver function parameters. High signal intensity in bilateral globus pallidus was noted on T{sub 1} W1 in 28 of 38 LC patients. The S1/S2 ratio of 1.186{+-}0.097 in the 38 LC patients was significantly higher than 0.987{+-}0.062 in the 9 normal volunteers (p<0.001), while T{sub 2}-weighted images showed no abnormal intensity. Compared with the LC patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE) (n=7) and without HE (n=31), the former S1/S2 ratio (1.239{+-}0.057) was significantly higher than the latter (1.174{+-}0.097) (p<0.05). There was a significant correlation between the value of the S1/S2 ratio and deterioration of ICG R{sub 15} (r=0.501, p<0.005), prolongation of prothrombine time (r=-0.392, p<0.05) and decrease of choline esterase (r=-0.336, p<0.05). There was, however, little correlation between the value of the S1/S2 ratio and ammonia and Fisher ratio. In conclusion, there is a significant relationship between high intensity of globus pallidus on T{sub 1}-WI and the degree of liver dysfunction. (author).

  6. Hallervorden Spatz syndrome: magnetic resonance findings. Case report; Sindrome de Hallervorden Spatz: achados na ressonancia magnetica. Relato de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farage, Luciano; Castro, Mario Augusto Padula; Macedo, Tulio Augusto Alves [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, MG (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas. Setor de Radiologia; Assis, Marcelo Cardoso de [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Cirurgia; Souza, Lincoln Pereira de; Freitas, Luiz Oliveira de [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica

    2004-09-01

    Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome is a neuro degenerative disease, autosomic recessive with two clinical features: early and late onset. Psychiatric, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs are present in the late subtype. We report the case of a 41-old woman with extrapyramidal signs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed the eye-of-the-tiger sign in the medial globus pallidus. This is due to a gliosis (increased signal) and accumulation of surrounding iron (decreased signal intensity) in long T R sequences. There is a strong relationship between MRI findings and the gene mutation responsible for this disease. It makes the MRI sensible for diagnosing this syndrome. (author)

  7. [Cerebral MRT in neurofibromatosis: gliosis versus neoplasia?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mautner, V F; Pressler, M; Fünsterer, C; Schneider, E

    1989-08-01

    15 patients aged 1-39 years with documented neurofibromatosis had MR examinations of the cerebrum within the scope of a basic diagnosis and therapy programme. Clinical examination did not lead to pathologic findings for 7 of the patients; 3 patients suffered from general developmental disabilities. A neurologico-psychiatric examination showed pathological findings in 5 patients. Signal-intense foci in proton density and T2-weighted MR images were found in the globus pallidus, thalamus, hippocampus, cerebellum and midbrain. In 2 patients, these foci could be found as well in T1-weighted images. Differentiation between gliosis areas and low grade astrocytomas was not possible in MR.

  8. Clinical and neuropathological findings of acute carbon monoxide toxicity in chihuahuas following smoke inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Marc; Creevy, Kate E; Delahunta, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Three adult Chihuahuas were presented for evaluation after smoke inhalation during a house fire. All three dogs received supportive care and supplemental oxygen. After initial improvement, the dogs developed seizures. Despite anticonvulsant therapy and supportive care, the dogs died. The brains of two dogs were examined. Lesions were identified that were compatible with acute carbon monoxide (CO) toxicity. Lesions were confined to the caudate nucleus, the globus pallidus, and the substantia nigra bilaterally, as well as the cerebellum, cerebral cortex, and dorsal thalamus. This case report describes the clinicopathological sequelae in acute CO toxicity.

  9. Massive calcification in basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum caused by postoperative hypoparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toneva, T.; Mlachkova, D.; Kaitazki, L.; Boneva, J.; Yordanova, S.

    2015-01-01

    The depicted case is of a 65 year old woman, who was admitted to hospital with complaints of excess sweating, dizziness and loss of consciousness. Symptomatic epilepsy was established after examination from a neurologist. A CT scan showed hyperdense symmetrical striation of the hemisphere of the small brain (parasagittal); symmetrical double-sided calcifications in the caudate nucleus, globus pallidus, thalamus and medial to the capsula interna; snake-like calcifications of the sulcus (occipital, parasagittai). Paraclinical tests have found hypocalcemia and hypoparathyroidism. Past illnesses: resection of the thyroid due to a nodose struma 20 years before. Key words: Calcifications in Basal Ganglia. Calcifications in the Cerebrum. Hypoparathyroidism

  10. MRI of the brain in chronic carbon monoxide poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Hasuo, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Shida, K. (Dept. of Neurology, Omuta Rosai Hospital (Japan)); Matsumoto, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Yasumori, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Masuda, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1994-07-01

    We examined 13 patients with CO poisoning by MRI; all of them had been in an explosion in a coal mine 25 years previously. Symmetrical globus pallidus lesions were observed in 12, as was degeneration of the white matter, with focal cortical atrophy. The temporal parietal and occipital lobes were usually affected, the parietooccipital region being the most frequently and extensively damaged. Of the 12 patients with white matter degeneration 7 had definitely asymmetrical cortical and subcortical lesions. There were 6 patients with dilated temporal horns, probably due to atrophy of the hippocampal gyri. (orig./MG)

  11. Acute carbon monoxide intoxication : the relation between MR findings and clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jin Bae; Jeong, Hae Woong; Kim, Ki Nam; Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Chang Soo

    1999-01-01

    To analyse MR findings of various involving sites and the relation between such findings and clinical outcome, the authors retrospectively reviewed MR images of acute carbon monoxide intoxication. In 12 patients, MR images obtained from several hours to 12 days after acute carbon monoxide intoxication were reviewed. The images were analysed with regard to involved sites, symmetricity, signal intensity, and the presence or absence of hemorrhage, and the relationship between MR findings and clinical outcome; the presence of delayed encephalopathy was then determined. The globus pallidus(n=9), white matter(n=3), [centrum semiovale(n=2), periventricular white matter(n=1)] and gyrus(n=6) [inferior temporal gyrus(n=2), cingulate gyrus(n=1), precentral gyrus(n=1), hippocampal gyrus(n=1), parahippocampal gyrus(n=1)] were typically involved, and there was also involvenent of the corpus callosum(n=3), thalamus(n=2) and midbrain(n=2). All lesions of the globus pallidus, thalamus, midbrain and temporal lobe were bilaterally symmetric. In all these cases, subtle or prominent low signal intensity was seen on spin-echo T1WI, and high signal intensity on PDWI and T2WI. Some lesions of the globus pallidus(n=1), thalamus(n=1) and midbrain(n=1) were associated with hemorrhage, which occurred during the early subacute stage and was seen on high/low signal intensity T1/T2WI images. Acute cerebral(n=1) and cerebellar(n=1) infarctions were also seen. Cerebral white matter involvement correlated with poor clinical outcome, and in two cases, delayed encephalopathy developed. In these cases of acute carbon monoxide intoxication, the globus pallidus, white matter, cortex and hippocampus were frequently involved, and there was also involvement of various sites such as the corpus callosum, thalamus and midbrain. Lesions of the temporal lobe, thalamus and midbrain were bilaterally symmetric. The involvement of cerebral white matter and the presence of delayed encephalopathy can influence

  12. Cerebral glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, W R.W.; Beckman, J H; Calne, D B; Adam, M J; Harrop, R; Rogers, J G; Ruth, T J; Sayre, C I; Pate, B D [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver (Canada). TRIUMF Facility

    1984-02-01

    Local cerebral glucose utilization was measured in patients with predominantly unilateral Parkinson's disease using sup(18)F-2-fluoro-deoxyglucose and positron emission tomography. Preliminary results indicate the presence of asymmetric metabolic rates in the inferior basal ganglia. The structure comprising the largest portion of basal ganglia at this level is globus pallidus. These findings are consistent with metabolic studies on animals with unilateral nigrostriatal lesions in which pallidal hypermetabolism on the lesioned side has been demonstrated. Increased pallidal activity is likely secondary to a loss of inhibitory dopaminergic input to the striatum from substantia nigra.

  13. Hyperintense basal ganglia lesions on T1-weighted MR images in asymptomatic patients with hepatic dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saatci, I. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ. Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Cila, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ. Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Dincer, F.F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ. Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    1995-12-31

    Cranial MRI findings in four patients who had hepatic dysfunction, including one with sole hepatic form of Wilson`s disease, were reported. The MR examinations revealed bilateral, symmetric hyperintensity in the globus pallidus, subthalamic nuclei and mesencephalon on T1-weighted images with no corresponding abnormality on T2-weighted sequences. The basal ganglia were normal on CT examinations in all patients. None of the patients had the clinical findings of hepatic encephalopathy. The MR findings in our patients did not correlate with the degree or duration of hepatic dysfunction. (orig.)

  14. Image-guided preoperative prediction of pyramidal tract side effect in deep brain stimulation: proof of concept and application to the pyramidal tract side effect induced by pallidal stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgarten, Clement; Zhao, Yulong; Sauleau, Paul; Malrain, Cecile; Jannin, Pierre; Haegelen, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the medial globus pallidus (GPm) is a surgical procedure for treating patients suffering from Parkinson���s disease. Its therapeutic effect may be limited by the presence of pyramidal tract side effect (PTSE). PTSE is a contraction time-locked to the stimulation when the current spreading reaches the motor fibers of the pyramidal tract within the internal capsule. The objective of the study was to propose a preoperative predictive model of PTSE. A machine learning-ba...

  15. [Right extremities pain caused by a malacia lesion in the left putamen:a resting functional magnetic resonance imaging of the marginal division of the human brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Ye; Ma, Lin

    2014-04-01

    To explore the role of marginal division of the human brain in the pain modulation. Resting functional magnetic resonance imaging was applied in a patient with right extremities pain caused by a malacia lesion in the left putamen and in 8 healthy volunteers. Marginal division was defined using manual drawing on structure images, and was applied to the computation of fuctional connectivity maps. The functional connectivities in the left marginal division showed an evident decrease in the patient when compared with healthy controls. These connectivities were mainly located in the bilateral head of caudate nucleus, putamen, and left globus pallidus. The marginal division may be involved in the pain modulation.

  16. Fast micrographia: An unusual but distinctive sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umaiorubahan Meenakshisundaram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast micrographia is a rare clinical sign, which is reported in patients with pallidal pathology. A 68-year-old male presented with hypophonia and short shuffling gait with decreased arm swing. About 3 weeks before, he had an acute myocardial infarction and a period of hemodynamic and respiratory distress during which he required mechanical ventilatory support. He was found to have a fast handwriting with micrographia from the outset. His rapid alternating hand and finger movements were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain showed features of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy including hyperintensities on T1 and T2 weighted images in the globus pallidus, and putamen bilaterally.

  17. Neuroradiologiske forandringer ved undertrykkelse af tics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sara Bohn; Sørensen, Camilla Birgitte; Skov, Liselotte

    2017-01-01

    Neuroradiological changes by suppression of tics Tourette’s syndrome is characterized by involuntary tics. First choice of treatment has been pharmacological, but recently, behavioural therapy teaching patients to suppress their tics has been introduced. Neuroimaging studies have shown an increased...... activity in the prefrontal cortex, temporal lobes and caudate nucleus, and a decreased activity in globus pallidus and putamen during inhibition of tics. The activity in the frontal lobes changes with age, probably caused by a lack of compensatory hypertrophy. In order to fully understand the mechanism...

  18. 1H MR spectroscopy of gray and white matter in carbon monoxide poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, D.; Danielsen, E.R.; Hansen, K.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication leads to acute and chronic neurological deficits, but little is known about the specific noxious mechanisms. (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may allow insight into the pathophysiology of CO poisoning by monitoring neurochemical disturbances, yet only......, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological testing. Five patients suffered from acute high-dose CO intoxication and were in coma for 1-6 days. In these patients, MRI revealed hyperintensities of the white matter and globus pallidus and also showed increased choline (Cho) and decreased N...

  19. Hallervorden Spatz syndrome: magnetic resonance findings. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farage, Luciano; Castro, Mario Augusto Padula; Macedo, Tulio Augusto Alves; Assis, Marcelo Cardoso de; Souza, Lincoln Pereira de; Freitas, Luiz Oliveira de

    2004-01-01

    Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome is a neuro degenerative disease, autosomic recessive with two clinical features: early and late onset. Psychiatric, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs are present in the late subtype. We report the case of a 41-old woman with extrapyramidal signs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed the eye-of-the-tiger sign in the medial globus pallidus. This is due to a gliosis (increased signal) and accumulation of surrounding iron (decreased signal intensity) in long T R sequences. There is a strong relationship between MRI findings and the gene mutation responsible for this disease. It makes the MRI sensible for diagnosing this syndrome. (author)

  20. Regional distribution of enkephalinase in rat brain by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waksman, G.; Hamel, E.; Besselievre, R.; Fournie-Zaluski, M.C.; Roques, B.P.; Bouboutou, R.

    1984-01-01

    The first visualization of enkephalinase (neutral metalloendopeptidase, E.C.3.4.24.11) in rat brain was obtained by autoradiography, using a new tritiated inhibitor: [ 3 H]N-[(R, S) 3-(N-hydroxy) carboxamido-2-benzyl propanoyl]-glycine ( 3 H-HCBP-Gly). The preliminary analysis of sections clearly showed a discrete localization of enkephalinase in enkephalin enriched regions, such as caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus, and substantia nigra. Moreover 3 H-HCBP-Gly binding also occured in choroid plexus and spinal cord [fr

  1. Basal ganglia calcification on CT in adult patients with Down's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Yoshiro; Yoshida, Hironobu; Yoshimasu, Fumio; Higashi, Yuji.

    1987-01-01

    Fourteen adult cases with Down's syndrome were examined on cranial CT scan, and 5 of them (35.7 %) showed basal ganglia calcification (BGC). The incidence of BGC in the present cases was very high in comparison with the one in general population (0.3 ∼ 1.5 %). Abnormalities of calcium metabolism or dysfunctions of the basal ganglia were absent in each case with BGC. Calcifications were exclusively located in globus pallidus. It is considered that BGC found in the present cases may be due to the premature aging process in Down's syndrome. (author)

  2. Cerebral glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.R.W.; Beckman, J.H.; Calne, D.B.; Adam, M.J.; Harrop, R.; Rogers, J.G.; Ruth, T.J.; Sayre, C.I.; Pate, B.D.

    1984-01-01

    Local cerebral glucose utilization was measured in patients with predominantly unilateral Parkinson's disease using sup(18)F-2-fluoro-deoxyglucose and positron emission tomography. Preliminary results indicate the presence of asymmetric metabolic rates in the inferior basal ganglia. The structure comprising the largest portion of basal ganglia at this level is globus pallidus. These findings are consistent with metabolic studies on animals with unilateral nigrostriatal lesions in which pallidal hypermetabolism on the lesioned side has been demonstrated. Increased pallidal activity is likely secondary to a loss of inhibitory dopaminergic input to the striatum from substantia nigra

  3. MRI of the brain in chronic carbon monoxide poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, A.; Hasuo, K.; Shida, K.; Matsumoto, S.; Yasumori, K.; Masuda, K.

    1994-01-01

    We examined 13 patients with CO poisoning by MRI; all of them had been in an explosion in a coal mine 25 years previously. Symmetrical globus pallidus lesions were observed in 12, as was degeneration of the white matter, with focal cortical atrophy. The temporal parietal and occipital lobes were usually affected, the parietooccipital region being the most frequently and extensively damaged. Of the 12 patients with white matter degeneration 7 had definitely asymmetrical cortical and subcortical lesions. There were 6 patients with dilated temporal horns, probably due to atrophy of the hippocampal gyri. (orig./MG)

  4. Lacunar infarct during pallidotomy: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christoforidis, G.A.; Spickler, E.M.; Papaioannou, G.; Junn, F.

    2001-01-01

    A symptomatic lacunar infarct is an unusual complication which may develop during stereotactically guided pallidotomy using radiofrequency thermoablation. We describe a 54-year-old man with Parkinson's disease involving predominantly the right side, progressively deteriorating under medical management. He underwent stereotactically guided radiofrequency thermoablation of the posteroventral globus pallidus interna. Despite intraoperative microelectrode recording and stimulation, the patient developed right facial weakness and pronator drift during the procedure. MRI showed a small lacunar infarct in the left internal capsule, in addition to the appropriately placed ablative lesion. We discuss the potential mechanisms for this type of injury. (orig.)

  5. Characterization of Thermophilic Halotolerant Aeribacillus pallidus TD1 from Tao Dam Hot Spring, Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Yasawong, Montri; Areekit, Supatra; Pakpitchareon, Arda; Santiwatanakul, Somchai; Chansiri, Kosum

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial strain TD1 was isolated from Tao Dam hot spring in Thailand. Strain TD1 was Gram positive, rod-shaped, aerobic, motile, and endospore forming. The cell was 2.0–40 mm in length and about 0.4 mm in diameter. The optimum growth occurred at 55–60 °C and at pH 7–8. Strain TD1 was able to grow on medium containing up to 10% NaCl. The DNA G+C content was 38.9 mol%. The cellular fatty acid content was mainly C16:0, which comprised 25.04% of the total amount of cellular fatty acid. 16S r...

  6. Neural correlates of enhanced visual short-term memory for angry faces: an FMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret C Jackson

    Full Text Available Fluid and effective social communication requires that both face identity and emotional expression information are encoded and maintained in visual short-term memory (VSTM to enable a coherent, ongoing picture of the world and its players. This appears to be of particular evolutionary importance when confronted with potentially threatening displays of emotion - previous research has shown better VSTM for angry versus happy or neutral face identities.Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, here we investigated the neural correlates of this angry face benefit in VSTM. Participants were shown between one and four to-be-remembered angry, happy, or neutral faces, and after a short retention delay they stated whether a single probe face had been present or not in the previous display. All faces in any one display expressed the same emotion, and the task required memory for face identity. We find enhanced VSTM for angry face identities and describe the right hemisphere brain network underpinning this effect, which involves the globus pallidus, superior temporal sulcus, and frontal lobe. Increased activity in the globus pallidus was significantly correlated with the angry benefit in VSTM. Areas modulated by emotion were distinct from those modulated by memory load.Our results provide evidence for a key role of the basal ganglia as an interface between emotion and cognition, supported by a frontal, temporal, and occipital network.

  7. Bilateral hyperintense basal ganglia on T1-weighted image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Seung Kug; Ahn, Woo Hyun; Choi, Han Yong; Kim, Bong Gi

    1994-01-01

    Bilateral high signal intensity in basal ganglia on T1-weighted images is unusual, the purpose of this study is to describe the pattern of high signal intensity and underlying disease. During the last three years, 8 patients showed bilateral high signal intensity in basal ganglia on T1-weighted image, as compared with cerebral white matter. Authors analyzed the images and underlying causes retrospectively. Of 8 patients, 5 were male and 3 were female. The age ranged from 15 days to 79 years. All patient were examined by a 0.5T superconductive MRI. Images were obtained by spin echo multislice technique. Underlying causes were 4 cases of hepatopathy, 2 cases of calcium metabolism disorder, and one case each of neurofibromatosis and hypoxic brain injury. These process were bilateral in all cases and usually symmetric. In all cases the hyperintense areas were generally homogenous without mass effect or edema, although somewhat nodular appearance was seen in neurofibromatosis. Lesions were located in the globus pallidus and internal capsule in hepatopathy and neurofibromatosis, head of the caudate nucleus in disorder of calcum metabolism, and the globus pallidus in hypoxic brain injury. Although this study is limited by its patient population, bilateral hyperintense basal ganglia is associated with various disease entities. On analysis of hyperintense basal ganglia lesion, the knowledge of clinical information improved diagnostic accuracy

  8. Structural differences in basal ganglia of elite running versus martial arts athletes: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Kai; Tsai, Jack Han-Chao; Wang, Chun-Chih; Chang, Erik Chihhung

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to use diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to characterize and compare microscopic differences in white matter integrity in the basal ganglia between elite professional athletes specializing in running and martial arts. Thirty-three young adults with sport-related skills as elite professional runners (n = 11) or elite professional martial artists (n = 11) were recruited and compared with non-athletic and healthy controls (n = 11). All participants underwent health- and skill-related physical fitness assessments. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD), the primary indices derived from DTI, were computed for five regions of interest in the bilateral basal ganglia, including the caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus internal segment (GPi), globus pallidus external segment (GPe), and subthalamic nucleus. Results revealed that both athletic groups demonstrated better physical fitness indices compared with their control counterparts, with the running group exhibiting the highest cardiovascular fitness and the martial arts group exhibiting the highest muscular endurance and flexibility. With respect to the basal ganglia, both athletic groups showed significantly lower FA and marginally higher MD values in the GPi compared with the healthy control group. These findings suggest that professional sport or motor skill training is associated with changes in white matter integrity in specific regions of the basal ganglia, although these positive changes did not appear to depend on the type of sport-related motor skill being practiced.

  9. Basal ganglia neuronal activity during scanning eye movements in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Sieger

    Full Text Available The oculomotor role of the basal ganglia has been supported by extensive evidence, although their role in scanning eye movements is poorly understood. Nineteen Parkinsońs disease patients, which underwent implantation of deep brain stimulation electrodes, were investigated with simultaneous intraoperative microelectrode recordings and single channel electrooculography in a scanning eye movement task by viewing a series of colored pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System. Four patients additionally underwent a visually guided saccade task. Microelectrode recordings were analyzed selectively from the subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra pars reticulata and from the globus pallidus by the WaveClus program which allowed for detection and sorting of individual neurons. The relationship between neuronal firing rate and eye movements was studied by crosscorrelation analysis. Out of 183 neurons that were detected, 130 were found in the subthalamic nucleus, 30 in the substantia nigra and 23 in the globus pallidus. Twenty percent of the neurons in each of these structures showed eye movement-related activity. Neurons related to scanning eye movements were mostly unrelated to the visually guided saccades. We conclude that a relatively large number of basal ganglia neurons are involved in eye motion control. Surprisingly, neurons related to scanning eye movements differed from neurons activated during saccades suggesting functional specialization and segregation of both systems for eye movement control.

  10. Basal ganglia neuronal activity during scanning eye movements in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieger, Tomáš; Bonnet, Cecilia; Serranová, Tereza; Wild, Jiří; Novák, Daniel; Růžička, Filip; Urgošík, Dušan; Růžička, Evžen; Gaymard, Bertrand; Jech, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The oculomotor role of the basal ganglia has been supported by extensive evidence, although their role in scanning eye movements is poorly understood. Nineteen Parkinsońs disease patients, which underwent implantation of deep brain stimulation electrodes, were investigated with simultaneous intraoperative microelectrode recordings and single channel electrooculography in a scanning eye movement task by viewing a series of colored pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System. Four patients additionally underwent a visually guided saccade task. Microelectrode recordings were analyzed selectively from the subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra pars reticulata and from the globus pallidus by the WaveClus program which allowed for detection and sorting of individual neurons. The relationship between neuronal firing rate and eye movements was studied by crosscorrelation analysis. Out of 183 neurons that were detected, 130 were found in the subthalamic nucleus, 30 in the substantia nigra and 23 in the globus pallidus. Twenty percent of the neurons in each of these structures showed eye movement-related activity. Neurons related to scanning eye movements were mostly unrelated to the visually guided saccades. We conclude that a relatively large number of basal ganglia neurons are involved in eye motion control. Surprisingly, neurons related to scanning eye movements differed from neurons activated during saccades suggesting functional specialization and segregation of both systems for eye movement control.

  11. Exploring personality traits related to dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in striatal subregions of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Fervaha, Gagan; Chung, Jun Ku; Gerretsen, Philip; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Plitman, Eric; Iwata, Yusuke; Wilson, Alan; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2016-04-01

    While several studies have examined how particular personality traits are related to dopamine D2/3 receptor (D2/3R) availability in the striatum of humans, few studies have reported how multiple traits measured in the same persons are differentially related to D2/3R availability in different striatal sub-regions. We examined how personality traits measured with the Karolinska Scales of Personality are related to striatal D2/3R availability measured with [(11)C]-raclopride in 30 healthy humans. Based on previous the literature, five personality traits were hypothesized to be most likely related to D2/3R availability: impulsiveness, monotony avoidance, detachment, social desirability, and socialization. We found self-reported impulsiveness was negatively correlated with D2/3R availability in the ventral striatum and globus pallidus. After controlling for age and gender, monotony avoidance was also negatively correlated with D2/3R availability in the ventral striatum and globus pallidus. Socialization was positively correlated with D2/3R availability in the ventral striatum and putamen. After controlling for age and gender, the relationship between socialization and D2/3R availability in these regions survived correction for multiple comparisons (p-threshold=.003). Thus, within the same persons, different personality traits are differentially related to in vivo D2/3R availability in different striatal sub-regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of aging on nitrergic system in human basal nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Lopes dos Santos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a gaseous molecule that plays a role in a number of physiologic processes. The available evidence suggests that NO is a major neurotransmitter involved in motor control and emotion/behavior modulation. To investigate the distribution and morphology of the nitrergic system in human basal nuclei, we studied samples from the striatum, globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra and pedunculopontine nucleus of 20 human brains from subjects without neurologic/psychiatric diseases. The samples were stained for NADPH-diaphorase using histochemistry and for neuronal NO synthase using immunohistochemistry. We then analyzed the nitrergic neuronal density and its morphometric parameters. Our data demonstrated that: (I the most posterior regions of the striatum exhibit a higher neuronal density; (II the limbic cortex-associated areas of the striatum exhibit higher neuronal density than other functional subdivisions; (III approximately 90% of the neurons in the subthalamic nucleus express NO; (IV the pedunculopontine nucleus exhibits a massive nitrergic neuronal density; (V in the globus pallidus, there is a marked presence of NO neurons in the medial medullary lamina; and (VI nitrergic neurons were not detected in the substantia nigra. Aging did not change the neuronal density or the morphometric parameters of nitrergic neurons in the analyzed nuclei.

  13. Image-guided preoperative prediction of pyramidal tract side effect in deep brain stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, C.; Zhao, Y.; Sauleau, P.; Malrain, C.; Jannin, P.; Haegelen, C.

    2016-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the medial globus pallidus is a surgical procedure for treating patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Its therapeutic effect may be limited by the presence of pyramidal tract side effect (PTSE). PTSE is a contraction time-locked to the stimulation when the current spreading reaches the motor fibers of the pyramidal tract within the internal capsule. The lack of side-effect predictive model leads the neurologist to secure an optimal electrode placement by iterating clinical testing on an awake patient during the surgical procedure. The objective of the study was to propose a preoperative predictive model of PTSE. A machine learning based method called PyMAN (for Pyramidal tract side effect Model based on Artificial Neural network) that accounted for the current of the stimulation, the 3D electrode coordinates and the angle of the trajectory, was designed to predict the occurrence of PTSE. Ten patients implanted in the medial globus pallidus have been tested by a clinician to create a labeled dataset of the stimulation parameters that trigger PTSE. The kappa index value between the data predicted by PyMAN and the labeled data was .78. Further evaluation studies are desirable to confirm whether PyMAN could be a reliable tool for assisting the surgeon to prevent PTSE during the preoperative planning.

  14. Biochemical mechanisms of pallidal deep brain stimulation in X-linked dystonia parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronnier, V M; Domingo, A; Moll, C K; Rasche, D; Mohr, C; Rosales, R; Capetian, P; Jamora, R D; Lee, L V; Münchau, A; Diesta, C C; Tadic, V; Klein, C; Brüggemann, N; Moser, A

    2015-08-01

    Invasive techniques such as in-vivo microdialysis provide the opportunity to directly assess neurotransmitter levels in subcortical brain areas. Five male Filipino patients (mean age 42.4, range 34-52 years) with severe X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism underwent bilateral implantation of deep brain leads into the internal part of the globus pallidus (GPi). Intraoperative microdialysis and measurement of gamma aminobutyric acid and glutamate was performed in the GPi in three patients and globus pallidus externus (GPe) in two patients at baseline for 25/30 min and during 25/30 min of high-frequency GPi stimulation. While the gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration increased in the GPi during high frequency stimulation (231 ± 102% in comparison to baseline values), a decrease was observed in the GPe (22 ± 10%). Extracellular glutamate levels largely remained unchanged. Pallidal microdialysis is a promising intraoperative monitoring tool to better understand pathophysiological implications in movement disorders and therapeutic mechanisms of high frequency stimulation. The increased inhibitory tone of GPi neurons and the subsequent thalamic inhibition could be one of the key mechanisms of GPi deep brain stimulation in dystonia. Such a mechanism may explain how competing (dystonic) movements can be suppressed in GPi/thalamic circuits in favour of desired motor programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiplicative multifractal modeling and discrimination of human neuronal activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yi; Gao Jianbo; Sanchez, Justin C.; Principe, Jose C.; Okun, Michael S.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding neuronal firing patterns is one of the most important problems in theoretical neuroscience. It is also very important for clinical neurosurgery. In this Letter, we introduce a computational procedure to examine whether neuronal firing recordings could be characterized by cascade multiplicative multifractals. By analyzing raw recording data as well as generated spike train data from 3 patients collected in two brain areas, the globus pallidus externa (GPe) and the globus pallidus interna (GPi), we show that the neural firings are consistent with a multifractal process over certain time scale range (t 1 ,t 2 ), where t 1 is argued to be not smaller than the mean inter-spike-interval of neuronal firings, while t 2 may be related to the time that neuronal signals propagate in the major neural branching structures pertinent to GPi and GPe. The generalized dimension spectrum D q effectively differentiates the two brain areas, both intra- and inter-patients. For distinguishing between GPe and GPi, it is further shown that the cascade model is more effective than the methods recently examined by Schiff et al. as well as the Fano factor analysis. Therefore, the methodology may be useful in developing computer aided tools to help clinicians perform precision neurosurgery in the operating room

  16. Quantitative analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for brain disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Im, In-Chul; Kang, Su-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Kwak, Byung-Joon

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to quantitatively analyze data from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) in patients with brain disorders and to assess its potential utility for analyzing brain function. DTI was obtained by performing 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD), and the data were analyzed using Matlab-based SPM software. The two-sample t-test was used for error analysis of the location of the activated pixels. We compared regions of white matter where the fractional anisotropy (FA) values were low and the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were increased. In the AD group, the FA values were low in the right superior temporal gyrus, right inferior temporal gyrus, right sub-lobar insula, and right occipital lingual gyrus whereas the ADCs were significantly increased in the right inferior frontal gyrus and right middle frontal gyrus. In the VD group, the FA values were low in the right superior temporal gyrus, right inferior temporal gyrus, right limbic cingulate gyrus, and right sub-lobar caudate tail whereas the ADCs were significantly increased in the left lateral globus pallidus and left medial globus pallidus. In conclusion by using DTI and SPM analysis, we were able to not only determine the structural state of the regions affected by brain disorders but also quantitatively analyze and assess brain function.

  17. Benzodiazepine effect of {sup 125}I-iomazenil-benzodiazepine receptor binding and serum corticosterone level in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Ibaragi, 305-8575 (Japan)]. E-mail: gzl13162@nifty.ne.jp; Ogi, Shigeyuki [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 105-8461 (Japan); Uchiyama, Mayuki [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 105-8461 (Japan); Mori, Yutaka [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 105-8461 (Japan)

    2005-01-01

    To test the change in free or unoccupied benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) density in response to diazepam, we investigated {sup 125}I-iomazenil ({sup 125}I-IMZ) binding and serum corticosterone levels in a rat model. Wistar male rats, which received psychological stress using a communication box for 5 days, were divided into two groups according to the amount of administered diazepam: no diazepam [D (0)] group and 10 mg/kg per day [D (10)] group of 12 rats each. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of {sup 125}I-IMZ of the D (10) group were significantly lower (P<.05) than those of the D (0) group in the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices, globus pallidus, hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus. The serum corticosterone level ratio in the D (10) group was significantly lower than that in the D (0) group (P<.05). From the change in serum corticosterone levels, diazepam attenuated the psychological stress produced by the physical stress to animals in adjacent compartments. From the reduced binding of {sup 125}I-IMZ, it is clear that diazepam competed with endogenous ligand for the free BZR sites, and the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices, globus pallidus, hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus are important areas in which {sup 125}I-IMZ binding is strongly affected by administration of diazepam.

  18. Identification of Novel Compound Mutations in PLA2G6-Associated Neurodegeneration Patient with Characteristic MRI Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sen; Yang, Liu; Liu, Huijie; Chen, Wei; Li, Jinchen; Yu, Ping; Sun, Zhong Sheng; Chen, Xiang; Du, Jie; Cai, Tao

    2017-08-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation comprises a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized clinically by progressive motor dysfunction. Accurate identification of de novo and rare inherited mutations is important for determining causative genes of undiagnosed neurological diseases. In the present study, we report a unique case with cerebellar ataxia symptoms and social communication difficulties in an intermarriage family. MRI showed a marked cerebellar atrophy and the "eye-of-the-tiger"-like sign in the medial globus pallidus. Potential genetic defects were screened by whole-exome sequencing (WES) for the patient and four additional family members. A previously undescribed de novo missense mutation (c.1634A>G, p.K545R) in the exon 12 of the PLA2G6 gene was identified. A second rare variant c.1077G>A at the end of exon 7 was also identified, which was inherited from the mother, and resulted in a frame-shift mutation (c.1074_1077del.GTCG) due to an alternative splicing. In conclusion, the identification of the "eye-of-the-tiger"-like sign in the globus pallidus of the patient expands the phenotypic spectrum of PLA2G6-associated disorders and reveals its value in differential diagnosis of PLA2G6-associated disorders.

  19. Functional neuroanatomy of the basal ganglia as studied by dual-probe microdialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, William T. E-mail: woconn@iveagh.ucd.ie

    1998-11-01

    Dual probe microdialysis was employed in intact rat brain to investigate the effect of intrastriatal perfusion with selective dopamine D{sub 1} and D{sub 2} receptor agonists and with c-fos antisense oligonucleotide on (a) local GABA release in the striatum; (b) the internal segment of the globus pallidus and the substantia nigra pars reticulata, which is the output site of the strionigral GABA pathway; and (c) the external segment of the globus pallidus, which is the output site of the striopallidal GABA pathway. The data provide functional in vivo evidence for a selective dopamine D{sub 1} receptor-mediated activation of the direct strionigral GABA pathway and a selective dopamine D{sub 2} receptor inhibition of the indirect striopallidal GABA pathway and provides a neuronal substrate for parallel processing in the basal ganglia regulation of motor function. Taken together, these findings offer new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of dopamine-linked disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and schizophrenia.

  20. Hyperintensity of basal ganglia on T1-weighted images in patients with liver cirrhosis. Correlation with hepatic encephalopathy and liver function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hiroko; Kita, Keisuke; Mizobata, Toshiharu; Kimura, Masashi; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Kishi, Kazushi; Tanaka, Kayo; Sato, Morio; Yamada, Ryosaku

    1995-01-01

    Brain MR imaging was performed in 38 liver cirrhosis (LC) patients and 9 normal volunteers. On T 1 -weighted images, the signal intensity of globus pallidus (S1) and frontal white matter (S2) was measured and S1/S2 ratio was explored. We examined the relationship between S1/S2 ratio and liver function parameters. High signal intensity in bilateral globus pallidus was noted on T 1 W1 in 28 of 38 LC patients. The S1/S2 ratio of 1.186±0.097 in the 38 LC patients was significantly higher than 0.987±0.062 in the 9 normal volunteers (p 2 -weighted images showed no abnormal intensity. Compared with the LC patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE) (n=7) and without HE (n=31), the former S1/S2 ratio (1.239±0.057) was significantly higher than the latter (1.174±0.097) (p 15 (r=0.501, p 1 -WI and the degree of liver dysfunction. (author)

  1. Cognitive dysfunction, MRI findings and manganese levels in alcoholics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Tsutomu; Nakane, Yoshibumi [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Takahashi, Katsurou; Shimanaga, Masaki [National Nagasaki Medical Center, Omura (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Alcoholic patients have been known to have brain atrophy and cognitive dysfunction. However, recent studies have reported bilateral signal hyperintensities of the globus pallidus on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in liver failure, findings that are typically associated with manganese intoxication. The present study compared brain atrophy on T1-weighted MRI, signal intensity ratios of the globus pallidus on T1-weighted MRI, whole blood manganese levels, and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) IQ parameters between alcoholics with and without liver cirrhosis, to investigate cognitive dysfunction, MRI findings and manganese levels in alcoholics. Pallidal hyperintensity was visually identified in 80% of alcoholic patients with liver cirrhosis. In addition, a significant correlation was seen between pallidal signal intensity (P.S.I.) ratio and blood manganese level. However, no significant correlations were found between pallidal signal intensity ratio and any of the WAIS-R parameters. These findings suggest that no direct connection exists between cognitive dysfunction and pallidal hyperintensity in alcoholic patients with liver cirrhosis. We confirmed that brain MRI in alcoholics could detect pallidal signal hyperintensity, suggesting severe liver dysfunction. In addition to diagnosis, brain MRI is useful for therapeutic psychoeducation to alcoholic patients with liver cirrhosis, visualizing the severe liver dysfunction. (author)

  2. Anatomical brain difference of subthreshold depression in young and middle-aged individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wang, Zengjian; Hwang, JiWon; Zhao, Bingcong; Yang, Xinjing; Xin, Suicheng; Wang, Yu; Jiang, Huili; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Ye; Wang, Xu; Lang, Courtney; Park, Joel; Bao, Tuya; Kong, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Subthreshold depression (StD) is associated with substantial functional impairments due to depressive symptoms that do not fully meet the diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD). Its high incidence in the general population and debilitating symptoms has recently put it at the forefront of mood disorder research. In this study we investigated common volumetric brain changes in both young and middle-aged StD patients. Two cohorts of StD patients, young and middle-aged, ( n  = 57) and matched controls ( n  = 76) underwent voxel-based morphometry (VBM). VBM analysis found that: 1) compared with healthy controls, StD patients showed decreased gray matter volume (GMV) in the bilateral globus pallidus and precentral gyrus, as well as increased GMV in the left thalamus and right rostral anterior cingulate cortex/medial prefrontal cortex; 2) there is a significant association between Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale scores and the bilateral globus pallidus (negative) and left thalamus (positive); 3) there is no interaction between age (young vs. middle-age) and group (StD vs. controls). Our findings indicate significant VBM brain changes in both young and middle-aged individuals with StD. Individuals with StD, regardless of age, may share common neural characteristics.

  3. Cognitive dysfunction, MRI findings and manganese levels in alcoholics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Tsutomu; Nakane, Yoshibumi

    2002-01-01

    Alcoholic patients have been known to have brain atrophy and cognitive dysfunction. However, recent studies have reported bilateral signal hyperintensities of the globus pallidus on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in liver failure, findings that are typically associated with manganese intoxication. The present study compared brain atrophy on T1-weighted MRI, signal intensity ratios of the globus pallidus on T1-weighted MRI, whole blood manganese levels, and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) IQ parameters between alcoholics with and without liver cirrhosis, to investigate cognitive dysfunction, MRI findings and manganese levels in alcoholics. Pallidal hyperintensity was visually identified in 80% of alcoholic patients with liver cirrhosis. In addition, a significant correlation was seen between pallidal signal intensity (P.S.I.) ratio and blood manganese level. However, no significant correlations were found between pallidal signal intensity ratio and any of the WAIS-R parameters. These findings suggest that no direct connection exists between cognitive dysfunction and pallidal hyperintensity in alcoholic patients with liver cirrhosis. We confirmed that brain MRI in alcoholics could detect pallidal signal hyperintensity, suggesting severe liver dysfunction. In addition to diagnosis, brain MRI is useful for therapeutic psychoeducation to alcoholic patients with liver cirrhosis, visualizing the severe liver dysfunction. (author)

  4. CD73 is a major regulator of adenosinergic signalling in mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Kulesskaya

    Full Text Available CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase is a cell surface enzyme that regulates purinergic signalling by desphosphorylating extracellular AMP to adenosine. 5'-nucleotidases are known to be expressed in brain, but the expression of CD73 and its putative physiological functions at this location remain elusive. Here we found, using immunohistochemistry of wild-type and CD73 deficient mice, that CD73 is prominently expressed in the basal ganglia core comprised of striatum (caudate nucleus and putamen and globus pallidus. Furthermore, meninges and the olfactory tubercle were found to specifically express CD73. Analysis of wild type (wt and CD73 deficient mice revealed that CD73 confers the majority of 5'-nucleotidase activity in several areas of the brain. In a battery of behavioural tests and in IntelliCage studies, the CD73 deficient mice demonstrated significantly enhanced exploratory locomotor activity, which probably reflects the prominent expression of CD73 in striatum and globus pallidus that are known to control locomotion. Furthermore, the CD73 deficient mice displayed altered social behaviour. Overall, our data provide a novel mechanistic insight into adenosinergic signalling in brain, which is implicated in the regulation of normal and pathological behaviour.

  5. Grey matter alterations in patients with Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration (PKAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Raecke, Rea; Roa-Sanchez, Pedro; Speckter, Herwin; Fermin-Delgado, Rafael; Perez-Then, Eddy; Oviedo, Jairo; Stoeter, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a rare heritable disease marked by dystonia and loss of movement control. In contrast to the well-known "Eye-of-the-Tiger" sign affecting the globus pallidus, little is known about other deviations of brain morphology, especially about grey matter changes. We investigated 29 patients with PKAN and 29 age-matched healthy controls using Magnet Resonance Imaging and Voxel-Based Morphometry. As compared to controls, children with PKAN showed increased grey matter density in the putamen and nucleus caudatus and adults with PKAN showed increased grey matter density in the ventral part of the anterior cingulate cortex. A multiple regression analysis with dystonia score as predictor showed grey matter reduction in the cerebellum, posterior cingulate cortex, superior parietal lobule, pars triangularis and small frontal and temporal areas and an analysis with age as predictor showed grey matter decreases in the putamen, nucleus caudatus, supplementary motor area and anterior cingulate cortex. The grey matter increases may be regarded as a secondary phenomenon compensating the increased activity of the motor system due to a reduced inhibitory output of the globus pallidus. With increasing age, the grey matter reduction of cortical midline structures however might contribute to the progression of dystonic symptoms due to loss of this compensatory control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. CT of the brain in acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masato; Uchino, Akira; Hayashi, Kazuji; Nakata, Hajime.

    1988-01-01

    Cerebral computed tomographic (CT) findings of acute carbon monoxide (Co) poisoning were analized in thirty-six cases treated with hyperbraric oxygen therapy and their relationship with prognosis was evaluated. The cases were classified into there groups, early stage, interval form, and non-interval form groups. In all groups, the initial abnormality was low density areas presumably due to edema, demyelination and/or softening. It was seen in the globus pallidus and/or white matter. Following these initial changes, cerebral hemorrhage, ventricular dilatation, and cerebral atrophy developed in a few cases. The frequency of abnormal CT findings was higher in the interval form group (85 %) or non-interval group (83 %) than the early stage group (41 %). The prognosis was good in most cases with normal CT findings. The possibility of recovery diminished in the patients with abnormal CT findings. The prognosis was particularly poor in cases showing abnormality both in globus pallidus and white matter. We conclude that CT is useful not only for detecting the pathologic change but also for predicting the prognosis of the patient with acute Co poisoning. (author)

  7. Bilingualism at the core of the brain. Structural differences between bilinguals and monolinguals revealed by subcortical shape analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgaleta, Miguel; Sanjuán, Ana; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Sebastian-Galles, Núria; Ávila, César

    2016-01-15

    Naturally acquiring a language shapes the human brain through a long-lasting learning and practice process. This is supported by previous studies showing that managing more than one language from early childhood has an impact on brain structure and function. However, to what extent bilingual individuals present neuroanatomical peculiarities at the subcortical level with respect to monolinguals is yet not well understood, despite the key role of subcortical gray matter for a number of language functions, including monitoring of speech production and language control - two processes especially solicited by bilinguals. Here we addressed this issue by performing a subcortical surface-based analysis in a sample of monolinguals and simultaneous bilinguals (N=88) that only differed in their language experience from birth. This analysis allowed us to study with great anatomical precision the potential differences in morphology of key subcortical structures, namely, the caudate, accumbens, putamen, globus pallidus and thalamus. Vertexwise analyses revealed significantly expanded subcortical structures for bilinguals compared to monolinguals, localized in bilateral putamen and thalamus, as well as in the left globus pallidus and right caudate nucleus. A topographical interpretation of our results suggests that a more complex phonological system in bilinguals may lead to a greater development of a subcortical brain network involved in monitoring articulatory processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of carbon monoxide poisoning in chronic stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Shibata, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Nobuyoshi; Hirayama, Keizo

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated in three patients with carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning in chronic stage by comparison with serial X-ray computed tomography (CT). In Case 1 and 3, no pallidal lesions believed to be the most common lesion of the gray matter in CO poisoning were found in the serial X-ray CT scans. In the other case (Case 2), the typical initial bilateral symmetrical low density areas in the globus pallidus were found to have decreased markedly in size and finally disappeared in the latter X-ray CT scan. But MRI using inversion recovery (IR) or spin echo (SE) pulse sequence clearly showed bilateral symmetrical decreased or increased signal intensity areas in the globus pallidus in all three cases. In Case 3, chronic CO poisoning was confirmed by the bilateral symmetrical pallidal lesions on MRI, although differential diagnosis was difficult. Furthermore, in Case 2, with pure alexia, MRI using IR or SE pulse sequence demonstrated a patchy decreased or increased signal intensity area in the subcortical white matter at the left angular gyrus, although X-ray CT scan showed no abnormal findings. MRI is useful in the diagnosis of CO poisoning, especially chronic CO poisoning, because necrosis, cavitation, demyelination, gliosis and so on due to hypoxia of CO poisoning were sensitively detected from changes in the proton density and the T1 or T2 relaxation time value on MRI. (J.P.N.)

  9. Correlation of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and clinical outcome in acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Namik; Ozcam, Giray; Kosar, Pinar; Ozcan, Ayse; Basar, Hulya; Kaymak, Cetin

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide is a toxic gas for humans and is still a silent killer in both developed and developing countries. The aim of this case series was to evaluate early radiological images as a predictor of subsequent neuropsychological sequelae, following carbon monoxide poisoning. After carbon monoxide exposure, early computed tomography scans and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 52-year-old woman showed bilateral lesions in the globus pallidus. This patient was discharged and followed for 90 days. The patient recovered without any neurological sequela. In a 58-year-old woman exposed to carbon monoxide, computed tomography showed lesions in bilateral globus pallidus and periventricular white matter. Early magnetic resonance imaging revealed changes similar to that like in early tomography images. The patient recovered and was discharged from hospital. On the 27th day of exposure, the patient developed disorientation and memory impairment. Late magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse hyperintensity in the cerebral white matter. White matter lesions which progress to demyelination and end up in neuropsychological sequelae cannot always be diagnosed by early computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in carbon monoxide poisoning. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Behavioral Treatment of Conversion Disorder in Adolescence: A Case Example of Globus Hystericus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Brad; Thevenin, Deborah M.; Runyon, Melissa K.

    1997-01-01

    Using a case study, evaluates the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral intervention for the treatment of a patient diagnosed with a conversion disorder characterized by a perceived lump in the throat and subsequent weight loss. Results indicate that the behavioral therapy procedures contributed to increased weight and improved eating behavior. (RJM)

  11. Homologous Basal Ganglia Network Models in Physiological and Parkinsonian Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotika Bahuguna

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The classical model of basal ganglia has been refined in recent years with discoveries of subpopulations within a nucleus and previously unknown projections. One such discovery is the presence of subpopulations of arkypallidal and prototypical neurons in external globus pallidus, which was previously considered to be a primarily homogeneous nucleus. Developing a computational model of these multiple interconnected nuclei is challenging, because the strengths of the connections are largely unknown. We therefore use a genetic algorithm to search for the unknown connectivity parameters in a firing rate model. We apply a binary cost function derived from empirical firing rate and phase relationship data for the physiological and Parkinsonian conditions. Our approach generates ensembles of over 1,000 configurations, or homologies, for each condition, with broad distributions for many of the parameter values and overlap between the two conditions. However, the resulting effective weights of connections from or to prototypical and arkypallidal neurons are consistent with the experimental data. We investigate the significance of the weight variability by manipulating the parameters individually and cumulatively, and conclude that the correlation observed between the parameters is necessary for generating the dynamics of the two conditions. We then investigate the response of the networks to a transient cortical stimulus, and demonstrate that networks classified as physiological effectively suppress activity in the internal globus pallidus, and are not susceptible to oscillations, whereas parkinsonian networks show the opposite tendency. Thus, we conclude that the rates and phase relationships observed in the globus pallidus are predictive of experimentally observed higher level dynamical features of the physiological and parkinsonian basal ganglia, and that the multiplicity of solutions generated by our method may well be indicative of a natural

  12. The histamine system in human brain. Changes in neurological and psychiatric disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodchild, R.E

    1999-09-01

    Autoradiographical examination of the distribution of H{sub 1}- and H{sub 3}- histamine receptor subtypes, using [{sup 3}H]-mepyramine and [{sup 3}H]-R-({alpha}) methylhistamine respectively, found high H{sub 1}-receptor binding densities in neocortex, dentate gyrus and basolateral amygdala, with low binding in all subdivisions of the thalamus and other subcortical areas. H{sub 3}-receptor binding was enriched within the nucleus accumbens, globus pallidus and substantia nigra, whilst was low in the hippocampus, subthalamic nucleus, temporal cortex, motor and somatosensory thalamic areas and basolateral amygdala. In situ hybridisation found H{sub 2}-receptor mRNA located in the striatum, thalamus, hippocampal pyramidal cell layer and dentate gyrus, and specific laminae of neocortex. Comparison of autoradiographically determined H{sub 1}-, H{sub 2}- and H{sub 3}-receptor binding densities between normal and pathological cases found significantly decreased (p < 0.005, ANOVA) striatal and pallidal H{sub 3}-receptor binding in Huntington's disease (HD), with unaltered binding in the insular cortex. A significant correlation (p < 0.01) was present between binding in the internal globus pallidus and HD grade. Binding to the striatal H{sub 1}-receptor was increased (p < 0.05, ANOVA) in Parkinson's disease (PD), whilst H{sub 2}- (measured using [{sup 125}I]-iodoaminopotentidine) and H{sub 3}-receptor binding densities were normal in all areas examined. H{sub 1}-receptor binding was also increased in the hippocampus of Lewy-body dementia (DLB) cases (p < 0.05, Students two-tailed T-Test), whilst hippocampal and cortical H{sub 2}-receptor binding densities were decreased in DLB, together with Alzheimer's disease (AD) (p < 0.05, ANOVA). H{sub 3}-receptor binding was increased in the insular cortex and decreased in the temporal cortex of DLB, but not AD, cases (p < 0.05, ANOVA). H{sub 1}-receptor binding to tissue from patients with schizophrenia was

  13. MRI and MR spectroscopy study on basal ganglia alterations in patients with liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Haibo; Ma Lin; Cai Youquan; Li Tao; Li Dejun; Liang Li

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the signal changes and metabolic alterations in the basal ganglia (BG) by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in patients with hepatic encephalopathy with and without parkinsonism. Methods: MRI and MRS in the basal ganglia were performed in 27 patients (22 males, 5 females, age ranging from 29 to 62 years) with liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. 14 of the 27 patients were classified as having parkinsonian signs evaluated by Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) test. 18 age-matched healthy volunteers (13 males, 5 females, age ranging from 24 to 51 years) underwent MRI and MRS as a control group. Results: NAA/Cr levels (average numbers are 1.40±0.03, 1.35±0.03 respectively) showed no statistical difference between cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy and the control group (t=1.16, t=0.87, P>0.05). Values of signal hyperintensities (average numbers are 1.03±0.002, 1.04± 0.003 respectively) in globus pallidus and ratios of mI/Cr(average numbers are 0.63±0.01, 0.61± 0.02 respectively) and Cho/Cr (average numbers are 0.82±0.03, 0.80±0.02 respectively) showed no statistically significant differences between the control group and the 13 patients without parkinsonism (t=0.63, t=-0.52, t=-0.54, P>0.05), whereas values of signal hyperintensities (average numbers are 1.18±0.001, 1.04±0.003 respectively) in globus pallidus and ratios of mI/Cr (average numbers are 0.39±0.02, 0.63±0.01 respectively) and Cho/Cr(average numbers are 0.68±0.01, 0.82±0.03 respectively) shows statistically significant difference in patients without and with parkinsonism (t=-5.16, t=7.61, t=4.12, P<0.05). In patients with cirrhosis, the values of signal hyperintensities in globus pallidus were inversely correlated with the ratio for mI/Cr(r=-0.764, P<0.05) and Cho/Cr (r=-0.553, P<0.05), respectively. Conclusion: MRI and MRS may be useful tools in the evaluation of extrapyramidal

  14. Quantitative evaluation of hyperintensity on T1-weighted MRI in liver cirrhosis : correlation with child-pugh classification and hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eun, Hyo Won; Choi, Hye Young; Lee, Sun Wha; Yi, Sun Young

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the differences in signal changes in the globus pallidus and white matter, as seen on T1-weighted MR brain images, and to determine whether these differences can be used as an indicator of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy. A total of 25 cases of liver cirrhosis were evaluated and as a control group, 20 subjects were also studied. Using a 1.5T MRI scannet, brain MR images were obtained, and the differences in signal intensity in both the globus pallidus and thalamus and in both white and gray matter were then quantified using the contrast to noise ratio(CNR). On the basis of the Child-Pugh classification, 25patients with liver cirrhosis were divided into three groups, with eight in group A, eight in B, and nine in C. Using clinical criteria, hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed in seven of the 25 patients. There after, CNRs(CNR1 and CNR2) were conpared between the control and cirrhotic groups and between cirrhotic groups with or without hepatic encephalopathy. In the control group, mean values were 3.2±5.9 for CNR1 and 8.4±8.0 for CNR2. In the cirrhotic group, these values were 10.6±9.0 for CNR1 and 9.8±6.4 for CNR2. A statistically significant difference was noted between normal and cirrhotic groups only for CNR1(p<0.05). CNR values in patients with liver cirrhosis were 8.5±11.5 for CNR1 and 11.7±8.7 for CNR2 in the Child A group, 10.4±5.1 for CNR1 and 9.3±3.2 for CNR2 in the B group, and 12.8±9.7 for CNR1 and 8.7±6.5 for CNR2 in the C group. There was no significant difference in mean CNRI values between patients with or without hepatic encephalopathy. Differences in signal intensities in the globus pallidus and white matter, as seen on T1-weighted MR brain images, cannot be used as an indicator of hepatic encephalopathy in patients with liver cirrhosis

  15. Quantitative evaluation of hyperintensity on T1-weighted MRI in liver cirrhosis : correlation with child-pugh classification and hepatic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eun, Hyo Won; Choi, Hye Young; Lee, Sun Wha; Yi, Sun Young [Ewha Womans Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-11-01

    To investigate the differences in signal changes in the globus pallidus and white matter, as seen on T1-weighted MR brain images, and to determine whether these differences can be used as an indicator of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy. A total of 25 cases of liver cirrhosis were evaluated and as a control group, 20 subjects were also studied. Using a 1.5T MRI scannet, brain MR images were obtained, and the differences in signal intensity in both the globus pallidus and thalamus and in both white and gray matter were then quantified using the contrast to noise ratio(CNR). On the basis of the Child-Pugh classification, 25patients with liver cirrhosis were divided into three groups, with eight in group A, eight in B, and nine in C. Using clinical criteria, hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed in seven of the 25 patients. There after, CNRs(CNR1 and CNR2) were conpared between the control and cirrhotic groups and between cirrhotic groups with or without hepatic encephalopathy. In the control group, mean values were 3.2{+-}5.9 for CNR1 and 8.4{+-}8.0 for CNR2. In the cirrhotic group, these values were 10.6{+-}9.0 for CNR1 and 9.8{+-}6.4 for CNR2. A statistically significant difference was noted between normal and cirrhotic groups only for CNR1(p<0.05). CNR values in patients with liver cirrhosis were 8.5{+-}11.5 for CNR1 and 11.7{+-}8.7 for CNR2 in the Child A group, 10.4{+-}5.1 for CNR1 and 9.3{+-}3.2 for CNR2 in the B group, and 12.8{+-}9.7 for CNR1 and 8.7{+-}6.5 for CNR2 in the C group. There was no significant difference in mean CNRI values between patients with or without hepatic encephalopathy. Differences in signal intensities in the globus pallidus and white matter, as seen on T1-weighted MR brain images, cannot be used as an indicator of hepatic encephalopathy in patients with liver cirrhosis.

  16. The development of the region of basal nuclei in fetus using MRI of high field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Hequn; Zhang Zhonghe; Liu Shuwei

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the developmental process of the region of basal nuclei of postmortem fetuses by 3.0 T and 7.0 T MRI. Methods: One hundred and thirty-one postmortem fetuses of 14 to 40 weeks of gestational age (GA) were scanned by 3.0 T MR, of which 11 fetuses of 14-27 weeks of GA were chosen and scanned by 7.0 T MR. The time when the structures in the region of basal nuclei could be detected and the changes of MR signal intensity were analyzed for MRI of different Tesla. Results: On 3.0 T MRI, the dorsal thalamus could be delineated as early as 14 weeks of GA. The germinal matrix, caudate nucleus, and putamen could be visualized as early as 15 weeks of GA. The globus pallidus could be described as early as 18 weeks of GA, and the internal capsule and external capsule could be shown as early as 20 weeks of GA. The signal of the caudate nucleus during 15-30 weeks of GA was relatively hypointense on T 1 WI and hyperintense on T 2 WI, but during 31-40 weeks of GA, it was relatively hyperintense on T 1 WI and hypointense on T 2 WI. The putamen had a relatively high signal intensity on T 1 WI and low signal intensity on T 2 WI during 15-17 weeks of GA, and it appeared patchy during 18-25 weeks of GA, then it had a relatively low signal intensity on T 1 WI and high signal intensity on T 2 WI during 26-30 weeks of GA, and during 31-40 weeks of GA, its signal intensity was relatively high on T 1 WI and low on T 2 WI. The globus pallidus had a relatively high signal intensity on T 1 WI and low signal intensity on T 2 WI during 20- 40 weeks of GA. Compared to the 3.0 T MRI, the T 2 images of 7.0 T MRI were more clear, and most structures in the region of basal nuclei could be clearly displayed as early as 16 weeks of GA, such as the germinal matrix, caudate nucleus, dorsal thalamus, putamen, globus pallidus, internal capsule, and extemal capsule. The claustrum could be delineated as early as 18 weeks of GA on 7.0 T MRI. Conclusions: 3.0 T MRI could show the development

  17. Zolpidem in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip K. Dash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by motor symptoms, postural instability, personality changes, and cognitive impairment. There is no effective treatment for this disorder. Reduced neurotransmission of GABA in the striatum and globus pallidus may contribute to the symptoms of motor and cognitive symptoms seen in PSP. Zolpidem is a GABA agonist of the benzodiazepine subreceptor BZ1. Here a nondiabetic, normotensive case of PSP is (Progressive Supranuclear Palsy described, which showed improvement in swallowing, speech, and gaze paresis after zolpidem therapy and possible mechanism of actions are discussed. However, more trials are needed with large number of patients to confirm the effectiveness of zolpidem in progressive supranuclear palsy.

  18. Brain Networks Implicated in Seasonal Affective Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Martin; Ganz, Melanie; Svarer, Claus

    2017-01-01

    , patients with SAD fail to globally downregulate their cerebral serotonin transporter (5-HTT) in winter, and that this effect seemed to be particularly pronounced in female S-carriers of the 5-HTTLPR genotype. The purpose of this study was to identify a 5-HTT brain network that accounts for the adaption...... without SAD; it included the right superior frontal gyrus, brainstem, globus pallidus (bilaterally) and the left hippocampus. Across seasons, female S' carriers without SAD showed nominally higher 5-HTT levels in these regions compared to female S' carriers with SAD, but the group difference was only...... winter compared to female S' carriers without SAD. Limitations: The study is preliminary and limited by small sample size in the SAD group (N = 6). Conclusions: These findings provide novel exploratory evidence for a wintertime state-dependent difference in 5-HTT levels that may leave SAD females...

  19. Investigating the neural correlates of smoking: Feasibility and results of combining electronic cigarettes with fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Matthew B; Mentink, Alexander; Lyons, Georgina; Kowalczyk, Oliwia S; Demetriou, Lysia; Newbould, Rexford D

    2017-09-12

    Cigarette addiction is driven partly by the physiological effects of nicotine, but also by the distinctive sensory and behavioural aspects of smoking, and understanding the neural effects of such processes is vital. There are many practical difficulties associated with subjects smoking in the modern neuroscientific laboratory environment, however electronic cigarettes obviate many of these issues, and provide a close simulation of smoking tobacco cigarettes. We have examined the neural effects of 'smoking' electronic cigarettes with concurrent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). The results demonstrate the feasibility of using these devices in the MRI environment, and show brain activation in a network of cortical (motor cortex, insula, cingulate, amygdala) and sub-cortical (putamen, thalamus, globus pallidus, cerebellum) regions. Concomitant relative deactivations were seen in the ventral striatum and orbitofrontal cortex. These results reveal the brain processes involved in (simulated) smoking for the first time, and validate a novel approach to the study of smoking, and addiction more generally.

  20. Twiddler's syndrome in a patient with a deep brain stimulation device for generalized dystonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Schweder, Patrick M; Joint, Carole

    2011-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the technique of neurostimulation of deep brain structures for the treatment of conditions such as essential tremor, dystonia, Parkinson's disease and chronic pain syndromes. The procedure uses implanted deep brain stimulation electrodes connected to extension leads...... and an implantable pulse generator (IPG). Hardware failure related to the DBS procedure is not infrequent, and includes electrode migration and disconnection. We describe a patient who received bilateral globus pallidus internus DBS for dystonia with initially good clinical response, but the device eventually failed....... Radiographs showed multiple twisting of the extension leads with disconnection from the brain electrodes and a diagnosis of Twiddler's syndrome was made. Twiddler's syndrome was first described in patients with cardiac pacemakers. Patients with mental disability, elderly and obese patients are at increased...

  1. Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson’s Disease: New and Emerging Targets for Refractory Motor and Nonmotor Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin Anderson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative condition characterized by bradykinesia, tremor, rigidity, and postural instability (PI, in addition to numerous nonmotor manifestations. Many pharmacological therapies now exist to successfully treat PD motor symptoms; however, as the disease progresses, it often becomes challenging to treat with medications alone. Deep brain stimulation (DBS has become a crucial player in PD treatment, particularly for patients who have disabling motor complications from medical treatment. Well-established DBS targets include the subthalamic nucleus (STN, the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi, and to a lesser degree the ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM of the thalamus. Studies of alternative DBS targets for PD are ongoing, the majority of which have shown some clinical benefit; however, more carefully designed and controlled studies are needed. In the present review, we discuss the role of these new and emerging DBS targets in treating refractory axial motor symptoms and other motor and nonmotor symptoms (NMS.

  2. Advanced Parkinson's disease: clinical characteristics and treatment. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulisevsky, J; Luquin, M R; Arbelo, J M; Burguera, J A; Carrillo, F; Castro, A; Chacón, J; García-Ruiz, P J; Lezcano, E; Mir, P; Martinez-Castrillo, J C; Martínez-Torres, I; Puente, V; Sesar, A; Valldeoriola-Serra, F; Yañez, R

    2013-01-01

    Many patients who have had Parkinson's disease (PD) for several years will present severe motor fluctuations and dyskinesias which require more aggressive therapies. The different approaches which are now available include deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus or medial globus pallidus, subcutaneous infusion of apomorphine, and intestinal infusion of levodopa-carbidopa. To define the indications and results for the 3 available therapies for advanced PD. Exhaustive review of the literature concerning the indications and results of deep brain stimulation, subcutaneous apomorphine infusion and duodenal infusion of levodopa/carbidopa gel to treat patients with advanced Parkinson disease. Although numerous studies have confirmed the efficacy of the 3 different therapies in advanced PD, there are no comparative studies that would allow us to define the best candidate for each technique. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical and Imaging Presentation of a Patient with Beta-Propeller Protein-Associated Neurodegeneration, a Rare and Sporadic form of Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattingen, Elke; Handke, Nikolaus; Cremer, Kirsten; Hoffjan, Sabine; Kukuk, Guido Matthias

    2017-12-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a heterogeneous group of inherited neurologic disorders with iron accumulation in the basal ganglia, which share magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics, histopathologic and clinical features. According to the affected basal nuclei, clinical features include extrapyramidal movement disorders and varying degrees of intellectual disability status. The most common NBIA subtype is caused by pathogenic variants in PANK2. The hallmark of MR imaging in patients with PANK2 mutations is an eye-of-the-tiger sign in the globus pallidus. We report a 33-year-old female with a rare subtype of NBIA, called beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration (BPAN) with a hitherto unknown missense variant in WDR45. She presented with BPAN's particular biphasic course of neurological symptoms and with a dominant iron accumulation in the midbrain that enclosed a spotty T2-hyperintensity.

  4. Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction with parkinsonism and symmetric hyperintense basal ganglia on T1 weighted MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayalakshmi Sita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal high signal in the globus pallidus on T1 weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain has been well described in patients with chronic liver disease. It may be related to liver dysfunction or portal-systemic shunting. We report a case of extra hepatic portal vein obstruction with portal hypertension and esophageal varices that presented with extra pyramidal features. T1 weighted MRI brain scans showed increased symmetrical signal intensities in the basal ganglia. Normal hepatic function in this patient emphasizes the role of portal- systemic communications in the development of these hyperintensities, which may be due to deposition of paramagnetic substances like manganese in the basal ganglia.

  5. Multifocal dystonia, Clinical feature of Hallervorden-Spatz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghelichkhani H

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Hallervorden-spatz disease is an inherited metabolic disorder with autosomal recessive trait. Onset is in late childhood or early adolescence. Clinical manifestation is variable but pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs are often prominent. Many of patients show progressive dementia and extrapyramidal symptoms. Ataxia or myoclonus is reported in the course of the disease in individual cases. Focal dystonias including tongue, eyelids (blepharospasm and optic atrophy, retinitis pigmentosa, rarely familial parkinsonism are also reported. Pathologically pigmentary degeneration of globus pallidus, substantia nigra (pars reticular and red nucleus is characteristic. In our case the main clinical feature was multifocal dystonia without obvious pyramidal or other extrapyramidal symptoms, and diagnosis was based on clinical and MRI findings.

  6. Cerebellar and basal ganglion involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saatci, I.; Baskan, O.; Haliloglu, M.; Aydingoz, U. [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University Hospital, Sihhiye 06100, Ankara (Turkey)

    1999-06-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a disease of unknown cause characterised by proliferation of histiocytic granulomas in tissues; the primary cerebral manifestation is diabetes insipidus caused by hypothalamic infiltration. We present a patient in whom, except for the absence of high signal on T 1 weighting in the posterior pituitary, consistent with central diabetes insipidus, MRI showed no evidence of hypothalamic involvement by histiocytosis, despite the long duration of the disease. However, there was bilateral, symmetrical involvement of the cerebellum and globus pallidus in addition to a calvarial lesion. High signal in the cerebellar white matter on T 2-weighted images may represent demyelination, gliosis and cell loss, as previously reported on pathologic examination. (orig.) With 5 figs., 22 refs.

  7. The brain 5-HT4 receptor binding is down-regulated in the Flinders Sensitive Line depression model and in response to paroxetine administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Cecilie Löe; Marcussen, Anders Bue; Wegener, Gregers

    2009-01-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT(4)) receptor may be implicated in depression and is a new potential target for antidepressant treatment. We have investigated the brain 5-HT(4) receptor [(3)H]SB207145 binding in the Flinders Sensitive Line rat depression model by quantitative receptor autoradiography....... In the Flinders Sensitive Line, the 5-HT(4) receptor and 5-HT transporter binding were decreased in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, and the changes in binding were directly correlated within the dorsal hippocampus. Chronic but not acute paroxetine administration caused a 16-47% down-regulation of 5-HT(4......) receptor binding in all regions evaluated including the basal ganglia and hippocampus, while 5-HT depletion increased the 5-HT(4) receptor binding in the dorsal hippocampus, hypothalamus, and lateral globus pallidus. In comparison, the 5-HT(2A) receptor binding was decreased in the frontal and cingulate...

  8. Disrupting neuronal transmission: Mechanism of DBS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satomi eChiken

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Applying high-frequency stimulation to deep brain rain structure, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS, has now been recognized an effective therapeutic option for a wide range of neurological and psychiatric disorders. DBS targeting the basal ganglia thalamo-cortical loop, especially the internal segment of the globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus and thalamus, has been widely employed as a successful surgical therapy for movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, dystonia and tremor. However, the neurophysiological mechanism underling the action of DBS remains unclear and is still under debate: does DBS inhibit or excite local neuronal elements? In this review, we will examine this question and propose the alternative interpretation: DBS dissociates inputs and outputs, resulting in disruption of abnormal signal transmission.

  9. Electro-acupuncture stimulation acts on the basal ganglia output pathway to ameliorate motor impairment in Parkinsonian model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jun; Li, Bo; Sun, Zuo-Li; Yu, Fen; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2010-04-01

    The role of electro-acupuncture (EA) stimulation on motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) has not been well studied. In a rat hemiparkinsonian model induced by unilateral transection of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), EA stimulation improved motor impairment in a frequency-dependent manner. Whereas EA stimulation at a low frequency (2 Hz) had no effect, EA stimulation at a high frequency (100 Hz) significantly improved motor coordination. However, neither low nor high EA stimulation could significantly enhance dopamine levels in the striatum. EA stimulation at 100 Hz normalized the MFB lesion-induced increase in midbrain GABA content, but it had no effect on GABA content in the globus pallidus. These results suggest that high-frequency EA stimulation improves motor impairment in MFB-lesioned rats by increasing GABAergic inhibition in the output structure of the basal ganglia.

  10. Brain MRI findings of welders : high signal intensity in T1WI secondary to manganese exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. W.; Lim, M. A.; Shon, M. Y.; Lee, S. H.; Ha, D. G.; Kwon, K. R.; Kim, S. S.; Hong, Y. S.; Lee, Y. H. [Sunlin Presbyterian Hospital, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, H. K. [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical and brain MRI findings of welders and to determine the utility of MRI in the assessment of occupational manganese exposure. All welders complained of fatigue, headache, anorexia, and decreased libido. The palmomental reflex was positive in five (28%), Myerson`s sign in four (22%), and intention tremor in three (17%). Mean blood Mn was 5.18 (range, 1.77-9.34) {mu}g/dl, mean urine Mn was 5.84 (range, 1.07 -22) {mu}g/l, serum Fe was elevated in one welder, and serum Cd in two. T1WI of brain MRI revealed high signal intensities in the globus pallidus, the putamen, the substantia nigra, the tectum, the caudate nucleus, the subthalamic nucleus, the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland. These intensities correlated closely with blood Mn levels, suggesting their potential role in estimating the accumulation of Mn in the brain. (author). 25 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  11. A Stepwise Approach: Decreasing Infection in Deep Brain Stimulation for Childhood Dystonic Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johans, Stephen J; Swong, Kevin N; Hofler, Ryan C; Anderson, Douglas E

    2017-09-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary muscle contractions, which cause twisting movements or abnormal postures. Deep brain stimulation has been used to improve the quality of life for secondary dystonia caused by cerebral palsy. Despite being a viable treatment option for childhood dystonic cerebral palsy, deep brain stimulation is associated with a high rate of infection in children. The authors present a small series of patients with dystonic cerebral palsy who underwent a stepwise approach for bilateral globus pallidus interna deep brain stimulation placement in order to decrease the rate of infection. Four children with dystonic cerebral palsy who underwent a total of 13 surgical procedures (electrode and battery placement) were identified via a retrospective review. There were zero postoperative infections. Using a multistaged surgical plan for pediatric patients with dystonic cerebral palsy undergoing deep brain stimulation may help to reduce the risk of infection.

  12. Deep Brain Stimulation Target Selection in an Advanced Parkinson's Disease Patient with Significant Tremor and Comorbid Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar S. Patel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Vignette: A 67-year-old female with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD, medically refractory tremor, and a history of significant depression presents for evaluation of deep brain stimulation (DBS candidacy.  Clinical Dilemma: Traditionally, stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN has been the preferred target for patients with significant PD tremor. However, STN stimulation is avoided in patients with a significant pre-surgical history of mood disorder.  Clinical Solution: Bilateral DBS of the globus pallidus interna led to significant short term improvement in PD motor symptoms, including significant tremor reduction.  Gap in Knowledge: There is insufficient evidence to support or refute clinicians' traditional preference for STN stimulation in treating refractory PD tremor. Similarly, the available evidence for risk of worsening depression and/or suicidality after STN DBS is mixed. Both questions require further clarification to guide patient and clinician decision-making.

  13. A Case Of Transient Ischemic Attack Presenting As Hemichroea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hüseyin Özdemir

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Chorea is defined as; involuntary movements of the distal parts of limbs which have arrhythmic, rapid, bouncing or smooth, simple or complex properties. Choreiform movements occur when putamen, globus pallidus and subthalamic nucleus are affected. Chorea can be observed during the course of metabolic and vascular diseases, neurodegenerative or hereditary diseases. Chorea may be a rare symptom of cerebral hypoperfusion. Transient ischemic attack is an event that occurs in short term characterized by a temporary ischemia of brain. A wide variety of symptoms can be seen depending on the localization of cerebral hypoperfusion. Hemichorea is a very rare finding observed during transient ischemic attacks. In this article hemichorea in a case of symptomatic transient ischemic attack is discussed with relevant literature.

  14. Momentum-based morphometric analysis with application to Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingyun; Khan, Ali R.; McKeown, Martin J.; Beg, Mirza F.

    2011-03-01

    We apply the initial momentum shape representation of diffeomorphic metric mapping from a template region of interest (ROI) to a given ROI as a morphometic marker in Parkinson's disease. We used a three-step segmentation-registrationmomentum process to derive feature vectors from ROIs in a group of 42 subjects consisting of 19 Parkinson's Disease (PD) subjects and 23 normal control (NC) subjects. Significant group differences between PD and NC subjects were detected in four basal ganglia structures including the caudate, putamen, thalamus and globus pallidus. The magnitude of regionally significant between-group differences detected ranged between 34-75%. Visualization of the different structural deformation pattern between-groups revealed that some parts of basal ganglia structure actually hypertrophy, presumably as a compensatory response to more widespread atrophy. Our results of both hypertrophy and atrophy in the same structures further demonstrate the importance of morphological measures as opposed to overall volume in the assessment of neurodegenerative disease.

  15. Sensitivity analysis of discharge patterns of subthalamic nucleus in the model of basal ganglia in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jyotsna; Singh, Phool; Malik, Vikas

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson disease alters the information patterns in movement related pathways in brain. Experimental results performed on rats show that the activity patterns changes from single spike activity to mixed burst mode in Parkinson disease. However the cause of this change in activity pattern is not yet completely understood. Subthalamic nucleus is one of the main nuclei involved in the origin of motor dysfunction in Parkinson disease. In this paper, a single compartment conductance based model is considered which focuses on subthalamic nucleus and synaptic input from globus pallidus (external). This model shows highly nonlinear behavior with respect to various intrinsic parameters. Behavior of model has been presented with the help of activity patterns generated in healthy and Parkinson condition. These patterns have been compared by calculating their correlation coefficient for different values of intrinsic parameters. Results display that the activity patterns are very sensitive to various intrinsic parameters and calcium shows some promising results which provide insights into the motor dysfunction.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in schizophrenia: a morphometric study; Ressonancia magnetica na esquizofrenia: um estudo morfometrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Claudio Campi de [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Instituto do Coracao (InCor). Secao de Ressonancia Magnetica]. E-mail: campi@uol.com.br

    2001-06-01

    Thirty-three patients with chronic schizophrenia and 21 normal subjects were submitted to magnetic resonance imaging studies using a 1.5 T scanner. Axial and coronal T 2-weighted images were obtained. The volumes of the brain, intracranial, supratentorial, infratentorial and the total, ventricular and subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid volumes were measured using semi-automated morphometric methods. The volumes of the amygdala-hippocampus complex, para hippocampal gyrus cortex, putamen, globus pallidus, temporal lobe, gray and white matter of temporal lobe were also measured. These volumes were normalized using the intracranial volume as reference. The most relevant findings observed were reduced brain volume and increased total, ventricular and subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid volumes in patients with schizophrenia when compared to the controls. Patients with schizophrenia had also smaller amygdala-hippocampus complexes, temporal lobes and temporal lobe white matter than the controls, as well as increased putamen volumes. (author)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in schizophrenia: a morphometric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Claudio Campi de

    2001-01-01

    Thirty-three patients with chronic schizophrenia and 21 normal subjects were submitted to magnetic resonance imaging studies using a 1.5 T scanner. Axial and coronal T 2-weighted images were obtained. The volumes of the brain, intracranial, supratentorial, infratentorial and the total, ventricular and subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid volumes were measured using semi-automated morphometric methods. The volumes of the amygdala-hippocampus complex, para hippocampal gyrus cortex, putamen, globus pallidus, temporal lobe, gray and white matter of temporal lobe were also measured. These volumes were normalized using the intracranial volume as reference. The most relevant findings observed were reduced brain volume and increased total, ventricular and subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid volumes in patients with schizophrenia when compared to the controls. Patients with schizophrenia had also smaller amygdala-hippocampus complexes, temporal lobes and temporal lobe white matter than the controls, as well as increased putamen volumes. (author)

  18. Renal Failure in Dementia with Lewy Bodies Presenting as Catatonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Catatonia, originally described by Karl Kahlbaum in 1874, may be regarded as a set of clinical features found in a subtype of schizophrenia, but the syndrome may also stem from organic causes including vascular parkinsonism, brain masses, globus pallidus lesions, metabolic derangements, and pharmacologic agents, especially first generation antipsychotics. Catatonia may include paratonia, waxy flexibility (cerea flexibilitas), stupor, mutism, echolalia, and catalepsy (abnormal posturing). A case of catatonia as a result of acute renal failure in a patient with dementia with Lewy bodies is described. This patient recovered after intravenous fluid administration and reinstitution of the atypical dopamine receptor blocking agent quetiapine, but benzodiazepines and amantadine are additional possible treatments. Recognition of organic causes of catatonia leads to timely treatment and resolution of the syndrome. PMID:23466522

  19. Renal Failure in Dementia with Lewy Bodies Presenting as Catatonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Fekete

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catatonia, originally described by Karl Kahlbaum in 1874, may be regarded as a set of clinical features found in a subtype of schizophrenia, but the syndrome may also stem from organic causes including vascular parkinsonism, brain masses, globus pallidus lesions, metabolic derangements, and pharmacologic agents, especially first generation antipsychotics. Catatonia may include paratonia, waxy flexibility (cerea flexibilitas, stupor, mutism, echolalia, and catalepsy (abnormal posturing. A case of catatonia as a result of acute renal failure in a patient with dementia with Lewy bodies is described. This patient recovered after intravenous fluid administration and reinstitution of the atypical dopamine receptor blocking agent quetiapine, but benzodiazepines and amantadine are additional possible treatments. Recognition of organic causes of catatonia leads to timely treatment and resolution of the syndrome.

  20. [Bilateral Pallidotomy for Tardive Dystonia:A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohara, Kotaro; Taira, Takaomi; Horisawa, Shiro; Hanada, Tomoko; Kawamata, Takakazu

    2017-11-01

    Tardive dystonia is a movement disorder related to the use of dopamine-receptor-blocking drugs. Several reports have shown that deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus internus(GPi-DBS)is effective in treating tardive dystonia. However, a few reports demonstrated the efficacy of ablation of the GPi(pallidotomy). We herein report a case of tardive dystonia successfully treated with bilateral pallidotomy. A 32-year-old man developed severe tardive dystonia 10 years after the chronic use of antipsychotic drugs. Withdrawal of the drugs and botulinum toxin injections were ineffective. The patient underwent bilateral pallidotomy for tardive dystonia because of rejection of the implanted DBS devices. Significant improvement was observed, with a 95% decrease in the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale(BFMDRS)movement score, and no severe adverse events occurred. Symptomatic relief persisted for nine months. Pallidotomy is a feasible and efficacious procedure for tardive dystonia treatment without the use of hardware implantations.

  1. MRI manifestations of severe SSPE in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Xiao Enhua; Tan Lihua; Wu Xiaochuan; Fan Songqing

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To improve the understanding of MRI findings in severe SSPE. Methods: The MRI features in 2 cases of severe SSPE confirmed by pathology were reported, and related literature was reviewed. Results: In one case, various degrees of asymmetrical cerebral swelling were seen in bilateral gray matter and white matter under the cortex, and without clear dividing line between gray and white matter, especially in temporal lobe. Abnormal signals were revealed on T 1 and T 2 WI. In another case, lesions in the brain stem, temporal lobe, globus pallidus, putamen, thalamus, and radiate coronet showed hypointense signal on T 1 WI and hyperintense signal on T 2 WI with cerebral swelling, and no obviouse cerebral atrophy was found. The local abnormal lesions had occupying effects and enhancement in both cases. Conclusion: Lasting of various degrees of cerebral swelling may be the characteristic sign on MRI in severe SSPE, differing from cerebral atrophy that might be seen in common SSPE. (authors)

  2. An interesting case of metabolic dystonia: L-2 hydroxyglutaric aciduria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma Balaji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (L-2-HGA, a neurometabolic disorder caused by mutations in the L-2 hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (L-2-HGDH gene, presents with psychomotor retardation, cerebellar ataxia, extrapyramidal symptoms, macrocephaly and seizures. Characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings include subcortical cerebral white matter abnormalities with T2 hyperintensities of the dentate nucleus, globus pallidus, putamen and caudate nucleus. The diagnosis can be confirmed by elevated urinary L-2 hydroxyglutaric acid and mutational analysis of the L-2-HGDH gene. We report two siblings with dystonia diagnosed by classical neuroimaging findings with elevated urinary 2 hydroxyglutaric acid. Riboflavin therapy has shown promising results in a subset of cases, thus highlighting the importance of making the diagnosis in these patients.

  3. Delayed Encephalopathy of Carbon Monoxide Intoxication and Treatment with Hyperbaric Oxygen: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Polat

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Delayed encephalopathy (DE is a neuropsychiatric syndrome that can arise generally within 20 days of acute carbon monoxide (CO intoxication after apparent recovery and involves variable degrees of cognitive deficits, personality changes, movement disorders and focal neurologic deficits. We report a 35-year-old female patient with delayed encephalopathy due to CO intoxication, presenting with cognitive impairment and mild parkinsonism despite receiving hyberbaric oxigen therapy (HBO. Magnetic resonance imaging showed abnormal signal intensity and decreased diffusivity at both caudate nuclei and globus pallidus. She continued to receive additional HBO therapy and complete recovery was reached within six months. The positive effect of early HBO therapy of selected patients in reversing the acute effects of CO intoxication is appearant. We here also review the beneficial effect of HBO in preventing or limitating the late neurocognitive deficits associated with severe CO intoxication

  4. High signal of the striatum in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: sequential change on T2-weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, A.; O'uchi, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Yashiro, N.

    2002-01-01

    The object of this study is to describe the sequential change of high signal of the striatum on T2-weighted MRI in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Three cases of autopsy-proven sporadic CJD and a total of 18 serial MR images are included in this study. The degree of high signal of the striatum on T2-weighted MRI was evaluated by two neuroradiologists and divided into four grades by mutual agreement. Initial MRI of all three cases showed a slightly high signal of the bilateral striatum, and the conspicuity of the high signal became more prominent as the disease progressed. In each case the pathological change of striatum and globus pallidus was compared with the high signal on the last MR image. (orig.)

  5. High signal of the striatum in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: sequential change on T2-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, A.; O' uchi, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Yashiro, N. [Department of Radiology, Kameda Medical Center, Kamogawa, Chiba (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    The object of this study is to describe the sequential change of high signal of the striatum on T2-weighted MRI in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Three cases of autopsy-proven sporadic CJD and a total of 18 serial MR images are included in this study. The degree of high signal of the striatum on T2-weighted MRI was evaluated by two neuroradiologists and divided into four grades by mutual agreement. Initial MRI of all three cases showed a slightly high signal of the bilateral striatum, and the conspicuity of the high signal became more prominent as the disease progressed. In each case the pathological change of striatum and globus pallidus was compared with the high signal on the last MR image. (orig.)

  6. Benzodiazepine effect of 125I-iomazenil-benzodiazepine receptor binding and serum corticosterone level in a rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Ogi, Shigeyuki; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Mori, Yutaka

    2005-01-01

    To test the change in free or unoccupied benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) density in response to diazepam, we investigated 125 I-iomazenil ( 125 I-IMZ) binding and serum corticosterone levels in a rat model. Wistar male rats, which received psychological stress using a communication box for 5 days, were divided into two groups according to the amount of administered diazepam: no diazepam [D (0)] group and 10 mg/kg per day [D (10)] group of 12 rats each. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of 125 I-IMZ of the D (10) group were significantly lower (P 125 I-IMZ, it is clear that diazepam competed with endogenous ligand for the free BZR sites, and the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices, globus pallidus, hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus are important areas in which 125 I-IMZ binding is strongly affected by administration of diazepam

  7. Hepatic encephalopathy. Imaging Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo, Maria Claudia; Bermudez Munoz, Sonia; J Morillo, Anibal

    2007-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy occurs in patients with chronic hepatic insufficiency and can produce abnormalities in the central nervous system, which can be observed in MRI studies. Traditionally, these imaging findings include symmetrical hyper intensities in T1-weighted sequences in the basal ganglia (mainly globus pallidus), involving also the substantia nigra, mesencephalic tegmentum, frontal and occipital cortex. These areas appear of normal intensity in T2-weighted imaging sequences. Other entities that can lead to similar findings include manganese intoxication and type-1 neurofibromatosis. Currently, with the advent of MR spectroscopy, abnormalities in patients with clinical and subclinical hepatic encephalopathy have been described. After hepatic transplantation, hyper intensities of the basal ganglia and the MR spectroscopic findings may disappear within 3 months to 1 year, suggesting a functional, more than a structural damage. This article will demonstrate the MR findings of patients with hepatic encephalopathy due to chronic hepatic insufficiency.

  8. FDG-PET study of the bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation effects on the regional cerebral metabolism in advanced Parkinson disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; Shen, J.; Zan, S.; Sun, B.; Zuo, C.; Guan, Y.; Zhao, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the changes in regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRGIu) induced by bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). 18 F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET data obtained before and one month after stimulation were analyzed with statistical parametric mapping (SPM). As a result of clinically effective bilateral STN stimulation, rCMRGIu increased in lateral globus pallidus (GP), upper brain stem, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and posterior parietal-occipital cortex, and decreased in the orbital frontal cortex and parahippocampus gyrus (p <0.001). We conclude that the alleviation of clinical symptoms in advanced PD by bilateral STN stimulation may be the result of activation of both ascending and descending pathways from STN and of restoration of the impaired higher-order cortex functions. (author)

  9. Changes in 5-HT4 receptor and 5-HT transporter binding in olfactory bulbectomized and glucocorticoid receptor heterozygous mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Cecilie L; Kirkegaard, Lisbeth; Zueger, Maha

    2010-01-01

    . The olfactory bulbectomized mice displayed increased activity in the open field test, a characteristic depression-like feature of this model. After bulbectomy, 5-HT(4) receptor binding was increased in the ventral hippocampus (12%) but unchanged in the dorsal hippocampus, frontal and caudal caudate putamen......]citalopram in two murine models of depression-related states, olfactory bulbectomy and glucocorticoid receptor heterozygous (GR(+/-)) mice. The olfactory bulbectomy model is characterized by 5-HT system changes, while the GR(+/-) mice have a deficit in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) system control....... Among post hoc analyzed regions, there was a 14% decrease in 5-HT(4) receptor binding in the olfactory tubercles. The 5-HTT binding was unchanged in the hippocampus and caudate putamen of bulbectomized mice but post hoc analysis showed small decreases in lateral septum and lateral globus pallidus...

  10. Synthesis and preliminary biological evaluation of [{sup 123}I]Me{sub 2}Pyr, a new potential ligand for imaging of central cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gielow, P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University School of Medicine, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, D-30625 Hannover (Germany)]. E-mail: gielow.peter@mh-hannover.de; Klinge, P. [International Neuroscience Institute, Alexis Carrel Str. 4, D-30625 Hannover (Germany); Knapp, W.H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University School of Medicine, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, D-30625 Hannover (Germany); Berding, G. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University School of Medicine, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, D-30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    A synthesis of 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-[{sup 123}I]iodophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole -3-carboxylic acid N',N'-dimethyl-hydrazide ([{sup 123}I]Me{sub 2}Pyr), a new radioiodinated analogue of the high-affinity cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist SR141716A, is described. Labelling was achieved by radioiododestannylation of the tributylstannyl precursor with [{sup 123}I]iodide in the presence of chloramine T. HPLC purification afforded the labelled product in 48% radiochemical yield. Preliminary rat brain biodistribution studies with the {sup 125}I labelled compound revealed high uptake in the substantia nigra, the globus pallidus externus and the cerebellum, which is consistent with the known distribution of CB{sub 1} receptors.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of dystonic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutledge, J.N.; Hilal, S.K.; Silver, A.J.; Defendini, R.; Fahn, S.

    1988-01-01

    Interest in movement disorders is heightened by the recent capability of mapping the distribution of macromolecular complexes of Fe(III) in the brain using heavily T2-weighted images. This is accomplished through contrast caused by their T2 effect, a local inhomogeneity in the magnetic field which dephases spin and results in loss of signal. It is a unique characteristic of the extra-pyramidal system that its nuclei contain high concentrations of iron. The areas especially rich are the substantia nigra and globus pallidus. Lesser amounts of iron are found in the red nucleus, dentate nucleus, nigrostriatal tract, putamen, and caudate nucleus. The reasons for increased concentration of iron in nuclei related to movement are incompletely understood and are reviewed in this chapter

  12. Relationship between child epilepsy and MRI findings in von Recklinghausen Neurofibromatosis (NF 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasujima, Hidehiro; Komatsu, Mikio; Sakurai, Takashi; Kodama, Soichi

    1994-01-01

    Fourteen children meeting the NIH consensus diagnostic criteria for NF 1 were evaluated at the Department of Pediatrics, Himeji Red Cross Hospital. MRI and EEG were examined in all patients, respectively. Four of 14 patients had a history of epilepsy, two had suffered West syndrome, one had complex partial seizures and one had secondary generalized partial epilepsy. Seven (50%) of 14 patients showed abnormal MRI; three (75%) of 4 patients with epilepsy and four (40%) of 10 patients with epilepsy showed low intensity on T 1 -weighted images and hyperintensity on T 2 -weighted images in the globus pallidus and brain stem. These results suggest that children with NF 1 have a spectrum of MRI abnormalities, irrespective of existence of epilepsy. (author)

  13. Magnetisation transfer measurements of the subcortical grey and white matter in Parkinson's disease with and without dementia and in progressive supranuclear palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, H.; Asano, T.; Sakurai, H.; Takasaki, M.; Shindo, H.; Abe, K.

    2001-01-01

    We measured the magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) in the subcortical grey and white matter of 11 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) without dementia, six with PD with dementia (PDD), six with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and 12 elderly control subjects to assess regional differences in structural brain damage. There were no significant differences in MTR in any region between PD and controls. However, patients with PDD had significantly lower MTR in the subcortical white matter, including the frontal white matter and the genu of the corpus callosum than the controls, whereas PSP had significantly lower MTR in the subcortical grey matter, including the putamen, globus pallidus and thalamus, in addition to the subcortical white matter. This suggests that regional patterns of structural brain damage can be detected using the magnetisation transfer technique. Measurement of MTR in the subcortical grey and white matter may be useful in differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  14. Occlusion of Heubner's artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Manabu; Kidooka, Minoru

    1982-01-01

    A case of occlusion of the left Heubner's artery in a right-handed, 51-year-old man is reported. Cardinal clinical features were transient right hemiparesis and mental disturbance, especially intellectual defect. Low density areas were found at CT in the globus pallidus, putamen, anterior limb of the internal capsule and a part of the caudate nucleus. It is well known that the occlusion of the Heubner's artery causes transient motor paresis of upper extremity on the contralaterl side. However, in the case where the Heubner's artery is remarkably well developed when compared with the medial striate arteries as was the case in this patient, it should be noted that the occlusion of the Heubner's artery may well causes grave mental disturbance, in addition. (author)

  15. Successful deep brain stimulation surgery with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging on a difficult neuroacanthocytosis case: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Thien Thien; Fernandez, Hubert H; Cooper, Scott; Wilson, Kathryn Mary K; Machado, Andre G

    2013-07-01

    Chorea acanthocytosis is a progressive hereditary neurodegenerative disorder characterized by hyperkinetic movements, seizures, and acanthocytosis in the absence of any lipid abnormality. Medical treatment is typically limited and disappointing. We report on a 32-year-old patient with chorea acanthocytosis with a failed attempt at awake deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery due to intraoperative seizures and postoperative intracranial hematoma. He then underwent a second DBS operation, but under general anesthesia and with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging guidance. Marked improvement in his dystonia, chorea, and overall quality of life was noted 2 and 8 months postoperatively. DBS surgery of the bilateral globus pallidus pars interna may be useful in controlling the hyperkinetic movements in neuroacanthocytosis. Because of the high propensity for seizures in this disorder, DBS performed under general anesthesia, with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging guidance, may allow successful implantation while maintaining accurate target localization.

  16. Therapeutic deep brain stimulation in Parkinsonian rats directly influences motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Ke, Ya; Chan, Danny C W; Qian, Zhong-Ming; Yung, Ken K L; Ko, Ho; Arbuthnott, Gordon W; Yung, Wing-Ho

    2012-12-06

    Much recent discussion about the origin of Parkinsonian symptoms has centered around the idea that they arise with the increase of beta frequency waves in the EEG. This activity may be closely related to an oscillation between subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus. Since STN is the target of deep brain stimulation, it had been assumed that its action is on the nucleus itself. By means of simultaneous recordings of the firing activities from populations of neurons and the local field potentials in the motor cortex of freely moving Parkinsonian rats, this study casts doubt on this assumption. Instead, we found evidence that the corrective action is upon the cortex, where stochastic antidromic spikes originating from the STN directly modify the firing probability of the corticofugal projection neurons, destroy the dominance of beta rhythm, and thus restore motor control to the subjects, be they patients or rodents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The relative phases of basal ganglia activities dynamically shape effective connectivity in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnan, Hayriye; Duff, Eugene Paul; Brown, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Optimal phase alignment between oscillatory neural circuits is hypothesized to optimize information flow and enhance system performance. This theory is known as communication-through-coherence. The basal ganglia motor circuit exhibits exaggerated oscillatory and coherent activity patterns in Parkinson's disease. Such activity patterns are linked to compromised motor system performance as evinced by bradykinesia, rigidity and tremor, suggesting that network function might actually deteriorate once a certain level of net synchrony is exceeded in the motor circuit. Here, we characterize the processes underscoring excessive synchronization and its termination. To this end, we analysed local field potential recordings from the subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus of five patients with Parkinson's disease (four male and one female, aged 37-64 years). We observed that certain phase alignments between subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus amplified local neural synchrony in the beta frequency band while others either suppressed it or did not induce any significant change with respect to surrogates. The increase in local beta synchrony directly correlated with how long the two nuclei locked to beta-amplifying phase alignments. Crucially, administration of the dopamine prodrug, levodopa, reduced the frequency and duration of periods during which subthalamic and pallidal populations were phase-locked to beta-amplifying alignments. Conversely ON dopamine, the total duration over which subthalamic and pallidal populations were aligned to phases that left beta-amplitude unchanged with respect to surrogates increased. Thus dopaminergic input shifted circuit dynamics from persistent periods of locking to amplifying phase alignments, associated with compromised motoric function, to more dynamic phase alignment and improved motoric function. This effect of dopamine on local circuit resonance suggests means by which novel electrical interventions might prevent resonance

  18. Biodistribution study of [I-123] ADAM in mice brain using quantitative autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, K.J.; Yen, T.C.; Tzen, K.Y.; Ye, X.X.; Hwang, J.J.; Wey, S.P.; Ting, G.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Autoradiography with radioluminography is a delicate method to characterize newly developed radiotracers and to apply them to pharmacological studies. Herein, we reported a biodistribution result of [I-123] ADAM (2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5- iodophenylamine) in mice brain quantitatively using imaging plates. Materials and Methods: 1mCi [I-123] ADAM was injected into male ICR mice through tail veins. Brains were removed at sequential time points ranging from 0.5hr to 4hr after injection. The whole brain was cut into 14mm thick coronal sections using a cyrotome. The sections were thaw-mounted on glass plate and apposed placed on an imaging plate with filter paper standards for 24 hours. Imaging reading was done by a Fuji FLA5000 device. Regions of interest were placed on the globus pallidus, hypothalamus, substantia nigra, raphe nuclei and cerebellum corresponding to the sterotaxic atlas, and the PSL/mm 2 values were measured. The specific binding was expressed as the ratios of (targets - cerebellum) to cerebellum. Results: Autoradiography study of brain showed that the [I-123] ADAM was accumulated at serotonin transporter rich sites, including the olfactory tubercle, globus pallidus, thalamus nuclei, hypothalamus, substantia nigra, interpeduncular nucleus, amygdala and raphe nuclei. Biodistribution of [I-123] ADAM in mice brain using quantitative autoradiography method showed a high specific binding in the substantia nigra and hypothalamus and the time-activity curve peaked at 120 min post-injection. Compatible specific binding result was achieved in the region of hypothalamus as compared with previous study by other group using conventional tissue micro-dissection method (Synapse 38:403-412, 2000). However, higher specific binding was observed in certain small brain regions including substantia nigra, raphe nuclei due to improved spatial resolution of the quantitative autoradiography technique. Conclusion: Our result showed that the

  19. Inter regional correlations of glucose metabolism between the basal ganglia and different cortical areas: an ultra-high resolution PET/MRI fusion study using {sup 18}F-FDG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.H. [Research Institute for Advanced Industrial Technology, Korea University, Sejong (Korea, Republic of); Son, Y.D.; Kim, H.K.; Oh, C.H., E-mail: ohch@korea.ac.kr [College of Health Science, Gachon University, Incheon, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.M. [College of Science and Technology, Korea University, Sejong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.B. [Gachon University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, C. [Bioimaging Research Team, Korea Basic Science Institute, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-02-01

    Basal ganglia have complex functional connections with the cerebral cortex and are involved in motor control, executive functions of the forebrain, such as the planning of movement, and cognitive behaviors based on their connections. The aim of this study was to provide detailed functional correlation patterns between the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex by conducting an inter regional correlation analysis of the {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) data based on precise structural information. Fifteen participants were scanned with 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high resolution research tomography (HRRT)-PET fusion system using {sup 18}F-FDG. For detailed inter regional correlation analysis, 24 subregions of the basal ganglia including pre-commissural dorsal caudate, post-commissural caudate, pre-commissural dorsal putamen, post-commissural putamen, internal globus pallidus, and external globus pallidus and 80 cerebral regions were selected as regions of interest on the MRI image and their glucose metabolism were calculated from the PET images. Pearson's product-moment correlation analysis was conducted for the inter regional correlation analysis of the basal ganglia. Functional correlation patterns between the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex were not only consistent with the findings of previous studies, but also showed new functional correlation between the dorsal striatum (i.e., caudate nucleus and putamen) and insula. In this study, we established the detailed basal ganglia subregional functional correlation patterns using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI fusion imaging. Our methods and results could potentially be an important resource for investigating basal ganglia dysfunction as well as for conducting functional studies in the context of movement and psychiatric disorders. (author)

  20. Harsh corporal punishment is associated with increased T2 relaxation time in dopamine-rich regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Yi-Shin; Polcari, Ann; Anderson, Carl M; Teicher, Martin H

    2010-11-01

    Harsh corporal punishment (HCP) was defined as frequent parental administration of corporal punishment (CP) for discipline, with occasional use of objects such as straps, or paddles. CP is linked to increased risk for depression and substance abuse. We examine whether long-term exposure to HCP acts as sub-traumatic stressor that contributes to brain alterations, particularly in dopaminergic pathways, which may mediate their increased vulnerability to drug and alcohol abuse. Nineteen young adults who experienced early HCP but no other forms of maltreatment and twenty-three comparable controls were studied. T2 relaxation time (T2-RT) measurements were performed with an echo planar imaging TE stepping technique and T2 maps were calculated and analyzed voxel-by-voxel to locate regional T2-RT differences between groups. Previous studies indicated that T2-RT provides an indirect index of resting cerebral blood volume. Region of interest (ROI) analyses were also conducted in caudate, putamen, nucleus accumbens, anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, thalamus, globus pallidus and cerebellar hemispheres. Voxel-based relaxometry showed that HCP was associated with increased T2-RT in right caudate and putamen. ROI analyses also revealed increased T2-RT in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, substantia nigra, thalamus and accumbens but not globus pallidus or cerebellum. There were significant associations between T2-RT measures in dopamine target regions and use of drugs and alcohol, and memory performance. Alteration in the paramagnetic or hemodynamic properties of dopaminergic cell body and projection regions were observed in subjects with HCP, and these findings may relate to their increased risk for drug and alcohol abuse. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative comparison between a multiecho sequence and a single-echo sequence for susceptibility-weighted phase imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Guillaume; Savard, Geneviève; Bard, Céline; Beaudoin, Gilles

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the benefits arising from the use of a multiecho sequence for susceptibility-weighted phase imaging using a quantitative comparison with a standard single-echo acquisition. Four healthy adult volunteers were imaged on a clinical 3-T system using a protocol comprising two different three-dimensional susceptibility-weighted gradient-echo sequences: a standard single-echo sequence and a multiecho sequence. Both sequences were repeated twice in order to evaluate the local noise contribution by a subtraction of the two acquisitions. For the multiecho sequence, the phase information from each echo was independently unwrapped, and the background field contribution was removed using either homodyne filtering or the projection onto dipole fields method. The phase information from all echoes was then combined using a weighted linear regression. R2 maps were also calculated from the multiecho acquisitions. The noise standard deviation in the reconstructed phase images was evaluated for six manually segmented regions of interest (frontal white matter, posterior white matter, globus pallidus, putamen, caudate nucleus and lateral ventricle). The use of the multiecho sequence for susceptibility-weighted phase imaging led to a reduction of the noise standard deviation for all subjects and all regions of interest investigated in comparison to the reference single-echo acquisition. On average, the noise reduction ranged from 18.4% for the globus pallidus to 47.9% for the lateral ventricle. In addition, the amount of noise reduction was found to be strongly inversely correlated to the estimated R2 value (R=-0.92). In conclusion, the use of a multiecho sequence is an effective way to decrease the noise contribution in susceptibility-weighted phase images, while preserving both contrast and acquisition time. The proposed approach additionally permits the calculation of R2 maps. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical studies of the calcification of the basal ganglia as disclosed by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Node, Yoji; Nakazawa, Shozo (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo)

    1983-04-01

    One hundred and twenty-nine of the 12,645 patients (1.0%) were found to have attenuating changes suggesting calcification of the basal ganglia. Thirty-seven of those patients were male and 92 were female. The calcification was bilateral and grossly symmetric in 108 of these patients (83.7%), while it was unilateral in 21 (16.3%). In the unilaterally located cases, 15 were on the left side and 6 were on the right side. In 128 of these patients (99.2%), calcification was located in the globus pallidus. Only one patient, whose diagnosis was hypoparathyroidism, had calcification in both the globus pallidus and the head of the caudate nucleus. The patients' ages ranged from 10 to 85 years (mean, 58), but 88.4% of the patients were more than 40 years old at the time of the CT scanning. The attenuation values of the lesions varied from 35 to 375 EMI units (mean, 55.7). Skull radiographs were performed in 120 of the 129 patients. Calcification was detected in only one patient, a 76-year-old woman, whose diagnosis was myasthenia gravis. The clinical diagnoses of the 129 patients were as follows: 37, headache; 22, cerebrovascular diseases (19, occlusive cerebrovascular diseases); 20, vertigo and/or tinnitus; 12, psychiatric disorders; 5, Parkinson's Syndrome; 2, hypopara thyroidism; 2, Fahr's disease; 2, familial basal ganglia calcification; 2, epilepsy, and 25, miscellaneous (including carcinoma, brain tumor, and trauma). Nervous system abnormalities were observed in 41 of the 129 patients (31.2%). Mental signs, such as disturbance of recent memory, mental retardation, and dementia, were noted in 14 patients. Movement disorders were noted in 13 patients. Other nervous-system abnormalities were sensory disturbances (5 patients) and seizures (4 patients). Abnormal EEG activities were noted in 9 patients; three patients showed epileptic activity, and six had a pathologically slow rhythm.

  3. Sample size requirements for one-year treatment effects using deep gray matter volume from 3T MRI in progressive forms of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gloria; Chu, Renxin; Yousuf, Fawad; Tauhid, Shahamat; Stazzone, Lynn; Houtchens, Maria K; Stankiewicz, James M; Severson, Christopher; Kimbrough, Dorlan; Quintana, Francisco J; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weiner, Howard L; Healy, Brian C; Bakshi, Rohit

    2017-11-01

    The subcortical deep gray matter (DGM) develops selective, progressive, and clinically relevant atrophy in progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (PMS). This patient population is the target of active neurotherapeutic development, requiring the availability of outcome measures. We tested a fully automated MRI analysis pipeline to assess DGM atrophy in PMS. Consistent 3D T1-weighted high-resolution 3T brain MRI was obtained over one year in 19 consecutive patients with PMS [15 secondary progressive, 4 primary progressive, 53% women, age (mean±SD) 50.8±8.0 years, Expanded Disability Status Scale (median, range) 5.0, 2.0-6.5)]. DGM segmentation applied the fully automated FSL-FIRST pipeline ( http://fsl.fmrib.ox.ac.uk ). Total DGM volume was the sum of the caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and thalamus. On-study change was calculated using a random-effects linear regression model. We detected one-year decreases in raw [mean (95% confidence interval): -0.749 ml (-1.455, -0.043), p = 0.039] and annualized [-0.754 ml/year (-1.492, -0.016), p = 0.046] total DGM volumes. A treatment trial for an intervention that would show a 50% reduction in DGM brain atrophy would require a sample size of 123 patients for a single-arm study (one-year run-in followed by one-year on-treatment). For a two-arm placebo-controlled one-year study, 242 patients would be required per arm. The use of DGM fraction required more patients. The thalamus, putamen, and globus pallidus, showed smaller effect sizes in their on-study changes than the total DGM; however, for the caudate, the effect sizes were somewhat larger. DGM atrophy may prove efficient as a short-term outcome for proof-of-concept neurotherapeutic trials in PMS.

  4. Inter regional correlations of glucose metabolism between the basal ganglia and different cortical areas: an ultra-high resolution PET/MRI fusion study using 18F-FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.H.; Son, Y.D.; Kim, H.K.; Oh, C.H.; Kim, J.M.; Kim, Y.B.; Lee, C.

    2018-01-01

    Basal ganglia have complex functional connections with the cerebral cortex and are involved in motor control, executive functions of the forebrain, such as the planning of movement, and cognitive behaviors based on their connections. The aim of this study was to provide detailed functional correlation patterns between the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex by conducting an inter regional correlation analysis of the 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) data based on precise structural information. Fifteen participants were scanned with 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high resolution research tomography (HRRT)-PET fusion system using 18 F-FDG. For detailed inter regional correlation analysis, 24 subregions of the basal ganglia including pre-commissural dorsal caudate, post-commissural caudate, pre-commissural dorsal putamen, post-commissural putamen, internal globus pallidus, and external globus pallidus and 80 cerebral regions were selected as regions of interest on the MRI image and their glucose metabolism were calculated from the PET images. Pearson's product-moment correlation analysis was conducted for the inter regional correlation analysis of the basal ganglia. Functional correlation patterns between the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex were not only consistent with the findings of previous studies, but also showed new functional correlation between the dorsal striatum (i.e., caudate nucleus and putamen) and insula. In this study, we established the detailed basal ganglia subregional functional correlation patterns using 18 F-FDG PET/MRI fusion imaging. Our methods and results could potentially be an important resource for investigating basal ganglia dysfunction as well as for conducting functional studies in the context of movement and psychiatric disorders. (author)

  5. Cortical stimulation evokes abnormal responses in the dopamine-depleted rat basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Hitoshi; Kita, Takako

    2011-07-13

    The motor cortex (MC) sends massive projections to the basal ganglia. Motor disabilities in patients and animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) may be caused by dopamine (DA)-depleted basal ganglia that abnormally process the information originating from MC. To study how DA depletion alters signal transfer in the basal ganglia, MC stimulation-induced (MC-induced) unitary responses were recorded from the basal ganglia of control and 6-hydroxydopamine-treated hemi-parkinsonian rats anesthetized with isoflurane. This report describes new findings about how DA depletion alters MC-induced responses. MC stimulation evokes an excitation in normally quiescent striatal (Str) neurons projecting to the globus pallidus external segment (GPe). After DA-depletion, the spontaneous firing of Str-GPe neurons increases, and MC stimulation evokes a shorter latency excitation followed by a long-lasting inhibition that was invisible under normal conditions. The increased firing activity and the newly exposed long inhibition generate tonic inhibition and a disfacilitation in GPe. The disfacilitation in GPe is then amplified in basal ganglia circuitry and generates a powerful long inhibition in the basal ganglia output nucleus, the globus pallidus internal segment. Intra-Str injections of a behaviorally effective dose of DA precursor l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine effectively reversed these changes. These newly observed mechanisms also support the generation of pauses and burst activity commonly observed in the basal ganglia of parkinsonian subjects. These results suggest that the generation of abnormal response sequences in the basal ganglia contributes to the development of motor disabilities in PD and that intra-Str DA supplements effectively suppress abnormal signal transfer.

  6. External pallidal stimulation improves parkinsonian motor signs and modulates neuronal activity throughout the basal ganglia thalamic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitek, Jerrold L; Zhang, Jianyu; Hashimoto, Takao; Russo, Gary S; Baker, Kenneth B

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) are effective for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). We have shown previously that DBS of the external segment of the globus pallidus (GPe) is associated with improvements in parkinsonian motor signs; however, the mechanism of this effect is not known. In this study, we extend our findings on the effect of STN and GPi DBS on neuronal activity in the basal ganglia thalamic network to include GPe DBS using the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1.2.3.6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) monkey model. Stimulation parameters that improved bradykinesia were associated with changes in the pattern and mean discharge rate of neuronal activity in the GPi, STN, and the pallidal [ventralis lateralis pars oralis (VLo) and ventralis anterior (VA)] and cerebellar [ventralis lateralis posterior pars oralis (VPLo)] receiving areas of the motor thalamus. Population post-stimulation time histograms revealed a complex pattern of stimulation-related inhibition and excitation for the GPi and VA/VLo, with a more consistent pattern of inhibition in STN and excitation in VPLo. Mean discharge rate was reduced in the GPi and STN and increased in the VPLo. Effective GPe DBS also reduced bursting in the STN and GPi. These data support the hypothesis that therapeutic DBS activates output from the stimulated structure and changes the temporal pattern of neuronal activity throughout the basal ganglia thalamic network and provide further support for GPe as a potential therapeutic target for DBS in the treatment of PD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The cranial MRI in severe cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kazutaka; Itoh, Masahiro; Fueki, Noboru; Hirasawa, Kyoko; Suzuki, Noriko; Kurata, Kiyoko; Sato, Junichi; Morimatsu, Yoshio; Yagishita, Akira.

    1993-01-01

    The magnetic resonance examination was performed in 38 patients with severe cerebral palsy (CP; 15 males and 23 females) who had both motor delay (unable to move anywhere) and mental retardation (I.Q. or D.Q. below 30). Neuroimaging findings were compared with the CP type, etiology, and grade of understanding of language. Cranial magnetic resonance imagings (MRI) in CP were divided into five types. In type 1, nine predominantly showed cyst-liked ventricles and periventricular hyperintensity on T 2 -weighted imaging (PVH) and only scarred basal ganglia and thalamus were visible. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia and the clinical type was rigospastic tetraplegia (RST). In type 2, eleven predominantly showed PVH and hyperintensity on T 2 -weighted (HT2) in basal ganglia and thalamus. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia and the clinical type was RST or rigospastic diplegia. In type 3, five showed PVH and three had cortical atrophy. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia and the clinical type was spastic diplegia. In type 4, four predominantly showed HT2 in putamen and thalamus. Three had cortical atrophy. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia. The clinical type was athetotic CP (ATH). In type 5, nine predominantly showed HT2 in globus pallidus. Four had cortical atrophy and two had hippocampal atrophy. All suffered from neonatal jaundice and the clinical type was ATH. All patients who suffered from neonatal asphyxia and spastic CP had MRI in PVH. All patients who suffered from neonatal asphyxia and ATH showed HT2 in putamen and thalamus. Almost patients who suffered from neonatal jaundice and ATH showed HT2 in globus pallidus. With athetotic CP, cases with atrophy of the cerebral cortex and/or hippocampus were lower grade of understanding of language than no atrophy of both. The results of studies of MRI are in agreement with neuropathological findings. (author)

  8. The cranial MRI in severe cerebral palsy; A comparative study with clinical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Kazutaka; Itoh, Masahiro; Fueki, Noboru; Hirasawa, Kyoko; Suzuki, Noriko; Kurata, Kiyoko (Metropolitan Medical Center of the Severely Handicapped, Tokyo (Japan)); Sato, Junichi; Morimatsu, Yoshio; Yagishita, Akira

    1993-09-01

    The magnetic resonance examination was performed in 38 patients with severe cerebral palsy (CP; 15 males and 23 females) who had both motor delay (unable to move anywhere) and mental retardation (I.Q. or D.Q. below 30). Neuroimaging findings were compared with the CP type, etiology, and grade of understanding of language. Cranial magnetic resonance imagings (MRI) in CP were divided into five types. In type 1, nine predominantly showed cyst-liked ventricles and periventricular hyperintensity on T[sub 2]-weighted imaging (PVH) and only scarred basal ganglia and thalamus were visible. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia and the clinical type was rigospastic tetraplegia (RST). In type 2, eleven predominantly showed PVH and hyperintensity on T[sub 2]-weighted (HT2) in basal ganglia and thalamus. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia and the clinical type was RST or rigospastic diplegia. In type 3, five showed PVH and three had cortical atrophy. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia and the clinical type was spastic diplegia. In type 4, four predominantly showed HT2 in putamen and thalamus. Three had cortical atrophy. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia. The clinical type was athetotic CP (ATH). In type 5, nine predominantly showed HT2 in globus pallidus. Four had cortical atrophy and two had hippocampal atrophy. All suffered from neonatal jaundice and the clinical type was ATH. All patients who suffered from neonatal asphyxia and spastic CP had MRI in PVH. All patients who suffered from neonatal asphyxia and ATH showed HT2 in putamen and thalamus. Almost patients who suffered from neonatal jaundice and ATH showed HT2 in globus pallidus. With athetotic CP, cases with atrophy of the cerebral cortex and/or hippocampus were lower grade of understanding of language than no atrophy of both. The results of studies of MRI are in agreement with neuropathological findings. (author).

  9. Temporal changes of CB1 cannabinoid receptor in the basal ganglia as a possible structure-specific plasticity process in 6-OHDA lesioned rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela P Chaves-Kirsten

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system has been implicated in several neurobiological processes, including neurodegeneration, neuroprotection and neuronal plasticity. The CB1 cannabinoid receptors are abundantly expressed in the basal ganglia, the circuitry that is mostly affected in Parkinson's Disease (PD. Some studies show variation of CB1 expression in basal ganglia in different animal models of PD, however the results are quite controversial, due to the differences in the procedures employed to induce the parkinsonism and the periods analyzed after the lesion. The present study evaluated the CB1 expression in four basal ganglia structures, namely striatum, external globus pallidus (EGP, internal globus pallidus (IGP and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr of rats 1, 5, 10, 20, and 60 days after unilateral intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine injections, that causes retrograde dopaminergic degeneration. We also investigated tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, parvalbumin, calbindin and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD expression to verify the status of dopaminergic and GABAergic systems. We observed a structure-specific modulation of CB1 expression at different periods after lesions. In general, there were no changes in the striatum, decreased CB1 in IGP and SNpr and increased CB1 in EGP, but this increase was not sustained over time. No changes in GAD and parvalbumin expression were observed in basal ganglia, whereas TH levels were decreased and the calbindin increased in striatum in short periods after lesion. We believe that the structure-specific variation of CB1 in basal ganglia in the 6-hydroxydopamine PD model could be related to a compensatory process involving the GABAergic transmission, which is impaired due to the lack of dopamine. Our data, therefore, suggest that the changes of CB1 and calbindin expression may represent a plasticity process in this PD model.

  10. Dynamical analysis of Parkinsonian state emulated by hybrid Izhikevich neuron models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Li, Huiyan; Loparo, Kenneth A.; Fietkiewicz, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Computational models play a significant role in exploring novel theories to complement the findings of physiological experiments. Various computational models have been developed to reveal the mechanisms underlying brain functions. Particularly, in the development of therapies to modulate behavioral and pathological abnormalities, computational models provide the basic foundations to exhibit transitions between physiological and pathological conditions. Considering the significant roles of the intrinsic properties of the globus pallidus and the coupling connections between neurons in determining the firing patterns and the dynamical activities of the basal ganglia neuronal network, we propose a hypothesis that pathological behaviors under the Parkinsonian state may originate from combined effects of intrinsic properties of globus pallidus neurons and synaptic conductances in the whole neuronal network. In order to establish a computational efficient network model, hybrid Izhikevich neuron model is used due to its capacity of capturing the dynamical characteristics of the biological neuronal activities. Detailed analysis of the individual Izhikevich neuron model can assist in understanding the roles of model parameters, which then facilitates the establishment of the basal ganglia-thalamic network model, and contributes to a further exploration of the underlying mechanisms of the Parkinsonian state. Simulation results show that the hybrid Izhikevich neuron model is capable of capturing many of the dynamical properties of the basal ganglia-thalamic neuronal network, such as variations of the firing rates and emergence of synchronous oscillations under the Parkinsonian condition, despite the simplicity of the two-dimensional neuronal model. It may suggest that the computational efficient hybrid Izhikevich neuron model can be used to explore basal ganglia normal and abnormal functions. Especially it provides an efficient way of emulating the large-scale neuron network

  11. [Case report: kleptomania and other psychiatric symptoms after carbon monoxide intoxication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürlek Yüksel, Ebru; Taşkin, E Oryal; Yilmaz Ovali, Gülgün; Karaçam, Melek; Esen Danaci, Ayşen

    2007-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication is usually a serious condition, which can result in neurological disturbances or death. In some patients with CO intoxication, but not usually, a biphasic pattern can be seen. In this condition, after antitoxic treatment, patients may completely recover and after a short recovery period, neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms appear again. This condition is known as delayed encephalopathy and its occurrence rate is between 0.06% and 11.8%. Herein, we report a case with delayed encephalopathy after CO intoxication, which began with neurological symptoms and continued with obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, kleptomania, and psychotic disorder. The 41-year-old female patient had no psychiatric or neurological symptoms or disorders prior to CO intoxication. Increased signal intensity changes in the basal region of the left temporal lobe (including the cortex and subcortical white matter), globus pallidus (bilateral), and cerebellar cortical and subcortical white matter (bilaterally symmetrical) was detected on axial T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, there were atrophic changes in both cerebellar hemispheres. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of kleptomania described after CO intoxication in the literature. We discuss the organic etiology of kleptomania and the other psychiatric symptoms of this patient in the light of recent research. We concluded that the kleptomania seen in this patient was related to concurrent lesions in the temporal lobe and globus pallidus; in other words, her kleptomania may have been related to dysfunction simultaneously seen in both the temporolimbic and frontal-subcortical circuits.

  12. Gadolinium Deposition in Human Brain Tissues after Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Adult Patients without Intracranial Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Robert J; McDonald, Jennifer S; Kallmes, David F; Jentoft, Mark E; Paolini, Michael A; Murray, David L; Williamson, Eric E; Eckel, Laurence J

    2017-11-01

    Purpose To determine whether gadolinium deposits in neural tissues of patients with intracranial abnormalities following intravenous gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) exposure might be related to blood-brain barrier integrity by studying adult patients with normal brain pathologic characteristics. Materials and Methods After obtaining antemortem consent and institutional review board approval, the authors compared postmortem neuronal tissue samples from five patients who had undergone four to 18 gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) examinations between 2005 and 2014 (contrast group) with samples from 10 gadolinium-naive patients who had undergone at least one MR examination during their lifetime (control group). All patients in the contrast group had received gadodiamide. Neuronal tissues from the dentate nuclei, pons, globus pallidus, and thalamus were harvested and analyzed with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and light microscopy to quantify, localize, and assess the effects of gadolinium deposition. Results Tissues from the four neuroanatomic regions of gadodiamide-exposed patients contained 0.1-19.4 μg of gadolinium per gram of tissue in a statistically significant dose-dependent relationship (globus pallidus: ρ = 0.90, P = .04). In contradistinction, patients in the control group had undetectable levels of gadolinium with ICP-MS. All patients had normal brain pathologic characteristics at autopsy. Three patients in the contrast group had borderline renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate the contrast group was localized to the capillary endothelium and neuronal interstitium and, in two cases, within the nucleus of the cell. Conclusion Gadolinium deposition in neural tissues after GBCA administration occurs in the absence of intracranial abnormalities that might affect the permeability of the blood-brain barrier. These findings

  13. [18F]fallypride characterization of striatal and extrastriatal D2/3 receptors in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Adam J; Smith, Christopher T; Petersen, Kalen J; Trujillo, Paula; van Wouwe, Nelleke C; Donahue, Manus J; Kessler, Robert M; Deutch, Ariel Y; Zald, David H; Claassen, Daniel O

    2018-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by widespread degeneration of monoaminergic (especially dopaminergic) networks, manifesting with a number of both motor and non-motor symptoms. Regional alterations to dopamine D 2/3 receptors in PD patients are documented in striatal and some extrastriatal areas, and medications that target D 2/3 receptors can improve motor and non-motor symptoms. However, data regarding the combined pattern of D 2/3 receptor binding in both striatal and extrastriatal regions in PD are limited. We studied 35 PD patients off-medication and 31 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HCs) using PET imaging with [ 18 F]fallypride, a high affinity D 2/3 receptor ligand, to measure striatal and extrastriatal D 2/3 nondisplaceable binding potential (BP ND ). PD patients completed PET imaging in the off medication state, and motor severity was concurrently assessed. Voxel-wise evaluation between groups revealed significant BP ND reductions in PD patients in striatal and several extrastriatal regions, including the locus coeruleus and mesotemporal cortex. A region-of-interest (ROI) based approach quantified differences in dopamine D 2/3 receptors, where reduced BP ND was noted in the globus pallidus, caudate, amygdala, hippocampus, ventral midbrain, and thalamus of PD patients relative to HC subjects. Motor severity positively correlated with D 2/3 receptor density in the putamen and globus pallidus. These findings support the hypothesis that abnormal D 2/3 expression occurs in regions related to both the motor and non-motor symptoms of PD, including areas richly invested with noradrenergic neurons.

  14. Multi-modal and targeted imaging improves automated mid-brain segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; D'Haese, Pierre F.; Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Newton, Allen T.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2017-02-01

    The basal ganglia and limbic system, particularly the thalamus, putamen, internal and external globus pallidus, substantia nigra, and sub-thalamic nucleus, comprise a clinically relevant signal network for Parkinson's disease. In order to manually trace these structures, a combination of high-resolution and specialized sequences at 7T are used, but it is not feasible to scan clinical patients in those scanners. Targeted imaging sequences at 3T such as F-GATIR, and other optimized inversion recovery sequences, have been presented which enhance contrast in a select group of these structures. In this work, we show that a series of atlases generated at 7T can be used to accurately segment these structures at 3T using a combination of standard and optimized imaging sequences, though no one approach provided the best result across all structures. In the thalamus and putamen, a median Dice coefficient over 0.88 and a mean surface distance less than 1.0mm was achieved using a combination of T1 and an optimized inversion recovery imaging sequences. In the internal and external globus pallidus a Dice over 0.75 and a mean surface distance less than 1.2mm was achieved using a combination of T1 and FGATIR imaging sequences. In the substantia nigra and sub-thalamic nucleus a Dice coefficient of over 0.6 and a mean surface distance of less than 1.0mm was achieved using the optimized inversion recovery imaging sequence. On average, using T1 and optimized inversion recovery together produced significantly improved segmentation results than any individual modality (p<0.05 wilcox sign-rank test).

  15. Efficacy and Safety of Deep Brain Stimulation in Tourette Syndrome: The International Tourette Syndrome Deep Brain Stimulation Public Database and Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Jimenez-Shahed, Joohi; Leckman, James Frederick; Porta, Mauro; Servello, Domenico; Meng, Fan-Gang; Kuhn, Jens; Huys, Daniel; Baldermann, Juan Carlos; Foltynie, Thomas; Hariz, Marwan I; Joyce, Eileen M; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Kefalopoulou, Zinovia; Silburn, Peter; Coyne, Terry; Mogilner, Alon Y; Pourfar, Michael H; Khandhar, Suketu M; Auyeung, Man; Ostrem, Jill Louise; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Welter, Marie-Laure; Mallet, Luc; Karachi, Carine; Houeto, Jean Luc; Klassen, Bryan Timothy; Ackermans, Linda; Kaido, Takanobu; Temel, Yasin; Gross, Robert E; Walker, Harrison C; Lozano, Andres M; Walter, Benjamin L; Mari, Zoltan; Anderson, William S; Changizi, Barbara Kelly; Moro, Elena; Zauber, Sarah Elizabeth; Schrock, Lauren E; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Hu, Wei; Rizer, Kyle; Monari, Erin H; Foote, Kelly D; Malaty, Irene A; Deeb, Wissam; Gunduz, Aysegul; Okun, Michael S

    2018-03-01

    Collective evidence has strongly suggested that deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising therapy for Tourette syndrome. To assess the efficacy and safety of DBS in a multinational cohort of patients with Tourette syndrome. The prospective International Deep Brain Stimulation Database and Registry included 185 patients with medically refractory Tourette syndrome who underwent DBS implantation from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2016, at 31 institutions in 10 countries worldwide. Patients with medically refractory symptoms received DBS implantation in the centromedian thalamic region (93 of 163 [57.1%]), the anterior globus pallidus internus (41 of 163 [25.2%]), the posterior globus pallidus internus (25 of 163 [15.3%]), and the anterior limb of the internal capsule (4 of 163 [2.5%]). Scores on the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale and adverse events. The International Deep Brain Stimulation Database and Registry enrolled 185 patients (of 171 with available data, 37 females and 134 males; mean [SD] age at surgery, 29.1 [10.8] years [range, 13-58 years]). Symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder were present in 97 of 151 patients (64.2%) and 32 of 148 (21.6%) had a history of self-injurious behavior. The mean (SD) total Yale Global Tic Severity Scale score improved from 75.01 (18.36) at baseline to 41.19 (20.00) at 1 year after DBS implantation (P tic subscore improved from 21.00 (3.72) at baseline to 12.91 (5.78) after 1 year (P tic subscore improved from 16.82 (6.56) at baseline to 9.63 (6.99) at 1 year (P Tourette syndrome but also with important adverse events. A publicly available website on outcomes of DBS in patients with Tourette syndrome has been provided.

  16. Significance of apparent diffusion coefficient measurement for the differential diagnosis of multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, and Parkinson's disease: evaluation by 3.0-T MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Kazumichi; Kanasaki, Yoshiko; Kakite, Suguru; Fujii, Shinya; Kaminou, Toshio; Ogawa, Toshihide; Matsusue, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    The clinical differentiation of Parkinson's disease (PD) from multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) may be challenging, especially in their early stages. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement to distinguish among these degenerative disorders. Twenty-five MSA, 20 PSP, and 17 PD patients and 18 healthy controls were retrospectively studied. Axial diffusion-weighted and T2-weighted images were obtained using a 3-T MR system. Regions of interest (ROIs) were precisely placed in the midbrain, pons, putamen, globus pallidus, caudate nucleus, thalamus, superior cerebellar peduncle, middle cerebellar peduncle, cerebellar white matter, and cerebellar dentate nucleus, and the regional ADC (rADC) value was calculated in each ROI. In MSA, rADC values in the pons, middle cerebellar peduncle, cerebellar white matter, and cerebellar dentate nucleus were significantly higher than in PSP, PD, and controls. Furthermore, rADC values in the posterior putamen were significantly higher in MSA than in PSP and controls. In PSP, rADC values were significantly higher in the globus pallidus and midbrain than in MSA, PD, and controls. Furthermore, rADC values in the caudate nucleus and superior cerebellar peduncle were significantly higher in PSP than in MSA and controls. In PD, there were no significant differences in the rADC values compared to in MSA, PSP, and controls in all regions. Evaluation of rADC values in characteristic lesions in MSA, PSP, and PD by placing ROIs using 3-T systems can provide useful additional information for differentiating these disorders. (orig.)

  17. The histamine system in human brain. Changes in neurological and psychiatric disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodchild, R.E.

    1999-09-01

    Autoradiographical examination of the distribution of H 1 - and H 3 - histamine receptor subtypes, using [ 3 H]-mepyramine and [ 3 H]-R-(α) methylhistamine respectively, found high H 1 -receptor binding densities in neocortex, dentate gyrus and basolateral amygdala, with low binding in all subdivisions of the thalamus and other subcortical areas. H 3 -receptor binding was enriched within the nucleus accumbens, globus pallidus and substantia nigra, whilst was low in the hippocampus, subthalamic nucleus, temporal cortex, motor and somatosensory thalamic areas and basolateral amygdala. In situ hybridisation found H 2 -receptor mRNA located in the striatum, thalamus, hippocampal pyramidal cell layer and dentate gyrus, and specific laminae of neocortex. Comparison of autoradiographically determined H 1 -, H 2 - and H 3 -receptor binding densities between normal and pathological cases found significantly decreased (p 3 -receptor binding in Huntington's disease (HD), with unaltered binding in the insular cortex. A significant correlation (p 1 -receptor was increased (p 2 - (measured using [ 125 I]-iodoaminopotentidine) and H 3 -receptor binding densities were normal in all areas examined. H 1 -receptor binding was also increased in the hippocampus of Lewy-body dementia (DLB) cases (p 2 -receptor binding densities were decreased in DLB, together with Alzheimer's disease (AD) (p 3 -receptor binding was increased in the insular cortex and decreased in the temporal cortex of DLB, but not AD, cases (p 1 -receptor binding to tissue from patients with schizophrenia was significantly reduced in all cortical (p 2 -receptor binding was unaltered in all areas, however H 3 -receptor binding was increased in the posterior putamen (p < 0.05), and highly significantly decreased (p < 0.005, Students two-tailed T-Test) in the external globus pallidus in schizophrenia. (author)

  18. MR contrast of ferritin and hemosiderin in the brain: comparison among gradient-echo, conventional spin-echo and fast spin-echo sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, Tabassum Laz; Miki, Yukio; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Takahashi, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Akira; Konishi, Junya; Nozaki, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Konishi, Junji

    2003-12-01

    Objective: To compare the magnetic resonance image contrasts due to ferritin and hemosiderin in the brain tissue among different pulse sequences. Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with cavernous hemangioma in the brain prospectively underwent MR imaging with T2*-weighted gradient-echo (GRE), T2-weighted conventional spin-echo (SE) and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences. The relative contrast ratios (CRs) of the hypointense part of cavernous hemangioma, globus pallidus and putamen to the deep frontal white matter were measured on each pulse sequence and statistically analyzed using analysis of variance followed by paired t-test. Results: In the hypointense part of cavernous hemangioma, relative CRs were significantly lower on T2*-weighted GRE than on T2-weighted SE images (P=0.0001), and on T2-weighted SE than on T2-weighted FSE images (P=0.0001). In the globus pallidus, relative CRs were significantly lower on T2-weighted SE than on T2*-weighted GRE images (P=0.002), and on T2*-weighted GRE than on T2-weighted FSE images (P=0.0002). In the putamen, relative CRs were significantly lower on T2-weighted SE than on T2*-weighted GRE images (P=0.001), and there was no significant difference between CRs on T2-weighted FSE and T2*-weighted GRE images (P=0.90). Conclusion: Hemosiderin showed best image contrast on T2*-weighted GRE images but ferritin showed more prominent image contrast on T2-weighted SE than on T2*-weighted GRE images, which may help to determine an appropriate pulse sequence in neurological diseases associated with excessive ferritin accumulation.

  19. MR contrast of ferritin and hemosiderin in the brain: comparison among gradient-echo, conventional spin-echo and fast spin-echo sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, Tabassum Laz; Miki, Yukio; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Takahashi, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Akira; Konishi, Junya; Nozaki, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Konishi, Junji

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To compare the magnetic resonance image contrasts due to ferritin and hemosiderin in the brain tissue among different pulse sequences. Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with cavernous hemangioma in the brain prospectively underwent MR imaging with T2*-weighted gradient-echo (GRE), T2-weighted conventional spin-echo (SE) and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences. The relative contrast ratios (CRs) of the hypointense part of cavernous hemangioma, globus pallidus and putamen to the deep frontal white matter were measured on each pulse sequence and statistically analyzed using analysis of variance followed by paired t-test. Results: In the hypointense part of cavernous hemangioma, relative CRs were significantly lower on T2*-weighted GRE than on T2-weighted SE images (P=0.0001), and on T2-weighted SE than on T2-weighted FSE images (P=0.0001). In the globus pallidus, relative CRs were significantly lower on T2-weighted SE than on T2*-weighted GRE images (P=0.002), and on T2*-weighted GRE than on T2-weighted FSE images (P=0.0002). In the putamen, relative CRs were significantly lower on T2-weighted SE than on T2*-weighted GRE images (P=0.001), and there was no significant difference between CRs on T2-weighted FSE and T2*-weighted GRE images (P=0.90). Conclusion: Hemosiderin showed best image contrast on T2*-weighted GRE images but ferritin showed more prominent image contrast on T2-weighted SE than on T2*-weighted GRE images, which may help to determine an appropriate pulse sequence in neurological diseases associated with excessive ferritin accumulation

  20. Abnormal brain activation and connectivity to standardized disorder-related visual scenes in social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Carina Yvonne; Feldker, Katharina; Neumeister, Paula; Zepp, Britta Maria; Peterburs, Jutta; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Straube, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding of altered emotional processing in social anxiety disorder (SAD) is hampered by a heterogeneity of findings, which is probably due to the vastly different methods and materials used so far. This is why the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated immediate disorder-related threat processing in 30 SAD patients and 30 healthy controls (HC) with a novel, standardized set of highly ecologically valid, disorder-related complex visual scenes. SAD patients rated disorder-related as compared with neutral scenes as more unpleasant, arousing and anxiety-inducing than HC. On the neural level, disorder-related as compared with neutral scenes evoked differential responses in SAD patients in a widespread emotion processing network including (para-)limbic structures (e.g. amygdala, insula, thalamus, globus pallidus) and cortical regions (e.g. dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and precuneus). Functional connectivity analysis yielded an altered interplay between PCC/precuneus and paralimbic (insula) as well as cortical regions (dmPFC, precuneus) in SAD patients, which emphasizes a central role for PCC/precuneus in disorder-related scene processing. Hyperconnectivity of globus pallidus with amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) additionally underlines the relevance of this region in socially anxious threat processing. Our findings stress the importance of specific disorder-related stimuli for the investigation of altered emotion processing in SAD. Disorder-related threat processing in SAD reveals anomalies at multiple stages of emotion processing which may be linked to increased anxiety and to dysfunctionally elevated levels of self-referential processing reported in previous studies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Maternal pravastatin prevents altered fetal brain development in a preeclamptic CD-1 mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa R Carver

    Full Text Available Using an animal model, we have previously shown that preeclampsia results in long-term adverse neuromotor outcomes in the offspring, and this phenotype was prevented by antenatal treatment with pravastatin. This study aims to localize the altered neuromotor programming in this animal model and to evaluate the role of pravastatin in its prevention.For the preeclampsia model, pregnant CD-1 mice were randomly allocated to injection of adenovirus carrying sFlt-1 or its control virus carrying mFc into the tail vein. Thereafter they received pravastatin (sFlt-1-pra "experimental group" or water (sFlt-1 "positive control" until weaning. The mFc group ("negative control" received water. Offspring at 6 months of age were sacrificed, and whole brains underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. MRIs were performed using an 11.7 Tesla vertical bore MRI scanner. T2 weighted images were acquired to evaluate the volumes of 28 regions of interest, including areas involved in adaptation and motor, spatial and sensory function. Cytochemistry and cell quantification was performed using neuron-specific Nissl stain. One-way ANOVA with multiple comparison testing was used for statistical analysis.Compared with control offspring, male sFlt-1 offspring have decreased volumes in the fimbria, periaquaductal gray, stria medullaris, and ventricles and increased volumes in the lateral globus pallidus and neocortex; however, female sFlt-1 offspring showed increased volumes in the ventricles, stria medullaris, and fasciculus retroflexus and decreased volumes in the inferior colliculus, thalamus, and lateral globus pallidus. Neuronal quantification via Nissl staining exhibited decreased cell counts in sFlt-1 offspring neocortex, more pronounced in males. Prenatal pravastatin treatment prevented these changes.Preeclampsia alters brain development in sex-specific patterns, and prenatal pravastatin therapy prevents altered neuroanatomic programming in this animal model.

  2. Mutation of Elfn1 in mice causes seizures and hyperactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie Dolan

    Full Text Available A growing number of proteins with extracellular leucine-rich repeats (eLRRs have been implicated in directing neuronal connectivity. We previously identified a novel family of eLRR proteins in mammals: the Elfns are transmembrane proteins with 6 LRRs, a fibronectin type-3 domain and a long cytoplasmic tail. The recent discovery that Elfn1 protein, expressed postsynaptically, can direct the elaboration of specific electrochemical properties of synapses between particular cell types in the hippocampus strongly reinforces this hypothesis. Here, we present analyses of an Elfn1 mutant mouse line and demonstrate a functional requirement for this gene in vivo. We first carried out detailed expression analysis of Elfn1 using a β-galactosidase reporter gene in the knockout line. Elfn1 is expressed in distinct subsets of interneurons of the hippocampus and cortex, and also in discrete subsets of cells in the habenula, septum, globus pallidus, dorsal subiculum, amygdala and several other regions. Elfn1 is expressed in diverse cell types, including local GABAergic interneurons as well as long-range projecting GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. Elfn1 protein localises to axons of excitatory neurons in the habenula, and long-range GABAergic neurons of the globus pallidus, suggesting the possibility of additional roles for Elfn1 in axons or presynaptically. While gross anatomical analyses did not reveal any obvious neuroanatomical abnormalities, behavioural analyses clearly illustrate functional effects of Elfn1 mutation. Elfn1 mutant mice exhibit seizures, subtle motor abnormalities, reduced thigmotaxis and hyperactivity. The hyperactivity is paradoxically reversible by treatment with the stimulant amphetamine, consistent with phenotypes observed in animals with habenular lesions. These analyses reveal a requirement for Elfn1 in brain function and are suggestive of possible relevance to the etiology and pathophysiology of epilepsy and attention

  3. Clinical studies of the calcification of the basal ganglia as disclosed by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Node, Yoji; Nakazawa, Shozo [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo

    1983-04-01

    One hundred and twenty-nine of the 12,645 patients (1.0%) were found to have attenuating changes suggesting calcification of the basal ganglia. Thirty-seven of those patients were male and 92 were female. The calcification was bilateral and grossly symmetric in 108 of these patients (83.7%), while it was unilateral in 21 (16.3%). In the unilaterally located cases, 15 were on the left side and 6 were on the right side. In 128 of these patients (99.2%), calcification was located in the globus pallidus. Only one patient, whose diagnosis was hypoparathyroidism, had calcification in both the globus pallidus and the head of the caudate nucleus. The patients' ages ranged from 10 to 85 years (mean, 58), but 88.4% of the patients were more than 40 years old at the time of the CT scanning. The attenuation values of the lesions varied from 35 to 375 EMI units (mean, 55.7). Skull radiographs were performed in 120 of the 129 patients. Calcification was detected in only one patient, a 76-year-old woman, whose diagnosis was myasthenia gravis. The clinical diagnoses of the 129 patients were as follows: 37, headache; 22, cerebrovascular diseases (19, occlusive cerebrovascular diseases); 20, vertigo and/or tinnitus; 12, psychiatric disorders; 5, Parkinson's Syndrome; 2, hypopara thyroidism; 2, Fahr's disease; 2, familial basal ganglia calcification; 2, epilepsy, and 25, miscellaneous (including carcinoma, brain tumor, and trauma). Nervous system abnormalities were observed in 41 of the 129 patients (31.2%). Mental signs, such as disturbance of recent memory, mental retardation, and dementia, were noted in 14 patients. Movement disorders were noted in 13 patients. Other nervous-system abnormalities were sensory disturbances (5 patients) and seizures (4 patients). Abnormal EEG activities were noted in 9 patients; three patients showed epileptic activity, and six had a pathologically slow rhythm.

  4. Clinical studies of the calcification of the basal ganglia as disclosed by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Node, Yoji; Nakazawa, Shozo

    1983-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-nine of the 12,645 patients (1.0%) were found to have attenuating changes suggesting calcification of the basal ganglia. Thirty-seven of those patients were male and 92 were female. The calcification was bilateral and grossly symmetric in 108 of these patients (83.7%), while it was unilateral in 21 (16.3%). In the unilaterally located cases, 15 were on the left side and 6 were on the right side. In 128 of these patients (99.2%), calcification was located in the globus pallidus. Only one patient, whose diagnosis was hypoparathyroidism, had calcification in both the globus pallidus and the head of the caudate nucleus. The patients' ages ranged from 10 to 85 years (mean, 58), but 88.4% of the patients were more than 40 years old at the time of the CT scanning. The attenuation values of the lesions varied from 35 to 375 EMI units (mean, 55.7). Skull radiographs were performed in 120 of the 129 patients. Calcification was detected in only one patient, a 76-year-old woman, whose diagnosis was myasthenia gravis. The clinical diagnoses of the 129 patients were as follows: 37, headache; 22, cerebrovascular diseases (19, occlusive cerebrovascular diseases); 20, vertigo and/or tinnitus; 12, psychiatric disorders; 5, Parkinson's Syndrome; 2, hypopara thyroidism; 2, Fahr's disease; 2, familial basal ganglia calcification; 2, epilepsy, and 25, miscellaneous (including carcinoma, brain tumor, and trauma). Nervous system abnormalities were observed in 41 of the 129 patients (31.2%). Mental signs, such as disturbance of recent memory, mental retardation, and dementia, were noted in 14 patients. Movement disorders were noted in 13 patients. Other nervous-system abnormalities were sensory disturbances (5 patients) and seizures (4 patients). Abnormal EEG activities were noted in 9 patients; three patients showed epileptic activity, and six had a pathologically slow rhythm. (J.P.N.)

  5. End-To-End Solution for Integrated Workload and Data Management using glideinWMS and Globus Online

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Grid computing has enabled scientific communities to effectively share computing resources distributed over many independent sites. Several such communities, or Virtual Organizations (VO), in the Open Science Grid and the European Grid Infrastructure use the glideinWMS system to run complex application work-flows. GlideinWMS is a pilot-based workload management system (WMS) that creates on demand, dynamically-sized overlay Condor batch system on Grid resources. While the WMS addresses the management of compute resources, however, data management in the Grid is still the responsibility of the VO. In general, large VOs have resources to develop complex custom solutions, while small VOs would rather push this responsibility to the infrastructure. The latter requires a tight integration of the WMS and the data management layers, an approach still not common in modern Grids. In this paper we describe a solution developed to address this shortcoming in the context of Center for Enabling Distributed Petascale Scienc...

  6. Circuits regulating pleasure and happiness:the evolution of reward-seeking and misery-fleeing behavioral mechanisms in vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton J.M. Loonen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The very first free-moving animals in the oceans over 540 million years ago must have been able to obtain food, territory and shelter, as well as reproduce. Therefore, they would have needed regulatory mechanisms to induce movements enabling achievement of these prerequisites for survival. It can be useful to consider these mechanisms in primitive chordates, which represent our earliest ancestors, to develop hypotheses addressing how these essential parts of human behavior are regulated and relate to more sophisticated behavioral manifestations such as mood. An animal comparable to lampreys was the earliest known vertebrate with a modern forebrain consisting of old and new cortical parts. Lampreys have a separate dorsal pallium, the forerunner of the most recently developed part of the cerebral cortex. In addition, the lamprey extrapyramidal system, which regulates movement, is modern. However, in lampreys and their putative forerunners, the hagfishes, the striatum, which is the input part of this extrapyramidal system, probably corresponds to the human centromedial amygdala, which in higher vertebrates is part of a system mediating fear and anxiety. Both animals have well-developed nuclear habenulae, which are involved in several critical behaviors; in lampreys this system regulates the reward system that reinforces appetitive-seeking behavior or the avoidance system that reinforces flight behavior resulting from negative inputs. Lampreys also have a distinct glutamatergic nucleus, the so-called habenula-projection globus pallidus, which receives input from glutamatergic and GABAergic signals and gives output to the lateral habenula. Via this route, this nucleus influences midbrain monoaminergic nuclei and regulates the food acquisition system. These various structures involved in motor regulation in the lampreys may be conserved in humans and include two complementary mechanisms for reward reinforcement and avoidance behaviors. The first

  7. Circuits regulating pleasure and happiness: the evolution of reward-seeking and misery-fleeing behavioral mechanisms in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loonen, Anton J M; Ivanova, Svetlana A

    2015-01-01

    The very first free-moving animals in the oceans over 540 million years ago must have been able to obtain food, territory, and shelter, as well as reproduce. Therefore, they would have needed regulatory mechanisms to induce movements enabling achievement of these prerequisites for survival. It can be useful to consider these mechanisms in primitive chordates, which represent our earliest ancestors, to develop hypotheses addressing how these essential parts of human behavior are regulated and relate to more sophisticated behavioral manifestations such as mood. An animal comparable to lampreys was the earliest known vertebrate with a modern forebrain consisting of old and new cortical parts. Lampreys have a separate dorsal pallium, the forerunner of the most recently developed part of the cerebral cortex. In addition, the lamprey extrapyramidal system (EPS), which regulates movement, is modern. However, in lampreys and their putative forerunners, the hagfishes, the striatum, which is the input part of this EPS, probably corresponds to the human centromedial amygdala, which in higher vertebrates is part of a system mediating fear and anxiety. Both animals have well-developed nuclear habenulae, which are involved in several critical behaviors; in lampreys this system regulates the reward system that reinforces appetitive-seeking behavior or the avoidance system that reinforces flight behavior resulting from negative inputs. Lampreys also have a distinct glutamatergic nucleus, the so-called habenula-projection globus pallidus, which receives input from glutamatergic and GABAergic signals and gives output to the lateral habenula. Via this route, this nucleus influences midbrain monoaminergic nuclei and regulates the food acquisition system. These various structures involved in motor regulation in the lampreys may be conserved in humans and include two complementary mechanisms for reward reinforcement and avoidance behaviors. The first system is associated with

  8. Age-related deposition of brain iron in normal adults: an in vivo susceptibility weighted imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qidong; Xu Xiaojun; Zhang Minming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of age on the iron concentration of the human brain. Methods: The brain iron level was evaluated in vivo in 78 healthy adult volunteers using a noninvasive magnetic resonance method termed susceptibility weighted imaging. The subjects were divided intothree groups due to different ages: young (22-35 years old, n=27), middle- aged (36-55 years old, n=35), and aged (56-78 years old, n=16). The phase values were measured on the corrected phase images in the globus pallidus, putamen, caudate, substantia nigra, red nucleus, thalamus and frontal white matter. The phase values of those regions measured from the subjects over than 30 years old were correlated with published values of brain iron concentration in normal adults to check the validity of the data. Then, the phase values of the three groups were tested for significant age-related differences using one-way ANOVA, followed by post hoc testing using least significant difference (LSD) procedure. Regression analysis was used to further examine age-related effects revealed by group comparisons, and to estimate the rates of age-related changes. Results: A strong negative correlation was found between the phase values and the published values of the brain iron concentration (r=-0.796, P= 0.032), which indicated that the higher the iron deposition level, the greater the negative phase values. In the putamen (F=20.115, P<0.01) and frontal white matter (F=3.536, P=0.034), significant differences were detected in the phase values of the three age groups. Linear regression analysis showed that phase values of the putamen, frontal white matter, and red nucleus decreased with age (The regression coefficients were -0.001, -0.001, and < -0.001 respectively, and the P value were all < 0.05), which indicated that the iron concentration of those brain structures increased with age. No significant age- related changes of the iron concentration were found in the

  9. [Deep brain recording and length of surgery in stereotactic and functional neurosurgery for movement disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teijeiro, Juan; Macías, Raúl J; Maragoto, Carlos; García, Iván; Alvarez, Mario; Quintanal, Nelson E

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives were to study the length of multi-unit recordings (MURs) of brain activity in 20 years of movement disorder neurosurgeries and to determine the number of times in which it was necessary for the teams using single-unit recording (SUR) to explore all the electrode tracks in the simultaneously recorded sites (SRS). This was a retrospective descriptive statistical analysis of MUR length on 4,296 tracks in 952 surgeries. The exclusion criteria were: tracks with fewer than 5 recorded signals, tracks that had a signal length different from the habitual 2s, or there being unusual situations not related to the MUR, as well as the first 20 surgeries of each surgical target. This yielded a total of 3,448 tracks in 805 surgeries. We also determined the number of the total 952 surgeries in which all the tracks in the SURs of the SRS were explored. The mean and its confidence interval (P=.05) of time per MUR track were 5.49±0.16min in subthalamic nucleus surgery, 8.82±0.24min in the medial or internal globus pallidus) and 18.51±1.31min in the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus. For the total sum of tracks per surgery, in 75% of cases the total time was less than 39min in subthalamic nucleus, almost 42min in the medial or internal globus pallidus and less than 1h and 17min in ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus. All the tracks in the SUR SRS were explored in only 4.2% of the surgeries. The impact of MUR on surgical time is acceptable for this guide in objective localization for surgical targets, without having to use several simultaneous electrodes (not all indispensable in most of the cases). Consequently, there is less risk for the patient. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Frequency and function in the basal ganglia: the origins of beta and gamma band activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenkinsop, Alexander; Anderson, Sean; Gurney, Kevin

    2017-07-01

    Neuronal oscillations in the basal ganglia have been observed to correlate with behaviours, although the causal mechanisms and functional significance of these oscillations remain unknown. We present a novel computational model of the healthy basal ganglia, constrained by single unit recordings from non-human primates. When the model is run using inputs that might be expected during performance of a motor task, the network shows emergent phenomena: it functions as a selection mechanism and shows spectral properties that match those seen in vivo. Beta frequency oscillations are shown to require pallido-striatal feedback, and occur with behaviourally relevant cortical input. Gamma oscillations arise in the subthalamic-globus pallidus feedback loop, and occur during movement. The model provides a coherent framework for the study of spectral, temporal and functional analyses of the basal ganglia and lays the foundation for an integrated approach to study basal ganglia pathologies such as Parkinson's disease in silico. Neural oscillations in the basal ganglia (BG) are well studied yet remain poorly understood. Behavioural correlates of spectral activity are well described, yet a quantitative hypothesis linking time domain dynamics and spectral properties to BG function has been lacking. We show, for the first time, that a unified description is possible by interpreting previously ignored structure in data describing globus pallidus interna responses to cortical stimulation. These data were used to expose a pair of distinctive neuronal responses to the stimulation. This observation formed the basis for a new mathematical model of the BG, quantitatively fitted to the data, which describes the dynamics in the data, and is validated against other stimulus protocol experiments. A key new result is that when the model is run using inputs hypothesised to occur during the performance of a motor task, beta and gamma frequency oscillations emerge naturally during static-force and

  11. Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation Improves Higher Control of the Oculomotor System in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniades, Chrystalina A; Rebelo, Pedro; Kennard, Christopher; Aziz, Tipu Z; Green, Alexander L; FitzGerald, James J

    2015-09-23

    The frontal cortex and basal ganglia form a set of parallel but mostly segregated circuits called cortico-basal ganglia loops. The oculomotor loop controls eye movements and can direct relatively simple movements, such as reflexive prosaccades, without external help but needs input from "higher" loops for more complex behaviors. The antisaccade task requires the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which is part of the prefrontal loop. Information flows from prefrontal to oculomotor circuits in the striatum, and directional errors in this task can be considered a measure of failure of prefrontal control over the oculomotor loop. The antisaccadic error rate (AER) is increased in Parkinson's disease (PD). Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has no effect on the AER, but a previous case suggested that DBS of the globus pallidus interna (GPi) might. Our aim was to compare the effects of STN DBS and GPi DBS on the AER. We tested eye movements in 14 human DBS patients and 10 controls. GPi DBS substantially reduced the AER, restoring lost higher control over oculomotor function. Interloop information flow involves striatal neurons that receive cortical input and project to pallidum. They are normally silent when quiescent, but in PD they fire randomly, creating noise that may account for the degradation in interloop control. The reduced AER with GPi DBS could be explained by retrograde stimulation of striatopallidal axons with consequent activation of inhibitory collaterals and reduction in background striatal firing rates. This study may help explain aspects of PD pathophysiology and the mechanism of action of GPi DBS. Significance statement: Parkinson's disease causes symptoms including stiffness, slowness of movement, and tremor. Electrical stimulation of specific areas deep in the brain can effectively treat these symptoms, but exactly how is not fully understood. Part of the cause of such symptoms may be impairments in the way information flows

  12. Evaluation of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease by using FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Y.H.; Zuo, C.T.; Zhao, J.; Lin, X.T.; Sun, B.M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Patients are effectively treated with medication in their initial phases of Parkinson's disease. However, the drugs become less effective and the adverse effects revealed. Recent years, the chronic deep brain stimulation is becoming an important treatment for patients with patients with Parkinson's disease. It has shown that the Parkinson's state is characterized by pathological neural activity in the motor system including the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN). The chronic deep brain stimulation can make benefits in the patients by intermediate the pathological neural activity. It needs an external method to evaluate the mechanism of therapy and to monitor the effect of treatment. The objective of our study is to observe the regional glucose metabolism changes in the motor loops and demonstrate the mechanism of therapy and how to monitor the treatment. Patients and Methods: Employing FDG PET, we had studied 7 patients who suffered from Parkinson's disease all the patients were failing medical therapy.the electrodes were implanted in the brain by the direction of MRI.The target of DBS is STN. Resting FDG PET were performed on and off STN stimulation. Metabolic changes with DBS were correlated with clinical improvement as measured by changes in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor ratings off medication. PET imaging was read by visual interpretation in blind method and calculated by semi-quantitative analysis. The statistic data was analysis after FDG PET imaging. Results: Through the research, regional cerebral glucose metabolic changes with DBS on and off were correlated with clinical improvement as measured by changes in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor ratings. STN DBS improved UPDRS motor ratings (33%, P<0.001) and significantly increased regional glucose metabolism in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, Parietal lobe cortex ipsilateral to stimulation. The heighten

  13. Sustained effects of ecstasy on the human brain: a prospective neuroimaging study in novel users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Win, Maartje M L; Jager, Gerry; Booij, Jan; Reneman, Liesbeth; Schilt, Thelma; Lavini, Cristina; Olabarriaga, Sílvia D; den Heeten, Gerard J; van den Brink, Wim

    2008-11-01

    Previous studies have suggested toxic effects of recreational ecstasy use on the serotonin system of the brain. However, it cannot be excluded that observed differences between users and non-users are the cause rather than the consequence of ecstasy use. As part of the Netherlands XTC Toxicity (NeXT) study, we prospectively assessed sustained effects of ecstasy use on the brain in novel ecstasy users using repeated measurements with a combination of different neuroimaging parameters of neurotoxicity. At baseline, 188 ecstasy-naive volunteers with high probability of first ecstasy use were examined. After a mean period of 17 months follow-up, neuroimaging was repeated in 59 incident ecstasy users and 56 matched persistent ecstasy-naives and their outcomes were compared. Neuroimaging included [(123)I]beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-iodophenyl)tropane (CIT) SPECT to measure serotonin transporter densities as indicators of serotonergic function; (1)H-MR spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) to measure brain metabolites as indicators of neuronal damage; diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to measure the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy (FA) of the diffusional motion of water molecules in the brain as indicators of axonal integrity; and perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) to measure regional relative cerebral blood volume (rrCBV) which indicates brain perfusion. With this approach, both structural ((1)H-MRS and DTI) and functional ([(123)I]beta-CIT SPECT and PWI) aspects of neurotoxicity were combined. Compared to persistent ecstasy-naives, novel low-dose ecstasy users (mean 6.0, median 2.0 tablets) showed decreased rrCBV in the globus pallidus and putamen; decreased FA in thalamus and frontoparietal white matter; increased FA in globus pallidus; and increased apparent diffusion coefficient in the thalamus. No changes in serotonin transporter densities and brain metabolites were observed. These findings suggest sustained effects of ecstasy on brain microvasculature, white

  14. Imaging dopamine D3 receptors in the human brain with positron emission tomography, [11C]PHNO, and a selective D3 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Graham; Beaver, John D; Comley, Robert A; Bani, Massimo; Tziortzi, Andri; Slifstein, Mark; Mugnaini, Manolo; Griffante, Cristiana; Wilson, Alan A; Merlo-Pich, Emilio; Houle, Sylvain; Gunn, Roger; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Laruelle, Marc

    2010-08-15

    Dopamine D(3) receptors are involved in the pathophysiology of several neuropsychiatric conditions. [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO is a radiolabeled D(2) and D(3) agonist, suitable for imaging the agonist binding sites (denoted D(2HIGH) and D(3)) of these receptors with positron emission tomography (PET). PET studies in nonhuman primates documented that, in vivo, [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO displays a relative selectivity for D(3) compared with D(2HIGH) receptor sites and that the [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO signal is enriched in D(3) contribution compared with conventional ligands such as [(11)C] raclopride. To define the D(3) contribution (f(PHNO)(D3)) to [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO binding potential (BP(ND)) in healthy humans, 52 PET scans were obtained in 19 healthy volunteers at baseline and following oral administration of various doses of the selective D(3) receptor antagonist, GSK598809. The impact of GSK598809 on [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO was regionally selective. In dorsal regions of the striatum, GSK598809 did not significantly affect [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO BP(ND) (f(PHNO)(D3) approximately 0%). Conversely, in the substantia nigra, GSK598809 dose-dependently reduced [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO binding to nonspecific level (f(PHNO)(D3) approximately 100%). In ventral striatum (VST), globus pallidus and thalamus (THA), [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO BP(ND) was attributable to a combination of D(2HIGH) and D(3) receptor sites, with f(PHNO)(D3) of 26%, 67% and 46%, respectively. D(3) receptor binding potential (BP(ND)(D3)) was highest in globus pallidus (1.90) and substantial nigra (1.39), with lower levels in VST (.77) and THA (.18) and negligible levels in dorsal striatum. This study elucidated the pharmacologic nature of the [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO signal in healthy subjects and provided the first quantification of D(3) receptor availability with PET in the living human brain. Copyright 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in delayed encephalopathy of acute carbon monoxide poisoning - comparison with CT -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Suh, Chang Hae; Choo, In Wook

    1986-01-01

    Eleven magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomographic (CT) imaging were performed in nine patients with mild to moderate degree of delayed neuropsychiatric symptoms following acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, to evaluate the capability of MR in demonstrating any additional finding to CT. The MR images were obtained using 0.15 Tesla resistive system with various combination of three pulse sequences, including partial saturation recovery, T2-weighted spin echo and inversion recovery. Bilateral white matter abnormalities suggesting demyelination were demonstrated in 4 patients with MR and in only 2 patients with CT. The contrast discrimination between normal and abnormal white matter proved to be better with T2-weighted spin echo and inversion recovery than with partial saturation recovery and CT. But necrosis of the globus pallidus (1 patient) and diffuse atrophy (3 patients) were equally demonstrated on both MR and CT. It is suggested that MR be used as a initial imaging method in the evaluation of the delayed encephalopathy following acute CO poisoning, especially for the detection of the possible white matter lesions. Acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning produces hypoxia by displacing oxygen from hemoglobin and preventing its release from hemoglobin in tissues, often resulting in fetal event. Victims who survive acute CO poisoning may have various delayed symptoms and signs. Occasionally, an apparent recovery is followed within two days to three weeks by a sudden neurological deterioration. The degree of neuropsychiatric symptoms depends upon the extent and severity of the pathologic changes in the brain. The pathologic effects of CO poisoning are present in almost all organs of patients. However, the most important changes occur in the brain, which consist of necrosis of the globus pallidus and reticular zone of the substantia nigra, and the degeneration of the cerebral white matter. The diagnostic superiority of magnetic resonance (MR) over CT has already

  16. In vivo basal ganglia volumetry through application of NURBS models to MR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasi, Giuseppe; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Vitetta, Anton Giulio [University of Messina, Department of Biomorphology and Biotechnologies, Messina (Italy); Tomasello, Francesco; Lucerna, Sebastiano [University of Messina, Department of Neurosurgery, Messina (Italy); Bramanti, Placido; Bella, Paolo di [University of Messina, Study and Treatment Centre for Long-Stay Neurological Patients, Section of Neuroradiology, Messina (Italy); Parenti, Anna [University of Padua, Department of Diagnostic Sciences and Special Therapy, Section of Neuroradiology, Padua (Italy); Porzionato, Andrea; Caro, Raffaele de [University of Padua, Department of Human Anatomy and Physiology, Section of Anatomy, Padua (Italy); Macchi, Veronica [University of Padua, Department of Human Anatomy and Physiology, Section of Anatomy, Padua (Italy); University of Padua, Department of Diagnostic Sciences and Special Therapy, Section of Neuroradiology, Padua (Italy)

    2006-05-15

    Volumetry of basal ganglia (BG) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a sensitive marker in differential diagnosis of BG disorders. The non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces are mathematical representations of three-dimensional structures which have recently been applied in volumetric studies. In this study, a volumetric evaluation of BG based on NURBS was performed in 35 right-handed volunteers. We aimed to compare and validate this technique with respect to manual MRI volumetry and evaluate possible side differences between these structures. Intra- and interobserver biases less than 1.5% demonstrated the method's stability. The mean percentage differences between NURBS and manual methods were less than 1% for all the structures considered; however, the internal segments of the globus pallidus showed a mean percentage difference of about 1.7%. Rightward asymmetry was found for the caudate nucleus (mean{+-}SD 3.20{+-}0.20 cm{sup 3} vs. 3.10{+-}0.19 cm{sup 3}, P<0.001) for both its head (1.44{+-}0.10 cm{sup 3} vs. 1.41{+-}0.09 cm{sup 3}, P<0.01) and its body/tail (1.73{+-}0.11 cm{sup 3} and 1.68{+-}0.12 cm{sup 3}, P<0.01), and for the globus pallidus (1.23{+-}0.08 cm{sup 3} and 1.18{+-}0.09 cm{sup 3}, P<0.001) for both the internal (0.33{+-}0.05 cm{sup 3} vs. 0.31{+-}0.05 cm{sup 3}, P<0.01) and external (0.90{+-}0.05 cm{sup 3} vs. 0.86{+-}0.05 cm{sup 3}, P<0.001) segments. No volumetric side differences were found for the putamen (3.43{+-}0.14 cm{sup 3} vs. 3.39{+-}0.17 cm{sup 3}, P>0.05). The rightward asymmetry of the BG may be ascribed to the predominant use of the right hand. In conclusion, NURBS is an accurate and reliable method for quantitative volumetry of nervous structures. It offers the advantage of giving a three-dimensional representation of the structures examined. (orig.)

  17. Siesta-Globus Tallinn. [1] [Helisalvestis] : wo Mittelalter und IT-Zukunft aufeinander prallen / Redaktion: Luzia Stettler ; Produktion: Schweizer Radio DRS 1

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Helisalvestis saatesarjast Shveitsi raadios Schweizer Radio DRS 1, milles tutvustati uute Euroopa Liidu liikmesriikide pealinnu, 7.-11. mail 2007. a. Tallinnat. Intervjuu president Toomas Hendrik Ilvesega, kes iseloomustab Tallinnat ja vanalinna, räägib, kuidas ta ise sai varem Eestisse vaid külalisena, sest nõukogude võim ei sallinud teda ega tema nõukogude võimu, mainib oma vanemate ja vanavanemate saatust, kiidab Eestit kui e-riiki

  18. [The pharyngeal anxiety syndrome: globus perception and pharyngeal sensations as an oligosymptomatic abortive form of an anxiety disorder? Nosologic, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects, illustrated with a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, F

    1998-09-01

    Since the introduction of the modern psychiatric diagnosis systems anxiety disorders have been intensively discussed. As clinical subtypes in panic disorder the cardial type and the vestibular type are widely accepted. We describe in a case report another of these subtypes, the pharyngeal type; it is characterised by symptoms that are related to the pharynx such as feeling a lump in the throat, swallow disturbance or pain in the pharynx region. It may therefore be called "throat-anxiety syndrome" or "phagophobia". Nosological implications are also discussed.

  19. Brain intrinsic network connectivity in individuals with frequent tanning behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketcherside, Ariel; Filbey, Francesca M; Aubert, Pamela M; Seibyl, John P; Price, Julianne L; Adinoff, Bryon

    2018-05-01

    Emergent studies suggest a bidirectional relationship between brain functioning and the skin. This neurocutaneous connection may be responsible for the reward response to tanning and, thus, may contribute to excessive tanning behavior. To date, however, this association has not yet been examined. To explore whether intrinsic brain functional connectivity within the default mode network (DMN) is related to indoor tanning behavior. Resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) was obtained in twenty adults (16 females) with a history of indoor tanning. Using a seed-based [(posterior cingulate cortex (PCC)] approach, the relationship between tanning severity and FC strength was assessed. Tanning severity was measured with symptom count from the Structured Clinical Interview for Tanning Abuse and Dependence (SITAD) and tanning intensity (lifetime indoor tanning episodes/years tanning). rsFC strength between the PCC and other DMN regions (left globus pallidus, left medial frontal gyrus, left superior frontal gyrus) is positively correlated with tanning symptom count. rsFC strength between the PCC and salience network regions (right anterior cingulate cortex, left inferior parietal lobe, left inferior temporal gyrus) is correlated with tanning intensity. Greater connectivity between tanning severity and DMN and salience network connectivity suggests that heightened self-awareness of salient stimuli may be a mechanism that underlies frequent tanning behavior. These findings add to the growing evidence of brain-skin connection and reflect dysregulation in the reward processing networks in those with frequent tanning.

  20. [An fMRI Study of the Brain Activation Related to Intensive Positive Emotions During Viweing Erotic Pictures in 49-74 Old Men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynova, O; Portnova, G; Orlov, I

    2016-01-01

    According to psychological research erotic images are evaluated in the context of positive emotions as the most intense, most associated with emotional arousal, among the variety of pleasant and unpleasant stimuli. However it is difficult to separate areas of the brain that are related to the general emotional process from the activity of the brain areas involved in neuronal representations of reward system. The purpose of this study was to determine differences in the brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in male subjects in evaluating an intensity of pleasant images, including erotic, or unpleasant and neutral pictures. When comparing the condition with evaluation of the pleasant erotic images with conditions containing neutral or unpleasant stimuli, a significant activation was observed in the posterior cingulate cortex; the prefrontal cortex and the right globus pallidus. An increased activity of the right anterior central gyrus was observed in the conditions related to evaluation of pleasant and neutral stimuli. Thus, in the process of evaluating the intensity of emotional images of an erotic nature the active brain areas were related not only to neuronal representations of emotions, but also to motivations and control system of emotional arousal, which should be taken into account while using erotic pictures as intensive positive emotional stimuli.

  1. Time-Course Analysis of the Neuroanatomical Correlates of Sexual Arousal Evoked by Erotic Video Stimuli in Healthy Males

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaram, Thirunavukkarasu; Jeong, Gwang Woo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Gwang Won; Baek, Han Su; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National University Hospital, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    To assess the dynamic activations of the key brain areas associated with the time-course of the sexual arousal evoked by visual sexual stimuli in healthy male subjects. Fourteen right-handed heterosexual male volunteers participated in this study. Alternatively combined rest period and erotic video visual stimulation were used according to the standard block design. In order to illustrate and quantify the spatiotemporal activation patterns of the key brain regions, the activation period was divided into three different stages as the EARLY, MID and LATE stages. For the group result (p < 0.05), when comparing the MID stage with the EARLY stage, a significant increase of the brain activation was observed in the areas that included the inferior frontal gyrus, the supplementary motor area, the hippocampus, the head of the caudate nucleus, the midbrain, the superior occipital gyrus and the fusiform gyrus. At the same time, when comparing the EARLY stage with the MID stage, the putamen, the globus pallidus, the pons, the thalamus, the hypothalamus, the lingual gyrus and the cuneus yielded significantly increased activations. When comparing the LATE stage with the MID stage, all the above mentioned brain regions showed elevated activations except the hippocampus. Our results illustrate the spatiotemporal activation patterns of the key brain regions across the three stages of visual sexual arousal.

  2. Time-course analysis of the neuroanatomical correlates of sexual arousal evoked by erotic video stimuli in healthy males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Thirunavukkarasu; Jeong, Gwang-Woo; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Gwang-Won; Baek, Han-Su; Kang, Heoung-Keun

    2010-01-01

    To assess the dynamic activations of the key brain areas associated with the time-course of the sexual arousal evoked by visual sexual stimuli in healthy male subjects. Fourteen right-handed heterosexual male volunteers participated in this study. Alternatively combined rest period and erotic video visual stimulation were used according to the standard block design. In order to illustrate and quantify the spatiotemporal activation patterns of the key brain regions, the activation period was divided into three different stages as the EARLY, MID and LATE stages. For the group result (p < 0.05), when comparing the MID stage with the EARLY stage, a significant increase of the brain activation was observed in the areas that included the inferior frontal gyrus, the supplementary motor area, the hippocampus, the head of the caudate nucleus, the midbrain, the superior occipital gyrus and the fusiform gyrus. At the same time, when comparing the EARLY stage with the MID stage, the putamen, the globus pallidus, the pons, the thalamus, the hypothalamus, the lingual gyrus and the cuneus yielded significantly increased activations. When comparing the LATE stage with the MID stage, all the above mentioned brain regions showed elevated activations except the hippocampus. Our results illustrate the spatiotemporal activation patterns of the key brain regions across the three stages of visual sexual arousal.

  3. Can a Positive Allosteric Modulation of GABAergic Receptors Improve Motor Symptoms in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease? The Potential Role of Zolpidem in the Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD are unsatisfactorily controlled by currently used anti-Parkinsonian dopaminergic drugs. Various studies suggest that therapeutic strategies based on nondopaminergic drugs might be helpful in PD. Zolpidem, an imidazopyridine widely used as sleep inducer, shows high affinity only for GABAA receptors containing the α-1 subunit and facilitates GABAergic neurotransmission through a positive allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors. Various observations, although preliminary, consistently suggest that in PD patients zolpidem may induce beneficial (and sometimes remarkable effects on motor symptoms even after single doses and may also improve dyskinesias. Since a high density of zolpidem binding sites is in the two main output structures of the basal ganglia which are abnormally overactive in PD (internal globus pallidus, GPi, and substantia nigra pars reticulata, SNr, it was hypothesized that in PD patients zolpidem may induce through GABAA receptors an inhibition of GPi and SNr (and, possibly, of the subthalamic nucleus also, resulting in an increased activity of motor cortical areas (such as supplementary motor area, which may give rise to improvement of motor symptoms of PD. Randomized clinical trials are needed in order to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of zolpidem in treating motor symptoms of PD.

  4. Iron in typical and atypical parkinsonism – Mössbauer spectroscopy and MRI studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuliński, R. [Bródno Hospital, MRI Lab (Poland); Bauminger, E. R. [Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics (Israel); Friedman, A. [Medical University of Warsaw, Department of Neurology (Poland); Duda, P.; Gałązka-Friedman, J., E-mail: jgfrie@if.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics (Poland)

    2016-12-15

    Iron may play important role in neurodegeneration. The results of comparative studies of human brain areas (control and pathological) performed by Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are presented. Mössbauer spectroscopy demonstrated a higher concentration of iron in atypical parkinsonism (progressive supranuclear palsy PSP) in the brain areas Substantia Nigra (SN) and Globus Pallidus (GP) involved in this pathological process, compared to control, while the concentration of iron in pathological tissues in typical parkinsonism (Parkinson’s disease - PD) did not differ from that in control. These results were compared with the changes in 1/T1 and 1/T2 (T1 and T2 being the relaxation times determined by MRI). A good linear correlation curve was found between the concentration of iron as determined by MS in different areas of control human brains and between 1/T1 and 1/T2. Whereas the finding in PSP-GP (the brain area involved in PSP) also fitted to such a correlation, this was not so for the correlation between pathological SN – the brain area involved in both diseases – and 1/T2, indicating a dependence of T2 on other factors than just the concentration of iron.

  5. Chemical exchange saturation transfer MR imaging of Parkinson's disease at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chunmei; Peng, Shuai; Wang, Rui; Chen, Min [Beijing Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Chen, Haibo; Su, Wen [Beijing Hospital, Department of Neurology, Beijing (China); Zhao, Xuna [Peking University, Center for MRI Research and Beijing City Key Lab for Medical Physics and Engineering, Beijing (China); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-10-15

    To demonstrate the feasibility of using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging to detect Parkinson's disease (PD) in patients at 3 Tesla. Twenty-seven PD patients (17 men and 10 women; age range, 54-77 years) and 22 age-matched normal controls (13 men and 9 women; age range, 55-73 years) were examined on a 3-Tesla MRI system. Magnetization transfer spectra with 31 different frequency offsets (-6 to 6 ppm) were acquired at two transverse slices of the head, including the basal ganglia and midbrain. One-way analysis of variance tests was used to compare the differences in CEST imaging signals between PD patients and normal controls. Total CEST signal between the offsets of 0 and 4 ppm in the substantia nigra was significantly lower in PD patients than in normal controls (P = 0.006), which could be associated with the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Protein-based CEST imaging signals at the offset of 3.5 ppm in the globus pallidus, putamen and caudate were significantly increased in PD patients, compared to normal controls (P < 0.001, P = 0.003, P < 0.001, respectively). CEST imaging signals could potentially serve as imaging biomarkers to aid in the non-invasive molecular diagnosis of PD. (orig.)

  6. Visualizing Iron Deposition in Multiple Sclerosis Cadaver Brains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, Charbel A.; Zheng Weili; Mark Haacke, E.; Webb, Sam; Nichol, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To visualize and validate iron deposition in two cases of multiple sclerosis using rapid scanning X-Ray Fluorescence (RS-XRF) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI). Material and Methods: Two (2) coronal cadaver brain slices from patients clinically diagnosed with multiple sclerosis underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically SWI to image iron content. To confirm the presence of iron deposits and the absence of zinc-rich myelin in lesions, iron and zinc were mapped using RS-XRF. Results: MS lesions were visualized using FLAIR and correlated with the absence of zinc by XRF. XRF and SWI showed that in the first MS case, there were large iron deposits proximal to the draining vein of the caudate nucleus as well as iron deposits associated with blood vessels throughout the globus pallidus. Less iron was seen in association with lesions than in the basal ganglia. The presence of larger amounts of iron correlated reasonably well between RS-XRF and SWI. In the second case, the basal ganglia appeared normal and acute perivascular iron deposition was absent. Conclusion: Perivascular iron deposition is seen in some but not all MS cases, giving credence to the use of SWI to assess iron involvement in MS pathology in vivo.

  7. High affinity [3H]glibenclamide binding sites in rat neuronal and cardiac tissue: Localization and developmental characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.A.; Velayo, N.L.; Dage, R.C.; Rampe, D.

    1991-01-01

    We examined the binding of the antidiabetic sulfonylurea [3H] glibenclamide to rat brain and heart membranes. High affinity binding was observed in adult rat forebrain (Kd = 137.3 pM, maximal binding site density = 91.8 fmol/mg of protein) and ventricle (Kd = 77.1 pM, maximal binding site density = 65.1 fmol/mg of protein). Binding site density increased approximately 250% in forebrain membranes during postnatal development but was constant in ventricular membranes. Quantitative autoradiography was used to examine the regional distribution of [3H] glibenclamide binding sites in sections from rat brain, spinal cord and heart. The greatest density of binding in adult brain was found in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus, whereas the other areas displayed heterogenous binding. In agreement with the membrane binding studies, 1-day-old rat brain had significantly fewer [3H]glibenclamide binding sites than adult brain. Additionally, the pattern of distribution of these sites was qualitatively different from that of the adult. In adult rat spinal cord, moderate binding densities were observed in spinal cord gray and displayed a rostral to caudal gradient. In adult rat heart, moderate binding densities were observed and the sites were distributed homogeneously. In conclusion, significant development of [3H]glibenclamide binding sites was seen in the brain but not the heart during postnatal maturation. Furthermore, a heterogeneous distribution of binding sites was observed in both the brain and spinal cord of adult rats

  8. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Case Following Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Bilge

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive compulsive disorder is characterised by recurrent, unwanted, distressing thoughts, images, impulses and associated behaviours which generally emerge in the 2nd or 3rd decades of life. Elderly onset cases are rare. A 71 year old patient was admitted to our hospital because of left-sided weakness. Neurological examination revealed left hemiparesis, mild dysphasia and anosognosia. Using cranial magnetic resonance, infarcts were found in the MCA territories, in the posterior portion of the middle temporal gyrus supplied by the cortical (inferior branch and in the internal capsule, globus pallidus and putamen portions supplied by the lenticolostriate branch. An occlusion was also present in the right internal carotid artery (ICA. Fifteen days after presentation he developed an abnormal fear of urine contamination. He showered and handwashed excessively and exhibited insomnia and anxiety. The patient knew that his behaviour was ridiculous but could not prevent it. Formal neuropsychological testing found his simple attention to be mildly impared. His visuospatial function and construction abilities were also impaired. Obsessive compulsive disorder is usually an early onset disease. However this report seeks to draw attention to late-onset cases such as this, which are due to a cerebrovascular disorder.

  9. Autoradiographic localization of (125I-Tyr4)bombesin-binding sites in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarbin, M.A.; Kuhar, M.J.; O'Donohue, T.L.; Wolf, S.S.; Moody, T.W.

    1985-01-01

    The binding of ( 125 I-Tyr 4 )bombesin to rat brain slices was investigated. Radiolabeled (Tyr 4 )bombesin bound with high affinity (K/sub d/ . 4 nM) to a single class of sites (B/sub max/ . 130 fmol/mg of protein); the ratio of specific to nonspecific binding was 6/1. Also, pharmacology studies indicated that the C-terminal of bombesin was important for the high affinity binding activity. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the ( 125 I-Tyr4)bombesin-binding sites were discretely distributed in certain gray but not white matter regions of rat brain. Highest grain densities were present in the olfactory bulb and tubercle, nucleus accumbens, suprachiasmatic and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, central medial thalamic nucleus, medial amygdaloid nucleus, hippocampus, dentate gyrus, subiculum, nucleus of the solitary tract, and substantia gelatinosa. Moderate grain densities were present in the parietal cortex, deep layers of the neocortex, rhinal cortex, caudate putamen, stria terminalis, locus ceruleus, parabrachial nucleus, and facial nucleus. Low grain densities were present in the globus pallidus, lateral thalamus, and midbrain. Negligible grain densities were present in the cerebellum, corpus callosum, and all regions treated with 1 microM unlabeled bombesin. The discrete regional distribution of binding suggests that endogenous bombesin-like peptides may function as important regulatory agents in certain brain loci

  10. The cerebrovascular response to traditional acupuncture after stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.D.; Kim, H.J.; Yun, M.; Kim, D.I.; Yoo, H.S. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, 120-752, Seoul (Korea); Chon, J.S.; Kim, D.Y.; Park, C.I. [Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, 120-752, 120-752 (Korea); Jeong, H.K. [Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, 120-752, Seoul (Korea)

    2003-11-01

    Acupuncture is useful in treating the nausea and vomiting related to chemotherapy, adult postoperative surgery pain and postoperative dental pain. We obtained single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain perfusion images of six patients with middle cerebral artery occlusion obtained before and after acupuncture and compared the changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) to those in normal control. Images were obtained before and after acupuncture at six traditional acupoints (LI 4, 10, 11, 15 and 16 and TE5) in the affected arm. The baseline image was subtracted from the postacupuncture image, to produce a subtraction image displaying only voxels with values >2 SD from the mean and those voxels were coregistered to the baseline SPECT or T2-weighted MRI. Similar images were obtained before and after acupuncture of eight normal volunteers. Statistical parametric mapping with a threshold of P =0.001 and a corrected P of 0.05 was performed for group comparison between postacupuncture and baseline SPECT. Focally increased CBF was seen in all patients especially in the hypoperfused zone surrounding the ischaemic lesion, the ipsilateral or contralateral sensorimotor area, or both. Normal subjects showed increased rCBF mainly in the parahippocampal gyrus, premotor area, frontal and temporal areas bilaterally and ipsilateral globus pallidus. Acupuncture stimulation after stroke patients appears to activate perilesional or use-dependent reorganised sites and might be a way of looking at brain reorganisation. (orig.)

  11. The cerebrovascular response to traditional acupuncture after stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.; Kim, H.J.; Yun, M.; Kim, D.I.; Yoo, H.S.; Chon, J.S.; Kim, D.Y.; Park, C.I.; Jeong, H.K.

    2003-01-01

    Acupuncture is useful in treating the nausea and vomiting related to chemotherapy, adult postoperative surgery pain and postoperative dental pain. We obtained single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain perfusion images of six patients with middle cerebral artery occlusion obtained before and after acupuncture and compared the changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) to those in normal control. Images were obtained before and after acupuncture at six traditional acupoints (LI 4, 10, 11, 15 and 16 and TE5) in the affected arm. The baseline image was subtracted from the postacupuncture image, to produce a subtraction image displaying only voxels with values >2 SD from the mean and those voxels were coregistered to the baseline SPECT or T2-weighted MRI. Similar images were obtained before and after acupuncture of eight normal volunteers. Statistical parametric mapping with a threshold of P =0.001 and a corrected P of 0.05 was performed for group comparison between postacupuncture and baseline SPECT. Focally increased CBF was seen in all patients especially in the hypoperfused zone surrounding the ischaemic lesion, the ipsilateral or contralateral sensorimotor area, or both. Normal subjects showed increased rCBF mainly in the parahippocampal gyrus, premotor area, frontal and temporal areas bilaterally and ipsilateral globus pallidus. Acupuncture stimulation after stroke patients appears to activate perilesional or use-dependent reorganised sites and might be a way of looking at brain reorganisation. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of normal adult and children brain SPECT imaging using statistical parametric mapping(SPM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myoung Hoon; Yoon, Seok Nam; Joh, Chul Woo; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung

    2002-01-01

    This study compared rCBF pattern in normal adult and normal children using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). The purpose of this study was to determine distribution pattern not seen visual analysis in both groups. Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT was performed in 12 normal adults (M:F=11:1, average age 35 year old) and 6 normal control children (M:F=4:2, 10.5±3.1y) who visited psychiatry clinic to evaluate ADHD. Their brain SPECT revealed normal rCBF pattern in visual analysis and they were diagnosed clinically normal. Using SPM method, we compared normal adult group's SPECT images with those of 6 normal children subjects and measured the extent of the area with significant hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion (p<0.001, extent threshold=16). The areas of both angnlar gyrus, both postcentral gyrus, both superior frontal gyrus, and both superior parietal lobe showed significant hyperperfusion in normal adult group compared with normal children group. The areas of left amygdala gyrus, brain stem, both cerebellum, left globus pallidus, both hippocampal formations, both parahippocampal gyrus, both thalamus, both uncus, both lateral and medial occipitotemporal gyrus revealed significantly hyperperfusion in the children. These results demonstrated that SPM can say more precise anatomical area difference not seen visual analysis

  13. Comparison of normal adult and children brain SPECT imaging using statistical parametric mapping(SPM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung Hoon; Yoon, Seok Nam; Joh, Chul Woo; Lee, Dong Soo [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Sung [Seoul national University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    This study compared rCBF pattern in normal adult and normal children using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). The purpose of this study was to determine distribution pattern not seen visual analysis in both groups. Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT was performed in 12 normal adults (M:F=11:1, average age 35 year old) and 6 normal control children (M:F=4:2, 10.5{+-}3.1y) who visited psychiatry clinic to evaluate ADHD. Their brain SPECT revealed normal rCBF pattern in visual analysis and they were diagnosed clinically normal. Using SPM method, we compared normal adult group's SPECT images with those of 6 normal children subjects and measured the extent of the area with significant hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion (p<0.001, extent threshold=16). The areas of both angnlar gyrus, both postcentral gyrus, both superior frontal gyrus, and both superior parietal lobe showed significant hyperperfusion in normal adult group compared with normal children group. The areas of left amygdala gyrus, brain stem, both cerebellum, left globus pallidus, both hippocampal formations, both parahippocampal gyrus, both thalamus, both uncus, both lateral and medial occipitotemporal gyrus revealed significantly hyperperfusion in the children. These results demonstrated that SPM can say more precise anatomical area difference not seen visual analysis.

  14. Quantitative autoradiographic mapping of serotonin receptors in the rat brain. I. Serotonin-1 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazos, A.; Palacios, M.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of serotonin-1 (5-HT 1 ) receptors in the rat brain was studied by light microscopic quantitative autoradiography. Receptors were labeled with [ 3 H]serotonin (5-[ 3 H]HT), 8-hydroxy-2-[N-dipropylamino- 3 H]tetralin (8-OH-[ 3 H]DPAT), [ 3 H]LSD and [ 3 H]mesulergine, and the densities quantified by microdensitometry with the aid of a computer-assisted image-analysis system. Competition experiments for 5-[ 3 H]HT binding by several serotonin-1 agonists led to the identification of brain areas enriched in each one of the three subtypes of 5-HT 1 recognition sites already described. The existence of these 'selective' areas allowed a detailed pharmacological characterization of these sites to be made in a more precise manner than has been attained in membrane-binding studies. Very high concentrations of 5-HT 1 receptors were localized in the choroid plexus, lateroseptal nucleus, globus pallidus and ventral pallidum, dentate gyrus, dorsal subiculum, olivary pretectal nucleus, substantia nigra, reticular and external layer of the entorhinal cortex. The distribution of 5-HT 1 receptors reported here is discussed in correlation with the distribution of serotoninergic neurons and fibers, the related anatomical pathways and the effects which appear to be mediated by these sites. (Auth.)

  15. Global and regional brain atrophy is associated with low or retrograde facial vein flow in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Jakimovski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Increased collateral facial vein (FV flow may be associated with structural damage in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. The objective was to assess differences in FV flow and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-derived outcomes in MS. The study included 136 MS patients who underwent neck and head vascular system examination by echo-color Doppler. Inflammatory MRI markers were assessed on a 3T MRI using a semi-automated edge detection and contouring/ thresholding technique. MRI volumetric outcomes of whole brain (WB, gray matter (GM, white matter (WM, cortex, ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (vCSF, deep gray matter (DGM, thalamus, caudate nucleus (CN, putamen, globus pallidus (GP, and hippocampus were calculated. Independent t-test and ANCOVA, adjusted for age, were used to compare groups based on FV flow quartiles. Thirty-four MS patients with FV flow ≤327.8 mL/min (lowest quartile had significantly lower WB (P327.8 mL/min (higher quartiles. There were no differences in T1-, T2- and gadolinium- enhancing lesion volumes between the quartile groups. The lack of an association between FV blood flow and inflammatory MRI measures in MS patients, but an association with brain atrophy, suggests that the severity of neurodegenerative process may be related to hemodynamic alterations. MS patients with more advanced global and regional brain atrophy showed low or retrograde FV volume flow.

  16. Application of a data-mining method based on Bayesian networks to lesion-deficit analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herskovits, Edward H.; Gerring, Joan P.

    2003-01-01

    Although lesion-deficit analysis (LDA) has provided extensive information about structure-function associations in the human brain, LDA has suffered from the difficulties inherent to the analysis of spatial data, i.e., there are many more variables than subjects, and data may be difficult to model using standard distributions, such as the normal distribution. We herein describe a Bayesian method for LDA; this method is based on data-mining techniques that employ Bayesian networks to represent structure-function associations. These methods are computationally tractable, and can represent complex, nonlinear structure-function associations. When applied to the evaluation of data obtained from a study of the psychiatric sequelae of traumatic brain injury in children, this method generates a Bayesian network that demonstrates complex, nonlinear associations among lesions in the left caudate, right globus pallidus, right side of the corpus callosum, right caudate, and left thalamus, and subsequent development of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, confirming and extending our previous statistical analysis of these data. Furthermore, analysis of simulated data indicates that methods based on Bayesian networks may be more sensitive and specific for detecting associations among categorical variables than methods based on chi-square and Fisher exact statistics.

  17. Evaluation of the efficacy of deep brain stimulation in the surgical treatment of cervical dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calheiros-Trigo, Francisca; Linhares, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus internus (GPi) is a promising therapeutic option for patients with medically refractory dystonia. We present the results after 1 year of DBS of the GPi in 4 patients with cervical dystonia. Four patients with medically refractory cervical dystonia who underwent stereotactic pallidal DBS surgery between June 2010 and November 2011 were included in this retrospective study. Preoperative and postoperative evaluations at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery were performed using the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS). The 4 patients experienced a sustained improvement, with a mean TWSTRS reduction of 74.25%, at 12 months follow-up. Disability improved by 80.5% (mean) at 1 year follow-up. No stimulation-related side effects were reported. Pallidal DBS is a valid and effective second-line treatment for patients with cervical focal dystonia. Our results support its use in patients with an insufficient response to medical treatment. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Psychopathic traits modulate brain responses to drug cues in incarcerated offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lora M Cope

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent neuroscientific evidence indicates that psychopathy is associated with abnormal function and structure in limbic and paralimbic areas. Psychopathy and substance use disorders are highly comorbid, but clinical experience suggests that psychopaths abuse drugs for different reasons than non-psychopaths, and that psychopaths do not typically experience withdrawal and craving upon becoming incarcerated. These neurobiological abnormalities may be related to psychopaths’ different motivations for – and symptoms of – drug use. This study examined the modulatory effect of psychopathic traits on the neurobiological craving response to pictorial drug stimuli. Drug-related pictures and neutral pictures were presented and rated by participants while hemodynamic activity was monitored using functional magnetic resonance imaging. These data were collected at two correctional facilities in New Mexico using the Mind Research Network mobile magnetic resonance imaging system. The sample comprised 137 incarcerated adult males and females (93 females with histories of substance dependence. The outcome of interest was the relation between psychopathy scores (using the Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised and hemodynamic activity associated with viewing drug-related pictures versus neutral pictures. There was a negative association between psychopathy scores and hemodynamic activity for viewing drug-related cues in the anterior cingulate, posterior cingulate, hippocampus, amygdala, caudate, globus pallidus, and parts of the prefrontal cortex. Psychopathic traits modulate the neurobiological craving response and suggest that individual differences are important for understanding and treating substance abuse.

  19. Beyond the midbrain atrophy: wide spectrum of structural MRI finding in cases of pathologically proven progressive supranuclear palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Keita; Tokumaru, Aya M.; Shimoji, Keigo; Murayama, Shigeo; Kanemaru, Kazutomi; Morimoto, Satoru; Aiba, Ikuko; Nakagawa, Motoo; Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Shimohira, Masashi; Shibamoto, Yuta; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Hashizume, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    Recently, it has been recognized that pathologically proven progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) cases are classified into various clinical subtypes with non-uniform symptoms and imaging findings. This article reviews essential imaging findings, general information, and advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for PSP and presents these MRI findings of pathologically proven typical and atypical PSP cases for educational purposes. With the review of literatures, notably including atypical pathologically proven PSP cases, MRI and clinical information of 15 pathologically proven typical and atypical PSP cases were retrospectively evaluated. In addition to typical symptoms, PSP patients can exhibit atypical symptoms including levodopa-responsive parkinsonism, pure akinesia, non-fluent aphasia, corticobasal syndrome, and predominant cerebellar ataxia. As well as clinical symptoms, the degree of midbrain atrophy, a well-known imaging hallmark, is not consistent in atypical PSP cases. This fact has important implications for the limitation of midbrain atrophy as a diagnostic imaging biomarker of PSP pathology. Additional evaluation of other imaging findings including various regional atrophies of the globus pallidus, frontal lobe, cerebral peduncle, and superior cerebellar peduncle is essential for the diagnosis of atypical PSP cases. It is necessary for radiologists to recognize the wide clinical and radiological spectra of typical and atypical PSP cases. (orig.)

  20. Contribution of subcortical structures to cognition assessed with invasive electrophysiology in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F Münte

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Implantation of deep brain stimulation (DBS electrodes via stereotactic neurosurgery has become a standard procedure for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. More recently, the range of neuropsychiatric conditions and the possible target structures suitable for DBS have greatly increased. The former include obsessive compulsive disease, depression, obesity, tremor, dystonia, Tourette’s syndrome and cluster-headache. In this article we argue that several of the target structures for DBS (nucleus accumbens, posterior inferior hypothalamus, nucleus subthalamicus, nuclei in the thalamus, globus pallidus internus, nucleus pedunculopontinus are located at strategic positions with brain circuits related to motivational behaviors, learning, and motor regulation. Recording from DBS electrodes either during the operation or post-operatively from externalized leads while the patient is performing cognitive tasks tapping the functions of the respective circuits provides a new window on the brain mechanisms underlying these functions. This is exemplified by a study of a patient suffering from obsessive-compulsive disease from whom we recorded in a flanker task designed to tap action monitoring processes while he received a DBS electrode in the right nucleus accumbens. Clear error-related modulations were obtained from the target structure, demonstrating a role of the nucleus accumbens in action monitoring. Based on recent conceptualizations of several different functional loops and on neuroimaging results we suggest further lines of research using this new window on brain functions.

  1. Germinoma with Involvement of Midline and Off-Midline Intracranial Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Graciela Loto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Germinomas are malignant intracranial germ tumors, usually found in suprasellar regions. Less than 10% are localized in off-middle structures, and synchronous involvement of both structures has only exceptionally been published. A case of an 18-year-old male patient with progressive right-sided hemiparesis and panhypopituitarism was reviewed. Brain MRI showed a solid mass involving pituitary and hypothalamus with thickening of pituitary stalk, high intensity lesions on T2-weighted imaging in left internal capsule, caudate nucleus, globus pallidus, and mild atrophy of the left internal capsule and cerebral peduncle. Nonadenomatous lesions were considered in the differential diagnosis. Alfa-fetoprotein (AFP levels were negative in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, while β-human chorionic gonadotrophin (β-HCG levels were slightly increased in CSF. A transsphenoidal biopsy identified a germinoma. Four cycles of chemotherapy with bleomicine, etoposide, and cysplatin were given, followed by radiotherapy, but patients died due to a recidiva. Conclusion. Germinoma must be considered in patients with insipidus diabetes with a sellar mass with thickening of pituitary stalk; and ectopic germinoma must be suspected in patients with slowly progressive hemiparesis with cerebral hemiatrophy. Even with a rare condition, colocalization of midline and off-midline germinoma must be suspected in the presence of these typical signs of both localizations.

  2. [Motivation and Emotional States: Structural Systemic, Neurochemical, Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyan, A S

    2016-01-01

    The structural, systemic, neurochemical, molecular and cellular mechanisms of organization and coding motivation and emotional states are describe. The GABA and glutamatergic synaptic systems of basal ganglia form a neural network and participate in the implementation of voluntary behavior. Neuropeptides, neurohormones and paracrine neuromodulators involved in the organization of motivation and emotional states, integrated with synaptic systems, controlled by neural networks and organizing goal-directed behavior. Structural centers for united and integrated of information in voluntary and goal-directed behavior are globus pallidus. Substantia nigra pars reticulata switches the information from corticobasal networks to thalamocortical networks, induces global dopaminergic (DA) signal and organize interaction of mesolimbic and nigostriatnoy DA systems controlled by prefrontal and motor cortex. Together with the motor cortex, substantia nigra displays information in the brainstem and spinal cord to implementation of behavior. Motivation states are formed in the interaction of neurohormonal and neuropeptide systems by monoaminergic systems of brain. Emotional states are formed by monoaminergic systems of the mid-brain, where the leading role belongs to the mesolimbic DA system. The emotional and motivation state of the encoded specific epigenetic molecular and chemical pattern of neuron.

  3. Glutaric aciduria type 1: neuroimaging features with clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammad, Shaimaa Abdelsattar; Ahmed, Khaled A. [Ain-Shams University, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo (Egypt); Abdelkhalek, Heba Salah; Zaki, Osama K. [Ain-Shams University, Medical Genetics Unit, Pediatric Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo (Egypt)

    2015-10-15

    Glutaric aciduria type 1 is a rare neurometabolic disease with high morbidity. To describe the MR imaging abnormalities in glutaric aciduria type 1 and to identify any association between the clinical and imaging features. MRI scans of 29 children (mean age: 16.9 months) with confirmed diagnosis of glutaric aciduria type 1 were retrospectively reviewed. Gray matter and white matter scores were calculated based on a previously published pattern-recognition approach of assessing leukoencephalopathies. Hippocampal formation and opercular topography were assessed in relation to the known embryological basis. MRI scores were correlated with morbidity score. The most consistent MRI abnormality was widened operculum with dilatation of the subarachnoid spaces surrounding underdeveloped frontotemporal lobes. Incomplete hippocampal inversion was also seen. The globus pallidus was the most frequently involved gray matter structure (86%). In addition to the central tegmental tract, white matter abnormalities preferentially involved the central and periventricular regions. The morbidity score correlated with the gray matter abnormality score (P = 0.004). Patients with dystonia had higher gray matter and morbidity scores. Morbidity is significantly correlated with abnormality of gray matter, rather than white matter, whether secondary to acute encephalopathic crisis or insidious onset disease. (orig.)

  4. Cognitive Implications of Deep Gray Matter Iron in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, E; Kmech, J A; Cobzas, D; Sun, H; Seres, P; Blevins, G; Wilman, A H

    2017-05-01

    Deep gray matter iron accumulation is increasingly recognized in association with multiple sclerosis and can be measured in vivo with MR imaging. The cognitive implications of this pathology are not well-understood, especially vis-à-vis deep gray matter atrophy. Our aim was to investigate the relationships between cognition and deep gray matter iron in MS by using 2 MR imaging-based iron-susceptibility measures. Forty patients with multiple sclerosis (relapsing-remitting, n = 16; progressive, n = 24) and 27 healthy controls were imaged at 4.7T by using the transverse relaxation rate and quantitative susceptibility mapping. The transverse relaxation rate and quantitative susceptibility mapping values and volumes (atrophy) of the caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and thalamus were determined by multiatlas segmentation. Cognition was assessed with the Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Tests. Relationships between cognition and deep gray matter iron were examined by hierarchic regressions. Compared with controls, patients showed reduced memory ( P processing speed ( P = .02) and smaller putamen ( P deep gray matter iron accumulation in the current multiple sclerosis cohort. Atrophy and iron accumulation in deep gray matter both have negative but separable relationships to cognition in multiple sclerosis. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  5. Swallowing and deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troche, Michelle S.; Brandimore, Alexandra E.; Foote, Kelly D.; Okun, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to assess the current state of the literature on the topic of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and its effects on swallowing function in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Pubmed, Cochrane review, and web of science searches were completed on all articles addressing DBS that contained a swallowing outcome measure. Outcome measures included the penetration/aspiration scale, pharyngeal transit time, oropharyngeal residue, drooling, aspiration pneumonia, death, hyolaryngeal excursion, epiglottic inversion, UPDRS scores, and presence of coughing/throat clearing during meals. The search identified 13 studies specifically addressing the effects of DBS on swallowing. Critical assessment of the 13 identified peer-reviewed publications revealed nine studies employing an experimental design, (e.g. “on” vs. “off”, pre- vs. post-DBS) and four case reports. None of the nine experimental studies were found to identify clinically significant improvement or decline in swallowing function with DBS. Despite these findings, several common threads were identified across experimental studies and will be examined in this review. Additionally, available data demonstrate that, although subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation has been considered to cause more impairment to swallowing function than globus pallidus internus (GPi) stimulation, there are no experimental studies directly comparing swallowing function in STN vs. GPi. Moreover, there has been no comparison of unilateral vs. bilateral DBS surgery and the coincident effects on swallowing function. This review includes a critical analysis of all experimental studies and discusses methodological issues that should be addressed in future studies. PMID:23726461

  6. Changing pattern in the basal ganglia: motor switching under reduced dopaminergic drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Vincenzo G.; Rigoli, Francesco; Stenner, Max-Philipp; Zaehle, Tino; Hirth, Frank; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    Action selection in the basal ganglia is often described within the framework of a standard model, associating low dopaminergic drive with motor suppression. Whilst powerful, this model does not explain several clinical and experimental data, including varying therapeutic efficacy across movement disorders. We tested the predictions of this model in patients with Parkinson’s disease, on and off subthalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS), focussing on adaptive sensory-motor responses to a changing environment and maintenance of an action until it is no longer suitable. Surprisingly, we observed prolonged perseverance under on-stimulation, and high inter-individual variability in terms of the motor selections performed when comparing the two conditions. To account for these data, we revised the standard model exploring its space of parameters and associated motor functions and found that, depending on effective connectivity between external and internal parts of the globus pallidus and saliency of the sensory input, a low dopaminergic drive can result in increased, dysfunctional, motor switching, besides motor suppression. This new framework provides insight into the biophysical mechanisms underlying DBS, allowing a description in terms of alteration of the signal-to-baseline ratio in the indirect pathway, which better account of known electrophysiological data in comparison with the standard model. PMID:27004463

  7. Shifted dynamic interactions between subcortical nuclei and inferior frontal gyri during response preparation in persistent developmental stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, F Luise; Auer, Tibor; Helms, Gunther; Paulus, Walter; Frahm, Jens; Sommer, Martin; Neef, Nicole E

    2018-01-01

    Persistent developmental stuttering is associated with basal ganglia dysfunction or dopamine dysregulation. Here, we studied whole-brain functional connectivity to test how basal ganglia structures coordinate and reorganize sensorimotor brain networks in stuttering. To this end, adults who stutter and fluent speakers (control participants) performed a response anticipation paradigm in the MRI scanner. The preparation of a manual Go/No-Go response reliably produced activity in the basal ganglia and thalamus and particularly in the substantia nigra. Strikingly, in adults who stutter, substantia nigra activity correlated positively with stuttering severity. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses yielded altered task-related network formations in adults who stutter compared to fluent speakers. Specifically, in adults who stutter, the globus pallidus and the thalamus showed increased network synchronization with the inferior frontal gyrus. This implies dynamic shifts in the response preparation-related network organization through the basal ganglia in the context of a non-speech motor task in stuttering. Here we discuss current findings in the traditional framework of how D1 and D2 receptor activity shapes focused movement selection, thereby suggesting a disproportional involvement of the direct and the indirect pathway in stuttering.

  8. Neuroanatomical pathways underlying the effects of hypothalamo-hypophysial-adrenal hormones on exploratory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Robert; Strazielle, Catherine

    2017-07-26

    When injected via the intracerebroventricular route, corticosterone-releasing hormone (CRH) reduced exploration in the elevated plus-maze, the center region of the open-field, and the large chamber in the defensive withdrawal test. The anxiogenic action of CRH in the elevated plus-maze also occurred when infused in the basolateral amygdala, ventral hippocampus, lateral septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, nucleus accumbens, periaqueductal grey, and medial frontal cortex. The anxiogenic action of CRH in the defensive withdrawal test was reproduced when injected in the locus coeruleus, while the amygdala, hippocampus, lateral septum, nucleus accumbens, and lateral globus pallidus contribute to center zone exploration in the open-field. In addition to elevated plus-maze and open-field tests, the amygdala appears as a target region for CRH-mediated anxiety in the elevated T-maze. Thus, the amygdala is the principal brain region identified with these three tests, and further research must identify the neural circuits underlying this form of anxiety.

  9. Impact of perinatal asphyxia on the GABAergic and locomotor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Berg, W D J; Kwaijtaal, M; de Louw, A J A; Lissone, N P A; Schmitz, C; Faull, R L M; Blokland, A; Blanco, C E; Steinbusch, H W M

    2003-01-01

    Perinatal asphyxia can cause neuronal loss and depletion of neurotransmitters within the striatum. The striatum plays an important role in motor control, sensorimotor integration and learning. In the present study we investigated whether perinatal asphyxia leads to motor deficits related to striatal damage, and in particular to the loss of GABAergic neurons. Perinatal asphyxia was induced in time-pregnant Wistar rats on the day of delivery by placing the uterus horns, containing the pups, in a 37 degrees C water bath for 20 min. Three motor performance tasks (open field, grip test and walking pattern) were performed at 3 and 6 weeks of age. Antibodies against calbindin and parvalbumin were used to stain GABAergic striatal projection neurons and interneurons, respectively. The motor tests revealed subtle effects of perinatal asphyxia, i.e. small decrease in motor activity. Analysis of the walking pattern revealed an increase in stride width at 6 weeks of age after perinatal asphyxia. Furthermore, a substantial loss of calbindin-immunoreactive (-22%) and parvalbumin-immunoreactive (-43%) cells was found in the striatum following perinatal asphyxia at two months of age. GABA(A) receptor autoradiography revealed no changes in GABA binding activity within the striatum, globus pallidus or substantia nigra. We conclude that perinatal asphyxia resulted in a loss of GABAergic projection neurons and interneurons in the striatum without alteration of GABA(A) receptor affinity. Despite a considerable loss of striatal neurons, only minor deficits in motor performance were found after perinatal asphyxia.

  10. Gadolinium deposition in the brain: association with various GBCAs using a generalized additive model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sohi; Lee, Ho-Joon; Han, Kyunghwa; Park, Yae-Won; Choi, Yoon Seong; Ahn, Sung Soo; Kim, Jinna; Lee, Seung-Koo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    To determine the relationship between the number of administrations of various gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) and increased T1 signal intensity in the globus pallidus (GP) and dentate nucleus (DN). This retrospective study included 122 patients who underwent double-dose GBCA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Two radiologists calculated GP-to-thalamus (TH) signal intensity ratio, DN-to-pons signal intensity ratio and relative change (R{sub change}) between the baseline and final examinations. Interobserver agreement was evaluated. The relationships between R{sub change} and several factors, including number of each GBCA administrations, were analysed using a generalized additive model. Six patients (4.9%) received linear GBCAs (mean 20.8 number of administration; range 15-30), 44 patients (36.1%) received macrocyclic GBCAs (mean 26.1; range 14-51) and 72 patients (59.0%) received both types of GBCAs (mean 31.5; range 12-65). Interobserver agreement was almost perfect (0.99; 95% CI: 0.99-0.99). R{sub change} (DN:pons) was associated with gadodiamide (p = 0.006) and gadopentetate dimeglumine (p < 0.001), but not with other GBCAs. R{sub change} (GP:TH) was not associated with GBCA administration. Previous administration of linear agents gadoiamide and gadopentetate dimeglumine is associated with increased T1 signal intensity in the DN, whereas macrocyclic GBCAs do not show an association. (orig.)

  11. Radiological imaging features of the basal ganglia that may predict progression to hemicraniectomy in large territory middle cerebral artery infarct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mian, Asim Z.; Edasery, David; Sakai, Osamu; Mustafa Qureshi, M. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Holsapple, James [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Nguyen, Thanh [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Predicting which patients are at risk for hemicraniectomy can be helpful for triage and can help preserve neurologic function if detected early. We evaluated basal ganglia imaging predictors for early hemicraniectomy in patients with large territory anterior circulation infarct. This retrospective study evaluated patients with ischemic infarct admitted from January 2005 to July 2011. Patients with malignant cerebral edema refractory to medical therapy or with herniating signs such as depressed level of consciousness, anisocoria, and contralateral leg weakness were triaged to hemicraniectomy. Admission images were reviewed for presence of caudate, lentiform nucleus (putamen and globus pallidus), or basal ganglia (caudate + lentiform nucleus) infarction. Thirty-one patients with large territory MCA infarct, 10 (32%), underwent hemicraniectomy. Infarction of the caudate nucleus (9/10 vs 6/21, p = 0.002) or basal ganglia (5/10 vs 2/21, p = 0.02) predicted progression to hemicraniectomy. Infarction of the lentiform nucleus only did not predict progression to hemicraniectomy. Sensitivity for patients who did and did not have hemicraniectomy were 50% (5/10) and 90.5% (19/21). For caudate nucleus and caudate plus lentiform nucleus infarcts, the crude- and age-adjusted odds of progression to hemicraniectomy were 9.5 (1.4-64.3) and 6.6 (0.78-55.4), respectively. Infarction of the caudate nucleus or basal ganglia correlated with patients progressing to hemicraniectomy. Infarction of the lentiform nucleus alone did not. (orig.)

  12. An example of the application of Mössbauer spectroscopy for determination of concentration of iron in lyophilized brain tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rzepecka Patrycja

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mössbauer spectroscopy is not routinely used for the determination of the concentration of iron. However, as this method does not need any pre-treatment of samples before measurements, it may be of extreme importance for the assessment of iron in samples, which can then be used for further investigations. Biological samples are a good example, however, as the concentrations of iron are very low in these, it is important to exclude possible artefacts from the background spectrum related to iron present in the counter and cryostat windows. The aim of this study was to compare two methods of determination of the amounts of iron in investigated sample: one, in which the background spectrum was subtracted from the sample spectrum measured, and the other, in which the obtained non-elaborated spectrum was fitted with two doublets - a doublet for the measured sample and a doublet for the background spectrum. Three samples containing known amounts of natural iron (400, 800 and 1600 μg and a sample of lyophilized human brain tissue obtained from globus pallidus were assessed. Both methods led to the creation of a very good calibration curve with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. Although both methods gave similar results for the concentration of iron in the sample, the subtraction of the background spectrum had a significantly lower error of the final result.

  13. Common therapeutic mechanisms of pallidal deep brain stimulation for hypo- and hyperkinetic movement disorders

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    Iriki, Atsushi; Isoda, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in cortico-basal ganglia (CBG) networks can cause a variety of movement disorders ranging from hypokinetic disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), to hyperkinetic conditions, such as Tourette syndrome (TS). Each condition is characterized by distinct patterns of abnormal neural discharge (dysrhythmia) at both the local single-neuron level and the global network level. Despite divergent etiologies, behavioral phenotypes, and neurophysiological profiles, high-frequency deep brain stimulation (HF-DBS) in the basal ganglia has been shown to be effective for both hypo- and hyperkinetic disorders. The aim of this review is to compare and contrast the electrophysiological hallmarks of PD and TS phenotypes in nonhuman primates and discuss why the same treatment (HF-DBS targeted to the globus pallidus internus, GPi-DBS) is capable of ameliorating both symptom profiles. Recent studies have shown that therapeutic GPi-DBS entrains the spiking of neurons located in the vicinity of the stimulating electrode, resulting in strong stimulus-locked modulations in firing probability with minimal changes in the population-scale firing rate. This stimulus effect normalizes/suppresses the pathological firing patterns and dysrhythmia that underlie specific phenotypes in both the PD and TS models. We propose that the elimination of pathological states via stimulus-driven entrainment and suppression, while maintaining thalamocortical network excitability within a normal physiological range, provides a common therapeutic mechanism through which HF-DBS permits information transfer for purposive motor behavior through the CBG while ameliorating conditions with widely different symptom profiles. PMID:26180116

  14. Abnormal neuronal activity in Tourette syndrome and its modulation using deep brain stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelashvili, Michal; Loewenstern, Yocheved

    2015-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a common childhood-onset disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics that are typically accompanied by a multitude of comorbid symptoms. Pharmacological treatment options are limited, which has led to the exploration of deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a possible treatment for severe cases. Multiple lines of evidence have linked TS with abnormalities in the motor and limbic cortico-basal ganglia (CBG) pathways. Neurophysiological data have only recently started to slowly accumulate from multiple sources: noninvasive imaging and electrophysiological techniques, invasive electrophysiological recordings in TS patients undergoing DBS implantation surgery, and animal models of the disorder. These converging sources point to system-level physiological changes throughout the CBG pathway, including both general altered baseline neuronal activity patterns and specific tic-related activity. DBS has been applied to different regions along the motor and limbic pathways, primarily to the globus pallidus internus, thalamic nuclei, and nucleus accumbens. In line with the findings that also draw on the more abundant application of DBS to Parkinson's disease, this stimulation is assumed to result in changes in the neuronal firing patterns and the passage of information through the stimulated nuclei. We present an overview of recent experimental findings on abnormal neuronal activity associated with TS and the changes in this activity following DBS. These findings are then discussed in the context of current models of CBG function in the normal state, during TS, and finally in the wider context of DBS in CBG-related disorders. PMID:25925326

  15. MRI-Based Multiscale Model for Electromagnetic Analysis in the Human Head with Implanted DBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ida Iacono

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an established procedure for the treatment of movement and affective disorders. Patients with DBS may benefit from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to evaluate injuries or comorbidities. However, the MRI radio-frequency (RF energy may cause excessive tissue heating particularly near the electrode. This paper studies how the accuracy of numerical modeling of the RF field inside a DBS patient varies with spatial resolution and corresponding anatomical detail of the volume surrounding the electrodes. A multiscale model (MS was created by an atlas-based segmentation using a 1 mm3 head model (mRes refined in the basal ganglia by a 200 μm2 ex-vivo dataset. Four DBS electrodes targeting the left globus pallidus internus were modeled. Electromagnetic simulations at 128 MHz showed that the peak of the electric field of the MS doubled (18.7 kV/m versus 9.33 kV/m and shifted 6.4 mm compared to the mRes model. Additionally, the MS had a sixfold increase over the mRes model in peak-specific absorption rate (SAR of 43.9 kW/kg versus 7 kW/kg. The results suggest that submillimetric resolution and improved anatomical detail in the model may increase the accuracy of computed electric field and local SAR around the tip of the implant.

  16. Deep Brain Stimulation for Movement Disorders of Basal Ganglia Origin: Restoring Function or Functionality?

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    Wichmann, Thomas; DeLong, Mahlon R

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is highly effective for both hypo- and hyperkinetic movement disorders of basal ganglia origin. The clinical use of DBS is, in part, empiric, based on the experience with prior surgical ablative therapies for these disorders, and, in part, driven by scientific discoveries made decades ago. In this review, we consider anatomical and functional concepts of the basal ganglia relevant to our understanding of DBS mechanisms, as well as our current understanding of the pathophysiology of two of the most commonly DBS-treated conditions, Parkinson's disease and dystonia. Finally, we discuss the proposed mechanism(s) of action of DBS in restoring function in patients with movement disorders. The signs and symptoms of the various disorders appear to result from signature disordered activity in the basal ganglia output, which disrupts the activity in thalamocortical and brainstem networks. The available evidence suggests that the effects of DBS are strongly dependent on targeting sensorimotor portions of specific nodes of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical motor circuit, that is, the subthalamic nucleus and the internal segment of the globus pallidus. There is little evidence to suggest that DBS in patients with movement disorders restores normal basal ganglia functions (e.g., their role in movement or reinforcement learning). Instead, it appears that high-frequency DBS replaces the abnormal basal ganglia output with a more tolerable pattern, which helps to restore the functionality of downstream networks.

  17. Optogenetic Activation of the Sensorimotor Cortex Reveals "Local Inhibitory and Global Excitatory" Inputs to the Basal Ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Mitsunori; Sano, Hiromi; Sato, Shigeki; Ogura, Mitsuhiro; Mushiake, Hajime; Chiken, Satomi; Nakao, Naoyuki; Nambu, Atsushi

    2017-12-01

    To understand how information from different cortical areas is integrated and processed through the cortico-basal ganglia pathways, we used optogenetics to systematically stimulate the sensorimotor cortex and examined basal ganglia activity. We utilized Thy1-ChR2-YFP transgenic mice, in which channelrhodopsin 2 is robustly expressed in layer V pyramidal neurons. We applied light spots to the sensorimotor cortex in a grid pattern and examined neuronal responses in the globus pallidus (GP) and entopeduncular nucleus (EPN), which are the relay and output nuclei of the basal ganglia, respectively. Light stimulation typically induced a triphasic response composed of early excitation, inhibition, and late excitation in GP/EPN neurons. Other response patterns lacking 1 or 2 of the components were also observed. The distribution of the cortical sites whose stimulation induced a triphasic response was confined, whereas stimulation of the large surrounding areas induced early and late excitation without inhibition. Our results suggest that cortical inputs to the GP/EPN are organized in a "local inhibitory and global excitatory" manner. Such organization seems to be the neuronal basis for information processing through the cortico-basal ganglia pathways, that is, releasing and terminating necessary information at an appropriate timing, while simultaneously suppressing other unnecessary information. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Effective deep brain stimulation suppresses low frequency network oscillations in the basal ganglia by regularizing neural firing patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, George C.; So, Rosa Q.; Hilliard, Justin D; Lopomo, Paola; Grill, Warren M.

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The effects of DBS depend strongly on stimulation frequency: high frequencies (>90Hz) improve motor symptoms, while low frequencies (basal ganglia were studied in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rat model of PD. Only high frequency DBS reversed motor symptoms and the effectiveness of DBS depended strongly on stimulation frequency in a manner reminiscent of its clinical effects in persons with PD. Quantification of single-unit activity in the globus pallidus externa (GPe) and substantia nigra reticulata (SNr) revealed that high frequency DBS, but not low frequency DBS, reduced pathological low frequency oscillations (~9Hz) and entrained neurons to fire at the stimulation frequency. Similarly, the coherence between simultaneously recorded pairs of neurons within and across GPe and SNr shifted from the pathological low frequency band to the stimulation frequency during high frequency DBS, but not during low frequency DBS. The changes in firing patterns in basal ganglia neurons were not correlated with changes in firing rate. These results indicate that high frequency DBS is more effective than low frequency DBS, not as a result of changes in firing rate, but rather due to its ability to replace pathological low frequency network oscillations with a regularized pattern of neuronal firing. PMID:23136407

  19. Effective deep brain stimulation suppresses low-frequency network oscillations in the basal ganglia by regularizing neural firing patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, George C; So, Rosa Q; Hilliard, Justin D; Lopomo, Paola; Grill, Warren M

    2012-11-07

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). The effects of DBS depend strongly on stimulation frequency: high frequencies (>90 Hz) improve motor symptoms, while low frequencies (basal ganglia were studied in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rat model of PD. Only high-frequency DBS reversed motor symptoms, and the effectiveness of DBS depended strongly on stimulation frequency in a manner reminiscent of its clinical effects in persons with PD. Quantification of single-unit activity in the globus pallidus externa (GPe) and substantia nigra reticulata (SNr) revealed that high-frequency DBS, but not low-frequency DBS, reduced pathological low-frequency oscillations (∼9 Hz) and entrained neurons to fire at the stimulation frequency. Similarly, the coherence between simultaneously recorded pairs of neurons within and across GPe and SNr shifted from the pathological low-frequency band to the stimulation frequency during high-frequency DBS, but not during low-frequency DBS. The changes in firing patterns in basal ganglia neurons were not correlated with changes in firing rate. These results indicate that high-frequency DBS is more effective than low-frequency DBS, not as a result of changes in firing rate, but rather due to its ability to replace pathological low-frequency network oscillations with a regularized pattern of neuronal firing.

  20. The impact of multichannel microelectrode recording (MER) in deep brain stimulation of the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinfe, Thomas M; Vesper, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basal ganglia (Ncl. subthalamicus, Ncl. ventralis intermedius thalami, globus pallidus internus) has become an evidence-based and well-established treatment option in otherwise refractory movement disorders. The Ncl. subthalamicus (STN) is the target of choice in Parkinson's disease.However, a considerable discussion is currently ongoing with regard to the necessity for micro-electrode recording (MER) in DBS surgery.The present review provides an overview on deep brain stimulation and (MER) of the STN in patients with Parkinson's disease. Detailed description is given concerning the multichannel MER systems nowadays available for DBS of the basal ganglia, especially of the STN, as a useful tool for target refinement. Furthermore, an overview is given of the historical aspects, spatial mapping of the STN by MER, and its impact for accuracy and precision in current functional stereotactic neurosurgery.The pros concerning target refinement by MER means on the one hand, and cons including increased bleeding risk, increased operation time, local or general anesthesia, and single versus multichannel microelectrode recording are discussed in detail. Finally, the authors favor the use of MER with intraoperative testing combined with imaging to achieve a more precise electrode placement, aiming to ameliorate clinical outcome in therapy-resistant movement disorders.

  1. Deep brain stimulation changes basal ganglia output nuclei firing pattern in the dystonic hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblois, Arthur; Reese, René; Labarre, David; Hamann, Melanie; Richter, Angelika; Boraud, Thomas; Meissner, Wassilios G

    2010-05-01

    Dystonia is a heterogeneous syndrome of movement disorders characterized by involuntary muscle contractions leading to abnormal movements and postures. While medical treatment is often ineffective, deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the internal pallidum improves dystonia. Here, we studied the impact of DBS in the entopeduncular nucleus (EP), the rodent equivalent of the human globus pallidus internus, on basal ganglia output in the dt(sz)-hamster, a well-characterized model of dystonia by extracellular recordings. Previous work has shown that EP-DBS improves dystonic symptoms in dt(sz)-hamsters. We report that EP-DBS changes firing pattern in the EP, most neurons switching to a less regular firing pattern during DBS. In contrast, EP-DBS did not change the average firing rate of EP neurons. EP neurons display multiphasic responses to each stimulation impulse, likely underlying the disruption of their firing rhythm. Finally, neurons in the substantia nigra pars reticulata display similar responses to EP-DBS, supporting the idea that EP-DBS affects basal ganglia output activity through the activation of common afferent fibers. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A study on magnetic relaxation times of various organs and body fluids using superconducting magnetic resonance imaging system part I: measurement of relative signal intensity and T2 relaxation time in various portions of brain and cerebrospinal fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Ghi Jai; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Jae Ho; Han, Man Chang; Kim, Chu Wan

    1988-01-01

    This study was undertake to determine if routine clinical magnetic resonance imaging sequences using only two different repetition times (TRs) and with only two sequential echo times (TEs) can be used to measure reproducible relative signal intensity and T2 relaxation time for normal brain tissues and cerebrospinal fluid using a 2.0T superconducting system. In 47 patients 6 different anatomic sites were measured. For each anatomic location, the mean and standard deviation of these values were determined. On T1-weighted (SE 500msec/30msec) images, in globus pallidus and thalamus, of the CSF, cortical gray matter and retrobulbar fat tissue varied more, with a standard deviation of 11-14% on T1-weighted images. On T2-weighted (SE 3000msec/30msec and 3000msec/80msec) images, the relative signal intensity of all anatomic regions varied more than on T1-weighted images. The standard deviation of T2 relaxation times also varied from 10% (fat tissue) to 18% (CSF). These variations might be due to partial volume averaging, signal alteration of CSF secondary to CSF pulsatile motion, etc. Knowing that relative signal intensity and T2 relaxation times calculated from routine imaging sequences are reproducible in only limited area, these normal ranges can be used to investigate changes occurring in disease states of the limited regions.

  3. HTLV-I associated myelopathy with multiple spotty areas in cerebral white matter and brain stem by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Yasuo; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Yoshikawa, Hiroo; Yorifuji, Shirou; Tarui, Seiichiro

    1988-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman was admitted with complaints of urinary incontinence and gait disturbance, both of which had progressed slowly without any sign of remission. Family history was not contributory. Neurologically, extreme spasticity was recoginized in the lower limbs. Babinski sign was positive bilaterally. Flower-like atypical lymphocytes were seen in blood. Positive anti-HTLV-I antibody was confirmed in serum and spinal fluid by western blot. She was diagnosed as having HTLV-I associated myelopathy (HAM). CT reveald calcification in bilateral globus pallidus, and MRI revealed multiple spotty areas in cerebral white matter and brain stem, but no spinal cord lesion was detectable. Electrophysiologically, brain stem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) suggested the presence of bilateral brain stem lesions. Neither median nor posterior tibial nerve somatosensory evoked potentials were evoked, a finding suggesting the existence of spinal cord lesion. In this case, the lesion was not confined to spinal cord, it was also observed in brain stem and cerebral white matter. Such distinct lesions in cerebral white matter and brain stem have not been reported in patients with HAM. It is suggested that HTLV-I is probably associated with cerebral white matter and brain stem.

  4. CT and MRI findings of chorea associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Dongjin; Zhang Weidong; Wu Dingquan; Meng Lishi; Chen Jian

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the imaging diagnosis of chorea associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia by describing its CT and MR findings and correlating those findings with the clinical manifestations. Methods: The imaging findings and clinical data from 6 patients with chorea associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia were retrospectively analyzed. All 6 patients had unenhanced CT scans, 1 also had MR imaging examination. Three of 6 patients had follow-up CT scans and 1 of 3 patients had follow-up MR imaging studies. Results: CT studies of all 6 patients showed unilateral or bilateral hyperdense striatum. The putamen was involved in all 6 patients, the caudate nucleus or lateral portion of the globus pallidus were involved in 5 of all 6 patients. All 3 follow-up CT studies depicted a decreased or resolved hyperdensity of the abnormal striatum. T 1 -weighted MR images in 1 patient showed the hyperintense lesions of bilateral lentiform nuclei, T 2 -weighted MR images of the patient showed the hypointense lesions of the corresponding lentiform nuclei, and its follow-up MR images depicted invariable signal intensity of T 1 -weighted and T 2 -weighted images. In all patients, the chorea resolved within 2 to 6 days after treatment of the hyperglycemia. Conclusion: The characteristic imaging findings of chorea associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia can suggest an accurate diagnosis. (authors)

  5. The neural basis of unconditional love.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauregard, Mario; Courtemanche, Jérôme; Paquette, Vincent; St-Pierre, Evelyne Landry

    2009-05-15

    Functional neuroimaging studies have shown that romantic love and maternal love are mediated by regions specific to each, as well as overlapping regions in the brain's reward system. Nothing is known yet regarding the neural underpinnings of unconditional love. The main goal of this functional magnetic resonance imaging study was to identify the brain regions supporting this form of love. Participants were scanned during a control condition and an experimental condition. In the control condition, participants were instructed to simply look at a series of pictures depicting individuals with intellectual disabilities. In the experimental condition, participants were instructed to feel unconditional love towards the individuals depicted in a series of similar pictures. Significant loci of activation were found, in the experimental condition compared with the control condition, in the middle insula, superior parietal lobule, right periaqueductal gray, right globus pallidus (medial), right caudate nucleus (dorsal head), left ventral tegmental area and left rostro-dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. These results suggest that unconditional love is mediated by a distinct neural network relative to that mediating other emotions. This network contains cerebral structures known to be involved in romantic love or maternal love. Some of these structures represent key components of the brain's reward system.

  6. Effect of Deep Brain Stimulation on Parkinson's Nonmotor Symptoms following Unilateral DBS: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Hwynn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD management has traditionally focused largely on motor symptoms. Deep brain stimulation (DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN and globus pallidus internus (GPi are effective treatments for motor symptoms. Nonmotor symptoms (NMSs may also profoundly affect the quality of life. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate NMS changes pre- and post-DBS utilizing two recently developed questionnaires. Methods. NMS-Q (questionnaire and NMS-S (scale were administered to PD patients before/after unilateral DBS (STN/GPi targets. Results. Ten PD patients (9 STN implants, 1 GPi implant were included. The three most frequent NMS symptoms identified utilizing NMS-Q in pre-surgical patients were gastrointestinal (100%, sleep (100%, and urinary (90%. NMS sleep subscore significantly decreased (−1.6 points ± 1.8, =0.03. The three most frequent NMS symptoms identified in pre-surgical patients using NMS-S were gastrointestinal (90%, mood (80%, and cardiovascular (80%. The largest mean decrease of NMS scores was seen in miscellaneous symptoms (pain, anosmia, weight change, and sweating (−7 points ± 8.7, and cardiovascular/falls (−1.9, =0.02. Conclusion. Non-motor symptoms improved on two separate questionnaires following unilateral DBS for PD. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings and determine their clinical significance as well as to examine the strengths/weaknesses of each questionnaire/scale.

  7. Intermittent synchronization in a network of bursting neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choongseok; Rubchinsky, Leonid L.

    2011-09-01

    Synchronized oscillations in networks of inhibitory and excitatory coupled bursting neurons are common in a variety of neural systems from central pattern generators to human brain circuits. One example of the latter is the subcortical network of the basal ganglia, formed by excitatory and inhibitory bursters of the subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus, involved in motor control and affected in Parkinson's disease. Recent experiments have demonstrated the intermittent nature of the phase-locking of neural activity in this network. Here, we explore one potential mechanism to explain the intermittent phase-locking in a network. We simplify the network to obtain a model of two inhibitory coupled elements and explore its dynamics. We used geometric analysis and singular perturbation methods for dynamical systems to reduce the full model to a simpler set of equations. Mathematical analysis was completed using three slow variables with two different time scales. Intermittently, synchronous oscillations are generated by overlapped spiking which crucially depends on the geometry of the slow phase plane and the interplay between slow variables as well as the strength of synapses. Two slow variables are responsible for the generation of activity patterns with overlapped spiking, and the other slower variable enhances the robustness of an irregular and intermittent activity pattern. While the analyzed network and the explored mechanism of intermittent synchrony appear to be quite generic, the results of this analysis can be used to trace particular values of biophysical parameters (synaptic strength and parameters of calcium dynamics), which are known to be impacted in Parkinson's disease.

  8. A neural mass model of basal ganglia nuclei simulates pathological beta rhythm in Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Jiang; Liu, Chen; Li, Huiyan; Deng, Bin; Fietkiewicz, Chris; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2016-12-01

    An increase in beta oscillations within the basal ganglia nuclei has been shown to be associated with movement disorder, such as Parkinson's disease. The motor cortex and an excitatory-inhibitory neuronal network composed of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the external globus pallidus (GPe) are thought to play an important role in the generation of these oscillations. In this paper, we propose a neuron mass model of the basal ganglia on the population level that reproduces the Parkinsonian oscillations in a reciprocal excitatory-inhibitory network. Moreover, it is shown that the generation and frequency of these pathological beta oscillations are varied by the coupling strength and the intrinsic characteristics of the basal ganglia. Simulation results reveal that increase of the coupling strength induces the generation of the beta oscillation, as well as enhances the oscillation frequency. However, for the intrinsic properties of each nucleus in the excitatory-inhibitory network, the STN primarily influences the generation of the beta oscillation while the GPe mainly determines its frequency. Interestingly, describing function analysis applied on this model theoretically explains the mechanism of pathological beta oscillations.

  9. Analysis of simulataneous I-123-IPT/Tc-99m-HMPAO dual isotope brain SPECT in Parkinson's disease and normal volunteers using SPM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y. A.; Juh, R. H.; Kim, S. H.; Park, Y. H.; Lee, S. Y.; Sohn, H. S.; Chung, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    The basal ganglia are usually poorly delineated in Parkinson's diseases on IPT images. We have studied simultaneous dual isotope brain SPECTs using I-123-IPT and Tc-99m-HMPAO, in order to overcome this limitation of IPT imaging. 17 patients (M: 7, F: 10) with Parkinson's disease (Idiopathic parkison's disease: 12, Multiple system atrophy: 5) and 4 normal volunteers (N) underwent the dual isotope brain SPECT following simultaneously injection of 370 MBq Tc-99m-HMPAO (energy window: 130-146 keV) and 111 MBq I-123-IPT (energy window: 152-168 keV). We first obtained parameters of spatial normalization during spatial normalization of Tc-99m-HMPAO brain SPECT using SPECT template. Using these parameters, we could spatially normalized I-123-IPT brain PSECT to standard space, because these images were obtained simultaneously. The difference between each groups(N vs IPD, N vs MSA, IPD vs MSA) were compared with t-test (p<0.01). We demonstrated decreased perfusion in the head and body caudate and globus pallidus on MSA compared with IPD. No significant hypo- and hyperperfusion area was observed in the other analysis. The method proposed in this study can effectively evaluate the dopamine function, and is easily applicable to conventional gamma camera system with any dual energy window acquisition modes

  10. Multiplexed coding in the human basal ganglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, D. S.; Cerquetti, D.; Merello, M.

    2016-04-01

    A classic controversy in neuroscience is whether information carried by spike trains is encoded by a time averaged measure (e.g. a rate code), or by complex time patterns (i.e. a time code). Here we apply a tool to quantitatively analyze the neural code. We make use of an algorithm based on the calculation of the temporal structure function, which permits to distinguish what scales of a signal are dominated by a complex temporal organization or a randomly generated process. In terms of the neural code, this kind of analysis makes it possible to detect temporal scales at which a time patterns coding scheme or alternatively a rate code are present. Additionally, finding the temporal scale at which the correlation between interspike intervals fades, the length of the basic information unit of the code can be established, and hence the word length of the code can be found. We apply this algorithm to neuronal recordings obtained from the Globus Pallidus pars interna from a human patient with Parkinson’s disease, and show that a time pattern coding and a rate coding scheme co-exist at different temporal scales, offering a new example of multiplexed neuronal coding.

  11. Multiple-time-scale framework for understanding the progression of Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, D. S.; Gomez, F.; Ferrari, F. A. S.; Cerquetti, D.; Merello, M.; Viana, R.; Stoop, R.

    2014-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is marked by neurodegenerative processes that affect the pattern of discharge of basal ganglia neurons. The main features observed in the parkinsonian globus pallidus pars interna (GPi), a subdomain of the basal ganglia that is involved in the regulation of voluntary movement, are pathologically increased and synchronized neuronal activity. How these changes affect the implemented neuronal code is not well understood. Our experimental temporal structure-function analysis shows that in parkinsonian animals the rate-coding window of GPi neurons needed for the proper performance of voluntary actions is reduced. The model of the GPi network that we develop and discuss here reveals indeed that the size of the rate-coding window shrinks as the network activity increases and is expanded if the coupling strength among the neurons is increased. This leads to the novel interpretation that the pathological neuronal synchronization in Parkinson's disease in the GPi is the result of a collective attempt to counterbalance the shrinking of the rate-coding window due to increased activity in GPi neurons.

  12. Interaction between the 5-HT system and the basal ganglia: functional implication and therapeutic perspective in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguelez, Cristina; Morera-Herreras, Teresa; Torrecilla, Maria; Ruiz-Ortega, Jose A; Ugedo, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) has a multifaceted function in the modulation of information processing through the activation of multiple receptor families, including G-protein-coupled receptor subtypes (5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT4-7) and ligand-gated ion channels (5-HT3). The largest population of serotonergic neurons is located in the midbrain, specifically in the raphe nuclei. Although the medial and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) share common projecting areas, in the basal ganglia (BG) nuclei serotonergic innervations come mainly from the DRN. The BG are a highly organized network of subcortical nuclei composed of the striatum (caudate and putamen), subthalamic nucleus (STN), internal and external globus pallidus (or entopeduncular nucleus in rodents, GPi/EP and GPe) and substantia nigra (pars compacta, SNc, and pars reticulata, SNr). The BG are part of the cortico-BG-thalamic circuits, which play a role in many functions like motor control, emotion, and cognition and are critically involved in diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). This review provides an overview of serotonergic modulation of the BG at the functional level and a discussion of how this interaction may be relevant to treating PD and the motor complications induced by chronic treatment with L-DOPA.

  13. Chemical exchange saturation transfer MR imaging of Parkinson's disease at 3 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chunmei; Peng, Shuai; Wang, Rui; Chen, Min; Chen, Haibo; Su, Wen; Zhao, Xuna; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging to detect Parkinson's disease (PD) in patients at 3 Tesla. Twenty-seven PD patients (17 men and 10 women; age range, 54-77 years) and 22 age-matched normal controls (13 men and 9 women; age range, 55-73 years) were examined on a 3-Tesla MRI system. Magnetization transfer spectra with 31 different frequency offsets (-6 to 6 ppm) were acquired at two transverse slices of the head, including the basal ganglia and midbrain. One-way analysis of variance tests was used to compare the differences in CEST imaging signals between PD patients and normal controls. Total CEST signal between the offsets of 0 and 4 ppm in the substantia nigra was significantly lower in PD patients than in normal controls (P = 0.006), which could be associated with the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Protein-based CEST imaging signals at the offset of 3.5 ppm in the globus pallidus, putamen and caudate were significantly increased in PD patients, compared to normal controls (P < 0.001, P = 0.003, P < 0.001, respectively). CEST imaging signals could potentially serve as imaging biomarkers to aid in the non-invasive molecular diagnosis of PD. (orig.)

  14. The role of inhibition in generating and controlling Parkinson's disease oscillations in the basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind eKumar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD are commonly associated with slow oscillations and increased synchrony of neuronal activity in the basal ganglia. The neural mechanisms underlying this dynamic network dysfunction, however, are only poorly understood. Here, we show that the strength of inhibitory inputs from striatum to globus pallidus external (GPe is a key parameter controlling oscillations in the basal ganglia. Specifically, the increase in striatal activity observed in PD is sufficient to unleash the oscillations in the basal ganglia. This finding allows us to propose a unified explanation for different phenomena: absence of oscillation in the healthy state of the basal ganglia, oscillations in dopamine-depleted state and quenching of oscillations under deep brain stimulation (DBS. These novel insights help us to better understand and optimize the function of DBS protocols. Furthermore, studying the model behaviour under transient increase of activity of the striatal neurons projecting to the indirect pathway, we are able to account for both motor impairment in PD patients and for reduced response inhibition in DBS implanted patients.

  15. Levodopa Effect on Basal Ganglia Motor Circuit in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Jia-Rong; Chan, Piu; Wu, Tao

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of levodopa on the basal ganglia motor circuit (BGMC) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Thirty PD patients with asymmetrical bradykinesia and 30 control subjects were scanned using resting-state functional MRI. Functional connectivity of the BGMC was measured and compared before and after levodopa administration in patients with PD. The correlation between improvements in bradykinesia and changes in BGMC connectivity was examined. In the PD-off state (before medication), the posterior putamen and internal globus pallidus (GPi) had decreased connectivity while the subthalamic nucleus (STN) had enhanced connectivity within the BGMC relative to control subjects. Levodopa administration increased the connectivity of posterior putamen- and GPi-related networks but decreased the connectivity of STN-related networks. Improvements in bradykinesia were correlated with enhanced connectivity of the posterior putamen-cortical motor pathway and with decreased connectivity of the STN-thalamo-cortical motor pathway. In PD patients with asymmetrical bradykinesia, levodopa can partially normalize the connectivity of the BGMC with a larger effect on the more severely affected side. Moreover, the beneficial effect of levodopa on bradykinesia is associated with normalization of the striato-thalamo-cortical motor and STN-cortical motor pathways. Our findings inform the neural mechanism of levodopa treatment in PD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Nitric oxide modulation of the basal ganglia circuitry: therapeutic implication for Parkinson's disease and other motor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierucci, Massimo; Galati, Salvatore; Valentino, Mario; Di Matteo, Vincenzo; Benigno, Arcangelo; Pitruzzella, Alessandro; Muscat, Richard; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe

    2011-11-01

    Several recent studies have emphasized a crucial role for the nitrergic system in movement control and the pathophysiology of the basal ganglia (BG). These observations are supported by anatomical evidence demonstrating the presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in all the basal ganglia nuclei. In fact, nitrergic terminals have been reported to make synaptic contacts with both substantia nigra dopamine-containing neurons and their terminal areas such as the striatum, the globus pallidus and the subthalamus. These brain areas contain a high expression of nitric oxide (NO)-producing neurons, with the striatum having the greatest number, together with important NO afferent input. In this paper, the distribution of NO in the BG nuclei will be described. Furthermore, evidence demonstrating the nitrergic control of BG activity will be reviewed. The new avenues that the increasing knowledge of NO in motor control has opened for exploring the pathophysiology and pharmacology of Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders will be discussed. For example, inhibition of striatal NO/guanosine monophosphate signal pathway by phosphodiesterases seems to be effective in levodopa-induced dyskinesia. However, the results of experimental studies have to be interpreted with caution given the complexities of nitrergic signalling and the limitations of animal models. Nevertheless, the NO system represents a promising pharmacological intervention for treating Parkinson's disease and related disorders.

  17. Adaptive autoregressive identification with spectral power decomposition for studying movement-related activity in scalp EEG signals and basal ganglia local field potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foffani, Guglielmo; Bianchi, Anna M.; Priori, Alberto; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2004-09-01

    We propose a method that combines adaptive autoregressive (AAR) identification and spectral power decomposition for the study of movement-related spectral changes in scalp EEG signals and basal ganglia local field potentials (LFPs). This approach introduces the concept of movement-related poles, allowing one to study not only the classical event-related desynchronizations (ERD) and synchronizations (ERS), which correspond to modulations of power, but also event-related modulations of frequency. We applied the method to analyze movement-related EEG signals and LFPs contemporarily recorded from the sensorimotor cortex, the globus pallidus internus (GPi) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in a patient with Parkinson's disease who underwent stereotactic neurosurgery for the implant of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. In the AAR identification we compared the whale and the exponential forgetting factors, showing that the whale forgetting provides a better disturbance rejection and it is therefore more suitable to investigate movement-related brain activity. Movement-related power modulations were consistent with previous studies. In addition, movement-related frequency modulations were observed from both scalp EEG signals and basal ganglia LFPs. The method therefore represents an effective approach to the study of movement-related brain activity.

  18. Basal ganglia circuits changes in Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Wang, Jue; Wang, Chaodong; Hallett, Mark; Zang, Yufeng; Wu, Xiaoli; Chan, Piu

    2012-08-22

    Functional changes in basal ganglia circuitry are responsible for the major clinical features of Parkinson's disease (PD). Current models of basal ganglia circuitry can only partially explain the cardinal symptoms in PD. We used functional MRI to investigate the causal connectivity of basal ganglia networks from the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) in PD in the movement and resting state. In controls, SNc activity predicted increased activity in the supplementary motor area, the default mode network, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, but, in patients, activity predicted decreases in the same structures. The SNc had decreased connectivity with the striatum, globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus, thalamus, supplementary motor area, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, insula, default mode network, temporal lobe, cerebellum, and pons in patients compared to controls. Levodopa administration partially normalized the pattern of connectivity. Our findings show how the dopaminergic system exerts influences on widespread brain networks, including motor and cognitive networks. The pattern of basal ganglia network connectivity is abnormal in PD secondary to dopamine depletion, and is more deviant in more severe disease. Use of functional MRI with network analysis appears to be a useful method to demonstrate basal ganglia pathways in vivo in human subjects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduced topological efficiency in cortical-basal Ganglia motor network of Parkinson's disease: a resting state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Luqing; Zhang, Jiuquan; Long, Zhiliang; Wu, Guo-Rong; Hu, Xiaofei; Zhang, Yanling; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is mainly characterized by dopamine depletion of the cortico-basal ganglia (CBG) motor circuit. Given that dopamine dysfunction could affect functional brain network efficiency, the present study utilized resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) and graph theoretical approach to investigate the topological efficiency changes of the CBG motor network in patients with PD during a relatively hypodopaminergic state (12 hours after a last dose of dopamimetic treatment). We found that PD compared with controls had remarkable decreased efficiency in the CBG motor network, with the most pronounced changes observed in rostral supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), caudal SMA (SMA-proper), primary motor cortex (M1), primary somatosensory cortex (S1), thalamus (THA), globus pallidus (GP), and putamen (PUT). Furthermore, reduced efficiency in pre-SMA, M1, THA and GP was significantly correlated with Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor scores in PD patients. Together, our results demonstrate that individuals with PD appear to be less effective at information transfer within the CBG motor pathway, which provides a novel perspective on neurobiological explanation for the motor symptoms in patients. These findings are in line with the pathophysiology of PD, suggesting that network efficiency metrics may be used to identify and track the pathology of PD.

  20. Effects of deep brain stimulation on balance and gait in patients with Parkinson's disease: A systematic neurophysiological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collomb-Clerc, A; Welter, M-L

    2015-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and internal globus pallidus (GPi) deep brain stimulation (DBS) provides an efficient treatment for the alleviation of motor signs in patients with Parkinson's disease. The effects of DBS on gait and balance disorders are less successful and may even lead to an aggravation of freezing of gait and imbalance. The identification of a substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr)-mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) network in the control of locomotion and postural control and of its dysfunction/lesion in PD patients with gait and balance disorders led to suggestion that DBS should be targeting the SNr and the pedunculopontine nucleus (part of the MLR) for PD patients with these disabling axial motor signs. However, the clinical results to date have been disappointing. In this review, we discuss the effects of DBS of these basal ganglia and brainstem structures on the neurophysiological parameters of gait and balance control in PD patients. Overall, the data suggest that both STN and GPi-DBS improve gait parameters and quiet standing postural control in PD patients, but have no effect or may even aggravate dynamic postural control, in particular with STN-DBS. Conversely, DBS of the SNr and PPN has no effect on gait parameters but improves anticipatory postural adjustments and gait postural control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of surgery targeting the caudal intralaminar thalamic nuclei on the pathophysiological functioning of basal ganglia in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia; Bacci, Jean-Jacques; Jouve, Loreline; Melon, Christophe; Salin, Pascal

    2009-02-16

    There is accumulating evidence that the centre median-parafascicular (CM/Pf) complex of the thalamus is implicated in basal ganglia-related movement disorders and notably in Parkinson's disease. However, the impact of the changes affecting CM/Pf on the pathophysiological functioning of basal ganglia in parkinsonian state remains poorly understood. To address this issue, we have examined the effects of excitotoxic lesion of CM/Pf and of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesion of nigral dopamine neurons, separately or in association, on gene expression of markers of neuronal activity in the rat basal ganglia (striatal neuropeptide precursors, GAD67, cytochrome oxidase subunit I) by quantitative in situ hybridization histochemistry. CM/Pf lesion prevented the changes produced by the dopamine denervation in the components of the indirect pathway connecting the striatum to the output structures (striatopallidal neurons, globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus), and among the output structures, in the entopeduncular nucleus. Preliminary data on the effects of deep brain stimulation of CM/Pf in rats with nigral dopamine lesion show that this surgical approach produces efficient anti-akinetic effect associated with partial reversal of the dopamine lesion-induced increase in striatal preproenkephalin A mRNA levels, a marker of the striatopallidal neurons. These data, which provide substrates for the potential of CM/Pf surgery in the treatment of movement disorders, are discussed in comparison with the effects of lesion or deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, the currently preferred target for the surgical treatment of PD.

  2. Effect of Deep Brain Stimulation on Speech Performance in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Skodda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS has been reported to be successful in relieving the core motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD and motor fluctuations in the more advanced stages of the disease. However, data on the effects of DBS on speech performance are inconsistent. While there are some series of patients documenting that speech function was relatively unaffected by DBS of the nucleus subthalamicus (STN, other investigators reported on improvements of distinct parameters of oral control and voice. Though, these ameliorations of single speech modalities were not always accompanied by an improvement of overall speech intelligibility. On the other hand, there are also indications for an induction of dysarthria as an adverse effect of STN-DBS occurring at least in some patients with PD. Since a deterioration of speech function has more often been observed under high stimulation amplitudes, this phenomenon has been ascribed to a spread of current-to-adjacent pathways which might also be the reason for the sporadic observation of an onset of dysarthria under DBS of other basal ganglia targets (e.g., globus pallidus internus/GPi or thalamus/Vim. The aim of this paper is to review and evaluate reports in the literature on the effects of DBS on speech function in PD.

  3. Non-Motor Symptom Burdens Are Not Associated with Iron Accumulation in Early Parkinson's Disease: a Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Chaewon; Lee, Seon; Lee, Jee Young; Rhim, Jung Hyo; Park, Sun Won

    2018-03-26

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) has been used to measure iron accumulation in the deep nuclei of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). This study examined the relationship between non-motor symptoms (NMSs) and iron accumulation in the deep nuclei of patients with PD. The QSM data were acquired from 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 29 patients with early PD and 19 normal controls. The Korean version of the NMS scale (K-NMSS) was used for evaluation of NMSs in patients. The patients were divided into high NMS and low NMS groups. The region-of-interest analyses were performed in the following deep nuclei: red nucleus, substantia nigra pars compacta, substantia nigra pars reticulata, dentate nucleus, globus pallidus, putamen, and head of the caudate nucleus. Thirteen patients had high NMS scores (total K-NMSS score, mean = 32.1), and 16 had low NMS scores (10.6). The QSM values in the deep were not different among the patients with high NMS scores, low NMS scores, and controls. The QSM values were not correlated linearly with K-NMSS total score after adjusting the age at acquisition of brain MRI. The study demonstrated that the NMS burdens are not associated with iron accumulation in the deep nuclei of patients with PD. These results suggest that future neuroimaging studies on the pathology of NMSs in PD should use more specific and detailed clinical tools and recruit PD patients with severe NMSs. © 2018 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  4. Beyond the midbrain atrophy: wide spectrum of structural MRI finding in cases of pathologically proven progressive supranuclear palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Keita; Tokumaru, Aya M.; Shimoji, Keigo [Tokyo Metropolitan Medical Center of Gerontology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Murayama, Shigeo; Kanemaru, Kazutomi; Morimoto, Satoru [Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital, Department of Neurology, Tokyo (Japan); Aiba, Ikuko [National Hospital Organization Higashi Nagoya National Hospital, Department of Neurology, Nagoya (Japan); Nakagawa, Motoo; Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Shimohira, Masashi; Shibamoto, Yuta [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Nagoya (Japan); Matsukawa, Noriyuki [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Nagoya (Japan); Hashizume, Yoshio [Fukushimura Hospital, Choju Medical Institute, Toyohashi (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    Recently, it has been recognized that pathologically proven progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) cases are classified into various clinical subtypes with non-uniform symptoms and imaging findings. This article reviews essential imaging findings, general information, and advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for PSP and presents these MRI findings of pathologically proven typical and atypical PSP cases for educational purposes. With the review of literatures, notably including atypical pathologically proven PSP cases, MRI and clinical information of 15 pathologically proven typical and atypical PSP cases were retrospectively evaluated. In addition to typical symptoms, PSP patients can exhibit atypical symptoms including levodopa-responsive parkinsonism, pure akinesia, non-fluent aphasia, corticobasal syndrome, and predominant cerebellar ataxia. As well as clinical symptoms, the degree of midbrain atrophy, a well-known imaging hallmark, is not consistent in atypical PSP cases. This fact has important implications for the limitation of midbrain atrophy as a diagnostic imaging biomarker of PSP pathology. Additional evaluation of other imaging findings including various regional atrophies of the globus pallidus, frontal lobe, cerebral peduncle, and superior cerebellar peduncle is essential for the diagnosis of atypical PSP cases. It is necessary for radiologists to recognize the wide clinical and radiological spectra of typical and atypical PSP cases. (orig.)

  5. Interaction between the 5-HT system and the basal ganglia: Functional implication and therapeutic perspective in Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eMiguelez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT has a multifaceted function in the modulation of information processing through the activation of multiple receptor families, including G-protein-coupled receptor subtypes (5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT4-7 and ligand-gated ion channels (5-HT3. The largest population of serotonergic neurons is located in the midbrain, specifically in the raphe nuclei. Although the medial and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN share common projecting areas, in the basal ganglia (BG nuclei serotonergic innervations come mainly from the DRN. The BG are a highly organized network of subcortical nuclei composed of the striatum (caudate and putamen, subthalamic nucleus (STN, internal and external globus pallidus (or entopeduncular nucleus in rodents, GPi/EP and GPe and substantia nigra (pars compacta, SNc, and pars reticulata, SNr. The BG are part of the cortico-BG-thalamic circuits, which play a role in many functions like motor control, emotion, and cognition and are critically involved in diseases such as Parkinson’s disease. This review provides an overview of serotonergic modulation of the BG at the functional level and a discussion of how this interaction may be relevant to treating Parkinson’s disease and the motor complications induced by chronic treatment with L-DOPA.

  6. Human subcortical brain asymmetries in 15,847 people worldwide reveal effects of age and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadalupe, Tulio; Mathias, Samuel R; vanErp, Theo G M; Whelan, Christopher D; Zwiers, Marcel P; Abe, Yoshinari; Abramovic, Lucija; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Arias-Vásquez, Alejandro; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Arolt, Volker; Artiges, Eric; Ayesa-Arriola, Rosa; Baboyan, Vatche G; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth; Bastin, Mark E; Baune, Bernhard T; Blangero, John; Bokde, Arun L W; Boedhoe, Premika S W; Bose, Anushree; Brem, Silvia; Brodaty, Henry; Bromberg, Uli; Brooks, Samantha; Büchel, Christian; Buitelaar, Jan; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cattrell, Anna; Cheng, Yuqi; Conrod, Patricia J; Conzelmann, Annette; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Crivello, Fabrice; Dannlowski, Udo; de Zubicaray, Greig I; de Zwarte, Sonja M C; Deary, Ian J; Desrivières, Sylvane; Doan, Nhat Trung; Donohoe, Gary; Dørum, Erlend S; Ehrlich, Stefan; Espeseth, Thomas; Fernández, Guillén; Flor, Herta; Fouche, Jean-Paul; Frouin, Vincent; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gill, Michael; Suarez, Andrea Gonzalez; Gowland, Penny; Grabe, Hans J; Grotegerd, Dominik; Gruber, Oliver; Hagenaars, Saskia; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hauser, Tobias U; Heinz, Andreas; Hibar, Derrek P; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hoogman, Martine; Howells, Fleur M; Hu, Hao; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Huyser, Chaim; Ittermann, Bernd; Jahanshad, Neda; Jönsson, Erik G; Jurk, Sarah; Kahn, Rene S; Kelly, Sinead; Kraemer, Bernd; Kugel, Harald; Kwon, Jun Soo; Lemaitre, Herve; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Lochner, Christine; Luciano, Michelle; Marquand, Andre F; Martin, Nicholas G; Martínez-Zalacaín, Ignacio; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mataix-Cols, David; Mather, Karen; McDonald, Colm; McMahon, Katie L; Medland, Sarah E; Menchón, José M; Morris, Derek W; Mothersill, Omar; Maniega, Susana Munoz; Mwangi, Benson; Nakamae, Takashi; Nakao, Tomohiro; Narayanaswaamy, Janardhanan C; Nees, Frauke; Nordvik, Jan E; Onnink, A Marten H; Opel, Nils; Ophoff, Roel; Paillère Martinot, Marie-Laure; Papadopoulos Orfanos, Dimitri; Pauli, Paul; Paus, Tomáš; Poustka, Luise; Reddy, Janardhan Yc; Renteria, Miguel E; Roiz-Santiáñez, Roberto; Roos, Annerine; Royle, Natalie A; Sachdev, Perminder; Sánchez-Juan, Pascual; Schmaal, Lianne; Schumann, Gunter; Shumskaya, Elena; Smolka, Michael N; Soares, Jair C; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Stein, Dan J; Strike, Lachlan T; Toro, Roberto; Turner, Jessica A; Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie; Uhlmann, Anne; Hernández, Maria Valdés; van den Heuvel, Odile A; van der Meer, Dennis; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Veltman, Dick J; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Vetter, Nora C; Vuletic, Daniella; Walitza, Susanne; Walter, Henrik; Walton, Esther; Wang, Zhen; Wardlaw, Joanna; Wen, Wei; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Robert; Wittfeld, Katharina; Wolfers, Thomas; Wright, Margaret J; Xu, Jian; Xu, Xiufeng; Yun, Je-Yeon; Zhao, JingJing; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Glahn, David C; Mazoyer, Bernard; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde

    2017-10-01

    The two hemispheres of the human brain differ functionally and structurally. Despite over a century of research, the extent to which brain asymmetry is influenced by sex, handedness, age, and genetic factors is still controversial. Here we present the largest ever analysis of subcortical brain asymmetries, in a harmonized multi-site study using meta-analysis methods. Volumetric asymmetry of seven subcortical structures was assessed in 15,847 MRI scans from 52 datasets worldwide. There were sex differences in the asymmetry of the globus pallidus and putamen. Heritability estimates, derived from 1170 subjects belonging to 71 extended pedigrees, revealed that additive genetic factors influenced the asymmetry of these two structures and that of the hippocampus and thalamus. Handedness had no detectable effect on subcortical asymmetries, even in this unprecedented sample size, but the asymmetry of the putamen varied with age. Genetic drivers of asymmetry in the hippocampus, thalamus and basal ganglia may affect variability in human cognition, including susceptibility to psychiatric disorders.

  7. Enkephalin dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase (enkephalinase) activity: selective radioassay, properties, and regional distribution in human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llorens, C.; Malfroy, B.; Schwartz, J.C.; Gacel, G.; Roques, B.P.; Roy, J.; Morgat, J.L.; Javoy-Agid, F.; Agid, Y.

    1982-01-01

    The compound [ 3 H-Tyr 1 ,D-Ala 2 ,Leu-OH 5 ]enkephalin has been synthesised as a potentially selective substrate for enkephalin dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase (enkephalinase) activity in brain. Incubations in the presence of homogenates and particulate fractions from rodent and human brain result in the formation of [ 3 H]Tyr-D-Ala-Gly, which can be conveniently isolated by polystyrene bead column chromatography. The enzyme activity responsible for the hydrolysis of the Gly 3 -Phe 4 amide bond of this substrate displays close resemblance to that hydrolysing the natural enkephalins at the same level. In addition, enkephalinase activity characterised in postmortem human brain is closely similar to that in rodent brain, with regard to optimal pH and apparent affinities of various substrates and inhibitors, including the potent compound thiorphan. Enkephalinase activity is distributed in a highly heterogeneous fashion among regions of human brain, the highest levels being found in globus pallidus and pars reticulata of the substantia nigra. This distribution is poorly correlated with that of opiate receptor binding sites but displays some resemblance to that of reported Met 5 -enkephalin levels. (author)

  8. The influence of puberty on subcortical brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddings, Anne-Lise; Mills, Kathryn L; Clasen, Liv S; Giedd, Jay N; Viner, Russell M; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2014-03-01

    Puberty is characterized by hormonal, physical and psychological transformation. The human brain undergoes significant changes between childhood and adulthood, but little is known about how puberty influences its structural development. Using a longitudinal sample of 711 magnetic resonance imaging scans from 275 individuals aged 7-20years, we examined how subcortical brain regions change in relation to puberty. Our regions of interest included the amygdala, hippocampus and corpus striatum including the nucleus accumbens (NA), caudate, putamen and globus pallidus (GP). Pubertal development was significantly related to structural volume in all six regions in both sexes. Pubertal development and age had both independent and interactive influences on volume for the amygdala, hippocampus and putamen in both sexes, and the caudate in females. There was an interactive puberty-by-age effect on volume for the NA and GP in both sexes, and the caudate in males. These findings suggest a significant role for puberty in structural brain development. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Surgical Treatment of Dyskinesia in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Puppi Munhoz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the main indications for stereotactic surgery in Parkinson’s disease (PD is the control of levodopa induced dyskinesia. This can be achieved by by pallidotomy and globus pallidus internus (GPi deep brain stimulation (DBS or by subthalamotomy and subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS, which usually allow for a cut down in the dosage of levodopa. DBS has assumed a pivotal role in stereotactic surgical treatment of PD and, in fact, ablative procedures are currently considered surrogates, particularly when bilateral procedures are required, as DBS does not produce a brain lesion and the stimulator can be programmed to induce better therapeutic effects while minimizing adverse effects. Interventions in either the STN and the GPi seem to be similar in controlling most of the other motor aspects of PD, nonetheless, GPi surgery seems to induce a more particular and direct effect on dyskinesia, while the antidyskinetic effect of STN interventions is mostly dependent on a reduction of dopaminergic drug dosages. Hence, the si ne qua non condition for a reduction of dyskinesia when STN interventions are intended is their ability to allow for a reduction of levodopa dosage. Pallidal surgery is indicated when dyskinesia is a dose-limiting factor for maintaining or introducing higher adequate levels of dopaminergic therapy. Also medications used for the treatment of PD may be useful for the improvement of several non-motor aspects of the disease, including sleep, psychiatric, and cognitive domains, therefore, dose reduction of medication withdrawal are not always a fruitful objective.

  10. Critical Roles of the Direct GABAergic Pallido-cortical Pathway in Controlling Absence Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Ma, Tao; Wu, Shengdun; Ma, Jingling; Cui, Yan; Xia, Yang; Xu, Peng; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-01-01

    The basal ganglia (BG), serving as an intermediate bridge between the cerebral cortex and thalamus, are believed to play crucial roles in controlling absence seizure activities generated by the pathological corticothalamic system. Inspired by recent experiments, here we systematically investigate the contribution of a novel identified GABAergic pallido-cortical pathway, projecting from the globus pallidus externa (GPe) in the BG to the cerebral cortex, to the control of absence seizures. By computational modelling, we find that both increasing the activation of GPe neurons and enhancing the coupling strength of the inhibitory pallido-cortical pathway can suppress the bilaterally synchronous 2–4 Hz spike and wave discharges (SWDs) during absence seizures. Appropriate tuning of several GPe-related pathways may also trigger the SWD suppression, through modulating the activation level of GPe neurons. Furthermore, we show that the previously discovered bidirectional control of absence seizures due to the competition between other two BG output pathways also exists in our established model. Importantly, such bidirectional control is shaped by the coupling strength of this direct GABAergic pallido-cortical pathway. Our work suggests that the novel identified pallido-cortical pathway has a functional role in controlling absence seizures and the presented results might provide testable hypotheses for future experimental studies. PMID:26496656

  11. Manganese toxicity with ephedrone abuse manifesting as parkinsonism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Mudassir

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Neurologic consequences of manganese toxicity have been recognized since 1837. A new form of presumed manganese poisoning has been reported in drug-addicted persons from Eastern Europe and the Baltic states who have intravenously injected self-prepared methcathinone hydrochloride (ephedrone, which is synthesized from pseudoephedrine hydrochloride using potassium permanganate as a potent oxidant. This clinical syndrome is under-recognized in Western Europe and there are no reported cases in the literature from Ireland. Case presentation We report a 30-year-old Eastern European man who presented with a two-year history of gait disturbance. A neurological assessment revealed features of parkinsonism which included hypophonia, hypomimia, mild bradykinesia and rigidity with no resting tremor. He held his arms slightly abducted from his sides when walking, with a reduction in arm swing. Magnetic resonance imaging of his brain showed a high signal on T1 in the globus pallidus and serum manganese levels were raised. He had no response to levodopa. Conclusion Manganism secondary to ephedrone abuse causing parkinsonism has emerged in Western Europe in recent years due to mass immigration and often remains unrecognized. This paper highlights the various features of this rare cause of parkinsonism and aids in its recognition and subsequent diagnosis. Neurologists in Western Europe will increasingly encounter such patients.

  12. Time-Course Analysis of the Neuroanatomical Correlates of Sexual Arousal Evoked by Erotic Video Stimuli in Healthy Males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaram, Thirunavukkarasu; Jeong, Gwang Woo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Gwang Won; Baek, Han Su; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2010-01-01

    To assess the dynamic activations of the key brain areas associated with the time-course of the sexual arousal evoked by visual sexual stimuli in healthy male subjects. Fourteen right-handed heterosexual male volunteers participated in this study. Alternatively combined rest period and erotic video visual stimulation were used according to the standard block design. In order to illustrate and quantify the spatiotemporal activation patterns of the key brain regions, the activation period was divided into three different stages as the EARLY, MID and LATE stages. For the group result (p < 0.05), when comparing the MID stage with the EARLY stage, a significant increase of the brain activation was observed in the areas that included the inferior frontal gyrus, the supplementary motor area, the hippocampus, the head of the caudate nucleus, the midbrain, the superior occipital gyrus and the fusiform gyrus. At the same time, when comparing the EARLY stage with the MID stage, the putamen, the globus pallidus, the pons, the thalamus, the hypothalamus, the lingual gyrus and the cuneus yielded significantly increased activations. When comparing the LATE stage with the MID stage, all the above mentioned brain regions showed elevated activations except the hippocampus. Our results illustrate the spatiotemporal activation patterns of the key brain regions across the three stages of visual sexual arousal

  13. 125I-iomazenil-benzodiazepine receptor binding during psychological stress in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Tsuchida, Daisuke; Ogi, Shigeyuki; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Mori, Yutaka

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the changes in 125 I-iomazenil ( 125 I-IMZ) benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) binding with psychological stress in a rat model. Six male Wistar rats were placed under psychological stress for 1 hour by using a communication box. No physical stress was not received. 1.85 MBq of 125 I-IMZ was injected into the lateral tail vein and the rat was killed 3 hours later. Twenty-micormeter-thick sections of the brain were collected and % injected dose per body weight (% ID/BW) of eleven regions (frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital cortices, caudate putamen, accumubens nuclei, globus pallidus, amygdala, thalamus, hippocampus and hypothalamus) were calculated by autoradiography. The %ID/BW of rats which were placed under psychological stress was compared with that of 6 control rats. The %ID/BW of rats which were placed under psychological stress diffusely tended to show a reduction in 125 I-IMZ-BZR binding. A significant decrease in BZR binding was observed in the hippocampus of the rats which were placed under psychological stress. 125 I-IMZ-BZR binding tended to decrease throughout the brain. (author)

  14. Can a Positive Allosteric Modulation of GABAergic Receptors Improve Motor Symptoms in Patients with Parkinson's Disease? The Potential Role of Zolpidem in the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Antonio; Panza, Francesco; Greco, Antonio; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Seripa, Davide

    2016-01-01

    At present, patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) are unsatisfactorily controlled by currently used anti-Parkinsonian dopaminergic drugs. Various studies suggest that therapeutic strategies based on nondopaminergic drugs might be helpful in PD. Zolpidem, an imidazopyridine widely used as sleep inducer, shows high affinity only for GABAA receptors containing the α-1 subunit and facilitates GABAergic neurotransmission through a positive allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors. Various observations, although preliminary, consistently suggest that in PD patients zolpidem may induce beneficial (and sometimes remarkable) effects on motor symptoms even after single doses and may also improve dyskinesias. Since a high density of zolpidem binding sites is in the two main output structures of the basal ganglia which are abnormally overactive in PD (internal globus pallidus, GPi, and substantia nigra pars reticulata, SNr), it was hypothesized that in PD patients zolpidem may induce through GABAA receptors an inhibition of GPi and SNr (and, possibly, of the subthalamic nucleus also), resulting in an increased activity of motor cortical areas (such as supplementary motor area), which may give rise to improvement of motor symptoms of PD. Randomized clinical trials are needed in order to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of zolpidem in treating motor symptoms of PD. PMID:27293955

  15. A single-neuron tracing study of arkypallidal and prototypic neurons in healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyama, Fumino; Nakano, Takashi; Matsuda, Wakoto; Furuta, Takahiro; Udagawa, Jun; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2016-12-01

    The external globus pallidus (GP) is known as a relay nucleus of the indirect pathway of the basal ganglia. Recent studies in dopamine-depleted and healthy rats indicate that the GP comprises two main types of pallidofugal neurons: the so-called "prototypic" and "arkypallidal" neurons. However, the reconstruction of complete arkypallidal neurons in healthy rats has not been reported. Here we visualized the entire axonal arborization of four single arkypallidal neurons and six single prototypic neurons in rat brain using labeling with a viral vector expressing membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein and examined the distribution of axon boutons in the target nuclei. Results revealed that not only the arkypallidal neurons but nearly all of the prototypic neurons projected to the striatum with numerous axon varicosities. Thus, the striatum is a major target nucleus for pallidal neurons. Arkypallidal and prototypic GP neurons located in the calbindin-positive and calbindin-negative regions mainly projected to the corresponding positive and negative regions in the striatum. Because the GP and striatum calbindin staining patterns reflect the topographic organization of the striatopallidal projection, the striatal neurons in the sensorimotor and associative regions constitute the reciprocal connection with the GP neurons in the corresponding regions.

  16. Deep Brain Stimulation for Tourette-Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldermann, Juan Carlos; Schüller, Thomas; Huys, Daniel; Becker, Ingrid; Timmermann, Lars; Jessen, Frank; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Kuhn, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A significant proportion of patients with Tourette syndrome (TS) continue to experience symptoms across adulthood that in severe cases fail to respond to standard therapies. For these cases, deep brain stimulation (DBS) is emerging as a promising treatment option. We conducted a systematic literature review to evaluate the efficacy of DBS for GTS. Individual data of case reports and series were pooled; the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) was chosen as primary outcome parameter. In total, 57 studies were eligible, including 156 cases. Overall, DBS resulted in a significant improvement of 52.68% (IQR = 40.74, p < 0.001) in the YGTSS. Analysis of controlled studies significantly favored stimulation versus off stimulation with a standardized mean difference of 0.96 (95% CI: 0.36-1.56). Disentangling different target points revealed significant YGTSS reductions after stimulation of the thalamus, the posteroventrolateral part and the anteromedial part of the globus pallidus internus, the anterior limb of the internal capsule and nucleus accumbens with no significant difference between these targets. A significant negative correlation of preoperative tic scores with the outcome of thalamic stimulation was found. Despite small patient numbers, we conclude that DBS for GTS is a valid option for medically intractable patients. Different brain targets resulted in comparable improvement rates, indicating a modulation of a common network. Future studies might focus on a better characterization of the clinical effects of distinct regions, rather than searching for a unique target. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Manganese toxicity with ephedrone abuse manifesting as parkinsonism: a case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Iqbal, Mudassir

    2012-02-07

    Abstract Introduction Neurologic consequences of manganese toxicity have been recognized since 1837. A new form of presumed manganese poisoning has been reported in drug-addicted persons from Eastern Europe and the Baltic states who have intravenously injected self-prepared methcathinone hydrochloride (ephedrone), which is synthesized from pseudoephedrine hydrochloride using potassium permanganate as a potent oxidant. This clinical syndrome is under-recognized in Western Europe and there are no reported cases in the literature from Ireland. Case presentation We report a 30-year-old Eastern European man who presented with a two-year history of gait disturbance. A neurological assessment revealed features of parkinsonism which included hypophonia, hypomimia, mild bradykinesia and rigidity with no resting tremor. He held his arms slightly abducted from his sides when walking, with a reduction in arm swing. Magnetic resonance imaging of his brain showed a high signal on T1 in the globus pallidus and serum manganese levels were raised. He had no response to levodopa. Conclusion Manganism secondary to ephedrone abuse causing parkinsonism has emerged in Western Europe in recent years due to mass immigration and often remains unrecognized. This paper highlights the various features of this rare cause of parkinsonism and aids in its recognition and subsequent diagnosis. Neurologists in Western Europe will increasingly encounter such patients.

  18. Preferential responses in amygdala and insula during presentation of facial contempt and disgust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambataro, Fabio; Dimalta, Savino; Di Giorgio, Annabella; Taurisano, Paolo; Blasi, Giuseppe; Scarabino, Tommaso; Giannatempo, Giuseppe; Nardini, Marcello; Bertolino, Alessandro

    2006-10-01

    Some authors consider contempt to be a basic emotion while others consider it a variant of disgust. The neural correlates of contempt have not so far been specifically contrasted with disgust. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated the neural networks involved in the processing of facial contempt and disgust in 24 healthy subjects. Facial recognition of contempt was lower than that of disgust and of neutral faces. The imaging data indicated significant activity in the amygdala and in globus pallidus and putamen during processing of contemptuous faces. Bilateral insula and caudate nuclei and left as well as right inferior frontal gyrus were engaged during processing of disgusted faces. Moreover, direct comparisons of contempt vs. disgust yielded significantly different activations in the amygdala. On the other hand, disgusted faces elicited greater activation than contemptuous faces in the right insula and caudate. Our findings suggest preferential involvement of different neural substrates in the processing of facial emotional expressions of contempt and disgust.

  19. Computation of an MRI brain atlas from a population of Parkinson’s disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelidakis, L.; Papageorgiou, I. E.; Damianou, C.; Psychogios, M. N.; Lingor, P.; von Eckardstein, K.; Hadjidemetriou, S.

    2017-11-01

    Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder of the brain. This study presents an MRI-based brain atlas of PD to characterize associated alterations for diagnostic and interventional purposes. The atlas standardizes primarily the implicated subcortical regions such as the globus pallidus (GP), substantia nigra (SN), subthalamic nucleus (STN), caudate nucleus (CN), thalamus (TH), putamen (PUT), and red nucleus (RN). The data were 3.0 T MRI brain images from 16 PD patients and 10 matched controls. The images used were T1-weighted (T 1 w), T2-weighted (T 2 w) images, and Susceptibility Weighted Images (SWI). The T1w images were the reference for the inter-subject non-rigid registration available from 3DSlicer. Anatomic labeling was achieved with BrainSuite and regions were refined with the level sets segmentation of ITK-Snap. The subcortical centers were analyzed for their volume and signal intensity. Comparison with an age-matched control group unravels a significant PD-related T1w signal loss in the striatum (CN and PUT) centers, but approximately a constant volume. The results in this study improve MRI based PD localization and can lead to the development of novel biomarkers.

  20. Neural correlates of long-term intense romantic love.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Bianca P; Aron, Arthur; Fisher, Helen E; Brown, Lucy L

    2012-02-01

    The present study examined the neural correlates of long-term intense romantic love using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Ten women and 7 men married an average of 21.4 years underwent fMRI while viewing facial images of their partner. Control images included a highly familiar acquaintance; a close, long-term friend; and a low-familiar person. Effects specific to the intensely loved, long-term partner were found in: (i) areas of the dopamine-rich reward and basal ganglia system, such as the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and dorsal striatum, consistent with results from early-stage romantic love studies; and (ii) several regions implicated in maternal attachment, such as the globus pallidus (GP), substantia nigra, Raphe nucleus, thalamus, insular cortex, anterior cingulate and posterior cingulate. Correlations of neural activity in regions of interest with widely used questionnaires showed: (i) VTA and caudate responses correlated with romantic love scores and inclusion of other in the self; (ii) GP responses correlated with friendship-based love scores; (iii) hypothalamus and posterior hippocampus responses correlated with sexual frequency; and (iv) caudate, septum/fornix, posterior cingulate and posterior hippocampus responses correlated with obsession. Overall, results suggest that for some individuals the reward-value associated with a long-term partner may be sustained, similar to new love, but also involves brain systems implicated in attachment and pair-bonding.

  1. Modulatory effects of L-DOPA on D2 dopamine receptors in rat striatum, measured using in vivo microdialysis and PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opacka-Juffry, J.; Hume, S. P.; Ashworth, S.; Ahier, R. G.

    1997-01-01

    Putative modulatory effects of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) on D2 dopamine receptor function in the striatum of anaesthetized rats were investigated using both in vivo microdialysis and positron emission tomography (PET) with carbon-11 labelled raclopride as a selective D2 receptor ligand. A single dose of L-DOPA (20 or 100 mg/kg i.p.) resulted in an increase in [ 11 C]raclopride binding potential which was also observed in the presence of the central aromatic decarboxylase inhibitor NSD 1015, confirming that the effect was independent of dopamine. This L-DOPA evoked D2 receptor sensitization was abolished by a prior, long-term administration of L-DOPA in drinking water (5 weeks, 170 mg/kg/day). In the course of acute L-DOPA treatment (20 mg/kg), extracellular GABA levels were reduced by ∼20 % in the globus pallidus. It is likely that L-DOPA sensitising effect on striatal D2 receptors, as confirmed by PET, may implicate striato-pallidal neurones, hence a reduced GABA-ergic output in the projection area. Since the L-DOPA evoked striatal D2 receptor supersensitivity habituates during long-term treatment, the effects reported here may contribute to the fluctuations observed during chronic L-DOPA therapy in Parkinson's disease. (author)

  2. Selective alterations in cerebral metabolism within the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system produced by acute cocaine administration in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porrino, L.J.; Domer, F.R.; Crane, A.M.; Sokoloff, L.

    1988-05-01

    The 2-(/sup 14/C)deoxyglucose method was used to examine the effects of acute intravenous administration of cocaine on local cerebral glucose utilization in rats. These effects were correlated with the effects of cocaine on locomotor activity assessed simultaneously in the same animals. At the lowest dose of cocaine, 0.5 mg/kg (1.47 mumol/kg), alterations in glucose utilization were restricted to the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Metabolic activity at 1.0 mg/kg (2.9 mumol/kg) was altered in these structures, but in the substantia nigra reticulata and lateral habenula as well. The selectivity of cocaine's effects at low doses demonstrates the particular sensitivity of these structures to cocaine's actions in the brain. In contrast, 5.0 mg/kg (14.7 mumol/kg) produced widespread changes in glucose utilization, particularly in the extrapyramidal system. Only this dose significantly increased locomotor activity above levels in vehicle-treated controls. Rates of glucose utilization were positively correlated with locomotor activity in the globus pallidus, substantia nigra reticulata, and subthalamic nucleus, and negatively correlated in the lateral habenula.

  3. MRI of the normal brain from early childhood to middle age. Pt. 2. Age dependence of signal intensity changes on T2-weighted images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autti, T.; Raininko, R.; Vanhanen, S.L.; Kallio, M.; Santavuori, P.

    1994-01-01

    We examined 66 healthy volunteers aged 4 to 50 years by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the signal intensity was measured on T2-weighted images in numerous sites and correlated with age and sex. Using distilled water and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as references on each slice, we calculated the signal intensities of the brain structures. Calculated ratios between structures did not change with age, except for those of the globus pallidus and thalamus, in which the signal intensities decreased more rapidly. The signal intensities of other brain structures changed equally but this could not be discerned visually and quantitative measurements were required. The signal intensities in the white and deep grey matter decreased rapidly in the first decade and then gradually to reach a plateau after the age of 18 years. Maturation of the brain thus seems to continue until near the end of the second decade of life. No sex differences were found. Quantitative analysis requires intensity references. The CSF in the tips of the frontal horns seems to be as reliable as an external fluid reference for intensity, and can be used in routine examinations provided the frontal horns are large enough to avoid partial volume effect. (orig.)

  4. R2* mapping for brain iron: associations with cognition in normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadery, Christine; Pirpamer, Lukas; Hofer, Edith; Langkammer, Christian; Petrovic, Katja; Loitfelder, Marisa; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Seiler, Stephan; Duering, Marco; Jouvent, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Fazekas, Franz; Mangin, Jean-Francois; Chabriat, Hugues; Dichgans, Martin; Ropele, Stefan; Schmidt, Reinhold

    2015-02-01

    Brain iron accumulates during aging and has been associated with neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Magnetic resonance (MR)-based R2* mapping enables the in vivo detection of iron content in brain tissue. We investigated if during normal brain aging iron load relates to cognitive impairment in region-specific patterns in a community-dwelling cohort of 336 healthy, middle aged, and older adults from the Austrian Stroke Prevention Family Study. MR imaging and R2* mapping in the basal ganglia and neocortex were done at 3T. Comprehensive neuropsychological testing assessed memory, executive function, and psychomotor speed. We found the highest iron concentration in the globus pallidus, and pallidal and putaminal iron was significantly and inversely associated with cognitive performance in all cognitive domains, except memory. These associations were iron load dependent. Vascular brain lesions and brain volume did not mediate the relationship between iron and cognitive performance. We conclude that higher R2*-determined iron in the basal ganglia correlates with cognitive impairment during brain aging independent of concomitant brain abnormalities. The prognostic significance of this finding needs to be determined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Spatial distribution of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 in normal canine central and peripheral nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Freundt-Revilla

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system is a regulatory pathway consisting of two main types of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2 and their endogenous ligands, the endocannabinoids. The CB1 receptor is highly expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems (PNS in mammalians and is involved in neuromodulatory functions. Since endocannabinoids were shown to be elevated in cerebrospinal fluid of epileptic dogs, knowledge about the species specific CB receptor expression in the nervous system is required. Therefore, we assessed the spatial distribution of CB1 receptors in the normal canine CNS and PNS. Immunohistochemistry of several regions of the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerves from a healthy four-week-old puppy, three six-month-old dogs, and one ten-year-old dog revealed strong dot-like immunoreactivity in the neuropil of the cerebral cortex, Cornu Ammonis (CA and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, midbrain, cerebellum, medulla oblongata and grey matter of the spinal cord. Dense CB1 expression was found in fibres of the globus pallidus and substantia nigra surrounding immunonegative neurons. Astrocytes were constantly positive in all examined regions. CB1 labelled neurons and satellite cells of the dorsal root ganglia, and myelinating Schwann cells in the PNS. These results demonstrate for the first time the spatial distribution of CB1 receptors in the healthy canine CNS and PNS. These results can be used as a basis for further studies aiming to elucidate the physiological consequences of this particular anatomical and cellular distribution.

  6. Inhibitory Control in the Cortico-Basal Ganglia-Thalamocortical Loop: Complex Regulation and Interplay with Memory and Decision Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2016-12-07

    We developed a circuit model of spiking neurons that includes multiple pathways in the basal ganglia (BG) and is endowed with feedback mechanisms at three levels: cortical microcircuit, corticothalamic loop, and cortico-BG-thalamocortical system. We focused on executive control in a stop signal task, which is known to depend on BG across species. The model reproduces a range of experimental observations and shows that the newly discovered feedback projection from external globus pallidus to striatum is crucial for inhibitory control. Moreover, stopping process is enhanced by the cortico-subcortical reverberatory dynamics underlying persistent activity, establishing interdependence between working memory and inhibitory control. Surprisingly, the stop signal reaction time (SSRT) can be adjusted by weights of certain connections but is insensitive to other connections in this complex circuit, suggesting novel circuit-based intervention for inhibitory control deficits associated with mental illness. Our model provides a unified framework for inhibitory control, decision making, and working memory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Image-guided preoperative prediction of pyramidal tract side effect in deep brain stimulation: proof of concept and application to the pyramidal tract side effect induced by pallidal stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Clement; Zhao, Yulong; Sauleau, Paul; Malrain, Cecile; Jannin, Pierre; Haegelen, Claire

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the medial globus pallidus (GPm) is a surgical procedure for treating patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Its therapeutic effect may be limited by the presence of pyramidal tract side effect (PTSE). PTSE is a contraction time-locked to the stimulation when the current spreading reaches the motor fibers of the pyramidal tract within the internal capsule. The objective of the study was to propose a preoperative predictive model of PTSE. A machine learning-based method called PyMAN (PTSE model based on artificial neural network) accounting for the current used in stimulation, the three-dimensional electrode coordinates and the angle of the trajectory, was designed to predict the occurrence of PTSE. Ten patients implanted in the GPm have been tested by a clinician to create a labeled dataset of the stimulation parameters that trigger PTSE. The kappa index value between the data predicted by PyMAN and the labeled data was 0.78. Further evaluation studies are desirable to confirm whether PyMAN could be a reliable tool for assisting the surgeon to prevent PTSE during the preoperative planning.

  8. T2 relaxometry of brain in myotonic dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Costanzo, A.; Bonavita, V.; Tedeschi, G. [Inst. of Neurological Sciences, 2. Univ. of Naples (Italy); Di Salle, F. [Dept. of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Univ. ' ' Federico II' ' , Naples (Italy); Santoro, L. [Dept. of Neurological Sciences, University ' ' Federico II' ' , Naples (Italy)

    2001-03-01

    We investigated the nature and extent of brain involvement in myotonic dystrophy (DM), examining possible T2 relaxation abnormalities in the brain of 20 patients with adult-onset DM and 20 sex- and age-matched normal controls. Brain MRI was performed at 0.5 T, and T2 values were calculated from signal intensity in two echoes. Regions of interest included: frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital and callosal (rostral and splenial) normal-appearing white matter; frontal, occipital, insular and hippocampal cortex; caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus and thalamus. All white-matter and occipital and right frontal cortex regions showed a significantly longer T2 in the patients. Multiple regression analysis, including grey- and white-matter T2 as dependent variables, plus age at onset and at imaging, disease duration, muscular disability, brain atrophy and CTG trinucleotide repeats as independent variables, revealed that only white-matter T2 elongation and disease duration correlated positively. White-matter involvement in DM is more extensive than previously reported by MRI and neuropathological studies and seems to be progressive in the course of disease. (orig.)

  9. Coordinated reset stimulation in a large-scale model of the STN-GPe circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eEbert

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Synchronization of populations of neurons is a hallmark of several brain diseases. Coordinated reset (CR stimulation is a model-based stimulation technique which specifically counteracts abnormal synchrony by desynchronization. Electrical CR stimulation, e.g. for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD, is administered via depth electrodes. In order to get a deeper understanding of this technique, we extended the top-down approach of previous studies and constructed a large-scale computational model of the respective brain areas. Furthermore, we took into account the spatial anatomical properties of the simulated brain structures and incor- porated a detailed numerical representation of 2·104 simulated neurons. We simulated the subthalamic nucleus (STN and the globus pallidus externus (GPe. Connections within the STN were governed by spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP. In this way, we modeled the physiological and pathological activity of the considered brain structures. In particular, we investigated how plasticity could be exploited and how the model could be shifted from strongly synchronized (pathological activity to strongly desynchronized (healthy activity of the neuronal populations via CR stimulation of the STN neurons. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of specific stimulation parameters especially the electrode position on the stimulation outcome. Our model provides a step forward towards a biophysically realistic model of the brain areas relevant to the emergence of pathological neuronal activity in PD. Furthermore, our model constitutes a test bench for the optimization of both stimulation parameters and novel electrode geometries for efficient CR stimulation.

  10. In vivo (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding: imaging of receptor regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciliax, B.J.; Penney, J.B. Jr.; Young, A.B.

    1986-08-01

    The use of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam as a ligand to measure alterations in benzodiazepine receptors in vivo in rats was investigated. Animals were injected with (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam i.v., arterial samples of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam were obtained and, later, the animals were sacrificed to assay brain binding. (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam enters the brain rapidly and binds to benzodiazepine receptors. About two-thirds of this binding is blocked by predosing the animals with 5 mg/kg of clonazepam. The amount of remaining (nonspecific) binding correlates very well (r = 0.88) with the amount of radioactivity found in plasma at the time of death. A series of rats were lesioned unilaterally with kainic acid in the caudate-putamen several months before the infusion of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam. In vivo autoradiography in lesioned rats showed that benzodiazepine binding in globus pallidus and substantia nigra on the side of the lesion was increased significantly as compared to the intact side. The observed changes in benzodiazepine binding were similar to those observed previously in lesioned rats using in vitro techniques. Thus, benzodiazepine receptor regulation can be imaged quantitatively using in vivo binding techniques.

  11. MR imaging of the brain in neurofibromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, J.P.; Cohen, M.L.; Duffner, P.K.; Seidel, F.; Harwood-Nash, D.

    1986-01-01

    Fifteen children and young adults with neurofibromatosis underwent CT and MR imaging (0.5-T superconducting magnet). Seven had optic gliomas and five had other intracranial neoplasms. Before thin-section MR imaging became available, CT was superior for demonstrating the optic nerves, although MR imaging better delineated tumor spread to the optic chiasm and tract. MR imaging was superior for demonstrating other gliomatous lesions associated with neurofibromatosis. Most lesions had long T1 and T2 values and were best seen on T2-weighted images. MR imaging revealed small areas of increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images in nearly half the patients. These lesions were not apparent on CT and were usually located in the globus pallidus, but were seen in many areas of the brain, commonly in the white matter, and in the brain steam and the cerebellar peduncles. Their exact etiology is unknown. Their imaging characteristics are somewhat different from those of gray matter. They may represent hamartomas or areas of glial scarring. Differentiation from a small glioma is presently not possible on a single examination

  12. Neuroarchitecture of verbal and tonal working memory in nonmusicians and musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Katrin; Zysset, Stefan; Mueller, Karsten; Friederici, Angela D; Koelsch, Stefan

    2011-05-01

    Working memory (WM) for auditory information has been thought of as a unitary system, but whether WM for verbal and tonal information relies on the same or different functional neuroarchitectures has remained unknown. This fMRI study examines verbal and tonal WM in both nonmusicians (who are trained in speech, but not in music) and highly trained musicians (who are trained in both domains). The data show that core structures of WM are involved in both tonal and verbal WM (Broca's area, premotor cortex, pre-SMA/SMA, left insular cortex, inferior parietal lobe), although with significantly different structural weightings, in both nonmusicians and musicians. Additionally, musicians activated specific subcomponents only during verbal (right insular cortex) or only during tonal WM (right globus pallidus, right caudate nucleus, and left cerebellum). These results reveal the existence of two WM systems in musicians: A phonological loop supporting rehearsal of phonological information, and a tonal loop supporting rehearsal of tonal information. Differences between groups for tonal WM, and between verbal and tonal WM within musicians, were mainly related to structures involved in controlling, programming and planning of actions, thus presumably reflecting differences in action-related sensorimotor coding of verbal and tonal information. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Dopamine neurons projecting to the posterior striatum form an anatomically distinct subclass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegas, William; Bergan, Joseph F; Ogawa, Sachie K; Isogai, Yoh; Umadevi Venkataraju, Kannan; Osten, Pavel; Uchida, Naoshige; Watabe-Uchida, Mitsuko

    2015-01-01

    Combining rabies-virus tracing, optical clearing (CLARITY), and whole-brain light-sheet imaging, we mapped the monosynaptic inputs to midbrain dopamine neurons projecting to different targets (different parts of the striatum, cortex, amygdala, etc) in mice. We found that most populations of dopamine neurons receive a similar set of inputs rather than forming strong reciprocal connections with their target areas. A common feature among most populations of dopamine neurons was the existence of dense ‘clusters’ of inputs within the ventral striatum. However, we found that dopamine neurons projecting to the posterior striatum were outliers, receiving relatively few inputs from the ventral striatum and instead receiving more inputs from the globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus, and zona incerta. These results lay a foundation for understanding the input/output structure of the midbrain dopamine circuit and demonstrate that dopamine neurons projecting to the posterior striatum constitute a unique class of dopamine neurons regulated by different inputs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10032.001 PMID:26322384

  14. Histopathological studies on the irradiated brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Tadao

    1980-01-01

    Of 43 cases of irradiated brain tumor, histological findings showed extensive necrosis or disappearance of the neoplasm, considered to be attributable to radiation treatment, in 30 (70%). Extensive necrosis of the tumor in areas exposed to radiation was found in 16 treated cases (37.2%). The histopathology of massive necrosis was that of simple coagulative necrosis, sometimes with marked vascular alterations and extravasation of fibrinoid material into the necrotic tissue. Necrosis was almost always incomplete, and foci of residual tumors were found at the periphery of the tumors. The terminal picture in cases of massive necrosis was often that of widespread intra- and extracranial metastasis. Almost complete disappearance of the tumor was observed in some cases with subsequent diffuse degenerative changes in the brain parenchyma exposed to radiation. In 5 cases of irradiated tumors, autopsy findings suggested that the growth of the primary tumor might have been restricted. And in 5 cases tumor cytology revealed the marked presence of a large number of multinucleated, bizarre giant cells with evidence of degeneration in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Multifocal necrosis of the brain, with axonal swelling and sponginess of the tissue, was observed in two patients following combined radiation and antineoplastic chemotherapy. Diffuse loss and degeneration of nerve cells of the cerebral cortex in pseudo-laminar fashion was observed in 7 patients with or without bilateral necrosis of the globus pallidus. Histological findings revealed typical anoxic encephalopathy. (J.P.N.)

  15. Musical, visual and cognitive deficits after middle cerebral artery infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Rosemann

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The perception of music can be impaired after a stroke. This dysfunction is called amusia and amusia patients often also show deficits in visual abilities, language, memory, learning, and attention. The current study investigated whether deficits in music perception are selective for musical input or generalize to other perceptual abilities. Additionally, we tested the hypothesis that deficits in working memory or attention account for impairments in music perception. Twenty stroke patients with small infarctions in the supply area of the middle cerebral artery were investigated with tests for music and visual perception, categorization, neglect, working memory and attention. Two amusia patients with selective deficits in music perception and pronounced lesions were identified. Working memory and attention deficits were highly correlated across the patient group but no correlation with musical abilities was obtained. Lesion analysis revealed that lesions in small areas of the putamen and globus pallidus were connected to a rhythm perception deficit. We conclude that neither a general perceptual deficit nor a minor domain general deficit can account for impairments in the music perception task. But we find support for the modular organization of the music perception network with brain areas specialized for musical functions as musical deficits were not correlated to any other impairment.

  16. Musical, visual and cognitive deficits after middle cerebral artery infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemann, Stephanie; Brunner, Freimuth; Kastrup, Andreas; Fahle, Manfred

    2017-03-01

    The perception of music can be impaired after a stroke. This dysfunction is called amusia and amusia patients often also show deficits in visual abilities, language, memory, learning, and attention. The current study investigated whether deficits in music perception are selective for musical input or generalize to other perceptual abilities. Additionally, we tested the hypothesis that deficits in working memory or attention account for impairments in music perception. Twenty stroke patients with small infarctions in the supply area of the middle cerebral artery were investigated with tests for music and visual perception, categorization, neglect, working memory and attention. Two amusia patients with selective deficits in music perception and pronounced lesions were identified. Working memory and attention deficits were highly correlated across the patient group but no correlation with musical abilities was obtained. Lesion analysis revealed that lesions in small areas of the putamen and globus pallidus were connected to a rhythm perception deficit. We conclude that neither a general perceptual deficit nor a minor domain general deficit can account for impairments in the music perception task. But we find support for the modular organization of the music perception network with brain areas specialized for musical functions as musical deficits were not correlated to any other impairment.

  17. Diffusion tensor tractography of language functional areas and fiber pathways in normal human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xuejin; Dai Jianping; Chen Hongyan; Gao Peiyi; Ai Lin; Tian Shengyong; Pang Ruilin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the fiber pathways of Broca area to the other functional brain areas with diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tracking. Methods: Conventionality MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fiber tracking were performed using 3.0 T MRI in 20 healthy person. The fiber bundles and tracts were analyzed in Broca area and contralateral normal area. Results: The left-side fiber bundles were 428 and the right-side were 416 in B45 area, there were no statistically significant differences between both sides (t=0.216, P>0.05). The left-side fiber bundles were 432 and the right-side were 344 in B44 area,there were statistically significant (t=2.314, P 0.05). Differences of the arcuate fascicule between both sides were not statistically significant (t=-0.465, P>0.05), the mean FA on the left was higher than the right (t=1.912, P<0.05). DTI and fiber tracking exhibited that the fiber bundles from Broca area were distributed superoanteriorly to the lateral foreside of the frontal lobe, lateroinferiorly to the occipital lobe through external capsule, and went down through globus pallidus and internal capsule. Conclusion: The fiber tracts bewteen Broca area and other brain areas were the fundamental structures for performing language function of the human brain. (authors)

  18. Involvement of dopamine loss in extrastriatal basal ganglia nuclei in the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease

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    Abdelhamid eBenazzouz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease is a neurological disorder characterized by the manifestation of motor symptoms, such as akinesia, muscle rigidity and tremor at rest. These symptoms are classically attributed to the degeneration of dopamine neurons in the pars compacta of substantia nigra (SNc, which results in a marked dopamine depletion in the striatum. It is well established that dopamine neurons in the SNc innervate not only the striatum, which is the main target, but also other basal ganglia nuclei including the two segments of globus pallidus and the subthalamic nucleus. The role of dopamine and its depletion in the striatum is well known, however, the role of dopamine depletion in the pallidal complex and the subthalamic nucleus in the genesis of their abnormal neuronal activity and in parkinsonian motor deficits is still not clearly determined. Based on recent experimental data from animal models of Parkinson's disease in rodents and non-human primates and also from parkinsonian patients, this review summarizes current knowledge on the role of dopamine in the modulation of basal ganglia neuronal activity and also the role of dopamine depletion in these nuclei in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease.

  19. Improvement of Isolated Myoclonus Phenotype in Myoclonus Dystonia after Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation

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    Ritesh Ramdhani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Myoclonus–dystonia is a condition that manifests predominantly as myoclonic jerks with focal dystonia. It is genetically heterogeneous with most mutations in the epsilon sarcoglycan gene (SGCE. In medically refractory cases, deep brain stimulation (DBS has been shown to provide marked sustainable clinical improvement, especially in SGCE-positive patients. We present two patients with myoclonus–dystonia (one SGCE positive and the other SGCE negative who have the isolated myoclonus phenotype and had DBS leads implanted in the bilateral globus pallidus internus (GPi. Methods: We review their longitudinal Unified Myoclonus Rating Scale scores along with their DBS programming parameters and compare them with published cases in the literature. Results: Both patients demonstrated complete amelioration of all aspects of myoclonus within 6–12 months after surgery. The patient with the SGCE-negative mutation responded just as well as the patient who was SGCE positive. High-frequency stimulation (130 Hz with amplitudes greater than 2.5 V provided therapeutic benefit. Discussion: This case series demonstrates that high frequency GPi-DBS is effective in treating isolated myoclonus in myoclonus–dystonia, regardless of the presence of SGCE mutation.

  20. Surgery for Dystonia and Tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Jason L; Shah, Binit B

    2016-03-01

    Surgical procedures for dystonia and tremor have evolved over the past few decades, and our understanding of risk, benefit, and predictive factors has increased substantially in that time. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the most utilized surgical treatment for dystonia and tremor, though lesioning remains an effective option in appropriate patients. Dystonic syndromes that have shown a substantial reduction in severity secondary to DBS are isolated dystonia, including generalized, cervical, and segmental, as well as acquired dystonia such as tardive dystonia. Essential tremor is quite amenable to DBS, though the response of other forms of postural and kinetic tremor is not nearly as robust or consistent based on available evidence. Regarding targeting, DBS lead placement in the globus pallidus internus has shown marked efficacy in dystonia reduction. The subthalamic nucleus is an emerging target, and increasing evidence suggests that this may be a viable target in dystonia as well. The ventralis intermedius nucleus of the thalamus is the preferred target for essential tremor, though targeting the subthalamic zone/caudal zona incerta has shown promise and may emerge as another option in essential tremor and possibly other tremor disorders. In the carefully selected patient, DBS and lesioning procedures are relatively safe and effective for the management of dystonia and tremor.

  1. The many facets of motor learning and their relevance for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Lucio; Quartarone, Angelo; Hallett, Mark; Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Ghilardi, Maria Felice

    2017-07-01

    The final goal of motor learning, a complex process that includes both implicit and explicit (or declarative) components, is the optimization and automatization of motor skills. Motor learning involves different neural networks and neurotransmitters systems depending on the type of task and on the stage of learning. After the first phase of acquisition, a motor skill goes through consolidation (i.e., becoming resistant to interference) and retention, processes in which sleep and long-term potentiation seem to play important roles. The studies of motor learning in Parkinson's disease have yielded controversial results that likely stem from the use of different experimental paradigms. When a task's characteristics, instructions, context, learning phase and type of measures are taken into consideration, it is apparent that, in general, only learning that relies on attentional resources and cognitive strategies is affected by PD, in agreement with the finding of a fronto-striatal deficit in this disease. Levodopa administration does not seem to reverse the learning deficits in PD, while deep brain stimulation of either globus pallidus or subthalamic nucleus appears to be beneficial. Finally and most importantly, patients with PD often show a decrease in retention of newly learned skill, a problem that is present even in the early stages of the disease. A thorough dissection and understanding of the processes involved in motor learning is warranted to provide solid bases for effective medical, surgical and rehabilitative approaches in PD. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. All rights reserved.

  2. Afferent connectivity of the zebrafish habenulae

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    Katherine Jane Turner

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The habenulae are bilateral nuclei located in the dorsal diencephalon that are conserved across vertebrates.Here we describe the main afferents to the habenulae in larval and adult zebrafish.We observe afferents from the subpallium, nucleus rostrolateralis,posterior tuberculum, posterior hypothalamic lobe, median raphe, olfactory bulb to the right habenula and from the parapineal to the lefthabenula.In addition,we find afferents from a ventrolateral telencephalic nucleus that neurochemical and hodological data identify as the ventral entopeduncular nucleus(vENT,confirming and extending observations of Amo et al.(2014.Fate map and marker studies suggest that vENT originates from the diencephalic prethalamic eminence and extends into the lateral telencephalon from 48 to 120 hpf.No afferents to the habenula were observed from the dorsal entopeduncular nucleus(dENT.Consequently,we confirm that the vENT(and not the dENT should be considered as the entopeduncular nucleus proper in zebrafish.Furthermore,comparison with data in other vertebrates suggests that the vENT is a conserved basal ganglia nucleus,being homologous to the entopeduncular nucleus of mammals(internal segment of the globus pallidus of primates by both embryonic origin and projections,as previously suggested by Amo et al.(2014.Key words: habenula,connections,afferents,entopeduncular nucleus,posterior tuberculum,basal ganglia,zebrafish

  3. Afferent Connectivity of the Zebrafish Habenulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Katherine J.; Hawkins, Thomas A.; Yáñez, Julián; Anadón, Ramón; Wilson, Stephen W.; Folgueira, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    The habenulae are bilateral nuclei located in the dorsal diencephalon that are conserved across vertebrates. Here we describe the main afferents to the habenulae in larval and adult zebrafish. We observe afferents from the subpallium, nucleus rostrolateralis, posterior tuberculum, posterior hypothalamic lobe, median raphe; we also see asymmetric afferents from olfactory bulb to the right habenula, and from the parapineal to the left habenula. In addition, we find afferents from a ventrolateral telencephalic nucleus that neurochemical and hodological data identify as the ventral entopeduncular nucleus (vENT), confirming and extending observations of Amo et al. (2014). Fate map and marker studies suggest that vENT originates from the diencephalic prethalamic eminence and extends into the lateral telencephalon from 48 to 120 hour post-fertilization (hpf). No afferents to the habenula were observed from the dorsal entopeduncular nucleus (dENT). Consequently, we confirm that the vENT (and not the dENT) should be considered as the entopeduncular nucleus “proper” in zebrafish. Furthermore, comparison with data in other vertebrates suggests that the vENT is a conserved basal ganglia nucleus, being homologous to the entopeduncular nucleus of mammals (internal segment of the globus pallidus of primates) by both embryonic origin and projections, as previously suggested by Amo et al. (2014). PMID:27199671

  4. Neural correlates of long-term intense romantic love

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Arthur; Fisher, Helen E.; Brown, Lucy L.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the neural correlates of long-term intense romantic love using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Ten women and 7 men married an average of 21.4 years underwent fMRI while viewing facial images of their partner. Control images included a highly familiar acquaintance; a close, long-term friend; and a low-familiar person. Effects specific to the intensely loved, long-term partner were found in: (i) areas of the dopamine-rich reward and basal ganglia system, such as the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and dorsal striatum, consistent with results from early-stage romantic love studies; and (ii) several regions implicated in maternal attachment, such as the globus pallidus (GP), substantia nigra, Raphe nucleus, thalamus, insular cortex, anterior cingulate and posterior cingulate. Correlations of neural activity in regions of interest with widely used questionnaires showed: (i) VTA and caudate responses correlated with romantic love scores and inclusion of other in the self; (ii) GP responses correlated with friendship-based love scores; (iii) hypothalamus and posterior hippocampus responses correlated with sexual frequency; and (iv) caudate, septum/fornix, posterior cingulate and posterior hippocampus responses correlated with obsession. Overall, results suggest that for some individuals the reward-value associated with a long-term partner may be sustained, similar to new love, but also involves brain systems implicated in attachment and pair-bonding. PMID:21208991

  5. {sup 125}I-iomazenil-benzodiazepine receptor binding during psychological stress in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Tsuchida, Daisuke; Ogi, Shigeyuki; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Mori, Yutaka [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-05-01

    We investigated the changes in {sup 125}I-iomazenil ({sup 125}I-IMZ) benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) binding with psychological stress in a rat model. Six male Wistar rats were placed under psychological stress for 1 hour by using a communication box. No physical stress was not received. 1.85 MBq of {sup 125}I-IMZ was injected into the lateral tail vein and the rat was killed 3 hours later. Twenty-micormeter-thick sections of the brain were collected and % injected dose per body weight (% ID/BW) of eleven regions (frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital cortices, caudate putamen, accumubens nuclei, globus pallidus, amygdala, thalamus, hippocampus and hypothalamus) were calculated by autoradiography. The %ID/BW of rats which were placed under psychological stress was compared with that of 6 control rats. The %ID/BW of rats which were placed under psychological stress diffusely tended to show a reduction in {sup 125}I-IMZ-BZR binding. A significant decrease in BZR binding was observed in the hippocampus of the rats which were placed under psychological stress. {sup 125}I-IMZ-BZR binding tended to decrease throughout the brain. (author)

  6. Total and regional brain volumes in a population-based normative sample from 4 to 18 years: the NIH MRI Study of Normal Brain Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Using a population-based sampling strategy, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Normal Brain Development compiled a longitudinal normative reference database of neuroimaging and correlated clinical/behavioral data from a demographically representative sample of healthy children and adolescents aged newborn through early adulthood. The present paper reports brain volume data for 325 children, ages 4.5-18 years, from the first cross-sectional time point. Measures included volumes of whole-brain gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM), left and right lateral ventricles, frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobe GM and WM, subcortical GM (thalamus, caudate, putamen, and globus pallidus), cerebellum, and brainstem. Associations with cross-sectional age, sex, family income, parental education, and body mass index (BMI) were evaluated. Key observations are: 1) age-related decreases in lobar GM most prominent in parietal and occipital cortex; 2) age-related increases in lobar WM, greatest in occipital, followed by the temporal lobe; 3) age-related trajectories predominantly curvilinear in females, but linear in males; and 4) small systematic associations of brain tissue volumes with BMI but not with IQ, family income, or parental education. These findings constitute a normative reference on regional brain volumes in children and adolescents.

  7. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Wild-Type and Knock-in Q140/Q140 Huntington's Disease Mouse Brains Reveals Changes in Glycerophospholipids Including Alterations in Phosphatidic Acid and Lyso-Phosphatidic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodicka, Petr; Mo, Shunyan; Tousley, Adelaide; Green, Karin M; Sapp, Ellen; Iuliano, Maria; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Shaffer, Scott A; Aronin, Neil; DiFiglia, Marian; Kegel-Gleason, Kimberly B

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG expansion in the HD gene, which encodes the protein Huntingtin. Huntingtin associates with membranes and can interact directly with glycerophospholipids in membranes. We analyzed glycerophospholipid profiles from brains of 11 month old wild-type (WT) and Q140/Q140 HD knock-in mice to assess potential changes in glycerophospholipid metabolism. Polar lipids from cerebellum, cortex, and striatum were extracted and analyzed by liquid chromatography and negative ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-MS/MS). Gene products involved in polar lipid metabolism were studied using western blotting, immuno-electron microscopy and qPCR. Significant changes in numerous species of glycerophosphate (phosphatidic acid, PA) were found in striatum, cerebellum and cortex from Q140/Q140 HD mice compared to WT mice at 11 months. Changes in specific species could also be detected for other glycerophospholipids. Increases in species of lyso-PA (LPA) were measured in striatum of Q140/Q140 HD mice compared to WT. Protein levels for c-terminal binding protein 1 (CtBP1), a regulator of PA biosynthesis, were reduced in striatal synaptosomes from HD mice compared to wild-type at 6 and 12 months. Immunoreactivity for CtBP1 was detected on membranes of synaptic vesicles in striatal axon terminals in the globus pallidus. These novel results identify a potential site of molecular pathology caused by mutant Huntingtin that may impart early changes in HD.

  8. Reward, motivation, and emotion systems associated with early-stage intense romantic love.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Arthur; Fisher, Helen; Mashek, Debra J; Strong, Greg; Li, Haifang; Brown, Lucy L

    2005-07-01

    Early-stage romantic love can induce euphoria, is a cross-cultural phenomenon, and is possibly a developed form of a mammalian drive to pursue preferred mates. It has an important influence on social behaviors that have reproductive and genetic consequences. To determine which reward and motivation systems may be involved, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and studied 10 women and 7 men who were intensely "in love" from 1 to 17 mo. Participants alternately viewed a photograph of their beloved and a photograph of a familiar individual, interspersed with a distraction-attention task. Group activation specific to the beloved under the two control conditions occurred in dopamine-rich areas associated with mammalian reward and motivation, namely the right ventral tegmental area and the right postero-dorsal body and medial caudate nucleus. Activation in the left ventral tegmental area was correlated with facial attractiveness scores. Activation in the right anteromedial caudate was correlated with questionnaire scores that quantified intensity of romantic passion. In the left insula-putamen-globus pallidus, activation correlated with trait affect intensity. The results suggest that romantic love uses subcortical reward and motivation systems to focus on a specific individual, that limbic cortical regions process individual emotion factors, and that there is localization heterogeneity for reward functions in the human brain.

  9. The Development of the Basal Ganglia in Capuchin Monkeys (Cebus apella)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kimberley A.; Sobieski, Courtney A.; Gilbert, Valerie R.; Chiappini-Williamson, Christine; Sherwood, Chet C.; Strick, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    The basal ganglia are subcortical structures involved in the planning, initiation and regulation of movement as well as a variety of non-motor, cognitive and affective functions. Capuchin monkeys share several important characteristics of development with humans, including a prolonged infancy and juvenile period, a long lifespan, and complex manipulative abilities. This makes capuchins important comparative models for understanding age-related neuroanatomical changes in these structures. Here we report developmental volumetric data on the three subdivisions of the basal ganglia, the caudate, putamen and globus pallidus in brown capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella). Based on a cross-sectional sample, we describe brain development in 28 brown capuchin monkeys (male n = 17, female n = 11; age range = 2 months – 20 years) using high-resolution structural MRI. We found that the raw volumes of the putamen and caudate varied significantly with age, decreasing in volume from birth through early adulthood. Notably, developmental changes did not differ between sexes. Because these observed developmental patterns are similar to humans, our results suggest that capuchin monkeys may be useful animal models for investigating neurodevelopmental disorders of the basal ganglia. PMID:20227397

  10. Dynamic brain glucose metabolism identifies anti-correlated cortical-cerebellar networks at rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Dardo G; Shokri-Kojori, Ehsan; Wiers, Corinde E; Kim, Sunny W; Demiral, Şukru B; Cabrera, Elizabeth A; Lindgren, Elsa; Miller, Gregg; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D

    2017-12-01

    It remains unclear whether resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rfMRI) networks are associated with underlying synchrony in energy demand, as measured by dynamic 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoroglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). We measured absolute glucose metabolism, temporal metabolic connectivity (t-MC) and rfMRI patterns in 53 healthy participants at rest. Twenty-two rfMRI networks emerged from group independent component analysis (gICA). In contrast, only two anti-correlated t-MC emerged from FDG-PET time series using gICA or seed-voxel correlations; one included frontal, parietal and temporal cortices, the other included the cerebellum and medial temporal regions. Whereas cerebellum, thalamus, globus pallidus and calcarine cortex arose as the strongest t-MC hubs, the precuneus and visual cortex arose as the strongest rfMRI hubs. The strength of the t-MC linearly increased with the metabolic rate of glucose suggesting that t-MC measures are strongly associated with the energy demand of the brain tissue, and could reflect regional differences in glucose metabolism, counterbalanced metabolic network demand, and/or differential time-varying delivery of FDG. The mismatch between metabolic and functional connectivity patterns computed as a function of time could reflect differences in the temporal characteristics of glucose metabolism as measured with PET-FDG and brain activation as measured with rfMRI.

  11. Subthalamic hGAD65 Gene Therapy and Striatum TH Gene Transfer in a Parkinson’s Disease Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Deyu; Jiang, Xiaohua; Zhao, Junpeng; Duan, Deyi; Zhao, Huanying; Xu, Qunyuan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to detect a combination method to utilize gene therapy for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Here, a PD rat model is used for the in vivo gene therapy of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV2) containing a human glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (rAAV2-hGAD65) gene delivered to the subthalamic nucleus (STN). This is combined with the ex vivo gene delivery of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) by fibroblasts injected into the striatum. After the treatment, the rotation behavior was improved with the greatest efficacy in the combination group. The results of immunohistochemistry showed that hGAD65 gene delivery by AAV2 successfully led to phenotypic changes of neurons in STN. And the levels of glutamic acid and GABA in the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) were obviously lower than the control groups. However, hGAD65 gene transfer did not effectively protect surviving dopaminergic neurons in the SNc and VTA. This study suggests that subthalamic hGAD65 gene therapy and combined with TH gene therapy can alleviate symptoms of the PD model rats, independent of the protection the DA neurons from death. PMID:23738148

  12. What basal ganglia changes underlie the parkinsonian state? The significance of neuronal oscillatory activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga-Varela, A.; Walters, J.R.; Brazhnik, E.; Marin, C.; Obeso, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    One well accepted functional feature of the parkinsonian state is the recording of enhanced beta oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia. This has been demonstrated in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and in animal models such as the rat with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced lesion and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated monkeys, all of which are associated with severe striatal dopamine depletion. Neuronal hyper-synchronization in the beta (or any other) band is not present despite the presence of bradykinetic features in the rat and monkey models, suggesting that increased beta band power may arise when nigro-striatal lesion is advanced and that it is not an essential feature of the early parkinsonian state. Similar observations and conclusions have been previously made for increased neuronal firing rate in the subthalamic and globus pallidus pars interna nuclei. Accordingly, it is suggested that early parkinsonism may be associated with dynamic changes in basal ganglia output activity leading to reduced movement facilitation that may be an earlier feature of the parkinsonian state. PMID:23727447

  13. Clinical-pathomorphological correlation in patients with symptomatic dystonias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Nataša

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic dystonia can be the result of various metabolic, degenerative diseases, the consumption of certain medications or exposure to toxic agents. However, only symptomatic dystonia with focal structural lesion provides a significant "window" for, at least indirect, perception of aetiopa-thogenesis and pathomorphological substratum of idiopathic dystonia. Our study included 57 patients with symptomatic dystonia, which as a base had focal or multifocal lesions, of whom 7 patients had generalized dystonia, 18 hemidystonia, 6 segmental dystonia, 7 torticollis, 6 blepharospasm, 7 hand dystonia, 3 spasmodic dysphonia, and 3 had oromandibular dystonia. Stroke was highly statistically the most frequent cause of structural lesions (33/57 or 58%. Relevant pathomorphological changes were present in 50/57 (88% patients, of whom 25 (50% had lesion in the lenticular nucleus (including individual damage of the putamen and globus pallidus, 12/50 (24% had damage of the thalamus and 6/50 (12% had damage of the brainstem. Generalized dystonia was most frequently associated with bilateral lesion of the putamen, hemidystonia with lesion of contralateral putamen, torticollis with damage of the caudate nucleus, hand dystonia with lesion of the thalamus and blepharospasm with lesion of the upper brainstem.

  14. Brain activity related to phonation in young patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyuna, Asanori; Maeda, Hiroyuki; Higa, Asano; Shingaki, Kouta; Uehara, Takayuki; Suzuki, Mikio

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated the brain activities during phonation of young patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) of relatively short disease duration (<10 years). Six subjects with ADSD of short duration (mean age: 24. 3 years; mean disease duration: 41 months) and six healthy controls (mean age: 30.8 years) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using a sparse sampling method to identify brain activity during vowel phonation (/i:/). Intragroup and intergroup analyses were performed using statistical parametric mapping software. Areas of activation in the ADSD and control groups were similar to those reported previously for vowel phonation. All of the activated areas were observed bilaterally and symmetrically. Intergroup analysis revealed higher brain activities in the SD group in the auditory-related areas (Brodmann's areas [BA] 40, 41), motor speech areas (BA44, 45), bilateral insula (BA13), bilateral cerebellum, and middle frontal gyrus (BA46). Areas with lower activation were in the left primary sensory area (BA1-3) and bilateral subcortical nucleus (putamen and globus pallidus). The auditory cortical responses observed may reflect that young ADSD patients control their voice by use of the motor speech area, insula, inferior parietal cortex, and cerebellum. Neural activity in the primary sensory area and basal ganglia may affect the voice symptoms of young ADSD patients with short disease duration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A case series study of the neurophysiological effects of altered states of mind during intense Islamic prayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberg, Andrew B; Wintering, Nancy A; Yaden, David B; Waldman, Mark R; Reddin, Janet; Alavi, Abass

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a case series with preliminary data regarding the neurophysiological effects of specific prayer practices associated with the Islamic religion. Such practices, like other prayer practices, are likely associated with several coordinated cognitive activities and a complex pattern of brain physiology. However, there may also be changes specific to the goals of Islamic prayer which has, as its most fundamental concept, the surrendering of one's self to God. To evaluate Islamic prayer practices, we measured changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in three Islamic individuals while practicing two different types of Islamic prayer. In this case series, intense Islamic prayer practices generally showed decreased CBF in the prefrontal cortex and related frontal lobe structures, and the parietal lobes. However, there were also several regions that differed between the two types of prayer practices including increased CBF in the caudate nucleus, insula, thalamus, and globus pallidus. These patterns also appear distinct from concentrative techniques in which an individual focuses on a particular idea or object. It is hypothesized that the changes in brain activity may be associated with feelings of "surrender" and "connectedness with God" described to be experienced during these intense Islamic prayer practices. Overall, these results suggest that several coordinated cognitive processes occur during intense Islamic prayer. Methodological issues and implications of the results are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Increased putamen volume in adults with autism spectrum disorder

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    Wataru eSato

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Basal ganglia (BG abnormalities are implicated in the pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD. However, studies measuring the volume of the entire BG in individuals with ASD have reported discrepant findings, and no study conducted volume measurement of the entire substructures of the BG (the caudate, putamen, nucleus accumbens, and globus pallidus in individuals with ASD. We delineated the BG substructures and measured their volumes in 29 adults with ASD without intellectual disabilities and 29 age- and gender-matched typically developed adult controls. We acquired T1-weighted anatomical images and performed semi-automated delineation and volume measurements of the above-mentioned subregions. Total cerebral volumes, sex, and ages were partialed out. Compared with controls, the putamen was significantly larger in the ASD group. The increased volume of the putamen found in high-functioning adults with ASD suggests that structural or histological abnormalities of the putamen may underlie the pathologies of ASD such as repetitive and stereotyped behaviors and impaired social interactions.

  17. Modular Reorganization of Brain Resting State Networks and Its Independent Validation in Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

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    Guangyu eChen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated disruption in structural and functional connectivity occurring in the Alzheimer’s Disease (AD. However, it is not known how these disruptions alter brain network reorganization. With the modular analysis method of graph theory, and datasets acquired by the resting-state functional connectivity MRI (R-fMRI method, we investigated and compared the brain organization patterns between the AD group and the cognitively normal control (CN group. Our main finding is that the largest homotopic module (defined as the insula module in the CN group was broken down to the pieces in the AD group. Specifically, it was discovered that the eight pairs of the bilateral regions (the opercular part of inferior frontal gyrus, area triangularis, insula, putamen, globus pallidus, transverse temporal gyri, superior temporal gyrus, and superior temporal pole of the insula module had lost symmetric functional connection properties, and the corresponding gray matter concentration (GMC was significant lower in AD group. We further quantified the functional connectivity changes with an index (index A and structural changes with the GMC index in the insula module to demonstrate their great potential as AD biomarkers. We further validated these results with six additional independent datasets (271 subjects in six groups. Our results demonstrated specific underlying structural and functional reorganization from young to old, and for diseased subjects. Further, it is suggested that by combining the structural GMC analysis and functional modular analysis in the insula module, a new biomarker can be developed at the single-subject level.

  18. Exposure to the cytokine EGF leads to abnormal hyperactivity of pallidal GABA neurons: implications for schizophrenia and its modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoyama, Hidekazu; Namba, Hisaaki; Chiken, Satomi; Nambu, Atsushi; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies on a cytokine model for schizophrenia reveal that the hyperdopaminergic innervation and neurotransmission in the globus pallidus (GP) is involved in its behavioral impairments. Here, we further explored the physiological consequences of the GP abnormality in the indirect pathway, using the same schizophrenia model established by perinatal exposure to epidermal growth factor (EGF). Single-unit recordings revealed that the neural activity from the lateral GP was elevated in EGF-treated rats in vivo and in vitro (i.e., slice preparations), whereas the central area of the GP exhibited no significant differences. The increase in the pallidal activity was normalized by subchronic treatment with risperidone, which is known to ameliorate their behavioral deficits. We also monitored extracellular GABA concentrations in the substantia nigra, one of the targets of pallidal efferents. There was a significant increase in basal GABA levels in EGF-treated rats, whereas high potassium-evoked GABA effluxes and glutamate levels were not affected. A neurotoxic lesion in the GP of EGF-treated rats normalized GABA concentrations to control levels. Corroborating our in vivo results, GABA release from GP slices was elevated in EGF-treated animals. These findings suggest that the hyperactivity and enhanced GABA release of GP neurons represent the key pathophysiological features of this cytokine-exposure model for schizophrenia. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  19. Modeling and Theories of Pathophysiology and Physiology of the Basal Ganglia–Thalamic–Cortical System: Critical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery Jr., Erwin B.

    2016-01-01

    Theories impact the movement disorders clinic, not only affecting the development of new therapies but determining how current therapies are used. Models are theories that are procedural rather than declarative. Theories and models are important because, as argued by Kant, one cannot know the thing-in-itself (das Ding an sich) and only a model is knowable. Further, biological variability forces higher level abstraction relevant for all variants. It is that abstraction that is raison d’être of theories and models. Theories “connect the dots” to move from correlation to causation. The necessity of theory makes theories helpful or counterproductive. Theories and models of the pathophysiology and physiology of the basal ganglia–thalamic–cortical system do not spontaneously arise but have a history and consequently are legacies. Over the last 40 years, numerous theories and models of the basal ganglia have been proposed only to be forgotten or dismissed, rarely critiqued. It is not harsh to say that current popular theories positing increased neuronal activities in the Globus Pallidus Interna (GPi), excessive beta oscillations and increased synchronization not only fail to provide an adequate explication but are inconsistent with many observations. It is likely that their shared intellectual and epistemic inheritance plays a factor in their shared failures. These issues are critically examined. How one is to derive theories and models and have hope these will be better is explored as well. PMID:27708569

  20. Study of the neural basis of striatal modulation of the jaw-opening reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barceló, Ana C; Fillipini, B; Pazo, Jorge Horacio

    2010-02-01

    Previous experimental data from this laboratory demonstrated the participation of the striatum and dopaminergic pathways in central nociceptive processing. The objective of this study was to examine the possible pathways and neural structures associated with the analgesic action of the striatum. The experiments were carried out in rats anesthetized with urethane. The jaw-opening reflex (JOR) was evoked by electrical stimulation of the tooth pulp of lower incisors and recorded in the anterior belly of the digastric muscles. Intrastriatal microinjection of apomorphine, a nonspecific dopamine agonist, reduced or abolished the JOR amplitude. Electrolytic or kainic acid lesions, unilateral to the apomorphine-injected striatum, of the globus pallidus, substantia nigra pars reticulata, subthalamic nucleus and bilateral lesion the rostroventromedial medulla (RVM), blocked the inhibition of the JOR by striatal stimulation. These findings suggest that the main output nuclei of the striatum and the RVM may be critical elements in the neural pathways mediating the inhibition of the reflex response, evoked in jaw muscles by noxious stimulation of dental pulp.

  1. Is the spatial distribution of brain lesions associated with closed-head injury predictive of subsequent development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder? Analysis with brain-image database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herskovits, E. H.; Megalooikonomou, V.; Davatzikos, C.; Chen, A.; Bryan, R. N.; Gerring, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether there is an association between the spatial distribution of lesions detected at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain in children after closed-head injury and the development of secondary attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data obtained from 76 children without prior history of ADHD were analyzed. MR images were obtained 3 months after closed-head injury. After manual delineation of lesions, images were registered to the Talairach coordinate system. For each subject, registered images and secondary ADHD status were integrated into a brain-image database, which contains depiction (visualization) and statistical analysis software. Using this database, we assessed visually the spatial distributions of lesions and performed statistical analysis of image and clinical variables. RESULTS: Of the 76 children, 15 developed secondary ADHD. Depiction of the data suggested that children who developed secondary ADHD had more lesions in the right putamen than children who did not develop secondary ADHD; this impression was confirmed statistically. After Bonferroni correction, we could not demonstrate significant differences between secondary ADHD status and lesion burdens for the right caudate nucleus or the right globus pallidus. CONCLUSION: Closed-head injury-induced lesions in the right putamen in children are associated with subsequent development of secondary ADHD. Depiction software is useful in guiding statistical analysis of image data.

  2. Histopathological studies on the irradiated brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, T [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan).School of Medicine

    1980-01-01

    Of 43 cases of irradiated brain tumor, histological findings showed extensive necrosis or disappearance of the neoplasm, considered to be attributable to radiation treatment, in 30 (70%). Extensive necrosis of the tumor in areas exposed to radiation was found in 16 treated cases (37.2%). The histopathology of massive necrosis was that of simple coagulative necrosis, sometimes with marked vascular alterations and extravasation of fibrinoid material into the necrotic tissue. Necrosis was almost always incomplete, and foci of residual tumors were found at the periphery of the tumors. The terminal picture in cases of massive necrosis was often that of widespread intra- and extracranial metastasis. Almost complete disappearance of the tumor was observed in some cases with subsequent diffuse degenerative changes in the brain parenchyma exposed to radiation. In 5 cases of irradiated tumors, autopsy findings suggested that the growth of the primary tumor might have been restricted. And in 5 cases tumor cytology revealed the marked presence of a large number of multinucleated, bizarre giant cells with evidence of degeneration in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Multifocal necrosis of the brain, with axonal swelling and sponginess of the tissue, was observed in two patients following combined radiation and antineoplastic chemotherapy. Diffuse loss and degeneration of nerve cells of the cerebral cortex in pseudo-laminar fashion was observed in 7 patients with or without bilateral necrosis of the globus pallidus. Histological findings revealed typical anoxic encephalopathy.

  3. Exploring risk factors for stuttering development in Parkinson disease after deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picillo, Marina; Vincos, Gustavo B; Sammartino, Francesco; Lozano, Andres M; Fasano, Alfonso

    2017-05-01

    Stuttering is a speech disorder with disruption of verbal fluency, occasionally present in Parkinson's disease (PD). PD co-incident stuttering may either worsen or improve after Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS). Sixteen out of 453 PD patients (3.5%) exhibited stuttering after DBS (PD-S) and were compared with a group of patients without stuttering (PD-NS) using non-parametric statistics. After DBS, stuttering worsened in 3 out of 4 patients with co-incidental stuttering. Most PD-S underwent subthalamic (STN) DBS, but 4 were implanted in the globus pallidus (GPi). Nine out of 16 PD-S (56.3%) reported a positive familial history for stuttering compared to none of the PD-NS. PD-S were mainly male (81.3%) with slight worse motor features compared to PD-NS. Herein, we describe a group of PD patients developing stuttering after DBS and report the presence of a positive familial history for stuttering as the most relevant risk factor, suggesting a possible underlying genetic cause. The fact that stuttering occurred after either STN or GPi DBS is an argument against the impact of medication reduction on stuttering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Long-Term Effect of GPi-DBS in a Patient With Generalized Dystonia Due to GLUT1 Deficiency Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idil Hanci

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Treatment outcomes from pallidal deep brain stimulation are highly heterogeneous reflecting the phenotypic and etiologic spectrum of dystonia. Treatment stratification to neurostimulation therapy primarily relies on the phenotypic motor presentation; however, etiology including genetic factors are increasingly recognized as modifiers of treatment outcomes. Here, we describe a 53 year-old female patient with a progressive generalized dystonia since age 25. The patient underwent deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus internus (GPi-DBS at age 44. Since the clinical phenotype included mobile choreo-dystonic features, we expected favorable therapeutic outcome from GPi-DBS. Although mobile dystonia components were slightly improved in the long-term outcome from GPi-DBS the overall therapeutic response 9 years from implantation was limited when comparing “stimulation off” and “stimulation on” despite of proper electrode localization and sufficient stimulation programming. In order to further understand the reason for this limited motor symptom response, we aimed to clarify the etiology of generalized dystonia in this patient. Genetic testing identified a novel heterozygous pathogenic SLC2A1 mutation as cause of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS. This case report presents the first outcome of GPi-DBS in a patient with GLUT1-DS, and suggests that genotype relations may increasingly complement phenotype-based therapy stratification of GPi-DBS in dystonia.

  5. Changes of deep gray matter magnetic susceptibility over 2years in multiple sclerosis and healthy control brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Hagemeier

    Full Text Available In multiple sclerosis, pathological changes of both tissue iron and myelin occur, yet these factors have not been characterized in a longitudinal fashion using the novel iron- and myelin-sensitive quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM MRI technique. We investigated disease-relevant tissue changes associated with myelin loss and iron accumulation in multiple sclerosis deep gray matter (DGM over two years. One-hundred twenty (120 multiple sclerosis patients and 40 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included in this prospective study. Written informed consent and local IRB approval were obtained from all participants. Clinical testing and QSM were performed both at baseline and at follow-up. Brain magnetic susceptibility was measured in major DGM structures. Temporal (baseline vs. follow-up and cross-sectional (multiple sclerosis vs. controls differences were studied using mixed factorial ANOVA analysis and appropriate t-tests. At either time-point, multiple sclerosis patients had significantly higher susceptibility in the caudate and globus pallidus and lower susceptibility in the thalamus. Over two years, susceptibility increased significantly in the caudate of both controls and multiple sclerosis patients. Inverse thalamic findings among MS patients suggest a multi-phase pathology explained by simultaneous myelin loss and/or iron accumulation followed by iron depletion and/or calcium deposition at later stages. Keywords: Quantitative susceptibility mapping, QSM, Iron, Multiple sclerosis, Longitudinal study

  6. Mental Health-Related Healthcare Use Following Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation For Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbay, Lauren C; Cao, Lishan; Burnett-Zeigler, Inger; Reizine, Natalie; Barton, Brandon; Ippolito, Dolores; Weaver, Frances M; Stroupe, Kevin T

    2015-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the globus pallidus internus (GPi) are both effective targets for deep brain stimulation (DBS) to relieve motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. However, studies have reported varied effects on mental health-related adverse events and depressed mood following DBS. The current observational study sought to compare mental health healthcare utilization and costs for three years following STN or GPi DBS. For a cohort of Veterans (n = 161) with Parkinson's disease who participated in a larger multi-site randomized trial, we compared mental health outpatient visits, medication use, inpatient admissions, and associated costs by DBS target site (STN vs. GPi). Neither group nor time differences were significant for mental health outpatient or inpatient utilization following DBS. Overall costs associated with mental health visits and medications did not differ by time or by group. However, the percentage of patients with mental health medication use increased in the 6-month and 6 to 12 month periods post-surgery. The STN group had significantly greater increase in medication use at 6 to 12 months post-surgery compared to the GPi group (p use following surgery, this study suggests that mental health healthcare use and costs are stable over time and similar between DBS targets. Prior research findings of mental health-related adverse events and mood following DBS did not translate to greater mental health service utilization in our cohort. The changes seen in the year following surgery may reflect temporary adjustments with stabilization over time.

  7. T2 relaxometry of brain in myotonic dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Costanzo, A.; Bonavita, V.; Tedeschi, G.; Di Salle, F.; Santoro, L.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the nature and extent of brain involvement in myotonic dystrophy (DM), examining possible T2 relaxation abnormalities in the brain of 20 patients with adult-onset DM and 20 sex- and age-matched normal controls. Brain MRI was performed at 0.5 T, and T2 values were calculated from signal intensity in two echoes. Regions of interest included: frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital and callosal (rostral and splenial) normal-appearing white matter; frontal, occipital, insular and hippocampal cortex; caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus and thalamus. All white-matter and occipital and right frontal cortex regions showed a significantly longer T2 in the patients. Multiple regression analysis, including grey- and white-matter T2 as dependent variables, plus age at onset and at imaging, disease duration, muscular disability, brain atrophy and CTG trinucleotide repeats as independent variables, revealed that only white-matter T2 elongation and disease duration correlated positively. White-matter involvement in DM is more extensive than previously reported by MRI and neuropathological studies and seems to be progressive in the course of disease. (orig.)

  8. Staged pallidotomy: MRI and clinical follow-up in status dystonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzini, Angelo; Levi, Vincenzo; Franzini, Andrea; Dones, Ivano; Messina, Giuseppe

    2017-11-28

    We report on a patient affected by Status Distonicus who was treated with Deep Brain Stimulation electrodes implanted in the Globus Pallidus internus (Gpi) and used for serial radiofrequency lesions. The evolution of radiofrequency lesions was monitored by post-operative and late Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). After the first lesion the patient did improve, though not in a significant fashion. Therefore, three further radiofrequency lesions were delivered 2, 4 and 6 days respectively after surgery with subsequent improvement of dystonic movements. MRI scans performed at 8 days, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery showed a diffuse T2-hyperintense and T1-hypointense GPi signal alteration which progressively decreased over time. We confirm that the possibility to stage pallidotomies over time using a couple of new contacts is a safe and efficacious procedure in treating SD patients where the lesions themselves are limited by the appearance of side effects, or in patients showing a poor response to a single lesion. As far as we know, this is the first description of MRI evolution and monitoring of a staged pallidotomy.

  9. Neurotensin receptor binding levels in basal ganglia are not altered in Huntington's chorea or schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, J.M.; Chinaglia, G.; Rigo, M.; Ulrich, J.; Probst, A.

    1991-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques were used to examine the distribution and levels of neurotensin receptor binding sites in the basal ganglia and related regions of the human brain. Monoiodo ( 125 I-Tyr3)neurotensin was used as a ligand. High amounts of neurotensin receptor binding sites were found in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Lower but significant quantities of neurotensin receptor binding sites characterized the caudate, putamen, and nucleus accumbens, while very low quantities were seen in both medial and lateral segments of the globus pallidus. In Huntington's chorea, the levels of neurotensin receptor binding sites were found to be comparable to those of control cases. Only slight but not statistically significant decreases in amounts of receptor binding sites were detected in the dorsal part of the head and in the body of caudate nucleus. No alterations in the levels of neurotensin receptor binding sites were observed in the substantia nigra pars compacta and reticulata. These results suggest that a large proportion of neurotensin receptor binding sites in the basal ganglia are located on intrinsic neurons and on extrinsic afferent fibers that do not degenerate in Huntington's disease

  10. Ageing effect on 18F-DOPA and 123I-MIBG uptake: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Barbagallo, Gaetano; Ricci, Maria; Sannino, Pasqualina; Karalis, Georgios; Ursini, Francesco; Schillaci, Orazio

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between age and uptake of fluorine-18-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (F-DOPA) in the brain and myocardial uptake of iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (I-MIBG) in normal adult participants. To this end, a total of 72 healthy participants were enroled. Of these, 37 individuals (male, 21; female, 16; mean age: 60±12 years; age range: 38-85 years) underwent F-DOPA PET/CT, whereas 35 individuals (male, 19; female, 16; mean age: 61±17 years; age range: 17-87 years) underwent I-MIBG scintigraphy. For F-DOPA PET/CT, regions of interest were placed on the caudate nucleus, globus pallidus and putamen by means of the WFU Pickatlas tool implemented in SPM8 and further analysed after a normalization process. For I-MIBG scintigraphy, regions of interest were set over the upper mediastinum and a heart-to-mediastinum count ratio was calculated. The relation between age and normalized F-DOPA values or heart-to-mediastinum ratio values was examined using correlation analysis of variance and Pearson's correlation coefficient. We did not find any significant relationship between age and F-DOPA and I-MIBG uptake, respectively. Our findings suggest that both brain F-DOPA PET/CT and cardiac I-MIBG scintigraphy represent age-independent biomarkers whose analyses of quantitative uptake may not require adjustment for patients' age.

  11. Sex Commonalities and Differences in Obesity-Related Alterations in Intrinsic Brain Activity and Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arpana; Mayer, Emeran A; Labus, Jennifer S; Bhatt, Ravi R; Ju, Tiffany; Love, Aubrey; Bal, Amanat; Tillisch, Kirsten; Naliboff, Bruce; Sanmiguel, Claudia P; Kilpatrick, Lisa A

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to characterize obesity-related sex differences in the intrinsic activity and connectivity of the brain's reward networks. Eighty-six women (n = 43) and men (n = 43) completed a 10-minute resting functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. Sex differences and commonalities in BMI-related frequency power distribution and reward seed-based connectivity were investigated by using partial least squares analysis. For whole-brain activity in both men and women, increased BMI was associated with increased slow-5 activity in the left globus pallidus (GP) and substantia nigra. In women only, increased BMI was associated with increased slow-4 activity in the right GP and bilateral putamen. For seed-based connectivity in women, increased BMI was associated with reduced slow-5 connectivity between the left GP and putamen and the emotion and cortical regulation regions, but in men, increased BMI was associated with increased connectivity with the medial frontal cortex. In both men and women, increased BMI was associated with increased slow-4 connectivity between the right GP and bilateral putamen and the emotion regulation and sensorimotor-related regions. The stronger relationship between increased BMI and decreased connectivity of core reward network components with cortical and emotion regulation regions in women may be related to the greater prevalence of emotional eating. The present findings suggest the importance of personalized treatments for obesity that consider the sex of the affected individual. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  12. Freehand technique for putaminal hemorrhage. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokosuka, Kimihiko; Uno, Masaaki; Hirano, Kazuhiro; Toi, Hiroyuki; Matsuzaki, Kazuhito; Matsubara, Shunji

    2011-01-01

    We designed a new endoscopic surgical procedure for putaminal hemorrhage (freehand technique) and evaluated its effectiveness and safety in patients with putaminal hemorrhage. Computed tomography (CT) data sets from 40 healthy patients were used. The CT data were transformed into three-dimensional images using AZE VirtualPlace Plus. The nasion and external auditory foramen were the intraoperative reference points. The median point from medial of the globus pallidus to the insula was the target point. The location of the burr hole point was 80-125 mm above and 27.5 mm lateral to the nasion, and the direction was parallel to the midline and a line drawn from the burr hole to the ipsilateral external auditory foramen. This point was used for 15 patients with putaminal hemorrhage. In all cases, only one puncture was required, and there were no complications. The median surgical time was 91.7 minutes, and the median hematoma removal rate was 95.9%. No recurrent bleeding or operative complications occurred. The freehand technique is a simple and safe technique for patients with putaminal hemorrhage. We believe that this technique of endoscopic hematoma evacuation may provide a less-invasive method for treating patients with putaminal hemorrhage. (author)

  13. Persistent Autobiographical Amnesia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Repetto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 47-year-old man who referred to the Emergency Department for sudden global amnesia and left mild motor impairment in the setting of increased arterial blood pressure. The acute episode resolved within 24 hours. Despite general recovery and the apparent transitory nature of the event, a persistent selective impairment in recollecting events from some specific topics of his personal life became apparent. Complete neuropsychological tests one week after the acute onset and 2 months later demonstrated a clear retrograde memory deficit contrasting with the preservation of anterograde memory and learning abilities. One year later, the autobiographic memory deficit was unmodified, except for what had been re-learnt. Brain MRI was normal while H20 brain PET scans demonstrated hypometabolism in the right globus pallidus and putamen after 2 weeks from onset, which was no longer present one year later. The absence of a clear pathomechanism underlying focal amnesia lead us to consider this case as an example of functional retrograde amnesia.

  14. A real-time artifact reduction algorithm based on precise threshold during short-separation optical probe insertion in neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitao Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During neurosurgery, an optical probe has been used to guide the micro-electrode, which is punctured into the globus pallidus (GP to create a lesion that can relieve the cardinal symptoms. Accurate target localization is the key factor to affect the treatment. However, considering the scattering nature of the tissue, the “look ahead distance (LAD” of optical probe makes the boundary between the different tissues blurred and difficult to be distinguished, which is defined as artifact. Thus, it is highly desirable to reduce the artifact caused by LAD. In this paper, a real-time algorithm based on precise threshold was proposed to eliminate the artifact. The value of the threshold was determined by the maximum error of the measurement system during the calibration procession automatically. Then, the measured data was processed sequentially only based on the threshold and the former data. Moreover, 100μm double-fiber probe and two-layer and multi-layer phantom models were utilized to validate the precision of the algorithm. The error of the algorithm is one puncture step, which was proved in the theory and experiment. It was concluded that the present method could reduce the artifact caused by LAD and make the real boundary sharper and less blurred in real-time. It might be potentially used for the neurosurgery navigation.

  15. Cerebral Activity Changes in Different Traditional Chinese Medicine Patterns of Psychogenic Erectile Dysfunction Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pattern differentiation is the foundation of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED. This study aims to investigate the differences in cerebral activity in ED patients with different TCM patterns. Methods. 27 psychogenic ED patients and 27 healthy subjects (HS were enrolled in this study. Each participant underwent an fMRI scan in resting state. The fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF was used to detect the brain activity changes in ED patients with different patterns. Results. Compared to HS, ED patients showed an increased cerebral activity in bilateral cerebellum, insula, globus pallidus, parahippocampal gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, and middle cingulate cortex (MCC. Compared to the patients with liver-qi stagnation and spleen deficiency pattern (LSSDP, the patients with kidney-yang deficiency pattern (KDP showed an increased activity in bilateral brainstem, cerebellum, hippocampus, and the right insula, thalamus, MCC, and a decreased activity in bilateral putamen, medial frontal gyrus, temporal pole, and the right caudate nucleus, OFC, anterior cingulate cortex, and posterior cingulate cortex (P<0.005. Conclusions. The ED patients with different TCM patterns showed different brain activities. The differences in cerebral activity between LSSDP and KDP were mainly in the emotion-related regions, including prefrontal cortex and cingulated cortex.

  16. Cerebral Activity Changes in Different Traditional Chinese Medicine Patterns of Psychogenic Erectile Dysfunction Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Zhang, Peihai; Pan, Junjie; Li, Zhengjie; Liu, Jixin; Li, Guangsen; Qin, Wei; You, Yaodong; Yu, Xujun; Sun, Jinbo; Dong, Minghao; Gong, Qiyong; Guo, Jun; Chang, Degui

    2015-01-01

    Background. Pattern differentiation is the foundation of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED). This study aims to investigate the differences in cerebral activity in ED patients with different TCM patterns. Methods. 27 psychogenic ED patients and 27 healthy subjects (HS) were enrolled in this study. Each participant underwent an fMRI scan in resting state. The fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) was used to detect the brain activity changes in ED patients with different patterns. Results. Compared to HS, ED patients showed an increased cerebral activity in bilateral cerebellum, insula, globus pallidus, parahippocampal gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and middle cingulate cortex (MCC). Compared to the patients with liver-qi stagnation and spleen deficiency pattern (LSSDP), the patients with kidney-yang deficiency pattern (KDP) showed an increased activity in bilateral brainstem, cerebellum, hippocampus, and the right insula, thalamus, MCC, and a decreased activity in bilateral putamen, medial frontal gyrus, temporal pole, and the right caudate nucleus, OFC, anterior cingulate cortex, and posterior cingulate cortex (P emotion-related regions, including prefrontal cortex and cingulated cortex.

  17. Design of robust adaptive controller and feedback error learning for rehabilitation in Parkinson's disease: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhollahi, Korosh; Emadi Andani, Mehran; Karbassi, Seyed Mahdi; Izadi, Iman

    2017-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an efficient therapy to control movement disorders of Parkinson's tremor. Stimulation of one area of basal ganglia (BG) by DBS with no feedback is the prevalent opinion. Reduction of additional stimulatory signal delivered to the brain is the advantage of using feedback. This results in reduction of side effects caused by the excessive stimulation intensity. In fact, the stimulatory intensity of controllers is decreased proportional to reduction of hand tremor. The objective of this study is to design a new controller structure to decrease three indicators: (i) the hand tremor; (ii) the level of delivered stimulation in disease condition; and (iii) the ratio of the level of delivered stimulation in health condition to disease condition. For this purpose, the authors offer a new closed-loop control structure to stimulate two areas of BG simultaneously. One area (STN: subthalamic nucleus) is stimulated by an adaptive controller with feedback error learning. The other area (GPi: globus pallidus internal) is stimulated by a partial state feedback (PSF) controller. Considering the three indicators, the results show that, stimulating two areas simultaneously leads to better performance compared with stimulating one area only. It is shown that both PSF and adaptive controllers are robust regarding system parameter uncertainties. In addition, a method is proposed to update the parameters of the BG model in real time. As a result, the parameters of the controllers can be updated based on the new parameters of the BG model.

  18. 18F-FDG PET imaging on the neuronal network of Parkinson's disease patients following deep brain stimulation of bilateral subthalamic nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Chuantao; Huang Zhemin; Zhao Jun; Guan Yihui; Lin Xiangtong; Li Dianyou; Sun Bomin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: There is evidence that the cause and progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) may be attributed to subthalamic nucleus (STN) dysfunction and that external electrical stimulation of the STN may improve the underlying neuronal network. This study aimed at using 18 F-FDG PET to monitor the functional status of the neuronal network of advanced PD patients following deep brain stimulation (DBS) of bilateral STN. Methods: Five PD patients in advanced stage, rated according to unified PD rat- ing scale (UPDRS) motion score, underwent bilateral STN DBS implantation. Six months after the implantation, each patient was studied with 18 F-FDG PET scans under stimulation turned 'on' and 'off' conditions. Statistical parametric mapping 2 (SPM2) was applied for data analyses. Results: Bilateral STN DBS reduced glucose utilization in lentiform nucleus (globus pallidus), bilateral thalamus, cerebellum, as well as the distal parietal cortex. However, glucose utilization in midbrain and pons was increased. The PD-related pattern (PDRP) scores were significantly different during the 'on' status (2.12 ± 15.24) and 'off' status (4.93 ± 13.01), which corresponded to the clinical improvement of PD symptoms as PDRP scores decreased. Conclusion: 18 F-FDG PET may be useful in monitoring and mapping the metabolism of the neuronal network during bilateral STN DBS, thus supporting its therapeutic impact on PD patients. (authors)

  19. Subcortical regional morphology correlates with fluid and spatial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgaleta, Miguel; MacDonald, Penny A; Martínez, Kenia; Román, Francisco J; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Ramos González, Ana; Karama, Sherif; Colom, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    Neuroimaging studies have revealed associations between intelligence and brain morphology. However, researchers have focused primarily on the anatomical features of the cerebral cortex, whereas subcortical structures, such as the basal ganglia (BG), have often been neglected despite extensive functional evidence on their relation with higher-order cognition. Here we performed shape analyses to understand how individual differences in BG local morphology account for variability in cognitive performance. Structural MRI was acquired in 104 young adults (45 men, 59 women, mean age = 19.83, SD = 1.64), and the outer surface of striatal structures (caudate, nucleus accumbens, and putamen), globus pallidus, and thalamus was estimated for each subject and hemisphere. Further, nine cognitive tests were used to measure fluid (Gf), crystallized (Gc), and spatial intelligence (Gv). Latent scores for these factors were computed by means of confirmatory factor analysis and regressed vertex-wise against subcortical shape (local displacements of vertex position), controlling for age, sex, and adjusted for brain size. Significant results (FDR intelligence-related prefrontal areas. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Effect of micro lesions of the basal ganglia on ballistic movements in patients with deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arun; Mehrkens, Jan H; Bötzel, Kai

    2012-03-15

    Bradykinesia and hypokinesia are the prominent symptoms of substantia nigra degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). In segmental dystonia, movements of not affected limbs are not impaired. Here we studied the impact of the mere implantation of stimulation electrodes on the performance of fast movements in these two groups. We investigated 9 PD patients with subthalamic electrodes and 9 patients with segmental dystonia with electrodes in the globus pallidus internum. Patients were studied on the first postoperative day without electrical stimulation of the electrodes. Subjects had to perform boxing movements with either touching the target or stopping the fist in front of the target. PD subjects performed significantly faster movements in the touch-task only as compared to dystonic patients. No difference was seen in the stopping task. In conclusion, our findings suggest that a small subthalamic lesion in individuals with PD specifically reverses bradykinesia during simple ballistic movements (touch) but not during complex ones requiring more pre-programming (no-touch paradigm). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Long-term increase in coherence between the basal ganglia and motor cortex after asphyxial cardiac arrest and resuscitation in developing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravamuthan, Bhooma R; Shoykhet, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The basal ganglia are vulnerable to injury during cardiac arrest. Movement disorders are a common morbidity in survivors. Yet, neuronal motor network changes post-arrest remain poorly understood. We compared function of the motor network in adult rats that, during postnatal week 3, underwent 9.5 min of asphyxial cardiac arrest (n = 9) or sham intervention (n = 8). Six months after injury, we simultaneously recorded local field potentials (LFP) from the primary motor cortex (MCx) and single neuron firing and LFP from the rat entopeduncular nucleus (EPN), which corresponds to the primate globus pallidus pars interna. Data were analyzed for firing rates, power, and coherence between MCx and EPN spike and LFP activity. Cardiac arrest survivors display chronic motor deficits. EPN firing rate is lower in cardiac arrest survivors (19.5 ± 2.4 Hz) compared with controls (27.4 ± 2.7 Hz; P motor network after cardiac arrest. Increased motor network synchrony is thought to be antikinetic in primary movement disorders. Characterization of motor network synchrony after cardiac arrest may help guide management of post-hypoxic movement disorders.

  2. Measurement of phase value of the deep gray nuclei in underage brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lei; Chen Tao; Ning Ning; Ren Zhuanqin; Luo Jun; Dang Shaonong; Yang Jian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To measure the phase values of the deep gray nuclei by using susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) in underage brains, and to investigate the correlation between the phase value and age. Methods: A total of 105 healthy juveniles were examined in this study by using MRI conventional sequence and SWI. Their ages ranged from 0 to 18 years(0-<1 year, 60 cases; 1-<3 years, 10 cases; 3.7 years, 10 cases; 7-12 years, 10 cases; 12-18 years, 15 cases). Phase values of deep gray nuclei were measured. The correlation between phase value and age was analyzed by Spearman correlation method. Results: During 0-3 years, the phase value of caudate nucleus was the lowest within the same age group (0-<1 year: left -0.0433 ± 0.0291, right -0.0369 ± 0.0215; 1-<3 years: left -0.0369 ± 0.0215, right -0.0384 ± 0.0259), whereas the phase value of red nucleus was the highest (0-<1 year: left 0.0286 ± 0.0380, right 0.0254 ± 0.0361; 1-<3 years: left 0.0325 ± 0.0237, right 0.0395 ±0.0270). After 3 years old, the phase value of globus pallidus was the lowest within the same age group (3-<7 years: left -0.0967 ± 0.0656, right -0.0953 ± 0.0617; 7-<12 years: left -0.1870 ± 0.0531, right -0.1724 ± 0.0547; 12-<18 years: left -0.2037 ± 0.0492, right -0.1849 ±0.0324), whereas the phase value of thalamus was the highest (3-<7 years: left -0.0019 ± 0.0225, right -0.0007 ± 0.0167; 7-<12 years: left -0.0067 ± 0.0104, right -0.0064 ± 0.0118; 12-<18 years: left -0.0204 ± 0.0181, right -0.0172 ± 0.0133). During 0-18 years, a moderate negative correlation between phase values of bilateral caudate nucleus, globus pallidus, red nucleus, substantia nigra and age were observed (r s =-0.483, -0.497, -0.67, -0.621, -0.489, -0.43, -0.552, -0.58 respectively) A low negative correlation between phase values of bilateral putamen, thalamus and age were observed (r s =-0.272, -0.213, -0.382, -0.366 respectively). Conclusions: There is a negative correlation between phase value and age in

  3. Hepatocerebral degeneration: report of a pediatric case Degeneración hepatocerebral: reporte de un caso pediátrico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José William Cornejo Ochoa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired (non-Wilsonian hepatocerebral degeneration (AHD is a rare, irreversible neurologic syndrome that occurs in patients with associated chronic liver disease. It is characterized by progressive dysfunction of extrapyramidal and cerebellar systems. Although clinical and laboratory findings are helpful in the differentiation from Wilson´s disease, the underlying pathophysiology has not been clearly elucidated. These patients have hyperammonemia or abnormal ammonia tolerance tests and high manganese concentrations. Some neurological signs are dysarthria, ataxia, tremor and dementia, with recurrent attacks of hepatic encephalopathy. Pyramidal tract signs are usually present. T1-weighted images demonstrate increased signal intensity in the basal ganglia, although cerebellum seems to be spared. However, bilateral signal abnormalities in the dentate nuclei on T2-weighted images can occur in AHD, indistinguishable from those of Wilson's disease. Such gray matter lesions can be found in hepatocerebral degeneration due to deposition of paramagnetic substances in the putamen, globus pallidus, subthalamic region, red nucleus, quadrigeminal plate and anterior pituitary. We describe the case of a 3.5 year-old male patient with an hepatic miofibroblastic tumor who had been followed for one year. Neurologic examination and mental status were normal, except for the presence of bilateral palmomental reflexes and the characteristic MRI findings of AHD. There were no Kayser-Fleischer corneal rings. In conclusion AHD can be found in children with liver disease and no apparent neurological findings and MRI abnormalities in T1 may be the only way of diagnosing this entity. La degeneración hepatocebral adquirida (DHCA es un síndrome neurológico raro e irreversible que ocurre en pacientes con enfermedad hepática crónica. Se caracteriza por una disfunción progresiva de los sistemas extrapiramidal y cerebeloso. Aunque los hallazgos clínicos y de laboratorio

  4. Application of routine MRI and 1H-MRS in evaluating the central neurological damages caused by occupational manganese exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiangrong; Long Liling; Jiang Muliang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: MRI and MR hydrogen proton spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) were used to detect the abnormal signal and alteration of metabolites, in order to explore the efficacy of these method in evaluating the damages of central nervous system (CNS) induced by occupational manganese exposure. Methods: Eighteen workers exposed to manganese without any manganism symptoms, 12 workers with slightly chronic manganese poisoning, and 19 hea