WorldWideScience

Sample records for globalised world economy

  1. World Society and Globalisation

    Wittmann, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate discourses on globalisation and world society and to disclose the commonalities and differences of both scientific debates. In particular, it draws attention to theoretical concepts of globalisation and world society. This is considered fruitful for comprehending the complex mechanisms of…

  2. Editorial: Globalisation of Economies and Industries

    Radosław Rybkowski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available At  the  beginning  of  the  21st  century  we  also  experience  some  drawbacks  of globalisation. Yes, it “promotes economic and social advancement”, but the progress is not evenly distributes and not “all peoples” enjoy the benefits of globalisation. Growing interdependency has also brought greater competition,  this time reaching much further that  just  neighbouring  countries. Therefore,  we  decided  to  focus  this  issue  of our  journal  on  exploring  the Globalisation of Economies and Industries. We do hope that the articles presented in this issue  will inspire further research.

  3. Globalisation

    H.W. ARNDT

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation, which was predicted by experts to do away with the nation state and create a single world market, has not turned out exactly as foretold. The most striking developments brought by the phenomenon have come in terms of faster transfer of goods and services across international borders, due in part to better communications and computer technology. Critics of globalisation still assert that it promotes inequality among classes, unfair competition, and undermines democracy. However, these criticisms can be seen as an aversion to foreign competition brought about by protectionist views. An attempt is made to develop a pragmatic interpretation of the globalisation phenomenon.

  4. Social investment in the globalising learning economy

    Lundvall, Bengt-Åke; Lorenz, Edward

    2011-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the importance of social investment and egalitarian distribution policy for reproducing the basis of a learning economy.......This paper demonstrates the importance of social investment and egalitarian distribution policy for reproducing the basis of a learning economy....

  5. Changes in Chinese Education under Globalisation and Market Economy: Emerging Issues and Debates

    Guo, Shibao; Guo, Yan; Beckett, Gulbahar; Li, Qing; Guo, Linyuan

    2013-01-01

    Fuelled by forces of globalisation, China has gradually shifted from a centrally planned economy to the "socialist market economy". This study examines changes in Chinese education under globalisation and market economy, focusing on the teaching and living conditions of teachers. The study reveals that the profound transformation of…

  6. Globalisation and the Small Economy: The Case of the Netherlands

    Hogenbirk Annelies; Narula Rajneesh

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we have examined the importance and implications of globalisation due to FDI for one particular small country: the Netherlands. Although it has limited resources and size, the Netherlands is home to the sixth largest outward FDI stock in the world, and also is one of the most important destinations for inward FDI activity. Its location advantages are, inter alia, a function of its de facto market size, given its central location within the EU, and its well developed infrastruct...

  7. Health policy in a globalising world

    Fustukian, Suzanne; Buse, Kent; Lee, Kelley

    2002-01-01

    ... reform since the 1980s 97 KELLEY LEE AND HILARY GOODMAN viiviii Contents 7 The globalisation of health sector reform policies: is 'lesson drawing' part of the process? 120 BARBARA MCPAKE 8 Cost-...

  8. Religion and violence in a globalised world

    Wolfgang Huber

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Violent religious extremism is seen as one of the mega-problems of the 21st century. This article � based on a key lecture at the conference on �Violence in a democratic South Africa� at the University of Pretoria and the David de Villiers memorial lecture at the University of Stellenbosch, both held during August 2010 � critically discussed the interaction between religion and violence in our present-day, globalised world. Three different propositions on the relationship between religion and violence were scrutinised. In countering the proposition that religion, or more specifically monotheism, necessarily leads to violence, it was argued that violence is not an inherent, but rather an acquired or even an ascribed quality of religion. The second proposition that religion leads to non-violence was affirmed to the extent that religions do provide a strong impulse to overcome violence. However, they also tend to accept violence as an inevitable part of reality and even justify the use of violence on religious grounds. The third proposition was regarded as the most convincing, for it argues that the link between religion and violence is contingent. Some situations do seem to make the use of violence inevitable; however, religions should refrain from justifying the use of violence and maintain a preferential option for nonviolence.

  9. Towards a "Critical Cultural Political Economy" Account of the Globalising of Education

    Robertson, Susan L.; Dale, Roger

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines the basis of an alternative theoretical approach to the study of the globalisation of "education"--a Critical, Cultural Political Economy of Education (CCPEE) approach. Our purpose here is to bring this body of concepts--critical, cultural, political, economy--into our interrogation of globalising projects and…

  10. Gender and Globalisation: Labor Changes in the Global Economy

    Kolářová, Marta

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 6 (2006), s. 1241-1257 ISSN 0038-0288 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : gender * globalisation * labour Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography Impact factor: 0.128, year: 2006

  11. Globalised rebellion: the Darfur insurgents and the world

    Jumbert, Maria Gabrielsen; Lanz, David

    2017-01-01

    This article is concerned with the rebellion in Darfur as a way to illustrate the politics of insurgency in the era of globalisation. We first show how the Darfur rebels have projected their struggle onto the world stage, before examining the effects that this has engendered. On the one hand, Darfur's global profile solidified the rebels' cause and co-opted international actors in support of it. This translated into real leverage for the rebels, and it constrained the Sudanese government by r...

  12. English for Globalisation or for the World's People?

    Phillipson, Robert

    2001-07-01

    The article explores the role of English in ongoing processes of globalisation, the reasons for its dominance, and the need for conceptual clarification in analysing English worldwide. Examples from the post-colonial and post-communist worlds and the European Union reveal increasing corporate involvement in education, and World Bank policies that favour European languages. Studies of global English range from those that uncritically endorse global English to those which see it as reflecting a post-imperial but essentially capitalist agenda. Many of the contem-porary trends are captured in two competing language policy paradigms that situate English in broader economic, political and cultural facets of globalisation, the Diffusion of English paradigm, and the Ecology of Languages paradigm. A number of studies of various dimensions of linguistic and professional imperialism in the teaching of English to Asians reveal the persistence of western agendas in education. There is also increasing documentation of resistance to this, both at the level of awareness of the need to anchor English more firmly in local cultural systems, and at classroom level. Language pedagogy needs to ensure that English is not learned subtractively. Only in this way can globalisation be made more accountable and locally relevant.

  13. Globalisation, Knowledge and the Myth of the Magnet Economy

    Brown, Phillip; Lauder, Hugh

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the dominant view of the changing relationship between education, jobs and rewards in the global knowledge economy. This asserts that the developed economies can resolve issues of individual aspirations, economic efficiency and social justice through the creation of a high-skills, high-wage "magnet" economy. Here…

  14. Globalisation

    2013-01-01

    Dans le fil de la globalisation des activités, les chaînes de création de valeur franchissent les frontières, et les biens et services sont produits au sein de multiples réseaux dont la configuration est en perpétuel mouvement. Quelles sont les répercussions de ces processus dynamiques et des nouveaux liens d’interdépendance qu’ils génèrent sur les mutations du travail, et particulièrement sur la qualité du travail ? L’ouvrage présente une analyse comparée des travaux sur la question réalisés...

  15. Education, Globalisation and the Future of the Knowledge Economy

    Brown, Phillip; Lauder, Hugh; Ashton, David

    2008-01-01

    The dominant view today is of a global knowledge-based economy, driven by the application of new technologies, accelerating the shift to high-skilled, high-waged European economies. This view is reflected in the expansion of higher education and the key role of higher education in national and European economic policy. The Lisbon agenda seeks to…

  16. Shaping Subjects of Globalisation: At the Intersection of Voluntourism and the New Economy

    Dlaske, Kati

    2016-01-01

    Volunteer tourism is one of the latest branches of the ever expanding globalised tourism. The initiative Workaway, an expression of this trend, was established in the late 90s with the aim of promoting "cultural understanding between different peoples and lands throughout the world". The figure of the workawayer as a new cosmopolitan…

  17. New Geographies of Accumulation, Globalising Firm Networks and the Role of the Auckland Region in the Australasian Economy

    Richard Le Heron

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surprisingly little theoretical or empirical research is available on Auckland’s actual functional and geographic connectivity, including developments relating to closer economic relations with Australia. This paper draws on the geography of accumulation literatures to argue that close attention must be given to developments in the three circuits of capital (trade, production and finance if the changing character and contributions of globalising firm networks are to be discerned and understood. The empirical investigations show that for Australian owned firms globalising rather than purely Australasian networks are the norm, network complexity is considerable and that it makes sense to think of Auckland’s economy in globalising terms. A globalising networks perspective means that estimates of the magnitude and assessments of the character of employment contributions of Australian owned firms to the Auckland economy reflects these interdependencies.

  18. Sustainable City Regions: Re-localising Landscapes in a Globalising World

    Robert Thayer Jnr

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper emphasises physical, technological and economic variables in a globalising world, and how they might influence local economies and local landscapes. With the expected 'big rollover' in demand versus supply of oil in the next decade, the scale of the landscape will change in response to a permanent rise in the price of transportation and shipping fuels. Air travel will become less accessible, as will shipping of high mass, low value-added materials and goods. This will necessitate the re-establishment of more local supplies and shorter transport distances for people and goods, and for the first time in human history the perceived size of the world will expand. In response, the 'grain' of the landscape will become finer. More people will populate the rural landscape, while cities and towns will become more compact. The landscape is influenced by the three major operative technological systems (matter, energy and information. While the depletion of oil will greatly affect matter and energy, it will have less influence on information, which is relatively immune from entropic thermodynamic effects. While source-to-end-use distances will shorten, world per-capita energy expenditures will fall, and more local goods will be created and consumed, it remains to be seen whether this contraction in the scale of the instrumental landscape will be matched by more localised ownership, or by continued globalisation of corporate systems of production and distribution. Assuming the former is preferable, the paper concludes by suggesting that the bioregion, or natural 'life place', is the appropriate location for the protection of biodiversity, sustained use of resources, and identity and life satisfaction of local inhabitants.

  19. Northern Togo and the world economy

    L.J. de Haan (Leo); H.A. Reitsma (Henk)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractHow global is the world economy? Does it also encompass the remote corners of the Third World where subsistence agriculture still predominates and where the first hard-surface roads have yet to be built? And if it does, when did these areas become incorporated into the world economy?

  20. GLOBALISATION EFFECTS UPON THE ECONOMY IN TERMS OF RISK AND INCERTITUDE

    CRISTINA NITESCU

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation effects upon the economy in terms of risk and incertitude. Globalization represents the process of mutual integration among the worldwide countries which leads, on one hand, to significant cost reducing of transport and communications and, on the other hand, it generates artificial barriers which can block the circulation of goods, services, capital, knowledge and in a smaller measures people. However, under the circumstance of risk and incertitude a substantiate decision requires strong knowledge and in due time of two ways, internal and external, where the trade agents carry out their activity as well as the rationalization of actions and human decisions which consist not only of prevention and avoiding the risks and their consequences but also the reducing the uncertainty and the misjudgment at the acceptable levels in the given situations.

  1. Transaction component of exogenous factors of influence upon employment under conditions of globalisation of economy

    Glushach Anna V.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article lies in identification of influence of globalisation upon efficiency of financial and loan instruments that ensure regulation and stimulation of employment and the role of transaction costs in these processes. To achieve the goal, the article shows how globalisation processes, which take place in the sphere of the financial sector, influence the real economy and employment of the population, identifies positive and negative sides of this influence. The article conducts analysis of causes and effects of the financial and economic crisis from the point of view of the theory of transaction costs, in the process of which the role of specific types of these costs in the processes that took place was ascertained. In the course of the study the article reveals negative influence of the growing disproportion between the public and private transaction costs of the risks of financial and economic instability, especially in the countries with the transformation economy, and justifies the necessity of stabilising mechanisms of the international financial market with the aim of elimination of the marked transaction disproportions such as introduction of a special tax on financial transactions or establishment of the double currency course: less flexible – for servicing trading operations, and more flexible – for regulation of financial flows. Studies of negative effects of integration processes allowed formation of directions of the state policy, which would prevent dangerous consequences of interference of the foreign capital with the financial sector and would protect the Ukrainian labour market from influence of negative effects of integration processes.

  2. Management by Objectives (MBO) Imperatives for Transforming Higher Education for a Globalised World

    Ofojebe, Wenceslaus N.; Olibie, Eyiuche Ifeoma

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the extent to which the stipulations and visions of Management by Objectives (MBO) would be integrated in higher education institutions in South Eastern Nigeria to enhance higher education transformation in a globalised world. Four research questions and a null hypothesis guided the study. A sample of 510…

  3. Using Interactive Online Role-Playing Simulations to Develop Global Competency and to Prepare Engineering Students for a Globalised World

    May, Dominik; Wold, Kari; Moore, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The world is changing significantly, and it is becoming increasingly globalised. This means that countries, businesses, and professionals must think and act globally to be successful. Many individuals, however, are not prepared with the global competency skills needed to communicate and perform effectively in a globalised system. To address this…

  4. Imaging Globalisation

    Bildsøe, Helle Schulz

    Globalisation has become a buzz - word of the contemporary age. It connotes an infinite number of developments simultaneously . In general, the globalisation paradigm is concerned with explaining the processes by which previously distant parts of the world have become connected in historically un...

  5. Managing Recreation Enterprises Efficiency under Conditions of Informatisation and Globalisation of Economy

    Korogodova Olena O.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article is development of recommendations on improvement of the recreation enterprise efficiency management mechanism with consideration of new tendencies of globalisation and informatisation of economy. The article considers main approaches to determination of efficiency of entrepreneurial activity and proposes a classification of types of enterprise efficiency by the following criteria: nature of expenditures and results, environmental impact of the enterprise, duration of effect and localisation. The article marks out the cause-effect relation for each type of enterprise efficiency. It develops a scheme of elements of the mechanism of management of recreation enterprise efficiency and identifies conceptual principles of this mechanism. It offers the “recreation attractiveness” notion, which, unlike existing ones, reflects the essence of demand on enterprise services more accurately and facilitates development of the recreation enterprise recreation attractiveness management mechanism by criteria of recreation potential, prices and quality of enterprise services. Using this criteria as basic, the article builds methods of rating assessment of recreation enterprises. It is necessary to study deeper the methodical instruments for diagnostics of four elements of recreation enterprise functioning: external environment, recreation potential, organisational status and management potential.

  6. The impact of virtual world economy in real world economy

    Ionuţ Constantin

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Internet technology is transforming the way we define nation-states. It has created “virtualstates” in which parallel communities are formed and political agendas are executed. Due to the emergenceof Internet technology, visions of “techno-imperialism” and “electronic warfare” are causing nation-statesto enact regulatory measures to preserve political, economic and cultural integrity. While the informationinfrastructure is the heart of the economic stability for most nations, the possibility of “viruses” or “electronicbombs” bringing ruin to an economy is real indeed. This means that architects of the “nation-state”will have the gargantuan task of re-examining existing politico-economic paradigms and fully integratetechnological initiatives in its apparatus to prevent imminent marginalization

  7. Analysis of Population Dynamics in World Economy

    Martin, Gress

    2011-01-01

    Population dynamics is an important topic in current world economy. The size and growth of population have an impact on economic growth and development of individual countries and vice versa, economic development influences demographic variables in a country. The aim of the article is to analyze historical development of world population, population stock change and relations between population stock change and economic development.

  8. The Future of Comparative and International Education in a Globalised World

    Wilson, David N.

    2003-03-01

    This article examines the history and future prospects of comparative and international education with particular reference to the impact of globalisation and Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs). Connections and interactions between comparative educationists and the technologies of printing and electronic communications are examined in a historical context. The global nature of communications in comparative and international education is demonstrated both spatially and historically, using information from all regions of the world. The changing nature of technologies is noted to have broadened the audience for comparative insights. The development of textbooks, journals, conferences, international agencies, the Internet, web-based communications, and professional comparative education societies is related to the themes of communications and globalisation.

  9. Globalisation and Internationalism: Democratic Prospects for World Education.

    Jones, Phillip W.

    1998-01-01

    Contrasts the logic of globalization with that of internationalism (global pursuit of interest through unfettered capitalism versus promotion of global peace and well-being through international structures). Uses these frameworks to explore the policies of key international organizations in education (UNESCO, UNICEF, the World Bank). Contains 39…

  10. World Health Organisation, Right to Health and Globalisation

    Necati Dedeoglu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available World Health Organisation (WHO is an international organisation founded after the Second World War with the aim of developing cooperation among countries of the world. Its budget is provided by members’ dues along with donations. Its constitution which has been endorsed by parliaments of all member countries accepts health as a social right and health services as a public service, highlighting the social and economic determinants of health. However, the Organisation has been object to political influences since its inception and especially the USA has tried to use it for her own interests. Dominant political trends have influenced policies of WHO. For example, WHO had started Primary Health Care Program in 1970’s, when many newly independent states existed, when Third World countries like India and Yugoslavia were effective and when Soviet Union was powerful, with the slogan of “ Health for all” which prioritised equality, participation,, prevention, socio- economic factors in health. Globalization and neo-liberal economic policies which have dominated the world have also changed the values and principles of WHO; a deterioration was experienced: from an approach of public services and health as a a social right, to one of privatisation and market forces. This new WHO has ignored the unfavourable health consequences of economic “ structural adjustment” programs forced on poor nations and the distruction of civilians during the Iraq and Afganistan wars. A favorable change in WHO policies depend upon the regaining of economic and political independence of poor nations and their influence in international organisations. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(4.000: 361-366

  11. The Globalisation of migration

    Milan Mesić

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper demonstrates that contemporary international migration is a constitutive part of the globalisation process. After defining the concepts of globalisation and the globalisation of migration, the author discusses six key themes, linking globalisation and international migration (“global cities”, the scale of migration; diversification of migration flows; globalisation of science and education; international migration and citizenship; emigrant communities and new identities. First, in accordance with Saskia Sassen’s analysis, the author rejects the wide-spread notion that unqualified migrants have lost an (important role in »global cities«, i.e. in the centres of the new (global economy. Namely, the post-modern service sector cannot function without the support of a wide range of auxiliary unqualified workers. Second, a critical comparison with traditional overseas mass migration to the USA at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries indicates that present international migration is, perhaps, less extensive – however it is important to take into consideration various limitations that previously did not exist, and thus the present migration potential is in really greater. Third, globalisation is more evident in a diversification of the forms of migration: the source area of migrants to the New World and Europe has expanded to include new regions in the world; new immigration areas have arisen (the Middle East, new industrial countries of the Far East, South Europe; intra-regional migration has intensified. Forth, globalisation is linked to an increased migration of experts and the pessimistic notion of a brain drain has been replaced by the optimistic idea of a brain gain. Fifth, contemporary international migration has been associated with a crisis of the national model of citizenship. Sixth, the interlinking of (migrant cultural communities regardless of distance and the physical proximity of cultural centres (the

  12. WORLD ECONOMY POST-CRYSIS DEVELOPMENT

    Sergiu GARSTEA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Once the acute phases of the financial and euro crises were over, it was clear that it would take time for advanced economies to recover. The history of past financial crises gave a clear warning that recovery would typically be long and painful. The aim is to investigate the state of the world economy to make some conclusions for the less advanced countries, like Moldova. Research methodology involves analytical, comparative, foresight, induction and deduction methods. New development and planning institutions presume the rejection of forms of bureaucratic centralism and base on network forms of organization of the subject and the process of production, trade and services.

  13. Challenges for adult skill formation in the globalising learning economy - a European perspective

    Lundvall, Bengt-Åke; Rasmussen, Palle Damkjær

    2016-01-01

    requirements for employees. This is true for all parts of the world economy. In this paper, the focus is on Europe and developments in the first decade of the new millennium. The major challenge for Europe is to counter the inherent trend, reinforced by the crisis, towards unequal access to learning both...... in work and in education. Without a new new deal that gives privileged access to vocational education and training for those with little education, the economic performance of Europe will be undermined. Such a new new deal must be a fundamental element in the effort to lift Europe out of its current...

  14. Globalisation, Trade Openness and Foreign Direct Investment in Romania

    Dima Stela

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the trend of globalisation, trade openness and foreign direct investments (FDI in Romania and the link between them in the last 25 years. Data from UNCTAD, World Bank and KOF globalisation index were used in econometrical models testing the link between globalisation, trade openness and foreign direct investment. A strong positive and statistical validated link is found between globalisation and FDI, between trade openness and FDI, and between FDI and globalisation. In the context of Romanian economy, these three phenomena are interrelated and each of them is acting to potentiate the effect of the other. Moreover, a multivariate regression analysis emphasized the dependency between globalisation index and foreign direct investment, trade openness and market capitalisation. These results can be taken into account when national policies aiming to attract FDI and stimulating export-import activities are designed.

  15. Globalisation and the University: Myths and Realities in an Unequal World

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2004-01-01

    Much has been said about the impact of globalisation on higher education. Some have argued that globalisation, the Internet and the scientific community will level the playing field in the new age of knowledge interdependence. Others claim that globalisation means both worldwide inequality and the McDonaldisation of the university. It is argued…

  16. International Students, Academic Publications and World University Rankings: The Impact of Globalisation and Responses of a Malaysian Public University

    Tan, Yao Sua; Goh, Soo Khoon

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the responses of a Malaysian public university, namely Universiti Sains Malaysia, to the impact of globalisation vis-à-vis three key issues: international students, academic publications and world university rankings. There are concerted efforts put in place by the university to recruit more international students. But a global…

  17. Globalisation and its Obstacles. Nationalism and Ethno-Confessionalism in the Islamic World

    Mendel, Miloš

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 17, - (2002), s. 61-68 ISSN 0239-8818. [Identity vs. Globalisation: Problems, Examples, Contexts. Warszawa, 27.10.2002-28.10.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z9021901 Keywords : Globalisation * Islam * Identity Subject RIV: AD - Politology ; Political Sciences

  18. Discussion and Conclusion: A Global Perspective on the World Economy.

    Hague, Douglas

    1983-01-01

    Important changes are taking place in the world economy which are not adequately dealt with by either Keynesian or monetarist theories. Too much emphasis placed on what is happening in the American and western European economies can blind us to important developments in such nonwestern economies as the OPEC nations. (IS)

  19. Dentistry in the 21st century: challenges of a globalising world.

    Hayashi, Mikako; Haapasalo, Markus; Imazato, Satoshi; Lee, Jae Il; Momoi, Yasuko; Murakami, Shinya; Whelton, Helen; Wilson, Nairn

    2014-12-01

    Oral health is - literally - vital to good general health, not least because the mouth is the sentinel of the body. Dentistry, the Cinderella of health care, faces immense challenges of globalisation. Governments, having spent freely on everything from defence to social security, face mountains of debts which make budget cutbacks essential. Simultaneously, most developed countries have to pay increasing costs of caring for rapidly ageing populations. Dentistry is being pulled two ways: wealthy members of society demand high-end expensive treatment, much of it cosmetic rather than necessary to deal with disease, whereas many millions of poor people in developing countries cannot afford basic dental treatment and may never see a dentist. Too many governments and dentists persist with the expensive and destructive regime of 'drill and fill (and bill)'. International advances in care may not reach the clinician's chair because treatment guidelines and payments are set locally. An international symposium to celebrate Mikako Hayashi becoming Professor of Restorative Dentistry and Endodontology at Osaka University concluded that dentistry should move from an increasingly un-affordable curative model to a cost-effective evidence-based preventive model. The goal is to help people retain healthy natural teeth throughout their lives, as an essential part of enhancing their general health. © 2014 FDI World Dental Federation.

  20. Globalisation as the Carrier of the Current Changes in the Modern World

    Jelena Lončar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the development of the globalization process, meaning of the term globalization and influences that globalization has on world economy, politics and human community in general. It makes the point that globalization has negative and positive aspects, but it certainly brings big changes. The developed part of the world uses very well global conditions, in the same time playing the role of the main carrier of the globalization processes. With the development of informatics and communication technology world is becoming much smaller so that connection between two subjects in different parts of the world is made in a few minutes. Creation of economic and politic integrations is also one of the causes and consequences of globalization.

  1. Using interactive online role-playing simulations to develop global competency and to prepare engineering students for a globalised world

    May, Dominik; Wold, Kari; Moore, Stephanie

    2015-09-01

    The world is changing significantly, and it is becoming increasingly globalised. This means that countries, businesses, and professionals must think and act globally to be successful. Many individuals, however, are not prepared with the global competency skills needed to communicate and perform effectively in a globalised system. To address this need, higher education institutions are looking for ways to instil these skills in their students. This paper explains one promising approach using current learning principles: transnational interactive online environments in engineering education. In 2011, the TU Dortmund and the University of Virginia initiated a collaboration in which engineering students from both universities took part in one online synchronous course and worked together on global topics. This paper describes how the course was designed and discusses specific research results regarding how interactive online role-playing simulations support students in gaining the global competency skills required to actively participate in today's international workforce.

  2. World Economy and World Seaborne Trade in the 2005-2013 Period

    Romeo Bosneagu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the period 1990-2013 the world economy has evolved increasing and decreasing with good and weak years, with mini crisis, and with a recent strong crisis, which apparently has not yet passed. World seaborne trade, inextricably linked to the global economy followed the upward and the downward trend of the global economy, but with much higher amplitudes. Comparative analysis of the evolution of the global economy and world seaborne trade during the period 2005-2013 shows a decrease in world seaborne trade in tandem with the global economy.

  3. The NNP and Sustainability in Open Economy: Highlights on Recent World Economy and on Open Economy of Bangladesh

    Mohajan, Haradhan

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the theory of the net national product and, emphasizes on social welfare and sustainable accounting in open economy. It is observed that the world economy following an egalitarian path, the aggregate capital gains being positive is equivalent to the interest rate tending to decrease. This is important for the concept of net national product in open economies. Martin Weitzman gives a foundation for net national product as the stationary equivalent of a wealth maximizing pa...

  4. The impact of artificial intelligence on the world economy

    Kuprevich, T. S.

    2017-01-01

    In the article the potential benefits and opportunities offered by AI in the world economy are considered. In the course of the research benefits and tendencies of artificial intelligence in the world economy were revealed, the main directions of development and barriers of artificial intelligence adoption are analyzed and revealed. Nowadays artificial intelligence (AI) is going mainstream, driven by machine learning, big data and cloud computing.

  5. OSH and globalisation, challenges for today.

    Marie, J L

    2006-01-01

    Globalisation is a phenomenon that concerns all countries in the world at every level: economic, of course, but also political and cultural. It is hard to see any alternative to the dominant market economy model, which is asserting itself as the only way towards wealth and value creation. And within this model, it is free enterprise, generating jobs and boosting consumption, that is the unequivocal model of development for the world's economies. How can we then address the question of occupational safety and health (OSH) within the context of globalisation? How can we ensure that worker protection is not relegated to the status of a secondary concern? Safety and health inequalities between countries are such that it seems difficult to state without being hypocritical that OSH is already a value in the globalised world. The number of occupational accidents and diseases remains at a disturbingly high level, especially in developing countries. The sectors most affected are traditionally heavy industry, agriculture, mining and construction. In these sectors, there is so much economically and financially at stake that the obligation to protect workers' health is often viewed as a constraint, at odds with the requirement of immediate profitability. I sincerely believe that the prevention of occupational risks really has a different meaning depending on whether you work in an SMU or a large corporation. And, of course, depending on whether you live in a country with a high level of social protection, or one where social insurance is considered a luxury only for the richest. And the globalisation of trade is tending to further increase this gap. We have therefore elected to state that occupational safety and health "cannot be taken for granted" in a globalised world and that there are challenges facing all those, whether officials in institutions or managers of a business, who believe that working in a decent environment is a non negotiable demand.

  6. Management of Innovation in a Flat World: Growing Complexity, Globalisation and Citizen Participation

    Mulder, K.F.

    2016-01-01

    Innovation is not what it was in the 20th century; the classic century of R & D based innovation. The nature of innovation is changing, only in part because different technologies dominate innovation. This paper identifies three main societal trends that are of major importance for strategic management of innovation in industry and for government industrial- and technology policies. These trends are: - Growing complexity - Globalisation - Citizen participation As a result, innovation strategy...

  7. Economic globalisation and paradoxes

    Dokmanović Mirjana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased development of technology and integration of markets have created possibilities to eradicate hunger, poverty and other illnesses of the mankind. Contrary, the world is facing opposite trends: the widening gap between the rich and the poor, increasing poverty, human security and conflicts. The negative effects of the globalisation that experience the majority of the world population are rooted at the ruling neoliberal model of macro economy, shaped and dictated by the international financial institutions, WTO, multilateral companies and transnational corporations. This logic is based on the free market economy, free flow of capital, resources, investments and labour force, trade liberalisation, deregulation, privatisation, reduction of social services, and elimination of the concept of “the public good”. This economic model induces exploitation, discrimination, and inequalities, and therefore, it suits only to the big and powerful (states, markets, companies, individuals..., while brings disadvantages to the small and less powerful (states, markets, companies, individuals.... In addition, it deepens historical and contemporary inequalities based on race, sex, ethnicity, nationality etc. between and within states, and regions, including the West and the North. This context of development especially hurts vulnerable and marginalised groups, including women, resulting in their social exclusion and increased poverty. The efforts regarding the realisation of the UN Millennium Development Goals, including eradication of poverty and hunger, and development of gender equity, will be not effective at all until the neoliberal model should be replaced by the heliocentric, human rights approach to development.

  8. Modelling the world economy at the 2050 horizon

    Fouré , Jean; Bénassy-Quéré , Agnès; Fontagné , Lionel

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Economic analysis is increasingly addressing long-term issues (such as global warming) that require a dynamic baseline for the world economy. In this article, we develop a three-factor (capital, energy, labour) macroeconometric (MaGE - Macroeconometrics of the Global Economy) model, and project growth for 147 countries to 2050. We improve on the literature by the following: (i) accounting for the energy constraint through dynamic modelling of energy productivity, (ii) ...

  9. Oil and the world economy: some possible futures.

    Kumhof, Michael; Muir, Dirk

    2014-01-13

    This paper, using a six-region dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model of the world economy, assesses the output and current account implications of permanent oil supply shocks hitting the world economy. For modest-sized shocks and conventional production technologies, the effects are modest. But for larger shocks, for elasticities of substitution that decline as oil usage is reduced to a minimum, and for production functions in which oil acts as a critical enabler of technologies, output growth could drop significantly. Also, oil prices could become so high that smooth adjustment, as assumed in the model, may become very difficult.

  10. Globalisation and Higher Education

    Marginson, Simon; van der Wende, Marijk

    2007-01-01

    Economic and cultural globalisation has ushered in a new era in higher education. Higher education was always more internationally open than most sectors because of its immersion in knowledge, which never showed much respect for juridical boundaries. In global knowledge economies, higher education

  11. "Globalised sports in a historical perspective"

    Christer Ericsson; Bjorn Horgby

    2010-01-01

    The great interest in Asia for European, male football is an expression of globalised sports. Here globalisation and processes of globalisation stands for the economical, social and cultural processes, which link and affect globally. Global capitalism created a world hegemony. As a consequence the hegemonic power of the western world (including Japan) until now will be the norm of interpretation. A precondition for the development of globalised sports as an industry of entertainment is the de...

  12. Road safety in a globalised and more sustainable world: current issues and future challenges.

    Daniels, Stijn; Risser, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Although many countries have had considerable success in reducing traffic injuries over recent decades, there are still some fundamental problems in this area. At the same time, there is increasing focus on road safety research and policy development in the context of globalisation, sustainability, liveability and health. This special section presents a selection of papers that were presented at the annual ICTCT workshop held on the 8th and 9th of November 2012 in Hasselt, Belgium, and accepted for publication in Accident Analysis and Prevention following the journal's reviewing procedure. The aim of the ICTCT workshop was to analyse road safety facts, data and visions for the future in the wider context of current issues and future challenges in road safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. CONTRIBUTIONS OF “KNOWLEDGE” IN WORLD ECONOMY

    Gabriela-Liliana CIOBAN

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of knowledge globally is reflected in the growth / development of national economies and improvement of living standards of the population. Arguments underlying this statement are reflected in the values ​​held by certain indicators (Knowledge Economy Index, Gross Domestic Product, Index of Innovation, Knowledge Intensive Services etc. and their effects on national economies. Factors contributing to the development of these indicators are the "key" to success in each economy and also part of their basic foundation. The explanation so far obliges us to analyze current global economic situation and its prospects. As a first step we will try to answer the question "What is the generator factor of growth / prosperity in different countries?" and to identify its evolution over time. A second stage of the study will represent an analysis in the architecture centers of power due to the competitive advantage held by certain countries / companies in creating wealth. The study is based upon emergence and strengthening of competitiveness in the businesses and the national economy. Knowledge-intensive services’ presence in the world's economies is a vital source of economic growth.

  14. A NEW THINKING FOR A NEW WORLD. REPRESENTATIONS FROM ECONOMY

    Negucioiu Aurel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An incursion, even a succinct one, incomplete, in the universal history, in the world economic history and not in the least in the real world gives more and more credit to the idea according to which the movement is the main form of existence- working and evolution- of the society, economy, and of all the structures they are made of. Its "force motrice", its internal cause is represented, in our opinion, the unity and interaction of opposites. The changes, the transformations taking place in society and in its economy have direct or indirect authors the human beings who, using their minds, "leaven bread" and express at the beginning through thinking, the objectives that are going to complete or lessen reality. The positive changes and transformations that the people operate renew the world. For more than half of a century, the humankind has been in a vast and very complex process of transformation, changes with innovative character. In other words, a process of building a new world. Hence, the need to create a new thinking. "A new thinking for a new world" Making a halt in the field of economy -theory, science and practice - we are trying to bring to attention to those interested a few considerations concerning the truth value of some paradigms in the theoretical circuit, including their degree of rationality or irrationality.

  15. Interstate Economic Integration - Essential Characteristic of the Contemporary World Economy

    Ramona Mariana CALINICA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available After the Second World War, the world economy became more and more characterized by an intensification of economic relations between different countries. The complex and diverse problems that faced the states, have imposed necessity for the identification of appropriate solutions to economic cooperation and economic interstate integration was considered an effective way to development and an answer to all these problems. The purpose of this article is to analyze the integration process of interstate economic integration in all its essential aspects. The study begins with the definition of the concept and continues with the analysis of the forms of interstate economic integration and the main organizations of this kind that existing in the world economy nowadays.

  16. The Problem Of Reindustrialization Of The World Economy

    A. N. Zakharov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article looks into the most important aspects of the world economy reindustrialization, examines strategies for reindustrialization of the USA, Canada, and Australia. The correlation between the world trend, namely the transition to the digital economy, and the process of reindustrialization within the framework of the Fourth Industrial Revolution is considered. On the basis of comparison and analysis of expert evaluations, statistical data by sectors of industrial production of the USA and Canada it is shown that the absolute advantage of Canada when carrying out the re-industrialization of the economy is skilled labor, specialists with secondary education. The study confirms the fact that amid the reindustrialization on the verge of the Fourth industrial revolution, the availability of skilled labor is a necessary condition for the competitiveness of the state. The Russian Federation faces the situation when conducting the re-industrialization is complicated by adverse international economic and political environment (policy of sanctions against Russia. It is revealed that for the Russian Federation the reindustrialization of the economy shall combine the active modernization of the existing production capacity, while shaping new industries on the basis of technologies of the sixth technology wave. The comparative analysis outlined that under the circumstances the drivers of the new industrialization should be science-based industries, with the latest technologies and the largest number of highly skilled personnel concentrating there.

  17. The integration of China and India into the world economy: a comparison

    Isabelle Bensidoun

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available China and India have successfully integrated into the world economy. Once specialised in textiles, they have developed new export-oriented sectors linked to the information and communication technology (ICT, taking advantage of the globalisation process which has enlarged access to new technology, capital and markets. China has become a global export platform for electronic goods and India a global centre for ICT services. They have followed different paths of specialisation. China is heavily involved in the international segmentation of production processes in manufacturing, which is not the case of India. China is heavily specialised in mass exports of cheap goods, while India focuses on niches. Both countries are in a process of technological catch-up but in different industries. By the middle of this decade, the pattern of development followed by each of them seemed to have reached its limits and even before the shock of the global crisis in 2008, there was a debate about the changes necessary to make growth sustainable. The crisis has made clear that their long term growth will depend on their ability to build on their large domestic markets.

  18. Nuclear energy - stabilising factor in the world economy

    Legassov, V.; Feoktistov, L.; Kouzmine, I.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most important factors for international stability is the development of the economy, reducing the risk of local armed conflicts which could escalate into world-wide nuclear war. Economic progress which plays such a vital part is in turn heavily dependent on energy supplies. The article takes a brief look at the role of nuclear power in this context. (B.M.S.)

  19. Globalisation and global economic governance: Contextualising the interpretations and the debate. A review of literature

    AJ Van Niekerk

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As one of the most contentious and fascinating issues of modern times, globalisation is a notion in desperate need of conceptual clarification. By creating a theoretical framework and adding historical depth to the analysis of the globalisation thesis, this article attempts first to provide a contextual basis on which to weigh up the credence of globalisation as a process that is transforming the contemporary world economy. Secondly, it highlights the significance of global economic governance in performing both a somewhat regulatory function and a rather stimulating role in the advancement of globalisation. In essence, the article provides a survey of the literature concerned with theories and the historical context for globalisation and global economic governance. The third aim is to emphasise the importance of the debate surrounding globalisation and global economic governance. The evolution and outcome of this debate is seen to be a factor that will make a significant impact on the future direction of the world economy, mainly in terms of helping to shape leading economic thinking.

  20. Interactions between the energy economy and the world economy in the next 10 to 15 years

    Nydegger, A.

    1984-01-01

    The present economic depression is unlikely to be succeeded by a lengthy lasting period of growth. An exponential increase in energy demand appears improbable. Into the nineties, the cause will not be an insufficient supply but the factors determining the demand. Later, scarcity may be important. This could seriously damage the world economy and keep the demand for energy at a relatively low level. (R.S.)

  1. GLOBALIZATION PRECONDITIONS FOR TRANSNATIONALIZATION OF THE WORLD ECONOMY

    Vyshnevska O.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Globalization is a process that embodies the transformation of the spatial organization of the world and its regions, social relations and interactions measured by such indicators as: duration, intensity, speed and influence that give rise to intercontinental or interregional flows and structures of activity, interactions and manifestations at the socio-economic and ecological levels. The purpose of the study is to substantiate the priorities in ensuring the national security of the state in view of the impact of globalization factors, the introduction of approaches to the adaptation of the country’s economy to the processes of transnationalization of the world economy. Modern globalization of the world economy is reflected in the deepening of internationalization of production. Globalization is characterized by a positive and negative impact on different systems, an increase in the influence of the process of transnationalization. It is revealed that transnationalization is often understood by new phenomena, qualitative changes taking place in the world economy. Transnationalization is seen as a process of expanding the international activities of industrial firms, banks, service companies, and their exit from the national boundaries of individual countries, which leads to the growth of national companies in transnational. The main factors of the negative impact of TNCs on the economy of the recipient country are: the danger of introducing environmentally hazardous technologies; development of innovations in strategic enterprises of the defense industry; outflow of foreign investment due to negative macroeconomic trends; insufficient rates of development of branches of TNCs, due to the tendency to exaggerate the reaction to a possible change in market conditions. For the transnationalization of the economic sphere, the emergence and strengthening of the positions of international monopolies, transnational corporations, international financial

  2. Globalisation, transport and the environment

    2010-01-01

    OECD and the International Transport Forum (ITF) held a GLobal Forum on Transport and Environment in a Globalising World, 10-12 November 2008 in Guadalajara, Mexico. There were around 200 participants from 23 countries at the global forum, representi...

  3. The position of Apple Incorporated in the World Economy

    Marahimi, Narmin

    2011-01-01

    My Diploma Thesis is aimed to clarify the position of the Apple Incorporated in the world economy, as well as expectations and anticipations for future. I decided to write about Apple not only because it's one of the leading company in the technology Market, but because interest to its production is increasing day by day, making it highly competitive. Coming to the content of my work: It consists of 3 chapters, with several subchapters being included into each chapter. The first chapter is an...

  4. A World of Competitors: Assessing the US High-Tech Advantage and the Process of Globalisation

    Douglass, John Aubrey

    2008-01-01

    Research universities throughout the world are part of a larger effort by countries to bolster science and technological innovation and compete economically. The United States remains highly competitive as a source of high-tech innovation because of a number of market positions, many the results of long-term investments in institutions (such as…

  5. The Future of the World Economy is an Integrated World Economic Structure

    Sergey Yurievich Glazyev

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Global changes in the modern world cannot be adequately described on the basis of neoliberal thinking and require a new approach. It can be formed on the basis of the cyclical-wave characterization of the development of mankind. The hypothesis about the wave-like development of the world economy with a certain cyclicity lies at the heart of thisresearch. The authors determined the economic basis of the formation, development and change of these waves (technological ways and technical revolutions. These changes reflect in the cyclical fluctuations of the world economy.The mechanism of these fluctuations is described by the theory of “large cycles of the economic conjuncture” by N. Kondratiev. The authors propose a methodology and methodological tools for analyzing and forecasting cyclic-wave processes in the economic development. The study has concluded that it is the regularities of K-cycles that allow one to correctly assess the ongoing processes in the world economy, to forecast possible variants of their development. The authors came to the conclusion that the development of the world economic structure is necessarily accompanied by a cyclical shift in the instruments of capital accumulation (material and financial expansion. These processes are reflected in the periodic replacement of scientific paradigms of economic development and management. The state always takes an active part in the phase of the dominance of productive capital, and the ideological paradigm is of a directing nature. While in the phase of domination of financial capital the liberal paradigm becomes dominant. We have substantiated the thesis about the transition from the American to the Asian systemic cycle of capital accumulation, which would inevitably lead in the middle of the 21st century to the shift of the center of the world economy from the West to the East. The paper concludes that the world is facing a change from the Monopolistic world economic structure to

  6. Understanding the impact of globalisation on universities | Currie ...

    This article discusses the concept of globalisation as a neoliberal ideology with materialist consequences for universities. It distinguishes between globalisation and internationalisation, emphasising that in globalisation there is the transcendence of the nation to establish a borderless economy. It describes how universities ...

  7. Adapting veterinary infrastructures to meet the challenges of globalisation and the requirements of the World Trade Organization Agreement on Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures.

    Thiermann, A

    2004-04-01

    To maximise the benefits of globalisation, countries and their stakeholders must become familiar with and adhere to the rights and obligations set out by the World Trade Organization under the Agreement on Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures. Furthermore, for trade in animals and animal products, they must adhere to the standards, guidelines and recommendations established by the OIE (World organisation for animal health), which also encourages participation of countries in the standard-setting process. Only after implementing these requirements and strengthening veterinary infrastructures and surveillance and monitoring systems, will countries be able to fully benefit from the new international trade rules.

  8. The Road to Rio: The Cultural History and Globalisation of the World Cup 1930-2014

    Williams, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Academic conference hosted by the British Library and the International Centre for Sport History and Culture De Montfort University 9.30-9.45: Introduction (Jean Williams and Jude England) 9.45-10.30: David Goldblatt "Futebol nation: A footballing History of Brazil" 10.30-11.15: Matthew Brown "The First Footballers in South America: Between Empires and Nations, 1880-1950" 11.30-12.00: Matt Taylor "Football Connected: World Cups, Contact Zones and Global Spaces" 12.00-12.30: Ri...

  9. Globalisation, Powerty and Genetically Modified Agricultural Product

    Aktas, Erkan

    2006-01-01

    Poverty and income equality have become to stand in the forefront of the world that globalised through neo-classical policies after 1980. Besides technological dependence, globalisation wave has also led to a commercial dependence of surrounding countries to the central countries as well. The purpose of this study is to evaluate globalisation process in the world through its results of technological development and poverty. Production of genetically modified products which were justified as a...

  10. Leading Trade Networks in the Context of Globalisation of the World Retail Trade

    Kavun Olha O.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers main tendencies of development of trade networks during 2002 – 2012 and determines that the overwhelming majority of them increased their presence in foreign markets. It analyses specific features of manifestation of the expansion policy by trade structures depending on the region of their origin. It studies motives that make leading retailers go out of boundaries of the national markets. Main of them are sharpening of competition in domestic, more mature markets, due to increase of concentration of network structures and also application of the state policy of restrictions in the trading activity. It considers methods that were selected by major trade networks in 2011 – 2012 for entering foreign markets. It establishes that the most popular was franchising. It determines directions of manifestation of regulation barriers, faced by major trade networks of the world when entering markets of developing countries. It establishes that major national structures, which are the main competitors for international trade networks and which make them develop a more weighted approach to making decisions that are connected with entering a new market and adjustment of existing strategies of development, are represented in markets of individual countries, in particular, in Asia and South Africa.

  11. The economic costs of 'decarbonising' the world economy

    Burniaux, J.M.; Chateau, J.

    2008-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: In the context of growing scientific evidence about a relationship between ongoing climate change and man-made Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) emissions, policy makers will meet in Copenhagen at the end of 2009 in order to negotiate a new agreement to reduce GHGs emissions. The previous agreement - the Kyoto Protocol that was signed in 1997 and will end in 2012 - encompassed relatively modest emission reductions undertaken by a group of countries (Annex 1 countries). Such a partial action gave rise to concerns about the effectiveness of such a scheme - potentially undermined by the existence of carbon leakages - and its adverse effect on the international competitiveness of the energy-intensive industries in the Annex 1 countries. More importantly, it is now clear that industrialized countries alone are unable to stabilize the earth climate, an objective that is out of range without the active participation of the emerging economies. Therefore, the scenarios that will be discussed at the Copenhagen meeting will need to be much more ambitious, with emissions objectives that will imply a major restructuring of the world economy, putting it on the way of growth without carbon. This presentation will address the trade-offs between economic growth and environmental risks in the choice of a post-Kyoto strategy

  12. Financial crises and the outlook for the world energy economy

    Scanlan, Tony

    1999-01-01

    With respect to world energy, two subjects are preoccupying energy economists. They are (1) how will production of oil and gas hold up with the lowest oil prices since 1945 and (2) are the recessions in Asia, parts of Latin America and the CIS rendering futile any attempts to balance the energy markets? The fundamental question asked is: What kind of market are we in? The paper is structured to provide answers or discuss the following sub-questions. (i) does the energy market operate by the same rules as the global economy; (ii) what lessons can be learned from disconnection of the oil market problems of 1973 and the collapse of the tanker market and (iii) how should the markets be regulated. A detailed analysis of world energy growth in the second half of this century and how it may develop in the next 20 years is given. Special attention is paid to the role of the Asia/Pacific market, the strength of the world economic system, the impact of privatisation in Russia and possible turbulence in share markets. (UK)

  13. An overview of energy consumption of the globalized world economy

    Chen, Z.M.; Chen, G.Q.

    2011-01-01

    For the globalized world economy with intensive international trade, an overview of energy consumption is presented by an embodied energy analysis to track both direct and indirect energy uses based on a systems input-output simulation. In 2004, the total amounts of energy embodied in household consumption, government consumption, and investment are 7749, 874, and 2009 Mtoe (million tons of oil equivalent), respectively. The United States is shown as the world's biggest embodied energy importer (683 Mtoe) and embodied energy surplus receiver (290 Mtoe), in contrast to China as the biggest exporter (662 Mtoe) and deficit receiver (274 Mtoe). Energy embodied in consumption per capita varies from 0.05 (Uganda) to 19.54 toe (Rest of North America). Based on a forecast for 2005-2035, China is to replace the United States as the world's leading embodied energy consumer in 2027, when its per capita energy consumption will be one quarter of that of the United States. - Highlights: → We present an overview of global energy profile in terms of embodied energy. → The US and China are top embodied energy consumers as well as traders in 2004. → Equality issue is studied by analyzing per capita embodied energy consumption. → The US remains to be the leading energy consumer until replaced by China in 2027.

  14. The macroeconomic rebound effect and the world economy

    Barker, T.; Dagoumas, A. [Cambridge Centre for Climate Change Mitigation Research (4CMR), Department of Land Economy, University of Cambridge, 19 Silver Street, Cambridge, CB3 9PE (United Kingdom); Rubin, J. [School of Economics, University of Maine, 5782 Winslow Hall, Orono, ME 04469-5782 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    This paper examines the macroeconomic rebound effect for the global economy arising from energy-efficiency policies. Such policies are expected to be a leading component of climate policy portfolios being proposed and adopted in order to achieve climate stabilisation targets for 2020, 2030 and 2050, such as the G8 50% reduction target by 2050. We apply the global 'New Economics' or Post Keynesian model E3MG, developing the version reported in IPCC AR4 WG3. The rebound effect refers to the idea that some or all of the expected reductions in energy consumption as a result of energy-efficiency improvements are offset by an increasing demand for energy services, arising from reductions in the effective price of energy services resulting from those improvements. As policies to stimulate energy-efficiency improvements are a key part of climate-change policies, the likely magnitude of any rebound effect is of great importance to assessing the effectiveness of those policies. The literature distinguishes three types of rebound effect from energy-efficiency improvements: direct, indirect and economy-wide. The macroeconomic rebound effect, which is the focus of this paper, is the combination of the indirect and economy-wide effects. Estimates of the effects of no-regrets efficiency policies are reported by the International Energy Agency in World Energy Outlook, 2006, and synthesised in the IPCC AR4 WG3 report. We analyse policies for the transport, residential and services buildings and industrial sectors of the economy for the post-2012 period, 2013-2030. The estimated direct rebound effect, implicit in the IEA WEO/IPCC AR4 estimates, is treated as exogenous, based on estimates from the literature, globally about 10%. The total rebound effect, however, is 31% by 2020 rising to 52% by 2030. The total effect includes the direct effect and the effects of (1) the lower cost of energy on energy demand in the three broad sectors as well as of (2) the extra consumers

  15. The macroeconomic rebound effect and the world economy

    Barker, T.; Dagoumas, A.; Rubin, J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the macroeconomic rebound effect for the global economy arising from energy-efficiency policies. Such policies are expected to be a leading component of climate policy portfolios being proposed and adopted in order to achieve climate stabilisation targets for 2020, 2030 and 2050, such as the G8 50% reduction target by 2050. We apply the global 'New Economics' or Post Keynesian model E3MG, developing the version reported in IPCC AR4 WG3. The rebound effect refers to the idea that some or all of the expected reductions in energy consumption as a result of energy-efficiency improvements are offset by an increasing demand for energy services, arising from reductions in the effective price of energy services resulting from those improvements. As policies to stimulate energy-efficiency improvements are a key part of climate-change policies, the likely magnitude of any rebound effect is of great importance to assessing the effectiveness of those policies. The literature distinguishes three types of rebound effect from energy-efficiency improvements: direct, indirect and economy-wide. The macroeconomic rebound effect, which is the focus of this paper, is the combination of the indirect and economy-wide effects. Estimates of the effects of no-regrets efficiency policies are reported by the International Energy Agency in World Energy Outlook, 2006, and synthesised in the IPCC AR4 WG3 report. We analyse policies for the transport, residential and services buildings and industrial sectors of the economy for the post-2012 period, 2013-2030. The estimated direct rebound effect, implicit in the IEA WEO/IPCC AR4 estimates, is treated as exogenous, based on estimates from the literature, globally about 10%. The total rebound effect, however, is 31% by 2020 rising to 52% by 2030. The total effect includes the direct effect and the effects of (1) the lower cost of energy on energy demand in the three broad sectors as well as of (2) the extra consumers' expenditure

  16. Democracy and development in the age of globalisation | Mubangizi ...

    Globalisation is one of the leading characteristics of the world today – a world that is striving for development, democracy and the protection of human rights. There is no doubt that the relationship between globalisation and democracy is quite complex. So too is the relationship between globalisation and development.

  17. Globalisation and public health.

    Bettcher, D; Lee, K

    2002-01-01

    At the dawn of the 21st century, globalisation is a word that has become a part of everyday communication in all corners of the world. It is a concept that for some holds the promise of a new and brighter future, while for others it represents a threat that needs to be confronted and counteracted. In the area of public health, a wide range of claims have been made about the various impacts, both positive and negative, that can be attributed to globalisation. In the ever expanding literature on globalisation and health, it has become apparent that considerable confusion is emerging in both the ways that terminology is applied and concepts are defined. The determinants of health are increasingly multisectoral, and in tackling these challenges it is necessary to take a multidisciplinary approach that includes policy analyses in such areas as trade, environment, defence/security, foreign policy, and international law. In assembling the terms for this glossary, we have attempted to demonstrate the richness of the globalisation and public health debate, and in so doing have selected some of the core terms that require definition. We hope that this glossary will help to clarify this interesting and challenging area, and will also serve as a useful entry point to this new debate in public health.

  18. Globalisation and Mainstreaming of LCA

    Wangel, Arne

    2018-01-01

    The chapter describes how a globalised economy exacerbates the need of a mainstreaming of LCA, in particular the emergence of long, complex and geographically highly dispersed global value chains (GVCs). In documenting the three phases of the UNEP-SETAC Life Cycle Initiative, a conventional roadmap...

  19. Oil price movements and globalisation: is there a connection?

    Looney, R.

    2002-01-01

    There has been considerable speculation over the years concerning the cost of large oil price movements ('shocks') to consuming countries. For the advanced industrial countries, the conventional wisdom appears to be that, because these economies are becoming more service-oriented, less energy is needed per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) and hence a lessening of the economic costs associated with increased oil prices. On the other hand, because many newly industrialised or catching-up countries are entering a phase of energy-intensive industrialisation, the same oil shocks are placing an increasing burden on these economies. One can easily argue, however, that industrialisation is only one facet of economic change taking place in the world economy. Conceivably, the rapid pace of increased globalisation may significantly modify these patterns. To test this proposition, an operational definition of globalisation is developed and shown to be positively associated with the strength of oil price shocks. The main finding of the study is that increased globalisation appears to be strengthening the impact of oil price shocks in the advanced industrial countries, but to a much lesser extent in the newly industrialising countries. (author)

  20. Globalisation, Inequality and Populism

    Nolan, Brian

    2017-01-01

    read before the Society, 20 April 2017; Symposium 2016-2017: Globalisation, Inequality and the Rise of Populism Inequality in the distribution of income and wealth among individuals has now come to the fore as a core concern across the industrialised world. In 2013 then President of the United States Barack Obama identified rising income inequality as ?the defining challenge of our times?. The Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund Christine Lagarde has stated that ?reducing ...

  1. The world economy: Its impact on the gas processing industry

    Teleki, A.

    1994-01-01

    Gas processors are in the business of extracting C 2-7 hydrocarbons from natural gas streams and converting them to commercial grade gas liquids, valued at or slightly below oil product prices. If the margin of oil prices over gas prices is higher, the gas processing business is more profitable. An approximate index of profitability is the ratio of the price of a bbl of oil divided by the price of a million Btu of gas (the oil-gas ratio). Since the mid-1980s, by which time both the oil and gas markets had been largely deregulated, the oil-gas ratio fluctuated in the 10-12 range then peaked to over 15 in 1990-91. The recent fall in oil prices has driven the ratio to historically low levels of 6-7, which leads to gas processors curtailing ethane recovery. Various aspects of the world economy and the growth of oil consumption are discussed to forecast their effect on gas processors. It is expected that oil demand should grow at least 4% annually over 1994-98, due to factors including world economic growth and low energy prices. Oil prices are forecast to bottom out in late 1995 and rise thereafter to the mid-20 dollar range by the end of the 1990s. A close supply-demand balance could send short-term prices much higher. Some widening of the gas-oil ratio should occur, providing room for domestic natural gas prices to rise, but with a lag. 8 figs

  2. English in Economy World: an Overview of English Learning

    Setyaningsih, Ani; Kurniasih, Siwi Karmadi

    2007-01-01

    English is not a language for the English-speaking countries anymore. English has spread worldwide to the countries in the five continents. One of the reasons is economy. People need to acquire English since it is one way to cope with the communication in economy trend. English is needed to process information, analyze, evaluate, experiment, negotiate and collaborate in economy. The awareness of English importance in the globalization era has made people learn this universal language consciou...

  3. Getting China and India right: Strategies for leveraging the world's fastest growing economies for global advantage

    Ravi Ramamurti

    2010-01-01

    The re-emergence of the old world: MNEs and the emerging economies of China and IndiaAccording to projections of the National Intelligence Council, a US government think tank, by 2025 China and India will have the world's second- and fourth-largest economies, respectively. The world is changing before our eyes – within the memories of many readers of this journal, these economies were known for little other than abject poverty. Today they are the largest of the “emerging market economies.” Ye...

  4. Management of Innovative Projects for Ensuring the Economic Safety in the Conditions of Integration of Economies into the World Economy

    T. K. Usmanova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the aim of the article is to reveal problems and prospects, formulate economic security within the framework of innovation projects management, plan technologies in the context of integrating economies into the world economy, identify opportunities for forming, organizing, financing, managing priority economic directions. The subject is the management of innovative projects to ensure the economic security of Russian regions. The relevance of the chosen topic is due to the study of the features of the current state and the problems of the formation of economic security, the development of innovative design solutions in the context of integrating economies into the world economy. Ensuring the economic security of the regions of Russia directly depends on the introduction of innovative technologies and project management in the sectors of the national economy of Russia. Methods: the methodology of the solution of objectives is based on usage of a method of dialectic research, methods of the economic analysis, forecasting, the situational and systemic analysis, expert evaluations and the analysis of empirical data. Hypothesis. Ensuring an economic safety requires formation of innovative solutions, change of the current legislation within the Strategy of social and economic development in the conditions of integration of economies into the world economy. Results: the practical significance of the work is to identify the interrelationship between the development processes of innovative projects that ensure the economic security of the regions of Russia within the framework of regulating the current legislation, forecasting effective economic activity within the framework of the New Industrialization Strategy, selecting optimal project planning models to ensure the country's economic security and competitiveness in the conditions of integration Economies into the world economy. Conclusions and Relevance: in the conditions of integration of

  5. Book Review: John M. Hobson and Leonard Seabrooke (2007) (eds) Everyday Politics of the World Economy

    Strange, Michael Stewart

    2009-01-01

    Book Review: John M. Hobson and Leonard Seabrooke (2007) (eds) Everyday Politics of the World Economy (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 254pp. Udgivelsesdato: 2009......Book Review: John M. Hobson and Leonard Seabrooke (2007) (eds) Everyday Politics of the World Economy (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 254pp. Udgivelsesdato: 2009...

  6. The changing strategic roles for warehousing in an emerging economy: case study in Ukraine

    de Boer, S.J.; Voordijk, Johannes T.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing globalisation of the world economy is having a profound impact on logistics. Emerging economies are experiencing rapid developments that affect their warehousing facilities. The purpose of this study is to explore the strategic roles that warehousing plays and the changes therein.

  7. Globalisation Trapped

    João Caraça

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The promise of making society progress through the direct applications of science was finally fulfilled in the mid-20th century. Science progressed immensely, propelled by the effects of the two world wars. The first science-based technologies saw the daylight during the 1940s and their transformative power was such that neither the military, nor subsequently the markets, allowed science to return intact to its curiosity-driven nest. Technoscience was born then and (being progressively pulled away from curiosity-driven science was able to grow enormously, erecting a formidable structure of networks of institutions that impacted decisively on the economy. It is a paradox, or maybe a trap, that the fulfillment of science’s solemn promise of ‘transforming nature’ means seeing ourselves and our Western societies entangled in crises after crises with no clear outcome in view. A redistribution of geopolitical power is under way, along with the deployment of information and communication technologies, forcing dominant structures to oscillate, as knowledge about organization and methods, marketing, design, and software begins to challenge the role of technoscience as the main vector of economic growth and wealth accumulation. What ought to be done?

  8. The Globalisation of migration

    Milan Mesić

    2002-01-01

    The paper demonstrates that contemporary international migration is a constitutive part of the globalisation process. After defining the concepts of globalisation and the globalisation of migration, the author discusses six key themes, linking globalisation and international migration (“global cities”, the scale of migration; diversification of migration flows; globalisation of science and education; international migration and citizenship; emigrant communities and new identities). First, in ...

  9. Post-Colonial Africa and the World Economy: The Long Waves of Uneven Development

    Fouad Makki

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to examine the interactive dynamics of "Africa" and the "world economy" over the past half century. By relating the overarching developmental trajectory of the continent to the long-wave rhythms of the world economy, the article identifies three relatively articulated periods in the political economy of postcolonial Africa. The first, from circa 1960 to the late 1970s, was a period of state-led developmentalism enabled by the long postwar boom in the world economy and the embedded liberalism of the Bretton Woods system. A second period from circa 1980 to the turn of the new century was conditioned by the long downturn in the world-economy and a neo-li beral regime of accumulation that sought to re-structure and re-integrate Africa into a deregulated world market. The turn of the new millennium constitutes a new period in which neither the deep structural springs of the long downturn nor the neo-liberal project as such have been overcome; but their impact on Africa has been relativized by the emergence of East Asia as the new center of accumulation in the world economy. The resulting de-synchronization of the long-wave rhythms of the world economy has permitted a modest economic expansion in Africa within a largely extractive regime of accumulation and a wave of new enclosures that are profoundly reconstituting the social universe of Africa's primary producers.

  10. On-Road Validation of a Simplified Model for Estimating Real-World Fuel Economy: Preprint

    Wood, Eric; Gonder, Jeff; Jehlik, Forrest

    2017-01-01

    On-road fuel economy is known to vary significantly between individual trips in real-world driving conditions. This work introduces a methodology for rapidly simulating a specific vehicle's fuel economy over the wide range of real-world conditions experienced across the country. On-road test data collected using a highly instrumented vehicle is used to refine and validate this modeling approach. Model accuracy relative to on-road data collection is relevant to the estimation of 'off-cycle credits' that compensate for real-world fuel economy benefits that are not observed during certification testing on a chassis dynamometer.

  11. THE WORLD ECONOMY IN 2017 AND THE PROSPECTS FOR 2018

    Andrei Rădulescu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the global economy improved in 2017 under the influence of the expansionary policy mix in the US and Euroland, as well as the wave of optimism across the international financial markets. An acceleration of fixed investments in the United States may be noticed, given the expected effects of the fiscal reform implemented by the Trump administration. At the same time, GDP in the Euroland rose at its highest pace since 2007, due to the expansionary monetary policy promoted by the European Central Bank and the accelerating global economy. This paper gives a brief review of the recent developments in the global economy, the United States and Euroland, as well as the prospects for 2018.

  12. Estimate of Technical Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies

    Letschert, Virginie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Desroches, Louis-Benoit [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ke, Jing [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McNeil, Michael [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    As part of the ongoing effort to estimate the foreseeable impacts of aggressive minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) programs in the world’s major economies, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed a scenario to analyze the technical potential of MEPS in 13 major economies around the world1 . The “best available technology” (BAT) scenario seeks to determine the maximum potential savings that would result from diffusion of the most efficient available technologies in these major economies.

  13. Intergenerational perspectives on ageing, economics and globalisation.

    Fine, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Evidence shows population ageing to be historically a product of economic development, closely associated with high living standards and national affluence. Nonetheless, fears that an aged population leads to economic stagnation and public bankruptcy are widespread. In justification for cuts to public programs and the transfer of costs and risks from the state to individuals and families, the projections of social expenditures, in particular those based on ageing, are frequently identified as overgenerous and unsustainable in many G20 countries such as Australia and New Zealand. Claims based on intergenerational research methodologies and frameworks, a relatively new and innovative approach to using data projections, have proven to be important in these policy debates. This paper explores the application of these new technologies to understanding the impact of ageing on the economy in the globalised world of the 21st century. © 2014 AJA Inc.

  14. Marketing Globalisation – Polish Market Experience

    Robert Nowacki

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The beginning of the 21st century has been yielded with an acceleration of transformations occurring in economies of the whole world. These changes relate to all the areas of economic life functioning. The most important manifestation thereof is a reinforcement of competitive phenomena. Among the most important reasons for such a state of affairs, there is mentioned globalisation. The course of its processes forces the organisation operating in the market to undertake adaptive actions. One of them is reorientation of marketing activities. The need to modify the previous marketing concepts results, first of all, from far reaching alterations in the sphere of consumption, just triggered by globalisationís impact. These trends are noticed in all the markets, also in the Polish one. The foreign enterprises operating in it more and more often use the concept of global marketing. This makes us to have reflection on what is the real effectiveness of such actions and what are the possibilities to form oneís competitive position owing to that. The article constitutes an attempt to provide answers to these questions.

  15. Transition to a green economy – a challenge and a solution for the world economy in multiple crisis context

    Alina-Mihaela BABONEA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of "Green Economy" is heavily debated recently because it is considered to be essential for the future global economy. This concept aims to find practical solutions that can be applied in international affairs regarding the environment development as a result of the massive problems caused by multiple crises that are no longer solvable. However, the international community is looking for long-term alternatives to improve the quality of life and eliminate poverty population as much as possible.To make sustainable economic development requires a transition with multiple implications for both the government and the private sector. In other words, you need a joint effort between public and private, in order to separate economic growth from excessive use of resources; the main objective should be considered the quality of life along with reducing the environmental and social deficit.The transition to a "Green Economy" means practicing a certain type of economy based on policies and investment that should be able to create a connection between economic development, biodiversity, ecosystem, climate change, health and welfare on the medium and long term. These premises must be connected together to achieve sustainable development – which is considered the resumption of economic growth at global scale.Switching to "Green Economy" implies a proper concern based on adequate knowledge, research and innovation in order to create a framework for promoting sustainable development on long term. This study aims to generate an overview on the concept of "Green Economy", considered by some experts as the main solution to the problems that countries of the world are facing nowadays. It is well known that the economic system is situated in a collapse and requires a rethinking from all points of view. A solution to adapt the economy and its development to these new global challenges can be the transition to "Green Economy", especially by integrating the

  16. Globalising the Arctic Climate:

    Corry, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    This chapter uses an object-oriented approach to explore how the Arctic is being constituted as an object of global governance within an emerging ‘global polity’, partly through geoengineering plans and political visions ('imaginaries'). It suggests that governance objects—the socially constructed...... on world politics. The emergence of the Arctic climate as a potential target of governance provides a case in point. The Arctic climate is becoming globalised, pushing it up the political agenda but drawing it away from its local and regional context....

  17. USSR Report, World Economy and International Relations, No. 12, December 1986

    1987-01-01

    This report is a Translation of the Russian-language monthly journal MIROVAYA EKONOMIKA I MEZHDUNARODNYYE OTNOSHENIYA published in Moscow by the Institute of World Economy and international Relations...

  18. JPRS Report. Soviet Union: World Economy & International Relations, No. 4, April 1989

    1989-01-01

    This report is a translation of the Russian-language monthly journal MIROVAYA EKONOMIKA I MEZHDUNARODNYYE OTNOSHENIYA published in Moscow by the Institute of World Economy and International Relations...

  19. JPRS Report. Soviet Union: World Economy & International Relations, No. 2, February 1989

    1989-01-01

    This report is a translation of the Russian-language monthly journal MIROVAYA EKONOMIKA I MEZHDUNARODNYYE OTNOSHENIYA published in Moscow by the Institute of World Economy and International Relations...

  20. Testing the growth links of emerging economies: Croatia in a growing world economy

    Ziesemer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We estimate a dynamic simultaneous equation model for 16 variables of the Croatian economy in order to test the links of growth with education, R&D, trade, savings and FDI. In order to motivate the choice of variables we review the related theories of growth and look at the relevant data. Permanent

  1. Overall socio-economic perspective of the world economy to the year 2000

    1990-01-01

    The document contains the following 10 chapters: Introduction, Long-term trends in world economic development, Quantitative scenarios for the world economy to the year 2000, Structural changes in world production and trade, Long-term sectoral issues, New technologies, Environmental issues, Population and human settlements, Human resource development and social policy, Concluding observations. The chapter devoted to long-term sectoral issues includes an analysis of the trends in the field of energy consumption and production in the overall socio-economic perspective of the world economy to the year 2000. Figs and tabs

  2. Introducing a Neo-Weberian Perspective in the Study of Globalisation and Education: Structural Reforms of the Education Systems in France and Israel after the Second World War

    Resnik, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Only since the 1990s has the impact of globalisation on education drawn scholarly attention, primarily due to the impact of international school achievement surveys. This study argues that the globalisation of education began much earlier, with the establishment of intergovernmental agencies, such as UNESCO and the OECD, and the adoption of…

  3. The Position of Sub-Saharan Countries in the World Economy

    Baumgartner Boris

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Most of the countries of sub-Saharan Africa belong to the most underdeveloped and poorest countries in the world economy. This region consists of forty-nine countries but at world GDP, world export, world import and inflow of foreign direct investment share only by small percent. There are some positive facts in the recent history of sub- Saharan Africa. Sub-Saharan Africa has grown faster than the world economy in the past ten years. The predictions are also positive. There is an expectation of another growth till the 2020. If the sub-Saharan countries want to keep the growth in the future they have to invest to infrastructure, in educational system, in research and science to make their economies more competitive.

  4. Realities of and perspectives for languages in the globalised world: Can language teaching survive the inadequacies of policies implemented today at Leeds Beckett University?

    Saadia Gamir

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Various newspaper articles report that British ministers, university representatives, exam chiefs and business bodies agree that foreign languages skills in primary, secondary and tertiary UK education are in crisis. Lower funding and policy changes have caused language skills deficiencies felt gravely in the business sectors. Funding and support initiatives pledged by policy makers appear to be election-driven, barely outliving newly elected governments. Others blame secondary school language curriculum for failing to inspire students to take up a language when they reach 13 or 14. Others still argue that severe A-level examinations marking deters students from taking up a foreign language at 6th form level, producing fewer prospective language learners for university departments. Community languages are also undervalued as small-entry languages could soon be axed from GCSE and A-level examinations. In a world increasingly interconnected, it is essential the importance of language learning be reinstated in all our educational institutions. This paper reviews two decades of the conditions of language provision in the UK in general, with an emphasis on Leeds Beckett University. It also attempts to answer two questions emerging form the author’s personal teaching experience and reflections: What are the realities and challenges language teaching faces at Leeds Beckett University? And, how may we support language learners in fulfilling their ambition to acquire the required skills to communicate effectively in this globalised world?

  5. TRENDS OF NATURAL RESOURCES MARKET IN A GLOBALIZED WORLD ECONOMY

    Cristian, SIMA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural resources are not homogeneous in nature, having certain features in the productive process that require grouping them into different categories by different criteria. Consequently, natural resources cannot be addressed all at once, but only distinctly, according to relevant criteria selected based on the proposed goals. Changing approaches based resources (materials to the knowledge, from quantity to quality, from mass products to new concepts of higher added value, follows a development that is based on eco-efficiency and sustainable products and services. In this respect, integrated research will become key factors towards global processing. Also, global digitalization requires a new approach on the role of information in the development of economy and increase of competitiveness.

  6. World Economy at the Confluence between Globalization and Regionalization

    Costel Marian DIMA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the enlargement and deepening of connections in various spheres of influence of the economic, political, social and cultural life, the problems occurring in the process of globalization are rather global than national, their solving being carried out globally instead of nationally. Thus, in economic and financial terms, globalization contributes to strengthening and enlarging the connections among national economies in the global market of goods, services and capital. In the paper first part, it is presented the current situation of globalization and the need for development at regional level. In the second part, taking into account that the regionalization process varies from country to country, depending on the economic, social, political, demographic and ethnic situation, we showed an analysis of the European Union’s policy of development and cohesion. In the last part, we brought forward the current situation of European development policy, conclusions and views concerning the theme approached.

  7. Globalisation of international health.

    Walt, G

    1998-02-07

    40 years ago, activities in international health were the domain of WHO, governments (based on bilateral agreements), and non-governmental organisations. This has changed. Today, new players (such as the World Bank and, increasingly, the World Trade Organisation) have an influence on international health. As globalisation of trade and markets takes hold, new coalitions and alliances are forming to examine and deal with the direct and indirect consequences on health. This paper examines the changing context of cooperation in international health, and voices concerns about rising potential inequalities in health, both within and between countries. The question of how such changes will affect the actions of organisations working in international health is also addressed.

  8. Ghana integrated to the world economy : focus on Ghana-UK-Germany trade linkage model

    Sarpong, Daniel Bruce

    1998-01-01

    In this study of Ghana integrated to the world economy, we focus primarily on Ghana-UK-Germany trade axis partly because of Ghana?s relative dependence on the EU for her international trade. The study employs ?representative? country macroeconometric models of these economies, using data over 1970-1991, including bilateral trade links among them and with the USA and Japan, to quantitatively analyze and draw policy inference of the international transmission mechanism of macroeconomic disturba...

  9. Geo-economy of world energy supply and demand

    Gauthier, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    For over 50 years now, the global primary energy demand structure has been based on fossil fuels for more than 80%. In 25 years, our energy needs will still be covered by an over 80% fossil energy mix according to the reference scenario of most energy agencies. Over this period of time, the economics of energy will be radically altered as a result of a long term sustained global demand of energy and a growing constraint on some hydrocarbon production, conventional oil in particular. The oil production profile on currently operated oil fields, essentially in the OECD, will further decline or require significantly increasing investments. Non conventional oil sources are already proving to be even more capital-intensive. In the face of dwindling reserves in the old OECD hydrocarbon basins, the only resource-rich region in the world with low extraction costs and available swing supply capacities is the Middle East. Tomorrow's oil industry and markets will therefore represent a risk concentrated around a single region in the world, whilst the global gas industry will face a risk concentrated around two regions in the world, including Russia and the Middle East. Massive investments in energy infrastructures will be necessary to bring gas from these two sources to the remote markets in Asia, Europe or the US. The era of cheap energy is definitely gone. Far from being an obsolete fuel, coal is and will remain the most abundant, competitive and favoured source of energy for power generation across the world. CO_2 emissions from coal use are coal's only handicap. The vision of our energy future is in front of us: the environment will be filthy, energy will be costly and geopolitical tensions between producers and consumers will be strong

  10. Race walking gait and its influence on race walking economy in world-class race walkers.

    Gomez-Ezeiza, Josu; Torres-Unda, Jon; Tam, Nicholas; Irazusta, Jon; Granados, Cristina; Santos-Concejero, Jordan

    2018-03-06

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationships between biomechanical parameters of the gait cycle and race walking economy in world-class Olympic race walkers. Twenty-One world-class race walkers possessing the Olympic qualifying standard participated in this study. Participants completed an incremental race walking test starting at 10 km·h -1 , where race walking economy (ml·kg -1 ·km -1 ) and spatiotemporal gait variables were analysed at different speeds. 20-km race walking performance was related to race walking economy, being the fastest race walkers those displaying reduced oxygen cost at a given speed (R = 0.760, p < 0.001). Longer ground contact times, shorter flight times, longer midstance sub-phase and shorter propulsive sub-phase during stance were related to a better race walking economy (moderate effect, p < 0.05). According to the results of this study, the fastest race walkers were more economi cal than the lesser performers. Similarly, shorter flight times are associated with a more efficient race walking economy. Coaches and race walkers should avoid modifying their race walking style by increasing flight times, as it may not only impair economy, but also lead to disqualification.

  11. Globalisation in higher education : manifestations and implications

    LANZENDORF, Ute

    2013-01-01

    Globalisation has been adding a permanent new dimension to the world of higher education. So-called transnational or cross-border education is conceptualized here as a complement to the well-established internationalisation process. The paper elaborates on major aspects of globalisation in higher education, namely changes in the degree mobility of students, recent trends in the international mobility of scholars and also the increase in cross-border provision of study programmes (“programme m...

  12. The Global Compact. Corporate Leadership in the World Economy

    Annan, Kofi

    2002-01-01

    United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan first proposed the Global Compact in an address to The World Economic Forum on the 31st January 1999. The Global Compact’s operational phase was launched at UN Headquarters in New York on the 26th July 2000. The Secretary-General challenged business leaders to join an international initiative – the Global Compact – that would bring companies together with UN agencies, labour and civil society to support nine principles in the areas of human rights, ...

  13. GLOBALISATION AND EXPORT COMPETITIVENESS: A THEORETICAL APPROACH

    DODESCU Anca

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, globalisation has given a boost to world trade, has grown one and a half times faster than world output, and the difference has even been considerably higher in recent years as world trade growth accelerated very strongly. More

  14. The World Financial Crisis

    F. Gerard Adams

    2009-01-01

    The world financial crisis of 2008 is a consequence of new financial technologies, new accounting methods and new international linkages. These developments have come at a time when governments have returned to an old-fashioned freemarket philosophy. This paper links the systemic financial/economic crisis of 2008 to the new economy developments, globalisation and policy philosophy perspectives of recent decades. It raises the question of how to re-establish confidence once traditional thinkin...

  15. Six Decades of Educational Multilateralism in a Globalising World: The History of the UNESCO Institute in Hamburg

    Elfert, Maren

    2013-01-01

    Created in 1945 as a specialised agency of the United Nations (UN), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) was given, among other mandates, the task of reconstructing education systems devastated during the Second World War. UNESCO, in turn, and after some debate about an engagement in Germany, founded the…

  16. The Determinants of Bank Internationalisation in Times of Financial Globalisation: Evidence from the World's Largest Banks (1980-2007)

    Westerhuis, Gerarda; Mulder, Arjen

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the determinants of bank internationalisation, of the world's largest banks from the period 1980–2007. The purpose of the article is twofold. First, we show how a mixed-methods research design, in which we combine a variables-based research with three case studies, can

  17. Globalisation, complex humanitarian emergencies and health.

    O'Dempsey, T J D; Munslow, B

    2006-01-01

    A new political economy of conflict has emerged in the aftermath of colonialism and the Cold War. Complex political emergencies have been simmering in the post-colonial world for more than three decades. Intra-country armed conflict, often combined with natural disasters, at present contributes to the displacement of over 20 million people world-wide. The international community remains profoundly uncomfortable with the complex political emergencies of the new era, torn between the respect for national sovereignty upon which the international political system of the United Nations and other agencies is built, and the growth of concern with human rights and a burgeoning International Humanitarian Law. Globalisation may have brought many benefits to some but there are also many losers. The Word Bank and the International Monetary Fund imposed structural adjustment policies to ensure debt repayment and economic restructuring that have resulted in a net reduction in expenditure on health, education and development. A downward spiral has been created of debt, disease, malnutrition, missed education, economic entrapment, poverty, powerlessness, marginalization, migration and instability. Africa's complex political emergencies are particularly virulent and tenacious. Three examples that are among the most serious humanitarian emergencies to have faced the world in recent times--those in Angola, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Sudan--are reviewed here in detail. The political evolution of these emergencies and their impact on the health of the affected populations are also explored.

  18. Asia and the world economy: “Walking on two legs (of different lengths”

    Max Spoor

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The global imbalance that currently exists between high-income countries and medium- and low-income countries is being positively compensated for by the rapid growth of the economies of South-East Asia, as well as those of East and South Asia. In fact, viewed as a whole, the economies of China and India possess a sufficient potential to surpass the USA’s economy in just a few decades, while in 2010 China has already become the second-largest economy in the world. Its enormous dynamism has been made clear, furthermore, by the speed and relative success with which these economies have succeeded in weathering and emerging from the recent global financial crisis of 2008-2009 which, however, has strongly impacted on the economies of the countries of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD. In the first part of this article, the author analyses the scope of this emergency for Asia’s economies and, especially, for the world economy as a whole, the centre of gravity of which has become increasingly displaced towards this region. In the second part, the author tackles the issue of trade as a motor of such development and, as a consequence of same, the strategic competition for raw materials, in which China and India are playing an increasing role. Finally, the author notes the existence of imbalances generated by sustaining this model, such as the ones that affect trade balances, current accounts and exchange rates which, if they are not corrected, will have negative effects on developing countries, once again.

  19. Real-world fuel economy and CO2 emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles

    Ploetz, Patrick; Funke, Simon Arpad; Jochem, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) combine electric propulsion with an internal combustion engine. Their potential to reduce transport related green-house gas emissions highly depends on their actual usage and electricity provision. Various studies underline their environmental and economic advantages, but are based on standardised driving cycles, simulations or small PHEV fleets. Here, we analyse real-world fuel economy of PHEV and the factors influencing it based on about 2,000 actual PHEV that have been observed over more than a year in the U.S. and Germany. We find that real-world fuel economy of PHEV differ widely among users. The main factors explaining this variation are the annual mileage, the regularity of daily driving, and the likelihood of long-distance trips. Current test cycle fuel economy ratings neglect these factors. Despite the broad range of PHEV fuel economies, the test cycle fuel economy ratings can be close to empiric PHEV fleet averages if the average annual mile-age is about 17,000 km. For the largest group of PHEV in our data, the Chevrolet Volt, we find the average fuel economy to be 1.45 litres/100 km at an average electric driving share of 78%. The resulting real-world tank-to-wheel CO 2 emissions of these PHEV are 42 gCO 2 /km and the annual CO 2 savings in the U.S. amount to about 50 Mt. In conclusion, the variance of empirical PHEV fuel economy is considerably higher than of conventional vehicles. This should be taken into account by future test cycles and high electric driving shares should be incentivised.

  20. TRIPOLARISATION OF THE CURRENCIES IN THE WORLD ECONOMY: US DOLLAR – EURO – YEN

    Ramona TOMA

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available At present, the world economy is dominated by three poles – the USA, the European Union and Japan – among which there should be real co-operation to ensure the international stability on all levels. The introduction of the euro was perceived by the experts as the beginning of the competition among the currencies on the international financial markets. The European Monetary Union was conceived to cause an internal, not an external change, with an economic and financial purpose and as a further step of the European integration. Moreover, the international monetary system does not allow the European single currency to make gains that might cause losses to the US dollar. Both currencies have room in the world economy, but the euro has been beneficial to both the euro area and the rest of the world. At present, the euro is stronger than the sum of the twelve former national currencies. The consolidation of the national economies of the euro area becomes stronger due to the impact on liquidities, to the various investment opportunities for the entities that manage the financial portfolios and the central banks that manage the foreign currency reserves. The competition among the currencies means more opportunities in the world economy: the euro is an international currency used along with the US dollar and the yen, not against them.

  1. Globalisation Trapped

    João Caraça

    2017-01-01

    The promise of making society progress through the direct applications of science was finally fulfilled in the mid-20th century. Science progressed immensely, propelled by the effects of the two world wars. The first science-based technologies saw the daylight during the 1940s and their transformative power was such that neither the military, nor subsequently the markets, allowed science to return intact to its curiosity-driven nest. Technoscience was born then and (being progressively pulled...

  2. OER and the Value of Openness: Implications for the Knowledge Economy

    Bernstein, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge economy is marked by recent trends in technological advancement, globalisation and increasing knowledge intensity. Through new technologies like Open Educational Resources (OER), knowledge can be freely accessed by individuals around the world, blurring traditional notions of ownership and prompting a social transformation manifested…

  3. Impact of Globalisation On Economic Growth in Romania: An Empirical Analysis of Its Economic, Social and Political Dimensions

    Olimpia Neagu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the link between globalisation and economic growth in Romania for a time span of 24 years. Data from World Bank were used in an econometrical model in order to highlight the impact of globalisation, expressed by the KOF globalisation index and its components (economic, social and political globalisation indices on economic growth rate. A statistical strong and positive link is found between GDP per capita dynamics and overall globalisation index as well as between GDP growth rate and economic and political globalisation, except the social dimension of globalisation which has a negative impact on economic growth in Romania for the time span 1990-2013.

  4. Revaluing donor and recipient bodies in the globalised blood economy: transitions in public policy on blood safety in the United Kingdom.

    Busby, Helen; Kent, Julie; Farrell, Anne-Maree

    2014-01-01

    The clinical use of blood has a long history, but its apparent stability belies the complexity of contemporary practices in this field. In this article, we explore how the production, supply and deployment of blood products are socially mediated, drawing on theoretical perspectives from recent work on 'tissue economies'. We highlight the ways in which safety threats in the form of infections that might be transmitted through blood and plasma impact on this tissue economy and how these have led to a revaluation of donor bodies and restructuring of blood economies. Specifically, we consider these themes in relation to the management of recent threats to blood safety in the United Kingdom. We show that the tension between securing the supply of blood and its products and ensuring its safety may give rise to ethical concerns and reshape relations between donor and recipient bodies.

  5. Francophonie: An Alternative Education for Globalisation

    Gavari Starkie, Elisa

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses the Francophonie strategy to foster diversity of cultures and multilingualism in a globalised world. The first part of the article provides the analyses of the historic role of the French cultural and educational model in the diplomatic relations. Then the article refers to the context of the Second World War and the American…

  6. Globalisation, the Challenge of Educational Synchronisation and Teacher Education

    Papastephanou, Marianna; Christou, Miranda; Gregoriou, Zelia

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we set out from the challenge that globalising synchronisation--usually exemplified by Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and World Bank initiatives--presents for education to argue that the time-space compression effected by globalisation must educationally be dealt with with caution, critical vigilance and a…

  7. Six decades of educational multilateralism in a globalising world: The history of the UNESCO Institute in Hamburg

    Elfert, Maren

    2013-07-01

    Created in 1945 as a specialised agency of the United Nations (UN), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) was given, among other mandates, the task of reconstructing education systems devastated during the Second World War. UNESCO, in turn, and after some debate about an engagement in Germany, founded the UNESCO Institute for Education (UIE) in Hamburg in 1952. This paper traces the development of an institute which was founded to contribute to social renewal in war-torn Germany and Europe, functioned as a mediator between Western and Eastern countries during the Cold War and later shifted its geographical focus to developing countries. The institute was instrumental in conceptualising lifelong learning as a global educational paradigm, as well as in shaping the shift from education to learning and the concept of literacy as a "continuum". The author is particularly interested in the nature of the institute's niche which secured its survival in the uncertain domain of educational multilateralism in the past six decades.

  8. Globalisation and lifelong learning

    Rasmussen, Palle Damkjær

    2006-01-01

    The paper discusses how concepts and practises of lifelong learning interact with the multiple processes of globalisation that characterise the present. Three types of interaction are discussed: the role of international organisations in educational policies, the development of international...... educational markets and the unintended consequences of globalisation for education and learning....

  9. Globalisation, economics and professionalism.

    Tan, Chay-Hoon; Macneill, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the effect of globalisation and attendant economic factors on the global practice of medicine, medical education, medical ethics and medical professionalism. The authors discuss the implications of these trends, citing case scenarios in the healthcare insurance, medical tourism, pharmaceutical industries, and the educational systems as well as in clinical practice, to illustrate the impact of globalisation and economics on professionalism. Globalisation, on the one hand, offers benefits for the global practice of medicine and for medical education. On the other, globalisation can have negative effects, particularly when the main driver is to maximise profitability across national boundaries rather than concern for human well-being. Appraising the effect of globalisation on professionalism involves assessing its effects at the intrapersonal, interpersonal, and institutional levels, and its effect on society at large.

  10. The Regularities of the Cyclical Development of the World Economy in the Current Phase

    Revyakin Georgy V.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at identifying and describing the key tendencies in the cyclical development of the world economy. In order to allocate the cyclical component in the dynamics of the world-wide GDP growth, a time series decomposition was performed using the Hodrick-Prescott filter and the relationship of economic cycles to the dynamics of different indicators of economic conditions was analyzed. The persistent relationship between inflation, unemployment and the current phase of the economic cycle have been identified and described. The truth of the Phillips curve has been empirically demonstrated: existence of an inverse relationship between the rate of inflation and the level of unemployment. A new classification of branches of economy has been provided according to their susceptibility to the current phase of the economic cycle. According to this criterion, all branches of economy have been divided into the cyclical and the non-cyclical sectors. A hypothesis that there is a direct relationship between the average annual growth rate of GDP and the structure of the national economy has been suggested.

  11. Globalisation and the internationalisation of higher education in sub-Saharan Africa

    Kuzvinetsa Peter Dzvimbo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a shrinking world, in which a neo-liberal discourse has permeated sub-Saharan African higher education, critical reflection is required to assess the merits and demerits of globalisation. Research, intensive discussion and hearings conducted over a two-year period by the Task Force on Higher Education and Society, convened by the World Bank and United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO for the purpose of exploring the future of higher education in the developing world, led to the conclusion that without more and better higher education, developing countries would find it increasingly difficult to benefit from the global knowledge economy. A decade later, we argue for a radical change in the traditional discourse on globalisation because of the emergence of countries such as China, South Africa, India, and Brazil as global players in the world economy. These emerging global powers, reframe the political and imperial philosophy at the epicentre of globalisation discourse - an economic creed, through their mutual consultation and coordination on significant political issues. Their economic and military capabilities enable them to influence the trade regime and thereby strengthen the voice of the developing world as a whole. In relation to this paper's inquiry, the cooperation of these emerging powers gives the free enfranchised people of the world an opportunity to choose a different path of international relations (internationalisation formed on more liberal lines, as opposed to the neo-liberal economic rationality of globalisation. This paper therefore examines globalisation and internationalisation of higher education in sub-Saharan Africa, a field in which increased knowledge production and distribution open up opportunities for users, institutions and societies. Against a background of chronic economic uncertainty we examine the influence of major international institutions on the direction of higher

  12. Unravelling the argument for bioenergy production in developing countries: A world-economy perspective

    Kuchler, Magdalena

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers a critical look at how energy security-, food and agriculture-, and climate change-oriented international organizations frame biomass energy production in developing countries, in particular, ethanol production in Brazil. Using the world-economy system as a theoretical lens, the paper raises a concern as to whether the way these global institutions frame bioenergy's role in developing regions manifests energy and ecological inequalities between the core and the periphery, as...

  13. Collapsing Worlds and Varieties of welfare capitalism: In search of a new political economy of welfare

    Waltraud Schelkle

    2012-01-01

    The study of welfare capitalism is concerned with a founding question of political economy, namely how capitalism and democracy can be combined. Ever since the publication of Esping-Andersen’s Three Worlds of Welfare Capitalism in 1990, the answer was sought in identifying ideal types of welfare states that support a class compromise. The Varieties of (Welfare) Capitalism literature is increasingly used as a complementary theory of production systems although its rationale for social policies...

  14. Economy

    Haring, Ben

    2009-01-01

    The economy of ancient Egypt is a difficult area of study due to the lack of preservation of much data (especially quantitative data); it is also a controversial subject on which widely divergent views have been expressed. It is certain, however, that the principal production and revenues of Egyptian society as a whole and of its individual members was agrarian, and as such, dependent on the yearly rising and receding of the Nile. Most agricultural producers were probably self-sufficient tena...

  15. Latin America in the World Economy and Trade at the Beginning of the XXI st Century

    A R Massarova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the role of Latin America in the world economy during the pre- and post-crisis period. It analyses the dynamics of the indicators that define social and economic capacity of the region and the impact of the world financial crisis in different types of the region's countries. The article examines in details structural and regional shifts in the foreign trade of Latin America. The analysis revealed the major problems of the region's foreign trade (branch and regional structure and allowed to set out the ways of their decisions through the diversification of Latin American export and the intensification of intra-regional trade.

  16. Globalisation in African and Biblical perspectives

    P.O. Abioje

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The main focus of this article consists of unraveling the meaning of globalisation in terms of its purpose, and determining why many Africans appear to view its goals skeptically. The study is done from a Christian theological perspective, thus the conformity of globalisation to Biblical worldview is also examined. The data were gathered mainly through library consultation. Theoretically, the study is expository and critical. One discovers that globalisation conforms with Afro-Biblical worldviews, but only in so far as it embraces unstinting love of God and the neighbour, universal justice, mercy and compassion. The world itself seems to be realising how interdependent human life is. It is, however, suspected that the owners of the multinational corporations who are drumming up globalisation, have ulterior motives. It was noted that Western institutions, represented by multinationals, have always sought ways to exploit Africa and the Third World in general. At the same time, there is the realisation that no external enemy could succeed without the cooperation of some internal enemy, and there have always been African rulers who collaborate with foreigners to exploit the continent. It is explained that Africa can fare better with globalisation if the leaders are ethically and prudentially upright.

  17. Climate change, economics and Buddhism. Part 2. New views and practices for sustainable world economies

    Daniels, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    The evidence of impending and serious climate and other consequences of an expanding world economy based on fossil carbon energy continues to accumulate. This two-part paper examines the potential contribution of the world view and insights of Buddhism to this search. It presents both a conceptual and practical case that Buddhism can help shape and move towards an alternative and effective paradigmatic basis for sustainable economies - one capable of bringing about and maintaining genuine, high welfare levels across the world's societies. The first paper outlined a comprehensive analytical framework to identify the fundamental nature of anthropogenic climate change. Based on the integration of two of the most influential environmental analysis tools of recent decades (the DPSIR model and IPAT equation), the framework was then broadened to facilitate ideas from the Buddhist world view by injecting two key missing aspects - the interrelated role of (1) beliefs and values (on goals and behavior) and (2) the nature of well-being or human happiness. Finally, the principal linkages between this climate change analysis framework and Buddhism were explored. In this concluding paper, the systems framework is used to demonstrate how Buddhist and related world views can feed into appropriate and effective responses to the impending challenges of climate change. This is undertaken by systematically presenting a specific, if indicative, list of relevant strategies informed by the understanding of interconnectedness and other basic principles about the nature of reality and human well-being as proposed in Buddhism. (author)

  18. Climate change, economics and Buddhism. Part 2. New views and practices for sustainable world economies

    Daniels, Peter L. [Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, Brisbane, 4111 (Australia)

    2010-03-15

    The evidence of impending and serious climate and other consequences of an expanding world economy based on fossil carbon energy continues to accumulate. This two-part paper examines the potential contribution of the world view and insights of Buddhism to this search. It presents both a conceptual and practical case that Buddhism can help shape and move towards an alternative and effective paradigmatic basis for sustainable economies - one capable of bringing about and maintaining genuine, high welfare levels across the world's societies. The first paper outlined a comprehensive analytical framework to identify the fundamental nature of anthropogenic climate change. Based on the integration of two of the most influential environmental analysis tools of recent decades (the DPSIR model and IPAT equation), the framework was then broadened to facilitate ideas from the Buddhist world view by injecting two key missing aspects - the interrelated role of (1) beliefs and values (on goals and behavior) and (2) the nature of well-being or human happiness. Finally, the principal linkages between this climate change analysis framework and Buddhism were explored. In this concluding paper, the systems framework is used to demonstrate how Buddhist and related world views can feed into appropriate and effective responses to the impending challenges of climate change. This is undertaken by systematically presenting a specific, if indicative, list of relevant strategies informed by the understanding of interconnectedness and other basic principles about the nature of reality and human well-being as proposed in Buddhism. (author)

  19. Transitions in a globalising world

    P. Martens (Pim); J. Rotmans (Jan)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe increasing complexity of our global society means that sustainable development cannot be addressed from a single perspective or scientific discipline. By using the concept of transitions, we examine current and future tensions between welfare, well-being and the environment, and

  20. Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism Strategies in a Globalised World : alternative perceptiveness of terrorist emergence theory and policing strategies confrontation with human rights

    Kikkas, Margit

    2015-01-01

    Globalisation and development in technology have advanced terrorism to reach a broader target audience. Especially focussing at the international co-operation strategies and combined social networks, terrorist activities have an direct- and indirect effect on private households, international commerce and local governments. Security institutions and state organisations use various combinations of counter- terrorism measures, that are mostly social-, political-, or financial in nature. Neverth...

  1. Globalisering, voedsel en regulering

    Oosterveer, P.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Steeds meer producten komen uit andere landen van de wereld. Het proces van globalisering brengt ook nieuwe voedselrisico¿s met zich mee. De mogelijkheden om de risico¿s te beheersen lijken af te nemen.

  2. RISE OF MOBILITY PROGRAMS IN GERMANY DUE TO GLOBALISATION

    Eva Poppe

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning has come to the front position of the educational agenda in many countries of the world – the knowledge society, learning society, learning organization and so forth are the common terms now in the 21st century. The terms come into view in countless publications of the European Union and of many other countries in and outside the European Community. The learning society is one of the products of globalisation and knowledge, learning and education are intertwined with global capitalism. Education is considered as a servant to global capitalism, enabling trans-boundary companies to gather more effectively in the knowledge society. Learning has become to a central task in governmental education policy in many countries and it is being treated as investment – adding value to human and social capital, resulting in employability and then in work, which makes an even greater distribution to the economy, rather than being treated as a natural human process that results in the improvement of people as human beings. Profound changes are taking place as a result of globalisation that is affecting the whole of the educational institution. The objective of this contribution is to present Germany on its way to a knowledge society by examining the past and the present situation of Germany concerning mobility and furthermore mobility programs.

  3. Decrease in oil prices: which consequences for the World economy and for France?

    Camatte, Hadrien; Darmet-Cucchiarini, Maxime; Gillet, Thomas; Masson, Emmanuelle; Meslin, Olivier; Padieu, Ysaline; Tavin, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    Based of various statistics, this public publication first describes that, since summer 2014, oil price has been sharply decreasing (70 per cent) and keeping on decreasing due to a still abundant supply (with non conventional oil in the USA, and a still high production by OPEC countries) and a rather disappointing demand. It also outlines that production commitments stated by producers are still uncertain. This paper then notices that this oil price decrease could remain positive for World economy, but that some short term factors still impair these effects. This positive effect is indeed slow to appear in importing countries. Negative effects in exporting countries are emphasized by local economic policies. Moreover, there could be a transmission of this oil price decrease to the financial sphere, oil price decrease makes monetary policy more complex, and the USA are increasingly exposed to the energy sector activity. The third part shows that oil prices have positive effects on the French economy. They favour a wealth transfer from the rest of the world to the French economy, positively impacts companies margins and household purchase power on the short and medium terms, induces external effects as it also affects trade partners, and could result in an activity gain in the finance bill

  4. Matter, Space, Energy, and Political Economy: The Amazon in the World-System

    Stephen G. Bunker

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Many authors have attempted co-incorporate the local into the global. World-systems analysis, though, is rooted in processes of production, and all production remains profoundly local. Understanding the expansion and intensification of the social and material relations of capitalism that have created and sustain the dynamic growth of the world-system from the local to the global requires analysis of material processes of natural and social production in space as differentiated by topography, hydrology, climate, and absolute distance betweenplaces. In this article, I consider some of the spatio-material configurations chat have struc-tured local effects on global formations within a single region, the Amazon Basin. I first detail and criticize the tendency in world system and globalization analysis, and in the modern social sciences generally, to use spatial metaphors without examining how space affects the material processes around which social actors organize economy and policy. I next examine thework of some earlier social scientists who analyzed specific materio-spatial configurations as these structured human social, economic, and political activities and organization, searching for possible theoretical or methodological tools for building from local to global analysis. I then review some recent analyses of spatio-material determinants of social and economic organiza-tion in the Amazon Basin. Finally, I show that the 400-year-long sequence of extractive econ-omies in the Amazon reflected the changing demands of expanded industrial production in the core, and how such processes can best be understood by focusing our analysis on spatio-material configurations of local extraction, transport, and production. The Amazon is but one of the specific environments that have supplied raw materials to changing global markets, but close consideration of how its material and spatial attributes shaped the global economy provides insights into the ways

  5. The whole world's watching: decarbonizing the economy and saving the world

    Turner, M.; O'Connell, B.

    2000-11-01

    In this book the authors explain how money can be channeled into the technology that will preserve the lifestyles we currently enjoy and create a new era of economic growth. This is a book that proposes real, concrete solutions. Environmentalists and politicians will not stop climate change from occurring: industry will and it will happen a lot sooner than we think. Global warming is real and not a problem that will disappear on its own. This book explains why it is now time to mobilize the world's financial markets to work for the good of mankind. The money to finance the changes necessary to prevent climatic mutation should come from Wall Street, instead of Washington or Berlin. (author)

  6. Scanning WorldScan. Final report on the presentation and evaluation of WorldScan, a model of the WORLD economy for SCenario ANalysis

    Geurts, B.; Gielen, A.; Nahuis, R.; Tang, P.; Timmer, H.

    1997-01-01

    An overview is given of the efforts made to present and evaluate WorldScan, a long-term model of the world economy, developed at the Dutch Central Planning Bureau (CPB). One of the pivotal activities was the organisation of a peer review of the model during a two-day workshop. The reviewers were selected both from the academic and the policy field. The main recommendations of that review were (a) not to pursue a formal, full-scale linkage between WorldScan and the RIVM-developed climate model IMAGE. Instead, WorldScan should be used for separate economic analyses, which is input in the climate model; (b) to make more precise choices with respect to the underlying theories the time horizon of the analyses; (c) to improve the empirical base of WorldScan; and (d) to enhance the use of WorldScan for policy analyses on behalf of international policy fora. The review proved to be very beneficial for the evolution of WorldScan. Implementation of some of the recommendations has led to increased use of the model by international institutions. Since the review, WorldScan has been used on behalf of the European Union (EU), the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the Energy Modelling Forum (EMF), the Centre for Global Trade Analysis (GTAP), the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) and Indian Planning Commission (IPC). 110 refs

  7. Energy for the world economy of tomorrow. Energie fuer die Weltwirtschaft von morgen

    Bennewitz, J

    1984-01-01

    Will the world's energy resources suffice to secure the world economy's supply in the face of the continuing growth of the world population. This question is answered. The development of the world population shows patterns which make possible an estimation of the future populations of industrial and developing countries. The rise of the primary energy carriers is described. An analysis of the reserves and resources concludes that, if energy policies remain unchanged, reserves will be exhausted by the middle of the next century. In this connection, the introduction of atomic energy according to present plans and the possibilities of energy sources which may be re-generated are considered. The availability of liquid energy carriers based on petroleum will probably become a decisive bottleneck for the world's energy supply before the end of this century. The danger of coming to an energy disaster in our life-time can be averted. Possibilities for securing the energy supply in the future are proposed. In this connection, the positive effects on unemployment are spelled out. The idea of 'World Energy Management' is discussed.

  8. The World Economy in the Times of Financial Crisis and its Impact on European Energy Policy

    Peter Baláž; Juraj Bayer

    2015-01-01

    Since 2007, globalization of the world economy has led to the expansion of the financial crisis. It affects the long-term international negative positions of EU members. They reacted to the new situation by carrying out structural reforms and by support of new adaptation programs. An important element of this process was the preparing of the convergence of the national energy policies in the framework of the Europe 20-20-20 program, which should remain one of the determining elements of their...

  9. The World Economy in the Times of Financial Crisis and its Impact on European Energy Policy

    Peter Baláž

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Since 2007, globalization of the world economy has led to the expansion of the financial crisis. It affects the long-term international negative positions of EU members. They reacted to the new situation by carrying out structural reforms and by support of new adaptation programs. An important element of this process was the preparing of the convergence of the national energy policies in the framework of the Europe 20-20-20 program, which should remain one of the determining elements of their success in support of the international competitiveness of the EU.

  10. How to Measure Globalisation? A New Globalisation Index (NGI)

    Vujakovic, Petra

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a new composite globalisation index will be presented. With its 21 variables, it accounts for the multidimensionality of this phenomenon instead of relying purely on economic indicators. As compared to other existing globalisation indices, three major innovations are introduced in this New Globalisation Index (NGI). Firstly, five variables that have until now not been used in globalisation indices enter the calculations. Secondly, geographical distances between countries are ...

  11. The Coffee Commodity Chain in the World-Economy: Arrighi's Systemic Cycles and Braudel's Layers of Analysis

    John M. Talbot

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a history of coffee in the modern world-economy, w;ing an analyticalframework synthesized from Arrighi's concept of systemic cycles of accumulation and Braudel'snotion of three levels of economic analysis: material life, the market economy, and capitalism. Ittakes the commodity chain as the unit of analysis, and argues that this choice helps to illuminatethe caw;al connections between Braudel 's three layers. The method of incorporated comparisonis w;ed to compare restructurings of the coffee commodity chain with the restructurings of thelarger world-economy during each of Arrighi 's systemic cycles.

  12. Multinational corporations, the politics of the world economy, and their effects on women's health in the developing world: a review.

    Hippert, Christine

    2002-12-01

    Presently, globalization and the world economy maintain power relations that hamper the economic integrity and the political autonomy of the developing world. My paper addresses specific economic conditions that perpetuate poverty and poor health. I examine multinational corporations and their effects on women's health, particularly in Mexico and parts of Asia. The advent of multinational corporate business in Mexico, Malaysia, Philippines, India, and Indonesia has led to increased poverty and human rights abuses. Women bear the brunt of this because of specific international economic arrangements and their low social status, both locally and globally. As a result, their physical, mental, and emotional health is suffering. Solutions to these health problems have been proposed on multiple levels: international top-down approaches (i.e., employing international protectionist regulatory standards, exposing multinationals who infringe on their workers' human rights), as well as local grassroots organizational campaigns (i.e., conducting informational human rights workshops for factory workers). Ultimately, the answers lie in holding corporations accountable to their laborers while developing countries maintain their comparative advantage; this is the only way women's health will improve and the developing world can entice corporate investment.

  13. Globalisation of Education: The Experience of the National University of Singapore

    Tan Eng Chye

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation has deep impacts on today’s world and in order to prepare students for the globalised world, universities have to adopt strategies to plug their students into the real world. How could universities leverage on their strengths and partners to achieve this? I will share some experiences which NUS has gone through in this aspect.

  14. ANALYSIS ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE PROFIT TAX AND INVESTMENTS IN THE CONTEXT OF A GLOBALISED WORLD. CASE STUDY – ROMANIA

    Dumitru-Cristian Oanea

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Although it is a relative old concept, having ruts in the writings of the late „60s, globalization has become in current times a cliché, being used in many parts of the world and in many languages but not having a specific definition. Financial globalization is considered to be the core element of the process of globalization and consists in a complex integration of financial markets through exchange and financial flows. In this context, the economic agents are considered to be important players, given the fact that fortheir investments they appeal to financial recourses wherever they may be. However there investment behavior is greatly influenced by the state, through the fiscal policy, especially through a very important instrument at its disposal, the profit tax rate.The aim of this paper is to emphasize the evolution of the relationship between the profit tax and investments, in the case of Romania from 1990 until 2008, trying to show particular developments of each of this two variables studied and the relations between them, the amplitude of influence exercised by them. The paper also focuses upon a better understanding of how the variables analyzed influence the real economy in this globalized environment.

  15. Positioning Mauritius as a Knowledge Hub in the Context of Globalisation

    Deepa Gokulsing

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge is the most valued commodity in the global economy. Since 2005, it has been proposed to develop Mauritius into a knowledge hub and a centre of higher learning, thus meeting the needs of an increasingly competitive, knowledge-based and globalised economy. Therefore, this paper provides an understanding of the higher education system in Mauritius. Secondly, it explores the interconnection between globalisation and higher education in Mauritius. Thirdly, it also focuses the challenges ...

  16. International perspectives on work-family policies: lessons from the world's most competitive economies.

    Earle, Alison; Mokomane, Zitha; Heymann, Jody

    2011-01-01

    The United States does not guarantee families a wide range of supportive workplace policies such as paid maternity and paternity leave or paid leave to care for sick children. Proposals to provide such benefits are invariably met with the complaint that the costs would reduce employment and undermine the international competitiveness of American businesses. In this article, Alison Earle, Zitha Mokomane, and Jody Heymann explore whether paid leave and other work-family policies that support children's development exist in countries that are economically competitive and have low unemployment rates. Their data show that the answer is yes. Using indicators of competitiveness gathered by the World Economic Forum, the authors identify fifteen countries, including the United States, that have been among the top twenty countries in competitiveness rankings for at least eight of ten years. To this group they add China and India, both rising competitors in the global economy. They find that every one of these countries, except the United States, guarantees some form of paid leave for new mothers as well as annual leave. And all but Switzerland and the United States guarantee paid leave for new fathers. The authors perform a similar exercise to identify thirteen advanced countries with consistently low unemployment rates, again including the United States. The majority of these countries provide paid leave for new mothers, paid leave for new fathers, paid leave to care for children's health care needs, breast-feeding breaks, paid vacation leave, and a weekly day of rest. Of these, the United States guarantees only breast-feeding breaks (part of the recently passed health care legislation). The authors' global examination of the most competitive economies as well as the economies with low unemployment rates makes clear that ensuring that all parents are available to care for their children's healthy development does not preclude a country from being highly competitive

  17. The Perspectives of Green Economy in the Republic of Moldova under the Impact of Ecologization World Economy Megatrend

    Zorina SHISHCAN

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors have outlined the conceptual methodology in the field as well as the relevant Strategies, Programs and Projects implemented in European Union and Republic of Moldova, and have figured out the key elements as well as the perspectives of green economy development in the country.

  18. Financial globalisation uncertainty/instability is good for financial development

    Asongu, Simplice A.; Koomson, Isaac; Tchamyou, Vanessa S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – This study assesses the effect of time-dynamic financial globalisation uncertainty on financial development in 53 African countries for the period 2000-2011. Design/methodology/approach – Financial globalisation uncertainty is estimated as time-dynamic to capture business cycle disturbances while all dimensions identified by the Financial Development and Structure Database of the World Bank are employed, namely: financial depth (money supply and liquid liabilities), financial sy...

  19. Buses retrofitting with diesel particle filters: Real-world fuel economy and roadworthiness test considerations.

    Fleischman, Rafael; Amiel, Ran; Czerwinski, Jan; Mayer, Andreas; Tartakovsky, Leonid

    2018-05-01

    Retrofitting older vehicles with diesel particulate filter (DPF) is a cost-effective measure to quickly and efficiently reduce particulate matter emissions. This study experimentally analyzes real-world performance of buses retrofitted with CRT DPFs. 18 in-use Euro III technology urban and intercity buses were investigated for a period of 12months. The influence of the DPF and of the vehicle natural aging on buses fuel economy are analyzed and discussed. While the effect of natural deterioration is about 1.2%-1.3%, DPF contribution to fuel economy penalty is found to be 0.6% to 1.8%, depending on the bus type. DPF filtration efficiency is analyzed throughout the study and found to be in average 96% in the size range of 23-560nm. Four different load and non-load engine operating modes are investigated on their appropriateness for roadworthiness tests. High idle is found to be the most suitable regime for PN diagnostics considering particle number filtration efficiency. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. The world on a collision course and the need for a new economy.

    Max-Neef, Manfred

    2010-05-01

    The first part of the paper is an attempt to demonstrate that what we are going through at the present time is not just an economic-financial crisis, but a crisis of humanity. It seems that for the first time in human history several crises converge to simultaneously reach their maximum level of tension. The dominant economic model is to a great degree responsible for the world's collision course. Hence a number of myths that sustain the model are listed and analyzed. It is argued that a new economy, coherent with the problematiques of the twenty first century, needs urgently to be devised. The second part proposes the foundations for a new economy based on five fundamental postulates that allow the construction of transdisciplinary, holistic, and systemic visions to adequately understand the interdependence of all the elements that sustain life. It is stressed that it is no longer acceptable that Universities still teach economic theories of the nineteenth century in order to tackle twenty first century problems that have no precedence.

  1. Free trade – a priority issue of G-20 summits after the world economy went into recession

    Ph. D. Alina-Petronela Haller

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The world economy has been greatly affected by the current recession. All countries have suffered regardless of their level of development. Given that global problems require global solutions, world powers have met at summits of the G-20 forum, in order to determine the causes of the recession and adopt the most relevant measures to overcome the crisis and to correct other imbalances (e.g. environmental issues, hunger existing in the world.

  2. Globalisering og forbrugerkultur

    2007-01-01

      "Globalisering og forbrugerkultur - over en kop kaffe" I denne podcast fortæller lektor Dannie Kjeldgaard (Institut for Marketing & Management) om resultaterne af sit forskningsprojekt om global forbrugerkultur og spredningen kaffebarkulturen. Han stiller spørgsmålstegn ved den gængse betragtning...

  3. Globalisering og nationalisme

    Schmidt, Garbi

    2015-01-01

    På universitetet underviser jeg – sammen med gode kolleger – i et kursus om fænomenerne globalisering og transnationalisme. Jeg har gjort det nogle år nu, og en af de ting, som jeg synes er påfaldende hver gang er, at jeg kommer til at tale meget om nationalstaten. Det bliver brugt rigtigt meget...

  4. Unravelling the argument for bioenergy production in developing countries. A world-economy perspective

    Kuchler, Magdalena

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers a critical look at how energy security-, food and agriculture-, and climate change-oriented international organizations frame biomass energy production in developing countries, in particular, ethanol production in Brazil. Using the world-economy system as a theoretical lens, the paper raises a concern as to whether the way these global institutions frame bioenergy's role in developing regions manifests energy and ecological inequalities between the core and the periphery, as well as creates internal contradictions that perpetuate unequal exchange embedded in the system. Simultaneously, these organizations frame Brazil as a semi-peripheral state that, while successful in finding a niche concurring with the core's demand for cheap energy and cost-effective decarbonization strategies, is not necessarily a suitable role model for the periphery's socio-economic development. (author)

  5. Searching for Opportunities for Sub-Saharan Africa's Renewal in the Era of Globalisation

    Muchie, Mammo

    2000-01-01

    depend on the type of global settlement expected to emerge in the post-cold war world. SSA has therefore a stake on the type of globalisation which may frame world economic policy and financial aid to it. Neo-liberal globalisation has no enthusiasm for massive financial transfers. The incipient...

  6. Global identification, xenophobia and globalisation: A cross-national exploration.

    Ariely, Gal

    2017-12-01

    This paper explores the ways in which globalisation influences social identity. Combining a psychological social-identity framework with sociological considerations regarding the contextual impact of globalisation, it tests whether global identification-that is, people's identification as global citizens-constitutes an inclusive category, negatively linked to xenophobic attitudes towards immigrants across countries and whether the actual country level of globalisation moderates the relationship between global identification and xenophobia. Unlike most psychological studies of globalisation, it draws its data from 124 national samples across 86 countries, with 154,760 respondents overall, using three different cross-national surveys. Study 1 (International Social Survey Program National Identity Module III 2013; N = 39,426, countries = 32) evinces that while global identification is in fact negatively linked to xenophobia, the correlation is moderated by the country level of globalisation, countries marked by higher levels of globalisation exhibiting a stronger negative relation between global identification and xenophobia than those characterised by a lower level of globalisation. Study 2 (European Values Study 2008; N = 53,083, countries = 44) and Study 3 (World Values Survey 6; N = 65,251, countries = 48) replicated these results across other countries employing dissimilar scales for global identification and xenophobia. © 2016 International Union of Psychological Science.

  7. Labouring in the Knowledge Fields: Researching Knowledge in Globalising Workspaces

    Farrell, Lesley

    2006-01-01

    While research on globalisation can hardly be said to have ignored the phenomenon of the global corporation or the globally distributed supply chain, the focus has overwhelmingly been on "globalization from above"--on corporate structures and on the movement of global capital in global "knowledge economies". My focus in this…

  8. Effects of Globalisation on Carbon Footprints of Products

    Herrmann, Ivan Tengbjerg; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2009-01-01

    Outsourcing of production from the industrialised countries to the newly industrialised economies holds the potential to increase wealth in both places, but what are the environmental costs of the globalised manufacturing systems? This paper looks into the changes in carbon footprint...

  9. Globalisation, Crisis and Industrial Relations in the Indian Auto Industry

    D'Costa, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    in the broader capital-labour relation in the wider global economy due to globalisation is argued to be tempered by India's particular national and local institutions governing industrial relations, unionisation, the specific trajectory of the Indian auto industry, and economic development strategies. When much...... for employment security and lessons for other countries in these turbulent times....

  10. POWER-SHIFTS IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY. TRANSITION TOWARDS A MULTIPOLAR WORLD ORDER

    Ion IGNAT

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to analyze the new realities and trends related to the new polarity of the global economy, and thus the reconfiguration of global power centers, a process characterized by two simultaneous trends: the rise of new powers and the relative decline of traditional powers. At the beginning of 21st century, global power is suffering two major changes: on the one hand it manifests a transition from West to East, from Atlantic to the Asia-Pacific, and on the other hand, a diffusion from state to non-state actors. Current global economic power has a multipolar distribution, shared between the United States, European Union, Japan and BRICs, with no balance of power between these poles, opposed by the strong ambition of rising countries, China especially, China that rivals the traditional powers represented by the developed countries. The evolution of the main macroeconomic indicators given by the most important global organizations, shows a gradual transition towards a multipolar world. Therefore, the United States is and will remain for a long period of time the global economic leader. However, as China, India and Brazil are growing rapidly, and Russia is looking for lost status, the world is becoming multipolar.

  11. Globalisation and blood safety.

    Farrugia, Albert

    2009-05-01

    Globalisation may be viewed as the growing interdependence of countries worldwide through the increasing volume and variety of cross-border transactions in goods and services, and also through the more rapid and widespread diffusion of technology. Globalisation is not just an economic phenomenon, although it is frequently described as such, but includes commerce, disease and travel, and immigration, and as such it affects blood safety and supply in various ways. The relatively short travel times offered by modern aviation can result in the rapid spread of blood-borne pathogens before measures to counteract transmission can be put in place; this would have happened with SARS if the basic life cycle of the SARS virus included an asymptomatic viraemia. This risk can be amplified by ecological factors which effect the spread of these pathogens once they are transferred to a naïve ecosystem, as happened with West Nile Virus (WNV) in North America. The rationalization and contraction of the plasma products industry may be viewed as one aspect of globalisation imposed by the remorseless inevitability of the market; the effect of this development on the safety and supply of products has yet to be seen, but the oversight and assurance of a shrinking number of players will present particular challenges. Similarly, the monopolization of technology, through patent enforcement which puts access beyond the reach of developing countries, can have an effect on blood safety. The challenges presented to blood safety by globalisation are heightening the tensions between the traditional focus on the product safety - zero risk paradigm and the need to view the delivery of safe blood as an integrated process. As an illustration of this tension, donor deferral measures imposed by globalisation-induced risks such as vCJD and WNV have resulted in the loss of the safest and most committed portion of the blood donor population in many Western countries, leading to an increased risk to

  12. JPRS Report, Soviet Union, World Economy and International Relations, No. 1, January 1988.

    1988-05-23

    ous sectors of the economy. Such sections might just as happily have been accommodated in any book on the country’s economy or in an economico ...of the military sector of the economy. Admitting the need for highly developed productive forces in order to build up the military might the author...military business. The high level of monopolization characteristic of the Japanese economy’s military sector is combined with a comparatively low volume

  13. Increased Blood Lactate Level Deteriorates Running Economy in World Class Endurance Athletes.

    Hoff, Jan; Støren, Øyvind; Finstad, Arnstein; Wang, Eivind; Helgerud, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Blood lactate accumulation is associated with development of muscle fatigue and negatively correlated to endurance performance. No research has quantified the effects of lactate presence at moderate levels of lactate accumulation. The purpose of this study was to test whether 2 moderate blood lactate concentration levels affect running economy (RE) when running at the individual lactate threshold (LT). Seven male world class endurance athletes with an average V[Combining Dot Above]O2max of 80.7 ± 2.7 ml·kg·min or 5.8 ± 0.5 L·min participated in this study. After the V[Combining Dot Above]O2max test, the subjects were resting or walking and in a random order tested for RE at their LT velocity when the blood lactate level reached either 3 mmol·L or 5 mmol·L. After a new 5-minute exercising period at maximal aerobic velocity, the crossover lactate value RE testing was performed. Running economy was significantly (p ≤ 0.05) deteriorated from 0.668 ± 0.044 to 0.705 ± 0.056 ml·kg·m or 5.5% (p ≤ 0.05) for blood lactate level of 3 mmol·L compared with 5 mmol·L, respectively. Increased lactate level from 3 to 5 mmol·L is thus accompanied by deteriorated RE at LT running velocity. The deteriorated RE at moderate levels of lactate concentration emphasizes the importance of avoiding intensities above LT in the early parts of a dominantly aerobic endurance competition. It also emphasizes the importance of a high V[Combining Dot Above]O2max for aerobic endurance athletes and may partly explain the V[Combining Dot Above]O2 slow component as impaired RE.

  14. The accounting law and the Globalisation Era

    Gheorghe LEPĂDATU

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The accounting law appeared as a new procedure together with the globalisation period and the knowledge economy. The accounting information relevance for company patrimony approach is both an economic theoretical issue and an accounting law one. Apart from the norms regarding significance breakeven and economic axiom, contractual aspects are also important. The most precise, organized and significant data can be obtained only from accounting. In this way, managers and administrators would like to get information ignoring the real capacity of accounting as much as possible. For this kind of situations, it is the accounting law that puts things into light.

  15. Globalisation and social policy.

    Langmore, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses six major themes: that economic and social issues are closely interdependent and that the appropriate stance is to work on both together, simultaneously; that though the threats from globalisation have been exaggerated, there can be substantial costs as well as considerable benefits; that constraints on national policy are significant but are less severe than is commonly considered; that the vitality-the vigour-of national and international political processes must be increased to cope effectively with the changes which are underway; that the private sector, unions and civil society have crucial roles in the provision of services and in advocating socially responsible values, standards and policies; and that one of the most effective means of addressing the erosion of national autonomy from globalisation is for countries to cooperate in setting and implementing shared objectives and international standards and establishing more global public goods.

  16. Attending to the specific needs and demands of students in a globalised world: the case of a ‘spanish for travelling’ MOOC

    Beatriz Sedano Cuevas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Language MOOCs (LMOOCs, whose content is related to language teaching, is still a field in need of further exploration, with respect to both the number of courses available and scientific research carried out, constituting a developing and expanding field. This paper will show a concrete example of the types of courses developed within the European Project ECO. This course is aimed at Spanish language students who want to learn the language in order to travel and has been created based on a rigorous needs analysis, according to the approach oriented towards action as advocated by CEFR (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages; and following a new MOOC typology proposed by the ECO project, the sMOOCs, whose pedagogical framework is based on Connectivism, and insists on a social, interactive and ubiquitouscomponent.  This study follows a qualitative methodology through initial and final questionnaires. The analysis of data extracted from the first edition of this MOOC will show that a previous needs analysis, with the use of social networks and OER (Open Educational Resources contribute to fulfill the expectations and development of the participants as autonomous learners who will be able to carry out their actions in the language within a globalised context.

  17. Transnational Corporations in World Development – Still the Same Harmful Effects in an Increasingly Globalized World Economy?

    Mark Herkenrath

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transnational corporations (TNCs have reached historically unprecedented weight and power in the world’s political economy. Thus, the old question of how these corporations a?ect global development is nowadays more signi?cant than ever. While some scholars claim that corporate globalization will eventually close the worldwide development gap, many others contend that TNC activities lead to insu?cient exploitation of growth potentials within the host country, thereby hindering convergence of national income levels. The present study aims at assessing the validity of these controversial positions by confronting them with the results of past and present empirical research. In the ?rst part, we examine the e?ect of TNC presence on intra-national income inequality by reviewing the most recent cross-national studies dealing with this issue. In the second part, we present the results of our own research, which analyzes the e?ect of TNC presence on economic growth in a sample of 84 countries. The contemporary empirical evidence discussed in the ?rst part as well as the results of our own analyses tend to con?rm earlier ?ndings. They suggest that dependence on TNC activities increases inequality without adding to economic growth. However, the strong negative e?ect of TNC presence on growth found in analyses of data from the late 1960s cannot be reproduced in our contemporary analysis. In a signi?cant number of cases, the potentially harmful consequences of TNC activities seem to have been overcome by adequate countervailing state actions.

  18. Real-world fuel economy and CO{sub 2} emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles

    Ploetz, Patrick; Funke, Simon Arpad; Jochem, Patrick [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI), Karlsruhe (Germany). Competence Center Energiepolitik und Energiesysteme

    2015-07-01

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) combine electric propulsion with an internal combustion engine. Their potential to reduce transport related green-house gas emissions highly depends on their actual usage and electricity provision. Various studies underline their environmental and economic advantages, but are based on standardised driving cycles, simulations or small PHEV fleets. Here, we analyse real-world fuel economy of PHEV and the factors influencing it based on about 2,000 actual PHEV that have been observed over more than a year in the U.S. and Germany. We find that real-world fuel economy of PHEV differ widely among users. The main factors explaining this variation are the annual mileage, the regularity of daily driving, and the likelihood of long-distance trips. Current test cycle fuel economy ratings neglect these factors. Despite the broad range of PHEV fuel economies, the test cycle fuel economy ratings can be close to empiric PHEV fleet averages if the average annual mile-age is about 17,000 km. For the largest group of PHEV in our data, the Chevrolet Volt, we find the average fuel economy to be 1.45 litres/100 km at an average electric driving share of 78%. The resulting real-world tank-to-wheel CO{sub 2} emissions of these PHEV are 42 gCO{sub 2}/km and the annual CO{sub 2} savings in the U.S. amount to about 50 Mt. In conclusion, the variance of empirical PHEV fuel economy is considerably higher than of conventional vehicles. This should be taken into account by future test cycles and high electric driving shares should be incentivised.

  19. Globalisation and allergy.

    Castelain, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Globalisation brings patients more and more into contact with products or food from other cultures or countries. Europeans may be confronted with allergens not yet known in Europe - such as dimethylfumarate - responsible for contact allergy epidemics. Moreover, "low cost" goods, not always legally imported into Europe, sometimes may lead to European legislation being circumvented and thus bring our patients into contact with components that have been banned from manufacturing processes or strongly regulated, such as nickel in jewelry or telephones, some colouring agents in clothes or preservatives in cosmetics. Disinfection measures for freight containers arriving from other continents into our harbours lead to fumigants and other toxic products contaminating the air and the transported products or goods. Globalisation can not only elicit contact allergy but also airborne contact dermatitis or food allergy. The aim of this paper is not to make an exhaustive review of cutaneous allergic problems elicited by globalisation, but to illustrate this new worldwide problem with a few meaningful examples.

  20. Malaysia and the Knowledge Economy: Building a World-Class Higher Education System. Human Development Sector Reports

    Regel, Omporn; Salmi, Jamil; Watkins, Alfred; Tan, Hong; Dawkins, John; Saroyan, Alenoush; Vestergaard, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    This report was prepared at the request of the Government of Malaysia (GOM) as a contribution to the long term development objectives for the university sector under the Ninth Malaysia Plan. The GOM is considering new policy directions to make the country a more competitive player in the world economy. Such a strategy will require bold innovations…

  1. Simply a Matter of Luck & Looks? Predicting Elections When Both the World Economy and the Psychology of Faces Count

    Garretsen, Harry; Stoker, Janka I.; Alessie, Rob; Lammers, Joris

    2014-01-01

    Economic research shows that candidates have a higher chance of getting (re-)elected when they have the luck that the world economy does well even though this is beyond their control and unrelated to their competence. Psychological research demonstrates that candidates increase their chances if they

  2. Financing energy investments world-wide and in the economies in transition

    Brendow, K.

    1998-01-01

    The necessity of mobilizing the finance under given circumstances is pointed out. The energy sector investments needs correspond to only 3-4% of world GDP or 6-7% of world capital formation. In most developing countries mobilizing financing is a issue, where the risk/return ratio of a given energy investment project does not compare favourably with competing projects and if their handicap is not compensating for by public financing or government guarantees. Compared to the other regions, the energy systems of the economies in transition absorb a high proportion of domestic capital. This is due to past and continuing supply-oriented energy policies and inefficiencies and the export orientation of the energy-rich countries, and to limited domestic capital markets. As a result only a estimated 9-13% of long-term investment 'needs' is presently financed. The root of the problem is slow progress in the reform of energy and capital markets at a time government withdraw from financing and guaranteeing energy investments. Recommendations include transition to sustainable energy strategies ; the liberalization of energy prices and tariffs; the phasing out of subsides and cross-subsides; the stabilization of tax and depreciation regimes; neutrality with regard of the various forms of ownership; reliable law enforcement; non-discrimination of foreign investors, shareholders, competitors; the ratification of the Energy Charter Treaty; and generally, institutional and regulatory frameworks that address market imperfections. Regarding domestic capital markets the goal is to increase traded volume, reduce volatility, and avoid discrimination and favour international integration

  3. Cities as command and control centres of the world economy: An empirical analysis, 2006–2015

    Csomós György

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As a result of their rapid economic growth, several powerful corporate giants have emerged in developing countries, especially in China, operating not only in the traditional manufacturing sector, but also in high-tech industries and finance. Major cities in developing countries have gradually become important command and control centres of the global economy, and have also become powerful enough to be in the same tier as major cities of developed countries around the world. In this paper, I examine the position of cities as command and control centres on the basis of the power of their headquartered corporations. The result shows that until 2012, New York, London, Tokyo, and Paris; i.e. the global cities, were the leading command and control centres. However, the gap between these global cities and Beijing gradually closed, and by 2015, the Chinese capital outranked all the global cities. The outstanding performance of Beijing-based corporations that operate in financial, energy, and construction services sectors is the driving force behind Beijing’s increasing global power. In addition, the leading position of the global cities as command and control centres has been threatened by the San Francisco-San Jose metropolitan region, a newly emerging economic hub in the United States.

  4. TRANSITION IN TERMS OF GLOBALISATION

    Miroslav Milutinović

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the essential constituents of the term transition, in Serbia as well as in other postsocialistic countries, refers to the transition from one development concept onto another one (extensive and mobilising, which is completely different (market-based and innovation-oriented. Market behaviour rules have changed to a great extent, as well as the increasingly present innovations in the field of technology, and introduced certain innovations in business orientation of companies. The struggle for market share is becoming more aggressive and dynamic enabling the survival of exclusively those companies which have implanted high flexibility and innovation levels into their business ambience. Globalisation is inherent in capitalism, it is its constituent logic. In future, new rules will have to be brought which would allow of the managment function to be performed within the complete business policy mutually agreed upon betwen the representatives of the capital owner and those of the personell. These regulations are necessary for long-term efficiency and profitability of private sector, as well as for the final success of economy.

  5. Study of emissions and fuel economy for parallel hybrid versus conventional vehicles on real world and standard driving cycles

    Ahmed Al-Samari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Parallel hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs increasing rapidly in the automobile markets. However, the benefits out of using this kind of vehicles are still concerned a lot of costumers. This work investigated the expected benefits (such as decreasing emissions and increasing fuel economy from using the parallel HEV in comparison to the conventional vehicle model of the real-world and standard driving cycles. The software Autonomie used in this study to simulate the parallel HEV and conventional models on these driving cycles.The results show that the fuel economy (FE can be improved significantly up to 68% on real-world driving cycle, which is represented mostly city activities. However, the FE improvement was limited (10% on the highway driving cycle, and this is expected since the using of brake system was infrequent. Moreover, the emissions from parallel HEV decreased about 40% on the real-world driving cycle, and decreased 11% on the highway driving cycle. Finally, the engine efficiency, improved about 12% on the real-world driving cycle, and about 7% on highway driving cycle. Keywords: Emissions, Hybrid electric vehicles, Fuel economy, Real-world driving cycle

  6. Globalisation and the internationalisation of higher education in sub ...

    A decade later, we argue for a radical change in the traditional ... of globalisation are the World Bank (WB), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and the World .... in SSA for the school year ending 2005 is still very low (UNESCO, 2008). The.

  7. Globalisation, Faith and Terrorism: Religious Opposition to Modern ...

    The world is now moving from secular wars to religious motivated wars, from conventional wars to unconventional wars, that is, terrorism. This new phenomenon has been fuelled by globalisation and the drive to turn the world into a single global village. At the local level, Nigeria has had its own share of religious motivated ...

  8. Is globalisation outpacing ethics and social responsibility in occupational health?

    Voyi, Kuku

    2006-01-01

    The definition of globalisation is varied. However, one certainty is that in a globalised world the borders are porous in many aspects; people movement, goods exchange, knowledge sharing and redistribution of labour. The concept of globalisation, its impact on society, and its direction leads to a two-sided argument. Could this be the effect of globalisation on ethics and social responsibility, as it is perceived? This paper endeavours to further our understanding of the dynamic relationship of globalisation, ethics and social responsibility in occupational health. The multidisciplinary activity approach to occupational health was used. The globalisation, ethical and social responsibility relationship of the activities in occupational health was analysed using a schematic map of the direct and indirect influences. The analysis revealed areas that can be clustered to address the interaction between driving forces in occupational health ethics and social responsibility for a healthy workforce. Each cluster is discussed highlighting areas of concern. In the discussion proposals are made on how we can modify the way we think in order to avoid repeating mistakes. Suggestion is made of using an innovative method borrowed from other disciplines and adopted for use in occupational health. A partnership approach is proposed and explored on how it will be applied in situations of unequal balance of power.

  9. School Curriculum, Globalisation and the Constitution of Policy Problems and Solutions

    Winter, Christine

    2012-01-01

    To varying degrees, education policy reforms around the world are driven by educational discourses relating to globalisation. At the same time, national and local histories, cultures and politics mediate the effects of globalisation discourses. This paper employs methods of analysis that draw on the concepts of "vernacular globalization"…

  10. Adopting and Implementing Globalised Policies of Intercultural Education: The Example of Cyprus

    Hajisoteriou, Christina; Angelides, Panayiotis

    2017-01-01

    Globalisation has heavily influenced the terrain of intercultural education policy development and implementation in multiple countries around the world. To this end, in this article, we seek to introduce a broader focus of analysis encompassing not only the development of globalised policies of intercultural education, but also the adoption,…

  11. Globalisation, football and emerging urban 'tribes' : fans of the European leagues in a Nigerian city

    Onyebueke, V.U.

    2015-01-01

    Football is arguably the world's most popular and globalised sport, and it has been implicated in the continuing efforts in social science disciplines to understand current globalisation processes. Electronic colonialism, the metonym for the dominance of global mediascape by transnational media

  12. Bangladesh apparel industry and its workers in a changing world economy

    Ahmed, N.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis explores and analyses recent changes and challenges faced by the apparel industry of Bangladesh and the consequences of those for the Bangladesh economy. More specifically, it explores and analyses the importance of the apparel industry in the Bangladesh economy, the challenges faced by

  13. DIRECTIONS AND MEASURES FOR THE RE-LAUNCHING OF THE ROMANIAN ECONOMY IN THE CONTEXT OF THE WORLD ECONOMIC CRISIS

    Claudia Loredana JUNCU

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The re-launching of the Romanian economy in the context of the world economic crisis can be implemented by using a set of principles and economic measures that will lead to a strict monetary policy, a fiscal and budgetary discipline as well as a reduction of the inflation. This paper presents a series of reforms that Romania needs in the present context, to start the process of re-launching the economy that is currently in a significant descending trend. It is necessary that all the economic and political actors participate actively in progressively meeting the competitive conditions of the Comunitary economies. Corrective, stimulating and functional measures need to be undertaken to permit the applicability towards all the actors that define the structure of the economic environment. The application and enforcement of the needed anti-crisis measures will determine a stop of the decline and the creation of the premises to economical re-launching.

  14. World-Economy Centrality and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: A New Look at the Position in the Capitalist World-System and Environmental Pollution

    Paul Prew

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the ever-growing concern of climate change, much attention has been paid to the factors driving carbon dioxide emissions. Previous research in the World-Systems perspective has identified a relationship between carbon dioxide emissions and position in the world-economy. This study intends to build on the previous research by developing a new, more parsimonious indicator of World-System position based on Immanuel Wallerstein’s theoretical concepts of incorporation and core-periphery processes. The new World-System indicator is derived from the centrality measure in network analysis based on import data from the International Monetary Fund’s Direction of Trade Statistics. Based on the theoretical concepts of core-periphery processes, carbon dioxide emissions are predicted to rise based on the predominance of energy-intensive, high-technology, core processes within the nation. The results tend to demonstrate a strong relationship between carbon dioxide emissions and position in the world-economy, and the new World-System position indicator is more strongly related with carbon dioxide emissions than Gross Domestic Product per capita.

  15. RELIGIOUS RESPONSES TO GLOBALISATION

    Hatib A. Kadir

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Sociological discussion of globalisation is preoccupied with the political, economic, and military dimension of it, with little attention to its religious aspect. This paper attempts to trace the impacts of globalisation on religion and religious responses, the argument of which derives mainly from the so-called “Bridge-Building Program” organised by CRCS & ICRS-UGM in 2008. It argues that though they share a common concern, people of different faiths are at risk of deepening the problems rather than offering solutions in view of their different responses for which we categorise them into different but overlapping categories -ideological, ambivalent, integrative, exclusive, and imitative. It then leads to a more fundamental question of whether interfaith cooperation is possible given those different and sometime opposing responses. [Dalam kajian sosiologi, diskusi mengenai globalisasi kerap kali semata-mata ditinjau dari sisi politik, enonomi dan militer, sementara dimensi agama sering kali dikesampingkan. Artikel ini membahas dampak globalisasi terhadap agama dan respon komunitas agama terhadap globalisasi. Data yang muncul dalam artikel ini diambil dari sebuah workshop berjudul“Bridge- Building Program.” Melalui artikel ini, saya berpendapat bahwa, meskikomunitas agama-agama memiliki keprihatinan yang sama terhadap dampak globalisasi, namun respon mereka cenderung mempertajam persoalan yang diakibatkan globalisasi, ketimbang memberikan solusi. Respon tersebut dalam dikategorikan –meski tidak kaku- dalam: respon ideologis, ambivalen, integratif, ekslusif dan imitatif. Selanjutnya, artikel juga mengulas pada pertanyaan mendasar mengenai apakah kerjasama antar agama mungkin dilakukan menyimak ragam respon yang saling bertentangan tersebut.

  16. Tourism Development as a Dimension of Globalisation: Experiences and Policies of China and Australia

    Tisdell, Clement A.

    2004-01-01

    Both China and Australia have participated in the process of growing economic globalisation in recent decades. This paper compares trends in the openness of China’s and Australia’s economy in terms of international trade and foreign direct investment, and then examines global trends in international tourism. This dimension of growing globalisation indicates an accelerating trend in the second half of the 20th century. The article shows how China was able to take advantage of this trend as a c...

  17. Qualifications Frameworks and their conflicting social imaginaries of globalisation

    Sarauw, Laura Louise

    2013-01-01

    Critics of the European Bologna process often see it as a univocal standardization of higher education. By exploring how different qualifications frameworks currently project unlike imaginaries of and responses to globalisation, this article takes a different stance. As a key point, I argue...... that the well-known imaginary of globalisation as a change towards a more diverse and unforeseeable world, which calls for the development of flexible, lifelong learners with a broad knowledge base and strong democratic competencies that we find in the overarching qualifications framework of the Bologna process......, is a highly contested imaginary. In contrast, for example, the Danish qualifications framework of 2003 projects an imaginary of globalisation as a change towards a smaller and more predictable world, which enables a novel and more efficient alignment of the curriculum towards specific professional needs...

  18. Higher education in the era of globalisation

    Siddiqui, Kalim

    2014-01-01

    The article will analyse the impact of globalisation on higher education. Some have argued that globalisation will\\ud provide equal opportunities. While others claim that globalisation would mean the McDonaldisation of the university and\\ud also worldwide inequality. The current pressure on higher education mainly due to neoliberal globalisation has increased\\ud the role for private sector in higher education. The paper examines the realities of globalisation in higher education to\\ud highlig...

  19. Globalisation and schooling: equity and access issues

    Zajda, Joseph

    2011-03-01

    This review essay focuses on the prominence given to globalisation and discourses of globalisation in education reforms and pedagogy, as well as the way conceptual thinking in this area has changed and developed, due to competing ideologies, forces of globalisation and political, economic and cultural transformations. It analyses and evaluates the shifts in methodological approaches to globalisation and its effects on education policy and pedagogy. It focuses on forces of globalisation, ideology, social inequality and implications for equity and access to quality education.

  20. Simply a Matter of Luck & Looks? Predicting Elections when Both the World Economy and the Psychology of Faces Count

    Harry Garretsen; Janka I. Stoker; Rob Alessie; Joris Lammers

    2014-01-01

    Economic research shows that candidates have a higher chance of getting (re-)elected when they have the luck that the world economy does well even though this is beyond their control and unrelated to their competence. Psychological research demonstrates that candidates increase their chances if they have the right looks, a facial characteristic that is also unrelated to a politician’s actual policies. We combine these two strands of literature by assessing the relative strength of luck and ...

  1. The Limits of Cultural Globalisation?

    Daniele Conversi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The proliferation of studies on virtually every aspect of globalisation has not clarified the central terminological conundrum of the field. Globalisation studies do not share a univocal set of terms and concepts, so that the loose usage of the very term globalisation has led to polysemy and homonymy. Accordingly, ‘globalisation’ is now used to describe everything and its opposite, from the Roman Empire to WW1, from cosmopolitan behaviour to Genghis Khan’s conquests, and even the Neolithic age. The task of critical globalisation studies should thus be to re-contextualize the phenomenon and re-locate it where it belongs. In contrast, the term Americanisation has been used more sparely, therefore maintaining an autonomous conceptual strength. However, both manufactured opinion and scholarly studies tend to argue that globalisation and Americanisation are wholly distinct phenomena. Multi-National Corporations (MNCs have adamantly defended that they are not vehicles of Americanisation and that the result of their actions in neoliberal markets is rather a form of ‘indigenization’ or ‘domestication’ through adaptation to local cultures. Similarly, much of the globalisation literature has not come to term with the unidirectional nature of globalisation in the field of culture. This article argues that both globalisation and Americanisation should be historicized, and their respective trajectories identified as beginning in distinct epochs, operating through waves of diffusion and within specific ideological frameworks, and culminating in periods of military and economic expansion. Finally, I argue that, if cultural globalisation is studied in tandem with Americanisation, it can be conceptually circumscribed and its finite nature better identified.

  2. Bangladesh apparel industry and its workers in a changing world economy

    Ahmed, N.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis explores and analyses recent changes and challenges faced by the apparel industry of Bangladesh and the consequences of those for the Bangladesh economy. More specifically, it explores and analyses the importance of the apparel industry in the Bangladesh economy, the challenges faced by this industry, impacts of implementation of various international trade rules on the apparel industry, consequences of Bangladesh's attempts to enter in bilateral and regional free trade agreements...

  3. The Emerging World Order

    PETER COLLECOTT

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It is common ground amongst almost all commentators that the world has changed radically over the past 25 years – the 25 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall heralded the ending of the Cold War, the reunification of a tragically divided Europe, and the acceleration of the process of globalisation which has its only comparable period in the decades leading up to the First World War in 1914. When analyzing the Emerging World Order it is important to cover more than Brazil economy or any other individual BRICs or other Emerging Powers. Instead, our analysis will provide a global view about the economic and political global power structures which are evolving and forming before our eyes, and then to talk about the challenges these emerging realities pose for us in Europe, and in the West in general.

  4. Mediterranean Migrations: Regionalisms Versus Globalisation

    Martin Baldwin-Eduards

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper challenges the claim of globalisation as a cause ofimmigration into Southern Europe and, on an empirical basis, identifies regionalisation as being the primary issue, along with networked migratory patterns. However, the changing patterns of immigration do present challenges to both state and society. It is argued here that recent policy responses in Portugal, Italy and Spain have been inconsistent and irrational – reflecting more the ‘securitisation’ of migration than European reality. Earlier policy innovations are identified, by country and date: most of these have now been abandoned. It is suggested that all of Southern Europe has converged onto a statist, restrictionist model of immigration control that was formerly held only by Greece. The principal characteristics of this model are outlined, along with a migration flowchart and indicative data for migrant flows and sub-flows in Italy and Spain. In the final section, I try to show that the needs of the economy cannot be predicted, immigration cannot becontrolled in the manner currently being enforced across Southern Europe, and attempts to do so will damage rather than improve economic productivity and growth. The concept of an accomodating immigration policy is advanced, whereby the state tries to manage the needs of both employers and potential migrants. Six guidelines for policy development are suggested – most of which have alreadybeen successfully carried out in the European Union. These are the following: migration in order to find a job; circular cross-border migration; EU level negotiation of readmission agreements; the need for a variety of migration-for-employment schemes; legal residence should not depend upon continuity of employment; and discreet legalisation will still be needed in Southern Europe.

  5. Impact of Globalisation on Harmonisation of Financial Reporting for SMEs

    Mamić Sačer, Ivana; Smrekar, Nikolina; Žager, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    Small and medium-sized enterprises form a dominant part of the overall economy in most countries, both in developed and in transition or developing countries. Consequently, as a result of globalisation and the increasing role played by small and medium-sized enterprises, the need for harmonisation and standardisation of financial reporting is of particular importance for this segment of entrepreneurship. This paper focuses on financial reporting of small and medium-sized enterprises under the...

  6. Shadow economies and corruption all over the world: revised estimates for 120 countries

    Schneider, Friedrich G.; Buehn, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Estimations of the shadow economies for 120 countries, including developing, Eastern Europe and Central Asian and high income OECD countries over 1999 to 2006 are presented. The average size of the shadow economy (as a percent of "official" GDP) in 2004/05 in 76 developing countries is 35.5%, in 19 Eastern and Central Asian countries 36.7% and in 25 high income OECD countries 15.5%. An increased burden of taxation and social security contributions, combined with labour market regulations are ...

  7. Globalisation and Nigerian Education in the 21st Century: Issues ...

    This paper seeks to establish the importance of education in Nigeria within the global framework. On this basis, an investment in building human capital to drive technological innovation and economic growth is imperative. In the case of Nigeria, gains of globalisation can be maximised by accepting aid from the World Bank ...

  8. (Post-)Migration in the age of globalisation

    Petersen, Anne Ring; Schramm, Moritz

    2017-01-01

    In their introduction to this special issue, the editors first outline the overall thematic content of the issue. The editors suggest that art, culture, and aesthetics have an important role to play with respect to the intensified migration and globalisation that characterise the world today, bec...

  9. (De)constructing globalisation | van Niekerk | South African Journal ...

    The modernist drive for order contrasts with the post-modern acceptance of pluralism. The world finds itself in a crisis of difference, and we can no longer count on a harmonious society that embraces a dominant status quo with its values. Globalisation as an organising principle seems to contradict the complexity of a ...

  10. Globalisation and mental disorders. Overview with relation to depression.

    Bhugra, Dinesh; Mastrogianni, Anastasia

    2004-01-01

    Globalisation is the process by which traditional boundaries of cultures are changing. Industrialisation, urbanisation and influence of the media are influencing idioms of distress across cultures. To discuss the role of globalisation, using the epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical presentation and treatment of depression across various cultures as an example. Recent studies focusing on transcultural aspects of depression were reviewed and summarised. Cultural, social and religious mores account for variations in the presentation of depression across cultures. Somatic symptoms are common presenting features throughout the world and may serve as cultural idioms of distress, but psychological symptoms can usually be found when probed. Feelings of guilt and suicide rates vary across cultures and depression may be underdiagnosed. Training packages could enhance clinicians'cultural competency in multicultural settings. However, globalisation is likely to influence idioms of distress and pathways to care in ways that are difficult to predict.

  11. JPRS Report, Soviet Union, World Economy and International Affairs, No. 4, April 1988.

    1988-08-03

    to be correct to consider the UN as a certain " embryo " of the "world government" to come. Petrovsky is against counterposing the "diplomacy of...problems—Europe’s place in the modern world (and, correspondingly, the place of one’s country in Europe and the world) and Europe’s destiny (and

  12. Globalisation, football and emerging urban 'tribes': fans of the European leagues in a Nigerian city

    Onyebueke, V.U.

    2015-01-01

    Football is arguably the world's most popular and globalised sport, and it has been implicated in the continuing efforts in social science disciplines to understand current globalisation processes. Electronic colonialism, the metonym for the dominance of global mediascape by transnational media corporations like Sky and Fox has combined with the ongoing commodification of football to create a complex world-wide web of football authorities, clubs, players and agents, sport equipment makers, sp...

  13. The world economy of petroleum products and the strategy of a petroleum company from exporting country: Cases of SONATRACH (Algeria), KPC (Kuwait), PEMEX (Mexico), PDVSA (Venezuela). First volume

    Preure, M.

    1992-12-01

    This thesis contains 2 volumes. In this first volume, the author describes in a first part the world economy of petroleum and natural gas products: Historical aspects and relationships between the different actors; General structure of the world economy of petroleum and gas products and actual trends. In a second part, the relationships between petroleum products, national economic development and problem of technology conservation are studied. The cases of Algeria, Kuwait, Mexico and Venezuela are given. 258 refs., 103 tabs

  14. Globalising the classical foundations of IPE thought

    Eric Helleiner

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Current efforts to teach and research the historical foundations of IPE thought in classical political economy in the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries centre largely on European and American thinkers. If a more extensive 'global conversation' is to be fostered in the field today, the perspectives of thinkers in other regions need to be recognised, and brought into the mainstream of its intellectual history. As a first step towards 'globalising' the classical foundations of IPE thought, this article demonstrates some ways in which thinkers located beyond Europe and the United States engaged with and contributed to debates associated with the three well-known classical traditions on which current IPE scholarship often draws: economic liberalism, economic nationalism and Marxism. It also reveals the extensive nature of 'global conversations' about IPE issues in this earlier era.

  15. A hydrogen economy and its impact on the world as we know it

    Blanchette, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    An assortment of governmental, technological, environmental, and economic factors has combined to spur renewed interest in alternatives to petroleum, and especially in hydrogen. While there is no clear consensus on the viability of the technology, governments and corporations alike have vigorous hydrogen research programs. The result is that hydrogen may stand on the verge of becoming a true successor to oil. A transition from oil to hydrogen would alter familiar global economic and political structures in profound ways. The ramifications will influence developed and developing nations, oil importers, and exporters alike. New alliances among governments, corporations, and other groups may challenge existing notions of governance. Although a hydrogen-based economy may be decades away, the vision for it requires near- and mid-term thinking to manage the transition smoothly. Further, hydrogen is only a metaphor; any change from the current oil economy will entail dramatic changes to the global status quo that must be planned for now

  16. Modern trends of development of the world economy and financial competitiveness of enterprises

    Volkova Nadezhda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers modern trends in the development of the global economy, the dynamics of the activity of the domestic economy. The statistical data of the share of loss-making enterprises on the domestic market are analyzed. The importance of competitiveness and financial stability of enterprises in modern conditions is considered, the relationship between competitiveness and financial stability is indicated. The notion of financial competitiveness is formulated. Financial competitiveness is analyzed from the point of view of enterprise management and on the parameters for assessing the financial stability of enterprises. Methods for assessing the financial competitiveness of enterprises have been identified. The primary calculation of financial competitiveness indicators for PJSC “SF Almaz” was carried out based on the selected methods. The analysis of the obtained calculation results is carried out. Methods are proposed to ensure financial competitiveness of Russian companies.

  17. The Governance of the Black Holes of the World Economy: Shadow Banking and Offshore Finance

    Palan, R.; Nesvetailova, A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on regulatory challenges posed by the two interconnected structures of the global financial system – the economy of tax havens (or offshore financial centres), and the shadow banking system. The financial crisis of 2007-09 has revealed that tax havens structures and shadow banking entities play a central role in the practise of financial institutions reliant on financial innovation. Thriving on complexity, opaque networks and driven by arbitrage, the two phenomena pose trem...

  18. World trade organization and structural changes in economy of a region

    Yelena Davidovna Vasman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the results of the research dedicated to the probable consequences of Russian entry to WTO are represented. Based on the analysis of the opposite points of view, it is shown that changes depend more on the economic situation in the country and not on the entry itself. The series of negative starting characteristics of Russian economy is noticed. Among those are the significant spatial differentiation of particular regions and the disproportion of the regional development. It also noted that Russian entry to WTO may deepen this disproportion. The prognosis of economic structural changes is proposed to implement in the two fields: in the traditional economic sector and the field of the knowledge-based economy. The method was developed for determining the first field of prognosis, which approbation confirmed the probable declining trend in traditional economic sectors. The task considering the second field was solved on the basis of the research in technology and innovation capital transformation processes on the example of two groups of countries: already WTO members but still developing countries and developing countries beyond WTO. The results of the research show the WTO entry neutral influence on structural changes in the knowledge-based economy.

  19. International Inequality in the Age of Globalization: Japanese Economic Ascent and the Restructuring of the Capitalist World-Economy

    Paul S. Ciccantell

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how Japanese ?rms and the Japanese state constructed a development model based on the steel industry as a generative sector that drove Japan’s economic ascent in the world-historical context of U.S. hegemony. We make three arguments in this paper. First, there is a new model of capital accumulation that does create new forms of social inequality by redistributing costs and bene?ts in very di?erent ways than earlier models. Second, Japanese ?rms and the Japanese state created this new model of capital accumulation and social inequality via mechanisms including joint ventures, long term contracts, and other forms of international trade and investment, not U.S.-based transnational corporations, as is usually assumed. Third, world-systems theory reconstructed through the lens of the new historical materialism explains this restructuring of the capitalist world-economy as the outcome of Japan’s economic ascent over the last ?fty years. Further, we argue that this new model of capital accumulation has had similar impacts on redistributing the costs and bene?ts of development between core and peripheral regions of the capitalist world-economy in a wide range of global industries. These strategies created a tightly linked set of technological and organizational innovations to overcome the natural and social obstacles to Japanese development, dramatically increase Japan’s international economic competitiveness by lowering production costs in all sectors of the economy, turn Japan into the world’s largest exporter of manufactured products, restructure a range of global industries, and recreate the world-system hierarchy in support of Japanese development. In particular, organizational inno-vations in the use of long term contracts and joint ventures in raw materials industries to foster global excess capacity and lower rents to resource extracting ?rms and states reallocated the costs of providing the material building blocks of

  20. The Marginalization of Globally-Born Businesses: Ethnically Divided Trade in Hamburg and the World Economy

    Rezaei, Shahamak

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: Persian carpets have long been a major commodity in the world. Persian carpets have long been a major commodity in the world market, controlled by the Tehran Carpet Bazaar and the Hamburg Free Harbor. Today about 200 private traders in the Hamburg Free Harbor area export...

  1. The New Geographical Structures of the Capitalist World-Economy and the Role of the BRICS: a View from Brazil

    Alexandre de Freitas Barbosa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an alternative theoretical framework in order to understand the new nature of the capitalist world-economy and its corresponding international division of labor. It studies the meaning of BRICS by examining the once-held belief that the world was divided by a center, semi-periphery and periphery; it analyses the newly established divisions of intra-South and intra-North. These countries operate under various forms of capitalism, thus creating new power relations that work collectively from a geopolitical standpoint. Despite weak economic ties, with the exception of China, leaders of the BRICS are attempting to promote a reform within multilateral organizations and the G-20. The objective of this paper is to shed light on such challenges to this new strategy facing these countries, particularly from the perspective of Brazil’s foreign policy.

  2. Christianity and globalisation: An alternative ethical response ...

    This article critically evaluated the role of Christian Ethics in response to globalisation. It showed that ethical critiques of globalisation inevitably fall short when Christianity's historical contributions to processes of globalisation are neglected or de-emphasised. A Christian Ethics that attempts completely to wash its hands of ...

  3. Fourth worlds and neo-Fordism: American Apparel and the cultural economy of consumer anxiety

    Littler, J.; Moor, L.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the strategies of the ‘sweatshop-free’ clothing company American Apparel in the context of ongoing debates over the cultural turn and cultural economy. American Apparel’s key selling point is that it does not outsource: it manufactures in Los Angeles, pays ‘good’ wages and provides healthcare, yet the workers are not unionised and the migrant labour it depends upon is often temporary. These same employees are used in promotional material to create its brand identity of a...

  4. Corporate taxes in the world economy: reforming the taxation of cross-border income

    Grubert, Harry; Altshuler, Rosanne

    2006-01-01

    Proposals for the reform of the taxation of cross-border income are evaluated within the general context of the corporate tax in an open economy. We focus on the various behavioral decisions that can be affected such as the location of income and its repatriation. The two income tax proposals considered are: (1) dividend exemption and (2) burden neutral worldwide taxation in which all foreign subsidiary income is included currently in the U.S. worldwide tax base, and at the same time the corp...

  5. Economic growth in Kosovo and in other countries in terms of globalization of world economy

    Lumnije Thaçi

    2013-07-01

    It is important to consider the fact that, despite the recent crisis, economic growth model, based on the deepening of EU integration process, in terms of finance, trade, labour markets and institutions, remains as best model for developing countries and Kosovo itself. Special treatment is given to achieved achievements and projections for the following years under policies compiled by the Government of the Republic of Kosovo to enable generic analysis for concrete situation of our national economy. Also, this paper shall explain the underlying factors which will influence on a more accelerated economic development.

  6. The Political Economy of World Heavyweight Boxing during the Great Depression

    Vlad ROŞCA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to show how boxing managed to remain an affordable and consumable good for the USAmerican citizens in the times of the Great Depression of 1929-1933, when industrial production was closing. Moreover, while other economic activities faced problems, boxing continued to produce money. The research analyzes the economic market of professional heavyweight boxing, presenting some of the tools that helped promoters produce and sell the fight shows to the consumers – like price discrimination and cartel agreements, for example, and, thus, helped generating incomes and assured money circulation in the economy.

  7. The Influence Of Globalisation And Modern Technological Changes On Manufacturing Industries In Libya

    Nuri M. Triki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation and new technologies are having an intense impact on the manufacturing industries. This is affecting business global and might demand new strategies and policies for manufacturing companies. Libya like several other countries in the Middle East and also is among the few developing African economies has been facing problems related to its productivity in industrial sector. Manufacturing industries in Libya was reared to offer better products and services as part of the government plans to reconstruct their economy and improve its industrial companies. So as to face these problems manufacturing sectors need to increase their production and they also require a clear strategy and policies towards an efficient supply chain about modern technology. A new technology is one of the improvement initiatives that can be used to enhance industrial performance competitiveness and decrease its costs by eliminating of waste and increasing added value activities. The significance of new technology and modern systems in the industrial world has enhanced in this decade because of the benefits that they bring to the factories and companies. The aims of this research is to investigate new technology strategies that will enable the Libyan manufacturing industries to shift towards an increase production and reduce its costs as well as to quantify the modern technological changes and the role of globalisation in addition to declaration of its effect on the growth additionally development of the Libyan industrial sector and competitiveness lastly moreover this survey make a recommendations to establish systems that improve the emergent needs of the national industrial sector.

  8. Meeting the Challenge of Earthquake Risk Globalisation: Towards the Global Earthquake Model GEM (Sergey Soloviev Medal Lecture)

    Zschau, J.

    2009-04-01

    Earthquake risk, like natural risks in general, has become a highly dynamic and globally interdependent phenomenon. Due to the "urban explosion" in the Third World, an increasingly complex cross linking of critical infrastructure and lifelines in the industrial nations and a growing globalisation of the world's economies, we are presently facing a dramatic increase of our society's vulnerability to earthquakes in practically all seismic regions on our globe. Such fast and global changes cannot be captured with conventional earthquake risk models anymore. The sciences in this field are, therefore, asked to come up with new solutions that are no longer exclusively aiming at the best possible quantification of the present risks but also keep an eye on their changes with time and allow to project these into the future. This does not apply to the vulnerablity component of earthquake risk alone, but also to its hazard component which has been realized to be time-dependent, too. The challenges of earthquake risk dynamics and -globalisation have recently been accepted by the Global Science Forum of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD - GSF) who initiated the "Global Earthquake Model (GEM)", a public-private partnership for establishing an independent standard to calculate, monitor and communicate earthquake risk globally, raise awareness and promote mitigation.

  9. Collaborative Economy

    that are emerging from them, and how governments are responding to these new challenges. In doing so, the book provides both theoretical and practical insights into the future of tourism in a world that is, paradoxically, becoming both increasingly collaborative and individualized. Table of Contents Preface 1.The...... collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...... in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge 5.Networked cultures in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 6.Policy and regulatory perspectives in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge PART II - Disruptions, innovations and transformations 7.Regulating innovation in the collaborative economy: An examination...

  10. Reframing aid in a world where the poor live in emerging economies

    Gilles Carbonnier

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of International Development Policy analyses the major shifts affecting traditional development assistance, particularly with regard to global public policy and the emerging economies. In this introductory chapter, the authors examine the changing development landscape and the shifting geography of poverty to question the role of aid organisations in middle-income economies (MICs. They argue that continued donor engagement in these richer countries is warranted for two reasons. First, and in the best interest of lower-income countries (LICs, traditional donors and MICs must cooperate in the design and implementation of global policies to protect global public goods. Second, foreign aid agencies can assist MICs in reducing poverty at home. They must, however, tread lightly in this political endeavour that often implies supporting domestic drivers of change in pushing for tax reform and improved public service delivery. The authors focus in particular on the pivotal role of the emerging middle classes and civil society organisations in MICs. Finally, they introduce policy coherence for sustainable development as a shared framework for MICs and high-income countries (HICs to effectively address the poverty and global public goods agendas.

  11. The impact of globalisation

    Thornley, Clare; Doherty, Eileen; Carcary, Marian

    2014-01-01

    A new twist in Europe’s history is just around the corner. The third industrial revolution is underway and our actions will determine Europe’s position in the emerging new economy. Joining the digital age is not just about adopting the latest technologies, but also about favouring risk taking, stirring faith in the future and supporting entrepreneurism. We need to reinstate the passion for progress that Europe once embodied, that very passion which drove Europe when she sent...

  12. Mediating Discourse in a Globalising World

    McIlvenny, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Social and political theory has taken a decidedly 'global' turn in recent years, resulting in a sustained critique of our conceptualisations of 'society' and the 'nation-state'. Social theorists ask us to refocus on, for example, transnationality, global orderings, hybrid collectives, flows, mobi......-to-be-adopted' is figured as a quasi-object, a heterogeneous assemblage of biology and culture, and thus how its origin, identity and agency is performatively distributed across the social and discursive field....

  13. Youth Employment in a Globalising World

    Gough, Katherine V.; Langevang, Thilde; Owusu, George

    2013-01-01

    and the nature of policies introduced to tackle youth (un)employment. It provides an overview of the six papers that make up this special issue and shows how highlighting the complexities and diversities of youth employment strategies in sub-Saharan Africa provides valuable lessons, both for enhancing current...

  14. China and the World Economy : A Global Value Chain Perspective on Exports, Incomes and Jobs

    Los, Bart; Timmer, Marcel; Vries, Gaaitzen J. de

    2012-01-01

    Based on a new dataset of world input-output tables we analyze the impact of foreign demand on Chinese factor incomes and employment since 1995. We extend the global input-output methodology introduced by Johnson and Noguera (2012) and find that exports of value added rapidly increased after 2001,

  15. Soil Erosion: Quiet Crisis in the World Economy. Worldwatch Paper 60.

    Brown, Lester R.; Wolf, Edward C.

    Although soil erosion is a natural process, it has increased to the point where it far exceeds the natural formation of new soil. However, with only occasional exceptions, national agricultural and population policies have failed to take soil depletion into account. Projections of world food production always incorporate estimates of future…

  16. JPRS Report, Soviet Union, World Economy & International Relations, No. 7, July 1988

    1988-12-29

    extensively in the monograph by A.P. Butenko "Sotsializm Kak Miro- vaya Sistema " [Socialism as a World System] (Moscow, 1984). The author names...nature (the episodic transportation of companions , casual repairs, various assistance and mutual assistance in looking after the sick or children

  17. JPRS Report, Soviet Union. World Economy & International Relations, No. 12, December 1988.

    1989-04-18

    enterprises for the achievement of specific economic goals. Work is proceeding on the creation of a uniform taxation system, whose purpose is to ensure... canons of area studies. World practice has for many centuries testified that the motive in the choice of country as the subject of study has been

  18. The political economy of research and innovation in organic photovoltaics (OPV) in different world regions

    Turkeli, S.; Kemp, R.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this paper, we examine the status, prospects and organization of OPV research, innovation and governance in three major world regions: Northern America, Western Europe and East Asia through our constructed evolutionary cognitive-institutional framework of reference. Method: We gathered

  19. Globalisation and the labour market: an analysis of job stability and job security in Britain

    Prajapati, Bina

    2011-01-01

    Globalisation represents the increased international integration of goods, services, labour, technology, knowledge, ideas and capital of national economics from around the world. It also evokes many opinions in relation to the costs and benefits it can provide. Globalisation can bring greater benefits to countries in the form of greater productivity and output, potentially faster economic growth, increased welfare and even greater incentives to innovate. However, workers fear that globalisati...

  20. Globalisation, Responsibility and Virtual Schools

    Russell, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    The intersection of globalisation and information technology influences ethical positions and notions of responsibility within businesses and in distance education for school students. As the spatial and temporal distance between student and teacher increases, and is mediated by computers, there have been changes to the ways in which individuals…

  1. Algeria embraces globalisation and liberalisation

    De Saint Jacob, Y.

    2008-07-15

    Algeria's culture of state monopoly and single party rule has been set aside as the country appears to have resolutely chosen globalisation and liberalisation of its markets. The 2-page article is followed by an interview with the Algerian Minister of Energy and President of OPEC for 2008, explaining the energy policy of Algeria.

  2. Algeria embraces globalisation and liberalisation

    De Saint Jacob, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Algeria's culture of state monopoly and single party rule has been set aside as the country appears to have resolutely chosen globalisation and liberalisation of its markets. The 2-page article is followed by an interview with the Algerian Minister of Energy and President of OPEC for 2008, explaining the energy policy of Algeria

  3. Ledelsesroller i globalisering af cleantech

    Knudsen, Poul Frøjk; Tambo, Torben

    2011-01-01

    nyeste teknologier, globalisering af salg, installation og produktion, og at vækstdagsordenen er blevet fastholdt. Den globale satsning på cleantech sætter disse ledelsesmæssige kvaliteter under pres. Dette studie ser på en mellemstor komponentleverandør til vindindustrien, og dennes kamp...

  4. Russia's accession to the WTO as an important factor of the country's integration into the world economy

    Linetsky Alexander

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Russia's accession to the WTO is an efficient instrument of the country's integration into the globalized world economy. However, it can adversely affect a number of enterprises and industries within the national economy. Thus, there is a need to develop a methodology for the assessment of the preparedness for operating under WTO membership conditions, which can be practically applied in the development of measures aimed at increasing the competitiveness of economic entities. This determines the objective of the research. This article offers the author's assessment of the reasonability of Russia's accession to the WTO and suggests methodological approaches to the assessment of preparedness of the constituent entities of the Russian Federation for functioning in the new economic conditions based on the algorithm of choosing a system of indicators, as well as the organisation of enterprise monitoring according to this system, which makes it possible to formulate rational administrative decisions in order to minimise the adverse effects of Russia's accession to the WTO. The major result of the research is the conclusion that, although the objective of identifying the start position of the constituent entities before the accession to the WTO and its possible implications is quite difficult to attain, it is both theoretically and practically feasible.

  5. Evaluating the Impact of Road Grade on Simulated Commercial Vehicle Fuel Economy Using Real-World Drive Cycles

    Lopp, Sean; Wood, Eric; Duran, Adam

    2015-10-13

    Commercial vehicle fuel economy is known to vary significantly with both positive and negative road grade. Medium- and heavy-duty vehicles operating at highway speeds require incrementally larger amounts of energy to pull heavy payloads up inclines as road grade increases. Non-hybrid vehicles are then unable to recapture energy on descent and lose energy through friction braking. While the on-road effects of road grade are well understood, the majority of standard commercial vehicle drive cycles feature no climb or descent requirements. Additionally, existing literature offers a limited number of sources that attempt to estimate the on-road energy implications of road grade in the medium- and heavy-duty space. This study uses real-world commercial vehicle drive cycles from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Fleet DNA database to simulate the effects of road grade on fuel economy across a range of vocations, operating conditions, and locations. Drive-cycles are matched with vocation-specific vehicle models and simulated with and without grade. Fuel use due to grade is presented, and variation in fuel consumption due to drive cycle and vehicle characteristics is explored through graphical and statistical comparison. The results of this study suggest that road grade accounts for 1%-9% of fuel use in commercial vehicles on average and up to 40% on select routes.

  6. A review of the world market of indium (Economy of indium)

    Naumov, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the current state of the world and Russian markets of indium and indium-containing products was made based on the publications of the last years. Main fields of indium application are given, in particular, its using for neutron absorbing regulating rods in nuclear reactors. The second γ-radiation resulted from neutron absorption allows using indium as a neutron detector. Indium market stabilization is expected due to supply from China and South Korea [ru

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF E-COMMERCE IN WORLD AND TURKEY AND THE IMPACTS OF MARKETING STRATEGIES IN E-COMMERCE ON TURKEY’S ECONOMY

    Terzi, Nuray; Gokce, Cemre

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate thedevelopment of e-commerce and the impact of marketing strategies in e-commerceon economy. Economic indicators is used and and questionnaire method is appliedto analyze the development of e-commerce and the impact of marketing strategiesin e-commerce on economy. Results show that e-commerce is gaining a momentum inthe world and Turkey as well, and e-marketing strategies are positively relatedon economy, both macroeconomic and microeconomic. E-commerce...

  8. Experiments in Globalisation, Food Security and Land Use Decision Making

    Brown, Calum; Murray-Rust, Dave; van Vliet, Jasper; Alam, Shah Jamal; Verburg, Peter H.; Rounsevell, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    The globalisation of trade affects land use, food production and environments around the world. In principle, globalisation can maximise productivity and efficiency if competition prompts specialisation on the basis of productive capacity. In reality, however, such specialisation is often constrained by practical or political barriers, including those intended to ensure national or regional food security. These are likely to produce globally sub-optimal distributions of land uses. Both outcomes are subject to the responses of individual land managers to economic and environmental stimuli, and these responses are known to be variable and often (economically) irrational. We investigate the consequences of stylised food security policies and globalisation of agricultural markets on land use patterns under a variety of modelled forms of land manager behaviour, including variation in production levels, tenacity, land use intensity and multi-functionality. We find that a system entirely dedicated to regional food security is inferior to an entirely globalised system in terms of overall production levels, but that several forms of behaviour limit the difference between the two, and that variations in land use intensity and functionality can substantially increase the provision of food and other ecosystem services in both cases. We also find emergent behaviour that results in the abandonment of productive land, the slowing of rates of land use change and the fragmentation or, conversely, concentration of land uses following changes in demand levels. PMID:25437010

  9. Experiments in globalisation, food security and land use decision making.

    Brown, Calum; Murray-Rust, Dave; van Vliet, Jasper; Alam, Shah Jamal; Verburg, Peter H; Rounsevell, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    The globalisation of trade affects land use, food production and environments around the world. In principle, globalisation can maximise productivity and efficiency if competition prompts specialisation on the basis of productive capacity. In reality, however, such specialisation is often constrained by practical or political barriers, including those intended to ensure national or regional food security. These are likely to produce globally sub-optimal distributions of land uses. Both outcomes are subject to the responses of individual land managers to economic and environmental stimuli, and these responses are known to be variable and often (economically) irrational. We investigate the consequences of stylised food security policies and globalisation of agricultural markets on land use patterns under a variety of modelled forms of land manager behaviour, including variation in production levels, tenacity, land use intensity and multi-functionality. We find that a system entirely dedicated to regional food security is inferior to an entirely globalised system in terms of overall production levels, but that several forms of behaviour limit the difference between the two, and that variations in land use intensity and functionality can substantially increase the provision of food and other ecosystem services in both cases. We also find emergent behaviour that results in the abandonment of productive land, the slowing of rates of land use change and the fragmentation or, conversely, concentration of land uses following changes in demand levels.

  10. Experiments in globalisation, food security and land use decision making.

    Calum Brown

    Full Text Available The globalisation of trade affects land use, food production and environments around the world. In principle, globalisation can maximise productivity and efficiency if competition prompts specialisation on the basis of productive capacity. In reality, however, such specialisation is often constrained by practical or political barriers, including those intended to ensure national or regional food security. These are likely to produce globally sub-optimal distributions of land uses. Both outcomes are subject to the responses of individual land managers to economic and environmental stimuli, and these responses are known to be variable and often (economically irrational. We investigate the consequences of stylised food security policies and globalisation of agricultural markets on land use patterns under a variety of modelled forms of land manager behaviour, including variation in production levels, tenacity, land use intensity and multi-functionality. We find that a system entirely dedicated to regional food security is inferior to an entirely globalised system in terms of overall production levels, but that several forms of behaviour limit the difference between the two, and that variations in land use intensity and functionality can substantially increase the provision of food and other ecosystem services in both cases. We also find emergent behaviour that results in the abandonment of productive land, the slowing of rates of land use change and the fragmentation or, conversely, concentration of land uses following changes in demand levels.

  11. Material consumption and social well-being within the periphery of the world economy: an ecological analysis of maternal mortality.

    Rice, James

    2008-12-01

    The degree to which social well-being is predicated upon levels of material consumption remains under-examined from a large-N, quantitative perspective. The present study analyzes the factors influencing levels of maternal mortality in 2005 among 92 peripheral countries. We incorporate into regression analysis the ecological footprint, a comprehensive measure of natural resource consumption, and alternative explanatory variables drawn from previous research. Results illustrate ecological footprint consumption has a moderately strong direct influence shaping lower levels of maternal mortality. Path analysis reveals export commodity concentration has a negative effect on level of ecological footprint demand net the strong positive influence of income per capita. This illustrates cross-national trade dependency relations directly influence natural resource consumption opportunities and thereby indirectly contribute to higher maternal mortality levels within the periphery of the world economy. The results confirm material consumption is an important dimension of improvement in maternal mortality.

  12. Sectoral effects of a world oil-price shock: economy-wide linkages to the agricultural sector. Staff report

    Hanson, K.; Robinson, S.; Schluter, G.

    1991-10-01

    The effects of a world oil price shock on U.S. agriculture are analyzed in an economywide environment. The authors use an input-output model to analyze the direct and indirect cost linkages between energy and other sectors of the economy. Then, to allow sectoral output adjustment and the effects on the U.S. current account, they use the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Economic Research Service Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model to analyze the sectoral effects under three different macro adjustment scenarios. The effects on agriculture are not limited to the direct and indirect energy costs. Exchange rate or foreign borrowing adjustments to higher oil import costs and government support programs for agriculture also matter

  13. Globalisation, Transnational Academic Mobility and the Chinese Knowledge Diaspora: An Australian Case Study

    Yang, Rui; Welch, Anthony R.

    2010-01-01

    The master discourses of economic globalisation and the knowledge economy each cite knowledge diasporas as vital "trans-national human capital". Based on a case study of a major Australian university, this article examines the potential to deploy China's large and highly-skilled diaspora in the service of Chinese and Australian…

  14. Globalisation and Higher Education: From Within-Border to Cross-Border

    Youssef, Leïla

    2014-01-01

    Globalisation, the shift to a knowledge economy, and changing demographics are increasingly challenging higher education systems. The move from elite through mass to universal education, coupled with the internationalisation of higher education, has profoundly influenced the system, especially in terms of academic mobility. It has created new…

  15. The Effect of Foreign Trade Policy Transparency on Integration of Ukraine in the World Economy

    Yakovchenko Victoria S.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is concerned with the interdependence between dynamics of the international trade and economic relations development and the existing level of foreign trade policy transparency in accordance with the provisions of the WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement. The effect of observance of transparency principle in foreign trade policy on forming the transaction costs in foreign trade is analyzed. A comparative analysis of the influence of import duties and transaction costs on the formation of Ukraine’s foreign trade barriers is carried out. Prospects of the national export-import activity development under increasing transparency of foreign trade policy of Ukraine and other world countries are determined.

  16. COMPETITIVENESS ОF CHINESE ECONOMY AFTER JOINING WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION

    V. S. Shlik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains analysis of the China’s membership in the World Trade Organization (WTO. The advantages and disadvantages of WTO joining and also prospects and unforeseen difficulties are given in the paper. The People’s Republic of China has already been a full-member of WTO for 6 years. The Chinese Government has mainly fulfilled all the conditions which were imposed for WTO joining. They concerned customs legislation that presupposed a considerable reduction of custom duties, an access to the service market for foreign investors, an increase of responsibility for violation of intellectual property rights. Many of these conditions have been fulfilled in advance.

  17. The impact of the 2011 floods in Thailand on world economy using resilience concept

    Jaboyedoff, Michel; Derron, Marc-Henri; Nicolet, Pierrick; Rudaz, Benjamin; Sudmeier, Karen

    2014-05-01

    In fall 2011, Thailand suffered from floods in the area of Bangkok, where 30% of the world production of hard disks (HD) was located. This event had a great impact on HD production, which decreased drastically. In analysing the market price evolution of HDs throughout time after the event, the market price for HDs returned to a "normal" after one year. This variable can be considered as an index that recovers its normal value, similar to an indicator of resilience, when defined as « the efficiency required to return to a normal state during a given period of time ». In other words, it describes how efficiently world HD production returned to "business as usual". This presentation aims to provide a further analysis of resilience as relates to the overall cost of recovery after disasters and an element that should be included in a more comprehensive analysis of risk. To further analyse the concept of resilience, instantaneous resilience is defined: integration over time permits to obtain the total impact of this flood event on the world HD business based on the market prices. In the present approach we consider the direct cost of a disaster as the result of the standard risk (R) equation (R = H x V x Exp x W) including the vulnerability (V) which describes the direct impact of a disaster taking into account the elements at risk's value or number (W), the exposure (Exp) and the hazard (H). The total impact of a disaster (Impact total = R + DRE) is the sum of R and cost post disaster (DRE), which corresponds to the indirect costs of the disaster and depends on resilience. The resilience is then the capacity of a variable to reach a value similar to its pre-event value over a period of time. Its unit is then %. Regarding the Thai event, over one year, resilience is estimated at 69%, which leads to a negative impact of the flood of around 31% on the HD price or approximately 10 billion US globally. This result is similar to other estimations. This approach underlines

  18. RESEARCHING FACTORS OF INNOVATIVE ACTIVITIES OF AGRARIAN BUSINESS OF UKRAINE UNDER GLOBALIZATION OF THE WORLD ECONOMY

    Vadim Sidorov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern processes of reforming the agroindustrial complex of Ukraine, a large part of which belongs to the agrarian sector, under the globalization of world economic processes in the agricultural market require that domestic agroindustrial enterprises improve and rationally manage innovative activities (IА. The effective solution of problems that arise in this context in the rapidly changing economic and social and political environment requires that analytical methods in the management of the enterprises of the agroindustrial complex (AIC be used on the basis of the tools of economic and mathematical modelling, taking into account characteristics of agrarian production. The main approaches to modelling systems related to IА management are either descriptive or insufficiently formalized, and suggest virtual experimenting with IA management, avoiding the possibility of assessing the impact and consequences of different management options in the long view, minimizing IA risks when making managerial decisions. The subject matter of the article is the tools of economic and mathematical simulation of the development of innovative activities of the domestic agroindustrial complex. The goal is to develop tools for modelling innovative activities of enterprises of the agroindustrial complex of Ukraine in the form of analytical dependencies of impact factors. The objective is to research the dynamics of innovative activities of enterprises of the agroindustrial complex of Ukraine in terms of its components under the globalization of world economic processes in the market of agricultural products. General scientific methods are used, such as system analysis – to determine the peculiarities of development of IА of agroindustrial production in Ukraine, factor analysis – to formalize the cause-and-effect relationships of the investigated factors of AIC enterprises impact on IA. The following results were obtained: on the basis of the analysis of the

  19. Activities of UNIDO-ICHET: On a Mission to Convert the World to Hydrogen Economy

    Barbir, Frano; Veziroglu, T. Nejat; Ture, Engin; Dziedzic, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    United Nations Industrial Development Organization - International Centre for Hydrogen Energy Technologies (UNIDO-ICHET) is an autonomous technological institution within the auspices of UNIDO, located in Istanbul Turkey. UNIDO-ICHET''s mission is to act as a bridge between developed and developing countries in spanning the gap between research and development organizations, innovative enterprises and the market-place, by stimulating appropriate applications of hydrogen energy technologies and the hydrogen energy related industrial development throughout the world in general, and in the developing countries in particular. The activities of UNIDO-ICHET include initiation of demonstration and pilot projects worldwide, establishment of a database on hydrogen energy technology and R and D activities, applied research and development, testing services, and education and training. UNIDO-ICHET is also assisting developing countries in adopting their Hydrogen Road-maps, by working with local governments, universities and industries, with other international organizations having similar mission, and with the leading technology and energy companies. (authors)

  20. Globalisation as we enter the 21st century: reflections and directions for nursing education, science, research and clinical practice.

    Davidson, Patricia M; Meleis, Afaf; Daly, John; Douglas, Marilyn Marty

    2003-10-01

    The events of September 11th, 2001 in the United States and the Bali bombings of October 2002 are chastening examples of the entangled web of the religious, political, health, cultural and economic forces we experience living in a global community. To view these forces as independent, singular, linearly deterministic entities of globalisation is irrational and illogical. Understanding the concept of globalisation has significant implications not only for world health and international politics, but also the health of individuals. Depending on an individual's political stance and world-view, globalisation may be perceived as an emancipatory force, having the potential to bridge the chasm between rich and poor or, in stark contrast, the very essence of the divide. It is important that nurses appreciate that globalisation does not pertain solely to the realms of economic theory and world politics, but also that it impacts on our daily nursing practice and the welfare of our patients. Globalisation and the closer interactions of human activity that result, have implications for international governance, policy and theory development as well as nursing education, research and clinical practice. Nurses, individually and collectively, have the political power and social consciousness to influence the forces of globalisation to improve health for all. This paper defines and discusses globalisation in today's world and its implications for contemporary nursing education, science, research and clinical practice.

  1. Reshaping globalisation: a new order for international financial markets

    Dieter, Heribert

    2002-01-01

    Since the Mexican crisis in 1994/95, a large number of developing countries and emerging markets have been hit by financial crises. Argentina is the last country that is suffering from dramatic economic problems. The main cause of these crises are the deregulation and liberalisation of financial markets that have been associated with the current model of globalisation. This model is not sustainable: Is has contributed to massive economic problems in the developing world without providing the ...

  2. Global Economy under the Current Economic Crisis Effects

    Voicu Ioana-Iulica; Talmaciu Iuliana

    2010-01-01

    In the current context in which countries in the world search new solutions and strategies to counteract the negative effects generated by the worst economic crisis in the last 80 years, the globalisation rises polemics and controversies regarding the causes that lead to the expansion of the crisis. May it be, the current economic crisis, a consequence of the globalisation? Beyond the contradictory answers, the globalisation must be seen in essence as a stimulating and expansion factor of the...

  3. The macroeconomics of dementia--will the world economy get Alzheimer's disease?

    Banerjee, Sube

    2012-11-01

    Health is firmly on the economic radar. It is big business. In 2009, the proportion of the Gross Domestic Product spent on health care varied between 6.4% in Mexico and 17.4% in the U.S., with the UK at 9.8% and Germany, Switzerland and Canada ∼11%. These are considerable amounts of money and they are growing. With all projections pointing to a growth in the numbers of older people, the pressure on budgets will only increase. In this paper we will consider the role of dementia in this. Demographic and economic data were combined and policy implications developed. The costs of dementia dwarf those of the illnesses that are currently prioritized at a national and international level such as HIV, cancer, heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Based on simple demographics, the costs of dementia are set to increase by 85% by 2030, with developing countries bearing an increasing share of the economic burden. The data suggest that dementia is a clear and present economic challenge for the world from the macro level down to the individual. Before the crisis, governmental structural primary deficits were generally improving and this would have given time and resource to meet the challenges of ageing in general and dementia in particular. However, increasing government debt over the past 3 years has had the effect of our needing to implement reforms to contain the risks to sovereign budgets sooner rather than later. This is not an issue that can be ignored. Inaction will only lead to further debt accumulation in the medium term and the death of systems of care in the long term. Across the developed world, the main long-term fiscal challenges come from health care costs, and dementia is a major driver of those costs. There is a need for budgetary consolidation and pension reform more generally. But, given that dementia is the highest ticket health and social care item that we have, making up 60% of long term care spending according to some estimates, then targeted investment

  4. Globalisation and higher education studies in South Africa | Strydom ...

    Globalisation and higher education studies in South Africa. ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Globalisation and its impact on higher education will be discussed, while globalisation as a critical external influence on the ...

  5. IMPORT COMPONENTS AND IMPORT MULTIPLIERS IN INDONESIAN ECONOMY: WORLD INPUT-OUTPUT ANALYSIS

    Muchdie Muchdie

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper calculates, presents and discusses on import components and the impact of final demand change on Indonesian imports using Indonesian 36 sector input-output tables of years: 2000, 2005, 2010 and 2014 from World Input-Output Tables. The results showed that firstly, Indonesian import components of input were, on average, more than 20 percent; meaning that input that locally provided were less than 80 percent. Secondly, Indonesian import of input had increased significantly from US$ 36,011 million in 2000 to US$ 151,505 million in 2014. Thirdly, Indonesian imports have been dominated by Sector-3: Manufacture of food products, beverages and tobacco products, Sector-4: Manufacture of textiles, wearing apparel and leather products, Sector-24: Construction, Sector-25: Wholesale and retail trade and repair, and Sector-26: Transportation and post services. Fourthly, by country of origin, Indonesian imports have been dominated by Japan, Korea, the USA, Australia, and China. Imports from Australia, Japan, and the US have been decreased significantly, but import from China has steadily increased. Finally, highest sectoral import multipliers occurred if final demands change in Sector-1: Crop and animal production, forestry, fishing and aquaculture, Sector-2: Mining and quarrying, Sector-23: Water collection; sewerage; waste collection, treatment and disposal activities, and Sector-30: Real estate activities, but there was no significant difference of import multipliers for country origin of import.

  6. The materials flow of mercury in the economies of the United States and the world

    Sznopek, John L.; Goonan, Thomas G.

    2000-01-01

    Although natural sources of mercury exist in the environment, measured data and modeling results indicate that the amount of mercury released into the biosphere has increased since the beginning of the industrial age. Mercury is naturally distributed in the air, water, and soil in minute amounts, and can be mobile within and between these media. Because of these properties and the subsequent impacts on human health, mercury was selected for an initial materials flow study, focusing on the United States in 1990. This study was initiated to provide a current domestic and international analysis. As part of an increased emphasis on materials flow, this report researched changes and identified the associated trends in mercury flows; it also updates statistics through 1996. In addition to domestic flows, the report includes an international section, because all primary mercury-producing mines are currently foreign, 86 percent of the mercury cell sector of the worldwide chlor-alkali industry is outside the United States, there is a large international mercury trade (1,395 t 1 in 1996), and environmental regulations are not uniform or similarly enforced from country to country. Environmental concerns have brought about numerous regulations that have dramatically decreased both the use and the production of mercury since the late 1980?s. Our study indicates that this trend is likely to continue into the future, as the world eliminates the large mercury inventories that have been stockpiled to support prior industrial processes and products.

  7. OPEC at middle age: facing an uncertain future in the world oil market economy

    1992-01-01

    International institutions, like individuals, groups, and even societies and cultures, pass through various stages in their development as they grow from youth through middle age into more experienced and mature members of the international community. OPEC, the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, is no exception to this generally observable phenomenon on the world economic scene. It has clearly undergone a gradual process of growth over the past three decades or so since its establishment by five founding states in Baghdad in September 1960. OPEC's history since then could be characterized as being divided into three distinct developmental stages. The first decade, the 1960s, was a period of consolidation of OPEC's power over the oil companies and their control over the member countries'oil resources. The second decade - the 1970s - was a decade characterized by almost continuous and prolonged producer - consumer confrontation as well as revelation of some of the more basic cleavages within OPEC as an organization. This was followed by the decade of the 1980s -- a period of relative accommodation between producers and consumers in the interest of longer term market stability

  8. THE POLITICS OF BANKING: GLOBALISATION AND DOMESTIC POLICY CHANGE

    Sukarman, Widigdo

    2015-01-01

    The current article aims to elaborate on the history of bank policy modifications as a response towards economic and financial change, mainly due to globalisation. The centralstatus of banks in the economy causes a need for the government to protect it in many forms that differ from one country to another. Bank policy makers that are closed oresoteric and are short-lived must be opened up to be able to receive long term ideas. The process is also marked intensively with competing interests be...

  9. A Review on the Impact of Globalisation on the Cocoa Industry in Nigeria

    ANYANSO, Helen Okoro

    2014-01-01

    2014 dissertation for MSc in International Business Management. Selected by academic staff as a good example of a masters level dissertation.\\ud PURPOSE OF STUDY: Globalisation in its current form is seen in developed\\ud countries as a certain positive effect for the development of developing\\ud nations. However, these viewpoints on the positive impact of globalisation\\ud on under developed countries have also been argued. The Nigerian economy\\ud has so much dependency on imports and oil reve...

  10. Theorizing Environmental Governance of the World System: Global Political Economy Theory and Some Applications to Stratospheric Ozone Politics

    Brian J. Gareau

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper incorporates world-systems perspectives into an analysis of global environmental politics, thus adjoining a political economic analysis of scale with studies of global environmental policy. It is the ability of some social groups and institutions to jump scale that determines how global environmental policies are shaped. The United States’ carbon-intensive economy is seen to face larger short-term costs from global environmental agreements than many other countries in the core of the world-system, but what remains unexplored in the environmental politics literature is the question of why the United States sees its long-term economic condition hindered by these agreements. This analysis points to the ways industry actors intervene at multiple scales of global environmental negotiations to affect national policy positions as well as larger discourses about science and risk. The article reviews the methyl bromide controversy in the Montreal Protocol to explain why this agreement has recently failed to live up to expectations in removing ozone-depleting substances. The United States is particularly responsible for this impediment: rather than innovate in response to new information and changing international contexts, industry actors have drawn upon US hegemony to enforce their dominant market positions. As the parties to the Montreal Protocol remain polarized over questions of methyl bromide use, this analysis calls for attention to the ways capital, states, and other social institutions are embedded in international environmental agreements and how they use such arrangements to obstruct successful multilateral agreements. I conclude by suggesting that environmental and other social movements might strategize in two ways: 1 by helping support an emergent ‘green hegemony’ (most apparent in Chinese policy as a counterhegemonic alternative, and 2 by developing strategies that account for the ways industry interests overlap with declining

  11. Risks, prices, and positions: A social network analysis of illegal drug trafficking in the world-economy.

    Boivin, Rémi

    2014-03-01

    Illegal drug prices are extremely high, compared to similar goods. There is, however, considerable variation in value depending on place, market level and type of drugs. A prominent framework for the study of illegal drugs is the "risks and prices" model (Reuter & Kleiman, 1986). Enforcement is seen as a "tax" added to the regular price. In this paper, it is argued that such economic models are not sufficient to explain price variations at country-level. Drug markets are analysed as global trade networks in which a country's position has an impact on various features, including illegal drug prices. This paper uses social network analysis (SNA) to explain price markups between pairs of countries involved in the trafficking of illegal drugs between 1998 and 2007. It aims to explore a simple question: why do prices increase between two countries? Using relational data from various international organizations, separate trade networks were built for cocaine, heroin and cannabis. Wholesale price markups are predicted with measures of supply, demand, risks of seizures, geographic distance and global positioning within the networks. Reported prices (in $US) and purchasing power parity-adjusted values are analysed. Drug prices increase more sharply when drugs are headed to countries where law enforcement imposes higher costs on traffickers. The position and role of a country in global drug markets are also closely associated with the value of drugs. Price markups are lower if the destination country is a transit to large potential markets. Furthermore, price markups for cocaine and heroin are more pronounced when drugs are exported to countries that are better positioned in the legitimate world-economy, suggesting that relations in legal and illegal markets are directed in opposite directions. Consistent with the world-system perspective, evidence is found of coherent world drug markets driven by both local realities and international relations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B

  12. Globalisation and global health: issues for nursing.

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Clark, Maria

    2017-05-24

    'Globalisation' is the term used to describe the increasing economic and social interdependence between countries. Shifting patterns of health and disease are associated with globalisation. Global health refers to a health issue that is not contained geographically and that single countries cannot address alone. In response to globalisation and global health issues, nurses practise in new and emerging transnational contexts. Therefore, it is important that nurses respond proactively to these changes and understand the effects of globalisation on health worldwide. This article aims to increase nurses' knowledge of, and confidence in, this important area of nursing practice.

  13. Gender, globalisation, and democracy.

    Walby, S

    2000-03-01

    This article discusses the link between gender, globalization and democracy in relation to women¿s empowerment. Analyzing gender relations within the processes of development planning involves five approaches: 1) welfare, 2) equity, 3) anti-poverty, 4) efficiency, and 5) empowerment. In addition, a new approach, which combines efficiency and empowerment, must be added to highlight the problematic nature of the direction of causality assumed by traditional theory of development. The rise on women's representation in national parliament can be attributed to the increase of women's economic power and women's political struggles. However, promotion of globalization produces new opportunities for feminist politics, as well as difficulties, which include: the emergent position of productive engagement in which an efficient economy and democratic society are seen as interdependent; and increase in parliamentary representation correlates with increased paid employment for women. In conclusion, the author underscores that globalization is a gendered process which is restructuring social relations on a large scale and the challenges it bring provide opportunities for women in development.

  14. The political economy of redistribution in the U.S. in the aftermath of World War II and the delayed impacts of the Great Depression - Evidence and theory

    Beetsma, R.; Cukierman, A.; Giuliodori, M.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents evidence of an upward ratchet in transfers and taxes in the U.S. around World-War II. This finding is explained within a political-economy framework involving an executive who sets defense spending and the median voter in the population who interacts with a (richer) agenda setter

  15. The political economy of redistribution in the US in the aftermath of World War II and the delayed impacts of the Great Depression: evidence and theory

    Beetsma, R.M.W.J.; Cukierman, A.; Giuliodori, M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents evidence of an substantial upward ratchet in transfers and taxes in the U.S. around World-War II. This finding is explained within a political-economy framework involving an executive who sets defense spending and the median voter in the population who interacts with a (richer)

  16. The world economy facing the climate. Increasing responsibilities lead to new opportunities; L'Economie mondiale face au climat. A responsabilites accrues, opportunites nouvelles

    Gabus, A

    2003-09-01

    The respect of the Kyoto protocol the decrease of the greenhouse gases emission, will provide more constraints to the economy but also more opportunities. The author analyzes these constraints and the possible opportunities to propose then, an environmental, technological and institutional prospective of the greenhouse effect attenuation. (A.L.B.)

  17. A science administrator's view of the new economy

    Pak, N.K.

    2001-01-01

    impact of the customs union with the EU. Instead of collapsing under the onslaught of the much cheaper consumer goods, Turkey's industry thrived and adapted to competition. Our businessmen proved themselves to be a match for the hardy Western rivals all over the globe. No one can overlook the fact that we have still a lot of homework to do, still some distance to cover to be on par with our industrialised role models. Our per-capita GNP of about 6000 dollars in purchasing power parities, is still a third of the West European Average. Customs union, perhaps the most brutal application of globalisation to an economy accustomed to state protection, keeps pushing imports to twice the level of imports. But on the whole, one can say with confidence that Turkey has managed to benefit from globalisation despite some heavy odds. On balance, Turkey's profits from globalisation appear overweighing its losses: its successful efforts to modernise its communications infrastructure have paid off in a flood of information and know-how, which the people have readily exploited to the country's economic and cultural benefit. The globalising market, while opening Turkey's industry to vicious competition, also caused the country's economy to break its shell and expand. At first look, energy and globalisation appear to have a natural association. Energy is a common need for the whole mankind, and (although not totally,) the distribution of energy resources and the wealth they bring help paper over the vast chasm between the technology producers and technology users in terms of income. So, in a sense it globalizes the wealth to a limited extent. Energy, or, rather its use, has been insisted upon by the West as a measure of a country's development. Then, according to its advocates, globalisation smoothes out the irregularities in the distribution of wealth, and hence, of energy. So, ultimately, globalisation should lift the per capita energy consumption in the developing world to levels

  18. Globalisation of tobacco industry influence and new global responses

    Yach, D.; Bettcher, D.

    2000-01-01

    The globalisation of tobacco marketing, trade, research, and industry influence represents a major threat to public health worldwide. Drawing upon tobacco industry strategy documents prepared over several decades, this paper will demonstrate how the tobacco industry operates as a global force, regarding the world as its operating market by planning, developing, and marketing its products on a global scale. The industry has used a wide range of methods to buy influence and power, and penetrate markets across the world. It has an annual turnover of almost US$400 billion. In contrast, until recently tobacco control lacked global leadership and strategic direction and had been severely underfunded. As part of moving towards a more sustainable form of globalisation, a global enabling environment linked to local actions should focus on the following strategies: global information management; development of nationally and locally grounded action; global regulation, legal instruments, and foreign policy; and establishment of strong partnerships with purpose. As the vector of the tobacco epidemic, the tobacco industry's actions fall far outside of the boundaries of global corporate responsibility. Therefore, global and local actions should not provide the tobacco industry with the two things that it needs to ensure its long term profitability: respectability and predictability.


Keywords: globalisation of tobacco marketing PMID:10841858

  19. Regional Cooperation of the Post‑Soviet Countries – Can it Be Influenced by the Structure of the Economy?

    Irena Benešová

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, economic development has largely been influenced by globalisation of the world economy. Regional cooperation represents a certain alternative for the ongoing globalisation and concerns establishment of geographically larger markets. Through regional integration, countries are better able to react to changes in the external environment and therefore a larger market scale enables better marketing opportunities. The conclusion of this research is the fact that despite significant differences between, for example, GDP per capita or the economic growth, there is still similarity in the business cycle or even GDP creation when private consumption and stockbuilding play the key role. In addition, most of the countries mentioned have a negative contribution of export to their GDP, which is closely related to the structure of export itself and its dependency on primary products.

  20. Globalisation and the Internationalisation of Higher Education in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Dzvimbo, Kuzvinetsa Peter; Moloi, Kholeka Constance

    2013-01-01

    In a shrinking world, in which a neo-liberal discourse has permeated sub-Saharan African higher education, critical reflection is required to assess the merits and demerits of globalisation. Research, intensive discussion and hearings conducted over a two-year period by the Task Force on Higher Education and Society, convened by the World Bank and…

  1. Christianity and globalisation: An alternative ethical response

    2011-07-27

    Jul 27, 2011 ... on Christian Ethics and Globalisation at Keimyung University in South Korea. The students .... business minded people, such as Lydia (Ac 16) and Priscilla and Aquila (Ac 18), ... it is in all cases an unwelcome extension. In some ..... our textbook disparaging the same globalisation, which has either directly ...

  2. Globalisation; Its Implications and Consequences for Developing ...

    This paper attempts to look at the concept of globalisations and analyse its implications and consequences for developing nations in Africa. It is premised on the general perception that globalisations is a positive and powerful force for the improved material well-being of humankind, that would aid the developing countries ...

  3. Globalisation and MATESOL Programmes in the UK

    Hasrati, Mostafa; Tavakoli, Parvaneh

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the results of a mixed-methods approach to investigating the association between globalisation and MATESOL in UK universities. Qualitative and quantitative data collected from academic staff through eight emails, four interviews and 41 questionnaires indicate that the globalised context of higher education has affected these…

  4. Joint competition – the world dominance of Danish fur production

    Christensen, Jesper Lindgaard

    2010-01-01

    Low-tech industries provide a substantial contribution to the Western economies and there is a growing literature that criticizes the over-emphasis both policies and economic analyses often put on high-tech industries. Clusters have been pointed to as instrumental for small firms in meeting...... the challenges of a globalised, knowledge-based economy because they are known to have deeper specialization, which in turn is seen as a prerequisite for constructing comparative advantages and industrial strongholds. The paper takes the point of departure in the Danish fur production and an agglomeration...... of production of mink/furs in North/North-Western Jutland, Denmark. This industry has been by far the major producer in the world with a large world market share. Two paradoxes needs to be explained: the world dominance of a low-tech, labour intensive sector by a small, high-income/high-wage, high-tech country...

  5. Charting African Prosperity Gospel economies

    Andreas Heuser

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article maps the vital debate on Prosperity Gospel in Africa and its relevance for socioeconomic change. Prosperity Gospel centres mainly on speech acts surrounding faith, wealth and victory, combined with ritual enactments around secondary evidences of divine blessings. Claiming this-worldly success and material well-being as signs of grace it has captured public spheres and has created African religio-scapes of prosperity. The survey on the socioeconomics of African prosperity-oriented Pentecostalism firstly traces the historic genealogy of Prosperity Gospel as transposable message. It appears as a generic formula in paradigmatic reinventions of Pentecostalism in post-second and/or cold war America and in its globalisation in postcolonial Africa. The double resignification of Pentecostal theology - a rereading of ‘mammon’ alongside a new ethic of being in the world - relates to the question of socioeconomic agency. Academic discourse connects Prosperity Gospel social capital with interpretations of its ritual texture thriving around rituals of tithings and offerings. Prosperity Gospel economies are profiled as forms of sacral consumption or sacrificial economy, or else as Pentecostal kleptocracy. Contrarily Prosperity Gospel is portrayed as a variant and porter of African social change. The contextualisation of Prosperity Gospel highlights diverse social agency in different milieus. Rural and peri-urban theologies of survival differ from urban progressive and metropolitan business management Prosperity Gospel. The findings defy generalised views on Prosperity Gospel socioeconomics. African Prosperity Gospel indicates a transformative potential in immediate social relationships, whereas claims of impacting structural parameters of society remain, with a few exceptions, part of Pentecostal imagination.

  6. Christianity and globalisation: An alternative ethical response

    Retief Müller

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This article critically evaluated the role of Christian Ethics in response to globalisation. It showed that ethical critiques of globalisation inevitably fall short when Christianity’s historical contributions to processes of globalisation are neglected or de-emphasised. A Christian Ethics that attempts completely to wash its hands of and disavow globalisation is therefore indicated to be perched on a false premise. In this regard, the author specifically discussed the divergent stances of Max Stackhouse and Rebecca Todd Peters and opted for the former as the more helpful when considered from an interdisciplinary approach. In the final analysis, the author argued that the problem of globalisation might fruitfully be addressed with an ethics that is not averse to bring the various insights of missiology, church history and practical theology to the table, focusing particularly on rituals of reconciliation and forgiveness.

  7. Sustaining “Lilliputs” in the Global Knowledge-Based Economy: Prospects for Micro, Small, and Medium-Scale Enterprises in the Developing World

    Maria Divina Gracia Z. Roldan

    2015-01-01

    Micro, small, and medium-scale enterprises (MSMEs) comprise bulk of business entities in the developing world. Their contribution is seen in terms of employment generation and capital formation. Seen as the engine of growth in present knowledge-based economies, MSMEs play a crucial role in the economic sustainability of Asian developing countries. This paper discusses the role of MSMEs in Asia, with the Philippines as a case in point. It examines issues and challenges these enterprises face, ...

  8. Preliminary results in implementing a model of the world economy on the CYBER 205: A case of large sparse nonsymmetric linear equations

    Szyld, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    A brief description of the Model of the World Economy implemented at the Institute for Economic Analysis is presented, together with our experience in converting the software to vector code. For each time period, the model is reduced to a linear system of over 2000 variables. The matrix of coefficients has a bordered block diagonal structure, and we show how some of the matrix operations can be carried out on all diagonal blocks at once.

  9. European health research and globalisation: is the public-private balance right?

    McCarthy Mark

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The creation and exchange of knowledge between cultures has benefited world development for many years. The European Union now puts research and innovation at the front of its economic strategy. In the health field, biomedical research, which benefits the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, has been well supported, but much less emphasis has been given to public health and health systems research. A similar picture is emerging in European support for globalisation and health Case studies Two case-studies illustrate the links of European support in global health research with industry and biomedicine. The European Commission's directorates for (respectively Health, Development and Research held an international conference in Brussels in June 2010. Two of six thematic sessions related to research: one was solely concerned with drug development and the protection of intellectual property. Two European Union-supported health research projects in India show a similar trend. The Euro-India Research Centre was created to support India's participation in EU research programmes, but almost all of the health research projects have been in biotechnology. New INDIGO, a network led by the French national research agency CNRS, has chosen 'Biotechnology and Health' and funded projects only within three laboratory sciences. Discussion Research for commerce supports only one side of economic development. Innovative technologies can be social as well as physical, and be as likely to benefit society and the economy. Global health research agendas to meet the Millenium goals need to prioritise prevention and service delivery. Public interest can be voiced through civil society organisations, able to support social research and public-health interventions. Money for health research comes from public budgets, or indirectly through healthcare costs. European 'Science in Society' programme contrasts research for 'economy', using technical

  10. European health research and globalisation: is the public-private balance right?

    McCarthy, Mark

    2011-03-22

    The creation and exchange of knowledge between cultures has benefited world development for many years. The European Union now puts research and innovation at the front of its economic strategy. In the health field, biomedical research, which benefits the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, has been well supported, but much less emphasis has been given to public health and health systems research. A similar picture is emerging in European support for globalisation and health Two case-studies illustrate the links of European support in global health research with industry and biomedicine. The European Commission's directorates for (respectively) Health, Development and Research held an international conference in Brussels in June 2010. Two of six thematic sessions related to research: one was solely concerned with drug development and the protection of intellectual property. Two European Union-supported health research projects in India show a similar trend. The Euro-India Research Centre was created to support India's participation in EU research programmes, but almost all of the health research projects have been in biotechnology. New INDIGO, a network led by the French national research agency CNRS, has chosen 'Biotechnology and Health' and funded projects only within three laboratory sciences. Research for commerce supports only one side of economic development. Innovative technologies can be social as well as physical, and be as likely to benefit society and the economy. Global health research agendas to meet the Millenium goals need to prioritise prevention and service delivery. Public interest can be voiced through civil society organisations, able to support social research and public-health interventions. Money for health research comes from public budgets, or indirectly through healthcare costs. European 'Science in Society' programme contrasts research for 'economy', using technical solutions, commercialisation and a passive consumer voice for

  11. European health research and globalisation: is the public-private balance right?

    2011-01-01

    Background The creation and exchange of knowledge between cultures has benefited world development for many years. The European Union now puts research and innovation at the front of its economic strategy. In the health field, biomedical research, which benefits the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, has been well supported, but much less emphasis has been given to public health and health systems research. A similar picture is emerging in European support for globalisation and health Case studies Two case-studies illustrate the links of European support in global health research with industry and biomedicine. The European Commission's directorates for (respectively) Health, Development and Research held an international conference in Brussels in June 2010. Two of six thematic sessions related to research: one was solely concerned with drug development and the protection of intellectual property. Two European Union-supported health research projects in India show a similar trend. The Euro-India Research Centre was created to support India's participation in EU research programmes, but almost all of the health research projects have been in biotechnology. New INDIGO, a network led by the French national research agency CNRS, has chosen 'Biotechnology and Health' and funded projects only within three laboratory sciences. Discussion Research for commerce supports only one side of economic development. Innovative technologies can be social as well as physical, and be as likely to benefit society and the economy. Global health research agendas to meet the Millenium goals need to prioritise prevention and service delivery. Public interest can be voiced through civil society organisations, able to support social research and public-health interventions. Money for health research comes from public budgets, or indirectly through healthcare costs. European 'Science in Society' programme contrasts research for 'economy', using technical solutions, commercialisation

  12. Trade Unions facing the dual challenge of globalising work division and globalising environmental degradation

    Räthzel, N; Uzzell, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents results of a project aimed at investigating the ways in which trade unions in the “Global North” and the “Global South” respond to the dual challenge of a globalising work division and globalising environmental degradation, and whether and under what conditions trade unions perceive and address these issues as connected. While globalising corporations are forming new international relations of power, trade unions are lagging behind in unifying their efforts to counter glob...

  13. Globalising Early Childhood Teacher Education: A Study of Student Life Histories and Course Experience in Teacher Education

    Farell, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Globalisation in early childhood teacher education is examined in light of a study of the life histories and course experience of students in early childhood teacher education in Queensland, Australia. Contemporary teacher education is embedded in global economies, new technologies and marketisation, which, in turn, may contribute to students…

  14. Entry and Growth Strategies for Emerging Economies

    Meyer, Klaus E.; Tran, Yen Thi Thu

    2004-01-01

    to adapt their strategies, most notably their marketing and acquisition strategies, to the local context. In this paper, we outline why globalisation drives MNEs into emerging economies, and we provide conceptual frameworks that may aid investors to adapt their strategies to emerging economy contexts. MNEs...... requires the acquisition of complementary local resources controlled by local firms. However, acquisitions in emerging economies are inhibited by institutional obstacles and weak local firms. Thus, foreign investors may pursue staged, multiple, indirect, or Brownfield acquisitions to build their projected...... operation. We illustrate our proposed strategies by analysing how one multination enterprise - Carlsberg Breweries - has developed its operations in three very different emerging economies: Poland, Lithuania and Vietnam....

  15. Globalisation and local power: influences on health matters in South Africa.

    Gilbert, Tal; Gilbert, Leah

    2004-03-01

    This paper reviews some of the multiple influences on health issues in South Africa, placing them in the context of globalisation. By examining the complexity of factors, both domestic and global, which impact on these issues, it questions the extent to which global patterns in areas such as health policy, HIV/AIDS, health care pluralism, and neo-liberal macroeconomic policy have played out in South Africa. The identification of some of the multiple and complex forces in each case reveals a relatively consistent story of global pressures interacting with domestic realities, with some recognizably local results. There is no doubt that a full and nuanced understanding of health in South Africa requires an appreciation of developments in the global political economy, international organizations such as the WHO and World Bank, and forces which operate outside of institutions. In each case, however, the specific opportunities available to actors within the country, as well as the relative power of those actors, should be given their due consideration in analysing their potential impact on health matters.

  16. Assessment of Influence of Globalisation upon the State of Economic Security of Ukraine Оценка влияния глобализации на состояние экономической безопасности Украины

    Martynenko Valentina V.

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of the article lies in statistical assessment of influence of globalisation upon the growth of the national economy and upon the level of economic security of the state. The author justifies expediency of a formalised expression of globalisation through sub-index of economic globalisation (KOF Index of Globalization methods). The article proves that economic growth of the national economy reflects the index of the physical volume of GDP and the state of economic security of the ...

  17. Globalisation and western music historiography

    Romanou Katy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation of musicology and music history aims to fuse the divisions created during Western music’s acme, and is referred to as “post-European historical thinking”. Therefore, “post” and “pre” European historical thinking have much in common. One aspect of this process of fragmentation was that music history was separated from theory and that Western Music Histories succeeded General Music Histories (a development described in some detail in the article. Connecting global music history with “post-European” historical thinking is one among numerous indications of Western awareness that European culture has reached some sort of a terminal phase. Concurrently, countries that have been developing by following Western Europe as a prototype, are leading today some past phase of Western development, which, with the ideas of cultural relativism prevailing, are not considered inferior.

  18. Inpatriation in a Globalising MNC

    Gertsen, Martine Cardel; Søderberg, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    his paper draws on a qualitative case study of inpatriation in a globalising multinational company headquartered in Denmark. Based on analysis of in–depth interviews with inpatriates from the Peoples Republic of China, the USA, Brazil and Japan, we discuss their experiences at headquarters. We...... focus on the potential of inpatriates as mediators of knowledge flows between headquarters and subsidiaries. Although the inpatriates knowledge is seemingly not exploited in a systematic manner, they are well situated to act as boundary spanners, and also as cultural mediators. The inpatriates...... perceptions of the case company's corporate values of openness, empowerment and work–life balance point to their potential as mediators when developing a global companys corporate culture and translating it to various cultural contexts. We also touch upon the roles that an HR department plays in inpatriate...

  19. Globalisation, corporate governance and the construction industry

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available good corporate governance expectations generally. It reviews the development of globalisation with particular reference to the establishment of a common code of conduct, undertakes a review of the definition and evolution of good corporate governance...

  20. Impacts of globalisation on foodborne parasites.

    Robertson, Lucy J; Sprong, Hein; Ortega, Ynes R; van der Giessen, Joke W B; Fayer, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Globalisation is a manmade phenomenon encompassing the spread and movement of everything, animate and inanimate, material and intangible, around the planet. The intentions of globalisation may be worthy--but may also have unintended consequences. Pathogens may also be spread, enabling their establishment in new niches and exposing new human and animal populations to infection. The plethora of foodborne parasites that could be distributed by globalisation has only recently been acknowledged and will provide challenges for clinicians, veterinarians, diagnosticians, and everyone concerned with food safety. Globalisation may also provide the resources to overcome some of these challenges. It will facilitate sharing of methods and approaches, and establishment of systems and databases that enable control of parasites entering the global food chain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The impact of economic globalisation on health.

    Koivusalo, Meri

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of the impact of economic globalisation on health depends on how it is defined and should consider how it shapes both health and health policies. I first discuss the ways in which economic globalisation can and has been defined and then why it is important to analyse its impact both in terms of health and health policies. I then explore the ways in which economic globalisation influences health and health policies and how this relates to equity, social justice, and the role of values and social rights in societies. Finally, I argue that the process of economic globalisation provides a common challenge for all health systems across the globe and requires a broader debate on values, accountability, and policy approaches.

  2. Religion, Psychology and Globalisation Process: Attitudinal ...

    A key consequence of globalisation is the integrative approach to reality whereby emphasis is ... between psychology and religion has revolutionised the field of psychology of religion ..... paranormal or abnormal. In this wise, one is able to ...

  3. Globalisation of birth markets: a case study of assisted reproductive technologies in India

    Sarojini Nadimpally; Marwah Vrinda; Shenoi Anjali

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The escalation of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ARTs) in India into a veritable fertility industry is the result of a multitude of reasons. This paper places the bio-genetic industry within the larger political economy framework of globalisation and privatisation, thus employing a framework that is often omitted from discussions on ARTs, but has direct and significant bearings on the ART industry in India. As markets for human organs, tissues and reproductive body parts experie...

  4. The Globalisation of (Educational) Language rights

    Skutnabb-Kangas, Tove

    2001-07-01

    Languages are today being murdered faster than ever before in human history: 90% of the world's oral languages may be dead or moribund (no longer learned by children) in a hundred years' time. The media and the educational systems are the most important direct agents in language murder. Behind them are the real culprits, the global economic, military and political systems. Linguistic human rights might be one way of promoting conflict prevention and self-determination, preventing linguistic genocide, and maintaining linguistic diversity and biodiversity (which are correlationally and also causally related). The most basic linguistic human rights for maintenance of linguistic diversity, specifically the right to mother tongue medium education, are not protected by the present provisions in human rights law. Linguistically, formal education is today often 'forcibly transferring children of one group to another group' (one of the definitions of genocide in the UN Genocide Convention). Human rights are supposed to act as correctives to the 'free market'. Despite good intentions, forces behind economic globalisation have instead given brutal market forces free range.

  5. What is the Globalisation of Inflation?

    Altansukh, Gantungalag; Becker, Ralf; Bratsiotis, George J.; Osborn, Denise R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies the globalisation of CPI inflation by analysing core, energy and food components, testing for structural breaks in the relationships between domestic inflation and a corresponding country-specific foreign inflation series at the monthly frequency for OECD countries.The iterative methodology employed separates coefficient and variance breaks, while also taking account of outliers. We find that the overall pattern of globalisation in aggregate inflation is largely driven by c...

  6. Globalisation, big business and the Blair government

    Grant, Wyn

    2000-01-01

    After reviewing definitions of globalisation, this paper suggests that the ‘company state model is becoming increasingly important in business-government relations. It is argued that Prime Minister Blair has a particular construction of globalisation which fits in well with the agenda of big international business. However, increasing tensions have arisen in the relationship between New Labour and business, reaching crisis point in May 2000. The paper concludes by suggesting that Burnham’s de...

  7. Globalisation and the developing countries (in Dutch)

    Miquel Dijkman

    2003-01-01

    Globalisation is a highly controversial topic. Despite its potential for accelerating growth and reducing poverty (to which most policy makers and economist would agree) objections are often expressed about the position of developing countries, and a number of damaging side-effects of the current globalisation wave. In the present analysis, a number of questions raised by the antiglobalist movement is assessed on its economic merits. On the basis of empirical analyses, it is assessed whether:...

  8. Globalisation, corporate governance and the construction industry

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available , corporate governance, ethics, globalisation Introduction One of the characteristics of globalisation is the ease of engaging in business transactions in global financial markets. The exploration of these markets has, however, exposed a high degree.... The search for core values is manifest in the inclusion of social issues like poverty alleviation, job creation, human rights, corporate governance, and ethics and spirituality onto the global agenda. The second struggle – determining a management model...

  9. Tackling the adverse effects of globalisation and integration : Ideas on a European Social Union

    Ferrera, Maurizio; Matsaganis, Manos; Tortola, Pier Domenico

    2017-01-01

    Besides creating new opportunities and improving the lot of many people around the world, globalisation and economic integration have also generated economic and social losses. The latter are particularly concentrated among the lower and middle classes of advanced industrialised countries, who have

  10. Population Policies and Education: Exploring the Contradictions of Neo-Liberal Globalisation

    Bovill, Catherine; Leppard, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    The world is increasingly characterised by profound income, health and social inequalities (Appadurai, 2000). In recent decades development initiatives aimed at reducing these inequalities have been situated in a context of increasing globalisation with a dominant neo-liberal economic orthodoxy. This paper argues that neo-liberal globalisation…

  11. Hydrogen economy

    Pahwa, P.K.; Pahwa, Gulshan Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the future, our energy systems will need to be renewable and sustainable, efficient and cost-effective, convenient and safe. Hydrogen has been proposed as the perfect fuel for this future energy system. The availability of a reliable and cost-effective supply, safe and efficient storage, and convenient end use of hydrogen will be essential for a transition to a hydrogen economy. Research is being conducted throughout the world for the development of safe, cost-effective hydrogen production, storage, and end-use technologies that support and foster this transition. This book discusses hydrogen economy vis-a-vis sustainable development. It examines the link between development and energy, prospects of sustainable development, significance of hydrogen energy economy, and provides an authoritative and up-to-date scientific account of hydrogen generation, storage, transportation, and safety.

  12. Globalisation and suicide: an empirical investigation in 35 countries over the period 1980-2006.

    Milner, Allison; McClure, Rod; Sun, Jing; De Leo, Diego

    2011-07-01

    Globalisation is mediated through a variety of flows including persons, information and ideas, capital, and goods. The process is increasingly recognised as a potential mediator of changes in attitudes and habits around the globe. This research investigated the relationship between globalisation and suicide rates in 35 countries over the period 1980-2006. The association between a globalisation "index" and suicide rates was tested using a fixed-effects regression model. The model also tested the influence of eleven other socio-economic variables on male and female suicide rates. Overall, high levels of the globalisation index were associated with higher male and female suicide rates; however, the significance of this association dropped when assessed alongside other social and economic variables. While the nature of these findings should be regarded as exploratory, this paper highlights the need for researchers to consider the influence of world-changing phenomena like globalisation on suicide, which might deeply upset the traditional structure of societies with mixed types of impact. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ways of Thinking Globalisation--Insights into a Currently Running Investigation of Students' Ideas of Globalisation

    Fischer, Sebastian; Fischer, Florian; Kleinschmidt, Malte; Lange, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    The investigation is about which ideas ninth form students at grammar schools and secondary modern schools have about globalisation. It shall be investigated if the perception of and judgement on globalisation-connected contexts happens along social structure-specific patterns. At first, by way of a questionnaire, the field of ideas is supposed to…

  14. THE GLOBALIZATION OF THE WORLD ECONOMY AND ITS IMPACT ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF ACCOUNTING REPORTS IN UKRAINE

    Mihail PRODANCIUK

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article explains the impact of the globalization processes in Ukraine's economy on the development of accounting reports systems. Also described is the essence of harmonization and standardization of accounting reports and financial reports. There are four scientific positions known that characterize standardization records worldwide. There are submitted proposals regarding accounting reports regulation in Ukraine in terms of economic globalization.

  15. The New World economy. Report addressed to Ms Segolene Royal, Minister of Environment, Sustainable Development and Energy, working group led by Corinne Lepage

    Babinet, Gilles; Courousse, Christophe; Croise, Nathalie; Delanoy, Isabelle; Dupres, Stanislas; Ferrari, Romain; Feireira, Victor; Heron, Antoine; Kloboukoff, Charles; Lahiani, Mathias; Le Tyrant, Catherine; Lepercq, Thierry; Maestroni, Myriam; Massias, Louis; Novel, Anne-Sophie; Orru, Serge; Porcher, Thomas; Rapenne, Jean; Roquette, Marc; Siegel, Francois; Spiroux, Joel; Tenzer, Nicolas; Tincq, Benjamin; Tropper, Helene; Zimmer, Daniel; Damerval, Francois; Krabal, Nicolas; Berger, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    The New World economy is an economy at the service of mankind, free of fossil and fissile energies, connected and relocated. Everywhere in the world, energy transition is taking place. France is no exception. We have in front of us living proof that an efficient, long-term economy serving the common good and creating employment is not only possible, but also capable to generate enthusiasm and confidence. A newer economic model becomes possible. Synergies are developing in France along this direction. Though, unfortunately, the tipping point has not yet been reached. Still, we have the capacity and it is our duty to commit ourselves to this new economy. The levers to be put in place are now clearly known: giving priority to health and well-being, acknowledging external factors, promoting intangible assets, innovating at the local level, and properly taking demand into account. It is also about bolstering the transformation of entrepreneur-ship already under way, introducing fairness in the economy by agreeing to address the question of profit distribution. Such revolutions imply that the rules of the game will change in the taxation, financial, legislative, and normative fields as well as in the area of vocational training. A number of reforms are recommended in the report: creation of certificates relating to systems of externality to finance the transition, a circular VAT as well as an incentive VAT for organic products and products of the circular economy, and massive development of complementary currencies, alternative financing and civic funds. The report also points to the necessary simplification of rules applicable to start-ups and small innovative companies, the promotion of Green Deals and the development of experimentation, the abolition of standards which favor entrenched privileges, as well as the support for state actors making innovative choices in terms of procurement in the public sector. We thus call for a Green Business Act that can put together

  16. Book review: Unholy trinity: The IMF, World Bank and WTO Richard Peet

    M Breitenbach

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this timely book Richard Peet and his team lay the foundation with an excellent analysis of the process of globalisation and the resultant emergence of the global economy. The authors are especially critical of the increasing influence of institutions like the International Monetary Fund (IMF, World Bank and World Trade Organisation (WTO on the economy and the consequences experienced by peoples, cultures and the environment. The single ideology of neo-liberalism is blamed for the undesirable outcomes. This book considers concepts of power, political interest, hegemony, discourse, responsibility and the power of practicality, in critically examining the IMF, World Bank and WTO. The conclusion is reached that “all three institutions play roles greatly different from those originally agreed to under the charters that set them up”.

  17. Building Inclusive Economies, Building a Better World: A Look at the APEC 2015 Priority Areas (Volume 1)

    Philippine Institute for Development Studies (PIDS); Philippine APEC Study Center Network (PASCN)

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Foreign Affairs, as chair of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) 2015 National Organizing Council Committee on Host Economy Priorities and as APEC National Secretariat, commissioned the Philippine Institute for Development Studies, through the Philippine APEC Study Center Network, to undertake research on the identified priority areas of APEC 2015 in order to gather expert analyses and insights that can serve as inputs to the various discussions during the summit as...

  18. Modelling Development of Economy Under Globalisation Моделирование развития экономики в условиях глобализации

    Kulishov Vladimir V.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The article studies issues of the degree of openness of public systems under conditions of modern globalisation. It considers interaction of international economic subjects, formation of interrelations and inevitability of transition to a new more progressive model of economic development. I analyses appearance of national economic innovation systems, formation of the market of innovations and tendencies and problems of modelling development of the innovation economy. It studies appearance of scientific and production agglomerations and complexes and role of clusters in the economic process.В статье исследуются вопросы степени открытости общественных систем в условиях современной глобализации. Рассматривается взаимодействие межнациональных экономических субъектов, формирование взаимосвязей и неотвратимость перехода на новую, более прогрессивную модель развития экономики. Анализируется возникновение национальных хозяйственных инновационных систем, формирование рынка инноваций, тенденции и проблемы моделирования развития инновационной экономики. Исследуется возникновение научно-производственных агломераций и комплексов, роль кластеров в экономическом процессе.

  19. Globalisation: what is it and how does it affect health?

    Lee, Kelley

    2004-02-16

    The term "globalisation" tends to be misused and overused. We need greater clarity in our understanding of the globalisation process, including the distinct changes involved and their relation to human health. The health impacts of globalisation are simultaneously positive and negative, varying according to factors such as geographical location, sex, age, ethnic origin, education level, and socioeconomic status. Globalisation is not an unstoppable force. Our key challenge is to create socially and environmentally sustainable forms of globalisation that provide the greatest benefits and least costs, shared more equitably than is currently the case. The health community must engage more directly in current research and policy debates on globalisation and encourage values that promote human health. At the same time, those at the helm of globalisation processes must recognise that attending to health impacts will strengthen the long-term sustainability of globalisation.

  20. Estimate of Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies Energy Savings, Environmental and Financial Impacts

    Letschert, Virginie E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bojda, Nicholas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ke, Jing [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McNeil, Michael A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This study analyzes the financial impacts on consumers of minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) for appliances that could be implemented in 13 major economies around the world. We use the Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), to analyze various appliance efficiency target levels to estimate the net present value (NPV) of policies designed to provide maximum energy savings while not penalizing consumers financially. These policies constitute what we call the “cost-effective potential” (CEP) scenario. The CEP scenario is designed to answer the question: How high can we raise the efficiency bar in mandatory programs while still saving consumers money?

  1. Globalising Dublin: indicators of an urban society in transition

    Niamh M. Moore

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation – political, economic or cultural - is controlled from, but is simultaneously shaping, urban places. Much of the recent research on globalisation and urban transformati-on has focused on the emergence of an international urban system. Within this system, the role and place of Dublin has been highly contested. This is due in part to the unique way in which the city has attempted to re-position itself within a global framework, but is also due to the difficulty in defining what actually constitutes a world city. Friedmann (1986 argues that one of the key characteristics of these places is that they become destination points for both domestic and international migrants, while Sassen (1991 argues that they are typified by significant socio-spatial polarisation. This paper examines some of the ways in which Dublin, a former peripheral city in global terms, is becoming increasingly embedded in the global urban system. It highlights how the city is beginning to exemplify many of the eco-nomic, social and cultural characteristics associated with ‘world cities’ and discusses a suitable framework for understanding this transition.

  2. A reconstructive ethic in the face of globalisation

    Ingrid Adriana Alvarez Osses

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This investigation seeks to expound a critical ethic of hegemonic globalisation. We reflect on the common good ethics of Franz Hinkelammert, the contribution made by the intercultural dialogue of Raúl Fornet-Betancourt, the Ethics of Liberation of Enrique Dussel, and the situated, contextual thinking of Rodolfo Kusch. At the same time, the text reflects on the dilemmas of  globalisation, especially with respect to polarisation and mutual incomprehension. We attempt to descry prospects for a situated critical ethic in the face of the cultural and economic order which governs the world. It is also important to consider the relevance of other assumptions which seek  to change the logic of negation and non-recognition that have led to the Self and Totality. As part of this prospect, we propose a reconstructive ethic for the rehabilitation of a world order which has no ears for the voice of the victims of the profit imperative and a functional ethic based on utilitarism. This reveals a void in supportive behavior which demands a more responsible attitude towards those sectors which have always been passed over. Thus we propose  an ethic which will strengthen dialogue in pursuit of other possibilities for the human race.

  3. INDIAN SCHOOL TEACHERS’ PERSPECTIVE ON GLOBALISATION OF EDUCATION: A Case Study of Atomic Energy Education Society School Teachers

    M. RAJESH

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation has become an enduring reality of our times and more so in the field of education. Teachers are the harbingers of change in the global economy and school teachers have a major role in shaping the attitude of the society towards all social and economic phenomena including that of globalisation. At the Regional Centre of IGNOU situated at Cochin, Kerala an unique training programme was conducted for a year to train school teachers of the Atomic Energy Education Society (AEES one of the elite educational organisations of the country in ICT applications. This opportunity was utilised by the researchers to conduct a study that holds multiple portends for policy makers to channel the direction of the forces affecting the globalisation of education.

  4. Globalisation, transnational policies and adult education

    Milana, Marcella

    2012-12-01

    Globalisation, transnational policies and adult education - This paper examines policy documents produced by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the European Union (EU) in the field of adult education and learning. Both these entities address adult education as an explicit object of policy. This paper investigates how globalisation processes are constructed as policy problems when these transnational political agents propose adult education as a response. The author's main argument is that while UNESCO presents the provision of adult education as a means for governments worldwide to overcome disadvantages experienced by their own citizenry, the EU institutionalises learning experiences as a means for governments to sustain regional economic growth and political expansion. After reviewing the literature on globalisation to elucidate the theories that inform current understanding of contemporary economic, political, cultural and ecological changes as political problems, she presents the conceptual and methodological framework of her analysis. The author then examines the active role played by UNESCO and the EU in promoting adult education as a policy objective at transnational level, and unpacks the specific problem "representations" that are substantiated by these organisations. She argues that UNESCO and EU processes assign specific values and meanings to globalisation, and that these reflect a limited understanding of the complexity of globalisation. Finally, she considers two of the effects produced by these problem representations.

  5. The IMF-World Bank's economic stabilisation and structural adjustment policies and the Uganda economy, 1981-1989

    Nabudere, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    This research report traces all the main developments in IMF-World Bank policies in Uganda. Most of the material concerns the three IMF standby arrangements with Uganda for 1981-1984 and the World Bank Group's Structural Adjustment Programmes. These programmes introduced two contradictory policies

  6. Globalisation: Implications for health care delivery in developing ...

    Globalisation entails a rapid increase in economic, technological and cultural exchange, which flows from economically and technologically dominant nations to less dominant nations. Many of the underlying principles of globalisation are contradictory to traditional values. Globalisation could aggravate marginalisation of ...

  7. Universities' Responses to Globalisation: The Influence of Organisational Culture

    Burnett, Sally-Ann; Huisman, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to assess how and why some higher education institutions have responded to aspects of globalisation and, in particular how organisational culture influences universities' responses to globalisation. Using a predominantly qualitative, mixed-methods approach, empirical research was used to explore the impact of globalisation at…

  8. Globalisation and its implications for health care and nursing practice.

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline

    Globalisation describes the increasing economic and social interdependence between countries. This article examines globalisation in terms of the opportunities and threats it poses to health, in particular increasing rates of non-communicable diseases. Nursing is challenged with responding to the changing health needs of the global population that have arisen as a result of globalisation.

  9. Competition in higher education: lessons from the corporate world ...

    Much has been written about the impact of globalisation in the corporate world. Most of those involved in the corporate world are aware of the impact of globalisation on their business activities and are taking required precautions. Actions followed include mergers, acquisitions and strategic alliances. These actions are ...

  10. Globalisation and the internationalisation of higher education in sub-Saharan Africa

    Dzvimbo, Kuzvinetsa Peter; Moloi, Kholeka Constance

    2013-01-01

    In a shrinking world, in which a neo-liberal discourse has permeated sub-Saharan African higher education, critical reflection is required to assess the merits and demerits of globalisation. Research, intensive discussion and hearings conducted over a two-year period by the Task Force on Higher Education and Society, convened by the World Bank and United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) for the purpose of exploring the future of higher education in the devel...

  11. Trans-nationalisation Processes in the Ukrainian Economy

    Bolharova Natalya K.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers main processes of trans-nationalisation of Ukrainian economy, identifies specific features of trans-national production and explains some theoretical aspects of these issues. It provides main stages of theoretical comprehension of activity of trans-national corporations (TNC, specific features of the theory of competitive advantages of TNC and specifies the basic ones of them. The article conducts analysis of flows of direct foreign investments into the Ukrainian economy. It shows distribution of direct foreign investments into Ukraine by main countries-investors, regions-recipients and types of economic activity. It conducts review and analysis of the modern state of trans-national corporations of foreign origin in the Ukrainian market. It considers functioning of domestic TNC in Ukraine and main tendencies of entering of Ukrainian companies into the world environment and also identifies directions of further development of these phenomena. Prospects of further studies in this direction are identification of the degree of trans-nationalisation processes in the Ukrainian economy and identification of the positive effect, in particular, synergy from integration and globalisation.

  12. The role of economies of scale in the cost of dialysis across the world: a macroeconomic perspective.

    Karopadi, Akash Nayak; Mason, Giacomo; Rettore, Enrico; Ronco, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    The treatment of chronic kidney disease through dialysis is a considerable expense in most health systems. The two chief methods of providing dialysis, haemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) have significant differences in cost composition and factors of production. The aim of this article is to identify and quantify the macroeconomic variables that influence the relative cost of such modalities across different countries. From previously published literature, we extracted the estimates of HD/PD cost ratios in a total of 46 countries. We conducted a multivariate regression analysis using the estimated HD/PD cost ratio in each country, with several country level indicators as explanatory variables. We found a strong statistical effect of the following variables on the HD/PD cost ratio: country's level of development, economies of scale and percentage of private health-care expenditure. The statistical effects on HD/PD ratio by local manufacturing and relaxed import regulation of PD equipment were calculated and were found to be very significant. it is possible for a country to still reap the benefits of economies of scale in provision of PD, even in the absence of a large enough market to make local production of PD equipment feasible in that country.

  13. THE IMPACT OF GLOBALISATION ON BANKING SERVICE QUALITY IN ZIMBABWE (2003-2008

    KOSMAS NJANIKE

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study sought to investigate the impact of globalization on the quality of products in a developing economy banking sector. The objectives of the research were to ascertain whether globalisation helps restore or maintain confidence in the banking sector; ensure a sound financial sector; helps reduce fraudulent activities and whether the implementation of global measures improves the quality of products in the banking sector. Zimbabwe banking sector was used as a case study. Questionnaires and interviews were used to collect the data in addition to documentary review. It was found that globalization ensures efficient service delivery as human bank tellers; long queues and underutilisation of internetwere still in existence in the banking system. Globalisation of the banking sector is essential in that it brings new technology which help improve banking services and infrastructure hence reduce fraudulent activities, new risk management techniques and increased confidence in the banking sector.

  14. Globalisation and Higher Education Development: A Critical Analysis

    Yang, Rui

    2003-07-01

    This article sets out to analyse critically the nature of globalisation and how it is affecting higher education. The author first reviews the nature of globalisation, and then examines its international impact on higher education development. He contends that globalisation is predominantly economic, and points out that global exchanges in the economic, cultural and educational domains continue to be unequal. At the same time, education is increasingly treated as a business. By exposing the negative side of globalisation and its effects on universities, the author aims to counter the uncritical acceptance of globalisation as a positive force for higher education and society as a whole.

  15. Globalisation Reflected onto Architecture: Tall Buildings of Ankara-Turkey

    Tanju Gültekin, Ahmet

    2017-10-01

    Policy switching, radical socioeconomic changes, integration and globalisation were started in 1980s. New urban space developments have been accelerated in 1990s and provided urban space identity policies in 2000s. Luxurious shopping malls, hotels, and ultra-posh residences within the city and gated communities on city peripheries have been formed. Thus, the urban geography, urban silhouette and urban identity are being converted through tall buildings that signify the created prestige, status, and power in competition with the global capital. By the globalisation foresight the cities which have gotten ahead of the nation-state was seen. The buildings that converted into a symbolic (iconic) global product leads to an advantage in the race for attracting global investments and tourism, on behalf of the cities/urban districts. This process, which was initiated haphazardly in Turkey in the 1980s, has been on-going throughout the 1990s and especially in 2000s by means of the re-structuring of the government on a neo-liberal basis. The process is concurrently observable through the tall buildings and/or building blocks which match with urban regeneration projects, urban zoning plan revisions and fragmented zoning plans. In this study, the new global world order is evaluated by their status and architectural properties of selected tall and iconic/ultra-modern buildings in Ankara.

  16. Globalisation, Transnational Policies and Adult Education

    Milana, Marcella

    2012-01-01

    Globalisation, transnational policies and adult education--This paper examines policy documents produced by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the European Union (EU) in the field of adult education and learning. Both these entities address adult education as an explicit object of policy. This paper…

  17. Globalisation and Social Sciences in Africa | Nieftagodien ...

    Globalisation and Social Sciences in Africa. Noor Nieftagodien. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access · FAQ's · News · AJOL jobs · More about AJOL ...

  18. Perspectives on Globalisation and Its Structures | Hammouda ...

    Perspectives on Globalisation and Its Structures. Hakim Ben Hammouda. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access · FAQ's · News · AJOL jobs · More about ...

  19. Nietzsche l'islam et la globalisation

    17 déc. 2013 ... Obscurantism, Islam, jihad, theocracy dominate . The century in fact expresses a new concept of postmodern revolutions or the society is in intersection between philosophy, politics and religion. The three pillars of all social facts. Keywords: revolution, Islam, globalisation, democracy, jihad, will for power.

  20. Theoretical resources for a globalised bioethics

    Verkerk, Marian A.; Lindemann, Hilde

    In an age of global capitalism, pandemics, far-flung biobanks, multinational drug trials and telemedicine it is impossible for bioethicists to ignore the global dimensions of their field. However, if they are to do good work on the issues that globalisation requires of them, they need theoretical

  1. Theoretical resources for a globalised bioethics.

    Verkerk, Marian A; Lindemann, Hilde

    2011-02-01

    In an age of global capitalism, pandemics, far-flung biobanks, multinational drug trials and telemedicine it is impossible for bioethicists to ignore the global dimensions of their field. However, if they are to do good work on the issues that globalisation requires of them, they need theoretical resources that are up to the task. This paper identifies four distinct understandings of 'globalised' in the bioethics literature: (1) a focus on global issues; (2) an attempt to develop a universal ethical theory that can transcend cultural differences; (3) an awareness of how bioethics itself has expanded, with new centres and journals emerging in nearly every corner of the globe; (4) a concern to avoid cultural imperialism in encounters with other societies. Each of these approaches to globalisation has some merit, as will be shown. The difficulty with them is that the standard theoretical tools on which they rely are not designed for cross-cultural ethical reflection. As a result, they leave important considerations hidden. A set of theoretical resources is proposed to deal with the moral puzzles of globalisation. Abandoning idealised moral theory, a normative framework is developed that is sensitive enough to account for differences without losing the broader context in which ethical issues arise. An empirically nourished, self-reflexive, socially inquisitive, politically critical and inclusive ethics allows bioethicists the flexibility they need to pick up on the morally relevant particulars of this situation here without losing sight of the broader cultural contexts in which it all takes place.

  2. Rethinking Education in an Era of Globalisation

    Wrigley, Terry

    2007-01-01

    This article reflects on the historic tensions of education under capitalism, arguing that they have been exacerbated in our era of neo-liberal globalisation. Government drives for greater "accountability" and "effectiveness" are a blinkered response to the threefold global crisis we face: poverty and debt; a collapse of the…

  3. Revisiting Jullien in an Era of Globalisation

    Beech, Jason; Rizvi, Fazal

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss some of the ways in which forces of globalisation have transformed the spaces in which educational policies are now developed and practices now enacted. We will consider further the widely held claim that the emergence of these transnational spaces requires new ways of thinking about comparative education. We will examine…

  4. Globalisation, Equity and Social Development | Mkandawire ...

    African Sociological Review / Revue Africaine de Sociologie. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 6, No 1 (2002) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Globalisation, Equity and ...

  5. Globalisation and international compatibility - a challenge to ...

    The contexts of institutions for higher education are in flux with consequent learning challenges. One of these challenges is that of globalisation and the need for international compatibility. Another challenge is that Mode 2 learning programmes, material and methods need to be relevant to the specific context in which they ...

  6. Konference European Studies: between Globalisation and Regionalism

    Laštovková, Jitka

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 5 (2006), s. 1009-1010 ISSN 0038-0288. [European Studies: between Globalisation and Regionalism. Šiauliai, 12.05.2006-03.05.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : conference * European identitiy * globalization Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography Impact factor: 0.128, year: 2006

  7. Historicising and Globalising the African Environmental Condition ...

    The literature dealing with African environmental issues has grown exponentially in recent years. Nevertheless, much of these scholarly debates configure environmentalism in colonial and neocolonial terms, thereby interpreting the historical roots and environmental impact of globalisation. This article, however, argues that ...

  8. Glocalisation: Examining the Globalisation of the Curriculum ...

    It is posited that neoliberal globalisation has had some deleterious effects on educational provision by buttressing colonial-like forms of curriculum continuity and entrenching differential access by the poor and disadvantaged groups such as the girl child. However, it is also submitted that new externally inspired initiatives ...

  9. Globalisation of Language and Culture in Singapore

    Vaish, Viniti

    2007-01-01

    What are the effects of globalisation on patterns of language use in the domain of media in Singapore? Rather than only cultural imperialism of hegemonic English, which is no doubt the case, the use of languages in the "mediascap" also shows the consumption of non-English languages and cultures. Though English may be the main language of…

  10. Changing role of non-timber forest products (NTFP) in rural household economy: the case of Sinharaja World Heritage site in Sri Lanka.

    Senaratne, Athula; Abeygunawardena, Piyasena; Jayatilake, Wijaya

    2003-11-01

    This paper examines the modified patterns of utilizing non-timber forest products (NTFP) and associated behavioral changes around tropical forest areas in the context of conservation-related objectives and other commercially driven objectives. Our study introduces a conceptual framework based on the household production theory and tests empirically the hypotheses drawn at Sinharaja World Heritage in Sri Lanka. The results show that conditions introduced by forest conservation programs and the spread of small-scale commercial tea cultivation are transforming the economy around Sinharaja. The process is an economically rational one where resident communities decide upon their actions based on the opportunity cost of time involved with NTFP in the absence of observable prices. Although the process, overall, has led to a decline in the role of NTFP in the household economy, its impact over different NTFP are not uniform, leaving sustained demand for certain NTFP. This situation calls for a multifaceted approach in forest management programs to address the various household needs fulfilled by NTFP-based activities.

  11. Processes of Globalisations and Adult Educations in Croatia.

    Klapan, Anita; Lavrnja, Ilija

    Globalization is one of those words being used every day, although the majority of the common people hardly know its true meaning. Globalization is a term formed and promoted by economists and ecologists, both understanding the world as a unique and inseparable space. Globalization is a force reorganizing the world's economy, and the main…

  12. Globalisation and the Paradox of Participatory Governance in ...

    sulaiman.adebowale

    2006-06-01

    Jun 1, 2006 ... marginalisation in the global political economy. Participatory .... world, a fourth world has emerged with the same characteristics of their counterparts in the .... Although unique in some ways, developments in South .... sition to labour laws and affirmative action laws and policies are illus-. 1.Edigheji2.pmd.

  13. The effects of globalisation of financial services on banking industry and stock market: an Algerian case study

    Benamraoui, Abdelhafid

    2003-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, Algeria has embarked on a programme of comprehensive financial liberalisation to establish a market-oriented financial system, and to develop the role of the Algiers Stock Exchange in the mobilisation of financial resources. The transition from a centrally planned to a market-oriented economy meant fewer regulatory barriers towards local and foreign banks. This study demonstrates that financial liberalisation is the main force that drives the globalisation of financial se...

  14. Energy - economy - policy: considerations on the world energy market. Energie - Oekonomie - Politik: wirtschaftstheoretische und wirtschaftspolitische Betrachtungen zum Weltenergiemarkt

    Giesel, H B

    1991-07-11

    Worldwide, there is no technical scarcity of energy resources, there is a scarcity of those which might be recovered cost-effectively. The approach of the traditional resource theory is orientated to the optimum distribution of the finite energy resources between the generations. The present distribution problem is, however, the excessive demand for cost-advantageous energy resources of the Third World by the industrialized countries. The industrialized countries themselves own abundant energy resources (e.g. 'non-conventional' oils) which, however, cannot be cost-effectively recovered unless a substantially higher energy price level assures economic viability. This analysis raises fundamental questions concerning an optimized balance of interests in the field of utilization of resources between the North (rich countries) and the South (poor countries, need for energy; increasing overpopulation). Alternative solutions aiming at better conservation of cost-effectively recoverable resources to the advantage of the Third World countries are discussed as well as viable instruments to be used within the framework of an international energy policy. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  15. The challenges and effects of globalisation on forensic dentistry.

    Bernitz, Herman

    2009-08-01

    This paper deals with the challenges faced by forensic dentists in a world in which globalisation has become a reality. People travelling across the globe on a daily basis become victims of violent crime, terrorist attacks, human displacement, natural and man made disasters. This has forced colleagues in the profession to participate in joint operations exposing inadequacies which need urgent attention. Forensic dentists practise in isolation creating their own rules and regulations oblivious to the greater global community. No international protocols exist for the many procedures practised by the profession. Possible solutions to the complex problems are offered. These include co-operation with colleagues around the globe while striving for the highest levels of quality control, standardisation, reliability, impartiality, reproducibility and ethical accountability.

  16. The ‘torn curriculum’ in globalised doctoral education

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    of future researchers, mainly through doctoral education, has become of heightened interest. In this process several global trends and related drivers of such changes can be identified, e.g. professionalization and quality assurance of doctoral education, and researcher mobility. With the European...... for students during the PhD – when at the same time political fractions state that “[o]verregulation of doctoral programs should be avoided” as doctoral education is seen as “a source for human capital for research but is also an extremely important part of the research itself” (Gudmundsson, 2008, p. 77). Also...... the PhD to not only international disciplinary arenas, but also to a world beyond the campus made manifest through a culturally diverse and existentially enhanced PhD process and learning environment. I argue that we should acknowledge that globalisation does not only make possible ‘standardisation...

  17. Energy poker. How petroleum and natural gas influence the world economy; Der Energiepoker. Wie Erdoel und Erdgas die Weltwirtschaft beeinflussen

    Kneissl, K.

    2006-07-01

    Petroleum, coal and natural gas are dominating the energy market. All three of these fossil fuels are in short supply and thus costly. Geopolitical restrictions, speculations and market psychology define the energy market just as much as the law of supply and demand. Threshold countries like India and China with their rapidly increasing energy demand will bring about a dramatic price crisis already in the very near future. Since as long as 20 years ago, energy consumption worldwide is higher than the volume of newly developed petroleum deposits. This shortage causes problems that will have to be solved by industry and politics within the next few decades as the supply shortage is very dangerous for the international political balance. The author, Dr. Karin Kneissl, takes the reader into the world of energy markets. Interdependences between geopolitics, petroleum, natural gas and industry are explained in detail, and thre reader is given valuable aid in making his own decisions. (orig.)

  18. Agrobiodiversity, Rural Transformations and Household Experiences of Globalised Change: A Case Study from Southern Bolivia

    Katherine Turner

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines reconfigurations of household economies and agrobiodiversity through the experiences and responses of rural households to local manifestations of globalisation and environmental change in the Central Valley of Tarija, Bolivia, from the 1950s to the present. Research participant narratives from seven study communities document a widely experienced regional shift from rain-fed agriculture and pastured livestock production for household consumption to market-oriented production of regionally-specialised commodities. Particularly important to this reconfiguration are changing land access and use regimes, household responses to changing opportunities, discourses and social requirements related with ‘modernising lifestyles’, market integration and dependence, changing environmental and ecological conditions, and greater availability of consumer goods and technologies. We analyse how these processes have combined to reconfigure the range of livelihood possibilities available to rural households, or their ‘landscapes of possibility’, in ways that favour transition to specialised commodity production. Patterns of change in household agrobiodiversity use, however, are entwined with threads of persistence, underscoring the contingent nature of rural transitions and the role of local agency and creativity in responding to and sometimes shaping how globalisation unfolds. Examining rural transition through the experiences of households in particular contexts over time offers insights for development policy and practice to support producers’ ability to respond to globalisation and environmental change in ways they see as desirable and beneficial to their livelihoods and wellbeing.

  19. Impact of Globalisation on Industrial Relations

    Kaia Philips

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation means intensified competition, the transfer of investments, production relocation outside of Europe, job losses, unemployment and rapid structural changes. European labour markets are characterised as relatively rigid, with high social security and strong industrial relations (IR. The aim of this study is to find out, how the social partners, governments and researchers interpret the challenges of globalisation on future developments of industrial relations. The research is based on expert foresight survey where IR experts from 34 countries were interviewed. The project looked to the future, to the year 2025 and discussed on what industrial relations and social dialogue would look like after fifteen-twenty years. The main findings convinced that decentralisation of collective bargaining is expected in old member states, while the situation will remain unchanged in majority of the new member states. We can conclude that European level convergence is expected in the area of industrial relations

  20. The impact of globalisation on teleradiology practice.

    Shieh, Yao Y; Tsai, Fong Y; Shieh, Mengkai

    2008-01-01

    Some advocates of globalisation argue that a free market with little regulation is the best approach for achieving cost-effective healthcare. Healthcare, however, is different from other business activities in that it is typically less profit-driven; instead, it often involves the goal of providing equitable care to the underprivileged. Traditionally, the government has subsidised the expenses of delivering affordable healthcare to underserved communities. Because of the many recent advances in telecommunications technology, telemedicine has gained increasing attention. Teleradiology, in particular, is by far the maturest of all telemedicine disciplines and, thus, it may serve as a pivotal indicator of whether telemedicine on a global scale is feasible or not. In this paper, a prediction of the future landscape of globalised teleradiology operations is attempted based on the extrapolation of the historical trends in teleradiology practice as well as the growing pressure on federal and local governments to reduce their regulatory power under the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS).

  1. Globalisation and Air Transportation Industry: A Case Study of Malaysia

    Kamaruddin, Shahrul Kamal

    2010-01-01

    Air transportation remains a large and growing industry that is central to the globalisation process. The globalisation impact on the air transportation industry remains largely focused on the airlines, while the impact on airports is rarely defined. The objective of this research is to identify the processes of globalisation that impact the air transportation industry specifically on airport development and operations that will greatly influence the changing nature of airports. A survey ques...

  2. Financial globalisation and crisis, institutional transformation and equity

    Arestis, Philip; Singh, Ajit

    2010-01-01

    This paper comprises the long introduction to the symposium of five papers on financial globalisation published in the Cambridge Journal of Economics, volume 34, no 2. The paper discusses the impact of financial globalisation in a variety of spheres and shows how the five papers link together to provide a coherent view of the current economic and financial crisis. In this paper we also examine the globalisation of finance more broadly both in historical terms as well as in relation to the cur...

  3. TECHNOLOGIES OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AS THE FACTOR OF DIGITALIZATION OF ECONOMY IN RUSSIA AND IN THE WORLD

    L. A. Tsvetkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth rates of the market for high-tech goods and services based on deep learning technologies are estimated. Key investors and beneficiaries in the development of deep learning technologies were identified. The patent activity in the world is analyzed and the place of Russia in the patent landscape in the field of deep learning is determined. It is shown that most of the patent documents are concentrated in the portfolios of major US corporations, which are headed by Microsoft, IBM, Google, Yahoo. Among the leaders of the rating of patent holders are also the corporations of Japan and the Republic of Korea. High rates of growth of patent activity in China are noted. The prospects of the development of artificial intelligence technologies and deep learning in Russia are estimated. Special attention is paid to the fact that most of the research and development in this area is carried out in public research institutes and universities, while in the countries – technological leaders the driver of development of the direction is the business sector.

  4. Globalisation of agrifood systems and sustainable nutrition.

    Qaim, Matin

    2017-02-01

    The globalisation of agrifood systems is a mega-trend with potentially profound nutritional implications. This paper describes various facets of this globalisation process and reviews studies on nutritional effects with a particular focus on developing countries. Results show that global trade and technological change in agriculture have substantially improved food security in recent decades, although intensified production systems have also contributed to environmental problems in some regions. New agricultural technologies and policies need to place more emphasis on promoting dietary diversity and reducing environmental externalities. Globalising agrifood systems also involve changing supply-chain structures, with a rapid rise of modern retailing, new food safety and food quality standards, and higher levels of vertical integration. Studies show that emerging high-value supply chains can contribute to income growth in the small farm sector and improved access to food for rural and urban populations. However, there is also evidence that the retail revolution in developing countries, with its growing role of supermarkets and processed foods, can contribute to overweight and obesity among consumers. The multi-faceted linkages between changing agrifood systems and nutrition are a new field of interdisciplinary research, combining agricultural, nutritional, economics and social sciences perspectives. The number of studies on specific aspects is still limited, so the evidence is not yet conclusive. A review at this early stage can help to better understand important relationships and encourage follow-up work.

  5. CULTURAL GLOBALISATION AND CHALLENGES TO TRADITIONAL COMMUNICATION THEORIES

    Lauren Movius

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews existing traditional media theories, and analyses the challenges that the current developments of globalisation present to them. The article provides a short history of the concept of globalisation, and reviews the primary theoretical approaches to globalisation that are critical to communication scholars. The article also examines how globalisation challenges the ways in which media and communication have traditionally been theorised. Specifically, the cultural imperialism theory is discussed, as well as the main challenges to the theory. Audience reception studies, which focus on how audiences negotiate meaning differently in specific cultural contexts, are highlighted as the key critique of cultural imperialism

  6. On the Conditions of Collective Action in Globalisation

    Augusto Santos Silva

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available One must confer specific attention to “collective action” in the framework of globalisation. The article addresses this issue both at the analytical and normative levels. For the first one, it makes use of sociology. Two main problems are identified: the inequalities and imbalances that constitute globalisation are associated to globalisation; and its institutional embeddedness, that is, the way by which it can be combined with national, social and political structures. For the second level, the article uses the perspective of democratic public policies, advocating the building of a critical metanarrative about globalisation. Three axes can underpin this metanarrative: democracy, law and development.

  7. Globalisation or Westernisation? Ethical concerns in the whole bio-business.

    Tangwa, Godfrey B

    1999-07-01

    Increasing awareness of the importance of the biodiversity of the whole global biosphere has led to further awareness that the problems which arise in connection with preservation and exploitation of our planet's biodiversity are best tackled from a global perspective. The 'Biodiversity Convention' and the 'Human Genome Project' are some of the concrete attempts at such globalisation. But, while these efforts are certainly very good at the intentional level and on paper, there is, at the practical level of implementation, the danger that globalisation may simply translate into westernisation, given the Western world's dominance and will to dominate the rest of the globe. How is 'global bioethics' to be possible in a world inhabited by different cultural groups whose material situation, powers, ideas, experiences and attitudes differ rather markedly and who are not, in any case, equally represented in globalisation efforts and fora? One index of the pertinence of this question is that talk about biodiversity, biotechnology, biotrade etc. is being increasingly matched by talk about biopiracy, biorade, biocolonialism etc. In this paper, I attempt to explore and develop these very general concerns.

  8. Peace, Security, Globalisation & Cultural Diplomacy

    Ashok Natarajan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article argues for a positive, comprehensive conception of peace that goes beyond the mere absence of war and a more integrated conception of human security that encompasses a wider range of issues than threats of physical violence. Education is one of humanity’s most effective social institutions for redirecting the violent physical energies of destruction into higher avenues of civilization and culture as an instrument of conscious social evolution. Organization is knowledge of higher accomplishment. Organization has the power to vastly accelerate and multiply the potentials of education for the promotion of peace and security. Peace and Security have a mutually reinforcing effect on each other in the sense that peace results in security while security results in peace. Physical violence eventually led to the development of the knowledge needed for the avoidance of violence by means of diplomacy, trade and cultural exchanges, marking the beginning of the transition from the physical to the mental level of evolution. Trade requires travel, transport, human interaction, exchange, trust with respect to products, and reliable mechanisms for the exchange of a stable currency that can only be effectively founded on an enduring peace that generates confidence among the traders. Isolated communities evolve a communal consciousness as they mature into organized social units founded on shared customs and culture, which later develop into a common legal framework. What began as diplomacy so many centuries ago has now evolved into a near universal recognition of fundamental human rights and the rule of law. The evolution of diplomacy in previous centuries is the foundation for the remarkable betterment of human life witnessed in recent times. The world is in the process of evolving a unifying global culture founded on universal values and recognition of the rich contributions of different cultures to humanity’s progress. As physical force once

  9. Signs of political economy

    Bernard Lamizet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Like any political system, economy is a system of signs and representations. The Semiotics of economy elaborates its analytical methods to interpret such signs, which give meaning to the economy by representing its performances in public debate and in the media. Four major features distinguish the Semiotics of political economy from other semiotic forms or other systems of information and political representation. First of all, the relationship between the signification of the economy and the real or the imaginary phenomena to which they refer always pertains to the order of values. The second characteristic of economic signs is the significance of the state of lack they express. The third characteristic of signs of the economy is the form of sign production, which can be designated by the concept of emission of signs and their diffusion. Finally, as all signs, the economic sign is arbitrary. In the field of Economics, such arbitrariness does not imply that the Subject is free to superimpose whatever value to the signs themselves, but refers to the rupture between the world and its possible transformation. The very meaning of the word economy is here at stake. Oikos, in Greek (the term from which the word economy is derived refers to a known, familiar space. Economy transforms the real, natural world into a symbolic social world, into a world of relations with others whom we recognise and whose actions are relatively predictable. It might be useful to consider the contemporary issue of debt, its implications and its multiple meanings, which includes both the ethical and moral dimension of the condemnation of debt as well as the imaginary political dimension based on the expression of an idea of independence.

  10. Orientalism and the geoculture of the World System: Discursive othering, political economy and the cameralist division of labor in Habsburg Central Europe (1713-1815

    Klemens Kaps

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the question of to what degree the concept of geoculture can be brought in line with research on Orientalist stereotypes and imaginary. Following Said’s original definition of orientalism discourses of the 18th-century political economy are reassessed by focusing on their perception of spatial hierarchies in Eastern Europe. This article reconsiders these discourses as an active factor in the struggle for power and a tool in the hands of the geopolitical interests of absolutist monarchs in Prussia, the Habsburg Monarchy, and Russia in the age of mercantilism, as demonstrated by the Partitions of Poland-Lithuania. By focusing on the Habsburg Monarchy between the Spanish War of Succession and the Congress of Vienna, it is demonstrated here that, territorial landlocked empires within Europe used a similar language as colonial maritime empires in order to justify their geopolitical expansion and territorial domination of Eastern Europe. In a second step, it is shown that this discourse was part of the geopolitical culture of the World System and was instrumental in setting ideological conditions for cameralist-driven institutional transformations in favor of the core regions within the Habsburg dominions in Central Europe.

  11. Globalisation and trends in international R&D alliances

    Narula, Rajneesh

    2003-01-01

    Abstract: The growth of collaborative activity is greatly influenced by the process of globalisation. This paper focuses on the narrow area of collaborative R&D activity, and takes a `macro' view of the effects of these developments. Globalisation has affected the need of firms to collaborate, in...

  12. Educational Research, Policy and Practice in an Era of Globalisation

    Power, Colin

    2007-01-01

    Globalisation includes not only the changes brought about by the opening up of markets and communication technology, but also those set in motion by shifts in policy relating to the responsibilities of government and the role of research and innovation in development. This paper examines the impact of globalisation on education research, policy…

  13. Coping With Change And Globalisation: A Study Of Managerial ...

    This paper draws in part on the findings from a study of managerial perceptions of Globalisation-related business issues in the island of Mauritius. The objectives of the research were to determine the degree of awareness of Mauritian senior executives regarding the Globalisation issue, and to investigate the difficulties and ...

  14. Globalisation and National Environmental Policy: Update and Overview

    F.H. Wijen (Frank); K. Zoeteman; J. Pieters (Jan); P. Seters (Paul)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractSUMMARY After outlining recent developments and the scope, target audience, and structure of the book, we review the literature on globalisation and environmental policy, especially the impact of globalisation on the environment and changes in environmental governance in relation to

  15. Globalisation And African Cultural Heritage Erosion: Implications For ...

    Globalisation And African Cultural Heritage Erosion: Implications For Policy. ... Globalisation has had both negative and positive impact on the cultural heritage development and preservation in Africa. However, this article argues that ... This cooperation can only be meaningful if it begins with what is already there, i.e. in the ...

  16. Power and Insecurity: The politics of globalisation | van der ...

    Globalisation is presented by some as an inevitable force of history. However, it is very much the result of political and policy decisions made by powerful elites to advance their interests. Globalisation is not a benign, neutral process, but ideologically driven in the service of the rich and powerful. This ideology is ...

  17. Globalisation and the Global Economic Meltdown; Prospects and ...

    Coming at the heels of the demise of the USSR, globalisation portends the unbridled spread of capitalist tendencies across geographic and ideological boundaries. In Nigeria, globalisation has translated into deregulation and privatisation of public corporations with the attendant lay off of workers. Increased unemployment ...

  18. Globalisation and Labour Utilisation in Nigeria: Evidence from the ...

    This study examines the influence of globalisation on labour utilisation in Nigeria using the construction industry as a case study. It reveals that the era of globalisation has given rise to profound changes in the way labour is utilised, specifically in terms of employment patterns as well as the related issues of earnings, job ...

  19. Crossed Looks: Globalisations and Curriculum in Guinea-Bissau

    da Silva, Rui; dos Santos, Júlio Gonçalves; Pacheco, José Augusto

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on education in Guinea-Bissau in the context of globalisations, examining the concept of globalisation and its relation to education and the curriculum. It focuses on the relatively neglected area of national education policies in Guinea-Bissau, comparing differences and common points of interference/influence of multilateral…

  20. Global Education--An Educational Perspective to Cope with Globalisation?

    Lehner, Daniela; Wurzenberger, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of Global Education (GE) from a "theory of action plan" and an "evolutionary and systems theory" approach as an educational perspective to cope with globalisation--more specifically, the challenges of globalisation. Moreover, an additional aim is to analyse the…

  1. Collaborative Economy

    collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...... in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge 5.Networked cultures in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 6.Policy and regulatory perspectives in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge PART II - Disruptions, innovations and transformations 7.Regulating innovation in the collaborative economy: An examination...... localities of tourism Greg Richards 11.Collaborative economy and destination marketing organizations: A systems approach Jonathan Day 12.Working within the Collaborative Tourist Economy: The complex crafting of work and meaning Jane Widtfeldt Meged and Mathilde Dissing Christensen PART - III Encounters...

  2. The health impacts of globalisation: a conceptual framework

    Huynen, Maud MTE; Martens, Pim; Hilderink, Henk BM

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a conceptual framework for the health implications of globalisation. The framework is developed by first identifying the main determinants of population health and the main features of the globalisation process. The resulting conceptual model explicitly visualises that globalisation affects the institutional, economic, social-cultural and ecological determinants of population health, and that the globalisation process mainly operates at the contextual level, while influencing health through its more distal and proximal determinants. The developed framework provides valuable insights in how to organise the complexity involved in studying the health effects resulting from globalisation. It could, therefore, give a meaningful contribution to further empirical research by serving as a 'think-model' and provides a basis for the development of future scenarios on health. PMID:16078989

  3. Globalisation and women in India.

    Krishnaraj, M

    1999-11-01

    Globalization arrived in India through an external and internal alignment of political and economic forces that led to the opening of the country to the outside world. The five processes under globalization are: 1) commercialism wherein more services become monetized and incomes are received in money rather than in kind; 2) more capitalization; 3) foreign trade becomes important for the production and distribution process; 4) greater financialization develops; and 5) international capital moves freely. These changes affect women more than men in different ways. Capitalization results in more self-employed marginal farmers becoming wage workers, making it less possible for women to manage domestic duties alongside their productive work. In general, macro-economic policies affect women through the household, market, and gender relations. In countries like India where women suffer from serious discrimination, whatever affects the household will worsen women's position. Thus, the process of liberalization, privatization, and globalization will put the clock back for women and for the poor in general.

  4. Crises in Asia or crisis of globalisation?

    Dieter, Heribert

    1998-01-01

    The crises in Southeast and East Asia have started a new round of debate on the benefits and disadvantages of globalisation. We have to ask whether the crises in Asia were the result of failures in national economic policy or whether they were the consequence of ill-constructed global financial markets. It can be concluded that the crises were caused by a number of factors, both internal and external, but that the decisive shifts came from actors on international financial markets as well as ...

  5. The Effects of Globalisation on Corporate Communication

    Sanden, Guro Refsum

    One important effect of globalisation for the multinational corporation (MNC) is the increasing diversity of the workforce, which becomes clear through the variety of different language backgrounds found among employees at all levels of the organisation. In order to overcome the linguistic barriers...... presented by the multilingual workforce, MNCs may try to implement various language policies or strategies to regulate the internal communicative environment, for example by adopting a common corporate language, or deploy language management tools such as language training for employees or use...

  6. Religion, Psychology and Globalisation Process: Attitudinal Appraisal

    Emmanuel Orok Duke

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A key consequence of globalisation is the integrative approach to reality whereby emphasis is placed on interdependence. Religion being an expression of human culture is equally affected by this cultural revolution. The main objective of this paper is to examine how religious affiliation, among Christians, influences attitudes towards the application of psychological sciences to the assuagement of human suffering. The sociological theory of structural functionalism was deployed to explain attitudinal appraisal. Ethnographic methodology, through quantitative analysis of administered questionnaire, was also used. The study reveals that religious tenets largely shape attitudinal appraisal and redefine the borders of globalisation’s metanarratives.

  7. Anti-Ageing Cultures, Biopolitics and Globalisation

    Brett Neilson

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In March 2004, the author attended the Inaugural International Conference on Longevity at the Sydney Exhibition and Convention Centre in Darling Harbour. As a cultural researcher interested in the interactions between demographic shifts, capitalist globalisation and changing forms of political power, the prospect of a direct encounter with the debates and practices surrounding the burgeoning field of anti-ageing medicine promised a means to observe the complex cultural dynamics of population ageing at play. This article explores the discord the atuhor witnessed; a quarrel that, despite the march of technological advance, attests the ongoing conflict in the nexus where politics meets life.

  8. Transborder regionalisation in the conditions of globalisation

    Fedorov Gennady

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation creates favourable conditions for the formation of transborder regions through enhancing communication. This process involves industrial, transport, trade and other enterprises as well as education, culture and research institutions, which develop multiple links. The formation of cross-border regions is facilitated by the regional policy of the European Union, which encourages the development of connections between the transborder regions of different countries including non-EU members, for instance, Russia. A positive example is the Baltic macroregion, which serve as a ground for the formation of numerous cross-border meso- and microregions.

  9. Globalisation of the nuclear fuel cycle

    Rougeau, J.-P.; Durret, L.-F.

    1995-01-01

    Three main features of the globalisation of the nuclear fuel cycle are identified and discussed. The first is an increase in the scale of the nuclear fuel cycle materials and services markets in the past 20 years. This has been accompanied by a growth in the sophistication of the fuel cycle. Secondly, the nuclear industry is now more vulnerable to outside pressures; it is no longer possible to make strategic decisions on the industry within a country solely on national considerations. Thirdly, there are changes in the decision-making process at the political, regulatory, operational and industrial level which are the consequence of global factors. (UK)

  10. Leadership for development in a globalised environment

    S. Vil-Nkomo

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of Africa and NEPAD depends entirely on the emergence of an African leadership for development. Issues of leadership and operational citizenship are examined and analysed. The article uses Othello to dramatize and analyse the challenges of African leadership. The scramble to save Africa from within and external is presented. The consequences of globalisation are examined. The article demonstrates that NEPAD is not a given for this continent, because certain conditions must be met which are succinctly outlined in the United Nations Millennium Declaration, the Monterrey consensus, and the United Nations Development Programme. The article raises questions of shifting goal posts.

  11. Prospects for the world economy

    Paolo Sylos Labini

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Analysis here is founded on certain analogies with the Great Depression of the Thirties and four fundamental points: innovations, changes in the market forms, changes in income distribution and the sustainability of debts. The duration of prosperity depends first of all on the importance and variety of investment opportunities opened up by them, whereas crisis duration is conditioned by the size of indebtedness. The central problem in America today is precisely that of the sustainability of debts, to evaluate which criteria are studied in this paper. Full recovery will only be possible once past the stage in which firms and families contract debts primarily to repay other debts falling due and avoid bankruptcy. Proof that debts have fully reacquired the function of supporting growth will be given by the recovery of investments. In any case, the crisis is unlikely to reach the gravity of the Great Depression not only because a price fall is to excluded, but also because repetition of the mistakes in monetary policy are to be ruled out.

  12. Globalization of the world economy

    Adelman, M.A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Global trade has been growing for some 400 years. Comparing the present with 1914, there are several major changes: speed of communication and travel, the ease of moving financial assets, the growth in the Asian countries and the end of colonialism. The impact of this economic-political change in forces has a market effect on the energy industry and examples are explained. (UK)

  13. Intimate Relationships across ethnic borders in the globalised world

    Singla, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    and counseling based primarily on an explorative study A theoretical framework consisting of intersectionality approach combined with everyday life management and life course forms the basis of the study. The participants (n=10) are ‘ordinary’ persons in mixed relationships where one partner is from South Asia...

  14. Benchmarking in the globalised world and its impact on South ...

    In order to understand the potential impact of international benchmarking on South African institutions, it is important to explore the future role of benchmarking on the international level. In this regard, examples of transnational benchmarking activities will be considered. As a result of the involvement of South African ...

  15. Transmission Channels and Spillover Effects in a Globalised World

    Fries, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The first study readdresses the determinants of business cycle synchronisation to test, on the one hand, whether FDI promoting policies may have consequences for the business cycle comovement between countries, and on the other hand, whether more plausible identification strategies change previous results. Our results suggest that linkages through foreign direct investment contribute in most cases positively to the synchronisation between country pairs. In contrast, the beneficial effects of ...

  16. “Ethical Traceability” in a globalised world

    Nielsen, Thorkild

    Traceability as a concept has emerged in modern societies and their global markets where production and consumption of food have become increasingly separated. An increasing number of intermediaries like shippers, wholesalers, processors, repackers, brokers, importers and exporters are involved i...... of private sector and public sector endorsed traceability forms in the food system. Realisation of ethical traceability is not just a morally approved step supported by appropriate technology and communication strategies, but is a politically disputed process....

  17. African philosophy in globalising world: A particularist perspective ...

    In this essay, I try to show that the universalists argument is not only erroneous but also that it is motivated by cultural imperialism. I argue that a universalist approach to African philosophy will not succeed in whittling out a methodology that will serve as a universal recipe for doing African philosophy because there is no ...

  18. Globalisation and inequalities in a third world sport context | Burnett ...

    The complex reality of the globalization process is explored through analyses of the discourse that since the nineties there has increasingly been debated in the field of sport sociology. Most prominent theoretical perspectives including modernism, post-modernism, broad Marxist traditions and the figurational approach ...

  19. Exploring globalisation as a structure of socio-economic ...

    The paper contends that globalization still toes the line of slavery, colonialism and imperialism. The global village system is lopsided and cannot benefit week economies such as Nigeria. Globalization appears to be a new modern design for slavery, a tool for marginalization and re-colonization of the Third World nations ...

  20. Staying Ahead of the Game: The Globalising Practices of Elite Schools

    Kenway, Jane; Fahey, Johannah

    2014-01-01

    How are elite schools caught up in the changing processes of globalisation? Is globalisation a new phenomenon for them? This paper focuses on the globalising practices that selected elite schools adopt. It also explores how globalisation is impacting on the social purposes of elite schools, which conventionally have been to serve privileged social…

  1. Globalisation, Geography Education and the Curriculum: What Are the Challenges for Curriculum Makers in Geography?

    Butt, Graham

    2011-01-01

    The forces of globalisation affect the lives of everybody on the planet--but defining the concept of globalisation, and its appropriate place within the school curriculum, still proves problematic. This article engages with three key issues: our understanding and conceptualisation of globalisation; the impacts of globalisation on education; and…

  2. World law

    Harold J. Berman

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In the third millennium of the Christian era, which is characterised by the emergence of a world economy and eventually a world society, the concept of world law is needed to embrace not only the traditional disciplines of public international law, and comparative law, but also the common underlying legal principles applicable in world trade, world finance, transnational transfer of technology and other fields of world economic law, as well as in such emerging fields as the protection of the world's environment and the protection of universal human rights. World law combines inter-state law with the common law of humanity and the customary law of various world communities.

  3. Cross-culture Communications in Tourism under Conditions of Globalisation

    Aldoshyna Mariia V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the study of cross-cultural specific features of interaction within social and business communication in the international tourism. The goal of the article is analysis of the cross-cultural environment of Ukraine in the context of the world globalisation for efficient interaction in the sphere of international management and marketing. The article shows a necessity of a study of influence of national cultural features upon business activity of tourist enterprises with consideration of their international and cross-cultural nature of activity. The article identifies functions of culture and presents basic classifications of the world cultures by Geert Hofstede, Fons Trompenaars and Edward Twitchell Hall Jr. It considers specific features of activity of tourist enterprises in the spheres of cross-cultural management and marketing, formulates problems of manifestation of cultural differences in these spheres. It offers main advertising strategies in the international communication policy, which help enterprises to promote their tourist products to international markets more efficiently.

  4. Do international economic developments affect the South African economy?

    JA Swanepoel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation has opened economies more, exposing them to more international shocks and increasing the challenges to which domestic economic policies must respond. This paper provides a starting point for the analysis of the impact of international economic developments on the South African economy by means of graphical illustrations, correlations coefficients and in some cases a VAR analysis. Although this paper has shed some light on the importance of international economic developments on the South African economy, more rigorous econometric investigation is needed to validate the arguments and to address many of the unresolved questions.

  5. Theorising the State and Globalisation in Education Politics and Policy (English version

    Guy Burton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The essay aims to overturn much conventional (and generally critical thinking which emphasises neoliberal prominence in policy and policy making. Two main policy making processes are noted: (1 a rational, systematic process or (2 an incoherent, incremental version. The latter account is perceived as more realistic model and accounted for by making use of particular perspectives regarding the nature and role of the state in today’s globalised world. Using Dunleavy and O’Leary’s Theories of the State (1987 and its update, Theories of the Liberal Democratic State (2009 by Dryzek and Dunleavy, four main theories are identified: the pluralist/neopluralist, Marxist, elitist and New Right/market liberal. Three perspectives on globalisation – the neoliberal, radical and transformationalist – are analysed with the latter providing insights into the varied impact of globalisation on the policy making process and its outcome. The essay concludes with an appeal for future research to acknowledge the complex nature of policy making, thereby using more nuanced analysis.

  6. Survey article: the legitimacy of Supreme Courts in the context of globalisation

    Sidney W. Richards

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to present an overview of the state of the art concerning the legitimacy of Supreme Courts in the context of globalisation. In recent years, there has been much discussion about the observed increase in both the references to foreign decisions in matters of domestic adjudication, as well as the alleged and precipitate rise of ‘transjudicial dialogue’, or formal and informal communication between the domestic courts of various national jurisdictions. A central concern is whether Supreme Courts possess the necessary authority, and thus the legitimacy, to adopt a more ‘internationalist’ disposition. This article will demonstrate how there are various coexisting discourses of legitimacy, each with their own particular features. These various discourses are not always compatible or easily commensurable. It will argue, moreover, that the basic dilemma regarding judicial legitimacy in a globalised world is a species of a more general problem of globalisation studies, namely how to reconcile a conceptual vernacular which is permeated by domestic, state-centric notions with a political reality which is increasingly non-national in its outlook.

  7. A Comparative Analysis of the Price Index in Transition Countries in the Time of Globalisation

    Pejović Igor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation with all its features can be divided in two segments - good and bad. When we look at the good side of globalisation, it is obvious that it has erased boundaries between countries in terms of trade, education, knowledge sharing, and other new technologies, while on the other hand, the bad side is that it has created a considerable gap between developed and developing countries, then different types of commercial, political and other conditioning, and dependence on strong, developed states. A great contribution to the negative part of globalisation was of economic instability that occurred at the beginning of this century and which consequences are still present in the world. In this article, we presented the impact of economic instability on the price index trough a comparative analysis of transition countries such as Montenegro, Serbia and Croatia over a period of five years (Croatia has just recently become a member of the European Union and due to that fact it was included in this study. The survey covered price indices relating to the prices of industrial products for the domestic markets, consumer price indices, indices of the hospitality services and the prices of the agricultural products.

  8. Collaborative Economy

    collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...... and similar phenomena are among these collective innovations in tourism that are shaking the very bedrock of an industrial system that has been traditionally sustained along commercial value chains. To date there has been very little investigation of these trends, which have been inspired by, amongst other...... in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge 5.Networked cultures in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 6.Policy and regulatory perspectives in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge PART II - Disruptions, innovations and transformations 7.Regulating innovation in the collaborative economy: An examination...

  9. THE NEW ECONOMY AND THE ECONOMY OF TOURISM

    MIRELA MAZILU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Together with the Internet, e-business and the new economy era, in general, fundamental transformation of the social and economic structure take place. In parallel, the assaults on the standard economic science amplify, in the sense of some conceptual reformulations and of some reinterpretations of the economic phenomena and laws. Besides the classical factors of production, work and capital, information is added, either as a distinct factor or as a detached one of the two mentioned. Also, the empiric findings regarding the so-called tertiarisation of the economy or the increase of the share of the services sector in the total of the national economy, as well as the so-called intangible investments in the total of the investment funds, have lead to numerous attempts of redefining what we call today a "modern economy". Other factors with major influence, regarding the adjustment of the economic science to the new trends from the real economy, refer to the following: the liberalisation of the international exchanges and the globalisation; the growth of the importance of the so-called free time (including here the household activities and the ones unfolded in the interest of the community, entertainment, but also the time destined to the development of the degree of culture and education on one's own and the fluidisation of the limits of differentiation between this and the work activity in the formal sector as well as the informal one; the more rapid dynamic of the financial and banking markets than the so-called classic productive sector of the economy; the extension of the use of computers and of the means and techniques of communication, in the activity of the companies as well as in the households, and the impact on the structure of the time and the financial budget of the population etc. All these have an impact on the tourism unfolding.

  10. ‘Fuck the Border’? Music, Gender and Globalisation

    Samuel Dwinell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available I argue in this paper that the urgent discussions of gender and globalisation within postcolonial and transnational feminisms must inform all critiques of globalisation, especially those concerning music. Yet, the near-absence of gender from the analytical methodologies of studies of music and globalisation stands in marked contrast to the scholarship on Western ‘art music’ and Anglo-American popular repertoires, in which discussion of gender and sexuality are now indispensable. This paper, therefore, represents an attempt to bring together music, gender and globalisation—to inaugurate a ‘conversation,’ in other words, in which these three terms remain central categories for analysis.

  11. The effect of the volatility of the oil price in the actual world economy (1998 until 02/2008); A influencia da volatilidade dos precos do petroleo na atual economia mundial

    Plaster, Vinicius Almeida [Universidade Vila-Velha, ES (Brazil). Relacoes Internacionais

    2008-07-01

    In the elapse of the X X century the world experienced different cycles of prices in the world's oil production. From the principle of the century until the years 70's there were times of relative stability, in the 70's nevertheless a little variation in the price took the world's economy into a huge recession. Since then the consume of oil, that were increasing, has suffered a shock and started to decrease. The stability just will return in the 90's , but it will not last for a long time, and not with the same level of prices of the time before crisis, but as sad before it do not last long, as we can see nowadays the quotation break new records every day , but one factor distinguish this new shock of prices, of the shock of the 70's. Distinct of that time, the global economy in the beginning of the X XI century live a period of economical stability that was not seen for a long time in history, with controlled inflation and decrease of the interests rates, therefore this article concludes that happened a maturation of global economy, and that due the previous shocks happened a diversification in relation of the previous excessive dependence of oil. (author)

  12. Globalisation And Local Indigenous Education In Mexico

    Reinke, Leanne

    2004-11-01

    Globalisation is often viewed as a threat to cultural and linguistic diversity and therefore is a central concern of educational practices and policy. The present study challenges this common view by demonstrating that local communities can use global means to support and enhance their specific practices and policies. An historical exploration of education policy in Mexico reveals that there has been a continuing struggle by indigenous peoples to maintain locally relevant modes of teaching. Indigenous peoples have increasingly used technology to maintain their languages and local cultural practices. Such accentuation of the local in a global context is exemplified by the people of Chiapas: They live in subsistence-type communities, yet their recent education movements and appeals to international solidarity (such as in the Zapatista rebellion) have employed computer-aided technologies.

  13. Globalisation of innovation in knowledge intensive industries

    Chen, Yun-Chung; Vang, Jan; Chaminade, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    in developing countries: reduce research costs, access large markets, tap into a large pool of qualified human resources or benefit from knowledge spillovers available in the local/regional system of innovation. The empirical research presented in this paper reveals that none of these arguments can fully......The global location of R&D labs by MNCs is a rather new phenomenon; especially when it comes to establishing R&D labs in developing countries. The existing and rather limited literature on globalisation of innovation provides four possible explanations of why multinationals locate R&D labs...... countries such as China and thus calls for an integration in the regional innovation systems framework....

  14. Enhancing diversity through globalised higher education?

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Nørgård, Rikke Toft; Locke, William

    for individual working patterns and career prospects. The fourth contribution discusses how globalisation, seen through the lense of the digitalised university, does not have to lead to uniformity in higher education learning and teaching practices, but may advance and bring forward local and personal life......, and the knowledge and skills developed transferrable (Francois, 2015; Nerad & Evans, 2014; Nerad & Heggelund, 2008). In these ways, universities are able to align educational policy, the production of social capital and higher education curricula. As a result, students are not confined to their home countries when...... academic practice, work, careers and cultures through a multi-layered analysis and discussion of the academic domains of: undergraduate education, doctoral education, junior and mid career academic work and careers, and inter-university digital communities. We ask: What are the meanings of local...

  15. Globalisation and Governance: Educational Policy Instruments and Regulatory Arrangements

    Mok, Ka-Ho

    2005-07-01

    For more than a decade, the economic, social, political and cultural effects of globalisation have been central topics of debate. Those who see globalisation as a combination of economic transactions and worldwide telecommunications tend to believe that its impact is profound, inasmuch as it is fundamentally altering the way in which we live and creating hybrid cultural styles. No country is immune from the effects of globalisation, and controversy continues to reign about its positive and negative consequences. The present study identifies and examines numerous challenges posed by globalisation and their implications for educational restructuring, with special attention being given to new forms of governance; the relation between the state, the market and civil society; and governmental policy instruments for education.

  16. Democracy and development in the age of globalisation: Tensions ...

    User

    Besides reflecting on the impact of globalisation on development and ..... that of Australia or Mexico), of which about 50% was contributed by South Africa and ... of tuberculosis patients in Southern Africa are also HIV-positive.58 Indeed, TB is.

  17. Internationalisation and globalisation in mathematics and science education

    Atweh, Bill; Borba, Marcelo C; Gough, Noel; Keitel-Kreidt, Christine; Vistro-Yu, Catherine; Vithal, Renuka

    2008-01-01

    This book develops theoretical frameworks of internationalisation and globalisation. It identifies related ethical, moral, political and economic issues as well as details international comparisons on cultural differences and similarities.

  18. Post-Colonial Nation Building, Global Governance, Globalisation ...

    Post-Colonial Nation Building, Global Governance, Globalisation and Development in Nigeria and Africa. ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... A common route that nations take is that of nation building, especially within the ...

  19. globalisation and environmental education: a view from the south

    of new and increasingly complex patterns of inter- ... that globalisation is a subject and/or object to be con- strained by definition ... tural production' through which this transnational imaginary ... nationalism, and guided by the principles of voca-.

  20. The Constitutional state in the developing world in the age of ...

    The author argues that this trend has been the principal casualty of globalisation. Globalisation has redefined the role of the state in the developing world, weakening its mission of providing public goods and mediating social justice. In this context, it is suggested, democracy is reduced to little more than a ritual in electoral ...

  1. Knowledge Economy

    Kerr, Aphra; O Riain, Sean

    2009-01-01

    We examine a number of key questions regarding this knowledge economy. First, we look at the origin of the concept as well as early attempts to define and map the knowledge economy empirically. Second, we examine a variety of perspectives on the socio-spatial organisation of the knowledge economy and approaches which link techno-economic change and social-spatial organisation. Building on a critique of these perspectives, we then go on to develop a view of a knowledge economy that is conteste...

  2. Globalisation and trends in international R&D alliances

    Narula,Rajneesh

    2003-01-01

    Abstract: The growth of collaborative activity is greatly influenced by the process of globalisation. This paper focuses on the narrow area of collaborative R&D activity, and takes a ‘macro’ view of the effects of these developments. Globalisation has affected the need of firms to collaborate, in that firms now seek opportunities to cooperate, rather than identify situations where they can achieve majority control. The use of collaboration is particularly acute in capital-intensive and knowle...

  3. Globalisation, Tradition And Cultural Identity In Spanish Football

    Jim O'Brien

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article offers some reflections and observations on the complex relationship between the forces of Globalisation and Spanish football, posing the key question as to whether the impact of Globalisation has been a quintessentially corrosive dynamic, eroding the quasi - sacrosanct traditions of the Spanish game to fashion a distinctive post- modern pastiche of elitism and inequality based on an orgy of consumption and commodity.

  4. Globalisation: implications for health care delivery in developing countries

    Louise de Villiers

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation entails a rapid increase in economic, technological and cultural exchange, which flows from economically and technologically dominant nations to less dominant nations. Opsomming Globalisering behels ‘n toename in ekonomiese, tegnologiese en kulturele uitruiling vanaf ekonomies-dominante na ekonomies minder-dominante samelewings. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  5. Prospects for sustainable development of the nickel industry of Russia in conditions of transition in the world economy to the new technological mode

    Stolbov A. G.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The essence of new technological mode in the world economy, some features of innovative development of the mineral complex and the nickel industry, dynamics of world production and consumption of nickel have been considered. The organization and economic structure of the nickel industry in Russia has been characterized. The prospects for sustainable development of the nickel industry in conditions of the sixth technological mode have been justified. Рассмотрены сущность нового технологического уклада в мировой экономике, особенности инновационного развития минерально-сырьевого комплекса и никелевой промышленности, динамика мирового производства и потребления никеля. Дана характеристика организационно-экономической структуры никелевой промышленности России. Обоснованы перспективы устойчивого развития никелевой промышленности в условиях шестого технологического уклада

  6. FROM WAR ECONOMIES TO PEACE ECONOMIES IN AFRICA

    Abel

    temporary 'interruption' to an ongoing process of development”.4 The second ... indication of the changing nature of world political and economic trends .... (FDI), where war economies cannot, at least not in a positive or legal fashion.24 The.

  7. Nuclides Economy

    Ivanov, Evgeny; Subbotin, Stanislav

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally the subject of discussion about the nuclear technology development is focused on the conditions that facilitate the nuclear power deployment. The main objective of this work is seeking of methodological basis for analysis of the coupling consequences of nuclear development. Nuclide economy is the term, which defines a new kind of society relations, dependent on nuclear technology development. It is rather closed to the setting of problems then to the solving of them. Last year Dr. Jonathan Tennenbaum published in Executive Intelligence Review Vol. 33 no 40 the article entitled as 'The Isotope Economy' where main interconnections for nuclear energy technologies and their infrastructure had been explained on the popular level. There he has given several answers and, therefore, just here we will try to expand this concept. We were interested by this publication because of similarity of our vision of resource base of technologies development. The main paradigm of 'Isotope economy' was expresses by Lyndon H. LaRouche: 'Instead of viewing the relevant resources of the planet as if they were a fixed totality, we must now assume responsibility of man's creating the new resources which will be more than adequate to sustain a growing world population at a constantly improved standard of physical per-capita output, and personal consumption'. We also consider the needed resources as a dynamic category. Nuclide economy and nuclide logistics both are needed for identifying of the future development of nuclear power as far we follow the holistic analysis approach 'from cave to grave'. Thus here we try to reasoning of decision making procedures and factors required for it in frame of innovative proposals development and deployment. The nuclear power development is needed in humanitarian scientific support with maximally deep consideration of all inter-disciplinary aspects of the nuclear power and nuclear technologies implementation. The main objectives for such

  8. The world economy of petroleum products and the strategy of a petroleum company from exporting country: Cases of SONATRACH (Algeria), KPC (Kuwait), PEMEX (Mexico), PDVSA (Venezuela). Second volume

    Preure, M.

    1992-12-01

    This thesis contains 2 volumes. In this second volume, the author describes the industrial and technological developments and the strategy of petroleum companies in exporting countries. The main industrial strategies studied are national integration strategy in a planned economy (case of Algeria) or in a controlled-liberal economy (case of Mexico) and international integration strategies to the lower part of petroleum industry and external growth (cases of Kuwait and Venezuela). Technological strategies studied are development of a national engineering, information, research programs/ development and innovation. The last chapter takes stock of research and development programs for petroleum products (case of Mexico) . 258 refs., 103 tabs

  9. English as a Medium of Instruction in East Asia's Higher Education Sector: A Critical Realist Cultural Political Economy Analysis of Underlying Logics

    Kedzierski, Matt

    2016-01-01

    As discourses of globalisation and the knowledge-based economy become increasingly influential in both policy-making and in public debates about education, employability and national competitiveness--the choice of language in the classroom takes on a strategic importance. The paper employs a critical realist Cultural Political Economy lens to…

  10. Antimatter Economy

    Hansen, Norm

    2004-05-01

    The Antimatter Economy will bring every country into the 21st century without destroying our environment and turn the Star Trek dream into reality by using antimatter from comets. At the April 2002 joint meeting of the American Physical Society and American Astronomical Society, I announced that comets were composed of antimatter, there were 109 antimatter elements, and the Periodic Table of Elements had been updated to include the antimatter elements. When matter and antimatter come together, energy is produce according to Einstein's equation of mass times the speed of light squared or E = mc2. Antimatter energy creates incredible opportunities for humanity. People in spacecraft will travel to the moon in hours, planets in days, and stars in weeks. Antimatter power will replace fossil plants and produce hydrogen from off-peak electrical power. Hydrogen will supplant gas in cars, trucks, and other vehicles. The billions of ton of coal, billions of barrels of oil, and trillions of cubic feet of natural gas will be used to make trillions of dollars of products to bring countries into the 21st century. Within this millennium, the Worlds Gross National Product will increase from 30 trillion to 3,000 trillion plus 1,500 trillion from space commercialization bringing the Total Gross National Product to 4,500 trillion. Millions of businesses and billions of jobs will be created. However, the real benefits will come from taking billions of people out of poverty and empowering them to pursue their dreams of life, liberty and pursuit of happiness. Please visit www.AntimatterEnergy.com.

  11. Can the Millennium Development Goals database be used to measure the effects of globalisation on women's health in Sub-Saharan Africa? A critical analysis.

    Wamala, Sarah; Breman, Anna; Richardson, Matt X; Loewenson, Rene

    2010-03-01

    Africa has had poor returns from integration with world markets in globalisation, has experienced worsening poverty and malnutrition and has high burdens of HIV and communicable disease, with particular burdens on women. It is therefore essential to describe the impact of globalisation on women's health. Indicators such as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are presented as having a major role in measuring this impact, but an assessment of the adequacy of aggregate national indicators used in monitoring the MDGs for this purpose is lacking. The Millennium Development Goals' panel database 2000 to 2006 was used to investigate the association between globalisation and women's health in Sub-Saharan Africa based on various determinants of heath. Out of the 148 countries classified as developing countries, 48 were in Sub-Saharan Africa. Results suggest that developing countries are becoming more integrated with world markets through some lowering of trade barriers. At the same time, women's occupational roles are changing, which could affect their health status. However, it is difficult to measure the impact of globalisation on women's health from the MDG database. First, data on trade liberalization is aggregated at the regional level and does not hold any information on individual countries. Second, too few indicators in the MDG database are disaggregated by sex, making it difficult to separate the effects on women from those on men. The MDG database is not adequate to assess the effects of globalisation on women's health in Sub-Saharan Africa. We recommend that researchers aim to address this research question to find other data sources or turn to case studies. We hope that results from this study will stimulate research on globalisation and health using reliable sources.

  12. Problems and Prospects of the Whole Language Approach to Literacy Education in the Depressed Economies of the Third World: The Nigerian Experience.

    Onukaogu, C. E.

    Whole language has the potential to boost literacy in Third World countries like Nigeria, where the language curriculum has not been given the political and economic support it deserves. The economic depression in the Third World may not allow for a robust development of whole language. One effect of the decay of education in the Third World is…

  13. Moneyless Economy

    Das, Subhendu

    2012-01-01

    Moneyless economy (MLE) does not have any money in the economy. All products and services are free for all people. This means everybody must work, work for free, and get everything they want for free also. Any work that a society needs is considered legitimate. MLE is not socialism. MLE has the ability to provide a lifestyle that anyone wants. We show that it is possible to run the exact same economy that we have now, in the exact same way, and without money. Any government of any country can...

  14. Iran's Economy

    Ilias, Shayerah

    2008-01-01

    .... To the extent that U.S. sanctions and other efforts to change Iranian state policy target aspects of Iran ssssssss economy as a means of influence, it is important to evaluate Iran's economic structure, strengths, and vulnerabilities...

  15. Iran's Economy

    Ilias, Shayerah

    2008-01-01

    .... To the extent that U.S. sanctions and other efforts to change Iranian state policy target aspects of Iran's economy as a means of influence, it is important to evaluate Iran's economic structure, strengths, and vulnerabilities...

  16. Cambodia's economy

    Ear, Sophal

    2008-01-01

    "This presentation is adapted from a Harvard KSG workshop held earlier this year on the Political Economy of "Binding Constraints to Growth" Cambodia Pilot for which I served as an External Panelist/Resource Person."

  17. Mobile economy

    Turowski, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    Mobile economy : Transaktionen, Prozesse, Anwendungen und Dienste ; 4. Workshop Mobile Commerce, 02.-03. Februar 2004, Univ. Augsburg / K. Turowski ... (Hrsg.). - Bonn : Ges. für Informatik, 2004. - 189 S. : Ill., graph. Darst. - (GI-Edition : Proceedings ; 42)

  18. Comparative education in the era of globalisation: evolution, mission and roles

    Mark Bray

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available To begin with this, we ought to say that Comparative Education is concerned with cross-national analysis and by its nature encourages its participants to be outward looking. The field of Comparative Education is shaped by globalisation. Held (1999:2 thinks that globalisation could be considered as «the widening, deeping and spending up of worldwide interconnectedness in all aspects of contemporary social life». Apart from that, we must say that there are some institutions, which promote this phenomenon called globalisation (among these institutions we can find the World Council of Comparative Education Societies —WCCES—. Globalisation has converted into an important topic for study. The comparative education’s field possess some hyperglobalists who give reasons against that the world is transforming into borderless. Last but not least, we don’t have to forget that by itself, comparative education is an interdisciplinary field; and because of that, the possibility of being developed for common conceptions is highly limited.Para empezar, deberíamos decir que la Educación Comparada está relacionada con el análisis transnacional y por su naturaleza alienta a sus partícipes a ser observadores externos.El campo de la Educación Comparada se encuentra modelado por la globalización.Held (1999:2 piensa que la globalización podría considerarse como «el ensanchamiento, profundización, y estabilización de interconexiones mundiales en todos los aspectosde la vida contemporánea social». Aparte de eso, debemos decir que existen algunas instituciones promotoras de este fenómeno llamado globalización (entre estas instituciones podemos hallar el Consejo Mundial de Sociedades de Educación Comparada. La globalización se ha convertido en un importante tema de estudio. El campo de educación comparada posee algunos hiperglobalistas, los cuales sostienen argumentos en contra de la transformación del mundo sin la existencia de fronteras

  19. Globalisation, rural restructuring and health service delivery in Australia: policy failure and the role of social work?

    Alston, Margaret

    2007-05-01

    The impacts of globalisation and rural restructuring on health service delivery in rural Australia have been significant. In the present paper, it is argued that declining health service access represents a failure of policy. Rural communities across the world are in a state of flux, and Australia is no different: rural communities are ageing at faster rates than urban communities and young people are out-migrating in large numbers. During the past 5 years, rural Australia has also experienced a severe and widespread drought that has exacerbated rural poverty, and impacted on the health and well-being of rural Australians. Australian governments have responded to globalising forces by introducing neoliberal policy initiatives favouring market solutions and championing the need for self-reliance among citizens. The result for rural Australia has been a withdrawal of services at a time of increased need. This paper addresses the social work response to these changes.

  20. The challenges of Belgian prostitution markets as legal informal economies: an empirical look behind the scenes at the oldest profession in the world

    Boels, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    An extensive body of literature exists on sex work and prostitution, covering a variety of topics. The relation between prostitution and the informal economy, however, has not been widely studied. This article aims to contribute to this under-researched domain. Furthermore, it empirically contributes to the current topical policy debate on prostitution by offering insights into the perceptions of prostitutes and other stakeholders in the prostitution business and policy towards it in Ghent, B...

  1. Ekonomiczne i spoleczne nastepstwa globalizacji/Economic and Social Consequences of Globalisation

    Bartlomiej Kaczmarek

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this article in an analysis of the globalisation process in economic and social areas. The author describes the main spheres of globalisation such as economic and political integration, the declining role of nation states, cultural homogenisation and the increasing significance of transnational corporations. The advantages and disadvantages of globalisation are discussed. The author also indicates differences between regions that benefit from globalisation. The article tries to...

  2. Globalisation and Its Impact on Competitiveness: the Case of the British and German Pharmaceutical Industry

    Christel Lane; Jocelyn Probert

    2003-01-01

    This paper assesses the degree of financial and economic globalisation of British and German pharmaceutical companies during 1990 and 2001 and explores the changing balance between globalisation and national embeddedness. It tries to explain both the much lower degree of globalisation of German as compared to British companies in 1990, as well as their catching up at the beginning of the 21st century. The paper suggests that the lesser degree of globalisation of German firms during most of th...

  3. Globalising China : Part 1: The domestic market of the People’s Republic of China

    Segers, Rien

    2013-01-01

    In 1978 under the leadership of Deng Xiaoping, China decided to gradually open up its economy to achieve more economic development. Three and a half decades later, China has become an economic force to be reckoned with, surpassing Japan as the second largest economy in the world in 2010. China’s

  4. Globalisation and health inequalities: can a human rights paradigm create space for civil society action?

    London, Leslie; Schneider, Helen

    2012-01-01

    While neoliberal globalisation is associated with increasing inequalities, global integration has simultaneously strengthened the dissemination of human rights discourse across the world. This paper explores the seeming contradiction that globalisation is conceived as disempowering nations states' ability to act in their population's interests, yet implementation of human rights obligations requires effective states to deliver socio-economic entitlements, such as health. Central to the actions required of the state to build a health system based on a human rights approach is the notion of accountability. Two case studies are used to explore the constraints on states meeting their human rights obligations regarding health, the first drawing on data from interviews with parliamentarians responsible for health in East and Southern Africa, and the second reflecting on the response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic in South Africa. The case studies illustrate the importance of a human rights paradigm in strengthening parliamentary oversight over the executive in ways that prioritise pro-poor protections and in increasing leverage for resources for the health sector within parliamentary processes. Further, a rights framework creates the space for civil society action to engage with the legislature to hold public officials accountable and confirms the importance of rights as enabling civil society mobilization, reinforcing community agency to advance health rights for poor communities. In this context, critical assessment of state incapacity to meet claims to health rights raises questions as to the diffusion of accountability rife under modern international aid systems. Such diffusion of accountability opens the door to 'cunning' states to deflect rights claims of their populations. We argue that human rights, as both a normative framework for legal challenges and as a means to create room for active civil society engagement provide a means to contest both the real and the

  5. Four Stories: Confronting Contemporary Ideas about Globalisation and Internationalisation in Higher Education

    Cantwell, Brendan; Maldonado-Maldonado, Alma

    2009-01-01

    There is a common distinction between globalisation and internationalisation in higher education scholarship. Globalisation is seen as an over-arching social and economic process where as internatinalisation is understood as the ways in which institutions of higher education respond to globalisation. This conceptual distinction has also worked its…

  6. Vernacular Globalisations: Neo-Statist Accountability Policies in France and Quebec Education

    Maroy, Christian; Pons, Xavier; Dupuy, Claire

    2017-01-01

    The article argues that there is no single globalisation of education systems, but rather multiple globalisations of each system taken in its individual context. We propose three explanatory factors to account for these vernacular globalisation processes, that is, for individual policy trajectories in each national context: path dependence on…

  7. An Examination of the Influence of Globalisation on Science Education in Anglophone Sub-Saharan Africa

    Koosimile, Anthony T.; Suping, Shanah M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper takes the view that the emergence of some trends and practices in science education mirrors the influence of the process of globalisation in Anglophone Sub-Saharan Africa. Through a literature review, an attempt is made to link science education and globalisation by answering the question: "What influence does globalisation have on…

  8. Education, Globalisation and the "Voice of Knowledge"

    Young, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper argues that underlying the links being made between the need for educational change in responding to the knowledge economy is an evacuation of the content of curricula and a misplaced emphasis on "genericism" and experience. As an alternative the paper draws on ideas from Durkheim, Vygotsky and Bernstein to make the case for…

  9. EXPLORING GLOBALISATION AS A STRUCTURE OF SOCIO ...

    FBL

    equity for Third World nations such as Nigeria to have access to determine the prices of ... International Monetary Fund, World Trade Organization; and the regional alliances like. European ..... devaluation of the nation‟s currency. As a fact ...

  10. The effects of exchange rate on balance trade and on monetary aggregates of macedonia and the impact of the current world crisis in its economy

    Mr.Sc. Kadishe Limani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Macedonia is a country that is close related to the European Union countries where the majority of the Macedonian foreign trade is with the European Union countries (52%. So the Macedonian economy is in a high level dependency of Euro.  Since Denar is connected closely to Euro, and the level of its usage in everyday economic activity is close to the usage of Denar, it is obvious to be discussed as a dilemma whether Macedonia should have Euro as its currency. However, the problem lies in that whether it is the right time for such action as the best solution for Macedonian economy, keeping in mind the fact that in the international arena there is present a second crisis that is the crisis of Euro-Zone. Based on various sources and on our econometric results, in this paper is argued and supported the main hypothesis that the fix exchange rate for Macedonia is a more optimal choice in comparison with the unilateral euroisation and flexible exchange rate. Thus, during the research we found out some arguments that support the existing regime, such as: under a flexible regime an eventual devaluation of the Denar is more possible, which can lead to more negative effects on the economy than benefits. Thus, devaluation of the Denar will have no significant effects on the balance trade (export and imports and GDP. This means that the competitiveness of a country relies on the other factors. In addition an eventual devaluation of the Denar, it will not have significant effects on monetary aggregates (M2 and M4 due to the asset substitution from Denar deposits to foreign deposits and vice-versa.

  11. Reconstruction of War Damaged Buildings - A Problem that Still Stands. The Case of the National Economy Bank in Warsaw Restored During the Second World War

    Łotysz, Sławomir

    2016-12-01

    The Polish national historiography remains silent on the reconstruction of damaged towns and cities that was undertaken by the German administration after capturing Poland in September 1939. This paper, on the war-time restoration of the National Economy Bank's headquarters in Warsaw, is an attempt to at least partially fill the gap. Designed by celebrated architect Rudolf Świerczyński in the late 1920s in accordance with contemporary air raid defence regulations, it was bombed and nevertheless seriously damaged during the September Campaign. Under the German management of the bank, the building was reconstructed and even modernized by commissioned Polish engineers.

  12. Reconstruction of War Damaged Buildings - A Problem that Still Stands. The Case of the National Economy Bank in Warsaw Restored During the Second World War

    Łotysz Sławomir

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Polish national historiography remains silent on the reconstruction of damaged towns and cities that was undertaken by the German administration after capturing Poland in September 1939. This paper, on the war-time restoration of the National Economy Bank’s headquarters in Warsaw, is an attempt to at least partially fill the gap. Designed by celebrated architect Rudolf Świerczyński in the late 1920s in accordance with contemporary air raid defence regulations, it was bombed and nevertheless seriously damaged during the September Campaign. Under the German management of the bank, the building was reconstructed and even modernized by commissioned Polish engineers.

  13. Financial Globalisation and Sectoral Reallocation of Capital in South Africa

    Ziv Chinzara; Radhika Lahiri; En Te chen

    2012-01-01

    The study examines the impact of financial globalisation on intra-sector and inter-sector firm level reallocation of capital in South Africa using panel data for the period 1991-2008. The measure of efficient reallocation of capital is based on the variation of firm's marginal returns to capital around the optimal level, while the measure of financial globalisation is constructed by tracing the financial reforms/restrictions that took place in South Africa since the 1970s. We find that financ...

  14. Brazil's Exception to the World-Class University Movement

    Alperin, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    The continued importance of university rankings has only served to fuel the growth of the "world-class" university movement. There is a growing impression that, in a globalised and interconnected world, no country can do without a world-class university. No country, that is, except Brazil. While Brazil has the resources necessary to…

  15. The Aalborg Model in the Ruins: Project-Centred Pedagogy under GATS and Globalisation

    McIlvenny, Paul; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    Recently, the Danish higher education sector has become more aware of the issues of academic freedom, democratic control, deregulation and privatisation, eg. with the new university reform law. But we note that not many are as aware of the issues that lie beyond the national debate. The question...... of what the University stands for in an age of globalisation hangs in the air. In fact, there are big changes looming that threaten the whole fabric of public higher education in Denmark and globally. The danger comes from neoliberal global institutions such as the World Trade Organisation (WTO......) and the World Bank (EdInvest), as well as from the private lobby groups such as Global Alliance for Transnational Education (GATE). By implementing the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), the WTO stands to have an immeasurable impact on the funding, provision, staffing, democracy and content...

  16. A framework for modelling the complexities of food and water security under globalisation

    Dermody, Brian J.; Sivapalan, Murugesu; Stehfest, Elke; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Wassen, Martin J.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.; Dekker, Stefan C.

    2018-01-01

    We present a new framework for modelling the complexities of food and water security under globalisation. The framework sets out a method to capture regional and sectoral interdependencies and cross-scale feedbacks within the global food system that contribute to emergent water use patterns. The framework integrates aspects of existing models and approaches in the fields of hydrology and integrated assessment modelling. The core of the framework is a multi-agent network of city agents connected by infrastructural trade networks. Agents receive socio-economic and environmental constraint information from integrated assessment models and hydrological models respectively and simulate complex, socio-environmental dynamics that operate within those constraints. The emergent changes in food and water resources are aggregated and fed back to the original models with minimal modification of the structure of those models. It is our conviction that the framework presented can form the basis for a new wave of decision tools that capture complex socio-environmental change within our globalised world. In doing so they will contribute to illuminating pathways towards a sustainable future for humans, ecosystems and the water they share.

  17. A framework for modelling the complexities of food and water security under globalisation

    B. J. Dermody

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new framework for modelling the complexities of food and water security under globalisation. The framework sets out a method to capture regional and sectoral interdependencies and cross-scale feedbacks within the global food system that contribute to emergent water use patterns. The framework integrates aspects of existing models and approaches in the fields of hydrology and integrated assessment modelling. The core of the framework is a multi-agent network of city agents connected by infrastructural trade networks. Agents receive socio-economic and environmental constraint information from integrated assessment models and hydrological models respectively and simulate complex, socio-environmental dynamics that operate within those constraints. The emergent changes in food and water resources are aggregated and fed back to the original models with minimal modification of the structure of those models. It is our conviction that the framework presented can form the basis for a new wave of decision tools that capture complex socio-environmental change within our globalised world. In doing so they will contribute to illuminating pathways towards a sustainable future for humans, ecosystems and the water they share.

  18. Human economy and natural economy

    Masullo Andrea

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The decline of economy is due to its dependency from a virtual value, the currency, the coin, that in the recent phase of consumerism is so far from real value: human capital and natural capital. If human economy wants to continue to produce wellbeing, it must accept to be a subset of natural economy, intercept flux of matter produced by its circular mechanisms, put constraints in it, i.e. machines and structures, to direct it temporarily for our advantage, and finally release it to the same original flux, in an still usable state. In this way it will assume a function no more parasitic but symbiotic. It will be connected to natural cycles without destroying it, recovering the co-evolutionary link between nature and culture, building an economic web suited to the ecological web; thus we will have a mosaic characterised by biodiversity, technological diversity, and cultural diversity, able to produce a durable prosperity.

  19. Governance in Times of Globalisation: the Kaleidoscope of the Legal System

    Francesca Scamardella

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades, the West has been deeply transformed by globalisation; global markets have been replacing national economies and states have been losing their legislative and executive powers. The global economy is imposing its own standards, such as the so-called Brazilianisation of the West, consisting of labour changes inspired by typical Brazilian features (low wages, flexibility and insecurity. In such a context, a question arises: how is the legal system changing? Sociology of law has indicated legal transformations in terms of soft law, such as lex mercatoria, codes of conduct, etc. This informal system seems to constitute a legal kaleidoscope where global and local players are involved, rather than an effective legal system. From this perspective, globalisation can also be considered the legal premise of governance, based on the participation of social parties to policy and law-making processes. The aim of this article is to focus on legal transformations in times of globalisation, stressing the governance approach as a legal kaleidoscope capable of managing social inequalities, different distributions of power and knowledge and the other perverse effects determined by globalisation.En las últimas décadas, la globalización ha transformado profundamente Occidente; los mercados mundiales han ido sustituyendo a las economías nacionales y los Estados han ido perdiendo sus poderes legislativo y ejecutivo. La economía mundial está imponiendo sus propias normas, como la denominada brasileñización de Occidente, que consiste en implantar cambios laborales inspirados en las características típicas de Brasil (salarios bajos, flexibilidad e inseguridad. En este contexto, surge una pregunta: ¿cómo está cambiando el sistema legal? La sociología jurídica ha apuntado transformaciones legales en materia de leyes "blandas", como la lex mercatoria, códigos de conducta, etc. Este sistema informal parece constituir un caleidoscopio

  20. A crise Baring e a crise do Encilhamento nos quadros da economia-mundo capitalista The Baring crisis and the Encilhamento crisis in the context of the capitalist world-economy

    Felipe Amin Filomeno

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available O final do século XIX foi marcado, para Brasil e Argentina, por crescimento e instabilidade na economia. Neste período, ocorreram duas importantes crises econômicas, que ficaram conhecidas como crise Baring (na Argentina e crise do Encilhamento (no Brasil. Este artigo tem o objetivo de apresentar as conexões existentes entre essas duas crises e a conjuntura da economia-mundo capitalista das últimas décadas do século XIX, enfatizando o problema da dívida externa e da política econômica, e re-organizando algumas contribuições da historiografia econômica por meio da metodologia da "encompassing comparison" e da teoria dos ciclos mundiais de endividamento. O artigo mostra que ambas as crises estiveram condicionadas pela dinâmica da economia-mundo capitalista, especialmente pelos fluxos mundiais de capital, não sendo resultados exclusivos de políticas econômicas nacionais.The end of the 19th century was characterized by economic growth and instability in Brazil and Argentina. In this period, two important economic crises took place - the Baring Crisis (in Argentina and the Encilhamento Crisis (in Brazil. The aim of this paper is to present the connections between these two crises and the dynamics of the capitalist world-economy of the end of the 19th century, focusing on the problems of external debt and economic policy and re-organizing some contributions of economic historiography through the methodology of "encompassing comparison" and of the world debt cycles' theory. The paper concludes that both crises were influenced by the dynamics of the capitalist world-economy, especially by the international flows of capital, and that they were not exclusive results of national economic policies.

  1. Education's Effect on Income Inequality: An Economic Globalisation Perspective

    Wells, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    Utilising a globalisation framework this study contributes to discussions concerning inequality, education, and development by re-examining the effects of educational and economic variables on income inequality. This research shows that the effects of education on income inequality are affected by the level of economic freedom in a country, and…

  2. Globalisation, the Research Imagination and Deparochialising the Study of Education

    Lingard, Bob

    2006-01-01

    This paper works in dialogue with Arjun Appadurai's paper, "Grassroots globalization and the research imagination" in an attempt to outline some necessary changes in researching education in the multiple contexts of globalisation. The paper provides two narratives as part of this project, which Appadurai calls the…

  3. The Bologna Process, Globalisation and Engineering Education Developments

    Uhomoibhi, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on the Bologna Process in the light of globalisation and examine how it affects curriculum and engineering education developments. Design/methodology/approach: The growing need for creative competitiveness and the striving for specific profiles of engineering qualifications that are of high quality…

  4. Democratising the Research Imagination: Globalising Knowledge about HIV/AIDS

    Epstein, Debbie; Boden, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    This paper problematises globalisation and the democratisation of the research imagination, highlighting the potentials for harm and good. We do so, first, by exploring two philosophical/epistemological issues: the definition of "knowledge" and the role of "research" in knowledge creation. The paper then considers some of…

  5. Globalisation and private infrastructure investments in emerging markets

    Chege, L

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available benefit, it is argued that globalisation has brought a mixed basket of hope and disillusionment to emerging markets. On the one hand, there is the euphoria that comes with increased private capital inflows and market access, and on the other...

  6. Globalisation and Chinese Knowledge Diaspora: An Australian Case Study

    Yang, Rui; Qiu, Fang-fang

    2010-01-01

    In a context of intensified globalisation, knowledge diaspora as "trans-national human capital" have become increasingly valuable to society. With an awareness of a need for more empirical studies especially in Australia, this article concentrates on a group of academics who were working at a major university in Australia and came…

  7. Globalisation, Transport and the Environment: New Perspectives for Ecological Economics

    Veen-Groot, D.B.; Nijkamp, P.

    1999-01-01

    This article aims to offer an overview of key issues centred around the relationship between globalisation and transport-related environmental decay in the ecological economics literature of the past decade, followed by an exploration of new research endeavours. The scientific contribution of 10

  8. Globalisation and Labour Utilisation in Nigeria: Evidence from the ...

    sulaiman.adebowale

    2007-12-05

    Dec 5, 2007 ... the firms in the industry is determined solely by the dictates of ... L'étude examine l'impact de la mondialisation sur l'utilisation de la .... globalisation has been the most influential in government policy .... social, and has economic implications for both the individual worker ..... with the payment of low wages.

  9. Globalisation and Funding of Higher Education in Africa | Okoli ...

    The study focuses on the effects of the forces of globalisation on the funding of higher education in Africa. It posits that since the 1960s the human capitalist theory promoted the funding of education especially at the tertiary level both in the developed and developing countries. However at the turn of the 21st century, the ...

  10. Globalisation and Migration in Africa | Akokpari | African Sociological ...

    African Sociological Review / Revue Africaine de Sociologie. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 2 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Globalisation and Migration in ...

  11. Globalisation, social values and human rights NGOs in Nigeria ...

    Globalisation, social values and human rights NGOs in Nigeria. Edlyne E Anugwom. Abstract. (Africa Insight: 2002 32(4): 21-27). Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Article Metrics. Metrics Loading ... Metrics powered by PLOS ALM

  12. Rethinking Security in the Age of Uncertain Globalisation: NEPAD ...

    Globalisation can hardly be said to have caused Africa's contemporary predicaments. However, it is clear that it continues to exacerbate them by posing diverse challenges to local and global governance and security. This paper demonstrates how the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD), launched in 2003 to ...

  13. Globalisation and Social Sciences in Africa | Sawyerr | African ...

    African Sociological Review / Revue Africaine de Sociologie. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 1 (1999) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Globalisation and Social ...

  14. Capitalist Globalisation and the Role of the International Community ...

    The principal thesis of this paper is that under contemporary capitalist globalisation, the so-called international community constitutes more of the problem than the solution in the continent's resource and allied conflicts. We argue that the geo-strategic and geo-political interests of. major western and other powers and the ...

  15. Qualifications Frameworks and Their Conflicting Social Imaginaries of Globalisation

    Louise Sarauw, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Critics often see the European Bologna Process as a univocal standardisation of higher education. By exploring how different qualifications frameworks project different social imaginaries of globalisation, this article takes a different stance. The overarching qualifications framework of the Bologna Process rests on a socially constituted and…

  16. Globalisering, pædagogik og ungdom - i Syd

    Madsen, Ulla Ambrosius

    2007-01-01

    Artiklen introducerer til teorier om sammenhængen mellem globalisering, pædagogik og ungdom. Med udgangspunkt i etnografiske, komparative studier af skole og lungdom i Vietnam, Zambia og Brasilien diskuteres forholdet mellem uddannelsespolitiske tiltag, pædagogiske reformer og unges dannelse. Det...

  17. Globalisation, health and foreign policy: emerging linkages and interests

    Owen, John Wyn; Roberts, Olivia

    2005-01-01

    A discussion of the growing links between the issues of globalisation, health and foreign policy. This article examines the effect this has on health, development and foreign policy communities in the UK and internationally and considers what steps the policy community must take to address the challenges and opportunities of this new relationship. PMID:16053520

  18. Goals for United States Higher Education: From Democracy to Globalisation

    Hutcheson, Philo

    2011-01-01

    Although globalisation has been an increasingly important characteristic of United States higher education for over two decades, there has been little historical analysis of the process or its origins. This article argues that beginning in the early 1970s, institutional, national, and international events established a powerful context for the…

  19. Globalisation and health: the need for a global vision.

    Schrecker, Ted; Labonté, Ronald; De Vogli, Roberto

    2008-11-08

    The reduction of health inequities is an ethical imperative, according to the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH). Drawing on detailed multidisciplinary evidence assembled by the Globalization Knowledge Network that supported the CSDH, we define globalisation in mainly economic terms. We consider and reject the presumption that globalisation will yield health benefits as a result of its contribution to rapid economic growth and associated reductions in poverty. Expanding on this point, we describe four disequalising dynamics by which contemporary globalisation causes divergence: the global reorganisation of production and emergence of a global labour-market; the increasing importance of binding trade agreements and processes to resolve disputes; the rapidly increasing mobility of financial capital; and the persistence of debt crises in developing countries. Generic policies designed to reduce health inequities are described with reference to the three Rs of redistribution, regulation, and rights. We conclude with an examination of the interconnected intellectual and institutional challenges to reduction of health inequities that are created by contemporary globalisation.

  20. The disappearing state?: retrenchment realities in an age of globalisation

    Castles, Francis Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    ...?: retrenchment realities in an age of globalisation/ edited by Francis G. Castles. p. cm. Revisions of papers presented at a workshop held Mar. 2006 in Delmenhorst, Germany. Includes bibliographical references and index. 1. Expenditures, Public. 2. OECD countries- Appropriations and expenditures. 3. Government spending policy. 4. Government spending policy...

  1. The Underground Economy in Romania

    Cleopatra Sendroiu

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Underground economic activities exist in most countries around the world, and they usually have the same causes: inadequate tax systems, excessive state interference in the economy and the lack of coordination in establishing economic policies. Through this paper, we aim to offer certain recommendations, which, in our opinion, would lead to solving the issue of inadequate allocation of resources and would also contribute to restoration of the worldwide economy.

  2. Future Economy and Touristic Entrepreneurship

    Viorica Jelev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Specialists claim that Eco-Bio-economy or social economy is the economy of future, in the service of human life by the rational use of environmental resources. The concept brings together in an integrated manner, according to the researchers, economy, ecology, biodiversity, biotechnologies and focuses on integrated sustainable development of the world. The new social economy, together with the corporate social responsibility joins a new multipolar world to a healthy environment by creative and innovative concepts that will ensure the sustainability of living in a sustainable manner. Doctors have added to thisEco-Bio-Economy concept a new one called One Health - a new integrated approach for human, animals and environment health state to that they should emphasize the importance of human behavior upon the planet biodiversity. Economer agents have mostly understood the importance of alarm signals drawn up by researchers on the destruction of the resources of the planet and adapted their business sites to the requirements of the green economy. A responsible business is also ecotourism that promotes a favourable travel for the surrounding environment. It requires accommodation on farms, in peasant houses, small rural hotels. The educational environment contributes to the trend planetary tourism, with the formation of new specialists with new knowledge, behaviors and consumers use formation of new characters, sensitive to environmental issues. This educational model is also promoted by Spiru Haret University, by creating the Master degree in tourism but also in environmental protection.

  3. Food security in a world without borders.

    de Haen, Hartwig; Thompson, Brian

    2003-01-01

    The alleviation of poverty and the eradication of hunger and malnutrition are within reach. Considerable progress has been made over the past thirty years in reducing the numbers of the hungry, and projections over the next thirty years suggest that this progress will continue. The majority of developing countries have participated in this progress and have improved nutrition but there are significant regional differences. The current challenge is to build upon and accelerate the progress already made. Everyone is involved in this struggle against hunger and malnutrition, and to achieve these goals, global partnerships to enhance co-operation and co-ordination are being strengthened. Successful country experiences for improving food security and nutrition have demonstrated the importance of peace, political stability, and stable economic growth. There is also the need for increased foreign investment and increased ODA, particularly for African agriculture, debt relief, the better integration of LDCs in the global economy, their more secure access to markets and more equitable terms of trade, enhanced South-South co-operation, training and research and new high-yield and drought-resistant crop varieties. While all these have been commented on and recognised before, we must close the credibility gap in our political will by honouring our existing commitments for providing tangible benefits at the local level. For globalisation, the key issue is how the aggregate benefits of globalisation will be distributed and how to translate this into better nutrition. The LDCs, which are the most vulnerable and disadvantaged members of the international community, should be at the centre of this drive towards food security and take genuine ownership of policies, initiatives and activities to improve development. At the same time we need to succeed in making the developed world more aware of and responsive to the conditions of the LDCs. The most effective way to improve nutrition

  4. Mega-events, Local Economies, and Global Status: What Happened before the 2008 Olympics in Beijing and the 2010 World Expo in Shanghai

    Jian Sun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mega-events such as the World Cup and the Olympics have been used for economic development, urban transformation and global status enhancement. Beijing and Shanghai embraced these purposes when they won the bids for the 2008 Olympics and the 2010 World Expo respectively. This article examines the pre-event economic changes in Beijing and Shanghai that are associated with their pursuit of mega-events. Changes in a group of economic indicators are tracked from 1997 to 2006. It was found that after winning the bids for the Olympics and the World Expo, Beijing and Shanghai experienced greater growth in construction and tourism, a speeding-up in economic development and restructuring, and an improvement in physical infrastructure. However, the enhancement of global exposure was not accompanied by growth in foreign trade and in the finance, insurance and real estate (FIRE industries. The empirical analyses place the mega-events in large economic contexts and provide a base for future post-event studies.

  5. Report of working committee 9 ''world gas prospects, strategies and economics''; Rapport du comite de travail 9 ''perspective, strategie et economie du gaz dans le monde''

    Tokumoto, T

    2000-07-01

    This report is the product of investigations carried out by the following Study Groups in WOC9 in the triennium 1997-2000 based on the information supplied by the IGU member countries. - Study Group 9.1: World Gas Supply Prospects - Study Group 9.2: Prospects for World Gas Demand - Study Group 9.3: Gas Trade and World Investment Prospects - Study Group 9.4: Ultra Long-term Global Energy Scenario, Role of Natural Gas. The report includes the long-term prospects of natural gas supply, demand and inter-regional trade up to 2030 as well as various categories of natural gas reserves originally reviewed by WOC9. It was concluded that there are abundant reserves sufficient to support the expanding demand of natural gas well beyond 2030. Necessary investments to develop the infrastructure are also investigated. The role of natural gas throughout the 21. century in relation with other energy options was also analysed for the first time in IGU. All the results are presented in the Committee report session, and additional information is provided in Round Table sessions. The Statistics Team was also created in WOC9 to collect data on the current status of the gas industry through the IGU original data collection network. The results have been published on IGU web site, and will be revised regularly. (author)

  6. The globalisation strategies of five Asian tobacco companies: An analytical framework

    Lee, Kelley; Eckhardt, Jappe

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT With 30% of the world’s smokers, two million deaths annually from tobacco use, and rising levels of tobacco consumption, the Asian region is recognised as central to the future of global tobacco control. There is less understanding, however, of how Asian tobacco companies with regional and global aspirations are contributing to the global burden of tobacco-related disease and death. This introductory article sets out the background and rationale for this special issue on ‘The Emergence of Asian Tobacco Companies: Implications for Global Health Governance’. The article discusses the core questions to be addressed and presents an analytical framework for assessing the globalisation strategies of Asian tobacco firms. The article also discusses the selection of the five case studies, namely as independent companies in Asia which have demonstrated concerted ambitions to be a major player in the world market. PMID:27884083

  7. The globalisation strategies of five Asian tobacco companies: An analytical framework.

    Lee, Kelley; Eckhardt, Jappe

    2017-03-01

    With 30% of the world’s smokers, two million deaths annually from tobacco use, and rising levels of tobacco consumption, the Asian region is recognised as central to the future of global tobacco control. There is less understanding, however, of how Asian tobacco companies with regional and global aspirations are contributing to the global burden of tobacco-related disease and death. This introductory article sets out the background and rationale for this special issue on ‘The Emergence of Asian Tobacco Companies: Implications for Global Health Governance’. The article discusses the core questions to be addressed and presents an analytical framework for assessing the globalisation strategies of Asian tobacco firms. The article also discusses the selection of the five case studies, namely as independent companies in Asia which have demonstrated concerted ambitions to be a major player in the world market.

  8. Political Psychology in Russia: Current Issues in International Studies (Interview with Nikolay Kosolapov, Institute of World Economy and International Relations, Russian Academy of Science

    Vera Andreevna Chmyreva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Interview with Professor N. Kosolapov is devoted to the most urgent and complex problems of modern international relations and world politics, reveals the current state of political psychology in Russia and abroad, as well as the evolution of the science. As estimated by N. Kosolapov, the viability of political-psychological projects in Russia has fallen sharply compared to 1990's. They are not fully used in the development of political strategies, as well as in the process of operational decision making and its realization. In the interview are marked the obstacles to the emergence of theoretical and applied research in Russia, as well as key milestones for future development of political psychology. It also touches upon the most important questions of psychology of leadership within the framework of modern Russian and international practice, the political process as a whole, shows the differences in the approaches of European and Russian scientific schools in the analysis of political leadership. The author’s vision of key issues of contemporary international relations is of particular interest: we are witnessing the fact that American global leadership is experiencing an acute crisis, which contributes to the escalation of inter-state conflicts. However, the positive effect of the international crisis for our country is that it led the elites to reconsider their own ideological guidance with respect to Russia's role in world politics and forced to fight for the «new position».

  9. Plutonium economy

    Traube, K.

    1984-01-01

    The author expresses his opinion on the situation, describes the energy-economic setting, indicates the alternatives: fuel reprocessing or immediate long-term storage, and investigates the prospects for economic utilization of the breeder reactors. All the facts suggest that the breeder reactor will never be able to stand economic competition with light-water reactors. However, there is no way to prove the future. It is naive to think that every doubt could and must be removed before stopping the development of breeder reactors - and thus also the reprocessing of the fuel of light-water reactors. On the basis of the current state of knowledge an unbiased cost-benefit-analysis can only lead to the recommendation to stop construction immediately. But can 'experts', who for years or even decades have called for and supported the development of breeder reactors be expected to make an unbiased analysis. Klaus Traube strikes the balance of the state Germany's nuclear economy is in: although there is no chance of definitively abandoning that energy-political cul-de-sac, no new adventures must be embarked upon. Responsible handling of currently used nuclear technology means to give up breeder technology and waive plutonium economy. It is no supreme technology with the aid of which structural unemployment or any other economic problem could be solved. (orig.) [de

  10. English, Education, and Globalisation: A Bangladesh Perspective

    Akteruzzaman, Mohammad; Islam, Rakibul

    2017-01-01

    As a third world country and a former British colony, Bangladesh has seen a dramatic upsurge in the use of the English language. Built on the concept of imperialistic aspects of the English language, this paper draws on responses from anonymous survey results and interviews and attempts to provide deeper insights into the global aspects of English…

  11. Economic Development through Globalisation in Nigeria : An analysis of Shell & the IMF Structural Adjustment Programs

    Bokhari, Sven; Del Duca, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    Date: 2008/06/03 Level: Master thesis in International Business and Entrepreneurship, 10p (15ECTS) Authors: Sven Bokhari Fabrizio Del Duca Title: Economic Development through globalisation in Nigeria. An analysis of Shell & the IMF Structural Adjustment Programs Tutor: Leif Linnskog, Ph.D. Research Question: Can globalisation be seen as positive or negative for the Economic Development of Nigeria? A focus on Shell and the International Monetary Fund Research Issue: Globalisation in its cu...

  12. The Effect of Fast Food Globalisation on Students' Food Choice

    Ijeoma Chinyere Ukonu

    2016-01-01

    This research seeks to investigate how the globalisation of fast food has affected students' food choice. A mixed method approach was used in this research; basically involving quantitative and qualitative methods. The quantitative method uses a self-completion questionnaire to randomly sample one hundred and four students; while the qualitative method uses a semi structured interview technique to survey four students on their knowledge and choice to consume fast food. A cross tabulation of v...

  13. Globalisation and National Incentives for Protecting Environmental Goods

    Alkuin Kölliker

    2004-01-01

    This article tries to explain national incentives for protecting environmental goods either autonomously or collectively; it explores how globalisation has affected those incentives; and it suggests how national environmental policy might respond so as to ensure its effectiveness. The central argument is that national incentives for environmental protection may to a considerable extent be explained by a combination of the type of environmental good to be protected (in terms of public goods th...

  14. European Globalisation Adjustment Fund-Assistance in the Labour Market

    Ramona Mariana CALINICA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The intensification of globalization and through intense manifestation of the effects on recent economic and financial crisis, employment market has been affected, and at European Union level was considered increasingly necessary granting support for counter of the negative effects of the two phenomena on this market. European Globalisation Adjustment Fund is designed for a rapid reintegration of fired workers and increase of the employment potential of the workforce, after mass dismissals linked to the two phenomena mentioned above.

  15. Property valuers as business consultants in Estonia in globalising economy / Veronika Ilsjan

    Ilsjan, Veronika

    2004-01-01

    Lühiülevaade kinnisvarahindamise alasest tegevusest ja sellega seonduvatest probleemidest Eestis koos ettepanekutega valupunktide lahendamiseks. Eesti Kinnisvara Hindajate Ühingu (EKHÜ) tegevusvaldkondadest. Diagramm

  16. Employment, entrepreneurship, and citizenship in a globalised economy: the Chinese in Prato

    Mirela Barbu; Michael Dunford; Liu Weidong

    2013-01-01

    Since 2000 Prato’s domestic textile sector has contracted in the face of international competition. From the 1990s a large Chinese community has emerged, and since 2000 the number of Chinese clothing enterprises has increased rapidly. In recent years tensions between the Italian and Chinese communities have increased, and police investigations have risen, in part due to perceptions of unfair Chinese competition and illegality. This paper examines these tensions, their roots in differing econo...

  17. Globalisation and science education: Rethinking science education reforms

    Carter, Lyn

    2005-05-01

    Like Lemke (J Res Sci Teach 38:296-316, 2001), I believe that science education has not looked enough at the impact of the changing theoretical and global landscape by which it is produced and shaped. Lemke makes a sound argument for science education to look beyond its own discourses toward those like cultural studies and politics, and to which I would add globalisation theory and relevant educational studies. Hence, in this study I draw together a range of investigations to argue that globalisation is indeed implicated in the discourses of science education, even if it remains underacknowledged and undertheorized. Establishing this relationship is important because it provides different frames of reference from which to investigate many of science education's current concerns, including those new forces that now have a direct impact on science classrooms. For example, one important question to investigate is the degree to which current science education improvement discourses are the consequences of quality research into science teaching and learning, or represent national and local responses to global economic restructuring and the imperatives of the supranational institutions that are largely beyond the control of science education. Developing globalisation as a theoretical construct to help formulate new questions and methods to examine these questions can provide science education with opportunities to expand the conceptual and analytical frameworks of much of its present and future scholarship.

  18. Globalisation and climate change in Asia: the urban health impact.

    Munslow, Barry; O'Dempsey, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Asia's economic development successes will create new policy areas to address, as the advances made through globalisation create greater climate change challenges, particularly the impact on urban health. Poverty eradication and higher standards of living both increase demand on resources. Globalisation increases inequalities and those who are currently the losers will carry the greatest burden of the costs in the form of the negative effects of climate change and the humanitarian crises that will ensue. Of four major climate change challenges affecting the environment and health, two—urban air pollution and waste management—can be mitigated by policy change and technological innovation if sufficient resources are allocated. Because of the urban bias in the development process, these challenges will probably register on policy makers' agenda. The second two major challenges—floods and drought—are less amenable to policy and technological solutions: many humanitarian emergency challenges lie ahead. This article describes the widely varying impact of both globalisation and climate change across Asia. The greatest losers are those who flee one marginal location, the arid inland areas, only to settle in another marginal location in the flood prone coastal slums. Effective preparation is required, and an effective response when subsequent humanitarian crises occur.

  19. Buddhism, science, and market: The globalisation of Tibetan medicine.

    Janes, Craig R

    2002-01-01

    In this paper I discuss the processes by which Tibetan medicine has become globalised, and the ways in which these have come to determine, constrain, and, ultimately, transform local practices of healing in both Tibet and the West. I examine the degree to which globalisation, in particular international market capitalism, operating in this case through the Chinese state, structures the content of primary medical resources, confers legitimacy to certain technologies, and sets the ground rules by which the healers in charge of deploying such technologies are set into conversation with one another. I also argue that the cultural dimensions of globalisation enter the local context through the multiple-stranded flows of people, images, and ideas, and contribute to redefinitions of identity, suffering, and body praxis among patients/consumers in diverse local contexts. I proceed within two registers of analysis. In the first, I analyse these movements in the context of Tibetan medicine as it has been transformed, practised, and used, in the Tibet Autonomous Region of China. In the second, the analytic lens shifts to a focus on Tibetan medicine as a 'global' alternative medicine in North America and Europe. The focus throughout is on the global-local dialectic: how Tibetan medicine is both produced as global commodity and consumed as 'local' tradition.

  20. Economy and energy politic

    Martin, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    This book, divided into four parts, describes, first, energy consumption and national economy growth. In a second part, the irresistible ascent of coal, natural gas and petroleum international markets is studied. In the third part, energy politic is investigated: exchanges releasing, prices deregulation, contestation of power industry monopoly, energy national market and common energetic politic, single market concept. In the last part, global risks and world-wide regulations are given: demand, energy resources, technical changes, comparative evaluations between fossil, nuclear and renewable energies, environment, investments financing and international cooperation. 23 refs., 14 figs., 16 tabs