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Sample records for globular protein hp-36

  1. Nonlinear dynamics of globular proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomdahl, P.S.

    1983-01-01

    Some ongoing work aimed at generalizing DAVYDOV's ideas to a real globular protein is described. So far, a computer code, GLOP, which calculates amide-I bond energy evolution on a globular protein has been developed and tested. The code is quite versatile and takes as input the coordinates of a protein. The full geometry of the molecule is then taken into account when the dipole-dipole interaction between peptide groups is calculated. The amide-I energy is coupled to one intramolecular excitation, but can without difficulty be extended to more or to include intermolecular excitations.

  2. Statistical interior properties of globular proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou-Ting, Jiang; Tai-Quan, Wu; Lin-Xi, Zhang; Ting-Ting, Sun

    2009-01-01

    The character of forming long-range contacts affects the three-dimensional structure of globular proteins deeply. As the different ability to form long-range contacts between 20 types of amino acids and 4 categories of globular proteins, the statistical properties are thoroughly discussed in this paper. Two parameters N C and N D are defined to confine the valid residues in detail. The relationship between hydrophobicity scales and valid residue percentage of each amino acid is given in the present work and the linear functions are shown in our statistical results. It is concluded that the hydrophobicity scale defined by chemical derivatives of the amino acids and nonpolar phase of large unilamellar vesicle membranes is the most effective technique to characterise the hydrophobic behavior of amino acid residues. Meanwhile, residue percentage P i and sequential residue length L i of a certain protein i are calculated under different conditions. The statistical results show that the average value of P i as well as L i of all-α proteins has a minimum among these 4 classes of globular proteins, indicating that all-α proteins are hardly capable of forming long-range contacts one by one along their linear amino acid sequences. All-β proteins have a higher tendency to construct long-range contacts along their primary sequences related to the secondary configurations, i.e. parallel and anti-parallel configurations of β sheets. The investigation of the interior properties of globular proteins give us the connection between the three-dimensional structure and its primary sequence data or secondary configurations, and help us to understand the structure of protein and its folding process well. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  3. Pyroelectricity in globular protein lysozyme films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, A.; Noor, M. R.; Haq, E. U.; Silien, C.; Soulimane, T.; Tofail, S. A. M.

    2018-03-01

    Pyroelectricity is the ability of certain non-centrosymmetric materials to generate an electric charge in response to a change in temperature and finds use in a range of applications from burglar alarms to thermal imaging. Some biological materials also exhibit pyroelectricity but the examples of the effect are limited to fibrous proteins, polypeptides, and tissues and organs of animals and plants. Here, we report pyroelectricity in polycrystalline aggregate films of lysozyme, a globular protein.

  4. Engineering Globular Protein Vesicles through Tunable Self-Assembly of Recombinant Fusion Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yeongseon; Choi, Won Tae; Heller, William T; Ke, Zunlong; Wright, Elizabeth R; Champion, Julie A

    2017-09-01

    Vesicles assembled from folded, globular proteins have potential for functions different from traditional lipid or polymeric vesicles. However, they also present challenges in understanding the assembly process and controlling vesicle properties. From detailed investigation of the assembly behavior of recombinant fusion proteins, this work reports a simple strategy to engineer protein vesicles containing functional, globular domains. This is achieved through tunable self-assembly of recombinant globular fusion proteins containing leucine zippers and elastin-like polypeptides. The fusion proteins form complexes in solution via high affinity binding of the zippers, and transition through dynamic coacervates to stable hollow vesicles upon warming. The thermal driving force, which can be tuned by protein concentration or temperature, controls both vesicle size and whether vesicles are single or bi-layered. These results provide critical information to engineer globular protein vesicles via self-assembly with desired size and membrane structure. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Interactions between globular proteins and procyanidins of different degrees of polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prigent, S.V.E.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Koningsveld, van G.A.; Baron, A.; Renard, C.M.; Gruppen, H.

    2009-01-01

    Interactions of proteins with phenolic compounds occur in food products containing vegetable sources, such as cocoa, cereals, or yogurts containing fruit. Such interactions can modify protein digestion and protein industrial properties. Noncovalent interactions between globular proteins (proteins

  6. Golden triangle for folding rates of globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuzynskiy, Sergiy O; Ivankov, Dmitry N; Bogatyreva, Natalya S; Finkelstein, Alexei V

    2013-01-02

    The ability of protein chains to spontaneously form their spatial structures is a long-standing puzzle in molecular biology. Experimentally measured rates of spontaneous folding of single-domain globular proteins range from microseconds to hours: the difference (11 orders of magnitude) is akin to the difference between the life span of a mosquito and the age of the universe. Here, we show that physical theory with biological constraints outlines a "golden triangle" limiting the possible range of folding rates for single-domain globular proteins of various size and stability, and that the experimentally measured folding rates fall within this narrow triangle built without any adjustable parameters, filling it almost completely. In addition, the golden triangle predicts the maximal size of protein domains that fold under solely thermodynamic (rather than kinetic) control. It also predicts the maximal allowed size of the "foldable" protein domains, and the size of domains found in known protein structures is in a good agreement with this limit.

  7. Self-Assembly of Globular Protein-Polymer Diblock Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C. S.; Olsen, B. D.

    2011-03-01

    The self-assembly of globular protein-polymer diblock copolymers into nanostructured phases is demonstrated as an elegant and simple method for structural control in biocatalysis or bioelectronics. In order to fundamentally investigate self-assembly in these complex block copolymer systems, a red fluorescent protein was expressed in E. coli and site-specifically conjugated to a low polydispersity poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPAM) block using thiol-maleimide coupling to form a well-defined model globular protein-polymer diblock. Functional protein materials are obtained by solvent evaporation and solvent annealing above and below the lower critical solution temperature of PNIPAM in order to access different pathways toward self-assembly. Small angle x-ray scattering and microscopy are used to show that the diblock forms lamellar nanostructures and to explore dependence of nanostructure formation on processing conditions. Circular dichroism and UV-vis show that a large fraction of the protein remains in its folded state after conjugation, and wide angle x-ray scattering demonstrates that diblock copolymer self-assembly changes the protein packing symmetry.

  8. Globular conformation of some ribosomal proteins in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serdyuk, I.N.; Spirin, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    The possibility that such RNA-binding proteins of the 30 S subparticle as S4, S7, S8 and S16 exist in the form of compact globules in solution has been explored experimentally. These proteins have been studied in D 2 O solution by neutron scattering to measure their radii of gyration. This type of radiation using D 2 O as a solvent provides the maximum 'contrast', that is the maximum difference between the scattering of the protein and the solvent. It allowed measurements to be made using protein at <= 1.5 mg/ml. The radii of gyration for the ribosomal proteins S4, S7, S8 and S16 were found to be relatively small corresponding to the radii of gyration of compact globular proteins of the same molecular weights. (Auth.)

  9. Roughness of the globular protein surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timchenko, A.A.; Galzitskaya, O.V.; Serdyuk, I.N.

    1998-01-01

    Protein surface analysis using high resolution X ray shows that this surface has a two-level organization, on the micro- and macro-scales. On the micro-scale (2-7 Angstroem), the surface is characterized by the d = 2.1 fractal dimension which is intrinsic to surface with weak deformation and reflects the local atomic group packing. On the macro-scale the large scale surface defects are revealed which are interpreted as the result of secondary structure elements packing

  10. The direct piezoelectric effect in the globular protein lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, A.; Noor, M. R.; Sweeney, J.; Casey, V.; Kholkin, A. L.; Silien, C.; Gandhi, A. A.; Soulimane, T.; Tofail, S. A. M.

    2017-10-01

    Here, we present experimental evidence of the direct piezoelectric effect in the globular protein, lysozyme. Piezoelectric materials are employed in many actuating and sensing applications because they can convert mechanical energy into electrical energy and vice versa. Although originally studied in inorganic materials, several biological materials including amino acids and bone, also exhibit piezoelectricity. The exact mechanisms supporting biological piezoelectricity are not known, nor is it known whether biological piezoelectricity conforms strictly to the criteria of classical piezoelectricity. The observation of piezoelectricity in protein crystals presented here links biological piezoelectricity with the classical theory of piezoelectricity. We quantify the direct piezoelectric effect in monoclinic and tetragonal aggregate films of lysozyme using conventional techniques based on the Berlincourt Method. The largest piezoelectric effect measured in a crystalline aggregate film of lysozyme was approximately 6.5 pC N-1. These findings raise fundamental questions as to the possible physiological significance of piezoelectricity in lysozyme and the potential for technical applications.

  11. The nature of folded states of globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, J D; Thirumalai, D

    1992-06-01

    We suggest, using dynamical simulations of a simple heteropolymer modelling the alpha-carbon sequence in a protein, that generically the folded states of globular proteins correspond to statistically well-defined metastable states. This hypothesis, called the metastability hypothesis, states that there are several free energy minima separated by barriers of various heights such that the folded conformations of a polypeptide chain in each of the minima have similar structural characteristics but have different energies from one another. The calculated structural characteristics, such as bond angle and dihedral angle distribution functions, are assumed to arise from only those configurations belonging to a given minimum. The validity of this hypothesis is illustrated by simulations of a continuum model of a heteropolymer whose low temperature state is a well-defined beta-barrel structure. The simulations were done using a molecular dynamics algorithm (referred to as the "noisy" molecular dynamics method) containing both friction and noise terms. It is shown that for this model there are several distinct metastable minima in which the structural features are similar. Several new methods of analyzing fluctuations in structures belonging to two distinct minima are introduced. The most notable one is a dynamic measure of compactness that can in principle provide the time required for maximal compactness to be achieved. The analysis shows that for a given metastable state in which the protein has a well-defined folded structure the transition to a state of higher compactness occurs very slowly, lending credence to the notion that the system encounters a late barrier in the process of folding to the most compact structure. The examination of the fluctuations in the structures near the unfolding----folding transition temperature indicates that the transition state for the unfolding to folding process occurs closer to the folded state.

  12. Characterization of dry globular proteins and protein fibrils by synchrotron radiation vacuum UV circular dichroism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nesgaard, Lise W.; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Andersen, Christian Beyschau

    2008-01-01

    different types of protein fibrils, highlighting that bona fide fibrils formed by lysozyme are structurally more similar to the nonclassical fibrillar aggregates formed by the SerADan peptide than with the amyloid formed by alpha-synuclein. Thus, despite the lack of direct structural conclusions......Circular dichroism using synchrotron radiation (SRCD) can extend the spectral range down to approximately 130 nm for dry proteins, potentially providing new structural information. Using a selection of dried model proteins, including alpha-helical, beta-sheet, and mixed-structure proteins, we...... observe a low-wavelength band in the range 130-160 nm, whose intensity and peak position is sensitive to the secondary structure of the protein and may also reflect changes in super-secondary structure. This band has previously been observed for peptides but not for globular proteins, and is compatible...

  13. Hydrophobicity diversity in globular and nonglobular proteins measured with the Gini index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carugo, Oliviero

    2017-12-01

    Amino acids and their properties are variably distributed in proteins and different compositions determine all protein features, ranging from solubility to stability and functionality. Gini index, a tool to estimate distribution uniformity, is widely used in macroeconomics and has numerous statistical applications. Here, Gini index is used to analyze the distribution of hydrophobicity in proteins and to compare hydrophobicity distribution in globular and intrinsically disordered proteins. Based on the analysis of carefully selected high-quality data sets of proteins extracted from the Protein Data Bank (http://www.rcsb.org) and from the DisProt database (http://www.disprot.org/), it is observed that hydrophobicity is distributed in a more diverse way in intrinsically disordered proteins than in folded and soluble globular proteins. This correlates with the observation that the amino acid composition deviates from the uniformity (estimate with the Shannon and the Gini-Simpson indices) more in intrinsically disordered proteins than in globular and soluble proteins. Although statistical tools tike the Gini index have received little attention in molecular biology, these results show that they allow one to estimate sequence diversity and that they are useful to delineate trends that can hardly be described, otherwise, in simple and concise ways. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Unified understanding of folding and binding mechanisms of globular and intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Munehito

    2018-01-06

    Extensive experimental and theoretical studies have advanced our understanding of the mechanisms of folding and binding of globular proteins, and coupled folding and binding of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). The forces responsible for conformational changes and binding are common in both proteins; however, these mechanisms have been separately discussed. Here, we attempt to integrate the mechanisms of coupled folding and binding of IDPs, folding of small and multi-subdomain proteins, folding of multimeric proteins, and ligand binding of globular proteins in terms of conformational selection and induced-fit mechanisms as well as the nucleation-condensation mechanism that is intermediate between them. Accumulating evidence has shown that both the rate of conformational change and apparent rate of binding between interacting elements can determine reaction mechanisms. Coupled folding and binding of IDPs occurs mainly by induced-fit because of the slow folding in the free form, while ligand binding of globular proteins occurs mainly by conformational selection because of rapid conformational change. Protein folding can be regarded as the binding of intramolecular segments accompanied by secondary structure formation. Multi-subdomain proteins fold mainly by the induced-fit (hydrophobic collapse) mechanism, as the connection of interacting segments enhances the binding (compaction) rate. Fewer hydrophobic residues in small proteins reduce the intramolecular binding rate, resulting in the nucleation-condensation mechanism. Thus, the folding and binding of globular proteins and IDPs obey the same general principle, suggesting that the coarse-grained, statistical mechanical model of protein folding is promising for a unified theoretical description of all mechanisms.

  15. Modular organization of proteins containing C1q-like globular domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, U; Reid, K B

    1999-05-01

    The first step in the activation of the classical pathway of complement cascade by immune complexes involves the binding of the six globular heads of C1q to the Fc regions of immunoglobulin G (IgG) or immunoglobulin M (IgM). The globular heads of C1q are located C-terminal to the six triple-helical stalks present in the molecule, each head is considered to be composed of the C-terminal halves (3 x 135 residues) of one A-, one B- and one C-chain. It is not known if the C-terminal globular regions, present in each of the three types of chains, are independently folded modules (with each chain having distinct binding properties towards immunoglobulins) or whether the different binding functions of C1q are dependent upon a globular structure which relies on contributions from all three chains. Recent reports of recombinant production and characterisation of soluble globular head regions of all the three chains indicate that the globular regions of C1q may adopt a modular organization, i.e., each globular head of C1q may be composed of three, structurally and functionally, independent domains, thus retaining multivalency in the form of a heterotrimer. Modules of the same type as the C1q C-terminal module are also found in a variety of noncomplement proteins that include the C-terminal regions of the human type VIII and type X collagens, precerebellin, the chipmunk hibernation proteins, the human endothelial cell protein, multimerin, the serum protein, Acrp-30 which is secreted from mouse adipocytes, and the sunfish inner-ear specific structural protein. The C1q molecule is the only one of these proteins for which, to date, a function has been ascribed to the module. The existence of a shared structural region between C1q and certain collagens may suggest an evolutionarily common ancestral precursor. Various structural and biochemical data suggest that these modules may be responsible for multimerisation through patches of aromatic residues within them.

  16. How round is a protein? Exploring protein structures for globularity using conformal mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel eHass

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a new algorithm that automatically computes a measure of the geometric difference between the surface of a protein and a round sphere. The algorithm takes as input two triangulated genus zero surfaces representing the protein and the round sphere, respectively, and constructs a discrete conformal map between these surfaces. The conformal map is chosen to minimize a symmetric elastic energy that measures the distance of the constructed conformal map from an isometry. We illustrate our approach on a set of basic sample problems and then on a dataset of diverse protein structures. We show first that the symmetric elastic energy is able to quantify the roundness of the Platonic solids and that for these surfaces it replicates well traditional measures of roundness such as the sphericity. We then demonstrate that the symmetric elastic energy captures both global and local differences between two surfaces, showing that our method identifies the presence of protruding regions in protein structures and quantifies how these regions make the shape of a protein deviate from globularity. Based on these results, we show that the symmetric elastic energy serves as a probe of the limits of the application of conformal mappings to parametrize protein shapes. We identify limitations of the method and discuss its extension to achieving automatic registration of protein structures based on their surface geometry.

  17. Comparison of experimental and theoretical data on hydrogen-deuterium exchange for ten globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorina, M Yu; Surin, A K; Dovidchenko, N V; Lobanov, M Yu; Galzitskaya, O V

    2012-06-01

    The number of protons available for hydrogen-deuterium exchange was predicted for ten globular proteins using a method described elsewhere by the authors. The average number of protons replaced by deuterium was also determined by mass spectrometry of the intact proteins in their native conformations. Based on these data, we find that two models proposed earlier agree with each other in estimation of the number of protons replaced by deuterium. Using a model with a probability scale for hydrogen bond formation, we estimated a number of protons replaced by deuterium that is close to the experimental data for long-term incubation in D(2)O (24 h). Using a model based on estimations with a scale of the expected number of contacts in globular proteins there is better agreement with the experimental data obtained for a short period of incubation in D(2)O (15 min). Therefore, the former model determines weakly fluctuating parts of a protein that are in contact with solvent only for a small fraction of the time. The latter model (based on the scale of expected number of contacts) predicts either flexible parts of a protein chain exposed to interactions with solvent or disordered parts of the protein.

  18. Three entropic classes of side chain in a globular protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, Dennis C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Krishnan, Marimuthu [International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderbad (India); Smith, Jeremy C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baudry, Jerome Y. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-02-19

    The relationship between the NMR methyl group axial order parameter and the side chain conformational entropy is investigated in inhibitor-bound and apo human HIV protease using molecular dynamics simulation. Three distinct entropic classes of methyl-bearing side chains, determined by the topological distance of the methyl group from the protein backbone (i.e., the number of -bonds between the C and the carbon of the CH3 group), are revealed by atomistic trajectory analyses performed in the local frame of reference of individual methyl probes. The results demonstrate that topologically equivalent methyl groups experience similar nonbonded microenvironments regardless of the type of residues to which they are attached. Similarly, methyl groups that belong to the same side chain but that are not topologically equivalent exhibit different thermodynamic and dynamic properties. As a result, the two-parameter classification (based upon entropy and methyl axial order parameter) of side chains described here permits improved estimates of the conformational entropies of proteins from NMR motional parameters.

  19. SANS study of understanding mechanism of cold gelation of globular proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinchalikar, A. J.; Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.; Wagh, A. G.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2014-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to probe the evolution of interaction and the resultant structures in the cold gelation of globular proteins. The cold gelation involves two steps consisting of irreversible protein deformation by heating followed by some means (e.g. increasing ionic strength) to bring them together at room temperature. We have examined the role of different salts in cold gelation of preheated aqueous Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) protein solutions. The interactions have been modeled by two Yukawa potential combining short-range attraction and long-range repulsion. We show that in step 1 (preheated temperature effect) the deformation of protein increases the magnitude of attractive interaction but not sufficient to induce gel. The attractive interaction is further enhanced in step 2 (salt effect) to result in gel formation. The salt effect is found to be strongly depending on the valency of the counterions. The gel structure has been characterized by the mass fractals

  20. Salt-bridge networks within globular and disordered proteins: characterizing trends for designable interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sankar; Mukharjee, Debasish

    2017-07-01

    There has been considerable debate about the contribution of salt bridges to the stabilization of protein folds, in spite of their participation in crucial protein functions. Salt bridges appear to contribute to the activity-stability trade-off within proteins by bringing high-entropy charged amino acids into close contacts during the course of their functions. The current study analyzes the modes of association of salt bridges (in terms of networks) within globular proteins and at protein-protein interfaces. While the most common and trivial type of salt bridge is the isolated salt bridge, bifurcated salt bridge appears to be a distinct salt-bridge motif having a special topology and geometry. Bifurcated salt bridges are found ubiquitously in proteins and interprotein complexes. Interesting and attractive examples presenting different modes of interaction are highlighted. Bifurcated salt bridges appear to function as molecular clips that are used to stitch together large surface contours at interacting protein interfaces. The present work also emphasizes the key role of salt-bridge-mediated interactions in the partial folding of proteins containing long stretches of disordered regions. Salt-bridge-mediated interactions seem to be pivotal to the promotion of "disorder-to-order" transitions in small disordered protein fragments and their stabilization upon binding. The results obtained in this work should help to guide efforts to elucidate the modus operandi of these partially disordered proteins, and to conceptualize how these proteins manage to maintain the required amount of disorder even in their bound forms. This work could also potentially facilitate explorations of geometrically specific designable salt bridges through the characterization of composite salt-bridge networks. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  1. Interaction of Small Zinc Complexes with Globular Proteins and Free Tryptophan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joann M. Butkus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of eight water soluble anionic, cationic, and neutral zinc(II complexes were synthesized and characterized. The interaction of these complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA, human serum albumin (HSA, lysozyme, and free tryptophan (Trp was investigated using steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. Static and dynamic fluorescence quenching analysis based on Stern-Volmer kinetics was conducted, and the decrease in fluorescence intensity of the Trp residue(s can be ascribed predominantly to static quenching that occurs when the Zn complex binds to the protein and forms a nonfluorescent complex. The role played by the nature of the ligand, the metal, and complex charge in quenching Trp fluorescence was investigated. The binding association constants (Ka ranged from 104 to 1010 M−1 and indicate that complexes with planar aromatic features have the strongest affinity for globular proteins and free Trp. Complexes with nonaromatic features failed to interact with these proteins at or in the vicinity of the Trp residues. These interactions were studied over a range of temperatures, and binding was found to weaken with the increase in temperature and was exothermic with a negative change in entropy. The thermodynamic parameters suggest that binding of Zn complexes to the proteins is a highly spontaneous and favorable process.

  2. Identifying the adaptive mechanism in globular proteins: Fluctuations in densely packed regions manipulate flexible parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Lutfu Safak; Atilgan, Ali Rana

    2000-09-01

    A low-resolution structural model based on the packing geometry of α-carbons is utilized to establish a connection between the flexible and rigid parts of a folded protein. The former commonly recognizes a complementing molecule for making a complex, while the latter manipulates the necessary conformational change for binding. We attempt analytically to distinguish this control architecture that intrinsically exists in globular proteins. First with two-dimensional simple models, then for a native protein, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, we explicitly demonstrate that inserting fluctuations in tertiary contacts supported by the stable core, one can regulate the displacement of residues on loop regions. The positional fluctuations of the flexible regions are annihilated by the rest of the protein in conformity with the Le Chatelier-Braun principle. The results indicate that the distortion of the principal nonbonded contacts between highly packed residues is accompanied by that of the slavery fluctuations that are widely distributed over the native structure. These positional arrangements do not appear in a reciprocal relation between a perturbation and the associated response; the effect of a movement of residue i on residue j is not equal to that of the same movement of residue j on residue i.

  3. Chromosomal rearrangements and protein globularity changes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from cerebrospinal fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seow Hoon Saw

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Meningitis is a major cause of mortality in tuberculosis (TB. It is not clear what factors promote central nervous system invasion and pathology but it has been reported that certain strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb might have genetic traits associated with neurotropism. Methods In this study, we generated whole genome sequences of eight clinical strains of Mtb that were isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients presenting with tuberculous meningitis (TBM in Malaysia, and compared them to the genomes of H37Rv and other respiratory Mtb genomes either downloaded from public databases or extracted from local sputum isolates. We aimed to find genomic features that might be distinctly different between CSF-derived and respiratory Mtb. Results Genome-wide comparisons revealed rearrangements (translocations, inversions, insertions and deletions and non-synonymous SNPs in our CSF-derived strains that were not observed in the respiratory Mtb genomes used for comparison. These rearranged segments were rich in genes for PE (proline-glutamate/PPE (proline-proline-glutamate, transcriptional and membrane proteins. Similarly, most of the ns SNPs common in CSF strains were noted in genes encoding PE/PPE proteins. Protein globularity differences were observed among mycobacteria from CSF and respiratory sources and in proteins previously reported to be associated with TB meningitis. Transcription factors and other transcription regulators featured prominently in these proteins. Homologs of proteins associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis and Neisseria meningitidis virulence were identified in neuropathogenic as well as respiratory mycobacterial spp. examined in this study. Discussion The occurrence of in silico genetic differences in CSF-derived but not respiratory Mtb suggests their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of TBM. However, overall findings in this comparative analysis support the postulation that TB

  4. THE SURFACE-MEDIATED UNFOLDING KINETICS OF GLOBULAR PROTEINS IS DEPENDENT ON MOLECULAR WEIGHT AND TEMPERATURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patananan, A.N.; Goheen, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and unfolding pathways of proteins on rigid surfaces are essential in numerous complex processes associated with biomedical engineering, nanotechnology, and chromatography. It is now well accepted that the kinetics of unfolding are characterized by chemical and physical interactions dependent on protein deformability and structure, as well as environmental pH, temperature, and surface chemistry. Although this fundamental process has broad implications in medicine and industry, little is known about the mechanism because of the atomic lengths and rapid time scales involved. Therefore, the unfolding kinetics of myoglobin, β-glucosidase, and ovalbumin were investigated by adsorbing the globular proteins to non-porous cationic polymer beads. The protein fractions were adsorbed at different residence times (0, 9, 10, 20, and 30 min) at near-physiological conditions using a gradient elution system similar to that in high-performance liquid chromatography. The elution profi les and retention times were obtained by ultraviolet/visible spectrophotometry. A decrease in recovery was observed with time for almost all proteins and was attributed to irreversible protein unfolding on the non-porous surfaces. These data, and those of previous studies, fi t a positively increasing linear trend between percent unfolding after a fi xed (9 min) residence time (71.8%, 31.1%, and 32.1% of myoglobin, β-glucosidase, and ovalbumin, respectively) and molecular weight. Of all the proteins examined so far, only myoglobin deviated from this trend with higher than predicted unfolding rates. Myoglobin also exhibited an increase in retention time over a wide temperature range (0°C and 55°C, 4.39 min and 5.74 min, respectively) whereas ovalbumin and β-glucosidase did not. Further studies using a larger set of proteins are required to better understand the physiological and physiochemical implications of protein unfolding kinetics. This study confi rms that surface

  5. Globular and disordered-the non-identical twins in protein-protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Olsen, Johan Gotthardt; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt

    2015-01-01

    In biology proteins from different structural classes interact across and within classes in ways that are optimized to achieve balanced functional outputs. The interactions between intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and other proteins rely on changes in flexibility and this is seen as a str...... of other protein-protein interactions. We find that ordered proteins and the disordered ones act as non-identical twins operating by similar principles but where the disordered proteins complexes are on average less stable by 2.5 kcal mol(-1)....

  6. Globular and disordered – the non-identical twins in protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaare eTeilum

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In biology proteins from different structural classes interact across and within classes in ways that are optimized to achieve balanced functional outputs. The interactions between intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs and other proteins rely on changes in flexibility and this is seen as a strong determinant for their function. This has fostered the notion that IDP’s bind with low affinity but high specificity. Here we have analyzed available detailed thermodynamic data for protein-protein interactions to put to the test if the thermodynamic profiles of IDP interactions differ from those of other protein-protein interactions. We find that ordered proteins and the disordered ones act as non identical twins operating by similar principles but where the disordered proteins complexes are on average less stable by 2.5 kcal mol-1.

  7. A single cysteine post-translational oxidation suffices to compromise globular proteins kinetic stability and promote amyloid formation

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    Patrizia Marinelli

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidatively modified forms of proteins accumulate during aging. Oxidized protein conformers might act as intermediates in the formation of amyloids in age-related disorders. However, it is not known whether this amyloidogenic conversion requires an extensive protein oxidative damage or it can be promoted just by a discrete, localized post-translational modification of certain residues. Here, we demonstrate that the irreversible oxidation of a single free Cys suffices to severely perturb the folding energy landscape of a stable globular protein, compromise its kinetic stability, and lead to the formation of amyloids under physiological conditions. Experiments and simulations converge to indicate that this specific oxidation-promoted protein aggregation requires only local unfolding. Indeed, a large scale analysis indicates that many cellular proteins are at risk of undergoing this kind of deleterious transition; explaining how oxidative stress can impact cell proteostasis and subsequently lead to the onset of pathological states. Keywords: Protein oxidation, Protein misfolding, Protein aggregation, Oxidative stress, Post-translational modification

  8. Insight into the Unfolding Properties of Chd64, a Small, Single Domain Protein with a Globular Core and Disordered Tails.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Tarczewska

    Full Text Available Two major lipophilic hormones, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E and juvenile hormone (JH, govern insect development and growth. While the mode of action of 20E is well understood, some understanding of JH-dependent signalling has been attained only in the past few years, and the crosstalk of the two hormonal pathways remains unknown. Two proteins, the calponin-like Chd64 and immunophilin FKBP39 proteins, have recently been found to play pivotal roles in the formation of dynamic, multiprotein complex that cross-links these two signalling pathways. However, the molecular mechanism of the interaction remains unexplored. The aim of this work was to determine structural elements of Chd64 to provide an understanding of molecular basis of multiple interactions. We analysed Chd64 in two unrelated insect species, Drosophila melanogaster (DmChd64 and Tribolium castaneum (TcChd64. Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS, we showed that both Chd64 proteins have disordered tails that outflank the globular core. The folds of the globular cores of both Chd64 resemble the calponin homology (CH domain previously resolved by crystallography. Monitoring the unfolding of DmChd64 and TcChd64 by far-ultraviolet (UV circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC revealed a highly complex process. Chd64 unfolds and forms of a molten globule (MG-like intermediate state. Furthermore, our data indicate that in some conditions, Chd64 may exists in discrete structural forms, indicating that the protein is pliable and capable of easily acquiring different conformations. The plasticity of Chd64 and the existence of terminal intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs may be crucial for multiple interactions with many partners.

  9. The recombinant globular head domain of the measles virus hemagglutinin protein as a subunit vaccine against measles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanova, Liubov M; Eng, Nelson F; Satkunarajah, Malathy; Mutwiri, George K; Rini, James M; Zakhartchouk, Alexander N

    2012-04-26

    Despite the availability of live attenuated measles virus (MV) vaccines, a large number of measles-associated deaths occur among infants in developing countries. The development of a measles subunit vaccine may circumvent the limitations associated with the current live attenuated vaccines and eventually contribute to global measles eradication. Therefore, the goal of this study was to test the feasibility of producing the recombinant globular head domain of the MV hemagglutinin (H) protein by stably transfected human cells and to examine the ability of this recombinant protein to elicit MV-specific immune responses. The recombinant protein was purified from the culture supernatant of stably transfected HEK293T cells secreting a tagged version of the protein. Two subcutaneous immunizations with the purified recombinant protein alone resulted in the production of MV-specific serum IgG and neutralizing antibodies in mice. Formulation of the protein with adjuvants (polyphosphazene or alum) further enhanced the humoral immune response and in addition resulted in the induction of cell-mediated immunity as measured by the production of MV H-specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and interleukin 5 (IL-5) by in vitro re-stimulated splenocytes. Furthermore, the inclusion of polyphosphazene into the vaccine formulation induced a mixed Th1/Th2-type immune response. In addition, the purified recombinant protein retained its immunogenicity even after storage at 37°C for 2 weeks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of multiple picosecond high-mass molecular dynamics simulations to predict crystallographic B-factors of folded globular proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Ping Pang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Predicting crystallographic B-factors of a protein from a conventional molecular dynamics simulation is challenging, in part because the B-factors calculated through sampling the atomic positional fluctuations in a picosecond molecular dynamics simulation are unreliable, and the sampling of a longer simulation yields overly large root mean square deviations between calculated and experimental B-factors. This article reports improved B-factor prediction achieved by sampling the atomic positional fluctuations in multiple picosecond molecular dynamics simulations that use uniformly increased atomic masses by 100-fold to increase time resolution. Using the third immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, ubiquitin, and lysozyme as model systems, the B-factor root mean square deviations (mean ± standard error of these proteins were 3.1 ± 0.2–9 ± 1 Å2 for Cα and 7.3 ± 0.9–9.6 ± 0.2 Å2 for Cγ, when the sampling was done for each of these proteins over 20 distinct, independent, and 50-picosecond high-mass molecular dynamics simulations with AMBER forcefield FF12MC or FF14SB. These results suggest that sampling the atomic positional fluctuations in multiple picosecond high-mass molecular dynamics simulations may be conducive to a priori prediction of crystallographic B-factors of a folded globular protein.

  11. Larger red-shift in optical emissions obtained from the thin films of globular proteins (BSA, lysozyme) - polyelectrolyte (PAA) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Hrishikesh; Kundu, Sarathi; Basu, Saibal

    2016-09-01

    Globular proteins (lysozyme and BSA) and polyelectrolyte (sodium polyacrylic acid) are used to form protein-polyelectrolyte complexes (PPC). Out-of-plane structures of ≈30-60 nm thick PPC films and their surface morphologies have been studied by using X-ray reflectivity and atomic force microscopy, whereas optical behaviors of PPC and protein conformations have been studied by using UV-vis, photoluminescence and FTIR spectroscopy respectively. Our study reveals that thin films of PPC show a larger red-shift of 23 and 16 nm in the optical emissions in comparison to that of pure protein whereas bulk PPC show a small blue-shift of ≈3 nm. A small amount of peak-shift is found to occur due to the heat treatment or concentration variation of the polyelectrolyte/protein in bulk solution but cannot produce such film thickness independent larger red-shift. Position of the emission peak remains nearly unchanged with the film thickness. Mechanism for such larger red-shift has been proposed.

  12. Front-face fluorescence spectroscopy study of globular proteins in emulsions: displacement of BSA by a nonionic surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampon, V; Genot, C; Riaublanc, A; Anton, M; Axelos, M A V; McClements, D J

    2003-04-23

    The displacement of a globular protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA) from the surface of oil droplets in concentrated oil-in-water emulsions by a nonionic surfactant (polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolauarate, Tween 20) was studied using front-face fluorescence spectroscopy (FFFS). This method relies on measurement of the change in intensity (I(MAX)) and wavelength (lambda(MAX)) of the maximum in the tryptophan emission spectrum. A series of oil-in-water emulsions (21 wt % n-hexadecane, 0.22 wt % BSA, pH 7.0) containing different molar ratios of Tween 20 to BSA (R = 0-131) were prepared. As the surfactant concentration was increased, the protein was progressively displaced from the droplet surfaces. At R > or = 66, the protein was completely displaced from the droplet surfaces. There was an increase in both I(MAX) and lambda(MAX) with increasing Tween 20 concentration up to R = 66, which correlated with the increase in the ratio of nonadsorbed to adsorbed protein. In contrast, there was a decrease in I(MAX) and lambda(MAX) with Tween 20 concentration in protein solutions and for R > or = 66 in the emulsions, which was attributed to binding of the surfactant to the protein. This study shows that FFFS is a powerful technique for nondestructively providing information about the interfacial composition of droplets in concentrated protein-stabilized emulsions in situ. Nevertheless, in general the suitability of the technique may also depend on protein type and the nature of the physicochemical matrix surrounding the proteins.

  13. Effect of Small Molecule Osmolytes on the Self-Assembly and Functionality of Globular Protein-Polymer Diblock Copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Carla S.; Xu, Liza; Olsen, Bradley D. [MIT

    2013-12-05

    Blending the small molecule osmolytes glycerol and trehalose with the model globular protein–polymer block copolymer mCherry-b-poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (mCherry-b-PNIPAM) is demonstrated to improve protein functionality in self-assembled nanostructures. The incorporation of either additive into block copolymers results in functionality retention in the solid state of 80 and 100% for PNIPAM volume fractions of 40 and 55%, respectively. This represents a large improvement over the 50–60% functionality observed in the absence of any additive. Furthermore, glycerol decreases the thermal stability of block copolymer films by 15–20 °C, while trehalose results in an improvement in the thermal stability by 15–20 °C. These results suggest that hydrogen bond replacement is responsible for the retention of protein function but suppression or enhancement of thermal motion based on the glass transition of the osmolyte primarily determines thermal stability. While both osmolytes are observed to have a disordering effect on the nanostructure morphology with increasing concentration, this effect is less pronounced in materials with a larger polymer volume fraction. Glycerol preferentially localizes in the protein domains and swells the nanostructures, inducing disordering or a change in morphology depending on the PNIPAM coil fraction. In contrast, trehalose is observed to macrophase separate from the block copolymer, which results in nanodomains becoming more disordered without changing significantly in size.

  14. Protein selectivity with immobilized metal ion-tacn sorbents: chromatographic studies with human serum proteins and several other globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, W; Graham, B; Spiccia, L; Hearn, M T

    1998-01-01

    The chromatographic selectivity of the immobilized chelate system, 1,4,7-triazocyclononane (tacn), complexed with the borderline metal ions Cu2+, Cr3+, Mn2+, Co2+, Zn2+, and Ni2+ has been investigated with hen egg white lysozyme, horse heart cytochrome c, and horse skeletal muscle myoglobin, as well as proteins present in partially fractionated preparations of human plasma. The effects of ionic strength and pH of the loading and elution buffers on protein selectivities of these new immobilized metal ion affinity chromatographic (IMAC) systems have been examined. The results confirm that immobilized Mn;pl-tacn sorbents exhibit a novel type of IMAC behavior with proteins. In particular, the chromatographic properties of these immobilized M(n+)-tacn ligand systems were significantly different compared to the IMAC behavior observed with other types of immobilized tri- and tetradentate chelating ligands, such as iminodiacetic acid, O-phosphoserine, or nitrilotriacetic acid, when complexed with borderline metal ions. The experimental results have consequently been evaluated in terms of the additional contributions to the interactive processes mediated by effects other than solely the conventional lone pair Lewis soft acid-Lewis soft base coordination interactions, typically found for the IMAC of proteins with borderline and soft metal ions, such as Cu2+ or Ni2+.

  15. Self-assembly dynamics for the transition of a globular aggregate to a fibril network of lysozyme proteins via a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Pandey

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The self-organizing dynamics of lysozymes (an amyloid protein with 148 residues with different numbers of protein chains, Nc = 1,5,10, and 15 (concentration 0.004 – 0.063 is studied by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation with knowledge-based residue-residue interactions. The dynamics of an isolated lysozyme (Nc = 1 is ultra-slow (quasi-static at low temperatures and becomes diffusive asymptotically on raising the temperature. In contrast, the presence of interacting proteins leads to concentration induced protein diffusion at low temperatures and concentration-tempering sub-diffusion at high temperatures. Variation of the radius of gyration of the protein with temperature shows a systematic transition from a globular structure (at low T to a random coil (high T conformation when the proteins are isolated. The crossover from globular to random coil becomes sharper upon increasing the protein concentration (i.e. with Nc = 5,10, with larger Rg at higher temperatures and concentration; Rg becomes smaller on adding more protein chains (e.g. Nc = 15 a non-monotonic response to protein concentration. Analysis of the structure factor (S(q provides an estimate of the effective dimension (D ≥ 3, globular conformation at low temperature, and D ∼ 1.7, random coil, at high temperatures of the isolated protein. With many interacting proteins, the morphology of the self-assembly varies with scale, i.e. at the low temperature (T = 0.015, D ∼ 2.9 on the scale comparable to the radius of gyration of the protein, and D ∼ 2.3 at the large scale over the entire sample. The global network of fibrils appears at high temperature (T = 0.021 with D ∼ 1.7 (i.e. a random coil morphology at large scale involving tenuous distribution of micro-globules (at small scales.

  16. Calorimetric and spectroscopic properties of small globular proteins (bovine serum albumin, hemoglobin) after free radical generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, N.; Belagyi, J.; Lorinczy, D.

    2003-01-01

    Mild oxidation of -SH-containing proteins (serum albumin, hemoglobin) by Ce(IV)-ions in the presence of the spin trap phenyl-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) resulted in the appearance of strongly immobilized nitroxide free radicals which evidences the formation of thiyl radicals on the thiol site of the proteins. In hydroxyl free radical generating system a fraction of strongly immobilized nitroxide radicals was also detected in these proteins, which implies that the oxidation of a fraction of the thiol groups was also involved in the free radical reaction. According to the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments the melting processes of the proteins were calorimetrically irreversible, therefore the two-state kinetic model was used to evaluate the experiments. The results support the view that site-specific interaction of SH-containing proteins with hydroxyl and thiyl free radicals is able to modify the internal dynamics of proteins and affect the conformation of large molecules

  17. Stability of globular proteins in H2O and in D2O

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efimova, Y.M.; Haemers, S.; Wierczinsky, B.; Norde, W.; Well, van A.A.

    2007-01-01

    In several experimental techniques D2O rather then H2O is often used as a solvent for proteins. Concerning the influence of the solvent on the stability of the proteins, contradicting results have been reported in literature. In this paper the influence of H2O-D2O solvent substitution on the

  18. Stability of globular proteins in H2O and D2O

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efimova, Y. M.; Haemers, S.; Wierczinski, B.; Norde, W.; van Well, A. A.

    2007-01-01

    In several experimental techniques D2O rather then H2O is often used as a solvent for proteins. Concerning the influence of the solvent on the stability of the proteins, contradicting results have been reported in literature. In this paper the influence of H2O-D2O solvent substitution on the

  19. Structural features that predict real-value fluctuations of globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamroz, Michal; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-05-01

    It is crucial to consider dynamics for understanding the biological function of proteins. We used a large number of molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories of nonhomologous proteins as references and examined static structural features of proteins that are most relevant to fluctuations. We examined correlation of individual structural features with fluctuations and further investigated effective combinations of features for predicting the real value of residue fluctuations using the support vector regression (SVR). It was found that some structural features have higher correlation than crystallographic B-factors with fluctuations observed in MD trajectories. Moreover, SVR that uses combinations of static structural features showed accurate prediction of fluctuations with an average Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.669 and a root mean square error of 1.04 Å. This correlation coefficient is higher than the one observed in predictions by the Gaussian network model (GNM). An advantage of the developed method over the GNMs is that the former predicts the real value of fluctuation. The results help improve our understanding of relationships between protein structure and fluctuation. Furthermore, the developed method provides a convienient practial way to predict fluctuations of proteins using easily computed static structural features of proteins. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Front-face fluorescence spectroscopy study of globular proteins in emulsions: influence of droplet flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampon, V; Genot, C; Riaublanc, A; Anton, M; Axelos, M A V; McClements, D J

    2003-04-23

    Measurement of the intensity (I(MAX)) and/or wavelength (lambda(MAX)) of the maximum in the tryptophan (TRP) emission spectrum using front-face fluorescence spectroscopy (FFFS) can be used to provide information about the molecular environment of proteins in nondiluted emulsions. Many protein-stabilized emulsions in the food industry are flocculated, and therefore, we examined the influence of droplet flocculation on FFFS. Stock oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by bovine serum albumin were prepared by high-pressure valve homogenization (30 wt % n-hexadecane, 0.35 wt % BSA, pH 7). These emulsions were used to create model systems with different degrees of droplet flocculation, either by changing the pH, adding surfactant, or adding xanthan. Emulsions (21 wt % n-hexadecane, 0.22 wt % BSA) with different pH (5 and 7) and molar ratios of Tween 20 to BSA (R = 0-131) were prepared by dilution of the stock emulsion. As the surfactant concentration was increased, the protein was displaced from the droplet surfaces, which caused an increase in both I(MAX) and lambda(MAX), because of the change in TRP environment. The dependence of I(MAX) and lambda(MAX) on surfactant concentration followed a similar pattern in emulsions that were initially flocculated (pH 5) and nonflocculated (pH 7). Relatively small changes in FFFS emission spectra were observed in emulsions (21 wt % n-hexadecane, 0.22 wt % BSA, pH 7) with different levels of depletion flocculation induced by adding xanthan. These results suggested that droplet flocculation did not have a major impact on FFFS. This study shows that FFFS is a powerful technique for nondestructively providing information about the molecular environment of proteins in concentrated and flocculated protein-stabilized emulsions. Nevertheless, in general the suitability of the technique may also depend on protein type and the nature of the physicochemical matrix surrounding the proteins.

  1. Chemical denaturation of globular proteins at the air-water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perriman, A.; White, J.; Henderson, M.

    2003-01-01

    X-ray and neutron reflectometry has been used to probe the equilibrium surface structure of hen egg white lysozyme (lysozyme) and bovine β -lactoglobulin (β -lactoglobulin) under denaturing conditions at the air-water interface. This was achieved by performing experiments on 10 mg mL -1 protein solutions containing increasing concentrations of guanidinium hydrochloride For solutions containing no G.HCl, the surface structure of the proteins was represented by a two-layer model with total thicknesses of 48 Angstroms and 38 Angstroms for lysozyme and β -lactoglobulin, respectively. The total volume of a single protein molecule and the associated water molecules was determined to be approximately 45 (0.3) nm 3 for lysozyme, and 60 (0.3) nm 3 for β -lactoglobulin. The thickness dimensions and the total volumes compared favourably with the crystal dimensions of 45 x 30 x 30 Angstroms (40.5 nm 3 ), and 36 x 36 x 36 Angstroms (47 nm 3 ) for lysozyme and β -lactoglobulin, respectively. This comparison suggests that when no denaturant was present, the structures of lysozyme and β -lactoglobulin were near to their native conformations at the air-water The response to the presence of the chemical denaturant was different for each protein. The surface layer of β -lactoglobulin expanded at very low concentrations (0.2 mol dm -3 ) of G.HCl, where the lysozyme layer contracted. At higher concentrations, unfolding of both the proteins led to the formation of a third diffuse layer. In general, lysozyme appeared to be less responsive to the chemical denaturant, which is most likely a result of the higher disulfide content of lysozyme. A protocol allowing quantitative analysis of the contribution from the air-water interface to the chemical denaturation of a protein was developed. The protocol involved calculation of the Gibbs free energy of a protein at zero denaturant concentration, by using the change in the adsorbed layer thickness as an order parameter

  2. In vitro biosynthesis of globular proteins by murine splenic lymphocytes: effect of serum components as supplement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, H.K.L.; Pandey, A.K.; Singh, L.N.

    1991-01-01

    Studies on replacement of foetal calf serum (FCS) with precipitable protein, non precipitable protein, dialysable and non dialysable components of the FCS in media for the growth and proliferation of murine splenic rat lymphocytes have revealed that the whole serum could be completely replaced by either of the components without any appreciable deleterious effect on the mitogenic response but none of these components could offer optimum immune response. These findings establish a covalent association of whole FCS for synthesis and secretion of immunologically important pulsed proteins in terms of turnover rate and quantification by FPLC and suggest an important and yet undefined role of FCS in the process of immunoglobulin synthesis. (author). 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  3. Zaccai neutron resilience and site-specific hydration dynamics in a globular protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinglong [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hong, Liang [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yi, Zheng [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Jeremy C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-07-16

    A discussion is presented of contributions of the Zaccai group to the understanding of flexibility in biological macromolecules using dynamic neutron scattering. The concept of resilience as introduced by Zaccai is discussed and investigated using molecular dynamics simulation on camphor-bound cytochrome P450. The resilience of hydrophilic residues is found to be more strongly affected by hydration than that of hydrophobic counterparts. The hydration-induced softening of protein propagates from the surface into the dry core. Furthermore, buried hydrophilic residues behave more like those exposed on the protein surface, and are different from their hydrophobic counterparts.

  4. Does the Sauerbrey equation hold true for binding of peptides and globular proteins to a QCM?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean E. Sohna Sohna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The term ‘microbalance’ arose after Sauerbrey showed a mass per unit area dependence on sensor frequency change for thin, solid films on a QCM. Others have extrapolated this relationship to interactions with biological ‘soft’ matter using acoustic wave devices. We rigorously examined the relationship between QCM frequency change and the molecular weight of protein and peptide analytes on a RAP♦id 4™ system using more than 120 individual assays. A series of amino acid, peptides and proteins with molecular weight from 372 to 150,000 Da constituting a molecular weight ladder were biotinylated with a target biotin/protein ratio close to one to minimize avidity effects. Analyte concentration and contact time were chosen so as to attain near saturation of an anti-biotin antibody surface. The series resistance and resonant frequency changes (dF and dR arising from a 5-parameter fit of the imaginary component of the impedance signal were analysed, giving a linear relationship (R2 = 0.98 between frequency response and analyte molecular weight, even down to level of a single amino-acid. As predicted by theory, there was also a linear relationship between the changes in density and viscosity of the liquid in contact with the sensor and both dF and dR. The resistance and resonance frequency changes recorded for mixtures of deuterium oxide and glycerol were the sum of changes induced by each individual liquid. Hence the Sauerbrey equation for mass per unit area dependence of QCM signal does hold true for peptides and proteins in a liquid.

  5. Photophysical studies of PET based acridinedione dyes with globular protein: Bovine serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajendran, Kumaran; Perumal, Ramamurthy

    2010-01-01

    Interaction of acridinedione dyes with model transport proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solution were investigated by fluorescence spectral studies. A fluorescence enhancement was observed on the addition of BSA to photoinduced electron transfer (PET) based acridinedione dyes, which posses C 6 H 4 (p-OCH 3 ) in the 9th position of the basic acridinedione ring. On the contrary, the addition of BSA to non-PET based acridinedione dyes with methyl or phenyl substitution in the 9th position does not result in any fluorescence enhancement. The enhancement in the fluorescence intensity is attributed to the suppression of PET process through space between -OCH 3 group and the acridinedione moiety is elucidated by steady state fluorescence measurements. The fluorescence anisotropy value (r) of 0.40 reveals that the motion of the dye molecule is highly constrained and is largely confined to the rigid microenvironment of the protein molecule. The binding constant (K) was found to be in the order of 6.0x10 3 [M] -1 , which implies the existence of hydrophobic interaction between the PET based dye and BSA. Time resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements reveal that the PET based acridinedione dye preferably binds in the hydrophobic interior of BSA.

  6. Pulsed laser study of excited states of aromatic molecules absorbed in globular proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.; Thomas, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    Pyrene and several derivatives of pyrene such as pyrene sulfonic acid, and pyrene butyric acid were incorporated into bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solution. The pyrene chromophore was subsequently excited by a pulse of uv light (lambda = 3471 A) from a Q switched frequency doubled ruby laser. The lifetime of the pyrene excited singlet and triplet states were monitored by time resolved spectrophotometry. Various molecules, such as O 2 and I - , dissolved in the aqueous phase, diffused into the protein and quenched pyrene excited states. The rates of these reactions were followed under a variety of conditions such as pH and temperature and in the presence of inert additives. The rates of pyrene excited-state quenching were often considerably smaller than the rates observed in simple solutions. A comparison of the rates in the protein and homogeneous solutions gives information on the factors such as temperature, charge, and pH that control the movement of small molecules in and into BSA

  7. Structure-volume relationships: singular volume effects produced by cupric ion-globular protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, S; Shinaberry, G; Heck, E L; Squire, W

    1980-08-05

    The nature of the volume isotherms produced by the coordination of Cu(II) with ovalbumin and bovine serum albumin differs substantially from the adsorption isotherms produced by these systems. Whereas there was increased binding of Cu(II) associated with a pH increase from pH 5.3 to pH 7.4, the volume isotherms for these systems did not exhibit this type of pH dependence. The volume changes were determined at 30.0 +/- 0.001 degrees C with microdilatometers which could be read to 0.01 muL. The binding isotherms for ovalbumin at pH 5.3 and 7.4 and for bovine serum albumin at pH 5.3 was resolved by a Scatchard plot to yield the appropriate thermodynamic parameters. An algorithm was derived to calculate the distribution of the individual PMi complexes, i.e., PMi-1 + M in equilibrium (Ki) PMi where i equals 1, 2, 3, ..., n moles of cation, M, bound per mole of protein, P, for the above systems. The volume isotherms were then resolved in terms of the constituent delta Vi terms, i.e., the volume change produced by the formation of the individual PMi complexes. These values were verified by an independent graphical differentiation procedure. The coordination of Cu(II) to BSA at pH 7.4 produced a cooperative adsorption isotherm which was not amenable to a Scatchard analysis. The resultant anomalous volume isotherm was resolved into a component related to Cu(II)-site interaction and a negative volume effect attributable to a conformational change induced by complex formation. This structural transition which occurs at physiological pH may constitute a control mechanism for regulating the serum level of Cu(II) and possibly other divalent ions.

  8. Structures and interactions among globular proteins above the isoelectric point in the presence of divalent ions: A small angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Sarathi; Pandit, Subhankar; Abbas, Sohrab; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2018-02-01

    Small angle neutron scattering study reveals that at pD ≈ 7.0, above the isoelectric point of the globular protein Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA), in the presence of different divalent ions (Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+), the short-range attractive interaction remains nearly constant and the intermediate-range repulsive interaction decreases with increasing salt concentration up to a certain concentration value but after that remains unchanged. However, for the monovalent ion (Na+), repulsive interaction decreases gradually up to 1 M salt concentration. Dynamic light scattering study shows that for all ions, diffusion coefficient of BSA decreases with increasing salt concentration and then nearly saturates.

  9. Larger red-shift in optical emissions obtained from the thin films of globular proteins (BSA, lysozyme) – polyelectrolyte (PAA) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukdar, Hrishikesh [Physical Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Vigyan Path, Paschim Boragaon, Garchuk, Guwahati 781035, Assam (India); Kundu, Sarathi, E-mail: sarathi.kundu@gmail.com [Physical Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Vigyan Path, Paschim Boragaon, Garchuk, Guwahati 781035, Assam (India); Basu, Saibal [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-09-30

    Graphical abstract: Thin films of protein-polyelectrolyte complexes show larger red-shift in optical emission. - Highlights: • Globular proteins (lysozyme and BSA) and polyelectrolyte (sodium polyacrylic acid) are used to form protein-polyelectrolyte complexes (PPC). • Larger red-shift in optical emission is obtained from the thin films of PPC. • Red-shift is not obtained from the solution of PPC and pure protein thin films. • Larger red-shift from PPC films is due to the energy dissipation as non-radiative form through interactions with nearby atoms. • Red-shift in optical emission is independent on the thickness of the PPC film. - Abstract: Globular proteins (lysozyme and BSA) and polyelectrolyte (sodium polyacrylic acid) are used to form protein-polyelectrolyte complexes (PPC). Out-of-plane structures of ≈30–60 nm thick PPC films and their surface morphologies have been studied by using X-ray reflectivity and atomic force microscopy, whereas optical behaviors of PPC and protein conformations have been studied by using UV–vis, photoluminescence and FTIR spectroscopy respectively. Our study reveals that thin films of PPC show a larger red-shift of 23 and 16 nm in the optical emissions in comparison to that of pure protein whereas bulk PPC show a small blue-shift of ≈3 nm. A small amount of peak-shift is found to occur due to the heat treatment or concentration variation of the polyelectrolyte/protein in bulk solution but cannot produce such film thickness independent larger red-shift. Position of the emission peak remains nearly unchanged with the film thickness. Mechanism for such larger red-shift has been proposed.

  10. Chemical denaturation of globular proteins at the air/water interface: an x-ray and neutron reflectometry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perriman, A.W.; Henderson, M.J.; White, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: X-ray and neutron reflectometry has been used to probe the equilibrium surface structure of hen egg white lysozyme (lysozyme) and bovine β -lactoglobulin (β -lactoglobulin) under denaturing conditions at the air-water interface. This was achieved by performing experiments on 10 mg mL -1 protein solutions containing increasing concentrations of the chemical denaturant guanidinium hydrochloride (G.HCl). For solutions containing no G.HCl, the surface structure of the proteins was represented by a two-layer model with total thicknesses of 48 Angstroms and 38 Angstroms for lysozyme and β -lactoglobulin, respectively. The total volume of a single protein molecule and the associated water molecules was evaluated to be approximately 45 (0.3) nm 3 for lysozyme, and 60 (0.3) nm 3 for β-lactoglobulin. The thickness dimensions and the total volumes compared favourably with the crystal dimensions of 45 x 30 x 30 Angstroms (40.5 nm 3 ),1 and 36 x 36 x 36 Angstroms (47 nm 3 ) 2 for lysozyme and β -lactoglobulin, respectively. This comparison suggests that when no denaturant was present, the structures of lysozyme and β -lactoglobulin were near to their native conformations at the air-water interface. The response to the presence of the chemical denaturant was different for each protein. The surface layer of β-lactoglobulin expanded at very low concentrations (0.2 mol dm -3 ) of G.HCl. In contrast, the lysozyme layer contracted. At higher concentrations, unfolding of both the proteins led to the formation of a third diffuse layer. In general, lysozyme appeared to be less responsive to the chemical denaturant, which is most likely a result of the higher disulfide content of lysozyme. A protocol allowing quantitative thermodynamic analysis of the contribution from the air-water interface to the chemical denaturation of a protein was developed

  11. Optimal definition of inter-residual contact in globular proteins based on pairwise interaction energy calculations, its robustness, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fačkovec, Boris; Vondrášek, Jiří

    2012-10-25

    Although a contact is an essential measurement for the topology as well as strength of non-covalent interactions in biomolecules and their complexes, there is no general agreement in the definition of this feature. Most of the definitions work with simple geometric criteria which do not fully reflect the energy content or ability of the biomolecular building blocks to arrange their environment. We offer a reasonable solution to this problem by distinguishing between "productive" and "non-productive" contacts based on their interaction energy strength and properties. We have proposed a method which converts the protein topology into a contact map that represents interactions with statistically significant high interaction energies. We do not prove that these contacts are exclusively stabilizing, but they represent a gateway to thermodynamically important rather than geometry-based contacts. The process is based on protein fragmentation and calculation of interaction energies using the OPLS force field and relies on pairwise additivity of amino acid interactions. Our approach integrates the treatment of different types of interactions, avoiding the problems resulting from different contributions to the overall stability and the different effect of the environment. The first applications on a set of homologous proteins have shown the usefulness of this classification for a sound estimate of protein stability.

  12. Optimal Definition of Inter-Residual Contact in Globular Proteins Based on Pairwise Interaction Energy Calculations, Its Robustness, and Applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fačkovec, Boris; Vondrášek, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 42 (2012), s. 12651-12660 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/0725; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11020 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : egg-white lysozyme * force-field * 3-dimensional structure * thermophilic proteins * thermal-stability * mutant Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.607, year: 2012

  13. Probing folding free energy landscape of small proteins through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    lattice and off-lattice models of proteins have been used to study the statistical and dynamical aspects of folding.12,13 Levitt pioneered in the computational studies of protein folding using off-lattice protein models.14 A recent off-lattice model study of HP-36 based on hydrophobicity tried to correlate the folding with many ...

  14. Collisions between Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloni, D. T.; Rocha-Pinto, H. J.

    2014-10-01

    The study of globular clusters (GC) plays an important role in our understanding of the Universe since these systems are true laboratories for theories of stellar dynamics and evolution. We are interested in studying a globular cluster formed by a collision between two different GC with NBODY6 (Aarseth, 2003). Firstly, in order to understand this code, we analyse how tidal streams form from a globular cluster in a circular orbit (on the disk) around the center of the Milky Way. In the next stage of this work we will study that collision. The stellar escape or capture from globular cluster can be understood with the Restricted Three Body Problem. These stars escape in a chaotic orbit, and in some cases may return (again in a chaotic orbit) to the cluster due to the Galactic potential. In most cases, such stars quickly alter their escape chaotic orbits to orbits that are similar to the parent cluster's orbit. Our results show an agglomeration of stars in a normal direction related to the direction towards the center of the Milky Way, forming thus a stream. We can explain this considering that a circular orbit around the dominant potential is the most likely orbit, since it requires minimum energy. In this coordinate systems, the tidal tails (or streams) rotates around the cluster center with the same mean motion associated to cluster around the Milky Way center.

  15. Globular Clusters - Guides to Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Richtler, Tom; Joint ESO-FONDAP Workshop on Globular Clusters

    2009-01-01

    The principal question of whether and how globular clusters can contribute to a better understanding of galaxy formation and evolution is perhaps the main driving force behind the overall endeavour of studying globular cluster systems. Naturally, this splits up into many individual problems. The objective of the Joint ESO-FONDAP Workshop on Globular Clusters - Guides to Galaxies was to bring together researchers, both observational and theoretical, to present and discuss the most recent results. Topics covered in these proceedings are: internal dynamics of globular clusters and interaction with host galaxies (tidal tails, evolution of cluster masses), accretion of globular clusters, detailed descriptions of nearby cluster systems, ultracompact dwarfs, formations of massive clusters in mergers and elsewhere, the ACS Virgo survey, galaxy formation and globular clusters, dynamics and kinematics of globular cluster systems and dark matter-related problems. With its wide coverage of the topic, this book constitute...

  16. Relative Ages of Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzia, Thomas H.

    Ages of extragalactic globular clusters can provide valuable insights into the formation and evolution of galaxies. In this contribution the photometric methods of age dating old globular cluster systems are summarised. The spectroscopic approach is reviewed with an emphasis of the fight choice of age diagnostics. We present a new method of quantifying the relatively best age-sensitive spectroscopic index given the quality of a data set and a certain theoretical stellar synthesis model. The relatively best diagnostic plot is constructed from the set of Lick indices and used to age date globular clusters in several early-type galaxies which are part of a large spectroscopic survey of extragalactic globular cluster systems. We find that, independently of host galaxy, metal-poor ([Fe/H] old (t > 8 Gyr) and coeval. Metal-rich clusters show a wide range of ages from ˜ 15 down to a few Gyr.

  17. Relativistic Binaries in Globular Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Benacquista

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Galactic globular clusters are old, dense star systems typically containing 10^4 – 10^6 stars. As an old population of stars, globular clusters contain many collapsed and degenerate objects. As a dense population of stars, globular clusters are the scene of many interesting close dynamical interactions between stars. These dynamical interactions can alter the evolution of individual stars and can produce tight binary systems containing one or two compact objects. In this review, we discuss theoretical models of globular cluster evolution and binary evolution, techniques for simulating this evolution that leads to relativistic binaries, and current and possible future observational evidence for this population. Our discussion of globular cluster evolution will focus on the processes that boost the production of tight binary systems and the subsequent interaction of these binaries that can alter the properties of both bodies and can lead to exotic objects. Direct N-body integrations and Fokker–Planck simulations of the evolution of globular clusters that incorporate tidal interactions and lead to predictions of relativistic binary populations are also discussed. We discuss the current observational evidence for cataclysmic variables, millisecond pulsars, and low-mass X-ray binaries as well as possible future detection of relativistic binaries with gravitational radiation.

  18. Effects of non-covalent interactions with 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (chlorogenic acid) on the heat denaturation and solubility of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prigent, S.V.E.; Gruppen, H.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Koningsveld, G.A. van; Jong, G.A.H. de; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    The non-covalent interactions between the monomeric phenolic compound chlorogenic acid (5-CQA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme, and α-lactalbumin were characterized, and their effect on protein properties was examined. 5-CQA had a low affinity for all three proteins, and these interactions

  19. Speckle imaging of globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sams, B.J. III

    1990-01-01

    Speckle imaging is a powerful tool for high resolution astronomy. Its application to the core regions of globular clusters produces high resolution stellar maps of the bright stars, but is unable to image the faint stars which are most reliable dynamical indicators. The limits on resolving these faint, extended objects are physical, not algorithmic, and cannot be overcome using speckle. High resolution maps may be useful for resolving multicomponent stellar systems in the cluster centers. 30 refs

  20. Globular Clusters for Faint Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    The origin of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) has posed a long-standing mystery for astronomers. New observations of several of these faint giants with the Hubble Space Telescope are now lending support to one theory.Faint-Galaxy MysteryHubble images of Dragonfly 44 (top) and DFX1 (bottom). The right panels show the data with greater contrast and extended objects masked. [van Dokkum et al. 2017]UDGs large, extremely faint spheroidal objects were first discovered in the Virgo galaxy cluster roughly three decades ago. Modern telescope capabilities have resulted in many more discoveries of similar faint galaxies in recent years, suggesting that they are a much more common phenomenon than we originally thought.Despite the many observations, UDGs still pose a number of unanswered questions. Chief among them: what are UDGs? Why are these objects the size of normal galaxies, yet so dim? There are two primary models that explain UDGs:UDGs were originally small galaxies, hence their low luminosity. Tidal interactions then puffed them up to the large size we observe today.UDGs are effectively failed galaxies. They formed the same way as normal galaxies of their large size, but something truncated their star formation early, preventing them from gaining the brightness that we would expect for galaxies of their size.Now a team of scientists led by Pieter van Dokkum (Yale University) has made some intriguing observations with Hubble that lend weight to one of these models.Globulars observed in 16 Coma-cluster UDGs by Hubble. The top right panel shows the galaxy identifications. The top left panel shows the derived number of globular clusters in each galaxy. [van Dokkum et al. 2017]Globulars GaloreVan Dokkum and collaborators imaged two UDGs with Hubble: Dragonfly 44 and DFX1, both located in the Coma galaxy cluster. These faint galaxies are both smooth and elongated, with no obvious irregular features, spiral arms, star-forming regions, or other indications of tidal interactions

  1. ω-Turn: a novel β-turn mimic in globular proteins stabilized by main-chain to side-chain C−H···O interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Jesmita; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Saini, Harpreet; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh; Kishore, Raghuvansh

    2015-02-01

    Mimicry of structural motifs is a common feature in proteins. The 10-membered hydrogen-bonded ring involving the main-chain C − O in a β-turn can be formed using a side-chain carbonyl group leading to Asx-turn. We show that the N − H component of hydrogen bond can be replaced by a C(γ) -H group in the side chain, culminating in a nonconventional C − H···O interaction. Because of its shape this β-turn mimic is designated as ω-turn, which is found to occur ∼ three times per 100 residues. Three residues (i to i + 2) constitute the turn with the C − H···O interaction occurring between the terminal residues, constraining the torsion angles ϕi + 1, ψi + 1, ϕi + 2 and χ'1(i + 2) (using the interacting C(γ) atom). Based on these angles there are two types of ω-turns, each of which can be further divided into two groups. C(β) -branched side-chains, and Met and Gln have high propensities to occur at i + 2; for the last two residues the carbonyl oxygen may participate in an additional interaction involving the S and amino group, respectively. With Cys occupying the i + 1 position, such turns are found in the metal-binding sites. N-linked glycosylation occurs at the consensus pattern Asn-Xaa-Ser/Thr; with Thr at i + 2, the sequence can adopt the secondary structure of a ω-turn, which may be the recognition site for protein modification. Location between two β-strands is the most common occurrence in protein tertiary structure, and being generally exposed ω-turn may constitute the antigenic determinant site. It is a stable scaffold and may be used in protein engineering and peptide design. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Quantification of particle sizes with metal replication under standard freeze-etching conditions: a gold ball standard for calibrating shadow widths was used to measure freeze-etched globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruben, G C

    1995-11-01

    120 sec yielded a low contrast, less granular Pt-C film. Both gold balls and protein particles were subjected in separate experiments to either 19 or 120 sec of outgassing of the Pt-C gun prior to Pt-C replication. Outgassing had a profound effect on the average size of the Pt-C shadow widths on both gold and protein particles. The Pt-C gun outgassing procedure also determined the smallest replicated particle that could be resolved. The frequency of some smaller gold ball sizes detected after replication was reduced disproportionately with 19 sec vs. 120 sec outgassing. However, Pt-C gun outgassing did not affect the average measured diameter of the Pt-C-coated protein particles. The "geometric assumption" that each metal-coated particle creates a shadow width the same size as the metal-coated particle diameter was tested using a globular protein. Pt-C replication of protein particles at a 45 degree and 20 degree angle could not confirm the geometric assumption because an average shadow width was always significantly larger than its average Pt-C-coated particle diameter. A model for how the large shadow widths are formed is presented. Gold balls were also replicated at a 45 degree angle with current high resolution conditions at a substrate temperature of -185 degrees C, and the results of these replicas were compared to the results reported here at approximately -100 degrees C.

  3. Gamma-ray Emission from Globular Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak-Hin T. Tam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, the data obtained using the Large Area Telescope (LAT aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided new insights on high-energy processes in globular clusters, particularly those involving compact objects such as MilliSecond Pulsars (MSPs. Gamma-ray emission in the 100 MeV to 10 GeV range has been detected from more than a dozen globular clusters in our galaxy, including 47 Tucanae and Terzan 5. Based on a sample of known gammaray globular clusters, the empirical relations between gamma-ray luminosity and properties of globular clusters such as their stellar encounter rate, metallicity, and possible optical and infrared photon energy densities, have been derived. The measured gamma-ray spectra are generally described by a power law with a cut-off at a few gigaelectronvolts. Together with the detection of pulsed γ-rays from two MSPs in two different globular clusters, such spectral signature lends support to the hypothesis that γ-rays from globular clusters represent collective curvature emission from magnetospheres of MSPs in the clusters. Alternative models, involving Inverse-Compton (IC emission of relativistic electrons that are accelerated close to MSPs or pulsar wind nebula shocks, have also been suggested. Observations at >100 GeV by using Fermi/LAT and atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S.-II, MAGIC-II, VERITAS, and CTA will help to settle some questions unanswered by current data.

  4. GLOBULAR RESISTANCE MODIFICATION ON RATS CONSECUTIVELY TO Al2(SO43 ADDITION FOR TWO GENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LOREDANA GABRIELA STANA

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Some of the major modifications on membranes produced by the oxygen reactivespecies are membranal structure and functions modifications, lipids peroxydation,membranal protein alterations and transportation disturbances thru membranes. Aseries of xenobotics like oxidant pollutants, lead, aluminium and others directly orindirectly are producing thru metabolization free radicals which interact with cellscomponents and alterate their functions. The purpose of this paper was to relieve theimpact of aluminium cumulative addition onto globular resistance on rats. Has beenadministrated three levels of aluminium (200ppb, 400 ppb şi 1000 ppb as Al2(SO43ad libidum in water. Was followed their toxicity impact on the globular resistancefor two generations. The results indicate a decrease of globular resistance directlycorrelated with the aluminium addition.

  5. Stellar black holes in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Hut, Piet; Mcmillan, Steve

    1993-01-01

    The recent discovery of large populations of millisec pulsars associated with neutron stars in globular clusters indicates that several hundred stellar black holes of about 10 solar masses each can form within a typical cluster. While, in clusters of high central density, the rapid dynamical evolution of the black-hole population leads to an ejection of nearly all holes on a short timescale, systems of intermediate density may involve a normal star's capture by one of the surviving holes to form a low-mass X-ray binary. One or more such binaries may be found in the globular clusters surrounding our galaxy.

  6. Tidal evolution of globular clusters. I - Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, K. S.; Lin, D. N. C.; Aarseth, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Tidal evolution of globular clusters is regulated by both Galactic tidal effects and internal relaxation processes. In order to investigate the tidal evolution of globular clusters, a numerical scheme which utilizes a Fokker-Planck approach as well as direct numerical integration of the restricted three-body problem is developed. In the inner regions of the cluster, stellar orbits are mapped with the cluster's gravitational potential and orbit-averaged diffusion coefficients. In the outer regions, the Galactic tidal field is explicitly included in the direct orbital integration. This method is presented here with some tests on King-Michie models.

  7. Shaping Globular Clusters with Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-03-01

    How many black holes lurk within the dense environments of globular clusters, and how do these powerful objects shape the properties of the cluster around them? One such cluster, NGC 3201, is now helping us to answer these questions.Hunting Stellar-Mass Black HolesSince the detection of merging black-hole binaries by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), the dense environments of globular clusters have received increasing attention as potential birthplaces of these compact binary systems.The central region of the globular star cluster NGC 3201, as viewed by Hubble. The black hole is in orbit with the star marked by the blue circle. [NASA/ESA]In addition, more and more stellar-mass black-hole candidates have been observed within globular clusters, lurking in binary pairs with luminous, non-compact companions. The most recent of these detections, found in the globular cluster NGC 3201, stands alone as the first stellar-mass black hole candidate discovered via radial velocity observations: the black holes main-sequence companion gave away its presence via a telltale wobble.Now a team of scientists led by Kyle Kremer (CIERA and Northwestern University) is using models of this system to better understand the impact that black holes might have on their host clusters.A Model ClusterThe relationship between black holes and their host clusters is complicated. Though the cluster environment can determine the dynamical evolution of the black holes, the retention rate of black holes in a globular cluster (i.e., how many remain in the cluster when they are born as supernovae, rather than being kicked out during the explosion) influences how the host cluster evolves.Kremer and collaborators track this complex relationship by modeling the evolution of a cluster similar to NGC 3201 with a Monte Carlo code. The code incorporates physics relevant to the evolution of black holes and black-hole binaries in globular clusters, such as two-body relaxation

  8. Dityrosine, 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), and radical formation from tyrosine residues on milk proteins with globular and flexible structures as a result of riboflavin-mediated photo-oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Trine Kastrup; Nielsen, Jacob Holm; Brown, Bronwyn

    2011-01-01

    Riboflavin-mediated photo-oxidative damage to protein Tyr residues has been examined to determine whether protein structure influences competing protein oxidation pathways in single proteins and protein mixtures. EPR studies resulted in the detection of Tyr-derived o-semiquione radicals, with thi......Riboflavin-mediated photo-oxidative damage to protein Tyr residues has been examined to determine whether protein structure influences competing protein oxidation pathways in single proteins and protein mixtures. EPR studies resulted in the detection of Tyr-derived o-semiquione radicals...

  9. Infrared dust emission from globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeletti, L.; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.; Giannone, P.; Blanco, A.; Bussoletti, E.

    1982-01-01

    The implications of the presence of a central cloud in the cores of globular clusters were investigated recently. A possible mechanism of confinement of dust in the central region of our cluster models was also explored. The grain temperature and infrared emission have now been computed for rather realistic grain compositions. The grain components were assumed to be graphite and/or silicates. The central clouds turned out to be roughly isothermal. The wavelengths of maximum emission came out to be larger than 20 μm in all studied cases. An application of the theoretical results to five globular clusters showed that the predictable infrared emission for 47 Tuc, M4 and M22 should be detectable by means of present instrumentation aboard flying platforms. (author)

  10. Chemical Abundances of Giants in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, Raffaele G.; Bragaglia, Angela; Carretta, Eugenio; D'Orazi, Valentina; Lucatello, Sara

    A large fraction of stars form in clusters. According to a widespread paradigma, stellar clusters are prototypes of single stellar populations. According to this concept, they formed on a very short time scale, and all their stars share the same chemical composition. Recently it has been understood that massive stellar clusters (the globular clusters) rather host various stellar populations, characterized by different chemical composition: these stellar populations have also slightly different ages, stars of the second generations being formed from the ejecta of part of those of an earlier one. Furthermore, it is becoming clear that the efficiency of the process is quite low: many more stars formed within this process than currently present in the clusters. This implies that a significant, perhaps even dominant fraction of the ancient population of galaxies formed within the episodes that lead to formation the globular clusters.

  11. VARIABLES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 5024

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safonova, M.; Stalin, C. S., E-mail: rita@iiap.res.in, E-mail: stalin@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India)

    2011-12-15

    We present the results of a commissioning campaign to observe Galactic globular clusters for the search of microlensing events. The central 10' Multiplication-Sign 10' region of the globular cluster NGC 5024 was monitored using the 2 m Himalayan Chandra Telescope in R-band for a period of about 8 hr on 2010 March 24. Light curves were obtained for nearly 10,000 stars using a modified Differential Image Analysis technique. We identified all known variables within our field of view and revised the periods and status of some previously reported short-period variables. We report about 70 new variable sources and present their equatorial coordinates, periods, light curves, and possible types. Out of these, 15 are SX Phe stars, 10 are W UMa-type stars, and 14 are probable RR Lyrae stars. Nine of the newly discovered SX Phe stars and one eclipsing binary belong to the blue straggler star population.

  12. Globular Cluster Tidal Streams: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, William L.; Lauchner, A.; Wilhelm, R.; McWilliam, A.

    2006-12-01

    Globular cluster tidal streams are of interest for what they can tell us of the dynamical evolution of the clusters and of our Galaxy. Recent studies have used photometric and statistical subtraction methods to attempt to separate potential streams from the field stars that contaminate the samples. We chose instead as our primary method to use photometry to select blue stars that match the horizontal branch of the clusters. We then make spectroscopic observations of these candidates to determine their metallicity and radial velocities. Combining these results with the photometric data offers a better picture of the structure and validity of tidal streams. We present photometric and spectroscopic results for several globular clusters and their surrounding fields. Data were obtained at McDonald Observatory, Kitt Peak, and Las Campanas Observatory. SDSS data were also used. WLP acknowledges the support of a Sigma Xi Grant-In-Aid of research. RW acknowledges the support of a AAS Small Research Grant.

  13. BtcA, A class IA type III chaperone, interacts with the BteA N-terminal domain through a globular/non-globular mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guttman

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of "whooping cough" disease, utilizes the type III secretion system (T3SS to deliver a 69 kDa cytotoxic effector protein, BteA, directly into the host cells. As with other T3SS effectors, prior to its secretion BteA binds BtcA, a 13.9 kDa protein predicted to act as a T3SS class IA chaperone. While this interaction had been characterized for such effector-chaperone pairs in other pathogens, it has yet to be fully investigated in Bordetella. Here we provide the first biochemical proof that BtcA is indeed a class IA chaperone, responsible for the binding of BteA's N-terminal domain. We bring forth extensive evidence that BtcA binds its substrate effector through a dual-interface binding mechanism comprising of non-globular and bi-globular interactions at a moderate micromolar level binding affinity. We demonstrate that the non-globular interactions involve the first 31 N-terminal residues of BteA287 and their removal leads to destabilization of the effector-chaperone complex and lower binding affinities to BtcA. These findings represent an important first step towards a molecular understanding of BteA secretion and cell entry.

  14. Exploring the Internal Dynamics of Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Laura L.; van der Marel, Roeland; Bellini, Andrea; Luetzgendorf, Nora; HSTPROMO Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Exploring the Internal Dynamics of Globular ClustersThe formation histories and structural properties of globular clusters are imprinted on their internal dynamics. Energy equipartition results in velocity differences for stars of different mass, and leads to mass segregation, which results in different spatial distributions for stars of different mass. Intermediate-mass black holes significantly increase the velocity dispersions at the centres of clusters. By combining accurate measurements of their internal kinematics with state-of-the-art dynamical models, we can characterise both the velocity dispersion and mass profiles of clusters, tease apart the different effects, and understand how clusters may have formed and evolved.Using proper motions from the Hubble Space Telescope Proper Motion (HSTPROMO) Collaboration for a set of 22 Milky Way globular clusters, and our discrete dynamical modelling techniques designed to work with large, high-quality datasets, we are studying a variety of internal cluster properties. We will present the results of theoretical work on simulated clusters that demonstrates the efficacy of our approach, and preliminary results from application to real clusters.

  15. Antibody mapping and tissue localization of globular and cysteine-rich regions of perlecan domain III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Ljubimov, A V; Sthanam, M

    1995-01-01

    Perlecan is the best-characterized basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan. It has a large (approximately 400 KD) core protein consisting of five distinct domains. Domain III, a centrally located domain, contains three globular domains separated by cysteine-rich epidermal growth factor (EGF......)-like repeats. Domain III has overall homology with the N-terminus of the laminin alpha 1-chain. The aim of this study was to map a library of nine rat monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against murine perlecan core protein, using recombinant whole Domain III and defined subdomains of Domain III. ELISA and Western...... blotting showed that six of the nine MAbs recognized Domain III of perlecan, three of them mapping to globular Subdomain IIIc, and the other three recognized epitopes within the cysteine-rich regions. All six MAbs stained every basement membrane of several mouse organs as well as some connective tissues...

  16. A simple model for electrical charge in globular macromolecules and linear polyelectrolytes in solution

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnan, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a model for calculating the net and effective electrical charge of globular macromolecules and linear polyelectrolytes such as proteins and DNA, given the concentration of monovalent salt and pH in solution. The calculation is based on a numerical solution of the non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation using a finite element discretized continuum approach. The model simultaneously addresses the phenomena of charge regulation and renormalization, both of which underpin the electrostat...

  17. Cortactin Adopts a Globular Conformation and Bundles Actin into Sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowieson, Nathan P.; King, Gordon; Cookson, David; Ross, Ian; Huber, Thomas; Hume, David A.; Kobe, Bostjan; Martin, Jennifer L. (Queensland); (Aust. Synch.)

    2008-08-21

    Cortactin is a filamentous actin-binding protein that plays a pivotal role in translating environmental signals into coordinated rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. The dynamic reorganization of actin in the cytoskeleton drives processes including changes in cell morphology, cell migration, and phagocytosis. In general, structural proteins of the cytoskeleton bind in the N-terminal region of cortactin and regulatory proteins in the C-terminal region. Previous structural studies have reported an extended conformation for cortactin. It is therefore unclear how cortactin facilitates cross-talk between structural proteins and their regulators. In the study presented here, circular dichroism, chemical cross-linking, and small angle x-ray scattering are used to demonstrate that cortactin adopts a globular conformation, thereby bringing distant parts of the molecule into close proximity. In addition, the actin bundling activity of cortactin is characterized, showing that fully polymerized actin filaments are bundled into sheet-like structures. We present a low resolution structure that suggests how the various domains of cortactin interact to coordinate its array of binding partners at sites of actin branching.

  18. Dynamics of the globular cluster NGC 362

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Philippe; Welch, Douglas L.; Mateo, Mario; Cote, Patrick

    1993-01-01

    A combination of V-band CCD images and echelle spectra of member red giants is presently used to examine the internal dynamics of the globular cluster NGC 362. A total of 285 stellar spectra were obtained of 215 stars for radial velocity determinations, and the true cluster binary fraction was determined from simulations to be 0.15 for circular orbits and 0.27 for orbits with an f(e) = e (eccentricity) distribution function. An overabundance of binaries is surmised for NGC 362 on this basis.

  19. Near infrared photometry of globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.L.; Menzies, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    Photographic photometry on the V, Isub(K) system has been obtained for giant stars in the metal-rich globular clusters NGC 5927, 6171, 6352, 6356, 6388, 6522, 6528, 6712 and 6723. Colour-magnitude diagrams are presented. These data, with earlier observations of NGC 104 (47 Tuc), yield new parameters to describe the giant branch. These are the colour of the red variables, represented by their mean colour (V - Isub(K)) 0 or by the colour (V - Isub(K))sub(BO) of the bluest red variable on the giant branch of a cluster, and ΔV' which is the magnitude difference between the horizontal branch and the highest point on the giant branch. The latter is independent of reddening, since the giant branch of the most metal-rich clusters passes through a maximum in the V, V - Isub(K) plane. These parameters are correlated with the metal content, deduced from integrated photometry: the red variables are redder and the giant branch fainter the higher the metal content. Comparison with theoretical evolutionary tracks suggests that the range in metal content of these clusters is at most a factor of 10, the most metal-rich clusters possibly approaching the solar value. The cluster giant branches and those of open clusters, groups and field stars of the old disk population are compared. The assumption that all the globular clusters have an absolute magnitude on the horizontal branch of Msub(v) = + 0.9, as found recently for 47 Tuc, gives good agreement between the magnitudes of giant stars in the most metal rich of the globular clusters and those of field stars deduced from statistical parallaxes and moving group parallaxes. The values of the parameters ΔV' and (V - Isub(k))sub(BO) also approach those in the moving groups. The globular clusters have a longer horizontal branch, however, and the subgiants are bluer even when the values of ) 7Fe/H{ appear to be the same. (author). )

  20. Edades relativas de cúmulos globulares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller Bertolami, M.; Forte, J. C.

    El trabajo de Rossemberg et al (1999), estudia las edades relativas de cúmulos globulares galácticos mediante el análisis de ciertos parámetros morfológicos de los diagramas color-magnitud de dichos cúmulos. Este trabajo se centra en tres puntos: analizar la consistencia de los resultados obtenidos por Rossemberg et al (1999) al emplear observaciones en el sistema fotométrico de Washington, más precisamente, las magnitudes C y T1 en lugar de las magnitudes V e I utilizadas por dichos autores. De la existencia de colores integrados, metalicidad y edad (relativa) para 21 de los cúmulos utilizados en dicho trabajo, se analiza la consistencia de estos resultados con las dependencias de color integrado como función de la edad y la metalicidad que se desprenden de los modelos teóricos de luz integrada por Worthey (1994), Schulz (2002) y Lee et al (2002). Por último se lleva a cabo una breve comparación de la morfología de los diagramas color-magnitud de los cúmulos globulares y de las isocronas utilizadas, a fin de intentar identificar algunas de las posibles causas de las diferencias observadas en los incisos anteriores.

  1. Efectos de mareas en cúmulos globulares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, F.; Coenda, V.; Muriel, H.; Abadi, M.

    Using an N-body numerical simulation in the framework of the CDM cosmological model we study the globular cluster population in a simulated galaxy cluster. We select particles that trace the bimodal (red and blue) globular cluster system of each individual dark matter halo prior to their incorporation to the cluster virial radius. We found that the blue population is more prone to be removed from the halo than the red one. This result suggests that globular clusters are tidally disrupted; being the blue (more extended) population easily removed. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  2. Extragalactic globular clusters. I. The metallicity calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodie, J.P.; Huchra, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    The ability of absorption-line strength indices, measured from integrated globular cluster spectra, to predict mean cluster metallicity is explored. Statistical criteria, are used to identify the six best indices out of about 20 measured in a large sample of Galactic and M31 cluster spectra. Linear relations between index and metallicity have been derived along with new calibrations of infrared colors (V - K, J - K, and CO) versus Fe/H. Estimates of metallicity from the six spectroscopic index-metallicity relations have been combined in three different ways to identify the most efficient estimator and the minimum bias estimator of Fe/H - the weighted mean. This provides an estimate of Fe/H accurate to about 15 percent. 37 refs

  3. Detecting Globular Star Cluster Tidal Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, William Lee, Jr.; Wilhelm, Ronald; Lauchner, Adam; McWilliam, Andrew

    2006-10-01

    Globular cluster tidal streams are of interest for what they can tell us of the dynamical evolution of the clusters and of our Galaxy. Recent studies have used photometric and statistical subtraction methods to attempt to separate potential streams from the field stars that contaminate the samples. As our primary method we choose instead to use photometry to select blue stars that match the horizontal branch of the clusters. We then make spectroscopic observations of these candidates to determine their metallicities and radial velocities, which further constrains whether the candidate stars really originated in the cluster. Combining these results with the photometric data offers a better picture of the structure of tidal streams, and allows comparison of detected stars to theoretical predictions. We present preliminary photometric and spectroscopic results. Data obtained at McDonald Observatory, Kitt Peak National Observatory, and Las Campanas Observatory.

  4. Individual globular domains and domain unfolding visualized in overstretched titin molecules with atomic force microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Mártonfalvi

    Full Text Available Titin is a giant elastomeric protein responsible for the generation of passive muscle force. Mechanical force unfolds titin's globular domains, but the exact structure of the overstretched titin molecule is not known. Here we analyzed, by using high-resolution atomic force microscopy, the structure of titin molecules overstretched with receding meniscus. The axial contour of the molecules was interrupted by topographical gaps with a mean width of 27.7 nm that corresponds well to the length of an unfolded globular (immunoglobulin and fibronectin domain. The wide gap-width distribution suggests, however, that additional mechanisms such as partial domain unfolding and the unfolding of neighboring domain multimers may also be present. In the folded regions we resolved globules with an average spacing of 5.9 nm, which is consistent with a titin chain composed globular domains with extended interdomain linker regions. Topographical analysis allowed us to allocate the most distal unfolded titin region to the kinase domain, suggesting that this domain systematically unfolds when the molecule is exposed to overstretching forces. The observations support the prediction that upon the action of stretching forces the N-terminal ß-sheet of the titin kinase unfolds, thus exposing the enzyme's ATP-binding site and hence contributing to the molecule's mechanosensory function.

  5. LITHIUM-RICH GIANTS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guhathakurta, Puragra [UCO/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Zhang, Andrew J. [The Harker School, 500 Saratoga Avenue, San Jose, CA 95129 (United States); Hong, Jerry [Palo Alto High School, 50 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto, CA, 94301 (United States); Guo, Michelle [Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Guo, Rachel [Irvington High School, 41800 Blacow Road, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Cunha, Katia [Observatório Nacional, São Cristóvão Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2016-03-10

    Although red giants deplete lithium on their surfaces, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron–Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 ± 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 ± 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 ± 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propose the following origin for Li enrichment: (1) All luminous giants experience a brief phase of Li enrichment at the He core flash. (2) All post-RGB stars with binary companions on the lower RGB will engage in mass transfer. This scenario predicts that 0.1% of lower RGB stars will appear Li-rich due to mass transfer from a recently Li-enhanced companion. This frequency is at the lower end of our confidence interval.

  6. A DYING STAR IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A DYING STAR IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER M15 The globular cluster Messier 15 is shown in this color image obtained with the NASA Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). Lying some 40,000 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Pegasus, M15 is one of nearly 150 known globular clusters that form a vast halo surrounding our Milky Way galaxy. Each of these clusters is a spherical association of hundreds of thousands of ancient stars. The image, prepared by the Hubble Heritage team, attempts to show the stars in M15 in their true colors. The brightest cluster stars are red giants, with an orange color due to surface temperatures lower than our Sun's. Most of the fainter stars are hotter, giving them a bluish-white color. If we lived in the core of M15, our sky would blaze with tens of thousands of brilliant stars both day and night! Nestled among the myriads of stars visible in the Hubble image is an astronomical oddity. The pinkish object to the upper left of the cluster's core is a gas cloud surrounding a dying star. Known as Kuestner 648, this was the first planetary nebula to be identified in a globular cluster. In 1928, F. G. Pease, working at the 100-inch telescope of California's Mount Wilson Observatory, photographed the spectrum of K 648 and discovered the telltale bright emission of a nebular gas cloud rather than a normal star. In the ensuing 70 years, only three more planetary nebulae have been discovered in globular clusters. The stars in M15 and other globular clusters are estimated to be about 12 billion years old. They were among the first generations of stars to form in the Milky Way. Our Sun, by comparison, is a youthful 4.6 billion years old. As a star like the Sun ages, it exhausts the hydrogen that fuels its nuclear fusion, and increases in size to become a red giant. Then it ejects its outer layers into space, producing a planetary nebula. The remnant star at the center of the nebula gradually dies away as a

  7. Most Massive Globular Cluster in Our Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Far down in the southern sky, in the constellation of Centaurus, a diffuse spot of light can be perceived with the unaided eye. It may be unimpressive, but when seen through a telescope, it turns out to be a beautiful, dense cluster of innumerable stars [1]. Omega Centauri, as this object is called, is the brightest of its type in the sky. We refer to it as a "globular cluster", due to its symmetric form. It belongs to our Milky Way galaxy and astrophysical investigations have shown that it is located at a distance of about 16,500 light-years (1 light-year = 9,460,000,000,000 km). Nobody knows for sure how many individual stars it contains, but recent estimates run into the millions. Most of these stars are more than 10,000 million years old and it is generally agreed that Omega Centauri has a similar age. Measurements of its motion indicate that Omega Centauri plows through the Milky Way in an elongated orbit. It is not easy to understand how it has managed to keep its stars together during such an extended period. MEASURING STELLAR VELOCITIES IN OMEGA CENTAURI A group of astronomers [2] have recently carried through a major investigation of Omega Centauri. After many nights of observations at the ESO La Silla observatory, they now conclude that not only is this globular cluster the brightest, it is indeed by far the most massive known in the Milky Way. The very time-consuming observations were made during numerous observing sessions over a period of no less than 13 years (1981-1993), with the photoelectric spectrometer CORAVEL mounted on the 1.5-m Danish telescope at La Silla. The CORAVEL instrument (COrelation RAdial VELocities) was built in a joint effort between the Geneva (Switzerland) and Marseilles (France) observatories. It functions according to the cross-correlation technique, by means of which the spectrum of the observed star is compared with a "standard stellar spectrum" [3]. HOW HEAVY IS OMEGA CENTAURI? In the present study, a total of 1701

  8. Analytical Solution for Stellar Density in Globular Clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, four parameters analytical solution will be established for the stellar density function in globular clusters. The solution could be used for any arbitrary order of outward decrease of the cluster's density.

  9. Milky Way Globular Clusters and the Astronomical Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graeme H.

    2017-06-01

    Globular clusters of the Milky Way have been the subject of many publications in the astronomical literature. However, there is quite a large dispersion in the level of scrutiny that individual clusters have received from the astronomy research community. The goal of this paper is to address the question: what makes some clusters more popular than others? Several metrics are used to compare the numbers of papers written about each globular cluster of the galaxy prior to 2015. The extent to which the metrics correlate with various intrinsic and extrinsic cluster properties is explored. The metrics are used to highlight the ten most-studied globular clusters, as well as to delineate certain types of clusters that have been least covered by research to date. As a guide to objects that might potentially reward increased study, a list is given of the highest-mass globular clusters that have received relatively little attention to date.

  10. Evidence for Primordial Mass Segregation in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardt, Holger; De Marchi, Guido; Kroupa, Pavel

    2008-09-01

    We have studied the dissolution of initially mass-segregated and unsegregated star clusters due to two-body relaxation in external tidal fields, using Aarseth's collisional N-body code NBODY4 on GRAPE6 special-purpose computers. When extrapolating results of initially non-mass-segregated models to globular clusters, we obtain a correlation between the time until destruction and the slope of the mass function, in the sense that globular clusters that are closer to dissolution are more strongly depleted in low-mass stars. This correlation fits observed mass functions of most globular clusters. The mass functions of several globular clusters are, however, more strongly depleted in low-mass stars than is suggested by these models. Such strongly depleted mass functions can be explained if globular clusters started initially mass segregated. Primordial mass segregation also explains the correlation between the slope of the stellar mass function and the cluster concentration that was recently discovered by De Marchi and coworkers. In this case, it is possible that all globular clusters started with a mass function similar to that seen in young open clusters in the present-day universe, at least for stars below m = 0.8 M⊙. This argues for a near universality of the mass function for different star formation environments and metallicities in the range -2 < [ Fe/H ] < 0. We finally describe a novel algorithm that can initialize stationary mass-segregated clusters with an arbitrary density profile and amount of mass segregation.

  11. Metallicity Spreads in M31 Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Terry

    2003-07-01

    Our recent deep HST photometry of the M31 halo globular cluster {GC} Mayall II, also called G1, has revealed a red-giant branch with a clear spread that we attribute to an intrinsic metallicity dispersion of at least 0.4 dex in [Fe/H]. The only other GC exhibiting such a metallicity dispersion is Omega Centauri, the brightest and most massive Galactic GC, whose range in [Fe/H] is about 0.5 dex. These observations are obviously linked to the fact that both G1 and Omega Cen are bright and massive GC, with potential wells deep enough to keep part of their gas, which might have been recycled, producing a metallicity scatter among cluster stars. These observations dramatically challenge the notion of chemical homogeneity as a defining characteristic of GCs. It is critically important to find out how common this phenomenon is and how it can constrain scenarios/models of GC formation. The obvious targets are other bright and massive GCs, which exist in M31 but not in our Galaxy where Omega Cen is an isolated giant. We propose to acquire, with ACS/HRC, deep imaging of 3 of the brightest M31 GCs for which we have observed velocity dispersion values similar to those observed in G1 and Omega Cen. A sample of GCs with chemical abundance dispersions will provide essential information about their formation mechanism. This would represent a major step for the studies of the origin and evolution of stellar populations.

  12. Diffusion and Mixing in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiron, Yohai; Kocsis, Bence

    2018-03-01

    Collisional relaxation describes the stochastic process with which a self-gravitating system near equilibrium evolves in phase-space due to the fluctuating gravitational field of the system. The characteristic timescale of this process is called the relaxation time. In this paper, we highlight the difference between two measures of the relaxation time in globular clusters: (1) the diffusion time with which the isolating integrals of motion (i.e., energy E and angular momentum magnitude L) of individual stars change stochastically and (2) the asymptotic timescale required for a family of orbits to mix in the cluster. More specifically, the former corresponds to the instantaneous rate of change of a star’s E or L, while the latter corresponds to the timescale for the stars to statistically forget their initial conditions. We show that the diffusion timescales of E and L vary systematically around the commonly used half-mass relaxation time in different regions of the cluster by a factor of ∼10 and ∼100, respectively, for more than 20% of the stars. We define the mixedness of an orbital family at any given time as the correlation coefficient between its E or L probability distribution functions and those of the whole cluster. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we find that mixedness converges asymptotically exponentially with a decay timescale that is ∼10 times the half-mass relaxation time.

  13. Enrichment by supernovae in globular clusters with multiple populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Woo; Kang, Young-Woon; Lee, Jina; Lee, Young-Wook

    2009-11-26

    The most massive globular cluster in the Milky Way, omega Centauri, is thought to be the remaining core of a disrupted dwarf galaxy, as expected within the model of hierarchical merging. It contains several stellar populations having different heavy elemental abundances supplied by supernovae-a process known as metal enrichment. Although M 22 appears to be similar to omega Cen, other peculiar globular clusters do not. Therefore omega Cen and M 22 are viewed as exceptional, and the presence of chemical inhomogeneities in other clusters is seen as 'pollution' from the intermediate-mass asymptotic-giant-branch stars expected in normal globular clusters. Here we report Ca abundances for seven globular clusters and compare them to omega Cen. Calcium and other heavy elements can only be supplied through numerous supernovae explosions of massive stars in these stellar systems, but the gravitational potentials of the present-day clusters cannot preserve most of the ejecta from such explosions. We conclude that these globular clusters, like omega Cen, are most probably the relics of more massive primeval dwarf galaxies that merged and disrupted to form the proto-Galaxy.

  14. THE TIMING OF NINE GLOBULAR CLUSTER PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Ryan S. [Physics Department, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Freire, Paulo C. C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Ransom, Scott M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-4325 (United States); Jacoby, Bryan A., E-mail: rlynch@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: pfreire@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: sransom@nrao.edu, E-mail: bryan.jacoby@gmail.com [Aerospace Corporation, 15049 Conference Center Drive, Chantilly, VA 20151-3824 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    We have used the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope to time nine previously known pulsars without published timing solutions in the globular clusters (GCs) M62, NGC 6544, and NGC 6624. We have full timing solutions that measure the spin, astrometric, and (where applicable) binary parameters for six of these pulsars. The remaining three pulsars (reported here for the first time) were not detected enough to establish solutions. We also report our timing solutions for five pulsars with previously published solutions, and find good agreement with other authors, except for PSR J1701-3006B in M62. Gas in this system is probably responsible for the discrepancy in orbital parameters, and we have been able to measure a change in the orbital period over the course of our observations. Among the pulsars with new solutions we find several binary pulsars with very low mass companions (members of the so-called 'black widow' class) and we are able to place constraints on the mass-to-light ratio in two clusters. We confirm that one of the pulsars in NGC 6624 is indeed a member of the rare class of non-recycled pulsars found in GCs. We have also measured the orbital precession and Shapiro delay for a relativistic binary in NGC 6544. If we assume that the orbital precession can be described entirely by general relativity, which is likely, we are able to measure the total system mass (2.57190(73) M{sub Sun }) and companion mass (1.2064(20) M{sub Sun }), from which we derive the orbital inclination (sin i = 0.9956(14)) and the pulsar mass (1.3655(21) M{sub Sun }), the most precise such measurement ever obtained for a millisecond pulsar. The companion is the most massive known around a fully recycled pulsar.

  15. Looking for tidal streams around Galactic globular clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Delgado D.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The picture of building the Milky Way halo from merging protogalactic fragments is considered the local manifestation of the hierarchical galaxy formation process. In this scenario, some observational evidences have suggested that the outer young Galactic halo globular cluster population might be associated (or even the nuclei to tidal disrupted dwarf spheroidals, now extinct galaxies. If this hypothesis is true, these systems might be surrounded by a distinct and still detectable stellar population. We have carried out a systematic observation of Galactic globulars covering the galactocentric distance range 10 < RGC< 40 kpc in both hemispheres. We have used wide field instruments both in La Palma and in La Silla observatories to obtain deep photometry of wide areas around these globulars to unveil the possible remnants of their progenitor dwarf galaxies.

  16. Evaluación de proteína C reactiva, velocidad de sedimentación globular, reticulocitos y ancho de distribución eritrocitaria, en niños menores de 5 años con anemia por déficit de hierro, en Cumaná, Venezuela | Evaluation of C reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, reticulocytes and erithrocyte distribution width, in children under 5 years old with iron deficiency anemia, in Cumaná, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Hannaoui

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate C-reactive protein, rate of globular sedimentation, reticulocytes and erythrocyte distribution width, in infants with iron deficiency anemia, 114 children of both genders were studied, aged 0 to 5 years, who attended the pediatric consultation of three health centers in the city of Cumana, Sucre state. The infants were divided into three groups: 35 apparently healthy children formed the control group, 59 children enrolled in iron deficiency anemia and 20 children with anemia from other causes. Each infant was determined the levels of serum iron, ferritin, C-reactive protein (CRP, hemoglobin, hematocrit, hematimetric indices (MCHC and MCV, red cell distribution width (ADE, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and percentage reticulocyte. An ANOVA statistical analysis was applied to determine possible differences between the evaluated parameters. There were highly significant differences in the levels of iron, hemoglobin, hematocrit, MCHC, MCV and ADE among the three groups studied; while ferritin variables, reticulocytes, CRP and ESR showed no significant differences among these groups. The results allow to conclude that the determination of iron and hematological parameters are useful tools for diagnosis and for monitoring patients with iron deficiency anemia. It is recommended that the ADE be included within the profile of exams for such patients in order to assess the degree of anisocitosis in iron deficiency anemia, and thus lead doctors to a quick and accurate diagnosis as quickly as possible.

  17. Access to gram scale amounts of functional globular adiponectin from E. coli inclusion bodies by alkaline-shock solubilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiker, John T; Klöting, Nora; Blüher, Matthias; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2010-07-16

    The adipose tissue derived protein adiponectin exerts anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic effects. Adiponectin serum concentrations are in the microgram per milliliter range in healthy humans and inversely correlate with obesity and metabolic disorders. Accordingly, raising circulating adiponectin levels by direct administration may be an intriguing strategy in the treatment of obesity-related metabolic disorders. However production of large amounts of recombinant adiponectin protein is a primary obstacle so far. Here, we report a novel method for large amount production of globular adiponectin from E. coli inclusion bodies utilizing an alkaline-shock solubilization method without chaotropic agents followed by precipitation of the readily renaturing protein. Precipitation of the mildly solubilized protein capitalizes on advantages of inclusion body formation. This approach of inclusion body protein recovery provides access to gram scale amounts of globular adiponectin with standard laboratory equipment avoiding vast dilution or dialysis steps to neutralize the pH and renature the protein, thus saving chemicals and time. The precipitated protein is readily renaturing in buffer, is of adequate purity without a chromatography step and shows biological activity in cultured MCF7 cells and significantly lowered blood glucose levels in mice with streptozotocin induced type 1 diabetes. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Analytical Solution for Stellar Density in Globular Clusters MA Sharaf ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Caloi 2008). In contrast with galaxies, it was known since the last twenty years that globular clusters represent unique laboratories for learning about two-body relax- ation, mass segregation from equipartition of energy (Spitzer 1987), stellar collisions. (Binney & Tremaine 1987), stellar mergers, and core collapse. 371 ...

  19. A 500 PARSEC HALO SURROUNDING THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR NGC 1851

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olszewski, Edward W.; Saha, Abhijit; Knezek, Patricia; Subramaniam, Annapurni; de Boer, Thomas; Seitzer, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Using imaging that shows 4 mag of main-sequence stars, we have discovered that the Galactic globular cluster NGC 1851 is surrounded by a halo that is visible from the tidal radius of 700 arcsec (41 pc) to more than 4500 arcsec (> 250 pc). This halo is symmetric and falls in density as a power law of

  20. Dynamics of globular cluster systems in elliptical galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romanowsky, AJ; Geisler, D; Grebel, EK; Minniti, D

    2002-01-01

    One of the most promising avenues for exploring the dynamics of the outer parts of elliptical galaxies involves using bright discrete objects as kinematical tracers: globular clusters and planetary nebulae. As large data sets are becoming available, rigorous dynamical analyses are needed to

  1. Dynamics of Stars and Globular Clusters in Galaxy Halos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Douglas, Nigel G.; Kuijken, Konrad; Arnaboldi, Magda; Kissler-Patig, Markus; Sharples, Ray M.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Rhode, Katherine L.; Kissler-Patig, M.

    2003-01-01

    We have obtained kinematical data in the halos of the giant ellipticals M49 and M87. These include globular cluster velocities in M49 to 10 R_eff and planetary nebula velocities in M49 and M87 to 4 R_eff. We report initial results, including dynamical comparisons between the diffuse stellar

  2. BVRI CCD photometry of the globular cluster NGC 2808

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.; Alvarado, F.; Wenderoth, E.

    1990-01-01

    As a part of a continuing program, CCD color-magnitude diagrams are presented for the bright globular cluster NGC 2808 in the four colors comprising BVRI. From a comparison of four different CMDs with theoretical isochrones, an age of 16 + or - 2 Gyr is obtained, assuming a value for Fe/H near -1.3. 28 refs

  3. Supra-galactic colour patterns in globular cluster systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Juan C.

    2017-07-01

    An analysis of globular cluster systems associated with galaxies included in the Virgo and Fornax Hubble Space Telescope-Advanced Camera Surveys reveals distinct (g - z) colour modulation patterns. These features appear on composite samples of globular clusters and, most evidently, in galaxies with absolute magnitudes Mg in the range from -20.2 to -19.2. These colour modulations are also detectable on some samples of globular clusters in the central galaxies NGC 1399 and NGC 4486 (and confirmed on data sets obtained with different instruments and photometric systems), as well as in other bright galaxies in these clusters. After discarding field contamination, photometric errors and statistical effects, we conclude that these supra-galactic colour patterns are real and reflect some previously unknown characteristic. These features suggest that the globular cluster formation process was not entirely stochastic but included a fraction of clusters that formed in a rather synchronized fashion over large spatial scales, and in a tentative time lapse of about 1.5 Gy at redshifts z between 2 and 4. We speculate that the putative mechanism leading to that synchronism may be associated with large scale feedback effects connected with violent star-forming events and/or with supermassive black holes.

  4. Globular adiponectin enhances invasion in human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    FALK LIBBY, EMILY; LIU, JIANZHONG; LI, YI; LEWIS, MONICA J.; DEMARK-WAHNEFRIED, WENDY; HURST, DOUGLAS R.

    2016-01-01

    Every year, a large number of women succumb to metastatic breast cancer due to a lack of curative approaches for this disease. Adiponectin (AdipoQ) is the most abundant of the adipocyte-secreted adipokines. In recent years, there has been an interest in the use of AdipoQ and AdipoQ receptor agonists as therapeutic agents for the treatment of breast cancer. However, while multiple epidemiological studies have previously indicated that low levels of circulating plasma AdipoQ portend poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer, recent studies have reported that elevated expression levels of AdipoQ in breast tissue are correlated with advanced stages of the disease. Thus, the aim of the present study was to clarify the mechanism by which AdipoQ in breast tissue acts directly on tumor cells to regulate the early steps of breast cancer metastasis. In the present study, the effects of different AdipoQ isoforms on the metastatic potential of human breast cancer cells were investigated. The results revealed that globular adiponectin (gAd) promoted invasive cell morphology and significantly increased the migration and invasion abilities of breast cancer cells, whereas full-length adiponectin (fAd) had no effect on these cells. Additionally, gAd, but not fAd, increased the expression levels of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 beta (LC3B)-II and intracellular LC3B puncta, which are indicators of autophagosome formation, thus suggesting autophagic induction by gAd. Furthermore, the inhibition of autophagic function by autophagy-related protein 7 knockdown attenuated the gAd-induced increase in invasiveness in breast cancer cells. Therefore, the results of the present study suggested that a specific AdipoQ isoform may enhance breast cancer invasion, possibly via autophagic induction. Understanding the roles of the different AdipoQ isoforms as microenvironmental regulatory molecules may aid the development of effective AdipoQ-based treatments for breast cancer

  5. Effects of Dynamical Evolution on Globular Clusters’ Internal Kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiongco, Maria; Vesperini, Enrico; Varri, Anna Lisa

    2018-01-01

    The synergy between recent photometric, spectroscopic, and astrometric studies is revealing that globular clusters deviate from the traditional picture of dynamically simple and single stellar population systems. Complex kinematical features such as velocity anisotropy and rotation, and the existence of multiple stellar populations are some of the key observational findings. My thesis work has aimed to build a theoretical framework to interpret these new observational results and to understand their link with a globular cluster’s dynamical history.I have focused on the study of the evolution of globular clusters' internal kinematics, as driven by two-body relaxation, and the interplay between internal angular momentum and the external Galactic tidal field. With a specifically-designed, large survey of direct N-body simulations, I have explored the three-dimensional structure of the velocity space of tidally-perturbed clusters, by characterizing their degree of anisotropy and their rotational properties. These studies have proved that a cluster's kinematical properties contain a distinct imprints of the cluster’s initial structural properties, dynamical history, and tidal environment. By relaxing a number of simplifying assumptions that are traditionally imposed, I have also showed how the interplay between a cluster's internal evolution and the interaction with the host galaxy can produce complex morphological and kinematical properties, such as a counter-rotating core and a twisting of the projected isodensity contours.Building on this fundamental understanding, I have then studied the dynamics of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters, with attention to the largely unexplored role of angular momentum. I have analyzed the evolution of clusters with stellar populations characterized by different initial structural and kinematical properties to determine how long these differences are preserved, and in what cases they could still be observable in

  6. A simple model for electrical charge in globular macromolecules and linear polyelectrolytes in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, M.

    2017-05-01

    We present a model for calculating the net and effective electrical charge of globular macromolecules and linear polyelectrolytes such as proteins and DNA, given the concentration of monovalent salt and pH in solution. The calculation is based on a numerical solution of the non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation using a finite element discretized continuum approach. The model simultaneously addresses the phenomena of charge regulation and renormalization, both of which underpin the electrostatics of biomolecules in solution. We show that while charge regulation addresses the true electrical charge of a molecule arising from the acid-base equilibria of its ionizable groups, charge renormalization finds relevance in the context of a molecule's interaction with another charged entity. Writing this electrostatic interaction free energy in terms of a local electrical potential, we obtain an "interaction charge" for the molecule which we demonstrate agrees closely with the "effective charge" discussed in charge renormalization and counterion-condensation theories. The predictions of this model agree well with direct high-precision measurements of effective electrical charge of polyelectrolytes such as nucleic acids and disordered proteins in solution, without tunable parameters. Including the effective interior dielectric constant for compactly folded molecules as a tunable parameter, the model captures measurements of effective charge as well as published trends of pKa shifts in globular proteins. Our results suggest a straightforward general framework to model electrostatics in biomolecules in solution. In offering a platform that directly links theory and experiment, these calculations could foster a systematic understanding of the interrelationship between molecular 3D structure and conformation, electrical charge and electrostatic interactions in solution. The model could find particular relevance in situations where molecular crystal structures are not available or

  7. On tidal radius determination for a globular cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, S.

    1985-01-01

    A tidal radius determination for a globular cluster based on its density minimum, which is caused by the galactic tidal forces and derivable from a model of the Galaxy, is proposed. Results obtained on the basis of the Schmidt model for two clusters are in a satisfactory agreement with those obtained earlier by means of other methods. A mass determination for the clusters through the tidal radius, when the latter one is identified with the cluster perigalactic distance, yields unusually large mass values. Probably, the tidal radius should be identified with the instantaneous galactocentric distance. Use of models more recent than the Schmidt one indicates that a globular cluster may contain a significant portion of an invisible interstellar matter. (author)

  8. BVI photometry of globular clusters in M87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couture, J.; Harris, W.E.; Allwright, J.W.B.

    1990-01-01

    CCD photometry in B, V, and I is presented for a sample of globular clusters in the Virgo central giant elliptical galaxy M87. No detectable gradient of mean cluster color (metallicity) in (B - V) or (V - I) with radial distance is found. The cluster system does, however, display a large dispersion in color at any radius, corresponding to sigma (Fe/H) about 0.6 about a mean metallicity of about -1.1 according to the present color index scale. The difference in mean color between the globular clusters and the underlying halo light of the galaxy itself shows up strongly in all the color indices; virtually no clusters as red as the mean color of the halo stars is found at any radius. 43 refs

  9. Globular Cluster Candidates for Hosting a Central Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyola, Eva

    2009-07-01

    We are continuing our study of the dynamical properties of globular clusters and we propose to obtain surface brightness profiles for high concentration clusters. Our results to date show that the distribution of central surface brightness slopes do not conform to standard models. This has important implications for how they form and evolve, and suggest the possible presence of central intermediate-mass black holes. From our previous archival proposals {AR-9542 and AR-10315}, we find that many high concentration globular clusters do not have flat cores or steep central cusps, instead they show weak cusps. Numerical simulations suggest that clusters with weak cusps may harbor intermediate-mass black holes and we have one confirmation of this connection with omega Centauri. This cluster shows a shallow cusp in its surface brightness profile, while kinematical measurements suggest the presence of a black hole in its center. Our goal is to extend these studies to a sample containing 85% of the Galactic globular clusters with concentrations higher than 1.7 and look for objects departing from isothermal behavior. The ACS globular cluster survey {GO-10775} provides enough objects to have an excellent coverage of a wide range of galactic clusters, but it contains only a couple of the ones with high concentration. The proposed sample consists of clusters whose light profile can only be adequately measured from space-based imaging. This would take us close to completeness for the high concentration cases and therefore provide a more complete list of candidates for containing a central black hole. The dataset will also be combined with our existing kinematic measurements and enhanced with future kinematic studies to perform detailed dynamical modeling.

  10. NMR-based homology model for the solution structure of the C-terminal globular domain of EMILIN1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdone, Giuliana [Istituto Biochimico Italiano ' G. Lorenzini' (Italy); Corazza, Alessandra [Universita di Udine, Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biomediche - MATI Centre of Excellence (Italy); Colebrooke, Simon A. [University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Cicero, Daniel; Eliseo, Tommaso [Universita di Tor Vergata, Dipartimento di Chimica (Italy); Boyd, Jonathan [University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Doliana, Roberto [Centro di Riferimento Oncologico di Aviano, Divisione di Oncologia Sperimentale 2 (Italy); Fogolari, Federico; Viglino, Paolo; Colombatti, Alfonso [Universita di Udine, Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biomediche - MATI Centre of Excellence (Italy); Campbell, Iain D. [University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Esposito, Gennaro [Universita di Udine, Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biomediche - MATI Centre of Excellence (Italy)], E-mail: gesposito@mail.dstb.uniud.it

    2009-02-15

    EMILIN1 is a glycoprotein of elastic tissues that has been recently linked to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The protein is formed by different independently folded structural domains whose role has been partially elucidated. In this paper the solution structure, inferred from NMR-based homology modelling of the C-terminal trimeric globular C1q domain (gC1q) of EMILIN1, is reported. The high molecular weight and the homotrimeric structure of the protein required the combined use of highly deuterated {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C-labelled samples and TROSY experiments. Starting from a homology model, the protein structure was refined using heteronuclear residual dipolar couplings, chemical shift patterns, NOEs and H-exchange data. Analysis of the gC1q domain structure of EMILIN1 shows that each protomer of the trimer adopts a nine-stranded {beta} sandwich folding topology which is related to the conformation observed for other proteins of the family. Distinguishing features, however, include a missing edge-strand and an unstructured 19-residue loop. Although the current data do not allow this loop to be precisely defined, the available evidence is consistent with a flexible segment that protrudes from each subunit of the globular trimeric assembly and plays a key role in inter-molecular interactions between the EMILIN1 gC1q homotrimer and its integrin receptor {alpha}4{beta}1.

  11. Globular adiponectin controls insulin-mediated vasoreactivity in muscle through AMPKα2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Boer, Michiel P; Meijer, Rick I; Richter, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Decreased tissue perfusion increases the risk of developing insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease in obesity, and decreased levels of globular adiponectin (gAdn) have been proposed to contribute to this risk. We hypothesized that gAdn controls insulin's vasoactive effects through AMP......-activated protein kinase (AMPK), specifically its α2 subunit, and studied the mechanisms involved. In healthy volunteers, we found that decreased plasma gAdn levels in obese subjects associate with insulin resistance and reduced capillary perfusion during hyperinsulinemia. In cultured human microvascular...... endothelial cells (HMEC), gAdn increased AMPK activity. In isolated muscle resistance arteries gAdn uncovered insulin-induced vasodilation by selectively inhibiting insulin-induced activation of ERK1/2, and the AMPK inhibitor compound C as well as genetic deletion of AMPKα2 blunted insulin...

  12. GLOBULAR RESISTANCE MODIFICATION ON RATS CONSECUTIVELY TO Al2(SO43 ADDITION FOR TWO GENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STANA LOREDANA GABRIELA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Some of the major modifications on membranes produced by the oxygen reactivespecies are membranal structure and functions modifications, lipids peroxydation,membranal protein alterations and transportation disturbances thru membranes.A series of xenobotics like oxidant pollutants, lead, aluminium and others directlyor indirectly are producing thru metabolization free radicals which interact withcells components and alterate their functions. The purpose of this paper was torelieve the impact of aluminium cumulative addition onto globular resistance onrats. Has been administrated three levels of aluminium (200ppb, 400 ppb şi 1000ppb as Al2(SO43 ad libidum in water. Was followed their toxicity impact on theglobular resistance for two generations. The results indicate a decrease ofglobular resistance directly correlated with the aluminium addition.

  13. Effects of cosmic string velocities and the origin of globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ling; Yamanouchi, Shoma; Brandenberger, Robert

    2015-12-01

    With the hypothesis that cosmic string loops act as seeds for globular clusters in mind, we study the role that velocities of these strings will play in determining the mass distribution of globular clusters. Loops with high enough velocities will not form compact and roughly spherical objects and can hence not be the seeds for globular clusters. We compute the expected number density and mass function of globular clusters as a function of both the string tension and the peak loop velocity, and compare the results with the observational data on the mass distribution of globular clusters in our Milky Way. We determine the critical peak string loop velocity above which the agreement between the string loop model for the origin of globular clusters (neglecting loop velocities) and observational data is lost.

  14. Globular adiponectin induces a pro-inflammatory response in human astrocytic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Zhongxiao; Mah, Dorrian; Simtchouk, Svetlana [School of Health and Exercise Sciences, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC (Canada); Klegeris, Andis [Department of Biology, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC (Canada); Little, Jonathan P., E-mail: jonathan.little@ubc.ca [School of Health and Exercise Sciences, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC (Canada)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Adiponectin receptors are expressed in human astrocytes. • Globular adiponectin induces secretion of IL-6 and MCP-1 from cultured astrocytes. • Adiponectin may play a pro-inflammatory role in astrocytes. - Abstract: Neuroinflammation, mediated in part by activated brain astrocytes, plays a critical role in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Adiponectin is the most abundant adipokine secreted from adipose tissue and has been reported to exert both anti- and pro-inflammatory effects in peripheral tissues; however, the effects of adiponectin on astrocytes remain unknown. Shifts in peripheral concentrations of adipokines, including adiponectin, could contribute to the observed link between midlife adiposity and increased AD risk. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of globular adiponectin (gAd) on pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression and secretion in human U373 MG astrocytic cells and to explore the potential involvement of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3 K) signaling pathways in these processes. We demonstrated expression of adiponectin receptor 1 (adipoR1) and adipoR2 in U373 MG cells and primary human astrocytes. gAd induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, and gene expression of IL-6, MCP-1, IL-1β and IL-8 in U373 MG cells. Using specific inhibitors, we found that NF-κB, p38MAPK and ERK1/2 pathways are involved in gAd-induced induction of cytokines with ERK1/2 contributing the most. These findings provide evidence that gAd may induce a pro-inflammatory phenotype in human astrocytes.

  15. Globular adiponectin induces a pro-inflammatory response in human astrocytic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Zhongxiao; Mah, Dorrian; Simtchouk, Svetlana; Klegeris, Andis; Little, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Adiponectin receptors are expressed in human astrocytes. • Globular adiponectin induces secretion of IL-6 and MCP-1 from cultured astrocytes. • Adiponectin may play a pro-inflammatory role in astrocytes. - Abstract: Neuroinflammation, mediated in part by activated brain astrocytes, plays a critical role in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Adiponectin is the most abundant adipokine secreted from adipose tissue and has been reported to exert both anti- and pro-inflammatory effects in peripheral tissues; however, the effects of adiponectin on astrocytes remain unknown. Shifts in peripheral concentrations of adipokines, including adiponectin, could contribute to the observed link between midlife adiposity and increased AD risk. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of globular adiponectin (gAd) on pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression and secretion in human U373 MG astrocytic cells and to explore the potential involvement of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3 K) signaling pathways in these processes. We demonstrated expression of adiponectin receptor 1 (adipoR1) and adipoR2 in U373 MG cells and primary human astrocytes. gAd induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, and gene expression of IL-6, MCP-1, IL-1β and IL-8 in U373 MG cells. Using specific inhibitors, we found that NF-κB, p38MAPK and ERK1/2 pathways are involved in gAd-induced induction of cytokines with ERK1/2 contributing the most. These findings provide evidence that gAd may induce a pro-inflammatory phenotype in human astrocytes

  16. The Blue Hook Populations of Massive Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    Blue hook stars are a class of hot { 35,000 K} subluminous horizontal branch stars that have been recently discovered using HST ultraviolet images of the globular clusters omega Cen and NGC 2808. These stars occupy a region of the HR diagram that is unexplained by canonical stellar evolution theory. Using new theoretical evolutionary and atmospheric models, we have shown that the blue hook stars are very likely the progeny of stars that undergo extensive internal mixing during a late helium core flash on the white dwarf cooling curve. This "flash mixing" produces an enormous enhancement of the surface helium and carbon abundances, which suppresses the flux in the far ultraviolet. Although flash mixing is more likely to occur in stars that are born with high helium abundances, a high helium abundance, by itself, does not explain the presence of a blue hook population - flash mixing of the envelope is required. We propose ACS ultraviolet {SBC/F150LP and HRC/F250W} observations of the five additional globular clusters for which the presence of blue hook stars is suspected from longer wavelength observations. Like omega Cen and NGC 2808, these five targets are also among the most massive globular clusters, because less massive clusters show no evidence for blue hook stars. Because our targets span 1.5 dex in metallicity, we will be able to test our prediction that flash-mixing should be less drastic in metal-rich blue hook stars. In addition, our observations will test the hypothesis that blue hook stars only form in globular clusters massive enough to retain the helium-enriched ejecta from the first stellar generation. If this hypothesis is correct, then our observations will yield important constraints on the chemical evolution and early formation history in globular clusters, as well as the role of helium self-enrichment in producing blue horizontal branch morphologies and multiple main sequence turnoffs. Finally, our observations will provide new insight into the

  17. Globular adiponectin ameliorates metabolic insulin resistance via AMPK-mediated restoration of microvascular insulin responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hypoadiponectinaemia is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and microvasculature plays a critical role in the regulation of insulin action in muscle. Here we tested whether adiponectin replenishment could improve metabolic insulin sensitivity in male rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) via the modulation of microvascular insulin responses. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were fed either a HFD or low-fat diet (LFD) for 4 weeks. Small resistance artery myograph changes in tension, muscle microvascular recruitment and metabolic response to insulin were determined. Compared with rats fed a LFD, HFD feeding abolished the vasodilatory actions of globular adiponectin (gAd) and insulin on pre-constricted distal saphenous arteries. Pretreatment with gAd improved insulin responses in arterioles isolated from HFD rats, which was blocked by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibition. Similarly, HFD abolished microvascular responses to either gAd or insulin and decreased insulin-stimulated glucose disposal by ∼60%. However, supplementing gAd fully rescued insulin’s microvascular action and significantly improved the metabolic responses to insulin in HFD male rats and these actions were abolished by inhibition of either AMPK or nitric oxide production. We conclude that HFD induces vascular adiponectin and insulin resistance but gAd administration can restore vascular insulin responses and improve insulin’s metabolic action via an AMPK- and nitric oxide-dependent mechanism in male rats. Key points Adiponectin is an adipokine with anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic properties. Hypoadiponectinaemia is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes. Insulin resistance is present in muscle microvasculature and this may contribute to decreased insulin delivery to, and action in, muscle. In this study we examined whether adiponectin ameliorates metabolic insulin resistance by affecting muscle

  18. Globular adiponectin ameliorates metabolic insulin resistance via AMPK-mediated restoration of microvascular insulin responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2015-09-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine with anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic properties. Hypoadiponectinaemia is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes. Insulin resistance is present in muscle microvasculature and this may contribute to decreased insulin delivery to, and action in, muscle. In this study we examined whether adiponectin ameliorates metabolic insulin resistance by affecting muscle microvascular recruitment. We demonstrated that a high-fat diet induces vascular adiponectin and insulin resistance but globular adiponectin administration can restore vascular insulin responses and improve insulin's metabolic action via an AMPK- and nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. This suggests that globular adiponectin might have a therapeutic potential for improving insulin resistance and preventing cardiovascular complications in patients with diabetes via modulation of microvascular insulin responses. Hypoadiponectinaemia is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and microvasculature plays a critical role in the regulation of insulin action in muscle. Here we tested whether adiponectin replenishment could improve metabolic insulin sensitivity in male rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) via the modulation of microvascular insulin responses. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a HFD or low-fat diet (LFD) for 4 weeks. Small resistance artery myograph changes in tension, muscle microvascular recruitment and metabolic response to insulin were determined. Compared with rats fed a LFD, HFD feeding abolished the vasodilatory actions of globular adiponectin (gAd) and insulin on pre-constricted distal saphenous arteries. Pretreatment with gAd improved insulin responses in arterioles isolated from HFD rats, which was blocked by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibition. Similarly, HFD abolished microvascular responses to either gAd or insulin and decreased insulin-stimulated glucose disposal by

  19. Optimized purification of a fusion protein by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography informed by the linear solvent strength model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, Isaac B; Mant, Colin T; McKnight, C James; Vugmeyster, Liliya; Hodges, Robert

    2017-10-27

    Fusion protein systems are commonly used for expression of small proteins and peptides. An important criterion for a fusion protein system to be useful is the ability to separate the protein of interest from the tag. Additionally, because no protease cleaves fusion proteins with 100% efficiency, the ability to separate the desired peptide from any remaining uncleaved protein is also necessary. This is likely to be the more difficult task as at least a portion of the sequence of the fusion protein is identical to that of the protein of interest. When a high level of purity is required, gradient elution reversed-phase HPLC is frequently used as a final purification step. Shallow gradients are often advantageous for maximizing both the purity and yield of the final product; however, the relationship between relative retention times at shallow gradients and those at steeper gradients typically used for analytical HPLC are not always straightforward. In this work, we report reversed-phase HPLC results for the fusion protein system consisting of the N-terminal domain of ribosomal protein L9 (NTL9) and the 36-residue villin headpiece subdomain (HP36) linked by a recognition sequence for the protease factor Xa. This system represents an excellent example of the difficulties in purification that may arise from this unexpected elution behavior at shallow gradients. Additionally, we report on the sensitivity of this elution behavior to the concentration of the additive trifluoroacetic acid in the mobile phase and present optimized conditions for separating HP36 from the full fusion protein by reversed-phase HPLC using a shallow gradient. Finally, we suggest that these findings are relevant to the purification of other fusion protein systems, for which similar problems may arise, and support this suggestion using insights from the linear solvent strength model of gradient elution liquid chromatography. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Immunization with influenza virus hemagglutinin globular region containing the receptor-binding pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sung Ho; Arnon, Ruth

    2002-01-01

    The globular region of hemagglutinin (residues 91-261) membrane glycoprotein of influenza virus that encompasses the binding zone to the oligosaccharide receptor of target cells has been cloned by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). This protein segment (denoted HA91-261 peptide) induced significant immune response in mice. The serum antibodies and lung homogenates from the immunized mice cross-reacted with native virus particles. The cellular immunity was manifested by proliferative splenocyte responses and cytokine release indicating T helper type 1 activity. The plasmid DNA containing this segment (denoted pHA91-261) provoked, in addition, a significant cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response, whereas the HA91-261 protein fragment led to no such response. Both the DNA and the protein fragment of HA91-261 induced significant protection against viral challenge, although the immune response they induce might be along different pathways. Interestingly, the combined DNA priming-protein boosting immunization regimen did not induce protection against viral challenges even though it led to significant humoral immune responses similar to that induced by the peptide vaccine.

  1. An AO-assisted Variability Study of Four Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, R.; Contreras Ramos, R.; Strader, J.; Hakala, P.; Catelan, M.; Peacock, M. B.; Simunovic, M.

    2016-09-01

    The image-subtraction technique applied to study variable stars in globular clusters represented a leap in the number of new detections, with the drawback that many of these new light curves could not be transformed to magnitudes due to severe crowding. In this paper, we present observations of four Galactic globular clusters, M 2 (NGC 7089), M 10 (NGC 6254), M 80 (NGC 6093), and NGC 1261, taken with the ground-layer adaptive optics module at the SOAR Telescope, SAM. We show that the higher image quality provided by SAM allows for the calibration of the light curves of the great majority of the variables near the cores of these clusters as well as the detection of new variables, even in clusters where image-subtraction searches were already conducted. We report the discovery of 15 new variables in M 2 (12 RR Lyrae stars and 3 SX Phe stars), 12 new variables in M 10 (11 SX Phe and 1 long-period variable), and 1 new W UMa-type variable in NGC 1261. No new detections are found in M 80, but previous uncertain detections are confirmed and the corresponding light curves are calibrated into magnitudes. Additionally, based on the number of detected variables and new Hubble Space Telescope/UVIS photometry, we revisit a previous suggestion that M 80 may be the globular cluster with the richest population of blue stragglers in our Galaxy. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  2. Fatigue behaviour of cast iron with globular graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, P.; Pusch, G.; Krodel, L. [Institut fuer Werkstofftechnik, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Gustav-Zeuner-Strasse 5, 09599 Freiberg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Cast iron with bainitic matrix and globular graphite, so called austempered ductile iron (ADI), allows the substitution of heat-treatable steels. The use of ADI in safety-relevant components requires knowledge of the fracture and fatigue behaviour. Cyclic stress strain behaviour and fatigue life at total strain control and random loading have been investigated at ADI (EN-GJS-1000-5) and pearlitic cast iron (EN-GJS-600-3). In addition fracture mechanic tests at cyclic loading at various stress ratios were carried out. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. The gravitational waveforms of white dwarf collisions in globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loren-Aguilar, P; Garcia-Berro, E; Lobo, J A; Isern, J

    2009-01-01

    In the dense central regions of globular clusters close encounters of two white dwarfs are relatively frequent. The estimated frequency is one or more strong encounters per star in the lifetime of the cluster. Such encounters should be then potential sources of gravitational wave radiation. Thus, it is foreseeable that these collisions could be either individually detected by LISA or they could contribute significantly to the background noise of the detector. We compute the pattern of gravitational wave emission from these encounters for a sufficiently broad range of system parameters, namely the masses, the relative velocities and the distances of the two white dwarfs involved in the encounter.

  4. The WAGGS project - I. The WiFeS Atlas of Galactic Globular cluster Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Christopher; Pastorello, Nicola; Bellstedt, Sabine; Alabi, Adebusola; Cerulo, Pierluigi; Chevalier, Leonie; Fraser-McKelvie, Amelia; Penny, Samantha; Foster, Caroline; McDermid, Richard M.; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Villaume, Alexa

    2017-07-01

    We present the WiFeS Atlas of Galactic Globular cluster Spectra, a library of integrated spectra of Milky Way and Local Group globular clusters. We used the WiFeS integral field spectrograph on the Australian National University 2.3 m telescope to observe the central regions of 64 Milky Way globular clusters and 22 globular clusters hosted by the Milky Way's low-mass satellite galaxies. The spectra have wider wavelength coverage (3300-9050 Å) and higher spectral resolution (R = 6800) than existing spectral libraries of Milky Way globular clusters. By including Large and Small Magellanic Cloud star clusters, we extend the coverage of parameter space of existing libraries towards young and intermediate ages. While testing stellar population synthesis models and analysis techniques is the main aim of this library, the observations may also further our understanding of the stellar populations of Local Group globular clusters and make possible the direct comparison of extragalactic globular cluster integrated light observations with well-understood globular clusters in the Milky Way. The integrated spectra are publicly available via the project website.

  5. A stochastic finite element model for the dynamics of globular macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Robin C.; Read, Daniel J.; Harlen, Oliver G.; Harris, Sarah A.

    2013-04-01

    We describe a novel coarse-grained simulation method for modelling the dynamics of globular macromolecules, such as proteins. The macromolecule is treated as a continuum that is subject to thermal fluctuations. The model includes a non-linear treatment of elasticity and viscosity with thermal noise that is solved using finite element analysis. We have validated the method by demonstrating that the model provides average kinetic and potential energies that are in agreement with the classical equipartition theorem and that the nodal velocities have the correct Gaussian distribution. In addition, we have performed Fourier analysis on the simulation trajectories obtained for a series of linear beams to confirm that the correct average energies are present in the first two Fourier bending modes and that the probability distribution of the amplitudes of the first two Fourier modes match the theoretical results. We demonstrate spatial convergence of the model by showing that the anisotropy of the inertia tensor for a cubic mesh converges as a function of the mesh resolution. We have then used the new modelling method to simulate the thermal fluctuations of a representative protein over 500 ns timescales. Using reasonable parameters for the material properties, we have demonstrated that the overall deformation of the biomolecule is consistent with the results obtained for proteins in general from atomistic molecular dynamics simulations.

  6. New VVV Survey Globular Cluster Candidates in the Milky Way Bulge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minniti, Dante; Gómez, Matías [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, Av. Fernandez Concha 700, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Geisler, Douglas; Fernández-Trincado, Jose G. [Departamento de Astronomía, Casilla 160-C, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Alonso-García, Javier; Beamín, Juan Carlos; Borissova, Jura; Catelan, Marcio; Ramos, Rodrigo Contreras; Kurtev, Radostin; Pullen, Joyce [Instituto Milenio de Astrofísica, Santiago (Chile); Palma, Tali; Clariá, Juan J. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Laprida 854, Córdoba (Argentina); Cohen, Roger E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 2700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore (United States); Dias, Bruno [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Hempel, Maren [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Instituto de Astrofísica, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Santiago (Chile); Ivanov, Valentin D. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarszchild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Lucas, Phillip W. [Dept. of Astronomy, University of Hertfordshire, Hertfordshire (United Kingdom); Moni-Bidin, Christian; Alegría, Sebastian Ramírez [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Católica del Norte, Antofagasta (Chile); and others

    2017-11-10

    It is likely that a number of Galactic globular clusters remain to be discovered, especially toward the Galactic bulge. High stellar density combined with high and differential interstellar reddening are the two major problems for finding globular clusters located toward the bulge. We use the deep near-IR photometry of the VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) Survey to search for globular clusters projected toward the Galactic bulge, and hereby report the discovery of 22 new candidate globular clusters. These objects, detected as high density regions in our maps of bulge red giants, are confirmed as globular cluster candidates by their color–magnitude diagrams. We provide their coordinates as well as their near-IR color–magnitude diagrams, from which some basic parameters are derived, such as reddenings and heliocentric distances. The color–magnitude diagrams reveal well defined red giant branches in all cases, often including a prominent red clump. The new globular cluster candidates exhibit a variety of extinctions (0.06 < A {sub Ks} < 2.77) and distances (5.3 < D < 9.5 kpc). We also classify the globular cluster candidates into 10 metal-poor and 12 metal-rich clusters, based on the comparison of their color–magnitude diagrams with those of known globular clusters also observed by the VVV Survey. Finally, we argue that the census for Galactic globular clusters still remains incomplete, and that many more candidate globular clusters (particularly the low luminosity ones) await to be found and studied in detail in the central regions of the Milky Way.

  7. Brain asymmetry in the white matter making and globularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantina eTheofanopoulou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies from the field of language genetics and evolutionary anthropology have put forward the hypothesis that the emergence of our species-specific brain is to be understood not in terms of size, but in light of developmental changes that gave rise to a more globular braincase configuration after the split from Neanderthals-Denisovans. On the grounds that (i white matter myelination is delayed relative to other brain structures and in humans is protracted compared with other primates and (ii neural connectivity is linked genetically to our brain/skull morphology and language-ready brain, I take it that one significant evolutionary change in Homo sapiens’ lineage is the interhemispheric connectivity mediated by the Corpus Callosum. The size, myelination and fiber caliber of the Corpus Callosum presents an anterior-to-posterior increase, in a way that inter-hemispheric connectivity is more prominent in the sensory motor areas, whereas high- order areas are more intra-hemispherically connected. Building on evidence from language-processing studies that account for this asymmetry (‘lateralization’ in terms of brain rhythms, I present an evo-devo hypothesis according to which the myelination of the Corpus Callosum, Brain Asymmetry and Globularity are conjectured to make up the angles of a co-evolutionary triangle that gave rise to our language-ready brain.

  8. Comparing Chemical Compositions of Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies and Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jason; Sparkman, Lea; Toloba, Elisa; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2015-01-01

    Because of their abundance in cluster environments and fragility due to their low mass, dwarf elliptical galaxies (dEs) are excellent specimens for studying the physical processes that occur inside galaxy clusters. These studies can be used to expand our understanding of the process of galaxy (specifically dE) formation and the role of dark matter in the Universe. To move closer to better understanding these topics, we present a study of the relationship between dEs and globular clusters (GCs) by using the largest sample of dEs and GC satellites to date. We focus on comparing the ages and chemical compositions of dE nuclei with those of satellite GCs by analyzing absorption lines in their spectra. To better view the spectral features of these relatively dim objects, we employ a spectral co-addition process, where we add the fluxes of several objects to produce a single spectrum with high signal-to-noise ratio. Our finding that dE nuclei are younger and more metal rich than globular clusters establishes important benchmarks that future dE formation theories will consider. We also establish a means to identify GCs whose parent galaxies are uncertain, which allows us to make comparisons between this GC group and the satellite GCs.

  9. Color Gradients Within Globular Clusters: Restricted Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jong Sohn

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of a restricted numerical simulation for the color gradients within globular clusters have been presented. The standard luminosity function of M3 and Salpeter's initial mass functions were used to generate model clusters as a fundamental population. Color gradients with the sample clusters for both King and power law cusp models of surface brightness distributions are discussed in the case of using the standard luminosity function. The dependence of color gradients on several parameters for the simulations with Salpeter's initial mass functions, such as slope of initial mass functions, cluster ages, metallicities, concentration parameters of King model, and slopes of power law, are also discussed. No significant radial color gradients are shown to the sample clusters which are regenerated by a random number generation technique with various parameters in both of King and power law cusp models of surface brightness distributions. Dynamical mass segregation and stellar evolution of horizontal branch stars and blue stragglers should be included for the general case of model simulations to show the observed radial color gradients within globular clusters.

  10. Theoretical stellar luminosity functions and globular cluster ages and compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, S. J.

    The ages and chemical compositions of the stars in globular clusters are of great interest, particularly because age estimates from the well known exercise of fitting observed color-magnitude diagrams to theoretical predictions tend to yield ages in excess of the Hubble time in standard cosmological models. Relatively little use was made of the stellar luminosity functions of the globular clusters to constrain the ages or compositions. The comparison of observed luminosity functions to theoretical ones allows the use of information not usually considered, and has the advantage of being relatively insensitive to lack of knowledge of the detailed structure of stellar envelopes and atmospheres. A computer program was developed to apply standard stellar evolutionary theory, using the most recently available input physics to the calculation of the evolution of low-mass Population II stars. A comparison of the computed theoretical luminosity functions to an observed, though still preliminary, luminosity function for the cluster M13 demonstrates the viability of this approach.

  11. SEARCH FOR RED DWARF STARS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6397

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Left A NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of a small region (1.4 light-years across) in the globular star cluster NGC 6397. Simulated stars (diamonds) have been added to this view of the same region of the cluster to illustrate what astronomers would have expected to see if faint red dwarf stars were abundant in the Milky Way Galaxy. The field would then contain 500 stars, according to theoretical calculations. Right The unmodified HST image shows far fewer stars than would be expected, according to popular theories of star formation. HST resolves about 200 stars. The stellar density is so low that HST can literally see right through the cluster and resolve far more distant background galaxies. From this observation, scientists have identified the surprising cutoff point below which nature apparently doesn't make many stars smaller that 1/5 the mass of our Sun. These HST findings provide new insights into star formation in our Galaxy. Technical detail:The globular cluster NGC 6397, one of the nearest and densest agglomerations of stars, is located 7,200 light-years away in the southern constellation Ara. This visible-light picture was taken on March 3, 1994 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, as part the HST parallel observing program. Credit: F. Paresce, ST ScI and ESA and NASA

  12. THE FIRST CONFIRMED MICROLENS IN A GLOBULAR CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrukowicz, P.; Udalski, A. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Minniti, D.; Alonso-Garcia, J. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna MacKenna 4860, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Jetzer, Ph. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-01-10

    In 2000 July/August a microlensing event occurred at a distance of 2.'33 from the center of the globular cluster M22 (NGC 6656), observed against the dense stellar field of the Milky Way bulge. We have used the adaptive optics system NACO at the ESO Very Large Telescope to resolve the two objects that participated in the event: the lens and the source. The position of the objects measured in 2011 July is in agreement with the observed relative proper motion of M22 with respect to the background bulge stars. Based on the brightness of the microlens components we find that the source is a solar-type star located at a distance of 6.0 {+-} 1.5 kpc in the bulge, while the lens is a 0.18 {+-} 0.01 M{sub Sun} dwarf member of the globular cluster located at the known distance of 3.2 {+-} 0.2 kpc from the Sun.

  13. Long Period Variable Stars in Globular Cluster NGC 6553

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kager, Elisabeth

    2010-04-01

    Long period variable stars (LPVs) are red giants or supergiants that vary in brightness as they pulsate radially. Their periods range from months to several years, and amplitudes can be many magnitudes. Studying these pulsation properties of LPVs as a function of position on the giant branch helps to constrain models of stellar structure, evolution, and pulsation. Studying LPVs in environments with known metallicity, age, and distance allows us to control these variables; globular clusters are an excellent environment. This study targets the metal-rich ([Fe/H] = -0.2) bulge globular cluster NGC 6553 in which variables have not been studied very thoroughly. Over the past year, 49 nights worth of data have been taken with PROMPT 4, a motorized telescope positioned at Cerro Tololo, Chile. Images have been processed, combined, and photometered and the stars' (X,Y) positions and brightness values were determined. The variability indices of the magnitudes of the stars between nights were used to find LPVs and plot their brightness as a function of time. These light curves will be characterized for their amplitude, period, and regularity; these can be used to compare to LPVs in other clusters at the same/other metallicities. A color-magnitude diagram will be created onto which the LPVs' position can be plotted to understand how far they are up the red giant branch to get a better understanding of their evolutionary state.

  14. Combined Photometry and Spectroscopy of Globular Cluster Tidal Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, W. L.; Wilhelm, R.; McWilliam, A.; Westfall, A.; Lauchner, A.

    2005-12-01

    Globular cluster tidal streams are of interest for what they can tell us of the dynamical evolution of the clusters and our Galaxy. Recent studies have used photometric and statistical subtraction methods to attempt to separate potential streams from the field stars that contaminate the samples. We chose instead to use photometry to select blue stars that match the horizontal branch of the clusters and make spectroscopic observations of these candidates to determine their metallicity and radial velocities. Combining these results with the photometric data offers a better picture of the structure and formation of tidal streams. We present preliminary photometric and spectroscopic results for the globular clusters and surrounding fields of NGC 6934, M 10, M 92 and Pal 13. Data obtained at McDonald Observatory, Kitt Peak, and Las Campanas Observatory. WLP acknowledges the support of a Sigma Xi Grant-In-Aid of research, and the Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowship. RW acknowledges the support of a AAS Small Research Grant.

  15. Ages of Globular Clusters from HIPPARCOS Parallaxes of Local Subdwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, Raffaele G.; Fusi Pecci, Flavio; Carretta, Eugenio; Clementini, Gisella; Corsi, Carlo E.; Lattanzi, Mario

    1997-12-01

    We report here initial but strongly conclusive results for absolute ages of Galactic globular clusters (GGCs). This study is based on high-precision trigonometric parallaxes from the HIPPARCOS satellite coupled with accurate metal abundances ([Fe/H], [O/Fe], and [α/Fe]) from high-resolution spectroscopy for a sample of about thirty subdwarfs. Systematic effects due to star selection (Lutz-Kelker corrections to parallaxes) and the possible presence of undetected binaries in the sample of bona fide single stars are examined, and appropriate corrections are estimated. They are found to be small for our sample. The new data allow us to reliably define the absolute location of the main sequence (MS) as a function of metallicity. These results are then used to derive distances and ages for a carefully selected sample of nine globular clusters having metallicities determined from high-dispersion spectra of individual giants according to a procedure totally consistent with that used for the field subdwarfs. Very precise and homogeneous reddening values have also been independently determined for these clusters. Random errors for our distance moduli are +/-0.08 mag, and systematic errors are likely of the same order of magnitude. These very accurate distances allow us to derive ages with internal errors of ~12% (+/-1.5 Gyr). The main results are: 1. HIPPARCOS parallaxes are smaller than corresponding ground-based measurements, leading, in turn, to longer distance moduli (~0.2 mag) and younger ages (~2.8 Gyr). 2. The distance to NGC 6752 derived from our MS fitting is consistent with that determined using the white dwarf cooling sequence. 3. The relation between the zero-age HB (ZAHB) absolute magnitude and metallicity for the nine program clusters is MV(ZAHB)=(0.22+/-0.09)([Fe/H]+1.5)+(0.49+/-0.04) . This relation is fairly consistent with some of the most recent theoretical models. Within quoted errors, the slope is in agreement with that given by the Baade-Wesselink (BW

  16. Intraperitoneal administration of the globular adiponectin gene ameliorates diabetic nephropathy in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fang; Liu, Ying-Hong; Liu, Fu-You; Peng, You-Ming; Tian, Jun-Wei

    2014-06-01

    The present study investigated the potential effects of the long-term expression of exogenous adiponectin (ADPN) on normal and diabetic kidneys. Type 2 diabetes mellitus models were induced by high-lipid and high-sucrose feeding plus intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. The recombinant plasmid pIRES2-EGFP-gAd, which is able to co-express globular ADPN (gAd) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), was intraperitoneally injected into rat models mediated by Lipofectamine. In total, 32 Wistar rats were randomly assigned into four groups: the normal control group, the diabetes group, the diabetes group treated with pIRES2-EGFP-gAd and the diabetes group treated with pIRES2-EGFP. After 12 weeks, serum biochemistry and urine albumin levels were measured. The kidneys were collected to assess the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the renal pathological changes were observed by light microcopy. The protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK) were determined by an immunohistochemical staining method and western blot analysis. Intraperitoneal injection of the human gAd gene via Lipofectamine resulted in abundant ADPN protein in the kidney. In the diabetic rats, the delivery of the exogenous gAd gene ameliorated the progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN). ADPN attenuated urine albumin excretion in the diabetic rats. ADPN also mitigated glomerular mesangial expansion, reduced the generation of ROS and prevented interstitial fibrosis. In addition, the expression of gAd inhibited the renal expression of TGF-β1, promoted the protein expression of eNOS and activated the opening of the AMPK signaling pathway in the renal tissues of the diabetic rats. Despite the effects of ADPN on DN being controversial, these observations indicate that the supplementation of ADPN is beneficial in ameliorating DN in rats.

  17. Chemical abundances in the old LMC globular cluster Hodge 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateluna, R.; Geisler, D.; Villanova, S.; Carraro, G.; Grocholski, A.; Sarajedini, A.; Cole, A.; Smith, V.

    2012-12-01

    Context. The study of globular clusters is one of the most powerful ways to learn about a galaxy's chemical evolution and star formation history. They preserve a record of chemical abundances at the time of their formation and are relatively easy to age date. The most detailed knowledge of the chemistry of a star is given by high resolution spectroscopy, which provides accurate abundances for a wide variety of elements, yielding a wealth of information on the various processes involved in the cluster's chemical evolution. Aims: We studied red giant branch (RGB) stars in an old, metal-poor globular cluster of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), Hodge 11 (H11), in order to measure as many elements as possible. The goal is to compare its chemical trends to those in the Milky Way halo and dwarf spheroidal galaxies in order to help understand the formation history of the LMC and our own Galaxy. Methods: We have obtained high resolution VLT/FLAMES spectra of eight RGB stars in H11. The spectral range allowed us to measure a variety of elements, including Fe, Mg, Ca, Ti, Si, Na, O, Ni, Cr, Sc, Mn, Co, Zn, Ba, La, Eu and Y. Results: We derived a mean [Fe/H] = -2.00 ± 0.04, in the middle of previous determinations. We found low [α/Fe] abundances for our targets, more comparable to values found in dwarf spheroidal galaxies than in the Galactic halo, suggesting that if H11 is representative of its ancient populations then the LMC does not represent a good halo building block. Our [Ca/Fe] value is about 0.3 dex less than that of halo stars used to calibrate the Ca IR triplet technique for deriving metallicity. A hint of a Na abundance spread is observed. Its stars lie at the extreme high O, low Na end of the Na:O anti-correlation displayed by Galactic and LMC globular clusters. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (proposal ID 082.B-0458).Table 4 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Detection of a large-scale structure of intracluster globular clusters in the Virgo cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Park, Hong Soo; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2010-04-16

    Globular clusters are usually found in galaxies, and they are excellent tracers of dark matter. Long ago it was suggested that intracluster globular clusters (IGCs) may exist that are bound to a galaxy cluster rather than to any single galaxy. Here we present a map showing the large-scale distribution of globular clusters over the entire Virgo cluster. It shows that IGCs are found out to 5 million light years from the Virgo center and that they are concentrated in several substructures that are much larger than galaxies. These objects might have been mostly stripped off from low-mass dwarf galaxies.

  19. The Composition of the Bulge Globular Cluster NGC 6273

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilachowski, C. A.; Johnson, C. I.; Rich, R. M.; Caldwell, N.; Mateo, M.; Bailey, J. I.; Crane, J. D.

    2017-03-01

    Observations of red giants in the Bulge globular cluster NGC 6273 with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS) mounted on the Nasmuth-East port of the Magellan-Clay 6.5-m telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory reveal a spread in metallicity. Members have been confirmed with radial velocity. NGC 6273 has at least two populations separated by 0.2-0.3 dex in [Fe/H]. The sodium and aluminum abundances are correlated while the magnesium and aluminum abundances are anti-correlated. The cluster also shows a rise in the abundance of the s-process element lanthanum with [Fe/H] similar to other massive clusters. The cluster contains a possible third population depleted in most elements by 0.3 dex.

  20. Anomalous globular clusters: insights from neutron capture elements abundances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, A. F.

    Thanks to the large amount of spectroscopic and photometric data assembled in the last couple of decades, the assumption that all globular clusters (GCs) contain a simple mono-metallic stellar population has been modified. Besides the common variations in the elements created/destroyed in the H-burning processes, spreads and/or multi-modalities in heavier elements have been detected in a few objects. Among the most remarkable chemical inhomogeneity in these anomalous objects is the internal variation in the neutron-capture (n-capture) elements, that can provide some information about the material from which stars were born. I report a summary of the chemical pattern observed in GCs where variations in n-capture have been detected, and the connection between these chemical features and the distribution of stars along the color-magnitude diagrams in the context of the lively debate on multiple stellar populations.

  1. How Black Holes Shape Globular Clusters: Modeling NGC 3201

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Kyle; Ye, Claire S.; Chatterjee, Sourav; Rodriguez, Carl L.; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2018-03-01

    Numerical simulations have shown that black holes (BHs) can strongly influence the evolution and present-day observational properties of globular clusters (GCs). Using a Monte Carlo code, we construct GC models that match the Milky Way cluster NGC 3201, the first cluster in which a stellar-mass BH was identified through radial velocity measurements. We predict that NGC 3201 contains ≳200 stellar-mass BHs. Furthermore, we explore the dynamical formation of main-sequence–BH binaries and demonstrate that systems similar to the observed BH binary in NGC 3201 are produced naturally. Additionally, our models predict the existence of bright blue straggler–BH binaries that are unique to core-collapsed clusters, which otherwise retain few BHs.

  2. Variable Stars in the LMC Globular Cluster NGC 1754

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Charles A., III; Taylor, L.; Smith, H. A.; Catelan, M.; Pritzl, B. J.; De Lee, N.

    2006-12-01

    We have used BVI observations taken with the SMARTS 1.3m telescope and with the SOAR telescope to identify variable stars in the vicinity of the old LMC cluster NGC 1754. We present light curves and periods for the variables and classify the variables according to type. The probability that the RR Lyrae stars found in the neighborhood of NGC 1754 actually belong to the cluster is discussed. Unlike most globular clusters of the Milky Way halo, many of the old star clusters of the LMC have Oosterhoff intermediate properties. The Oosterhoff classification of field and cluster RR Lyrae stars near NGC 1754 is considered. We thank the NSF for partial support of this research.

  3. AGB subpopulations in the nearby globular cluster NGC 6397

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, B. T.; Campbell, S. W.; De Silva, G. M.; Lattanzio, J.; D'Orazi, V.; Cottrell, P. L.; Momany, Y.; Casagrande, L.

    2018-03-01

    It has been well established that Galactic Globular clusters (GCs) harbour more than one stellar population, distinguishable by the anticorrelations of light-element abundances (C-N, Na-O, and Mg-Al). These studies have been extended recently to the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Here, we investigate the AGB of NGC 6397 for the first time. We have performed an abundance analysis of high-resolution spectra of 47 red giant branch (RGB) and eight AGB stars, deriving Fe, Na, O, Mg, and Al abundances. We find that NGC 6397 shows no evidence of a deficit in Na-rich AGB stars, as reported for some other GCs - the subpopulation ratios of the AGB and RGB in NGC 6397 are identical, within uncertainties. This agrees with expectations from stellar theory. This GC acts as a control for our earlier work on the AGB of M4 (with contrasting results), since the same tools and methods were used.

  4. Kinematic fingerprint of core-collapsed globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, P.; Webb, J. J.; Sills, A.; Vesperini, E.

    2018-03-01

    Dynamical evolution drives globular clusters towards core collapse, which strongly shapes their internal properties. Diagnostics of core collapse have so far been based on photometry only, namely on the study of the concentration of the density profiles. Here, we present a new method to robustly identify core-collapsed clusters based on the study of their stellar kinematics. We introduce the kinematic concentration parameter, ck, the ratio between the global and local degree of energy equipartition reached by a cluster, and show through extensive direct N-body simulations that clusters approaching core collapse and in the post-core collapse phase are strictly characterized by ck > 1. The kinematic concentration provides a suitable diagnostic to identify core-collapsed clusters, independent from any other previous methods based on photometry. We also explore the effects of incomplete radial and stellar mass coverage on the calculation of ck and find that our method can be applied to state-of-art kinematic data sets.

  5. Kinematic fingerprint of core-collapsed globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, P.; Webb, J. J.; Sills, A.; Vesperini, E.

    2018-01-01

    Dynamical evolution drives globular clusters toward core collapse, which strongly shapes their internal properties. Diagnostics of core collapse have so far been based on photometry only, namely on the study of the concentration of the density profiles. Here we present a new method to robustly identify core-collapsed clusters based on the study of their stellar kinematics. We introduce the kinematic concentration parameter, ck, the ratio between the global and local degree of energy equipartition reached by a cluster, and show through extensive direct N-body simulations that clusters approaching core collapse and in the post-core collapse phase are strictly characterized by ck > 1. The kinematic concentration provides a suitable diagnostic to identify core-collapsed clusters, independent from any other previous methods based on photometry. We also explore the effects of incomplete radial and stellar mass coverage on the calculation of ck and find that our method can be applied to state-of-art kinematic datasets.

  6. SHRINKING THE BRANEWORLD: BLACK HOLE IN A GLOBULAR CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Zepf, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    Large extra dimensions have been proposed as a possible solution to the hierarchy problem in physics. In one of the suggested models, the RS2 braneworld model, black holes may evaporate by Hawking radiation faster than in general relativity, on a timescale that depends on the black hole mass and on the asymptotic radius of curvature of the extra dimensions. Thus the size of the extra dimensions can be constrained by astrophysical observations. Here we point out that the black hole, recently discovered in an extragalactic globular cluster, places the strongest upper limit on the size of the extra dimensions in the RS2 model, L ∼< 0.003 mm. This black hole has the virtues of old age and relatively small mass. The derived upper limit is within an order of magnitude of the absolute limit afforded by astrophysical observations of black holes.

  7. Restrictions to protein folding determined by the protein size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Alexei V; Bogatyreva, Natalya S; Garbuzynskiy, Sergiy O

    2013-06-27

    Experimentally measured rates of spontaneous folding of single-domain globular proteins range from microseconds to hours: the difference (11 orders of magnitude!) is akin to the difference between the life span of a mosquito and the age of the Universe. We show that physical theory with biological constraints outlines the possible range of folding rates for single-domain globular proteins of various size and stability, and that the experimentally measured folding rates fall within this narrow "golden triangle" built without any adjustable parameters, filling it almost completely. This "golden triangle" also successfully predicts the maximal allowed size of the "foldable" protein domains, as well as the maximal size of protein domains that fold under solely thermodynamic (rather than kinetic) control. In conclusion, we give a phenomenological formula for dependence of the folding rate on the size, shape and stability of the protein fold. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Marasmioid and gymnopoid fungi of the Republic of Korea. 2. Marasmius sect. Globulares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonín, V; Ryoo, R; Shin, H-D

    2010-06-01

    Seven species of Marasmius sect. Globulares with smooth pileipellis cells (sect. Globulares s. Singer) have been collected in the Republic of Korea (South Korea) to date, viz. M. aurantioferrugineus, M. brunneospermus, M. maximus, M. nivicola, M. purpureostriatus, M. wynneae and M. fusicystidiosus. Descriptions of their macro- and microscopic features with a discussion of similar taxa are given. Their taxonomic position was confirmed using DNA data. Marasmius fusicystidiosus is described as a new species. A key to aid in their identification is also provided.

  9. Power Law Behavior of Structural Properties of Protein Gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, Marleen; Roefs, Sebastianus P.F.M.; Mellema, J.; Kruif, Kees G.

    1998-01-01

    Whey proteins are globular, heat-sensitive proteins. The gel structure, the formation of this structure, and the rheological properties of particulate whey protein isolate (WPI) gels have been investigated. On increasing the NaCl concentration, the permeability of the WPI gels increased, indicating

  10. Sulphur in the metal poor globular cluster NGC 6397

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, A.; Caffau, E.

    2011-10-01

    Sulphur (S) is a non-refractory α-element that is not locked into dust grains in the interstellar medium. Thus no correction to the measured, interstellar sulphur abundance is needed and it can be readily compared to the S content in stellar photospheres. Here we present the first measurement of sulphur in the metal poor globular cluster (GC) NGC 6397, as detected in a MIKE/Magellan high signal-to-noise, high-resolution spectrum of one red giant star. While abundance ratios of sulphur are available for a larger number of Galactic stars down to an [Fe/H] of ~ -3.5 dex, no measurements in globular clusters more metal poor than -1.5 dex have been reported so far. We find aNLTE, 3-D abundance ratio of [S/Fe] = +0.52 ± 0.20 (stat.) ± 0.08 (sys.), based on theS I, Multiplet 1 line at 9212.8 Å. This value is consistent with a Galactic halo plateau as typical of other α-elements in GCs and field stars, but we cannot rule out its membership with a second branch of increasing [S/Fe] with decreasing [Fe/H], claimed in the literature, which leads to a large scatter at metallicities around - 2 dex. The [S/Mg] and [S/Ca] ratios in this star are compatible with a Solar value to within the (large) uncertainties. Despite the very large scatter in these ratios across Galactic stars between literature samples, this indicates that sulphur traces the chemical imprints of the other α-elements in metal poor GCs. Combined with its moderate sodium abundance ([S/Na]NLTE = 0.48), the [S/Fe] ratio in this GC extends a global, positive S-Na correlation that is not seen in field stars and might indicate that proton-capture reactions contributed to the production of sulphur in the (metal poor) early GC environments. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  11. The X-ray globular cluster NGC 1851

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaino, G

    1976-01-01

    A BV photometric investigation of the Southern Globular Cluster NGC 1851, was carried out using the 1 m telescope of Cerro La Silla (ESO) for the photoelectric work and the 1 m telescope of Cerro Las Campanas (CARSO) for the photographic work. Nineteen stars were observed photoelectrically, the limiting magnitude being V=16.18. Using this sequence, 156 stars were measured photographically. The derived apparent distance modulus is (m-M)/sub app/=15/sup m/.50. The reddening is E(B-V)=0/sup m/.10. The true distance modulus is (m-M) /sub 0/=15/sup m/.20. The distance is 11 kpc from the sun, 6 kpc from the galactic plane and 17 kpc from the galactic centre. The main features of the colour-magnitude diagram are: a well defined horizontal branch abundant in red stars and deficient in blue stars, a rich subgiant and asymptotic branch and a moderately populated red giant branch of medium steepness rising to Delta V=2/sup m/.5 at (B-V) /sub 0/=1.4. At the distance of 11 kpc the maximum observed luminosity of the X-ray ...

  12. Helium enhancements in globular cluster stars from AGB star pollution .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, A.; Fenner, Y.; Sills, Alison; Campbell, S. W.; Lattanzio, J. C.

    Using a chemical evolution model we investigate the intriguing suggestion that there are populations of stars in some globular clusters (e.g. NGC 2808, omega Centauri) with enhanced levels of helium (Y ˜ 0.28 to 0.40) compared to the majority of the population that presumably have a primordial helium abundance. We assume that a previous generation of massive low-metallicity Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars has polluted the cluster gas via a slow stellar wind. We use two independent sets of AGB yields computed from detailed models to follow the evolution of helium, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen in the cluster gas using a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) and a number of top-heavy IMFs. In no case were we able to fit the observational constraints, Y > 0.30 and C+N+O ≈ constant. Depending on the shape of the IMF and the yields, we either obtained Y gtrsim 0.30 and large increases in C+N+O or Y responsible for the large helium enrichment or that any dredge-up from this generation of stars was less than predicted by standard models.

  13. Study of Remote Globular Cluster Satellites of M87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Arushi; Shao, Andrew; Toloba, Elisa; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Peng, Eric W.; Zhang, Hao

    2017-01-01

    We present a sample of “orphan” globular clusters (GCs) with previously unknown parent galaxies, which we determine to be remote satellites of M87, a massive elliptical galaxy at the center of the Virgo Cluster of Galaxies. Because GCs were formed in the early universe along with their original parent galaxies, which were cannibalized by massive galaxies such as M87, they share similar age and chemical properties. In this study, we first confirm that M87 is the adoptive parent galaxy of our orphan GCs using photometric and spectroscopic data to analyze spatial and velocity distributions. Next, we increase the signal-to-noise ratio of our samples’ spectra through a process known as coaddition. We utilize spectroscopic absorption lines to determine the age and metallicity of our orphan GCs through comparison to stellar population synthesis models, which we then relate to the GCs’ original parent galaxies using a mass-metallicity relation. Our finding that remote GCs of M87 likely developed in galaxies with ~1010 solar masses implies that M87’s outer halo is formed of relatively massive galaxies, serving as important parameters for developing theories about the formation and evolution of massive galaxies.This research was funded in part by NASA/STScI and the National Science Foundation. Most of this work was carried out by high school students working under the auspices of the Science Internship Program at UC Santa Cruz.

  14. KINEMATICS OF OUTER HALO GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veljanoski, J.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Bernard, E. J.; Peñarrubia, J.; Mackey, A. D.; Huxor, A. P.; Irwin, M. J.; Chapman, S. C.; Côté, P.; Tanvir, N. R.; McConnachie, A.; Ibata, R. A.; Martin, N. F.; Fardal, M.; Lewis, G. F.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first kinematic analysis of the far outer halo globular cluster (GC) population in the Local Group galaxy M31. Our sample contains 53 objects with projected radii of ∼20-130 kpc, 44 of which have no previous spectroscopic information. GCs with projected radii ∼> 30 kpc are found to exhibit net rotation around the minor axis of M31, in the same sense as the inner GCs, albeit with a smaller amplitude of 79 ± 19 km s –1 . The rotation-corrected velocity dispersion of the full halo GC sample is 106 ± 12 km s –1 , which we observe to decrease with increasing projected radius. We find compelling evidence for kinematic coherence among GCs that project on top of halo substructure, including a clear signature of infall for GCs lying along the northwest stream. Using the tracer mass estimator, we estimate the dynamical mass of M31 within 200 kpc to be M M31 = (1.2-1.5) ± 0.2 × 10 12 M ☉ . This value is highly dependent on the chosen model and assumptions within.

  15. THE DISCOVERY OF REMOTE GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M33

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huxor, A.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Barker, M. K.; Tanvir, N. R.; Irwin, M. J.; Chapman, S. C.; Ibata, R.; Lewis, G.

    2009-01-01

    We present the discovery of four remote star clusters in M33, one of which is of an extended nature. Three of the clusters were discovered using survey data from the Isaac Newton Telescope Wide-Field Camera while one was discovered serendipitously in a deep image taken with the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys. With projected radii of 38-113 arcmin (9.6-28.5 kpc for an assumed M33 distance of 870 kpc), these clusters lie significantly beyond all but one of the currently confirmed clusters in M33. The clusters have magnitudes and colors consistent with their being old to intermediate-age globular clusters (GCs). Indeed, they bear a strong resemblance to the outer halo GC population of the Milky Way and M31 in terms (V - I) 0 color. The three outermost clusters are projected on the far side of M33 with respect to M31, an asymmetry that could suggest tidal interactions have affected M33's GC distribution at large radii.

  16. Color Gradient in the King Type Globular Cluster NGC 7089

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jong Sohn

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available We use BV CCD images to investigate the reality of the color gradient within a King type globular cluster NGC 7089. Surface photometry shows that there is a strong radial color gradient in the central region of the cluster in the sense of bluer center with the amplitude of -0.39 +/- 0.07 mag/arcsec2 in (B - V. In the outer region of the cluster, however, the radial color gradient shows a reverse case, i.e., redder toward the center. (B - V color profile which was derived from resolved stars in VGC 7089 field also shows a significant color gradient in the central region of the clusters, indicating that lights from the combination of red giant stars and blue horizontal branch stars cause the radial color gradient. Color gradient of the outer region of NGC 7089 may be due to the unresolved background of the cluster. Similar color gradients in the central area of clusters have been previously observed exserved exclusively in highly concentrated systems classified as post core collapse clusters. We caution, however, to confirm the reality of the color gradient from resolved stars, we need more accurate imaging data of the cluster with exceptional seeing condition because the effect of completeness correlates with local density of stars.

  17. Dynamics of gravitational systems: Globular clusters and dark matter halos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, K.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of globular clusters is investigated using a combination of the modified Fokker-Plank equation and numerical integrations of N-body systems. The orbit-averaged diffusion coefficients in the inner region of the cluster and integrated orbits of the stars in the outer region are used. The King-Michie distribution is adopted as an initial model. Both isotropic and anisotropic cases are examined. The following was found. There is no orbital phase dependence of tidal radius of clusters in eccentric orbits. The number of stars with retrograde orbits is similar to the number with prograde orbits inside the tidal radius for the isotropic case. Escape rates are similar to those found in previous work for the isotropic case but considerably smaller in the anisotropic case. Disk shocking is very efficient isotropizing the orbits of stars in the outer region of the cluster in the anisotropic case. The response of dark matter galactic halos during the dissipational collapse of the baryonic matter are investigated. N-body simulations are used with the total mass and z-component of angular momentum conserved. Then the baryonic matter is forced to contract, forming the final luminous components of the galaxy. Both slow and fast growth of the luminous components are considered. Relatively flat rotation curves are easily obtained for reasonable values of the free parameters. There is no significant difference between slow collapse and fast collapse for all these results

  18. ARE SOME MILKY WAY GLOBULAR CLUSTERS HOSTED BY UNDISCOVERED GALAXIES?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Crnojević, Denija; Sand, David J., E-mail: dennis.zaritsky@gmail.com [Physics Department, Texas Tech University, Box 41051, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States)

    2016-07-20

    The confirmation of a globular cluster (GC) in the recently discovered ultrafaint galaxy Eridanus II (Eri II) motivated us to examine the question posed in the title. After estimating the halo mass of Eri II using a published stellar mass—halo mass relation, the one GC in this galaxy supports extending the relationship between the number of GCs hosted by a galaxy and the galaxy’s total mass about two orders of magnitude in stellar mass below the previous limit. For this empirically determined specific frequency of between 0.06 and 0.39 GCs per 10{sup 9} M {sub ⊙} of total mass, the surviving Milky Way (MW) subhalos with masses smaller than 10{sup 10} M {sub ⊙} could host as many as 5–31 GCs, broadly consistent with the actual population of outer halo MW GCs, although matching the radial distribution in detail remains a challenge. Using a subhalo mass function from published high-resolution numerical simulations and a Poissonian model for populating those halos with the aforementioned empirically constrained frequency, we find that about 90% of these GCs lie in lower-mass subhalos than that of Eri II. From what we know about the stellar mass–halo mass function, the subhalo mass function, and the mass-normalized GC specific frequency, we conclude that some of the MW’s outer halo GCs are likely to be hosted by undetected subhalos with extremely modest stellar populations.

  19. The variable star population in the globular cluster NGC 6934

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepez, M. A.; Arellano Ferro, A.; Muneer, S.; Giridhar, Sunetra

    2018-04-01

    We report an analysis of new V and I CCD time-series photometry of the globular cluster NGC 6934. Through the Fourier decomposition of the RR Lyrae light curves the mean values of [Fe/H] and the distance of the cluster were estimated; we found: [Fe/H]UVES = - 1.48 ± 0.14 and d = 16.03 ± 0.42 kpc, and [Fe/H]UVES = - 1.43 ± 0.11 and d = 15.91 ± 0.39 kpc, from the calibrations of RRab and RRc stars respectively. Independent distance estimations from SX Phe and SR stars are also discussed. Individual absolute magnitudes, radii and masses are also reported for RR Lyrae stars. We found 12 new variables: 4 RRab, 3 SX Phe, 2 W Virginis (CW) and 3 semi-regular (SR). The inter-mode or "either-or" region in the instability strip is shared by the RRab and RRc stars. This characteristic, observed only in some OoI clusters and never seen in an OoII, is discussed in terms of mass distribution in the ZAHB.

  20. A study of rotating globular clusters. The case of the old, metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4372

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacharov, N.; Bianchini, P.; Koch, A.; Frank, M. J.; Martin, N. F.; van de Ven, G.; Puzia, T. H.; McDonald, I.; Johnson, C. I.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. NGC 4372 is a poorly studied old, very metal-poor globular cluster (GC) located in the inner Milky Way halo. Aims: We present the first in-depth study of the kinematic properties and derive the structural parameters of NGC 4372 based on the fit of a Plummer profile and a rotating, physical model. We explore the link between internal rotation to different cluster properties and together with similar studies of more GCs, we put these in the context of globular cluster formation and evolution. Methods: We present radial velocities for 131 cluster member stars measured from high-resolution FLAMES/GIRAFFE observations. Their membership to the GC is additionally confirmed from precise metallicity estimates. We build a velocity dispersion profile and a systemic rotation curve using this kinematic data set. Additionally, we obtain an elliptical number density profile of NGC 4372 based on optical images using a Markov chain Monte Carlo fitting algorithm. From this, we derive the cluster's half-light radius and ellipticity as rh = 3.44' ± 0.04' and ɛ = 0.08 ± 0.01. Finally, we give a physical interpretation of the observed morphological and kinematic properties of this GC by fitting an axisymmetric, differentially rotating, dynamical model. Results: Our results show that NGC 4372 has an unusually high ratio of rotation amplitude to velocity dispersion (1.2 vs. 4.5 km s-1) for its metallicity. This puts it in line, however, with two other exceptional, very metal-poor GCs: M 15 and NGC 4590. We also find a mild flattening of NGC 4372 in the direction of its rotation. Given its old age, this suggests that the flattening is indeed caused by the systemic rotation rather than tidal interactions with the Galaxy. Additionally, we estimate the dynamical mass of the GC Mdyn = 2.0 ± 0.5 × 105M⊙ based on the dynamical model, which constrains the mass-to-light ratio of NGC 4372 between 1.4 and 2.3 M⊙/L⊙, representative of an old, purely stellar population. Based on

  1. Crystal structure of the C-terminal globular domain of the third paralog of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus oligosaccharyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shunsuke; Shimada, Atsushi; Kohda, Daisuke

    2013-07-01

    Protein N-glycosylation occurs in the three domains of life. Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) transfers an oligosaccharide chain to the asparagine residue in the N-glycosylation sequons. The catalytic subunits of the OST enzyme are STT3 in eukaryotes, AglB in archaea and PglB in eubacteria. The genome of a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, encodes three paralogous AglB proteins. We previously solved the crystal structures of the C-terminal globular domains of two paralogs, AglB-Short 1 and AglB-Short 2. We determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal globular domain of the third AglB paralog, AglB-Long, at 1.9 Å resolutions. The crystallization of the fusion protein with maltose binding protein (MBP) afforded high quality protein crystals. Two MBP-AglB-L molecules formed a swapped dimer in the crystal. Since the fusion protein behaved as a monomer upon gel filtration, we reconstituted the monomer structure from the swapped dimer by exchanging the swapped segments. The C-terminal domain of A. fulgidus AglB-L includes a structural unit common to AglB-S1 and AglB-S2. This structural unit contains the evolutionally conserved WWDYG and DK motifs. The present structure revealed that A. fulgidus AglB-L contained a variant type of the DK motif with a short insertion, and confirmed that the second signature residue, Lys, of the DK motif participates in the formation of a pocket that binds to the serine and threonine residues at the +2 position of the N-glycosylation sequon. The structure of A. fulgidus AglB-L, together with the two previously solved structures of AglB-S1 and AglB-S2, provides a complete overview of the three AglB paralogs encoded in the A. fulgidus genome. All three AglBs contain a variant type of the DK motif. This finding supports a previously proposed rule: The STT3/AglB/PglB paralogs in one organism always contain the same type of Ser/Thr-binding pocket. The present structure will be useful as a search model for molecular

  2. Globular clusters as tracers of stellar bimodality in elliptical galaxies: the case of NGC 1399

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Juan C.; Faifer, Favio; Geisler, Doug

    2005-02-01

    Globular cluster systems (GCSs) frequently show a bimodal distribution of cluster integrated colours. This work explores the arguments to support the idea that the same feature is shared by the diffuse stellar population of the galaxy they are associated with. The particular case of NGC 1399, one of the dominant central galaxies in the Fornax cluster, for which a new B surface brightness profile and (B-RKC) colours are presented, is discussed taking advantage of a recently published wide-field study of its GCS. The results show that the galaxy brightness profile and colour gradient, as well as the behaviour of the cumulative globular cluster specific frequency, are compatible with the presence of two dominant stellar populations, associated with the so-called `blue' and `red' globular cluster families. These globular families are characterized by different intrinsic specific frequencies (defined in terms of each stellar population): Sn= 3.3 +/- 0.3 in the case of the red globulars and Sn= 14.3 +/- 2.5 for the blue ones. We stress that this result does not necessarily conflict with recent works that point out a clear difference between the metallicity distribution of (resolved) halo stars and globulars when comparing their number statistics. The region within 0.5arcmin of the centre shows a deviation from the model profile (in both surface brightness and colour) that may be explained in terms of the presence of a bulge-like high-metallicity component. Otherwise, the model gives an excellent fit up to 12arcmin (or 66.5Kpc) from the centre, the galactocentric limit of our blue brightness profile. The inferred specific frequencies imply that, in terms of their associated stellar populations, the formation of the blue globulars took place with an efficiency about six times higher than that corresponding to their red counterparts. The similarity of the spatial distribution of the blue globulars with that inferred for dark matter, as well as with that of the X

  3. Spectroscopic confirmation of the first symbiotic star in a globular cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, David

    2013-10-01

    We have recently discovered an 18-minute period in the ultraviolet of a star in the globular cluster NGC 1851. In the redder optical bands, this star is red and bright, while it shows a clear UV excess relative to other stars at similar positions in the HR diagram. The system is most likely a symbiotic binary, composed of a cool evolved star and a white dwarf, with an 18 minute spin period, accreting the cool star's wind. The binary would be the first such object ever found in a globular cluster, and only the third in the Galaxy where the white dwarf spin period is measured. The only viable alternatives are that the two components are a chance superposition - something with a nontrivial chance of happening in a globular cluster core. In such a case, the 18 minute period would most likely be the spin period of a magnetic white dwarf in an intermediate polar cataclysmic variable {this would be the first confirmed magnetic CV in a globular cluster}, or the orbital period of a double-degenerate AM CVn binary. Each of these three possibilities show unique {and very different} emission line spectra in the blue wavelength range. Two orbits of HST with STIS/G430L will produce a spectrum of sufficient signal-to-noise to distinguish between these 3 scenarios. The result will be an important constraint on N-body models of globular clusters.

  4. Two stellar-mass black holes in the globular cluster M22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strader, Jay; Chomiuk, Laura; Maccarone, Thomas J; Miller-Jones, James C A; Seth, Anil C

    2012-10-04

    Hundreds of stellar-mass black holes probably form in a typical globular star cluster, with all but one predicted to be ejected through dynamical interactions. Some observational support for this idea is provided by the lack of X-ray-emitting binary stars comprising one black hole and one other star ('black-hole/X-ray binaries') in Milky Way globular clusters, even though many neutron-star/X-ray binaries are known. Although a few black holes have been seen in globular clusters around other galaxies, the masses of these cannot be determined, and some may be intermediate-mass black holes that form through exotic mechanisms. Here we report the presence of two flat-spectrum radio sources in the Milky Way globular cluster M22, and we argue that these objects are black holes of stellar mass (each ∼10-20 times more massive than the Sun) that are accreting matter. We find a high ratio of radio-to-X-ray flux for these black holes, consistent with the larger predicted masses of black holes in globular clusters compared to those outside. The identification of two black holes in one cluster shows that ejection of black holes is not as efficient as predicted by most models, and we argue that M22 may contain a total population of ∼5-100 black holes. The large core radius of M22 could arise from heating produced by the black holes.

  5. Images in the rocket ultraviolet - UV fluxes of M31 globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohlin, R.C.; Cornett, R.H.; Hill, J.K.; Hill, R.S.; Stecher, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    Images obtained by a rocket-borne UV imaging telescope are used here to determine near-UV fluxes for 17 sources in M31 that are optical globular-cluster candidates and for the bright open cluster vdB0 in M31. Far-UV fluxes or flux limits are determined for the same clusters. The m(NUV)-V colors for M31 clusters are similar to those of Galactic clusters, except for the high-metallicity M31 cluster Bo 171. Four of the detected clusters have optical, m(NUV) - V, and m(FUV) - V colors indicating ages of about 100 million years. These four clusters are probably similar to the so-called 'blue globular' clusters of the LMC. The existence of young LMC-type blue globulars and the possible existence of middle-aged metal-rich globulars may indicate that M31 has continued to form globular clusters throughout its life. 39 references

  6. Mass evaporation rate of globular clusters in a strong tidal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, Juan P.; Leigh, Nathan W. C.; Hurley, Jarrod R.; Giersz, Mirek

    2017-09-01

    The mass evaporation rate of globular clusters evolving in a strong Galactic tidal field is derived through the analysis of large, multimass N-body simulations. For comparison, we also study the same evaporation rates using mocca Monte Carlo models for globular cluster evolution. Our results show that the mass evaporation rate is a dynamical value, that is, far from a constant single number found in earlier analytical work and commonly used in the literature. Moreover, the evaporation rate derived with these simulations is higher than values previously published. These models also show that the value of the mass evaporation rate depends on the strength of the tidal field. We give an analytical estimate of the mass evaporation rate as a function of time and galactocentric distance ξ(RGC, t). Upon extrapolating this formula to smaller RGC values, our results provide tentative evidence for a very high ξ value at small RGC. Our results suggest that the corresponding mass-loss in the inner Galactic potential could be high and it should be accounted for when star clusters pass within it. This has direct relevance to nuclear cluster formation/growth via the infall of globular clusters through dynamical friction. As an illustrative example, we estimate how the evaporation rate increases for an ˜105 M⊙ globular cluster that decays through dynamical friction into the Galactic Centre. We discuss the findings of this work in relation to the formation of nuclear star clusters by inspiralling globular clusters.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Revised Bologna Catalog of M31 globular clusters (Galleti+, 2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galleti, S.; Federici, L.; Bellazzini, M.; Fusi Pecci, F.; Macrina, S.

    2003-11-01

    We have identified in the 2MASS database 693 known and candidate globular clusters in M31. The 2MASS J,H,K magnitudes of these objects have been transformed to the same homogeneous photometric system of existing near infrared photometry of M31 globulars, finally yielding J,H,K integrated photometry for 279 confirmed M31 clusters, 406 unconfirmed candidates and 8 objects with controversial classification. Of these objects 529 lacked any previous estimate of their near infrared magnitudes. The newly assembled near infrared dataset has been implemented into a revised version of the Bologna Catalogue of M31 globulars, with updated optical (UBVRI) photometry taken, when possible, from the most recent sources of CCD photometry available in the literature and transformed to a common photometric system. The final Revised Bologna Catalogue (table 2) most comprehensive list presently available of confirmed and candidate M31 globular clusters, with a total of 1164 entries. In particular, it includes 337 confirmed GCs, 688 GC candidates, 10 objects with controversial classification, 70 confirmed galaxies, 55 confirmed stars, and 4 HII regions. Using the newly assembled database we show that the V-K color provides a powerful tool to discriminate between M31 clusters and background galaxies, and we identify a sample of 83 globular cluster candidates, which is not likely to be contaminated by misclassified galaxies. (4 data files).

  8. Human diploid fibroblasts have receptors for the globular domain of C1Q

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordin, S.; Page, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors showed that mass cultures of fibroblasts grown from gingival explants in DB medium with 10% human serum are enriched in a phenotype that binds C1q with an affinity much higher than the rest of the population. Because of potential biologic importance of C1q receptors, the authors studied whether the interaction between C1q and this phenotype was mediated by the globular or collagenous domains of the molecule. Globular fragments were prepared by digesting C1q with collagenase, and collagenous fragments obtained after pepsin treatment. C1q binding on cells in suspension was determined by reaction with 125 I-C1q as reported. Competition experiments were performed under conditions in which intact 125 I-C1q binding saturated all available receptors. The results showed that collagenous fragments inhibited 20% of the 125 I-C1q binding to high affinity receptors, whereas inhibition by globular fragments was 70%. Unlabeled intact C1q and collagen type 1 were used as controls, and inhibited 92% and 17% of C1q binding, respectively. These studies show that C1q interacts with the fibroblast phenotype expressing high affinity receptors through its globular domain. The authors suggest that at sites of trauma, native C1 may bind to the surface of these cells via the globular domain of C1q, and that this unique phenotype may play an important role in tissue repair

  9. An Enigmatic Population of Luminous Globular Clusters in a Galaxy Lacking Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dokkum, Pieter; Cohen, Yotam; Danieli, Shany; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Merritt, Allison; Abraham, Roberto; Brodie, Jean; Conroy, Charlie; Lokhorst, Deborah; Mowla, Lamiya; O’Sullivan, Ewan; Zhang, Jielai

    2018-04-01

    We recently found an ultra diffuse galaxy (UDG) with a half-light radius of R e = 2.2 kpc and little or no dark matter. The total mass of NGC1052–DF2 was measured from the radial velocities of bright compact objects that are associated with the galaxy. Here, we analyze these objects using a combination of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging and Keck spectroscopy. Their average size is =6.2+/- 0.5 pc and their average ellipticity is =0.18+/- 0.02. From a stacked Keck spectrum we derive an age of ≳9 Gyr and a metallicity of [Fe/H] = ‑1.35 ± 0.12. Their properties are similar to ω Centauri, the brightest and largest globular cluster in the Milky Way, and our results demonstrate that the luminosity function of metal-poor globular clusters is not universal. The fraction of the total stellar mass that is in the globular cluster system is similar to that in other UDGs, and consistent with “failed galaxy” scenarios, where star formation terminated shortly after the clusters were formed. However, the galaxy is a factor of ∼1000 removed from the relation between globular cluster mass and total galaxy mass that has been found for other galaxies, including other UDGs. We infer that a dark matter halo is not a prerequisite for the formation of metal-poor globular cluster-like objects in high-redshift galaxies.

  10. The DRAGON simulations: globular cluster evolution with a million stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long; Spurzem, Rainer; Aarseth, Sverre; Giersz, Mirek; Askar, Abbas; Berczik, Peter; Naab, Thorsten; Schadow, Riko; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.

    2016-05-01

    Introducing the DRAGON simulation project, we present direct N-body simulations of four massive globular clusters (GCs) with 106 stars and 5 per cent primordial binaries at a high level of accuracy and realism. The GC evolution is computed with NBODY6++GPU and follows the dynamical and stellar evolution of individual stars and binaries, kicks of neutron stars and black holes (BHs), and the effect of a tidal field. We investigate the evolution of the luminous (stellar) and dark (faint stars and stellar remnants) GC components and create mock observations of the simulations (I.e. photometry, colour-magnitude diagrams, surface brightness and velocity dispersion profiles). By connecting internal processes to observable features, we highlight the formation of a long-lived `dark' nuclear subsystem made of BHs, which results in a two-component structure. The inner core is dominated by the BH subsystem and experiences a core-collapse phase within the first Gyr. It can be detected in the stellar (luminous) line-of-sight velocity dispersion profiles. The outer extended core - commonly observed in the (luminous) surface brightness profiles - shows no collapse features and is continuously expanding. We demonstrate how a King model fit to observed clusters might help identify the presence of post core-collapse BH subsystems. For global observables like core and half-mass radii, the direct simulations agree well with Monte Carlo models. Variations in the initial mass function can result in significantly different GC properties (e.g. density distributions) driven by varying amounts of early mass-loss and the number of forming BHs.

  11. GLOBULAR CLUSTERS INDICATE THAT ULTRA-DIFFUSE GALAXIES ARE DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beasley, Michael A.; Trujillo, Ignacio, E-mail: beasley@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Calle Via Láctea, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2016-10-10

    We present an analysis of archival HST /ACS imaging in the F475W ( g {sub 475}), F606W ( V {sub 606}), and F814W ( I {sub 814}) bands of the globular cluster (GC) system of a large (3.4 kpc effective radius) ultra-diffuse galaxy (DF17) believed to be located in the Coma Cluster of galaxies. We detect 11 GCs down to the 5 σ completeness limit of the imaging ( I {sub 814} = 27 mag). Correcting for background and our detection limits yields a total population of GCs in this galaxy of 27 ± 5 and a V -band specific frequency S {sub N} = 28 ± 5. Based on comparisons to the GC systems of local galaxies, we show that both the absolute number and the colors of the GC system of DF17 are consistent with the GC system of a dark-matter-dominated dwarf galaxy with virial mass ∼9.0 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ⊙} and a dark-to-stellar mass ratio M {sub vir}/ M {sub star} ∼ 1000. Based on the stellar mass growth of the Milky Way, we show that DF17 cannot be understood as a failed Milky-Way-like system, but is more similar to quenched Large-Magellanic-Cloud-like systems. We find that the mean color of the GC population, g {sub 475}– I {sub 814} = 0.91 ± 0.05 mag, coincides with the peak of the color distribution of intracluster GCs and is also similar to those of the blue GCs in the outer regions of massive galaxies. We suggest that both the intracluster GC population in Coma and the blue peak in the GC populations of massive galaxies may be fed—at least in part—by the disrupted equivalents of systems such as DF17.

  12. The Globular Cluster System of the Spiral Galaxy NGC 7814

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode, Katherine L.; Zepf, Stephen E.

    2003-11-01

    We present the results of a wide-field photometric study of the globular cluster (GC) system of the edge-on Sab spiral NGC 7814. This is the first spiral to be fully analyzed from our survey of the GC systems of a large sample of galaxies beyond the Local Group. NGC 7814 is of particular interest because a previous study estimated that it has 500-1000 GCs, giving it the largest specific frequency (SN) known for a spiral. Understanding this galaxy's GC system is important in terms of our understanding of the GC populations of spirals in general and has implications for the formation of massive galaxies. We observed the galaxy in BVR filters with the WIYN 3.5 m telescope and used image classification and three-color photometry to select GC candidates. We also analyzed archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 images of NGC 7814, both to help quantify the contamination level of the WIYN GC candidate list and to detect GCs in the inner part of the galaxy halo. Combining HST data with high-quality ground-based images allows us to trace the entire radial extent of this galaxy's GC system and determine the total number of GCs directly through observation. We find that rather than being an especially high-SN spiral, NGC 7814 has <~200 GCs and SN~1, making it comparable to the two most well-studied spiral galaxies, the Milky Way and M31. We explore the implications of these results for models of the formation of galaxies and their GC systems. The initial results from our survey suggest that the GC systems of typical elliptical galaxies can be accounted for by the merger of two or more spirals, but that for highly luminous elliptical galaxies, additional physical processes may be needed.

  13. The Globular Cluster NGC 6402 (M14). II. Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras Peña, C.; Catelan, M.; Grundahl, F.; Stephens, A. W.; Smith, H. A.

    2018-03-01

    We present time-series BVI photometry for the Galactic globular cluster NGC 6402 (M14). The data consist of ∼137 images per filter, obtained using the 0.9 and 1.0 m SMARTS telescopes at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. The images were obtained during two observing runs in 2006–2007. The image-subtraction package ISIS, along with DAOPHOT II/ALLFRAME, was used to perform crowded-field photometry and search for variable stars. We identified 130 variables, eight of which are new discoveries. The variable star population is comprised of 56 ab-type RR Lyrae stars, 54 c-type RR Lyrae, 6 type II Cepheids, 1 W UMa star, 1 detached eclipsing binary, and 12 long-period variables. We provide Fourier decomposition parameters for the RR Lyrae, and discuss the physical parameters and photometric metallicity derived therefrom. The M14 distance modulus is also discussed, based on different approaches for the calibration of the absolute magnitudes of RR Lyrae stars. The possible presence of second-overtone RR Lyrae in M14 is critically addressed, with our results arguing against this possibility. By considering all of the RR Lyrae stars as members of the cluster, we derive =0.589 {{d}}{{a}}{{y}}{{s}}. This, together with the position of the RR Lyrae stars of both Bailey types in the period–amplitude diagram, suggests an Oosterhoff-intermediate classification for the cluster. Such an intermediate Oosterhoff type is much more commonly found in nearby extragalactic systems, and we critically discuss several other possible indications that may point to an extragalactic origin for this cluster. Based on observations obtained with the 0.9 m and 1 m telescopes at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile, operated by the SMARTS consortium.

  14. Globular Clusters Indicate That Ultra-diffuse Galaxies Are Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Michael A.; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2016-10-01

    We present an analysis of archival HST/ACS imaging in the F475W (g 475), F606W (V 606), and F814W (I 814) bands of the globular cluster (GC) system of a large (3.4 kpc effective radius) ultra-diffuse galaxy (DF17) believed to be located in the Coma Cluster of galaxies. We detect 11 GCs down to the 5σ completeness limit of the imaging (I 814 = 27 mag). Correcting for background and our detection limits yields a total population of GCs in this galaxy of 27 ± 5 and a V-band specific frequency S N = 28 ± 5. Based on comparisons to the GC systems of local galaxies, we show that both the absolute number and the colors of the GC system of DF17 are consistent with the GC system of a dark-matter-dominated dwarf galaxy with virial mass ˜9.0 × 1010 M ⊙ and a dark-to-stellar mass ratio M vir/M star ˜ 1000. Based on the stellar mass growth of the Milky Way, we show that DF17 cannot be understood as a failed Milky-Way-like system, but is more similar to quenched Large-Magellanic-Cloud-like systems. We find that the mean color of the GC population, g 475-I 814 = 0.91 ± 0.05 mag, coincides with the peak of the color distribution of intracluster GCs and is also similar to those of the blue GCs in the outer regions of massive galaxies. We suggest that both the intracluster GC population in Coma and the blue peak in the GC populations of massive galaxies may be fed—at least in part—by the disrupted equivalents of systems such as DF17.

  15. Spatial Substructure in the M87 Globular Cluster System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuting; Zhang, Yunhao; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Peng, Eric; Lim, Sungsoon

    2018-01-01

    Based on the observation of Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) project, we obtained the u,g,r,i,z and Ks band photometric information of all the objects in the 2 degree × 2 degree area (Pilot Region) around M87, the major subcluster of Virgo. By adapting an Extreme Deconvolution method, which classifies objects into Globular Clusters (GCs), galaxies and foreground stars with their color and morphology data, we got a purer-than-ever GC distribution map with a depth to gmag=25 in Pilot Region. After masking galaxy GCs, smoothing with a 10arcmin Gaussian kernel and performing a flat field correction, we show the GC density map of M87, and got a good sersic fitting of GC radial distribution with a sersic index~2.2 in the central ellipse part (45arcmin semi major axis area of M87). We quantitatively compared our GC sample with a substructure-free mock data set, which was generated from the smoothed density map as well as the sersic fitting, by calculating the 2 point correlation function (TPCF) value in different parts of the map. After separately performing such comparison with mocks based on different galaxy masking radii which vary from 4 times g band effective radius to 10, we found signals of remarkable spatial enhancement in certain directions in the central ellipse of M87, as well as halo substructures shown as lumpiness and holes in the outer region. We present the estimated scales of these substructures from the TPCF results, and, managed to locate them with a statistical analysis of the pixelized GC map. Apart from all results listed above, we discuss the constant, extra-galactic substructure signal at a scale of ~3kpc, which does not diminish with masking sizes, as the evidence of merging and accretion history of M87.

  16. A Unified Picture of Mass Segregation in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Laura

    2017-08-01

    The sensitivity, stability and longevity of HST have opened up an exciting new parameter space: we now have velocity measurements, in the form of proper motions (PMs), for stars from the tip of the red giant branch to a few magnitudes below the main-sequence turn off for a large sample of globular clusters (GCs). For the very first time, we have the opportunity to measure both kinematic and spatial dependences on stellar mass in GCs.The formation and evolution histories of GCs are poorly understood, so too are their intermediate-mass black hole populations and binary fractions. However, the current structure and dynamical state of a GC is directly determined by its past history and its components, so by understanding the former we can gain insight into the latter. Quantifying variations in spatial structure for stars of different mass is extremely difficult with photometry alone as datasets are inhomogenous and incomplete. We require kinematic data for stars that span a range of stellar masses, combined with proper dynamical modelling. We now have the data in hand, but still lack the models needed to maximise the scientific potential of our HST datasets.Here, we propose to extend existing single-mass discrete dynamical-modelling tools to include kinematic and spatial variations with stellar mass, and verify the upgrades using mock data generated from N-body models. We will then apply the models to HST PM data and directly quantify energy equipartition and mass segregation in the GCs. The theoretical phase of the project is vital for the success of the subsequent data analysis, and will serve as a benchmark for future observational campaigns with HST, JWST and beyond.

  17. Binary Black Hole Mergers from Globular Clusters: Implications for Advanced LIGO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carl L; Morscher, Meagan; Pattabiraman, Bharath; Chatterjee, Sourav; Haster, Carl-Johan; Rasio, Frederic A

    2015-07-31

    The predicted rate of binary black hole mergers from galactic fields can vary over several orders of magnitude and is extremely sensitive to the assumptions of stellar evolution. But in dense stellar environments such as globular clusters, binary black holes form by well-understood gravitational interactions. In this Letter, we study the formation of black hole binaries in an extensive collection of realistic globular cluster models. By comparing these models to observed Milky Way and extragalactic globular clusters, we find that the mergers of dynamically formed binaries could be detected at a rate of ∼100 per year, potentially dominating the binary black hole merger rate. We also find that a majority of cluster-formed binaries are more massive than their field-formed counterparts, suggesting that Advanced LIGO could identify certain binaries as originating from dense stellar environments.

  18. The ellipticities of a sample of globular clusters in M31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupton, R.H.

    1989-01-01

    Images for a sample of 18 globular clusters in M31 have been obtained. The mean ellipticity on the sky in the range 7-14 pc (2-4 arcsec) is 0.08 + or - 0.02 and 0.12 + or - 0.01 in the range 14-21 pc (4-6 arcsec), with corresponding true ellipticities of 0.12 and 0.18. The difference between the inner and outer parts is significant at a 99 percent level. The flattening of the inner parts is statistically indistinguishable from that of the Galactic globular clusters, while the outer parts are flatter than the Galactic clusters at a 99.8 percent confidence level. There is a significant anticorrelation of ellipticity with line strength; such a correlation may in retrospect also be seen in the Galactic globular cluster system. For the M31 data, this anticorrelation is stronger in the inner parts of the galaxy. 30 refs

  19. NO EVIDENCE FOR INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS: STRONG CONSTRAINTS FROM THE JVLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strader, Jay; Chomiuk, Laura; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Miller-Jones, James C. A.; Seth, Anil C.; Heinke, Craig O.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.

    2012-01-01

    With a goal of searching for accreting intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs), we report the results of ultra-deep Jansky Very Large Array radio continuum observations of the cores of three Galactic globular clusters: M15, M19, and M22. We reach rms noise levels of 1.5-2.1 μJy beam –1 at an average frequency of 6 GHz. No sources are observed at the center of any of the clusters. For a conservative set of assumptions about the properties of the accretion, we set 3σ upper limits on IMBHs from 360 to 980 M ☉ . These limits are among the most stringent obtained for any globular cluster. They add to a growing body of work that suggests either (1) IMBHs ∼> 1000 M ☉ are rare in globular clusters or (2) when present, IMBHs accrete in an extraordinarily inefficient manner.

  20. No Evidence for Intermediate-mass Black Holes in Globular Clusters: Strong Constraints from the JVLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strader, Jay; Chomiuk, Laura; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Miller-Jones, James C. A.; Seth, Anil C.; Heinke, Craig O.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.

    2012-05-01

    With a goal of searching for accreting intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs), we report the results of ultra-deep Jansky Very Large Array radio continuum observations of the cores of three Galactic globular clusters: M15, M19, and M22. We reach rms noise levels of 1.5-2.1 μJy beam-1 at an average frequency of 6 GHz. No sources are observed at the center of any of the clusters. For a conservative set of assumptions about the properties of the accretion, we set 3σ upper limits on IMBHs from 360 to 980 M ⊙. These limits are among the most stringent obtained for any globular cluster. They add to a growing body of work that suggests either (1) IMBHs >~ 1000 M ⊙ are rare in globular clusters or (2) when present, IMBHs accrete in an extraordinarily inefficient manner.

  1. RR Lyrae in LMC Globular Clusters: Insights into the Oosterhoff Phenomenon and Milky Way Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Charles A., III; Smith, H. A.; Catelan, M.; Taylor, L.; McClellan, R. E.; Looper, K.; DeLee, N.; Pritzl, B. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present results from a study of RR Lyrae stars in five globular clusters located in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The goal of this study was to look at the behavior and properties of RR Lyrae stars in Oosterhoff-intermediate globular clusters and compare them to RR Lyrae in Oosterhoff I and II clusters. New BVI photometric observations of these clusters were obtained with the SMARTS consortium telescopes and with the SOAR 4-meter telescope. We present light curves and Fourier properties for the RR Lyrae stars in our study as well as physical properties for these stars derived from their Fourier parameters. We compare these physical properties to those of RR Lyrae in Milky Way halo globular clusters and discuss implications for Milky Way halo formation.

  2. A NEW DISTANT MILKY WAY GLOBULAR CLUSTER IN THE PAN-STARRS1 3π SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laevens, Benjamin P. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Sesar, Branimir; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schlafly, Edward F.; Bernard, Edouard J.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Denneau, Larry; Kaiser, Nicholas; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Magnier, Eugene A.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Sweeney, William E.; Draper, Peter W.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Price, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new satellite in the outer halo of the Galaxy, the first Milky Way satellite found in the stacked photometric catalog of the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS1) Survey. From follow-up photometry obtained with WFI on the MPG/ESO 2.2 m telescope, we argue that the object, located at a heliocentric distance of 145 ± 17 kpc, is the most distant Milky Way globular cluster yet known. With a total magnitude of M V = –4.3 ± 0.2 and a half-light radius of 20 ± 2 pc, it shares the properties of extended globular clusters found in the outer halo of our Galaxy and the Andromeda galaxy. The discovery of this distant cluster shows that the full spatial extent of the Milky Way globular cluster system has not yet been fully explored

  3. The Most Massive Star Clusters: Supermassive Globular Clusters or Dwarf Galaxy Nuclei?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, William

    2004-07-01

    Evidence is mounting that the most massive globular clusters, such as Omega Centauri and M31-G1, may be related to the recently discovered "Ultra-Compact Dwarfs" and the dense nuclei of dE, N galaxies. However, no systematic imaging investigation of these supermassive globular clusters - at the level of Omega Cen and beyond - has been done, and we do not know what fraction of them might bear the signatures {such as large effective radii or tidal tails} of having originated as dE nuclei. We propose to use the ACS/WFC to obtain deep images of 18 such clusters in NGC 5128 and M31, the two nearest rich globular cluster systems. These globulars are the richest star clusters that can be found in nature, the biggest of them reaching 10^7 Solar masses, and they are likely to represent the results of star formation under the densest and most extreme conditions known. Using the profiles of the clusters including their faint outer envelopes, we will carry out state-of-the-art dynamical modelling of their structures, and look for any clear evidence which would indicate that they are associated with stripped satellites. This study will build on our previous work with STIS and WFPC2 imaging designed to study the 'Fundamental Plane' of globular clusters. When our new work is combined with Archival WFPC2, STIS, and ACS material, we will also be able to construct the definitive mapping of the Fundamental Plane of globular clusters at its uppermost mass range, and confirm whether or not the UCD and dE, N objects occupy a different structural parameter space.

  4. The Luminosity Functions of Old and Intermediate-Age Globular Clusters in NGC 3610

    OpenAIRE

    Whitmore, B. C.; Schweizer, F.; Kundu, A.; Miller, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    The WFPC2 Camera on board HST has been used to obtain high-resolution images of NGC 3610, a dynamically young elliptical galaxy. These observations supersede shorter, undithered HST observations where an intermediate-age population of globular clusters was first discovered. The new observations show the bimodal color distribution of globular clusters more clearly, with peaks at (V-I)o = 0.95 and 1.17. The luminosity function (LF) of the blue, metal-poor population of clusters in NGC 3610 turn...

  5. Keck Spectroscopy of Globular Clusters in the Elliptical Galaxy NGC 3610

    OpenAIRE

    Strader, Jay; Brodie, Jean P.; Schweizer, Francois; Larsen, Soeren S.; Seitzer, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    We present moderate-resolution Keck spectra of nine candidate globular clusters in the possible merger-remnant elliptical galaxy NGC 3610. Eight of the objects appear to be bona fide globular clusters of NGC 3610. We find that two of the clusters belong to an old metal-poor population, five to an old metal-rich population, and only one to an intermediate-age metal-rich population. The estimated age of the intermediate-age cluster is 1-5 Gyr, which is in agreement with earlier estimates of the...

  6. A Search for Millisecond Pulsars in Fermi LAT-Detected Globular Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    DeCesar, Megan E.; Ransom, Scott M.; Ray, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    We have searched for millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in two globular clusters detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. These clusters contained no known MSPs prior to their detections in gamma rays. The discovery of gamma ray emission from many MSPs and the prevalence of MSPs in globular clusters points to a population of MSPs as the likely source of the detected GeV emission, directing our search for new cluster MSPs. We observed NGC 6652 and NGC 6388 at 2 GHz with the Green Bank Ultimate Puls...

  7. Integrated-light Two Micron All Sky Survey infrared photometry of Galactic globular clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Judith G.; Hsieh, Scott; Metchev, Stanimir; Djorgovski, S. G.; Malkan, M.

    2007-01-01

    We have mosaicked Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) images to derive surface brightness profiles in J, H, and K_s for 104 Galactic globular clusters. We fit these with King profiles and show that the core radii are identical to within the errors for each of these IR colors and are identical to the core radii at V in essentially all cases. We derive integrated-light colors V-J, V-H, V-K_s, J-H, and J-Ks for these globular clusters. Each color shows a reasonably tight relation between the dered...

  8. Origins of gene, genetic code, protein and life

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have investigated the origin of genes, the genetic code, proteins and life using six indices (hydropathy, -helix, -sheet and -turn formabilities, acidic amino acid content and basic amino acid content) necessary for appropriate three-dimensional structure formation of globular proteins. From the analysis of microbial ...

  9. Changes in the protein profile of Habanero pepper (Capsicum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-06-12

    Jun 12, 2012 ... Protein profile was studied during the development of Capsicum chinense somatic embryos. The total protein content and profile of polypeptides (by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) of somatic embryos at different developmental stages (globular, heart-shaped, torpedo.

  10. Changes in the protein profile of Habanero pepper ( Capsicum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protein profile was studied during the development of Capsicum chinense somatic embryos. The total protein content and profile of polypeptides (by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) of somatic embryos at different developmental stages (globular, heart-shaped, torpedo and cotyledonary stages) ...

  11. Galactic evolution of sulphur as traced by globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacharov, N.; Koch, A.; Caffau, E.; Sbordone, L.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Sulphur is an important volatile α element, but its role in the Galactic chemical evolution is still uncertain, and more observations constraining the sulphur abundance in stellar photospheres are required. Aims: We derive the sulphur abundances in red giant branch (RGB) stars in three Galactic halo globular clusters (GC) that cover a wide metallicity range (-2.3 noise (S/N ~ 200 per px) spectra in the region of the S I multiplet 3 at 1045 nm for 15 GC stars selected from the literature (six stars in M 4,six stars in M 22, and three stars in M 30). Multiplet 3 is better suited for S abundance derivation than the more commonly used lines of multiplet 1 at 920 nm, since its lines are not blended by telluric absorption or other stellar features at low metallicity. Results: We used spectral synthesis to derive the [S/Fe] ratio of the stars assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We find mean [S/Fe]LTE = 0.58 ± 0.01 ± 0.20 dex (statistical and systematic error) for M 4, [S/Fe]LTE = 0.57 ± 0.01 ± 0.19 dex for M 22, and [S/Fe]LTE = 0.55 ± 0.02 ± 0.16 dex for M 30. The negative NLTE corrections are estimated to be in the order of the systematic uncertainties. We do not detect star-to-star variations of the S abundance in any of the observed GCs, with the possible exception of two individual stars, one in M 22 and one in M 30, which appear to be highly enriched in S. Conclusions: With the tentative exception of two stars with measured high S abundances, we conclude that sulphur behaves like a typical α element in the studied Galactic GCs, showing enhanced abundances with respect to the solar value at metallicities below [Fe/H]-1.0 dex without a considerable spread. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programmes ID 091.B-0171(A).The reduced spectra and the best fit synthetic models are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  12. The onset of gravothermal oscillations in globular cluster evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeden, Joseph L.; Cohn, Haldan N.; Hut, Piet

    1994-01-01

    We have carried out an extensive set of Fokker-Planck simulations of the evolution of globular clusters on very long timescales, up to 600 times the initial core collapse time tcc. We consider an idealized equal mass star cluster, with a wide range of values for the total number of stars, 7000 less than N less than 2 x 106. Our models include the heating effect of compact binaries formed in three-body encounters, which halts the initial core collapse and drives a core reexpansion. Postcollapse gravothermal oscillations of the cluster core are found to occur for all N approximately greater than or equal to 8000. For 8000 approximately less than or equal to N approximately less than or equal to 11,000, the oscillation has a simple, regular waveform with a single, well-defined period. For N approximately equals 12,000, the oscillations become nonlinear in a process resembling a period doubling. For N approximately greater than or equal to 14,000, the waveform of the oscillations becomes increasingly more irregular with increasing N, resembling chaotic behavior for N approximately greater than or equal to 15,000. During the oscillations, the core radius and core mass vary dramatically: by more than a factor of 10 for N greater than 15,000, by more than a factor of 100 for N greater than 5 x 104, and by more than a factor of 1000 for N greater than 5 x 105. However, even during the times of maximum expansion, the core contains only a small fraction of the cluster mass. For most N values, the maximum core mass at any time after core collapse is less than 1% of the cluster mass. The exceptions lie in the range 5 x 104 approximately less than or equal to N approximately equal to or less than 2 x 105, where the maximum post-collapse core mass reaches approximately 2% of the cluster mass. We discuss the observational implications of these predictions.

  13. Surface Compositions of Red Giant Stars in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Eric; Lau, Marie; Smith, Graeme; Chen, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are excellent “laboratories” to study the formation and evolution of our galaxy. In order to understand, more specifically, the chemical compositions and stellar evolution of the stars in GCs, we ask whether or not deep internal mixing occurs in red giants or if in fact the compositions come from the primordial interstellar medium or previous generations of stars. It has been discovered that as a star evolves up the red giant branch, the surface carbon abundance decreases, which is evidence of deep internal mixing. We questioned whether these processes also affect O or Na abundance as a star evolves. We collected measurement data of red giants from GCs out of academic journals and sorted the data into catalogs. Then, we plotted the catalogs into figures, comparing surface O and Na each with stellar luminosity. Statistical tests were ran to quantify the amount of correlation between the variables. Out of 27 GCs, we concluded that eight show a positive correlation between Na and luminosity, and two show a negative correlation between O and luminosity. Properties of GCs were compared to determine if chemical distribution in stars depends on GCs as the self-enrichment scenario suggests. We created histograms of sodium distribution to test for bimodality to examine if there are separate trends in each GC. In six GCs, two different sequences of red giants appear for Na versus luminosity, suggesting evidence that the depth of mixing may differ among each red giant in a GC. This study has provided new evidence that the changing chemical abundances on the surfaces of red giants can be due to stellar evolutionary effects and deep internal mixing, which may not necessarily depend on the GC and may differ in depth among each red giant. Through this study, we learn more about stellar evolution which will eventually help us understand the origins of our universe. Most of this work was carried out by high school students working under the auspices of

  14. Depletion-induced instability in protein-DNA mixtures: Influence of protein charge and size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.J.

    2006-01-01

    While there is abundant experimental and theoretical work on polymer-induced DNA condensation, it is still unclear whether globular proteins can condense linear DNA or not. We develop a simple analytical approximation for the depletion attraction between rodlike segments of semiflexible

  15. Protein structure and neutral theory of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptitsyn, O B; Volkenstein, M V

    1986-08-01

    The neutral theory of evolution is extended to the origin of protein molecules. Arguments are presented which suggest that the amino acid sequences of many globular proteins mainly represent "memorized" random sequences while biological evolution reduces to the "editing" these random sequences. Physical requirements for a functional globular protein are formulated and it is shown that many of these requirement do not involve strategical selection of amino acid sequences during biological evolution but are inherent also for typical random sequences. In particular, it is shown that random sequences of polar and amino acid residues can form alpha-helices and beta-strand with lengths and arrangement along the chain similar to those in real globular proteins. These alpha- and beta-regions in random sequences can form three-dimensional folding patterns also similar to those in proteins. The arguments are presented suggesting that even the tight packing of side groups inside protein core do not require very strong biological selection of amino acid sequences either. Thus many structural features of real proteins can exist also in random sequences and the biological selection is needed mainly for the creation of active site of protein and for their stability under physiological conditions.

  16. The Case of the Missing Cyanogen-rich AGB Stars in Galactic Globular Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, S. W.; Yong, D.; Wylie-de Boer, E. C.

    2012-01-01

    The handful of available observations of AGB stars in Galactic Globular Clusters suggest that the GC AGB populations are dominated by cyanogen-weak stars (eg. Norris et al. 1981; Sneden et al. 2000). This contrasts strongly with the distributions on the RGB (and other) populations, which generall...

  17. Search for continuous gravitational waves from neutron stars in globular cluster NGC 6544

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, Laura; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M. Di; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Namjun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magana; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, D.M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, Perminder S; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoebeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D.S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Sigurdsson, S.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a directed search for continuous gravitational waves in data from the sixth initial LIGO science run. The target was the nearby globular cluster NGC 6544 at a distance of approximate to 2.7 kpc. The search covered a broad band of frequencies along with first and second frequency

  18. THE SIZE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN RED AND BLUE GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IS NOT DUE TO PROJECTION EFFECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Harris, William E.; Sills, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Metal-rich (red) globular clusters in massive galaxies are, on average, smaller than metal-poor (blue) globular clusters. One of the possible explanations for this phenomenon is that the two populations of clusters have different spatial distributions. We test this idea by comparing clusters observed in unusually deep, high signal-to-noise images of M87 with a simulated globular cluster population in which the red and blue clusters have different spatial distributions, matching the observations. We compare the overall distribution of cluster effective radii as well as the relationship between effective radius and galactocentric distance for both the observed and simulated red and blue sub-populations. We find that the different spatial distributions does not produce a significant size difference between the red and blue sub-populations as a whole or at a given galactocentric distance. These results suggest that the size difference between red and blue globular clusters is likely due to differences during formation or later evolution.

  19. The SLUGGS survey: globular cluster stellar population trends from weak absorption lines in stacked spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Christopher; Forbes, Duncan A.; Brodie, Jean P.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Strader, Jay; Conroy, Charlie; Foster, Caroline; Pastorello, Nicola; Pota, Vincenzo; Arnold, Jacob A.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and GalaxieS (SLUGGS) survey, we stack 1137 Keck DEIMOS (Deep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph) spectra of globular clusters from 10 galaxies to study their stellar populations in detail. The stacked spectra have median signal-to-noise ratios of ˜90 Å-1. Besides the calcium triplet, we study weaker sodium, magnesium, titanium and iron lines as well as the Hα and higher order Paschen hydrogen lines. In general, the stacked spectra are consistent with old ages and a Milky Way-like initial mass function. However, we see different metal line index strengths at fixed colour and magnitude, and differences in the calcium triplet-colour relation from galaxy to galaxy. We interpret this as strong evidence for variations in the globular cluster colour-metallicity relation between galaxies. Two possible explanations for the colour-metallicity relation variations are that the average ages of globular clusters vary from galaxy to galaxy or that the average abundances of light elements (i.e. He, C, N and O) differ between galaxies. Stacking spectra by magnitude, we see that the colours become redder and metal line indices stronger with brighter magnitudes. These trends are consistent with the previously reported `blue tilts' being mass-metallicity relations.

  20. The Size Difference between Red and Blue Globular Clusters is not due to Projection Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Harris, William E.; Sills, Alison

    2012-11-01

    Metal-rich (red) globular clusters in massive galaxies are, on average, smaller than metal-poor (blue) globular clusters. One of the possible explanations for this phenomenon is that the two populations of clusters have different spatial distributions. We test this idea by comparing clusters observed in unusually deep, high signal-to-noise images of M87 with a simulated globular cluster population in which the red and blue clusters have different spatial distributions, matching the observations. We compare the overall distribution of cluster effective radii as well as the relationship between effective radius and galactocentric distance for both the observed and simulated red and blue sub-populations. We find that the different spatial distributions does not produce a significant size difference between the red and blue sub-populations as a whole or at a given galactocentric distance. These results suggest that the size difference between red and blue globular clusters is likely due to differences during formation or later evolution.

  1. The Observational and Theoretical Tidal Radii of Globular Clusters in M87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Sills, Alison; Harris, William E.

    2012-02-01

    Globular clusters have linear sizes (tidal radii) which theory tells us are determined by their masses and by the gravitational potential of their host galaxy. To explore the relationship between observed and expected radii, we utilize the globular cluster population of the Virgo giant M87. Unusually deep, high signal-to-noise images of M87 are used to measure the effective and limiting radii of approximately 2000 globular clusters. To compare with these observations, we simulate a globular cluster population that has the same characteristics as the observed M87 cluster population. Placing these simulated clusters in the well-studied tidal field of M87, the orbit of each cluster is solved and the theoretical tidal radius of each cluster is determined. We compare the predicted relationship between cluster size and projected galactocentric distance to observations. We find that for an isotropic distribution of cluster velocities, theoretical tidal radii are approximately equal to observed limiting radii for R gc < 10 kpc. However, the isotropic simulation predicts a steep increase in cluster size at larger radii, which is not observed in large galaxies beyond the Milky Way. To minimize the discrepancy between theory and observations, we explore the effects of orbital anisotropy on cluster sizes, and suggest a possible orbital anisotropy profile for M87 which yields a better match between theory and observations. Finally, we suggest future studies which will establish a stronger link between theoretical tidal radii and observed radii.

  2. THE OBSERVATIONAL AND THEORETICAL TIDAL RADII OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Sills, Alison; Harris, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Globular clusters have linear sizes (tidal radii) which theory tells us are determined by their masses and by the gravitational potential of their host galaxy. To explore the relationship between observed and expected radii, we utilize the globular cluster population of the Virgo giant M87. Unusually deep, high signal-to-noise images of M87 are used to measure the effective and limiting radii of approximately 2000 globular clusters. To compare with these observations, we simulate a globular cluster population that has the same characteristics as the observed M87 cluster population. Placing these simulated clusters in the well-studied tidal field of M87, the orbit of each cluster is solved and the theoretical tidal radius of each cluster is determined. We compare the predicted relationship between cluster size and projected galactocentric distance to observations. We find that for an isotropic distribution of cluster velocities, theoretical tidal radii are approximately equal to observed limiting radii for R gc < 10 kpc. However, the isotropic simulation predicts a steep increase in cluster size at larger radii, which is not observed in large galaxies beyond the Milky Way. To minimize the discrepancy between theory and observations, we explore the effects of orbital anisotropy on cluster sizes, and suggest a possible orbital anisotropy profile for M87 which yields a better match between theory and observations. Finally, we suggest future studies which will establish a stronger link between theoretical tidal radii and observed radii.

  3. A Fossil Bulge Globular Cluster Revealed by very Large Telescope Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ortolani, S.; Barbuy, B.; Momany, Y.; Saviane, I.; Bica, E.; Jílková, L.; Salerno, G.M.; Jungwiert, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 737, č. 1 (2011), 31/1-31/9 ISSN 0004-637X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : galaxy * globular clusters Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 6.024, year: 2011

  4. Multiple populations along the asymptotic giant branch of the globular cluster M 4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lardo, C.; Salaris, M.; Savino, A.; Donati, P.; Stetson, P. B.; Cassisi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all Galactic globular clusters host stars that display characteristic abundance anti-correlations, like the O-rich/Na-poor pattern typical of field halo stars, together with O-poor/Na-rich additional components. A recent spectroscopic investigation questioned the presence of O-poor/Na-rich

  5. NGC 6362: The Least Massive Globular Cluster with Chemically Distinct Multiple Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mucciarelli, Alessio; Dalessandro, Emanuele; Massari, Davide; Bellazzini, Michele; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Lanzoni, Barbara; Lardo, Carmela; Salaris, Maurizio; Cassisi, Santi

    2016-01-01

    We present the first measure of Fe and Na abundances in NGC 6362, a low-mass globular cluster (GC) where first- and second-generation stars are fully spatially mixed. A total of 160 member stars (along the red giant branch (RGB) and the red horizontal branch (RHB)) were observed with the

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities in seven globular clusters (Lardo+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardo, C.; Pancino, E.; Bellazzini, M.; Bragaglia, A.; Donati, P.; Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Feltzing, S.; Jeffries, R. D.; Vallenari, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Allende Prieto, C.; Flaccomio, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Bergemann, M.; Carraro, G.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Hourihane, A.; Jofree, P.; de Laverny, P.; Marconi, G.; Masseron, T.; Morbidelli, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Worley, C. C.

    2014-11-01

    Velocities are given for 1826 stars in the field of the globular clusters NGC 1851, NGC 2808, NGC 4372, NGC 4833, NGC 5927, NGC 6752, and NGC 7078 observed with FLAMES/GIRAFFE@VLT. The table provides the individual identifications, coordinates, V magnitudes, velocities and their associated uncertainties for each star. (2 data files).

  7. Hubble Space Telescope ACS wide-field photometry of the sombrero galaxy globular cluster system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitler, L.; Larsen, S.S.; Strader, J.; Brodie, J.P.; Forbes, D.A.; Beasley, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    A detailed imaging analysis of the globular cluster (GC) system of the Sombrero galaxy (NGC 4594) has been accomplished using a six-image mosaic from the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. The quality of the data is such that contamination by foreground stars and background galaxies

  8. Photoelectric UBVRI sequences in the Galactic globular clusters NGC 6752 and NGC 6864

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado, F.; Wenderoth, E.; Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.

    1990-01-01

    UBVRI photoelectric sequences for the Galactic globular clusters NGC 6752 and NGC 6864 are presented. Both of them include fields suitable for CCD exposures. From five UBV sequences in NGC 6572, only five stars are in common with the previous works. 15 refs

  9. The ACS Virgo Cluster Survey XVI. Selection Procedure and Catalogs of Globular Cluster Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordán, Andrés; Peng, Eric W.; Blakeslee, John P.; Côté, Patrick; Eyheramendy, Susana; Ferrarese, Laura; Mei, Simona; Tonry, John L.; West, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    We present catalogs of globular cluster candidates for the 100 galaxies of the Advanced Camera for Surveys Virgo Cluster Survey, a large program to carry out imaging of early-type members of the Virgo Cluster using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. We describe the procedure used to select bona fide globular cluster candidates out of the full list of detections based on model-based clustering methods with the use of expected contamination catalogs constructed using blank field observations and which are customized for each galaxy. We also present the catalogs of expected contaminants for each of our target galaxies. For each detected source we measure its position, magnitudes in the F475W (≈ Sloan g) and F850LP (≈ Sloan z) bandpasses, and half-light radii by fitting point-spread function convolved King models to the observed light distribution. These measurements are presented for 20,375 sources, of which 12,763 are likely to be globular clusters. Finally, we detail the calculation of the aperture corrections adopted for the globular cluster photometry. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  10. Disrupted globular clusters and the gamma-ray excess in the Galactic Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragione, Giacomo; Antonini, Fabio; Gnedin, Oleg Y.

    2018-04-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope has provided the most detailed view towards the Galactic Centre (GC) in high-energy gamma-rays. Besides the interstellar emission and point source contributions, the data suggest a residual diffuse gamma-ray excess. The similarity of its spatial distribution with the expected profile of dark matter has led to claims that this may be evidence for dark matter particle annihilation. Here, we investigate an alternative explanation that the signal originates from millisecond pulsars (MSPs) formed in dense globular clusters and deposited at the GC as a consequence of cluster inspiral and tidal disruption. We use a semi-analytical model to calculate the formation, migration, and disruption of globular clusters in the Galaxy. Our model reproduces the mass of the nuclear star cluster and the present-day radial and mass distribution of globular clusters. For the first time, we calculate the evolution of MSPs from disrupted globular clusters throughout the age of the Galaxy and consistently include the effect of the MSP spin-down due to magnetic-dipole braking. The final gamma-ray amplitude and spatial distribution are in good agreement with the Fermi observations and provide a natural astrophysical explanation for the GC excess.

  11. The chemical composition of the low-mass Galactic globular cluster NGC 6362

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massari, D.; Mucciarelli, A.; Dalessandro, E.; Bellazzini, M.; Cassisi, S.; Fiorentino, G.; Ibata, R. A.; Lardo, C.; Salaris, M.

    We present chemical abundances for 17 elements in a sample of 11 red giant branch stars in NGC 6362 from UVES spectra. NGC 6362 is one of the least massive globulars where multiple populations have been detected, yet its detailed chemical composition has not been investigated so far. NGC 6362 turns

  12. A comparison of two mass distributions applicable to globular clusters and dwarf galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninković Slobodan D.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A particular case of mass distribution in stellar systems, already described in the literature, is compared to the King model of mass distribution. For the cases which would correspond to the description of real stellar systems such as the globular clusters and dwarf galaxies, one finds a satisfactory agreement between these two mass distributions.

  13. Three Ancient Halo Subgiants: Precise Parallaxes, Compositions, Ages, and Implications for Globular Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    VandenBerg, Don A.; Bond, Howard E.; Nelan, Edmund P.

    2014-01-01

    very soon after the Big Bang. (Stellar models that neglect diffusive processes seem to be ruled out as they would predict that HD 140283 is ~1.5 Gyr older than the universe.) The field halo subgiants appear to be older than globular clusters of similar metallicities: if distances close to those implied...

  14. GeMS MCAO observations of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 2808: the absolute age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massari, D.; Fiorentino, G.; McConnachie, A.; Bono, G.; Dall'Ora, M.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Stetson, P. B.; Turri, P.; Tolstoy, E.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Globular clusters are the oldest stellar systems in the Milky Way, and they probe the early epoch of the Galaxy formation. However, the uncertainties on their absolute age are still too large to soundly constrain how the Galactic structures have assembled. Aims: The aim of this work is to

  15. Electrorheological properties of suspensions of hollow globular titanium oxide/polypyrrole particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlačík, M.; Mrlík, M.; Pavlínek, V.; Sáha, P.; Quadrat, Otakar

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 290, č. 1 (2012), s. 41-48 ISSN 0303-402X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : electrorheology * titanium oxide * hollow globular clusters Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 2.161, year: 2012

  16. The deposition of globular polypyrrole and polypyrrole nanotubes on cotton textile

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bober, Patrycja; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Šeděnková, Ivana; Trchová, Miroslava; Martinková, L.; Marek, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 356, 30 November (2015), s. 737-741 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020022 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : conducting textile * cotton * globular polypyrrole Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.150, year: 2015

  17. VLT/UVES abundances of individual stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal globular clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Letarte, B.; Hill, V.; Jablonka, P.; Tolstoy, E.; Randich, S; Pasquini, L

    2006-01-01

    We present high resolution abundance analysis of nine stars belonging to three of the five globular clusters (GCs) of the Fornax dwarf galaxy. The spectra were taken with UVES at a resolution of 43 000. We find them to be slightly more metal-poor than what was previously calculated with other

  18. Massive binaries as the source of abundance anomalies in globular clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mink, S.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833231; Pols, O.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/111811155; Langer, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829498; Izzard, R.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304836052

    2009-01-01

    Abundance anomalies observed in globular cluster stars indicate pollution with material processed by hydrogen burning. Two main sources have been suggested: asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and massive stars rotating near the break-up limit (spin stars). We propose massive binaries as an

  19. On the blind use of statistical tools in the analysis of globular cluster stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antona, Francesca; Caloi, Vittoria; Tailo, Marco

    2018-04-01

    As with most data analysis methods, the Bayesian method must be handled with care. We show that its application to determine stellar evolution parameters within globular clusters can lead to paradoxical results if used without the necessary precautions. This is a cautionary tale on the use of statistical tools for big data analysis.

  20. Cloning and expression of adiponectin and its globular domain, and measurement of the biological activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Yu-Jian; Zhang, Hui-Tang; Yang, Sheng-Li; Gong, Yi

    2003-11-01

    3T3-L1-adipocytes produce the adipocyte complement related protein of 30 kD (ACRP30), which is exclusively expressed in differentiated adipocytes. Decreased expression of ACRP30 correlates with insulin resistance in mouse models of altered insulin sensitivity. Adiponectin, the human homologue of ACRP30, circulates in human plasma at high levels. Plasma adiponectin levels have been reported to be decreased in some insulin-resistant states, such as obesity and type II diabetes mellitus. Here, full-length adiponectin and its C-terminal globular head domain (gAdiponectin) were expressed in Escherichia coli and gAdiponectin was used to immunize a rabbit to obtain polyclonal antiserum with titer of 10,000. Adiponectin was detected in human plasma with the use of gAdiponectin anti-serum by Western blot analysis, which was also detected by gACRP30 anti-serum. Injection in alloxan-treated rats with purified recombinant fusion adiponectin or gAdiponectin transiently abolished hyperglycemia. So adiponectin and gAdiponectin might have activity as a glucose lowering agent and potentially as a therapeutic for metabolic disease. All these results suggested that the recombinant protein had biological activity, and provided a useful tool in further studies.

  1. THE HELIUM CONTENT OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS: NGC 6121 (M4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanova, S.; Geisler, D.; Piotto, G.; Gratton, R. G.

    2012-01-01

    In the context of the multiple stellar population scenario in globular clusters, helium (He) has been proposed as a key element to interpret the observed multiple main sequences, subgiant branches, and red giant branches, as well as the complex horizontal branch (HB) morphology. In particular, second-generation stars belonging to the bluer part of the HB are thought to be more He-rich (ΔY = 0.03 or more) but also more Na-rich/O-poor than those located in the redder part that should have Y equal to the cosmological value. Up to now this hypothesis was only partially confirmed in NGC 6752, where stars of the redder zero-age HB showed an He content of Y = 0.25 ± 0.01, fully compatible with the primordial He content of the universe, and were all Na-poor/O-rich. Here we study hot blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars in the GC NGC 6121 (M4) to measure their He plus O/Na content. Our goal is to complete the partial results obtained for NGC 6752, focusing our attention on targets located on the bluer part of the HB of M4. We observed six BHB stars using the VLT2/UVES spectroscopic facility. Spectra of signal-to-noise ratio ∼ 150 were obtained and the very weak He line at 5875 Å measured for all our targets. We compared this feature with synthetic spectra to obtain He abundances. In addition O, Na, and Fe abundances were estimated. Stars turned out to be all Na-rich and O-poor and to have a homogeneous He content with a mean value of Y = 0.29 ± 0.01(random) ± 0.01(systematic), which is enhanced by ΔY ∼ 0.04 with respect to the most recent measurements of the primordial He content of the universe (Y ∼ 0.24/0.25). The high He content of blue HB stars in M4 is also confirmed by the fact that they are brighter than red HB stars (RHB). Theoretical models suggest the BHB stars are He-enhanced by Δ(Y) = 0.02/0.03 with respect to the RHB stars. The whole sample of stars has a metallicity of [Fe/H] = –1.06 ± 0.02 (internal error), in agreement with other studies

  2. The Helium Content of Globular Clusters: NGC 6121 (M4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanova, S.; Geisler, D.; Piotto, G.; Gratton, R. G.

    2012-03-01

    In the context of the multiple stellar population scenario in globular clusters, helium (He) has been proposed as a key element to interpret the observed multiple main sequences, subgiant branches, and red giant branches, as well as the complex horizontal branch (HB) morphology. In particular, second-generation stars belonging to the bluer part of the HB are thought to be more He-rich (ΔY = 0.03 or more) but also more Na-rich/O-poor than those located in the redder part that should have Y equal to the cosmological value. Up to now this hypothesis was only partially confirmed in NGC 6752, where stars of the redder zero-age HB showed an He content of Y = 0.25 ± 0.01, fully compatible with the primordial He content of the universe, and were all Na-poor/O-rich. Here we study hot blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars in the GC NGC 6121 (M4) to measure their He plus O/Na content. Our goal is to complete the partial results obtained for NGC 6752, focusing our attention on targets located on the bluer part of the HB of M4. We observed six BHB stars using the VLT2/UVES spectroscopic facility. Spectra of signal-to-noise ratio ~ 150 were obtained and the very weak He line at 5875 Å measured for all our targets. We compared this feature with synthetic spectra to obtain He abundances. In addition O, Na, and Fe abundances were estimated. Stars turned out to be all Na-rich and O-poor and to have a homogeneous He content with a mean value of Y = 0.29 ± 0.01(random) ± 0.01(systematic), which is enhanced by ΔY ~ 0.04 with respect to the most recent measurements of the primordial He content of the universe (Y ~ 0.24/0.25). The high He content of blue HB stars in M4 is also confirmed by the fact that they are brighter than red HB stars (RHB). Theoretical models suggest the BHB stars are He-enhanced by Δ(Y) = 0.02/0.03 with respect to the RHB stars. The whole sample of stars has a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.06 ± 0.02 (internal error), in agreement with other studies available in

  3. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF LMXBs IN CENTAURUS A: GLOBULAR CLUSTERS VERSUS THE FIELD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, Rasmus; Gilfanov, Marat; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Jordan, Andres; Brassington, Nicola J.; Evans, Daniel A.; Murray, Stephen S.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Birkinshaw, Mark; Worrall, Diana M.; Croston, Judith H.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Harris, William E.; Woodley, Kristin A.; Juett, Adrienne M.

    2009-01-01

    We study the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) in the nearby early-type galaxy Centaurus A, concentrating primarily on two aspects of binary populations: the XLF behavior at the low-luminosity limit and the comparison between globular cluster and field sources. The 800 ksec exposure of the deep Chandra VLP program allows us to reach a limiting luminosity of ∼8 x 10 35 erg s -1 , about ∼2-3 times deeper than previous investigations. We confirm the presence of the low-luminosity break of the overall LMXB XLF at log(L X ) ∼ 37.2-37.6, below which the luminosity distribution follows a dN/d(ln L) ∼ const law. Separating globular cluster and field sources, we find a statistically significant difference between the two luminosity distributions with a relative underabundance of faint sources in the globular cluster population. This demonstrates that the samples are drawn from distinct parent populations and may disprove the hypothesis that the entire LMXB population in early-type galaxies is created dynamically in globular clusters. As a plausible explanation for this difference in the XLFs, we suggest an enhanced fraction of helium-accreting systems in globular clusters, which are created in collisions between red giants and neutron stars. Due to the four times higher ionization temperature of He, such systems are subject to accretion disk instabilities at ∼20 times higher mass accretion rate and, therefore, are not observed as persistent sources at low luminosities.

  4. The Frequency of Binary Stars in the Globular Cluster M71

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, S. C.; Armandroff, T. E.; Pryor, C. P.

    1994-12-01

    The frequency of binary stars is a fundamental property of a stellar population. A comparison of the frequency of binaries in globular clusters with those in the field halo and disk populations tests the similarity of star formation in those environments. Binary stars in globular clusters also act as an energy source which ``heats" the cluster through super-elastic encounters with other stars and binaries. Such encounters can not only profoundly affect the dynamical evolution of the cluster, they can disrupt the widely separated binaries and catalyze the formation of exotic objects such as blue stragglers, x-ray binaries, and milli-second pulsars. We have used the KPNO 4-m and the multi-fiber instruments Nessie and Hydra to measure radial velocities at 4 epochs over two years for a sample of 126 stars in the globular cluster M71. Velocity errors are under 1 km s(-1) for the brighter stars and under 2 km s(-1) for the majority of our data set. These velocities will be valuable for studying the kinematics of M71, but here we focus on searching for binaries. The faintest stars are at V=17, or just above the main sequence turnoff. Our sample is thus deeper than any published globular cluster binary search utilizing spectroscopic techniques. By observing smaller stars, we double the number of decades of binary periods sampled compared to previous studies and come within a factor of 4 of the shortest possible periods for turnoff stars. This wider period window has produced the largest known sample of binaries in a globular cluster. Four stars show velocity ranges larger than 20 km s(-1) , nine have ranges larger than 10 km s(-1) , and others are clearly variable. We will compare the radial distribution of these stars to that predicted by theory and derive the main-sequence binary fraction.

  5. The Primordial Binary Fractions for a Sample of 35 Galactic Globular Clusters with HST Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jun; Bregman, J. N.

    2011-01-01

    Binaries are thought to be the primary heating energy source in globular clusters, since they can convert their binding energy to kinetic energy of the encounter stars through dynamical interactions. Even a small fraction of binaries are sufficient to prevent globular clusters from core collapse for many relaxation times. But the observed global binary fractions in globular clusters are still uncertain. Here we present our preliminary results for the binary fractions of 35 Galactic globular clusters with the HST archival data in the F606W and F814W bands. We use the secondary sequence method on the color-magnitude diagram to statistically account for the main-sequence-main-sequence binaries (primordial binaries). The binary fraction is obtained by fitting the residual color distribution after subtracting the color of the main-sequence ridge line, with properly modeling the photometric errors, field stars, and blending stars. We estimate the binary fractions with 3 different assumed binary mass-ratio distribution functions, and the current data sets are still not good to constrain the binary mass-ratio distributions. In our sample, we obtain a mean binary fraction of (9.1±4.1)% within their half-mass radii assuming a flat binary mass-ratio distribution. There is no clear trend for the binary fractions against the dynamical ages and [Fe/H], but binary fractions tend to increase with the absolute magnitudes of clusters. This is probably because less massive globular clusters consume fewer binaries through dynamical interactions due to their lower stellar density.

  6. Short-term X-ray variability of the globular cluster source 4U 1820 - 30 (NGC 6624)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, L.; Kahn, S. M.; Grindlay, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical techniques for improved identification of the temporal and spectral variability properties of globular cluster and galactic bulge X-ray sources are described in terms of their application to a large set of observations of the source 4U 1820 - 30 in the globular cluster NGC 6624. The autocorrelation function, cross-correlations, time skewness function, erratic periodicities, and pulse trains are examined. The results are discussed in terms of current models with particular emphasis on recent accretion disk models. It is concluded that the analyzed observations provide the first evidence for shot-noise variability in a globular cluster X-ray source.

  7. Bio systematics of two species of the genus globular ia L. in Jordan and Tuns ia (Research Note)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oran, A. S.; Kochkar, N.; Raies, A.

    1999-01-01

    The status of the genus Globular ia L. in Jordan and Tunisia is presented. Bio systematic data related to morphology, habitats, geographical distribution, pollen and seed morphology as revealed by both light and scanning electron microscopy were studied based on material collected from both countries. Based on the collected bio systematic information on, this study has confirmed that only one species Globular ia arabica ac curs in Jordan and one species, G. alypum occurs in Tunisia. (authors). 12 refs., 1 table. 1 fig

  8. A period-luminosity relation for Mira variables in globular clusters and its impact on the distance scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzies, J.W.; Whitelock, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    JHKL photometry is presented for 31 red variables in 15 galactic globular clusters. The photometry of the Mira variables is used to find absolute bolometric magnitudes and an Msub(bol)-log P relation which differs from the one found for LMC Miras. This can be understood only if there is some systematic error in the globular cluster and/or LMC distance scales or if there is some fundamental difference between the cluster Miras and those in the LMC. (author)

  9. Another non-segregated Blue Straggler population in a globular cluster: the case of NGC 2419.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Vespe, F.; Bellazzini, M.; Rood, R. T.

    We have used a combination of ACS-HST high-resolution and wide-field SUBARU data in order to study the Blue Straggler Star (BSS) population over the entire extension of the remote Galactic globular cluster NGC 2419. The radial distribution of the selected BSS is the same as that of the other cluster stars. In this sense the BSS radial distribution is like that of omega Centauri and unlike that of all Galactic globular clusters studied to date, which have highly centrally segregated distributions and in most cases a pronounced upturn in the external regions. As in the case of omega Centauri, this evidence indicates that NGC 2419 is not yet relaxed even in the central regions. This observational fact is in agreement with estimated half-mass relaxation time, which is of the order of the cluster age.

  10. Globular cluster neutron stars and the determination of the dense matter equation of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Sebastien

    2016-09-01

    Combining measurements of the mass and radius of multiple neutron stars (NSs) represents the most promising way to determine the equation of state of dense NS matter. NSs in quiescent low-mass x-ray binaries (qLMXB) located in globular clusters have placed useful constraints on the equation of state. The statistical approaches combining measurements from multiple NSs can be further improved by the addition of more NS observations. We propose here to obtain a high signal to noise spectrum of the qLMXB in M30, the only low-absorption globular cluster qLMXBs that does not have deep X-ray observations, and which requires Chandra unmatched angular resolution. The 300 ks proposed observation will permit measurement of the NS radius with 12-15% uncertainties.

  11. A detached stellar-mass black hole candidate in the globular cluster NGC 3201

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesers, Benjamin; Dreizler, Stefan; Husser, Tim-Oliver; Kamann, Sebastian; Anglada Escudé, Guillem; Brinchmann, Jarle; Carollo, C. Marcella; Roth, Martin M.; Weilbacher, Peter M.; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2018-03-01

    As part of our massive spectroscopic survey of 25 Galactic globular clusters with MUSE, we performed multiple epoch observations of NGC 3201 with the aim of constraining the binary fraction. In this cluster, we found one curious star at the main-sequence turn-off with radial velocity variations of the order of 100 km s- 1, indicating the membership to a binary system with an unseen component since no other variations appear in the spectra. Using an adapted variant of the generalized Lomb-Scargle periodogram, we could calculate the orbital parameters and found the companion to be a detached stellar-mass black hole with a minimum mass of 4.36 ± 0.41 M⊙. The result is an important constraint for binary and black hole evolution models in globular clusters as well as in the context of gravitational wave sources.

  12. Intrachromosomal exchange aberrations predicted on the basis of globular interphase chromosome model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, S.G.; Eidelman, Yu.A

    2002-07-01

    One of the key questions in understanding mechanisms of chromosome aberration production is how does interphase chromosome structure affect aberration formation. To explore this a modelling approach is presented which combines Monte Carlo simulation of both a particle track and interphase chromosome structure. The structural state of interphase chromosome influences a dose-effect relationship for intrachromosomal exchange aberrations (intrachanges). It is shown that intrachanges are induced frequently by both X rays and a particles if the chromosome is in the condensed globular but not in the decondensed coiled state. Truly simple intra-arm intrachanges induced by X rays are dose squared in coiled chromosomes, but exhibit linear dose dependence in globular chromosomes. Experimental data on interarm intrachanges obtained by dual arm chromosome painting are analysed by means of the technique presented. Results of analysis support the conclusion about the arms proximity of chromosome 1 in human lymphocytes. (author)

  13. THE INFLUENCE OF POTASSIUM DICHROMATE Cr (VI ADMINISTRATION DURATION ON GLOBULAR RESISTANCE IN FEMALE RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LETIŢIA STANA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The „in vivo” experiment has had as aim the study of different Cr(VI doses administration on globular resistance in female rats related to administration duration. Study was carried out on 56 female rats divided in 8 groups, 6 experimental and 2 control that received potassium dichromate in drinking water in doses of 25 ppm, 50 ppm and 75ppm Cr(VI, for 3 months, respectively, 6 months. Decrease of globular resistance (in terms of haemolysis degree in hypotonic solutions at increasing dose (up to 0.8% NaCl at 75 ppm dose in all experimental groups, in direct relation with the duration of administration was registered. Control groups were in physiological limits. The results of the present study revealed the affecting of erythrocyte membrane in function of administration duration and chromium intake level, because of oxidative lesions produced by it.

  14. Wide-Field Washington Photometry of the NGC 5128 Globular Cluster System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, D.; Harris, G. L. H.; Reid, M.; Milne, M.; Hulme, S. C.; Kidd, T. T.; Harris, W. E.; Schmidt, B. P.; Hesser, J. E.

    2004-05-01

    We have obtained deep imaging in the Washington CMT1 filters for an area of almost 2 square degrees centered on NGC 5128 in order to investigate its globular cluster system. Our data suffers from severe foreground and background contamination problems. Nonetheless, we can examine some of the global statistical properties of the cluster system. We find that NGC 5128 has a smaller cluster population than previously thought, with a steep projected radial distribution. We find the metallicity distribution for some 211 known globular clusters to be strongly bimodal with nearly equal numbers of clusters in each mode. We also present a list of 327 new cluster candidates not previously identified. D.G. gratefully acknowledges support from the Chilean Centro de Astrofisica FONDAP grant No. 15010003 and from NASA contract No. 1228235.

  15. CONSTRAINTS ON HELIUM ENHANCEMENT IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M3 (NGC 5272): THE HORIZONTAL BRANCH TEST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catelan, M.; Valcarce, A. A. R.; Cortes, C.; Grundahl, F.; Sweigart, A. V.

    2009-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that the presence of multiple populations showing various amounts of helium enhancement is the rule, rather than the exception, among globular star clusters. An important prediction of this helium enhancement scenario is that the helium-enhanced blue horizontal branch (HB) stars should be brighter than the red HB stars which are not helium enhanced. In this Letter, we test this prediction in the case of the Galactic globular cluster M3 (NGC 5272), for which the helium-enhancement scenario predicts helium enhancements of ∼>0.02 in virtually all blue HB stars. Using high-precision Stroemgren photometry and spectroscopic gravities for blue HB stars, we find that any helium enhancement among most of the cluster's blue HB stars is very likely less than 0.01, thus ruling out the much higher helium enhancements that have been proposed in the literature.

  16. NGC 6273: Towards Defining A New Class of Galactic Globular Clusters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Rich, Robert Michael; Pilachowski, Catherine A.; Caldwell, Nelson; Mateo, Mario L.; Ira Bailey, John; Crane, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of observations have found that several Galactic globular clusters exhibit abundance dispersions beyond the well-known light element (anti-)correlations. These clusters tend to be very massive, have >0.1 dex intrinsic metallicity dispersions, have complex sub-giant branch morphologies, and have correlated [Fe/H] and s-process element enhancements. Interestingly, nearly all of these clusters discovered so far have [Fe/H]~-1.7. In this context, we have examined the chemical composition of 18 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the massive, metal-poor Galactic bulge globular cluster NGC 6273 using high signal-to-noise, high resolution (R~27,000) spectra obtained with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS) and MSpec spectrograph mounted on the Magellan-Clay 6.5m telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. We find that the cluster exhibits a metallicity range from [Fe/H]=-1.80 to -1.30 and is composed of two dominant populations separated in [Fe/H] and [La/Fe] abundance. The increase in [La/Eu] as a function of [La/H] suggests that the increase in [La/Fe] with [Fe/H] is due to almost pure s-process enrichment. The most metal-rich star in our sample is not strongly La-enhanced, but is α-poor and may belong to a third "anomalous" stellar population. The two dominant populations exhibit the same [Na/Fe]-[Al/Fe] correlation found in other "normal" globular clusters. Therefore, NGC 6273 joins ω Centauri, M 22, M 2, and NGC 5286 as a possible new class of Galactic globular clusters.

  17. The SUMO project I. A survey of multiple populations in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monelli, M.; Milone, A. P.; Stetson, P. B.; Marino, A. F.; Cassisi, S.; del Pino Molina, A.; Salaris, M.; Aparicio, A.; Asplund, M.; Grundahl, F.; Piotto, G.; Weiss, A.; Carrera, R.; Cebrián, M.; Murabito, S.; Pietrinferni, A.; Sbordone, L.

    2013-05-01

    We present a general overview and the first results of the SUMO project (a SUrvey of Multiple pOpulations in Globular Clusters). The objective of this survey is the study of multiple stellar populations in the largest sample of globular clusters homogeneously analysed to date. To this aim we obtained high signal-to-noise (S/N > 50) photometry for main sequence stars with mass down to ˜0.5 M⊙ in a large sample of clusters using both archival and proprietary U, B, V and I data from ground-based telescopes. In this paper, we focus on the occurrence of multiple stellar populations in 23 clusters. We define a new photometric index, cU, B, I = (U - B) - (B - I), which turns out to be very effective for identifying multiple sequences along the red giant branch (RGB). We found that in the V-cU, B, I diagram all clusters presented in this paper show broadened or multimodal RGBs, with the presence of two or more components. We found a direct connection with the chemical properties of different sequences, which display different abundances of light elements (O, Na, C, N and Al). The cU, B, I index is also a powerful tool for identifying distinct sequences of stars along the horizontal branch and, for the first time in the case of NGC 104 (47 Tuc), along the asymptotic giant branch. Our results demonstrate that (i) the presence of more than two stellar populations is a common feature amongst globular clusters, as already highlighted in previous work; (ii) multiple sequences with different chemical contents can be easily identified by using standard Johnson photometry obtained with ground-based facilities; (iii) in the study of globular cluster multiple stellar populations the cU, B, I index is an alternative to spectroscopy, and has the advantage of larger statistics.

  18. AS1411 Aptamer-Anionic Linear Globular Dendrimer G2-Iohexol Selective Nano-Theranostics

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadzadeh, Pardis; Cohan, Reza Ahangari; Ghoreishi, Seyedeh Masoumeh; Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee

    2017-01-01

    Molecular theranostics is of the utmost interest for diagnosis as well as treatment of different malignancies. In the present study, anionic linear globular dendrimer G2 is employed as a suitable carrier for delivery and AS1411 aptamer is exploited as the targeting agent to carry Iohexol specifically to the human breast cancer cells (MCF-7). Dendrimer G2 was prepared and conjugation of dendrimer and aptamer was carried out thereafter. Based on the data yielded by AFM, morphology of smooth and...

  19. BVRI CCD photometry of the metal-poor globular cluster M68 (NGC 4590)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.; Alvarado, F.; Wenderoth, E.

    1990-01-01

    BVRI photometry of the low metallicity globular cluster M68 (NGC 4590) was obtained with a CCD camera and the 2.2-m ESO telescope. The resulting BV color-magnitude diagrams are compared with the observations of McClure et al. (1987). The observations are also compared with theoretical isochrones, yielding a cluster age of 13 Gyr with a likely external uncertainty of 2 or 3 Gyr. 25 refs

  20. Globular hepatic amyloid is highly sensitive and specific for LECT2 amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandan, Vishal S; Shah, Sejal S; Lam-Himlin, Dora M; Petris, Giovanni De; Mereuta, Oana M; Dogan, Ahmet; Torbenson, Michael S; Wu, Tsung-Teh

    2015-04-01

    Globular hepatic amyloid (GHA) is rare, and its clinical significance remains unclear. Recently, leukocyte chemotactic factor-associated amyloidosis (ALECT2) has been reported to involve the liver, showing a globular pattern. We reviewed 70 consecutive cases of hepatic amyloidosis to determine the prevalence and morphology of hepatic amyloid subtypes, especially ALECT2 and its association with GHA. Each case was reviewed for amyloid subtype (immunohistochemistry and/or mass spectrometry), its pattern (linear or globular), and distribution (vascular, perisinusoidal, or stromal). In addition, 24 cases of confirmed hepatic ALECT2 on mass spectrometry from our consultation files were also reviewed. LECT2 immunostaining was performed in 49 cases. Of the 70 cases, immunoglobulin light chain (AL) type was most common with 41 cases (59%), followed by transthyretin (ATTR) 15 cases (22%), 3 cases each of fibrinogen A (AFib) (4%), serum amyloid A (AA) (4%), and ALECT2 (4%), 2 cases of apolipoproteins (AApoA1) (3%), and 3 cases (4%) were unclassified. Three of our 70 cases (4%), with ALECT2, and all 24 cases (100%) of mass spectrometry-confirmed hepatic ALECT2 showed only GHA deposits in the hepatic sinusoids and portal tracts. Three (4%) other cases of AL type showed a focal globular pattern admixed with prominent linear amyloid. None of the other amyloid subtypes showed GHA. LECT2 immunostain was positive in all 27 cases (100%) of ALECT2 and negative in the other 22 non-ALECT2 cases (100%) (14 AL, 5 ATTR, 1 AA, 1 AFib, 1 AApoA1). Pure GHA is uncommon (4%) but is highly specific for ALECT2, and LECT2 immunostain is helpful in confirming this amyloid type.

  1. Detecting the effect of Globular Cluster impacts on the disk of the Milky Way

    OpenAIRE

    Putte, D. Vande; Cropper, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The crossing of the Galactic disk by a Globular Cluster could produce star formation due to gravitational focussing or compression of disk material. We report on simulations of the effect on disk material which reveal that the crossing can sometimes cause local gravitational focussing of disk material. We also present the salient points of a little-known paper by Levy (2000), that shows that strong compression can result from the shock wave generated by GC disk crossing. The main thrust of ou...

  2. Distribución en gran escala de los cúmulos globulares en Fornax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrov, P. G.

    Para analizar los cúmulos globulares azules y rojos de NGC 1399 asociados con NGC 1399 en particular, o si los cúmulos azules representaban un sistema asociado con el cúmulo de Fornax en general, se obtuvieron imágenes CCD de gran formato con el telescopio de 4m del CTIO, en las bandas C y T1. Se describe el método empleado y lo encontrado.

  3. The pulsation mode and period-luminosity relationship of cool variables in globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitelock, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The period-luminosity-temperature relationship for globular cluster red and yellow variables is examined. The results suggest that the higher temperature, more metal-deficient cluster variables pulsate in the fundamental mode, while the lower temperature more metal-rich variables pulsate in the first overtone. On the assumption that this is correct, a relationship between fundamental period and bolometric magnitude is derived for cluster variables with observed periods of between 1 and 300 days. (author)

  4. Effect of different concentrations of gold chloride on biosynthesis of globular proteins by mixed lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, H.K.L.; Pandey, A.K.; Singh, L.N.

    1991-01-01

    Effect of gold chloride at 5, 25 and 125 μg/ml concentration on the biosynthesis and secretion of immunoglobulins by murine splenic mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) under standard conditions of temperature, humidity and carbon dioxide was studied. All the three concentrations supported fairly good cell growth, the mitogenic response being greater at higher gold chloride levels. Although the levels of total immunoglobulin fractions in gold chloride treated lymphocyte cultures were lower than the control, the specific activities were generally higher. The dose level response was, however, not linear. The specific activity was highest at 5 μg/ml gold chloride concentration in case of IgA, HC and LC components, while maximum specific activity in IgG was observed at 125 μg/ml concentration of the metal. The overall results indicate that all the three levels of gold chloride promoted mitogenic response, but such stimulatory effect in terms of synthesis and secretion of immunoglobulins in mixed lymphocyte cultures was not evident from this study. (author). 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  5. First-Principles Predictions of Vibrational Raman Optical Activity of Globular Proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kessler, Jiří; Kapitán, J.; Bouř, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 16 (2015), s. 3314-3319 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA ČR GA15-09072S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005; GA MŠk(CZ) ED3.2.00/08.0144 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular property tensors * activity spectra * spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 8.539, year: 2015 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/acs.jpclett.5b01500

  6. Structure and dynamics of interfacial water. Role of hydratation water in the globular proteins dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanotti, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    This memoir includes five chapters. In the first chapter, are given the elements of the neutrons scattering theory that is used in this study. the second chapter is devoted to a general presentation of the interaction between biological macro molecule and water. The third part is dedicated to the study of the structure and the dynamics of interfacial water in the neighbouring of model systems, the vycor and the amorphous carbon. The results presented in this part are compared with these one relative to water dynamics at the C-phycocyanin surface. This study makes the object of the fourth chapter. Then, in the fifth and last chapter are discussed the results relative to the role of hydratation on the parv-albumin dynamics for which have been combined the neutron quasi elastic incoherent scattering and the nuclear magnetic resonance of the carbon 13 solid in natural abundance

  7. Storage of the complement components C4, C3, and C 3-activator in the human liver as PAS-negative globular hyaline bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, W; Riedel, H; Trautmann, B; Justus, J; Hiemann, D

    1982-01-01

    Liver biopsies of a 58-year-old clinically healthy patient with a hepatomegaly and intracisternal PAS-negative globular hyaline bodies were immunofluorescent-optically examined for the content of the complement components C 1 q, C 4, C 9, C 1-inactivator, C 3-activator. Further examinations were performed for fibrinogen, IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD, IgE, L-chain (type chi and lambda), alpha 1-antitrypsin, alpha 1-fetoprotein, alpha 1- and alpha 2-glycoprotein, cholinesterase, ceruloplasmin, myoglobin, hemopexin, HBsAg and HBsAg. Th inclusion bodies reacted with antisera against the complement components C 4, C 3 and C 3-activator, as also identified by double immunofluorescence. Probably this is a disturbance of the protein metabolism of the liver cell with abnormal complement storage in the presence of normal total complement and normal complement components in the serum.

  8. Gravitational microlensing by low-mass objects in the globular cluster M22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, K C; Casertano, S; Livio, M; Gilliland, R L; Panagia, N; Albrow, M D; Potter, M

    2001-06-28

    Gravitational microlensing offers a means of determining directly the masses of objects ranging from planets to stars, provided that the distances and motions of the lenses and sources can be determined. A globular cluster observed against the dense stellar field of the Galactic bulge presents ideal conditions for such observations because the probability of lensing is high and the distances and kinematics of the lenses and sources are well constrained. The abundance of low-mass objects in a globular cluster is of particular interest, because it may be representative of the very early stages of star formation in the Universe, and therefore indicative of the amount of dark baryonic matter in such clusters. Here we report a microlensing event associated with the globular cluster M22. We determine the mass of the lens to be 0.13(+0.03)(-0.02) solar masses. We have also detected six events that are unresolved in time. If these are also microlensing events, they imply that a non-negligible fraction of the cluster mass resides in the form of free-floating planetary-mass objects.

  9. Chemical Abundances of Red Giant Branch Stars in the Globular Clusters NGC 6333 and NGC 6366

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Rich, R. M.; Pilachowski, C. A.; Kunder, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    We present chemical abundances and radial velocities for >20 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the Galactic globular clusters NGC 6333 ([Fe/H]≈-1.8) and NGC 6366 ([Fe/H]≈-0.6). The results are based on moderate resolution (R=18,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (>100) spectra obtained with the Hydra multifiber positioner and bench spectrograph on the WIYN 3.5m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. Both objects are likely associated with the Galactic bulge globular cluster system, and we therefore compare the cluster abundance patterns with those of nearby bulge field stars. Additionally, we investigate differences in the O-Na anticorrelation and neutron-capture element dispersion between the two clusters, and compare their abundance patterns with those of similar metallicity halo globular clusters. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under award No. AST-1003201 to C.I.J. C.A.P. gratefully acknowledges support from the Daniel Kirkwood Research Fund at Indiana University. R.M.R. acknowledges support from NSF grant AST-0709479 and AST-121120995.

  10. Globular Cluster Variable Stars—Atlas and Coordinate Improvement using AAVSOnet Telescopes (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, D.; Henden, A.; Bell, T.; Suen, C.; Fare, I.; Sills, A.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) The variable stars of globular clusters have played and continue to play a significant role in our understanding of certain classes of variable stars. Since all stars associated with a cluster have the same age, metallicity, distance and usually very similar (if not identical reddenings), such variables can produce uniquely powerful constraints on where certain types of pulsation behaviors are excited. Advanced amateur astronomers are increasingly well-positioned to provide long-term CCD monitoring of globular cluster variable star but are hampered by a long history of poor or inaccessible finder charts and coordinates. Many of variable-rich clusters have published photographic finder charts taken in relatively poor seeing with blue-sensitive photographic plates. While useful signal-to-noise ratios are relatively straightforward to achieve for RR Lyrae, Type 2 Cepheids, and red giant variables, correct identification remains a difficult issue—particularly when images are taken at V or longer wavelengths. We describe the project and report its progress using the OC61, TMO61, and SRO telescopes of AAVSOnet after the first year of image acquisition and demonstrate several of the data products being developed for globular cluster variables.

  11. No Evidence for Multiple Stellar Populations in the Low-mass Galactic Globular Cluster E 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Ricardo; Strader, Jay

    2015-08-01

    Multiple stellar populations are a widespread phenomenon among Galactic globular clusters. Even though the origin of the enriched material from which new generations of stars are produced remains unclear, it is likely that self-enrichment will be feasible only in clusters massive enough to retain this enriched material. We searched for multiple populations in the low mass (M˜ 1.4× {10}4 {M}⊙ ) globular cluster E3, analyzing SOAR/Goodman multi-object spectroscopy centered on the blue cyanogen (CN) absorption features of 23 red giant branch stars. We find that the CN abundance does not present the typical bimodal behavior seen in clusters hosting multistellar populations, but rather a unimodal distribution that indicates the presence of a genuine single stellar population, or a level of enrichment much lower than in clusters that show evidence for two populations from high-resolution spectroscopy. E3 would be the first bona fide Galactic old globular cluster where no sign of self-enrichment is found. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the US National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  12. VARIABLE STARS IN LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. II. NGC 1786

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, Charles A.; Smith, Horace A.; De Lee, Nathan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Catelan, Marcio [Facultad de Fisica, Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Pritzl, Barton J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wisconsin Oskosh, Oshkosh, WI 54901 (United States); Borissova, Jura, E-mail: kuehn@physics.usyd.edu.au, E-mail: smith@pa.msu.edu, E-mail: nathan.delee@vanderbilt.edu, E-mail: mcatelan@astro.puc.cl, E-mail: pritzlb@uwosh.edu, E-mail: jura.borissova@uv.cl [Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Falcultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2012-12-01

    This is the second in a series of papers studying the variable stars in Large Magellanic Cloud globular clusters. The primary goal of this series is to study how RR Lyrae stars in Oosterhoff-intermediate systems compare to their counterparts in Oosterhoff I/II systems. In this paper, we present the results of our new time-series B-V photometric study of the globular cluster NGC 1786. A total of 65 variable stars were identified in our field of view. These variables include 53 RR Lyraes (27 RRab, 18 RRc, and 8 RRd), 3 classical Cepheids, 1 Type II Cepheid, 1 Anomalous Cepheid, 2 eclipsing binaries, 3 Delta Scuti/SX Phoenicis variables, and 2 variables of undetermined type. Photometric parameters for these variables are presented. We present physical properties for some of the RR Lyrae stars, derived from Fourier analysis of their light curves. We discuss several different indicators of Oosterhoff type which indicate that the Oosterhoff classification of NGC 1786 is not as clear cut as what is seen in most globular clusters.

  13. The Velocity Field of the Globular Cluster System in NGC 5128 (Cen A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, William; Woodley, Kristin; Geisler, Doug; Gomez, Matias; Harris, Gretchen

    2007-02-01

    We propose to carry out a comprehensive new dynamical study of the globular cluster system of NGC 5128 (Centaurus A), the nearest giant E galaxy. A key component of our proposal is a completely new catalog of globular cluster candidates that we have generated from a wide-field (1.4 sq deg) R-band imaging survey of NGC 5128 taken April 2006 with Magellan/IMACS under remarkable 0.45" seeing. We have used this new imaging survey to isolate a list of GC candidates that is far more precise, complete, and contamination-free than in any previous work. As spectroscopic followup, we will use the CTIO 4m + Hydra to measure velocities for 800 new GC candidates, of which 400 or more should be bona fide clusters. Our new data will double the known NGC 5128 GC sample and will eliminate the spatial biases inherent in all previous studies of this unique system. More importantly, the large new velocity database will be the springboard for a superior dynamical analysis of the galaxy and the halo velocity field. This work will allow us to define later programs aimed at detailed abundance and age distribution profiles for the system, and systematic trends with metallicity, that will closely connect with galaxy formation models. In addition, our GC database will rank among the largest ever assembled for a single galaxy, not only enabling us to test galaxy formation models but also providing a benchmark dataset in globular cluster research.

  14. Evidence from stellar abundances for a large age difference between two globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, R.J.; Croke, B.F.W.; Cannon, R.D.; Bell, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The globular clusters NGC288 and NGC362 are central to recent claims of large age differences (∼3 Gyr) between globular clusters associated with our Galaxy. According to standard models for the formation of the Galaxy, the system of globular clusters formed during the dynamical collapse of the protogalactic cloud, a process which should have lasted no more than 1 Gyr. But the claimed age differences are derived from stellar evolution models using assumed CNO abundances, and uncertainty in the actual CNO abundances of about a factor of three could account for an apparent 2-Gyr age difference. We have accurately measured abundances in red giants in NGC288 and NGC362, and find that the Fe abundance and the sum of the C, N and O abundances are essentially the same in every star studied. By eliminating compositional differences and thus confirming the reality of the age difference, these results imply a cluster formation period that is hard to reconcile with the standard collapse model. (author)

  15. [Astrophysics of binary stars, Seyfert galaxies, quasars, and globular clusters. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Press, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Several problems were investigated. The time-steady accretion of gas irradiated by a self-consistently generated quasar-like continuum was studied. The observed x-ray sources near the core of the Orion molecular cloud were established to be sufficient to supply all the ionization that is needed to drive the molecular chemistry throughout that portion of the cloud in which the greatest density and diversity of molecular species is found. A new suggestion was put forth for a single pass, high gain, O 5+ ion laboratory laser at 1035 A. The only evidence for binaries in globular clusters was found to come from binaries in extreme states, cataclysmic variables, and x-ray sources. The various evolutionary paths possible for highly compact binaries in globular clusters where they come under the simultaneous influence of gravitational radiation and gravitational encounters with field stars were analyzed. The secular evolution of a highly compact binary stellar system, composed of a collapsed object and a low-mass secondary star, in the core of a globular cluster was calculated. The dynamics of the narrow line regions of Seyfert galaxies were investigated. New calculations of the soft x-ray opacity of gas having cosmic elemental abunances were developed for a variety of ionization states. Results were presented of the analysis of 28 Einstein SSS observations of 15 high x-ray luminosity quasars and Seyfert type I nuclei

  16. The correlation between the sizes of globular cluster systems and their host dark matter haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Michael J.; Robison, Bailey

    2018-04-01

    The sizes of entire systems of globular clusters (GCs) depend on the formation and destruction histories of the GCs themselves, but also on the assembly, merger and accretion history of the dark matter (DM) haloes that they inhabit. Recent work has shown a linear relation between total mass of globular clusters in the globular cluster system and the mass of its host dark matter halo, calibrated from weak lensing. Here we extend this to GC system sizes, by studying the radial density profiles of GCs around galaxies in nearby galaxy groups. We find that radial density profiles of the GC systems are well fit with a de Vaucouleurs profile. Combining our results with those from the literature, we find tight relationship (˜0.2 dex scatter) between the effective radius of the GC system and the virial radius (or mass) of its host DM halo, for halos with masses greater than ˜1012M⊙. The steep non-linear dependence of this relationship (R_{{e, GCS}} ∝ R_{200}^{2.5 - 3} ∝ M_{200}^{0.8 - 1}) is currently not well understood, but is an important clue regarding the assembly history of DM haloes and of the GC systems that they host.

  17. Chemical analysis of eight giant stars of the globular cluster NGC 6366

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puls, Arthur A.; Brito, Alan Alves; Campos, Fabíola; Dias, Bruno; Barbuy, Beatriz

    2018-02-01

    The metal-rich Galactic globular cluster NGC 6366 is the fifth closest to the Sun. Despite its interest, it has received scarce attention, and little is known about its internal structure. Its kinematics suggests a link to the halo, but its metallicity indicates otherwise. We present a detailed chemical analysis of eight giant stars of NGC 6366, using high resolution and high quality spectra (R > 40 000, S/N > 60) obtained at the VLT (8.2 m) and CFHT (3.6 m) telescopes. We attempted to characterize its chemistry and to search for evidence of multiple stellar populations. The atmospheric parameters were derived using the method of excitation and ionization equilibrium of Fe I and Fe II lines and from those atmospheric parameters we calculated the abundances for other elements and found that none of the elements measured presents star-to-star variation greater than the uncertainties. We compared the derived abundances with those of other globular clusters and field stars available in the literature. We determined a mean [Fe/H] = -0.60 ± 0.03 for NGC 6366 and found some similarity of this object with M 71, another inner halo globular cluster. The Na-O anticorrelation extension is short and no star-to-star variation in Al is found. The presence of second generation stars is not evident in NGC 6366.

  18. The expected very-high-energy flux from a population of globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, C.; Kopp, A.

    Given their old ages, globular clusters are expected to harbour many evolved stellar objects. Their high core densities enhance stellar encounter rates, also facilitating the formation of stellar end products. In particular, many millisecond pulsars are found in these clusters. Such a population of millisecond pulsars is expected to radiate several spectral components in the radio through gamma -ray waveband. We present ongoing work involving a refined spectral model that assumes millisecond pulsars as sources of relativistic particles to model the multi-wavelength emission properties of globular clusters. We apply the model to a population of globular clusters that have been observed by H.E.S.S. and use upper limits derived from stacking analyses to test the viability of this ``millisecond pulsar scenario''. We derive general expressions for the ensemble-averaged flux and its error stemming from the uncertainty in free model parameters. The errors exceed this calculated average flux value so that there are regions in parameter space for which the model predictions satisfy the H.E.S.S. upper limits. Improved constraints on single-cluster parameters are therefore needed to aid in discriminating between competing spectral models.

  19. Testing modified gravity with globular clusters: the case of NGC 2419

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llinares, Claudio

    2018-02-01

    The dynamics of globular clusters has been studied in great detail in the context of general relativity as well as with modifications of gravity that strongly depart from the standard paradigm such as MOND. However, at present there are no studies that aim to test the impact that less extreme modifications of gravity (e.g. models constructed as alternatives to dark energy) have on the behaviour of globular clusters. This Letter presents fits to the velocity dispersion profile of the cluster NGC 2419 under the symmetron modified gravity model. The data shows an increase in the velocity dispersion towards the centre of the cluster which could be difficult to explain within general relativity. By finding the best fitting solution associated with the symmetron model, we show that this tension does not exist in modified gravity. However, the best fitting parameters give a model that is inconsistent with the dynamics of the Solar System. Exploration of different screening mechanisms should give us the chance to understand if it is possible to maintain the appealing properties of the symmetron model when it comes to globular clusters and at the same time recover the Solar System dynamics properly.

  20. VARIABLE STARS IN LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. II. NGC 1786

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, Charles A.; Smith, Horace A.; De Lee, Nathan; Catelan, Márcio; Pritzl, Barton J.; Borissova, Jura

    2012-01-01

    This is the second in a series of papers studying the variable stars in Large Magellanic Cloud globular clusters. The primary goal of this series is to study how RR Lyrae stars in Oosterhoff-intermediate systems compare to their counterparts in Oosterhoff I/II systems. In this paper, we present the results of our new time-series B–V photometric study of the globular cluster NGC 1786. A total of 65 variable stars were identified in our field of view. These variables include 53 RR Lyraes (27 RRab, 18 RRc, and 8 RRd), 3 classical Cepheids, 1 Type II Cepheid, 1 Anomalous Cepheid, 2 eclipsing binaries, 3 Delta Scuti/SX Phoenicis variables, and 2 variables of undetermined type. Photometric parameters for these variables are presented. We present physical properties for some of the RR Lyrae stars, derived from Fourier analysis of their light curves. We discuss several different indicators of Oosterhoff type which indicate that the Oosterhoff classification of NGC 1786 is not as clear cut as what is seen in most globular clusters.

  1. Study of the spray to globular transition in gas metal arc welding: a spectroscopic investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valensi, F; Pellerin, S; Castillon, Q; Zielinska, S; Boutaghane, A; Dzierzega, K; Pellerin, N; Briand, F

    2013-01-01

    The gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process is strongly influenced by the composition of the shielding gas. In particular, addition of CO 2 increases the threshold current for the transition from unstable globular to more stable spray transfer mode. We report on the diagnostics—using optical emission spectroscopy—of a GMAW plasma in pure argon and in mixtures of argon, CO 2 and N 2 while operated in spray and globular transfer modes. The spatially resolved plasma parameters are obtained by applying the Abel transformation to laterally integrated emission data. The Stark widths of some iron lines are used to determine both electron density and temperature, and line intensities yield relative contents of neutral and ionized iron to argon. Our experimental results indicate a temperature drop on the arc axis in the case of spray arc transfer. This drop reduces with addition of N 2 and disappears in globular transfer mode when CO 2 is added. Despite the temperature increase, the electron density decreases with CO 2 concentration. The highest concentration of iron is observed in the plasma column upper part (close to the anode) and for GMAW with CO 2 . Our results are compared with recently published works where the effect of non-homogeneous metal vapour concentration has been taken into account. (paper)

  2. Chemical analysis of eight giant stars of the globular cluster NGC 6366

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puls, Arthur A.; Alves-Brito, Alan; Campos, Fabíola; Dias, Bruno; Barbuy, Beatriz

    2018-05-01

    The metal-rich Galactic globular cluster NGC 6366 is the fifth closest to the Sun. Despite its interest, it has received scarce attention, and little is known about its internal structure. Its kinematics suggests a link to the halo, but its metallicity indicates otherwise. We present a detailed chemical analysis of eight giant stars of NGC 6366, using high-resolution and high-quality spectra (R > 40 000, S/N > 60) obtained at the VLT (8.2 m) and CFHT (3.6 m) telescopes. We attempted to characterize its chemistry and to search for evidence of multiple stellar populations. The atmospheric parameters were derived using the method of excitation and ionization equilibrium of Fe I and Fe II lines and from those atmospheric parameters we calculated the abundances for other elements and found that none of the elements measured presents star-to-star variation greater than the uncertainties. We compared the derived abundances with those of other globular clusters and field stars available in the literature. We determined a mean [Fe/H] = -0.60 ± 0.03 for NGC 6366 and found some similarity of this object with M 71, another inner halo globular cluster. The Na-O anticorrelation extension is short and no star-to-star variation in Al is found. The presence of second generation stars is not evident in NGC 6366.

  3. Systematic discovery of new recognition peptides mediating protein interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neduva, Victor; Linding, Rune; Su-Angrand, Isabelle

    2005-01-01

    Many aspects of cell signalling, trafficking, and targeting are governed by interactions between globular protein domains and short peptide segments. These domains often bind multiple peptides that share a common sequence pattern, or "linear motif" (e.g., SH3 binding to PxxP). Many domains are kn...

  4. Preferential melting of secondary structures during protein unfolding in different solvents: Competition between hydrophobic solvation and hydrogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Biman; Roy, Susmita; Ghosh, Rikhia

    2014-03-01

    Aqueous binary mixtures such as water-DMSO, water-urea, and water-ethanol are known to serve as denaturants of a host of proteins, although the detailed mechanism is often not known. Here we combine studies on several proteins in multiple binary mixtures to obtain a unified understanding of the phenomenon. We compare with experiments to support the simulation findings. The proteins considered include (i) chicken villin head piece (HP-36), (ii) immunoglobulin binding protein G (GB1), (iii) myoglobin and (iv) lysozyme. We find that for amphiphilic solvents like DMSO, the hydrophobic groups and the strong hydrogen bonding ability of the >S =O oxygen atom act together to facilitate the unfolding. However, the hydrophilic solvents like urea, due to the presence of more hydrophilic ends (C =O and two NH2) has a high propensity of forming hydrogen bonds with the side-chain residues and backbone of beta-sheet than the same of alpha helix. Such diversity among the unfolding pathways of a given protein in different chemical environments is especially characterized by the preferential solvation of a particular secondary structure.

  5. Contribution to the study of proteins and peptides structure by hydrogen isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabedryk-Viala, Eliane.

    1978-01-01

    Development of hydrogen exchange measurement methods to study the structure and the molecular interaction of globular protein molecules in aqueous solution (ribonuclease A, cytochrome c, coupling factors of chloroplasts), in peptide hormones in trifluoroethanol solution (angiotensin II, corticotropin) and in proteins of membranes (rhodopsin) [fr

  6. Recombinant Protein Truncation Strategy for Inducing Bactericidal Antibodies to the Macrophage Infectivity Potentiator Protein of Neisseria meningitidis and Circumventing Potential Cross-Reactivity with Human FK506-Binding Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Bielecka, Magdalena K.; Devos, Nathalie; Gilbert, Mélanie; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Weynants, Vincent; Heckels, John E.; Christodoulides, Myron

    2014-01-01

    A recombinant macrophage infectivity potentiator (rMIP) protein of Neisseria meningitidis induces significant serum bactericidal antibody production in mice and is a candidate meningococcal vaccine antigen. However, bioinformatics analysis of MIP showed some amino acid sequence similarity to human FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) in residues 166 to 252 located in the globular domain of the protein. To circumvent the potential concern over generating antibodies that could recognize human protein...

  7. New cataclysmic variables and other exotic binaries in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera Sandoval, L. E.; van den Berg, M.; Heinke, C. O.; Cohn, H. N.; Lugger, P. M.; Anderson, J.; Cool, A. M.; Edmonds, P. D.; Wijnands, R.; Ivanova, N.; Grindlay, J. E.

    2018-04-01

    We present 22 new (+3 confirmed) cataclysmic variables (CVs) in the non-core-collapsed globular cluster 47 Tucanae (47 Tuc). The total number of CVs in the cluster is now 43, the largest sample in any globular cluster so far. For the identifications we used near-ultraviolet (NUV) and optical images from the Hubble Space Telescope, in combination with X-ray results from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This allowed us to build the deepest NUV CV luminosity function of the cluster to date. We found that the CVs in 47 Tuc are more concentrated towards the cluster centre than the main-sequence turn-off stars. We compared our results to the CV populations of the core-collapsed globular clusters NGC 6397 and NGC 6752. We found that 47 Tuc has fewer bright CVs per unit mass than those two other clusters. That suggests that dynamical interactions in core-collapsed clusters play a major role creating new CVs. In 47 Tuc, the CV population is probably dominated by primordial and old dynamically formed systems. We estimated that the CVs in 47 Tuc have total masses of ˜1.4 M⊙. We also found that the X-ray luminosity function of the CVs in the three clusters is bimodal. Additionally, we discuss a possible double degenerate system and an intriguing/unclassified object. Finally, we present four systems that could be millisecond pulsar companions given their X-ray and NUV/optical colours. For one of them we present very strong evidence for being an ablated companion. The other three could be CO or He white dwarfs.

  8. The globular cluster systems of 54 Coma ultra-diffuse galaxies: statistical constraints from HST data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorisco, N. C.; Monachesi, A.; Agnello, A.; White, S. D. M.

    2018-04-01

    We use data from the HST Coma Cluster Treasury program to assess the richness of the globular cluster systems (GCSs) of 54 Coma ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs), 18 of which have a half-light radius exceeding 1.5 kpc. We use a hierarchical Bayesian method tested on a large number of mock data sets to account consistently for the high and spatially varying background counts in Coma. These include both background galaxies and intra-cluster globular clusters (ICGCs), which are disentangled from the population of member globular clusters (GCs) in a probabilistic fashion. We find no candidate for a GCS as rich as that of the Milky Way, our sample has GCSs typical of dwarf galaxies. For the standard relation between GCS richness and halo mass, 33 galaxies have a virial mass Mvir ≤ 1011 M⊙ at 90 per cent probability. Only three have Mvir > 1011 M⊙ with the same confidence. The mean colour and spread in colour of the UDG GCs are indistinguishable from those of the abundant population of ICGCs. The majority of UDGs in our sample are consistent with the relation between stellar mass and GC richness of `normal' dwarf galaxies. Nine systems, however, display GCSs that are richer by a factor of 3 or more (at 90 per cent probability). Six of these have sizes ≲1.4 kpc. Our results imply that the physical mechanisms responsible for the extended size of the UDGs and for the enhanced GC richness of some cluster dwarfs are at most weakly correlated.

  9. Deep and accurate near-infrared photometry of the Galactic globular cluster omega Cen .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamida, A.; Bono, G.; Corsi, C. E.; Stetson, P. B.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Marchetti, E.; Amico, P.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Monelli, M.; Buonanno, R.; Caputo, F.; Dall'Ora, M.; Freyhammer, L. M.; Koester, D.; Nonino, M.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pulone, L.; Romaniello, M.

    We present deep and accurate Near-Infrared (NIR) photometry of the Galactic Globular Cluster omega Cen . Data were collected using the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics Demonstrator (MAD) mounted on the VLT (ESO). We combined the NIR photometry with optical space data collected with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) for the same region of the cluster. Our deep optical-NIR CMD indicates that the spread in age among the different stellar populations in omega Cen is at most of the order of 2 Gyr.

  10. On the radial distribution of white dwarfs in the Galactic globular cluster omega Cen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamida, A.; Corsi, C. E.; Bono, G.; Stetson, P. B.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Koester, D.; Pulone, L.; Monelli, M.; Amico, P.; Buonanno, R.; Freyhammer, L. M.; Marchetti, E.; Nonino, M.; Romaniello, M.

    We present deep and accurate photometry (F435W, F625W, F658N) of the Galactic Globular Cluster omega Cen collected with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We identified ≈ 6,500 white dwarf (WD) candidates and compared their radial distribution with that of Main Sequence (MS) stars. We found a mild evidence that young WDs ( 0.1 ≲ t ≲ 0.6 Gyr) are less centrally concentrated when compared to MS stars in the magnitude range 25 < F435W < 26.5.

  11. Globular star cluster systems around galaxies. II. The cases of spiral and dwarf galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadjibaev, I.U.; Nuritdinov, S.N.; Ganiev, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Our compiled catalogue of globular cluster systems (GCS) which had studied in pervious part [1] is replenished now essentially as it are not sufficient the data to search for some empirical relationships between physical GCS parameters of the spiral and dwarf galaxies with a glance host galaxy characteristics. A number of empirical relationships for GCS of spiral and dwarf galaxies is first found. These results are differing essentially from analogous relationships for GCS of elliptical and lenticular galaxies which were found in [1]. It is also offered a possible new approach to the origin theory of the poor GCS which occupy a significant portion in our list of dwarf and spiral galaxies

  12. The gravitational wave emission from white dwarf interactions in globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loren-Aguilar, P; Garcia-Berro, E; Lobo, J A; Isern, J

    2009-01-01

    In the dense central regions of globular clusters close encounters of two white dwarfs are relatively frequent. The estimated frequency is one or more strong encounters per star in the lifetime of the cluster. Such encounters should be then potential sources of gravitational wave radiation. Thus, it is foreseeable that these collisions could be either individually detected by LISA or they could contribute significantly to the background noise of the detector. We compute the pattern of gravitational wave emission from these encounters for a sufficiently broad range of system parameters, namely the masses, the relative velocities and the distances of the two white dwarfs involved in the encounter.

  13. On the Variability of Blue Straggler Stars in the Globular Cluster M53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Chang Rey

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of a search for photometric variable blue straggler stars (BSSs in the globular cluster M53. Six of the 151 probable BSSs are identified as variable candidates based on the robust variable star detection technique of Welch & Stetson (1993. Most variable BSS candidates appear to occupy the instability strip in the color-magnitude diagram, and they appear to have visual light amplitudes of 0.2 mag - 0.3 mag. Further observations are required, however, to resolve the nature of variability between pulsating stars and eclipsing binaries for these variable BSS candidates.

  14. The Correlations between the Intrinsic Colors and Spectroscopic Metallicities of M31 Globular Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Zhou; Ma, Jun; Zhou, Xu; Jiang, Zhaoji

    2010-01-01

    We present the correlations between the spectroscopic metallicities and ninety-three different intrinsic colors of M31 globular clusters, including seventy-eight BATC colors and fifteen SDSS and near infrared ugrizK colors. The BATC colors were derived from the archival images of thirteen filters (from c to p), which were taken by Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) Multicolor Sky Survey with a 60/90 cm f/3 Schmidt telescope. The spectroscopic metallicities adopted in our work were from...

  15. Fermi Detection of a Luminous γ-Ray Pulsar in a Globular Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Freire, C. C.P.; A. Abdo, A.; Ajello, Marco; Allafort, A.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, Guido; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; D. Blandford, R.; D. Bloom, E.; Bonamente, E.; W. Borgland, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2011-01-01

    We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope detection of gamma-ray (>100 megaelectronvolts) pulsations from pulsar J1823-3021A in the globular cluster NGC 6624 with high significance (~7 sigma). Its gamma-ray luminosity L_gamma = (8.4 +/- 1.6) x10^34 ergs per second, is the highest observed for any millisecond pulsar (MSP) to date, and it accounts for most of the cluster emission. The non-detection of the cluster in the off-pulse phase implies that its contains < 32 gamma-ray MSPs, not ~100 as p...

  16. High Cadence Photometric Survey of Four Southern Hemisphere Milky Way Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Douglas Kyle; Albrow, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The Milky Way galaxy is surrounded by some 200 compact Globular Cluster (GCs) of stars, containing up to a million stars each. At 13 billion years of age, these globular clusters are almost as old as the universe itself and were born when the first generations of stars and galaxies formed. GCs are dynamical test beds for investigating and proving theories of stellar evolution. A key parameter to understanding the evolution of GCs is the binary fraction of stars contained within a GC. Binary stars are thought to be a controlling factor in globular cluster evolution and provide a unique tool to determine crucial information about a variety of stellar characteristics such as mass, radius and luminosity. In addition to containing binary stars, GCs also harbor a wide variety of variable stars such as RR Lyrae stars and other stellar exotica, such as blue stragglers, cataclysmic variables, and low-mass X-ray binaries. Recently, a potential new class of rapidly pulsating star, hydrogen-rich subdwarf (sdO) pulsators, has been discovered in the Omega Centauri GC. At present, these Hydrogen sdO pulsators have not been detected in any other GC or among the general field star population.This talk will discuss the use of Difference Imaging Algorithms (DIAs) applied to time-series photometry data from the 10m Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) to investigate short period low amplitude variable stars in the GCs: NGC 1904, NGC 2808, NGC 4833 and NGC 5139. We will present results of• Searching for new discoveries in pulsating stars, cataclysmic variables (a white dwarf star accreting material from its companion), BY Draconis stars (rapidly rotating dwarf stars spun up by a binary companion) and contact binary stars (rapidly rotating binaries that are beginning to coalesce)• Comparison analysis of variables across clusters in relation to cluster Main Sequence regions• Determining the fraction of binary stars in the identified GCsSpecific scientific questions that are

  17. ALMA reveals sunburn: CO dissociation around AGB stars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Iain; Zijlstra, Albert A.; Lagadec, Eric; Sloan, Gregory C.; Boyer, Martha L.; Matsuura, Mikako; Smith, Rowan J.; Smith, Christina L.; Yates, Jeremy A.; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Jones, Olivia C.; Ramstedt, Sofia; Avison, Adam; Justtanont, Kay; Olofsson, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Atacama Large Millimetre Array observations show a non-detection of carbon monoxide around the four most luminous asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. Stellar evolution models and star counts show that the mass-loss rates from these stars should be similar to 1.2-3.5x10(-7) M-circle dot yr(-1). We would naively expect such stars to be detectable at this distance (4.5 kpc). By modelling the ultraviolet radiation field from post-AGB stars and white dwarfs in 4...

  18. Predictions of Gamma-ray Emission from Globular Cluster Millisecond Pulsars Above 100 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, C.; de Jaker, O.C.; Clapson, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The recent Fermi detection of the globular cluster (GC) 47 Tucanae highlighted the importance of modeling collective gamma-ray emission of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in GCs. Steady flux from such populations is also expected in the very high energy (VHE) domain covered by ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. We present pulsed curvature radiation (CR) as well as unpulsed inverse Compton (IC) calculations for an ensemble of MSPs in the GCs 47 Tucanae and Terzan 5. We demonstrate that the CR from these GCs should be easily detectable for Fermi, while constraints on the total number of MSps and the nebular B-field may be derived using the IC flux components.

  19. In vitro study of proteins surface activity by tritium probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernysheva, M.G.; Badun, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    A new technique for in vitro studies of biomacromolecules interactions, their adsorption at aqueous/organic liquid interfaces and distribution in the bulk of liquid/liquid systems was developed. The method includes (1) tritium labeling of biomolecules by tritium thermal activation method and (2) scintillation phase step with organic phase, which can be concerned as a model of cellular membrane. Two globular proteins lysozyme and human serum albumin tested. We have determined the conditions of tritium labeling when labeled by-products can be easy separated by means of dialysis and size-exclusion chromatography. Scintillation phase experiments were conducted for three types of organic liquids. Thus, the influences of the nature of organic phase on proteins adsorption and its distribution in the bulk of aqueous/organic liquid system were determined. It was found that proteins possess high surface activity at aqueous/organic liquid interface. Furthermore, values of hydrophobicity of globular proteins were found by the experiment. (author)

  20. The "Globularization Hypothesis" of the Language-ready Brain as a Developmental Frame for Prosodic Bootstrapping Theories of Language Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irurtzun, Aritz

    2015-01-01

    In recent research (Boeckx and Benítez-Burraco, 2014a,b) have advanced the hypothesis that our species-specific language-ready brain should be understood as the outcome of developmental changes that occurred in our species after the split from Neanderthals-Denisovans, which resulted in a more globular braincase configuration in comparison to our closest relatives, who had elongated endocasts. According to these authors, the development of a globular brain is an essential ingredient for the language faculty and in particular, it is the centrality occupied by the thalamus in a globular brain that allows its modulatory or regulatory role, essential for syntactico-semantic computations. Their hypothesis is that the syntactico-semantic capacities arise in humans as a consequence of a process of globularization, which significantly takes place postnatally (cf. Neubauer et al., 2010). In this paper, I show that Boeckx and Benítez-Burraco's hypothesis makes an interesting developmental prediction regarding the path of language acquisition: it teases apart the onset of phonological acquisition and the onset of syntactic acquisition (the latter starting significantly later, after globularization). I argue that this hypothesis provides a developmental rationale for the prosodic bootstrapping hypothesis of language acquisition (cf. i.a. Gleitman and Wanner, 1982; Mehler et al., 1988, et seq.; Gervain and Werker, 2013), which claim that prosodic cues are employed for syntactic parsing. The literature converges in the observation that a large amount of such prosodic cues (in particular, rhythmic cues) are already acquired before the completion of the globularization phase, which paves the way for the premises of the prosodic bootstrapping hypothesis, allowing babies to have a rich knowledge of the prosody of their target language before they can start parsing the primary linguistic data syntactically.

  1. The globularization hypothesis of the language-ready brain as a developmental frame for prosodic bootstrapping theories of language acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aritz eIrurtzun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent research Boeckx & Benítez-Burraco (2014a,b have advanced the hypothesis that our species-specific language-ready brain should be understood as the outcome of developmental changes that occurred in our species after the split from Neanderthals-Denisovans, which resulted in a more globular braincase configuration in comparison to our closest relatives, who had elongated endocasts. According to these authors, the development of a globular brain is an essential ingredient for the language faculty and in particular, it is the centrality occupied by the thalamus in a globular brain that allows its modulatory or regulatory role, essential for syntactico-semantic computations. Their hypothesis is that the syntactico-semantic capacities arise in humans as a consequence of a process of globularization, which significantly takes place postnatally (cf. Neubauer et al. (2010. In this paper, I show that Boeckx & Benítez-Burraco’s hypothesis makes an interesting developmental prediction regarding the path of language acquisition: it teases apart the onset of phonological acquisition and the onset of syntactic acquisition (the latter starting significantly later, after globularization. I argue that this hypothesis provides a developmental rationale for the prosodic bootstrapping hypothesis of language acquisition (cf. i.a. Gleitman & Wanner (1982; Mehler et al. (1988, et seq.; Gervain & Werker (2013, which claim that prosodic cues are employed for syntactic parsing. The literature converges in the observation that a large amount of such prosodic cues (in particular, rhythmic cues are already acquired before the completion of the globularization phase, which paves the way for the premises of prosodic bootstrapping hypothesis, allowing babies to have a rich knowledge of the prosody of their target language before they can start parsing the primary linguistic data syntactically.

  2. Synthetic horizontal branch models for globular clusters - the luminosity of the horizontal branch and the Oosterhoff effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.W.; Demarque, P.; Zinn, R.

    1987-01-01

    The variation of horizontal-branch (HB) luminosities with metal abundances is analyzed on the basis of HB models synthesized from theoretical HB evolutionary tracks. The focus is on the Oosterhoff effect, as related to period shifts in globular-cluster RR Lyr variables. The construction of the models and the Oosterhoff period groups is explained in detail, and the implications for globular-cluster ages are considered. The ratio of Delta M(bol) (RR) to Delta Fe/H for the HB is calculated as 0.24, slightly steeper than that found by Sandage (1981 and 1982). 35 references

  3. Dynamics in protein powders on the nanosecond-picosecond time scale are dominated by localized motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Jonathan D; García Sakai, Victoria; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2013-10-03

    We present analysis of nanosecond-picosecond dynamics of Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) using neutron scattering data obtained on three spectrometers. GFP has a β-barrel structure that differs significantly from the structure of other globular proteins and is thought to result in a more rigid local environment. Despite this difference, our analysis reveals that the dynamics of GFP are similar to dynamics of other globular proteins such as lysozyme and myoglobin. We suggest that the same general concept of protein dynamics may be applicable to all these proteins. The dynamics of dry protein are dominated by methyl group rotations, while hydration facilitates localized diffusion-like motions in the protein. The latter has an extremely broad relaxation spectrum. The nanosecond-picosecond dynamics of both dry and hydrated GFP are localized to distances of ∼1-3.5 Å, in contrast to the longer range diffusion of hydration water.

  4. Effects of main-sequence mass loss on the turnoff ages of globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzik, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Willson, Bowen, and Struck-Marcell have proposed that globular cluster main-sequence turnoff ages can be reconciled with the lower ages of the Galaxy and universe deduced from other methods by incorporating an epoch of early main-sequence mass-loss by stars of spectral types A through early-F. The proposed mass loss is pulsation-driven, and facilitated by rapid rotation. This paper presents stellar evolution calculations of Pop. II (Z = 0.001) mass-losing stars of initial mass 0.8 to 1.6 M circle dot , with exponentially-decreasing mass loss rates of e-folding times 0.5 to 2.0 Gyr, evolving to a final mass of 0.7 M circle dot . The calculations indicate that a globular cluster with apparent turnoff age 18 Gyr could have an actual age as low as ∼12 Gyr. Observational implications that may help to verify the hypothesis, e.g. low C/N abundance ratios among red giants following first dredge-up, blue stragglers, red giant deficiencies, and signatures in cluster mass/luminosity functions, are also discussed.25 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  5. The Hot Stellar Content and HB morphology of the massive globular cluster G1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, R.

    2010-09-01

    We propose to obtain deep WFC3 imagery of the Local Group's most luminous globular cluster, G1. Our primary aim is to define the hot stellar content and the extent of what appears to be a multimodal horizontal branch, analogous to those known in Omega Cen and NGC 2808. G1 is 40 kpc distant in the M31, and it would have been highly unlikely that collision with a giant molecular clould would be responsible for the complex populations which must therefore be the result of self-enrichment. We will obtain data very similar to those obtained for the known Galactic multimodal globular clusters NGC 6388 and 6441, and compare the stellar distribution on the horizontal branch with models. We can constrain the fraction of helium-enriched stars, if present, and search for supra-horizontal branch and other anomalous hot, evolved, stars. Parallel ACS observations will be the deepest ever obtained in the adjacnt field to G1, and will help to constrain whether G1 was the nucleus of a now disrupted galaxy.

  6. Chemical Abundances of Red Giant Branch Stars in the Globular Cluster NGC 288

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsyu, Tiffany; Johnson, C. I.; Pilachowski, C. A.; Lee, Y.; Rich, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    We present chemical abundances and radial velocities for ~30 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the globular cluster NGC 288. The results are based on moderate resolution (R≈18,000) and moderate signal-to-noise ratio 50-75) obtained with the Hydra multi-object spectrograph on the Blanco 4m telescope. NGC 288 has been shown to exhibit two separate RGBs and we investigate possible differences in metallicity and/or light element abundances between stars on each branch. We present a new filter tracing for the CTIO Calcium HK narrow band filter and explore its effects on previous globular cluster color-magnitude diagrams. We also compare the light element abundance patterns of NGC 288 to those of other similar metallicity halo clusters. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under award No.AST-1003201 to C.I.J. C.A.P. gratefully acknowledges support from the Daniel Kirkwood Research Fund at Indiana University. R.M.R. acknowledges support from NSF grants AST-0709479 and AST-121120995.

  7. NEAR-IR PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF HB, MSTO, AND SGB FOR METAL POOR GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-W. Kim

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available We report photometric features of the HB, MSTO, and SGB for a set of metal-poor Galactic globular clusters on the near-IR CMDs. The magnitude and color of the MSTO and SGB are measured on the fiducial normal points of the CMDs by applying a polynomial fit. The near-IR luminosity functions of horizontal branch stars in the classical second parameter pair M3 and M13 indicate that HB stars in M13 are dominated by hot stars that are rotatively faint in the infrared, whereas HB stars in M3 are brighter than those in M13. The luminosity functions of HB stars in the observed bulge clusters, except for NGC 6717, show a trend that the fainter hot HB stars are dominated in the relatively metal-poor clusters while the relatively metal-rich clusters contain the brighter HB stars. It is suggestive that NGC 6717 would be an extreme example of the second-parameter phenomenon for the bulge globular clusters.

  8. Effects of main-sequence mass loss on the turnoff ages of globular clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzik, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Willson, Bowen, and Struck-Marcell have proposed that globular cluster main-sequence turnoff ages can be reconciled with the lower ages of the Galaxy and universe deduced from other methods by incorporating an epoch of early main-sequence mass-loss by stars of spectral types A through early-F. The proposed mass loss is pulsation-driven, and facilitated by rapid rotation. This paper presents stellar evolution calculations of Pop. II (Z = 0.001) mass-losing stars of initial mass 0.8 to 1.6 M/sub /circle dot//, with exponentially-decreasing mass loss rates of e-folding times 0.5 to 2.0 Gyr, evolving to a final mass of 0.7 M/sub /circle dot//. The calculations indicate that a globular cluster with apparent turnoff age 18 Gyr could have an actual age as low as /approximately/12 Gyr. Observational implications that may help to verify the hypothesis, e.g. low C/N abundance ratios among red giants following first dredge-up, blue stragglers, red giant deficiencies, and signatures in cluster mass/luminosity functions, are also discussed.25 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Constraints on helium enhancement in the globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121): The horizontal branch test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcarce, A. A. R.; De Medeiros, J. R.; Catelan, M.; Alonso-García, J.; Cortés, C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent pieces of evidence have revealed that most, and possibly all, globular star clusters are composed of groups of stars that formed in multiple episodes with different chemical compositions. In this sense, it has also been argued that variations in the initial helium abundance (Y) from one population to the next are also the rule, rather than the exception. In the case of the metal-intermediate globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121), recent high-resolution spectroscopic observations of blue horizontal branch (HB) stars (i.e., HB stars hotter than the RR Lyrae instability strip) suggest that a large fraction of blue HB stars are second-generation stars formed with high helium abundances. In this paper, we test this scenario by using recent photometric and spectroscopic data together with theoretical evolutionary computations for different Y values. Comparing the photometric data with the theoretically derived color-magnitude diagrams, we find that the bulk of the blue HB stars in M4 have ΔY ≲ 0.01 with respect to the cluster's red HB stars (i.e., HB stars cooler than the RR Lyrae strip)—a result which is corroborated by comparison with spectroscopically derived gravities and temperatures, which also favor little He enhancement. However, the possible existence of a minority population on the blue HB of the cluster with a significant He enhancement level is also discussed.

  10. The globular cluster NGC 7492 and the Sagittarius tidal stream: together but unmixed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo-Bello, J. A.; Corral-Santana, J. M.; Catelan, M.; Martínez-Delgado, D.; Muñoz, R. R.; Sollima, A.; Navarrete, C.; Duffau, S.; Côté, P.; Mora, M. D.

    2018-03-01

    We have derived from VIMOS spectroscopy the radial velocities for a sample of 71 stars selected from CFHT/Megacam photometry around the Galactic globular cluster NGC 7492. In the resulting velocity distribution, it is possible to distinguish two relevant non-Galactic kinematic components along the same line of sight: a group of stars at 〈vr〉 ˜ 125 km s-1 which is compatible with the velocity of the old leading arm of the Sagittarius tidal stream, and a larger number of objects at 〈vr〉 ˜ -110 km s-1 that might be identified as members of the trailing wrap of the same stream. The systemic velocity of NGC 7492 set at vr ˜ -177 km s-1 differs significantly from that of both components, thus our results confirm that this cluster is not one of the globular clusters deposited by the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal in the Galactic halo, even if it is immersed in the stream. A group of stars with 〈vr〉 ˜ - 180 km s-1 might be comprised of cluster members along one of the tidal tails of NGC 7492.

  11. GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES: A NEAR-UNIVERSAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, William E.; O' Halloran, Heather; Cockcroft, Robert, E-mail: harris@physics.mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ohallohm@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: cockcroft@physics.mcmaster.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); and others

    2014-12-20

    We present the first results from our Hubble Space Telescope brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) survey of seven central supergiant cluster galaxies and their globular cluster (GC) systems. We measure a total of 48,000 GCs in all seven galaxies, representing the largest single GC database. We find that a log-normal shape accurately matches the observed the luminosity function (LF) of the GCs down to the globular cluster luminosity function turnover point, which is near our photometric limit. In addition, the LF has a virtually identical shape in all seven galaxies. Our data underscore the similarity in the formation mechanism of massive star clusters in diverse galactic environments. At the highest luminosities (L ≳ 10{sup 7} L {sub ☉}), we find small numbers of ''superluminous'' objects in five of the galaxies; their luminosity and color ranges are at least partly consistent with those of ultra-compact dwarfs. Last, we find preliminary evidence that in the outer halo (R ≳ 20 kpc), the LF turnover point shows a weak dependence on projected distance, scaling as L {sub 0} ∼ R {sup –0.2}, while the LF dispersion remains nearly constant.

  12. Movimiento regular y caótico en cúmulos globulares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpintero, D. D.; Muzzio, J. C.; Wachlin, F. C.

    Los cúmulos globulares exhiben diferentes grados de elipticidad y se mueven en el campo gravitatorio de la galaxia a la que pertenecen. Las órbitas de sus estrellas no necesitan, por ello, conservar la energía ni el momento angular, y resulta probable la presencia de movimientos caóticos. Como paso preliminar de una investigación más extensa, presentamos aquí los resultados de un estudio de órbitas estelares en un cúmulo globular levemente triaxial que describe una órbita circular dentro de una galaxia. Las órbitas se investigan utilizando dos métodos: 1) La clasificación por frecuencias de D.D. Carpintero y L.A. Aguilar (1998, MNRAS, en prensa), y 2) Los exponentes de Lyapunov (subrutina LIAMAG, gentilmente suministrada por D. Pfenniger). Utilizando diversos espacios de condiciones iniciales, investigamos las familias de órbitas de las estrellas del cúmulo. Confirmamos la presencia de órbitas caóticas, particularmente en las zonas externas del cúmulo, y discutimos su importancia para la estructura del cúmulo.

  13. Constraints on helium enhancement in the globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121): The horizontal branch test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valcarce, A. A. R.; De Medeiros, J. R. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Departamento de Física, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Catelan, M. [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Centro de Astroingeniería, Av. Vicuña Mackena 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Alonso-García, J. [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Av. Vicuña Mackena 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Cortés, C. [Universidad Metropolitana de Ciencias de la Educación, Facultad de Ciencias Básicas, Departamento de Física, Av. José Pedro Alessandri 774, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-02-20

    Recent pieces of evidence have revealed that most, and possibly all, globular star clusters are composed of groups of stars that formed in multiple episodes with different chemical compositions. In this sense, it has also been argued that variations in the initial helium abundance (Y) from one population to the next are also the rule, rather than the exception. In the case of the metal-intermediate globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121), recent high-resolution spectroscopic observations of blue horizontal branch (HB) stars (i.e., HB stars hotter than the RR Lyrae instability strip) suggest that a large fraction of blue HB stars are second-generation stars formed with high helium abundances. In this paper, we test this scenario by using recent photometric and spectroscopic data together with theoretical evolutionary computations for different Y values. Comparing the photometric data with the theoretically derived color-magnitude diagrams, we find that the bulk of the blue HB stars in M4 have ΔY ≲ 0.01 with respect to the cluster's red HB stars (i.e., HB stars cooler than the RR Lyrae strip)—a result which is corroborated by comparison with spectroscopically derived gravities and temperatures, which also favor little He enhancement. However, the possible existence of a minority population on the blue HB of the cluster with a significant He enhancement level is also discussed.

  14. THE ACS SURVEY OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. XI. THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL ORIENTATION OF THE SAGITTARIUS DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY AND ITS GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, Michael H.; Majewski, Steven R.; Law, David R.

    2011-01-01

    We use observations from the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) study of Galactic globular clusters to investigate the spatial distribution of the inner regions of the disrupting Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Sgr). We combine previously published analyses of four Sgr member clusters located near or in the Sgr core (M54, Arp 2, Terzan 7, and Terzan 8) with a new analysis of diffuse Sgr material identified in the background of five low-latitude Galactic bulge clusters (NGC 6624, 6637, 6652, 6681, and 6809) observed as part of the ACS survey. By comparing the bulge cluster color-magnitude diagrams to our previous analysis of the M54/Sgr core, we estimate distances to these background features. The combined data from four Sgr member clusters and five Sgr background features provide nine independent measures of the Sgr distance and, as a group, provide uniformly measured and calibrated probes of different parts of the inner regions of Sgr spanning 20° over the face of the disrupting dwarf. This allows us, for the first time, to constrain the three-dimensional orientation of Sgr's disrupting core and globular cluster system and compare that orientation to the predictions of an N-body model of tidal disruption. The density and distance of Sgr debris are consistent with models that favor a relatively high Sgr core mass and a slightly greater distance (28-30 kpc, with a mean of 29.4 kpc). Our analysis also suggests that M54 is in the foreground of Sgr by ∼2 kpc, projected on the center of the Sgr dSph. While this would imply a remarkable alignment of the cluster and the Sgr nucleus along the line of sight, we cannot identify any systematic effect in our analysis that would falsely create the measured 2 kpc separation. Finally, we find that the cluster Terzan 7 has the most discrepant distance (25 kpc) among the four Sgr core clusters, which may suggest a different dynamical history than the other Sgr core clusters.

  15. A Visual Language for Protein Design

    KAUST Repository

    Cox, Robert Sidney

    2017-02-08

    As protein engineering becomes more sophisticated, practitioners increasingly need to share diagrams for communicating protein designs. To this end, we present a draft visual language, Protein Language, that describes the high-level architecture of an engineered protein with easy-to draw glyphs, intended to be compatible with other biological diagram languages such as SBOL Visual and SBGN. Protein Language consists of glyphs for representing important features (e.g., globular domains, recognition and localization sequences, sites of covalent modification, cleavage and catalysis), rules for composing these glyphs to represent complex architectures, and rules constraining the scaling and styling of diagrams. To support Protein Language we have implemented an extensible web-based software diagram tool, Protein Designer, that uses Protein Language in a

  16. Refolding of SDS-Unfolded Proteins by Nonionic Surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspersen, Jørn Døvling; Søndergaard, Anne; Madsen, Daniel Jhaf; Otzen, Daniel E; Pedersen, Jan Skov

    2017-04-25

    The strong and usually denaturing interaction between anionic surfactants (AS) and proteins/enzymes has both benefits and drawbacks: for example, it is put to good use in electrophoretic mass determinations but limits enzyme efficiency in detergent formulations. Therefore, studies of the interactions between proteins and AS as well as nonionic surfactants (NIS) are of both basic and applied relevance. The AS sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) denatures and unfolds globular proteins under most conditions. In contrast, NIS such as octaethylene glycol monododecyl ether (C 12 E 8 ) and dodecyl maltoside (DDM) protect bovine serum albumin (BSA) from unfolding in SDS. Membrane proteins denatured in SDS can also be refolded by addition of NIS. Here, we investigate whether globular proteins unfolded by SDS can be refolded upon addition of C 12 E 8 and DDM. Four proteins, BSA, α-lactalbumin (αLA), lysozyme, and β-lactoglobulin (βLG), were studied by small-angle x-ray scattering and both near- and far-UV circular dichroism. All proteins and their complexes with SDS were attempted to be refolded by the addition of C 12 E 8 , while DDM was additionally added to SDS-denatured αLA and βLG. Except for αLA, the proteins did not interact with NIS alone. For all proteins, the addition of NIS to the protein-SDS samples resulted in extraction of the SDS from the protein-SDS complexes and refolding of βLG, BSA, and lysozyme, while αLA changed to its NIS-bound state instead of the native state. We conclude that NIS competes with globular proteins for association with SDS, making it possible to release and refold SDS-denatured proteins by adding sufficient amounts of NIS, unless the protein also interacts with NIS alone. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Lost and Found: Evidence of Second-generation Stars Along the Asymptotic Giant Branch of the Globular Cluster NGC 6752

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lapenna, E.; Lardo, C.; Mucciarelli, A.; Salaris, M.; Ferraro, F. R.; Lanzoni, B.; Massari, D.; Stetson, P. B.; Cassisi, S.; Savino, A.

    2016-01-01

    We derived chemical abundances for C, N, O, Na, Mg, and Al in 20 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the globular cluster (GC) NGC 6752. All these elements (but Mg) show intrinsic star-to-star variations and statistically significant correlations or anticorrelations analogous to those commonly

  18. Multiple stellar populations in the globular cluster M3 (NGC 5272) : a Strömgren perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massari, Davide; Lapenna, Emilio; Bragaglia, Angela; Dalessandro, Emanuele; Contreras Ramos, Rodrigo; Amigo, Pía

    2016-01-01

    We present Strömgren photometry of the Galactic Globular Cluster M3 to study its multiple generations phenomenon. The use of different colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and especially of the notoriously efficient cy index allowed us to detect a double red giant branch in the cluster CMD. After

  19. The first two transient supersoft X-ray sources in M 31 globular clusters and the connection to classical novae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Henze, M.; Pietsch, W.; Haberl, F.; Sala, G.; Quimby, R.; Hernanz, M.; Della Valle, M.; Milne, P.; Williams, G.G.; Burwitz, V.; Greiner, J.; Stiele, H.; Hartmann, D. H.; Kong, A. K. H.; Hornoch, Kamil

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 500, č. 2 (2009), s. 769-779 ISSN 0004-6361 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : M 31 * novae * globular clusters Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.179, year: 2009

  20. X-Ray and optical study of low core density globular clusters NGC6144 and E3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lan, S.-H.; Kong, A.K.H.; Verbunt, F.W.M.; Lewin, W.H.G.; Bassa, C.G.; Anderson, S.F.; Pooley, D.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of two low coredensity globular clusters, NGC6144 and E3. By comparing the number of X-ray sources inside the half-mass radius to those outside, we found six X-ray sources within the half-mass radius of NGC6144,

  1. The Absolute Age of the Globular Cluster M15 Using Near-infrared Adaptive Optics Images from PISCES/LBT.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monelli, M.; Testa, V.; Bono, G.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Fiorentino, G.; Arcidiacono, C.; Massari, D.; Boutsia, K.; Briguglio, R.; Busoni, L.; Carini, R.; Close, L.; Cresci, G.; Esposito, S.; Fini, L.; Fumana, M.; Guerra, J. C.; Hill, J.; Kulesa, C.; Mannucci, F.; McCarthy, D.; Pinna, E.; Puglisi, A.; Quiros-Pacheco, F.; Ragazzoni, R.; Riccardi, A.; Skemer, A.; Xompero, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present deep near-infrared J, {K}{{s}} photometry of the old, metal-poor Galactic globular cluster M15 obtained with images collected with the LUCI1 and PISCES cameras available at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). We show how the use of First Light Adaptive Optics (FLAO) system coupled with

  2. Dynamics of proteins and of their hydration layer studied by neutron scattering and additional biophysical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallat, Francois-Xavier

    2011-01-01

    This thesis work focused on the dynamics of proteins, surrounded by their hydration layer, a water shell around the protein vital for its biological function. Each of these components is accompanied by a specific dynamics which union reforms the complex energy landscape of the system. The joint implementation of selective deuteration, incoherent neutron scattering and tera-hertz spectroscopy allowed to explore the dynamics of proteins and that of the hydration shell. The influence of the folding state of protein on its dynamics has been studied by elastic neutron scattering. Globular proteins were less dynamic than its intrinsically disordered analogues. Themselves appear to be stiffer than non-physiological unfolded proteins. The oligomerization state and the consequences on the dynamics were investigated. Aggregates of a globular protein proved to be more flexible than the soluble form. In contrast, aggregates of a disordered protein showed lower average dynamics compared to the soluble form. These observations demonstrate the wide range of dynamics among the proteome. Incoherent neutron scattering experiences on the hydration layer of globular and disordered proteins have yielded information on the nature of water motion around these proteins. The measurements revealed the presence of translational motions concomitant with the onset of the transition dynamics of hydration layers, at 220 K. Measurements have also shown a stronger coupling between a disordered protein and its hydration water, compared to a globular protein and its hydration shell. The nature of the hydration layer and its influence on its dynamics has been explored with the use of polymers that mimic the water behavior and that act as a source of flexibility for the protein. Eventually, the dynamics of methyl groups involved in the dynamical changes observed at 150 and 220 K, was investigated. (author) [fr

  3. Crystal structure of the TLDc domain of oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaise, Mickael; Alsarraf, Husam Mohammad Ali Baker; Wong, Jaslyn

    2012-01-01

    structure of the TLDc domain of the oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish. The structure was determined by X-ray crystallography to atomic resolution (0.97Å) and adopts an overall globular shape. Two antiparallel β-sheets form a central β-sandwich, surrounded by two helices and two one-turn helices...

  4. Fluid-crystal coexistence for proteins and inorganic nanocolloids : Dependence on ionic strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinsen, P.; Odijk, T.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the fluid-crystal coexistence of solutions of globular charged nanoparticles such as proteins and inorganic colloids. The thermodynamic properties of the fluid phase are computed via the optimized Baxter model P. Prinsen and T. Odijk [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 6525 (2004)].

  5. Sequential unfolding of the two-domain protein Pseudomonas stutzeri cytochrome c(4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Niels Højmark; Jensen, Thomas Jon; Nørgaard, Allan

    2002-01-01

    F stutzeri cytochrome c. is a di-haem protein, composed of two globular domains each with His-Met coordinated haem. and a hydrogen bond network between the domains. The domain foldings are highly symmetric but with specific differences including structural differences of ligand coordination, and ...

  6. 2MASS NIR photometry for 693 candidate globular clusters in M 31 and the Revised Bologna Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galleti, S.; Federici, L.; Bellazzini, M.; Fusi Pecci, F.; Macrina, S.

    2004-03-01

    We have identified in the 2MASS database 693 known and candidate globular clusters in M 31. The 2MASS J, H, K magnitudes of these objects have been transformed to the same homogeneous photometric system of existing near infrared photometry of M 31 globulars, finally yielding J, H, K integrated photometry for 279 confirmed M 31 clusters, 406 unconfirmed candidates and 8 objects with controversial classification. Of these objects 529 lacked any previous estimate of their near infrared magnitudes. The newly assembled near infrared dataset has been implemented into a revised version of the Bologna Catalogue of M 31 globulars, with updated optical (UBVRI) photometry taken, when possible, from the most recent sources of CCD photometry available in the literature and transformed to a common photometric system. The final Revised Bologna Catalogue (available in electronic form) is the most comprehensive list presently available of confirmed and candidate M 31 globular clusters, with a total of 1164 entries. In particular, it includes 337 confirmed GCs, 688 GC candidates, 10 objects with controversial classification, 70 confirmed galaxies, 55 confirmed stars, and 4 H II regions lying within ˜3° from the center of the M 31 galaxy. Using the newly assembled database we show that the V-K color provides a powerful tool to discriminate between M 31 clusters and background galaxies, and we identify a sample of 83 globular cluster candidates, which is not likely to be contaminated by misclassified galaxies. Tables 2-4 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/416/917

  7. New Discoveries in the Search for Iron-Complex Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christian; Caldwell, Nelson; Rich, R. Michael; Mateo, Mario; Bailey, Jeb; Walker, Matthew G.; M2FS Team

    2018-01-01

    A growing number of Galactic globular clusters have been discovered that possess large intrinsic [Fe/H] and heavy element abundance variations. These "iron-complex" clusters are among the most massive in the Galaxy, and frequently exhibit extended blue horizontal branches and low metallicities. Additionally, a handful of clusters with [Fe/H] > -1 may also have large metallicity spreads (e.g., Terzan 5), but are instead characterized by having bimodal red horizontal brances. We present chemical composition analyses of several potential iron-complex clusters spanning [Fe/H] = -1.8 to -0.8, and discover that horizontal branch morphology alone is insufficient to identify clusters with heavy element abundance variations. However, we find that several of these clusters contain 4-5 chemically distinct populations, and the outer halo cluster NGC 6229 is added to the growing list of iron-complex clusters that may be the remnant cores of former dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  8. The Globular Clusters of the Galactic Bulge: Results from Multiwavelength Follow-up Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Roger; Geisler, Doug; Mauro, Francesco; Alonso Garcia, Javier; Hempel, Maren; Sarajedini, Ata

    2018-01-01

    The Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) located towards the bulge of the Milky Way suffer from severe total and differential extinction and high field star densities. They have therefore been systematically excluded from deep, large-scale homogenous GGC surveys, and will present a challenge for Gaia. Meanwhile, existing observations of bulge GGCs have revealed tantalizing hints that they hold clues to Galactic formation and evolution not found elsewhere. Therefore, in order to better characterize these poorly studied stellar systems and place them in the context of their optically well-studied counterparts, we have undertaken imaging programs at optical and near-infrared wavelengths. We describe these programs and present a variety of results, including self-consistent measurement of bulge GGC ages and structural parameters. The limitations imposed by spatially variable extinction and extinction law are highlighted, along with the complimentary nature of forthcoming facilities, allowing us to finally complete our picture of the Milky Way GGC system.

  9. Stellar envelopes of globular clusters embedded in dark mini-haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñarrubia, Jorge; Varri, Anna Lisa; Breen, Philip G.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén

    2017-10-01

    We show that hard encounters in the central regions of globular clusters (GCs) embedded in dark matter (DM) haloes necessarily lead to the formation of gravitationally bound stellar envelopes that extend far beyond the nominal tidal radius of the system. Using statistical arguments and numerical techniques, we derive the equilibrium distribution function of stars ejected from the centre of a non-divergent spherical potential. Independently of the velocity distribution with which stars are ejected, GC envelopes have density profiles that approach asymptotically ρ ∼ r-4 at large distances and become isothermal towards the centre. Adding a DM halo component leaves two clear-cut observational signatures: (i) a flattening, or slightly increase of the projected velocity dispersion profile at large distances, and (ii) an outer surface density profile that is systematically shallower than in models with no DM.

  10. Ghosts of Milky Way's past: the globular cluster ESO 37-1 (E 3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente Marcos, R.; de la Fuente Marcos, C.; Moni Bidin, C.; Ortolani, S.; Carraro, G.

    2015-09-01

    Context. In the Milky Way, most globular clusters are highly conspicuous objects that were found centuries ago. However, a few dozen of them are faint, sparsely populated systems that were identified largely during the second half of the past century. One of the faintest is ESO 37-1 (E 3) and as such it remains poorly studied, with no spectroscopic observations published so far although it was discovered in 1976. Aims: We investigate the globular cluster E 3 in an attempt to better constrain its fundamental parameters. Spectroscopy of stars in the field of E 3 is shown here for the first time. Methods: Deep, precise VI CCD photometry of E 3 down to V ~ 26 mag is presented and analysed. Low-resolution, medium signal-to-noise ratio spectra of nine candidate members are studied to derive radial velocity and metallicity. Proper motions from the UCAC4 catalogue are used to explore the kinematics of the bright members of E 3. Results: Isochrone fitting indicates that E 3 is probably very old, with an age of about 13 Gyr; its distance from the Sun is nearly 10 kpc. It is also somewhat metal rich with [Fe/H] = -0.7. Regarding its kinematics, our tentative estimate for the proper motions is (μα cosδ,μδ) = (-7.0 ± 0.8, 3.5 ± 0.3) mas yr-1 (or a tangential velocity of 382 ± 79 km s-1) and for the radial velocity 45 ± 5 km s-1 in the solar rest frame. Conclusions: E 3 is one of the most intriguing globular clusters in the Galaxy. Having an old age and being metal rich is clearly a peculiar combination, only seen in a handful of objects like the far more conspicuous NGC 104 (47 Tucanae). In addition, its low luminosity and sparse population make it a unique template for the study of the final evolutionary phases in the life of a star cluster. Unfortunately, E 3 is among the most elusive and challenging known globular clusters because field contamination severely hampers spectroscopic studies. This research note is based on observations made with the ESO VLT at the

  11. THE PECULIAR CHEMICAL INVENTORY OF NGC 2419: AN EXTREME OUTER HALO 'GLOBULAR CLUSTER'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Judith G.; Kirby, Evan N.; Huang Wenjin

    2011-01-01

    NGC 2419 is a massive outer halo Galactic globular cluster (GC) whose stars have previously been shown to have somewhat peculiar abundance patterns. We have observed seven luminous giants that are members of NGC 2419 with Keck/HIRES at reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. One of these giants is very peculiar, with an extremely low [Mg/Fe] and high [K/Fe] but normal abundances of most other elements. The abundance pattern does not match the nucleosynthetic yields of any supernova model. The other six stars show abundance ratios typical of inner halo Galactic GCs, represented here by a sample of giants in the nearby GC M30. Although our measurements show that NGC 2419 is unusual in some respects, its bulk properties do not provide compelling evidence for a difference between inner and outer halo GCs.

  12. Neutron-Capture Element Abundances in the Globular Cluster M15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneden; Johnson; Kraft; Smith; Cowan; Bolte

    2000-06-20

    High-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio, blue-violet spectra of three red giant branch tip stars in M15 have been obtained with the Keck I High-Resolution Echelle Spectrograph. These spectra have been analyzed to determine the abundances of several neutron-capture elements, including the radioactive chronometer element thorium. There are two principal results of this study. First, the abundances of the heavier (Z>/=56) elements for each of the three stars is well matched by a scaled solar system r-process abundance distribution. Second, a weighted mean-observed Th/Eu ratio for the stars implies an age for the neutron-capture material in M15 stars of 14+/-3 Gyr, in reasonable agreement with other recent age estimates for Galactic globular clusters.

  13. Image processing of globular clusters - Simulation for deconvolution tests (GlencoeSim)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazek, Martin; Pata, Petr

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents an algorithmic approach for efficiency tests of deconvolution algorithms in astronomic image processing. Due to the existence of noise in astronomical data there is no certainty that a mathematically exact result of stellar deconvolution exists and iterative or other methods such as aperture or PSF fitting photometry are commonly used. Iterative methods are important namely in the case of crowded fields (e.g., globular clusters). For tests of the efficiency of these iterative methods on various stellar fields, information about the real fluxes of the sources is essential. For this purpose a simulator of artificial images with crowded stellar fields provides initial information on source fluxes for a robust statistical comparison of various deconvolution methods. The "GlencoeSim" simulator and the algorithms presented in this paper consider various settings of Point-Spread Functions, noise types and spatial distributions, with the aim of producing as realistic an astronomical optical stellar image as possible.

  14. MAXI/GSC detection of X-ray enhancement toward the globular cluster Tarzan 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negoro, H.; Shidatsu, M.; Ueno, S.; Tomida, H.; Nakahira, S.; Kimura, M.; Ishikawa, M.; Nakagawa, Y.; Mihara, T.; Sugizaki, M.; Serino, M.; Morii, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Sugimoto, J.; Takagi, T.; Matsuoka, M.; Kawai, N.; Usui, R.; Ishikawa, K.; Yoshii, T.; Yoshida, A.; Sakamoto, T.; Nakano, Y.; Kawakubo, Y.; Tsunemi, H.; Sasaki, M.; Nakajima, M.; Fukushima, K.; Onodera, T.; Suzuki, K.; Ueda, Y.; Kawamuro, T.; Tsuboi, Y.; Higa, M.; Yamauchi, M.; Yoshidome, K.; Ogawa, Y.; Yamada, H.; Yamaoka, K.

    2013-06-01

    At 23:18 UT on May 24th, 2013, the MAXI/GSC auto-detection system triggered X-ray enhancement at the position consistent with the globular cluster Terzan 1. We have confirmed that the X-ray flux has gradually increased from around May 19th, 2013 (MJD 56431), and still remains stable on timescale of days at the 4-10 keV flux of about 8 mCrab. The central position of the enhanced region in the smoothed 2-20 keV image, obtained from May 19th to May 30th, is (R.A., Dec) = (263.84, -30.48) with a typical uncertainty of 0.3 deg.

  15. A spectroscopic study of chemical abundances in the globular cluster Omega Centauri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, S.P.

    1987-10-01

    Blue spectra at a resolution of 0.5 A of red giants in the globular clusters Omega Centauri and NGCs 288, 362, 6397 and 6809 (M55) have been obtained with the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The observations were made to test Sweigart and Mengel's [Astrophy S. J. 229, 624] theory of mixing of nuclearly-processed material to the star's surface, and to elucidate the relationship between primordial and evolutionary origins for the range in abundance within Omega Cen. The Omega Cen stars were chosen in two groups either side of the giant branch, covering the luminosity range where the onset of mixing was predicted to occur. Abundances of C, N, Fe and other heavy elements have been determined by fitting synthetic spectra, calculated from model atmospheres, to the observational data. (author)

  16. Searching for IMBHs in Galactic globular clusters through radial velocities of individual stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzoni, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    I present an overview of our ongoing project aimed at building a new generation of velocity dispersion profiles ad rotation curves for a representative sample of Galactic globular clusters, from the the radial velocity of hundreds of individual stars distributed at different distances from the cluster center. The innermost portion of the profiles will be used to constrain the possible presence of intermediate-mass black holes. The adopted methodology consists of combining spectroscopic observations acquired with three different instruments at the ESO-VLT: the adaptive-optics assisted, integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph SINFONI for the innermost and highly crowded cluster cores, the multi-IFU spectrograph KMOS for the intermediate regions, and the multi-fiber instrument FLAMES/GIRAFFE-MEDUSA for the outskirts. The case of NGC 6388, representing the pilot project that motivated the entire program, is described in some details.

  17. Carbon and nitrogen abundances in giant stars of the metal-poor globular cluster M92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon, D.F.; Langer, G.E.; Butler, D.; Kraft, R.P.; Suntzeff, N.B.; Kemper, E.; Trefzger, C.F.; Romanishin, W.

    1982-01-01

    Zinn in 1973 and 1977 and Norris and Zinn in 1977 showed that in M92 and several other metal-poor globular clusters the G bands (mostly due to CH) in the spectra of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are systematically weaker than those found in the less highly evolved subgiant branch (SGB) stars. If carbon is depleted in the atmospheres of evolved stars because material at the base of the envelope, processed through the CN cycle, has been mixed with the material above, then the atmospheric nitrogen abundance should be correspondingly increased. In this paper we test the hypothesis that C and N abundances in M92 giants are negatively correlated as the evolutionary state becomes more advanced. We find that this simple hypothesis is not adequate to describe the complex behavior of C and N in the cluster giants

  18. Application of CCD uvby photometry to the globular cluster NGC 6397

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony-twarog, B.J.

    1987-06-01

    The CTIO 4-m prime-focus CCD has been used with Stromgren uvby filters to study the turnoff of the globular cluster NGC 6397. A well-defined CM diagram to V about 18 has been achieved. A previously noted correlation between delta m1 and delta c1 for turnoff stars appears to be confirmed by the observations. This correlation is not predicted by model atmosphere synthesis of Stromgren colors, and has not been confirmed by recent observations of metal-poor dwarfs bluer than b-y = 0.40 by Schuster and Nissen (1987). An age of 16.6 + or - 0.7 x 10 to the 9th yr is indicated for a color excess of E(b-y) = 0.13 and (Fe/H) = -2.2. 43 references.

  19. The puzzling assembly of the Milky Way halo – contributions from dwarf Spheroidals and globular clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lépine S.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available While recent sky surveys have uncovered large numbers of ever fainter Milky Way satellites, their classification as star clusters, low-luminosity galaxies, or tidal overdensities remains often unclear. Likewise, their contributions to the build-up of the halo is yet debated. In this contribution we will discuss the current knowledge of the stellar populations and chemo-dynamics in these puzzling satellites, with a particular focus on dwarf spheroidal galaxies and the globular clusters in the outer Galactic halo. Also the question of whether some of the outermost halo objects are dynamically associated with the (Milky Way halo at all is addressed in terms of proper measurements in the remote Leo I and II dwarf galaxies.

  20. Suppression of globular cluster formation in metal-poor gas clouds by Lyman α radiation feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Makito; Yajima, Hidenobu

    2018-03-01

    We study the impact of Ly α radiation feedback on globular cluster (GC) formation. In this Letter, we analytically derive the relation between star formation efficiency (SFE) and metallicity in spherical clouds with the Ly α radiation feedback. Our models show that the SFE becomes small as the metallicity decreases. In metal-poor gas clouds, Ly α photons are trapped for a long time and exert strong radiation force to the gas, resulting in the suppression of star formation. We find that bound star clusters (SFE ≳ 0.5) form only for the metallicity higher than ˜ 10- 2.5 Z⊙ in the case with the initial cloud mass 105 M⊙ and the radius 5 pc. Our models successfully reproduce the lower bound of observed metallicity of GCs. Thus, we suggest that the Ly α radiation feedback can be essential in understanding the formation of GCs.

  1. Immunochemical and autoantigenic properties of the globular domain of basement membrane collagen (type IV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Mark, H; Oberbäumer, I; Timpl, R; Kemler, R; Wick, G

    1985-02-01

    Polyclonal rabbit antibodies raised against the globular domain NC1 of collagen IV from human placenta and a mouse tumor react with conformational antigenic determinants present on the NC1 hexamers and also with the three major subunits obtained after dissociation. The antibodies recognized unique structures within basement membranes and showed a broad tissue reactivity but only limited species cross-reactivity. Using these antibodies, it was possible to detect small amounts of collagen IV antigens from cell cultures and in serum. Monoclonal rat antibodies against mouse NC1 revealed a similar reaction potential. Autoantibodies could be produced in mice against mouse NC1 which react with kidney and lung basement membranes in a pathological manner, mimicking Goodpasture syndrome.

  2. Abundance inhomogeneities and atmospheric structure in CN-bimodal globular cluster giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Plez, Bertrand; Smith, Verne V.

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested by several authors that the sodium and aluminum abundance variations correlating with CN-band strength, frequently observed in CN-bimodal globular cluster giants, could be spurious manifestations of different temperature structures in the 'CN-strong' and 'CN-weak' stars, caused by different molecular line blanketing related to the C, N, and O trio. For stellar parameters generally appropriate to giants in the intermediate metallicity CN-bimodal cluster M4, we demonstrate through new model atmosphere calculations, employing opacity sampling and spherical geometry, that the observed abundance anomalies cannot be the result of atmospheric temperature structure. Our results using spherical geometry are compared to identical calculations performed with plane-parallel geometry: the effects of atmospheric extension on derived abundances for all lines considered amount to less than 0.1 dex.

  3. Biophysics of protein evolution and evolutionary protein biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikosek, Tobias; Chan, Hue Sun

    2014-01-01

    The study of molecular evolution at the level of protein-coding genes often entails comparing large datasets of sequences to infer their evolutionary relationships. Despite the importance of a protein's structure and conformational dynamics to its function and thus its fitness, common phylogenetic methods embody minimal biophysical knowledge of proteins. To underscore the biophysical constraints on natural selection, we survey effects of protein mutations, highlighting the physical basis for marginal stability of natural globular proteins and how requirement for kinetic stability and avoidance of misfolding and misinteractions might have affected protein evolution. The biophysical underpinnings of these effects have been addressed by models with an explicit coarse-grained spatial representation of the polypeptide chain. Sequence–structure mappings based on such models are powerful conceptual tools that rationalize mutational robustness, evolvability, epistasis, promiscuous function performed by ‘hidden’ conformational states, resolution of adaptive conflicts and conformational switches in the evolution from one protein fold to another. Recently, protein biophysics has been applied to derive more accurate evolutionary accounts of sequence data. Methods have also been developed to exploit sequence-based evolutionary information to predict biophysical behaviours of proteins. The success of these approaches demonstrates a deep synergy between the fields of protein biophysics and protein evolution. PMID:25165599

  4. A Spectroscopic Analysis of the Galactic Globular Cluster NGC 6273 (M19)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Rich, R. Michael; Pilachowski, Catherine A.; Caldwell, Nelson; Mateo, Mario; Bailey, John I., III; Crane, Jeffrey D.

    2015-08-01

    A combined effort utilizing spectroscopy and photometry has revealed the existence of a new globular cluster class. These “anomalous” clusters, which we refer to as “iron-complex” clusters, are differentiated from normal clusters by exhibiting large (≳0.10 dex) intrinsic metallicity dispersions, complex sub-giant branches, and correlated [Fe/H] and s-process enhancements. In order to further investigate this phenomenon, we have measured radial velocities and chemical abundances for red giant branch stars in the massive, but scarcely studied, globular cluster NGC 6273. The velocities and abundances were determined using high resolution (R ˜ 27,000) spectra obtained with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS) and MSpec spectrograph on the Magellan-Clay 6.5 m telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. We find that NGC 6273 has an average heliocentric radial velocity of +144.49 km s-1 (σ = 9.64 km s-1) and an extended metallicity distribution ([Fe/H] = -1.80 to -1.30) composed of at least two distinct stellar populations. Although the two dominant populations have similar [Na/Fe], [Al/Fe], and [α/Fe] abundance patterns, the more metal-rich stars exhibit significant [La/Fe] enhancements. The [La/Eu] data indicate that the increase in [La/Fe] is due to almost pure s-process enrichment. A third more metal-rich population with low [X/Fe] ratios may also be present. Therefore, NGC 6273 joins clusters such as ω Centauri, M2, M22, and NGC 5286 as a new class of iron-complex clusters exhibiting complicated star formation histories. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  5. An intermediate-mass black hole in the centre of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kızıltan, Bülent; Baumgardt, Holger; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-02-08

    Intermediate-mass black holes should help us to understand the evolutionary connection between stellar-mass and super-massive black holes. However, the existence of intermediate-mass black holes is still uncertain, and their formation process is therefore unknown. It has long been suspected that black holes with masses 100 to 10,000 times that of the Sun should form and reside in dense stellar systems. Therefore, dedicated observational campaigns have targeted globular clusters for many decades, searching for signatures of these elusive objects. All candidate signatures appear radio-dim and do not have the X-ray to radio flux ratios required for accreting black holes. Based on the lack of an electromagnetic counterpart, upper limits of 2,060 and 470 solar masses have been placed on the mass of a putative black hole in 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) from radio and X-ray observations, respectively. Here we show there is evidence for a central black hole in 47 Tucanae with a mass of solar masses when the dynamical state of the globular cluster is probed with pulsars. The existence of an intermediate-mass black hole in the centre of one of the densest clusters with no detectable electromagnetic counterpart suggests that the black hole is not accreting at a sufficient rate to make it electromagnetically bright and therefore, contrary to expectations, is gas-starved. This intermediate-mass black hole might be a member of an electromagnetically invisible population of black holes that grow into supermassive black holes in galaxies.

  6. THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE UV LEGACY SURVEY OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. VIII. PRELIMINARY PUBLIC CATALOG RELEASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, M.; Bellini, A.; Anderson, J.; Van der Marel, R. P.; Brown, T. M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, San Martin Drive 3700, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Piotto, G.; Granata, V.; Ortolani, S.; Nardiello, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia Galileo Galilei, Università di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bedin, L. R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Milone, A. P. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT, 2611 (Australia); Cool, A. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States); King, I. R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Sarajedini, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Cassisi, S. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Teramo, Via Mentore Maggini s.n.c., I-64100 Teramo (Italy); Aparicio, A.; Hidalgo, S., E-mail: mario.soto@uda.cl [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain)

    2017-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) UV Legacy Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters (GO-13297) has been specifically designed to complement the existing F606W and F814W observations of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Globular Cluster Survey (GO-10775) by observing the most accessible 47 of the previous survey’s 65 clusters in three WFC3/UVIS filters F275W, F336W, and F438W. The new survey also adds super-solar metallicity open cluster NGC 6791 to increase the metallicity diversity. The combined survey provides a homogeneous 5-band data set that can be used to pursue a broad range of scientific investigations. In particular, the chosen UV filters allow the identification of multiple stellar populations by targeting the regions of the spectrum that are sensitive to abundance variations in C, N, and O. In order to provide the community with uniform preliminary catalogs, we have devised an automated procedure that performs high-quality photometry on the new UV observations (along with similar observations of seven other programs in the archive). This procedure finds and measures the potential sources on each individual exposure using library point-spread functions and cross-correlates these observations with the original ACS-Survey catalog. The catalog of 57 clusters we publish here will be useful to identify stars in the different stellar populations, in particular for spectroscopic follow-up. Eventually, we will construct a more sophisticated catalog and artificial-star tests based on an optimal reduction of the UV survey data, but the catalogs presented here give the community the chance to make early use of this HST Treasury survey.

  7. A Deep X-ray Survey of the Globular Cluster Omega Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henleywillis, Simon; Cool, Adrienne M.; Haggard, Daryl; Heinke, Craig; Callanan, Paul; Zhao, Yue

    2018-03-01

    We identify 233 X-ray sources, of which 95 are new, in a 222 ks exposure of Omega Centauri with the Chandra X-ray Observatory's ACIS-I detector. The limiting unabsorbed flux in the core is fX(0.5-6.0 keV) ≃ 3×10-16 erg s-1 cm-2 (Lx ≃ 1×1030 erg s-1 at 5.2 kpc). We estimate that ˜60 ± 20 of these are cluster members, of which ˜30 lie within the core (rc = 155 arcsec), and another ˜30 between 1-2 core radii. We identify four new optical counterparts, for a total of 45 likely identifications. Probable cluster members include 18 cataclysmic variables (CVs) and CV candidates, one quiescent low-mass X-ray binary, four variable stars, and five stars that are either associated with ω Cen's anomalous red giant branch, or are sub-subgiants. We estimate that the cluster contains 40 ± 10 CVs with Lx > 1031 erg s-1, confirming that CVs are underabundant in ω Cen relative to the field. Intrinsic absorption is required to fit X-ray spectra of six of the nine brightest CVs, suggesting magnetic CVs, or high-inclination systems. Though no radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are currently known in ω Cen, more than 30 unidentified sources have luminosities and X-ray colours like those of MSPs found in other globular clusters; these could be responsible for the Fermi-detected gamma-ray emission from the cluster. Finally, we identify a CH star as the counterpart to the second-brightest X-ray source in the cluster and argue that it is a symbiotic star. This is the first such giant/white dwarf binary to be identified in a globular cluster.

  8. Globular Cluster Streams as Galactic High-Precision Scales - The Poster Child Palomar 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupper, Andreas Hans Wilhelm; Balbinot, Eduardo; Bonaca, Ana; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Hogg, David W.; Kroupa, Pavel; Santiago, Basilio

    2015-01-01

    We model the tidal stream of the Milky Way globular cluster Palomar 5 (Pal 5), and show that the unique geometry of the problem yields powerful constraints on the model parameters characterizing the Local Standard of Rest (LSR), the Milky Way and Pal 5 itself. Using only SDSS data and a few radial velocities from the literature, we find that the distance of the Sun from the Galactic Center is 8.30+/-0.25 kpc, and the LSR transverse velocity is 242+/-16 km/s. Assuming that the dark halo of the Galaxy follows a NFW density profile, we fit it with a virial mass of (1.6+/-0.4) 1012Msun, a virial radius of 195+/-19 kpc, and hence a rather low concentration of 5+/-2. Moreover, we find it with a flattening of qz = 0.95(+0.16)(-0.12) to be essentially spherical - at least within the inner 25 kpc, which are effectively probed by Pal 5. We also determine Pal 5's mass, distance and proper motions independently from other methods, which enables us to perform vital cross-checks for these methods. We conclude that finding more globular cluster streams is essential for mapping out the structure of the halo of our Galaxy to high precision. Finally, we point out that all our best-fit models yield similar substructure patterns as the ones observed in the Pal 5 stream within about 5 kpc of the cluster. The origin of these substructures is epicylic motion of stars along the stream. Such epicylic substructures have to be taken into account when searching tidal streams for signs of past encounters with dark-matter subhalos

  9. Chemical Abundances of Red Giant Stars in the Globular Cluster M107 (NGC 6171)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Julia E.; Johnson, Christian I.; Pilachowski, Catherine A.; Burks, Geoffrey

    2011-10-01

    We present chemical abundances of Al and several Fe-Peak and neutron-capture elements for 13 red giant branch stars in the Galactic globular cluster NGC 6171 (M107). The abundances were determined using equivalent width and spectrum synthesis analyses of moderate-resolution ( R ˜ 15,000), moderate signal-to-noise ratio ( ˜ 80) spectra obtained with the WIYN telescope and Hydra multifiber spectrograph. A comparison between photometric and spectroscopic effective temperature estimates seems to indicate that a reddening value of E(B - V) = 0.46 may be more appropriate for this cluster than the more commonly used value of E(B - V) = 0.33. Similarly, we found that a distance modulus of (m - M)V ≈ 13.7 provided reasonable surface gravity estimates for the stars in our sample. Our spectroscopic analysis finds M107 to be moderately metal-poor with = -0.93 and also exhibits a small star-to-star metallicity dispersion (σ = 0.04). These results are consistent with previous photometric and spectroscopic studies. Aluminum appears to be moderately enhanced in all program stars ( = +0.39, σ = 0.11). The relatively small star-to-star scatter in [Al/Fe] differs from the trend found in more metal-poor globular clusters, and is more similar to what is found in clusters with [Fe/H] ≳ -1. The cluster also appears to be moderately r-process-enriched with = +0.32 (σ = 0.17).

  10. Strömgren photometry in globular clusters: M55 & M22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, P.; Hilker, M.; Richtler, T.

    1999-10-01

    We present Strömgren CCD photometry for the two galactic globular clusters M55 (NGC 6809) and M22 (NGC 6656). We find average Strömgren metallicities of -1.71+/- 0.04 dex for M55 and -1.62+/- 0.08 dex for M22. The determination of metal abundances in cluster giants with the Strömgren m_1 index in comparison with spectroscopic data from Briley et al. (1993) and Norris & Freeman (1982, 1983) shows that M55 and M22 have different distributions of cyanogen strengths. In M55, no CN abundance variations are visible among the giant-branch stars. In striking contrast, a large dispersion of cyanogen strengths is seen in M22. For M22 we find patchily distributed variations in the foreground reddening of Delta E(B-V) ~ 0.07, which explain the colour dispersion among the giant-branch stars. There is no evidence for a spread in iron within M22 since the variations in m_1 are dominated by the large range in CN abundances, as already found by Anthony-Twarog et al. (1995). The difference between M55 and M22 may resemble the difference in integral CN band strength between M31 globular clusters and the galactic system. The colour-magnitude diagram of M55 shows the presence of a population of 56 blue-straggler stars that are more centrally concentrated than the red giant-branch stars. Based on data collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile

  11. An Extremely Lithium-rich Bright Red Giant in the Globular Cluster M3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Robert P.; Peterson, Ruth C.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Sneden, Christopher; Fulbright, Jon P.; Langer, G. Edward

    1999-06-01

    We have serendipitously discovered an extremely lithium-rich star on the red giant branch of the globular cluster M3 (NGC 5272). An echelle spectrum obtained with the Keck I High-Resolution Echelle Spectrograph reveals a Li I λ6707 resonance doublet of 520 mÅ equivalent width, and our analysis places the star among the most Li-rich giants known: logε(Li)~=+3.0. We determine the elemental abundances of this star, IV-101, and three other cluster members of similar luminosity and color and conclude that IV-101 has abundance ratios typical of giants in M3 and M13 that have undergone significant mixing. We discuss mechanisms by which a low-mass star may be so enriched in Li, focusing on the mixing of material processed by the hydrogen-burning shell just below the convective envelope. While such enrichment could conceivably happen only rarely, it may in fact regularly occur during giant-branch evolution but be rarely detected because of rapid subsequent Li depletion. Based on observations obtained with the Keck I Telescope of the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the California Association for Research in Astronomy (CARA), Inc., on behalf of the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. This Letter is dedicated to the memory of our beloved colleague Ed Langer, who died after a brief illness on February 16, 1999. Ed brought a unique theoretical perspective to our globular cluster abundance studies. His career truly embodied the academic ideals of inspiration in both teaching and research. He made friends wherever he traveled, and was an inspiration to students. We will miss him greatly.

  12. The SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and Galaxies survey (SLUGGS): sample definition, methods, and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Jean P.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Jennings, Zachary G.; Pota, Vincenzo; Kader, Justin; Roediger, Joel C.; Villaume, Alexa; Arnold, Jacob A.; Woodley, Kristin A. [University of California Observatories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Strader, Jay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Forbes, Duncan A.; Pastorello, Nicola; Usher, Christopher; Blom, Christina; Kartha, Sreeja S. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Foster, Caroline; Spitler, Lee R., E-mail: jbrodie@ucsc.edu [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

    2014-11-20

    We introduce and provide the scientific motivation for a wide-field photometric and spectroscopic chemodynamical survey of nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs) and their globular cluster (GC) systems. The SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and GalaxieS (SLUGGS) survey is being carried out primarily with Subaru/Suprime-Cam and Keck/DEIMOS. The former provides deep gri imaging over a 900 arcmin{sup 2} field-of-view to characterize GC and host galaxy colors and spatial distributions, and to identify spectroscopic targets. The NIR Ca II triplet provides GC line-of-sight velocities and metallicities out to typically ∼8 R {sub e}, and to ∼15 R {sub e} in some cases. New techniques to extract integrated stellar kinematics and metallicities to large radii (∼2-3 R {sub e}) are used in concert with GC data to create two-dimensional (2D) velocity and metallicity maps for comparison with simulations of galaxy formation. The advantages of SLUGGS compared with other, complementary, 2D-chemodynamical surveys are its superior velocity resolution, radial extent, and multiple halo tracers. We describe the sample of 25 nearby ETGs, the selection criteria for galaxies and GCs, the observing strategies, the data reduction techniques, and modeling methods. The survey observations are nearly complete and more than 30 papers have so far been published using SLUGGS data. Here we summarize some initial results, including signatures of two-phase galaxy assembly, evidence for GC metallicity bimodality, and a novel framework for the formation of extended star clusters and ultracompact dwarfs. An integrated overview of current chemodynamical constraints on GC systems points to separate, in situ formation modes at high redshifts for metal-poor and metal-rich GCs.

  13. Photometric study of the eclipsing blue straggler V205 in the globular cluster NGC 5139

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K.

    2018-02-01

    B and V light curves of an EA-type binary V205 in the globular cluster NGC 5139 are analyzed by the W-D program. We found that V205 is possibly a detached binary and the mass ratio is 0.1596. The secondary component is touching or nearly touching its inner Roche Lobe. By studying the O - C diagram of V205, we discovered that the orbital period is continuously decrease at a rate of dp / dt = - 1.89(± 0.01) ×10-7 d yr-1 and should be caused by angular momentum and mass loss. The angular momentum loss will drive it evolve into a contact binary. Since V205 is a proper motion member of NGC 5139, we estimated its absolute parameters based on the distance modulus of the cluster and determined that: a = 2.50R⊙ , M1 = 0.76M⊙ , R1 = 1.14R⊙ , L1 = 5.46L⊙ , M2 = 0.12M⊙ , R2 = 0.52R⊙ , and L2 = 0.70L⊙ . V205 occupied the blue straggler stars on the color-magnitude diagram of NGC 5139. It is an eclipsing blue straggler and is most possibly formed by mass transfer between the two components. Since original short-period systems similar to V205 should be evolved in such a long life time of the globular cluster, the short-period binary should undergo special evolutionary stages. High accuracy photometric and high resolution spectral observations are essential for this unusual system.

  14. A photometric study of globular clusters observed by the APOGEE survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, Szabolcs; García-Hernández, D. A.; Cassisi, Santi; Monelli, Matteo; Szigeti, László; Dell'Agli, Flavia; Derekas, Alíz; Masseron, Thomas; Shetrone, Matthew; Stetson, Peter; Zamora, Olga

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we describe the photometric and spectroscopic properties of multiple populations in seven northern globular clusters. In this study, we employ precise ground-based photometry from the private collection of Stetson, space photometry from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), literature abundances of Na and O, and Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey abundances for Mg, Al, C, and N. Multiple populations are identified by their position in the CU, B, I -Vpseudo colour-magnitude diagram (pseudo-CMD) and confirmed with their chemical composition determined using abundances. We confirm the expectation from previous studies that the red giant branches (RGBs) in all seven clusters are split and the different branches have different chemical compositions. The Mg-Al anticorrelations were well explored by the APOGEE and Gaia-ESO surveys for most globular clusters, some clusters showing bimodal distributions, while others continuous distributions. Even though the structure (i.e. bimodal versus continuous) of Mg-Al can greatly vary, the Al-rich and Al-poor populations do not seem to have very different photometric properties, agreeing with theoretical calculations. There is no one-to-one correspondence between the Mg-Al anticorrelation shape (bimodal versus continuous) and the structure of the RGB seen in the HST pseudo-CMDs, with the HST photometric information usually implying more complex formation/evolution histories than the spectroscopic ones. We report on finding two second-generation horizontal branch (HB) stars in M5, and five second-generation asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in M92, which is the most metal-poor cluster to date in which second-generation AGB stars have been observed.

  15. FURTHER DEFINITION OF THE MASS-METALLICITY RELATION IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS AROUND BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockcroft, Robert; Harris, William E.; Wehner, Elizabeth M. H.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Rothberg, Barry

    2009-01-01

    We combine the globular cluster (GC) data for 15 brightest cluster galaxies and use this material to trace the mass-metallicity relations (MMRs) in their globular cluster systems (GCSs). This work extends previous studies which correlate the properties of the MMR with those of the host galaxy. Our combined data sets show a mean trend for the metal-poor subpopulation that corresponds to a scaling of heavy-element abundance with cluster mass Z ∼ M 0.30±0.05 . No trend is seen for the metal-rich subpopulation which has a scaling relation that is consistent with zero. We also find that the scaling exponent is independent of the GCS specific frequency and host galaxy luminosity, except perhaps for dwarf galaxies. We present new photometry in (g',i') obtained with Gemini/GMOS for the GC populations around the southern giant ellipticals NGC 5193 and IC 4329. Both galaxies have rich cluster populations which show up as normal, bimodal sequences in the color-magnitude diagram. We test the observed MMRs and argue that they are statistically real, and not an artifact caused by the method we used. We also argue against asymmetric contamination causing the observed MMR as our mean results are no different from other contamination-free studies. Finally, we compare our method to the standard bimodal fitting method (KMM or RMIX) and find our results are consistent. Interpretation of these results is consistent with recent models for GC formation in which the MMR is determined by GC self-enrichment during their brief formation period.

  16. A single population of red globular clusters around the massive compact galaxy NGC 1277

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Michael A.; Trujillo, Ignacio; Leaman, Ryan; Montes, Mireia

    2018-03-01

    Massive galaxies are thought to form in two phases: an initial collapse of gas and giant burst of central star formation, followed by the later accretion of material that builds up their stellar and dark-matter haloes. The systems of globular clusters within such galaxies are believed to form in a similar manner. The initial central burst forms metal-rich (spectrally red) clusters, whereas more metal-poor (spectrally blue) clusters are brought in by the later accretion of less-massive satellites. This formation process is thought to result in the multimodal optical colour distributions that are seen in the globular cluster systems of massive galaxies. Here we report optical observations of the massive relic-galaxy candidate NGC 1277—a nearby, un-evolved example of a high-redshift ‘red nugget’ galaxy. We find that the optical colour distribution of the cluster system of NGC 1277 is unimodal and entirely red. This finding is in strong contrast to other galaxies of similar and larger stellar mass, the cluster systems of which always exhibit (and are generally dominated by) blue clusters. We argue that the colour distribution of the cluster system of NGC 1277 indicates that the galaxy has undergone little (if any) mass accretion after its initial collapse, and use simulations of possible merger histories to show that the stellar mass due to accretion is probably at most ten per cent of the total stellar mass of the galaxy. These results confirm that NGC 1277 is a genuine relic galaxy and demonstrate that blue clusters constitute an accreted population in present-day massive galaxies.

  17. Therapeutic effects of globular adiponectin in diabetic rats with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hong; Cui, Fan; Dong, Jing-Jing; You, Guo-Ping; Yang, Xiang-Jiu; Lu, Hua-Dong; Huang, Yan-Ling

    2014-10-28

    To explore the therapeutic role of globular adiponectin (gAd) in high-fat diet/streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 2 diabetic rats with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Seven rats were fed a basic diet (normal control group; NC) during the experiment. Experimental rats (14 rats) were given a high-fat diet for 4 wk and were then injected with STZ to induce type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and NAFLD. Half of the T2DM/NAFLD rats were randomly injected intraperitoneally with gAd for 7 d (gAd-treated group), while the other 7 rats (T2DM/NAFLD group) received 0.9% saline. Plasma biochemical parameters and insulin concentrations were measured. Liver histopathology was examined by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Insulin receptor expression in the liver was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining, Western blot and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. Compared to the control group, the T2DM/NAFLD group had increased levels of glucolipid and decreased levels of insulin. Plasma glucose and lipid levels were decreased in the gAd-treated group, while serum insulin levels increased. The expression of insulin receptor in the T2DM/NAFLD group increased compared with the NC group, and gAd downregulated insulin receptor expression in the livers of T2DM/NAFLD rats. Steatosis of the liver was alleviated in the gAd-treated group compared to the T2DM/NAFLD group (NAS 1.39 ± 0.51 vs 1.92 ± 0.51, P Globular adiponectin exerts beneficial effects in T2DM rats with NAFLD by promoting insulin secretion, mediating glucolipid metabolism, regulating insulin receptor expression and alleviating hepatic steatosis.

  18. ON THE RR LYRAE STARS IN GLOBULARS. IV. ω CENTAURI OPTICAL UBVRI PHOTOMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, V. F.; Bono, G.; Buonanno, R. [Department of Physics, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Stetson, P. B. [NRC-Herzberg, Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Dall’Ora, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Castellani, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Fiorentino, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Freyhammer, L. M. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute of Astrophysics, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Marengo, M.; Neeley, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Valenti, E. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany); Calamida, A. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Da Silva, R.; Fabrizio, M.; Giuffrida, G. [ASDC, via del Politecnico snc, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Degl’Innocenti, S. [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, I-56127, Pisa (Italy); Di Cecco, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Teramo, Via Mentore Maggini snc, Loc. Collurania, I-64100 Teramo (Italy); Freedman, W. L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); and others

    2016-12-01

    New accurate and homogeneous optical UBVRI photometry has been obtained for variable stars in the Galactic globular cluster ω Cen (NGC 5139). We secured 8202 CCD images covering a time interval of 24 years and a sky area of 84 × 48 arcmin. The current data were complemented with data available in the literature and provided new, homogeneous pulsation parameters (mean magnitudes, luminosity amplitudes, periods) for 187 candidate ω Cen RR Lyrae (RRLs). Among them we have 101 RRc (first overtone) and 85 RRab (fundamental) variables, and a single candidate RRd (double-mode) variable. Candidate Blazhko RRLs show periods and colors that are intermediate between the RRc and RRab variables, suggesting that they are transitional objects. A comparison of the period distribution and the Bailey diagram indicates that RRLs in ω Cen show a long-period tail not present in typical Oosterhoff II (OoII) globulars. The RRLs in dwarf spheroidals and in ultra-faint dwarfs have properties between Oosterhoff intermediate and OoII clusters. Metallicity plays a key role in shaping the above evidence. These findings do not support the hypothesis that ω Cen is the core remnant of a spoiled dwarf galaxy. Using optical period–Wesenheit relations that are reddening-free and minimally dependent on metallicity we find a mean distance to ω Cen of 13.71 ± 0.08 ± 0.01 mag (semi-empirical and theoretical calibrations). Finally, we invert the I -band period–luminosity–metallicity relation to estimate individual RRLs’ metal abundances. The metallicity distribution agrees quite well with spectroscopic and photometric metallicity estimates available in the literature.

  19. Limits on [O III] 5007 Emission from NGC 4472's Globular Clusters: Constraints on Planetary Nebulae and Ultraluminous Black Hole X-Ray Binaries in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Maccarone, Thomas J.

    2012-06-01

    We have searched for [O III] 5007 emission in high-resolution spectroscopic data from FLAMES/GIRAFFE Very Large Telescope observations of 174 massive globular clusters (GCs) in NGC 4472. No planetary nebulae (PNe) are observed in these clusters, constraining the number of PNe per bolometric luminosity, α evolution, if all stars produce PNe. Comparing our results to populations of PNe in galaxies, we find most galaxies have a higher α than these GCs (more PNe per bolometric luminosity—though some massive early-type galaxies do have similarly low α). The low α required in these GCs suggests that the number of PNe per bolometric luminosity does not increase strongly with decreasing mass or metallicity of the stellar population. We find no evidence for correlations between the presence of known GC PNe and either the presence of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) or the stellar interaction rates in the GCs. This, and the low α observed, suggests that the formation of PNe may not be enhanced in tight binary systems. These data do identify one [O III] emission feature, this is the (previously published) broad [O III] emission from the cluster RZ 2109. This emission is thought to originate from the LMXB in this cluster, which is accreting at super-Eddington rates. The absence of any similar [O III] emission from the other clusters favors the hypothesis that this source is a black hole LMXB, rather than a neutron star LMXB with significant geometric beaming of its X-ray emission.

  20. cDNA cloning of the basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein, bamacan: a five domain structure including coiled-coil motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, R R; Couchman, J R

    1997-01-01

    obtained cDNA clones encoding the entire bamacan core protein of Mr = 138 kD, which reveal a five domain, head-rod-tail configuration. The head and tail are potentially globular, while the central large rod probably forms coiled-coil structures, with one large central and several very short interruptions....... The protein sequence has low overall homology, apart from very small NH2- and COOH-terminal motifs. At the junctions between the distal globular domains and the coiled-coil regions lie glycosylation sites, with up to three N-linked oligosaccharides and probably three chondroitin chains. Three other Ser...

  1. Structural insights into the globular tails of the human type v myosins Myo5a, Myo5b, And Myo5c.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Velvarska

    Full Text Available Vertebrate type V myosins (MyoV Myo5a, Myo5b, and Myo5c mediate transport of several different cargoes. All MyoV paralogs bind to cargo complexes mainly by their C-terminal globular domains. In absence of cargo, the globular domain of Myo5a inhibits its motor domain. Here, we report low-resolution SAXS models for the globular domains from human Myo5a, Myo5b, and Myo5c, which suggest very similar overall shapes of all three paralogs. We determined the crystal structures of globular domains from Myo5a and Myo5b, and provide a homology model for human Myo5c. When we docked the Myo5a crystal structure into a previously published electron microscopy density of the autoinhibited full-length Myo5a, only one domain orientation resulted in a good fit. This structural arrangement suggests the participation of additional region of the globular domain in autoinhibition. Quantification of the interaction of the Myo5a globular domain with its motor complex revealed a tight binding with dissociation half-life in the order of minutes, suggesting a rather slow transition between the active and inactive states.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Globular and open clusters observed by SDSS/SEGUE (Morrison+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, H. L.; Ma, Z.; Clem, J. L.; An, D.; Connor, T.; Schechtman-Rook, A.; Casagrande, L.; Rockosi, C.; Yanny, B.; Harding, P.; Beers, T. C.; Johnson, J. A.; Schneider, D. P.

    2018-03-01

    The SEGUE project observed a number of globular and open clusters for calibration purposes. For calibration of the red giants, we selected the globular clusters M92, M13 and M71 (spanning metallicities from -2.4 to -0.8) and the open clusters Be 29, NGC 7789 and NGC 6791, whose [Fe/H] values range from -0.4 to +0.4. In all but one case, the clusters are within the SDSS footprint and so ugriz photometry is available for the cluster stars. The SDSS cluster images were analyzed using DAOPHOT (Stetson 1987PASP...99..191S) by An et al. (2008ApJS..179..326A) because the SDSS photometric pipeline was not designed to handle crowded fields. (8 data files).

  3. High-resolution abundance analysis of red giants in the globular cluster NGC 6522

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuy, B.; Chiappini, C.; Cantelli, E.; Depagne, E.; Pignatari, M.; Hirschi, R.; Cescutti, G.; Ortolani, S.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Trevisan, M.; Bica, E.; Gómez, A.

    2014-10-01

    Context. The [Sr/Ba] and [Y/Ba] scatter observed in some galactic halo stars that are very metal-poor and in a few individual stars of the oldest known Milky Way globular cluster NGC 6522 have been interpreted as evidence of early enrichment by massive fast-rotating stars (spinstars). Because NGC 6522 is a bulge globular cluster, the suggestion was that not only the very-metal poor halo stars, but also bulge stars at [Fe/H] ~ -1 could be used as probes of the stellar nucleosynthesis signatures from the earlier generations of massive stars, but at much higher metallicity. For the bulge the suggestions were based on early spectra available for stars in NGC 6522, with a medium resolution of R ~ 22 000 and a moderate signal-to-noise ratio. Aims: The main purpose of this study is to re-analyse the NGC 6522 stars reported previously by using new high-resolution (R ~ 45 000) and high signal-to-noise spectra (S/N > 100). We aim at re-deriving their stellar parameters and elemental ratios, in particular the abundances of the neutron-capture s-process-dominated elements such as Sr, Y, Zr, La, and Ba, and of the r-element Eu. Methods: High-resolution spectra of four giants belonging to the bulge globular cluster NGC 6522 were obtained at the 8m VLT UT2-Kueyen telescope with the UVES spectrograph in FLAMES-UVES configuration. The spectroscopic parameters were derived based on the excitation and ionization equilibrium of Fe i and Fe ii. Results: Our analysis confirms a metallicity [Fe/H] = -0.95 ± 0.15 for NGC 6522 and the overabundance of the studied stars in Eu (with +0.2 < [Eu/Fe] < + 0.4) and alpha-elements O and Mg. The neutron-capture s-element-dominated Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, and La now show less pronounced variations from star to star. Enhancements are in the range 0.0 < [Sr/Fe] < +0.4, +0.23 < [Y/Fe] < +0.43, 0.0 < [Zr/Fe] < +0.4, 0.0 < [La/Fe] < +0.35, and 0.05 < [Ba/Fe] < +0.55. Conclusions: The very high overabundances of [Y/Fe] previously reported for the four studied

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HST photometry of M31 globular clusters (Federici+, 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, L.; Cacciari, C.; Bellazzini, M.; Fusi Pecci, F.; Galleti, S.; Perina, S.

    2013-01-01

    Tables g58.dat, g108.dat, g105.dat, g219.dat, b468.dat, g1.dat, g64.dat, g87.dat, g119.dat, g287.dat, g302.dat, g11.dat, g33.dat, g76.dat, g312.dat, g319.dat, g322.dat present the photometry of the individual stars of 17 M31 globular clusters observed with the WFPC2 on board of the HST, employing the F555W/F814W filters (Fusi Pecci et al. 1996AJ....112.1461F (FFP96), Rich et al. 2005AJ....129.2670R (R05)). The data reduction has been performed using ROMAFOT (Buonanno et al. 1983A&A...126..278B), a multicomponent fitting package purposely adapted to handle HST data, that provides as output the magnitudes and the pixel positions of the detected sources. The CTE-corrected photometric data were converted to the Johnson-Cousins V,I magnitudes according to Holtzman et al (1995PASP..107..156H). Table g351.dat presents the photometry of the individual stars of the M31 globular cluster B405-G351 observed with the HST/COSTAR-corrected FOC + the F430W/F480LP filters. The data reduction has been performed using ROMAFOT; the photometric data were converted to the Johnson-Cousins system B,V magnitudes (see FFP96). Tables gc1.dat, gc2.dat, gc3.dat, gc5.dat, gc6.dat, gc7.dat, gc8.dat, gc9.dat, gc10.dat, gc4.dat, ec1.dat, ec2.dat, ec3.dat, ec4.dat present the photometry of the individual stars of 14 M31 globular clusters observed with the WFC/ACS on board of the HST + F435W/F606W filters (see Galleti et al., 2006ApJ...650L.107G; Mackey et al., 2007ApJ...655L..85M; Mackey et al., 2006ApJ...653L.105M). The data reduction has been performed using the ACS module of DOLPHOT, a point spread function-fitting package specifically devoted to the photometry of HST data, that provides as output the magnitudes and the pixel positions of the detected sources, and a number of quality parameters for a suitable sample selection. The tables present, for the ACS chip holding the cluster, all the stars with valid measurements in both passbands, global quality flag=1, crowding parameter 23.5,and noise

  5. Protein conformational transitions at the liquid-gas interface as studied by dilational surface rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noskov, Boris A

    2014-04-01

    Experimental results on the dynamic dilational surface elasticity of protein solutions are analyzed and compared. Short reviews of the protein behavior at the liquid-gas interface and the dilational surface rheology precede the main sections of this work. The kinetic dependencies of the surface elasticity differ strongly for the solutions of globular and non-globular proteins. In the latter case these dependencies are similar to those for solutions of non-ionic amphiphilic polymers and have local maxima corresponding to the formation of the distal region of the surface layer (type I). In the former case the dynamic surface elasticity is much higher (>60 mN/m) and the kinetic dependencies are monotonical and similar to the data for aqueous dispersions of solid nanoparticles (type II). The addition of strong denaturants to solutions of bovine serum albumin and β-lactoglobulin results in an abrupt transition from the type II to type I dependencies if the denaturant concentration exceeds a certain critical value. These results give a strong argument in favor of the preservation of the protein globular structure in the course of adsorption without any denaturants. The addition of cationic surfactants also can lead to the non-monotonical kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity indicating destruction of the protein tertiary and secondary structures. The addition of anionic surfactants gives similar results only for the protein solutions of high ionic strength. The influence of cationic surfactants on the local maxima of the kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity for solutions of a non-globular protein (β-casein) differs from the influence of anionic surfactants due to the heterogeneity of the charge distribution along the protein chain. In this case one can use small admixtures of ionic surfactants as probes of the adsorption mechanism. The effect of polyelectrolytes on the kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity of protein

  6. Chemical Compositions of Stars in the Globular Cluster NGC 3201: Tracers of Multi-Epoch Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmerer, Jennifer A.; Ivans, I. I.; Filler, D.

    2012-01-01

    The retrograde halo globular cluster NGC 3201 contains stars of substantially different iron abundance ([Fe/H]), a property that puts it at odds with the vast majority of the Galactic cluster system. Though its unusual orbit prompted speculation that NGC 3201 was the remnant of a captured object, much like the multi-metallicity globular cluster Omega Centauri, NGC 3201 is much less massive than Omega Centauri and all of the other halo globular clusters that have internal metallicity variations. We present the abundances of 21 elements in 24 red giant branch stars in NGC 3201 based on high-resolution (R 40,000), high signal-to-noise (S/N 70) spectra. We find that the detailed abundance pattern of NGC 3201 is unique amongst multi-metallicity halo clusters. Unlike M22, Omega Centauri, and NGC 1851, neither metal-poor nor metal-rich stars show any evidence of s-process enrichment (a product of the advanced evolution of low- and intermediate-mass stars). We find that while Na, O, and Al vary from star to star as is typical in globular clusters, there is no systematic difference between the abundance pattern in the metal-poor cluster stars and that of the metal-rich cluster stars. Furthermore, we find that the metallicity variations in NGC 3201 are independent of the well-known Na-O anticorrelation, which separates it from every other multi-metallicity cluster. In the context of a multi-episode star formation model, this implies that NGC 3201 began life with the [Fe/H] variations we measure now.

  7. Hydra Observations of Aluminum Abundances in the Red Giants of the Globular Clusters M80 and NGC 6752

    OpenAIRE

    Cavallo, Robert M.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Pilachowski, Catherine A.

    2004-01-01

    Aluminum and other metal abundances were determined in 21 red giants in the globular clusters NGC 6752 and M80 as part of a larger study to determine whether the aluminum distribution on the red giant branch is related to the second parameter effect that causes clusters of similar metallicity to display different horizontal branch morphologies. The observations were obtained of the Al I lines near 6700 Angstroms with the CTIO Blanco 4-m telescope and Hydra multi-object spectrograph. The spect...

  8. THE HST/ACS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. IV. INTERGALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AND THE MASSIVE GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM AT THE CORE OF THE COMA GALAXY CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Eric W.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hammer, Derek; Lucey, John R.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Carter, David; Balcells, Marc; Bridges, Terry; Chiboucas, Kristin; Del Burgo, Carlos; Graham, Alister W.; Guzman, Rafael; Hudson, Michael J.; Matkovic, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Intracluster stellar populations are a natural result of tidal interactions in galaxy clusters. Measuring these populations is difficult, but important for understanding the assembly of the most massive galaxies. The Coma cluster of galaxies is one of the nearest truly massive galaxy clusters and is host to a correspondingly large system of globular clusters (GCs). We use imaging from the HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey to present the first definitive detection of a large population of intracluster GCs (IGCs) that fills the Coma cluster core and is not associated with individual galaxies. The GC surface density profile around the central massive elliptical galaxy, NGC 4874, is dominated at large radii by a population of IGCs that extend to the limit of our data (R +4000 -5000 (systematic) IGCs out to this radius, and that they make up ∼70% of the central GC system, making this the largest GC system in the nearby universe. Even including the GC systems of other cluster galaxies, the IGCs still make up ∼30%-45% of the GCs in the cluster core. Observational limits from previous studies of the intracluster light (ICL) suggest that the IGC population has a high specific frequency. If the IGC population has a specific frequency similar to high-S N dwarf galaxies, then the ICL has a mean surface brightness of μ V ∼ 27 mag arcsec -2 and a total stellar mass of roughly 10 12 M sun within the cluster core. The ICL makes up approximately half of the stellar luminosity and one-third of the stellar mass of the central (NGC 4874+ICL) system. The color distribution of the IGC population is bimodal, with blue, metal-poor GCs outnumbering red, metal-rich GCs by a ratio of 4:1. The inner GCs associated with NGC 4874 also have a bimodal distribution in color, but with a redder metal-poor population. The fraction of red IGCs (20%), and the red color of those GCs, implies that IGCs can originate from the halos of relatively massive, L* galaxies, and not solely from the disruption of

  9. Cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography: Separation of highly basic proteins using volatile acidic solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijnden-van Raaij, A.J.M. van den; Koornneef, I.; Oostwaard, Th.M.J.; Laat, S.W. de; Zoelen, E.J.J. van

    1987-01-01

    The chromatographic behavior of a number of globular proteins was studied on a Bio-Sil TSK CM-2-SW weak cation exchange HPLC column under acidic conditions. A linear gradient of O-I M NH₄Ac in I M HOAc, inducing a convex pH gradient from 2.4-4.8, resulted in an excellent separation of highly

  10. Collective Excitations in Protein as a Measure of Balance Between its Softness and Rigidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrestha, Utsab R.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Van Delinder, Kurt W.; Mamontov, Eugene; O’Neill, Hugh

    2017-01-01

    Here, we elucidate the protein activity from the perspective of protein softness and flexibility by studying the collective phonon-like excitations in a globular protein, human serum albumin (HSA), and taking advantage of the state-of-the-art inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) technique. Such excitations demonstrate that the protein becomes softer upon thermal denaturation due to disruption of weak noncovalent bonds. On the other hand, no significant change in the local excitations is detected in ligand- (drugs) bound HSA compared to the ligand-free HSA. These results clearly suggest that the protein conformational flexibility and rigidity are balanced by the native protein structure for biological activity.

  11. Collective Excitations in Protein as a Measure of Balance Between its Softness and Rigidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Utsab R. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Bhowmik, Debsindhu [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Computational Science and Engineering Division; Van Delinder, Kurt W. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Mamontov, Eugene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemical and Engineering Materials Division; O’Neill, Hugh [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biology and Soft Matter Division; Zhang, Qiu [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biology and Soft Matter Division; Alatas, Ahmet [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source; Chu, Xiang-Qiang [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2017-01-12

    Here, we elucidate the protein activity from the perspective of protein softness and flexibility by studying the collective phonon-like excitations in a globular protein, human serum albumin (HSA), and taking advantage of the state-of-the-art inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) technique. Such excitations demonstrate that the protein becomes softer upon thermal denaturation due to disruption of weak noncovalent bonds. On the other hand, no significant change in the local excitations is detected in ligand- (drugs) bound HSA compared to the ligand-free HSA. These results clearly suggest that the protein conformational flexibility and rigidity are balanced by the native protein structure for biological activity.

  12. Chemical Complexity in the Eu-enhanced Monometallic Globular NGC 5986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Caldwell, Nelson; Rich, R. Michael; Mateo, Mario; Bailey, John I., III; Olszewski, Edward W.; Walker, Matthew G.

    2017-06-01

    NGC 5986 is a poorly studied but relatively massive Galactic globular cluster that shares several physical and morphological characteristics with “iron-complex” clusters known to exhibit significant metallicity and heavy-element dispersions. In order to determine whether NGC 5986 joins the iron-complex cluster class, we investigated the chemical composition of 25 red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch cluster stars using high-resolution spectra obtained with the Magellan-M2FS instrument. Cluster membership was verified using a combination of radial velocity and [Fe/H] measurements, and we found the cluster to have a mean heliocentric radial velocity of +99.76 km s-1 (σ = 7.44 km s-1). We derived a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.54 dex (σ = 0.08 dex), but the cluster’s small dispersion in [Fe/H] and low [La/Eu] abundance preclude it from being an iron-complex cluster. NGC 5986 has =+0.76 {dex} (σ = 0.08 dex), which is among the highest ratios detected in a Galactic cluster, but the small [Eu/Fe] dispersion is puzzling because such high values near [Fe/H] ˜ -1.5 are typically only found in dwarf galaxies exhibiting large [Eu/Fe] variations. NGC 5986 exhibits classical globular cluster characteristics, such as uniformly enhanced [α/Fe] ratios, a small dispersion in Fe-peak abundances, and (anti)correlated light-element variations. Similar to NGC 2808, we find evidence that NGC 5986 may host at least four to five populations with distinct light-element compositions, and the presence of a clear Mg-Al anticorrelation along with an Al-Si correlation suggests that the cluster gas experienced processing at temperatures ≳65-70 MK. However, the current data do not support burning temperatures exceeding ˜100 MK. We find some evidence that the first- and second-generation stars in NGC 5986 may be fully spatially mixed, which could indicate that the cluster has lost a significant fraction of its original mass. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m

  13. Primordial main equence binary stars in the globular cluster M71

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lin; Mateo, Mario

    1994-01-01

    We report the identification of five short-period variables near the center of the metal-rich globular cluster M71. Our observations consist of multiepoch VI charge coupled device (CCD) images centered on the cluster and covering a 6.3 min x 6.3 min field. Four of these variables are contact eclipsing binaries with periods between 0.35 and 0.41 days; one is a detached or semidetached eclipsing binary with a period of 0.56 days. Two of the variables were first identified as possible eclipsing binaries in an earlier survey by Hodder et al. (1992). We have used a variety of arguments to conclude that all five binary stars are probable members of M71, a result that is consistent with the low number (0.15) of short-period field binaries expected along this line of sight. Based on a simple model of how contact binaries evolve from initially detached binaries, we have determined a lower limit of 1.3% on the frequency of primordial binaries in M71 with initial orbital periods in the range 2.5 - 5 days. This implies that the overall primordial binary frequency, f, is 22(sup +26)(sub -12)% assuming df/d log P = const ( the 'flat' distribution), or f = 57(sup +15)(sub -8)% for df/d log P = 0.032 log P + const as observed for G-dwarf binaries in the solar neighborhood (the 'sloped' distribution). Both estimates of f correspond to binaries with initial periods shorter than 800 yr since any longer-period binaries would have been disrupted over the lifetime of the cluster. Our short-period binary frequency is in excellent agreement with the observed frequency of red-giant binaries observed in globulars if we adopt the flat distribution. For the sloped distribution, our results significantly overestimate the number of red-giant binaries. All of the short-period M71 binaries lie within 1 mag of the luminosity of the cluster turnoff in the color-magnitude diagram despite the fact we should have easily detected similar eclipsing binaries 2 - 2.5 mag fainter than this. We discuss the

  14. Peculiarities of dynamic evaluation of globular formation outlines of the lungs with multislice computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir G. Kolmogorov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Visualization of infiltration in lung tissue surrounding the globular formation of the lungs (GFL determined by X-ray is one of the important points in the differential diagnosis of primary lung cancer, specific and non-specific inflammatory processes. At CT gauge body phantoms test facilities are widely used for evaluating the performance of scanners that allow the evaluation of scanner characteristics : noise, contrast sensitivity, positioning accuracy, stiffness of the radiation beam, the layer thickness, spatial resolution, etc.Aim. To develop a methodology for assessing the GFL outlines of the dynamics of multislice computed tomography (MSCT by selecting the optimal image processing algorithms.Materials and methods. The visual analysis of two- component physical model images of the electronic window level (WL and electronic window width (WW was installed on the basis of the best conditions for studying a specific group of tissues. In the case of indistinct, poorly defined outlines of globular formations, visual assessment is operator-dependent and requires development and application of quantitative methods of analysis. For a quantitative description of the outlines of the image of the GFL model, a vector in a polar coordinate system coming from the center of the figure mass bounded by the outline was used. The following outline complexity measures were adopted: modified Shannon information entropy H(S(k for k harmonics of the normalized spectral power density S(k of the length of oscillation of loop radius vector R(n; the number of local maxima L of signature radius vector R(n; the maximum value of the normalized power spectral density S(k; product (multiplicity of the entropy H(S and the number of local maxima L.Results. “Multiplicity”, “the number of local maxima” of the outline depend on the GFL geometric dimensions and cannot be used for diagnosis without first normalizing for GFL outline length. The parameters

  15. SPACE VELOCITIES OF SOUTHERN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. VII. NGC 6397, NGC 6626 (M28), AND NGC 6656 (M22)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Girard, Terrence M.; Van Altena, William F. [Astronomy Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Jilkova, Lucie [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, CZ-61137 Brno (Czech Republic); Podesta, Federico; Lopez, Carlos E., E-mail: dana.casetti@yale.edu, E-mail: terry.girard@yale.edu, E-mail: william.vanaltena@yale.edu, E-mail: jilkoval@physics.muni.cz [Universidad National de San Juan, Observatorio Astronomico ' ' Felix Aguilar' ' and Yale Southern Observatory, Chimbas, 5413 San Juan (Argentina)

    2013-08-01

    We have measured the absolute proper motions of globular clusters NGC 6397, NGC 6626 (M22), and NGC 6656 (M28) as part of our ongoing Southern Proper-Motion Program. The reference system is the ICRS via Hipparcos stars for these three low-Galactic-latitude clusters. Formal errors range between {approx}0.3 and 0.7 mas yr{sup -1}. Notable is the result for NGC 6397, which differs by 2.5 mas yr{sup -1} from two Hubble Space Telescope determinations while agreeing with previous ground-based ones. We determine orbits for all three clusters in an axisymmetric and barred model of the Galaxy and discuss these in the context of globular-cluster formation. M22 is a well-known cluster with an iron abundance spread; such clusters are now believed to have formed in massive parent systems that can retain ejecta of core-collapsed supernovae. We find that the five currently accepted globular clusters with iron/calcium abundance spread show orbits unrelated to each other, thus suggesting at least five independent, massive progenitors that have contributed to the build-up of the Milky-Way halo.

  16. The most metal-poor Galactic globular cluster: the first spectroscopic observations of ESO280-SC06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Jeffrey D.

    2018-04-01

    We present the first spectroscopic observations of the very metal-poor Milky Way globular cluster ESO280-SC06. Using spectra acquired with the 2dF/AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope, we have identified 13 members of the cluster, and estimate from their infrared calcium triplet lines that the cluster has a metallicity of [Fe/H]={-2.48}^{+0.06}_{-0.11}. This would make it the most metal-poor globular cluster known in the Milky Way. This result was verified with comparisons to three other metal-poor globular clusters that had been observed and analyzed in the same manner. We also present new photometry of the cluster from EFOSC2 and SkyMapper and confirm that the cluster is located 22.9 ± 2.1 kpc from the Sun and 15.2 ± 2.1 kpc from the Galactic centre, and has a radial velocity of 92.5 + 2.4-1.6 km s-1. These new data finds the cluster to have a radius about half that previously estimated, and we find that the cluster has a dynamical mass of the cluster of (12 ± 2) × 103 M⊙. Unfortunately, we lack reliable proper motions to fully characterize its orbit about the Galaxy. Intriguingly, the photometry suggests that the cluster lacks a well-populated horizontal branch, something that has not been observed in a cluster so ancient or metal-poor.

  17. Core-multishell globular oxidation in a new TiAlNbCr alloy at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S Q; Qu, S J; Feng, A H; Feng, C; Shen, J; Chen, D L

    2017-06-14

    Oxidation resistance is one of key properties of titanium aluminide (TiAl) based alloys for high-temperature applications such as in advanced aero-engines and gas turbines. A new TiAlNbCr alloy with micro-addition of yttrium has been developed, but its oxidation behavior is unknown. To provide some fundamental insights, high-temperature oxidation characteristics of this alloy are examined via scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction. We show that distinctive core-multishell globular oxidation and "daisy" flower-like oxidation occur exclusively around Y 2 O 3 particles. Globular oxides exhibit multi-layered Y 2 O 3 /TiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 -rich/TiO 2 -rich shell structures from the inside to outside. Flower-like inner oxides consist of core Y 2 O 3 particles surrounded by divergent Al 2 O 3 and oxygen-rich α 2 -Ti 3 Al in the near-scale substrate. As the scale-substrate interface moves inward, the inner oxide structures suffer deeper oxidation and transform into the globular oxide structures. Our results demonstrate that the unique oxidation characteristics and the understanding of formation mechanisms pave the way for the exploration and development of advanced oxidation-resistant TiAl-based materials.

  18. Real-time study of protein adsorption on thin nanocrystalline diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Grieten, Lars; Janssens, S.D.; Ethirajan, Anitha; Vanden Bon, Natalie; Ameloot, Marcel; Michiels, Luc; Haenen, Ken; Wagner, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The study of protein adsorption on solid surfaces is interesting for theoretical and practical bio-analytical sensing applications. In this work we combine electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, and fluorescence microscopy with thin boron doped nanocrystalline diamond films to address and study the adsorption behavior of globular proteins (antibodies) on hydrophobic and hydrophilic diamond surfaces. A powerful combination of time resolved impedance spectros...

  19. The Gaia-ESO Survey. Mg-Al anti-correlation in iDR4 globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancino, E.; Romano, D.; Tang, B.; Tautvaišienė, G.; Casey, A. R.; Gruyters, P.; Geisler, D.; San Roman, I.; Randich, S.; Alfaro, E. J.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; Korn, A. J.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Smiljanic, R.; Carraro, G.; Bayo, A.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Jofré, P.; Lardo, C.; de Laverny, P.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Sbordone, L.; Sousa, S. G.; Villanova, S.

    2017-05-01

    We use Gaia-ESO (GES) Survey iDR4 data to explore the Mg-Al anti-correlation in globular clusters that were observed as calibrators, as a demonstration of the quality of Gaia-ESO Survey data and analysis. The results compare well with the available literature, within 0.1 dex or less, after a small (compared to the internal spreads) offset between the UVES and GIRAFFE data of 0.10-0.15 dex was taken into account. In particular, for the first time we present data for NGC 5927, which is one of the most metal-rich globular clusters studied in the literature so far with [ Fe / H ] = - 0.39 ± 0.04 dex; this cluster was included to connect with the open cluster regime in the Gaia-ESO Survey internal calibration. The extent and shape of the Mg-Al anti-correlation provide strong constraints on the multiple population phenomenon in globular clusters. In particular, we studied the dependency of the Mg-Al anti-correlation extension with metallicity, present-day mass,and age of the clusters, using GES data in combination with a large set of homogenized literature measurements.We find a dependency with both metallicity and mass, which is evident when fitting for the two parameters simultaneously, but we do not find significant dependency with age. We confirm that the Mg-Al anti-correlation is not seen in all clusters, but disappears for the less massive or most metal-rich clusters. We also use our data set to see whether a normal anti-correlation would explain the low [Mg/α] observed in some extragalactic globular clusters, but find that none of the clusters in our sample can reproduce it; a more extreme chemical composition, such as that of NGC 2419, would be required. We conclude that GES iDR4 data already meet the requirements set by the main survey goals and can be used to study globular clusters in detail, even if the analysis procedures were not specifically designed for them. Based on data products from observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal

  20. Formation of Black Hole X-Ray Binaries with Non-degenerate Donors in Globular Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Natalia; Rocha, Cassio A. da; Van, Kenny X.; Nandez, Jose L. A., E-mail: nata.ivanova@ualberta.ca [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E7 (Canada)

    2017-07-10

    In this Letter, we propose a formation channel for low-mass X-ray binaries with black hole accretors and non-degenerate donors via grazing tidal encounters with subgiants. We estimate that in a typically dense globular cluster with a core density of 10{sup 5} stars pc{sup −3}, the formation rates are about one binary per Gyr per 50–100 retained black holes. The donors—stripped subgiants—will be strongly underluminous when compared to subgiant or giant branch stars of the same colors. The products of tidal stripping are underluminous by at least one magnitude for several hundred million years when compared to normal stars of the same color, and differ from underluminous red stars that could be produced by non-catastrophic mass transfer in an ordinary binary. The dynamically formed binaries become quiescent LMXBs, with lifetimes of about a Gyr. The expected number of X-ray binaries is one per 50–200 retained black holes, while the expected number of strongly underluminous subsubgiant is about half this. The presence of strongly underluminous stars in a GC may be indicative of the presence of black holes.

  1. Multiple Populations in the Old and Massive Small Magellanic Cloud Globular Cluster NGC 121

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalessandro, E.; Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Origlia, L.; Ferraro, F. R.; Lanzoni, B.

    2016-10-01

    We used a combination of optical and near-UV Hubble Space Telescope photometry and FLAMES/ESO-VLT high-resolution spectroscopy to characterize the stellar content of the old and massive globular cluster (GC) NGC 121 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We report on the detection of multiple stellar populations, the first case in the SMC stellar cluster system. This result enforces the emerging scenario in which the presence of multiple stellar populations is a distinctive-feature of old and massive GCs regardless of the environment, as far as the light-element distribution is concerned. We find that second-generation (SG) stars are more centrally concentrated than first-generation (FG) ones. More interestingly, at odds with what is typically observed in Galactic GCs, we find that NGC 121 is the only cluster so far to be dominated by FG stars that account for more than 65% of the total cluster mass. In the framework where GCs were born with 90%-95% of FG stars, this observational finding would suggest that either NGC 121 experienced a milder stellar mass-loss with respect to Galactic GCs or it formed a smaller fraction of SG stars. Based on observations collected with NASA/ESA HST, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555 and collected at the ESO-VLT under the program 086.D-0665.

  2. On the physical nature of globular cluster candidates in the Milky Way bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatti, A. E.

    2018-03-01

    We present results from 2MASS JKs photometry on the physical reality of recently reported globular cluster (GC) candidates in the Milky Way (MW) bulge. We relied our analysis on photometric membership probabilities that allowed us to distinguish real stellar aggregates from the composite field star population. When building colour-magnitude diagrams and stellar density maps for stars at different membership probability levels, the genuine GC candidate populations are clearly highlighted. We then used the tip of the red giant branch (RGB) as distance estimator, resulting heliocentric distances that place many of the objects in regions near of the MW bulge where no GC had been previously recognised. Some few GC candidates resulted to be MW halo/disc objects. Metallicities estimated from the standard RGB method are in agreement with the values expected according to the position of the GC candidates in the Galaxy. Finally, we derived from the first time their structural parameters. We found that the studied objects have core, half-light and tidal radii in the ranges spanned by the population of known MW GCs. Their internal dynamical evolutionary stages will be described properly when their masses are estimated.

  3. On the kinematic separation of field and cluster stars across the bulge globular NGC 6528

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagioia, E. P.; Bono, G.; Buonanno, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Roma-Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Milone, A. P. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Stetson, P. B. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Prada Moroni, P. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Dall' Ora, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Aparicio, A.; Monelli, M. [Instituto de Astrofìsica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain); Calamida, A.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00044 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Gilmozzi, R. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Straße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Matsunaga, N. [Kiso Observatory, Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 10762-30, Mitake, Kiso-machi, Kiso-gun, 3 Nagano 97-0101 (Japan); Walker, A., E-mail: eplagioia@roma2.infn.it [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2014-02-10

    We present deep and precise multi-band photometry of the Galactic bulge globular cluster NGC 6528. The current data set includes optical and near-infrared images collected with ACS/WFC, WFC3/UVIS, and WFC3/IR on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The images cover a time interval of almost 10 yr, and we have been able to carry out a proper-motion separation between cluster and field stars. We performed a detailed comparison in the m {sub F814W}, m {sub F606W} – m {sub F814W} color-magnitude diagram with two empirical calibrators observed in the same bands. We found that NGC 6528 is coeval with and more metal-rich than 47 Tuc. Moreover, it appears older and more metal-poor than the super-metal-rich open cluster NGC 6791. The current evidence is supported by several diagnostics (red horizontal branch, red giant branch bump, shape of the sub-giant branch, slope of the main sequence) that are minimally affected by uncertainties in reddening and distance. We fit the optical observations with theoretical isochrones based on a scaled-solar chemical mixture and found an age of 11 ± 1 Gyr and an iron abundance slightly above solar ([Fe/H] = +0.20). The iron abundance and the old cluster age further support the recent spectroscopic findings suggesting a rapid chemical enrichment of the Galactic bulge.

  4. Magnesium isotopes: a tool to understand self-enrichment in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, P.; D'Antona, F.; Imbriani, G.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Dell'Agli, F.; Tailo, M.

    2018-03-01

    A critical issue in the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) self-enrichment scenario for the formation of multiple populations in Globular Clusters (GCs) is the inability to reproduce the magnesium isotopic ratios, despite the model in principle can account for the depletion of magnesium. In this work we analyze how the uncertainties on the various p-capture cross sections affect the results related to the magnesium content of the ejecta of AGB stars. The observed distribution of the magnesium isotopes and of the overall Mg-Al trend in M13 and NGC 6752 are successfully reproduced when the proton-capture rate by 25Mg at the temperatures ˜100 MK, in particular the 25Mg(p, γ)26Alm channel, is enhanced by a factor ˜3 with respect to the most recent experimental determinations. This assumption also allows to reproduce the full extent of the Mg spread and the Mg-Si anticorrelation observed in NGC 2419. The uncertainties in the rate of the 25Mg(p, γ)26Alm reaction at the temperatures of interest here leave space for our assumption and we suggest that new experimental measurements are needed to settle this problem. We also discuss the competitive model based on the super massive star nucleosynthesis.

  5. Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy of the Globular Cluster RZ 2109 and the Nature of its Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Kundu, Arunav; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.; Waters, Christopher Z.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Stern, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    We present optical Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) spectroscopy of RZ 2109, a globular cluster (GC) in the elliptical galaxy NGC 4472. This GC is notable for hosting an ultraluminous X-ray source as well as associated strong and broad [O III] λλ4959, 5007 emission. We show that the HST/STIS spectroscopy spatially resolves the [O III] emission in RZ 2109. While we are unable to make a precise determination of the morphology of the emission-line nebula, the best-fitting models all require that the [O III] λ5007 emission has a half-light radius in the range 3-7 pc. The extended nature of the [O III] λ5007 emission is inconsistent with published models that invoke an intermediate-mass black hole origin. It is also inconsistent with the ionization of ejecta from a nova in the cluster. The spatial scale of the nebula could be produced via the photoionization of a strong wind driven from a stellar mass black hole accreting at roughly its Eddington rate. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  6. SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER RZ 2109 AND THE NATURE OF ITS BLACK HOLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Kundu, Arunav [Eureka Scientific, Inc., 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100 Oakland, CA 94602 (United States); Maccarone, Thomas J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Waters, Christopher Z. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Stern, Daniel, E-mail: mpeacock@msu.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    We present optical Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) spectroscopy of RZ 2109, a globular cluster (GC) in the elliptical galaxy NGC 4472. This GC is notable for hosting an ultraluminous X-ray source as well as associated strong and broad [O III] {lambda}{lambda}4959, 5007 emission. We show that the HST/STIS spectroscopy spatially resolves the [O III] emission in RZ 2109. While we are unable to make a precise determination of the morphology of the emission-line nebula, the best-fitting models all require that the [O III] {lambda}5007 emission has a half-light radius in the range 3-7 pc. The extended nature of the [O III] {lambda}5007 emission is inconsistent with published models that invoke an intermediate-mass black hole origin. It is also inconsistent with the ionization of ejecta from a nova in the cluster. The spatial scale of the nebula could be produced via the photoionization of a strong wind driven from a stellar mass black hole accreting at roughly its Eddington rate.

  7. Globular cluster formation and evolution in the context of cosmological galaxy assembly: open questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Duncan A.; Bastian, Nate; Gieles, Mark; Crain, Robert A.; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Larsen, Søren S.; Ploeckinger, Sylvia; Agertz, Oscar; Trenti, Michele; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Pfeffer, Joel; Gnedin, Oleg Y.

    2018-02-01

    We discuss some of the key open questions regarding the formation and evolution of globular clusters (GCs) during galaxy formation and assembly within a cosmological framework. The current state of the art for both observations and simulations is described, and we briefly mention directions for future research. The oldest GCs have ages greater than or equal to 12.5 Gyr and formed around the time of reionization. Resolved colour-magnitude diagrams of Milky Way GCs and direct imaging of lensed proto-GCs at z˜6 with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) promise further insight. GCs are known to host multiple populations of stars with variations in their chemical abundances. Recently, such multiple populations have been detected in ˜2 Gyr old compact, massive star clusters. This suggests a common, single pathway for the formation of GCs at high and low redshift. The shape of the initial mass function for GCs remains unknown; however, for massive galaxies a power-law mass function is favoured. Significant progress has been made recently modelling GC formation in the context of galaxy formation, with success in reproducing many of the observed GC-galaxy scaling relations.

  8. Na-O abundances in M53: A Mostly First Generation Globular Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boberg, Owen M.; Friel, Eileen D.; Vesperini, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    We present the Fe, Ca, Ti, Ni, Ba, Na, and O abundances for a sample of 53 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the globular cluster (GC) NGC 5024 (M53). The abundances were measured from high signal-to-noise medium resolution spectra collected with the Hydra multi-object spectrograph on the WIYN 3.5- meter telescope. M53 is of interest because previous studies based on the morphology of the cluster's horizontal branch suggested that it might be composed primarily of first generation (FG) stars and differ from the majority of other GCs withmultiple populations, which have been found to be dominated by second generation (SG) stars. Our sample has an average [Fe/H] = -2.07 with a standard deviation of 0.07 dex. This value is consistent with previouslypublished results. The alpha-element abundances in our sample are also consistent with the trends seen in Milky Way halo stars at similar metallicities, with enhanced [Ca/Fe] and [Ti/Fe] relative to solar. We find thatthe Na-O anti-correlation is not as extended as other GCs with similarly high masses. The fraction of SG to FG stars in our sample is approximately 1:3 and the SG is more centrally concentrated. These findings further support that M53 might be a mostly FG cluster and could give further insight into how GCs formed the light element abundance patterns we observe in them today.

  9. Spectra of globular clusters in the Sombrero galaxy: evidence for spectroscopic metallicity bimodality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Brito, Alan; Hau, George K. T.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Spitler, Lee R.; Strader, Jay; Brodie, Jean P.; Rhode, Katherine L.

    2011-11-01

    We present a large sample of over 200 integrated-light spectra of confirmed globular clusters (GCs) associated with the Sombrero (M104) galaxy taken with the Deep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph (DEIMOS) instrument on the Keck telescope. A significant fraction of the spectra have signal-to-noise ratio levels high enough to allow measurements of GC metallicities using the method of Brodie & Huchra. We find a distribution of spectroscopic metallicities in the range -2.2 < [Fe/H] < +0.1 that is bimodal, with peaks at [Fe/H]˜-1.4 and -0.6. Thus, the GC system of the Sombrero galaxy, like a few other galaxies now studied in detail, reveals a bimodal spectroscopic metallicity distribution supporting the long-held belief that colour bimodality reflects two metallicity subpopulations. This further suggests that the transformation from optical colour to metallicity for old stellar populations, such as GCs, is not strongly non-linear. We also explore the radial and magnitude distribution with metallicity for GC subpopulations but small number statistics prevent any clear trends in these distributions. Based on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  10. The Peculiar Chemical Inventory of NGC 2419: An Extreme Outer Halo "Globular Cluster"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Judith G.; Huang, Wenjin; Kirby, Evan N.

    2011-10-01

    NGC 2419 is a massive outer halo Galactic globular cluster (GC) whose stars have previously been shown to have somewhat peculiar abundance patterns. We have observed seven luminous giants that are members of NGC 2419 with Keck/HIRES at reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. One of these giants is very peculiar, with an extremely low [Mg/Fe] and high [K/Fe] but normal abundances of most other elements. The abundance pattern does not match the nucleosynthetic yields of any supernova model. The other six stars show abundance ratios typical of inner halo Galactic GCs, represented here by a sample of giants in the nearby GC M30. Although our measurements show that NGC 2419 is unusual in some respects, its bulk properties do not provide compelling evidence for a difference between inner and outer halo GCs. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated jointly by the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  11. SOLAR-LIKE OSCILLATIONS IN A METAL-POOR GLOBULAR CLUSTER WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stello, Dennis; Gilliland, Ronald L.

    2009-01-01

    We present analyses of variability in the red giant stars in the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 6397, based on data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. We use a nonstandard data reduction approach to turn a 23 day observing run originally aimed at imaging the white dwarf population, into time-series photometry of the cluster's highly saturated red giant stars. With this technique we obtain noise levels in the final power spectra down to 50 parts per million, which allows us to search for low-amplitude solar-like oscillations. We compare the observed excess power seen in the power spectra with estimates of the typical frequency range, frequency spacing, and amplitude from scaling the solar oscillations. We see evidence that the detected variability is consistent with solar-like oscillations in at least one and perhaps up to four stars. With metallicities 2 orders of magnitude lower than those of the Sun, these stars present so far the best evidence of solar-like oscillations in such a low-metallicity environment.

  12. The Mystery of Globular Clusters: Uncovering the Complexities of Their Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Erin Marie

    In recent years, evidence has grown for the existence of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters (GCs). However, questions remain regarding the nature of these populations. Photometric observations clearly show discrete populations while spectroscopic observations seem to show a continuous spread. This dissertation provides steps to better understanding GCs and the complexities associated with their evolution. Calibration of stellar evolution models at low metallicity is necessary for comparison to GCs. Accurate abundances of metal-poor subdwarfs are determined and used in this calibration. A Monte Carlo analysis is then performed in order to determine accurate distances, absolute ages, and integrated orbital trajectories for 24 GCs. These results are of critical importance as they not only incorporate the observational uncertainty, but also the uncertainty incurred by the models themselves. Lastly, high resolution spectra of three GCs (NGC 6681, NGC 6584 and NGC 7099) are obtained for a detailed abundance analysis of red giant branch stars. The high resolution and signal-to-noise achieved in these observations allows for the discovery of a statistically significant Na-O anticorrelation in all three clusters, the populations of which agree with those from photometric observations. Although we cannot determine precisely the nature of the polluters that were the predecessors to the enhanced populations, we do know that both s-process and r-process mechanisms contributed to the evolution and these results can be used to help constrain future models of GC polluter candidates.

  13. Proper Motions and Structural Parameters of the Galactic Globular Cluster M71

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadelano, M.; Dalessandro, E.; Ferraro, F. R.; Miocchi, P.; Lanzoni, B.; Pallanca, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Massari, D. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2017-02-20

    By exploiting two ACS/ HST data sets separated by a temporal baseline of ∼7 years, we have determined the relative stellar proper motions (PMs; providing membership) and the absolute PM of the Galactic globular cluster M71. The absolute PM has been used to reconstruct the cluster orbit within a Galactic, three-component, axisymmetric potential. M71 turns out to be in a low-latitude disk-like orbit inside the Galactic disk, further supporting the scenario in which it lost a significant fraction of its initial mass. Since large differential reddening is known to affect this system, we took advantage of near-infrared, ground-based observations to re-determine the cluster center and density profile from direct star counts. The new structural parameters turn out to be significantly different from the ones quoted in the literature. In particular, M71 has a core and a half-mass radii almost 50% larger than previously thought. Finally, we estimate that the initial mass of M71 was likely one order of magnitude larger than its current value, thus helping to solve the discrepancy with the observed number of X-ray sources.

  14. Synthesis of giant globular multivalent glycofullerenes as potent inhibitors in a model of Ebola virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Antonio; Sigwalt, David; Illescas, Beatriz M.; Luczkowiak, Joanna; Rodríguez-Pérez, Laura; Nierengarten, Iwona; Holler, Michel; Remy, Jean-Serge; Buffet, Kevin; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Rojo, Javier; Delgado, Rafael; Nierengarten, Jean-François; Martín, Nazario

    2016-01-01

    The use of multivalent carbohydrate compounds to block cell-surface lectin receptors is a promising strategy to inhibit the entry of pathogens into cells and could lead to the discovery of novel antiviral agents. One of the main problems with this approach, however, is that it is difficult to make compounds of an adequate size and multivalency to mimic natural systems such as viruses. Hexakis adducts of [60]fullerene are useful building blocks in this regard because they maintain a globular shape at the same time as allowing control over the size and multivalency. Here we report water-soluble tridecafullerenes decorated with 120 peripheral carbohydrate subunits, so-called ‘superballs’, that can be synthesized efficiently from hexakis adducts of [60]fullerene in one step by using copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition click chemistry. Infection assays show that these superballs are potent inhibitors of cell infection by an artificial Ebola virus with half-maximum inhibitory concentrations in the subnanomolar range.

  15. A High-precision Trigonometric Parallax to an Ancient Metal-poor Globular Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T. M.; Casertano, S.; Strader, J.; Riess, A.; VandenBerg, D. A.; Soderblom, D. R.; Kalirai, J.; Salinas, R.

    2018-03-01

    Using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have obtained a direct trigonometric parallax for the nearest metal-poor globular cluster, NGC 6397. Although trigonometric parallaxes have been previously measured for many nearby open clusters, this is the first parallax for an ancient metal-poor population—one that is used as a fundamental template in many stellar population studies. This high-precision measurement was enabled by the HST/WFC3 spatial-scanning mode, providing hundreds of astrometric measurements for dozens of stars in the cluster and also for Galactic field stars along the same sightline. We find a parallax of 0.418 ± 0.013 ± 0.018 mas (statistical, systematic), corresponding to a true distance modulus of 11.89 ± 0.07 ± 0.09 mag (2.39 ± 0.07 ± 0.10 kpc). The V luminosity at the stellar main-sequence turnoff implies an absolute cluster age of 13.4 ± 0.7 ± 1.2 Gyr. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with programs GO-13817, GO-14336, and GO-14773.

  16. Chemical characterisation of the globular cluster NGC 5634 associated to the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretta, E.; Bragaglia, A.; Lucatello, S.; D'Orazi, V.; Gratton, R. G.; Donati, P.; Sollima, A.; Sneden, C.

    2017-04-01

    As part of our on-going project on the homogeneous chemical characterisation of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters (GCs), we studied NGC 5634, associated to the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy, using high-resolution spectroscopy of red giant stars collected with VLT/FLAMES. We present here the radial velocity distribution of the 45 observed stars, 43 of which are cluster members, the detailed chemical abundance of 22 species for the seven stars observed with UVES-FLAMES, and the abundance of six elements for stars observed with GIRAFFE. On our homogeneous UVES metallicity scale, we derived a low-metallicity [Fe/H] =-1.867 ± 0.019 ± 0.065 dex (±statistical ±systematic error) with σ = 0.050 dex (7 stars). We found the normal anticorrelations between light elements (Na and O, Mg and Al), a signature of multiple populations typical of massive and old GCs. We confirm the associations of NGC 5634 to the Sgr dSph, from which the cluster was lost a few Gyr ago, on the basis of its velocity and position, and the abundance ratios of α and neutron capture elements. Based on observations collected at ESO telescopes under programme 093.B-0583.Table 2 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/600/A118

  17. Testing lowered isothermal models with direct N-body simulations of globular clusters - II. Multimass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuten, M.; Zocchi, A.; Gieles, M.; Hénault-Brunet, V.

    2017-09-01

    Lowered isothermal models, such as the multimass Michie-King models, have been successful in describing observational data of globular clusters. In this study, we assess whether such models are able to describe the phase space properties of evolutionary N-body models. We compare the multimass models as implemented in limepy (Gieles & Zocchi) to N-body models of star clusters with different retention fractions for the black holes and neutron stars evolving in a tidal field. We find that multimass models successfully reproduce the density and velocity dispersion profiles of the different mass components in all evolutionary phases and for different remnants retention. We further use these results to study the evolution of global model parameters. We find that over the lifetime of clusters, radial anisotropy gradually evolves from the low- to the high-mass components and we identify features in the properties of observable stars that are indicative of the presence of stellar-mass black holes. We find that the model velocity scale depends on mass as m-δ, with δ ≃ 0.5 for almost all models, but the dependence of central velocity dispersion on m can be shallower, depending on the dark remnant content, and agrees well with that of the N-body models. The reported model parameters, and correlations amongst them, can be used as theoretical priors when fitting these types of mass models to observational data.

  18. THE SLUGGS SURVEY: NGC 3115, A CRITICAL TEST CASE FOR METALLICITY BIMODALITY IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Jean P.; Conroy, Charlie; Arnold, Jacob A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J. [University of California Observatories and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Usher, Christopher; Forbes, Duncan A. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Strader, Jay, E-mail: brodie@ucolick.org [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    Due to its proximity (9 Mpc) and the strongly bimodal color distribution of its spectroscopically well-sampled globular cluster (GC) system, the early-type galaxy NGC 3115 provides one of the best available tests of whether the color bimodality widely observed in GC systems generally reflects a true metallicity bimodality. Color bimodality has alternatively been attributed to a strongly nonlinear color-metallicity relation reflecting the influence of hot horizontal-branch stars. Here, we couple Subaru Suprime-Cam gi photometry with Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy to accurately measure GC colors and a CaT index that measures the Ca II triplet. We find the NGC 3115 GC system to be unambiguously bimodal in both color and the CaT index. Using simple stellar population models, we show that the CaT index is essentially unaffected by variations in horizontal-branch morphology over the range of metallicities relevant to GC systems (and is thus a robust indicator of metallicity) and confirm bimodality in the metallicity distribution. We assess the existing evidence for and against multiple metallicity subpopulations in early- and late-type galaxies and conclude that metallicity bi/multimodality is common. We briefly discuss how this fundamental characteristic links directly to the star formation and assembly histories of galaxies.

  19. ULTRA-DEEP GEMINI NEAR-INFRARED OBSERVATIONS OF THE BULGE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6624

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saracino, S.; Dalessandro, E.; Ferraro, F. R.; Lanzoni, B.; Miocchi, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Geisler, D.; Mauro, F.; Cohen, R. E.; Villanova, S. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Origlia, L. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Bidin, C. Moni, E-mail: sara.saracino@unibo.it [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Católica del Norte, Av. Angamos 0610, Antofagasta (Chile)

    2016-11-20

    We used ultra-deep J and K {sub s} images secured with the near-infrared (NIR) GSAOI camera assisted by the multi-conjugate adaptive optics system GeMS at the GEMINI South Telescope in Chile, to obtain a ( K {sub s} , J - K {sub s} ) color–magnitude diagram (CMD) for the bulge globular cluster NGC 6624. We obtained the deepest and most accurate NIR CMD from the ground for this cluster, by reaching K {sub s} ∼ 21.5, approximately 8 mag below the horizontal branch level. The entire extension of the Main Sequence (MS) is nicely sampled and at K {sub s} ∼ 20 we detected the so-called MS “knee” in a purely NIR CMD. By taking advantage of the exquisite quality of the data, we estimated the absolute age of NGC 6624 ( t {sub age} = 12.0 ± 0.5 Gyr), which turns out to be in good agreement with previous studies in the literature. We also analyzed the luminosity and mass functions of MS stars down to M ∼ 0.45 M{sub ⊙}, finding evidence of a significant increase of low-mass stars at increasing distances from the cluster center. This is a clear signature of mass segregation, confirming that NGC 6624 is in an advanced stage of dynamical evolution.

  20. Eight Hundred New Candidates for Globular Clusters in NGC 5128 (Centaurus A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Gretchen L. H.; Gómez, Matías; Harris, William E.; Johnston, Kyle; Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Kerzendorf, Wolfgang; Geisler, Doug; Woodley, Kristin A.

    2012-04-01

    We have used new wide-field imaging with the Magellan IMACS camera to search for globular cluster (GC) candidates around NGC 5128, the nearest giant E galaxy. The imaging data are in the B and R broadband filters and cover a 1.55 deg2 field centered on the galaxy, corresponding to an area about 90 × 90 kpc2 at the distance of NGC 5128. All the fields were taken under exceptionally high-quality seeing conditions (FWHM = 0farcs4-0farcs5 in R). Using this material we are able, for the first time in the literature, to construct a homogeneous list of GC candidates covering a wide span of the NGC 5128 halo and unusually free of field contaminants (foreground stars and faint background galaxies). Selecting the measured objects by color, magnitude, ellipticity, and profile size gives us a final catalog of 833 new high-quality GC candidates brighter than R = 21 (0.8 mag fainter than the standard GC luminosity function turnover point). The measured positions have better than 0farcs2 precision in both coordinates. This list can be used as the basis for spectroscopic follow-up, leading to a more comprehensive kinematic and dynamic study of the halo. This Paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  1. Constraining the origin of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters with N-body simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrobuono-Battisti, A.; Perets, H. B.

    2017-12-01

    Globular Clusters (GCs) are composed by multiple stellar populations whose origin is still unknown. Second population (SP) stars are currently thought to arise from gas ejected by first population (FP) stars, which is then accreted into the primordial GC core. Such gas forms a stellar disk whose long-term evolution and effects on the embedding cluster can be followed by means of N-body simulations. Here, we find that as the SP disk relaxes, the old, first stellar population flattens and develops a significant radial anisotropy, making the GC structure become more elliptical. The second stellar population is characterized by a lower velocity dispersion, and a higher rotational velocity, compared with the primordial population. The strength of these signatures increases with the relaxation time of the cluster and with the mass ratio between the SP and FP mass stars. We conclude that GC ellipticities and rotation constitute fossil records that can be used as observational proxies to unveil the origin of multiple stellar populations.

  2. Galaxy structure from multiple tracers - I. A census of M87's globular cluster populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, L. J.; Auger, M. W.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new photometric catalogue of the rich globular cluster (GC) system around M87, the brightest cluster galaxy in Virgo. Using archival Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey images in the ugriz bands, observed with Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/MegaPrime, we perform a careful subtraction of the galaxy's halo light in order to detect objects at small galactocentric radii as well as in the wider field, and find 17 620 GC candidates over a radius range from 1.3 to 445 kpc with g < 24 mag. By inferring their colour, radial and magnitude distributions in a Bayesian way, we find that they are well described as a mixture of two GC populations and two distinct contaminant populations, but confirm earlier findings of radius-dependent colour gradients in both GC populations. This is consistent with a picture in which the more enriched GCs reside deeper in the galaxy's potential well, indicating a role for dissipative collapse in the formation of both the red and the blue GCs.

  3. Globular adiponectin activates motility and regenerative traits of muscle satellite cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Fiaschi

    Full Text Available Regeneration of adult injured skeletal muscle is due to activation of satellite cells, a population of stem cells resident beneath the basal lamina. Thus, information on soluble factors affecting satellite cell activation, as well as migration towards injury and fusion into new myofibers are essential. Here, we show that globular adiponectin (gAd, positively affects several features of muscle satellite cells. gAd activates satellite cells to exit quiescence and increases their recruitment towards myotubes. gAd elicits in satellite cells a specific motility program, involving activation of the small GTPase Rac1, as well as expression of Snail and Twist transcription factors driving a proteolytic motility, useful to reach the site of injury. We show that satellite cells produce autocrine full length adiponectin (fAd, which is converted to gAd by activated macrophages. In turns, gAd concurs to attract to the site of injury both satellite cells and macrophages and induces myogenesis in muscle satellite cells. Thus, these findings add a further role for gAd in skeletal muscle, including the hormone among factors participating in muscle regeneration.

  4. The radius of the quiescent neutron star in the globular cluster M13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A. W.; Heinke, C. O.; Steiner, A. W.; Campana, S.; Cohn, H. N.; Ho, W. C. G.; Lugger, P. M.; Servillat, M.

    2018-03-01

    X-ray spectra of quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries containing neutron stars can be fit with atmosphere models to constrain the mass and the radius. Mass-radius constraints can be used to place limits on the equation of state of dense matter. We perform fits to the X-ray spectrum of a quiescent neutron star in the globular cluster M13, utilizing data from ROSAT, Chandra and XMM-Newton, and constrain the mass-radius relation. Assuming an atmosphere composed of hydrogen and a 1.4M⊙ neutron star, we find the radius to be R_NS=12.2^{+1.5}_{-1.1} km, a significant improvement in precision over previous measurements. Incorporating an uncertainty on the distance to M13 relaxes the radius constraints slightly and we find R_NS=12.3^{+1.9}_{-1.7} km (for a 1.4M⊙ neutron star with a hydrogen atmosphere), which is still an improvement in precision over previous measurements, some of which do not consider distance uncertainty. We also discuss how the composition of the atmosphere affects the derived radius, finding that a helium atmosphere implies a significantly larger radius.

  5. Fermi Detection of a Luminous gamma-ray Pulsar in a Globular Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, P. C. C.; Abdo, A. A.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope detection of gamma -ray (>100 mega-electron volts) pulsations from pulsar J1823--3021A in the globular cluster NGC 6624 with high significance (approx 7 sigma). Its gamma-ray luminosity L (sub 3) = (8:4 +/- 1:6) X 10(exp 34) ergs per second, is the highest observed for any millisecond pulsar (MSP) to date, and it accounts for most of the cluster emission. The non-detection of the cluster in the off-pulse phase implies that its contains < 32 gamma-ray MSPs, not approx 100 as previously estimated. The gamma -ray luminosity indicates that the unusually large rate of change of its period is caused by its intrinsic spin-down. This implies that J1823--3021A has the largest magnetic field and is the youngest MSP ever detected, and that such anomalous objects might be forming at rates comparable to those of the more normal MSPs.

  6. Multi-wavelength modeling of globular clusters–the millisecond pulsar scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, A.; Venter, C.; Büsching, I.; De Jager, O. C. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa)

    2013-12-20

    The potentially large number of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in globular cluster (GC) cores makes these parent objects ideal laboratories for studying the collective properties of an ensemble of MSPs. Such a population is expected to radiate several spectral components in the radio through γ-ray waveband. First, pulsed emission is expected via curvature and synchrotron radiation (CR and SR) and possibly even via inverse Compton (IC) scattering inside the pulsar magnetospheres. Second, unpulsed emission should transpire through the continuous injection of relativistic leptons by the MSPs into the ambient region, which in turn produce SR and IC emission when they encounter the cluster magnetic field, as well as several background photon components. In this paper we continue to develop the MSP scenario for explaining the multi-wavelength properties of GCs by considering the entire modeling chain, including the full transport equation, refined emissivities of stellar and Galactic background photons, integration of the flux along the line of sight, and comparison with observations. As an illustration, we apply the model to Terzan 5, where we can reasonably fit both the (line-of-sight-integrated) X-ray surface flux and spectral energy density data, using the first to constrain the leptonic diffusion coefficient within the GC. We lastly discuss possible future extensions to and applications of this maturing model.

  7. The VMC survey. XI. Radial stellar population gradients in the galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chengyuan; De Grijs, Richard [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Deng, Licai [Key Laboratory for Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Rubele, Stefano; Girardi, Leo; Gullieuszik, Marco [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Wang, Chuchu [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Bekki, Kenji; For, Bi-Qing [ICRAR M468, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Cioni, Maria-Rosa L. [Department of Physics, Astronomy, and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Clementini, Gisella [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Emerson, Jim [Astronomy Unit, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Groenewegen, Martin A. T. [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, 1180 Ukkel (Belgium); Guandalini, Roald [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D 2401, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Marconi, Marcella; Ripepi, Vincenzo [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, via Moiariello 16, I-80131 Naples (Italy); Piatti, Andrés E. [Observatorio Astrońomico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Laprida 854, 5000 Córdoba (Argentina); Van Loon, Jacco Th., E-mail: joshuali@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: grijs@pku.edu.cn [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-20

    We present a deep near-infrared color-magnitude diagram of the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae, obtained with the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) as part of the VISTA near-infrared Y, J, K{sub s} survey of the Magellanic System (VMC). The cluster stars comprising both the subgiant and red giant branches exhibit apparent, continuous variations in color-magnitude space as a function of radius. Subgiant branch stars at larger radii are systematically brighter than their counterparts closer to the cluster core; similarly, red-giant-branch stars in the cluster's periphery are bluer than their more centrally located cousins. The observations can very well be described by adopting an age spread of ∼0.5 Gyr as well as radial gradients in both the cluster's helium abundance (Y) and metallicity (Z), which change gradually from (Y = 0.28, Z = 0.005) in the cluster core to (Y = 0.25, Z = 0.003) in its periphery. We conclude that the cluster's inner regions host a significant fraction of second-generation stars, which decreases with increasing radius; the stellar population in the 47 Tuc periphery is well approximated by a simple stellar population.

  8. Snapshot Survey of the Globular Cluster Populations of Isolated Early Type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Michael

    2017-08-01

    We propose WFC3/UVIS snapshot observations of a sample of 75 isolated early type galaxiesresiding in cosmic voids or extremely low density regions. The primary aim is to usetheir globular cluster populations to reconstruct their evolutionary history, revealingif, how, and why void ellipticals differ from cluster ellipticals. The galaxies span arange of luminosities, providing a varied sample for comparison with the well-documentedglobular cluster populations in denser environments. This proposed WFC3 study of isolatedearly type galaxies breaks new ground by targeting a sample which has thus far receivedlittle attention, and, significantly, this will be the first such study with HST.Characterizing early type galaxies in voids and their GC systems promises to increase ourunderstanding of galaxy formation and evolution of galaxies in general because isolatedobjects are the best approximation to a control sample that we have for understanding theinfluence of environment on formation and evolution. Whether these isolated objects turnout to be identical to or distinct from counterparts in other regions of the Universe,they will supply insight into the formation and evolution of all galaxies. Parallel ACSimaging will help to characterize the near field environments of the sample.

  9. Spatial structure of the interstellar gas toward the globular cluster M22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, B.; Catney, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of Na I interstellar lines are presented for 14 stars in the globular cluster M22. The interstellar gas foreground to the cluster at distance about 2.6 kpc occurs essentially in two velocity ranges. There is a low-velocity component which is quite uniform across the cluster. This gas feature is likely to be a part of the extensive and nearby H I cloud first mapped in the radio region. There is also gas at higher velocities detected between +25 and 60 km/s which is observed with both a single- and a multi-component structure. Significant profile variations for this gas occur on a scale less than 1 arcmin. The location of this gas is not known but it may be associated with the Sagittarius arm. Spectra of the K I interstellar line for a nearby star roughly 1.3 deg from the cluster and for two cluster members provide useful estimates for the column densities of the gas components. 20 refs

  10. The CN–CH Positive Correlation in the Globular Cluster NGC 5286

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Dongwook; Hong, Seungsoo; Lee, Young-Wook, E-mail: dwlim@yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: ywlee2@yonsei.ac.kr [Center for Galaxy Evolution Research and Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-20

    We performed low-resolution spectroscopy of the red giant stars in the Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 5286, which is known to show intrinsic heavy element abundance variations. We found that the observed stars in this GC are clearly divided into three subpopulations by CN index (CN-weak, CN-intermediate, and CN-strong). The CN-strong stars are also enhanced in the calcium HK′ (7.4 σ ) and CH (5.1 σ ) indices, while the CN-intermediate stars show no significant difference in the strength of the HK′ index from the CN-weak stars. From the comparison with high-resolution spectroscopic data, we found that the CN- and HK′-strong stars are also enhanced in the abundances of Fe and s -process elements. It appears, therefore, that these stars are later-generation stars affected by some supernova enrichment in addition to the asymptotic giant branch ejecta. In addition, unlike normal GCs, sample stars in NGC 5286 show the CN–CH positive correlation, strengthening our previous suggestion that this positive correlation is only discovered in GCs with heavy element abundance variations, such as M22 and NGC 6273.

  11. Chemical study of the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 5927

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura-Guzmán, A.; Villanova, S.; Muñoz, C.; Tang, B.

    2018-03-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are natural laboratories where stellar and chemical evolution can be studied in detail. In addition, their chemical patterns and kinematics can tell us to which Galactic structure (disc, bulge, halo or extragalactic) the cluster belongs to. NGC 5927 is one of most metal-rich GCs in the Galaxy and its kinematics links it to the thick disc. We present abundance analysis based on high-resolution spectra of seven giant stars. The data were obtained using Fibre Large Array Multi Element Spectrograph/Ultraviolet Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) spectrograph mounted on UT2 telescope of the European Southern Observatory. The principal objective of this work is to perform a wide and detailed chemical abundance analysis of the cluster and look for possible Multiple Populations (MPs). We determined stellar parameters and measured 22 elements corresponding to light (Na, Al), alpha (O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti), iron-peak (Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn), and heavy elements (Y, Zr, Ba, Ce, Nd, Eu). We found a mean iron content of [Fe/H] = -0.47 ± 0.02 (error on the mean). We confirm the existence of MPs in this GC with an O-Na anti-correlation, and moderate spread in Al abundances. We estimate a mean [α/Fe] = 0.25 ± 0.08. Iron-peak elements show no significant spread. The [Ba/Eu] ratios indicate a predominant contribution from SNeII for the formation of the cluster.

  12. Low-mass X-ray binaries from black-hole retaining globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesler, Matthew; Clausen, Drew; Ott, Christian D.

    2018-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that globular clusters (GCs) may retain a substantial population of stellar-mass black holes (BHs), in contrast to the long-held belief of a few to zero BHs. We model the population of BH low-mass X-ray binaries (BH-LMXBs), an ideal observable proxy for elusive single BHs, produced from a representative group of Milky Way GCs with variable BH populations. We simulate the formation of BH-binaries in GCs through exchange interactions between binary and single stars in the company of tens to hundreds of BHs. Additionally, we consider the impact of the BH population on the rate of compact binaries undergoing gravitational wave driven mergers. The characteristics of the BH-LMXB population and binary properties are sensitive to the GCs structural parameters as well as its unobservable BH population. We find that GCs retaining ˜1000 BHs produce a galactic population of ˜150 ejected BH-LMXBs whereas GCs retaining only ˜20 BHs produce zero ejected BH-LMXBs. Moreover, we explore the possibility that some of the presently known BH-LMXBs might have originated in GCs and identify five candidate systems.

  13. Modelling the observed stellar mass function and its radial variation in galactic globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Vesperini, Enrico; Dalessandro, Emanuele; Beccari, Giacomo; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Lanzoni, Barbara

    2017-11-01

    We measure how the slope α of the stellar mass function (MF) changes as a function of clustercentric distance r in five Galactic globular clusters and compare α(r) to predictions from direct N-body star cluster simulations. Theoretical studies predict that α(r) (which traces the degree of mass segregation in a cluster) should steepen with time as a cluster undergoes two-body relaxation and that the amount by which the global MF can evolve from its initial state due to stellar escape is directly linked to α(r). We find that the amount of mass segregation in M10, NGC 6218, and NGC 6981 is consistent with their dynamical ages, but only the global MF of M10 is consistent with its degree of mass segregation as well. NGC 5466 and NGC 6101 on the other hand appear to be less segregated than their dynamical ages would indicate. Furthermore, despite the fact that the escape rate of stars in non-segregated clusters is independent of stellar mass, both NGC 5466 and NGC 6101 have near-flat MFs. We discuss various mechanisms which could produce non-segregated clusters with near-flat MFs, including higher mass-loss rates and black hole retention, but argue that for some clusters (NGC 5466 and NGC 6101) explaining the present-day properties might require either a non-universal initial mass function or a much more complex dynamical history.

  14. INFRARED HIGH-RESOLUTION INTEGRATED LIGHT SPECTRAL ANALYSES OF M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTERS FROM APOGEE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakari, Charli M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195-1580 (United States); Shetrone, Matthew D. [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, HC75 Box 1337-MCD, Fort Davis, TX 79734 (United States); Schiavon, Ricardo P. [Gemini Observatory, 670 N. A’Ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry; Pan, Kaike [Apache Point Observatory and New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM, 88349-0059 (United States); Prieto, Carlos Allende; García-Hernández, Domingo Aníbal [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), Va Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Beers, Timothy C. [Department of Physics and JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lucatello, Sara [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dellOsservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Majewski, Steven; O’Connell, Robert W. [Dept. of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Strader, Jay, E-mail: sakaricm@u.washington.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Chemical abundances are presented for 25 M31 globular clusters (GCs), based on moderately high resolution ( R = 22,500) H -band integrated light (IL) spectra from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). Infrared (IR) spectra offer lines from new elements, lines of different strengths, and lines at higher excitation potentials compared to the optical. Integrated abundances of C, N, and O are derived from CO, CN, and OH molecular features, while Fe, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, and Ti abundances are derived from atomic features. These abundances are compared to previous results from the optical, demonstrating the validity and value of IR IL analyses. The CNO abundances are consistent with typical tip of the red giant branch stellar abundances but are systematically offset from optical Lick index abundances. With a few exceptions, the other abundances agree between the optical and the IR within the 1 σ uncertainties. The first integrated K abundances are also presented and demonstrate that K tracks the α elements. The combination of IR and optical abundances allows better determinations of GC properties and enables probes of the multiple populations in extragalactic GCs. In particular, the integrated effects of the Na/O anticorrelation can be directly examined for the first time.

  15. Stellar streams as gravitational experiments. II. Asymmetric tails of globular cluster streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, G. F.; Famaey, B.; Ibata, R.; Renaud, F.; Martin, N. F.; Kroupa, P.

    2018-01-01

    Kinematically cold tidal streams of globular clusters (GC) are excellent tracers of the Galactic gravitational potential at moderate Galactocentric distances, and can also be used as probes of the law of gravity on Galactic scales. Here, we compare for the first time the generation of such streams in Newtonian and Milgromian gravity (MOND). We first computed analytical results to investigate the expected shape of the GC gravitational potential in both frameworks, and we then ran N-body simulations with the Phantom of Ramses code. We find that the GCs tend to become lopsided in MOND. This is a consequence of the external field effect which breaks the strong equivalence principle. When the GC is filling its tidal radius the lopsidedness generates a strongly asymmetric tidal stream. In Newtonian dynamics, such markedly asymmetric streams can in general only be the consequence of interactions with dark matter subhalos, giant molecular clouds, or interaction with the Galactic bar. In these Newtonian cases, the asymmetry is the consequence of a very large gap in the stream, whilst in MOND it is a true asymmetry. This should thus allow us in the future to distinguish these different scenarios by making deep observations of the environment of the asymmetric stellar stream of Palomar 5. Moreover, our simulations indicate that the high internal velocity dispersion of Palomar 5 for its small stellar mass would be natural in MOND. The movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Syntheses of nucleic acid and protein in somatic embryos of Fritillaria ussuriensis maxim in different development stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuyu; Tang Wei; Wang Hui

    1993-09-01

    After developing a procedure for somatic embryogenesis in Fritillaria ussuriensis, dynamics on the syntheses of DNA, RNA, and protein during globular, heart-shaped, torpedo-shaped, cotyledonary, and mature somatic embryo stages was demonstrated by both autoradiography and scintillation counting. The rates of syntheses of DNA, RNA, and protein gradually increase between the globular and cotyledonary somatic embryos stages. DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis rates are in peak at the cotyledonary later stage, precotyledonary stage, and cotyledonary stage, respectively. It appears that more DNA, RNA, and protein are synthesized in the cotyledonary somatic embryo stage than in other stages. All these results indicate that an increased syntheses of DNA, RNA, and protein is associated with the differentiation of embryogenic cells and organogenesis in somatic embryos

  17. Sensitivity of polarization fluctuations to the nature of protein-water interactions: Study of biological water in four different protein-water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rikhia; Banerjee, Saikat; Hazra, Milan; Roy, Susmita; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-12-01

    Since the time of Kirkwood, observed deviations in magnitude of the dielectric constant of aqueous protein solution from that of neat water (˜80) and slower decay of polarization have been subjects of enormous interest, controversy, and debate. Most of the common proteins have large permanent dipole moments (often more than 100 D) that can influence structure and dynamics of even distant water molecules, thereby affecting collective polarization fluctuation of the solution, which in turn can significantly alter solution's dielectric constant. Therefore, distance dependence of polarization fluctuation can provide important insight into the nature of biological water. We explore these aspects by studying aqueous solutions of four different proteins of different characteristics and varying sizes, chicken villin headpiece subdomain (HP-36), immunoglobulin binding domain protein G (GB1), hen-egg white lysozyme (LYS), and Myoglobin (MYO). We simulate fairly large systems consisting of single protein molecule and 20000-30000 water molecules (varied according to the protein size), providing a concentration in the range of ˜2-3 mM. We find that the calculated dielectric constant of the system shows a noticeable increment in all the cases compared to that of neat water. Total dipole moment auto time correlation function of water ⟨δMW(0)δMW(t)⟩ is found to be sensitive to the nature of the protein. Surprisingly, dipole moment of the protein and total dipole moment of the water molecules are found to be only weakly coupled. Shellwise decomposition of water molecules around protein reveals higher density of first layer compared to the succeeding ones. We also calculate heuristic effective dielectric constant of successive layers and find that the layer adjacent to protein has much lower value (˜50). However, progressive layers exhibit successive increment of dielectric constant, finally reaching a value close to that of bulk 4-5 layers away. We also calculate shellwise

  18. Electrostatic assembly of protein lysozyme on DNA visualized by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tao; Wei Gang; Li Zhuang

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to study the assembly of protein lysozyme on DNA molecule. Based on the electrostatic interaction, the positively charged lysozyme can easily bind onto the negatively charged DNA molecule surface. The protein molecules appear as globular objects on the DNA scaffold, which are distinguishable in the AFM images. At the same time, lysozyme molecules can be assembled onto DNA as dense or sporadic pattern by varying the protein concentration. This work may provide fundamental aspects for building protein nanostructures and studying of DNA-protein interaction

  19. The unfolding effects on the protein hydration shell and partial molar volume: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Galdo, Sara; Amadei, Andrea

    2016-10-12

    In this paper we apply the computational analysis recently proposed by our group to characterize the solvation properties of a native protein in aqueous solution, and to four model aqueous solutions of globular proteins in their unfolded states thus characterizing the protein unfolded state hydration shell and quantitatively evaluating the protein unfolded state partial molar volumes. Moreover, by using both the native and unfolded protein partial molar volumes, we obtain the corresponding variations (unfolding partial molar volumes) to be compared with the available experimental estimates. We also reconstruct the temperature and pressure dependence of the unfolding partial molar volume of Myoglobin dissecting the structural and hydration effects involved in the process.

  20. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Membrane Protein Folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto A. Roman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding protein folding has been one of the great challenges in biochemistry and molecular biophysics. Over the past 50 years, many thermodynamic and kinetic studies have been performed addressing the stability of globular proteins. In comparison, advances in the membrane protein folding field lag far behind. Although membrane proteins constitute about a third of the proteins encoded in known genomes, stability studies on membrane proteins have been impaired due to experimental limitations. Furthermore, no systematic experimental strategies are available for folding these biomolecules in vitro. Common denaturing agents such as chaotropes usually do not work on helical membrane proteins, and ionic detergents have been successful denaturants only in few cases. Refolding a membrane protein seems to be a craftsman work, which is relatively straightforward for transmembrane β-barrel proteins but challenging for α-helical membrane proteins. Additional complexities emerge in multidomain membrane proteins, data interpretation being one of the most critical. In this review, we will describe some recent efforts in understanding the folding mechanism of membrane proteins that have been reversibly refolded allowing both thermodynamic and kinetic analysis. This information will be discussed in the context of current paradigms in the protein folding field.

  1. Neutron-Capture Nucleosynthesis and the Chemical Evolution of Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingles, Luke J.

    2015-09-01

    Elements heavier than iron are almost entirely produced in stars through neutron captures and radioactive decays. Of these heavy elements, roughly half are produced by the slow neutron-capture process (s-process), which takes place under extended exposure to low neutron densities. Most of the s-process production occurs in stars with initial masses between roughly 0.8 and 8 solar masses (Msun), which evolve through the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) phase. This thesis explores several topics related to AGB stars and the s-process, with a focus on comparing theoretical models to observations in the literature on planetary nebulae, post-AGB stars, and globular cluster stars. A recurring theme is the uncertainty of carbon-13-pocket formation, which is crucial for building accurate models of s-process nucleosynthesis. We first investigated whether neutron-capture reactions in AGB stars are the cause of the low sulphur abundances in planetary nebulae and post-AGB stars relative to the interstellar medium. Accounting for uncertainties in the size of the partial mixing zone that forms carbon-13 pockets and the rates of neutron-capture and neutron-producing reactions, our models failed to reproduce the observed levels of sulphur destruction. From this, we concluded that AGB nucleosynthesis is not the cause of the sulphur anomaly. We also discovered a new method to constrain the extent of the partial mixing zone using neon abundances in planetary nebulae. We next aimed to discover the stellar sites of the s-process enrichment in globular clusters that have inter- and intra-cluster variation, with the examples of M4 (relative to M5) and M22, respectively. Using a new chemical evolution code developed by the candidate, we tested models with stellar yields from rotating massive stars and AGB stars. We compared our model predictions for the production of s-process elements with abundances from s-poor and s-rich populations. We found that rotating massive stars alone do not

  2. Strömgren uvby photometry of the peculiar globular cluster NGC 2419

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Matthias J.; Koch, Andreas; Feltzing, Sofia; Kacharov, Nikolay; Wilkinson, Mark I.; Irwin, Mike

    2015-09-01

    NGC 2419 is a peculiar Galactic globular cluster offset from the others in the size-luminosity diagram, and showing several chemical abundance anomalies. Here, we present Strömgren uvby photometry of the cluster. Using the gravity- and metallicity-sensitive c1 and m1 indices, we identify a sample of likely cluster members extending well beyond the formal tidal radius. The estimated contamination by cluster non-members is only one per cent, making our catalogue ideally suited for spectroscopic follow-up. We derive photometric [Fe/H] of red giants, and depending on which metallicity calibration from the literature we use, we find reasonable to excellent agreement with spectroscopic [Fe/H], both for the cluster mean metallicity and for individual stars. We demonstrate explicitly that the photometric uncertainties are not Gaussian and this must be accounted for in any analysis of the metallicity distribution function. Using a realistic, non-Gaussian model for the photometric uncertainties, we find a formal internal [Fe/H] spread of σ=0.11+0.02-0.01 dex. This is an upper limit to the cluster's true [Fe/H] spread and may partially, and possibly entirely, reflect the limited precision of the photometric metallicity estimation and systematic effects. The lack of correlation between spectroscopic and photometric [Fe/H] of individual stars is further evidence against a [Fe/H] spread on the 0.1 dex level. Finally, the CN-sensitive δ4, among other colour indices, anti-correlates strongly with magnesium abundance, indicating that the second-generation stars are nitrogen enriched. The absence of similar correlations in some other CN-sensitive indices supports the second generation being enriched in He, which in these indices approximately compensates the shift due to CN. Compared to a single continuous distribution with finite dispersion, the observed δ4 distribution of red giants is slightly better fit by two distinct populations with no internal spread, with the nitrogen

  3. Gravitational Waves and Intermediate-mass Black Hole Retention in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragione, Giacomo; Ginsburg, Idan; Kocsis, Bence

    2018-04-01

    The recent discovery of gravitational waves (GWs) has opened new horizons for physics. Current and upcoming missions, such as LIGO, VIRGO, KAGRA, and LISA, promise to shed light on black holes of every size from stellar mass (SBH) sizes up to supermassive black holes. The intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) family has not been detected beyond any reasonable doubt. Recent analyses suggest observational evidence for the presence of IMBHs in the centers of two Galactic globular clusters (GCs). In this paper, we investigate the possibility that GCs were born with a central IMBH, which undergoes repeated merger events with SBHs in the cluster core. By means of a semi-analytical method, we follow the evolution of the primordial cluster population in the galactic potential and the mergers of the binary IMBH-SBH systems. Our models predict ≈1000 IMBHs within 1 kpc from the galactic center and show that the IMBH-SBH merger rate density changes from { \\mathcal R }≈ 1000 Gpc‑3 yr‑1 beyond z ≈ 2 to { \\mathcal R }≈ 1{--}10 Gpc‑3 yr‑1 at z ≈ 0. The rates at low redshifts may be significantly higher if young massive star clusters host IMBHs. The merger rates are dominated by IMBHs with masses between 103 and 104 M ⊙. Currently, there are no LIGO/VIRGO upper limits for GW sources in this mass range, but our results show that at design sensitivity, these instruments will detect IMBH-SBH mergers in the coming years. LISA and the Einstein Telescope will be best suited to detect these events. The inspirals of IMBH-SBH systems may also generate an unresolved GW background.

  4. THE ROLE OF THERMOHALINE MIXING IN INTERMEDIATE- AND LOW-METALLICITY GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelou, George C.; Stancliffe, Richard J.; Church, Ross P.; Lattanzio, John C. [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia); Smith, Graeme H., E-mail: George.Angelou@monash.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, UC Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-04-20

    It is now widely accepted that globular cluster red giant branch (RGB) stars owe their strange abundance patterns to a combination of pollution from progenitor stars and in situ extra mixing. In this hybrid theory a first generation of stars imprints abundance patterns into the gas from which a second generation forms. The hybrid theory suggests that extra mixing is operating in both populations and we use the variation of [C/Fe] with luminosity to examine how efficient this mixing is. We investigate the observed RGBs of M3, M13, M92, M15, and NGC 5466 as a means to test a theory of thermohaline mixing. The second parameter pair M3 and M13 are of intermediate metallicity and our models are able to account for the evolution of carbon along the RGB in both clusters, although in order to fit the most carbon-depleted main-sequence stars in M13 we require a model whose initial [C/Fe] abundance leads to a carbon abundance lower than is observed. Furthermore, our results suggest that stars in M13 formed with some primary nitrogen (higher C+N+O than stars in M3). In the metal-poor regime only NGC 5466 can be tentatively explained by thermohaline mixing operating in multiple populations. We find thermohaline mixing unable to model the depletion of [C/Fe] with magnitude in M92 and M15. It appears as if extra mixing is occurring before the luminosity function bump in these clusters. To reconcile the data with the models would require first dredge-up to be deeper than found in extant models.

  5. Tycho- Gaia Astrometric Solution Parallaxes and Proper Motions for Five Galactic Globular Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, Laura L.; Van der Marel, Roeland P., E-mail: lwatkins@stsci.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore MD 21218 (United States)

    2017-04-20

    We present a pilot study of Galactic globular cluster (GC) proper motion (PM) determinations using Gaia data. We search for GC stars in the Tycho- Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) catalog from Gaia Data Release 1 (DR1), and identify five members of NGC 104 (47 Tucanae), one member of NGC 5272 (M3), five members of NGC 6121 (M4), seven members of NGC 6397, and two members of NGC 6656 (M22). By taking a weighted average of member stars, fully accounting for the correlations between parameters, we estimate the parallax (and, hence, distance) and PM of the GCs. This provides a homogeneous PM study of multiple GCs based on an astrometric catalog with small and well-controlled systematic errors and yields random PM errors similar to existing measurements. Detailed comparison to the available Hubble Space Telescope ( HST ) measurements generally shows excellent agreement, validating the astrometric quality of both TGAS and HST . By contrast, comparison to ground-based measurements shows that some of those must have systematic errors exceeding the random errors. Our parallax estimates have uncertainties an order of magnitude larger than previous studies, but nevertheless imply distances consistent with previous estimates. By combining our PM measurements with literature positions, distances, and radial velocities, we measure Galactocentric space motions for the clusters and find that these also agree well with previous analyses. Our analysis provides a framework for determining more accurate distances and PMs of Galactic GCs using future Gaia data releases. This will provide crucial constraints on the near end of the cosmic distance ladder and provide accurate GC orbital histories.

  6. Discovery of a new accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar in the globular cluster NGC 2808

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, A.; Papitto, A.; Burderi, L.; Bozzo, E.; Riggio, A.; Di Salvo, T.; Ferrigno, C.; Rea, N.; Iaria, R.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the discovery of coherent pulsations at a period of 2.9 ms from the X-ray transient MAXI J0911-655 in the globular cluster NGC 2808. We observed X-ray pulsations at a frequency of 339.97 Hz in three different observations of the source performed with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR during the source outburst. This newly discovered accreting millisecond pulsar is part of an ultra-compact binary system characterised by an orbital period of 44.3 min and a projected semi-major axis of 17.6 lt-ms. Based on the mass function, we estimate a minimum companion mass of 0.024 M⊙, which assumes a neutron star mass of 1.4 M⊙ and a maximum inclination angle of 75° (derived from the lack of eclipses and dips in the light-curve of the source). We find that the Roche-lobe of the companion star could either be filled by a hot (5 × 106 K) pure helium white dwarf with a 0.028 M⊙ mass (implying I ≃ 58°) or an old (>5 Gyr) brown dwarf with metallicity abundances between solar/sub-solar and mass ranging in the interval 0.065 to 0.085 (16 < I < 21). During the outburst, the broad-band energy spectra are well described by a superposition of a weak black-body component (kT 0.5 keV) and a hard cut-off power-law with photon index Γ 1.7 and cut-off at a temperature kTe 130 keV. Up until the latest Swift-XRT observation performed on 19th July, 2016, the source had been observed in outburst for almost 150 days, which makes MAXI J0911-655 the second accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar with outburst duration longer than 100 days.

  7. Double blue straggler sequences in globular clusters: The case of NGC 362

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalessandro, E.; Ferraro, F. R.; Massari, D.; Lanzoni, B.; Miocchi, P.; Mucciarelli, A.; Lovisi, L.; Beccari, G.; Bellini, A.; Sills, A.; Sigurdsson, S.

    2013-01-01

    We used high-quality images acquired with the Wide Field Camera 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope to probe the blue straggler star (BSS) population of the galactic globular cluster NGC 362. We have found two distinct sequences of BSSs: this is the second case, after M30, where such a feature has been observed. Indeed, the BSS location, their extension in magnitude and color, and their radial distribution within the cluster nicely resemble those observed in M30, thus suggesting that the same interpretative scenario can be applied: the red BSS sub-population is generated by mass-transfer binaries, the blue one by collisions. The discovery of four new W UMa stars, three of which lie along the red BSS sequence, further supports this scenario. We also found that the inner portion of the density profile deviates from a King model and is well reproduced by either a mild power law (α ∼ –0.2) or a double King profile. This feature supports the hypothesis that the cluster is currently undergoing the core-collapse phase. Moreover, the BSS radial distribution shows a central peak and monotonically decreases outward without any evidence of an external rising branch. This evidence is a further indication of the advanced dynamical age of NGC 362; in fact, together with M30, NGC 362 belongs to the family of dynamically old clusters (Family III) in the 'dynamical clock' classification proposed by Ferraro et al. The observational evidence presented here strengthens the possible connection between the existence of a double BSS sequence and a quite advanced dynamical status of the parent cluster.

  8. Globular cluster formation with multiple stellar populations: self-enrichment in fractal massive molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekki, Kenji

    2017-08-01

    Internal chemical abundance spreads are one of fundamental properties of globular clusters (GCs) in the Galaxy. In order to understand the origin of such abundance spreads, we numerically investigate GC formation from massive molecular clouds (MCs) with fractal structures using our new hydrodynamical simulations with star formation and feedback effects of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We particularly investigate star formation from gas chemically contaminated by SNe and AGB stars ('self-enrichment') in forming GCs within MCs with different initial conditions and environments. The principal results are as follows. GCs with multiple generations of stars can be formed from merging of hierarchical star cluster complexes that are developed from high-density regions of fractal MCs. Feedback effects of SNe and AGB stars can control the formation efficiencies of stars formed from original gas of MCs and from gas ejected from AGB stars. The simulated GCs have strong radial gradients of helium abundances within the central 3 pc. The original MC masses need to be as large as 107 M⊙ for a canonical initial stellar mass function (IMF) so that the final masses of stars formed from AGB ejecta can be ˜105 M⊙. Since star formation from AGB ejecta is rather prolonged (˜108 yr), their formation can be strongly suppressed by SNe of the stars themselves. This result implies that the so-called mass budget problem is much more severe than ever thought in the self-enrichment scenario of GC formation and thus that IMF for the second generation of stars should be 'top-light'.

  9. Therapeutic effects of globular adiponectin in diabetic rats with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hong; Cui, Fan; Dong, Jing-Jing; You, Guo-Ping; Yang, Xiang-Jiu; Lu, Hua-Dong; Huang, Yan-Ling

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To explore the therapeutic role of globular adiponectin (gAd) in high-fat diet/streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 2 diabetic rats with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). METHODS: Seven rats were fed a basic diet (normal control group; NC) during the experiment. Experimental rats (14 rats) were given a high-fat diet for 4 wk and were then injected with STZ to induce type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and NAFLD. Half of the T2DM/NAFLD rats were randomly injected intraperitoneally with gAd for 7 d (gAd-treated group), while the other 7 rats (T2DM/NAFLD group) received 0.9% saline. Plasma biochemical parameters and insulin concentrations were measured. Liver histopathology was examined by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Insulin receptor expression in the liver was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining, Western blot and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. RESULTS: Compared to the control group, the T2DM/NAFLD group had increased levels of glucolipid and decreased levels of insulin. Plasma glucose and lipid levels were decreased in the gAd-treated group, while serum insulin levels increased. The expression of insulin receptor in the T2DM/NAFLD group increased compared with the NC group, and gAd downregulated insulin receptor expression in the livers of T2DM/NAFLD rats. Steatosis of the liver was alleviated in the gAd-treated group compared to the T2DM/NAFLD group (NAS 1.39 ± 0.51 vs 1.92 ± 0.51, P T2DM rats with NAFLD by promoting insulin secretion, mediating glucolipid metabolism, regulating insulin receptor expression and alleviating hepatic steatosis. PMID:25356056

  10. The Dynamics of the Globular Star Cluster 47 TUC (NGC 104)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, B. W.; Moore, C. A.; Trotter, T. E.; Cohn, H. N.; Lugger, P. M.

    1998-12-01

    We have fit dynamically evolving Fokker-Planck models to the globular star cluster 47 Tuc (Ngc 104). Using mass-function and star-count data from the Hubble Space Telescope, we have determined the global stellar mass function down to 0.1 Msun. In addition to the mass function and star-count data, the velocity-dispersion profile and millisecond pulsar acceleration are well fit by the model. The best-fitting model is a pre-core-collapse model that mimics the behavior of a cluster with a sizable population of primordial binaries. These Fokker-Planck models are far more successful than are King-Mitchie model for fitting the full set of observational data. The best-fitting model has a mass function with power-law indices of 1.35, -1.0, 0.5, and -1.0 (where 1.35 is the Salpeter index) over the mass intervals of 60 to 1.0 Msun, 1.0 to 0.55 Msun, 0.55 to 0.25 Msun, and 0.35 to 0.1 Msun, respectively. The total mass of the cluster is 1.1x 10(6) Msun, the half-mass radius is 7 parsecs, and the core radius is 0.2 parsecs. The model contains a large number (4.6% of the total cluster mass) in nonluminous objects of 1.4 Msun. If most of these objects are neutron stars, the large inferred number suggest that either the upper main sequence mass function was flatter that the Salpeter mass function or that the progenitor stellar mass range for neutron star formation may extend to lower masses in low-metallicity systems than in high metallicity systems.

  11. Concurrent formation of supermassive stars and globular clusters: implications for early self-enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieles, Mark; Charbonnel, Corinne; Krause, Martin G. H.; Hénault-Brunet, Vincent; Agertz, Oscar; Lamers, Henny J. G. L. M.; Bastian, Nathan; Gualandris, Alessia; Zocchi, Alice; Petts, James A.

    2018-04-01

    We present a model for the concurrent formation of globular clusters (GCs) and supermassive stars (SMSs, ≳ 103 M⊙) to address the origin of the HeCNONaMgAl abundance anomalies in GCs. GCs form in converging gas flows and accumulate low-angular momentum gas, which accretes onto protostars. This leads to an adiabatic contraction of the cluster and an increase of the stellar collision rate. A SMS can form via runaway collisions if the cluster reaches sufficiently high density before two-body relaxation halts the contraction. This condition is met if the number of stars ≳ 106 and the gas accretion rate ≳ 105 M⊙/Myr, reminiscent of GC formation in high gas-density environments, such as - but not restricted to - the early Universe. The strong SMS wind mixes with the inflowing pristine gas, such that the protostars accrete diluted hot-hydrogen burning yields of the SMS. Because of continuous rejuvenation, the amount of processed material liberated by the SMS can be an order of magnitude higher than its maximum mass. This `conveyor-belt' production of hot-hydrogen burning products provides a solution to the mass budget problem that plagues other scenarios. Additionally, the liberated material is mildly enriched in helium and relatively rich in other hot-hydrogen burning products, in agreement with abundances of GCs today. Finally, we find a super-linear scaling between the amount of processed material and cluster mass, providing an explanation for the observed increase of the fraction of processed material with GC mass. We discuss open questions of this new GC enrichment scenario and propose observational tests.

  12. Atmospheric Parameters and Metallicities for 2191 Stars in the Globular Cluster M4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavolta, Luca; Sneden, Christopher; Piotto, Giampaolo; Milone, Antonino P.; Bedin, Luigi R.; Nascimbeni, Valerio

    2014-02-01

    We report new metallicities for stars of Galactic globular cluster M4 using the largest number of stars ever observed at high spectral resolution in any cluster. We analyzed 7250 spectra for 2771 cluster stars gathered with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) FLAMES+GIRAFFE spectrograph at VLT. These medium-resolution spectra cover a small wavelength range, and often have very low signal-to-noise ratios. We approached this data set by reconsidering the whole method of abundance analysis of large stellar samples from beginning to end. We developed a new algorithm that automatically determines the atmospheric parameters of a star. Nearly all of the data preparation steps for spectroscopic analyses are processed on the syntheses, not the observed spectra. For 322 red giant branch (RGB) stars with V 14.7, we obtain lang[Fe/H]rang = -1.16 (σ = 0.09) after fixing the microturbulent velocity. These values are consistent with previous studies that have performed detailed analyses of brighter RGB stars at higher spectroscopic resolution and wavelength coverage. It is not clear if the small mean metallicity difference between brighter and fainter M4 members is real or is the result of the low signal-to-noise characteristics of the fainter stars. The strength of our approach is shown by recovering a metallicity close to a single value for more than 2000 stars, using a data set that is non-optimal for atmospheric analyses. This technique is particularly suitable for noisy data taken in difficult observing conditions.

  13. Atmospheric parameters and metallicities for 2191 stars in the globular cluster M4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malavolta, Luca; Piotto, Giampaolo; Nascimbeni, Valerio; Sneden, Christopher; Milone, Antonino P.; Bedin, Luigi R.

    2014-01-01

    We report new metallicities for stars of Galactic globular cluster M4 using the largest number of stars ever observed at high spectral resolution in any cluster. We analyzed 7250 spectra for 2771 cluster stars gathered with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) FLAMES+GIRAFFE spectrograph at VLT. These medium-resolution spectra cover a small wavelength range, and often have very low signal-to-noise ratios. We approached this data set by reconsidering the whole method of abundance analysis of large stellar samples from beginning to end. We developed a new algorithm that automatically determines the atmospheric parameters of a star. Nearly all of the data preparation steps for spectroscopic analyses are processed on the syntheses, not the observed spectra. For 322 red giant branch (RGB) stars with V ≤ 14.7, we obtain a nearly constant metallicity, ([Fe/H]) = –1.07 (σ = 0.02). No difference in the metallicity at the level of 0.01 dex is observed between the two RGB sequences identified by Monelli et al. For 1869 subgiant and main-sequence stars with V > 14.7, we obtain ([Fe/H]) = –1.16 (σ = 0.09) after fixing the microturbulent velocity. These values are consistent with previous studies that have performed detailed analyses of brighter RGB stars at higher spectroscopic resolution and wavelength coverage. It is not clear if the small mean metallicity difference between brighter and fainter M4 members is real or is the result of the low signal-to-noise characteristics of the fainter stars. The strength of our approach is shown by recovering a metallicity close to a single value for more than 2000 stars, using a data set that is non-optimal for atmospheric analyses. This technique is particularly suitable for noisy data taken in difficult observing conditions

  14. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN NGC 5024 (M53): A MOSTLY FIRST GENERATION GLOBULAR CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boberg, Owen M.; Friel, Eileen D.; Vesperini, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    We present the Fe, Ca, Ti, Ni, Ba, Na, and O abundances for a sample of 53 red giant branch stars in the globular cluster (GC) NGC 5024 (M53). The abundances were measured from high signal-to-noise medium resolution spectra collected with the Hydra multi-object spectrograph on the Wisconsin–Indiana–Yale–NOAO 3.5 m telescope. M53 is of interest because previous studies based on the morphology of the cluster’s horizontal branch suggested that it might be composed primarily of first generation (FG) stars and differ from the majority of other GCs with multiple populations, which have been found to be dominated by the second generation (SG) stars. Our sample has an average [Fe/H] = −2.07 with a standard deviation of 0.07 dex. This value is consistent with previously published results. The alpha-element abundances in our sample are also consistent with the trends seen in Milky Way halo stars at similar metallicities, with enhanced [Ca/Fe] and [Ti/Fe] relative to solar. We find that the Na–O anti-correlation in M53 is not as extended as other GCs with similar masses and metallicities. The ratio of SG to the total number of stars in our sample is approximately 0.27 and the SG generation is more centrally concentrated. These findings further support that M53 might be a mostly FG cluster and could give further insight into how GCs formed the light element abundance patterns we observe in them today.

  15. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN NGC 5053: A VERY METAL-POOR AND DYNAMICALLY COMPLEX GLOBULAR CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boberg, Owen M.; Friel, Eileen D.; Vesperini, Enrico [Astronomy Department, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2015-05-10

    NGC 5053 provides a rich environment to test our understanding of the complex evolution of globular clusters (GCs). Recent studies have found that this cluster has interesting morphological features beyond the typical spherical distribution of GCs, suggesting that external tidal effects have played an important role in its evolution and current properties. Additionally, simulations have shown that NGC 5053 could be a likely candidate to belong to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr dSph) stream. Using the Wisconsin–Indiana–Yale–NOAO–Hydra multi-object spectrograph, we have collected high quality (signal-to-noise ratio ∼ 75–90), medium-resolution spectra for red giant branch stars in NGC 5053. Using these spectra we have measured the Fe, Ca, Ti, Ni, Ba, Na, and O abundances in the cluster. We measure an average cluster [Fe/H] abundance of −2.45 with a standard deviation of 0.04 dex, making NGC 5053 one of the most metal-poor GCs in the Milky Way (MW). The [Ca/Fe], [Ti/Fe], and [Ba/Fe] we measure are consistent with the abundances of MW halo stars at a similar metallicity, with alpha-enhanced ratios and slightly depleted [Ba/Fe]. The Na and O abundances show the Na–O anti-correlation found in most GCs. From our abundance analysis it appears that NGC 5053 is at least chemically similar to other GCs found in the MW. This does not, however, rule out NGC 5053 being associated with the Sgr dSph stream.

  16. Chemical Abundances in NGC 5053: A Very Metal-poor and Dynamically Complex Globular Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boberg, Owen M.; Friel, Eileen D.; Vesperini, Enrico

    2015-05-01

    NGC 5053 provides a rich environment to test our understanding of the complex evolution of globular clusters (GCs). Recent studies have found that this cluster has interesting morphological features beyond the typical spherical distribution of GCs, suggesting that external tidal effects have played an important role in its evolution and current properties. Additionally, simulations have shown that NGC 5053 could be a likely candidate to belong to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr dSph) stream. Using the Wisconsin-Indiana-Yale-NOAO-Hydra multi-object spectrograph, we have collected high quality (signal-to-noise ratio ˜ 75-90), medium-resolution spectra for red giant branch stars in NGC 5053. Using these spectra we have measured the Fe, Ca, Ti, Ni, Ba, Na, and O abundances in the cluster. We measure an average cluster [Fe/H] abundance of -2.45 with a standard deviation of 0.04 dex, making NGC 5053 one of the most metal-poor GCs in the Milky Way (MW). The [Ca/Fe], [Ti/Fe], and [Ba/Fe] we measure are consistent with the abundances of MW halo stars at a similar metallicity, with alpha-enhanced ratios and slightly depleted [Ba/Fe]. The Na and O abundances show the Na-O anti-correlation found in most GCs. From our abundance analysis it appears that NGC 5053 is at least chemically similar to other GCs found in the MW. This does not, however, rule out NGC 5053 being associated with the Sgr dSph stream.

  17. Chemical Abundances in NGC 5024 (M53): A Mostly First Generation Globular Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boberg, Owen M.; Friel, Eileen D.; Vesperini, Enrico

    2016-06-01

    We present the Fe, Ca, Ti, Ni, Ba, Na, and O abundances for a sample of 53 red giant branch stars in the globular cluster (GC) NGC 5024 (M53). The abundances were measured from high signal-to-noise medium resolution spectra collected with the Hydra multi-object spectrograph on the Wisconsin-Indiana-Yale-NOAO 3.5 m telescope. M53 is of interest because previous studies based on the morphology of the cluster’s horizontal branch suggested that it might be composed primarily of first generation (FG) stars and differ from the majority of other GCs with multiple populations, which have been found to be dominated by the second generation (SG) stars. Our sample has an average [Fe/H] = -2.07 with a standard deviation of 0.07 dex. This value is consistent with previously published results. The alpha-element abundances in our sample are also consistent with the trends seen in Milky Way halo stars at similar metallicities, with enhanced [Ca/Fe] and [Ti/Fe] relative to solar. We find that the Na-O anti-correlation in M53 is not as extended as other GCs with similar masses and metallicities. The ratio of SG to the total number of stars in our sample is approximately 0.27 and the SG generation is more centrally concentrated. These findings further support that M53 might be a mostly FG cluster and could give further insight into how GCs formed the light element abundance patterns we observe in them today.

  18. Galactic Pal-eontology: abundance analysis of the disrupting globular cluster Palomar 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Andreas; Côté, Patrick

    2017-05-01

    We present a chemical abundance analysis of the tidally disrupted globular cluster (GC) Palomar 5. By co-adding high-resolution spectra of 15 member stars from the cluster's main body, taken at low signal-to-noise with the Keck/HIRES spectrograph, we were able to measure integrated abundance ratios of 24 species of 20 elements including all major nucleosynthetic channels (namely the light element Na; α-elements Mg, Si, Ca, Ti; Fe-peak and heavy elements Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn; and the neutron-capture elements Y, Zr, Ba, La, Nd, Sm, Eu). The mean metallicity of -1.56 ± 0.02 ± 0.06 dex (statistical and systematic errors) agrees well with the values from individual, low-resolution measurements of individual stars, but it is lower than previous high-resolution results of a small number of stars in the literature. Comparison with Galactic halo stars and other disrupted and unperturbed GCs renders Pal 5 a typical representative of the Milky Way halo population, as has been noted before, emphasizing that the early chemical evolution of such clusters is decoupled from their later dynamical history. We also performed a test as to the detectability of light element variations in this co-added abundance analysis technique and found that this approach is not sensitive even in the presence of a broad range in sodium of 0.6 dex, a value typically found in the old halo GCs. Thus, while methods of determining the global abundance patterns of such objects are well suited to study their overall enrichment histories, chemical distinctions of their multiple stellar populations is still best obtained from measurements of individual stars. Full Table 3 is is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/601/A41

  19. Atmospheric parameters and metallicities for 2191 stars in the globular cluster M4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malavolta, Luca; Piotto, Giampaolo; Nascimbeni, Valerio [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Sneden, Christopher [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, The University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Milone, Antonino P. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Bedin, Luigi R., E-mail: luca.malavolta@unipd.it, E-mail: giampaolo.piotto@unipd.it, E-mail: valerio.nascimbeni@unipd.it, E-mail: luigi.bedin@oapd.inaf.it, E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: milone@mso.anu.edu.au [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy)

    2014-02-01

    We report new metallicities for stars of Galactic globular cluster M4 using the largest number of stars ever observed at high spectral resolution in any cluster. We analyzed 7250 spectra for 2771 cluster stars gathered with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) FLAMES+GIRAFFE spectrograph at VLT. These medium-resolution spectra cover a small wavelength range, and often have very low signal-to-noise ratios. We approached this data set by reconsidering the whole method of abundance analysis of large stellar samples from beginning to end. We developed a new algorithm that automatically determines the atmospheric parameters of a star. Nearly all of the data preparation steps for spectroscopic analyses are processed on the syntheses, not the observed spectra. For 322 red giant branch (RGB) stars with V ≤ 14.7, we obtain a nearly constant metallicity, ([Fe/H]) = –1.07 (σ = 0.02). No difference in the metallicity at the level of 0.01 dex is observed between the two RGB sequences identified by Monelli et al. For 1869 subgiant and main-sequence stars with V > 14.7, we obtain ([Fe/H]) = –1.16 (σ = 0.09) after fixing the microturbulent velocity. These values are consistent with previous studies that have performed detailed analyses of brighter RGB stars at higher spectroscopic resolution and wavelength coverage. It is not clear if the small mean metallicity difference between brighter and fainter M4 members is real or is the result of the low signal-to-noise characteristics of the fainter stars. The strength of our approach is shown by recovering a metallicity close to a single value for more than 2000 stars, using a data set that is non-optimal for atmospheric analyses. This technique is particularly suitable for noisy data taken in difficult observing conditions.

  20. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN NGC 5024 (M53): A MOSTLY FIRST GENERATION GLOBULAR CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boberg, Owen M.; Friel, Eileen D.; Vesperini, Enrico [Astronomy Department, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2016-06-10

    We present the Fe, Ca, Ti, Ni, Ba, Na, and O abundances for a sample of 53 red giant branch stars in the globular cluster (GC) NGC 5024 (M53). The abundances were measured from high signal-to-noise medium resolution spectra collected with the Hydra multi-object spectrograph on the Wisconsin–Indiana–Yale–NOAO 3.5 m telescope. M53 is of interest because previous studies based on the morphology of the cluster’s horizontal branch suggested that it might be composed primarily of first generation (FG) stars and differ from the majority of other GCs with multiple populations, which have been found to be dominated by the second generation (SG) stars. Our sample has an average [Fe/H] = −2.07 with a standard deviation of 0.07 dex. This value is consistent with previously published results. The alpha-element abundances in our sample are also consistent with the trends seen in Milky Way halo stars at similar metallicities, with enhanced [Ca/Fe] and [Ti/Fe] relative to solar. We find that the Na–O anti-correlation in M53 is not as extended as other GCs with similar masses and metallicities. The ratio of SG to the total number of stars in our sample is approximately 0.27 and the SG generation is more centrally concentrated. These findings further support that M53 might be a mostly FG cluster and could give further insight into how GCs formed the light element abundance patterns we observe in them today.

  1. Tracing the assembly history of NGC 1395 through its Globular Cluster System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Carlos G.; Faifer, Favio R.; Smith Castelli, Analía V.; Forte, Juan C.; Sesto, Leandro A.; González, Nélida M.; Scalia, María C.

    2018-03-01

    We used deep Gemini-South/GMOS g΄r΄i΄z΄ images to study the globular cluster (GC) system of the massive elliptical galaxy NGC 1395, located in the Eridanus supergroup. The photometric analysis of the GC candidates reveals a clear colour bimodality distribution, indicating the presence of `blue' and `red' GC subpopulations. While a negative radial colour gradient is detected in the projected spatial distribution of the red GCs, the blue GCs display a shallow colour gradient. The blue GCs also display a remarkable shallow and extended surface density profile, suggesting a significant accretion of low-mass satellites in the outer halo of the galaxy. In addition, the slope of the projected spatial distribution of the blue GCs in the outer regions of the galaxy, is similar to that of the X-ray halo emission. Integrating up to 165 kpc the profile of the projected spatial distribution of the GCs, we estimated a total GC population and specific frequency of 6000 ± 1100 and SN = 7.4 ± 1.4, respectively. Regarding NGC 1395 itself, the analysis of the deep Gemini/GMOS images shows a low surface brightness umbrella-like structure indicating, at least, one recent merger event. Through relations recently published in the literature, we obtained global parameters, such as Mstellar = 9.32 × 1011 M⊙ and Mh = 6.46 × 1013 M⊙. Using public spectroscopic data, we derive stellar population parameters of the central region of the galaxy by the full spectral fitting technique. We have found that this region seems to be dominated for an old stellar population, in contrast to findings of young stellar populations from the literature.

  2. Ultra-deep GEMINI Near-infrared Observations of the Bulge Globular Cluster NGC 6624.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracino, S.; Dalessandro, E.; Ferraro, F. R.; Geisler, D.; Mauro, F.; Lanzoni, B.; Origlia, L.; Miocchi, P.; Cohen, R. E.; Villanova, S.; Moni Bidin, C.

    2016-11-01

    We used ultra-deep J and K s images secured with the near-infrared (NIR) GSAOI camera assisted by the multi-conjugate adaptive optics system GeMS at the GEMINI South Telescope in Chile, to obtain a (K s , J - K s ) color-magnitude diagram (CMD) for the bulge globular cluster NGC 6624. We obtained the deepest and most accurate NIR CMD from the ground for this cluster, by reaching K s ˜ 21.5, approximately 8 mag below the horizontal branch level. The entire extension of the Main Sequence (MS) is nicely sampled and at K s ˜ 20 we detected the so-called MS “knee” in a purely NIR CMD. By taking advantage of the exquisite quality of the data, we estimated the absolute age of NGC 6624 (t age = 12.0 ± 0.5 Gyr), which turns out to be in good agreement with previous studies in the literature. We also analyzed the luminosity and mass functions of MS stars down to M ˜ 0.45 M⊙, finding evidence of a significant increase of low-mass stars at increasing distances from the cluster center. This is a clear signature of mass segregation, confirming that NGC 6624 is in an advanced stage of dynamical evolution. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina). Based on observations gathered with ESO-VISTA telescope (program ID 179.B-2002).

  3. Five Groups of Red Giants with Distinct Chemical Composition in the Globular Cluster NGC 2808

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretta, Eugenio

    2015-09-01

    The chemical composition of multiple populations in the massive globular cluster (GC) NGC 2808 is addressed with the homogeneous abundance reanalysis of 140 red giant branch stars. UVES spectra for 31 stars and GIRAFFE spectra for the other giants were analyzed with the same procedures used for about 2500 giants in 23 GCs in our FLAMES survey, deriving abundances of Fe, O, Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, Sc, Cr, Mn, and Ni. Iron, elements from α capture, and those in the Fe group do not show intrinsic scatter. On our UVES scale, the metallicity of NGC 2808 is [Fe/H] =\\-1.129+/- 0.005+/- 0.034 (± statistical ± systematic error) with σ = 0.030 (31 stars). The main features related to proton-capture elements are retrieved, but the improved statistics and the smaller associated internal errors allow us to uncover five distinct groups of stars along the Na-O anticorrelation. We observe large depletions in Mg, anticorrelated with enhancements of Na and also Si, suggestive of unusually high temperatures for proton captures. About 14% of our sample is formed by giants with solar or subsolar [Mg/Fe] ratios. Using the [Na/Mg] ratios, we confirm the presence of five populations with different chemical compositions that we call P1, P2, I1, I2, and E in order of decreasing Mg and increasing Na abundances. Statistical tests show that the mean ratios in any pair of groups cannot be extracted from the same parent distribution. The overlap with the five populations recently detected from UV photometry is good but not perfect, confirming that more distinct components probably exist in this complex GC. Based on data collected at the ESO telescopes under program 072.D-0507 and during the FLAMES Science Verification program.

  4. Evolution of the stellar mass function in multiple-population globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesperini, Enrico; Hong, Jongsuk; Webb, Jeremy J.; D'Antona, Franca; D'Ercole, Annibale

    2018-05-01

    We present the results of a survey of N-body simulations aimed at studying the effects of the long-term dynamical evolution on the stellar mass function (MF) of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters. Our simulations show that if first-(1G) and second-generation (2G) stars have the same initial MF (IMF), the global MFs of the two populations are affected similarly by dynamical evolution and no significant differences between the 1G and 2G MFs arise during the cluster's evolution. If the two populations have different IMFs, dynamical effects do not completely erase memory of the initial differences. Should observations find differences between the global 1G and 2G MFs, these would reveal the fingerprints of differences in their IMFs. Irrespective of whether the 1G and 2G populations have the same global IMF or not, dynamical effects can produce differences between the local (measured at various distances from the cluster centre) 1G and 2G MFs; these differences are a manifestation of the process of mass segregation in populations with different initial structural properties. In dynamically old and spatially mixed clusters, however, differences between the local 1G and 2G MFs can reveal differences between the 1G and 2G global MFs. In general, for clusters with any dynamical age, large differences between the local 1G and 2G MFs are more likely to be associated with differences in the global MF. Our study also reveals a dependence of the spatial mixing rate on the stellar mass, another dynamical consequence of the multiscale nature of multiple-population clusters.

  5. THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6402 (M14). I. A NEW BV COLOR-MAGNITUDE DIAGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras Pena, C.; Catelan, M. [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Grundahl, F. [Danish AsteroSeismology Centre (DASC), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Stephens, A. W. [Gemini Observatory, 670 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Smith, H. A., E-mail: mcatelan@astro.puc.cl, E-mail: c.contreras@herts.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    We present BV photometry of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 6402 (M14), based on 65 V frames and 67 B frames, reaching two magnitudes below the turnoff level. This represents, to the best of our knowledge, the deepest color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of NGC 6402 available in the literature. Statistical decontamination of field stars as well as differential reddening corrections are performed in order to derive a precise ridgeline and hence physical parameters of the cluster. We discuss previous attempts at deriving a reddening value for the cluster, and argue in favor of a value E(B - V) = 0.57 {+-} 0.02, which is significantly higher than indicated by either the Burstein and Heiles or Schlegel et al. (corrected according to Bonifacio et al.) interstellar dust maps. Differential reddening across the face of the cluster, which we find to be present at the level of {Delta}E(B - V) Almost-Equal-To 0.17 mag, is taken into account in our analysis. We measure several metallicity indicators based on the position of the red giant branch (RGB) in the cluster CMD. These give a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.38 {+-} 0.07 on the Zinn and West scale and [Fe/H] = -1.28 {+-} 0.08 on the new Carretta et al. (UVES) scale. We also provide measurements of other important photometric parameters for this cluster, including the position of the RGB luminosity function ''bump'' and the horizontal branch morphology. We compare the NGC 6402 ridgeline with that of NGC 5904 (M5) derived by Sandquist et al., and find evidence that NGC 6402 and M5 have approximately the same age to within the uncertainties, although the possibility that M14 may be slightly older cannot be ruled out.

  6. METALLICITY EFFECT ON LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY FORMATION IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.-W.; Fabbiano, G.; Fragos, T. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ivanova, N.; Sivakoff, G. R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Jordan, A. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Voss, R. [Department of Astrophysics/IMAPP, Radboud University, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-02-10

    We present comprehensive observational results of the metallicity effect on the fraction of globular clusters (GCs) that contain low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB), by utilizing all available data obtained with Chandra for LMXBs and Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) for GCs. Our primary sample consists of old elliptical galaxies selected from the ACS Virgo and Fornax surveys. To improve statistics at both the lowest and highest X-ray luminosity, we also use previously reported results from other galaxies. It is well known that the fraction of GCs hosting LMXBs is considerably higher in red, metal-rich, GCs than in blue, metal-poor GCs. In this paper, we test whether this metallicity effect is X-ray luminosity-dependent and find that the effect holds uniformly in a wide luminosity range. This result is statistically significant (at {>=}3{sigma}) in LMXBs with luminosities in the range L {sub X} = 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 37} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}, where the ratio of GC-LMXB fractions in metal-rich to metal-poor GCs is R = 3.4 {+-} 0.5. A similar ratio is also found at lower (down to 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}) and higher luminosities (up to the ULX regime), but with less significance ({approx}2{sigma} confidence). Because different types of LMXBs dominate in different luminosities, our finding requires a new explanation for the metallicity effect in dynamically-formed LMXBs. We confirm that the metallicity effect is not affected by other factors such as stellar age, GC mass, stellar encounter rate, and galacto-centric distance.

  7. Modeling the formation of globular cluster systems in the Virgo cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hui; Gnedin, Oleg Y.

    2014-01-01

    The mass distribution and chemical composition of globular cluster (GC) systems preserve fossil record of the early stages of galaxy formation. The observed distribution of GC colors within massive early-type galaxies in the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS) reveals a multi-modal shape, which likely corresponds to a multi-modal metallicity distribution. We present a simple model for the formation and disruption of GCs that aims to match the ACSVCS data. This model tests the hypothesis that GCs are formed during major mergers of gas-rich galaxies and inherit the metallicity of their hosts. To trace merger events, we use halo merger trees extracted from a large cosmological N-body simulation. We select 20 halos in the mass range of 2 × 10 12 to 7 × 10 13 M ☉ and match them to 19 Virgo galaxies with K-band luminosity between 3 × 10 10 and 3 × 10 11 L ☉ . To set the [Fe/H] abundances, we use an empirical galaxy mass-metallicity relation. We find that a minimal merger ratio of 1:3 best matches the observed cluster metallicity distribution. A characteristic bimodal shape appears because metal-rich GCs are produced by late mergers between massive halos, while metal-poor GCs are produced by collective merger activities of less massive hosts at early times. The model outcome is robust to alternative prescriptions for cluster formation rate throughout cosmic time, but a gradual evolution of the mass-metallicity relation with redshift appears to be necessary to match the observed cluster metallicities. We also affirm the age-metallicity relation, predicted by an earlier model, in which metal-rich clusters are systematically several billion younger than their metal-poor counterparts.

  8. WIDE-FIELD PRECISION KINEMATICS OF THE M87 GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strader, Jay [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Beasley, Michael A.; Arnold, Jacob A. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Spitler, Lee R. [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Tamura, Naoyuki [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Sharples, Ray M. [Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham (United Kingdom); Arimoto, Nobuo, E-mail: jstrader@cfa.harvard.edu [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    We present the most extensive combined photometric and spectroscopic study to date of the enormous globular cluster (GC) system around M87, the central giant elliptical galaxy in the nearby Virgo Cluster. Using observations from DEIMOS and the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer at Keck, and Hectospec on the Multiple Mirror Telescope, we derive new, precise radial velocities for 451 GCs around M87, with projected radii from {approx}5 to 185 kpc. We combine these measurements with literature data for a total sample of 737 objects, which we use for a re-examination of the kinematics of the GC system of M87. The velocities are analyzed in the context of archival wide-field photometry and a novel Hubble Space Telescope catalog of half-light radii, which includes sizes for 344 spectroscopically confirmed clusters. We use this unique catalog to identify 18 new candidate ultracompact dwarfs and to help clarify the relationship between these objects and true GCs. We find much lower values for the outer velocity dispersion and rotation of the GC system than in earlier papers and also differ from previous work in seeing no evidence for a transition in the inner halo to a potential dominated by the Virgo Cluster, nor for a truncation of the stellar halo. We find little kinematical evidence for an intergalactic GC population. Aided by the precision of the new velocity measurements, we see significant evidence for kinematical substructure over a wide range of radii, indicating that M87 is in active assembly. A simple, scale-free analysis finds less dark matter within {approx}85 kpc than in other recent work, reducing the tension between X-ray and optical results. In general, out to a projected radius of {approx}150 kpc, our data are consistent with the notion that M87 is not dynamically coupled to the Virgo Cluster; the core of Virgo may be in the earliest stages of assembly.

  9. Gemini/GMOS spectra of globular clusters in the Leo group elliptical NGC 3379

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Michael; Beasley, Michael A.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Bridges, Terry; Gebhardt, Karl; Faifer, Favio Raul; Forte, Juan Carlos; Zepf, Stephen E.; Sharples, Ray; Hanes, David A.; Proctor, Robert

    2006-03-01

    The Leo group elliptical NGC 3379 is one of the few normal elliptical galaxies close enough to make possible observations of resolved stellar populations, deep globular cluster (GC) photometry and high signal-to-noise ratio GC spectra. We have obtained Gemini/GMOS spectra for 22 GCs associated with NGC 3379. We derive ages, metallicities and α-element abundance ratios from simple stellar population models using the recent multi-index χ2 minimization method of Proctor & Sansom. All of these GCs are found to be consistent with old ages, i.e. >~10Gyr, with a wide range of metallicities. This is comparable to the ages and metallicities that Gregg et al. found a couple of years ago for resolved stellar populations in the outer regions of this elliptical. A trend of decreasing α-element abundance ratio with increasing metallicity is indicated. The projected velocity dispersion of the GC system is consistent with being constant with radius. Non-parametric, isotropic models require a significant increase in the mass-to-light ratio at large radii. This result is in contrast to that of Romanowsky et al., who recently found a decrease in the velocity dispersion profile as determined from planetary nebulae (PN). Our constant dispersion requires a normal-sized dark halo, although without anisotropic models we cannot rigorously determine the dark halo mass. A two-sided χ2 test over all radii gives a 2σ difference between the mass profile derived from our GCs compared to the PN-derived mass model of Romanowsky et al. However, if we restrict our analysis to radii beyond one effective radius and test if the GC velocity dispersion is consistently higher, we determine a > 3σ difference between the mass models, and hence we favour the conclusion that NGC 3379 does indeed have dark matter at large radii in its halo.

  10. Three ancient halo subgiants: precise parallaxes, compositions, ages, and implications for globular clusters , ,

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VandenBerg, Don A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 1700 STN CSC, Victoria, B.C., V8W 2Y2 (Canada); Bond, Howard E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Nelan, Edmund P. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Nissen, P. E. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Schaefer, Gail H. [The CHARA Array of Georgia State University, Mount Wilson Observatory, Mount Wilson, CA 91023 (United States); Harmer, Dianne, E-mail: vandenbe@uvic.ca, E-mail: heb11@psu.edu, E-mail: nelan@stsci.edu, E-mail: pen@phys.au.dk, E-mail: schaefer@chara-array.org, E-mail: diharmer@noao.edu [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    The most accurate ages for the oldest stars are those obtained for nearby halo subgiants because they depend almost entirely on just the measured parallaxes and absolute oxygen abundances. In this study, we have used the Fine Guidance Sensors on the Hubble Space Telescope to determine trigonometric parallaxes, with precisions of 2.1% or better, for the Population II subgiants HD 84937, HD 132475, and HD 140283. High quality spectra have been used to derive their surface abundances of O, Fe, Mg, Si, and Ca, which are assumed to be 0.1-0.15 dex less than their initial abundances due to the effects of diffusion. Comparisons of isochrones with the three subgiants on the (log T {sub eff}, M{sub V} ) diagram yielded ages of 12.08 ± 0.14, 12.56 ± 0.46, and 14.27 ± 0.38 Gyr for HD 84937, HD 132475, and HD 140283, in turn, where each error bar includes only the parallax uncertainty. The total uncertainty is estimated to be ∼ ± 0.8 Gyr (larger in the case of the near-turnoff star HD 84937). Although the age of HD 140283 is greater than the age of the universe as inferred from the cosmic microwave background by ∼0.4-0.5 Gyr, this discrepancy is at a level of <1σ. Nevertheless, the first Population II stars apparently formed very soon after the Big Bang. (Stellar models that neglect diffusive processes seem to be ruled out as they would predict that HD 140283 is ∼1.5 Gyr older than the universe.) The field halo subgiants appear to be older than globular clusters of similar metallicities: if distances close to those implied by the RR Lyrae standard candle are assumed, M 92 and M 5 are younger than HD 140283 and HD 132475 by ∼1.5 and ∼1.0 Gyr, respectively.

  11. Gemini/GMOS imaging of globular clusters in the Virgo galaxy NGC 4649 (M60)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Duncan A.; Faifer, Favio Raúl; Forte, Juan Carlos; Bridges, Terry; Beasley, Michael A.; Gebhardt, Karl; Hanes, David A.; Sharples, Ray; Zepf, Stephen E.

    2004-12-01

    We present Sloan g and i imaging from the Gemini Multi-object Spectrograph (GMOS) instrument on the Gemini North telescope for the globular cluster (GC) system around the Virgo galaxy NGC 4649 (M60). Our three pointings, taken in good seeing conditions, cover an area of about 90 square arcmin. We detect 2151 unresolved sources. Applying colour and magnitude selection criteria to this source list gives 995 candidate GCs. Our source list is greater than 90 per cent complete to a magnitude of i= 23.6, and has little contamination from background galaxies. We find fewer than half a dozen potential ultracompact dwarf galaxies around NGC 4649. Foreground extinction from the nearby spiral NGC 4647 is limited to be AV < 0.1. We confirm the bimodality in the GC colour distribution found by earlier work using Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2 imaging. As is commonly seen in other galaxies, the red GCs are concentrated towards the centre of the galaxy, having a steeper number density profile than the blue GC subpopulation. The varying ratio of red-to-blue GCs with radius can largely explain the overall GC system colour gradient. The underlying galaxy starlight has a similar density profile slope and colour to the red GCs. This suggests a direct connection between the galaxy field stars and the red GC subpopulation. We estimate a total GC population of 3700 +/- 900, with the uncertainty dominated by the extrapolation to larger radii than observed. This total number corresponds to a specific frequency SN= 4.1 +/- 1.0. Future work will present properties derived from GMOS spectra of the NGC 4649 GCs.

  12. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON A COMPLEX RELATION BETWEEN GLOBULAR CLUSTER COLORS AND ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powalka, Mathieu; Lançon, Ariane; Puzia, Thomas H.; Alamo-Martínez, Karla; Ángel, Simón; Peng, Eric W.; Lim, Sungsoon; Schönebeck, Frederik; Grebel, Eva K.; Blakeslee, John P.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Durrell, Patrick; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kuntschner, Harald

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of high-quality photometry for globular clusters (GCs) in the Virgo cluster core region, based on data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) pilot field, and in the Milky Way (MW), based on Very Large Telescope/X-Shooter spectrophotometry. We find significant discrepancies in color–color diagrams between sub-samples from different environments, confirming that the environment has a strong influence on the integrated colors of GCs. GC color distributions along a single color are not sufficient to capture the differences we observe in color–color space. While the average photometric colors become bluer with increasing radial distance to the cD galaxy M87, we also find a relation between the environment and the slope and intercept of the color–color relations. A denser environment seems to produce a larger dynamic range in certain color indices. We argue that these results are not due solely to differential extinction, Initial Mass Function variations, calibration uncertainties, or overall age/metallicity variations. We therefore suggest that the relation between the environment and GC colors is, at least in part, due to chemical abundance variations, which affect stellar spectra and stellar evolution tracks. Our results demonstrate that stellar population diagnostics derived from model predictions which are calibrated on one particular sample of GCs may not be appropriate for all extragalactic GCs. These results advocate a more complex model of the assembly history of GC systems in massive galaxies that goes beyond the simple bimodality found in previous decades.

  13. MASSIVE+: The Growth Histories of MASSIVE Survey Galaxies from their Globular Cluster Colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, John

    2017-08-01

    The MASSIVE survey is targeting the 100 most massive galaxies within 108 Mpc that are visible in the northern sky. These most massive galaxies in the present-day universe reside in a surprisingly wide variety of environments, from rich clusters to fossil groups to near isolation. We propose to use WFC3/UVIS and ACS to carry out a deep imaging study of the globular cluster populations around a selected subset of the MASSIVE targets. Though much is known about GC systems of bright galaxies in rich clusters, we know surprisingly little about the effects of environment on these systems. The MASSIVE sample provides a golden opportunity to learn about the systematics of GC systems and what they can tell us about environmental drivers on the evolution of the highest mass galaxies. The most pressing questions to be addressed include: (1) Do isolated giants have the same constant mass fraction of GCs to total halo mass as BCGs of similar luminosity? (2) Do their GC systems show the same color (metallicity) distribution, which is an outcome of the mass spectrum of gas-rich halos during hierarchical growth? (3) Do the GCs in isolated high-mass galaxies follow the same radial distribution versus metallicity as in rich environments (a test of the relative importance of growth by accretion)? (4) Do the GCs of galaxies in sparse environments follow the same mass function? Our proposed second-band imaging will enable us to secure answers to these questions and add enormously to the legacy value of existing HST imaging of the highest mass galaxies in the universe.

  14. Global and nonglobal parameters of horizontal-branch morphology of globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milone, A. P.; Marino, A. F.; Dotter, A.; Norris, J. E.; Jerjen, H.; Asplund, M.

    2014-01-01

    The horizontal-branch (HB) morphology of globular clusters (GCs) is mainly determined by metallicity. However, the fact that GCs with almost the same metallicity exhibit different HB morphologies demonstrates that at least one more parameter is needed to explain the HB morphology. It has been suggested that one of these should be a global parameter that varies from GC to GC and the other a nonglobal parameter that varies within the GC. In this study we provide empirical evidence corroborating this idea. We used the photometric catalogs obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys of the Hubble Space Telescope and analyze the color-magnitude diagrams of 74 GCs. The HB morphology of our sample of GCs has been investigated on the basis of the two new parameters L1 and L2 that measure the distance between the red giant branch and the coolest part of the HB and the color extension of the HB, respectively. We find that L1 correlates with both metallicity and age, whereas L2 most strongly correlates with the mass of the hosting GC. The range of helium abundance among the stars in a GC, characterized by ΔY and associated with the presence of multiple stellar populations, has been estimated in a few GCs to date. In these GCs we find a close relationship among ΔY, GC mass, and L2. We conclude that age and metallicity are the main global parameters, while the range of helium abundance within a GC is the main nonglobal parameter defining the HB morphology of Galactic GCs.

  15. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON A COMPLEX RELATION BETWEEN GLOBULAR CLUSTER COLORS AND ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powalka, Mathieu; Lançon, Ariane [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l’Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Puzia, Thomas H.; Alamo-Martínez, Karla; Ángel, Simón [Institute of Astrophysics, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Peng, Eric W.; Lim, Sungsoon [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Schönebeck, Frederik; Grebel, Eva K. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstraße 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Blakeslee, John P.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Gwyn, S. D. J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Duc, Pierre-Alain [AIM Paris Saclay, CNRS/INSU, CEA/Irfu, Université Paris Diderot, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Durrell, Patrick [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Guhathakurta, Puragra [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kuntschner, Harald, E-mail: mathieu.powalka@astro.unistra.fr [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2016-09-20

    We present an analysis of high-quality photometry for globular clusters (GCs) in the Virgo cluster core region, based on data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) pilot field, and in the Milky Way (MW), based on Very Large Telescope/X-Shooter spectrophotometry. We find significant discrepancies in color–color diagrams between sub-samples from different environments, confirming that the environment has a strong influence on the integrated colors of GCs. GC color distributions along a single color are not sufficient to capture the differences we observe in color–color space. While the average photometric colors become bluer with increasing radial distance to the cD galaxy M87, we also find a relation between the environment and the slope and intercept of the color–color relations. A denser environment seems to produce a larger dynamic range in certain color indices. We argue that these results are not due solely to differential extinction, Initial Mass Function variations, calibration uncertainties, or overall age/metallicity variations. We therefore suggest that the relation between the environment and GC colors is, at least in part, due to chemical abundance variations, which affect stellar spectra and stellar evolution tracks. Our results demonstrate that stellar population diagnostics derived from model predictions which are calibrated on one particular sample of GCs may not be appropriate for all extragalactic GCs. These results advocate a more complex model of the assembly history of GC systems in massive galaxies that goes beyond the simple bimodality found in previous decades.

  16. The outer envelopes of globular clusters. II. NGC 1851, NGC 5824 and NGC 1261*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, P. B.; Da Costa, G. S.; Mackey, A. D.

    2018-01-01

    We present a second set of results from a wide-field photometric survey of the environs of Milky Way globular clusters. The clusters studied are NGC 1261, NGC 1851 and NGC 5824: all have data from the Dark Energy Camera on the Blanco 4 m telescope. NGC 5824 also has data from the Magellan Clay telescope with MegaCam. We confirm the existence of a large diffuse stellar envelope surrounding NGC 1851 of size at least 240 pc in radius. The radial density profile of the envelope follows a power-law decline with index γ = -1.5 ± 0.2 and the projected shape is slightly elliptical. For NGC 5824, there is no strong detection of a diffuse stellar envelope, but we find the cluster is remarkably extended and is similar in size (at least 230 pc in radius) to the envelope of NGC 1851. A stellar envelope is also revealed around NGC 1261. However, it is notably smaller in size with radius ∼105 pc. The radial density profile of the envelope is also much steeper with γ = -3.8 ± 0.2. We discuss the possible nature of the diffuse stellar envelopes, but are unable to draw definitive conclusions based on the current data. NGC 1851, and potentially NGC 5824, could be stripped dwarf galaxy nuclei, akin to the cases of ω Cen, M54 and M2. On the other hand, the different characteristics of the NGC 1261 envelope suggest that it may be the product of dynamical evolution of the cluster.

  17. A Chemical Composition Survey of the Iron-complex Globular Cluster NGC 6273 (M19)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard–Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-15, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rich, R. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Mateo, Mario [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bailey, John I. III [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Clarkson, William I. [Department of Natural Sciences, University of Michigan–Dearborn, 4901 Evergreen Road, Dearborn, MI 48128 (United States); Olszewski, Edward W. [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Walker, Matthew G., E-mail: cjohnson@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: ncaldwell@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: rmr@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: mmateo@umich.edu, E-mail: baileyji@strw.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: wiclarks@umich.edu, E-mail: eolszewski@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: mgwalker@andrew.cmu.edu [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2017-02-20

    Recent observations have shown that a growing number of the most massive Galactic globular clusters contain multiple populations of stars with different [Fe/H] and neutron-capture element abundances. NGC 6273 has only recently been recognized as a member of this “iron-complex” cluster class, and we provide here a chemical and kinematic analysis of >300 red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch member stars using high-resolution spectra obtained with the Magellan –M2FS and VLT–FLAMES instruments. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that NGC 6273 possesses an intrinsic metallicity spread that ranges from about [Fe/H] = −2 to −1 dex, and may include at least three populations with different [Fe/H] values. The three populations identified here contain separate first (Na/Al-poor) and second (Na/Al-rich) generation stars, but a Mg–Al anti-correlation may only be present in stars with [Fe/H] ≳ −1.65. The strong correlation between [La/Eu] and [Fe/H] suggests that the s-process must have dominated the heavy element enrichment at higher metallicities. A small group of stars with low [ α /Fe] is identified and may have been accreted from a former surrounding field star population. The cluster’s large abundance variations are coupled with a complex, extended, and multimodal blue horizontal branch (HB). The HB morphology and chemical abundances suggest that NGC 6273 may have an origin that is similar to ω Cen and M54.

  18. Little Blue Dots in the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields: Precursors to Globular Clusters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2017-12-01

    Galaxies with stellar masses {10}-7.4 yr‑1 were examined on images of the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Field Parallels for Abell 2744 and MACS J0416.1-02403. They appear as unresolved “Little Blue Dots” (LBDs). They are less massive and have higher specific star formation rates (sSFRs) than “blueberries” studied by Yang et al. and higher sSFRs than “Blue Nuggets” studied by Tacchella et al. We divided the LBDs into three redshift bins and, for each, stacked the B435, V606, and I814 images convolved to the same stellar point-spread function (PSF). Their radii were determined from PSF deconvolution to be ∼80 to ∼180 pc. The high sSFRs suggest that their entire stellar mass has formed in only 1% of the local age of the universe. The sSFRs at similar epochs in local dwarf galaxies are lower by a factor of ∼100. Assuming that the star formation rate is {ε }{ff}{M}{gas}/{t}{ff} for efficiency {ε }{ff}, gas mass M gas, and free-fall time, t ff, the gas mass and gas-to-star mass ratio are determined. This ratio exceeds 1 for reasonable efficiencies, and is likely to be ∼5 even with a high {ε }{ff} of 0.1. We consider whether these regions are forming today’s globular clusters. With their observed stellar masses, the maximum likely cluster mass is ∼ {10}5 {M}ȯ , but if star formation continues at the current rate for ∼ 10{t}{ff}∼ 50 {Myr} before feedback and gas exhaustion stop it, then the maximum cluster mass could become ∼ {10}6 {M}ȯ .

  19. The peculiar Na-O anticorrelation of the bulge globular cluster NGC 6440

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, C.; Villanova, S.; Geisler, D.; Saviane, I.; Dias, B.; Cohen, R. E.; Mauro, F.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Galactic globular clusters (GCs) are essential tools for understanding the earliest epoch of the Milky Way, since they are among the oldest objects in the Universe and can be used to trace its formation and evolution. Current studies using high-resolution spectroscopy for many stars in each of a large sample of GCs allow us to develop a detailed observational picture of their formation and their relation with the Galaxy. However, it is necessary to complete this picture by including GCs that belong to all major Galactic components, including the bulge. Aims: Our aim is to perform a detailed chemical analysis of the bulge GC NGC 6440 in order to determine if this object has multiple populations (MPs) and investigate its relation with the bulge of the Milky Way and with the other Galactic GCs, especially those associated with the bulge, which are largely poorly studied. Methods: We determined the stellar parameters and the chemical abundances of light elements (Na, Al), iron-peak elements (Fe, Sc, Mn, Co, Ni), α-elements (O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti) and heavy elements (Ba, Eu) in seven red giant members of NGC 6440 using high-resolution spectroscopy from FLAMES-UVES. Results: We found a mean iron content of [Fe/H] =-0.50 ± 0.03 dex in agreement with other studies. We found no internal iron spread. On the other hand, Na and Al show a significant intrinsic spread, but the cluster has no significant O-Na anticorrelation nor does it exhibit a Mg-Al anticorrelation. The α-elements show good agreement with the bulge field star trend, although they are at the high alpha end and are also higher than those of other GCs of comparable metallicity. The heavy elements are dominated by the r-process, indicating a strong contribution by SNeII. The chemical analysis suggests an origin similar to that of the bulge field stars.

  20. Evolution of the Stellar Mass Function in Multiple-Population Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesperini, Enrico; Hong, Jongsuk; Webb, Jeremy J.; D'Antona, Franca; D'Ercole, Annibale

    2018-02-01

    We present the results of a survey of N-body simulations aimed at studying the effects of the long-term dynamical evolution on the stellar mass function (MF) of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters. Our simulations show that if first-(1G) and second-generation (2G) stars have the same initial MF (IMF), the global MFs of the two populations are affected similarly by dynamical evolution and no significant differences between the 1G and the 2G MFs arise during the cluster's evolution. If the two populations have different IMFs, dynamical effects do not completely erase memory of the initial differences. Should observations find differences between the global 1G and 2G MF, these would reveal the fingerprints of differences in their IMFs. Irrespective of whether the 1G and 2G populations have the same global IMF or not, dynamical effects can produce differences between the local (measured at various distances from the cluster centre) 1G and 2G MFs; these differences are a manifestation of the process of mass segregation in populations with different initial structural properties. In dynamically old and spatially mixed clusters, however, differences between the local 1G and 2G MFs can reveal differences between the 1G and 2G global MFs. In general, for clusters with any dynamical age, large differences between the local 1G and 2G MFs are more likely to be associated with differences in the global MF. Our study also reveals a dependence of the spatial mixing rate on the stellar mass, another dynamical consequence of the multiscale nature of multiple-population clusters.

  1. GLOBULAR CLUSTER POPULATIONS: FIRST RESULTS FROM S{sup 4}G EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Aravena, Manuel [Núcleo de Astronomía, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Avenida Ejército 441, Santiago (Chile); Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Comerón, Sébastien; Laine, Jarkko; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki [Astronomy Division, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 3000, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Knapen, Johan H. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Lácteas, E-38205 La Laguna (Spain); Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Hinz, Joannah L. [MMT Observatory, P.O. Box 210065, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ho, Luis C. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Holwerda, Benne [Leiden Observatory, University of Leiden, Niels Bohrweg 4, NL-2333 Leiden (Netherlands); Sheth, Kartik, E-mail: dennis.zaritsky@gmail.com [National Radio Astronomy Observatory/NAASC, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Using 3.6 μm images of 97 early-type galaxies, we develop and verify methodology to measure globular cluster populations from the S{sup 4}G survey images. We find that (1) the ratio, T {sub N}, of the number of clusters, N {sub CL}, to parent galaxy stellar mass, M {sub *}, rises weakly with M {sub *} for early-type galaxies with M {sub *} > 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} when we calculate galaxy masses using a universal stellar initial mass function (IMF) but that the dependence of T {sub N} on M {sub *} is removed entirely once we correct for the recently uncovered systematic variation of IMF with M {sub *}; and (2) for M {sub *} < 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, there is no trend between N {sub CL} and M {sub *}, the scatter in T {sub N} is significantly larger (approaching two orders of magnitude), and there is evidence to support a previous, independent suggestion of two families of galaxies. The behavior of N {sub CL} in the lower-mass systems is more difficult to measure because these systems are inherently cluster-poor, but our results may add to previous evidence that large variations in cluster formation and destruction efficiencies are to be found among low-mass galaxies. The average fraction of stellar mass in clusters is ∼0.0014 for M {sub *} > 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} and can be as large as ∼0.02 for less massive galaxies. These are the first results from the S{sup 4}G sample of galaxies and will be enhanced by the sample of early-type galaxies now being added to S{sup 4}G and complemented by the study of later-type galaxies within S{sup 4}G.

  2. Dynamics, Chemical Abundances, and ages of Globular Clusters in the Virgo Cluster of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; NGVS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamics, metallicities, and ages of globular clusters (GCs) in the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS), a deep, multi-band (u, g, r, i, z, and Ks), wide-field (104 deg2) imaging survey carried out using the 3.6-m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and MegaCam imager. GC candidates were selected from the NGVS survey using photometric and image morphology criteria and these were followed up with deep, medium-resolution, multi-object spectroscopy using the Keck II 10-m telescope and DEIMOS spectrograph. The primary spectroscopic targets were candidate GC satellites of dwarf elliptical (dE) and ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in the Virgo cluster. While many objects were confirmed as GC satellites of Virgo dEs and UDGs, many turned out to be non-satellites based on their radial velocity and/or positional mismatch any identifiable Virgo cluster galaxy. We have used a combination of spectral characteristics (e.g., presence of absorption vs. emission lines), new Gaussian mixture modeling of radial velocity and sky position data, and a new extreme deconvolution analysis of ugrizKs photometry and image morphology, to classify all the objects in our sample into: (1) GC satellites of dE galaxies, (2) GC satellites of UDGs, (3) intra-cluster GCs (ICGCs) in the Virgo cluster, (4) GCs in the outer halo of the central cluster galaxy M87, (5) foreground Milky Way stars, and (6) distant background galaxies. We use these data to study the dynamics and dark matter content of dE and UDGs in the Virgo cluster, place important constraints on the nature of dE nuclei, and study the origin of ICGCs versus GCs in the remote M87 halo.We are grateful for financial support from the NSF and NASA/STScI.

  3. Galactic globular cluster NGC 6752 and its stellar population as inferred from multicolor photometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravtsov, Valery [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Católica del Norte, Avenida Angamos 0610, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Alcaíno, Gonzalo [Isaac Newton Institute of Chile, Ministerio de Educación de Chile, Casilla 8-9, Correo 9, Santiago (Chile); Marconi, Gianni; Alvarado, Franklin, E-mail: vkravtsov@ucn.cl, E-mail: inewton@terra.cl, E-mail: falvarad@eso.org, E-mail: gmarconi@eso.org [ESO-European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-03-01

    This paper is devoted to photometric study of the Galactic globular cluster (GGC) NGC 6752 in UBVI, focusing on the multiplicity of its stellar population. We emphasize that our U passband is (1) narrower than the standard one due to its smaller extension blueward and (2) redshifted by ∼300 Å relative to its counterparts, such as the HST F336W filter. Accordingly, both the spectral features encompassed by it and photometric effects of the multiplicity revealed in our study are somewhat different than in recent studies of NGC 6752. Main sequence stars bluer in U – B are less centrally concentrated, as red giants are. We find a statistically significant increasing luminosity of the red giant branch (RGB) bump of ΔU ≈ 0.2 mag toward the cluster outskirts with no so obvious effect in V. The photometric results are correlated with spectroscopic data: the bluer RGB stars in U – B have lower nitrogen abundances. We draw attention to a larger width of the RGB than the blue horizontal branch (BHB) in U – B. This seems to agree with the effects predicted to be caused by molecular bands produced by nitrogen-containing molecules. We find that brighter BHB stars, especially the brightest ones, are more centrally concentrated. This implies that red giants that are redder in U – B, i.e., more nitrogen enriched and centrally concentrated, are the main progenitors of the brighter BHB stars. However, such a progenitor-progeny relationship disagrees with theoretical predictions and with the results on the elemental abundances in horizontal branch stars. We isolated the asymptotic giant branch clump and estimated the parameter ΔV{sub ZAHB}{sup clump} = 0.98 ± 0.12.

  4. New Constraints on a Complex Relation between Globular Cluster Colors and Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powalka, Mathieu; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lançon, Ariane; Peng, Eric W.; Schönebeck, Frederik; Alamo-Martínez, Karla; Ángel, Simón; Blakeslee, John P.; Côté, Patrick; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Durrell, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Grebel, Eva K.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Kuntschner, Harald; Lim, Sungsoon; Liu, Chengze; Lyubenova, Mariya; Mihos, J. Christopher; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Roediger, Joel; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén; Spengler, Chelsea; Toloba, Elisa; Zhang, Hongxin

    2016-09-01

    We present an analysis of high-quality photometry for globular clusters (GCs) in the Virgo cluster core region, based on data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) pilot field, and in the Milky Way (MW), based on Very Large Telescope/X-Shooter spectrophotometry. We find significant discrepancies in color-color diagrams between sub-samples from different environments, confirming that the environment has a strong influence on the integrated colors of GCs. GC color distributions along a single color are not sufficient to capture the differences we observe in color-color space. While the average photometric colors become bluer with increasing radial distance to the cD galaxy M87, we also find a relation between the environment and the slope and intercept of the color-color relations. A denser environment seems to produce a larger dynamic range in certain color indices. We argue that these results are not due solely to differential extinction, Initial Mass Function variations, calibration uncertainties, or overall age/metallicity variations. We therefore suggest that the relation between the environment and GC colors is, at least in part, due to chemical abundance variations, which affect stellar spectra and stellar evolution tracks. Our results demonstrate that stellar population diagnostics derived from model predictions which are calibrated on one particular sample of GCs may not be appropriate for all extragalactic GCs. These results advocate a more complex model of the assembly history of GC systems in massive galaxies that goes beyond the simple bimodality found in previous decades.

  5. Exploring the Chemical Composition and Double Horizontal Branch of the Bulge Globular Cluster NGC 6569

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Rich, R. Michael; Caldwell, Nelson; Mateo, Mario; Bailey, John I., III; Olszewski, Edward W.; Walker, Matthew G.

    2018-02-01

    Photometric and spectroscopic analyses have shown that the Galactic bulge cluster Terzan 5 hosts several populations with different metallicities and ages that manifest as a double red horizontal branch (HB). A recent investigation of the massive bulge cluster NGC 6569 revealed a similar, though less extended, HB luminosity split, but little is known about the cluster’s detailed chemical composition. Therefore, we have used high-resolution spectra from the Magellan–M2FS and VLT–FLAMES spectrographs to investigate the chemical compositions and radial velocity distributions of red giant branch and HB stars in NGC 6569. We found the cluster to have a mean heliocentric radial velocity of ‑48.8 km s‑1 (σ = 5.3 km s‑1 148 stars) and =-0.87 dex (19 stars), but the cluster’s 0.05 dex [Fe/H] dispersion precludes a significant metallicity spread. NGC 6569 exhibits light- and heavy-element distributions that are common among old bulge/inner Galaxy globular clusters, including clear (anti)correlations between [O/Fe], [Na/Fe], and [Al/Fe]. The light-element data suggest that NGC 6569 may be composed of at least two distinct populations, and the cluster’s low =-0.11 dex indicates significant pollution with r-process material. We confirm that both HBs contain cluster members, but metallicity and light-element variations are largely ruled out as sources for the luminosity difference. However, He mass fraction differences as small as ΔY ∼ 0.02 cannot be ruled out and may be sufficient to reproduce the double HB.

  6. Unexpectedly strong energy stabilization inside the hydrophobic core of small protein Rubredoxin mediated by aromatic residues: correlated ab initio quantum chemical calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vondrášek, Jiří; Bendová, Lada; Klusák, Vojtěch; Hobza, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 127, č. 8 (2005), s. 2615-2619 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400550510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : hydrophobic core * globular proteins * stabilization Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.419, year: 2005

  7. pH Dependence and protein selectivity of poly(ethyleneimine)/poly(acrylic acid) multilayers studied by in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Muller, M.; Kessler, B.; Houbenov, N.; Bohatá, Karolína; Pientka, Zbyněk; Brynda, Eduard

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2006), s. 1285-1294 ISSN 1525-7797 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polyelectrolyte multilayers * self-assembled monolayers * globular protein s Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.664, year: 2006

  8. NMR studies on the mechanism of structural destabilization of the globular proteins and DNA by aliphatic alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubas, B.; Witman, B.; Wieniewska, T.; Soltysik, M.

    1977-01-01

    The concept that the mechanism of structural destabilization of the biologically active macromolecules by typical denaturing agents should find a reflection in the NMR spectra of the denaturants themselves has been followed by proton NMR for some aliphatic alcohols in the system containing the serum albumin of DNA. (author)

  9. Old Metal-rich Globular Cluster Populations: Peak Color and Peak Metallicity Trends with Mass of Host Spheroids

    OpenAIRE

    Kravtsov, Valery V.

    2007-01-01

    We address the problem of the factors contributing to a peak color trend of old metal-rich globular cluster (MRGC) populations with mass of their hosts, early-type galaxies and spheroidal subsystems of spiral ones (spheroids). The color-mass trend is often converted to a metallicity-mass trend under the assumption that age effects are small or negligible. While direct estimates of the ages of MRGC populations neither can rule out nor reliably support the populations' age trend, key data on ti...

  10. p-capture reaction cycles in rotating massive stars and their impact on elemental abundances in globular cluster stars: A case study of O, Na and Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanta, Upakul; Goswami, Aruna; Duorah, Hiralal; Duorah, Kalpana

    2017-08-01

    Elemental abundance patterns of globular cluster stars can provide important clues for understanding cluster formation and early chemical evolution. The origin of the abundance patterns, however, still remains poorly understood. We have studied the impact of p-capture reaction cycles on the abundances of oxygen, sodium and aluminium considering nuclear reaction cycles of carbon-nitrogen-oxygen-fluorine, neon-sodium and magnesium-aluminium in massive stars in stellar conditions of temperature range 2×107 to 10×107 K and typical density of 102 gm cc-1. We have estimated abundances of oxygen, sodium and aluminium with respect to Fe, which are then assumed to be ejected from those stars because of rotation reaching a critical limit. These ejected abundances of elements are then compared with their counterparts that have been observed in some metal-poor evolved stars, mainly giants and red giants, of globular clusters M3, M4, M13 and NGC 6752. We observe an excellent agreement with [O/Fe] between the estimated and observed abundance values for globular clusters M3 and M4 with a correlation coefficient above 0.9 and a strong linear correlation for the remaining two clusters with a correlation coefficient above 0.7. The estimated [Na/Fe] is found to have a correlation coefficient above 0.7, thus implying a strong correlation for all four globular clusters. As far as [Al/Fe] is concerned, it also shows a strong correlation between the estimated abundance and the observed abundance for globular clusters M13 and NGC 6752, since here also the correlation coefficient is above 0.7 whereas for globular cluster M4 there is a moderate correlation found with a correlation coefficient above 0.6. Possible sources of these discrepancies are discussed.

  11. Small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy study of the Lactobacillus brevis S-layer protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeaeskelaeinen, Pentti [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, PO Box 2200, FI-02015 Aalto University School of Science and Technology (Finland); Engelhardt, Peter [Haartman Institute, Department of Pathology, PO Box 21, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Hynoenen, Ulla; Palva, Airi [Department of Basic Veterinary Sciences, Division of Microbiology, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Torkkeli, Mika; Serimaa, Ritva, E-mail: ritva.serimaa@helsinki.f [Department of Physics, POB 64, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-10-01

    The structure of self-assembly domain containing recombinant truncation mutants of Lactobacillus brevis surface layer protein SlpA in aqueous solution was studied using small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The proteins were found out to interact with each other forming stable globular oligomers of about 10 monomers. The maximum diameter of the oligomers varied between 75 A and 435 A.

  12. Small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy study of the Lactobacillus brevis S-layer protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jääskeläinen, Pentti; Engelhardt, Peter; Hynönen, Ulla; Torkkeli, Mika; Palva, Airi; Serimaa, Ritva

    2010-10-01

    The structure of self-assembly domain containing recombinant truncation mutants of Lactobacillus brevis surface layer protein SlpA in aqueous solution was studied using small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The proteins were found out to interact with each other forming stable globular oligomers of about 10 monomers. The maximum diameter of the oligomers varied between 75 Å and 435 Å.

  13. Dynamics of protein and its hydration water: neutron scattering studies on fully deuterated GFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Jonathan D; O'Neill, Hugh; Hong, Liang; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Ehlers, Georg; Weiss, Kevin L; Zhang, Qiu; Yi, Zheng; Mamontov, Eugene; Smith, Jeremy C; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2012-10-03

    We present a detailed analysis of the picosecond-to-nanosecond motions of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its hydration water using neutron scattering spectroscopy and hydrogen/deuterium contrast. The analysis reveals that hydration water suppresses protein motions at lower temperatures (high temperatures. Experimental data demonstrate that the hydration water is harmonic at temperatures high temperatures: on the picosecond-to-nanosecond timescale, the hydration water exhibits diffusive dynamics, while the protein motions are localized to temperatures appears to be stronger in GFP than in other globular proteins. We ascribe this observation to the barrellike structure of GFP. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Aquarius comoving group is not a disrupted classical globular cluster★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, A. R.; Keller, S. C.; Alves-Brito, A.; Frebel, A.; Da Costa, G.; Karakas, A.; Yong, D.; Schlaufman, K. C.; Jacobson, H. R.; Yu, Q.; Fishlock, C.

    2014-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra for five Aquarius stream stars observed with the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle spectrograph on the Magellan Clay telescope. Our sample represents one-third of the 15 known members in the stream. We find the stream is not monometallic: the metallicity ranges from [Fe/H] = -0.63 to -1.58. No anticorrelation in Na-O abundances is present, and we find a strong positive Mg-Al relationship, similar to that observed in the thick disc. We find no evidence that the stream is a result of a disrupted classical globular cluster, contrary to a previously published claim. High [(Na, Ni, α)/Fe] and low [Ba/Y] abundance ratios in the stream suggest that it is not a tidal tail from a disrupted dwarf galaxy, either. The stream is chemically indistinguishable from Milky Way field stars with the exception of one candidate, C222531-145437. From its position, velocity, and detailed chemical abundances, C222531-145437 is likely a star that was tidally disrupted from ω-Centauri. We propose that the Aquarius stream is Galactic in origin, and could be the result of a disc-satellite perturbation in the Milky Way thick disc of the order of a few Gyr ago: derived orbits, UVW velocities, and angular momenta of the Aquarius members offer qualitative support for our hypothesis. Assuming that C222531-145437 is a tidally disrupted member of ω-Centauri, this system is the most likely disc perturber. In the absence of compelling chemical and/or dynamical evidence that the Aquarius stream is the tidal tail of a disrupted satellite, we advocate the `Aquarius group' as a more appropriate description. Like the Canis Major overdensity, as well as the Hercules and Monoceros groups, the Aquarius group joins the list of kinematically identified substructures that are not actually accreted material: they are simply part of the rich complexity of the Milky Way structure.

  15. The chemical composition of a regular halo globular cluster: NGC 5897

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Andreas; McWilliam, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    We report for the first time on the chemical composition of the halo cluster NGC 5897 (R⊙ = 12.5 kpc), based on chemical abundance ratios for 27 α-, iron-peak, and neutron-capture elements in seven red giants. From our high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra obtained with the Magellan/MIKE spectrograph, we find a mean iron abundance from the neutral species of [Fe/H] = - 2.04 ± 0.01 (stat.) ± 0.15 (sys.), which is more metal-poor than implied by previous photometric and low-resolution spectroscopic studies. The cluster NGC 5897 is α-enhanced (to 0.34 ± 0.01 dex) and shows Fe-peak element ratios typical of other (metal-poor) halo globular clusters (GCs) with no overall, significant abundance spreads in iron or in any other heavy element. Like other GCs, NGC 5897 shows a clear Na-O anti-correlation, where we find a prominent primordial population of stars with enhanced O abundances and approximately solar Na/Fe ratios, while two stars are Na-rich, providing chemical proof of the presence of multiple populations in this cluster. Comparison of the heavy element abundances with the solar-scaled values and the metal-poor GC M15 from the literature confirms that NGC 5897 has experienced little contribution from s-process nucleosynthesis. One star of the first generation stands out in that it shows very low La and Eu abundances. Overall, NGC 5897 is a well behaved GC showing archetypical correlations and element-patterns, with little room for surprises in our data. We suggest that its lower metallicity could explain the unusually long periods of RR Lyr that were found in NGC 5897. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5-m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.Table 5 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFull Table 2 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/565/A23

  16. GEMINI/GeMS Observations Unveil the Structure of the Heavily Obscured Globular Cluster Liller 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracino, S.; Dalessandro, E.; Ferraro, F. R.; Lanzoni, B.; Geisler, D.; Mauro, F.; Villanova, S.; Moni Bidin, C.; Miocchi, P.; Massari, D.

    2015-06-01

    By exploiting the exceptional high-resolution capabilities of the near-IR camera GSAOI combined with the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive System at the GEMINI South Telescope, we investigated the structural and physical properties of the heavily obscured globular cluster Liller 1 in the Galactic bulge. We have obtained the deepest and most accurate color-magnitude diagram published so far for this cluster, reaching {{K}s}˜ 19 (below the main-sequence turnoff level). We used these data to redetermine the center of gravity of the system, finding that it is located about 2.″2 southeast from the literature value. We also built new star density and surface brightness profiles for the cluster and rederived its main structural and physical parameters (scale radii, concentration parameter, central mass density, total mass). We find that Liller 1 is significantly less concentrated (concentration parameter c=1.74) and less extended (tidal radius {{r}t}=298\\prime\\prime and core radius {{r}c}=5\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 39) than previously thought. By using these newly determined structural parameters, we estimated the mass of Liller 1 to be {{M}tot}=2.3+0.3-0.1× {{10}6} {{M}⊙ } ({{M}tot}=1.5+0.2-0.1× {{10}6} {{M}⊙ } for a Kroupa initial mass function), which is comparable to that of the most massive clusters in the Galaxy (ω Centari and Terzan 5). Also, Liller 1 has the second-highest collision rate (after Terzan 5) among all star clusters in the Galaxy, thus confirming that it is an ideal environment for the formation of collisional objects (such as millisecond pulsars). Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da

  17. Using Blue Stragglers to Predict Retained Black Hole Population in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanek, Keith; Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic

    2018-01-01

    Large numbers of black holes (BHs) are expected to form in massive star clusters typical of the globular clusters (GCs). Sophisticated theoretical models suggest that many of these BHs can be retained in present-day GCs. Observations have also identified several BH candidates in Galactic and extragalactic GCs (e.g., Macarone et al. 2007; Irwin et al. 2010; Strader et al. 2012; Chomiuk et al. 2013; Miller-Jones et al. 2014). It has also been shown that high-mass and high-density clusters such as GCs are efficient factories of merging binary BHs similar to those observed by the LIGO observatories (Abbott et al. 2016a,b,c,d,e; Rodriguez et al. 2016). Understanding the formation rate and properties of binary BHs are dependent on a detailed understanding of how the BHs dynamically evolve within GCs. Nevertheless, directly detecting BHs in GCs is extremely challenging; BHs only in binaries with limited configurations can be directly detected by the detection of gravitational wave, X-ray, or radio emissions. We propose an indirect of inferring the number of undetected retained BHs in a GC by investigating the dynamical effects of a large number of BHs on the production of other tracer populations such as Blue Straggler Stars (BSS). Using a large grid of detailed GC models we show that there is a clear anti-correlation between the number of BSS in a cluster and the number of retained BHs. Being the most massive species, large numbers of retained BHs will dominate the core of the cluster as a result of mass-segregation driving away other low-mass species such as main-sequence stars from central high-density regions. BSS are expected to form from physical collisions between main-sequence (MS) stars mediated by binary encounters (e.g., Chatterjee et al. 2013) in cores of GCs. Production of BSS by collisions or mass transfer channels are suppressed if a large number of retained BHs in a cluster restrict the number of MS stars in the core. Extensive observational data exist on

  18. The Globular Cluster NGC 2419: A Crucible for Theories of Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibata, R.; Sollima, A.; Nipoti, C.; Bellazzini, M.; Chapman, S. C.; Dalessandro, E.

    2011-09-01

    We present the analysis of a kinematic data set of stars in the globular cluster NGC 2419, taken with the DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Keck II telescope. Combined with a reanalysis of deep Hubble Space Telescope and Subaru Telescope imaging data, which provide an accurate luminosity profile of the cluster, we investigate the validity of a large set of dynamical models of the system, which are checked for stability via N-body simulations. We find that isotropic models in either Newtonian or Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) are ruled out with extremely high confidence. However, a simple Michie model in Newtonian gravity with anisotropic velocity dispersion provides an excellent representation of the luminosity profile and kinematics of the cluster. The anisotropy profiles of these models ensure an isotropic center to the cluster, which progresses to extreme radial anisotropy toward the outskirts. In contrast, with MOND we find that Michie models that reproduce the luminosity profile either overpredict the velocity dispersion on the outskirts of the cluster if the mass-to-light ratio (M/L) is kept at astrophysically motivated values or else they underpredict the central velocity dispersion if the M/L is taken to be very small. We find that the best Michie model in MOND is a factor of ~104 less likely than the Newtonian model that best fits the system. A likelihood ratio of 350 is found when we investigate more general models by solving the Jeans equation with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo scheme. We verified with N-body simulations that these results are not significantly different when the MOND external field effect is accounted for. If the assumptions that the cluster is in dynamical equilibrium, spherical, not on a peculiar orbit, and possesses a single dynamical tracer population of constant M/L are correct, we conclude that the present observations provide a very severe challenge for MOND. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W

  19. Star Counts in the Globular Cluster ω Centauri. I. Bright Stellar Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, V.; Calamida, A.; Bono, G.; Stetson, P. B.; Freyhammer, L. M.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Moroni, P. Prada; Monelli, M.; Corsi, C. E.; Nonino, M.; Buonanno, R.; Caputo, F.; Castellani, M.; Dall'Ora, M.; Del Principe, M.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pulone, L.; Vuerli, C.

    2007-07-01

    We present a photometric investigation on HB, RGB, and MSTO stars in ω Cen=NGC 5139. The center of the cluster was covered with a mosaic of F435W, F625W, and F658N band data collected with HST ACS. The outer reaches were covered with a mosaic of U-, B-, V-, and I-band data collected with the 2.2 m ESO/MPI telescope. The final catalog includes ~1.7 million stars. We identified more than 3200 likely HB stars, the largest sample ever collected in a globular cluster. We found that the HB morphology changes with the radial distance from the cluster center. The relative number of extreme HB stars decreases from ~30% to ~21% when moving from the center toward the outer reaches of the cluster, while the fraction of less hot HB stars increases from ~62% to ~72%. The comparison between theory and observations indicates that the empirical star counts of HB stars are on average larger (30%-40%) than predicted by canonical evolutionary models. Moreover, the rate of HB stars is ~43% larger than the MSTO rate. We also compared theory and observations by assuming a mix of stellar populations made with 70% of canonical He (Y=0.23) stars and 30% of He-enhanced (Y=0.33, 0.42) stars. We found that the observed RG/MSTO ratio agrees with the predicted lifetimes of He-mixed stellar populations. The discrepancy between theory and observations decreases by a factor of 2 when compared with rates predicted by canonical He content models, but still 15%-25% (Y=0.42) and 15%-20% (Y=0.33) higher than observed. Furthermore, the ratios between HB and MSTO star counts are ~24% (Y=0.42) and 30% (Y=0.33) larger than predicted lifetime ratios. During the revision of this manuscript, Vittorio Castellani passed away on 2006 May 19. His suggestions, ideas, and personality will be greatly missed. Based on data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility and the Hubble Space Telescope Archive Facility.

  20. Wide-Field Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Globular Cluster System in NGC 1399*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzia, Thomas H.; Paolillo, Maurizio; Goudfrooij, Paul; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Angelini, Lorella

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive high spatial resolution imaging study of globular clusters (GCs) in NGC 1399, thecentral giant elliptical cD galaxy in the Fornax galaxy cluster, conducted with the Advanced Camera for Surveys(ACS) aboard theHubble Space Telescope(HST).Using a novel technique to construct drizzled point-spreadfunction libraries for HSTACS data, we accurately determine the fidelity of GC structural parameter measurementsfrom detailed artificial star cluster experiments and show the superior robustness of the GC half-light radius,rh,compared with other GC structural parameters, such as King core and tidal radius. The measurement ofrhfor themajor fraction of the NGC 1399 GC system reveals a trend of increasingrhversus galactocentric distance,Rgal,out to about 10 kpc and a flat relation beyond. This trend is very similar for blue and red GCs, which are found tohave a mean size ratio ofrh,redrh,blue0.820.11 at all galactocentric radii from the core regions of the galaxyout to40 kpc. This suggests that the size difference between blue and red GCs is due to internal mechanismsrelated to the evolution of their constituent stellar populations. Modeling the mass density profile of NGC 1399shows that additional external dynamical mechanisms are required to limit the GC size in the galaxy halo regionstorh2 pc. We suggest that this may be realized by an exotic GC orbit distribution function, an extended darkmatter halo, andor tidal stress induced by the increased stochasticity in the dwarf halo substructure at largergalactocentric distances. We compare our results with the GCrhdistribution functions in various galaxies and findthat the fraction of extended GCs withrh5 pc is systematically larger in late-type galaxies compared with GCsystems in early-type galaxies. This is likely due to the dynamically more violent evolution of early-type galaxies.We match our GCrhmeasurements with radial velocity data from the literature and split the resulting sample at

  1. All quiet in the outer halo: chemical abundances in the globular cluster Pal 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, A.; Côté, P.; McWilliam, A.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Globular clusters (GCs) in the outer halo are important probes of the composition and origin of the Galactic stellar halo. Aims: We derive chemical element abundance ratios in red giants belonging to the remote (R ~ 90 kpc) GC Pal 3 and compare our measurements to those for red giant stars in both inner and outer halo GCs. Methods: From high-resolution spectroscopy of four red giants, obtained with the Magellan/MIKE spectrograph at moderately high S/N, we derive chemical abundances for 25 α-, iron peak-, and neutron-capture elements. These abundance ratios are confirmed by co-adding low S/N HIRES spectra of 19 stars along the red giant branch. Results: Pal 3 shows α-enhanced abundance patterns, and also its Fe-peak and neutron-capture element ratios, are fully compatible with those found in halo field stars and representative inner halo GCs of the same metallicity (such as M 13). The heavy elements in Pal 3 appear to be governed by r-process nucleosynthesis. Our limited sample does not show any significant star-to-star abundance variations in this cluster, although a weak Na-O anti-correlation cannot be ruled out by the present data. Conclusions: Pal 3 thus appears as an archetypical GC with abundance ratios dissimilar to dwarf spheroidal stars, ruling out a direct connection to such external systems. This conclusion is underscored by the lack of significant abundance spreads in this GC, in contrast to the broad abundance distributions seen in the dwarf galaxies. Pal 3 appears to have evolved chemically in analogy to the majority of GCs belonging to the Galactic inner and outer halo, experiencing a similar enrichment history. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National

  2. M31 Globular Cluster Abundances from High-Resolution, Integrated-Light Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Cameron, Scott; McWilliam, Andrew; Cohen, Judith G.

    2009-10-01

    We report the first detailed chemical abundances for five globular clusters (GCs) in M31 from high-resolution (R ~ 25,000) spectroscopy of their integrated light (IL). These GCs are the first in a larger set of clusters observed as part of an ongoing project to study the formation history of M31 and its GC population. The data presented here were obtained with the HIRES echelle spectrograph on the Keck I telescope and are analyzed using a new IL spectra analysis method that we have developed. In these clusters, we measure abundances for Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Y, and Ba, ages >=10 Gyr, and a range in [Fe/H] of -0.9 to -2.2. As is typical of Milky Way GCs, we find these M31 GCs to be enhanced in the α-elements Ca, Si, and Ti relative to Fe. We also find [Mg/Fe] to be low relative to other [α/Fe], and [Al/Fe] to be enhanced in the IL abundances. These results imply that abundances of Mg, Al (and likely O, Na) recovered from IL do display the inter- and intra-cluster abundance variations seen in individual Milky Way GC stars, and that special care should be taken in the future in interpreting low- or high-resolution IL abundances of GCs that are based on Mg-dominated absorption features. Fe-peak and the neutron-capture elements Ba and Y also follow Milky Way abundance trends. We also present high-precision velocity dispersion measurements for all five M31 GCs, as well as independent constraints on the reddening toward the clusters from our analysis. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  3. A RE-EVALUATION OF THE EVOLVED STARS IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandquist, Eric L.; Gordon, Mark; Levine, Daniel; Bolte, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We have analyzed photometry from space- and ground-based cameras to identify all bright red giant branch (RGB), horizontal branch (HB), and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars within 10' of the center of the globular cluster M13. We identify a modest (7%) population of HB stars redder than the primary peak (including RR Lyrae variables at the blue end of the instability strip) that is somewhat more concentrated to the cluster core than the rest of the evolved stars. We find support for the idea that they are noticeably evolved and in the late stages of depleting helium in their cores. This resolves a disagreement between distance moduli derived from the tip of the RGB and from stars in or near the RR Lyrae instability strip. We identified disagreements between HB model sets on whether stars with T eff ∼ eff ∼ eff ∼ 22, 000 K) as previously suggested. These stars are brighter than other stars of similar color (either redder or bluer), and may be examples of 'early hot flashers' that ignite core helium fusion shortly after leaving the RGB. We used ultraviolet photometry to identify hot post-HB stars, and based on their numbers (relative to canonical AGB stars) we estimate the position on the HB where the morphology of the post-HB tracks change to I ∼ 17.3, between the two peaks in the HB distribution. Concerning the possibility of helium enrichment in M13, we revisited the helium-sensitive R ratio, applying a new method for correcting star counts for larger lifetimes of hot HB stars. We find that M13's R ratio is in agreement with theoretical values for primordial helium abundance Y P = 0.245 and inconsistent with a helium enhancement ΔY = 0.04. The brightness of the HB (both in comparison to the end of the canonical HB and to the tip of the RGB) also appears to rule out the idea that the envelopes of the reddest HB stars have been significantly enriched in helium. The absolute colors of the turnoffs of M3 and M13 potentially may be used to look for

  4. THE ACS SURVEY OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. IX. HORIZONTAL BRANCH MORPHOLOGY AND THE SECOND PARAMETER PHENOMENON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dotter, Aaron; Sarajedini, Ata; Anderson, Jay; Bedin, Luigi R.; Paust, Nathaniel; Reid, I. Neill; Aparicio, Antonio; MarIn-Franch, A.; Rosenberg, Alfred; Chaboyer, Brian; Majewski, Steven; Milone, Antonino; Piotto, Giampaolo; Siegel, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The horizontal branch (HB) morphology of globular clusters (GCs) is most strongly influenced by metallicity. The second parameter phenomenon, first described in the 1960s, acknowledges that metallicity alone is not enough to describe the HB morphology of all GCs. In particular, astronomers noticed that the outer Galactic halo contains GCs with redder HBs at a given metallicity than are found inside the solar circle. Thus, at least a second parameter was required to characterize HB morphology. While the term 'second parameter' has since come to be used in a broader context, its identity with respect to the original problem has not been conclusively determined. Here we analyze the median color difference between the HB and the red giant branch, hereafter denoted as Δ(V - I), measured from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) photometry of 60 GCs within ∼20 kpc of the Galactic center. Analysis of this homogeneous data set reveals that, after the influence of metallicity has been removed from the data, the correlation between Δ(V - I) and age is stronger than that of any other parameter considered. Expanding the sample to include HST ACS and Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 photometry of the six most distant Galactic GCs lends additional support to the correlation between Δ(V - I) and age. This result is robust with respect to the adopted metallicity scale and the method of age determination, but must bear the caveat that high-quality, detailed abundance information is not available for a significant fraction of the sample. Furthermore, when a subset of GCs with similar metallicities and ages is considered, a correlation between Δ(V - I) and central luminosity density is exposed. With respect to the existence of GCs with anomalously red HBs at a given metallicity, we conclude that age is the second parameter and central density is most likely the third. Important problems related to HB morphology in GCs, notably multi-modal distributions

  5. The sluggs survey: HST/ACS mosaic imaging of the NGC 3115 globular cluster system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Arnold, Jacob A. [University of California Observatories, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Strader, Jay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, MI 48824 (United States); Lin, Dacheng; Irwin, Jimmy A.; Wong, Ka-Wah [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Sivakoff, Gregory R., E-mail: zgjennin@ucsc.edu [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada)

    2014-08-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) g and z photometry and half-light radii R {sub h} measurements of 360 globular cluster (GC) candidates around the nearby S0 galaxy NGC 3115. We also include Subaru/Suprime-Cam g, r, and i photometry of 421 additional candidates. The well-established color bimodality of the GC system is obvious in the HST/ACS photometry. We find evidence for a 'blue tilt' in the blue GC subpopulation, wherein the GCs in the blue subpopulation get redder as luminosity increases, indicative of a mass-metallicity relationship. We find a color gradient in both the red and blue subpopulations, with each group of clusters becoming bluer at larger distances from NGC 3115. The gradient is of similar strength in both subpopulations, but is monotonic and more significant for the blue clusters. On average, the blue clusters have ∼10% larger R {sub h} than the red clusters. This average difference is less than is typically observed for early-type galaxies but does match that measured in the literature for the Sombrero Galaxy (M104), suggesting that morphology and inclination may affect the measured size difference between the red and blue clusters. However, the scatter on the R {sub h} measurements is large. We also identify 31 clusters more extended than typical GCs, which we term ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) candidates. Many of these objects are actually considerably fainter than typical UCDs. While it is likely that a significant number will be background contaminants, six of these UCD candidates are spectroscopically confirmed as NGC 3115 members. To explore the prevalence of low-mass X-ray binaries in the GC system, we match our ACS and Suprime-Cam detections to corresponding Chandra X-ray sources. We identify 45 X-ray-GC matches: 16 among the blue subpopulation and 29 among the red subpopulation. These X-ray/GC coincidence fractions are larger than is typical for most GC systems, probably due to the increased

  6. GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AND SPUR CLUSTERS IN NGC 4921, THE BRIGHTEST SPIRAL GALAXY IN THE COMA CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Jang, In Sung, E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: isjang@astro.snu.ac.kr [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    We resolve a significant fraction of globular clusters (GCs) in NGC 4921, the brightest spiral galaxy in the Coma cluster. We also find a number of extended bright star clusters (star complexes) in the spur region of the arms. The latter are much brighter and bluer than those in the normal star-forming region, being as massive as 3 × 10{sup 5} M{sub ⊙}. The color distribution of the GCs in this galaxy is found to be bimodal. The turnover magnitudes of the luminosity functions of the blue (metal-poor) GCs (0.70 < (V − I) ≤ 1.05) in the halo are estimated V(max) = 27.11 ± 0.09 mag and I(max) = 26.21 ± 0.11 mag. We obtain similar values for NGC 4923, a companion S0 galaxy, and two Coma cD galaxies (NGC 4874 and NGC 4889). The mean value for the turnover magnitudes of these four galaxies is I(max) = 26.25 ± 0.03 mag. Adopting M{sub I} (max) = −8.56 ± 0.09 mag for the metal-poor GCs, we determine the mean distance to the four Coma galaxies to be 91 ± 4 Mpc. Combining this with the Coma radial velocity, we derive a value of the Hubble constant, H{sub 0} = 77.9 ± 3.6 km s{sup −1} Mpc{sup −1}. We estimate the GC specific frequency of NGC 4921 to be S{sub N} = 1.29 ± 0.25, close to the values for early-type galaxies. This indicates that NGC 4921 is in the transition phase to S0s.

  7. Comparison of Intra-cluster and M87 Halo Orphan Globular Clusters in the Virgo Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Tiffany Kaye; Tuan, Jin Zong; Martellini, Adhara; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Toloba, Elisa; Peng, Eric; Longobardi, Alessia; Lim, Sungsoon

    2018-01-01

    We present a study of “orphan” globular clusters (GCs) — GCs with no identifiable nearby host galaxy — discovered in NGVS, a 104 deg2 CFHT/MegaCam imaging survey. At the distance of the Virgo cluster, GCs are bright enough to make good spectroscopic targets and many are barely resolved in good ground-based seeing. Our orphan GC sample is derived from a subset of NGVS-selected GC candidates that were followed up with Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy. While our primary spectroscopic targets were candidate GC satellites of Virgo dwarf elliptical and ultra-diffuse galaxies, many objects turned out to be non-satellites based on a radial velocity mismatch with the Virgo galaxy they are projected close to. Using a combination of spectral characteristics (e.g., absorption vs. emission), Gaussian mixture modeling of radial velocity and positions, and extreme deconvolution analysis of ugrizk photometry and image morphology, these non-satellites were classified into: (1) intra-cluster GCs (ICGCs) in the Virgo cluster, (2) GCs in the outer halo of M87, (3) foreground Milky Way stars, and (4) background galaxies. The statistical distinction between ICGCs and M87 halo GCs is based on velocity distributions (mean of 1100 vs. 1300 km/s and dispersions of 700 vs. 400 km/s, respectively) and radial distribution (diffuse vs. centrally concentrated, respectively). We used coaddition to increase the spectral SNR for the two classes of orphan GCs and measured the equivalent widths (EWs) of the Mg b and H-beta absorption lines. These EWs were compared to single stellar population models to obtain mean age and metallicity estimates. The ICGCs and M87 halo GCs have = –0.6+/–0.3 and –0.4+/–0.3 dex, respectively, and mean ages of >~ 5 and >~ 10 Gyr, respectively. This suggests the M87 halo GCs formed in relatively high-mass galaxies that avoided being tidally disrupted by M87 until they were close to the cluster center, while IGCCs formed in relatively low-mass galaxies that were

  8. A 'Rosetta Stone' to Interpret the UV-HST Photometry of Multiple Stellar Populations in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzini, Alvio

    2011-10-01

    In this proposal we intend to firmly identify the chemical species responsible for the UV and UV-optical color differences exhibited by the multiple stellar populations harboured by two Galactic globular clusters: omega Centauri and 47 Tucanae, one with highly helium enriched sub-populations {omega Centauri}, the other not.We plan to collect ultraviolet STIS spectra for stars in the crowded cores of the clusters, where HST photometry is already available for thousands of stars in more than 10 filters, from F225W to F850LP. This WFC3+ACS photometric database has allowed us to show that UV colors are remarkably effective in separating the different cluster sub-populations, and with the proposed STIS spectroscopy we can quantify the chemical abundance differences among such sub-populations, most notably in Nitrogen and Oxygen. The resulting calibration of the UV colors in terms of CNO abundances will provide a new effective tool for the chemical characterization of large numbers of globular cluster stars belonging to the various sub-populations in each cluster, and to better isolate the specific role of the helium abundance.The plan is to observe at least one star for each of the main principal stellar sub-populations in each of the two clusters. These objects are selected on the basis of their accurate photometry and astrometry already in hand, based on existing UV-HST images.

  9. Age and Temperature of Globular-Open Star Clusters Case Study : M3 M35 and M67

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chewa Thassana

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the age and the temperature of the globular cluster M3 and the open clusters M37 and M67 were observed by CCD Photometer via a 0.5-meter Rithchey-Chertien Reflecting Telescope at Regional Observatory for the Public Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand ; images were obtained of the cluster stars in B and V photometric filter. The magnitude of the cluster stars were analyzed by Iris and Aperture Photometry Tool (ATP program. The age and temperature of M3, M35 and M67 clusters were calculated by the apparent magnitude and color index (B-V of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram . Our results shown that the both open cluster M35 and M67 were found to lie at a distance of 2,700 light years (832pc from the Earth. In addition, the M35 is approximately 110 million years old and the temperature in range of 7,000 -13,000K. Meanwhile M67 is roughly 3.11 billion years old, the temperature is about 4,400K to 6,400K. However, we determined that the globular cluster M3 is approximately 11.1 billion years old and located 34,000 light years (10,420pc away from the Earth, while temperature is around 3,600 -6,800K.

  10. Tails and streams around the Galactic globular clusters NGC 1851, NGC 1904, NGC 2298 and NGC 2808

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo-Bello, Julio A.; Martínez-Delgado, David; Navarrete, Camila; Catelan, Márcio; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Antoja, Teresa; Sollima, Antonio

    2018-02-01

    We present Dark Energy Camera imaging for the peculiar Galactic globular clusters NGC 1851, NGC 1904 (M 79), NGC 2298 and NGC 2808. Our deep photometry reveals that all the clusters have an important contribution of stars beyond their King tidal radii and present tails with different morphologies. We have also explored the surroundings of the clusters where the presence of the Canis Major overdensity and/or the low Galactic latitude Monoceros ring at d⊙ ˜ 8 kpc is evident. A second stellar system is found at d⊙ ˜ 17 kpc and spans at least 18 deg × 15 deg in the sky. As one of the possible scenarios to explain that feature, we propose that the unveiled system is part of Monoceros explained as a density wave moving towards the outer Milky Way. Alternatively, the unveiled system might be connected with other known halo substructures or associated with the progenitor dwarf galaxy of NGC 1851 and NGC 1904, which are widely considered accreted globular clusters.

  11. Globular Glial Mixed Four Repeat Tau and TDP-43 Proteinopathy with Motor Neuron Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Ryoko; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Tada, Mari; Tanaka, Hidetomo; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Shiga, Atsushi; Miura, Takeshi; Aoki, Kenju; Aikawa, Akane; Ishizawa, Shin; Ikeuchi, Takeshi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may be accompanied by frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We report a case of glial mixed tau and TDP-43 proteinopathies in a Japanese patient diagnosed clinically as having ALS-D. Autopsy revealed loss of lower motor neurons and degeneration of the pyramidal tracts in the spinal cord and brain stem. The brain showed frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), the most severe neuronal loss and gliosis being evident in the precentral gyrus. Although less severe, such changes were also observed in other brain regions, including the basal ganglia and substantia nigra. AT8 immunostaining revealed that predominant occurrence of astrocytic tau lesions termed globular astrocytic inclusions (GAIs) was a feature of the affected regions. These GAIs were Gallyas-Braak negative. Neuronal and oligodendrocytic tau lesions were comparatively scarce. pS409/410 immunostaining also revealed similar neuronal and glial TDP-43 lesions. Interestingly, occasional co-localization of tau and TDP-43 was evident in the GAIs. Immunoblot analyses revealed band patterns characteristic of a 4-repeat (4R) tauopathy, corticobasal degeneration and a TDP-43 proteinopathy, ALS/FTLD-TDP Type B. No mutations were found in the MAPT or TDP-43 genes. We consider that this patient harbored a distinct, sporadic globular glial mixed 4R tau and TDP-43 proteinopathy associated with motor neuron disease and FTD. © 2015 International Society of Neuropathology.

  12. Variable Stars in M13. II.The Red Variables and the Globular Cluster Period-Luminosity Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, W.; Layden, A.; Kopacki, G.; Smith, H.; Anderson, M.; Kelly, A.; McBride, K.; Pritzl, B.

    2017-06-01

    New CCD observations have been combined with archival data to investigate the nature of the red variables in the globular cluster M13. Mean magnitudes, colors and variation ranges on the UBVIC system have been determined for the 17 cataloged red variables. 15 of the stars are irregular or semi-regular variables that lie at the top of the red giant branch in the color-magnitude diagram. Two stars are not, including one with a well-defined period and a light curve shape indicating it is an ellipsoidal or eclipsing variable. All stars redder than (V-IC)0=1.38 mag vary, with the amplitudes being larger with increased stellar luminosity and with bluer filter passband. Searches of the data for periodicities yielded typical variability cycle times ranging from 30 d up to 92 d for the most luminous star. Several stars have evidence of multiple periods. The stars' period-luminosity diagram compared to those from microlensing survey data shows that most M13 red variables are overtone pulsators. Comparison with the diagrams for other globular clusters shows a correlation between red variable luminosity and cluster metallicity.

  13. An age difference of two billion years between a metal-rich and a metal-poor globular cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, B M S; Kalirai, J S; Anderson, J; Dotter, A; Richer, H B; Rich, R M; Shara, M M; Fahlman, G G; Hurley, J R; King, I R; Reitzel, D; Stetson, P B

    2013-08-01

    Globular clusters trace the formation history of the spheroidal components of our Galaxy and other galaxies, which represent the bulk of star formation over the history of the Universe. The clusters exhibit a range of metallicities (abundances of elements heavier than helium), with metal-poor clusters dominating the stellar halo of the Galaxy, and higher-metallicity clusters found within the inner Galaxy, associated with the stellar bulge, or the thick disk. Age differences between these clusters can indicate the sequence in which the components of the Galaxy formed, and in particular which clusters were formed outside the Galaxy and were later engulfed along with their original host galaxies, and which were formed within it. Here we report an absolute age of 9.9 ± 0.7 billion years (at 95 per cent confidence) for the metal-rich globular cluster 47 Tucanae, determined by modelling the properties of the cluster's white-dwarf cooling sequence. This is about two billion years younger than has been inferred for the metal-poor cluster NGC 6397 from the same models, and provides quantitative evidence that metal-rich clusters like 47 Tucanae formed later than metal-poor halo clusters like NGC 6397.

  14. Abundances of lithium, oxygen, and sodium in the turn-off stars of Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolskas, V.; Kučinskas, A.; Bonifacio, P.; Korotin, S. A.; Steffen, M.; Sbordone, L.; Caffau, E.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Royer, F.; Prakapavičius, D.

    2014-05-01

    Context. The cluster 47 Tuc is among the most metal-rich Galactic globular clusters and its metallicity is similar to that of metal-poor disc stars and open clusters. Like other globular clusters, it displays variations in the abundances of elements lighter than Si, which is generally interpreted as evidence of the presence of multiple stellar populations. Aims: We aim to determine abundances of Li, O, and Na in a sample of of 110 turn-off (TO) stars, in order to study the evolution of light elements in this cluster and to put our results in perspective with observations of other globular and open clusters, as well as with field stars. Methods: We use medium resolution spectra obtained with the GIRAFFE spectrograph at the ESO 8.2 m Kueyen VLT telescope and use state of the art 1D model atmospheres and NLTE line transfer to determine the abundances. We also employ CO5BOLD hydrodynamical simulations to assess the impact of stellar granulation on the line formation and inferred abundances. Results: Our results confirm the existence of Na-O abundance anti-correlation and hint towards a possible Li-O anti-correlation in the TO stars of 47 Tuc. At the same time, we find no convincing evidence supporting the existence of Li-Na correlation. The obtained 3D NLTE mean lithium abundance in a sample of 94 TO stars where Li lines were detected reliably, ⟨A(Li)3D NLTE⟩ = 1.78 ± 0.18 dex, appears to be significantly lower than what is observed in other globular clusters. At the same time, star-to-star spread in Li abundance is also larger than seen in other clusters. The highest Li abundance observed in 47 Tuc is about 0.1 dex lower than the lowest Li abundance observed among the un-depleted stars of the metal-poor open cluster NGC 2243. Conclusions: The correlations/anti-correlations among light element abundances confirm that chemical enrichment history of 47 Tuc was similar to that of other globular clusters, despite the higher metallicity of 47 Tuc. The lithium

  15. Knowledge-based computational intelligence development for predicting protein secondary structures from sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hong-Bin; Yi, Dong-Liang; Yao, Li-Xiu; Yang, Jie; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2008-10-01

    In the postgenomic age, with the avalanche of protein sequences generated and relatively slow progress in determining their structures by experiments, it is important to develop automated methods to predict the structure of a protein from its sequence. The membrane proteins are a special group in the protein family that accounts for approximately 30% of all proteins; however, solved membrane protein structures only represent less than 1% of known protein structures to date. Although a great success has been achieved for developing computational intelligence techniques to predict secondary structures in both globular and membrane proteins, there is still much challenging work in this regard. In this review article, we firstly summarize the recent progress of automation methodology development in predicting protein secondary structures, especially in membrane proteins; we will then give some future directions in this research field.

  16. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Radulova, Gergana M; Basheva, Elka S; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-08-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, E(sh) and η(sh), proportional to the fraction of the conventional protein. However, the experiments show that the effect of mixing can be rather different depending on the nature of the additive. If the additive is a globular protein, like β-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin, the surface rigidity is preserved, and even enhanced. The experiments with separate foam films indicate that this is due to the formation of a bilayer structure at the air/water interface. The more hydrophobic HFBII forms the upper layer adjacent to the air phase, whereas the conventional globular protein forms the lower layer that faces the water phase. Thus, the elastic network formed by the adsorbed hydrophobin remains intact, and even reinforced by the adjacent layer of globular protein. In contrast, the addition of the disordered protein β-casein leads to softening of the HFBII adsorption layer. Similar (an even stronger) effect is produced by the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. This can be explained with the penetration of the hydrophobic tails of β-casein and Tween 20 between the HFBII molecules at the interface, which breaks the integrity of the hydrophobin interfacial elastic network. The analyzed experimental data for the surface shear rheology of various protein adsorption layers comply with a viscoelastic thixotropic model, which allows one to determine E(sh) and η(sh) from the measured storage and loss moduli, G' and G″. The results could contribute for quantitative characterization and deeper understanding of the factors that control the surface rigidity of protein adsorption layers with potential application for the creation of stable foams and emulsions with fine bubbles or droplets. Copyright © 2014

  17. Altering protein surface charge with chemical modification modulates protein–gold nanoparticle aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamison, Jennifer A.; Bryant, Erika L.; Kadali, Shyam B.; Wong, Michael S.; Colvin, Vicki L.; Matthews, Kathleen S.; Calabretta, Michelle K.

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) can interact with a wide range of molecules including proteins. Whereas significant attention has focused on modifying the nanoparticle surface to regulate protein–AuNP assembly or influence the formation of the protein “corona,” modification of the protein surface as a mechanism to modulate protein–AuNP interaction has been less explored. Here, we examine this possibility utilizing three small globular proteins—lysozyme with high isoelectric point (pI) and established interactions with AuNP; α-lactalbumin with similar tertiary fold to lysozyme but low pI; and myoglobin with a different globular fold and an intermediate pI. We first chemically modified these proteins to alter their charged surface functionalities, and thereby shift protein pI, and then applied multiple methods to assess protein–AuNP assembly. At pH values lower than the anticipated pI of the modified protein, AuNP exposure elicits changes in the optical absorbance of the protein–NP solutions and other properties due to aggregate formation. Above the expected pI, however, protein–AuNP interaction is minimal, and both components remain isolated, presumably because both species are negatively charged. These data demonstrate that protein modification provides a powerful tool for modulating whether nanoparticle–protein interactions result in material aggregation. The results also underscore that naturally occurring protein modifications found in vivo may be critical in defining nanoparticle–protein corona compositions.

  18. Existence of different but overlapping IgG- and IgM-binding sties on the globular domain of human C1q

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zlatarova, A.S.; Rouseva, M.; Roumenina, L.T.

    2006-01-01

    C1q is the first subcomponent of the classical complement pathway that binds antigen-bound IgG or IgM and initiates complement activation via association of serine proteases C1r and C1s. The globular domain of C1q (gC1q), which is the ligand-recognition domain, is a heterotrimeric structure compo...

  19. Isolated ellipticals and their globular cluster systems. III. NGC 2271, NGC 2865, NGC 3962, NGC 4240, and IC 4889

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, R.; Alabi, A.; Richtler, T.; Lane, R. R.

    2015-05-01

    As tracers of star formation, galaxy assembly, and mass distribution, globular clusters have provided important clues to our understanding of early-type galaxies. But their study has been mostly constrained to galaxy groups and clusters where early-type galaxies dominate, leaving the properties of the globular cluster systems (GCSs) of isolated ellipticals as a mostly uncharted territory. We present Gemini-South/GMOS g'i' observations of five isolated elliptical galaxies: NGC 3962, NGC 2865, IC 4889, NGC 2271, and NGC 4240. Photometry of their GCSs reveals clear color bimodality in three of them, but remains inconclusive for the other two. All the studied GCSs are rather poor with a mean specific frequency SN ~ 1.5, independently of the parent galaxy luminosity. Considering information from previous work as well, it is clear that bimodality and especially the presence of a significant, even dominant, population of blue clusters occurs at even the most isolated systems, which casts doubts on a possible accreted origin of metal-poor clusters, as suggested by some models. Additionally, we discuss the possible existence of ultra-compact dwarfs around the isolated elliptical NGC 3962. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).Globular cluster photometry is available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/577/A59Appendices are available in

  20. Carbon and nitrogen abundances of stellar populations in the globular cluster M 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardo, C.; Pancino, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Milone, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    We present CH and CN index analysis and C and N abundance calculations based on the low-resolution blue spectra of red giant branch (RGB) stars in the Galactic globular cluster NGC 7089 (M 2). Our main goal is to investigate the C-N anticorrelation for this intermediate metallicity cluster. The data were collected with DOLORES, the multiobject, low-resolution facility at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. We first looked for CH and CN band strength variations and bimodalities in a sample of RGB stars with 17.5 ≤ V ≤ 14.5. Thus we derived C and N abundances under LTE assumption by comparing observed spectra with synthetic models from the spectral features at 4300 Å (G-band) and at ~3883 Å (CN). Spectroscopic data were coupled with UV photometry obtained during the spectroscopic run. We found a considerable star-to-star variation in both A(C) and A(N) at all luminosities for our sample of 35 targets. These abundances appear to be anticorrelated, with a hint of bimodality in the C content for stars with luminosities below the RBG bump (V ~ 15.7), while the range of variations in N abundances is very large and spans almost ~2 dex. We find additional C depletion as the stars evolve off the RGB bump, in fairly good agreement with theoretical predictions for metal-poor stars in the course of normal stellar evolution. We isolated two groups with N-rich and N-poor stars and found that N abundance variations correlate with the (U - V) color in the DOLORES color-magnitude diagram (CMD). The V, (U - V) CMD for this cluster shows an additional RGB sequence, located at the red of the main RGB and amounting to a small fraction of the total giant population. We identified two CH stars detected in previous studies in our U,V images. These stars, which are both cluster members, fall on this redder sequence, suggesting that the anomalous RGB should have a peculiar chemical pattern. Unfortunately, no additional spectra were obtained for stars in this previously unknown RGB branch

  1. A VST and VISTA study of globular clusters in NGC 253

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantiello, Michele; Grado, Aniello; Rejkuba, Marina; Arnaboldi, Magda; Capaccioli, Massimo; Greggio, Laura; Iodice, Enrica; Limatola, Luca

    2018-03-01

    Context. Globular clusters (GCs) are key to our understanding of the Universe, as laboratories of stellar evolution, fossil tracers of the past formation epoch of the host galaxy, and effective distance indicators from local to cosmological scales. Aim. We analyze the properties of the sources in the NGC 253 with the aim of defining an up to date catalog of GC candidates in the galaxy. Given the distance of the galaxy, GCs in NGC 253 are ideal targets for resolved color-magnitude diagram studies of extragalactic GCs with next-generation diffraction limited ground-based telescopes. Methods: Our analysis is based on the science verification data of two ESO survey telescopes, VST and VISTA. Using ugri photometry from VST and JKs from VISTA, GC candidates were selected using as reference the morpho-photometric and color properties of spectroscopically confirmed GCs available in the literature. The strength of the results was verified against available archival HST/ACS data from the GHOSTS survey: all but two of the selected GC candidates appear as star clusters in HST footprints. Results: The adopted GC selection leads to the definition of a sample of ˜350 GC candidates. At visual inspection, we find that 82 objects match all the requirements for selecting GC candidates and 155 are flagged as uncertain GC candidate; however, 110 are unlikely GCs, which are most likely background galaxies. Furthermore, our analysis shows that four of the previously spectroscopically confirmed GCs, i.e., ˜20% of the total spectroscopic sample, are more likely either background galaxies or high-velocity Milky Way stars. The radial density profile of the selected best candidates shows the typically observed r1/4-law radial profile. The analysis of the color distributions reveals only marginal evidence of the presence of color bimodality, which is normally observed in galaxies of similar luminosity. The GC luminosity function does not show the typical symmetry, mainly because of the lack

  2. Accurate prediction of peptide binding sites on protein surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Petsalaki

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Many important protein-protein interactions are mediated by the binding of a short peptide stretch in one protein to a large globular segment in another. Recent efforts have provided hundreds of examples of new peptides binding to proteins for which a three-dimensional structure is available (either known experimentally or readily modeled but where no structure of the protein-peptide complex is known. To address this gap, we present an approach that can accurately predict peptide binding sites on protein surfaces. For peptides known to bind a particular protein, the method predicts binding sites with great accuracy, and the specificity of the approach means that it can also be used to predict whether or not a putative or predicted peptide partner will bind. We used known protein-peptide complexes to derive preferences, in the form of spatial position specific scoring matrices, which describe the binding-site environment in globular proteins for each type of amino acid in bound peptides. We then scan the surface of a putative binding protein for sites for each of the amino acids present in a peptide partner and search for combinations of high-scoring amino acid sites that satisfy constraints deduced from the peptide sequence. The method performed well in a benchmark and largely agreed with experimental data mapping binding sites for several recently discovered interactions mediated by peptides, including RG-rich proteins with SMN domains, Epstein-Barr virus LMP1 with TRADD domains, DBC1 with Sir2, and the Ago hook with Argonaute PIWI domain. The method, and associated statistics, is an excellent tool for predicting and studying binding sites for newly discovered peptides mediating critical events in biology.

  3. Recombinant Protein Truncation Strategy for Inducing Bactericidal Antibodies to the Macrophage Infectivity Potentiator Protein of Neisseria meningitidis and Circumventing Potential Cross-Reactivity with Human FK506-Binding Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecka, Magdalena K.; Devos, Nathalie; Gilbert, Mélanie; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Weynants, Vincent; Heckels, John E.

    2014-01-01

    A recombinant macrophage infectivity potentiator (rMIP) protein of Neisseria meningitidis induces significant serum bactericidal antibody production in mice and is a candidate meningococcal vaccine antigen. However, bioinformatics analysis of MIP showed some amino acid sequence similarity to human FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) in residues 166 to 252 located in the globular domain of the protein. To circumvent the potential concern over generating antibodies that could recognize human proteins, we immunized mice with recombinant truncated type I rMIP proteins that lacked the globular domain and the signal leader peptide (LP) signal sequence (amino acids 1 to 22) and contained the His purification tag at either the N or C terminus (C-term). The immunogenicity of truncated rMIP proteins was compared to that of full (i.e., full-length) rMIP proteins (containing the globular domain) with either an N- or C-terminal His tag and with or without the LP sequence. By comparing the functional murine antibody responses to these various constructs, we determined that C-term His truncated rMIP (−LP) delivered in liposomes induced high levels of antibodies that bound to the surface of wild-type but not Δmip mutant meningococci and showed bactericidal activity against homologous type I MIP (median titers of 128 to 256) and heterologous type II and III (median titers of 256 to 512) strains, thereby providing at least 82% serogroup B strain coverage. In contrast, in constructs lacking the LP, placement of the His tag at the N terminus appeared to abrogate bactericidal activity. The strategy used in this study would obviate any potential concerns regarding the use of MIP antigens for inclusion in bacterial vaccines. PMID:25452551

  4. Recombinant protein truncation strategy for inducing bactericidal antibodies to the macrophage infectivity potentiator protein of Neisseria meningitidis and circumventing potential cross-reactivity with human FK506-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecka, Magdalena K; Devos, Nathalie; Gilbert, Mélanie; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Weynants, Vincent; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron

    2015-02-01

    A recombinant macrophage infectivity potentiator (rMIP) protein of Neisseria meningitidis induces significant serum bactericidal antibody production in mice and is a candidate meningococcal vaccine antigen. However, bioinformatics analysis of MIP showed some amino acid sequence similarity to human FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) in residues 166 to 252 located in the globular domain of the protein. To circumvent the potential concern over generating antibodies that could recognize human proteins, we immunized mice with recombinant truncated type I rMIP proteins that lacked the globular domain and the signal leader peptide (LP) signal sequence (amino acids 1 to 22) and contained the His purification tag at either the N or C terminus (C-term). The immunogenicity of truncated rMIP proteins was compared to that of full (i.e., full-length) rMIP proteins (containing the globular domain) with either an N- or C-terminal His tag and with or without the LP sequence. By comparing the functional murine antibody responses to these various constructs, we determined that C-term His truncated rMIP (-LP) delivered in liposomes induced high levels of antibodies that bound to the surface of wild-type but not Δmip mutant meningococci and showed bactericidal activity against homologous type I MIP (median titers of 128 to 256) and heterologous type II and III (median titers of 256 to 512) strains, thereby providing at least 82% serogroup B strain coverage. In contrast, in constructs lacking the LP, placement of the His tag at the N terminus appeared to abrogate bactericidal activity. The strategy used in this study would obviate any potential concerns regarding the use of MIP antigens for inclusion in bacterial vaccines. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. A brave new world of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentze, Matthias W; Castello, Alfredo; Schwarzl, Thomas; Preiss, Thomas

    2018-01-17

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are typically thought of as proteins that bind RNA through one or multiple globular RNA-binding domains (RBDs) and change the fate or function of the bound RNAs. Several hundred such RBPs have been discovered and investigated over the years. Recent proteome-wide studies have more than doubled the number of proteins implicated in RNA binding and uncovered hundreds of additional RBPs lacking conventional RBDs. In this Review, we discuss these new RBPs and the emerging understanding of their unexpected modes of RNA binding, which can be mediated by intrinsically disordered regions, protein-protein interaction interfaces and enzymatic cores, among others. We also discuss the RNA targets and molecular and cellular functions of the new RBPs, as well as the possibility that some RBPs may be regulated by RNA rather than regulate RNA.

  6. Crystal structures of the coil 2B fragment and the globular tail domain of human lamin B1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan, Jianbin; Xu, Chao; Bian, Chuanbing; Lam, Robert; Wang, Jia-Pey; Kania, Joanna; Min, Jinrong; Zang, Jianye (Toronto); (UST - China)

    2012-07-18

    We present here the crystal structures of human lamin B1 globular tail domain and coiled 2B domain, which adopt similar folds to Ig-like domain and coiled-coil domain of lamin A, respectively. Despite the overall similarity, we found an extra intermolecular disulfide bond in the lamin B1 coil 2B domain, which does not exist in lamin A/C. In addition, the structural analysis indicates that interactions at the lamin B1 homodimer interface are quite different from those of lamin A/C. Thus our research not only reveals the diversely formed homodimers among lamin family members, but also sheds light on understanding the important roles of lamin B1 in forming th