WorldWideScience

Sample records for global combustion mechanisms

  1. Global Combustion Mechanisms for Use in CFD Modeling under Oxy-Fuel Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jimmy; Rasmussen, Christian Lund; Giselsson, Trine

    2009-01-01

    Two global multistep schemes, the two-step mechanism of Westbrook and Dryer (WD) and the four-step mechanism of Jones and Lindstedt (JL), have been refined for oxy-fuel conditions. Reference calculations were conducted with a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism, validated for oxy-fuel combustion...... conditions. In the modification approach, the initiating reactions involving hydrocarbon and oxygen were retained, while modifying the H-2-CO-CO2 reactions in order to improve prediction of major species concentrations. The main attention has been to capture the trend and level of CO predicted...... by the detailed mechanism as well as the correct equilibrium concentration. A CFD analysis of a propane oxy-fuel flame has been performed using both the original and modified mechanisms. Compared to the original schemes, the modified WD mechanism improved the prediction of the temperature field and of CO...

  2. Fundamental and semi-global kinetic mechanisms for hydrocarbon combustion. Final report, March 1977-October 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dryer, F L; Glassman, I; Brezinsky, K

    1981-03-01

    Over the past three and one half years, substantial research efforts of the Princeton Fuels Research Group have been directed towards the development of simplified mechanisms which would accurately describe the oxidation of hydrocarbons fuels. The objectives of this combustion research included the study of semi-empirical modeling (that is an overall description) of the chemical kinetic mechanisms of simple hydrocarbon fuels. Such fuels include the alkanes: ethane, propane, butane, hexane and octane as well as the critically important alkenes: ethene, propene and butene. As an extension to this work, the study of the detailed radical species characteristics of combustion systems was initiated as another major aspect of the program, with emphasis on the role of the OH and HO/sub 2/ radicals. Finally, the studies of important alternative fuel problems linked the program to longer range approaches to the energy supply question. Studies of alternative fuels composed the major elements of this area of the program. The efforts on methanol research were completed, and while the aromatics aspects of the DOE work have been a direct extension of efforts supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, they represented a significant part of the overall research effort. The emphasis in the proposed program is to provide further fundamental understanding of the oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels which will be useful in guiding engineering approaches. Although the scope of program ranges from the fundamentals of chemical kinetics to that of alternative fuel combustion, the objective in mind is to provide insight and guidance to the understanding of practical combustion environments. The key to our approach has been our understanding of the fundamental combustion chemistry and its relation to the important practical combustion problems which exist in implementing energy efficient, alternate fuels technologies.

  3. Global-scale combustion sources of organic aerosols: sensitivity to formation and removal mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimpidi, Alexandra P.; Karydis, Vlassis A.; Pandis, Spyros N.; Lelieveld, Jos

    2017-06-01

    Organic compounds from combustion sources such as biomass burning and fossil fuel use are major contributors to the global atmospheric load of aerosols. We analyzed the sensitivity of model-predicted global-scale organic aerosols (OA) to parameters that control primary emissions, photochemical aging, and the scavenging efficiency of organic vapors. We used a computationally efficient module for the description of OA composition and evolution in the atmosphere (ORACLE) of the global chemistry-climate model EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry). A global dataset of aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements was used to evaluate simulated primary (POA) and secondary (SOA) OA concentrations. Model results are sensitive to the emission rates of intermediate-volatility organic compounds (IVOCs) and POA. Assuming enhanced reactivity of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and IVOCs with OH substantially improved the model performance for SOA. The use of a hybrid approach for the parameterization of the aging of IVOCs had a small effect on predicted SOA levels. The model performance improved by assuming that freshly emitted organic compounds are relatively hydrophobic and become increasingly hygroscopic due to oxidation.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Hydrogen Combustion: Global Reaction Model and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yun [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an (China); Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Liu, Yinhe, E-mail: yinheliu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an (China)

    2017-11-20

    Due to the complexity of modeling the combustion process in nuclear power plants, the global mechanisms are preferred for numerical simulation. To quickly perform the highly resolved simulations with limited processing resources of large-scale hydrogen combustion, a method based on thermal theory was developed to obtain kinetic parameters of global reaction mechanism of hydrogen–air combustion in a wide range. The calculated kinetic parameters at lower hydrogen concentration (C{sub hydrogen} < 20%) were validated against the results obtained from experimental measurements in a container and combustion test facility. In addition, the numerical data by the global mechanism (C{sub hydrogen} > 20%) were compared with the results by detailed mechanism. Good agreement between the model prediction and the experimental data was achieved, and the comparison between simulation results by the detailed mechanism and the global reaction mechanism show that the present calculated global mechanism has excellent predictable capabilities for a wide range of hydrogen–air mixtures.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Hydrogen Combustion: Global Reaction Model and Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yun; Liu, Yinhe

    2017-01-01

    Due to the complexity of modeling the combustion process in nuclear power plants, the global mechanisms are preferred for numerical simulation. To quickly perform the highly resolved simulations with limited processing resources of large-scale hydrogen combustion, a method based on thermal theory was developed to obtain kinetic parameters of global reaction mechanism of hydrogen–air combustion in a wide range. The calculated kinetic parameters at lower hydrogen concentration (C hydrogen < 20%) were validated against the results obtained from experimental measurements in a container and combustion test facility. In addition, the numerical data by the global mechanism (C hydrogen > 20%) were compared with the results by detailed mechanism. Good agreement between the model prediction and the experimental data was achieved, and the comparison between simulation results by the detailed mechanism and the global reaction mechanism show that the present calculated global mechanism has excellent predictable capabilities for a wide range of hydrogen–air mixtures.

  6. Comparison of different chemical kinetic mechanisms of methane combustion in an internal combustion engine configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Ennetta Ridha; Hamdi Mohamed; Said Rachid

    2008-01-01

    Three chemical kinetic mechanisms of methane combustion were tested and compared using the internal combustion engine model of Chemkin 4.02 [1]: one-step global reaction mechanism, four-step mechanism, and the standard detailed scheme GRIMECH 3.0. This study shows good concordances, especially between the four-step and the detailed mechanisms in the prediction of temperature and main species profiles. But reduced schemes were incapables to predict pollutant emissions in an internal combustion...

  7. Kinetics of the reduction of hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) by methane (CH{sub 4}) during chemical looping combustion: A global mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monazam, Esmail R; Breault, Ronald W; Siriwardane, Ranjani; Richards, George; Carpenter, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has emerged as a promising technology for fossil fuel combustion which produces a sequestration ready concentrated CO{sub 2} stream in power production. A CLC system is composed with two reactors, an air and a fuel reactor. An oxygen carrier such as hematite (94%Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) circulates between the reactors, which transfers the oxygen necessary for the fuel combustion from the air to the fuel. An important issue for the CLC process is the selection of metal oxide as oxygen carrier, since it must retain its reactivity through many cycles. The primary objective of this work is to develop a global mechanism with respective kinetics rate parameters such that CFD simulations can be performed for large systems. In this study, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the reduction of hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in a continuous stream of CH{sub 4} (15, 20, and 35%) was conducted at temperatures ranging from 700 to 825{degrees}C over ten reduction cycles. The mass spectroscopy analysis of product gas indicated the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O at the early stage of reaction and H{sub 2} and CO at the final stage of reactions. A kinetic model based on two parallel reactions, 1) first-order irreversible rate kinetics and 2) Avrami equation describing nucleation and growth processes, was applied to the reduction data. It was found, that the reaction rates for both reactions increase with, both, temperature and the methane concentration in inlet gas.

  8. Multitarget global sensitivity analysis of n-butanol combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dingyu D Y; Davis, Michael J; Skodje, Rex T

    2013-05-02

    A model for the combustion of butanol is studied using a recently developed theoretical method for the systematic improvement of the kinetic mechanism. The butanol mechanism includes 1446 reactions, and we demonstrate that it is straightforward and computationally feasible to implement a full global sensitivity analysis incorporating all the reactions. In addition, we extend our previous analysis of ignition-delay targets to include species targets. The combination of species and ignition targets leads to multitarget global sensitivity analysis, which allows for a more complete mechanism validation procedure than we previously implemented. The inclusion of species sensitivity analysis allows for a direct comparison between reaction pathway analysis and global sensitivity analysis.

  9. Study of mechanically activated coal combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burdukov Anatolij P.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion and air gasification of mechanically activated micro-ground coals in the flux have been studied. Influence of mechanically activated methods at coals grinding on their chemical activeness at combustion and gasification has been determined. Intense mechanical activation of coals increases their chemical activeness that enables development of new highly boosted processing methods for coals with various levels of metamorphism.

  10. Thermogravimetric Analysis of Modified Hematite by Methane (CH{sub 4}) for Chemical-Looping Combustion: A Global Kinetics Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monazam, Esmail R; Breault, Ronald W; Siriwardane, Ranjani; Miller, Duane D

    2013-10-01

    Iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) or in its natural form (hematite) is a potential material to capture CO{sub 2} through the chemical-looping combustion (CLC) process. It is known that magnesium (Mg) is an effective methyl cleaving catalyst and as such it has been combined with hematite to assess any possible enhancement to the kinetic rate for the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with methane. Therefore, in order to evaluate its effectiveness as a hematite additive, the behaviors of Mg-modified hematite samples (hematite –5% Mg(OH){sub 2}) have been analyzed with regard to assessing any enhancement to the kinetic rate process. The Mg-modified hematite was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis. The reactivity experiments were conducted in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) using continuous stream of CH{sub 4} (5, 10, and 20%) at temperatures ranging from 700 to 825 {degrees}C over ten reduction cycles. The mass spectroscopy analysis of product gas indicated the presence of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2} and CO in the gaseous product. The kinetic data at reduction step obtained by isothermal experiments could be well fitted by two parallel rate equations. The modified hematite samples showed higher reactivity as compared to unmodified hematite samples during reduction at all investigated temperatures.

  11. Combustion's impact on the global atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prather, M.J.; Logan, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    The combustion of a hydrocarbon fuel removes molecular oxygen (O 2 ) from the atmosphere and releases equivalent amounts of water (H 2 ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), almost always with trace amounts of numerous other compounds including hydrocarbon (CH 4 , C 2 H 2 , C 2 H 4 , C 2 H 6 , C 3 H 8 , C 6 H 6 , CH 3 CHO, etc.), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO, N 2 O) and reduced nitrogen (NH 3 and HCN), sulfur gases (SO 2 , OCS, CS 2 ), halocarbons (CH 3 Al and CH 3 Br), and particles. A review of the atmospheric budgets of these gases shows that burning of fossil fuels and recent biomass has led to global alterations in the composition of the atmosphere. Combustion is clearly responsible for most of the enhanced greenhouse forcing to date (through CO 2 , tropospheric O 3 , soot) and also some counteracting effects (through SO 2 ). It has had minimal impact on stratospheric O 3 (through CH 3 Cl, CH 3 Br, CH 4 ), but has likely changed the tropospheric oxidant levels (through CO, NO x , NMHC), at least over the northern hemisphere. Most of the important greenhouse gases and tropospheric oxidant gases have significant natural sources, which are not well defined today and may be changing; and thus, quantifying the role of combustion is difficult. 113 refs

  12. Global cloud condensation nuclei influenced by carbonaceous combustion aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Spracklen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon in carbonaceous combustion aerosol warms the climate by absorbing solar radiation, meaning reductions in black carbon emissions are often perceived as an attractive global warming mitigation option. However, carbonaceous combustion aerosol can also act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN so they also cool the climate by increasing cloud albedo. The net radiative effect of carbonaceous combustion aerosol is uncertain because their contribution to CCN has not been evaluated on the global scale. By combining extensive observations of CCN concentrations with the GLOMAP global aerosol model, we find that the model is biased low (normalised mean bias = −77 % unless carbonaceous combustion aerosol act as CCN. We show that carbonaceous combustion aerosol accounts for more than half (52–64 % of global CCN with the range due to uncertainty in the emitted size distribution of carbonaceous combustion particles. The model predicts that wildfire and pollution (fossil fuel and biofuel carbonaceous combustion aerosol causes a global mean cloud albedo aerosol indirect effect of −0.34 W m−2, with stronger cooling if we assume smaller particle emission size. We calculate that carbonaceous combustion aerosol from pollution sources cause a global mean aerosol indirect effect of −0.23 W m−2. The small size of carbonaceous combustion particles from fossil fuel sources means that whilst pollution sources account for only one-third of the emitted mass they cause two-thirds of the cloud albedo aerosol indirect effect that is due to carbonaceous combustion aerosol. This cooling effect must be accounted for, along with other cloud effects not studied here, to ensure that black carbon emissions controls that reduce the high number concentrations of fossil fuel particles have the desired net effect on climate.

  13. Reduced Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms for JP-8 Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Montgomery, Christopher J; Cannon, S. M; Mawid, M. A; Sekar, B

    2002-01-01

    Using CARM (Computer Aided Reduction Method), a computer program that automates the mechanism reduction process, six different reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for JP-8 combustion have been generated...

  14. Studies of combustion kinetics and mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutman, D. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The objective of the current research is to gain new quantitative knowledge of the kinetics and mechanisms of polyatomic free radicals which are important in hydrocarbon combustion processes. The special facility designed and built for these (which includes a heatable tubular reactor coupled to a photoionization mass spectrometer) is continually being improved. Where possible, these experimental studies are coupled with theoretical ones, sometimes conducted in collaboration with others, to obtain an improved understanding of the factors determining reactivity. The decomposition of acetyl radicals, isopropyl radicals, and n-propyl radicals have been studied as well as the oxidation of methylpropargyl radicals.

  15. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    2008-01-01

    Combustion Engineering, a topic generally taught at the upper undergraduate and graduate level in most mechanical engineering programs, and many chemical engineering programs, is the study of rapid energy and mass transfer usually through the common physical phenomena of flame oxidation. It covers the physics and chemistry of this process and the engineering applications-from the generation of power such as the internal combustion automobile engine to the gas turbine engine. Renewed concerns about energy efficiency and fuel costs, along with continued concerns over toxic and particulate emissions have kept the interest in this vital area of engineering high and brought about new developments in both fundamental knowledge of flame and combustion physics as well as new technologies for flame and fuel control. *New chapter on new combustion concepts and technologies, including discussion on nanotechnology as related to combustion, as well as microgravity combustion, microcombustion, and catalytic combustion-all ...

  16. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1997-01-01

    This Third Edition of Glassman's classic text clearly defines the role of chemistry, physics, and fluid mechanics as applied to the complex topic of combustion. Glassman's insightful introductory text emphasizes underlying physical and chemical principles, and encompasses engine technology, fire safety, materials synthesis, detonation phenomena, hydrocarbon fuel oxidation mechanisms, and environmental considerations. Combustion has been rewritten to integrate the text, figures, and appendixes, detailing available combustion codes, making it not only an excellent introductory text but also an important reference source for professionals in the field. Key Features * Explains complex combustion phenomena with physical insight rather than extensive mathematics * Clarifies postulates in the text using extensive computational results in figures * Lists modern combustion programs indicating usage and availability * Relates combustion concepts to practical applications.

  17. Mechanisms and characteristics of silicon combustion in nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukasian, A.S.; Martynenko, V.M.; Merzhanov, A.G.; Borovinskaia, I.P.; Blinov, M.IU.

    1986-10-01

    An experimental study is made of the principal characteristics of combustion in the system silicon-nitrogen associated with phase transitions of the first kind (silicon melting and silicon nitride dissociation). Concepts of the combustion mechanism are developed on the basis of elementary models of combustion of the second kind and filtering combustion theory. In particular, it is shown that, in the pressure range studied (10-20 MPa), filtering does not limit the combustion process. Details of the experimental procedure and results are presented. 22 references.

  18. Mechanisms and kinetics of granulated sewage sludge combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijo-Kleczkowska, Agnieszka; Środa, Katarzyna; Kosowska-Golachowska, Monika; Musiał, Tomasz; Wolski, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates sewage sludge disposal methods with particular emphasis on combustion as the priority disposal method. Sewage sludge incineration is an attractive option because it minimizes odour, significantly reduces the volume of the starting material and thermally destroys organic and toxic components of the off pads. Additionally, it is possible that ashes could be used. Currently, as many as 11 plants use sewage sludge as fuel in Poland; thus, this technology must be further developed in Poland while considering the benefits of co-combustion with other fuels. This paper presents the results of experimental studies aimed at determining the mechanisms (defining the fuel combustion region by studying the effects of process parameters, including the size of the fuel sample, temperature in the combustion chamber and air velocity, on combustion) and kinetics (measurement of fuel temperature and mass changes) of fuel combustion in an air stream under different thermal conditions and flow rates. The combustion of the sludge samples during air flow between temperatures of 800 and 900°C is a kinetic-diffusion process. This process determines the sample size, temperature of its environment, and air velocity. The adopted process parameters, the time and ignition temperature of the fuel by volatiles, combustion time of the volatiles, time to reach the maximum temperature of the fuel surface, maximum temperature of the fuel surface, char combustion time, and the total process time, had significant impacts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ammonium nitrate: combustion mechanism and the role of additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinditskii, Valery P.; Egorshev, Viacheslav Yu.; Levshenkov, Anton I.; Serushkin, Valery V. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, 9 Miusskaya Sq., 125047, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-09-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the observed combustion behavior of AN mixtures with different additives, fuels, and energetic materials. It has been determined on the basis of flame structure investigation by fine tungsten-rhenium thermocouples that the surface temperature of AN is controlled by the dissociation reaction of the salt occurring at the surface. Results obtained have indicated that the leading reaction of combustion of AN doped with additives proceeds in the condensed phase up to pressures of 20-30 MPa. A reason for the inability of pure AN to burn is suggested and the role of additives in the combustion mechanism is discussed. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Plasma Assisted Combustion Mechanism for Small Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    fast ionization wave. Combust.  Theory Modeling, 2001. V.5 pp.97‐129.  N.A.Popov. Effect of a  Pulsed  High‐Current  Discharge  on Hydrogen–Air  Mixtures... Discharge Tube Mono- chro- mator PM Pressure Gauge Electric Gauge Physics of Nonequilibrium  Systems Laboratory Hexane Oxidation by  Pulsed  Nanosecond...Pathways: C2H4‐air  Where PAC Experimental Data is Available Avalanche  to Streamer Transition in Uniform  Electric Field (air, 1 bar, 300 K, 1 cm

  1. A skeletal mechanism for biodiesel blend surrogates combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, H.; Yang, W.M.; Maghbouli, A.; Li, J.; Chua, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A skeletal biodiesel reaction mechanism with 112 species was constructed. • The developed mechanism contains the CO, NO x and soot formation kinetics. • It was well validated against detailed reaction mechanism and experimental results. • The mechanism is suitable to simulate biodiesel, diesel and their blend fuels. - Abstract: A tri-component skeletal reaction mechanism consisting of methyl decanoate, methyl-9-decenoate, and n-heptane was developed for biodiesel combustion in diesel engine. It comprises 112 species participating in 498 reactions with the CO, NO x and soot formation mechanisms embedded. In this study, a detailed tri-component biodiesel mechanism was used as the start of mechanism reduction and the reduced mechanism was combined with a previously developed skeletal reaction mechanism for n-heptane to integrate the soot formation kinetics. A combined mechanism reduction strategy including the directed relation graph with error propagation and sensitivity analysis (DRGEPSA), peak concentration analysis, isomer lumping, unimportant reactions elimination and reaction rate adjustment methods was employed. The reduction process for biodiesel was performed over a range of initial conditions covering the pressures from 1 to 100 atm, equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 2.0 and temperatures from 700 to 1800 K, whereas for n-heptane, ignition delay predictions were compared against 17 shock tube experimental conditions. Extensive validations were performed for the developed skeletal reaction mechanism with 0-D ignition delay testing and 3-D engine simulations. The results indicated that the developed mechanism was able to accurately predict the ignition delay timings of n-heptane and biodiesel, and it could be integrated into 3-D engine simulations to predict the combustion characteristics of biodiesel. As such, the developed 112-species skeletal mechanism can accurately mimic the significant reaction pathways of the detailed reaction

  2. Introduction to Analytical Methods for Internal Combustion Engine Cam Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, J J

    2013-01-01

    Modern design methods of Automotive Cam Design require the computation of a range of parameters. This book provides a logical sequence of steps for the derivation of the relevant equations from first principles, for the more widely used cam mechanisms. Although originally derived for use in high performance engines, this work is equally applicable to the design of mass produced automotive and other internal combustion engines.   Introduction to Analytical Methods for Internal Combustion Engine Cam Mechanisms provides the equations necessary for the design of cam lift curves with an associated smooth acceleration curve. The equations are derived for the kinematics and kinetics of all the mechanisms considered, together with those for cam curvature and oil entrainment velocity. This permits the cam shape, all loads, and contact stresses to be evaluated, and the relevant tribology to be assessed. The effects of asymmetry on the manufacture of cams for finger follower and offset translating curved followers is ...

  3. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1987-01-01

    Combustion, Second Edition focuses on the underlying principles of combustion and covers topics ranging from chemical thermodynamics and flame temperatures to chemical kinetics, detonation, ignition, and oxidation characteristics of fuels. Diffusion flames, flame phenomena in premixed combustible gases, and combustion of nonvolatile fuels are also discussed. This book consists of nine chapters and begins by introducing the reader to heats of reaction and formation, free energy and the equilibrium constants, and flame temperature calculations. The next chapter explores the rates of reactio

  4. Nitrogen chemistry in combustion and gasification - mechanisms and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilpinen, P.; Hupa, M.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this work has been to increase the understanding of the complex details of gaseous emission formation in energy production techniques based on combustion and/or gasification. The aim has also been to improve the accuracy of mathematical furnace models when they are used for predicting emissions. The main emphasis has been on nitrogen oxides (NO x , N 2 O). The work supports development of cleaner and more efficient combustion technology. The main emphasis has been on combustion systems that are based on fluidized bed technology including both atmospheric and pressurized conditions (BFBC, CFBC, PFBC/G). The work has consisted of advanced theoretical modeling and of experiments in laboratory devices that have partly been made in collaboration with other LIEKKI projects. Two principal modeling tools have been used: detailed homogeneous chemical kinetic modeling and computational fluid dynamic simulation. In this report, the most important results of the following selected items will be presented: (1) Extension of a detailed kinetic nitrogen and hydrocarbon oxidation mechanism into elevated pressure, and parametric studies on: effect of pressure on fuel-nitrogen oxidation under PFBC conditions, effect of pressure on selective non-catalytic NO x reduction under PFBC conditions, effect of different oxidizers on hot-gas cleaning of ammonia by means of selective oxidation in gasification gas. (2) Extension of the above mechanism to include chlorine reactions at atmospheric pressure, and parametric studies on: effect of HCl on CO burn-out in FBC combustion of waste. (3) Development of more accurate emission prediction models: incorporation of more accurate submodels on hydrocarbon oxidation into CFD furnace models, and evaluation of different concepts describing the interaction between turbulence and chemical reaction, development of a mechanistic detailed 1.5-dimensional emission model for circulating fluidized bed combustors. (orig.) 14 refs

  5. Simulation of low temperature combustion mechanism of different combustion-supporting agents in close-coupled DOC and DPF system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Penghao; Li, Zhijun; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Wen; He, Li; Wu, Yue

    2018-07-01

    In the coupled Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) and Diesel Particular Filter (DPF) system, soot cannot be completely removed by only using the passive regeneration. And DPF active regeneration is necessary. The research method in this paper is to spray different kinds of combustion-supporting agents to the DOC in the front of the DPF. Therefore, the low temperature combustion mechanism of different kinds of combustion-supporting agents in DOC was studied, in order to grasp the law of combustion in DOC, and the influence of follow-up emission on DPF removal of soot. During the study, CH 4 H 2 mixture and diesel (n-heptane + toluene) were used as combustion-supporting agents respectively. The simplified mechanisms of two kinds of gas mixtures used as the combustion-supporting agents in DPF have been constructed and testified in the paper. In this paper, the combustion and emission conditions of the two combustion-supporting agents were analyzed so as to meet the practical requirements of different working conditions. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Flashback mechanisms in lean premixed gas turbine combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Benim, Ali Cemal

    2014-01-01

    Blending fuels with hydrogen offers the potential to reduce NOx and CO2 emissions in gas turbines, but doing so introduces potential new problems such as flashback.  Flashback can lead to thermal overload and destruction of hardware in the turbine engine, with potentially expensive consequences. The little research on flashback that is available is fragmented. Flashback Mechanisms in Lean Premixed Gas Turbine Combustion by Ali Cemal Benim will address not only the overall issue of the flashback phenomenon, but also the issue of fragmented and incomplete research.Presents a coherent review of f

  7. Reaction Mechanisms on Multiwell Potential Energy Surfaces in Combustion (and Atmospheric) Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical reactions occurring on a potential energy surface with multiple wells are ubiquitous in low temperature combustion and the oxidation of volatile organic compounds in earth’s atmosphere. The rich variety of structural isomerizations that compete with collisional stabilization make characterizing such complex-forming reactions challenging. This review describes recent experimental and theoretical advances that deliver increasingly complete views of their reaction mechanisms. New methods for creating reactive intermediates coupled with multiplexed measurements provide many experimental observables simultaneously. Automated methods to explore potential energy surfaces can uncover hidden reactive pathways, while master equation methods enable a holistic treatment of both sequential and well-skipping pathways. Our ability to probe and understand nonequilibrium effects and reaction sequences is increasing. These advances provide the fundamental science base for predictive models of combustion and the atmosphere that are crucial to address global challenges.

  8. Reaction Mechanisms on Multiwell Potential Energy Surfaces in Combustion (and Atmospheric) Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, David L.

    2017-05-01

    Chemical reactions occurring on a potential energy surface with multiple wells are ubiquitous in low-temperature combustion and in the oxidation of volatile organic compounds in Earth's atmosphere. The rich variety of structural isomerizations that compete with collisional stabilization makes characterizing such complex-forming reactions challenging. This review describes recent experimental and theoretical advances that deliver increasingly complete views of their reaction mechanisms. New methods for creating reactive intermediates coupled with multiplexed measurements provide many experimental observables simultaneously. Automated methods to explore potential energy surfaces can uncover hidden reactive pathways, and master equation methods enable a holistic treatment of both sequential and well-skipping pathways. Our ability to probe and understand nonequilibrium effects and reaction sequences is increasing. These advances provide the fundamental science base for predictive models of combustion and the atmosphere that are crucial to address global challenges.

  9. Does fossil fuel combustion lead to global warming?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    Tropospheric sulfate aerosols produced by atmospheric oxidation of SO 2 emitted from fossil fuel combustion scatter solar radiation and enhance the reflectivity of clouds. Both effects decrease the absorption of solar radiation by the earth-atmosphere system. This cooling influence tends to offset the warming influence resulting from increased absorption of terrestrial infrared radiation by increased atmospheric concentrations of CO 2 . The sulfate forcing is estimated to be offsetting 70% of the forcing by CO 2 derived from fossil fuel combustion, although the uncertainty of this estimate is quite large--range 28-140%, the latter figure indicating that the present combined forcing is net cooling. Because of the vastly different atmospheric residence times of sulfate aerosol (about a week) and CO 2 (about 100 years), the cooling influence of sulfate aerosol is exerted immediately, whereas most of the warming influence of CO 2 is exerted over more than 100 years. Consequently the total forcing integrated over the entire time the materials reside in the atmosphere is net warming, with the total CO 2 forcing estimate to exceed the sulfate forcing by a factor of 4. The present situation in which the forcing by sulfate is comparable to that by CO 2 is shown to be a consequence of the steeply increasing rates of emission over the industrial era. (author)

  10. Comprehensive mechanisms for combustion chemistry: Experiment, modeling, and sensitivity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dryer, F.L.; Yetter, R.A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program is an integrated experimental/numerical effort to study pyrolysis and oxidation reactions and mechanisms for small-molecule hydrocarbon structures under conditions representative of combustion environments. The experimental aspects of the work are conducted in large diameter flow reactors, at pressures from one to twenty atmospheres, temperatures from 550 K to 1200 K, and with observed reaction times from 10{sup {minus}2} to 5 seconds. Gas sampling of stable reactant, intermediate, and product species concentrations provides not only substantial definition of the phenomenology of reaction mechanisms, but a significantly constrained set of kinetic information with negligible diffusive coupling. Analytical techniques used for detecting hydrocarbons and carbon oxides include gas chromatography (GC), and gas infrared (NDIR) and FTIR methods are utilized for continuous on-line sample detection of light absorption measurements of OH have also been performed in an atmospheric pressure flow reactor (APFR), and a variable pressure flow (VPFR) reactor is presently being instrumented to perform optical measurements of radicals and highly reactive molecular intermediates. The numerical aspects of the work utilize zero and one-dimensional pre-mixed, detailed kinetic studies, including path, elemental gradient sensitivity, and feature sensitivity analyses. The program emphasizes the use of hierarchical mechanistic construction to understand and develop detailed kinetic mechanisms. Numerical studies are utilized for guiding experimental parameter selections, for interpreting observations, for extending the predictive range of mechanism constructs, and to study the effects of diffusive transport coupling on reaction behavior in flames. Modeling using well defined and validated mechanisms for the CO/H{sub 2}/oxidant systems.

  11. 49 CFR 173.220 - Internal combustion engines, self-propelled vehicles, mechanical equipment containing internal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and vehicles with certain electronic equipment when transported by aircraft or vessel. When an... vehicles, mechanical equipment containing internal combustion engines, and battery powered vehicles or... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.220 Internal combustion engines, self-propelled vehicles, mechanical...

  12. Evaluation of reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms used for modeling mild combustion for natural gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdi Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical and parametric study was performed to evaluate the potential of reduced chemistry mechanisms to model natural gas chemistry including NOx chemistry under mild combustion mode. Two reduced mechanisms, 5-step and 9-step, were tested against the GRI-Mech3.0 by comparing key species, such as NOx, CO2 and CO, and gas temperature predictions in idealized reactors codes under mild combustion conditions. It is thus concluded that the 9-step mechanism appears to be a promising reduced mechanism that can be used in multi-dimensional codes for modeling mild combustion of natural gas.

  13. Combustion Characteristics of C5 Alcohols and a Skeletal Mechanism for Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Combustion Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Sungwoo

    2015-10-27

    C5 alcohols are considered alternative fuels because they emit less greenhouse gases and fewer harmful pollutants. In this study, the combustion characteristics of 2-methylbutanol (2-methyl-1-butanol) and isopentanol (3-methyl-1-butanol) and their mixtures with primary reference fuels (PRFs) were studied using a detailed chemical kinetic model obtained from merging previously published mechanisms. Ignition delay times of the C5 alcohol/air mixtures were compared to PRFs at 20 and 40 atm. Reaction path analyses were conducted at intermediate and high temperatures to identify the most influential reactions controlling ignition of C5 alcohols. The direct relation graph with expert knowledge methodology was used to eliminate unimportant species and reactions in the detailed mechanism, and the resulting skeletal mechanism was tested at various homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine combustion conditions. These simulations were used to investigate the heat release characteristics of the methyl-substituted C5 alcohols, and the results show relatively strong reactions at intermediate temperatures prior to hot ignition. C5 alcohol blending in PRF75 in HCCI combustion leads to a significant decrease of low-temperature heat release (LTHR) and a delay of the main combustion. The heat release features demonstrated by C5 alcohols can be used to improve the design and operation of advanced engine technologies.

  14. Global combustion: the connection between fossil fuel and biomass burning emissions (1997–2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, Jennifer K.; Nagy, R. Chelsea; Archibald, Sally; Moritz, Max A.; Williamson, Grant J.

    2016-01-01

    Humans use combustion for heating and cooking, managing lands, and, more recently, for fuelling the industrial economy. As a shift to fossil-fuel-based energy occurs, we expect that anthropogenic biomass burning in open landscapes will decline as it becomes less fundamental to energy acquisition and livelihoods. Using global data on both fossil fuel and biomass burning emissions, we tested this relationship over a 14 year period (1997–2010). The global average annual carbon emissions from biomass burning during this time were 2.2 Pg C per year (±0.3 s.d.), approximately one-third of fossil fuel emissions over the same period (7.3 Pg C, ±0.8 s.d.). There was a significant inverse relationship between average annual fossil fuel and biomass burning emissions. Fossil fuel emissions explained 8% of the variation in biomass burning emissions at a global scale, but this varied substantially by land cover. For example, fossil fuel burning explained 31% of the variation in biomass burning in woody savannas, but was a non-significant predictor for evergreen needleleaf forests. In the land covers most dominated by human use, croplands and urban areas, fossil fuel emissions were more than 30- and 500-fold greater than biomass burning emissions. This relationship suggests that combustion practices may be shifting from open landscape burning to contained combustion for industrial purposes, and highlights the need to take into account how humans appropriate combustion in global modelling of contemporary fire. Industrialized combustion is not only an important driver of atmospheric change, but also an important driver of landscape change through companion declines in human-started fires. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The interaction of fire and mankind’. PMID:27216509

  15. Global combustion: the connection between fossil fuel and biomass burning emissions (1997-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, Jennifer K; Nagy, R Chelsea; Archibald, Sally; Bowman, David M J S; Moritz, Max A; Roos, Christopher I; Scott, Andrew C; Williamson, Grant J

    2016-06-05

    Humans use combustion for heating and cooking, managing lands, and, more recently, for fuelling the industrial economy. As a shift to fossil-fuel-based energy occurs, we expect that anthropogenic biomass burning in open landscapes will decline as it becomes less fundamental to energy acquisition and livelihoods. Using global data on both fossil fuel and biomass burning emissions, we tested this relationship over a 14 year period (1997-2010). The global average annual carbon emissions from biomass burning during this time were 2.2 Pg C per year (±0.3 s.d.), approximately one-third of fossil fuel emissions over the same period (7.3 Pg C, ±0.8 s.d.). There was a significant inverse relationship between average annual fossil fuel and biomass burning emissions. Fossil fuel emissions explained 8% of the variation in biomass burning emissions at a global scale, but this varied substantially by land cover. For example, fossil fuel burning explained 31% of the variation in biomass burning in woody savannas, but was a non-significant predictor for evergreen needleleaf forests. In the land covers most dominated by human use, croplands and urban areas, fossil fuel emissions were more than 30- and 500-fold greater than biomass burning emissions. This relationship suggests that combustion practices may be shifting from open landscape burning to contained combustion for industrial purposes, and highlights the need to take into account how humans appropriate combustion in global modelling of contemporary fire. Industrialized combustion is not only an important driver of atmospheric change, but also an important driver of landscape change through companion declines in human-started fires.This article is part of the themed issue 'The interaction of fire and mankind'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. Development and validation of an n-dodecane skeletal mechanism for spray combustion applications

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Zhaoyu; Som, Sibendu K.; Sarathy, Mani; Plomer, Max; Pitz, William J.; Longman, Douglas E.; Lu, Tianfeng

    2014-01-01

    relation graph with expert knowledge (DRGX) and sensitivity analysis was employed for the present skeletal reduction. The skeletal mechanism was first extensively validated in 0-D and 1-D combustion systems, including auto-ignition, jet stirred reactor (JSR

  17. Modeling of the dynamical combustion of explosives: influence of mechanical properties; Modelisation de la combustion dynamique des explodifs: influence des proprietes mecaniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picart, D.; Pertuis, C. [CEA Le Ripault, 37 - Tours (France)

    1996-12-31

    Experimental observations performed during the combustion of solid explosives under pressure have shown an unexpected desensitization of the samples when damaged. A simplified method of combustion simulation inside a pressure cell is proposed in this study. The model used is based on the description of the mechanical behaviour of the solid phase. It allows to retrieve the overall experimental results, and in particular the occurrence of anomalous combustion modes. (J.S.) 8 refs.

  18. Global Governance Mechanisms to Address Antimicrobial Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padiyara, Ponnu; Inoue, Hajime; Sprenger, Marc

    2018-01-01

    Since their discovery, antibiotics, and more broadly, antimicrobials, have been a cornerstone of modern medicine. But the overuse and misuse of these drugs have led to rising rates of antimicrobial resistance, which occurs when bacteria adapt in ways that render antibiotics ineffective. A world without effective antibiotics can have drastic impacts on population health, global development, and the global economy. As a global common good, antibiotic effectiveness is vulnerable to the tragedy of the commons, where a shared limited resource is overused by a community when each individual exploits the finite resource for their own benefit. A borderless threat like antimicrobial resistance requires global governance mechanisms to mitigate its emergence and spread, and it is the responsibility of all countries and relevant multilateral organizations. These mechanisms can be in the form of legally binding global governance mechanisms such as treaties and regulatory standards or nonbinding mechanisms such as political declarations, resolutions, or guidelines. In this article, we argue that while both are effective methods, the strong, swift, and coordinated action needed to address rising rates of antimicrobial resistance will be better served through legally binding governance mechanisms.

  19. Study on mechanism of combustion instability in a dump gas turbine combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yeon Joo; Lee, Jong Ho; Jeon, Chong Hwan; Chang, Yonng June

    2002-01-01

    Combustion instabilities are an important concern associated with lean premixed combustion. Laboratory-scale dump combustor was used to understand the underlying mechanisms causing combustion instabilities. Experiments were conducted at atmospheric pressure and sound level meter was used to track the pressure fluctuations inside the combustor. Instability maps and phase-resolved OH chemiluminescence images were obtained at several conditions to investigate the mechanism of combustion instability and relations between pressure wave and heat release rate. It showed that combustion instability was susceptible to occur at higher value of equivalence ratio (>0.6) as the mean velocity was decreased. Instabilities exhibited a longitudinal mode with a dominant frequency of ∼341.8 Hz, which corresponded to a quarter wave mode of combustor. Heat release and pressure waves were in-phase when instabilities occurred. Rayleigh index distribution gave a hint about the location where the strong coherence of pressure and heat release existed. These results also give an insight to the control scheme of combustion instabilities. Emission test revealed that NO x emissions were affected by not only equivalence but also combustion instability

  20. Photographic investigation into the mechanism of combustion in irregular detonation waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyanda, C. B.; Higgins, A. J.

    2013-03-01

    Irregular detonations are supersonic combustion waves in which the inherent multi-dimensional structure is highly variable. In such waves, it is questionable whether auto-ignition induced by shock compression is the only combustion mechanism present. Through the use of high-speed schlieren and self-emitted light photography, the velocity of the different components of detonation waves in a {{ CH}}_4+2{ O}_2 mixture is analyzed. The observed burn-out of unreacted pockets is hypothesized to be due to turbulent combustion.

  1. Plasma-assisted ignition and combustion: nanosecond discharges and development of kinetic mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikovskaia, S. M.

    2014-09-01

    This review covers the results obtained in the period 2006-2014 in the field of plasma-assisted combustion, and in particular the results on ignition and combustion triggered or sustained by pulsed nanosecond discharges in different geometries. Some benefits of pulsed high voltage discharges for kinetic study and for applications are demonstrated. The necessity of and the possibility of building a particular kinetic mechanism of plasma-assisted ignition and combustion are discussed. The most sensitive regions of parameters for plasma-combustion kinetic mechanisms are selected. A map of the pressure and temperature parameters (P-T diagram) is suggested, to unify the available data on ignition delay times, ignition lengths and densities of intermediate species reported by different authors.

  2. Kinetics of coal combustion: Part 3, Mechanisms and kinetics of char combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavalas, G. R.; Flagan, R. C. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (USA)

    1988-09-01

    This report summarizes a three-year research program aimed at developing this level of understanding of char combustion through a combination of detailed analysis of chars as produced during devolatilization and as they evolve during oxidation, and theoretical studies of the porous microstructures and of pore diffusion and reaction within the coal particles. A small number of coals have been studied in detail, namely a HVA bituminous (PSOC 1451), a sub-bituminous (PSOC 1488), and a lignite (PSOC 1443). Chars have been generated from size-classified samples of these coals by pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere in a drop tube furnace. The chars were then characterized both chemically and physically. Subsequent oxidation studies were performed on these chars. 42 refs., 54 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. On the combustion mechanisms of ZrH2 in double-base propellant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanjing; Zhao, Fengqi; Yuan, Zhifeng; Wang, Ying; An, Ting; Chen, Xueli; Xuan, Chunlei; Zhang, Jiankan

    2017-12-13

    Metal hydrides are regarded as a series of promising hydrogen-supplying fuel for solid rocket propellants. Their effects on the energetic and combustion performances of propellants are closely related to their reaction mechanisms. Here we report a first attempt to determine the reaction mechanism of ZrH 2 , a high-density metal hydride, in the combustion of a double-base propellant to evaluate its potential as a fuel. ZrH 2 is determined to possess good resistance to oxidation by nitrocellulose and nitroglycerine. Thus its combustion starts with dehydrogenation to generate H 2 and metallic Zr. Subsequently, the newly formed Zr and H 2 participate in the combustion and, especially, Zr melts and then combusts on the burning surface which favors the heat feedback to the propellant. This phenomenon is completely different from the combustion behavior of the traditional fuel Al, where the Al particles are ejected off the burning surface of the propellant to get into the luminous flame zone to burn. The findings in this work validate the potential of ZrH 2 as a hydrogen-supplying fuel for double-base propellants.

  4. Automatic compression adjusting mechanism for internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkerman, J. W. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Means for controlling the compression pressure in an internal combustion engine having one or more cylinders and subject to widely varying power output requirements are provided. Received between each crank pin and connecting rod is an eccentric sleeve selectively capable of rotation about the crank pin and/or inside the rod and for latching with the rod to vary the effective length of the connecting rod and thereby the clearance volume of the engine. The eccentric normally rotates inside the connecting rod during the exhaust and intake strokes but a latching pawl carried by the eccentric is movable radially outwardly to latch the rod and eccentric together during the compression and power strokes. A control valve responds to intake manifold pressure to time the supply of hydraulic fluid to move the latch-pawl outwardly, varying the effective rod length to maintain a substantially optimum firing chamber pressure at all intake manifold pressures.

  5. Particle behavior and char burnout mechanisms under pressurized combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, C.M.; Spliethoff, H.; Hein, K.R.G.

    1999-07-01

    Combined cycle systems with coal-fired gas turbines promise highest cycle efficiencies for this fuel. Pressurized pulverized coal combustion, in particular, yields high cycle efficiencies due to the high flue gas temperatures possible. The main problem, however, is to ensure a flue gas clean enough to meet the high gas turbine standards with a dirty fuel like coal. On the one hand, a profound knowledge of the basic chemical and physical processes during fuel conversion under elevated pressures is required whereas on the other hand suitable hot gas cleaning systems need to be developed. The objective of this work was to provide experimental data to enable a detailed description of pressurized coal combustion processes. A series of experiments were performed with two German hvb coals, Ensdorf and Goettelborn, and one German brown coal, Garzweiler, using a semi-technical scale pressurized entrained flow reactor. The parameters varied in the experiments were pressure, gas temperature and bulk gas oxygen concentration. A two-color pyrometer was used for in-situ determination of particle surface temperatures and particle sizes. Flue gas composition was measured and solid residue samples taken and subsequently analyzed. The char burnout reaction rates were determinated varying the parameters pressure, gas temperature and initial oxygen concentration. Variation of residence time was achieved by taking the samples at different points along the reaction zone. The most influential parameters on char burnout reaction rates were found to be oxygen partial pressure and fuel volatile content. With increasing pressure the burn-out reactions are accelerated and are mostly controlled by product desorption and pore diffusion being the limiting processes. The char burnout process is enhanced by a higher fuel volatile content.

  6. Global combustion sources of organic aerosols: model comparison with 84 AMS factor-analysis data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimpidi, Alexandra P.; Karydis, Vlassis A.; Pandis, Spyros N.; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-07-01

    Emissions of organic compounds from biomass, biofuel, and fossil fuel combustion strongly influence the global atmospheric aerosol load. Some of the organics are directly released as primary organic aerosol (POA). Most are emitted in the gas phase and undergo chemical transformations (i.e., oxidation by hydroxyl radical) and form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this work we use the global chemistry climate model ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) with a computationally efficient module for the description of organic aerosol (OA) composition and evolution in the atmosphere (ORACLE). The tropospheric burden of open biomass and anthropogenic (fossil and biofuel) combustion particles is estimated to be 0.59 and 0.63 Tg, respectively, accounting for about 30 and 32 % of the total tropospheric OA load. About 30 % of the open biomass burning and 10 % of the anthropogenic combustion aerosols originate from direct particle emissions, whereas the rest is formed in the atmosphere. A comprehensive data set of aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements along with factor-analysis results from 84 field campaigns across the Northern Hemisphere are used to evaluate the model results. Both the AMS observations and the model results suggest that over urban areas both POA (25-40 %) and SOA (60-75 %) contribute substantially to the overall OA mass, whereas further downwind and in rural areas the POA concentrations decrease substantially and SOA dominates (80-85 %). EMAC does a reasonable job in reproducing POA and SOA levels during most of the year. However, it tends to underpredict POA and SOA concentrations during winter indicating that the model misses wintertime sources of OA (e.g., residential biofuel use) and SOA formation pathways (e.g., multiphase oxidation).

  7. Combustion research in the Internal Fluid Mechanics Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mularz, Edward J.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this research is to bring computational fluid dynamics to a state of practical application for the aircraft engine industry. The approach is to have a strongly integrated computational and experimental program for all the disciplines associated with the gas turbine and other aeropropulsion systems by advancing the understanding of flow physics, heat transfer, and combustion processes. The computational and experimental research is integrated in the following way: the experiments that are performed provide an empirical data set so that physical models can be formulated to describe the processes that are occurring - for example, turbulence or chemical reaction. These experiments also form a data base for those who are doing code development by providing experimental data against which the codes can be verified and assesed. Models are generated as closure to some of the numerical codes, and they also provide physical insight for experiments. At the same time, codes which solve the complete Navier-Stokes equations can be used as a kind of numerical experiment from which far more extensive data can be obtained than ever could be obtained experimentally. This could provide physical insight into the complex processes that are taking place. These codes are also exercised against experimental data to assess the accuracy and applicability of models.

  8. Fundamental mechanisms for conversion of volatiles in biomass and waste combustion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glarborg, P.; Hindiyarti, L.; Marshall, P.; Livbjerg, H.; Dagaut, P.; Jensen, Anker; Frandsen, Flemming

    2007-03-15

    This project deals with the volatile oxidation chemistry in biomass and waste fired systems, emphasizing reactions important for pollutants emissions (NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, HCl, aerosols). The project aims to extend existing models and databases with a number of chemical subsystems that are presently not well understood, but are particularly important in connection with combustion of biomass and waste. The project is divided into 3 tasks. Task 1: Conversion of chlorine, sulfur and alkali gas phase components in combustion of biomass. Task 2: Formation mechanisms for NO{sub x} in the freeboard of grate combustion of biomass. Task 3: Oxidation mechanisms for oxygenated hydrocarbons in the volatiles from pyrolysis of biomass. (au)

  9. Combustion synthesis of TiC-based materials: Mechanisms, densification, and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaSalvia, J.C.; Meyers, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The micromechanisms involved in the combustion synthesis of a Ti-C-Ni-Mo mixture resulting in the formation of a TiC-based composite were examined using the combustion wave quenching technique developed by Rogachev et al. At the micron level, the main reaction occurs at the interface between a Ti-Ni-C melt and C particles, resulting in the formation of a solid TiC x layer on the C particles. This layer undergoes a successive process of rapid growth and decomposition into TiC x spherules until all of the C particle is consumed. This mechanism is consistent with the apparent activation energy (E = 100 kJ/mol) for the process obtained from a macrokinetic investigation of the system. The apparent uniformity in size (d = 1 μm) of the TiC x spherules upon formation indicates a critical condition in the stability of the energetics involved in the process. These TiC x spherules undergo growth due to Ostwald ripening and coalescence mechanisms resulting in a final apparent size of 2.5 μm. For the compositions investigated, the addition of Mo did not affect either the micromechanisms or macrokinetics of the combustion synthesis process. Densification of the porous body after the combustion synthesis process can be carried out while it is still in a easily deformable state. The highly porous body is densified by a combination of fracture (communition), plastic deformation, and sintering. The mechanisms are identified for the case of combustion synthesized TiC. Mechanical properties and microstructures of a number of materials (e.g. TiC, TiB 2 , Al 2 O 3 -TiB 2 , TiB 2 -SiC, TiC-Ni-Mo) produced by combustion synthesis combined with a high-velocity forging step are reviewed

  10. Global burden of mortalities due to chronic exposure to ambient PM2.5 from open combustion of domestic waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodros, John K.; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Ford, Bonne; Cucinotta, Rachel; Gan, Ryan; Magzamen, Sheryl; Pierce, Jeffrey R.

    2016-12-01

    Uncontrolled combustion of domestic waste has been observed in many countries, creating concerns for air quality; however, the health implications have not yet been quantified. We incorporate the Wiedinmyer et al (2014 Environ. Sci. Technol. 48 9523-30) emissions inventory into the global chemical-transport model, GEOS-Chem, and provide a first estimate of premature adult mortalities from chronic exposure to ambient PM2.5 from uncontrolled combustion of domestic waste. Using the concentration-response functions (CRFs) of Burnett et al (2014 Environ. Health Perspect. 122 397-403), we estimate that waste-combustion emissions result in 270 000 (5th-95th: 213 000-328 000) premature adult mortalities per year. The confidence interval results only from uncertainty in the CRFs and assumes equal toxicity of waste-combustion PM2.5 to all other PM2.5 sources. We acknowledge that this result is likely sensitive to choice of chemical-transport model, CRFs, and emission inventories. Our central estimate equates to 9% of adult mortalities from exposure to ambient PM2.5 reported in the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. Exposure to PM2.5 from waste combustion increases the risk of premature mortality by more than 0.5% for greater than 50% of the population. We consider sensitivity simulations to uncertainty in waste-combustion emission mass, the removal of waste-combustion emissions, and model resolution. A factor-of-2 uncertainty in waste-combustion PM2.5 leads to central estimates ranging from 138 000 to 518 000 mortalities per year for factors-of-2 reductions and increases, respectively. Complete removal of waste combustion would only avoid 191 000 (5th-95th: 151 000-224 000) mortalities per year (smaller than the total contributed premature mortalities due to nonlinear CRFs). Decreasing model resolution from 2° × 2.5° to 4° × 5° results in 16% fewer mortalities attributed to waste-combustion PM2.5, and over Asia, decreasing resolution from 0.5° × 0.666° to 2° × 2

  11. Mechanical Damage and Combustion of TNT and Composition-B

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lieb, Robert

    2001-01-01

    ... from 0.1 to 100 s-1. The mechanical response was measured with parameters that have been used to characterize the fracture response of gun propellant during its development over the last decade...

  12. Reaction Mechanisms and HCCI Combustion Processes of Mixtures of n-Heptane and the Butanols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu eWang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A reduced primary reference fuel (PRF-Alcohol-Di-tert-butyl Peroxide (DTBP mechanism with 108 species and 435 reactions, including sub-mechanisms of PRF, methanol, ethanol, DTBP and the four butanol isomers, is proposed for homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI engine combustion simulations of butanol isomers/n-heptane mixtures. HCCI experiments fuelled with butanol isomer/n-heptane mixtures on two different engines are conducted for the validation of proposed mechanism. The mechanism has been validated against shock tube ignition delays, laminar flame speeds, species profiles in premixed flames and engine HCCI combustion data, and good agreements with experimental results are demonstrated under various validation conditions. It is found that although the reactivity of neat tert-butanol is the lowest, mixtures of tert-butanol/n-heptane exhibit the highest reactivity among the butanol isomer/n-heptane mixtures if the n-heptane blending ratio exceeds 20% (mole. Kinetic analysis shows that the highest C-H bond energy in the tert-butanol molecule is partially responsible for this phenomenon. It is also found that the reaction tC4H9OH+CH3O2 =tC4H9O+CH3O2H plays important role and eventually produces the OH radical to promote the ignition and combustion. The proposed mechanism is able to capture HCCI combustion processes of the butanol/n-heptane mixtures under different operating conditions. In addition, the trend that tert-butanol /n-heptane has the highest reactivity is also captured in HCCI combustion simulations. The results indicate that the current mechanism can be used for HCCI engine predictions of PRF and alcohol fuels.

  13. Creating mechanisms of toxic substances emission of combustion engines

    OpenAIRE

    Jankowski Antoni; Kowalski Mirosław

    2015-01-01

    The paper analyses the mechanisms of creation of toxic exhaust gases, which mainly derived from inexact fuel metering and improper air-fuel mixture preparation. The paper describes the process of creating toxic components in the exhaust gases of piston engines during engine operation, and impact on the emission of these components determining the composition of the fuel mixture determined equivalence factor Φ. The principal mechanisms of formation of toxic exhaust gases, in particular nitroge...

  14. Mechanism for automatic regulation of combustion. Regolazione automatica della combustione

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borelli, L.; Tagliaferro, B.; Cossalter, V.; Da Lio, M. (Padua Univ. (Italy))

    1993-09-01

    The article describes an original application of a mechanism for the automatic regulation of burners. The aim is to maintain a constant air-fuel ratio even with variations occurring in ambient temperature and fuel supply. To obtain the correct mixture, the air damper is opened with a double mechanism by an ambient temperature transducer and by a screw for the setting up of the rate of fuel supply.

  15. Creating mechanisms of toxic substances emission of combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankowski Antoni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the mechanisms of creation of toxic exhaust gases, which mainly derived from inexact fuel metering and improper air-fuel mixture preparation. The paper describes the process of creating toxic components in the exhaust gases of piston engines during engine operation, and impact on the emission of these components determining the composition of the fuel mixture determined equivalence factor Φ. The principal mechanisms of formation of toxic exhaust gases, in particular nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons, and also essential according to create each of toxic exhaust gases are the subject of the paper. Moreover, empirical relationships, by means of which it is possible to determine the time of creation of the individual components of toxic exhaust gases, are presented. For example, one of the mechanisms for prompt formation of nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons graphic illustration of formation as a function of crank angle is described. At the conclusion, the summary and significance of information on creation mechanisms of toxic components in the exhaust gases of piston engines are presented.

  16. Numerical comparison of hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms for unsteady shockinduced combustion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P. Pradeep; Kim, Kui Soon; Oh, Se Jong; Choi, Jeong Yeol [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    An unsteady shock-induced combustion (SIC) is characterized by the regularly oscillating combustion phenomenon behind the shock wave supported by the blunt projectile flying around the speed of Chapman-Jouguet detonation wave. The SIC is the coupling phenomenon between the hypersonic flow and the chemical kinetics, but the effects of chemical kinetics have been rarely reported. We compared hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms for the shock-induced combustion to demonstrate the importance of considering the reaction mechanisms for such complex flows. Seven hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms were considered, those available publically and used in other researches. As a first step in the comparison of the hydrogen combustion, ignition delay time of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures was compared at various initial conditions. Laminar premixed flame speed was also compared with available experimental data and at high pressure conditions. In addition, half-reaction length of ZND (Zeldovich-Neumann-Doering) detonation structure accounts for the length scale in SIC phenomena. Oscillation frequency of the SIC is compared by running the time-accurate 3rd-order Navier-Stokes CFD code fully coupled with the detailed chemistry by using four levels of grid resolutions.

  17. Numerical comparison of hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms for unsteady shockinduced combustion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, P. Pradeep; Kim, Kui Soon; Oh, Se Jong; Choi, Jeong Yeol

    2015-01-01

    An unsteady shock-induced combustion (SIC) is characterized by the regularly oscillating combustion phenomenon behind the shock wave supported by the blunt projectile flying around the speed of Chapman-Jouguet detonation wave. The SIC is the coupling phenomenon between the hypersonic flow and the chemical kinetics, but the effects of chemical kinetics have been rarely reported. We compared hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms for the shock-induced combustion to demonstrate the importance of considering the reaction mechanisms for such complex flows. Seven hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms were considered, those available publically and used in other researches. As a first step in the comparison of the hydrogen combustion, ignition delay time of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures was compared at various initial conditions. Laminar premixed flame speed was also compared with available experimental data and at high pressure conditions. In addition, half-reaction length of ZND (Zeldovich-Neumann-Doering) detonation structure accounts for the length scale in SIC phenomena. Oscillation frequency of the SIC is compared by running the time-accurate 3rd-order Navier-Stokes CFD code fully coupled with the detailed chemistry by using four levels of grid resolutions.

  18. Particular mechanism for continuously varying the compression ratio for an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raţiu, S.; Cătălinoiu, R.; Alexa, V.; Miklos, I.; Cioată, V.

    2018-01-01

    Variable compression ratio (VCR) is a technology to adjust the compression ratio of an internal combustion engine while the engine is in operation. The paper proposes the presentation of a particular mechanism allowing the position of the top dead centre to be changed, while the position of the bottom dead centre remains fixed. The kinematics of the mechanism is studied and its trajectories are graphically represented for different positions of operation.

  19. Cyclopentane combustion chemistry. Part I: Mechanism development and computational kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Rachidi, Mariam El

    2017-06-23

    Cycloalkanes are significant constituents of conventional fossil fuels, in which they are one of the main contributors to soot formation, but also significantly influence the ignition characteristics below ∼900K. This paper discusses the development of a detailed high- and low-temperature oxidation mechanism for cyclopentane, which is an important archetypical cycloalkane. The differences between cyclic and non-cyclic alkane chemistry, and thus the inapplicability of acyclic alkane analogies, required the detailed theoretical investigation of the kinetics of important cyclopentane oxidation reactions as part of the mechanism development. The cyclopentyl+O reaction was investigated at the UCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in a time-dependent master equation framework. Comparisons with analogous cyclohexane or non-cyclic alkane reactions are presented. Our study suggests that beyond accurate quantum chemistry the inclusion of pressure dependence and especially that of formally direct kinetics is crucial even at pressures relevant for practical application.

  20. Cyclopentane combustion chemistry. Part I: Mechanism development and computational kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Rachidi, Mariam El; Mehl, Marco; Pitz, William J.; Mohamed, Samah; Sarathy, Mani

    2017-01-01

    Cycloalkanes are significant constituents of conventional fossil fuels, in which they are one of the main contributors to soot formation, but also significantly influence the ignition characteristics below ∼900K. This paper discusses the development of a detailed high- and low-temperature oxidation mechanism for cyclopentane, which is an important archetypical cycloalkane. The differences between cyclic and non-cyclic alkane chemistry, and thus the inapplicability of acyclic alkane analogies, required the detailed theoretical investigation of the kinetics of important cyclopentane oxidation reactions as part of the mechanism development. The cyclopentyl+O reaction was investigated at the UCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in a time-dependent master equation framework. Comparisons with analogous cyclohexane or non-cyclic alkane reactions are presented. Our study suggests that beyond accurate quantum chemistry the inclusion of pressure dependence and especially that of formally direct kinetics is crucial even at pressures relevant for practical application.

  1. Mechanical properties of calcium phosphate cements obtained by solution combustion synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkmer, Tiago M.; Barreiro, Oscar; Souza, Vania Caldas; Santos, Luis Alberto dos, E-mail: tiagovolkmer@gmail.com, E-mail: oscarbafer@hotmail.com, E-mail: vania.souza@ufrgs.br, E-mail: luis.santos@ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Laboratorio de Biomateriais

    2009-07-01

    Bioceramics based on calcium phosphates, especially hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphates (TCP) are the most used biomaterials as bone substitutes. The objective of this work is to evaluate the mechanical properties of α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) synthesized by the solution combustion method. The solution combustion synthesis (SCS) can be considered as faster and simpler as other methods, furthermore it allows the obtainment of high purity α-TCP. In the calcium phosphates (CPC), α-TCP reacts with water forming needle like HA, which restrain the movement of grains, increasing mechanical resistance. In the present paper the influence of particle size on mechanical properties of α-TCP cements were evaluated. The α-TCP powder were characterized by XRD, TEM, BET and laser diffraction to asses particle size while the CPC bodies by SEM, Arquimedes method and compression tests. Increasing the milling time, the particle size decreases, resulting in samples with less porosity and consequently with higher compression resistance. (author)

  2. Cyclopentane combustion. Part II. Ignition delay measurements and mechanism validation

    KAUST Repository

    Rachidi, Mariam El

    2017-06-12

    This study reports cyclopentane ignition delay measurements over a wide range of conditions. The measurements were obtained using two shock tubes and a rapid compression machine, and were used to test a detailed low- and high-temperature mechanism of cyclopentane oxidation that was presented in part I of this study (Al Rashidi et al., 2017). The ignition delay times of cyclopentane/air mixtures were measured over the temperature range of 650–1350K at pressures of 20 and 40atm and equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0. The ignition delay times simulated using the detailed chemical kinetic model of cyclopentane oxidation show very good agreement with the experimental measurements, as well as with the cyclopentane ignition and flame speed data available in the literature. The agreement is significantly improved compared to previous models developed and investigated at higher temperatures. Reaction path and sensitivity analyses were performed to provide insights into the ignition-controlling chemistry at low, intermediate and high temperatures. The results obtained in this study confirm that cycloalkanes are less reactive than their non-cyclic counterparts. Moreover, cyclopentane, a high octane number and high octane sensitivity fuel, exhibits minimal low-temperature chemistry and is considerably less reactive than cyclohexane. This study presents the first experimental low-temperature ignition delay data of cyclopentane, a potential fuel-blending component of particular interest due to its desirable antiknock characteristics.

  3. Cyclopentane combustion. Part II. Ignition delay measurements and mechanism validation

    KAUST Repository

    Rachidi, Mariam El; Má rmol, Juan C.; Banyon, Colin; Sajid, Muhammad Bilal; Mehl, Marco; Pitz, William J.; Mohamed, Samah; Alfazazi, Adamu; Lu, Tianfeng; Curran, Henry J.; Farooq, Aamir; Sarathy, Mani

    2017-01-01

    This study reports cyclopentane ignition delay measurements over a wide range of conditions. The measurements were obtained using two shock tubes and a rapid compression machine, and were used to test a detailed low- and high-temperature mechanism of cyclopentane oxidation that was presented in part I of this study (Al Rashidi et al., 2017). The ignition delay times of cyclopentane/air mixtures were measured over the temperature range of 650–1350K at pressures of 20 and 40atm and equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0. The ignition delay times simulated using the detailed chemical kinetic model of cyclopentane oxidation show very good agreement with the experimental measurements, as well as with the cyclopentane ignition and flame speed data available in the literature. The agreement is significantly improved compared to previous models developed and investigated at higher temperatures. Reaction path and sensitivity analyses were performed to provide insights into the ignition-controlling chemistry at low, intermediate and high temperatures. The results obtained in this study confirm that cycloalkanes are less reactive than their non-cyclic counterparts. Moreover, cyclopentane, a high octane number and high octane sensitivity fuel, exhibits minimal low-temperature chemistry and is considerably less reactive than cyclohexane. This study presents the first experimental low-temperature ignition delay data of cyclopentane, a potential fuel-blending component of particular interest due to its desirable antiknock characteristics.

  4. An optimized chemical kinetic mechanism for HCCI combustion of PRFs using multi-zone model and genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neshat, Elaheh; Saray, Rahim Khoshbakhti

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new chemical kinetic mechanism for PRFs HCCI combustion is developed. • New mechanism optimization is performed using genetic algorithm and multi-zone model. • Engine-related combustion and performance parameters are predicted accurately. • Engine unburned HC and CO emissions are predicted by the model properly. - Abstract: Development of comprehensive chemical kinetic mechanisms is required for HCCI combustion and emissions prediction to be used in engine development. The main purpose of this study is development of a new chemical kinetic mechanism for primary reference fuels (PRFs) HCCI combustion, which can be applied to combustion models to predict in-cylinder pressure and exhaust CO and UHC emissions, accurately. Hence, a multi-zone model is developed for HCCI engine simulation. Two semi-detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms those are suitable for premixed combustion are used for n-heptane and iso-octane HCCI combustion simulation. The iso-octane mechanism contains 84 species and 484 reactions and the n-heptane mechanism contains 57 species and 296 reactions. A simple interaction between iso-octane and n-heptane is considered in new mechanism. The multi-zone model is validated using experimental data for pure n-heptane and iso-octane. A new mechanism is prepared by combination of these two mechanisms for n-heptane and iso-octane blended fuel, which includes 101 species and 594 reactions. New mechanism optimization is performed using genetic algorithm and multi-zone model. Mechanism contains low temperature heat release region, which decreases with increasing octane number. The results showed that the optimized chemical kinetic mechanism is capable of predicting engine-related combustion and performance parameters. Also after implementing the optimized mechanism, engine unburned HC and CO emissions predicted by the model are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data

  5. Investigation of the Influence of Acoustic Oscillation Parameters on the Mechanism of Waste Rubber Products Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakurov, R. F.; Sitnikov, O. R.; Galimova, A. I.; Sabitova, A. F.

    2018-03-01

    The article presents an analysis of the used methods of recycling of waste rubber products. The worn out tires are exposed to natural decomposition only after 50 - 100 years, and toxic organic compounds used in the manufacture constitute a danger to the environment. It contemplates a method of recycling waste rubber products in devices where pulsating combustion is realized. The dependence of the influence of acoustic pulsation parameters on the combustion mechanism of waste rubber products and on the composition of combustion products was experimentally investigated and established. For this purpose, the setup scheme based on the Rijke effect is optimized. The resonance pipe is coaxially embedded in the shaft. The known mathematical model of finding the combustion zones in the Rijke pipe, corresponding to the gas flow oscillations with the maximum amplitude, is applied to the chosen scheme. Investigations were carried out for three positions of the grate relative to the lower section of the experimental pipe, in which 1st, 2nd, 3rd modes of oscillation are formed. There are favorable conditions arise for the secondary combustion of mechanical particles entrained in the gas flow in the tube. The favorable conditions for afterburning also include the fact that through the upper section of the resonant pipe, the ambient air, caused by the features of the standing wave, is mixed into the gas stream. A comparative analysis of the change of gas concentration composition along the length of the resonance tube is carried out. It is established that the basic mode of oscillations contributes to the reduction of nitrogen oxides, in comparison with the oscillations occurring simultaneously at several harmonics, considering the main one. The results of research for the three positions of the grate in relation to the lower section of the installation are presented in tabular form, in which 1, 2, 3 modes of oscillation are formed. The analysis of experimental results confirms

  6. Combustible cigarettes cost less to use than e-cigarettes: global evidence and tax policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liber, Alex C; Drope, Jeffrey M; Stoklosa, Michal

    2017-03-01

    Some scholars suggest that price differences between combustible cigarettes and e-cigarettes could be effective in moving current combustible smokers to e-cigarettes, which could reduce tobacco-related death and disease. Currently, in most jurisdictions, e-cigarettes are not subject to the same excise taxes as combustible cigarettes, potentially providing the category with a price advantage over combustible cigarettes. This paper tests whether e-cigarettes tax advantage has translated into a price advantage. In a sample of 45 countries, the price of combustible cigarettes, disposable e-cigarettes and rechargeable cigarettes were compared. Comparable units of combustible cigarettes cost less than disposable e-cigarettes in almost every country in the sample. While the e-liquids consumed in rechargeable e-cigarettes might cost less per comparable unit than combustible cigarettes, the initial cost to purchase a rechargeable e-cigarette presents a significant cost barrier to switching from smoking to vaping. Existing prices of e-cigarettes are generally much higher than of combustible cigarettes. If policymakers wish to tax e-cigarettes less than combustibles, forceful policy action-almost certainly through excise taxation-must raise the price of combustible cigarettes beyond the price of using e-cigarettes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Development of a new reduced hydrogen combustion mechanism with NO_x and parametric study of hydrogen HCCI combustion using stochastic reactor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurya, Rakesh Kumar; Akhil, Nekkanti

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • PDF based stochastic reactor model used for study of hydrogen HCCI engine. • New reduced hydrogen combustion mechanism with NOx developed (30 species and 253 reactions). • Mechanism predicts cylinder pressure and captures NO_x emission trend with sufficient accuracy. • Parametric study of hydrogen HCCI engine over wide range of speed and load conditions. • Hydrogen HCCI operating range increases with compression ratio & decreases with engine speed. - Abstract: Hydrogen is a potential alternative and renewable fuel for homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine to achieve higher efficiency and zero emissions of CO, unburned hydrocarbons as well as other greenhouse gases such as CO_2 and CH_4. In this study, a detailed hydrogen oxidation mechanism with NO_x was developed by incorporating additional species and NO_x reactions to the existing hydrogen combustion mechanism (10 species and 40 reactions). The detailed hydrogen combustion mechanism used in this study consists of 39 species and 311 reactions. A reduced mechanism consisting 30 species and 253 reactions was also developed by using directed relation graph (DRG) method from detailed mechanism. Developed mechanisms were validated with experimental data by HCCI engine simulation using stochastic reactor model. Sensitivity analysis was performed to identify the most important reactions in hydrogen combustion and NO_x formation in HCCI engine. Pathway analysis was also performed to analyze the important reaction pathways at different temperatures. Results revealed that H2 + HO2 [=] H + H2O2 and O2 + NNH [=] N2 + HO2 are the most significant reactions in the hydrogen HCCI combustion and NO_x formation respectively. Detailed parametric study of HCCI combustion was conducted using developed chemical kinetic model. Numerical simulations are performed at different engine operating condition by varying engine speed (1000–3000 rpm), intake air temperature (380–460 K), and compression

  8. Experimental study on the mechanism of SO2 emission and calcium-based desulfurization in the coal oxygen-enriched combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Luning; Chen, Hanping; Yang, Haiping; Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Shihong

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The emission of SO 2 , CO 2 brings serious harm to the ecological environment, human health and the global climate change. The largest source of SO 2 , CO 2 is the combustion of fossil fuels for power generation. So developing the new technology for controlling pollutants emissions from coal combustion was imperative. Oxygen-enriched combustion technology is such a new technology which can realize CO 2 zero emission, enhance the combustion efficiency and reduce pollutants emission. Due to the high concentration of CO 2 , it has many different aspects in the SO 2 emission and calcium-based desulfurization compare with the conventional combustion. In this article, experiments have been done to investigate the behavior and mechanism of SO 2 emissions and removal in oxygen-enriched combustion. First, in TGA and fixed bed reactor, the SO 2 emission characteristics were investigated under various bed temperature, particle size and O 2 / CO 2 concentration. It was observed that SO 2 released faster and the emission peak was higher than air atmosphere. SO 2 emission concentration increased with the reaction temperature increasing. Simultaneously, the mechanism of SO 2 emission was obtained by analyzing the sulfur compounds in the gas products and solid products in different reaction times. Then, the impacts of reaction temperature, particle size, O 2 / CO 2 concentration and SO 2 concentration etc. on the efficiency of SO 2 removal were analyzed. The phase analysis, pore diameter distribution and microstructure of the solid product were investigated. The experimental results showed that the sulphur capture takes place by direct sulphation reaction at high CO 2 concentration which attributes to light sinter, better porous structure, higher optimal desulfurization temperature and high desulfurization efficiency of calcium-based sorbent. (author)

  9. Formation Mechanism of Spherical TiC in Ni-Ti-C System during Combustion Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guoliang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Chuanbao; Pan, Weitao; Huang, Haijun; Du, Dafan; Wang, Donghong; Shu, Da; Dong, Anping; Sun, Baode; Jiang, Sheng; Pu, Yilong

    2017-08-29

    The formation mechanism of TiC particles in a Ni-Ti-C system were revealed by using differential thermal analysis (DTA), XRD, and SEM to identify the reaction products in different temperature ranges. The results indicated that the synthesis mechanism of TiC in Ni-Ti-C system was complex; several reactions were involved in the combustion synthesis of TiC-Ni composite. The Ni-Ti intermediate phases play important roles during the formation of TiC. Moreover, the influence of heating rate on the size range of TiC was also discussed.

  10. Reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for NOx emission prediction in biomass combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houshfar, Ehsan; Skreiberg, Øyvind; Glarborg, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Because of the complex composition of biomass, the chemical mechanism contains many different species and therefore a large number of reactions. Although biomass gas‐phase combustion is fairly well researched and understood, the proposed mechanisms are still complex and need very long computational...... time and powerful hardware resources. A reduction of the mechanism for biomass volatile oxidation has therefore been performed to avoid these difficulties. The selected detailed mechanism in this study contains 81 species and 703 elementary reactions. Necessity analysis is used to determine which...... reactions and chemical species, that is, 35 species and 198 reactions, corresponding to 72% reduction in the number of reactions and, therefore, improving the computational time considerably. Yet, the model based on the reduced mechanism predicts correctly concentrations of NOx and CO that are essentially...

  11. Pollution from Fossil-Fuel Combustion is the Leading Environmental Threat to Global Pediatric Health and Equity: Solutions Exist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Frederica

    2017-12-23

    Fossil-fuel combustion by-products are the world's most significant threat to children's health and future and are major contributors to global inequality and environmental injustice. The emissions include a myriad of toxic air pollutants and carbon dioxide (CO₂), which is the most important human-produced climate-altering greenhouse gas. Synergies between air pollution and climate change can magnify the harm to children. Impacts include impairment of cognitive and behavioral development, respiratory illness, and other chronic diseases-all of which may be "seeded" in utero and affect health and functioning immediately and over the life course. By impairing children's health, ability to learn, and potential to contribute to society, pollution and climate change cause children to become less resilient and the communities they live in to become less equitable. The developing fetus and young child are disproportionately affected by these exposures because of their immature defense mechanisms and rapid development, especially those in low- and middle-income countries where poverty and lack of resources compound the effects. No country is spared, however: even high-income countries, especially low-income communities and communities of color within them, are experiencing impacts of fossil fuel-related pollution, climate change and resultant widening inequality and environmental injustice. Global pediatric health is at a tipping point, with catastrophic consequences in the absence of bold action. Fortunately, technologies and interventions are at hand to reduce and prevent pollution and climate change, with large economic benefits documented or predicted. All cultures and communities share a concern for the health and well-being of present and future children: this shared value provides a politically powerful lever for action. The purpose of this commentary is to briefly review the data on the health impacts of fossil-fuel pollution, highlighting the neurodevelopmental

  12. Combustion engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Ragland, Kenneth W

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Combustion Engineering The Nature of Combustion Combustion Emissions Global Climate Change Sustainability World Energy Production Structure of the Book   Section I: Basic Concepts Fuels Gaseous Fuels Liquid Fuels Solid Fuels Problems Thermodynamics of Combustion Review of First Law Concepts Properties of Mixtures Combustion StoichiometryChemical EnergyChemical EquilibriumAdiabatic Flame TemperatureChemical Kinetics of CombustionElementary ReactionsChain ReactionsGlobal ReactionsNitric Oxide KineticsReactions at a Solid SurfaceProblemsReferences  Section II: Combustion of Gaseous and Vaporized FuelsFlamesLaminar Premixed FlamesLaminar Flame TheoryTurbulent Premixed FlamesExplosion LimitsDiffusion FlamesGas-Fired Furnaces and BoilersEnergy Balance and EfficiencyFuel SubstitutionResidential Gas BurnersIndustrial Gas BurnersUtility Gas BurnersLow Swirl Gas BurnersPremixed-Charge Engine CombustionIntroduction to the Spark Ignition EngineEngine EfficiencyOne-Zone Model of Combustion in a Piston-...

  13. A method for generating reduced-order combustion mechanisms that satisfy the differential entropy inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ream, Allen E.; Slattery, John C.; Cizmas, Paul G. A.

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a new method for determining the Arrhenius parameters of a reduced chemical mechanism such that it satisfies the second law of thermodynamics. The strategy is to approximate the progress of each reaction in the reduced mechanism from the species production rates of a detailed mechanism by using a linear least squares method. A series of non-linear least squares curve fittings are then carried out to find the optimal Arrhenius parameters for each reaction. At this step, the molar rates of production are written such that they comply with a theorem that provides the sufficient conditions for satisfying the second law of thermodynamics. This methodology was used to modify the Arrhenius parameters for the Westbrook and Dryer two-step mechanism and the Peters and Williams three-step mechanism for methane combustion. Both optimized mechanisms showed good agreement with the detailed mechanism for species mole fractions and production rates of most major species. Both optimized mechanisms showed significant improvement over previous mechanisms in minor species production rate prediction. Both optimized mechanisms produced no violations of the second law of thermodynamics.

  14. Energy convergence of shock waves and its destruction mechanism in cone-roof combustion chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Han; Yao, Anren; Yao, Chunde; Gao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Experiments with simulations are designed to probe into engine severe knock. • Energy convergence at central and edge region is observed in closed-limited space. • Modes with different intensities and mechanism of energy convergence are revealed. • Chamber shape and equivalence ratio can affect the energy convergence. • The destruction effects of energy convergence on pistons are recognized. - Abstract: Energy convergence is considered as an important phenomenon in internal combustion engines under severe knock, in which shock waves caused by violent combustion may aggregate the energy released by fuel burning to damage engine parts like pistons and spark plugs easily. In order to reveal such convergence mechanism and its destruction effects, a novel detonation bomb experiment combined with numerical simulations are conducted. In bomb experiments, a detonation wave is forcibly introduced into a clearance-variable cone-roof combustion chamber by a high energy spark ignition. Four pressure transducers were installed in different positions to monitor the energy convergence. Combined with the experiments, numerical simulations were conducted to reveal the convergence modes and mechanisms. Finally, destruction samples were presented to validate this research. It’s found that the energy convergence of shock waves always occurs in middle and edge region, which are vulnerable to be damaged. Three modes of energy convergence are concluded for middle region while several ways of energy convergence are concluded for edge region, which are all related with the chamber shape and may result in different levels of convergence. It’s also found that though detonation strength (knock intensity) can be changed by both equivalence ratios and initial pressures, only the equivalence ratios can change the convergence modes while the initial pressures cannot.

  15. Development and validation of an n-dodecane skeletal mechanism for spray combustion applications

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Zhaoyu

    2014-03-04

    n-Dodecane is a promising surrogate fuel for diesel engine study because its physicochemical properties are similar to those of the practical diesel fuels. In the present study, a skeletal mechanism for n-dodecane with 105 species and 420 reactions was developed for spray combustion simulations. The reduction starts from the most recent detailed mechanism for n-alkanes consisting of 2755 species and 11,173 reactions developed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. An algorithm combining direct relation graph with expert knowledge (DRGX) and sensitivity analysis was employed for the present skeletal reduction. The skeletal mechanism was first extensively validated in 0-D and 1-D combustion systems, including auto-ignition, jet stirred reactor (JSR), laminar premixed flame and counter flow diffusion flame. Then it was coupled with well-established spray models and further validated in 3-D turbulent spray combustion simulations under engine-like conditions. These simulations were compared with the recent experiments with n-dodecane as a surrogate for diesel fuels. It can be seen that combustion characteristics such as ignition delay and flame lift-off length were well captured by the skeletal mechanism, particularly under conditions with high ambient temperatures. Simulations also captured the transient flame development phenomenon fairly well. The results further show that ignition delay may not be the only factor controlling the stabilisation of the present flames since a good match in ignition delay does not necessarily result in improved flame lift-off length prediction. The work of Zhaoyu Luo, Sibendu Som, Max Plomer, William J. Pitz, Douglas E. Longman and Tianfeng Lu was authored as part of their official duties as Employees of the United States Government and is therefore a work of the United States Government. In accordance with 17 USC. 105, no copyright protection is available for such works under US Law. S. Mani Sarathy hereby waives his right to

  16. The real mechanisms of the global economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Asensio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the main arguments of Bresser Pereira's Globalization and Competition. Development strategies based on the 'conventional orthodoxy' are shown to carry serious drawbacks ("Dutch disease", pernicious effects of external saving, currency overvaluation, while a 'new developmentalism' is promoted, in spite of the widespread belief that the nation-states have been dispossessed of their room for manoeuvre because of the globalization process. The "new developmentalism" is based on domestic finance, balanced public budgets, moderate interest rates and competitiveness policies aimed at neutralizing the tendency to exchange rate overappreciation. The paper also points out a few theoretical questions the book raises.

  17. Optimization and analysis of large chemical kinetic mechanisms using the solution mapping method - Combustion of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, Michael; Wang, Hai; Rabinowitz, Martin J.

    1992-01-01

    A method of systematic optimization, solution mapping, as applied to a large-scale dynamic model is presented. The basis of the technique is parameterization of model responses in terms of model parameters by simple algebraic expressions. These expressions are obtained by computer experiments arranged in a factorial design. The developed parameterized responses are then used in a joint multiparameter multidata-set optimization. A brief review of the mathematical background of the technique is given. The concept of active parameters is discussed. The technique is applied to determine an optimum set of parameters for a methane combustion mechanism. Five independent responses - comprising ignition delay times, pre-ignition methyl radical concentration profiles, and laminar premixed flame velocities - were optimized with respect to thirteen reaction rate parameters. The numerical predictions of the optimized model are compared to those computed with several recent literature mechanisms. The utility of the solution mapping technique in situations where the optimum is not unique is also demonstrated.

  18. Mechanically activated combustion synthesis of molybdenum borosilicides for ultrahigh-temperature structural applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esparza, Alan A.; Shafirovich, Evgeny, E-mail: eshafirovich2@utep.edu

    2016-06-15

    The thermal efficiency of gas-turbine power plants could be dramatically increased by the development of new structural materials based on molybdenum silicides and borosilicides, which can operate at temperatures higher than 1300 °C with no need for cooling. A major challenge, however, is to simultaneously achieve high oxidation resistance and acceptable mechanical properties at high temperatures. Materials based on Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} (called T{sub 2}) phase are promising materials that offer favorable combinations of high temperature mechanical properties and oxidation resistance. In the present paper, T{sub 2} phase based materials have been obtained using mechanically activated self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (MASHS). Upon ignition, Mo/Si/B/Ti mixtures exhibited a self-sustained propagation of a spinning combustion wave, but the products were porous, contained undesired secondary phases, and had low oxidation resistance. The “chemical oven” technique has been successfully employed to fabricate denser and stronger Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}–TiC, Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}–TiB{sub 2}, and Mo–Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}–Mo{sub 3}Si materials. Among them, Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}–TiB{sub 2} material exhibits the best oxidation resistance at temperatures up to 1500 °C. - Highlights: • Mechanical activation has enabled combustion synthesis of Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} based materials. • For the first time, the fabrication of Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}–TiB{sub 2} material has been reported. • Among the obtained materials, Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}–TiB{sub 2} exhibits the best oxidation resistance.

  19. Mechanically Activated Combustion Synthesis of MoSi2-Based Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafirovich, Evgeny [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The thermal efficiency of gas-turbine power plants could be dramatically increased by the development of new structural materials based on molybdenum silicides and borosilicides, which can operate at temperatures higher than 1300 °C with no need for cooling. A major challenge, however, is to simultaneously achieve high oxidation resistance and acceptable mechanical properties at high temperatures. One approach is based on the fabrication of MoSi2-Mo5Si3 composites that combine high oxidation resistance of MoSi2 and good mechanical properties of Mo5Si3. Another approach involves the addition of boron to Mo-rich silicides for improving their oxidation resistance through the formation of a borosilicate surface layer. In particular, materials based on Mo5SiB2 phase are promising materials that offer favorable combinations of high temperature mechanical properties and oxidation resistance. However, the synthesis of Mo-Si-B multi-phase alloys is difficult because of their extremely high melting temperatures. Mechanical alloying has been considered as a promising method, but it requires long milling times, leading to large energy consumption and contamination of the product by grinding media. In the reported work, MoSi2-Mo5Si3 composites and several materials based on Mo5SiB2 phase have been obtained by mechanically activated self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (MASHS). Short-term milling of Mo/Si mixture in a planetary mill has enabled a self-sustained propagation of the combustion front over the mixture pellet, leading to the formation of MoSi2-T1 composites. Combustion of Mo/Si/B mixtures for the formation of T2 phase becomes possible if the composition is designed for the addition of more exothermic reactions leading to the formation of MoB, TiC, or TiB2. Upon ignition, Mo/Si/B and Mo/Si/B/Ti mixtures exhibited spin combustion, but the products were porous, contained undesired secondary phases, and had low oxidation resistance. It has been shown that use of

  20. Conformational inversion-topomerization mechanism of ethylcyclohexyl isomers and its role in combustion kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Bian, Huiting

    2016-07-26

    With the "strain-free" cyclic structure, cyclohexane and alkyl cyclohexanes (and their radicals) have various conformers (e.g. chair, boat, and twist etc.) by pseudorotation of the alkyl ring. Noting that different conformers will undergo different types of H-migration reactions, the mechanism of conformational change may impact the distribution of cyclohexyl and the branched cyclohexyl radical isomers during cyclohexane and alkyl cyclohexanes combustion. Consequently, it will influence the formation of subsequent decomposition products. In this work, the conformational inversion-topomerization mechanism and H-migration reactions for six ethylcyclohexyl radical isomers were systematically studied by ab initio calculations and the transition state theory. The updated sub-mechanism of these conformational changes is incorporated into an ethylcyclohexane pyrolysis model. By comparing the simulated results of the "complete" model including the sub-mechanism of conformational changes and the simplified model ignoring these processes, the effect of inversion-topomerization mechanism on the relative concentrations of various ethylcyclohexyl radicals and the formation of subsequent decomposition products were revealed. © 2016.

  1. Pollution from Fossil-Fuel Combustion is the Leading Environmental Threat to Global Pediatric Health and Equity: Solutions Exist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Frederica

    2017-01-01

    Fossil-fuel combustion by-products are the world’s most significant threat to children’s health and future and are major contributors to global inequality and environmental injustice. The emissions include a myriad of toxic air pollutants and carbon dioxide (CO2), which is the most important human-produced climate-altering greenhouse gas. Synergies between air pollution and climate change can magnify the harm to children. Impacts include impairment of cognitive and behavioral development, respiratory illness, and other chronic diseases—all of which may be “seeded“ in utero and affect health and functioning immediately and over the life course. By impairing children’s health, ability to learn, and potential to contribute to society, pollution and climate change cause children to become less resilient and the communities they live in to become less equitable. The developing fetus and young child are disproportionately affected by these exposures because of their immature defense mechanisms and rapid development, especially those in low- and middle-income countries where poverty and lack of resources compound the effects. No country is spared, however: even high-income countries, especially low-income communities and communities of color within them, are experiencing impacts of fossil fuel-related pollution, climate change and resultant widening inequality and environmental injustice. Global pediatric health is at a tipping point, with catastrophic consequences in the absence of bold action. Fortunately, technologies and interventions are at hand to reduce and prevent pollution and climate change, with large economic benefits documented or predicted. All cultures and communities share a concern for the health and well-being of present and future children: this shared value provides a politically powerful lever for action. The purpose of this commentary is to briefly review the data on the health impacts of fossil-fuel pollution, highlighting the

  2. The READY program: Building a global potential energy surface and reactive dynamic simulations for the hydrogen combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogo, César; Brandão, João

    2014-06-30

    READY (REActive DYnamics) is a program for studying reactive dynamic systems using a global potential energy surface (PES) built from previously existing PESs corresponding to each of the most important elementary reactions present in the system. We present an application to the combustion dynamics of a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen using accurate PESs for all the systems involving up to four oxygen and hydrogen atoms. Results at the temperature of 4000 K and pressure of 2 atm are presented and compared with model based on rate constants. Drawbacks and advantages of this approach are discussed and future directions of research are pointed out. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Incineration and co-combustion of waste: accounting of greenhouse gases and global warming contributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas; Møller, Jacob; Fruergaard, Thilde

    2009-01-01

    Important greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to waste incineration and co-combustion of waste were identified and considered relative to critical aspects such as: the contents of biogenic and fossil carbon, N2O emissions, fuel and material consumptions at the plants, energy recovery, and soli...

  4. FAILURE MECHANISMS OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES AND llMPROVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADNAN PARLAK

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available MechanicaJ properties of high performance ceramics have been improved to the point where their use in heat engines is possible. The high temperature strength and low thermal expansion properties of bigh performance ceramics offer an advantage over metals in the development of non-water cooling engine. However, because bard environment in diesel engine combustion chamber, solving the problem of durabiUty of TBC is important. DurabiUty of thermal barrier coatings(TBC is liınited by two main failure mechanisms: Therınal expansion nlİsmatch betwcen bond coat and top coat and bond coat oxidation. Both of these can cause failure of the ceramic top coat. Developments of recent years sholv that bond coats \\Vith higher oxidation resistance tend to have better coating system cyclic lives

  5. Foliage and Grass as Fuel Pellets–Small Scale Combustion of Washed and Mechanically Leached Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hari Arti Khalsa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The high contents of disadvantageous elements contained in non-woody biomass are known to cause problems during small and large scale combustion, typically resulting in a higher risk of slagging, corrosion, and increased emissions. Mechanically leaching the respective elements from the biomass through a sequence of process steps has proven to be a promising solution.The florafuel process used here is comprised of size reduction followed by washing and subsequent mechanical dewatering of the biomass. Densification of the upgraded biomass into standardized pellets (Ø 6mm enables an application in existing small-scale boilers. The presented combustion trials investigated the performance of pellets made from leached grass, foliage and a mixture of both in two small-scale boilers (<100 kWth with slightly different technology (moving grate versus water-cooled burner tube during a 4-h measurement period. Emissions were in accordance with German emissions standards except for NOx (threshold is 0.50 g/m3 in the case of pure grass pellets (0.51 g/m3 and particulate matter (PM in all but one case (foliage, 13–16 mg/m3. An electrostatic precipitator (ESP unit installed with one of the boilers successfully reduced PM emission of both the grass and mixture fuel below the threshold of 20 mg/m3 (all emission values refer to 13 vol.% O2, at standard temperature and pressure (STP. Bottom ash composition and grate temperature profiles were analyzed and discussed for one of the boilers.

  6. CSP-based chemical kinetics mechanisms simplification strategy for non-premixed combustion: An application to hybrid rocket propulsion

    KAUST Repository

    Ciottoli, Pietro P.

    2017-08-14

    A set of simplified chemical kinetics mechanisms for hybrid rocket applications using gaseous oxygen (GOX) and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) is proposed. The starting point is a 561-species, 2538-reactions, detailed chemical kinetics mechanism for hydrocarbon combustion. This mechanism is used for predictions of the oxidation of butadiene, the primary HTPB pyrolysis product. A Computational Singular Perturbation (CSP) based simplification strategy for non-premixed combustion is proposed. The simplification algorithm is fed with the steady-solutions of classical flamelet equations, these being representative of the non-premixed nature of the combustion processes characterizing a hybrid rocket combustion chamber. The adopted flamelet steady-state solutions are obtained employing pure butadiene and gaseous oxygen as fuel and oxidizer boundary conditions, respectively, for a range of imposed values of strain rate and background pressure. Three simplified chemical mechanisms, each comprising less than 20 species, are obtained for three different pressure values, 3, 17, and 36 bar, selected in accordance with an experimental test campaign of lab-scale hybrid rocket static firings. Finally, a comprehensive strategy is shown to provide simplified mechanisms capable of reproducing the main flame features in the whole pressure range considered.

  7. Global Partitioning of NOx Sources Using Satellite Observations: Relative Roles of Fossil Fuel Combustion, Biomass Burning and Soil Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaegle, Lyatt; Steinberger, Linda; Martin, Randall V.; Chance, Kelly

    2005-01-01

    This document contains the following abstract for the paper "Global partitioning of NOx sources using satellite observations: Relative roles of fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning and soil emissions." Satellite observations have been used to provide important new information about emissions of nitrogen oxides. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are significant in atmospheric chemistry, having a role in ozone air pollution, acid deposition and climate change. We know that human activities have led to a three- to six-fold increase in NOx emissions since pre-industrial times, and that there are three main surface sources of NOx: fuel combustion, large-scale fires, and microbial soil processes. How each of these sources contributes to the total NOx emissions is subject to some doubt, however. The problem is that current NOx emission inventories rely on bottom-up approaches, compiling large quantities of statistical information from diverse sources such as fuel and land use, agricultural data, and estimates of burned areas. This results in inherently large uncertainties. To overcome this, Lyatt Jaegle and colleagues from the University of Washington, USA, used new satellite observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) instrument. As the spatial and seasonal distribution of each of the sources of NOx can be clearly mapped from space, the team could provide independent topdown constraints on the individual strengths of NOx sources, and thus help resolve discrepancies in existing inventories. Jaegle's analysis of the satellite observations, presented at the recent Faraday Discussion on "Atmospheric Chemistry", shows that fuel combustion dominates emissions at northern mid-latitudes, while fires are a significant source in the Tropics. Additionally, she discovered a larger than expected role for soil emissions, especially over agricultural regions with heavy fertilizer use. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  8. Reduced combustion mechanism for C1-C4 hydrocarbons and its application in computational fluid dynamics flare modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodara, Vijaya; Chen, Daniel H; Lou, Helen H; Rasel, Kader M A; Richmond, Peyton; Wang, Anan; Li, Xianchang

    2017-05-01

    Emissions from flares constitute unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide (CO), soot, and other partially burned and altered hydrocarbons along with carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and water. Soot or visible smoke is of particular concern for flare operators/regulatory agencies. The goal of the study is to develop a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model capable of predicting flare combustion efficiency (CE) and soot emission. Since detailed combustion mechanisms are too complicated for (CFD) application, a 50-species reduced mechanism, LU 3.0.1, was developed. LU 3.0.1 is capable of handling C 4 hydrocarbons and soot precursor species (C 2 H 2 , C 2 H 4 , C 6 H 6 ). The new reduced mechanism LU 3.0.1 was first validated against experimental performance indicators: laminar flame speed, adiabatic flame temperature, and ignition delay. Further, CFD simulations using LU 3.0.1 were run to predict soot emission and CE of air-assisted flare tests conducted in 2010 in Tulsa, Oklahoma, using ANSYS Fluent software. Results of non-premixed probability density function (PDF) model and eddy dissipation concept (EDC) model are discussed. It is also noteworthy that when used in conjunction with the EDC turbulence-chemistry model, LU 3.0.1 can reasonably predict volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions as well. A reduced combustion mechanism containing 50 C 1 -C 4 species and soot precursors has been developed and validated against experimental data. The combustion mechanism is then employed in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) of modeling of soot emission and combustion efficiency (CE) of controlled flares for which experimental soot and CE data are available. The validated CFD modeling tools are useful for oil, gas, and chemical industries to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) mandate to achieve smokeless flaring with a high CE.

  9. Mathematical modelling of NO emissions from high-temperature air combustion with nitrous oxide mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Weihong; Blasiak, Wlodzimierz

    2005-01-01

    A study of the mathematical modelling of NO formation and emissions in a gas-fired regenerative furnace with high-preheated air was performed. The model of NO formation via N 2 O-intermediate mechanism was proposed because of the lower flame temperature in this case. The reaction rates of this new model were calculated basing on the eddy-dissipation-concept. This model accompanied with thermal-NO, prompt-NO and NO reburning models were used to predict NO emissions and formations. The sensitivity of the furnace temperature and the oxygen availability on NO generation rate has been investigated. The predicted results were compared with experimental values. The results show that NO emission formed by N 2 O-intermediate mechanism is of outstanding importance during the high-temperature air combustion (HiTAC) condition. Furthermore, it shows that NO models with N 2 O-route model can give more reasonable profile of NO formation. Additionally, increasing excess air ratio leads to increasing of NO emission in the regenerative furnace. (author)

  10. Comprehensive Mechanisms for Combustion Chemistry: An Experimental and Numerical Study with Emphasis on Applied Sensitivity Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dryer, Frederick L.

    2009-04-10

    This project was an integrated experimental/numerical effort to study pyrolysis and oxidation reactions and mechanisms for small-molecule hydrocarbon structures under conditions representative of combustion environments. The experimental aspects of the work were conducted in large-diameter flow reactors, at 0.3 to 18 atm pressure, 500 to 1100 K temperature, and 10-2 to 2 seconds reaction time. Experiments were also conducted to determine reference laminar flame speeds using a premixed laminar stagnation flame experiment and particle image velocimetry, as well as pressurized bomb experiments. Flow reactor data for oxidation experiments include: (1)adiabatic/isothermal species time-histories of a reaction under fixed initial pressure, temperature, and composition; to determine the species present after a fixed reaction time, initial pressure; (2)species distributions with varying initial reaction temperature; (3)perturbations of a well-defined reaction systems (e.g. CO/H2/O2 or H2/O2)by the addition of small amounts of an additive species. Radical scavenging techniques are applied to determine unimolecular decomposition rates from pyrolysis experiments. Laminar flame speed measurements are determined as a function of equivalence ratio, dilution, and unburned gas temperature at 1 atm pressure. Hierarchical, comprehensive mechanistic construction methods were applied to develop detailed kinetic mechanisms which describe the measurements and literature kinetic data. Modeling using well-defined and validated mechanisms for the CO/H2/Oxidant systems and perturbations of oxidation experiments by small amounts of additives were also used to derive absolute reaction rates and to investigate the compatibility of published elementary kinetic and thermochemical information. Numerical tools were developed and applied to assess the importance of individual elementary reactions to the predictive performance of the

  11. Hydrodynamic and thermal mechanisms of filtration combustion inclinational instability based on non-uniform distribution of initial preheating temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yongfang; Shi, Junrui; Xu, Youning; Ma, Rui

    2018-03-01

    Filtration combustion (FC) is one style of porous media combustion with inert matrix, in which the combustion wave front propagates, only downstream or reciprocally. In this paper, we investigate the FC flame front inclinational instability of lean methane/air mixtures flowing through a packed bed as a combustion wave front perturbation of the initial preheating temperature non-uniformity is assumed. The predicted results show that the growth rate of the flame front inclinational angle is proportional to the magnitude of the initial preheating temperature difference. Additionally, depending on gas inlet gas velocity and equivalence ratio, it is demonstrated that increase of gas inlet gas velocity accelerates the FC wave front deformation, and the inclinational instability evolves faster at lower equivalence ratio. The development of the flame front inclinational angle may be regarded as a two-staged evolution, which includes rapid increase, and approaching maximum value of inclinational angle due to the quasi-steady condition of the combustion system. The hydrodynamic and thermal mechanisms of the FC inclinational instability are analyzed. Consequently, the local propagation velocity of the FC wave front is non-uniform to result in the development of inclinational angle at the first stage of rapid increase.

  12. Mechanism of influence water vapor on combustion characteristics of propane-air mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionov, V. M.; Mitrofanov, G. A.; Sachovskii, A. V.; Kozar, N. K.

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the results of an experimental study of the effect of water vapor at the flame temperature. Propane-butane mixture with air is burning on a modified Bunsen burner. Steam temperature was varied from 180 to 260 degrees. Combustion parameters changed by steam temperature and its proportion in the mixture with the fuel. The fuel-air mixture is burned in the excess air ratio of 0.1. It has been established that the injection of steam changes the characteristics of combustion fuel-air mixture and increase the combustion temperature. The concentration of CO in the combustion products is substantially reduced. Raising the temperature in the combustion zone is associated with increased enthalpy of the fuel by the added steam enthalpy. Reducing the concentration of CO is caused by decrease in the average temperature in the combustion zone by applying steam. Concentration of active hydrogen radicals and oxygen increases in the combustion zone. That has a positive effect on the process of combustion.

  13. Nonbinding Legal Instruments in Governance for Global Health: Lessons from the Global AIDS Reporting Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Allyn; Alfvén, Tobias; Hougendobler, Daniel; Buse, Kent

    2014-01-01

    Recent debate over World Health Organization reform has included unprecedented attention to international lawmaking as a future priority function of the Organization. However, the debate is largely focused on the codification of new binding legal instruments. Drawing upon lessons from the success of the Global AIDS Reporting Mechanism, established pursuant to the United Nations' Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS, we argue that effective global health governance requires consideration of a broad range of instruments, both binding and nonbinding. A detailed examination of the Global AIDS Reporting Mechanism reveals that the choice of the nonbinding format makes an important contribution to its effectiveness. For instance, the flexibility and adaptability of the nonbinding format have allowed the global community to: (1) undertake commitments in a timely manner; (2) adapt and experiment in the face of a dynamic pandemic; and (3) grant civil society an unparalleled role in monitoring and reporting on state implementation of global commitments. UNAIDS' institutional support has also played a vital role in ensuring the continuing effectiveness of the Global AIDS Reporting Mechanism. Overall, the experience of the Global AIDS Reporting Mechanism evidences that, at times, nimbler nonbinding instruments can offer benefits over slower, more rigid binding legal approaches to governance, but depend critically, like all instruments, on the perceived legitimacy thereof. © 2014 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  14. Global Mechanisms for Sustaining and Enhancing PES Schemes

    OpenAIRE

    Farley, Josh; Aquino, Andre; Daniels, Amy; Moulaert, Azur; Lee, Dan; Krause, Abby

    2010-01-01

    An international payment for ecosystem service (IPES) schemes may be one of the only mechanisms available to stimulate the provision of vital non-marketed ecosystem services at the global level, as those nations that benefit from global ecosystem services (GES) cannot readily force other sovereign nations to provide them. Currently, international trade offers trillions of dollars in incentives for countries to convert natural capital into marketable goods and services, and few payments to ent...

  15. Thermal Stability, Combustion Behavior, and Mechanical Property in a Flame-Retardant Polypropylene System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to comprehensively improve the strength, toughness, flame retardancy, smoke suppression, and thermal stability of polypropylene (PP, layered double hydroxide (LDH Ni0.2Mg2.8Al–LDH was synthesized by a coprecipitation method coupled with the microwave-hydrothermal treatment. The X-ray diffraction (XRD, morphology, mechanical, thermal, and fire properties for PP composites containing 1 wt %–20 wt % Ni0.2Mg2.8Al–LDH were investigated. The cone calorimeter tests confirm that the peak heat release rate (pk–HRR of PP–20%LDH was decreased to 500 kW/m2 from the 1057 kW/m2 of PP. The pk–HRR, average mass loss rate (AMLR and effective heat of combustion (EHC analysis indicates that the condensed phase fire retardant mechanism of Ni0.2Mg2.8Al–LDH in the composites. The production rate and mean release yield of CO for composites gradually decrease as Ni0.2Mg2.8Al–LDH increases in the PP matrix. Thermal analysis indicates that the decomposition temperature for PP–5%LDH and PP–10%LDH is 34 °C higher than that of the pure PP. The mechanical tests reveal that the tensile strength of PP–1%LDH is 7.9 MPa higher than that of the pure PP. Furthermore, the elongation at break of PP–10%LDH is 361% higher than PP. In this work, the synthetic LDH Ni0.2Mg2.8Al–LDH can be used as a flame retardant, smoke suppressant, thermal stabilizer, reinforcing, and toughening agent of PP products.

  16. Global and local aspects of causality in quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoica Cristinel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantum mechanics forces us to reconsider certain aspects of classical causality. The ‘central mystery’ of quantum mechanics manifests in different ways, depending on the interpretation. This mystery can be formulated as the possibility of selecting part of the initial conditions of the Universe ‘retroactively’. This talk aims to show that there is a global, timeless, ‘bird’s view’ of the spacetime, which makes this mystery more reasonable. We will review some well-known quantum effects from the perspective of global consistency.

  17. Combustion Characteristics of C5 Alcohols and a Skeletal Mechanism for Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Combustion Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Sungwoo; Chung, Suk-Ho; Lu, Tianfeng; Sarathy, Mani

    2015-01-01

    ) and their mixtures with primary reference fuels (PRFs) were studied using a detailed chemical kinetic model obtained from merging previously published mechanisms. Ignition delay times of the C5 alcohol/air mixtures were compared to PRFs at 20 and 40 atm. Reaction

  18. Mechanism of Methane Chemical Looping Combustion with Hematite Promoted with CeO 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Duane D.; Siriwardane, Ranjani

    2013-08-15

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a promising technology for fossil fuel combustion that produces sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream, reducing the energy penalty of CO{sub 2} separation from flue gases. An effective oxygen carrier for CLC will readily react with the fuel gas and will be reoxidized upon contact with oxygen. This study investigated the development of a CeO{sub 2}-promoted Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-hematite oxygen carrier suitable for the methane CLC process. Composition of CeO{sub 2} is between 5 and 25 wt % and is lower than what is generally used for supports in Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} carrier preparations. The incorporation of CeO{sub 2} to the natural ore hematite strongly modifies the reduction behavior in comparison to that of CeO{sub 2} and hematite alone. Temperature-programmed reaction studies revealed that the addition of even 5 wt % CeO{sub 2} enhances the reaction capacity of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxygen carrier by promoting the decomposition and partial oxidation of methane. Fixed-bed reactor data showed that the 5 wt % cerium oxides with 95 wt % iron oxide produce 2 times as much carbon dioxide in comparison to the sum of carbon dioxide produced when the oxides were tested separately. This effect is likely due to the reaction of CeO{sub 2} with methane forming intermediates, which are reactive for extracting oxygen from Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} at a considerably faster rate than the rate of the direct reaction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with methane. These studies reveal that 5 wt % CeO{sub 2}/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} gives stable conversions over 15 reduction/oxidation cycles. Lab-scale reactor studies (pulsed mode) suggest the methane reacts initially with CeO{sub 2} lattice oxygen to form partial oxidation products (CO + H{sub 2}), which continue to react with oxygen from neighboring Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, leading to its complete oxidation to form CO{sub 2}. The reduced cerium oxide promotes the methane decomposition reaction to form C + H{sub 2}, which continue to

  19. Distributions of carbon pricing on extraction, combustion and consumption of fossil fuels in the global supply-chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstensen, Jonas; Peters, Glen

    2018-01-01

    Pricing carbon is one of the most important tools to reduce emissions and mitigate climate change. Already, about 40 nations have implemented explicit or implicit carbon prices, and a carbon price was explicitly stated as a mitigation strategy by many nations in their emission pledges submitted to the Paris Agreement. The coverage of carbon prices varies significantly between nations though, often only covering a subset of sectors in the economy. We investigate the propagation of carbon prices along the global supply-chain when the carbon price is applied at the point where carbon is removed from the ground (extraction), is combusted (production), or where goods and services are consumed (consumption). We consider both the regional and sectoral effects, and compare the carbon price income and costs relative to economic output. We find that implementation using different accounting systems makes a significant difference to revenues and increased expenditure, and that domestic and global trade plays a significant role in spreading the carbon price between sectors and countries. A few single sectors experience the largest relative price increases (especially electricity and transport), but most of the carbon price is ultimately paid by households for goods and services due to the large expenditure and indirect supply chain impacts. We finally show that a global carbon price will generate a larger share of revenue relative to GDP in non-OECD nations than OECD nations, independent on the point of implementation.

  20. Priority setting of strategies and mechanisms for limiting global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, S.J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Scientific communities have reached a consensus that increases of greenhouse gas emission will result in climatic warming and sea level rises despite existing uncertainties. Major uncertainties include the sensitivities of climate changes in terms of timing, magnitude, and scales of regional changes. Socioeconomic uncertainties encompass population and economic growth, changes in technology, future reliance on fossil fuel, and policies compiled to stabilize the global warming. Moreover, increase in world population coupled with limited resources will increase the vulnerability of ecosystems and social systems. Global warming has become an international concern since the destinies of all nations are closely interwoven by this issue and how nations deal with it. Appropriate strategies and mechanisms are need to slow down the buildup of CO 2 and other greenhouse gases. Questionnaires were sent to 150 experts in 30 countries to evaluate such strategies and mechanisms for dealing with global warming, from both the domestic and international perspectives. This paper will focus primarily on strategy selection

  1. Combustion physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. R.

    1985-11-01

    Over 90% of our energy comes from combustion. By the year 2000 the figure will still be 80%, even allowing for nuclear and alternative energy sources. There are many familiar examples of combustion use, both domestic and industrial. These range from the Bunsen burner to large flares, from small combustion chambers, such as those in car engines, to industrial furnaces for steel manufacture or the generation of megawatts of electricity. There are also fires and explosions. The bountiful energy release from combustion, however, brings its problems, prominent among which are diminishing fuel resources and pollution. Combustion science is directed towards finding ways of improving efficiency and reducing pollution. One may ask, since combustion is a chemical reaction, why physics is involved: the answer is in three parts. First, chemicals cannot react unless they come together. In most flames the fuel and air are initially separate. The chemical reaction in the gas phase is very fast compared with the rate of mixing. Thus, once the fuel and air are mixed the reaction can be considered to occur instantaneously and fluid mechanics limits the rate of burning. Secondly, thermodynamics and heat transfer determine the thermal properties of the combustion products. Heat transfer also plays a role by preheating the reactants and is essential to extracting useful work. Fluid mechanics is relevant if work is to be performed directly, as in a turbine. Finally, physical methods, including electric probes, acoustics, optics, spectroscopy and pyrometry, are used to examine flames. The article is concerned mainly with how physics is used to improve the efficiency of combustion.

  2. Design Analysis and Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue of a Polyimide Composite for Combustion Chamber Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thesken, J. C.; Melis, M.; Shin, E.; Sutter, J.; Burke, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Polyimide composites are being evaluated for use in lightweight support structures designed to preserve the ideal flow geometry within thin shell combustion chambers of future space launch propulsion systems. Principles of lightweight design and innovative manufacturing techniques have yielded a sandwich structure with an outer face sheet of carbon fiber polyimide matrix composite. While the continuous carbon fiber enables laminated skin of high specific stiffness; the polyimide matrix materials ensure that the rigidity and durability is maintained at operation temperatures of 316 C. Significant weight savings over all metal support structures are expected. The protypical structure is the result of ongoing collaboration, between Boeing and NASA-GRC seeking to introduce polyimide composites to the harsh environmental and loads familiar to space launch propulsion systems. Design trade analyses were carried out using relevant closed form solutions, approximations for sandwich beams/panels and finite element analysis. Analyses confirm the significant thermal stresses exist when combining materials whose coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) differ by a factor of about 10 for materials such as a polymer composite and metallic structures. The ramifications on design and manufacturing alternatives are reviewed and discussed. Due to stringent durability and safety requirements, serious consideration is being given to the synergistic effects of temperature and mechanical loads. The candidate structure operates at 316 C, about 80% of the glass transition temperature T(sub g). Earlier thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) investigations of chopped fiber polyimide composites made this near to T(sub g), showed that cyclic temperature and stress promoted excessive creep damage and strain accumulation. Here it is important to verify that such response is limited in continuous fiber laminates.

  3. Global programme to demonstrate the viability and removal of barriers that impede adoption and successful implementation of available, non-combustion technologies for destroying persistent organic pollutants (POPs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the Global Programme, in line with the strategic priorities of GEF Business Plan FY04-06, is to demonstrate the viability and removal of barriers that impede adoption and successful implementation of available non-combustion technologies for use in the destruction of obsolete Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) stockpiles and wastes, more specifically PCBs wastes in developing countries and countries with economies in transition. This specific Project (Slovakia Project), part of the Global Programme, will introduce and apply such technologies to destroy significant obsolete PCBs wastes in Slovakia, and will help remove barriers to the further adoption and effective implementation of available non-combustion technologies and meet the Stockholm Convention requirement to ensure the use of Best Available Techniques (BAT) and Best Environmental Practices (BEP). The [final draft of the] National Implementation Plan (NIP) in Slovakia favors the application of non-combustion technologies to destroy POPs. The Project will make available all technical, economic and financial parameters of the selected technology in a comparative, open and transparent way that would facilitate and provide further incentive to the global diffusion of innovative alternative non-combustion technologies. The GEF Council has approved (May 2004) a Project Brief for a similar activity in the Philippines. The GEF Slovakia Project will last 70 months. The first twenty-four months will be committed to parallel activities of a tendering process, obtaining necessary operating permits, including conducting necessary environmental impact analyses; designing, constructing and testing of the non-combustion technology to be deployed; and generally planning and organizing, among other things, such activities as a comprehensive public participation and involvement plan, and a comprehensive, participatory monitoring and evaluation plan. The next eighteen months of Project time would involve the

  4. An adaptive least-squares global sensitivity method and application to a plasma-coupled combustion prediction with parametric correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kunkun; Massa, Luca; Wang, Jonathan; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2018-05-01

    We introduce an efficient non-intrusive surrogate-based methodology for global sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification. Modified covariance-based sensitivity indices (mCov-SI) are defined for outputs that reflect correlated effects. The overall approach is applied to simulations of a complex plasma-coupled combustion system with disparate uncertain parameters in sub-models for chemical kinetics and a laser-induced breakdown ignition seed. The surrogate is based on an Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) expansion, such as widely used in statistics, with orthogonal polynomials representing the ANOVA subspaces and a polynomial dimensional decomposition (PDD) representing its multi-dimensional components. The coefficients of the PDD expansion are obtained using a least-squares regression, which both avoids the direct computation of high-dimensional integrals and affords an attractive flexibility in choosing sampling points. This facilitates importance sampling using a Bayesian calibrated posterior distribution, which is fast and thus particularly advantageous in common practical cases, such as our large-scale demonstration, for which the asymptotic convergence properties of polynomial expansions cannot be realized due to computation expense. Effort, instead, is focused on efficient finite-resolution sampling. Standard covariance-based sensitivity indices (Cov-SI) are employed to account for correlation of the uncertain parameters. Magnitude of Cov-SI is unfortunately unbounded, which can produce extremely large indices that limit their utility. Alternatively, mCov-SI are then proposed in order to bound this magnitude ∈ [ 0 , 1 ]. The polynomial expansion is coupled with an adaptive ANOVA strategy to provide an accurate surrogate as the union of several low-dimensional spaces, avoiding the typical computational cost of a high-dimensional expansion. It is also adaptively simplified according to the relative contribution of the different polynomials to the total

  5. Global and Regional Impacts of the Clean Development Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shunli; De Groot, H.L.F.; Nijkamp, P.; Verhoef, E.T. [VU University, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-05-15

    Climate change is a serious concern worldwide. Policy research on climate change in the past decades has largely focused on applied modelling exercises. However, the implications of specific policy strategies such as the clean development mechanism (CDM) for global and regional economic and environmental developments has received relatively little attention. This is partly caused by the complexities of modelling an instrument like CDM. By using and modifying the GTAP-E modelling system (GTAP stands for Global Trade Analysis Project), this paper sets out to trace the combined economic and environmental impacts of CDM policies. Particular emphasis is placed on technology transfer induced by alternative CDM policies. Specific attention is devoted to the possible negative consequences of non-participation of the USA in the global coalition, and the associated distributional impacts world-wide.

  6. Global and Regional Impacts of the Clean Development Mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shunli; De Groot, H.L.F.; Nijkamp, P.; Verhoef, E.T.

    2009-05-01

    Climate change is a serious concern worldwide. Policy research on climate change in the past decades has largely focused on applied modelling exercises. However, the implications of specific policy strategies such as the clean development mechanism (CDM) for global and regional economic and environmental developments has received relatively little attention. This is partly caused by the complexities of modelling an instrument like CDM. By using and modifying the GTAP-E modelling system (GTAP stands for Global Trade Analysis Project), this paper sets out to trace the combined economic and environmental impacts of CDM policies. Particular emphasis is placed on technology transfer induced by alternative CDM policies. Specific attention is devoted to the possible negative consequences of non-participation of the USA in the global coalition, and the associated distributional impacts world-wide.

  7. Determining Role of the Chain Mechanism in the Temperature Dependence of the Gas-Phase Rate of Combustion Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azatyan, V. V.; Bolod'yan, I. A.; Kopylov, N. P.; Kopylov, S. N.; Prokopenko, V. M.; Shebeko, Yu. N.

    2018-05-01

    It is shown that the strong dependence of the rate of gas-phase combustion reactions on temperature is determined by the high values of the reaction rate constants of free atoms and radicals. It is established that with a branched chain mechanism, a special role in the reaction rate temperature dependence is played by positive feedback between the concentrations of active intermediate species and the rate of their change. The role of the chemical mechanism in the temperature dependence of the process rate with and without inhibitors is considered.

  8. Agglomeration mechanism in biomass fluidized bed combustion – Reaction between potassium carbonate and silica sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anicic, Bozidar; Lin, Weigang; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2018-01-01

    Agglomeration is one of the operational problems in fluidized bed combustion of biomass, which is caused by interaction between bed materials (e.g. silica sand) and the biomass ash with a high content of potassium species. However, the contribution of different potassium species to agglomeration ...

  9. The analysis of mechanical integrity in gas turbine engines subjected to combustion instabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altunlu, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Stringent regulations have been introduced towards reducing pollutant emissions and preserving our environment. Lowering NOx emissions is one of the main targets of industrial gas turbine engines for power generation. The combustion zone temperature is one of the critical parameters, which is

  10. Investigation of combustion and gasification mechanically activated coal fuel of various degrees of metamorphism on the 5-MW heat setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butakov Evgenii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The technology of mechanochemical activation of combustion and gasification of coals is of unquestionable scientific and technical interest; an increase in chemical activity of coals at their mechanically activated grinding is associated with an increase in the rate of reaction of the coal substance. To study the combustion and gasification process, the reactor model with tangential scroll input of coal-air suspension and cylindrical reaction chamber was used at the 5-MW thermal power plant. The experiments were carried out with coals of G and SS grades of the Kuznetsk deposit. Coal, ground after the boiler’s standard mill, is fed by a feeder to the disintegrator; then, it enters the scroll inlet of the reactor burner with transport air. The suspension is ignited by a gas igniting device with the power of 50 kW. In experiments on combustion and gasification of fine coal performed at the temperature in the reaction chamber of 1000-1300°C and air excess α = 0.5-0.7, the data on concentrations of CO and H2 were obtained: for coal of grade G, concentration of H2 was 6.3% and concentration of CO was 15.3%; for coal of SS grade, concentration of H2 was 9.5% and concentration of CO was 15.6%.

  11. INTEGRATED MECHANISMS FOR APROACHING PRIORITY ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES AT GLOBAL LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    iLDIKO iOAN

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Integrated mechanisms for approaching priority environmentalissues at global level. At global level, there are considered priorityenvironmental issues two interdependent processes that are essential for thesupport the processes that provide living conditions and wellbeing for the entirehumankind: climate change and loss of biodiversity. Payments of ecosystemservices became already well-known and applied economic instruments, althoughthere are still many uncertainties in the knowledge of eco-economic interdependencies.The paper discusses these aspects in the first part highlighting advantagesand disadvantages, while in the second part there is analyzed an integratedprogram of the United Nations, which was designed for making progress towardboth climate change, and loss of biodiversity. The REDD program – Reduction ofEmissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation – is addressed to developingcountries and it started in 2008. Based on assessment reports we will try toformulate a number of conclusions regarding the program’s effectiveness.

  12. Dioxin formation mechanisms: Implications for combustion technologies. Report for October 1997--March 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullett, B.K.

    1998-01-01

    The paper discusses current mechanistic theories relating to the formation of polychlorinated dibenzodioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) and how these theories relate to coal combustion, diesel vehicles, and open burning practices that may be of interest for the Asia-Pacific region. Co-firing coal with waste combustion has been shown to significantly decrease PCDD/F formation, likely by affecting the catalytic activity of the fly ash. On-road sampling results for diesel trucks have shown that modern, electronically controlled vehicles are likely a minor source of PCDD/F, although older vehicles remain a virtually uncharacterized and potentially significant source. Recent results from open burning of municipal waste have shown that PCDD/F emission factors are at least 14 orders of magnitude higher than modern waste combustors

  13. Mechanisms of ignition by transient energy deposition: Regimes of combustion wave propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Kiverin, A. D.; Kassoy, D. R.; Ivanov, M. F.; Liberman, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Regimes of chemical reaction wave propagating in reactive gaseous mixtures, whose chemistry is governed by chain-branching kinetics, are studied depending on the characteristics of a transient thermal energy deposition localized in a finite volume of reactive gas. Different regimes of the reaction wave propagation are initiated depending on the amount of deposited thermal energy, power of the source, and the size of the hot spot. The main parameters which define regimes of the combustion wave...

  14. Studies on Decomposition and Combustion Mechanism of Solid Fuel Rich Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    thrust to cruise at supersonic speed. This was followed by the test of large diameter ramjet called burner test vehicle (BTV). Advanced low volume...propellant surface. Vernekar et al (43) found that in pressed AP-Al pellets , maximum burn rate is obtained at intermediate metal content. Jain et al...conjunction with high pressure window strand burner . They found that the propellant combustion was irregular and regression rate varied from 0.3 to 3

  15. Automatic analysis and reduction of reaction mechanisms for complex fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Daniel

    2001-05-01

    general, detailed calculations of temperature, pressure, concentration and flame velocity show excellent agreement with measurements. Skeletal mechanisms for PRF were constructed for the SI engine case, reproducing autoignition well on removal of reactions pertaining to 15% of the species. QSSA reduction was tested on the staged combustor and the engines, using pure and weighted lifetime indices. Monitoring NO concentrations in the staged combustor and ignition timing in the engines, good reproduction is possible while approximating about 70% of the species. However, some species have to be manually retained for accuracy and numerical stability. For improved ranking, sensitivity was added to the index applied to the premixed flames, in addition to necessary molecular transport information. The maximum atomic mass fraction occupied by a certain molecular species was also constrained to limit the mass and energy deficiency caused by QSSA. For methane, the laminar flame velocities as well as concentration profiles are well predicted by the most strongly reduced mechanism with five global reaction steps. For the kerosene surrogate mechanism, QSSA involving 50% of the species was successfully attempted.

  16. Sugarcane bagasse gasification: Global reaction mechanism of syngas evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, I.I.; Gupta, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Gasification of sugarcane bagasse has been investigated using a semi batch reactor. ► Global reaction mechanism combining pyrolysis and gasification reactions is presented. ► High flow rates of syngas supported fragmentation and secondary reactions. ► CO flow rate increased at higher heating rates at the expense of CO 2 production. ► At high temperatures merger between pyrolysis and char gasification occurs. -- Abstract: Steam gasification of sugarcane bagasse has been investigated. A semi batch reactor with a fixed amount of sugarcane bagasse sample placed in steady flow of high temperature steam at atmospheric pressure has been used. The gasification of bagasse was examined at reactor and steam temperatures of 800, 900 and 1000 °C. The evolution of syngas flow rate and chemical composition has been monitored. The evolution of chemical composition and total flow rate of the syngas has been used to formulate a global reaction mechanism. The mechanism combines pyrolysis reaction mechanisms from the literature and steam gasification/reforming reactions. Steam gasification steps include steam–hydrocarbons reforming, char gasification and water gas shift reactions. Evidence of fragmentation, secondary ring opening reactions and tertiary reactions resulting in formation of gaseous hydrocarbons is supported by higher flow rates of syngas and hydrogen at high heating rates and high reactor temperatures. Increase in carbon monoxide flow rate at the expense of carbon dioxide flow rate with the increase in reactor temperature has been observed. This increase in the ratio of CO/CO 2 flow rate confirms the production of CO and CO 2 from the competing reaction routes. At 1000 °C gasification a total merging between the pyrolysis step and the char gasification step has been observed. This is attributed to acceleration of char gasification reactions and acceleration of steam–hydrocarbons reforming reactions. These hydrocarbons are the precursors to

  17. Global mechanisms for sustaining and enhancing PES schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farley, Josh; Moulaert, Azur; Lee, Dan; Krause, Abby; Aquino, Andre; Daniels, Amy

    2010-01-01

    An international payment for ecosystem service (IPES) schemes may be one of the only mechanisms available to stimulate the provision of vital non-marketed ecosystem services at the global level, as those nations that benefit from global ecosystem services (GES) cannot readily force other sovereign nations to provide them. Currently, international trade offers trillions of dollars in incentives for countries to convert natural capital into marketable goods and services, and few payments to entice countries to conserve natural capital in order to sustain critical non-marketed ecosystem services. We examine the biophysical characteristics of climate change and biodiversity to understand the obstacles to developing effective IPES schemes. We find that none of the existing schemes for providing GES are adequate, given the scale of the problem. A cap and auction scheme for CO 2 emissions among wealthy nations could fund IPES and simultaneously deter carbon emissions. To disburse funds, we should adapt Brazil's ICMS ecologico, and apportion available funds to targeted countries in proportion to how well they meet specific criteria designed to measure the provision of GES. Individual countries can then develop their own policies for increasing provision of these services, ensured of compensation if they do so. Indirect IPES should include funding for freely available technologies that protect or provide GES, such as the low carbon energy alternatives that will be essential for curbing climate change. Markets rely on the price mechanism to generate profits, which rations technology to those who can afford it, reducing adoption rates, innovation and total value. (author)

  18. Kinetics and mechanisms of elementary chemical processes of importance in combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munk, J.; Pagsberg, P.; Ratajczak, E.; Sztuba, B.; Sillesen, A.

    1988-01-01

    The technique of pulse radiolysis combined with transient ultraviolet absorption spectrophotometry has been employed in spectrokinetic studies of shortlived free radical intermediates of importance in combustion. Various source reactions for vinyl, propargyl and carboxyl radicals have been investigated and the UV-spectra of these radicals have been recorded. The spectral features have been utilized in kinetic studies of the self-reactions of the radicals and the reactions with oxygen. Kinetic results on the reaction NO + NH 2 are also reported. 10 refs. (author)

  19. Effect of rare earth dopants on structural and mechanical properties of nanoceria synthesized by combustion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbari-Fakhrabadi, A.; Meruane, V.; Jamshidijam, M.; Gracia-Pinilla, M.A.; Mangalaraja, R.V.

    2016-01-01

    Structural characteristics of combustion synthesized, calcined and densified pure and doped nanoceria with tri-valent cations of Er, Y, Gd, Sm and Nd were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The results showed that the as-synthesized and calcined nanopowders were mesoporous and calculated lattice parameters were close to theoretical ion-packing model. The effect of dopants on elastic modulus, microhardness and fracture toughness of sintered pure and doped ceria were investigated. It was observed that tri-valent cation dopants increased the hardness of the ceria, whereas the fracture toughness and elastic modulus were decreased.

  20. A detailed kinetic mechanism including methanol and nitrogen pollutants relevant to the gas-phase combustion and pyrolysis of biomass-derived fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coda Zabetta, Edgardo; Hupa, Mikko [Aabo Akademi Process Chemistry Centre, Piispankatu 8, FI-20500 Turku (Finland)

    2008-01-15

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the simulation of the gas-phase combustion and pyrolysis of biomass-derived fuels was compiled by assembling selected reaction subsets from existing mechanisms (parents). The mechanism, here referred to as ''AaA,'' includes reaction subsets for the oxidation of hydrogen (H{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), light hydrocarbons (C{sub 1} and C{sub 2}), and methanol (CH{sub 3}OH). The mechanism also takes into account reaction subsets of nitrogen pollutants, including the reactions relevant to staged combustion, reburning, and selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR). The AaA mechanism was validated against suitable experimental data from the literature. Overall, the AaA mechanism gave more accurate predictions than three other mechanisms of reference, although the reference mechanisms performed better occasionally. The predictions from AaA were also found to be consistent with the predictions of its parent mechanisms within most of their range of validity, thus transferring the validity of the parents to the inheriting mechanism (AaA). In parametric studies the AaA mechanism predicted that the effect of methanol on combustion and pollutants is often similar to that of light hydrocarbons, but it also showed that there are important exceptions, thus suggesting that methanol should be taken into account when simulating biomass combustion. To our knowledge, the AaA mechanism is currently the only mechanism that accounts for the chemistry of methanol and nitrogen relevant to the gas-phase combustion and pyrolysis of biomass-derived fuels. (author)

  1. A compact skeletal mechanism for n -dodecane with optimized semi-global low-temperature chemistry for diesel engine simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Tong; Pei, Yuanjiang; Zhong, Bei-Jing; Som, Sibendu; Lu, Tianfeng; Luo, Kai Hong

    2017-03-01

    A skeletal mechanism with 54 species and 269 reactions was developed to predict pyrolysis and oxidation of n-dodecane as a diesel fuel surrogate involving both high-temperature (high-T) and low-temperature (low-T) conditions. The skeletal mechanism was developed from a semi-detailed mechanism developed at the University of Southern California (USC). Species and reactions for high-T pyrolysis and oxidation of C5-C12 were reduced by using reaction flow analysis (RFA), isomer lumping, and then merged into a skeletal C0-C4 core to form a high-T sub-mechanism. Species and lumped semi-global reactions for low-T chemistry were then added to the high-T sub-mechanism and a 54-species skeletal mechanism is obtained. The rate parameters of the low-T reactions were tuned against a detailed mechanism by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), as well as the Spray A flame experimental data, to improve the prediction of ignition delay at low-T conditions, while the high-T chemistry remained unchanged. The skeletal mechanism was validated for auto-ignition, perfectly stirred reactors (PSR), flow reactors and laminar premixed flames over a wide range of flame conditions. The skeletal mechanism was then employed to simulate three-dimensional turbulent spray flames at compression ignition engine conditions and validated against experimental data from the Engine Combustion Network (ECN).

  2. Simulation of biodiesel combustion in a light-duty diesel engine using integrated compact biodiesel–diesel reaction mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, Hoon Kiat; Gan, Suyin; Ng, Jo-Han

    2013-01-01

    This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study is performed to investigate the combustion characteristics and emissions formation processes of biodiesel fuels in a light-duty diesel engine. A compact reaction mechanism with 80 species and 303 reactions is used to account for the effects of chemical...... kinetics. Here, the mechanism is capable of emulating biodiesel–diesel mixture of different blending levels and biodiesel produced from different feedstock. The integrated CFD-kinetic model was validated against a test matrix which covers the entire saturated–unsaturated methyl ester range typical...... of biodiesel fuels, as well as the biodiesel–diesel blending levels. The simulated cases were then validated for in-cylinder pressure profiles and peak pressure values/timings. Errors in the peak pressure values did not exceed 1%, while the variations in peak pressure timings were kept within 1.5 crank angle...

  3. Advanced Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  4. Advanced modeling of oxy-fuel combustion of natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chungen Yin

    2011-01-15

    The main goal of this small-scale project is to investigate oxy-combustion of natural gas (NG) through advanced modeling, in which radiation, chemistry and mixing will be reasonably resolved. 1) A state-of-the-art review was given regarding the latest R and D achievements and status of oxy-fuel technology. The modeling and simulation status and achievements in the field of oxy-fuel combustion were also summarized; 2) A computer code in standard c++, using the exponential wide band model (EWBM) to evaluate the emissivity and absorptivity of any gas mixture at any condition, was developed and validated in detail against data in literature. A new, complete, and accurate WSGGM, applicable to both air-fuel and oxy-fuel combustion modeling and applicable to both gray and non-gray calculation, was successfully derived, by using the validated EWBM code as the reference mode. The new WSGGM was implemented in CFD modeling of two different oxy-fuel furnaces, through which its great, unique advantages over the currently most widely used WSGGM were demonstrated. 3) Chemical equilibrium calculations were performed for oxy-NG flame and air-NG flame, in which dissociation effects were considered to different degrees. Remarkable differences in oxy-fuel and air-fuel combustion were revealed, and main intermediate species that play key roles in oxy-fuel flames were identified. Different combustion mechanisms are compared, e.g., the most widely used 2-step global mechanism, refined 4-step global mechanism, a global mechanism developed for oxy-fuel using detailed chemical kinetic modeling (CHEMKIN) as reference. 4) Over 15 CFD simulations were done for oxy-NG combustion, in which radiation, chemistry, mixing, turbulence-chemistry interactions, and so on were thoroughly investigated. Among all the simulations, RANS combined with 2-step and refined 4-step mechanism, RANS combined with CHEMKIN-based new global mechanism for oxy-fuel modeling, and LES combined with different combustion

  5. Experimental and numerical investigation of gas phase freeboard combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J.; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Meyer, K.E.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental data for velocity field, temperatures, and gas composition have been obtained from a 50 kW axisymmetric non-swirling natural gas fired combustion setup under two different settings. The reactor was constructed to simulate the conditions in the freeboard of a grate-fired boiler...... but under well-defined conditions. The experimental results are compared to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling predictions, using the eddy dissipation model (EDM) its well as the eddy dissipation concept (EDC). The use of EDC allows for implementation of more advanced combustion schemes; we have...... tested the four-step global mechanism by Jones and Lindstedt (Combust. Flame 1988, 73, 233-249), and the 16 species and 41 reaction skeletal mechanism by Yang and Pope (Combust. Flame 1998, 112 16-32). The CFD model captured the main features of the combustion process and flow patterns. The application...

  6. A Novel Cardiotoxic Mechanism for a Pervasive Global Pollutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brette, Fabien; Shiels, Holly A.; Galli, Gina L. J.; Cros, Caroline; Incardona, John P.; Scholz, Nathaniel L.; Block, Barbara A.

    2017-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon disaster drew global attention to the toxicity of crude oil and the potential for adverse health effects amongst marine life and spill responders in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The blowout released complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into critical pelagic spawning habitats for tunas, billfishes, and other ecologically important top predators. Crude oil disrupts cardiac function and has been associated with heart malformations in developing fish. However, the precise identity of cardiotoxic PAHs, and the mechanisms underlying contractile dysfunction are not known. Here we show that phenanthrene, a PAH with a benzene 3-ring structure, is the key moiety disrupting the physiology of heart muscle cells. Phenanthrene is a ubiquitous pollutant in water and air, and the cellular targets for this compound are highly conserved across vertebrates. Our findings therefore suggest that phenanthrene may be a major worldwide cause of vertebrate cardiac dysfunction.

  7. Growth mechanism and magnetism in carbothermal synthesized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles from solution combustion precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xuanli [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 China (China); Qin, Mingli, E-mail: qinml@mater.ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 China (China); Cao, Zhiqin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 China (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Pan Zhihua University, Pan Zhihua, 617000 China (China); Jia, Baorui; Gu, Yueru; Qu, Xuanhui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 China (China); Volinsky, Alex A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, 33620 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were prepared by carbothermal reduction using solution combustion synthesis precursors derived from ferric nitrate (oxidizer), glycine (fuel) and glucose (carbon source) mixed solution. In this paper, the growth mechanism and magnetism in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were investigated by adjusting the glucose content in precursor and the heat temperature in carbothermal process. The products were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Infrared adsorption method and Vibrating sample magnetometry. The results revealed that the more amount of glucose, the earlier Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase generated as temperature increasing. Depending on glucose content and thermal temperature, the average grain size of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles varied from 19.9 nm to 48 nm and saturation magnetization changed from 21.2 emu/g to 71.77 emu/g, which indicated that the saturation magnetization of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles fell off as the average grain size decreasing. These results were crucial not only from the application stand-point, but more importantly leaded to a new platform for further studies of high quality magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles at nanoscale. - Highlights: • Solution combustion. • Carbothermal. • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. • Magnetic properties.

  8. The lean-combustion gasoline engine. A concept with global application; Der magerbetriebene Ottomotor. Ein Konzept fuer den weltweiten Einsatz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemmler, Roland; Enderle, Christian; Waltner, Anton; Vent, Guido [Daimler AG, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    After Mercedes-Benz launched the first lean-combustion gasoline engines with spray-guided combustion in 2006, it rolled out this technology on a broad level based on the engine model series featuring the BlueDIRECT combustion system. Although these engines raise the bar among competitors in terms of fuel consumption, they are currently available only in countries that offer sulfur-free fuel. This leads to the question of what technical measures or altered constraints would be necessary to allow this environmentally-friendly technology to enjoy more widespread use. The following paper discusses how the accessibility of the lean-combustion technology can be improved by focusing primarily on the USA and China as potential markets. Challenges are involved, of course, in particular with respect to fuel quality and emissions as well as the market-specific implications for on-board diagnostics. By working to further reduce fuel sulfur content, however, lean-combustion gasoline engines could also be offered in the aforementioned regions in the mid-term. (orig.)

  9. Investigation of Deposit Formation Mechanisms for Engine In-cylinder Combustion and Exhaust Systems Using Quantitative Analysis and Sustainability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Z.; Meng, Q.; Mohamadian, H. P.; Wang, J. T.; Chen, L.; Zhu, L.

    2007-06-01

    The formation of SI engine combustion deposits is a complex phenomenon which depends on various factors of fuel, oil, additives, and engine. The goal of this study is to examine the effects of operating conditions, gasoline, lubricating oil, and additives on deposit formation. Both an experimental investigation and theoretical analysis are conducted on a single cylinder engine. As a result, the impact of deposits on engine performance and exhaust emissions (HC, NO x ) has been indicated. Using samples from a cylinder head and exhaust pipe as well as switching gases via the dual-gas method (N2, O2), the deposit formation mechanism is thoroughly investigated via the thermogravity analysis approach, where the roles of organic, inorganic, and volatile components of fuel, additives, and oil on deposit formation are identified from thermogravity curves. Sustainable feedback control design is then proposed for potential emission control and performance optimization

  10. Global versus local mechanisms of temperature sensing in ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, Cristina; Minor, Daniel L

    2018-05-01

    Ion channels turn diverse types of inputs, ranging from neurotransmitters to physical forces, into electrical signals. Channel responses to ligands generally rely on binding to discrete sensor domains that are coupled to the portion of the channel responsible for ion permeation. By contrast, sensing physical cues such as voltage, pressure, and temperature arises from more varied mechanisms. Voltage is commonly sensed by a local, domain-based strategy, whereas the predominant paradigm for pressure sensing employs a global response in channel structure to membrane tension changes. Temperature sensing has been the most challenging response to understand and whether discrete sensor domains exist for pressure and temperature has been the subject of much investigation and debate. Recent exciting advances have uncovered discrete sensor modules for pressure and temperature in force-sensitive and thermal-sensitive ion channels, respectively. In particular, characterization of bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel (BacNa V ) thermal responses has identified a coiled-coil thermosensor that controls channel function through a temperature-dependent unfolding event. This coiled-coil thermosensor blueprint recurs in other temperature sensitive ion channels and thermosensitive proteins. Together with the identification of ion channel pressure sensing domains, these examples demonstrate that "local" domain-based solutions for sensing force and temperature exist and highlight the diversity of both global and local strategies that channels use to sense physical inputs. The modular nature of these newly discovered physical signal sensors provides opportunities to engineer novel pressure-sensitive and thermosensitive proteins and raises new questions about how such modular sensors may have evolved and empowered ion channel pores with new sensibilities.

  11. Study of the Radical Chain Mechanism of Hydrocarbon Oxidation for In Situ Combustion Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Ushakova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the abundance of in situ combustion models of oil oxidation, many of the effects are still beyond consideration. For example, until now, initial stages of oxidation were not considered from a position of radical chain process. This is a serious difficulty for the simulation of oil recovery process that involves air injection. To investigate the initial stages of oxidation, the paper considers the sequence of chemical reactions, including intermediate short-living compounds and radicals. We have attempted to correlate the main stages of the reaction with areas of heat release observed in the experiments. The system of differential equations based on the equations of oxidation reactions was solved. Time dependence of peroxides formation and start of heat release is analytically derived for the initial stages. We have considered the inhibition of initial oxidation stages by aromatic oil compounds and have studied the induction time in dependence on temperature. Chain ignition criteria for paraffins and crude oil in presence of core samples were obtained. The calculation results are compared with the stages of oxidation that arise by high-pressure differential scanning calorimetry. According to experimental observations we have determined which reactions are important for the process and which can be omitted or combined into one as insignificant.

  12. Sixth-Grade Students' Progress in Understanding the Mechanisms of Global Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visintainer, Tammie; Linn, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    Developing solutions for complex issues such as global climate change requires an understanding of the mechanisms involved. This study reports on the impact of a technology-enhanced unit designed to improve understanding of global climate change, its mechanisms, and their relationship to everyday energy use. Global Climate Change, implemented in…

  13. The Global Environment Facility (GEF): Right mechanism for improved implementation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andresen, Steinar; Rosendal, Kristin G.

    2012-11-01

    The purpose is to feed into the international discussions of environmental financial mechanisms such as for forestry and mercury by examining the performance of the GEF. We discuss performance against effectiveness and legitimacy and focus on institutional set-up and key actors as explanatory factors. Methodologically, we use document and literature analysis and interviews with key actors in organizations, state representatives and NGOs. The dominant position of the USA and the World Bank has probably contributed to the bias towards a northern environmental agenda and emphasis on effectiveness and climate change projects. The GEF has somewhat predictably diverted the flow of international money from the poorest countries to more rapidly developing countries. Still, despite turf battles between the organizations involved, the broad organisational and thematic composition of the GEF has comparative advantages. This enhances the score on legitimacy especially for biodiversity projects, although they receive less overall funding. The GEF may be seen as an indication of how, regardless of choosing established or new institutions, basic power structures and interests of dominating parties will be largely decisive for what can be achieved in global environmental governance.(auth)

  14. Control technique of spontaneous combustion in fully mechan ized stope during period of end caving under complex mining influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Benqing

    2018-01-01

    In view of the phenomenon of spontaneous combustion of coal seam occurring during the period of end caving under complex mining conditions, taking the 1116 (3) stope of Guqiao mine as the object of study, the causes of spontaneous combustion during the period of end caving are analyzed, according to the specific geological conditions of the stope to develop corresponding fire prevention measures, including the reduction of air supply and air leakage in goaf, reduce the amount of coal left, reasonable drainage, nitrogen injection for spontaneous combustion prevention, grouting for spontaneous combustion prevention and permanent closure, fundamentally eliminates the potential for spontaneous combustion during the period of 1116(3) stope end caving. The engineering practice shows that this kind of measure has reference value for the prevention and control of spontaneous combustion during the period of stope end caving.

  15. Conformational inversion-topomerization mechanism of ethylcyclohexyl isomers and its role in combustion kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Bian, Huiting; Wang, Zhandong; Sun, Jinhua; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    the formation of subsequent decomposition products. In this work, the conformational inversion-topomerization mechanism and H-migration reactions for six ethylcyclohexyl radical isomers were systematically studied by ab initio calculations and the transition

  16. Fifteenth combustion research conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The BES research efforts cover chemical reaction theory, experimental dynamics and spectroscopy, thermodynamics of combustion intermediates, chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms, combustion diagnostics, and fluid dynamics and chemically reacting flows. 98 papers and abstracts are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers

  17. CATALYTIC COMBUSTION OF METHANE OVER Pt/γ-Al2O3 IN MICRO-COMBUSTOR WITH DETAILED CHEMICAL KINETIC MECHANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUNJIE CHEN

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Micro-scale catalytic combustion characteristics and heat transfer processes of preheated methane-air mixtures (φ = 0.4 in the plane channel were investigated numerically with detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms. The plane channel of length L = 10.0 mm, height H =1.0 mm and wall thickness δ = 0.1 mm, which inner horizontal surfaces contained Pt/γ-Al2O3 catalyst washcoat. The computational results indicate that the presence of the gas phase reactions extends mildly the micro-combustion stability limits at low and moderate inlet velocities due to the strong flames establishment, and have a more profound effect on extending the high-velocity blowout limits by allowing for additional heat release originating mainly from the incomplete CH4 gas phase oxidation in the plane channel. When the same mass flow rate (ρin × Vin is considered, the micro-combustion stability limits at p: 0.1 MPa are much narrower than at p: 0.6 MPa due to both gas phase and catalytic reaction activities decline with decreasing pressure. Catalytic micro-combustor can achieve stable combustion at low solid thermal conductivity ks < 0.1 W∙m-1•K-1, while the micro-combustion extinction limits reach their larger extent for the higher thermal conductivity ks = 20.0-100.0 W∙m-1•K-1. The existence of surface radiation heat transfers significantly effects on the micro-combustion stability limits and micro-combustors energy balance. Finally, gas phase combustion in catalytic micro-combustors can be sustained at the sub-millimeter scale (plane channel height of 0.25 mm.

  18. A Physical Mechanism and Global Quantification of Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Yu

    Full Text Available Initiation and progression of cancer depend on many factors. Those on the genetic level are often considered crucial. To gain insight into the physical mechanisms of breast cancer, we construct a gene regulatory network (GRN which reflects both genetic and environmental aspects of breast cancer. The construction of the GRN is based on available experimental data. Three basins of attraction, representing the normal, premalignant and cancer states respectively, were found on the phenotypic landscape. The progression of breast cancer can be seen as switching transitions between different state basins. We quantified the stabilities and kinetic paths of the three state basins to uncover the biological process of breast cancer formation. The gene expression levels at each state were obtained, which can be tested directly in experiments. Furthermore, by performing global sensitivity analysis on the landscape topography, six key genes (HER2, MDM2, TP53, BRCA1, ATM, CDK2 and four regulations (HER2⊣TP53, CDK2⊣BRCA1, ATM→MDM2, TP53→ATM were identified as being critical for breast cancer. Interestingly, HER2 and MDM2 are the most popular targets for treating breast cancer. BRCA1 and TP53 are the most important oncogene of breast cancer and tumor suppressor gene, respectively. This further validates the feasibility of our model and the reliability of our prediction results. The regulation ATM→MDM2 has been extensive studied on DNA damage but not on breast cancer. We notice the importance of ATM→MDM2 on breast cancer. Previous studies of breast cancer have often focused on individual genes and the anti-cancer drugs are mainly used to target the individual genes. Our results show that the network-based strategy is more effective on treating breast cancer. The landscape approach serves as a new strategy for analyzing breast cancer on both the genetic and epigenetic levels and can help on designing network based medicine for breast cancer.

  19. Microstructures and mechanical responses of powder metallurgy non-combustive magnesium extruded alloy by rapid solidification process in mass production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Katsuyoshi; Hamada, EL-Sayed Ayman; Imai, Hisashi; Umeda, Junko; Jones, Tyrone

    2010-01-01

    Spinning Water Atomization Process (SWAP), which was one of the rapid solidification processes, promised to produce coarse non-combustible magnesium alloy powder with 1-4 mm length, having fine α-Mg grains and Al 2 Ca intermetallic compounds. It had economical and safe benefits in producing coarse Mg alloy powders with very fine microstructures in the mass production process due to its extreme high solidification rate compared to the conventional atomization process. AMX602 (Mg-6%Al-0.5%Mn-2%Ca) powders were compacted at room temperature. Their green compacts with a relative density of about 85% were heated at 573-673 K for 300 s in Ar gas atmosphere, and immediately consolidated by hot extrusion. Microstructure observation and evaluation of mechanical properties of the extruded AMX602 alloys were carried out. The uniform and fine microstructures with grains less than 0.45-0.8 μm via dynamic recrystallization during hot extrusion were observed, and were much small compared to the extruded AMX602 alloy fabricated by using cast ingot. The extremely fine intermetallic compounds 200-500 nm diameter were uniformly distributed in the matrix of powder metallurgy (P/M) extruded alloys. These microstructures caused excellent mechanical properties of the wrought alloys. For example, in the case of AMX602 alloys extruded at 573 K, the tensile strength (TS) of 447 MPa, yield stress (YS) of 425 MPa and 9.6% elongation were obtained.

  20. Left Atrial Mechanical Function and Global Strain in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Jin Kim

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia and is associated with adverse outcomes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM. Although left atrial (LA remodeling and dysfunction are known to associate with the development of atrial fibrillation in HCM, the changes of the LA in HCM patients remain unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the changes in LA size and mechanical function in HCM patients compared to control subjects and to determine the characteristics of HCM associated with LA remodeling and dysfunction.Seventy-nine HCM patients (mean age, 54 ± 11 years; 76% were men were compared to 79 age- and sex-matched controls (mean age, 54 ± 11 years; 76% were men and 20 young healthy controls (mean age, 33 ± 5 years; 45% were men. The LA diameter, volume, and mechanical function, including global strain (ε, were evaluated by 2D-speckle tracking echocardiography. The phenotype of HCM, maximal left ventricular (LV wall thickness, LV mass, and presence and extent of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE were evaluated with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.HCM patients showed increased LA volume index, impaired reservoir function, and decreased LA ε compared to the control subjects. When we divided the HCM group according to a maximal LA volume index (LAVImax of 38.7 ml/m2 or LA ε of 21%, no significant differences in the HCM phenotype and maximal LV wall thickness were observed for patients with LAVImax >38.7 ml/m2 or LA ε ≤21%. Conversely, the LV mass index was significantly higher both in patients with maximal LA volume index >38.7 ml/m2 and with LA ε ≤21% and was independently associated with LAVImax and LA ε. Although the LGE extent was increased in patients with LA ε ≤21%, it was not independently associated with either LAVImax or LA ε.HCM patients showed progressed LA remodeling and dysfunction; the determinant of LA remodeling and dysfunction was LV mass index rather than LV myocardial fibrosis by LGE-magnetic resonance

  1. 49 CFR 176.905 - Motor vehicles or mechanical equipment powered by internal combustion engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of ignition. A motor vehicle or mechanical equipment showing any signs of leakage or electrical fault... equipment is stowed. (f) Each hold or compartment must be ventilated and fitted with an overhead water... smoke or fire detection system capable of alerting personnel on the bridge. (h) All electrical equipment...

  2. Thermal and mechanical behaviour of oxygen carrier materials for chemical looping combustion in a packed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, M.; Van Noyen, J.; Larring, Y.; Mccann, M.; Pishahang, M.; Amini, S.; Ortiz, M.; Galluci, F.; Sint-Annaland, M.V.; Tournigant, D.; Louradour, E.; Snijkers, F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ilmenite-based oxygen carriers were developed for packed-bed chemical looping. • Addition of Mn_2O_3 increased mechanical strength and microstructure of the carriers. • Oxygen carriers were able to withstand creep and thermal cycling up to 1200 °C. • Ilmenite-based granules are a promising shape for packed-bed reactor conditions. - Abstract: Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a promising carbon capture technology where cyclic reduction and oxidation of a metallic oxide, which acts as a solid oxygen carrier, takes place. With this system, direct contact between air and fuel can be avoided, and so, a concentrated CO_2 stream is generated after condensation of the water in the exit gas stream. An interesting reactor system for CLC is a packed bed reactor as it can have a higher efficiency compared to a fluidized bed concept, but it requires other types of oxygen carrier particles. The particles must be larger to avoid a large pressure drop in the reactor and they must be mechanically strong to withstand the severe reactor conditions. Therefore, oxygen carriers in the shape of granules and based on the mineral ilmenite were subjected to thermal cycling and creep tests. The mechanical strength of the granules before and after testing was investigated by crush tests. In addition, the microstructure of these oxygen particles was studied to understand the relationship between the physical properties and the mechanical performance. It was found that the granules are a promising shape for a packed bed reactor as no severe degradation in strength was noticed upon thermal cycling and creep testing. Especially, the addition of Mn_2O_3 to the ilmenite, which leads to the formation of an iron–manganese oxide, seems to results in stronger granules than the other ilmenite-based granules.

  3. 3D DNS of MILD combustion : a detailed analysis of heat loss effects, preferential diffusion, and flame formation mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goktolga, M.U.; Oijen, van J.A.; Goey, de L.P.H.

    2015-01-01

    Moderate or intense low oxygen dilution (MILD) combustion is a relatively new technology which combines low emissions with high efficiency. As the name suggests, it requires high degrees of dilution in addition to preheating of the reactants using the combustion products. It has been applied to

  4. The thermo-mechanics of the PWR fuel rod; La thermomecanique du crayon de combustible REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barral, J.C. [Electricite de France, EDF, 75 - Paris (France); Gautier, B.; Chaigne, G. [Electricite de France, Service Etudes et Projets Thermiques et Nucleaires, 75 - Paris (France)] [and others

    1999-03-29

    The fuel rod mechanics is of a great importance in the safety and performance of the reactors. In this domain a meeting has been organized by the SFEN the 18 march 1998 at Paris. With the participation of scientists from CEA, EDF and Framatome, the physics of the fuel rods was presented based on four main aspects. Two first papers dealt with the solicitations of the fuel rod in normal and accidental conditions. The physical phenomena under irradiation were then detailed in the four following talks. Three papers presented the simulation and the codes of the fuel-cladding interactions with the diabolo effect. The last paper was devoted to the experiment feedback and the research programs. (A.L.B.)

  5. Stearic acid coating on circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes and its effect on the mechanical performance of polymer composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Nina [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Zhang, Ping, E-mail: pingzhang@swust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, Sichuan 621010 (China); Song, Lixian; Kang, Ming; Lu, Zhongyuan [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, Sichuan 621010 (China); Zheng, Rong [Sichuan Jinhe Group Co., Ltd., Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2013-08-15

    The aim of this work was to test circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes (CFAs) for its potential to be utilized in polymer composites manufacturing to improve its toughness. CFAs was coated by stearic acid and used in the composite of polypropylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/high density polyethylene (PP/EVA/HDPE) by molding process method. The resulting coated and uncoated CFAs were fully characterized by particle size analyzer, contact angles, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The stearic acid coated onto the surface of CFAs particles in the physical and chemical ways, and the total clad ratio reached 2.05% by measuring TGA/DTA curve. The percentage of CFAs particles focused to a narrow range 2–4 μm and the median mean size was 3.2 μm more than uncoated CFAs. The properties of hydrophobic and dispersive of CFAs particles improved and original activity was reserved after stearic acid coating. The stearic acid was verified as a coupling agent by how much effect it had on the mechanical properties. It showed the elongation at break of PP/EVA/HDPE reinforced with 15 wt% coated CFAs (c-CFAs) was 80.20% and higher than that of the uncoated. The stearic acid treatment of CFAs is a very promising approach to improve the mechanical strength due to the incorporation of stearic acid on the CFAs surface, and hence, further enhances the potential for recycling CFAs as a suitable filler material in polymer composites.

  6. Stearic acid coating on circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes and its effect on the mechanical performance of polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Nina; Zhang, Ping; Song, Lixian; Kang, Ming; Lu, Zhongyuan; Zheng, Rong

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to test circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes (CFAs) for its potential to be utilized in polymer composites manufacturing to improve its toughness. CFAs was coated by stearic acid and used in the composite of polypropylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/high density polyethylene (PP/EVA/HDPE) by molding process method. The resulting coated and uncoated CFAs were fully characterized by particle size analyzer, contact angles, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The stearic acid coated onto the surface of CFAs particles in the physical and chemical ways, and the total clad ratio reached 2.05% by measuring TGA/DTA curve. The percentage of CFAs particles focused to a narrow range 2–4 μm and the median mean size was 3.2 μm more than uncoated CFAs. The properties of hydrophobic and dispersive of CFAs particles improved and original activity was reserved after stearic acid coating. The stearic acid was verified as a coupling agent by how much effect it had on the mechanical properties. It showed the elongation at break of PP/EVA/HDPE reinforced with 15 wt% coated CFAs (c-CFAs) was 80.20% and higher than that of the uncoated. The stearic acid treatment of CFAs is a very promising approach to improve the mechanical strength due to the incorporation of stearic acid on the CFAs surface, and hence, further enhances the potential for recycling CFAs as a suitable filler material in polymer composites.

  7. Synergistic capture mechanisms for alkali and sulfur species from combustion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, T.W.; Shadman, F.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Mwabe, P.O.

    1994-02-01

    Experimental work was carried out on a 17 kW, 600 cm long, gas laboratory combustor, to investigate the post flame reactive capture of alkali species by kaolinite. Emphasis was on alkali/sorbent interactions occurring in flue gas at temperatures above the alkali dewpoint and on the formation of water insoluble reaction products. Time-temperature studies were carried out by injecting kaolinite at different axial points along the combustor. The effect of chlorine and sulfur on alkali capture was investigated by doping the flame with SO{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2} gases to simulate coal flame environments. Particle time and temperature history was kept as close as possible to that which would ordinarily be found in a practical boiler. Experiments designed to extract apparent initial reaction rates were carried using a narrow range, 1-2 {mu}m modal size sorbent, while, a coarse, multi size sorbent was used to investigate the governing transport mechanisms. The capture reaction has been proposed to be between alkali hydroxide and activated kaolinite, and remains so in the presence of sulfur and chlorine. The presence of sulfur reduces sodium capture by under 10% at 1300{degree}C. Larger reductions at lower temperatures are attributed to the elevated dewpoint of sodium ({approximately}850{degree}C) with subsequent reduction in sorbent residence time in the alkali gas phase domain. Chlorine reduces sodium capture by 30% across the temperature range covered by the present experiments. This result has been linked to thermodynamic equilibria between sodium hydroxide, sodium chloride and water.

  8. Numerical studies of spray combustion processes of palm oil biodiesel and diesel fuels using reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms

    KAUST Repository

    Kuti, Olawole; Sarathy, Mani; Nishida, Keiya; Roberts, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Spray combustion processes of palm oil biodiesel (PO) and conventional diesel fuels were simulated using the CONVERGE CFD code. Thermochemical and reaction kinetic data (115 species and 460 reactions) by Luo et al. (2012) and Lu et al. (2009) (68

  9. Pre-Combustion Carbondioxide Capture in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zeki YILMAZOĞLU

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermal power plants have a significant place big proportion in the production of electric energy. Thermal power plants are the systems which converts heat energy to mechanical energy and also mechanical energy to electrical energy. Heat energy is obtained from combustion process and as a result of this, some harmful emissions, like CO2, which are the reason for global warming, are released to atmosphere. The contribution of carbondioxide to global warming has been exposed by the previous researchs. Due to this fact, clean energy technologies are growing rapidly all around the world. Coal is generally used in power plants and when compared to other fossil energy sources unit electricity production cost is less than others. When reserve rate is taken into account, coal may be converted to energy in a more efficient and cleaner way. The aim for using the clean coal technologies are to eradicate the harmful emissions of coal and to store the carbondioxide, orginated from combustion, in different forms. In line with this aim, carbondioxide may be captured by either pre-combustion, by O2/CO2 recycling combustion systems or by post combustion. The integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCC are available in pre-combustion capture systems, whereas in O2/CO2 recycling combustion systems there are ultrasuper critical boiler technologies and finally flue gas washing systems by amines exists in post combustion systems. In this study, a pre-combustion CO2 capture process via oxygen blown gasifiers is compared with a conventional power plant in terms of CO2 emissions. Captured carbondioxide quantity has been presented as a result of the calculations made throughout the study.

  10. Global Stability in Dynamical Systems with Multiple Feedback Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten; Vinther, Frank; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2016-01-01

    A class of n-dimensional ODEs with up to n feedbacks from the n’th variable is analysed. The feedbacks are represented by non-specific, bounded, non-negative C1 functions. The main result is the formulation and proof of an easily applicable criterion for existence of a globally stable fixed point...

  11. Leveraging non-binding instruments for global health governance: reflections from the Global AIDS Reporting Mechanism for WHO reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A L; Alfven, T; Hougendobler, D; Tanaka, S; Buse, K

    2014-02-01

    As countries contend with an increasingly complex global environment with direct implications for population health, the international community is seeking novel mechanisms to incentivize coordinated national and international action towards shared health goals. Binding legal instruments have garnered increasing attention since the World Health Organization adopted its first convention in 2003. This paper seeks to expand the discourse on future global health lawmaking by exploring the potential value of non-binding instruments in global health governance, drawing on the case of the 2001 United Nations General Assembly Special Session Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS. In other realms of international concern ranging from the environment to human rights to arms control, non-binding instruments are increasingly used as effective instruments of international cooperation. The experience of the Global AIDS Reporting Mechanism, established pursuant to the Declaration, evidences that, at times, non-binding legal instruments can offer benefits over slower, more rigid binding legal approaches to governance. The global AIDS response has demonstrated that the use of a non-binding instrument can be remarkably effective in galvanizing increasingly deep commitments, action, reporting compliance and ultimately accountability for results. Based on this case, the authors argued that non-binding instruments deserve serious consideration by the international community for the future of global health governance, including in the context of WHO reform. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Microenvironmental change as a mechanism to study global change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lortie, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Global change is a set of significant processes that influence all aspects of ecosystem functioning and often-natural services within Santa Barbara County. The sensitivity of coastal and urban systems is certainly very high. However, profound changes are also predicted for arid and semi-arid systems globally, and California is no exception. These dryland systems are less buffered by oceanic processes and typically express high inter-annual variation in precipitation and temperatures in addition to perturbations associated with long-term droughts. However, climate estimates and downscaled values can present challenges in providing evidence at the scale relevant to individual species or individuals, and the importance of biotic interactions must be coupled to these estimates in space and time. Coupled indicators of key micro-environmental measures to both positive and negative interactions between foundation species and other organisms provide a metric of buffering capacity and resilience to global change at fine spatial scales. Consequently, the primary objective of this research project is to provide both the a well-articulated, ecologically relevant micro-environmental big data measure of global change within Santa Barbara County and a coupled estimate of concurrent changes in interactions in key species within the region. Shrubs directly and indirectly buffered local changes in the microenvironment thereby functioning as refuges for other species within arid and semi-arid regions subject to dramatic global change drivers. The following major patterns were identified: (i) shrub micro-environments reduce the level of stress and amplitude of variation associated with temperature and moisture, (ii) many plant and animal species including threatened lizards are relatively more common with shrubs within the region, and (iii) the variation in the interaction patterns between species relates to the extent of amelioration provided by shrub-biodiversity complexes within

  13. Modelling of Combustion and Pollutant Formation in a Large, Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engine using Integrated CFD-Skeletal Chemical Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Kar Mun; Karvounis, Nikolas; Schramm, Jesper

    In this reported work, simulation studies of in-cylinder diesel combustion and pollutant formation processesin a two-stroke, low-speed uniflow-scavenged marine diesel engine are presented. Numerical computation is performed by integrating chemical kinetics into CFD computations. In order...... to minimize the computational runtime, an in-house skeletal n-heptane chemical mechanism is coupled with the CFD model. This surrogate fuel model comprises 89 reactions with 32 species essential to diesel ignition/combustion processes as well as the formation of soot precursors and nitrogen monoxide (NO......). Prior to the marine engine simulation,coupling of the newly developed surrogate fuel model and a revised multi-step soot model [1] is validated on the basis of optical diagnostics measurement obtained at varying ambient pressure levels [2]. It is demonstrated that the variation of ignition delay times...

  14. Global chaos synchronization of electro-mechanical gyrostat systems via variable substitution control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yun; Wu Xiaofeng; Liu Zhong

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies global synchronization of non-autonomous chaotic electro-mechanical gyrostat systems via variable substitution control. A master-slave non-autonomous synchronization scheme with variable substitution control is mathematically presented. Based on the scheme, some sufficient algebraic criteria for global chaos synchronization of master and slave electro-mechanical gyrostat systems via various single-variable coupling are derived. The effectiveness of the obtained criteria is numerically illustrated by the examples.

  15. Thermal and mechanical behaviour of oxygen carrier materials for chemical looping combustion in a packed bed reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.; Van Noyen, J.; Larring, Y.; McCann, M.; Pishahang, M.; Amini, S.; Ortiz, M.; Galluci, F.; Sint-Annaland, M. V.; Tournigant, D.; Louradour, E.; Snijkers, F.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a promising carbon capture technology where cyclic reduction and oxidation of a metallic oxide, which acts as a solid oxygen carrier, takes place. With this system, direct contact between air and fuel can be avoided, and so, a concentrated CO2 stream is generated

  16. Asymmetric cell division requires specific mechanisms for adjusting global transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Adriana; Medina, Daniel A; García-Martínez, José; Begley, Victoria; Singh, Abhyudai; Chávez, Sebastián; Muñoz-Centeno, Mari C; Pérez-Ortín, José E

    2017-12-01

    Most cells divide symmetrically into two approximately identical cells. There are many examples, however, of asymmetric cell division that can generate sibling cell size differences. Whereas physical asymmetric division mechanisms and cell fate consequences have been investigated, the specific problem caused by asymmetric division at the transcription level has not yet been addressed. In symmetrically dividing cells the nascent transcription rate increases in parallel to cell volume to compensate it by keeping the actual mRNA synthesis rate constant. This cannot apply to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where this mechanism would provoke a never-ending increasing mRNA synthesis rate in smaller daughter cells. We show here that, contrarily to other eukaryotes with symmetric division, budding yeast keeps the nascent transcription rates of its RNA polymerases constant and increases mRNA stability. This control on RNA pol II-dependent transcription rate is obtained by controlling the cellular concentration of this enzyme. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Development of flameless combustion; Desarrollo de la combustion sin flama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Sauceda, M. Leonardo; Cervantes de Gortari, Jaime Gonzalo [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: 8344afc@prodigy.net.mx; jgonzalo@servidor.unam.mx

    2010-11-15

    The paper intends contribute to global warming mitigation joint effort that develops technologies to capture the CO{sub 2} produced by fossil fuels combustion and to reduce emission of other greenhouse gases like the NO{sub x}. After reviewing existing combustion bibliography is pointed out that (a) touches only partial aspects of the collective system composed by Combustion-Heat transfer process-Environment, whose interactions are our primary interest and (b) most specialists think there is not yet a clearly winning technology for CO{sub 2} capture and storage. In this paper the study of combustion is focused as integrated in the aforementioned collective system where application of flameless combustion, using oxidant preheated in heat regenerators and fluent gas recirculation into combustion chamber plus appropriated heat and mass balances, simultaneously results in energy saving and environmental impact reduction. [Spanish] El trabajo pretende contribuir al esfuerzo conjunto de mitigacion del calentamiento global que aporta tecnologias para capturar el CO{sub 2} producido por la combustion de combustibles fosiles y para disminuir la emision de otros gases invernadero como NOx. De revision bibliografica sobre combustion se concluye que (a) trata aspectos parciales del sistema compuesto por combustion-proceso de trasferencia de calor-ambiente, cuyas interacciones son nuestro principal interes (b) la mayoria de especialistas considera no hay todavia una tecnologia claramente superior a las demas para captura y almacenaje de CO{sub 2}. Se estudia la combustion como parte integrante del mencionado sistema conjunto, donde la aplicacion de combustion sin flama, empleando oxidante precalentado mediante regeneradores de calor y recirculacion de gases efluentes ademas de los balances de masa y energia adecuados, permite tener simultaneamente ahorros energeticos e impacto ambiental reducido.

  18. Limits of policy intervention in a world of neoliberal mechanism designs: Paradoxes of the global crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dymski Gary A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The current global context poses several paradoxes: the recovery from the 2009 recession was not a recovery; investment, normally driven by profit rates, is lagging and not leading economic activity; the crisis is global but debate involves sub-global levels; and public safety-nets, which have helped to stabilize national income, are being cut. These paradoxes can be traced, in part, to the impact of the “truce” that followed the Keynesian-Monetarist controversy on economists’ ideas about policy activism. This implicit “truce” has removed activist macro policy from discussion, and shifted attention toward institutions as mechanisms for solving game-theoretic coordination problems. Policy activism then centers on how the “agents” (nations can achieve optimal use of their available resources (or optimal access to resources at the global level; and this involves creating and fine-tuning compacts - neoliberal mechanism designs - that can capture rents and attract globally mobile capital. This approach leads economists to see the key problem in the current global crisis as fixing broken neoliberal mechanisms. However, a global economy dominated by mechanisms that feed on aggregate demand without generating it faces the prospect of stagnation or collapse.

  19. Twenty-fifth symposium (international) on combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Approximately two-thirds of the papers presented at this conference are contained in this volume. The other one-third appear in special issues of ''Combustion and Flame'', Vol. 99, 1994 and Vol. 100, 1995. Papers are divided into the following sections: Supersonic combustion; Detonations and explosions; Internal combustion engines; Practical aspects of combustion; Incineration and wastes; Sprays and droplet combustion; Coal and organic solids combustion; Soot and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Reaction kinetics; NO x ; Turbulent flames; Turbulent combustion; Laminar flames; Flame spread, fire and halogenated fire suppressants; Global environmental effects; Ignition; Two-phase combustion; Solid propellant combustion; Materials synthesis; Microgravity; and Experimental diagnostics. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  20. Prediction of Combustion Instability with Detailed Chemical Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    of combustion instability. The mechanisms used for methane oxidation are the GRI 1.2 set that comprises of 32 chemical species and 177 reactions. All...with a single step global reaction and the GRI -1.2 kinetics mechanism which contains 177 reactions. The paper is organized as follows, Section II...flame speeds10. GRI -1.2 is a more complete set of hydrocarbon reactions consisting of 177 reactions involving 32 species and was optimized for natural

  1. Hydrogen storage properties of Mg-23.3wt.%Ni eutectic alloy prepared via hydriding combustion synthesis followed by mechanical milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquan Li; Yunfeng Zhu; Xiaofeng Liu

    2006-01-01

    A Mg-23.3wt.%Ni eutectic alloy was prepared by the process of hydriding combustion synthesis followed by mechanical milling (HCS+MM). The product showed a high hydriding rate at 373 K and the dehydrogenation started at temperature as low as 423 K. Several reasons contributing to the improvement in hydrogen storage properties were presented. The result of this study will provide attractive information for mobile applications of magnesium hydrogen storage materials, and the process of HCS+MM developed in this study showed its potential for synthesizing magnesium based hydrogen storage materials with novel hydriding/de-hydriding properties. (authors)

  2. Combustion system optimization of a P-62 lignite boiler in ContourGlobal Maritsa East 3 with NOx-reduction and efficiency improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkov, Ch.; Thierbach, Hans-Ulrich; Totev, T.

    2013-01-01

    Steinmueller Engineering GmbH, Gummersbach, Germany, successfully concluded in consortium with Siemens EOOD, Sofia, the combustion system modification of a P62 lignite fired boiler in TPP ContourGlobal Maritsa East 3, which was targeting mainly the reduction of the NOx emissions below 180 mg/Nm 3 at 6 % O 2 . The modification is part of an EPC contract covering the design, fabrication, installation and commissioning works needed to upgrade the boilers at the power station. The Modification concept involves optimization of PF- and Vapor distribution, replacement of the coal burners, installation of new Over-fire air (OFA) system and Side-wall air (SWA) system and minor modification of the existing control system to allow control of the OFAflow. The main results of the modification are: Reduction of the NOx emissions (at ESP exit) from approximately 390 g/Nm³ to below 180 mg/Nm³ at 6% O 2 , Efficiency increase of the furnace by reduction of the excess air ratio from 1.2 to 1.15 (at furnace outlet) and overall increase of the boiler efficiency. (authors)

  3. Method and apparatus for active control of combustion rate through modulation of heat transfer from the combustion chamber wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jr., Charles E.; Chadwell, Christopher J.

    2004-09-21

    The flame propagation rate resulting from a combustion event in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is controlled by modulation of the heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls. In one embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is mechanically modulated by a movable member that is inserted into, or withdrawn from, the combustion chamber thereby changing the shape of the combustion chamber and the combustion chamber wall surface area. In another embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is modulated by cooling the surface of a portion of the combustion chamber wall that is in close proximity to the area of the combustion chamber where flame speed control is desired.

  4. Studies in combustion dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koszykowski, M.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop a fundamental understanding and a quantitative predictive capability in combustion modeling. A large part of the understanding of the chemistry of combustion processes comes from {open_quotes}chemical kinetic modeling.{close_quotes} However, successful modeling is not an isolated activity. It necessarily involves the integration of methods and results from several diverse disciplines and activities including theoretical chemistry, elementary reaction kinetics, fluid mechanics and computational science. Recently the authors have developed and utilized new tools for parallel processing to implement the first numerical model of a turbulent diffusion flame including a {open_quotes}full{close_quotes} chemical mechanism.

  5. Sixth-Grade Students' Progress in Understanding the Mechanisms of Global Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visintainer, Tammie; Linn, Marcia

    2015-04-01

    Developing solutions for complex issues such as global climate change requires an understanding of the mechanisms involved. This study reports on the impact of a technology-enhanced unit designed to improve understanding of global climate change, its mechanisms, and their relationship to everyday energy use. Global Climate Change, implemented in the Web-based Inquiry Science Environment (WISE), engages sixth-grade students in conducting virtual investigations using NetLogo models to foster an understanding of core mechanisms including the greenhouse effect. Students then test how the greenhouse effect is enhanced by everyday energy use. This study draws on three data sources: (1) pre- and post-unit interviews, (2) analysis of embedded assessments following virtual investigations, and (3) contrasting cases of two students (normative vs. non-normative understanding of the greenhouse effect). Results show the value of using virtual investigations for teaching the mechanisms associated with global climate change. Interviews document that students hold a wide range of ideas about the mechanisms driving global climate change. Investigations with models help students use evidence-based reasoning to distinguish their ideas. Results show that understanding the greenhouse effect offers a foundation for building connections between everyday energy use and increases in global temperature. An impediment to establishing coherent understanding was the persistence of an alternative conception about ozone as an explanation for climate change. These findings illustrate the need for regular revision of curriculum based on classroom trials. We discuss key design features of models and instructional revisions that can transform the teaching and learning of global climate change.

  6. Elucidating the mechanism of Cr(VI) formation upon the interaction with metal oxides during coal oxy-fuel combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juan; Jiao, Facun; Zhang, Lian; Yao, Hong; Ninomiya, Yoshihiko

    2013-10-15

    The thermodynamics underpinning the interaction of Cr-bearing species with basic metal oxides, i.e. K2O, Fe2O3, MgO and CaO, during the air and oxy-fuel combustion of coal have been examined. The synchrotron-based X-ray adsorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) was used for Cr speciation. For the oxides tested, Cr(VI) formation is dominated by the reduction potential of the metals. The oxides of Ca(2+) with high reduction potential favored the oxidation of Cr(III), same for K(+). The other two basic metals, Fe2O3 and MgO with lower reduction potentials reacted with Cr(III) to form the corresponding chromites at the temperatures above 600°C. Coal combustion experiments in drop-tube furnace have confirmed the rapid capture of Cr vapors, either trivalent or hexavalent, by CaO into solid ash. The existence of HCl in flue gas favored the vaporization of Cr as CrO2Cl2, which was in turn captured by CaO into chromate. Both Fe2O3 and MgO exhibited less capability on scavenging the Cr(VI) vapor. Particularly, MgO alone exhibited a low capability for capturing the vaporized Cr(III) vapors. However, its co-existence with CaO in the furnace inhibited the Cr(VI) formation. This is beneficial for minimizing the toxicity of Cr in the coal combustion-derived fly ash. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Key factors of combustion from kinetics to gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rubtsov, Nikolai M

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the main advances in the mechanisms of combustion processes. It focuses on the analysis of kinetic mechanisms of gas combustion processes and experimental investigation into the interrelation of kinetics and gas dynamics in gas combustion. The book is complimentary to the one previously published, The Modes of Gaseous Combustion.

  8. Reduction and Uncertainty Analysis of Chemical Mechanisms Based on Local and Global Sensitivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Gaetano

    Numerical simulations of critical reacting flow phenomena in hypersonic propulsion devices require accurate representation of finite-rate chemical kinetics. The chemical kinetic models available for hydrocarbon fuel combustion are rather large, involving hundreds of species and thousands of reactions. As a consequence, they cannot be used in multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamic calculations in the foreseeable future due to the prohibitive computational cost. In addition to the computational difficulties, it is also known that some fundamental chemical kinetic parameters of detailed models have significant level of uncertainty due to limited experimental data available and to poor understanding of interactions among kinetic parameters. In the present investigation, local and global sensitivity analysis techniques are employed to develop a systematic approach of reducing and analyzing detailed chemical kinetic models. Unlike previous studies in which skeletal model reduction was based on the separate analysis of simple cases, in this work a novel strategy based on Principal Component Analysis of local sensitivity values is presented. This new approach is capable of simultaneously taking into account all the relevant canonical combustion configurations over different composition, temperature and pressure conditions. Moreover, the procedure developed in this work represents the first documented inclusion of non-premixed extinction phenomena, which is of great relevance in hypersonic combustors, in an automated reduction algorithm. The application of the skeletal reduction to a detailed kinetic model consisting of 111 species in 784 reactions is demonstrated. The resulting reduced skeletal model of 37--38 species showed that the global ignition/propagation/extinction phenomena of ethylene-air mixtures can be predicted within an accuracy of 2% of the full detailed model. The problems of both understanding non-linear interactions between kinetic parameters and

  9. Numerical studies of spray combustion processes of palm oil biodiesel and diesel fuels using reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms

    KAUST Repository

    Kuti, Olawole

    2014-04-01

    Spray combustion processes of palm oil biodiesel (PO) and conventional diesel fuels were simulated using the CONVERGE CFD code. Thermochemical and reaction kinetic data (115 species and 460 reactions) by Luo et al. (2012) and Lu et al. (2009) (68 species and 283 reactions) were implemented in the CONVERGE CFD to simulate the spray and combustion processes of the two fuels. Tetradecane (C14H30) and n- heptane (C7H 16) were used as surrogates for diesel. For the palm biodiesel, the mixture of methyl decanoate (C11H20O2), methyl-9-decenoate (C11H19O2) and n-heptane was used as surrogate. The palm biodiesel surrogates were combined in proportions based on the previous GC-MS results for the five major biodiesel components namely methyl palmitate, methyl stearate, methyl oleate, methyl linoleate and methyl linolenate. The Favre-Averaged Navier Stokes based simulation using the renormalization group (RNG) k-ε turbulent model was implemented in the numerical calculations of the spray formation processes while the SAGE chemical kinetic solver is used for the detailed kinetic modeling. The SAGE chemical kinetic solver is directly coupled with the gas phase calculations by renormalization group (RNG) k-ε turbulent model using a well-stirred reactor model. Validations of the spray liquid length, ignition delay and flame lift-off length data were performed against previous experimental results. The simulated liquid length, ignition delay and flame lift-off length were validated at an ambient density of 15kg/m3, and injection pressure conditions of 100, 200 and 300 MPa were utilized. The predicted liquid length, ignition delay and flame lift-off length agree with the trends obtained in the experimental data at all injection conditions. Copyright © 2014 SAE International.

  10. Aerosols from biomass combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T

    2001-07-01

    This report is the proceedings of a seminar on biomass combustion and aerosol production organised jointly by the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Task 32 on bio energy and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). This collection of 16 papers discusses the production of aerosols and fine particles by the burning of biomass and their effects. Expert knowledge on the environmental impact of aerosols, formation mechanisms, measurement technologies, methods of analysis and measures to be taken to reduce such emissions is presented. The seminar, visited by 50 participants from 11 countries, shows, according to the authors, that the reduction of aerosol emissions resulting from biomass combustion will remain a challenge for the future.

  11. In situ synthesis and formation mechanism of ZrC and ZrB2 by combustion synthesis from the Co-Zr-B4C system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengxian Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ZrC-ZrB2-based composites were prepared by combustion synthesis (CS reaction from 10 wt.% to 50 wt.% Co-Zr-B4C powder mixtures. With increasing Co contents, the particle sizes of near-spherical ZrC and platelet-like ZrB2 decreased from 1 μm to 0.5 μm and from 5 μm to 2 μm, respectively. In addition, the formation mechanism of ZrC and ZrB2 was explored by the phase transition and microstructure evolution on the combustion wave quenched sample in combination with differential scanning calorimeter analysis. The results showed that the production of ZrC was ascribed to the solid-solid reaction between Zr and C and the precipitation from the Co-Zr-B-C melt, while ZrB2 was prepared from the saturated liquid. The low B concentration in the Co-Zr-B-C liquid and high cooling rate during the CS process led to the presence of Co2B and ZrCo3B2 in the composites. The addition of Co in the Co-Zr-B4C system not only prevented ZrC and ZrB2 particulates from growing, but also promoted the occurrence of ZrC-ZrB2-forming reaction.

  12. Combustion science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Annamalai, Kalyan

    2006-01-01

    Introduction and Review of Thermodynamics Introduction Combustion Terminology Matter and Its Properties Microscopic Overview of Thermodynamics Conservation of Mass and Energy and the First Law of Thermodynamics The Second Law of Thermodynamics Summary Stoichiometry and Thermochemistry of Reacting Systems Introduction Overall Reactions Gas Analyses Global Conservation Equations for Reacting Systems Thermochemistry Summary Appendix Reaction Direction and Equilibrium Introduction Reaction Direction and Chemical Equilibrium Chemical Equilibrium Relations Vant Hoff Equation Adi

  13. Numerical and experimental study of the influence of the operational parameters on the formation mechanisms of oxides of nitrogen during the combustion of mixtures of cellulosic and plastic materials; Etude experimentale et numerique de l'influence des parametres operatoires sur les mecanismes de formation des oxydes d'azote lors de la combustion de melanges de materiaux cellulosiques et plastiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andzi Barhe, T.

    2004-10-15

    The current thesis was performed within a collaboration between the Laboratoire de Combustion et de Detonique (LCD of the University of Poitiers) and the Laboratoire de Physique et de Chimie d'Environnement (LPCE) of the University of Ouagadougou. It was financed by Agency for Environment and Energy Management (ADEME). The principle object of this study is the optimisation of the combustion process during the incineration of waste. This optimisation is aimed at the reduction of the polluting emissions, principally CO and NO, during the incineration of cellulosic and plastic materials. It involves the analysis of the influence of the operational parameters on the polluting emissions and the control of reaction mechanisms of formation and reduction of these pollutants during the combustion process. Consequently, the study was performed in two parts: an experimental part and a numerical part. The experimental part was realised using a fixed bed counterflow reactor. This setup simulates the combustion within an industrial waste incinerator. The reactor allows the combustion of a vertical layer of waste mixture (wood, cardboard, PET, polyamide) to be followed. Three model mixtures representative of the makeup of household waste were studied in order to determine the influence of the composition of the waste on the emission of pollutants (CO and NO). The obtained results show that this parameter has a practically negligible influence within the tested parameter range. Consequently the formation of pollutants depends on the operating parameters - the equivalence ratio and the temperature. A numerical study of the influence of these parameters in order to show their impact on the mechanisms of pollutant formation and to determine the chemical mechanisms involved in the formation of oxides of nitrogen. The numerical study was performed with software developed at the LCD. This programme based on a detailed chemical model coupled to a simple physical model. It uses the

  14. chemical kinetic study of nitrogen oxides formation in methane flameless combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado T, Pedro N; Cadavid S, Francisco; Mondragon, P Fanor; Ruiz, Wilson

    2009-01-01

    The present paper deals with the nitrogen oxides formation in a flameless combustion process characterized for using air highly diluted and preheated at high temperatures. The combustion model used in this study was the one dimensional counterflow methane air diffusion flame. The NOx production rate analysis showed that the thermal and prompt mechanisms are the most important for the formation and consumption of NO under dilution conditions for the oxidant in N 2 and combustion products. These mechanisms are related since the starting reaction for NO formation (N2 molecular dissociation) belongs to the prompt mechanism while the NO formation is reported mainly for the thermal mechanism reactions. On the other hand, the NO - NO 2 equilibrium showed that the reaction rates are comparable to that obtained by the thermal and prompt mechanisms, but its global contribution to NO formation are almost insignificant due to the oxidation reaction with radicals HO 2 .

  15. Biofuels combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Charles K

    2013-01-01

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acids and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. Research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly.

  16. Manifold methods for methane combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, B.; Pope, S.B. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Great progresses have been made in combustion research, especially, the computation of laminar flames and the probability density function (PDF) method in turbulent combustion. For one-dimensional laminar flames, by considering the transport mechanism, the detailed chemical kinetic mechanism and the interactions between these two basic processes, today it is a routine matter to calculate flame velocities, extinction, ignition, temperature, and species distributions from the governing equations. Results are in good agreement with those obtained for experiments. However, for turbulent combustion, because of the complexities of turbulent flow, chemical reactions, and the interaction between them, in the foreseeable future, it is impossible to calculate the combustion flow field by directly integrating the basic governing equations. So averaging and modeling are necessary in turbulent combustion studies. Averaging, on one hand, simplifies turbulent combustion calculations, on the other hand, it introduces the infamous closure problems, especially the closure problem with chemical reaction terms. Since in PDF calculations of turbulent combustion, the averages of the chemical reaction terms can be calculated, PDF methods overcome the closure problem with the reaction terms. It has been shown that the PDF method is a most promising method to calculate turbulent combustion. PDF methods have been successfully employed to calculate laboratory turbulent flames: they can predict phenomena such as super equilibrium radical levels, and local extinction. Because of these advantages, PDF methods are becoming used increasingly in industry combustor codes.

  17. Circuit Mechanisms Governing Local vs. Global Motion Processing in Mouse Visual Cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Yonehara, Keisuke

    2017-01-01

    components represented by component direction-selective (CDS) cells. However, how PDS and CDS cells develop their distinct response properties is still unresolved. The visual cortex of the mouse is an attractive model for experimentally solving this issue due to the large molecular and genetic toolbox...... literature on global motion processing based on works in primates and mice. Lastly, we propose what types of experiments could illuminate what circuit mechanisms are governing cortical global visual motion processing. We propose that PDS cells in mouse visual cortex appear as the perfect arena...

  18. Indirect Effects of Global Change: From Physiological and Behavioral Mechanisms to Ecological Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Alex R; Tsukimura, Brian; Stillman, Jonathon H

    2017-07-01

    A major focus of current ecological research is to understand how global change makes species vulnerable to extirpation. To date, mechanistic ecophysiological analyses of global change vulnerability have focused primarily on the direct effects of changing abiotic conditions on whole-organism physiological traits, such as metabolic rate, locomotor performance, cardiac function, and critical thermal limits. However, species do not live in isolation within their physical environments, and direct effects of climate change are likely to be compounded by indirect effects that result from altered interactions with other species, such as competitors and predators. The Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology 2017 Symposium "Indirect Effects of Global Change: From Physiological and Behavioral Mechanisms to Ecological Consequences" was designed to synthesize multiple approaches to investigating the indirect effects of global change by bringing together researchers that study the indirect effects of global change from multiple perspectives across habitat, type of anthropogenic change, and level of biological organization. Our goal in bringing together researchers from different backgrounds was to foster cross-disciplinary insights into the mechanistic bases and higher-order ecological consequences of indirect effects of global change, and to promote collaboration among fields. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulio Rosembuj

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available There is no singular globalization, nor is the result of an individual agent. We could start by saying that global action has different angles and subjects who perform it are different, as well as its objectives. The global is an invisible invasion of materials and immediate effects.

  20. Globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Tulio Rosembuj

    2006-01-01

    There is no singular globalization, nor is the result of an individual agent. We could start by saying that global action has different angles and subjects who perform it are different, as well as its objectives. The global is an invisible invasion of materials and immediate effects.

  1. Mechanisms of spray formation and combustion from a multi-hole injector with E85 and gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleiferis, P.G.; Serras-Pereira, J.; van Romunde, Z. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London (United Kingdom); Caine, J. [Ford Motor Company, Dunton Engineering Centre (United Kingdom); Wirth, M. [Ford Werke GmbH, Merkenich, Cologne (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    The spray formation and combustion characteristics of gasoline and E85 (85% ethanol, 15% gasoline) have been investigated using a multi-hole injector with asymmetric nozzle-hole arrangement. Experiments were carried out in a quiescent optical chamber using high-speed shadowgraphy (9 kHz) to characterise the spray sensitivity to both injector temperature and ambient pressure in the range of 20-120 C and 0.5, 1.0 bar. Spray-tip penetrations and 'umbrella' spray cone angles were calculated for all conditions. Phase Doppler Anemometry was also used to measure droplet sizes in the core of one of the spray plumes, 25 mm below the injector tip. To study the effect of fuel properties on vaporisation and mixture preparation under realistic operating conditions, a separate set of experiments was carried out in a direct-injection spark-ignition optical engine. The engine was run at 1500 RPM under cold and fully warmed-up conditions (20 C and 90 C) at part load and full load (0.5 and 1.0 bar intake pressure). Floodlit laser Mie-scattering images of the sprays on two orthogonal planes corresponding to the swirl and tumble planes of in-cylinder flow motion were acquired to study the full injection event and post-injection mixing stage. These were used to make comparisons with the static chamber sprays and to quantify the liquid-to-vapour phase evaporation process for both fuels by calculating the projected 'footprint' of the sprays at different conditions. Analysis of the macroscopic structure and turbulent primary break-up properties of the sprays was undertaken in light of jet exit conditions described in terms of non-dimensional numbers. The effects on stoichiometric combustion were investigated by imaging the natural flame chemiluminescence through the engine's piston crown (swirl plane) and by post-processing to derive flame growth rates and trajectories of flame motion. (author)

  2. Methods of Assessing the Resource of the Crankshaft Bearing of Internal Combustion Engine Based on the Calculation of Hydro-Mechanical Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.G. Levanov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to develop a tool to assess the theoretical resource crankshaft bearings of internal combustion engine. As a result, two methods for evaluating of the theoretical resource crankshaft bearings have been developed on the basis of the calculation of hydro-mechanical characteristics of bearings: the minimum film thickness and the extent of the zone of boundary friction. Under the theoretical resource of crankshaft bearing it is understood that during his work an increase of the radial clearance in the area of potential exposure (boundary friction is over the limit. The first technique is based on the bearing life dependence on the ratio between the minimum film thickness and its maximum allowable value. The second technique is based on the molecular-mechanical theory of friction and wear fatigue theory. Thus, these techniques may be used to estimate the resource of the crankshaft journal bearings at the design and finishing stage. However, some parameters of mathematical models have to be determined from the experimental test. The use of molecular-mechanical theory of friction and wear fatigue theory takes into account the influence of the physical and mechanical properties of a bearing material on his life.

  3. Physical mechanisms of spring and summertime drought related with the global warming over the northern America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, W.; Kim, K. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Drought during the growing season (spring through summer) is severe natural hazard in the large cropland over the northern America. It is important to understand how the drought is related with the global warming and how it will change in the future. This study aims to investigate the physical mechanism of global warming impact on the spring and summertime drought over the northern America using Cyclostationary Empirical Orthogonal Function (CSEOF) analysis. The Northern Hemisphere surface warming, the most dominant mode of the surface air temperature, has resulted in decreased relative humidity and precipitation over the mid-latitude region of North America. For the viewpoint of atmospheric water demand, soil moisture and evaporation have also decreased significantly, exacerbating vulnerability of drought. These consistent features of changes in water demand and supply related with the global warming can provide a possibility of credible insight for future drought change.

  4. The Mechanism of Russian Nanoindustry Development Caused by Globalization: Methods and Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avtonomova Oksana Alekseevna

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Establishing the effective mechanism of the Russian nanoindustry functioning by means of globalization benefits is one of the most important factors of raising the national economy competitiveness in the context of transition to a new technological way. Nanotechnologies is one of the key factors of this new way. The mechanism of nanoindustrial development of the Russian Federation caused by globalization is characterized in the article as a way of task-oriented implementation and management of the global nanotechnology industry development on the basis of cooperation of entities at different levels of the global economic system using the appropriate methods, tools, resources and communication channels, factors and capitals. The mechanism aims at adjusting the described contradictions faced by Russian entities in their business activities in the sphere of production, consumption and promotion of nanotechnologies, nanogoods and nanoservices. Within the framework of a theoretical research the author proposes the classification of methods and tools for the development of the Russian nanoindustry through the international cooperation by the criteria of economic functions: planning, institution, organization, management, investment, finance, information, analysis, control – all aimed at promoting the unification of concepts and actions of collaborating entities in the sphere of nanotechnology. The developed methodology of the international nanoindustrial interaction of Russian entities includes the result-oriented, institutional, organizational, budgetary, investment, tax, informative, and administrative methods, as well as analysis, audit, accounting and evaluation. Besides, the article proves the feasibility of marketing tools application in the sphere of nanoindustrial cooperation aimed at developing a more efficient strategy of promoting products with nanofeatures to the global market.

  5. Improved dehydriding property of polyvinylpyrrolidone coated Mg-Ni hydrogen storage nano-composite prepared by hydriding combustion synthesis and wet mechanical milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linglong Yao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP coated Mg95Ni5 nano-composites were prepared by hydriding combustion synthesis (HCS plus wet mechanical milling (WM with tetrahydrofuran (THF and donated as WM-x wt% PVP (x = 1, 3, 5 and 7 respectively. The phase compositions, microstructures and dehydriding property, as well as the co-effect of PVP and THF were investigated in detail. XRD results showed that the average crystal size of MgH2 in the milled Mg95Ni5 decreased from 23 nm without PVP to 18 nm with 1 wt% PVP. The peak temperature of dehydrogenation of MgH2 in the milled Mg95Ni5 decreased from 293.0 °C without THF to 250.4 °C with THF. The apparent activation energy for decomposition of MgH2 in WM-7 wt% PVP was estimated to be 66.94 kJ/mol, which is 37.70 kJ/mol lower than that of milled Mg95Ni5 without THF and PVP. PVP and THF can facilitate the refinement of particle size during mechanical milling process. Attributed to small particle sizes and synergistic effect of PVP and THF, the composites exhibit markedly improved dehydriding properties. Keywords: Mg-Ni-PVP, Composite, Mg-based alloy, Wet mechanical milling, Dehydriding temperature

  6. Globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Andru?cã Maria Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The field of globalization has highlighted an interdependence implied by a more harmonious understanding determined by the daily interaction between nations through the inducement of peace and the management of streamlining and the effectiveness of the global economy. For the functioning of the globalization, the developing countries that can be helped by the developed ones must be involved. The international community can contribute to the institution of the development environment of the gl...

  7. CSP-based chemical kinetics mechanisms simplification strategy for non-premixed combustion: An application to hybrid rocket propulsion

    KAUST Repository

    Ciottoli, Pietro P.; Malpica Galassi, Riccardo; Lapenna, Pasquale E.; Leccese, G.; Bianchi, D.; Nasuti, F.; Creta, F.; Valorani, M.

    2017-01-01

    A set of simplified chemical kinetics mechanisms for hybrid rocket applications using gaseous oxygen (GOX) and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) is proposed. The starting point is a 561-species, 2538-reactions, detailed chemical kinetics

  8. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) produced in the combustion of fatty acid alkyl esters from different feedstocks: Quantification, statistical analysis and mechanisms of formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas, Alberto; Al-Lal, Ana-María; García-Martínez, María-Jesús; Ortega, Marcelo F; Llamas, Juan F; Lapuerta, Magín; Canoira, Laureano

    2017-05-15

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants of concern due to their carcinogenic and mutagenic activity. Their emissions are mainly related with the combustion or pyrolysis of the organic matter, such as in fossil fuels combustion. It is important to characterize PAHs in the combustions of biofuels due to their increasing importance in the actual energetic setting. There is a lot of research focused in PAHs emission due to the combustion in diesel engines; but only few of them have analyzed the effect of raw material and type of alcohol used in the transesterification process. Different raw materials (i.e. animal fat, palm, rapeseed, linseed, peanut, coconut, and soybean oils) have been used for obtaining FAME and FAEE. A method for measuring PAHs generated during combustion in a bomb calorimeter has been developed. Combustion was made at different oxygen pressures and the samples were taken from the bomb after each combustion. Samples were extracted and the PAHs amounts formed during combustion were analyzed by GC-MS. This research shows the statistical relationships among the 16 PAHs of concern, biodiesel composition and oxygen pressure during combustion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Alcohol combustion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2014-10-01

    , also emphasizing advanced engine concepts. Research results addressing combustion reaction mechanisms have been reported based on results from pyrolysis and oxidation reactors, shock tubes, rapid compression machines, and research engines. This work is complemented by the development of detailed combustion models with the support of chemical kinetics and quantum chemistry. This paper seeks to provide an introduction to and overview of recent results on alcohol combustion by highlighting pertinent aspects of this rich and rapidly increasing body of information. As such, this paper provides an initial source of references and guidance regarding the present status of combustion experiments on alcohols and models of alcohol combustion. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Tubular combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    Tubular combustors are cylindrical tubes where flame ignition and propagation occur in a spatially confined, highly controlled environment, in a nearly flat, elongated geometry. This allows for some unique advantages where extremely even heat dispersion is required over a large surface while still maintaining fuel efficiency. Tubular combustors also allow for easy flexibility in type of fuel source, allowing for quick changeover to meet various needs and changing fuel pricing. This new addition to the MP sustainable energy series will provide the most up-to-date research on tubular combustion--some of it only now coming out of private proprietary protection. Plentiful examples of current applications along with a good explanation of background theory will offer readers an invaluable guide on this promising energy technology. Highlights include: * An introduction to the theory of tubular flames * The "how to" of maintaining stability of tubular flames through continuous combustion * Examples of both small-scal...

  11. A mechanism for land-ocean contrasts in global monsoon trends in a warming climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasullo, J. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, CAS/NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-09-15

    A central paradox of the global monsoon record involves reported decreases in rainfall over land during an era in which the global hydrologic cycle is both expected and observed to intensify. It is within this context that this work develops a physical basis for both interpreting the observed record and anticipating changes in the monsoons in a warming climate while bolstering the concept of the global monsoon in the context of shared feedbacks. The global-land monsoon record across multiple reanalyses is first assessed. Trends that in other studies have been taken as real are shown to likely be spurious as a result of changes in the assimilated data streams both prior to and during the satellite era. Nonetheless, based on satellite estimates, robust increases in monsoon rainfall over ocean do exist and a physical basis for this land-ocean contrast remains lacking. To address the contrast's causes, simulated trends are therefore assessed. While projections of total rainfall are inconsistent across models, the robust land-ocean contrast identified in observations is confirmed. A feedback mechanism is proposed rooted in the facts that land areas warm disproportionately relative to ocean, and onshore flow is the chief source of monsoonal moisture. Reductions in lower tropospheric relative humidity over land domains are therefore inevitable and these have direct consequences for the monsoonal convective environment including an increase in the lifting condensation level and a shift in the distribution of convection generally towards less frequent and potentially more intense events. The mechanism is interpreted as an important modulating influence on the ''rich-get-richer'' mechanism. Caveats for regional monsoons exist and are discussed. (orig.)

  12. GTSO: Global Trace Synchronization and Ordering Mechanism for Wireless Sensor Network Monitoring Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonastre, Alberto; Ors, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring is one of the best ways to evaluate the behavior of computer systems. When the monitored system is a distributed system—such as a wireless sensor network (WSN)—the monitoring operation must also be distributed, providing a distributed trace for further analysis. The temporal sequence of occurrence of the events registered by the distributed monitoring platform (DMP) must be correctly established to provide cause-effect relationships between them, so the logs obtained in different monitor nodes must be synchronized. Many of synchronization mechanisms applied to DMPs consist in adjusting the internal clocks of the nodes to the same value as a reference time. However, these mechanisms can create an incoherent event sequence. This article presents a new method to achieve global synchronization of the traces obtained in a DMP. It is based on periodic synchronization signals that are received by the monitor nodes and logged along with the recorded events. This mechanism processes all traces and generates a global post-synchronized trace by scaling all times registered proportionally according with the synchronization signals. It is intended to be a simple but efficient offline mechanism. Its application in a WSN-DMP demonstrates that it guarantees a correct ordering of the events, avoiding the aforementioned issues. PMID:29295494

  13. GTSO: Global Trace Synchronization and Ordering Mechanism for Wireless Sensor Network Monitoring Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navia, Marlon; Campelo, José Carlos; Bonastre, Alberto; Ors, Rafael

    2017-12-23

    Monitoring is one of the best ways to evaluate the behavior of computer systems. When the monitored system is a distributed system-such as a wireless sensor network (WSN)-the monitoring operation must also be distributed, providing a distributed trace for further analysis. The temporal sequence of occurrence of the events registered by the distributed monitoring platform (DMP) must be correctly established to provide cause-effect relationships between them, so the logs obtained in different monitor nodes must be synchronized. Many of synchronization mechanisms applied to DMPs consist in adjusting the internal clocks of the nodes to the same value as a reference time. However, these mechanisms can create an incoherent event sequence. This article presents a new method to achieve global synchronization of the traces obtained in a DMP. It is based on periodic synchronization signals that are received by the monitor nodes and logged along with the recorded events. This mechanism processes all traces and generates a global post-synchronized trace by scaling all times registered proportionally according with the synchronization signals. It is intended to be a simple but efficient offline mechanism. Its application in a WSN-DMP demonstrates that it guarantees a correct ordering of the events, avoiding the aforementioned issues.

  14. Development and validation of a generic reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for CFD spray combustion modelling of biodiesel fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Xinwei; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Ho, Jee Hou

    2015-01-01

    In this reported work, a generic reduced biodiesel chemical kinetic mechanism, with components of methyl decanoate (C11H22O2, MD), methyl-9-decenoate (C11H20O2, MD9D) and n-heptane (C7H16) was built to represent the methyl esters of coconut, palm, rapeseed and soybean. The reduced biodiesel...... and detailed mechanism predictions, for each zero-dimensional (0D) auto-ignition and extinction process using CHEMKIN-PRO. Maximum percentage errors of less than 40.0% were recorded when the predicted ignition delay (ID) periods for coconut, palm, rapeseed and soybean methyl esters were compared to those...

  15. Plasma Assisted Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-28

    Tracking an individual streamer branch among others in a pulsed induced discharge J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 35 2823--9 [29] van Veldhuizen E M and Rutgers...2005) AIAA–2005–0405. [99] E.M. Van Veldhuizen (ed) Electrical Discharges for Environmental Purposes: Fun- damentals and Applications (New York: Nova...Vandooren J, Van Tiggelen P J 1977 Reaction Mechanism and Rate Constants in Lean Hydrogen–Nitrous Oxide Flames Combust. Flame 28 165 [201] Dean A M, Steiner

  16. Application of Detailed Chemical Kinetics to Combustion Instability Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-04

    Clearance Number 15692 Clearance Date 12/3/2015 14. ABSTRACT A comparison of a single step global reaction and the detailed GRI -Mech 1.2 for combustion...comparison of a single step global reaction and the detailed GRI -Mech 1.2 for com- bustion instability modeling in a methane-fueled longitudinal-mode...methane as the fuel. We use the GRI -Mech 1.2 kinetics mechanism for methane oxidation.11 The GRI -Mech 1.2 was chosen over 2.11 because the only

  17. Combustion instability control in the model of combustion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmadullin, A N; Ahmethanov, E N; Iovleva, O V; Mitrofanov, G A

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study of the influence of external periodic perturbations on the instability of the combustion chamber in a pulsating combustion. As an external periodic disturbances were used sound waves emitted by the electrodynamics. The purpose of the study was to determine the possibility of using the method of external periodic perturbation to control the combustion instability. The study was conducted on a specially created model of the combustion chamber with a swirl burner in the frequency range from 100 to 1400 Hz. The study found that the method of external periodic perturbations may be used to control combustion instability. Depending on the frequency of the external periodic perturbation is observed as an increase and decrease in the amplitude of the oscillations in the combustion chamber. These effects are due to the mechanisms of synchronous and asynchronous action. External periodic disturbance generated in the path feeding the gaseous fuel, showing the high efficiency of the method of management in terms of energy costs. Power required to initiate periodic disturbances (50 W) is significantly smaller than the thermal capacity of the combustion chamber (100 kW)

  18. Carbon Disulfide (CS2) Mechanisms in Formation of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Formation from Unconventional Shale Gas Extraction and Processing Operations and Global Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Alisa L; Patel, Jay T

    2015-01-01

    Carbon disulfide (CS2) has been historically associated with the production of rayon, cellophane, and carbon tetrachloride. This study identifies multiple mechanisms by which CS2 contributes to the formation of CO2 in the atmosphere. CS2 and other associated sulfide compounds were found by this study to be present in emissions from unconventional shale gas extraction and processing (E&P) operations. The breakdown products of CS2; carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon monoxide (CO), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are indirect greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to CO2 levels in the atmosphere. The heat-trapping nature of CO2 has been found to increase the surface temperature, resulting in regional and global climate change. The purpose of this study is to identify five mechanisms by which CS2 and the breakdown products of CS2 contribute to atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The five mechanisms of CO2 formation are as follows: Chemical Interaction of CS2 and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) present in natural gas at high temperatures, resulting in CO2 formation;Combustion of CS2 in the presence of oxygen producing SO2 and CO2;Photolysis of CS2 leading to the formation of COS, CO, and SO2, which are indirect contributors to CO2 formation;One-step hydrolysis of CS2, producing reactive intermediates and ultimately forming H2S and CO2;Two-step hydrolysis of CS2 forming the reactive COS intermediate that reacts with an additional water molecule, ultimately forming H2S and CO2. CS2 and COS additionally are implicated in the formation of SO2 in the stratosphere and/or troposphere. SO2 is an indirect contributor to CO2 formation and is implicated in global climate change.

  19. Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plum, Maja

    Globalization is often referred to as external to education - a state of affair facing the modern curriculum with numerous challenges. In this paper it is examined as internal to curriculum; analysed as a problematization in a Foucaultian sense. That is, as a complex of attentions, worries, ways...... of reasoning, producing curricular variables. The analysis is made through an example of early childhood curriculum in Danish Pre-school, and the way the curricular variable of the pre-school child comes into being through globalization as a problematization, carried forth by the comparative practices of PISA...

  20. Globalization

    OpenAIRE

    F. Gerard Adams

    2008-01-01

    The rapid globalization of the world economy is causing fundamental changes in patterns of trade and finance. Some economists have argued that globalization has arrived and that the world is “flat†. While the geographic scope of markets has increased, the author argues that new patterns of trade and finance are a result of the discrepancies between “old†countries and “new†. As the differences are gradually wiped out, particularly if knowledge and technology spread worldwide, the t...

  1. Circuit Mechanisms Governing Local vs. Global Motion Processing in Mouse Visual Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Rasmussen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A withstanding question in neuroscience is how neural circuits encode representations and perceptions of the external world. A particularly well-defined visual computation is the representation of global object motion by pattern direction-selective (PDS cells from convergence of motion of local components represented by component direction-selective (CDS cells. However, how PDS and CDS cells develop their distinct response properties is still unresolved. The visual cortex of the mouse is an attractive model for experimentally solving this issue due to the large molecular and genetic toolbox available. Although mouse visual cortex lacks the highly ordered orientation columns of primates, it is organized in functional sub-networks and contains striate- and extrastriate areas like its primate counterparts. In this Perspective article, we provide an overview of the experimental and theoretical literature on global motion processing based on works in primates and mice. Lastly, we propose what types of experiments could illuminate what circuit mechanisms are governing cortical global visual motion processing. We propose that PDS cells in mouse visual cortex appear as the perfect arena for delineating and solving how individual sensory features extracted by neural circuits in peripheral brain areas are integrated to build our rich cohesive sensory experiences.

  2. Construction of combustion models for rapeseed methyl ester bio-diesel fuel for internal combustion engine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovitchev, Valeri I; Yang, Junfeng

    2009-01-01

    Bio-diesel fuels are non-petroleum-based diesel fuels consisting of long chain alkyl esters produced by the transesterification of vegetable oils, that are intended for use (neat or blended with conventional fuels) in unmodified diesel engines. There have been few reports of studies proposing theoretical models for bio-diesel combustion simulations. In this study, we developed combustion models based on ones developed previously. We compiled the liquid fuel properties, and the existing detailed mechanism of methyl butanoate ester (MB, C(5)H(10)O(2)) oxidation was supplemented by sub-mechanisms for two proposed fuel constituent components, C(7)H(16) and C(7)H(8)O (and then, by mp2d, C(4)H(6)O(2) and propyne, C(3)H(4)) to represent the combustion model for rapeseed methyl ester described by the chemical formula, C(19)H(34)O(2) (or C(19)H(36)O(2)). The main fuel vapor thermal properties were taken as those of methyl palmitate C(19)H(36)O(2) in the NASA polynomial form of the Burcat database. The special global reaction was introduced to "crack" the main fuel into its constituent components. This general reaction included 309 species and 1472 reactions, including soot and NO(x) formation processes. The detailed combustion mechanism was validated using shock-tube ignition-delay data under diesel engine conditions. For constant volume and diesel engine (Volvo D12C) combustion modeling, this mechanism could be reduced to 88 species participating in 363 reactions.

  3. Aerosols from biomass combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T.

    2001-07-01

    This report is the proceedings of a seminar on biomass combustion and aerosol production organised jointly by the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Task 32 on bio energy and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). This collection of 16 papers discusses the production of aerosols and fine particles by the burning of biomass and their effects. Expert knowledge on the environmental impact of aerosols, formation mechanisms, measurement technologies, methods of analysis and measures to be taken to reduce such emissions is presented. The seminar, visited by 50 participants from 11 countries, shows, according to the authors, that the reduction of aerosol emissions resulting from biomass combustion will remain a challenge for the future.

  4. Mechanism of ENSO influence on the South Asian monsoon rainfall in global model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Sneh; Kar, Sarat C.

    2018-02-01

    Coupled ocean atmosphere global climate models are increasingly being used for seasonal scale simulation of the South Asian monsoon. In these models, sea surface temperatures (SSTs) evolve as coupled air-sea interaction process. However, sensitivity experiments with various SST forcing can only be done in an atmosphere-only model. In this study, the Global Forecast System (GFS) model at T126 horizontal resolution has been used to examine the mechanism of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) forcing on the monsoon circulation and rainfall. The model has been integrated (ensemble) with observed, climatological and ENSO SST forcing to document the mechanism on how the South Asian monsoon responds to basin-wide SST variations in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. The model simulations indicate that the internal variability gets modulated by the SSTs with warming in the Pacific enhancing the ensemble spread over the monsoon region as compared to cooling conditions. Anomalous easterly wind anomalies cover the Indian region both at 850 and 200 hPa levels during El Niño years. The locations and intensity of Walker and Hadley circulations are altered due to ENSO SST forcing. These lead to reduction of monsoon rainfall over most parts of India during El Niño events compared to La Niña conditions. However, internally generated variability is a major source of uncertainty in the model-simulated climate.

  5. The influence of charge stratification on the spectral signature of partially premixed combustion in a light-duty optical engine

    KAUST Repository

    Najafabadi, M. Izadi

    2017-03-25

    The origin of light emission during low-temperature combustion in a light-duty IC engine is investigated by high-speed spectroscopy in both HCCI and PPC regimes. Chemiluminescence and thermal radiation are expected to be the dominant sources of light emission during combustion. A method has been developed to distinguish chemiluminescence from thermal radiation, and different chemiluminescing species could be identified. Different combustion modes and global equivalence ratios are analyzed in this manner. The results indicate that the spectral signature (270–540 nm range) of the combustion is highly dependent on the stratification level. A significant broadband chemiluminescence signal is detected and superimposed on all spectra. This broadband chemiluminescence signal can reach up to 100 percent of the total signal in HCCI combustion, while it drops to around 80 percent for stratified combustion (PPC). We show that this broadband signal can be used as a measure for the heat release rate. The broadband chemiluminescence did also correlate with the equivalence ratio quite well in both HCCI and PPC regimes, suggesting that the total emission in the spectral region of 330–400 nm can serve as a proxy of equivalence ratio and the rate of heat release. Regarding C2* chemiluminescence, we see two different chemical mechanisms for formation of C2* in the PPC regime: first during the early stage of combustion by the breakup of bigger molecules and the second during the late stage of combustion when soot particles are forming.

  6. Global thermo-mechanical effects from a KBS-3 type repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakami, E.; Olofsson, Stig-Olof

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study has been to identify the global thermo-mechanical effects in the bedrock hosting a nuclear waste repository. Numerical thermo-mechanical modeling using distinct element models was performed. The number of fracture zones, the heat intensity of the waste, the material properties of the rock mass and the boundary conditions of the models were varied. Different models for multi-level repositories were also analyzed and compared to the main single-level case. Further, the global influence from the excavation of repository tunnels and deposition holes was examined by introducing weaker rock mass material properties in the repository region of one model. The maximum compression stress obtained for the main model is 44 MPa and occurs at the repository level after about 100 years of deposition. Due to thermal expansion, the rock mass displaces upward, and the maximum heave at the ground surface after 1000 years is calculated to be 16 cm. In the area close to the ground surface the horizontal stresses reduce, causing the rock to yield in tension down to a depth of about 80 meters. The fracture zones show opening displacements at shallow depths and closing and shearing at the repository level. The maximum displacements are 0.3-2.5 cm for closing, 0.0-0.8 cm for opening and 0.2-2.2 cm for shearing. The resultant stresses and displacements depend in large part on the assumptions made concerning the heat intensity of the waste. In the main model, an initial heat intensity of 10 W/m 2 is assumed, which gives larger effects than the case with 6 W/m 2 . Another important input parameter for the analysis is the Young's modulus of the rock mass. In the main model, a value of 30 GPa is assumed. Higher values of Young's modulus give larger thermo-mechanical effects. All multi-level repository layouts give rise to higher temperatures than the single-level layout, causing the compressive stresses to increase more at the repository level. The multi

  7. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  8. Combustion Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Combustion Research Laboratory facilitates the development of new combustion systems or improves the operation of existing systems to meet the Army's mission for...

  9. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  10. A Study on Partnering Mechanism in B to B EC Server for Global Supply Chain Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaihara, Toshiya

    B to B Electronic Commerce (EC) technology is now in progress and regarded as an information infrastructure for global business. As the number and diversity of EC participants grows at the agile environment, the complexity of purchasing from a vast and dynamic array of goods and services needs to be hidden from the end user. Putting the complexity into the EC system instead means providing flexible auction server for enabling commerce within different business units. Market mechanism could solve the product distribution problem in the auction server by allocating the scheduled resources according to market prices. In this paper, we propose a partnering mechanism for B to B EC with market-oriented programming that mediates amongst unspecified various companies in the trade, and demonstrate the applicability of the economic analysis to this framework after constructing a primitive EC server. The proposed mechanism facilitates sophisticated B to B EC, which conducts a Pareto optimal solution for all the participating business units in the coming agile era.

  11. Transport, mechanical and global migration data of multilayer copolyamide nanocomposite films with different layouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfato, P; Garofalo, E; Di Maio, L; Incarnato, L

    2017-06-01

    Transport, mechanical and global migration data concern multilayer food packaging films with different layouts, all incorporating a layered silicate/polyamide nanocomposite as oxygen barrier layer, and a low-density polyethylene (LDPE) as moisture resistant layer in direct contact with food. The data are related to "Tuning of co-extrusion processing conditions and film layout to optimize the performances of PA/PE multilayer nanocomposite films for food packaging" by Garofalo et al. (2017) [1]. Nanocomposite multilayer films, with different relative layer thicknesses and clay types, were produced using a laboratory scale co-extrusion blown-film equipment and were analyzed in terms of transport to oxygen and water vapor, mechanical properties and overall migration. The results have shown that all the multilayer hybrid films, based on the copolyamide layer filled with Cloisite 30B, displayed the most significant oxygen barrier improvements and the best mechanical properties compared to the unfilled films. No significant alteration of the overall migration values was observed, as expectable [2], [3], [4]. The performance improvement was more relevant in the case of the film with the thinner nanocomposite layer.

  12. Theoretical study of stability and reaction mechanism of CuO supported on ZrO{sub 2} during chemical looping combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Minjun; Liu, Jing, E-mail: liujing27@mail.hust.edu.cn; Shen, Fenghua; Cheng, Hao; Dai, Jinxin; Long, Yan

    2016-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The stability and reaction mechanism of CuO supported on ZrO{sub 2} were studied by DFT. • ZrO{sub 2} provides a high resistance to CuO sintering. • ZrO{sub 2} promotes the activity of CuO for CO oxidation in fuel reactor. • The energy barriers are low enough for CuO/ZrO{sub 2} oxidation reaction in air reactor. - Abstract: The addition of inert support is important for the Cu-based oxygen carrier used in chemical looping combustion (CLC). The effects of the ZrO{sub 2} support on the stability and reactivity of Cu-based oxygen carrier were investigated using the density functional theory (DFT). First, the sintering inhibition mechanism of ZrO{sub 2} that support active CuO was investigated. The optimized Cu{sub 4}O{sub 4}/ZrO{sub 2} structure showed a strong interaction occurred between the Cu{sub 4}O{sub 4} cluster and ZrO{sub 2}(1 0 1) surface. The interaction prevented the migration and agglomeration of CuO. Next, the adsorption of CO on Cu{sub 4}O{sub 4}/ZrO{sub 2} and the mechanism of the CuO/ZrO{sub 2} reduction by CO were studied. CO mainly chemisorbed on the Cu site and ZrO{sub 2} acted as an electron donor in the adsorption system. The energy barrier of CuO/ZrO{sub 2} reduction by CO (0.79 eV) was much lower than that of the pure CuO cluster (1.44 eV), indicating that ZrO{sub 2} had a positive effect on CuO/ZrO{sub 2} reduction by CO. After CO was oxidized in the fuel reactor, the CuO was reduced into Cu. The adsorption of O{sub 2} on Cu{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} and the most likely pathway of Cu{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} oxidation by O{sub 2} were investigated. The adsorption of O{sub 2} was found a strong chemisorption behavior. The energy barriers were low enough for the Cu-based oxygen carrier oxidation reaction.

  13. An alternative mechanism for international health aid: evaluating a Global Social Protection Fund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; McKee, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Several public health groups have called for the creation of a global fund for 'social protection'-a fund that produces the international equivalent of domestic tax collection and safety net systems to finance care for the ill and disabled and related health costs. All participating countries would pay into a global fund based on a metric of their ability to pay and withdraw from the common pool based on a metric of their need for funds. We assessed how alternative strategies and metrics by which to operate such a fund would affect its size and impact on health system financing. Using a mathematical model, we found that common targets for health funding in low-income countries require higher levels of aid expenditures than presently distributed. Some mechanisms exist that may incentivize reduction of domestic health inequalities, and direct most funds towards the poorest populations. Payments from high-income countries are also likely to decrease over time as middle-income countries' economies grow.

  14. Formation and destruction mechanisms of nitrogen oxides during coal combustion in circulating fluidized beds; Mecanismes de formation et de destruction des oxydes d`azote lors de la combustion du charbon en lit fluidise circulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrel, G.; Lecuyer, I. [Universite du Haut-Rhin, 68 - Mulhouse (France)

    1997-01-01

    Formation and reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO and N{sub 2}O) during coal combustion in a circulating fluidized bed (CFBC) are very complicated and yet badly known. The aim of the present study was to better characterize these phenomena on a small-sized experimental unit (reactor diameter: 5 cm), with the possibility to re-inject the solids in the bottom of the furnace, as in a real industrial unit. This should allow then to develop a numerical set of chemical reactions involving the nitrogen oxides. The experimental results showed that coal ash plays a great role in reducing nitrogen oxides, the determining parameter being the quantity of unburnt carbon remaining in the ash. The study then detailed the interaction between nitrogen oxides and de-volatilized (char) according to the temperature, NO{sub x} concentration and the mass of solid. In the absence of oxygen small quantities of char can very significantly reduce NO as well as N{sub 2}O. It was possible to establish destruction kinetics on these particles, and orders of reaction could be determined versus the NO{sub x} concentration and the char particle mass (heterogeneous phase chemical reactions). Then, the coal pyrolysis study enabled to identify the products released during coal devolatilization and thermogravimetric analyses displayed several successive weight losses due CO, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} releases, during a linear temperature increase. Lastly coal combustion was studied in the small pilot with variable experimental conditions. Using the previous experimental was studied in the small pilot with variable experimental conditions. Using the previous experimental results, a model was developed to calculate NO{sub x} concentrations during the coal combustion and validated. The NO and N{sub 2}O contents calculated are thoroughly correlated with the experimental data whatever the injection carbon/oxygen ratio is. (author) 96 refs.

  15. Modeling and simulation of combustion chamber and propellant dynamics and issues in active control of combustion instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isella, Giorgio Carlo

    A method for a comprehensive approach to analysis of the dynamics of an actively controlled combustion chamber, with detailed analysis of the combustion models for the case of a solid rocket propellant, is presented here. The objective is to model the system as interconnected blocks describing the dynamics of the chamber, combustion and control. The analytical framework for the analysis of the dynamics of a combustion chamber is based on spatial averaging, as introduced by Culick. Combustion dynamics are analyzed for the case of a solid propellant. Quasi-steady theory is extended to include the dynamics of the gas-phase and also of a surface layer. The models are constructed so that they produce a combustion response function for the solid propellant that can be immediately introduced in the our analytical framework. The principal objective mechanisms responsible for the large sensitivity, observed experimentally, of propellant response to small variations. We show that velocity coupling, and not pressure coupling, has the potential to be the mechanism responsible for that high sensitivity. We also discuss the effect of particulate modeling on the global dynamics of the chamber and revisit the interpretation of the intrinsic stability limit for burning of solid propellants. Active control is also considered. Particular attention is devoted to the effect of time delay (between sensing and actuation); several methods to compensate for it are discussed, with numerical examples based on the approximate analysis produced by our framework. Experimental results are presented for the case of a Dump Combustor. The combustor exhibits an unstable burning mode, defined through the measurement of the pressure trace and shadowgraph imaging. The transition between stable and unstable modes of operation is characterized by the presence of hysteresis, also observed in other experimental works, and hence not a special characteristic of this combustor. Control is introduced in the

  16. Injector tip for an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Tsu Pin; Ye, Wen

    2003-05-20

    This invention relates to a the tip structure of a fuel injector as used in a internal combustion engine. Internal combustion engines using Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) technology require a tip structure that directs fuel spray in a downward direction. This requirement necessitates a tip design that is capable of withstanding mechanical stresses associated with the design.

  17. Rotary combustion device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    Rotary combustion device (1) with rotary combustion chamber (4). Specific measures are taken to provide ignition of a combustible mixture. It is proposed that a hollow tube be provided coaxially with the axis of rotation (6), so that a small part of the mixture is guided into the combustion chamber.

  18. Example Problems in LES Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    Lesieur, M., Turbulence in Fluids , 2nd Revised Ed., Fluid Mechanics and Its Applications, Vol. 1, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston, Massachusetts, 1990...34, Journal of Fluid Mechanics , Vol. 238, 1992, pp. 155-185. 5. Hirsch, C., Numerical Computation of Internal and External Flows, Vol. 2, Computational...reaction mechanisms for the oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels in flames", Combustion Science and Technology, Vol. 27, 1981, pp. 31-43. 14. Spalding, D.B

  19. Mechanical and Combustion Performance of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as an Additive to Paraffin-Based Solid Fuels for Hybrid Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Daniel B.; Boyer, Eric; Wachs, Trevor; Kuo, Kenneth, K.; Koo, Joseph H.; Story, George

    2012-01-01

    Paraffin-based solid fuels for hybrid rocket motor applications are recognized as a fastburning alternative to other fuel binders such as HTPB, but efforts to further improve the burning rate and mechanical properties of paraffin are still necessary. One approach that is considered in this study is to use multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) as an additive to paraffin wax. Carbon nanotubes provide increased electrical and thermal conductivity to the solid-fuel grains to which they are added, which can improve the mass burning rate. Furthermore, the addition of ultra-fine aluminum particles to the paraffin/MWNT fuel grains can enhance regression rate of the solid fuel and the density impulse of the hybrid rocket. The multi-walled carbon nanotubes also present the possibility of greatly improving the mechanical properties (e.g., tensile strength) of the paraffin-based solid-fuel grains. For casting these solid-fuel grains, various percentages of MWNT and aluminum particles will be added to the paraffin wax. Previous work has been published about the dispersion and mixing of carbon nanotubes.1 Another manufacturing method has been used for mixing the MWNT with a phenolic resin for ablative applications, and the manufacturing and mixing processes are well-documented in the literature.2 The cost of MWNT is a small fraction of single-walled nanotubes. This is a scale-up advantage as future applications and projects will require low cost additives to maintain cost effectiveness. Testing of the solid-fuel grains will be conducted in several steps. Dog bone samples will be cast and prepared for tensile testing. The fuel samples will also be analyzed using thermogravimetric analysis and a high-resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM). The SEM will allow for examination of the solid fuel grain for uniformity and consistency. The paraffin-based fuel grains will also be tested using two hybrid rocket test motors located at the Pennsylvania State University s High Pressure

  20. Combustion 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Levasseur; S. Goodstine; J. Ruby; M. Nawaz; C. Senior; F. Robson; S. Lehman; W. Blecher; W. Fugard; A. Rao; A. Sarofim; P. Smith; D. Pershing; E. Eddings; M. Cremer; J. Hurley; G. Weber; M. Jones; M. Collings; D. Hajicek; A. Henderson; P. Klevan; D. Seery; B. Knight; R. Lessard; J. Sangiovanni; A. Dennis; C. Bird; W. Sutton; N. Bornstein; F. Cogswell; C. Randino; S. Gale; Mike Heap

    2001-06-30

    . To achieve these objectives requires a change from complete reliance of coal-fired systems on steam turbines (Rankine cycles) and moving forward to a combined cycle utilizing gas turbines (Brayton cycles) which offer the possibility of significantly greater efficiency. This is because gas turbine cycles operate at temperatures well beyond current steam cycles, allowing the working fluid (air) temperature to more closely approach that of the major energy source, the combustion of coal. In fact, a good figure of merit for a HIPPS design is just how much of the enthalpy from coal combustion is used by the gas turbine. The efficiency of a power cycle varies directly with the temperature of the working fluid and for contemporary gas turbines the optimal turbine inlet temperature is in the range of 2300-2500 F (1260-1371 C). These temperatures are beyond the working range of currently available alloys and are also in the range of the ash fusion temperature of most coals. These two sets of physical properties combine to produce the major engineering challenges for a HIPPS design. The UTRC team developed a design hierarchy to impose more rigor in our approach. Once the size of the plant had been determined by the choice of gas turbine and the matching steam turbine, the design process of the High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) moved ineluctably to a down-fired, slagging configuration. This design was based on two air heaters: one a high temperature slagging Radiative Air Heater (RAH) and a lower temperature, dry ash Convective Air Heater (CAH). The specific details of the air heaters are arrived at by an iterative sequence in the following order:-Starting from the overall Cycle requirements which set the limits for the combustion and heat transfer analysis-The available enthalpy determined the range of materials, ceramics or alloys, which could tolerate the temperatures-Structural Analysis of the designs proved to be the major limitation-Finally the commercialization

  1. Canceling effect: a natural mechanism to reduce the effects of global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Bahar S.; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    The temperature sensitivity of enzymes responsible for organic matter decomposition in soil is crucial for predicting the effects of global warming on the carbon cycle and sequestration. We tested the hypothesis that differences in temperature sensitivity of enzyme kinetic parameters Vmax and Km will lead to a canceling effect: strong reduction of temperature response of catalytic reactions. Short-term temperature response of Vmax and Km of three hydrolytic enzymes responsible for decomposition of cellulose (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase) and hemicelluloses (xylanase) were analyzed in situ from 0 to 40 °C. The apparent activation energy varied between enzymes from 20.7 to 35.2 kJ mol-1 corresponding to the Q10 values of the enzyme activities of 1.4-1.9 (with Vmax-Q10 1.0-2.5 and Km-Q10 0.94-2.3). Temperature response of all tested enzymes fitted well to the Arrhenius equation. Despite that,the fitting of Arrhenius model revealed the non-linear increase of two cellulolytic enzymes activities with two distinct thresholds at 10-15 °C and 25-30 °C, which were less pronounced for xylanase. The nonlinearity between 10 and 15 °C was explained by 30-80% increase in Vmax. At 25-30 °C, however, the abrupt decrease of enzyme-substrate affinity was responsible for non-linear increase of enzyme activities. Our study is the first demonstrating nonlinear response of Vmax and Km to temperature causing canceling effect, which was most strongly pronounced at low substrate concentrations and at temperatures above 15 °C. Under cold climate, however, the regulation of hydrolytic activity by canceling in response to warming is negligible because canceling was never observed below 10 °C. The canceling, therefore, can be considered as natural mechanism reducing the effects of global warming on decomposition of soil organics at moderate temperatures. The non-linearity of enzyme responses to warming and the respective thresholds should therefore be investigated for other enzymes

  2. Reduced NOX combustion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delano, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a method for combusting fuel and oxidant to achieve reduced formation of nitrogen oxides. It comprises: It comprises: heating a combustion zone to a temperature at least equal to 1500 degrees F.; injecting into the heated combustion zone a stream of oxidant at a velocity within the range of from 200 to 1070 feet per second; injecting into the combustion zone, spaced from the oxidant stream, a fuel stream at a velocity such that the ratio of oxidant stream velocity to fuel stream velocity does not exceed 20; aspirating combustion gases into the oxidant stream and thereafter intermixing the aspirated oxidant stream and fuel stream to form a combustible mixture; combusting the combustible mixture to produce combustion gases for the aspiration; and maintaining the fuel stream substantially free from contact with oxidant prior to the intermixture with aspirated oxidant

  3. Introduction to Physics and Chemistry of Combustion Explosion, Flame, Detonation

    CERN Document Server

    Liberman, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Most of the material covered in this book deals with the fundamentals of chemistry and physics of key processes and fundamental mechanisms for various combustion and combustion related phenomena in gaseous combustible mixture. It provides the reader with basic knowledge of burning processes and mechanisms of reaction wave propagation. The combustion of a gas mixture (flame, explosion, detonation) is necessarily accompanied by motion of the gas. The process of combustion is therefore not only a chemical phenomenon but also one of gas dynamics. The material selection focuses on the gas phase and

  4. A multistep damage recognition mechanism for global genomic nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugasawa, K; Okamoto, T; Shimizu, Y; Masutani, C; Iwai, S; Hanaoka, F

    2001-03-01

    A mammalian nucleotide excision repair (NER) factor, the XPC-HR23B complex, can specifically bind to certain DNA lesions and initiate the cell-free repair reaction. Here we describe a detailed analysis of its binding specificity using various DNA substrates, each containing a single defined lesion. A highly sensitive gel mobility shift assay revealed that XPC-HR23B specifically binds a small bubble structure with or without damaged bases, whereas dual incision takes place only when damage is present in the bubble. This is evidence that damage recognition for NER is accomplished through at least two steps; XPC-HR23B first binds to a site that has a DNA helix distortion, and then the presence of injured bases is verified prior to dual incision. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) were hardly recognized by XPC-HR23B, suggesting that additional factors may be required for CPD recognition. Although the presence of mismatched bases opposite a CPD potentiated XPC-HR23B binding, probably due to enhancement of the helix distortion, cell-free excision of such compound lesions was much more efficient than expected from the observed affinity for XPC-HR23B. This also suggests that additional factors and steps are required for the recognition of some types of lesions. A multistep mechanism of this sort may provide a molecular basis for ensuring the high level of damage discrimination that is required for global genomic NER.

  5. Annual Report: Advanced Combustion (30 September 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey [NETL; Richards, George

    2012-09-30

    The Advanced Combustion Project addresses fundamental issues of fire-side and steam-side corrosion and materials performance in oxy-fuel combustion environments and provides an integrated approach into understanding the environmental and mechanical behavior such that environmental degradation can be ameliorated and long-term microstructural stability, and thus, mechanical performance can lead to longer lasting components and extended power plant life. The technical tasks of this effort are Oxy-combustion Environment Characterization, Alloy Modeling and Life Prediction, and Alloy Manufacturing and Process Development.

  6. Experimental and numerical investigation of gas phase freeboard combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jimmy; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Hvid, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    In part 1 of the present work (10.1021/ef900752a), experimental data and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling predictions for velocity field, temperatures, and major species were compared fora 50 kW axisymmetric, non-swirling natural gas Fired combustion setup, constructed to simulate...... the conditions in the freeboard of it grate-fired boiler. Here, in part 2, the ability of CFD to predict volatile N oxidation to NO and N(2) is evaluated. Trace amounts of ammonia were added to the natural gas, and local measurements of NH(3) and NO in the reactor were compared to modeling predictions. Different...... modeling approaches, including global schemes and analytically reduced mechanisms, were tested in the CFD calculations. In addition, the simplified schemes were compared to reference calculations with a detailed mechanism under isothermal plug flow reactor conditions. While none of the global ammonia...

  7. Plant communities as drivers of soil respiration: pathways, mechanisms, and significance for global change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, D. B.; Fisher, R. A.; Wardle, D. A.

    2011-08-01

    Understanding the impacts of plant community characteristics on soil carbon dioxide efflux (R) is a key prerequisite for accurate prediction of the future carbon (C) balance of terrestrial ecosystems under climate change. However, developing a mechanistic understanding of the determinants of R is complicated by the presence of multiple different sources of respiratory C within soil - such as soil microbes, plant roots and their mycorrhizal symbionts - each with their distinct dynamics and drivers. In this review, we synthesize relevant information from a wide spectrum of sources to evaluate the current state of knowledge about plant community effects on R, examine how this information is incorporated into global climate models, and highlight priorities for future research. Despite often large variation amongst studies and methods, several general trends emerge. Mechanisms whereby plants affect R may be grouped into effects on belowground C allocation, aboveground litter properties and microclimate. Within vegetation types, the amount of C diverted belowground, and hence R, may be controlled mainly by the rate of photosynthetic C uptake, while amongst vegetation types this should be more dependent upon the specific C allocation strategies of the plant life form. We make the case that plant community composition, rather than diversity, is usually the dominant control on R in natural systems. Individual species impacts on R may be largest where the species accounts for most of the biomass in the ecosystem, has very distinct traits to the rest of the community and/or modulates the occurrence of major natural disturbances. We show that climate vegetation models incorporate a number of pathways whereby plants can affect R, but that simplifications regarding allocation schemes and drivers of litter decomposition may limit model accuracy. We also suggest that under a warmer future climate, many plant communities may shift towards dominance by fast growing plants which

  8. Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 30 years The Combustion Research Facility (CRF) has served as a national and international leader in combustion science and technology. The need for a...

  9. Alcohol combustion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani; Oß wald, Patrick; Hansen, Nils; Kohse-Hö inghaus, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    . While biofuel production and its use (especially ethanol and biodiesel) in internal combustion engines have been the focus of several recent reviews, a dedicated overview and summary of research on alcohol combustion chemistry is still lacking. Besides

  10. Maximal combustion temperature estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golodova, E; Shchepakina, E

    2006-01-01

    This work is concerned with the phenomenon of delayed loss of stability and the estimation of the maximal temperature of safe combustion. Using the qualitative theory of singular perturbations and canard techniques we determine the maximal temperature on the trajectories located in the transition region between the slow combustion regime and the explosive one. This approach is used to estimate the maximal temperature of safe combustion in multi-phase combustion models

  11. Market-based mechanisms for biodiversity conservation: a review of existing schemes and an outline for a global mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarado Quesada, I.; Hein, L.G.; Weikard, H.P.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous decline of biodiversity over the past decades suggests that efforts to decrease biodiversity loss have been insufficient. One option to deal with this problem is the use of market-based mechanisms for biodiversity conservation. Several studies have analysed such mechanisms individually,

  12. Evaluation of NPP-VIIRS Nighttime Light Data for Mapping Global Fossil Fuel Combustion CO2 Emissions: A Comparison with DMSP-OLS Nighttime Light Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jinpei; Liu, Xiaoping; Li, Xia; Li, Meifang; Li, Wenkai

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the stable light products and radiance calibrated products from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) have been useful for mapping global fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at fine spatial resolution. However, few studies on this subject were conducted with the new-generation nighttime light data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Satellite, which has a higher spatial resolution and a wider radiometric detection range than the traditional DMSP-OLS nighttime light data. Therefore, this study performed the first evaluation of the potential of NPP-VIIRS data in estimating the spatial distributions of global CO2 emissions (excluding power plant emissions). Through a disaggregating model, three global emission maps were then derived from population counts and three different types of nighttime lights data (NPP-VIIRS, the stable light data and radiance calibrated data of DMSP-OLS) for a comparative analysis. The results compared with the reference data of land cover in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou show that the emission areas of map from NPP-VIIRS data have higher spatial consistency of the artificial surfaces and exhibit a more reasonable distribution of CO2 emission than those of other two maps from DMSP-OLS data. Besides, in contrast to two maps from DMSP-OLS data, the emission map from NPP-VIIRS data is closer to the Vulcan inventory and exhibits a better agreement with the actual statistical data of CO2 emissions at the level of sub-administrative units of the United States. This study demonstrates that the NPP-VIIRS data can be a powerful tool for studying the spatial distributions of CO2 emissions, as well as the socioeconomic indicators at multiple scales.

  13. Evaluation of NPP-VIIRS Nighttime Light Data for Mapping Global Fossil Fuel Combustion CO2 Emissions: A Comparison with DMSP-OLS Nighttime Light Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinpei Ou

    Full Text Available Recently, the stable light products and radiance calibrated products from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's (DMSP Operational Linescan System (OLS have been useful for mapping global fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions at fine spatial resolution. However, few studies on this subject were conducted with the new-generation nighttime light data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP Satellite, which has a higher spatial resolution and a wider radiometric detection range than the traditional DMSP-OLS nighttime light data. Therefore, this study performed the first evaluation of the potential of NPP-VIIRS data in estimating the spatial distributions of global CO2 emissions (excluding power plant emissions. Through a disaggregating model, three global emission maps were then derived from population counts and three different types of nighttime lights data (NPP-VIIRS, the stable light data and radiance calibrated data of DMSP-OLS for a comparative analysis. The results compared with the reference data of land cover in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou show that the emission areas of map from NPP-VIIRS data have higher spatial consistency of the artificial surfaces and exhibit a more reasonable distribution of CO2 emission than those of other two maps from DMSP-OLS data. Besides, in contrast to two maps from DMSP-OLS data, the emission map from NPP-VIIRS data is closer to the Vulcan inventory and exhibits a better agreement with the actual statistical data of CO2 emissions at the level of sub-administrative units of the United States. This study demonstrates that the NPP-VIIRS data can be a powerful tool for studying the spatial distributions of CO2 emissions, as well as the socioeconomic indicators at multiple scales.

  14. Handedness results from Complementary Hemispheric Dominance, not Global Hemispheric Dominance: Evidence from Mechanically Coupled Bilateral Movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woytowicz, Elizabeth J; Westlake, Kelly P; Whitall, Jill; Sainburg, Robert L

    2018-05-09

    Two contrasting views of handedness can be described as 1) complementary dominance, in which each hemisphere is specialized for different aspects of motor control, and 2) global dominance, in which the hemisphere contralateral to the dominant arm is specialized for all aspects of motor control. The present study sought to determine which motor lateralization hypothesis best predicts motor performance during common bilateral task of stabilizing an object (e.g. bread) with one hand while applying forces to the object (e.g. slicing) using the other hand. We designed an experimental equivalent of this task, performed in a virtual environment with the unseen arms supported by frictionless air-sleds. The hands were connected by a spring, and the task was to maintain the position of one hand, while moving the other hand to a target. Thus, the reaching hand was required to take account of the spring load to make smooth and accurate trajectories, while the stabilizer hand was required to impede the spring load to keep a constant position. Right-handed subjects performed two task sessions (right hand reach and left hand stabilize; left hand reach and right hand stabilize) with the order of the sessions counterbalanced between groups. Our results indicate a hand by task-component interaction, such that the right hand showed straighter reaching performance while the left showed more stable holding performance. These findings provide support for the complementary dominance hypothesis and suggest that the specializations of each cerebral hemisphere for impedance and dynamic control mechanisms are expressed during bilateral interactive tasks.

  15. Global modeling of flux transfer events: generation mechanism and spacecraft signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeder, J.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental mode of energy and momentum transfer from the solar wind to the magnetosphere. It is known to occur in different forms depending on solar wind and magnetospheric conditions. In particular, steady reconnection can be distinguished from pulse-like reconnection events which are also known as Flux Transfer Events (FTEs). The formation mechanism of FTEs and their contolling factors remain controversial. We use global MHD simulations of Earth's magnetosphere to show that for southward IMF conditions: a) steady reconnection preferentially occurs without FTEs when the stagnation flow line nearly coincides with the X-line location, which requires small dipole tilt and nearly due southward IMF, b) FTEs occur when the flow/field symmetry is broken, which requires either a large dipole tilt and/or a substantial east-west component of the IMF, c) the predicted spacecraft signature and the repetition frequency of FTEs in the simulations agrees very well with typical observations, lending credibility to the the model, d) the fundamental process that leads to FTE formation is multiple X-line formation caused by the flow and field patterns in the magnetosheath and requires no intrinsic plasma property variations like variable resistivity, e) if the dipole tilt breaks the symmetry FTEs occur only in the winter hemisphere whereas the reconnection signatures in the summer hemisphere are steady with no bipolar FTE-like signatures, f) if the IMF east-west field component breaks the symmetry FTEs occur in both hemispheres, and g) FTE formation depends on sufficient resolution and low diffusion in the model -- coarse resolution and/or high diffusivity lead to flow-through reconnection signatures that appear unphysical given the frequent observation of FTEs.

  16. Gas permeation process for post combustion CO2 capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, Marc

    2017-01-01

    CO 2 Capture and Storage (CCS) is a promising solution to separate CO 2 from flue gas, to reduce the CO 2 emissions in the atmosphere, and hence to reduce global warming. In CCS, one important constraint is the high additional energy requirement of the different capture processes. That statement is partly explained by the low CO 2 fraction in the inlet flue gas and the high output targets in terms of CO 2 capture and purity (≥90%). Gas permeation across dense membrane can be used in post combustion CO 2 capture. Gas permeation in a dense membrane is ruled by a mass transfer mechanism and separation performance in a dense membrane are characterized by component's effective permeability and selectivity. One of the newest and encouraging type of membrane in terms of separation performance is the facilitated transport membrane. Each particular type of membrane is defined by a specific mass transfer law. The most important difference to the mass transfer behavior in a dense membrane is related to the facilitated transport mechanism and the solution diffusion mechanism and its restrictions and limitations. Permeation flux modelling across a dense membrane is required to perform a post combustion CO 2 capture process simulation. A CO 2 gas permeation separation process is composed of a two-steps membrane process, one drying step and a compression unit. Simulation on the energy requirement and surface area of the different membrane modules in the global system are useful to determine the benefits of using dense membranes in a post combustion CO 2 capture technology. (author)

  17. Uncertainties in hydrogen combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamps, D.W.; Wong, C.C.; Nelson, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    Three important areas of hydrogen combustion with uncertainties are identified: high-temperature combustion, flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition, and aerosol resuspension during hydrogen combustion. The uncertainties associated with high-temperature combustion may affect at least three different accident scenarios: the in-cavity oxidation of combustible gases produced by core-concrete interactions, the direct containment heating hydrogen problem, and the possibility of local detonations. How these uncertainties may affect the sequence of various accident scenarios is discussed and recommendations are made to reduce these uncertainties. 40 references

  18. Plant communities as drivers of soil respiration: pathways, mechanisms, and significance for global change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Metcalfe

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the impacts of plant community characteristics on soil carbon dioxide efflux (R is a key prerequisite for accurate prediction of the future carbon (C balance of terrestrial ecosystems under climate change. However, developing a mechanistic understanding of the determinants of R is complicated by the presence of multiple different sources of respiratory C within soil – such as soil microbes, plant roots and their mycorrhizal symbionts – each with their distinct dynamics and drivers. In this review, we synthesize relevant information from a wide spectrum of sources to evaluate the current state of knowledge about plant community effects on R, examine how this information is incorporated into global climate models, and highlight priorities for future research. Despite often large variation amongst studies and methods, several general trends emerge.

    Mechanisms whereby plants affect R may be grouped into effects on belowground C allocation, aboveground litter properties and microclimate. Within vegetation types, the amount of C diverted belowground, and hence R, may be controlled mainly by the rate of photosynthetic C uptake, while amongst vegetation types this should be more dependent upon the specific C allocation strategies of the plant life form. We make the case that plant community composition, rather than diversity, is usually the dominant control on R in natural systems. Individual species impacts on R may be largest where the species accounts for most of the biomass in the ecosystem, has very distinct traits to the rest of the community and/or modulates the occurrence of major natural disturbances. We show that climate vegetation models incorporate a number of pathways whereby plants can affect R, but that simplifications regarding allocation schemes and drivers of litter decomposition may limit model accuracy. We also suggest that under a warmer future

  19. New class of combustion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merzhanov, A.G.; Borovinskaya, I.P.

    1975-01-01

    A short review is given of the results of work carried out since 1967 on studying the combustion processes caused by the interaction of chemical elements in the condensed phase and leading to the formation of refractory compounds. New phenomena and processes are described which are revealed when investigating the combustion of the systems of this class, viz solid-phase combustion, fast combustion in the condensed phase, filtering combustion, combustion in liquid nitrogen, spinning combustion, self-oscillating combustion, and repeated combustion. A new direction in employment of combustion processes is discussed, viz. a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of refractory nitrides, carbides, borides, silicides and other compounds

  20. Global thermo-mechanical effects from a KBS-3 type repository. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakami, E.; Olofsson, Stig-Olof; Hakami, H.; Israelsson, Jan

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this study has been to identify the global thermomechanical effects in the bedrock hosting a nuclear waste repository - i.e. the effects at large distances from the repository. Numerical thermomechanical modeling was performed in several steps, beginning with elastic continuum models and followed by distinct element models (3DEC), in which fracture zones are explicitly simulated. The number of fracture zones, the heat intensity of the waste, the material properties of the rock mass and the boundary conditions of the models were varied in different simulations. The results from the numerical modeling show that the principal stresses increase near the repository. The maximum stress obtained for the main model is 44 MPa and occurs at the repository level after about 100 years of deposition. Due to thermal expansion, the rock mass displaces upward, and the maximum heave at the ground surface after 1000 years is calculated to be 16 cm. In the area close to the ground surface, above the center of the repository, the horizontal stresses reduce, causing the rock to yield in tension down to a depth of about 80 m. In correspondence with the stress changes, the fracture zones show opening normal displacements at shallow depths and closing normal displacements and shearing at the repository level. The maximum displacements of the different fracture zones are 0.3-2.5 cm for closing, 0.0-0.8 cm for opening and 0.2-2.2 cm for shearing. Another important input parameter for the analysis is the Young's modulus of the rock mass. In the main model, a value of 30 GPa is assumed. Higher values of Young's modulus give larger thermo-mechanical effects. Other changes of the properties considered give minor changes of the rock mass behavior. All multi-level repository layouts give rise to higher temperatures than the single-level layout, causing the compressive stresses to increase more at the repository level. Fracture zone displacements caused by different layouts are

  1. Design of articulated mechanisms with a degree of freedom constraint using global optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawamoto, Atsushi; Stolpe, Mathias

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with design of articulated mechanisms using a truss ground structure representation. The considered mechanism design problem is to maximize the output displacement for a given input force by choosing a prescribed number of truss elements out of all the available elements, so...... that the resultant mechanism has one mechanical degree of freedom when supported in a statically determinate manner. The mechanical degree of freedom constraint is included since it is essential for obtaining a proper articulated mechanism design. The Green-Lagrange strain measure is used to accommodate for large...

  2. Large Eddy Simulation of High-Speed, Premixed Ethylene Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Kiran; Edwards, Jack R.; Chelliah, Harsha; Goyne, Christopher; McDaniel, James; Rockwell, Robert; Kirik, Justin; Cutler, Andrew; Danehy, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A large-eddy simulation / Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (LES/RANS) methodology is used to simulate premixed ethylene-air combustion in a model scramjet designed for dual mode operation and equipped with a cavity for flameholding. A 22-species reduced mechanism for ethylene-air combustion is employed, and the calculations are performed on a mesh containing 93 million cells. Fuel plumes injected at the isolator entrance are processed by the isolator shock train, yielding a premixed fuel-air mixture at an equivalence ratio of 0.42 at the cavity entrance plane. A premixed flame is anchored within the cavity and propagates toward the opposite wall. Near complete combustion of ethylene is obtained. The combustor is highly dynamic, exhibiting a large-scale oscillation in global heat release and mass flow rate with a period of about 2.8 ms. Maximum heat release occurs when the flame front reaches its most downstream extent, as the flame surface area is larger. Minimum heat release is associated with flame propagation toward the cavity and occurs through a reduction in core flow velocity that is correlated with an upstream movement of the shock train. Reasonable agreement between simulation results and available wall pressure, particle image velocimetry, and OH-PLIF data is obtained, but it is not yet clear whether the system-level oscillations seen in the calculations are actually present in the experiment.

  3. Combustion modeling in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental assumptions of the Blizard and Keck combustion model for internal combustion engines are examined and a generalization of that model is derived. The most significant feature of the model is that it permits the occurrence of unburned hydrocarbons in the thermodynamic-kinetic modeling of exhaust gases. The general formulas are evaluated in two specific cases that are likely to be significant in the applications of the model.

  4. Boiler using combustible fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

    1974-07-03

    A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

  5. Internal and surface phenomena in metal combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreizin, Edward L.; Molodetsky, Irina E.; Law, Chung K.

    1995-01-01

    liquid fuel droplet combustion studies. In addition, the internal compositions of rapidly quenched metal particles will be analyzed using SEM technique. Such compositions are similar to those existing during the combustion and provide new insight on metal combustion processes. The results of this experimental work will be used to model the fundamental mechanisms of metal combustion. Preliminary experimental results on Al and Zr particle combustion at normal gravity are discussed here.

  6. Improving global health governance to combat counterfeit medicines: a proposal for a UNODC-WHO-Interpol trilateral mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Tim K; Liang, Bryan A

    2013-10-31

    Perhaps no greater challenge exists for public health, patient safety, and shared global health security, than fake/falsified/fraudulent, poor quality unregulated drugs, also commonly known as "counterfeit medicines", now endemic in the global drug supply chain. Counterfeit medicines are prevalent everywhere, from traditional healthcare settings to unregulated sectors, including the Internet. These dangerous medicines are expanding in both therapeutic and geographic scope, threatening patient lives, leading to antimicrobial resistance, and profiting criminal actors. Despite clear global public health threats, surveillance for counterfeit medicines remains extremely limited, with available data pointing to an increasing global criminal trade that has yet to be addressed appropriately. Efforts by a variety of public and private sector entities, national governments, and international organizations have made inroads in combating this illicit trade, but are stymied by ineffectual governance and divergent interests. Specifically, recent efforts by the World Health Organization, the primary international public health agency, have failed to adequately incorporate the broad array of stakeholders necessary to combat the problem. This has left the task of combating counterfeit medicines to other organizations such as UN Office of Drugs and Crime and Interpol in order to fill this policy gap. To address the current failure of the international community to mobilize against the worldwide counterfeit medicines threat, we recommend the establishment of an enhanced global health governance trilateral mechanism between WHO, UNODC, and Interpol to leverage the respective strengths and resources of these organizations. This would allow these critical organizations, already engaged in the fight against counterfeit medicines, to focus on and coordinate their respective domains of transnational crime prevention, public health, and law enforcement field operations. Specifically, by

  7. MODELING SEGREGATED INSITU COMBUSTION PROCESSES THROUGH A VERTICAL DISPLACEMENT MODEL APPLIED TO A COLOMBIAN FIELD

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra Aristizábal, José-Julián; Grosso Vargas, Jorge-Luis

    2005-01-01

    Recently it has been proposed the incorporation of horizontal well technologies in thermal EOR processes like the in situ combustion process (ISC). This has taken to the conception of new recovery mechanisms named here as Segregated In-Situ Combustion processes which are conventional in-situ combustion process with a segregated flow component. Top/Down combustion, Combustion Override Splitproduction Horizontal-well and Toe-to-Heel Air Injection are three of these processes, which incorporate ...

  8. Lump wood combustion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubesa, Petr; Horák, Jiří; Branc, Michal; Krpec, Kamil; Hopan, František; Koloničný, Jan; Ochodek, Tadeáš; Drastichová, Vendula; Martiník, Lubomír; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with the combustion process for lump wood in low-power fireplaces (units to dozens of kW). Such a combustion process is cyclical in its nature, and what combustion facility users are most interested in is the frequency, at which fuel needs to be stoked to the fireplace. The paper defines the basic terms such as burnout curve and burning rate curve, which are closely related to the stocking frequency. The fuel burning rate is directly dependent on the immediate thermal power of the fireplace. This is also related to the temperature achieved in the fireplace, magnitude of flue gas losses and the ability to generate conditions favouring the full burnout of the fuel's combustible component, which, at once ensures the minimum production of combustible pollutants. Another part of the paper describes experiments conducted in traditional fireplaces with a grate, at which well-dried lump wood was combusted.

  9. Environmental market failures. Are there any local market-based corrective mechanisms for global problems?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, R.U.

    1997-01-01

    The paper reviews various policy tools that have been discussed in the literature, including legal, administrative and fiscal (tax) schemes, as well as tradeable emission permits and concludes that none of them are really suitable for dealing with global problems. An alternative is suggested, namely the use of tradeable individual consumption quotas for traded commodities at the national level, to be extended later to the global level by trading quotas among nations (assuming agreement can be reached on the basis for determining quotas). 28 refs

  10. Forests and global warming mitigation in Brazil: opportunities in the Brazilian forest sector for responses to global warming under the 'clean development mechanism''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearnside, P.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol created global warming response opportunities through the clean development mechanism that allow countries like Brazil to receive investments from companies and governments wishing to offset their emissions of greenhouse gases. Brazil has a special place in strategies for combating global warming because its vast areas of tropical forest represent a potentially large source of emissions if deforested. A number of issues need to be settled to properly assign credit for carbon in the types of options presented by the Brazilian forest sector. These include definition of the units of carbon (permanent sequestration versus carbon-ton-years, the latter being most appropriate for forest options), the means of crediting forest reserve establishment, adoption of discounting or other time-preference weighting for carbon, definition of the accounting method (avoided emissions versus stock maintenance), and mechanism to allow program contributions to be counted, rather than restricting consideration to free-standing projects. Silvicultural plantations offer opportunities for carbon benefits, but have high social impacts in the Brazilian context. Plantations also inherently compete with deforestation reduction options for funds. Forest management has been proposed as a global warming response option, but the assignment of any value to time makes this unattractive in terms of carbon benefits. However, reduced-impact logging can substantially reduce emissions over those from traditional logging practices. Slowing deforestation is the major opportunity offered by Brazil. Slowing deforestation will require understanding its causes and creating functional models capable of generating land-use change scenarios with and without different policy changes and other activities. Brazil already has a number of programs designed to slow deforestation, but the continued rapid loss of forest highlights the vast gulf that exists between the magnitude of the problem and the

  11. Processing of hydroxyapatite obtained by combustion synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canillas, M.; Rivero, R.; García-Carrodeguas, R.; Barba, F.; Rodríguez, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    One of the reasons of implants failure are the stress forces appearing in the material–tissue interface due to the differences between their mechanical properties. For this reason, similar mechanical properties to the surrounding tissue are desirable. The synthesis of hydroxyapatite by solution combustion method and its processing have been studied in order to obtain fully dense ceramic bodies with improved mechanical strength. Combustion synthesis provides nanostructured powders characterized by a high surface area to facilitate the following sintering. Moreover, synthesis was conducted in aqueous and oxidizing media. Oxidizing media improve homogenization and increase the energy released during combustion. It gives rise to particles whose morphology and size suggest lower surface energies compared with aqueous media. The obtained powders were sintered by using a controlled sintering rate schedule. Lower surfaces energies minimize the shrinkage during sintering and relative densities measurements and diametral compression test confirm improved densification and consequently mechanical properties. [es

  12. Processing of hydroxyapatite obtained by combustion synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Canillas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the reasons of implants failure are the stress forces appearing in the material–tissue interface due to the differences between their mechanical properties. For this reason, similar mechanical properties to the surrounding tissue are desirable. The synthesis of hydroxyapatite by solution combustion method and its processing have been studied in order to obtain fully dense ceramic bodies with improved mechanical strength. Combustion synthesis provides nanostructured powders characterized by a high surface area to facilitate the following sintering. Moreover, synthesis was conducted in aqueous and oxidizing media. Oxidizing media improve homogenization and increase the energy released during combustion. It gives rise to particles whose morphology and size suggest lower surface energies compared with aqueous media. The obtained powders were sintered by using a controlled sintering rate schedule. Lower surfaces energies minimize the shrinkage during sintering and relative densities measurements and diametral compression test confirm improved densification and consequently mechanical properties.

  13. Molecular mechanisms responsive to dehydration may impact the invasiveness of perennial weeds under global climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leafy spurge is an invasive perennial weed in the great plains of the US and Canada. The ability of this herbaceous weed to regenerate new shoot growth from an abundance of crown and root buds after severe abiotic stress is critical for survival. Due to its adaptable and aggressive nature, global cl...

  14. Mechanisms of private meta-governance: an analysis of global private governance for sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasbergen, P.

    2011-01-01

    One of the main characteristics of global governance for sustainable development is its fragmentation. Next to public regulations, there are often many private regulations in force on the same issue, which are induced by collaborations between businesses and NGOs. Traditionally, it is assumed that

  15. Protective Effects and Mechanism of Puerarin on Learning-Memory Disorder after Global Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Hai-qin; GUO He-na; WANG Hu-qing; CHANG Ming-ze; ZHANG Gui-lian; ZHAO Ying-xian

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of puerarin on the learning-memory disorder after global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats, and to explore its mechanism of action. Methods: The global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury model was established using the modified Pulsinelli four-vessel occlusion in Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were intraperitoneally injected with puerarin (100 mg/kg) 1 h before ischemia and once every 6 h afterwards. The learning-memory ability was evaluated by the passive avoidance test. The dynamic changes of the cell counts of apoptosis and positive expression of Bcl-2 in the hippocampus CA1 region were determined by the TUNEL and immunohistochemical methods, respectively. Results: (1) Compared with the reperfusion group, the step through latency (STL) in the passive avoidance test in the puerarin group was prolonged significantly (P<0.01). (2) The apoptotic neurons were injured most severely on the 3rd day in the hippocampal CA1 region after global ischemia and reperfusion. In the pueradn group, the number of apoptotic cells decreased at respective time points after ischemia-reperfusion (P<0.01). (3) The level of positive expression of Bcl-2 varied according to the duration of reperfusion and the peak level occurred on day 1 in the hippocampal CA1 region after global cerebral ischemia. Compared with the reperfusion group, the expression of Bcl-2 in the pueradn group was up-regulated at the respective time points after ischemia raperfusion (P<0.01), reaching the peak on day 1. Conclusions: Puerarin could improve the learning-memory ability after global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rats. The protective mechanism might be related to the effect of inhibiting or delaying the cell apoptosis through up-regulating the expression of Bcl-2 after ischemia and reperfusion.

  16. Flameless Combustion Workshop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gutmark, Ephraim

    2005-01-01

    .... "Flameless Combustion" is characterized by high stability levels with virtually no thermoacoustic instabilities, very low lean stability limits and therefore extremely low NOx production, efficient...

  17. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  18. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  19. NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM FOSSIL FUEL COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of coal combustion as a significant global source of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions was reexamined through on-line emission measurements from six pulverized-coal-fired utility boilers and from laboratory and pilot-scale combustors. The full-scale utility boilers yielded d...

  20. Combustion of metals, prevention and fire fighting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellottee, H.

    1991-01-01

    The paper reviews the knowledge on metal combustion. Few works are devoted on metals such as magnesium or titanium. On the contrary liquid metals used as coolants, especially sodium, are much more studied. Results obtained on pool fires and spray fires are briefly given for global safety analysis of LMFBR. 11 refs

  1. Combustion Stratification for Naphtha from CI Combustion to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; An, Yanzhao; Dawood, Alaaeldin; Izadi Najafabadi, Mohammad; Somers, Bart; Johansson, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates the combustion stratification from conventional compression ignition (CI) combustion to partially premixed combustion (PPC). Experiments are performed in an optical CI engine at a speed of 1200 rpm for diesel and naphtha (RON

  2. Analysis of JP-10 Combustion Mechanism Based on Bimolecular Reaction Collision Model%气体介质中 JP-10液滴蒸发数值模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁嵩; 于亮; 赵汝岩

    2016-01-01

    为了进一步了解 JP-10燃料在航空发动机燃烧室中的蒸发燃烧机理,基于 SRK 状态方程,运用数学建模的方法,对 JP-10液滴蒸发过程进行了数值模拟并分析了环境因素对液滴蒸发表面温度变化及液滴生存时间变化的影响。研究表明,气体介质与液滴间的相对速度和环境压力及温度对 JP-10液滴蒸发湿球温度、升温过程及生存时间影响明显。%In order to further understand the evaporation and combustion mechanism of the JP-10 droplet in the engine combustion chamber,based on the SRK state equation,and by means of mathematical modeling,we simulated the evaporation process of the JP-10 droplet and analyzed the influences of environmental factors on the droplet surface temperature and life time.The results show that the influences of ambient pressure and temperature and relative velocity between gas and droplet on the JP-10 evaporation wet-bulb temperature,heating process and survival time are obvious.

  3. Modeling nitrogen chemistry in combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Miller, James A.; Ruscic, Branko

    2018-01-01

    the accuracy of engineering calculations and thereby the potential of primary measures for NOx control. In this review our current understanding of the mechanisms that are responsible for combustion-generated nitrogen-containing air pollutants is discussed. The thermochemistry of the relevant nitrogen...... via NNH or N2O are discussed, along with the chemistry of NO removal processes such as reburning and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction of NO. Each subset of the mechanism is evaluated against experimental data and the accuracy of modeling predictions is discussed....

  4. Global Strategy Implementation at the Business Unit Level: Operational Capabilities and Administrative Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Kendall Roth; David M Schweiger; Allen J Morrison

    1991-01-01

    The study examines the impact of internationally strategy on organizational design and the influence of the organizational design on effectiveness at the business unit level. The empirical findings are based on survey responses from eighty-two business units competing in global industries. The findings are supportive of the contingency notion which suggests that business unit effectiveness is a function of the fit between the international strategy and the organizational design.© 1991 JIBS. J...

  5. Oxy-coal Combustion Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Eddings, E. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Lighty, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Ring, T. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Smith, P. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Thornock, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Y Jia, W. Morris [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Pedel, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Rezeai, D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Wang, L. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Zhang, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Kelly, K. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2012-01-06

    The objective of this project is to move toward the development of a predictive capability with quantified uncertainty bounds for pilot-scale, single-burner, oxy-coal operation. This validation research brings together multi-scale experimental measurements and computer simulations. The combination of simulation development and validation experiments is designed to lead to predictive tools for the performance of existing air fired pulverized coal boilers that have been retrofitted to various oxy-firing configurations. In addition, this report also describes novel research results related to oxy-combustion in circulating fluidized beds. For pulverized coal combustion configurations, particular attention is focused on the effect of oxy-firing on ignition and coal-flame stability, and on the subsequent partitioning mechanisms of the ash aerosol.

  6. Two phase exhaust for internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuk, Carl T [Denver, IA

    2011-11-29

    An internal combustion engine having a reciprocating multi cylinder internal combustion engine with multiple valves. At least a pair of exhaust valves are provided and each supply a separate power extraction device. The first exhaust valves connect to a power turbine used to provide additional power to the engine either mechanically or electrically. The flow path from these exhaust valves is smaller in area and volume than a second flow path which is used to deliver products of combustion to a turbocharger turbine. The timing of the exhaust valve events is controlled to produce a higher grade of energy to the power turbine and enhance the ability to extract power from the combustion process.

  7. Strobes: An oscillatory combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; Lingen, J.N.J. van; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the

  8. Catalytically enhanced combustion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, C.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a fuel having improved combustion efficiency. It comprises a petroleum based liquid hydrocarbon; and a combustion catalyst comprising from about 18 to about 21 weight percent naphthalene, from about 75 to about 80 weight percent toluene, and from about 2.8 to about 3.2 weight percent benzyl alcohol

  9. Flexible mechanisms in the corporate greenhouse: implementation of the Kyoto Protocol and the globalization of the electric power industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreuder, Y.; Sherry, C. [University of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Policy

    2001-07-01

    The contradictions and unresolved tensions between economic globalization and climate change negotiations have added urgency to the climate change debate. The paper argues that the declining role of the nation state in the global economy and the increasing reach of transnational corporations throughout the world present a serious challenge to the environmental integrity and success of international environmental treaties such as the Kyoto Protocol. In particular efficacy and equity of the flexible mechanism under the Kyoto Protocol are questioned as illustrated by the patterns of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) of the US electric power industry in the developing world. US FDI in the electric power sectors of developing countries supports continued carbon-intensive development patterns which will make the long-term goals of the Kyoto Protocol more difficult to achieve. Consequently, FDI raises questions about justifiability of giving credit to Annex I countries through CDM projects undertaken by transnational electric power corporations. 13 refs.

  10. Emissions of NO and CO from counterflow combustion of CH4 under MILD and oxyfuel conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Kin-Pang; Li, Pengfei; Wang, Feifei; Mi, Jianchun

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the NO and CO emission characteristics of counterflow combustion of methane simulated under MILD or/and oxyfuel conditions. Simulations using CHEMKIN are conducted for various injection conditions of fuel and oxidizer. Note that the terms “oxyfuel”, “MILD-N 2 ” and “MILD-CO 2 ” combustion adopted hereafter represent the conventional oxy-combustion and those MILD combustions diluted by N 2 and CO 2 , respectively. It is observed that the NO emission of MILD-CO 2 combustion is ultra-low for all cases of investigation, even when increasing the combustion temperature up to 2000 K or adding more N 2 (up to 20%) to either the fuel stream (to simulate nitrogen-containing fuels like biomass) or the oxidizer stream (to simulate the air-ingress). A higher temperature allowed under MILD-CO 2 combustion suggests the improvement of energy efficiency for the MILD combustion technology. Moreover, the presence of steam in the oxidant reduces both NO and CO emissions of combustion for all cases. The relative importance analysis reveals that the N 2 O-intermediate mechanism for producing NO prevails in MILD-CO 2 combustion while the prompt and thermal mechanisms predominate MILD-N 2 and oxyfuel combustion, respectively. In addition, the sensitivity analysis identifies those main reactions that play important roles for the NO emission under these combustion conditions. - Highlights: • Assessing the NO and CO emissions from MILD combustion diluted by CO 2 . • Examining the possibility of higher combustion intensity in MILD-CO 2 combustion than in MILD-N 2 combustion. • Differentiating the contributions from each NO mechanism to the total NO emission. • Revealing major NO mechanisms under different combustion conditions. • Better understanding the NO formation mechanisms under MILD combustion.

  11. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-08-17

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  12. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  13. Global climate regulation and border adjustment mechanisms: the case of carbon importers inclusion in the european trading scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-06-01

    The creation of an inclusion mechanism applied to imports whose production process increases significantly the global climate risk is looked upon as a solution to a collective-action problem. Such a mechanism would provide those States that will sign the next United Nations Convention on Climate Change with a potential remedy if and when gaps between quantified objects, to which all are committed, entail significant competition distortions. Whether this mechanism assumes the form of an external carbon tax or consists in including importers in the European system of CO 2 quota exchanges, it would surely respond to the re-distributive need generated by global warming, provided that the proceeds are used to help bring industrial production in developing countries up to standard. These restrictive measures aimed at preserving the planet are probably compatible with the extraordinary regimes applied by the WTO, which already uses exogenous non-trade norms to arbitrate conflicts. This would validate further the legitimacy of authority transfers onto the WTO, whose scope of legal authority increases constantly, along with that of conflicts that stem from collective preferences. (author)

  14. Development of multi-component diesel surrogate fuel models – Part II:Validation of the integrated mechanisms in 0-D kinetic and 2-D CFD spray combustion simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poon, Hiew Mun; Pang, Kar Mun; Ng, Hoon Kiat

    2016-01-01

    ), cyclohexane(CHX) and toluene developed in Part I are applied in this work. They are combined to produce two different versions of multi-component diesel surrogate models in the form of MCDS1 (HXN + HMN)and MCDS2 (HXN + HMN + toluene + CHX). The integrated mechanisms are then comprehensively validated in zero......-dimensional chemical kinetic simulations under a wide range of shock tube and jetstirred reactor conditions. Subsequently, the fidelity of the surrogate models is further evaluated in two-dimensional CFD spray combustion simulations. Simulation results show that ignition delay (ID) prediction corresponds well...... an increase of maximum local soot volume fraction by a factor of2.1 when the ambient temperature increases from 900 K to 1000 K, while the prediction by MCDS1 is lower at 1.6. This trend qualitatively agrees with the experimental observation. This work demonstrates that MCDS1 serves as a potential surrogate...

  15. PDF Modeling of Turbulent Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pope, Stephen B

    2006-01-01

    .... The PDF approach to turbulent combustion has the advantages of fully representing the turbulent fluctuations of species and temperature, and of allowing realistic combustion chemistry to be implemented...

  16. A Comparative Study on Recently-Introduced Nature-Based Global Optimization Methods in Complex Mechanical System Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulbaset El Hadi Saad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Advanced global optimization algorithms have been continuously introduced and improved to solve various complex design optimization problems for which the objective and constraint functions can only be evaluated through computation intensive numerical analyses or simulations with a large number of design variables. The often implicit, multimodal, and ill-shaped objective and constraint functions in high-dimensional and “black-box” forms demand the search to be carried out using low number of function evaluations with high search efficiency and good robustness. This work investigates the performance of six recently introduced, nature-inspired global optimization methods: Artificial Bee Colony (ABC, Firefly Algorithm (FFA, Cuckoo Search (CS, Bat Algorithm (BA, Flower Pollination Algorithm (FPA and Grey Wolf Optimizer (GWO. These approaches are compared in terms of search efficiency and robustness in solving a set of representative benchmark problems in smooth-unimodal, non-smooth unimodal, smooth multimodal, and non-smooth multimodal function forms. In addition, four classic engineering optimization examples and a real-life complex mechanical system design optimization problem, floating offshore wind turbines design optimization, are used as additional test cases representing computationally-expensive black-box global optimization problems. Results from this comparative study show that the ability of these global optimization methods to obtain a good solution diminishes as the dimension of the problem, or number of design variables increases. Although none of these methods is universally capable, the study finds that GWO and ABC are more efficient on average than the other four in obtaining high quality solutions efficiently and consistently, solving 86% and 80% of the tested benchmark problems, respectively. The research contributes to future improvements of global optimization methods.

  17. Governance Mechanism for Global Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Stochastic Differential Game Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Today developed and developing countries have to admit the fact that global warming is affecting the earth, but the fundamental problem of how to divide up necessary greenhouse gas reductions between developed and developing countries remains. In this paper, we propose cooperative and noncooperative stochastic differential game models to describe greenhouse gas emissions decision makings of developed and developing countries, calculate their feedback Nash equilibrium and the Pareto optimal solution, characterize parameter spaces that developed and developing countries can cooperate, design cooperative conditions under which participants buy the cooperative payoff, and distribute the cooperative payoff with Nash bargaining solution. Lastly, numerical simulations are employed to illustrate the above results.

  18. Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Possible Neuroprotective Mechanisms in the Model of Global Ischemia in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Nobre, Maria Elizabeth Pereira; Correia, Alyne Oliveira; Mendon?a, Francisco Nilson Maciel; Uchoa, Luiz Ricardo Ara?jo; Vasconcelos, Jessica Tamara Nunes; de Ara?jo, Carlos Ney Alencar; Brito, Gerly Anne de Castro; Siqueira, Rafaelly Maria Pinheiro; Cerqueira, Gilberto dos Santos; Neves, Kelly Rose Tavares; Arida, Ricardo M?rio; Viana, Glauce Socorro de Barros

    2016-01-01

    Background. Omega-3 (ω3) administration was shown to protect against hypoxic-ischemic injury. The objectives were to study the neuroprotective effects of ω3, in a model of global ischemia. Methods. Male Wistar rats were subjected to carotid occlusion (30 min), followed by reperfusion. The groups were SO, untreated ischemic and ischemic treated rats with ω3 (5 and 10 mg/kg, 7 days). The SO and untreated ischemic animals were orally treated with 1% cremophor and, 1 h after the last administrati...

  19. Mechanisms Controlling Global Mean Sea Surface Temperature Determined From a State Estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, R. M.; Piecuch, C. G.

    2018-04-01

    Global mean sea surface temperature (T¯) is a variable of primary interest in studies of climate variability and change. The temporal evolution of T¯ can be influenced by surface heat fluxes (F¯) and by diffusion (D¯) and advection (A¯) processes internal to the ocean, but quantifying the contribution of these different factors from data alone is prone to substantial uncertainties. Here we derive a closed T¯ budget for the period 1993-2015 based on a global ocean state estimate, which is an exact solution of a general circulation model constrained to most extant ocean observations through advanced optimization methods. The estimated average temperature of the top (10-m thick) level in the model, taken to represent T¯, shows relatively small variability at most time scales compared to F¯, D¯, or A¯, reflecting the tendency for largely balancing effects from all the latter terms. The seasonal cycle in T¯ is mostly determined by small imbalances between F¯ and D¯, with negligible contributions from A¯. While D¯ seems to simply damp F¯ at the annual period, a different dynamical role for D¯ at semiannual period is suggested by it being larger than F¯. At periods longer than annual, A¯ contributes importantly to T¯ variability, pointing to the direct influence of the variable ocean circulation on T¯ and mean surface climate.

  20. Global sensitivity analysis of thermo-mechanical models in numerical weld modelling; Analyse de sensibilite globale de modeles thermomecaniques de simulation numerique du soudage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petelet, M

    2007-10-15

    Current approach of most welding modellers is to content themselves with available material data, and to chose a mechanical model that seems to be appropriate. Among inputs, those controlling the material properties are one of the key problems of welding simulation: material data are never characterized over a sufficiently wide temperature range {exclamation_point} This way to proceed neglect the influence of the uncertainty of input data on the result given by the computer code. In this case, how to assess the credibility of prediction? This thesis represents a step in the direction of implementing an innovative approach in welding simulation in order to bring answers to this question, with an illustration on some concretes welding cases. The global sensitivity analysis is chosen to determine which material properties are the most sensitive in a numerical welding simulation and in which range of temperature. Using this methodology require some developments to sample and explore the input space covering welding of different steel materials. Finally, input data have been divided in two groups according to their influence on the output of the model (residual stress or distortion). In this work, complete methodology of the global sensitivity analysis has been successfully applied to welding simulation and lead to reduce the input space to the only important variables. Sensitivity analysis has provided answers to what can be considered as one of the probable frequently asked questions regarding welding simulation: for a given material which properties must be measured with a good accuracy and which ones can be simply extrapolated or taken from a similar material? (author)

  1. Experimental investigation of the oxy-fuel combustion of hard coal in a circulating fluidized-bed combustion; Experimentelle Untersuchung der Oxy-Fuel-Verbrennung von Steinkohle in einer zirkulierenden Wirbelschichtfeuerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofbauer, Gerrit Arne

    2017-03-16

    The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in 1992 first illustrated the social, economic and politic focus being placed on combating climate change caused by anthropogenic greenhouse gases. From there onwards research and development efforts have particularly centred on the reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in the production of electrical power through the use of carbonaceous fossil fuels. The long-term goal is a conversion to sustainable and CO{sub 2} free means of producing power, utilizing in the main part renewable forms of energy such as solar, wind and hydro power. Currently, such renewable ways of creating electricity only represent a small percentage of global energy production. The technological and economic hurdles that are associated with a substantial increase of renewable energy production have greatly slowed their increased implementation. However, the goal of keeping the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration below 450 ppm requires a significantly faster reduction in the amount of greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, considerations are being given to bridge technologies which would be able to capture and store the CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fired power plants. These technologies are referred to as CCS (carbon capture and storage). Oxy-fuel combustion, combustion with pure oxygen instead of air, is one of those technologies and forms the focus of investigation of this work. The Institute of Combustion and Power Plant Technology in Stuttgart, Germany, have researched this matter, carrying out combustion experiments in its 150 kW{sub th} circulating fluidized bed pilot facility. The experiments were aimed at investigating the influence of excess oxygen, combustion temperature and inlet oxygen concentration on the combustion process and comparing air to oxy-fuel combustion. These results were compared to the results of fundamental investigations and combustion experiments carried out by other research groups. The relationship

  2. Fuel Combustion Laboratory | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel Combustion Laboratory Fuel Combustion Laboratory NREL's Fuel Combustion Laboratory focuses on designs, using both today's technology and future advanced combustion concepts. This lab supports the combustion chamber platform for fuel ignition kinetics research, was acquired to expand the lab's

  3. Mechanical dispersion and global longitudinal strain by speckle tracking echocardiography: Predictors of appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candan, Ozkan; Gecmen, Cetin; Bayam, Emrah; Guner, Ahmet; Celik, Mehmet; Doğan, Cem

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we investigated whether mechanical dispersion which reflects electrical abnormality and other echocardiographic and clinic parameters predict appropriate ICD shock in patients undergone ICD implantation for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Sixty-three patients who received ICD implantation for primary or secondary prevention were included in the study. Patients' clinical, electrocardiographic, 2D classic, and speckle tracking echocardiographic data were collected. Mechanical dispersion was defined as the standard deviation of time to peak negative strain in 18 left ventricular segments. Appropriate ICD therapy was defined as cardioversion or defibrillation due to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation. Patients were divided into two groups as occurrence or the absence of appropriate ICD therapy. A total of 17 (26.9%) patients were observed to have an appropriate ICD therapy during follow-up periods. In patients who performed appropriate ICD therapy, a larger left atrial volume index, higher sudden cardiac death (SCD)-Risk Score, longer mechanical dispersion, and decreased global longitudinal peak strain (GLPS) were observed. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, including (GLPS, mechanical dispersion, LAVi, and SCD-Risk Score) was used to determine independent predictors of occurrence of appropriate ICD therapy during the follow-up. Mechanical dispersion, GLPS, and SCD-Risk Score were found to be independent predictors of occurrence of appropriate ICD therapy. Mechanical dispersion, GLPS, and SCD-Risk Score were found to be predictive for appropriate ICD therapy in patients receiving ICD implantation. Readily measurable mechanical dispersion and GLPS could be helpful to distinguish patients at high risk who could optimally benefit from ICD therapy. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Mechanisms of Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols and Implications for Global Radiative Forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seinfeld, John H. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2011-12-02

    Organic material constitutes about 50% of global atmospheric aerosol mass, and the dominant source of organic aerosol is the oxidation of volatile hydrocarbons, to produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Understanding the formation of SOA is crucial to predicting present and future climate effects of atmospheric aerosols. The goal of this program is to significantly increase our understanding of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the atmosphere. Ambient measurements indicate that the amount of SOA in the atmosphere exceeds that predicted in current models based on existing laboratory chamber data. This would suggest that either the SOA yields measured in laboratory chambers are understated or that all major organic precursors have not been identified. In this research program we are systematically exploring these possibilities.

  5. Abnormal global processing along the dorsal visual pathway in autism: a possible mechanism for weak visuospatial coherence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicano, Elizabeth; Gibson, Lisa; Maybery, Murray; Durkin, Kevin; Badcock, David R

    2005-01-01

    Frith and Happe (Frith, U., & Happe, F. (1994). Autism: Beyond theory of mind. Cognition, 50, 115-132) argue that individuals with autism exhibit 'weak central coherence': an inability to integrate elements of information into coherent wholes. Some authors have speculated that a high-level impairment might be present in the dorsal visual pathway in autism, and furthermore, that this might account for weak central coherence, at least at the visuospatial level. We assessed the integrity of the dorsal visual pathway in children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and in typically developing children, using two visual tasks, one examining functioning at higher levels of the dorsal cortical stream (Global Dot Motion (GDM)), and the other assessing lower-level dorsal stream functioning (Flicker Contrast Sensitivity (FCS)). Central coherence was tested using the Children's Embedded Figures Test (CEFT). Relative to the typically developing children, the children with ASD had shorter CEFT latencies and higher GDM thresholds but equivalent FCS thresholds. Additionally, CEFT latencies were inversely related to GDM thresholds in the ASD group. These outcomes indicate that the elevated global motion thresholds in autism are the result of high-level impairments in dorsal cortical regions. Weak visuospatial coherence in autism may be in the form of abnormal cooperative mechanisms in extra-striate cortical areas, which might contribute to differential performance when processing stimuli as Gestalts, including both dynamic (i.e., global motion perception) and static (i.e., disembedding performance) stimuli.

  6. Global Mechanical Response and Its Relation to Deformation and Failure Modes at Various Length Scales Under Shock Impact in Alumina AD995 Armor Ceramic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dandekar, D. P; McCauley, J. W; Green, W. H; Bourne, N. K; Chen, M. W

    2008-01-01

    ... maps relating the experimentally measured global mechanical response of a material through matured shock wave diagnostics to the nature of concurrent deformation and damage generated at varying length scales under shock wave loading.

  7. Against Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Lotte; Baggesgaard, Mads Anders

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand globalization, we need to consider what globalization is not. That is, in order to understand the mechanisms and elements that work toward globalization, we must, in a sense, read against globalization, highlighting the limitations of the concept and its inherent conflicts....... Only by employing this as a critical practice will we be analytically able to gain a dynamic understanding of the forces of globalization as they unfold today and as they have developed historically....

  8. Clostridium difficile Infections: A Global Overview of Drug Sensitivity and Resistance Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed S. Banawas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile (C. difficile is the most prevalent causative pathogen of healthcare-associated diarrhea. Notably, over the past 10 years, the number of Clostridium difficile outbreaks has increased with the rate of morbidity and mortality. The occurrence and spread of C. difficile strains that are resistant to multiple antimicrobial drugs complicate prevention as well as potential treatment options. Most C. difficile isolates are still susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin. Incidences of C. difficile resistance to other antimicrobial drugs have also been reported. Most of the antibiotics correlated with C. difficile infection (CDI, such as ampicillin, amoxicillin, cephalosporins, clindamycin, and fluoroquinolones, continue to be associated with the highest risk for CDI. Still, the detailed mechanism of resistance to metronidazole or vancomycin is not clear. Alternation in the target sites of the antibiotics is the main mechanism of erythromycin, fluoroquinolone, and rifamycin resistance in C. difficile. In this review, different antimicrobial agents are discussed and C. difficile resistance patterns and their mechanism of survival are summarized.

  9. Plant communities as drivers of soil respiration: pathways, mechanisms, and significance for global change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, D. B.; Fisher, R. A.; Wardle, D. A.

    2011-03-01

    Understanding the impacts of plant community characteristics on soil carbon dioxide efflux (R) is a key prerequisite for accurate prediction of the future carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems under climate change. In this review, we synthesize relevant information from a wide spectrum of sources to evaluate the current state of knowledge about plant community effects on R, examine how this information is incorporated into global climate models, and highlight priorities for future research. Plant species consistently exhibit cohesive suites of traits, linked to contrasting life history strategies, which exert a variety of impacts on R. As such, we propose that plant community shifts towards dominance by fast growing plants with nutrient rich litter could provide a major, though often neglected, positive feedback to climate change. Within vegetation types, belowground carbon flux will mainly be controlled by photosynthesis, while amongst vegetation types this flux will be more dependent upon the specific characteristics of the plant life form. We also make the case that community composition, rather than diversity, is usually the dominant control on ecosystem processes in natural systems. Individual species impacts on R may be largest where the species accounts for most of the biomass in the ecosystem, has very distinct traits to the rest of the community, or modulates the occurrence of major natural disturbances. We show that climate-vegetation models incorporate a number of pathways whereby plants can affect R, but that simplifications regarding allocation schemes and drivers of litter decomposition may limit model accuracy. This situation could, however, be relatively easily improved with targeted experimental and field studies. Finally, we identify key gaps in knowledge and recommend them as priorities for future work. These include the patterns of photosynthate partitioning amongst belowground components, ecosystem level effects of individual plant traits

  10. Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

  11. A comprehensive review of oil spill combustion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walavalkar, A.Y.; Kulkarni, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    The complex process of in-situ burning of oil or a water-in-oil emulsion floating on top of a water-base, such as the ocean, was discussed. The process was examined before, during and after actual combustion. In general, the success of oil spill combustion is measured in terms of the fraction of the spilled oil or emulsion that is burned away. However, the air and aquatic pollution caused by the combustion should also be considered. The physical conditions such as wind velocity, waves and the presence or absence of a containment device, such as a fire boom, could determine the continuation of the combustion process. An overview of the oil spill combustion techniques was provided. There still remains a need for fundamental studies, especially in mathematical modeling, to understand the basic mechanisms and predict the applicability of the in-situ combustion. 74 refs., 7 tabs., 3 figs

  12. Combustion of Sewage Sludge as Alternative Fuel for Cement Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fuzhou; ZHANG Wei

    2011-01-01

    The combustion of sewage sludge and coal was studied by thermogravimetric analysis.Both differential scanning calorimetric analysis and derivative thermogravimetric profiles showed differences between combustion of sewage sludge and coal, and non-isothermal kinetics analysis method was applied to evaluate the combustion process. Based on Coats-Redfem integral method, some reaction models were tested,the mechanism and kinetics of the combustion reaction were discussed. The results show that the combustion of sewage sludge is mainly in the Iow temperature stage, meanwhile the ignition temperature and Arrhenius activation energy are lower than that of coal. The combustion of sewage sludge has the advantage over coal in some aspects, thus sewage sludge can partly replace coal used as cement industry fuel.

  13. Thermal Behavior of Coal Used in Rotary Kiln and Its Combustion Intensification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis and combustion behaviors of three coals (A, B, and C coals were investigated and their combustion kinetics were calculated by the Freeman–Carroll method to obtain quantitative insight into their combustion behaviors. Moreover, the effects of coal size, air flow, oxygen content, and heating rate on coal combustion behaviors were analyzed. Results showed that the three coals have a similar trend of pyrolysis that occurs at about 670 K and this process continuously proceeds along with their combustion. Combustion characteristics and kinetic parameters can be applied to analyze coal combustion behaviors. Three coals having combustion characteristics of suitable ignition temperature (745–761 K, DTGmax (14.20–15.72%/min, and burnout time (7.45–8.10 min were analyzed in a rotary kiln. Combustion kinetic parameters provide quantitative insights into coal combustion behavior. The suitable particle size for coal combustion in a kiln is that the content of less than 74 μm is 60% to 80%. Low activation energy and reaction order make coal, especially C coal, have a simple combustion mechanism, great reactivity, be easily ignited, and a low peak temperature in the combustion state. Oxygen-enrichment and high heating rates enhance coal combustion, increasing combustion intensity and peak value, thus shortening burnout time.

  14. Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Possible Neuroprotective Mechanisms in the Model of Global Ischemia in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elizabeth Pereira Nobre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Omega-3 (ω3 administration was shown to protect against hypoxic-ischemic injury. The objectives were to study the neuroprotective effects of ω3, in a model of global ischemia. Methods. Male Wistar rats were subjected to carotid occlusion (30 min, followed by reperfusion. The groups were SO, untreated ischemic and ischemic treated rats with ω3 (5 and 10 mg/kg, 7 days. The SO and untreated ischemic animals were orally treated with 1% cremophor and, 1 h after the last administration, they were behaviorally tested and euthanized for neurochemical (DA, DOPAC, and NE determinations, histological (Fluoro jade staining, and immunohistochemical (TNF-alpha, COX-2 and iNOS evaluations. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Newman-Keuls as the post hoc test. Results. Ischemia increased the locomotor activity and rearing behavior that were partly reversed by ω3. Ischemia decreased striatal DA and DOPAC contents and increased NE contents, effects reversed by ω3. This drug protected hippocampal neuron degeneration, as observed by Fluoro-Jade staining, and the increased immunostainings for TNF-alpha, COX-2, and iNOS were partly or totally blocked by ω3. Conclusion. This study showed a neuroprotective effect of ω3, in great part due to its anti-inflammatory properties, stimulating translational studies focusing on its use in clinic for stroke managing.

  15. Global simulation of flux transfer events: Generation mechanism and spacecraft signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeder, J.

    We use global MHD simulations of Earth's magnetosphere to show that for southward IMF conditions: a) steady reconnection preferentially occurs without FTEs when the stagnation flow line nearly coincides with the X-line location, which requires small dipole tilt and nearly due southward IMF, b) FTEs occur when the flow/field symmetry is broken, which requires either a large dipole tilt and/or a substantial east-west component of the IMF, c) the predicted spacecraft signature and the repetition frequency of FTEs in the simulations agrees very well with typical observations, lending credibility to the the model, d) the fundamental process that leads to FTE formation is multiple X-line formation caused by the flow and field patterns in the magnetosheath and requires no intrinsic plasma property variations like variable resistivity, e) if the dipole tilt breaks the symmetry FTEs occur only in the winter hemisphere whereas the reconnection signatures in the summer hemisphere are steady with no bipolar FTE-like signatures, f) if the IMF east-west field component breaks the symmetry FTEs occur in both hemispheres but are least likely observed near the subsolar point, and g) FTE formation depends on sufficient resolution and low diffusion in the model. Too coarse resolution and/or too high diffusivity lead to flow-through reconnection signatures that appear unphysical given the frequent observation of FTEs.

  16. Point Climat no. 11 'Japan's Bilateral Offset Crediting Mechanism: A Bilateral Solution to a Global Issue?'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Hanh; Delbosc, Anais

    2012-01-01

    Among the publications of CDC Climat Research, 'Climate Briefs' presents, in a few pages, hot topics in climate change policy. This issue addresses the following points: In order to achieve its long-term emission reduction target following the Fukushima incident, Japan would rely more heavily on international offsetting activities. Concurrent to vigorous proposals to reform the CDM, Japan is also promoting an offset crediting scheme through bilateral agreements with developing countries as a post-2012 market mechanism. Despite potential benefits, issues relating to the accounting rules, environmental integrity and implications to carbon markets warrant further consideration prior to international recognition

  17. A global perspective on mechanical prosthetic heart valve thrombosis: Diagnostic and therapeutic challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, Mustafa Ozan; Kalçık, Macit; Yesin, Mahmut; Karakoyun, Süleyman; Bayam, Emrah; Gündüz, Sabahattin; Özkan, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis is one of the major causes of primary valve failure, which can be life-threatening. Multimodality imaging is necessary for determination of leaflet immobilization, cause of underlying pathology (thrombus versus pannus or both), and whether thrombolytic therapy attempt in the patient would be successful or surgery is needed. Current guidelines for the management of prosthetic valve thrombosis lack definitive class I recommendations due to lack of randomized controlled trials, and usually leave the choice of treatment to the clinician’s experience. In this review, we aimed to summarize the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of mechanical prosthetic valve thrombosis. PMID:28005024

  18. Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Towle; Richard Donais; Todd Hellewell; Robert Lewis; Robert Schrecengost

    2007-06-30

    For more than two decades, Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom) has developed a range of low cost, infurnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes Alstom's internally developed TFS 2000{trademark} firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy. As of the date of this report, more than 270 units representing approximately 80,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with Alstom low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coal to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coal, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing boiler equipment. On March 10, 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR). CAIR requires 25 Eastern states to reduce NOx emissions from the power generation sector by 1.7 million tons in 2009 and 2.0 million tons by 2015. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. The overall objective of the work is to develop an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner, which, when integrated with Alstom's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems will provide a means to achieve: Less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a high volatile Eastern or Western bituminous coal, Less than 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a subbituminous coal, NOx reduction costs at least 25% lower than the costs of an SCR, Validation of the NOx control technology developed through large (15 MWt) pilot scale demonstration, and Documentation required for

  19. Shale oil combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-dabbas, M.A.

    1992-05-01

    A 'coutant' carbon steel combustion chamber cooled by water jacket was conslructed to burn diesel fuel and mixlure of shale oil and diesel fuels. During experimental work nir fuel ratio was determined, temperaturces were measured using Chromel/ Almel thermocouple, finally the gasous combustion product analysis was carricd out using gas chromatograph technique. The constructed combustion chamber was operating salisfactory for several hours of continous work. According to the measurements it was found that: the flame temperature of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was greater than the flame temperature of diesel fuel. and the sulfer emissious of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was higher than that of diesel fuel. Calculation indicated that the dry gas energy loss was very high and the incomplete combustion energy loss very small. (author). 23 refs., 35 figs

  20. Shale oil combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-dabbas, M A

    1992-05-01

    A `coutant` carbon steel combustion chamber cooled by water jacket was conslructed to burn diesel fuel and mixlure of shale oil and diesel fuels. During experimental work nir fuel ratio was determined, temperaturces were measured using Chromel/ Almel thermocouple, finally the gasous combustion product analysis was carricd out using gas chromatograph technique. The constructed combustion chamber was operating salisfactory for several hours of continous work. According to the measurements it was found that: the flame temperature of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was greater than the flame temperature of diesel fuel. and the sulfer emissious of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was higher than that of diesel fuel. Calculation indicated that the dry gas energy loss was very high and the incomplete combustion energy loss very small. (author). 23 refs., 35 figs.

  1. Indoor combustion and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Kathleen; Triche, Elizabeth W

    2008-08-01

    Indoor combustion produces both gases (eg, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide) and particulate matter that may affect the development or exacerbation of asthma. Sources in the home include both heating devices (eg, fireplaces, woodstoves, kerosene heaters, flued [ie, vented] or nonflued gas heaters) and gas stoves for cooking. This article highlights the recent literature examining associations between exposure to indoor combustion and asthma development and severity. Since asthma is a chronic condition affecting both children and adults, both age groups are included in this article. Overall, there is some evidence of an association between exposure to indoor combustion and asthma, particularly asthma symptoms in children. Some sources of combustion such as coal stoves have been more consistently associated with these outcomes than other sources such as woodstoves.

  2. Numerical simulation of combustion and soot under partially premixed combustion of low-octane gasoline

    KAUST Repository

    An, Yanzhao

    2017-09-23

    In-cylinder combustion visualization and engine-out soot particle emissions were investigated in an optical diesel engine fueled with low octane gasoline. Single injection strategy with an early injection timing (−30 CAD aTDC) was employed to achieve partially premixed combustion (PPC) condition. A high-speed color camera was used to record the combustion images for 150 cycles. The regulated emission of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and soot mass concentration were measured experimentally. Full cycle engine simulations were performed using CONVERGE™ and the simulation results matched with the experimental results. The in-cylinder soot particle evolution was performed by coupling a reduced toluene reference fuel mechanism including the PAHs formation/oxidation reactions with particulate size mimic model. The results showed that PPC presents typical stratified combustion characteristics, which is significantly different from the conventional diesel spray-driven combustion. The in-cylinder temperature and equivalence ratio overlaid with soot-NO formation regime revealed that PPC operating condition under study mostly avoided the main sooting conditions throughout the entire combustion. The evaluation of temperature distribution showed formaldehyde could be regarded as an indicator for low temperature reactions, while hydroxyl group represents the high temperature reactions. Soot evolution happened during the combustion process, hydroxyl radicals promoted the soot oxidation.

  3. Establishment of Combustion Model for Isooctane HCCI Marine Diesel Engine and Research on the Combustion Characteristic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Biao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI combustion mode applied in marine diesel engine is expected to be one of alternative technologies to decrease nitrogen oxide (NOX emission and improve energy utilization rate. Applying the chemical-looping combustion (CLC mechanism inside the cylinder, a numerical study on the HCCI combustion process is performed taking a marine diesel engine as application object. The characteristic feature of combustion process is displayed. On this basis, the formation and emission of NOX are analyzed and discussed. The results indicate that the HCCI combustion mode always exhibit two combustion releasing heats: low-temperature reaction and high-temperature reaction. The combustion phase is divided into low-temperature reaction zone, high-temperature reaction zone and negative temperature coefficient (NTC zone. The operating conditions of the high compression ratio, high intake air temperature, low inlet pressure and small excess air coefficient would cause the high in-cylinder pressure which often leads engine detonation. The low compression ratio, low intake air temperature and big excess air coefficient would cause the low combustor temperature which is conducive to reduce NOX emissions. These technological means and operating conditions are expected to meet the NOX emissions limits in MARPOL73/78 Convention-Annex VI Amendment.

  4. Numerical simulation of combustion and soot under partially premixed combustion of low-octane gasoline

    KAUST Repository

    An, Yanzhao; Jaasim, Mohammed; Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; Im, Hong G.; Johansson, Bengt.

    2017-01-01

    In-cylinder combustion visualization and engine-out soot particle emissions were investigated in an optical diesel engine fueled with low octane gasoline. Single injection strategy with an early injection timing (−30 CAD aTDC) was employed to achieve partially premixed combustion (PPC) condition. A high-speed color camera was used to record the combustion images for 150 cycles. The regulated emission of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and soot mass concentration were measured experimentally. Full cycle engine simulations were performed using CONVERGE™ and the simulation results matched with the experimental results. The in-cylinder soot particle evolution was performed by coupling a reduced toluene reference fuel mechanism including the PAHs formation/oxidation reactions with particulate size mimic model. The results showed that PPC presents typical stratified combustion characteristics, which is significantly different from the conventional diesel spray-driven combustion. The in-cylinder temperature and equivalence ratio overlaid with soot-NO formation regime revealed that PPC operating condition under study mostly avoided the main sooting conditions throughout the entire combustion. The evaluation of temperature distribution showed formaldehyde could be regarded as an indicator for low temperature reactions, while hydroxyl group represents the high temperature reactions. Soot evolution happened during the combustion process, hydroxyl radicals promoted the soot oxidation.

  5. Research in Supercritical Fuel Properties and Combustion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-18

    identified reactions needing further study and C-2 and C-3 species to add to the mechanism . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Supercritical fluids , Brillouin scattering...kinetics mechanism for combustion of hydrocarbon fuels containing up to 2 carbon atoms, including uncertainties. • We identified key reactions and...safety. The chemical mechanisms for combustion of all of these fuels share the same set of elementary reactions of smaller-fragment hydrocarbons , and

  6. Internal Heterogeneous Processes in Aluminum Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreizin, E. L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the aluminum particle combustion mechanism which has been expanded by inclusion of gas dissolution processes and ensuing internal phase transformations. This mechanism is proposed based on recent normal and microgravity experiments with particles formed and ignited in a pulsed micro-arc. Recent experimental findings on the three stages observed in Al particle combustion in air and shows the burning particle radiation, trajectory (streak), smoke cloud shapes, and quenched particle interiors are summarized. During stage I, the radiation trace is smooth and the particle flame is spherically symmetric. The temperature measured using a three-color pyrometer is close to 3000 K. Because it exceeds the aluminum boiling point (2730 K), this temperature most likely characterizes the vapor phase flame zone rather than the aluminum surface. The dissolved oxygen content within particles quenched during stage I was below the detection sensitivity (about 1 atomic %) for Wavelength Dispersive Spectroscopy (WDS). After an increase in the radiation intensity (and simultaneous decrease in the measured color temperature from about 3000 to 2800 K) indicative of the transition to stage II combustion, the internal compositions of the quenched particles change. Both oxygen-rich (approx. 10 atomic %) and oxygen-lean (combustion behavior and the evolution of its internal composition, the change from the spherically symmetric to asymmetric flame shape occurring upon the transition from stage I to stage II combustion could not be understood based only on the fact that dissolved oxygen is detected in the particles. The connection between the two phenomena appeared even less significant because in earlier aluminum combustion studies carried in O2/Ar mixtures, flame asymmetry was not observed as opposed to experiments in air or O2/CO mixtures. It has been proposed that the presence of other gases, i.e., hydrogen, or nitrogen causes the change in the combustion regime.

  7. Epigenetic mechanisms in pulmonary arterial hypertension: the need for global perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Chelladurai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a severe and progressive disease, characterised by high pulmonary artery pressure that usually culminates in right heart failure. Recent findings of alterations in the DNA methylation state of superoxide dismutase 2 and granulysin gene loci; histone H1 levels; aberrant expression levels of histone deacetylases and bromodomain-containing protein 4; and dysregulated microRNA networks together suggest the involvement of epigenetics in PAH pathogenesis. Thus, PAH pathogenesis evidently involves the interplay of a predisposed genetic background, epigenetic state and injurious events. Profiling the genome-wide alterations in the epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation or histone modification pattern in PAH vascular cells, may explain the great variability in susceptibility and disease severity that is frequently associated with pronounced remodelling and worse clinical outcome. Moreover, the influence of genetic predisposition and the acquisition of epigenetic alterations in response to environmental cues in PAH progression and establishment has largely been unexplored on a genome-wide scale. In order to gain insights into the molecular mechanisms leading to the development of PAH and to design novel therapeutic strategies, high-throughput approaches have to be adopted to facilitate systematic identification of the disease-specific networks using next-generation sequencing technologies, the application of these technologies in PAH has been relatively trivial to date.

  8. Sandia Combustion Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, S.C.; Palmer, R.E.; Montana, C.A. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    During the late 1970s, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy (DOE) a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''user facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative-involving US inventories, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions several research projects which have been simulated by working groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship program, supported through the Office of Energy Research, has been instrumental in the success of some of these joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents results of calendar year 1988, separated thematically into eleven categories. Referred journal articles appearing in print during 1988 and selected other publications are included at the end of Section 11. Our traditional'' research activities--combustion chemistry, reacting flows, diagnostics, engine and coal combustion--have been supplemented by a new effort aimed at understanding combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

  9. Combustion of lean hydrogen-air mixtures in the connected compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Liu; Yoshio Yoshizawa; Akio Miyori; Kenya Kubota

    1997-01-01

    A study of combustion experiments with premixed lean hydrogen-air mixtures was conducted in a vessel consisting of two compartments connected by a diameter-variable vent. Effects of various parameters (hydrogen concentration, vent diameter and initial pressure) on mechanical loads of the combustion processes including mainly the peak pressures and the rates of pressure rise were investigated. Relation of flow and combustion was approached. Ignition-combustion processes were discussed, and the combustion types were classified into three patterns according to the pressure-time histories and the flow characteristics in main combustion compartment

  10. Potential of mechanical metamaterials to induce their own global rotational motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, K. K.; Wojciechowski, K. W.; Dudek, M. R.; Gatt, R.; Mizzi, L.; Grima, J. N.

    2018-05-01

    The potential of several classes of mechanical metamaterials to induce their own overall rotational motion through the individual rotation of their subunits is examined. Using a theoretical approach, we confirm that for various rotating rigid unit systems, if by design the sum of angular momentum of subunits rotating in different directions is made to be unequal, then the system will experience an overall rotation, the extent of which may be controlled through careful choice of the geometric parameters defining these systems. This phenomenon of self-induced rotation is also confirmed experimentally. Furthermore, we discuss how these systems can be designed in a special way so as to permit extended rotations which allows them to overcome geometric lockage and the relevance of this concept in applications ranging from satellites to spacecraft and telescopes employed in space.

  11. Degradation mechanisms of sulfonated poly-aromatic membranes in fuel cell; Mecanismes de degradation des membranes polyaromatiques sulfonees en pile a combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrot, C

    2006-11-15

    Fuel cell development requires an improvement in the electrode-membrane assembly durability which depends on both the polymer used and the fuel cell operating conditions. The origin of the degradation can be either electrochemical, chemical and/or mechanical. This study deals with the understanding of alternative membranes ageing mechanisms, i.e. non fluorinated membranes, such as sPEEK and sPI. For this kind of membranes, the first process is chemical. Understanding these mechanisms is the first essential step to develop more stable structures. An original approach is developed to overcome the analytical difficulties encountered with polymers. It consists in studying the degradation mechanism on model structures. Ageing are carried out in water, with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in some cases (identified as a cause of membrane chemical ageing in the fuel cell system), and at different temperatures. The approach consists in separating the different products formed by chromatography. Then they are identified (NMR, IR, MS) and quantified. This method allows us to establish the ageing mechanism. We show that the ageing of a sPEEK structure mainly results from an attack by end chains which spreads to the whole. This mechanism is confirmed on ex-situ and in-situ aged membranes. These two kinds of ageing lead to an important decrease in polymerisation degree (determined by SEC). Formation of the same degradation products is observed. In fuel cells, a heterogeneous degradation is noticed. It takes place mainly on the cathode side. sPI are known for their high sensitivity to hydrolysis. Nevertheless, we highlight a limited degradation at 80 Celsius degrees due to the recombination of hydrolyzed species at this temperature. (author)

  12. Global insights into acetic acid resistance mechanisms and genetic stability of Acetobacter pasteurianus strains by comparative genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Tao; Chen, Wanping; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-12-01

    Acetobacter pasteurianus (Ap) CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 are two acetic acid bacteria strains that, because of their strong abilities to produce and tolerate high concentrations of acetic acid, have been widely used to brew vinegar in China. To globally understand the fermentation characteristics, acid-tolerant mechanisms and genetic stabilities, their genomes were sequenced. Genomic comparisons with 9 other sequenced Ap strains revealed that their chromosomes were evolutionarily conserved, whereas the plasmids were unique compared with other Ap strains. Analysis of the acid-tolerant metabolic pathway at the genomic level indicated that the metabolism of some amino acids and the known mechanisms of acetic acid tolerance, might collaboratively contribute to acetic acid resistance in Ap strains. The balance of instability factors and stability factors in the genomes of Ap CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 strains might be the basis for their genetic stability, consistent with their stable industrial performances. These observations provide important insights into the acid resistance mechanism and the genetic stability of Ap strains and lay a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of these two strains.

  13. Global patterns and substrate-based mechanisms of the terrestrial nitrogen cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Shuli; Classen, Aimée T; Dukes, Jeffrey S; Kardol, Paul; Liu, Lingli; Luo, Yiqi; Rustad, Lindsey; Sun, Jian; Tang, Jianwu; Templer, Pamela H; Thomas, R Quinn; Tian, Dashuan; Vicca, Sara; Wang, Ying-Ping; Xia, Jianyang; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition is impacting the services that ecosystems provide to humanity. However, the mechanisms determining impacts on the N cycle are not fully understood. To explore the mechanistic underpinnings of N impacts on N cycle processes, we reviewed and synthesised recent progress in ecosystem N research through empirical studies, conceptual analysis and model simulations. Experimental and observational studies have revealed that the stimulation of plant N uptake and soil retention generally diminishes as N loading increases, while dissolved and gaseous losses of N occur at low N availability but increase exponentially and become the dominant fate of N at high loading rates. The original N saturation hypothesis emphasises sequential N saturation from plant uptake to soil retention before N losses occur. However, biogeochemical models that simulate simultaneous competition for soil N substrates by multiple processes match the observed patterns of N losses better than models based on sequential competition. To enable better prediction of terrestrial N cycle responses to N loading, we recommend that future research identifies the response functions of different N processes to substrate availability using manipulative experiments, and incorporates the measured N saturation response functions into conceptual, theoretical and quantitative analyses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  14. The mechanism of erythrocyte sedimentation. Part 2: The global collapse of settling erythrocyte network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribush, A; Meyerstein, D; Meyerstein, N

    2010-01-01

    Results reported in the companion paper showed that erythrocytes in quiescent blood are combined into a network followed by the formation of plasma channels within it. This study is focused on structural changes in the settling dispersed phase subsequent to the channeling and the effect of the structural organization on the sedimentation rate. It is suggested that the initial, slow stage of erythrocyte sedimentation is mainly controlled by the gravitational compactness of the collapsed network. The lifetime of RBC network and hence the duration of the slow regime of erythrocyte sedimentation decrease with an increase in the intercellular pair potential and with a decrease in Hct. The gravitational compactness of the collapsed network causes its rupture into individual fragments. The catastrophic collapse of the network transforms erythrocyte sedimentation from slow to fast regime. The size of RBC network fragment is insignificantly affected by Hct and is mainly determined by the intensity of intercellular attractive interactions. When cells were suspended in the weak aggregating medium, the Stokes radius of fragments does not differ measurably from that of individual RBCs. The proposed mechanism provides a reasonable explanation of the effects of RBC aggregation, Hct and the initial height of the blood column on the delayed erythrocyte sedimentation.

  15. On the influence of steam on combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, M.A.F.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, a numerical simulation study is presented of the influence of steam on premixed and partially premixed combustion. Both laminar (premixed) and turbulent (partially premixed) calculations are presented. The laminar calculations were performed using a detailed chemical mechanism and

  16. An Independent Review and Accountability Mechanism for the Sustainable Development Goals: The Possibilities of a Framework Convention on Global Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Eric A

    2016-06-01

    The Framework Convention on Global Health (FCGH), a proposed global treaty to be rooted in the right to health and aimed at health equity, could establish a nuanced, layered, and multi-faceted regime of compliance with, and accountability to, the right to health. In so doing, it would significantly strengthen accountability for the health-related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which it would encompass. Legally binding, the FCGH could facilitate accountability through the courts and catalyze comprehensive domestic accountability regimes, requiring national strategies that include transparency, community and national mechanisms for accountability and participation and an enabling environment for social empowerment. A "Right to Health Capacity Fund" could ensure resources to implement these strategies. Inclusive national processes could establish targets, benchmarks, and indicators consistent with FCGH guidance, with regular reporting to a treaty body, which could also hear individual cases. State reports could be required to include plans to overcome implementation gaps, subjecting poorly complying states to penalties and targeted capacity building measures. Regional special rapporteurs could facilitate compliance through regular country visits, while also responding to serious violations. And reaching beyond government compliance, from capacity building to the courts and contractual obligations, the FCGH could establish nationally enforceable right to health obligations on the private sector.

  17. Global reaction mechanism for the auto-ignition of full boiling range gasoline and kerosene fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersickel, A.; Wright, Y. M.; Boulouchos, K.

    2013-12-01

    Compact reaction schemes capable of predicting auto-ignition are a prerequisite for the development of strategies to control and optimise homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines. In particular for full boiling range fuels exhibiting two stage ignition a tremendous demand exists in the engine development community. The present paper therefore meticulously assesses a previous 7-step reaction scheme developed to predict auto-ignition for four hydrocarbon blends and proposes an important extension of the model constant optimisation procedure, allowing for the model to capture not only ignition delays, but also the evolutions of representative intermediates and heat release rates for a variety of full boiling range fuels. Additionally, an extensive validation of the later evolutions by means of various detailed n-heptane reaction mechanisms from literature has been presented; both for perfectly homogeneous, as well as non-premixed/stratified HCCI conditions. Finally, the models potential to simulate the auto-ignition of various full boiling range fuels is demonstrated by means of experimental shock tube data for six strongly differing fuels, containing e.g. up to 46.7% cyclo-alkanes, 20% napthalenes or complex branched aromatics such as methyl- or ethyl-napthalene. The good predictive capability observed for each of the validation cases as well as the successful parameterisation for each of the six fuels, indicate that the model could, in principle, be applied to any hydrocarbon fuel, providing suitable adjustments to the model parameters are carried out. Combined with the optimisation strategy presented, the model therefore constitutes a major step towards the inclusion of real fuel kinetics into full scale HCCI engine simulations.

  18. Leading global energy and environmental transformation: Unified ASEAN biomass-based bio-energy system incorporating the clean development mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Steven; Lee, Keat Teong

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the ten member countries in the Association of Southeast Asia Nations (ASEAN) have experienced high economic growth and, in tandem, a substantial increment in energy usage and demand. Consequently, they are now under intense pressure to secure reliable energy supplies to keep up with their growth rate. Fossil fuels remain the primary source of energy for the ASEAN countries, due to economic and physical considerations. This situation has led to unrestrained emissions of greenhouse gases to the environment and thus effectively contributes to global climate change. The abundant supply of biomass from their tropical environmental conditions offers great potential for ASEAN countries to achieve self-reliance in energy supplies. This fact can simultaneously transform into the main driving force behind combating global climate change, which is associated with the usage of fossil fuels. This research article explores the potential and advantages for ASEAN investment in biomass-based bio-energy supply, processing and distribution network with an emphasis on regional collaborations. It also investigates the implementation and operational challenges in terms of political, economic and technical factors for the cross-border energy scheme. Reliance of ASEAN countries on the clean development mechanism (CDM) to address most of the impediments in developing the project is also under scrutiny. Unified co-operation among ASEAN countries in integrating biomass-based bio-energy systems and utilising the clean development mechanism (CDM) as the common effort could serve as the prime example for regional partnerships in achieving sustainable development for the energy and environmental sector in the future. -- Highlights: →A study that explores feasibility for ASEAN investment in biomass-based bio-energy. →Focus is given on regional supply, processing and distribution network. →Cross-border implementation and operational challenges are discussed thoroughly.

  19. DIMCO. A new system for mechanical and bidimensional, of nuclear fuel pins; DIMCO un nuevo sistema de calculo mecanico de combustibles nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, A

    1977-07-01

    The system developed in JEN, for: the mechanical analysis uni and bidimensional, of nuclear fuels is presented. The mathematical and numerical foundations used, are here described. And so the models developed for effects such as swelling, cracking, clad growth etc. Numerical results for several cases are presented. a) Numerical test in one and two dimensions. b) Applicability range, c) Interaction effects. d) Influence of the power history. (Author) 17 refs.

  20. Thermo-mechanical behaviour modelling of particle fuels using a multi-scale approach; Modelisation du comportement thermomecanique des combustibles a particules par une approche multi-echelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanc, V.

    2009-12-15

    Particle fuels are made of a few thousand spheres, one millimeter diameter large, compound of uranium oxide coated by confinement layers which are embedded in a graphite matrix to form the fuel element. The aim of this study is to develop a new simulation tool for thermo-mechanical behaviour of those fuels under radiations which is able to predict finely local loadings on the particles. We choose to use the square finite element method, in which two different discretization scales are used: a macroscopic homogeneous structure whose properties in each integration point are computed on a second heterogeneous microstructure, the Representative Volume Element (RVE). First part of this works is concerned by the definition of this RVE. A morphological indicator based in the minimal distance between spheres centers permit to select random sets of microstructures. The elastic macroscopic response of RVE, computed by finite element has been compared to an analytical model. Thermal and mechanical representativeness indicators of local loadings has been built from the particle failure modes. A statistical study of those criteria on a hundred of RVE showed the significance of choose a representative microstructure. In this perspective, a empirical model binding morphological indicator to mechanical indicator has been developed. Second part of the work deals with the two transition scale method which are based on the periodic homogenization. Considering a linear thermal problem with heat source in permanent condition, one showed that the heterogeneity of the heat source involve to use a second order method to localized finely the thermal field. The mechanical non-linear problem has been treats by using the iterative Cast3M algorithm, substituting to integration of the behavior law a finite element computation on the RVE. This algorithm has been validated, and coupled with thermal resolution in order to compute a radiation loading. A computation on a complete fuel element

  1. Combining mechanical-biological residual waste treatment plants with the carbonisation-combustion process; Kombination MBA mit dem Schwel-Brenn-Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diekmann, J.; Wiehn, G. [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany). Bereich Energieerzeugung

    1998-09-01

    The disposal market for household waste is strongly influenced by the legal framework governing it. A further factor that makes it difficult for the authorities responsible for disposal to decide on residual waste disposal by means of thermal or mechanical-biological treatment plants is the downward pressure on disposal prices from inexpensive, underused landfills. This makes it all the more important for a future-oriented waste management to develop a both economically and ecologically optimised waste disposal concept. In this situation there is much in favour of adopting a concept consisting of a combination of mechanical, mechanical-biological, and thermal treatment which takes due account of waste disposal concepts at the regional and supraregional scale. [Deutsch] Der Entsorgungsmarkt fuer Siedlungsabfaelle wird stark durch die Entwicklung der rechtlichen Rahmenbedingungen beeinflusst. Hinzu kommt, dass der Entscheidungsprozess der oeffentlichen Entsorgungstraeger zur Restabfallentsorgung mittels thermischer oder mechanisch-biologischer Anlagen durch den Druck auf die Entsorgungspreise aufgrund der kostenguenstigen, nicht ausgelasteten Deponien erschwert wird. Umso mehr muss das Ziel einer zukunftsorientierten Abfallwirtschaft sein, unter oekonomischen und oekologischen Gesichtspunkten ein optimiertes Abfallkonzept aufzubauen. Hier kann es sehr hilfreich sein, sich eines Konzeptes, bestehend aus der Kombination von mechanischer, mechanisch-biologischer und thermischer Behandlung unter Beruecksichtigung des regionalen und ueberregionalen Abfallkonzeptes zu bedienen. (orig./SR)

  2. Metallurgical and mechanical behaviours of PWR fuel cladding tube oxidised at high temperature; Comportements metallurqigue et mecanique des materiaux de gainage du combustible REP oxydes a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, A

    2007-12-15

    Zirconium alloys are used as cladding materials in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). As they are submitted to very extreme conditions, it is necessary to check their behaviour and especially to make sure they meet the safety criteria. They are therefore studied under typical in service-loadings but also under accidental loadings. In one of these accidental scenarios, called Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) the cladding temperature may increase above 800 C, in a steam environment, and decrease before a final quench of the cladding. During this temperature transient, the cladding is heavily oxidised, and the metallurgical changes lead to a decrease of the post quench mechanical properties. It is then necessary to correlate this drop in residual ductility to the metallurgical evolutions. This is the problem we want to address in this study: the oxidation of PWR cladding materials at high temperature in a steam environment and its consequences on post quench mechanical properties. As oxygen goes massively into the metallic part - a zirconia layer grows at the same time - during the high temperature oxidation, the claddings tubes microstructure shows three different phases that are the outer oxide layer (zirconia) and the inner metallic phases ({alpha}(O) and 'ex {beta}') - with various mechanical properties. In order to reproduce the behaviour of this multilayered material, the first part of this study consisted in creating samples with different - but homogeneous in thickness - oxygen contents, similar to those observed in the different phases of the real cladding. The study was especially focused on the {beta}-->{alpha} phase transformation upon cooling and on the resulting microstructures. A mechanism was proposed to describe this phase transformation. For instance, we conclude that for our oxygen enriched samples, the phase transformation kinetics upon cooling are ruled by the oxygen partitioning between the two allotropic phases. Then, these materials

  3. Ignition of a combustible half space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    A half space of combustible material is subjected to an arbitrary energy flux at the boundary where convection heat loss is also allowed. An asymptotic analysis of the temperature growth reveals two conditions necessary for ignition to occur. Cases of both large and order unity Lewis number are shown to lead to a nonlinear integral equation governing the thermal runaway. Some global and asymptotic properties of the integral equation are obtained.

  4. Diffusion Driven Combustion Waves in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldushin, A. P.; Matkowsky, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Filtration of gas containing oxidizer, to the reaction zone in a porous medium, due, e.g., to a buoyancy force or to an external pressure gradient, leads to the propagation of Filtration combustion (FC) waves. The exothermic reaction occurs between the fuel component of the solid matrix and the oxidizer. In this paper, we analyze the ability of a reaction wave to propagate in a porous medium without the aid of filtration. We find that one possible mechanism of propagation is that the wave is driven by diffusion of oxidizer from the environment. The solution of the combustion problem describing diffusion driven waves is similar to the solution of the Stefan problem describing the propagation of phase transition waves, in that the temperature on the interface between the burned and unburned regions is constant, the combustion wave is described by a similarity solution which is a function of the similarity variable x/square root of(t) and the wave velocity decays as 1/square root of(t). The difference between the two problems is that in the combustion problem the temperature is not prescribed, but rather, is determined as part of the solution. We will show that the length of samples in which such self-sustained combustion waves can occur, must exceed a critical value which strongly depends on the combustion temperature T(sub b). Smaller values of T(sub b) require longer sample lengths for diffusion driven combustion waves to exist. Because of their relatively small velocity, diffusion driven waves are considered to be relevant for the case of low heat losses, which occur for large diameter samples or in microgravity conditions, Another possible mechanism of porous medium combustion describes waves which propagate by consuming the oxidizer initially stored in the pores of the sample. This occurs for abnormally high pressure and gas density. In this case, uniformly propagating planar waves, which are kinetically controlled, can propagate, Diffusion of oxidizer decreases

  5. Combustion and utilization of low calorific value gases (LCVG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore, Puneet; Ray, Anjan

    2010-09-15

    Combustion becomes increasingly difficult / inefficient / impossible with decrease in hydrocarbon content / calorific value of gas with available technologies. Through analysis it was postulated that Low Calorific Value Gas would be combustible with Oxygen in existing burner equipment with minor changes, and experimentally tested in the laboratory. The broad conclusion is that LCVG (with 8% or more Hydrocarbon content) could be combusted as efficiently as a normal High CV natural gas. This creates opportunity to translate significant promise and potential of LCVG from a variety of un-conventional sources globally into reliable long term energy resources.

  6. Global atmospheric changes.

    OpenAIRE

    Piver, W T

    1991-01-01

    Increasing concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere can be directly related to global warming. In terms of human health, because a major cause of increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 is the increased combustion of fossil fuels, global warming also may result in increases in air pollutants, acid deposition, and exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. To understand better the impacts of global warming phenomena on human health, this review emphasizes the proces...

  7. The Relation between Gas Flow and Combustibility using Actual Engine (Basic Experiment of Gas Flow and Combustibility under Low Load Condition)

    OpenAIRE

    田坂, 英紀; 泉, 立哉; 木村, 正寿

    2003-01-01

    Abstract ###Consideration of the global environment problems by exhaust gas is becoming important in recent years. ###Especially about internal combustion engine, social demand has been increasing about low pollution, high ###efficiency and so on. Controlling gas flow in cylinder becomes the key getting good combustion state in ###various driving states. ###The purpose of the research is analysis about the relation between gas flow and combustibility in the cylinder. ###So we measured gas flo...

  8. Transient flow combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacina, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    Non-steady combustion problems can result from engine sources such as accelerations, decelerations, nozzle adjustments, augmentor ignition, and air perturbations into and out of the compressor. Also non-steady combustion can be generated internally from combustion instability or self-induced oscillations. A premixed-prevaporized combustor would be particularly sensitive to flow transients because of its susceptability to flashback-autoignition and blowout. An experimental program, the Transient Flow Combustion Study is in progress to study the effects of air and fuel flow transients on a premixed-prevaporized combustor. Preliminary tests performed at an inlet air temperature of 600 K, a reference velocity of 30 m/s, and a pressure of 700 kPa. The airflow was reduced to 1/3 of its original value in a 40 ms ramp before flashback occurred. Ramping the airflow up has shown that blowout is more sensitive than flashback to flow transients. Blowout occurred with a 25 percent increase in airflow (at a constant fuel-air ratio) in a 20 ms ramp. Combustion resonance was found at some conditions and may be important in determining the effects of flow transients.

  9. Combustion and regulation; Combustion et reglementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This conference was organized after the publication of the French by-law no 2010 relative to combustion installations and to the abatement of atmospheric pollution. Five topics were discussed during the conference: the new regulations, their content, innovations and modalities of application; the means of energy suppliers to face the new provisions and their schedule; the manufacturers proposals for existing installations and the new equipments; the administration control; and the impact of the new measures on exploitation and engineering. Twenty papers and 2 journal articles are reported in these proceedings. (J.S.)

  10. Understanding Combustion Processes Through Microgravity Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronney, Paul D.

    1998-01-01

    A review of research on the effects of gravity on combustion processes is presented, with an emphasis on a discussion of the ways in which reduced-gravity experiments and modeling has led to new understanding. Comparison of time scales shows that the removal of buoyancy-induced convection leads to manifestations of other transport mechanisms, notably radiative heat transfer and diffusional processes such as Lewis number effects. Examples from premixed-gas combustion, non-premixed gas-jet flames, droplet combustion, flame spread over solid and liquid fuels, and other fields are presented. Promising directions for new research are outlined, the most important of which is suggested to be radiative reabsorption effects in weakly burning flames.

  11. Mechanical Properties and Fabrication of Nanostructured Mg_2SiO_4-MgAl_2O_4 Composites by High-Frequency Induction Heated Combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shon, In-Jin; Kang, Hyun-Su; Hong, Kyung-Tae; Doh, Jung-Mann; Yoon, Jin-Kook

    2011-01-01

    Nanopowders of MgO, Al_2O_3 and SiO_2 were made by high energy ball milling. The rapid sintering of nanostructured MgAl_2O_4-Mg_2SiO_4 composites was investigated by a high-frequency induction heating sintering process. The advantage of this process is that it allows very quick densification to near theoretical density and inhibition of grain growth. Nanocrystalline materials have received much attention as advanced engineering materials with improved physical and mechanical properties. As nanomaterials possess high strength, high hardness, excellent ductility and toughness, undoubtedly, more attention has been paid for the application of nanomaterials. Highly dense nanostructured MgAl_2O_4-Mg_2SiO_4 composites were produced with simultaneous application of 80 MPa pressure and induced output current of total power capacity (15 kW) within 2 min. The sintering behavior, gain size and mechanical properties of MgAl_2O_4-Mg_2SiO_4 composites were investigated.

  12. Miniaturization limitations of rotary internal combustion engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Zuo, Zhengxing; Liu, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Developed a phenomenological model for rotary internal combustion engines. • Presented scaling laws for the performance of micro rotary engines. • Adiabatic walls can improve the cycle efficiency but result in higher charge leakage. • A lower compression ratio can increase the efficiency due to lower mass losses. • Presented possible minimum engine size of rotary internal combustion engines. - Abstract: With the rapid development of micro electro-mechanical devices, the demands for micro power generation systems have significantly increased in recent years. Traditional chemical batteries have energy densities much lower than hydrocarbon fuels, which makes internal-combustion-engine an attractive technological alternative to batteries. Micro rotary internal combustion engine has drawn great attractions due to its planar design, which is well-suited for fabrication in MEMS. In this paper, a phenomenological model considering heat transfer and mass leakage has been developed to investigate effects of engine speed, compression ratio, blow-by and heat transfer on the performance of micro rotary engine, which provide the guidelines for preliminary design of rotary engine. The lower possible miniaturization limits of rotary combustion engines are proposed.

  13. Neutrophil Leukocyte: Combustive Microbicidal Action and Chemiluminescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. Allen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil leukocytes protect against a varied and complex array of microbes by providing microbicidal action that is simple, potent, and focused. Neutrophils provide such action via redox reactions that change the frontier orbitals of oxygen (O2 facilitating combustion. The spin conservation rules define the symmetry barrier that prevents direct reaction of diradical O2 with nonradical molecules, explaining why combustion is not spontaneous. In burning, the spin barrier is overcome when energy causes homolytic bond cleavage producing radicals capable of reacting with diradical O2 to yield oxygenated radical products that further participate in reactive propagation. Neutrophil mediated combustion is by a different pathway. Changing the spin quantum state of O2 removes the symmetry restriction to reaction. Electronically excited singlet molecular oxygen (O2*1 is a potent electrophilic reactant with a finite lifetime that restricts its radius of reactivity and focuses combustive action on the target microbe. The resulting exergonic dioxygenation reactions produce electronically excited carbonyls that relax by light emission, that is, chemiluminescence. This overview of neutrophil combustive microbicidal action takes the perspectives of spin conservation and bosonic-fermionic frontier orbital considerations. The necessary principles of particle physics and quantum mechanics are developed and integrated into a fundamental explanation of neutrophil microbicidal metabolism.

  14. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D.; Swank, W. David

    2013-04-02

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  15. Optical Tomography in Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evseev, Vadim

    spectral measurements at several line-of-sights with a view to applications for tomographic measurements on full-scale industrial combustion systems. The system was successfully applied on industrial scale for simultaneous fast exhaust gas temperature measurements in the three optical ports of the exhaust......D project, it was also important to investigate the spectral properties of major combustion species such as carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in the infrared range at high temperatures to provide the theoretical background for the development of the optical tomography methods. The new software....... JQSRT 113 (2012) 2222, 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2012.07.015] included in the PhD thesis as an attachment. The knowledge and experience gained in the PhD project is the first important step towards introducing the advanced optical tomography methods of combustion diagnostics developed in the project to future...

  16. Internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Quentin A.; Mecredy, Henry E.; O'Neal, Glenn B.

    1991-01-01

    An improved engine is provided that more efficiently consumes difficult fuels such as coal slurries or powdered coal. The engine includes a precombustion chamber having a portion thereof formed by an ignition plug. The precombustion chamber is arranged so that when the piston is proximate the head, the precombustion chamber is sealed from the main cylinder or the main combustion chamber and when the piston is remote from the head, the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication. The time for burning of fuel in the precombustion chamber can be regulated by the distance required to move the piston from the top dead center position to the position wherein the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication.

  17. Aerodynamic properties of turbulent combustion fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, C. C.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    Flow fields involving turbulent flames in premixed gases under a variety of conditions are modeled by the use of a numerical technique based on the random vortex method to solve the Navier-Stokes equations and a flame propagation algorithm to trace the motion of the front and implement the Huygens principle, both due to Chorin. A successive over-relaxation hybrid method is applied to solve the Euler equation for flows in an arbitrarily shaped domain. The method of images, conformal transformation, and the integral-equation technique are also used to treat flows in special cases, according to their particular requirements. Salient features of turbulent flame propagation in premixed gases are interpreted by relating them to the aerodynamic properties of the flow field. Included among them is the well-known cellular structure of flames stabilized by bluff bodies, as well as the formation of the characteristic tulip shape of flames propagating in ducts. In its rudimentary form, the mechanism of propagation of a turbulent flame is shown to consist of: (1) rotary motion of eddies at the flame front, (2) self-advancement of the front at an appropriate normal burning speed, and (3) dynamic effects of expansion due to exothermicity of the combustion reaction. An idealized model is used to illustrate these fundamental mechanisms and to investigate basic aerodynamic features of flames in premixed gases. The case of a confined flame stabilized behind a rearward-facing step is given particular care and attention. Solutions are shown to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental results, especially with respect to global properties such as the average velocity profiles and reattachment length.

  18. Advances in Turbulent Combustion Dynamics Simulations in Bluff-Body Stabilized Flames-Body Stabilized Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-30

    during combustion for GRI -Mech 1.2 reaction mechanism using LEM and CHEMKIN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 3.7 Comparison of temperature during...combustion for GRI -Mech 1.2 raction mechanism using LEM and CHEMKIN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 3.8 The methane profile along the 5 mm long...combustion process was tested using GRI -Mech 1.2 [44]. GRI -Mech is an optimized detailed chemical reaction mechanism capable of the best representation of

  19. Fuel and combustion stratification study of Partially Premixed Combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Dam, N.; Somers, B.; Johansson, B.

    2016-01-01

    Relatively high levels of stratification is one of the main advantages of Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) over the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) concept. Fuel stratification smoothens heat release and improves controllability of this kind of combustion. However, the lack of a clear definition of “fuel and combustion stratifications” is obvious in literature. Hence, it is difficult to compare stratification levels of different PPC strategies or other combustion concepts. T...

  20. High Gravity (g) Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    UNICORN (Unsteady Ignition and Combustion with Reactions) code10. Flame propagation in a tube that is 50-mm wide and 1000-mm long (similar to that...turbine engine manufacturers, estimating the primary zone space heating rate. Both combustion systems, from Company A and Company B, required a much...MBTU/atm-hr-ft3) Te m pe ra tu re R is e (K ) dP/P = 2% dP/P = 2.5% dP/P = 3% dP/P = 3.5% dP/P = 4% Company A Company B Figure 13: Heat Release Rate

  1. Combustibility of tetraphenylborate solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid slurries expected under normal in-tank processing (ITP) operations are not ignitible because of their high water content. However, deposits of dry solids from the slurries are combustible and produce dense, black smoke when burned. The dry solids burn similarly to Styrofoam and more easily than sawdust. It is the opinion of fire hazard experts that a benzene vapor deflagration could ignite the dry solids. A tetraphenylborate solids fire will rapidly plug the waste tank HEPA ventilation filters due to the nature of the smoke produced. To prevent ignition and combustion of these solids, the waste tanks have been equipped with a nitrogen inerting system

  2. United Nations Global Compact as a Corporate Social Responsibility Mechanism: A Case Study of Krüger A/S

    OpenAIRE

    Bereng, Reitumetse Esther

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Over the years, copious research has been done on variety of voluntary sustainable development initiatives including Corporate Social Responsibility. This research takes a different route to Corporate Social Responsibility, by looking into this voluntary initiative through the spectrum of the United Nations Global Compact. It looks into the United Nations Global Compact as a mechanism for Corporate Social Responsibility in order to find out the true motives behind Krüger A/S engagin...

  3. Combustion stratification for naphtha from CI combustion to PPC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; An, Y.; Dawood, A.; Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Somers, L.M.T.; Johansson, B.H.

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrated the change in combustion homogeneity from conventional diesel combustion via partially premixed combustion towards HCCI. Experiments are performed in an optical diesel engine at a speed of 1200 rpm with diesel fuel. Single injection strategy is employed and the fuel is

  4. Heterotrophic compensation: a possible mechanism for resilience of coral reefs to global warming or a sign of prolonged stress?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Hughes

    Full Text Available Thermally induced bleaching has caused a global decline in corals and the frequency of such bleaching events will increase. Thermal bleaching severely disrupts the trophic behaviour of the coral holobiont, reducing the photosynthetically derived energy available to the coral host. In the short term this reduction in energy transfer from endosymbiotic algae results in an energy deficit for the coral host. If the bleaching event is short-lived then the coral may survive this energy deficit by depleting its lipid reserves, or by increasing heterotrophic energy acquisition. We show for the first time that the coral animal is capable of increasing the amount of heterotrophic carbon incorporated into its tissues for almost a year following bleaching. This prolonged heterotrophic compensation could be a sign of resilience or prolonged stress. If the heterotrophic compensation is in fact an acclimatization response, then this physiological response could act as a buffer from future bleaching by providing sufficient heterotrophic energy to compensate for photoautotrophic energy losses during bleaching, and potentially minimizing the effect of subsequent elevated temperature stresses. However, if the elevated incorporation of zooplankton is a sign that the effects of bleaching continue to be stressful on the holobiont, even after 11 months of recovery, then this physiological response would indicate that complete coral recovery requires more than 11 months to achieve. If coral bleaching becomes an annual global phenomenon by mid-century, then present temporal refugia will not be sufficient to allow coral colonies to recover between bleaching events and coral reefs will become increasingly less resilient to future climate change. If, however, increasing their sequestration of zooplankton-derived nutrition into their tissues over prolonged periods of time is a compensating mechanism, the impacts of annual bleaching may be reduced. Thus, some coral species

  5. Toxicology of Biodiesel Combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Introduction The toxicology of combusted biodiesel is an emerging field. Much of the current knowledge about biological responses and health effects stems from studies of exposures to other fuel sources (typically petroleum diesel, gasoline, and wood) incompletely combusted. ...

  6. Underground treatment of combustible minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarapuu, E

    1954-10-14

    A process is described for treating oil underground, consisting in introducing several electrodes spaced one from the other in a bed of combustibles underground so that they come in electric contact with this bed of combustibles remaining insulated from the ground, and applying to the electrodes a voltage sufficient to produce an electric current across the bed of combustibles, so as to heat it and create an electric connection between the electrodes on traversing the bed of combustibles.

  7. Alteration mechanisms of UOX spent fuel under water; Mecanismes d'alteration sous eau du combustible irradie de type UOX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzeau, B

    2008-06-15

    The mechanisms of spent fuel alteration in aqueous media need to be understood on the assumption of a direct disposal of the assemblies in a geological formation or for long duration storage in pool. This work is a contribution to the study of the effects of the alpha and/or beta/gamma radiolysis of water on the oxidation and the dissolution of the UO{sub 2} matrix of UOX spent fuel. The effects of the alpha radiolysis, predominant in geological disposal conditions, were quantified by using samples of UO{sub 2} doped with plutonium. The leaching experiments highlighted two types of control for the matrix alteration according to the alpha activity. The first is based on the radiolytic oxidation of the surface and leads to a continuous release of uranium in solution whereas the second is based on a control by the solubility of uranium. An activity threshold, between 18 MBq.g{sup -1} and 33 MBq.g{sup -1}, was defined in a carbonated water. The value of this threshold is dependent on the experimental conditions and the presence or not of electro-active species such as hydrogen in the system. The effects of the alpha/beta/gamma radiolysis in relation with the storage conditions were also quantified. The experimental data obtained on spent fuel indicate that the alteration rate of the matrix based on the behaviour of tracer elements (caesium and strontium) reached a maximum value of some mg.m{sup -2}.d{sup -1}, even under very oxidizing conditions. The solubility of uranium and the nature of the secondary phases depend however on the extent of the oxidizing conditions. (author)

  8. Alteration mechanisms of UOX spent fuel in aqueous media; Mecanismes d'alteration sous eau du combustible irradie de type UOX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzeau, B

    2007-06-15

    The mechanisms of underwater alteration of spent fuels need to be understood on the assumption of a direct disposal of the assemblies in a geological formation or for long duration storage in pool. This work is a contribution to the study of the effects of the alpha and/or beta/gamma radiolysis of water on the oxidation and the dissolution of the UO{sub 2} matrix of UOX spent fuel. The effects of the alpha radiolysis, predominant in geological disposal conditions, were quantified using samples of UO{sub 2} doped with plutonium. The leaching experiments highlighted two types of control for the matrix alteration according to the alpha activity. The first is based on the radiolytic oxidation of the surface and leads to a continuous release of uranium in solution whereas the second is based on a control by the solubility of uranium. An activity threshold, located between 18 MBq/g and 33 MBq/g, was defined in a carbonated water. The value of this threshold is dependent on the experimental conditions and the presence or not of electro-active species such as hydrogen in the system. The effects of the alpha/beta/gamma radiolysis in relation with the storage conditions were also quantified. The experimental data obtained on spent fuel indicate that the alteration rate of the matrix based on the behaviour of tracer elements (caesium and strontium) reached a maximum value of some mg.m{sup -2}.d{sup -1}, even under very oxidizing conditions. The solubility of uranium and the nature of the secondary phases depend however on the extent of the oxidizing conditions. (author)

  9. Supersonic Combustion Ramjet Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    was in collaboration with Prof. R. Bowersox (Texas A&M University) and Dr. K. Kobayashi ( Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA). 4.2 Ignition... cinema stereoscopic PIV system for the measurement of micro- and meso-scale turbulent premixed flame dynamics,” Paper B13, 5th US Combustion

  10. Infrared monitoring of combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, S.C.; Morrison, P.W. Jr.; Solomon, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the use of Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy for combustion monitoring is described. A combination of emission, transmission, and reflection FT-IR spectroscopy yields data on the temperature and composition of the gases, surfaces and suspended particles in the combustion environment. Detection sensitivity of such trace exhaust gases as CO, CO 2 , SO 2 , NO x , and unburned hydrocarbons is at the ppm level. Tomographic reconstruction converts line-of-sight measurements into spatially resolved temperature and concentration data. Examples from various combustion processes are used to demonstrate the capabilities of the technique. Industrial measurements are described that have been performed directly in the combustion zone and in the exhaust duct of a large chemical recovery boiler. Other measurements of hot slag show how FT-IR spectroscopy can determine the temperature and optical properties of surfaces. In addition, experiments with water droplets show that transmission FT-IR data yield spectra that characterize particle size and number density

  11. Combustible dust tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sugar dust explosion in Georgia on February 7, 2008 killed 14 workers and injured many others (OSHA, 2009). As a consequence of this explosion, OSHA revised its Combustible Dust National Emphasis (NEP) program. The NEP targets 64 industries with more than 1,000 inspections and has found more tha...

  12. Direct Numerical Simulations for Combustion Science: Past, Present, and Future

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.

    2017-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion have evolved tremendously in the past decades, thanks to the rapid advances in high performance computing technology. Today’s DNS is capable of incorporating detailed reaction mechanisms and transport properties, with physical parameter ranges approaching laboratory scale flames, thereby allowing direct comparison and cross-validation against laser diagnostic measurements. While these developments have led to significantly improved understanding of fundamental turbulent flame characteristics, there are increasing demands to explore combustion regimes at higher levels of turbulent Reynolds (Re) and Karlovitz (Ka) numbers, with a practical interest in new combustion engines driving towards higher efficiencies and lower emissions. This chapter attempts to provide a brief historical review of the progress in DNS of turbulent combustion during the past decades. Major scientific accomplishments and contributions towards fundamental understanding of turbulent combustion will be summarized and future challenges and research needs will be proposed.

  13. Direct Numerical Simulations for Combustion Science: Past, Present, and Future

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.

    2017-12-12

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion have evolved tremendously in the past decades, thanks to the rapid advances in high performance computing technology. Today’s DNS is capable of incorporating detailed reaction mechanisms and transport properties, with physical parameter ranges approaching laboratory scale flames, thereby allowing direct comparison and cross-validation against laser diagnostic measurements. While these developments have led to significantly improved understanding of fundamental turbulent flame characteristics, there are increasing demands to explore combustion regimes at higher levels of turbulent Reynolds (Re) and Karlovitz (Ka) numbers, with a practical interest in new combustion engines driving towards higher efficiencies and lower emissions. This chapter attempts to provide a brief historical review of the progress in DNS of turbulent combustion during the past decades. Major scientific accomplishments and contributions towards fundamental understanding of turbulent combustion will be summarized and future challenges and research needs will be proposed.

  14. E25 stratified torch ignition engine emissions and combustion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Filho, Fernando Antonio; Baêta, José Guilherme Coelho; Teixeira, Alysson Fernandes; Valle, Ramón Molina; Fonseca de Souza, José Leôncio

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A stratified torch ignition (STI) engine was built and tested. • The STI engines was tested in a wide range of load and speed. • Significant reduction on emissions was achieved by means of the STI system. • Low cyclic variability characterized the lean combustion process of the torch ignition engine. • HC emission is the main drawback of the stratified torch ignition engine. - Abstract: Vehicular emissions significantly increase atmospheric air pollution and greenhouse gases (GHG). This fact associated with fast global vehicle fleet growth calls for prompt scientific community technological solutions in order to promote a significant reduction in vehicle fuel consumption and emissions, especially of fossil fuels to comply with future legislation. To meet this goal, a prototype stratified torch ignition (STI) engine was built from a commercial existing baseline engine. In this system, combustion starts in a pre-combustion chamber, where the pressure increase pushes the combustion jet flames through calibrated nozzles to be precisely targeted into the main chamber. These combustion jet flames are endowed with high thermal and kinetic energy, being able to generate a stable lean combustion process. The high kinetic and thermal energy of the combustion jet flame results from the load stratification. This is carried out through direct fuel injection in the pre-combustion chamber by means of a prototype gasoline direct injector (GDI) developed for a very low fuel flow rate. In this work the engine out-emissions of CO, NOx, HC and CO_2 of the STI engine are presented and a detailed analysis supported by the combustion parameters is conducted. The results obtained in this work show a significant decrease in the specific emissions of CO, NOx and CO_2 of the STI engine in comparison with the baseline engine. On the other hand, HC specific emission increased due to wall wetting from the fuel hitting in the pre-combustion chamber wall.

  15. Studies of global warming and global energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Atsushi

    1993-01-01

    Global warming caused by increase in atmospheric CO 2 concentration has been the focus of many recent global energy studies. CO 2 is emitted to the atmosphere mainly from the combustion of fossil fuels. This means that global warming is fundamentally a problem of the global energy system. An analysis of the findings of recent global energy studies is made in this report. The results are categorized from the viewpoint of concern about global warming. The analysis includes energy use and CO 2 emissions, measures taken to restrain CO 2 emissions and the cost of such measure, and suggestions for long term global energy generation. Following this comparative analysis, each of the studies is reviewed in detail. (author) 63 refs

  16. Global and Local Mechanical Responses for Necking of Rectangular Bars Using Updated and Total Lagrangian Finite Element Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio A. Careglio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In simulations of forged and stamping processes using the finite element method, load displacement paths and three-dimensional stress and strains states should be well and reliably represented. The simple tension test is a suitable and economical tool to calibrate constitutive equations with finite strains and plasticity for those simulations. A complex three-dimensional stress and strain states are developed when this test is done on rectangular bars and the necking phenomenon appears. In this work, global and local numerical results of the mechanical response of rectangular bars subjected to simple tension test obtained from two different finite element formulations are compared and discussed. To this end, Updated and Total Lagrangian formulations are used in order to get the three-dimensional stress and strain states. Geometric changes together with strain and stress distributions at the cross section where necking occurs are assessed. In particular, a detailed analysis of the effective plastic strain, stress components in axial and transverse directions and pressure, and deviatoric stress components is presented. Specific numerical results are also validated with experimental measurements comparing, in turn, the performance of the two numerical approaches used in this study.

  17. Low emission internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaba, Albert M.

    1979-01-01

    A low emission, internal combustion compression ignition engine having a cylinder, a piston movable in the cylinder and a pre-combustion chamber communicating with the cylinder near the top thereof and in which low emissions of NO.sub.x are achieved by constructing the pre-combustion chamber to have a volume of between 70% and 85% of the combined pre-chamber and main combustion chamber volume when the piston is at top dead center and by variably controlling the initiation of fuel injection into the pre-combustion chamber.

  18. 1998 annual report of advanced combustion science utilizing microgravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    For the purpose of stabilizing energy supply, diversifying energy supply sources and reducing the worsening of global environment caused by combustion exhaust gases, advanced combustion technology was studied and the FY 1998 results were summarized. Following the previous year, the following were conducted: international research jointly with NASA, experiments using microgravity test facilities of Japan Space Utilization Promotion Center (JSUP), evaluation studies made by universities/national research institutes/private companies, etc. In the FY 1998 joint study, a total of 52 drop experiments were carried out on 4 themes using test facilities of Japan Microgravity Center (JAMIC), and 100 experiments were conducted on one theme using test facilities of NASA. In the study using microgravity test facilities, the following were carried out: study of combustion and evaporation of fuel droplets, study of ignition/combustion of fuel droplets in the suspending state, study of combustion of spherical/cylinder state liquid fuels, study of high pressure combustion of binary fuel spray, study of interaction combustion of fuel droplets in the microgravity field, etc. (NEDO)

  19. Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilik, Gregory K.; Boehman, Andre L. [The EMS Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhang, Hedan; Haworth, Daniel C. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Herreros, Jose Martin [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla La-Mancha, Avda. Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion was investigated on a DDC/VM Motori 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection light-duty diesel engine, with a focus on exhaust emissions. Hydrogen was substituted for diesel fuel on an energy basis of 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10% and 15% by aspiration of hydrogen into the engine's intake air. Four speed and load conditions were investigated (1800 rpm at 25% and 75% of maximum output and 3600 rpm at 25% and 75% of maximum output). A significant retarding of injection timing by the engine's electronic control unit (ECU) was observed during the increased aspiration of hydrogen. The retarding of injection timing resulted in significant NO{sub X} emission reductions, however, the same emission reductions were achieved without aspirated hydrogen by manually retarding the injection timing. Subsequently, hydrogen assisted diesel combustion was examined, with the pilot and main injection timings locked, to study the effects caused directly by hydrogen addition. Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion resulted in a modest increase of NO{sub X} emissions and a shift in NO/NO{sub 2} ratio in which NO emissions decreased and NO{sub 2} emissions increased, with NO{sub 2} becoming the dominant NO{sub X} component in some combustion modes. Computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD) of the hydrogen assisted diesel combustion process captured this trend and reproduced the experimentally observed trends of hydrogen's effect on the composition of NO{sub X} for some operating conditions. A model that explicitly accounts for turbulence-chemistry interactions using a transported probability density function (PDF) method was better able to reproduce the experimental trends, compared to a model that ignores the influence of turbulent fluctuations on mean chemical production rates, although the importance of the fluctuations is not as strong as has been reported in some other recent modeling studies. The CFD results confirm

  20. Nanoparticle emissions from combustion engines

    CERN Document Server

    Merkisz, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

     This book focuses on particulate matter emissions produced by vehicles with combustion engines. It describes the physicochemical properties of the particulate matter, the mechanisms of its formation and its environmental impacts (including those on human beings). It discusses methods for measuring particulate mass and number, including the state-of-the-art in Portable Emission Measurement System (PEMS) equipment for measuring the exhaust emissions of both light and heavy-duty vehicles and buses under actual operating conditions. The book presents the authors’ latest investigations into the relations between particulate emission (mass and number) and engine operating parameters, as well as their new findings obtained through road tests performed on various types of vehicles, including those using diesel particulate filter regeneration. The book, which addresses the needs of academics and professionals alike, also discusses relevant European regulations on particulate emissions and highlights selected metho...

  1. Dynamics of one- and two-dimensional fronts in a bistable equation with time-delayed global feedback: Propagation failure and control mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boubendir, Yassine; Mendez, Vicenc; Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2010-01-01

    We study the evolution of fronts in a bistable equation with time-delayed global feedback in the fast reaction and slow diffusion regime. This equation generalizes the Hodgkin-Grafstein and Allen-Cahn equations. We derive a nonlinear equation governing the motion of fronts, which includes a term with delay. In the one-dimensional case this equation is linear. We study the motion of one- and two-dimensional fronts, finding a much richer dynamics than for the previously studied cases (without time-delayed global feedback). We explain the mechanism by which localized fronts created by inhibitory global coupling loose stability in a Hopf bifurcation as the delay time increases. We show that for certain delay times, the prevailing phase is different from that corresponding to the system in the absence of global coupling. Numerical simulations of the partial differential equation are in agreement with the analytical predictions.

  2. Partially premixed prevalorized kerosene spray combustion in turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrigui, M.; Ahmadi, W.; Sadiki, A.; Janicka, J. [Institute for Energy and Powerplant Technology, TU Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 30, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Moesl, K. [Lehrstuhl fuer Thermodynamik, TU Muenchen, Boltzmannstr. 15, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    A detailed numerical simulation of kerosene spray combustion was carried out on a partially premixed, prevaporized, three-dimensional configuration. The focus was on the flame temperature profile dependency on the length of the pre-vaporization zone. The results were analyzed and compared to experimental data. A fundamental study was performed to observe the temperature variation and flame flashback. Changes were made to the droplet diameter, kerosene flammability limits, a combustion model parameter and the location of the combustion initialization. Investigations were performed for atmospheric pressure, inlet air temperature of 90 C and a global equivalence ratio of 0.7. The simulations were carried out using the Eulerian Lagrangian procedure under a fully two-way coupling. The Bray-Moss-Libby model was adjusted to account for the partially premixed combustion. (author)

  3. Environmental effects of fossil fuel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    Fossil fuel which include natural gas, petroleum, shale oil and bitumen are the main source of heat and electrical energy. All these fuels contain beside major constituents (carbon, hydrogen, oxygen) other materials as metal, sulfur and nitrogen compounds. During the combustion process different pollutants as fly ash, sulfur oxides (SO 2 and SO 3 ), nitrogen oxides (NO x NO + NO 2 ) and volatile organic compounds are emitted. Fly ash contain different trace elements (heavy metals). Gross emission of pollutants is tremendous all over the world. These pollutants are present in the atmosphere in such conditions that they can affect man and his environment. Air pollution caused by the particulate matter and other pollutants not only acts directly on environment but by contamination of water and soil leads to their degradation. Wet and dry deposition of inorganic pollutants leads to acidification of environment. These phenomena affect health of the people, increase corrosion, destroy cultivated soil and forests. Most of the plants, especially coniferous trees are not resistant to sulfur and nitrogen oxides. Following longer exposure leaves wither and fall. Widespread forest damage has been reported in Europe and North America regions. Many cultivated plants are not resistant to these pollutants either especially in the early period vegetation. The mechanisms of pollutants transformation in atmosphere are described by environmental chemistry. An important role in these transformations plays photochemistry. SO 2 and NO x are oxidized and sulfuric and nitric acids are formed in presence of water vapours, fog and droplets. Other problem discussed connected with human activities is emission of volatile organic compounds to the atmosphere. These emissions cause stratospheric ozone depletion, ground level photochemical ozone formation, toxic or carcinogenic human health effects, enhancing the global greenhouse effect, accumulation and persistence in environment. Wet flue gas

  4. Environmental effects of fossil fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewski, A G

    1999-07-01

    Fossil fuel which include natural gas, petroleum, shale oil and bitumen are the main source of heat and electrical energy. All these fuels contain beside major constituents (carbon, hydrogen, oxygen) other materials as metal, sulfur and nitrogen compounds. During the combustion process different pollutants as fly ash, sulfur oxides (SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} NO + NO{sub 2}) and volatile organic compounds are emitted. Fly ash contain different trace elements (heavy metals). Gross emission of pollutants is tremendous all over the world. These pollutants are present in the atmosphere in such conditions that they can affect man and his environment. Air pollution caused by the particulate matter and other pollutants not only acts directly on environment but by contamination of water and soil leads to their degradation. Wet and dry deposition of inorganic pollutants leads to acidification of environment. These phenomena affect health of the people, increase corrosion, destroy cultivated soil and forests. Most of the plants, especially coniferous trees are not resistant to sulfur and nitrogen oxides. Following longer exposure leaves wither and fall. Widespread forest damage has been reported in Europe and North America regions. Many cultivated plants are not resistant to these pollutants either especially in the early period vegetation. The mechanisms of pollutants transformation in atmosphere are described by environmental chemistry. An important role in these transformations plays photochemistry. SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} are oxidized and sulfuric and nitric acids are formed in presence of water vapours, fog and droplets. Other problem discussed connected with human activities is emission of volatile organic compounds to the atmosphere. These emissions cause stratospheric ozone depletion, ground level photochemical ozone formation, toxic or carcinogenic human health effects, enhancing the global greenhouse effect, accumulation and persistence in

  5. Combustion strategy : United Kingdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenhalgh, D. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edingburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom). School of Engineering and Physical Sciences

    2009-07-01

    The United Kingdom's combustion strategy was briefly presented. Government funding sources for universities were listed. The United Kingdom Research Councils that were listed included the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC); the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC); the Economic and Social Research Council; the Medical Research Council; the Natural Environment Research Council; and the Science and Technology Facilities Council. The EPSRC supported 65 grants worth 30.5 million pounds. The combustion industry was noted to be dominated by three main players of which one was by far the largest. The 3 key players were Rolls-Royce; Jaguar Land Rover; and Doosan Babcock. Industry and government involvement was also discussed for the BIS Technology Strategy Board, strategy technology areas, and strategy application areas.

  6. Fluid-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.; Schoebotham, N.

    1981-02-01

    In Energy Equipment Company's two-stage fluidized bed system, partial combustion in a fluidized bed is followed by burn-off of the generated gases above the bed. The system can be retrofitted to existing boilers, and can burn small, high ash coal efficiently. It has advantages when used as a hot gas generator for process drying. Tests on a boiler at a Cadbury Schweppes plant are reported.

  7. Study on Characteristics of Co-firing Ammonia/Methane Fuels under Oxygen Enriched Combustion Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hua; Wang, Zhaolin; Valera-Medina, Agustin; Bowen, Philip J.

    2018-06-01

    Having a background of utilising ammonia as an alternative fuel for power generation, exploring the feasibility of co-firing ammonia with methane is proposed to use ammonia to substitute conventional natural gas. However, improvement of the combustion of such fuels can be achieved using conditions that enable an increase of oxygenation, thus fomenting the combustion process of a slower reactive molecule as ammonia. Therefore, the present study looks at oxygen enriched combustion technologies, a proposed concept to improve the performance of ammonia/methane combustion. To investigate the characteristics of ammonia/methane combustion under oxygen enriched conditions, adiabatic burning velocity and burner stabilized laminar flame emissions were studied. Simulation results show that the oxygen enriched method can help to significantly enhance the propagation of ammonia/methane combustion without changing the emission level, which would be quite promising for the design of systems using this fuel for practical applications. Furthermore, to produce low computational-cost flame chemistry for detailed numerical analyses for future combustion studies, three reduced combustion mechanisms of the well-known Konnov's mechanism were compared in ammonia/methane flame simulations under practical gas turbine combustor conditions. Results show that the reduced reaction mechanisms can provide good results for further analyses of oxygen enriched combustion of ammonia/methane. The results obtained in this study also allow gas turbine designers and modellers to choose the most suitable mechanism for further combustion studies and development.

  8. Issues in waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsson, Lennart; Robertson, Kerstin; Tullin, Claes [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden); Sundquist, Lena; Wrangensten, Lars [AaF-Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Blom, Elisabet [AaF-Processdesign AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-05-01

    The main purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art on research and development issues related to waste combustion with relevance for Swedish conditions. The review focuses on co-combustion in grate and fluidised bed furnaces. It is primarily literature searches in relevant databases of scientific publications with to material published after 1995. As a complement, findings published in different report series, have also been included. Since the area covered by this report is very wide, we do not claim to cover the issues included completely and it has not been possitile to evaluate the referred studies in depth. Basic knowledge about combustion issues is not included since such information can be found elsewhere in the literature. Rather, this review should be viewed as an overview of research and development in the waste-to-energy area and as such we hope that it will inspire scientists and others to further work in relevant areas.

  9. Nonsteady Combustion Mechanisms of Advanced Solid Propellants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Branch, Melvyn

    1997-01-01

    .... The individual tasks which we are studying will pursue solid propellant decomposition under unsteady conditions, nonsteady aspects of gas phase flame structure measurements, numerical modeling...

  10. The TOMCAT global chemical transport model v1.6: description of chemical mechanism and model evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Monks

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents the tropospheric chemical mechanism scheme used in the TOMCAT 3-D chemical transport model. The current scheme includes a more detailed representation of hydrocarbon chemistry than previously included in the model, with the inclusion of the emission and oxidation of ethene, propene, butane, toluene and monoterpenes. The model is evaluated against a range of surface, balloon, aircraft and satellite measurements. The model is generally able to capture the main spatial and seasonal features of high and low concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO, ozone (O3, volatile organic compounds (VOCs and reactive nitrogen. However, model biases are found in some species, some of which are common to chemistry models and some that are specific to TOMCAT and warrant further investigation. The most notable of these biases are (1 a negative bias in Northern Hemisphere (NH winter and spring CO and a positive bias in Southern Hemisphere (SH CO throughout the year, (2 a positive bias in NH O3 in summer and a negative bias at high latitudes during SH winter and (3 a negative bias in NH winter C2 and C3 alkanes and alkenes. TOMCAT global mean tropospheric hydroxyl radical (OH concentrations are higher than estimates inferred from observations of methyl chloroform but similar to, or lower than, multi-model mean concentrations reported in recent model intercomparison studies. TOMCAT shows peak OH concentrations in the tropical lower troposphere, unlike other models which show peak concentrations in the tropical upper troposphere. This is likely to affect the lifetime and transport of important trace gases and warrants further investigation.

  11. Emissions from laboratory combustion of wildland fuels: Emission factors and source profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    L.-W. Anthony Chen; Hans Moosmuller; W. Patrick Arnott; Judith C. Chow; John G. Watson; Ronald A. Susott; Ronald E. Babbitt; Cyle E. Wold; Emily N. Lincoln; Wei Min Hao

    2007-01-01

    Combustion of wildland fuels represents a major source of particulate matter (PM) and light-absorbing elemental carbon (EC) on a national and global scale, but the emission factors and source profiles have not been well characterized with respect to different fuels and combustion phases. These uncertainties limit the accuracy of current emission inventories, smoke...

  12. Gasoline Combustion Fundamentals DOE FY17 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekoto, Isaac W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Advanced automotive gasoline engines that leverage a combination of reduced heat transfer, throttling, and mechanical losses; shorter combustion durations; and higher compression and mixture specific heat ratios are needed to meet aggressive DOE VTP fuel economy and pollutant emission targets. Central challenges include poor combustion stability at low-power conditions when large amounts of charge dilution are introduced and high sensitivity of conventional inductive coil ignition systems to elevated charge motion and density for boosted high-load operation. For conventional spark ignited operation, novel low-temperature plasma (LTP) or pre-chamber based ignition systems can improve dilution tolerances while maintaining good performance characteristics at elevated charge densities. Moreover, these igniters can improve the control of advanced compression ignition (ACI) strategies for gasoline at low to moderate loads. The overarching research objective of the Gasoline Combustion Fundamentals project is to investigate phenomenological aspects related to enhanced ignition. The objective is accomplished through targeted experiments performed in a single-cylinder optically accessible research engine or an in-house developed optically accessible spark calorimeter (OASC). In situ optical diagnostics and ex situ gas sampling measurements are performed to elucidate important details of ignition and combustion processes. Measurements are further used to develop and validate complementary high-fidelity ignition simulations. The primary project audience is automotive manufacturers, Tier 1 suppliers, and technology startups—close cooperation has resulted in the development and execution of project objectives that address crucial mid- to long-range research challenges.

  13. Steam-moderated oxy-fuel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seepana, Sivaji; Jayanti, Sreenivas

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to propose a new variant of the oxy-fuel combustion for carbondioxide (CO 2 ) sequestration in which steam is used to moderate the flame temperature. In this process, pure oxygen is mixed with steam and the resulting oxidant mixture is sent to the boiler for combustion with a fossil fuel. The advantage of this method is that flue gas recirculation is avoided and the volumetric flow rates through the boiler and auxiliary components is reduced by about 39% when compared to the conventional air-fired coal combustion power plant leading to a reduction in the size of the boiler. The flue gas, after condensation of steam, consists primarily of CO 2 and can be sent directly for compression and sequestration. Flame structure analysis has been carried out using a 325-step reaction mechanism of methane-oxidant combustion to determine the concentration of oxygen required to ensure a stable flame. Thermodynamic exergy analysis has also been carried out on SMOC-operated CO 2 sequestration power plant and air-fired power plant, which shows that though the gross efficiency increases the absolute power penalty of ∼8% for CO 2 sequestration when compared to air-fired power plant.

  14. Steam-moderated oxy-fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seepana, Sivaji; Jayanti, Sreenivas [Department of Chemical Engineering, IIT Madras, Adyar, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2010-10-15

    The objective of the present paper is to propose a new variant of the oxy-fuel combustion for carbondioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in which steam is used to moderate the flame temperature. In this process, pure oxygen is mixed with steam and the resulting oxidant mixture is sent to the boiler for combustion with a fossil fuel. The advantage of this method is that flue gas recirculation is avoided and the volumetric flow rates through the boiler and auxiliary components is reduced by about 39% when compared to the conventional air-fired coal combustion power plant leading to a reduction in the size of the boiler. The flue gas, after condensation of steam, consists primarily of CO{sub 2} and can be sent directly for compression and sequestration. Flame structure analysis has been carried out using a 325-step reaction mechanism of methane-oxidant combustion to determine the concentration of oxygen required to ensure a stable flame. Thermodynamic exergy analysis has also been carried out on SMOC-operated CO{sub 2} sequestration power plant and air-fired power plant, which shows that though the gross efficiency increases the absolute power penalty of {proportional_to}8% for CO{sub 2} sequestration when compared to air-fired power plant. (author)

  15. The Diesel Combustion Collaboratory: Combustion Researchers Collaborating over the Internet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. M. Pancerella; L. A. Rahn; C. Yang

    2000-02-01

    The Diesel Combustion Collaborator (DCC) is a pilot project to develop and deploy collaborative technologies to combustion researchers distributed throughout the DOE national laboratories, academia, and industry. The result is a problem-solving environment for combustion research. Researchers collaborate over the Internet using DCC tools, which include: a distributed execution management system for running combustion models on widely distributed computers, including supercomputers; web-accessible data archiving capabilities for sharing graphical experimental or modeling data; electronic notebooks and shared workspaces for facilitating collaboration; visualization of combustion data; and video-conferencing and data-conferencing among researchers at remote sites. Security is a key aspect of the collaborative tools. In many cases, the authors have integrated these tools to allow data, including large combustion data sets, to flow seamlessly, for example, from modeling tools to data archives. In this paper the authors describe the work of a larger collaborative effort to design, implement and deploy the DCC.

  16. Internal combustion engine using premixed combustion of stratified charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Craig D [Rochester Hills, MI; Reitz, Rolf D [Madison, WI

    2003-12-30

    During a combustion cycle, a first stoichiometrically lean fuel charge is injected well prior to top dead center, preferably during the intake stroke. This first fuel charge is substantially mixed with the combustion chamber air during subsequent motion of the piston towards top dead center. A subsequent fuel charge is then injected prior to top dead center to create a stratified, locally richer mixture (but still leaner than stoichiometric) within the combustion chamber. The locally rich region within the combustion chamber has sufficient fuel density to autoignite, and its self-ignition serves to activate ignition for the lean mixture existing within the remainder of the combustion chamber. Because the mixture within the combustion chamber is overall premixed and relatively lean, NO.sub.x and soot production are significantly diminished.

  17. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Brand

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (13C and 18O abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the δ18O signature of CO2 from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires, and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the 18O signature of the produced CO2 is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects on the order of up to 26%permil; became obvious in the derived CO2 from combustion of different kinds of material, a clear differentiation of about 7‰ was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent 18O signature, sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO2 and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original total 18O signature of the material appeared to have little influence, however, a contribution of specific bio

  18. Oxy combustion with CO{sub 2} capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-01-15

    An update for oxyfuel-combustion carbon capture in the power industry is provided. The report was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) on behalf of the Global CCS Institute. In the oxyfuel-combustion processes, the bulk nitrogen is removed from the air before combustion. The resulting combustion products will have CO2 content up to about 90 per cent (dry basis). The flue gas impurities (predominantly O2, N2, and Ar) may be removed by reducing the flue gas (at moderate pressure) to a temperature at which the CO2 condenses and the impurities do not. Oxyfuel-combustion may be employed with solid fuels such as coal, petroleum coke, and biomass, as well as liquid and gaseous fuels. Some key points raised in the oxyfuel-combustion carbon capture report are: The oxyfuel-combustion/CO2 capture power plant designs being developed and deployed for service in the next four or five years are based on individual component technologies and arrangements which have demonstrated sufficient maturity, with the greatest remaining technical challenge being integrating the systems into a complete steam-electric power plant; By its nature, an oxyfuel-coal power plant is likely to be a 'near zero' emitter of all criteria pollutants; Existing air-fired power plants might be retrofitted with an air separation unit, oxyfuel-fired burners, flue gas recycle, and a CO2 processing unit, with the large fleet of air-fired power plants in service calling for more study of this option; and, Future efficiency improvements to the oxyfuel-combustion process for power generation point toward an oxyfuel-combustion plant with near zero emissions of conventional pollutants, up to 98 per cent CO2 capture, and efficiency comparable to the best power plants currently being built.

  19. Reduction of NOx emission from stationary combustion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, P.F.

    1992-01-01

    The environmental impacts of NO x emission from stationary combustion sources are briefly described. These include the formation of both acid rain and photochemical smog, major environmental problems. The three mechanisms which have been identified for the formation of NO x in combustion (thermal, prompt and fuel) are also briefly outlined. Recently stringent standards have been introduced to control emissions of NO x and the review describes the major primary and secondary measures. 10 refs. 2 tabs., 5 figs

  20. Experimental Studies of Hydrocarbon Flame Phenomena: Enabling Combustion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-30

    flames," Physics of Fluids , vol. 7, no. 6, pp. 1447-54, 1995. [8] K. Lyons, " Toward an understanding of the stabilization mechanisms of lifted...Experimental Studies of Hydrocarbon Flame Phenomena: Enabling Combustion Control This report summarizes the research accomplished in the project...34Experimental Studies of Hydrocarbon Flame Phenomena: Enabling Combustion Control". The main areas of activity are: a) electrostatic flame and flow

  1. The Multi-User Droplet Combustion Apparatus: the Development and Integration Concept for Droplet Combustion Payloads in the Fluids and Combustion Facility Combustion Integrated Rack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, C. A.

    2002-01-01

    The Multi-user Droplet Combustion Apparatus (MDCA) is a multi-user facility designed to accommodate four different droplet combustion science experiments. The MDCA will conduct experiments using the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF). The payload is planned for the International Space Station. The MDCA, in conjunction with the CIR, will allow for cost effective extended access to the microgravity environment, not possible on previous space flights. It is currently in the Engineering Model build phase with a planned flight launch with CIR in 2004. This paper provides an overview of the capabilities and development status of the MDCA. The MDCA contains the hardware and software required to conduct unique droplet combustion experiments in space. It consists of a Chamber Insert Assembly, an Avionics Package, and a multiple array of diagnostics. Its modular approach permits on-orbit changes for accommodating different fuels, fuel flow rates, soot sampling mechanisms, and varying droplet support and translation mechanisms to accommodate multiple investigations. Unique diagnostic measurement capabilities for each investigation are also provided. Additional hardware provided by the CIR facility includes the structural support, a combustion chamber, utilities for the avionics and diagnostic packages, and the fuel mixing capability for PI specific combustion chamber environments. Common diagnostics provided by the CIR will also be utilized by the MDCA. Single combustible fuel droplets of varying sizes, freely deployed or supported by a tether are planned for study using the MDCA. Such research supports how liquid-fuel-droplets ignite, spread, and extinguish under quiescent microgravity conditions. This understanding will help us develop more efficient energy production and propulsion systems on Earth and in space, deal better with combustion generated pollution, and address fire hazards associated with

  2. Global policy and programme guidance on maternal nutrition: what exists, the mechanisms for providing it, and how to improve them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimpton, Roger

    2012-07-01

    Undernutrition in one form or another affects the majority of women of reproductive age in most developing countries. However, there are few or no effective programmes trying to solve maternal undernutrition problems. The purpose of the paper is to examine global policy and programme guidance mechanisms for nutrition, what their content is with regard to maternal nutrition in particular, as well as how these might be improved. Almost all countries have committed themselves politically to ensuring the right of pregnant and lactating women to good nutrition through the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women. Despite this, the World Health Organization (WHO) has not endorsed any policy commitments with regard to maternal nutrition. The only policy guidance coming from the various technical departments of WHO relates to the control of maternal anaemia. There is no policy or programme guidance concerning issues of maternal thinness, weight gain during pregnancy and/or low birthweight prevention. Few if any countries have maternal nutrition programmes beyond those for maternal anaemia, and most of those are not effective. The lack of importance given to maternal nutrition is related in part to a weakness of evidence, related to the difficulty of getting ethical clearance, as well as a generalised tendency to downplay the importance of those interventions found to be efficacious. No priority has been given to implementing existing policy and programme guidance for the control of maternal anaemia largely because of a lack of any dedicated funding, linked to a lack of Millennium Development Goals indicator status. This is partly due to the poor evidence base, as well as to the common belief that maternal anaemia programmes were not effective, even if efficacious. The process of providing evidence-based policy and programme guidance to member states is currently being revamped and strengthened by the Department of Nutrition for Health and

  3. Trace emissions from gaseous combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seebold, J.G. [Chevron Research and Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The U.S. Clean Air Act (CAA) was amended in 1990 to include the development of maximum achievable control technology (MACT) emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) for certain stationary sources by November 2000. MACT emissions standards would affect process heaters and industrial boilers since combustion processes are a potential source for many air toxins. The author noted that one of the problems with MACT is the lack of a clear solid scientific footing which is needed to develop environmentally responsible regulations. In order to amend some of these deficiencies, a 4-year, $7 million research project on the origin and fate of trace emissions in the external combustion of gaseous hydrocarbons was undertaken in a collaborative effort between government, universities and industry. This collaborative project entitled the Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (PERF) Project 92-19 produced basic information and phenomenological understanding in two important areas, one basic and one applied. The specific objectives of the project were to measure emissions while operating different full-scale burners under various operating conditions and then to analyze the emission data to identify which operating conditions lead to low air toxic emissions. Another objective was to develop new chemical kinetic mechanisms and predictive models for the formation of air toxic species which would explain the origin and fate of these species in process heaters and industrial boilers. It was determined that a flame is a very effective reactor and that trace emissions from a typical gas-fired industry burner are very small. An unexpected finding was that trace emissions are not affected by hydrocarbon gaseous fuel composition, nor by the use of ultra low nitrous oxide burners. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Sulfur Chemistry in Combustion I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Glarborg, Peter

    2000-01-01

    of the sulphur compounds in fossil fuels and the possibilities to remove them will be given. Then the combustion of sulphur species and their influence on the combustion chemistry and especially on the CO oxidation and the NOx formation will be described. Finally the in-situ removal of sulphur in the combustion...... process by reaction between SO2 and calcium containing sorbents and the influence on the NOx chemistry will be treated....

  5. Experiments and simulations of NOx formation in the combustion of hydroxylated fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Bohon, Myles; Rachidi, Mariam El; Sarathy, Mani; Roberts, William L.

    2015-01-01

    and flame temperature profiles utilizing a rake of thermocouples were obtained in globally lean, swirling, liquid atomized spray flames inside a refractory-lined combustion chamber as a function of the atomizing air flow rate and swirl number

  6. Pulsating combustion - Combustion characteristics and reduction of emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, Annika

    1999-11-01

    In the search for high efficiency combustion systems pulsating combustion has been identified as one of the technologies that potentially can meet the objectives of clean combustion and good fuel economy. Pulsating combustion offers low emissions of pollutants, high heat transfer and efficient combustion. Although it is an old technology, the interest in pulsating combustion has been renewed in recent years, due to its unique features. Various applications of pulsating combustion can be found, mainly as drying and heating devices, of which the latter also have had commercial success. It is, however, in the design process of a pulse combustor, difficult to predict the operating frequency, the heat release etc., due to the lack of a well founded theory of the phenomenon. Research concerning control over the combustion process is essential for developing high efficiency pulse combustors with low emissions. Natural gas fired Helmholtz type pulse combustors have been the experimental objects of this study. In order to investigate the interaction between the fluid dynamics and the chemistry in pulse combustors, laser based measuring techniques as well as other conventional measuring techniques have been used. The experimental results shows the possibilities to control the combustion characteristics of pulsating combustion. It is shown that the time scales in the large vortices created at the inlet to the combustion chamber are very important for the operation of the pulse combustor. By increasing/decreasing the time scale for the large scale mixing the timing of the heat release is changed and the operating characteristics of the pulse combustor changes. Three different means for NO{sub x} reduction in Helmholtz type pulse combustors have been investigated. These include exhaust gas recirculation, alteration of air/fuel ratio and changed inlet geometry in the combustion chamber. All used methods achieved less than 10 ppm NO{sub x} emitted (referred to stoichiometric

  7. Formation of Co2P in the combustion regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muchaik, S.V.; Dubrov, A.N.; Lynchak, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    Combustion of the system Co-P produces the compounds Co 2 P, CoP and CoP 3 , the first two being producible in the combustion regime, while for synthesis of stoichiometric Co 2 P at normal argon pressure, an original mixture with a certain excess of phosphorus is required. The present experiments were performed with electrolytic cobalt powder and red phosphorus. As the Co-P mixture is diluted by the final product (Co 2 P) there is a decrease in combustion temperature and rate, unaccompanied by any of the anomalies seen with dilution by cobalt. It can be suggested that although the combustion in the Co-P system and, possibly, i-- other phosphide systems, is not gasless in its kinetic aspects the combustion mechanism is similar to that in gasless systems. It is shown that formation of the phosphide Co=3''P and specimens wyth composition Co-Co 2 P in the combustion regime occurs with participation of a lIqui] phase of eutectic composition. Combustion occurs in a self-oscillating regime. The temperature for Co 2 P formation is close to its melting point, and the process activation energy comprises 205 kJ/mole

  8. Combustion from basics to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lackner, Maximilian; Winter, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Combustion, the process of burning, is defined as a chemical reaction between a combustible reactant (the fuel) and an oxidizing agent (such as air) in order to produce heat and in most cases light while new chemical species (e.g., flue gas components) are formed. This book covers a gap on the market by providing a concise introduction to combustion. Most of the other books currently available are targeted towards the experienced users and contain too many details and/or contain knowledge at a fairly high level. This book provides a brief and clear overview of the combustion basics, suitable f

  9. Mathematical Modeling in Combustion Science

    CERN Document Server

    Takeno, Tadao

    1988-01-01

    An important new area of current research in combustion science is reviewed in the contributions to this volume. The complicated phenomena of combustion, such as chemical reactions, heat and mass transfer, and gaseous flows, have so far been studied predominantly by experiment and by phenomenological approaches. But asymptotic analysis and other recent developments are rapidly changing this situation. The contributions in this volume are devoted to mathematical modeling in three areas: high Mach number combustion, complex chemistry and physics, and flame modeling in small scale turbulent flow combustion.

  10. Fuel composition impact on heavy duty diesel engine combustion & emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijters, P.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Heavy Duty Diesel or compression ignition (CI) engine plays an important economical role in societies all over the world. Although it is a fuel efficient internal combustion engine design, CI engine emissions are an important contributor to global pollution. To further reduce engine emissions

  11. International cooperation as a mechanism for the development of environmental management Theoretical approach to the Global Environmental Management Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda Morales, Paola Maria

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a theoretical study of a global environmental management structure. This structure can be made possible after a new Global Environmental Order (CID) is established. The new order should be supported by the international development politics. It also has to be funded in the understanding of the interaction dynamics: ecosystem- culture. The theoretical studies of this work on global environmental Management allowed identifying the main difficulties to be overcome by the CID in order to fulfill its role as a leading actor in the global environmental transformation. The first issue to be considered by the CID is related to the fact that the actual regulation and follow up politics are insufficient. A second difficulty has to do with the very few results obtained on guaranteeing fair exchange of information and technology between Northern and Southern countries.

  12. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  13. The combustion of sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.N.

    1978-01-01

    The burning rates of sodium in the form of vapour jets, droplets, sprays and unconfined and confined pools have been reviewed. Attention has been paid to assessing the value of models in the various combustion modes. Additional models have been constructed for the descriptions of laminar and turbulent vapour jets, stationary droplets, forced convection over ambient pool fires together with correlations for peak pressures in confined pool environments. Where appropriate experiments with sodium have not been conducted, the likely behaviour is predicted by comparison with the burning of other fuels, particularly in the field of large free ambient fires. Some areas where further knowledge is required are highlighted. (author)

  14. Alternate fuels; Combustibles alternos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero Paredes R, Hernando; Ambriz G, Juan Jose [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana. Iztapalapa (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In the definition and description of alternate fuels we must center ourselves in those technological alternatives that allow to obtain compounds that differ from the traditional ones, in their forms to be obtained. In this article it is tried to give an overview of alternate fuels to the conventional derivatives of petroleum and that allow to have a clear idea on the tendencies of modern investigation and the technological developments that can be implemented in the short term. It is not pretended to include all the tendencies and developments of the present world, but those that can hit in a relatively short term, in accordance with agreed with the average life of conventional fuels. Nevertheless, most of the conversion principles are applicable to the spectrum of carbonaceous or cellulosic materials which are in nature, are cultivated or wastes of organic origin. Thus one will approach them in a successive way, the physical, chemical and biological conversions that can take place in a production process of an alternate fuel or the same direct use of the fuel such as burning the sweepings derived from the forests. [Spanish] En la definicion y descripcion de combustibles alternos nos debemos centrar en aquellas alternativas tecnologicas que permitan obtener compuestos que difieren de los tradicionales, al menos en sus formas de ser obtenidos. En este articulo se pretende dar un panorama de los combustibles alternos a los convencionales derivados del petroleo y que permita tener una idea clara sobre las tendencias de la investigacion moderna y los desarrollos tecnologicos que puedan ser implementados en el corto plazo. No se pretende abarcar todas las tendencias y desarrollos del mundo actual, sino aquellas que pueden impactar en un plazo relativamente corto, acordes con la vida media de los combustibles convencionales. Sin embargo, la mayor parte de los principios de conversion son aplicables al espectro de materiales carbonaceos o celulosicos los cuales se

  15. Fluidised bed combustion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion systems that facilitates the maintenance of the depth of the bed are described. A discharge pipe projects upwardly into the bed so that bed material can flow into its upper end and escape downwardly. The end of the pipe is surrounded by an enclosure and air is discharged into the enclosure so that material will enter the pipe from within the enclosure and have been cooled in the enclosure by the air discharged into it. The walls of the enclosure may themselves be cooled

  16. Vertical eddy diffusion as a key mechanism for removing perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) from the global surface oceans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohmann, Rainer; Jurado, Elena; Dijkstra, Henk A.; Dachs, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Here we estimate the importance of vertical eddy diffusion in removing perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) from the surface Ocean and assess its importance as a global sink. Measured water column profiles of PFOA were reproduced by assuming that vertical eddy diffusion in a 3-layer ocean model is the sole cause for the transport of PFOA to depth. The global oceanic sink due to eddy diffusion for PFOA is high, with accumulated removal fluxes over the last 40 years of 660 t, with the Atlantic Ocean accounting for 70% of the global oceanic sink. The global oceans have removed 13% of all PFOA produced to a depth greater than 100 m via vertical eddy diffusion; an additional 4% has been removed via deep water formation. The top 100 m of the surface oceans store another 21% of all PFOA produced (∼1100 t). Highlights: •Eddy diffusion has removed ∼660 t of PFOA from surface oceans over the last 40 years. •Atlantic Ocean accounts for 70% of the global oceanic sink of PFOA. •Vertical eddy diffusion has moved ∼13% of PFOA to oceans deeper than 100 m. •Around 4% of PFOA has been removed via deep water formation. •The top 100 m of global oceans contain ∼21% of historical PFOA production. -- Vertical eddy diffusion is an important removal process for hydrophilic organic pollutants such as PFOA from the surface ocean

  17. Study on Combustion Characteristics and Propelling Projectile Motion Process of Bulk-Loaded Liquid Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiaochun; Yu, Yonggang; Mang, Shanshan

    2017-07-01

    Data are presented showing that the problem of gas-liquid interaction instability is an important subject in the combustion and the propellant projectile motion process of a bulk-loaded liquid propellant gun (BLPG). The instabilities themselves arise from the sources, including fluid motion, to form a combustion gas cavity called Taylor cavity, fluid turbulence and breakup caused by liquid motion relative to the combustion chamber walls, and liquid surface breakup arising from a velocity mismatch on the gas-liquid interface. Typically, small disturbances that arise early in the BLPG combustion interior ballistic cycle can become amplified in the absence of burn rate limiting characteristics. Herein, significant attention has been given to developing and emphasizing the need for better combustion repeatability in the BLPG. Based on this goal, the concept of using different geometries of the combustion chamber is introduced and the concept of using a stepped-wall structure on the combustion chamber itself as a useful means of exerting boundary control on the combustion evolution to thus restrain the combustion instability has been verified experimentally in this work. Moreover, based on this background, the numerical simulation is devoted to a special combustion issue under transient high-pressure and high-temperature conditions, namely, studying the combustion mechanism in a stepped-wall combustion chamber with full monopropellant on one end that is stationary and the other end can move at high speed. The numerical results also show that the burning surface of the liquid propellant can be defined geometrically and combustion is well behaved as ignition and combustion progressivity are in a suitable range during each stage in this combustion chamber with a stepped-wall structure.

  18. Fuel and combustion stratification study of Partially Premixed Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Dam, N.; Somers, B.; Johansson, B.

    2016-01-01

    Relatively high levels of stratification is one of the main advantages of Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) over the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) concept. Fuel stratification smoothens heat release and improves controllability of this kind of combustion. However, the lack of a

  19. Combustion Stratification for Naphtha from CI Combustion to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.

    2017-03-28

    This study demonstrates the combustion stratification from conventional compression ignition (CI) combustion to partially premixed combustion (PPC). Experiments are performed in an optical CI engine at a speed of 1200 rpm for diesel and naphtha (RON = 46). The motored pressure at TDC is maintained at 35 bar and fuelMEP is kept constant at 5.1 bar to account for the difference in fuel properties between naphtha and diesel. Single injection strategy is employed and the fuel is injected at a pressure of 800 bar. Photron FASTCAM SA4 that captures in-cylinder combustion at the rate of 10000 frames per second is employed. The captured high speed video is processed to study the combustion homogeneity based on an algorithm reported in previous studies. Starting from late fuel injection timings, combustion stratification is investigated by advancing the fuel injection timings. For late start of injection (SOI), a direct link between SOI and combustion phasing is noticed. At early SOI, combustion phasing depends on both intake air temperature and SOI. In order to match the combustion phasing (CA50) of diesel, the intake air temperature is increased to 90°C for naphtha. The combustion stratification from CI to PPC is also investigated for various level of dilution by displacing oxygen with nitrogen in the intake. The start of combustion (SOC) was delayed with the increase in dilution and to compensate for this, the intake air temperature is increased. The mixture homogeneity is enhanced for higher dilution due to longer ignition delay. The results show that high speed image is initially blue and then turned yellow, indicating soot formation and oxidation. The luminosity of combustion images decreases with early SOI and increased dilution. The images are processed to generate the level of stratification based on the image intensity. The level of stratification is same for diesel and naphtha at various SOI. When O concentration in the intake is decreased to 17.7% and 14

  20. Some Factors Affecting Combustion in an Internal-Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrock, A M; Cohn, Mildred

    1936-01-01

    An investigation of the combustion of gasoline, safety, and diesel fuels was made in the NACA combustion apparatus under conditions of temperature that permitted ignition by spark with direct fuel injection, in spite of the compression ratio of 12.7 employed. The influence of such variables as injection advance angle, jacket temperature, engine speed, and spark position was studied. The most pronounced effect was that an increase in the injection advance angle (beyond a certain minimum value) caused a decrease in the extent and rate of combustion. In almost all cases combustion improved with increased temperature. The results show that at low air temperatures the rates of combustion vary with the volatility of the fuel, but that at high temperatures this relationship does not exist and the rates depend to a greater extent on the chemical nature of the fuel.

  1. Preliminary assessment of combustion modes for internal combustion wave rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalim, M. Razi

    1995-01-01

    Combustion within the channels of a wave rotor is examined as a means of obtaining pressure gain during heat addition in a gas turbine engine. Several modes of combustion are considered and the factors that determine the applicability of three modes are evaluated in detail; premixed autoignition/detonation, premixed deflagration, and non-premixed compression ignition. The last two will require strong turbulence for completion of combustion in a reasonable time in the wave rotor. The compression/autoignition modes will require inlet temperatures in excess of 1500 R for reliable ignition with most hydrocarbon fuels; otherwise, a supplementary ignition method must be provided. Examples of combustion mode selection are presented for two core engine applications that had been previously designed with equivalent 4-port wave rotor topping cycles using external combustion.

  2. Oxy-coal combustion in an entrained flow reactor: Application of specific char and volatile combustion and radiation models for oxy-firing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Álvarez, L.; Yin, Chungen; Riaza, J.

    2013-01-01

    The deployment of oxy-fuel combustion in utility boilers is one of the major options for CO2 capture. However, combustion under oxy-firing conditions differs from conventional air-firing combustion, e.g., in the aspect of radiative heat transfer, coal conversion and pollutants formation....... In this work, a numerical study on pulverised coal combustion was conducted to verify the applicability and accuracy of several sub-models refined for oxy-fuel conditions, e.g., gaseous radiative property model, gas-phase combustion mechanism and heterogeneous char reaction model. The sub-models were...... implemented in CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations of combustion of three coals under air-firing and various oxy-firing (21-35% vol O2 in O2/CO2 mixture) conditions in an EFR (entrained flow reactor). The predicted coal burnouts and gaseous emissions were compared against experimental results...

  3. Novel approaches in advanced combustion characterization of fuels for advanced pressurized combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, M.; Haemaelaeinen, J. [VTT Energy (Finland); Joutsenoja, T. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    This project is a part of the EU Joule 2 (extension) programme. The objective of the research of Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) is to produce experimental results of the effects of pressure and other important parameters on the combustion of pulverized coals and their char derivates. The results can be utilized in modelling of pressurized combustion and in planning pilot-scale reactors. The coals to be studied are Polish hvb coal, French lignite (Gardanne), German anthracite (Niederberg) and German (Goettelbom) hvb coal. The samples are combusted in an electrically heated, pressurized entrained flow reactor (PEFR), where the experimental conditions are controlled with a high precision. The particle size of the fuel can vary between 100 and 300 {mu}m. The studied things are combustion rates, temperatures and sizes of burning single coal and char particles. The latter measurements are performed with a method developed by Tampere University of Technology, Finland. In some of the experiments, mass loss and elemental composition of the char residue are studied in more details as the function of time to find out the combustion mechanism. Combustion rate of pulverized (140-180 {mu}m) Gardanne lignite and Niederberg anthracite were measured and compared with the data obtained earlier with Polish hvb coal at various pressures, gas temperatures, oxygen partial pressures and partial pressures of carbon dioxide in the second working period. In addition, particle temperatures were measured with anthracite. The experimental results were treated with multivariable partial least squares (PLS) method to find regression equation between the measured things and the experimental variables. (author)

  4. Combustion and direct energy conversion inside a micro-combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Yafeng; Chen, Wei; Lei, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The flammability range of micro-combustor was broadened with heat recirculation. • The quenching diameter decreased with heat recirculation compared to without recirculation. • The surface areas to volume ratio was the most important parameter affecting the energy conversion efficiency. • The maximum conversion efficiency (3.15%) was achieved with 1 mm inner diameter. - Abstract: Electrical energy can be generated by employing a micro-thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cell which absorbs thermal radiation from combustion taking place in a micro-combustor. The stability of combustion in a micro-combustor is essential for operating a micro-power system using hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels as energy source. To understand the mechanism of sustaining combustion within the quenching distance of fuel, this study proposed an annular micro combustion tube with recirculation of exhaust heat. To explore the feasibility of combustion in the micro annular tube, the parameters influencing the combustion namely, quenching diameter, and flammability were studied through numerical simulation. The results indicated that combustion could be realized in micro- combustor using heat recirculation. Following results were obtained from simulation. The quenching diameter reduced from 1.3 mm to 0.9 mm for heat recirculation at equivalence ratio of 1; the lean flammability was 2.5%–5% lower than that of without heat recirculation for quenching diameters between 2 mm and 5 mm. The overall energy conversion efficiency varied at different inner diameters. A maximum efficiency of 3.15% was achieved at an inner diameter of 1 mm. The studies indicated that heat recirculation is an effective strategy to maintain combustion and to improve combustion limits in micro-scale system.

  5. Experimental Study of Liquid Fuel Spray Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westlye, Fredrik Ree

    the specific physical quantities needed in CFD validation of these types of flames. This work is a testament to that fact. The first part of this thesis is an extensive study of optical combustion diagnostics applied to complex transient sprayflames in a high temperature and pressure environment...... by the Danish Council for Strategic Research. Other supporters of the project have been MAN Diesel & Turbo A/S, DTU Mechanical Engineering, DTU Chemical Engineering, Sandia National Laboratories USA, Norwegian University of Science & Technology (NTNU) and University of Nottingham, Malaysia Campus.......The physiochemical properties and electromagnetic interactions in flames, of which various optical combustion diagnostics are based, have been reviewed. Key diagnostics have been presented with practical examples of their application which, together with a comprehensive review of fuel spray flames, form...

  6. Path planning during combustion mode switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Ravi, Nikhil

    2015-12-29

    Systems and methods are provided for transitioning between a first combustion mode and a second combustion mode in an internal combustion engine. A current operating point of the engine is identified and a target operating point for the internal combustion engine in the second combustion mode is also determined. A predefined optimized transition operating point is selected from memory. While operating in the first combustion mode, one or more engine actuator settings are adjusted to cause the operating point of the internal combustion engine to approach the selected optimized transition operating point. When the engine is operating at the selected optimized transition operating point, the combustion mode is switched from the first combustion mode to the second combustion mode. While operating in the second combustion mode, one or more engine actuator settings are adjusted to cause the operating point of the internal combustion to approach the target operating point.

  7. AIR EMISSIONS FROM SCRAP TIRE COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses air emissions from two types of scrap tire combustion: uncontrolled and controlled. Uncontrolled sources are open tire fires, which produce many unhealthful products of incomplete combustion and release them directly into the atmosphere. Controlled combustion...

  8. Plasma igniter for internal-combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breshears, R. R.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Hot ionized gas (plasma) ignites air/fuel mixture in internal combustion engines more effectively than spark. Electromagnetic forces propel plasma into combustion zone. Combustion rate is not limited by flame-front speed.

  9. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartog, J P Den

    1961-01-01

    First published over 40 years ago, this work has achieved the status of a classic among introductory texts on mechanics. Den Hartog is known for his lively, discursive and often witty presentations of all the fundamental material of both statics and dynamics (and considerable more advanced material) in new, original ways that provide students with insights into mechanical relationships that other books do not always succeed in conveying. On the other hand, the work is so replete with engineering applications and actual design problems that it is as valuable as a reference to the practicing e

  10. Proceedings of IEA combustion 2009 : IEA 31. task leaders meeting on energy conservation and emissions reduction in combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The International Energy Agency (IEA) supports research and development in energy technology. This meeting provided a forum to discuss combustion processes, which is fundamental to achieving further improvements in fuel use efficiency, reducing the production of pollutants such as nitrogen oxides, and facilitating the transition to alternative fuels. The presentations demonstrated recent studies in improving the efficiency and fuel flexibility of automotive engines; improving the performance of industrial furnaces; emissions formation and control mechanisms; and fuel injection and fuel/air mixing. The conference also highlighted studies involving hydrogen combustion, alternative fuels, particulate diagnostics, fuel sprays, gas turbines, and advanced combustion processes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The sessions were entitled: HCCI fuels; sprays; nanoparticle diagnostics; alternative fuels; hydrogen internal combustion engines; turbines; energy security; and collaborative task planning. All 45 presentations from the conference have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  11. Global atmospheric changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piver, W T

    1991-12-01

    Increasing concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere can be directly related to global warming. In terms of human health, because a major cause of increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 is the increased combustion of fossil fuels, global warming also may result in increases in air pollutants, acid deposition, and exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. To understand better the impacts of global warming phenomena on human health, this review emphasizes the processes that are responsible for the greenhouse effect, air pollution, acid deposition, and increased exposure to UV radiation.

  12. Combustion & Laser Diagnostics Research Complex (CLDRC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Combustion and Laser Diagnostics Research Complex (CLRDC) supports the experimental and computational study of fundamental combustion phenomena to...

  13. The combustion kinetics of the lignocellulosic biofuel, ethyl levulinate

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Manik Kumer; Howard, Mí cheá l Sé amus; Zhang, Yingjia; Djebbi, Khalil; Capriolo, Gianluca; Farooq, Aamir; Curran, Henry J.; Dooley, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    Ethyl levulinate (Ethyl 4-oxopentanoate) is a liquid molecule at ambient temperature, comprising of ketone and ethyl ester functionalities and is one of the prominent liquid fuel candidates that may be easily obtained from lignocellulosic biomass. The combustion kinetics of ethyl levulinate have been investigated. Shock tube and rapid compression machine apparatuses are utilised to acquire gas phase ignition delay measurements of 0.5% ethyl levulinate/O2 mixtures at ϕ = 1.0 and ϕ = 0.5 at ∼ 10 atm over the temperature range 1000–1400 K. Ethyl levulinate is observed not to ignite at temperatures lower than ∼1040 K in the rapid compression machine. The shock tube and rapid compression machine data are closely consistent and show ethyl levulinate ignition delay to exhibit an Arrhenius dependence to temperature. These measurements are explained by the construction and analysis of a detailed chemical kinetic model. The kinetic model is completed by establishing thermochemical-kinetic analogies to 2-butanone, for the ethyl levulinate ketone functionality, and to ethyl propanoate for the ethyl ester functionality. The so constructed model is observed to describe the shock tube data very accurately, but computes the rapid compression machine data set to a lesser but still applicable fidelity. Analysis of the model suggests the autooxidation mechanism of ethyl levulinate to be entirely dominated by the propensity for the ethyl ester functionality to unimolecularly decompose to form levulinic acid and ethylene. The subsequent reaction kinetics of these species is shown to dictate the overall rate of the global combustion reaction. This model is then use to estimate the Research and Motored Octane Numbers of ethyl levulinate to be ≥97.7 and ≥ 93, respectively. With this analysis ethyl levulinate would be best suited as a gasoline fuel component, rather than as a diesel fuel as suggested in the literature. Indeed it may be considered to be useful as an

  14. The combustion kinetics of the lignocellulosic biofuel, ethyl levulinate

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Manik Kumer

    2018-04-04

    Ethyl levulinate (Ethyl 4-oxopentanoate) is a liquid molecule at ambient temperature, comprising of ketone and ethyl ester functionalities and is one of the prominent liquid fuel candidates that may be easily obtained from lignocellulosic biomass. The combustion kinetics of ethyl levulinate have been investigated. Shock tube and rapid compression machine apparatuses are utilised to acquire gas phase ignition delay measurements of 0.5% ethyl levulinate/O2 mixtures at ϕ = 1.0 and ϕ = 0.5 at ∼ 10 atm over the temperature range 1000–1400 K. Ethyl levulinate is observed not to ignite at temperatures lower than ∼1040 K in the rapid compression machine. The shock tube and rapid compression machine data are closely consistent and show ethyl levulinate ignition delay to exhibit an Arrhenius dependence to temperature. These measurements are explained by the construction and analysis of a detailed chemical kinetic model. The kinetic model is completed by establishing thermochemical-kinetic analogies to 2-butanone, for the ethyl levulinate ketone functionality, and to ethyl propanoate for the ethyl ester functionality. The so constructed model is observed to describe the shock tube data very accurately, but computes the rapid compression machine data set to a lesser but still applicable fidelity. Analysis of the model suggests the autooxidation mechanism of ethyl levulinate to be entirely dominated by the propensity for the ethyl ester functionality to unimolecularly decompose to form levulinic acid and ethylene. The subsequent reaction kinetics of these species is shown to dictate the overall rate of the global combustion reaction. This model is then use to estimate the Research and Motored Octane Numbers of ethyl levulinate to be ≥97.7 and ≥ 93, respectively. With this analysis ethyl levulinate would be best suited as a gasoline fuel component, rather than as a diesel fuel as suggested in the literature. Indeed it may be considered to be useful as an

  15. Vertical eddy diffusion as a key mechanism for removing perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) from the global surface oceans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohmann, R.; Jurado Cojo, E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325788227; Dijkstra, H.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073504467; Dachs, J.

    2013-01-01

    Here we estimate the importance of vertical eddy diffusion in removing perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) from the surface Ocean and assess its importance as a global sink. Measured water column profiles of PFOA were reproduced by assuming that vertical eddy diffusion in a 3-layer ocean model is the sole

  16. Fuel properties to enable lifted-flame combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Eric [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States)

    2015-03-15

    understanding of flame lift-off, generate model validation data, and demonstrate LLFC concurrent with FMC efforts. Additionally, LLNL was added to the project during the second year to develop a detailed kinetic mechanism for a key oxygenate to support CFD modeling. Successful completion of this project allowed the team to enhance fundamental understanding of LLFC, improve the state of current combustion models and increase understanding of desired fuel properties. This knowledge also improves our knowledge of how cost effective and environmentally friendly renewable fuels can assist in helping meet future emission and greenhouse gas regulations.

  17. Explosive growth in African combustion emissions from 2005 to 2030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liousse, C; Rosset, R; Assamoi, E; Criqui, P; Granier, C

    2014-01-01

    Emissions of gases and particles from the combustion of fossil fuels and biofuels in Africa are expected to increase significantly in the near future due to the rapid growth of African cities and megacities. There is currently no regional emissions inventory that provides estimates of anthropogenic combustion for the African continent. This work provides a quantification of the evolution of African combustion emissions from 2005 to 2030, using a bottom-up method. This inventory predicts very large increases in black carbon, organic carbon, CO, NO x , SO 2 and non-methane hydrocarbon emissions if no emission regulations are implemented. This paper discusses the effectiveness of scenarios involving certain fuels, specific to Africa in each activity sector and each region (western, eastern, northern and southern Africa), to reduce the emissions. The estimated trends in African emissions are consistent with emissions provided by global inventories, but they display a larger range of values. African combustion emissions contributed significantly to global emissions in 2005. This contribution will increase more significantly by 2030: organic carbon emissions will for example make up 50% of the global emissions in 2030. Furthermore, we show that the magnitude of African anthropogenic emissions could be similar to African biomass burning emissions around 2030. (paper)

  18. Anthropogenic combustion iron as a complex climate forcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hitoshi; Mahowald, Natalie M; Moteki, Nobuhiro; Hamilton, Douglas S; Ohata, Sho; Yoshida, Atsushi; Koike, Makoto; Scanza, Rachel A; Flanner, Mark G

    2018-04-23

    Atmospheric iron affects the global carbon cycle by modulating ocean biogeochemistry through the deposition of soluble iron to the ocean. Iron emitted by anthropogenic (fossil fuel) combustion is a source of soluble iron that is currently considered less important than other soluble iron sources, such as mineral dust and biomass burning. Here we show that the atmospheric burden of anthropogenic combustion iron is 8 times greater than previous estimates by incorporating recent measurements of anthropogenic magnetite into a global aerosol model. This new estimation increases the total deposition flux of soluble iron to southern oceans (30-90 °S) by 52%, with a larger contribution of anthropogenic combustion iron than dust and biomass burning sources. The direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic magnetite is estimated to be 0.021 W m -2 globally and 0.22 W m -2 over East Asia. Our results demonstrate that anthropogenic combustion iron is a larger and more complex climate forcer than previously thought, and therefore plays a key role in the Earth system.

  19. Space Station Freedom combustion research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    Extended operations in microgravity, on board spacecraft like Space Station Freedom, provide both unusual opportunities and unusual challenges for combustion science. On the one hand, eliminating the intrusion of buoyancy provides a valuable new perspective for fundamental studies of combustion phenomena. On the other hand, however, the absence of buoyancy creates new hazards of fires and explosions that must be understood to assure safe manned space activities. These considerations - and the relevance of combustion science to problems of pollutants, energy utilization, waste incineration, power and propulsion systems, and fire and explosion hazards, among others - provide strong motivation for microgravity combustion research. The intrusion of buoyancy is a greater impediment to fundamental combustion studies than to most other areas of science. Combustion intrinsically heats gases with the resulting buoyant motion at normal gravity either preventing or vastly complicating measurements. Perversely, this limitation is most evident for fundamental laboratory experiments; few practical combustion phenomena are significantly affected by buoyancy. Thus, we have never observed the most fundamental combustion phenomena - laminar premixed and diffusion flames, heterogeneous flames of particles and surfaces, low-speed turbulent flames, etc. - without substantial buoyant disturbances. This precludes rational merging of theory, where buoyancy is of little interest, and experiments, that always are contaminated by buoyancy, which is the traditional path for developing most areas of science. The current microgravity combustion program seeks to rectify this deficiency using both ground-based and space-based facilities, with experiments involving space-based facilities including: laminar premixed flames, soot processes in laminar jet diffusion flames, structure of laminar and turbulent jet diffusion flames, solid surface combustion, one-dimensional smoldering, ignition and flame

  20. Characterisation of metal combustion with DUST code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Cascales, José R., E-mail: jr.garcia@upct.es [DITF, ETSII, Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena, Dr Fleming s/n, 30202 Murcia (Spain); Velasco, F.J.S. [Centro Universitario de la Defensa de San Javier, MDE-UPCT, C/Coronel Lopez Peña s/n, 30730 Murcia (Spain); Otón-Martínez, Ramón A.; Espín-Tolosa, S. [DITF, ETSII, Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena, Dr Fleming s/n, 30202 Murcia (Spain); Bentaib, Ahmed; Meynet, Nicolas; Bleyer, Alexandre [Institut de Radioprotection et Sûreté Nucléaire, BP 17, 92260 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • This paper is part of the work carried out by researchers of the Technical University of Cartagena, Spain and the Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Security of France. • We have developed a code for the study of mobilisation and combustion that we have called DUST by using CAST3M, a multipurpose software for studying many different problems of Mechanical Engineering. • In this paper, we present the model implemented in the code to characterise metal combustion which describes the combustion model, the kinetic reaction rates adopted and includes a first comparison between experimental data and calculated ones. • The results are quite promising although suggest that improvement must be made on the kinetic of the reaction taking place. - Abstract: The code DUST is a CFD code developed by the Technical University of Cartagena, Spain and the Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Security, France (IRSN) with the objective to assess the dust explosion hazard in the vacuum vessel of ITER. Thus, DUST code permits the analysis of dust spatial distribution, remobilisation and entrainment, explosion, and combustion. Some assumptions such as particle incompressibility and negligible effect of pressure on the solid phase make the model quite appealing from the mathematical point of view, as the systems of equations that characterise the behaviour of the solid and gaseous phases are decoupled. The objective of this work is to present the model implemented in the code to characterise metal combustion. In order to evaluate its ability analysing reactive mixtures of multicomponent gases and multicomponent solids, two combustion problems are studied, namely H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/C and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/W mixtures. The system of equations considered and finite volume approach are briefly presented. The closure relationships used are commented and special attention is paid to the reaction rate correlations used in the model. The numerical

  1. Pollutants generated by the combustion of solid biomass fuels

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Jenny M; Ma, Lin; Williams, Alan; Pourkashanian, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    This book considers the pollutants formed by the combustion of solid biomass fuels. The availability and potential use of solid biofuels is first discussed because this is the key to the development of biomass as a source of energy.This is followed by details of the methods used for characterisation of biomass and their classification.The various steps in the combustion mechanisms are given together with a compilation of the kinetic data. The chemical mechanisms for the formation of the pollutants: NOx, smoke and unburned hydrocarbons, SOx, Cl compounds, and particulate metal aerosols

  2. Coal combustion aerothermochemistry research. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witte, A.B.; Gat, N.; Denison, M.R.; Cohen, L.M.

    1980-12-15

    On the basis of extensive aerothermochemistry analyses, laboratory investigations, and combustor tests, significant headway has been made toward improving the understanding of combustion phenomena and scaling of high swirl pulverized coal combustors. A special attempt has been made to address the gap between scientific data available on combustion and hardware design and scaling needs. Both experimental and theoretical investigations were conducted to improve the predictive capability of combustor scaling laws. The scaling laws derived apply to volume and wall burning of pulverized coal in a slagging high-swirl combustor. They incorporate the findings of this investigation as follows: laser pyrolysis of coal at 10/sup 6/ K/sec and 2500K; effect of coal particle shape on aerodynamic drag and combustion; effect of swirl on heat transfer; coal burnout and slag capture for 20 MW/sub T/ combustor tests for fine and coarse coals; burning particle trajectories and slag capture; particle size and aerodynamic size; volatilization extent and burnout fraction; and preheat level. As a result of this work, the following has been gained: an increased understanding of basic burning mechanisms in high-swirl combustors and an improved model for predicting combustor performance which is intended to impact hardware design and scaling in the near term.

  3. Different Mechanisms of Soil Microbial Response to Global Change Result in Different Outcomes in the MIMICS-CN Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyker-Snowman, E.; Wieder, W. R.; Grandy, S.

    2017-12-01

    Microbial-explicit models of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling have improved upon simulations of C and N stocks and flows at site-to-global scales relative to traditional first-order linear models. However, the response of microbial-explicit soil models to global change factors depends upon which parameters and processes in a model are altered by those factors. We used the MIcrobial-MIneral Carbon Stabilization Model with coupled N cycling (MIMICS-CN) to compare modeled responses to changes in temperature and plant inputs at two previously-modeled sites (Harvard Forest and Kellogg Biological Station). We spun the model up to equilibrium, applied each perturbation, and evaluated 15 years of post-perturbation C and N pools and fluxes. To model the effect of increasing temperatures, we independently examined the impact of decreasing microbial C use efficiency (CUE), increasing the rate of microbial turnover, and increasing Michaelis-Menten kinetic rates of litter decomposition, plus several combinations of the three. For plant inputs, we ran simulations with stepwise increases in metabolic litter, structural litter, whole litter (structural and metabolic), or labile soil C. The cumulative change in soil C or N varied in both sign and magnitude across simulations. For example, increasing kinetic rates of litter decomposition resulted in net releases of both C and N from soil pools, while decreasing CUE produced short-term increases in respiration but long-term accumulation of C in litter pools and shifts in soil C:N as microbial demand for C increased and biomass declined. Given that soil N cycling constrains the response of plant productivity to global change and that soils generate a large amount of uncertainty in current earth system models, microbial-explicit models are a critical opportunity to advance the modeled representation of soils. However, microbial-explicit models must be improved by experiments to isolate the physiological and stoichiometric

  4. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  5. The reduction of air pollution by improved combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchill, S.W. [Pennsylvania Univ., Chemical Engineering Dept., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The contributions of combustion to air pollution and possible remedies are discussed. Control and reduction of air pollution from combustion is more feasible than from other sources because of its discrete localization. The gaseous products of combustion inevitably include H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}, NO and/or NO{sub 2} and may include N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3} and unburned and partially burned hydrocarbons. Soot, ash and other dispersed solids may also be present, but are not considered herein. Unburned and partially burned hydrocarbons are prima facie evidence of poor mechanics of combustion and should not be tolerated. On the other hand, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} are unavoidable if the fuel contains nitrogen and sulfur. The best remedy in this latter case is to remove these species from the fuel. Otherwise their products of combustion must be removed by absorption, adsorption or reaction. NO{sub x} from the fixation of N{sub 2} in the air and CO may be minimized by advanced techniques of combustion. One such method is described in some detail. If CO{sub 2} must be removed this can be accomplished by absorption, adsorption or reaction, but precooling is necessary and the quantity is an order of magnitude greater than that of any of the other pollutants. (Author)

  6. Producer for vegetal combustibles for internal-combustion motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1943-12-28

    A producer is described for internal-combustion motors fed with wood or agricultural byproducts characterized by the fact that its full operation is independent of the degree of wetness of the material used.

  7. The development and experimental validation of a reduced ternary kinetic mechanism for the auto-ignition at HCCI conditions, proposing a global reaction path for ternary gasoline surrogates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias, Simeon; Amouroux, Jacques [UPMC Universite Paris 06, LGPPTS, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, 11, rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2009-02-15

    To acquire a high amount of information of the behaviour of the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) auto-ignition process, a reduced surrogate mechanism has been composed out of reduced n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene mechanisms, containing 62 reactions and 49 species. This mechanism has been validated numerically in a 0D HCCI engine code against more detailed mechanisms (inlet temperature varying from 290 to 500 K, the equivalence ratio from 0.2 to 0.7 and the compression ratio from 8 to 18) and experimentally against experimental shock tube and rapid compression machine data from the literature at pressures between 9 and 55 bar and temperatures between 700 and 1400 K for several fuels: the pure compounds n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene as well as binary and ternary mixtures of these compounds. For this validation, stoichiometric mixtures and mixtures with an equivalence ratio of 0.5 are used. The experimental validation is extended by comparing the surrogate mechanism to experimental data from an HCCI engine. A global reaction pathway is proposed for the auto-ignition of a surrogate gasoline, using the surrogate mechanism, in order to show the interactions that the three compounds can have with one another during the auto-ignition of a ternary mixture. (author)

  8. Reducing emissions from diesel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper contains information dealing with engine design to reduce emissions and improve or maintain fuel economy. Topics include: Observation of High Pressure Fuel Spray with Laser Light Sheet Method; Determination of Engine Cylinder Pressures from Crankshaft Speed Fluctuations; Combustion Similarity for Different Size Diesel Engines: Theoretical Prediction and Experimental Results; Prediction of Diesel Engine Particulate Emission During Transient Cycles; Characteristics and Combustibility of Particulate Matter; Dual-Fuel Diesel Engine Using Butane; Measurement of Flame Temperature Distribution in D.I. Diesel Engine with High Pressure Fuel Injection: and Combustion in a Small DI Diesel Engine at Starting

  9. Numerical Studies on Controlling Gaseous Fuel Combustion by Managing the Combustion Process of Diesel Pilot Dose in a Dual-Fuel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulski Maciej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Protection of the environment and counteracting global warming require finding alternative sources of energy. One of the methods of generating energy from environmentally friendly sources is increasing the share of gaseous fuels in the total energy balance. The use of these fuels in compression-ignition (CI engines is difficult due to their relatively high autoignition temperature. One solution for using these fuels in CI engines is operating in a dualfuel mode, where the air and gas mixture is ignited with a liquid fuel dose. In this method, a series of relatively complex chemical processes occur in the engine's combustion chamber, related to the combustion of individual fuel fractions that interact with one another. Analysis of combustion of specific fuels in this type of fuel injection to the engine is difficult due to the fact that combustion of both fuel fractions takes place simultaneously. Simulation experiments can be used to analyse the impact of diesel fuel combustion on gaseous fuel combustion. In this paper, we discuss the results of simulation tests of combustion, based on the proprietary multiphase model of a dual-fuel engine. The results obtained from the simulation allow for analysis of the combustion process of individual fuels separately, which expands the knowledge obtained from experimental tests on the engine.

  10. Modelling of Non-Premixed Turbulent Combustion of Hydrogen using Conditional Moment Closure Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor, M M; Hairuddin, A Aziz; Wandel, Andrew P; Yusaf, T F

    2012-01-01

    Most of the electricity generation and energy for transport is still generated by the conversion of chemical to mechanical energy by burning the fuels in the combustion chamber. Regulation for pollution and the demand for more fuel economy had driven worldwide researcher to focus on combustion efficiency. In order to reduce experimental cost, accurate modelling and simulation is very critical step. Taylor series expansion was utilised to reduce the error term for the discretization. FORTRAN code was used to execute the discretized partial differential equation. Hydrogen combustion was simulated using Conditional Moment Closure (CMC) model. Combustion of hydrogen with oxygen was successfully simulated and reported in this paper.

  11. Computational Modeling of Turbulent Spray Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the research presented in this thesis is development and validation of predictive models or modeling approaches of liquid fuel combustion (spray combustion) in hot-diluted environments, known as flameless combustion or MILD combustion. The goal is to combine good physical insight,

  12. Measures for a quality combustion (combustion chamber exit and downstream); Mesures pour une combustion de qualite (sortie de chambre de combustion et en aval)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epinat, G. [APAVE Lyonnaise, 69 (France)

    1996-12-31

    After a review of the different pollutants related to the various types of stationary and mobile combustion processes (stoichiometric, reducing and oxidizing combustion), measures and analyses than may be used to ensure the quality and efficiency of combustion processes are reviewed: opacimeters, UV analyzers, etc. The regulation and control equipment for combustion systems are then listed, according to the generator capacity level

  13. Fuels and Combustion | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuels and Combustion Fuels and Combustion This is the March 2015 issue of the Transportation and , combustion strategy, and engine design hold the potential to maximize vehicle energy efficiency and performance of low-carbon fuels in internal combustion engines with a whole-systems approach to fuel chemistry

  14. Combustion performance evaluation of air staging of palm oil blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Jaafar, Mohammad Nazri; Eldrainy, Yehia A; Mat Ali, Muhammad Faiser; Wan Omar, W Z; Mohd Hizam, Mohd Faizi Arif

    2012-02-21

    The problems of global warming and the unstable price of petroleum oils have led to a race to develop environmentally friendly biofuels, such as palm oil or ethanol derived from corn and sugar cane. Biofuels are a potential replacement for fossil fuel, since they are renewable and environmentally friendly. This paper evaluates the combustion performance and emission characteristics of Refined, Bleached, and Deodorized Palm Oil (RBDPO)/diesel blends B5, B10, B15, B20, and B25 by volume, using an industrial oil burner with and without secondary air. Wall temperature profiles along the combustion chamber axis were measured using a series of thermocouples fitted axially on the combustion chamber wall, and emissions released were measured using a gas analyzer. The results show that RBDPO blend B25 produced the maximum emission reduction of 56.9% of CO, 74.7% of NOx, 68.5% of SO(2), and 77.5% of UHC compared to petroleum diesel, while air staging (secondary air) in most cases reduces the emissions further. However, increasing concentrations of RBDPO in the blends also reduced the energy released from the combustion. The maximum wall temperature reduction was 62.7% for B25 at the exit of the combustion chamber.

  15. Fundamental characterization of alternate fuel effects in continuous combustion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazowski, W.S.; Edelman, R.B.; Harsha, P.T.

    1978-09-11

    The overall objective of this contract is to assist in the development of fuel-flexible combustion systems for gas turbines as well as Rankine and Stirling cycle engines. The primary emphasis of the program is on liquid hydrocarbons produced from non-petroleum resouces. Fuel-flexible combustion systems will provide for more rapid transition of these alternate fuels into important future energy utilization centers (especially utility power generation with the combined cycle gas turbine). The specific technical objectives of the program are to develop an improved understanding of relationships between alternate fuel properties and continuous combustion system effects, and to provide analytical modeling/correlation capabilities to be used as design aids for development of fuel-tolerant combustion systems. Efforts this past year have been to evaluate experimental procedures for studying alternate fuel combustion effects and to determine current analytical capabilities for prediction of these effects. Jet Stirred Combustor studies during this period have produced new insights into soot formation in strongly backmixed systems and have provided much information for comparison with analytical predictions. The analytical effort included new applications of quasi-global modeling techniques as well as comparison of prediction with the experimental results generated.

  16. Combustion modeling in waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.; Unal, C.; Travis, J.R.; Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe

    1997-01-01

    This paper has two objectives. The first one is to repeat previous simulations of release and combustion of flammable gases in tank SY-101 at the Hanford reservation with the recently developed code GASFLOW-II. The GASFLOW-II results are compared with the results obtained with the HMS/TRAC code and show good agreement, especially for non-combustion cases. For combustion GASFLOW-II predicts a steeper pressure rise than HMS/TRAC. The second objective is to describe a so-called induction parameter model which was developed and implemented into GASFLOW-II and reassess previous calculations of Bureau of Mines experiments for hydrogen-air combustion. The pressure time history improves compared with the one-step model, and the time rate of pressure change is much closer to the experimental data

  17. Environmental sensing and combustion diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoleri, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains proceedings of Environmental Sensing and Combustion Diagnostics. Topics covered include: Incineration Systems Applications, Permitting, And Monitoring Overview; Infrared Techniques Applied to Incineration Systems; Continuous Emission Monitors; Analyzers and Sensors for Process Control And Environmental Monitoring

  18. Sodium nitrate combustion limit tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitel, G.A.

    1976-04-01

    Sodium nitrate is a powerful solid oxidant. Energetically, it is capable of exothermically oxidizing almost any organic material. Rate-controlling variables such as temperature, concentration of oxidant, concentration of fuel, thermal conductivity, moisture content, size, and pressure severely limit the possibility of a self-supported exothermic reaction (combustion). The tests reported in this document were conducted on one-gram samples at atmospheric pressure. Below 380 0 C, NaNO 3 was stable and did not support combustion. At moisture concentrations above 22 wt percent, exothermic reactions did not propagate in even the most energetic and reactive compositions. Fresh resin and paraffin were too volatile to enable a NaNO 2 -supported combustion process to propagate. Concentrations of NaNO 3 above 95 wt percent or below 35 wt percent did not react with enough energy release to support combustion. The influence of sample size and confining pressure, both important factors, was not investigated in this study

  19. 75 FR 3881 - Combustible Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ..., rubber, drugs, dried blood, dyes, certain textiles, and metals (such as aluminum and magnesium..., furniture manufacturing, metal processing, fabricated metal products and machinery manufacturing, pesticide... standard that will comprehensively address the fire and explosion hazards of combustible dust. The Agency...

  20. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chester, W

    1979-01-01

    When I began to write this book, I originally had in mind the needs of university students in their first year. May aim was to keep the mathematics simple. No advanced techniques are used and there are no complicated applications. The emphasis is on an understanding of the basic ideas and problems which require expertise but do not contribute to this understanding are not discussed. How­ ever, the presentation is more sophisticated than might be considered appropri­ ate for someone with no previous knowledge of the subject so that, although it is developed from the beginning, some previous acquaintance with the elements of the subject would be an advantage. In addition, some familiarity with element­ ary calculus is assumed but not with the elementary theory of differential equations, although knowledge of the latter would again be an advantage. It is my opinion that mechanics is best introduced through the motion of a particle, with rigid body problems left until the subject is more fully developed. Howev...

  1. Combustion energy frontier research center (CEFRC) final report (August 1, 2009 – July 31, 2016)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Chung [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2017-05-05

    The Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center (CEFRC) was established to tackle the single overarching grand challenge of energy sustainability, energy security and global warming: to develop a “validated, predictive, multi-scale, combustion modeling capability to optimize the design and operation of evolving fuels in advanced engines for transportation applications,” as identified in the DOE report on “Basic Energy Needs for Clean and Efficient Combustion of 21st Century Transportation Fuels”. The challenge is particularly daunting since energy conversion efficiencies and exhaust emissions are governed by coupled chemical and transport processes at multiple length scales ranging from electron excitation to molecular rearrangements to nanoscale particulate formation to turbulent fuel/air mixing. To tackle this challenge, the CEFRC assembled a world-class team of 15 principal investigators, with the objectives to: 1) develop and test theoretical models to predict elementary reaction rates, molecule thermalization rates, chemical bond dissociation energies, and nonequilibrium transport properties using quantum chemistry calculations that account for strong electron correlation and multiple electronic potential energy surfaces; 2) develop automated kinetic mechanism generation, reduction, and error control methods for predicting alternative fuel including biofuel oxidation, fuel droplet decomposition, and NOx and particulate formation; 3) validate and improve the predictions of these models by measuring ignition delay times, species profiles, flame structures, burning limits, turbulence-kinetic coupling, and NOx and soot emissions at high-pressures and near-limit conditions, by using advanced experimental diagnostic techniques including multiple laser techniques, molecular beam sampling and synchrotron photoionization, and by conducting the measurements in high-pressure shock tubes, jet-stirred and flow reactors, flame bombs, counterflow flames, and advanced

  2. Modeling of microgravity combustion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmaster, John

    1995-01-01

    This program started in February 1991, and is designed to improve our understanding of basic combustion phenomena by the modeling of various configurations undergoing experimental study by others. Results through 1992 were reported in the second workshop. Work since that time has examined the following topics: Flame-balls; Intrinsic and acoustic instabilities in multiphase mixtures; Radiation effects in premixed combustion; Smouldering, both forward and reverse, as well as two dimensional smoulder.

  3. Quantifying emissions from spontaneous combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-09-01

    Spontaneous combustion can be a significant problem in the coal industry, not only due to the obvious safety hazard and the potential loss of valuable assets, but also with respect to the release of gaseous pollutants, especially CO2, from uncontrolled coal fires. This report reviews methodologies for measuring emissions from spontaneous combustion and discusses methods for quantifying, estimating and accounting for the purpose of preparing emission inventories.

  4. Analysis of two different types of hydrogen combustion during severe accidents in a typical pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko Yuchih; Lee Min

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen combustion is an important phenomenon that may occur during severe accidents of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Depending on the specific plant design, the initiating events, and mitigation actions executed, hydrogen combustion may have distinct characteristics and may damage the plant in various degrees. The worst scenario will be the catastrophic failure of containment. In this study two specific types of hydrogen combustion are analyzed to evaluate their impact on the containment integrity. In this paper, Station Blackout (SBO) and Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCAs) sequences are analyzed using MAAP4 (Modular Accident Analysis Program) code. The former sequence is used to represent hydrogen combustion phenomenon under the condition that the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) breaches at high pressure and the latter sequence represents the phenomenon that RPV fails at low pressure. Two types of hydrogen combustion are observed in the simulation. The Type I hydrogen combustion represents global and instantaneous hydrogen combustion. Large pressure spike is created during the combustion and represents a threat to containment integrity. Type II hydrogen combustion is localized burn and burn continuously over a time period. There is hardly any impact of this type hydrogen burn on the containment pressurization rate. Both types of hydrogen combustion can occur in the severe accidents without any human intervention. From the accident mitigation point of view, operators should try to bring the containment into conditions that favor the Type II hydrogen combustion. (authors)

  5. Timing of global regression and microbial bloom linked with the Permian-Triassic boundary mass extinction: implications for driving mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baresel, Björn; Bucher, Hugo; Bagherpour, Borhan; Brosse, Morgane; Guodun, Kuang; Schaltegger, Urs

    2017-03-06

    New high-resolution U-Pb dates indicate a duration of 89 ± 38 kyr for the Permian hiatus and of 14 ± 57 kyr for the overlying Triassic microbial limestone in shallow water settings of the Nanpanjiang Basin, South China. The age and duration of the hiatus coincides with the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) and the extinction interval in the Meishan Global Stratotype Section and Point, and strongly supports a glacio-eustatic regression, which best explains the genesis of the worldwide hiatus straddling the PTB in shallow water records. In adjacent deep marine troughs, rates of sediment accumulation display a six-fold decrease across the PTB compatible with a dryer and cooler climate as indicated by terrestrial plants. Our model of the Permian-Triassic boundary mass extinction (PTBME) hinges on the synchronicity of the hiatus with the onset of the Siberian Traps volcanism. This early eruptive phase released sulfur-rich volatiles into the stratosphere, thus simultaneously eliciting a short-lived ice age responsible for the global regression and a brief but intense acidification. Abrupt cooling, shrunk habitats on shelves and acidification may all have synergistically triggered the PTBME. Subsequently, the build-up of volcanic CO 2 induced a transient cool climate whose early phase saw the deposition of the microbial limestone.

  6. Combustion means for solid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murase, D.

    1987-09-23

    A combustion device for solid fuel, suitable for coal, coke, charcoal, coal-dust briquettes etc., comprising:- a base stand with an opening therein, an imperforate heat resistant holding board locatable to close said opening; a combustion chamber standing on the base stand with the holding board forming the base of the combustion chamber; a wiper arm pivoted for horizontal wiping movement over the upper surface of the holding board; an inlet means at a lower edge of said chamber above the base stand, and/or in a surrounding wall of said chamber, whereby combustion air may enter as exhaust gases leave the combustion chamber; an exhaust pipe for the exhaust gases; generally tubular gas-flow heat-exchange ducting putting the combustion chamber and exhaust pipe into communication; and means capable of moving the holding board into and out of the opening for removal of ash or other residue. The invention can be used for a heating system in a house or in a greenhouse or for a boiler.

  7. Control issues in oxy-fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snarheim, Dagfinn

    2009-08-15

    Combustion of fossil fuels is the major energy source in todays society. While the use of fossil fuels is a necessity for our society to function, there has been an increasing concern on the emissions of CO{sub 2} resulting from human activities. Emissions of CO{sub 2} are considered to be the main cause for the global warming and climate changes we have experienced in recent years. To fight the climate changes, the emissions of CO{sub 2} must be reduced in a timely fashion. Strategies to achieve this include switching to less carbon intensive fuels, renewable energy sources, nuclear energy and combustion with CO{sub 2} capture. The use of oxy-fuel combustion is among the alternative post- and pre combustion capture concepts, a strategy to achieve power production from fossil fuels with CO{sub 2} capture. In an oxy-fuel process, the fuel is burned in a mixture of oxygen and CO{sub 2} (or steam), leaving the exhaust consisting mainly of CO{sub 2} and steam. The steam can be removed by use of a condenser, leaving (almost) pure CO{sub 2} ready to be captured. The downside to CO{sub 2} capture is that it is expensive, both in capital cost of extra equipment, and in operation as it costs energy to capture the CO{sub 2}. Thus it is important to maximize the efficiency in such plants. One attractive concept to achieve CO{sub 2} capture by use of oxy-fuel, is a semi-closed oxy-fuel gas turbine cycle. The dynamics of such a plant are highly integrated, involving energy and mass recycle, and optimizing efficiency might lead to operational (control) challenges. In these thesis we investigate how such a power cycle should be controlled. By looking at control at such an early stage in the design phase, it is possible to find control solutions otherwise not feasible, that leads to better overall performance. Optimization is used on a nonlinear model based on first principles, to compare different control structures. Then, closed loop simulations using MPC, are used to validate

  8. Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert Andrus; Gregory Burns; John Chiu; Gregory Lijedahl; Peter Stromberg; Paul Thibeault

    2009-01-07

    For the past several years Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), a leading world-wide power system manufacturer and supplier, has been in the initial stages of developing an entirely new, ultra-clean, low cost, high efficiency power plant for the global power market. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion-gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology The process consists of the oxidation, reduction, carbonation, and calcination of calcium-based compounds, which chemically react with coal, biomass, or opportunity fuels in two chemical loops and one thermal loop. The chemical and thermal looping technology can be alternatively configured as (i) a combustion-based steam power plant with CO{sub 2} capture, (ii) a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas for gas turbines or fuel cells, or (iii) an integrated hybrid combustion-gasification process producing hydrogen for gas turbines, fuel cells or other hydrogen based applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. In its most advanced configuration, this new concept offers the promise to become the technology link from today's Rankine cycle steam power plants to tomorrow's advanced energy plants. The objective of this work is to develop and verify the high temperature chemical and thermal looping process concept at a small-scale pilot facility in order to enable AL to design, construct and demonstrate a pre-commercial, prototype version of this advanced system. In support of this objective, Alstom and DOE started a multi-year program, under this contract. Before the contract started, in a preliminary phase (Phase 0) Alstom funded and built the required small-scale pilot facility (Process Development Unit, PDU) at its Power Plant Laboratories in Windsor, Connecticut. Construction was completed in calendar year 2003. The objective for Phase I was to develop the indirect combustion loop with CO{sub 2

  9. Near wall combustion modeling in spark ignition engines. Part B: Post-flame reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demesoukas, Sokratis; Caillol, Christian; Higelin, Pascal; Boiarciuc, Andrei; Floch, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Models for the post flame reactions (CO and hydrocarbons) and heat release rate are proposed. • ‘Freezing’ effect of CO kinetics is captured but equilibrium CO concentrations are low. • Reactive–diffusive processes are modeled for hydrocarbons and the last stage of combustion is captured. - Abstract: Reduced fuel consumption, low pollutant emissions and adequate output performance are key features in the contemporary design of spark ignition engines. Zero-dimensional numerical simulation is an attractive alternative to engine experiments for the evaluation of various engine configurations. Both flame front reaction and post-flame processes contribute to the heat release rate. The contribution of this work is to highlight and model the role of post-flame reactions (CO and hydrocarbons) in the heat release rate. The modeling approach to CO kinetics used two reactions considered to be dominant and thus more suitable for the description of CO chemical mechanism. Equilibrium concentrations of all the species involved were calculated by a two-zone thermodynamic model. The computed characteristic time of CO kinetics was found to be of a similar order to the results of complex chemistry simulations. The proposed model captured the ‘freezing’ effect (reaction rate is almost zero) for temperatures lower than 1800 K and followed the trends of the measured values at exhaust. However, a consistent underestimation of CO levels at the exhaust was observed. The impact of the remaining CO on the combustion efficiency is considerable especially for rich mixtures. For a remaining 0.4% CO mass fraction, the impact on combustion inefficiency is 0.1%. Unburnt hydrocarbon, which have not reacted within the flame front before quenching, diffuse in the burnt gas and react. In this work, a global reaction rate models the kinetic behavior of hydrocarbon. The diffusion process was modeled by a relaxation equation applied on the calculated kinetic concentration

  10. Experiments and simulations of NOx formation in the combustion of hydroxylated fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Bohon, Myles

    2015-06-01

    This work investigates the influence of molecular structure in hydroxylated fuels (i.e. fuels with one or more hydroxyl groups), such as alcohols and polyols, on NOx formation. The fuels studied are three lower alcohols (methanol, ethanol, and n-propanol), two diols (1,2-ethanediol and 1,2-propanediol), and one triol (1,2,3-propanetriol); all of which are liquids at room temperature and span a wide range of thermophysical properties. Experimental stack emissions measurements of NO/NO2, CO, and CO2 and flame temperature profiles utilizing a rake of thermocouples were obtained in globally lean, swirling, liquid atomized spray flames inside a refractory-lined combustion chamber as a function of the atomizing air flow rate and swirl number. These experiments show significantly lower NOx formation with increasing fuel oxygen content despite similarities in the flame temperature profiles. By controlling the temperature profiles, the contribution to NOx formation through the thermal mechanism were matched, and variations in the contribution through non-thermal NOx formation pathways are observed. Simulations in a perfectly stirred reactor, at conditions representative of those measured within the combustion region, were conducted as a function of temperature and equivalence ratio. The simulations employed a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic model for NOx formation from hydroxylated fuels developed based on recent alcohol combustion models and extended to include polyol combustion chemistry. These simulations provide a qualitative comparison to the range of temperatures and equivalence ratios observed in complex swirling flows and provide insight into the influence of variations in the fuel decomposition pathways on NOx formation. It is observed that increasing the fuel bound oxygen concentration ultimately reduces the formation of NOx by increasing the proportion of fuel oxidized through formaldehyde, as opposed to acetylene or acetaldehyde. The subsequent

  11. Global oscillations of a fluid torus as a modulation mechanism for black-hole high-frequency QPOs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bursa, Michal

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 326 (2005), s. 849-855 ISSN 0004-6337 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : black hole physics * gravitation * X-rays Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.871, year: 2005

  12. Evaluation of combustion experiments conducted during the research and development project ``Mechanical-biological waste conditioning in combination with thermal processing of partial waste fractions``; Auswertung der Verbrennungsversuche zum Forschungs- und Entwicklungsvorhaben ``mechanisch-biologische Restmuellbehandlung unter Einbindung thermischer Verfahren fuer Teilfraktionen``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, J.; Lohf, A.; Herr, C. [Institut WAR, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The technical code on municipal waste makes specific demands on waste to be deposited at landfills which can only be met if mechanical-biological conditioning of waste as well as thermal processing of partial waste fractions are continued also in the future. But waste that has undergone mechanical or mechanical-biological conditioning presents different combustion properties from those of unconditioned waste. In this second stage of the research project, the thermal processability of waste having undergone mechanical or mechanical-biological conditioning was studied. Together with the results from the first project stage, where the throughput represented exclusively mechanically conditioned material, the results of the latter measuring campaigns comprehensively demonstrate possibilities for the thermal processing of partial waste fractions having undergone biological-mechanical conditioning, and inform on changes in plant performance. (orig.) [Deutsch] Um die in der TA-Siedlungsabfall an den abzulagernden Restmuell gestellten Deponieeingangsbedingungen zu erfuellen, muss neben einer mechanisch-biologischen Aufbereitung bei Teilfraktionen auch weiterhin eine thermische Behandlung eingeplant werden. Die Verbrennungseigenschaften von mechanisch oder mechanisch-biologisch vorbehandeltem Restmuell weichen allerdings von denen von unbehandeltem Restmuell ab. In dieser zweiten Projektphase des Forschungsvorhabens wurde eine Untersuchung bezueglich der thermischen Behandelbarkeit von mechanisch und auch biologisch vorbehandeltem Muell durchgefuehrt. Die Ergebnisse der Messkampagnen bilden zusammen mit den Ergebnissen der ersten Projektphase, in der ausschliesslich mechanisch vorbehandeltes Material durchgesetzt wurde, eine umfassende Darstellung ueber Moeglichkeiten und veraenderte Anlagenverhalten bei der thermischen Behandlung von Teilfraktionen aus der biologisch-mechanisch Vorbehandlung. (orig.)

  13. Volatiles and char combustion rates of demineralised lignite and wood blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilgin, Melek; Pehlivan, Dursun

    2009-01-01

    Today, much interest is given to the utilisation of materials of plant origin as substitutions of fossil fuels in meeting energy needs to reduce the level of atmospheric pollutant emissions and global warming threat, and emphasis has been placed on the co-combustion of coal and biomass. In this study, volatiles and char combustion behaviour of the fuel pellets composed from demineralised lignite and poplar wood sawdust, were investigated in a cylindrical wire mesh basket placed in a preheated tube furnace. The results have shown that ignition times of the pellets decreased with the burning temperature and shortened further due to demineralisation of lignite. Volatiles combustion rates of the samples did not correlate well with combustion times. However, they can be correlated with their respective proximate volatile matter contents. Char burnout times decreased with increasing combustion rates and correlated well with the respective proximate fixed carbon contents of the samples. Deviations were more considerable in the case of rate data. (author)

  14. Numerical Simulation of Combustion and Rotor-Stator Interaction in a Turbine Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos D. Isvoranu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the development of a numerical algorithm for the computation of flow and combustion in a turbine combustor. The flow and combustion are modeled by the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the species-conservation equations. The chemistry model used herein is a two-step, global, finite-rate combustion model for methane and combustion gases. The governing equations are written in the strong conservation form and solved using a fully implicit, finite-difference approximation. The gas dynamics and chemistry equations are fully decoupled. A correction technique has been developed to enforce the conservation of mass fractions. The numerical algorithm developed herein has been used to investigate the flow and combustion in a one-stage turbine combustor.

  15. Mult-Pollutant Control Through Novel Approaches to Oxygen Enhanced Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Axelbaum; Pratim Biswas

    2009-02-28

    Growing concerns about global climate change have focused effortss on identifying approaches to stabilizing carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere. One approach utilizes oxy-fuel combustion to produce a concentrated flue gas that will enable economical CO{sub 2} capture by direct methods. Oxy-fuel combustion rewuires an Air Separation Unit (ASU) to provide a high-purity stream of oxygen as well as a Compression and Purification Unit (CPU) to clean and compress the CO{sub 2} for long term storage. Overall plant efficiency will suffer from the parasitic load of both the ASU and CPU and researchers are investigating techniques to enhance other aspects of the combustion and gas cleanup proceses to improve the benefit-to-cost ratio. This work examines the influence of oxy-fuel combustion and non-carbon based sorbents on the formation and fate of multiple combustion pollutants both numerically and experimentally.

  16. Working group report: methane emissions from fuel combustion and industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdowski, J.J.M.; Beck, L.; Piccot, S.; Olivier, J.G.J.; Veldt, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper lists the source categories which are currently recognised as minor sources of methane. These fall into five broad groups: stationary fuel combustion (residential combustion of fuels, solid waste incineration at home sites, on-site agricultural waste burning, industrial and utility combustion of coal, wood, oil and gas, commercial and industrial waste incineration); mobile fuel combustion; non-combustion industrial processes (primary metals production, chemical manufacturing processes, petroleum refining, commercial charcoal manufacturing waste treatments); minor energy production sources (storage and distribution of automotive fuels, geothermal energy production; peat mining operations, oil shale mining operations); and miscellaneous sources. The paper also presents a preliminary estimate of global methane emissions from these minor sources and the results of the working group's discussion on recommendations for the IPCC/OECD methodology and specific research needs. A list of control options for emissions from minor sources is provided. 2 tabs

  17. Mars Global Surveyor Data Analysis Program. Origins of Small Volcanic Cones: Eruption Mechanisms and Implications for Water on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagents, Sarah A.; Greeley, Ronald; Thordarson, Thorvaldur

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the proposed work was to determine the origins of small volcanic cones observed in Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) data, and their implications for regolith ice stores and magma volatile contents. For this 1-year study, our approach involved a combination of: Quantitative morphologic analysis and interpretation of Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) and Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data; Numerical modeling of eruption processes responsible for producing the observed features; Fieldwork on terrestrial analogs in Iceland. Following this approach, this study succeeded in furthering our understanding of (i) the spatial and temporal distribution of near-surface water ice, as defined by the distribution and sizes of rootless volcanic cones ("pseudocraters"), and (ii) the properties, eruption conditions, and volatile contents of magmas producing primary vent cones.

  18. A Field Study of Structures, Affordances, and Coordination Mechanisms of a Cross-Organizational Extended Team in Global Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahedi, Mansooreh; Ali Babar, Muhammad

    Context: Growing popularity of Global Software Development (GSD) has resulted in an increasing number of cross-organizational teams that are formed according to Extended Team Model (ETM). There is little empirical body of knowledge about the structures (work, social, and communication) that may...... exist in these types of teams and the potential strengths and weaknesses of these structures in dealing with GSD challenges. Objective: This research has been motivated by the need of studying the types of work, communication and social structures designed and implemented for a cross...... interviews with both onshore and offshore team members. We applied qualitative data analysis approach called thematic analysis for finding the answers to our key research questions. Results: Our study has identified that the current work structure of ETM create several kinds of interdependencies for which...

  19. Techniques de combustion Combustin Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perthuis E.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available L'efficacité d'un processus de chauffage par flamme est étroitement liée à la maîtrise des techniques de combustion. Le brûleur, organe essentiel de l'équipement de chauffe, doit d'une part assurer une combustion complète pour utiliser au mieux l'énergie potentielle du combustible et, d'autre part, provoquer dans le foyer les conditions aérodynamiques les plus propices oux transferts de chaleur. En s'appuyant sur les études expérimentales effectuées à la Fondation de Recherches Internationales sur les Flammes (FRIF, au Groupe d'Étude des Flammes de Gaz Naturel (GEFGN et à l'Institut Français du Pétrole (IFP et sur des réalisations industrielles, on présente les propriétés essentielles des flammes de diffusion aux combustibles liquides et gazeux obtenues avec ou sans mise en rotation des fluides, et leurs répercussions sur les transferts thermiques. La recherche des températures de combustion élevées conduit à envisager la marche à excès d'air réduit, le réchauffage de l'air ou son enrichissement à l'oxygène. Par quelques exemples, on évoque l'influence de ces paramètres d'exploitation sur l'économie possible en combustible. The efficiency of a flame heating process is closely linked ta the mastery of, combustion techniques. The burner, an essential element in any heating equipment, must provide complete combustion sa as to make optimum use of the potential energy in the fuel while, at the same time, creating the most suitable conditions for heat transfers in the combustion chamber. On the basis of experimental research performed by FRIF, GEFGN and IFP and of industrial achievements, this article describesthe essential properties of diffusion flames fed by liquid and gaseous fuels and produced with or without fluid swirling, and the effects of such flames on heat transfers. The search for high combustion temperatures means that consideration must be given to operating with reduced excess air, heating the air or

  20. Ultrasonic-assisted solution combustion synthesis of porous Na{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C: formation mechanism and sodium storage performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiuyun; Liu, Qing [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die and Mould Technology (China); Chu, Xiangcheng; Zhang, Yiling [Tsinghua University, State Key Laboratory of New Ceramic and Fine Processing (China); Yan, Youwei; Xue, Lihong, E-mail: xuelh@hust.edu.cn; Zhang, Wuxing, E-mail: zhangwx@hust.edu.cn [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die and Mould Technology (China)

    2017-04-15

    Solution combustion synthesis (SCS) is an effective and rapid method for synthesizing nanocrystalline materials. However, the control over size, morphology, and microstructure are rather limited in SCS. Here, we develop a novel ultrasonic-assisted solution combustion route to synthesize the porous and nano-sized Na{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C composites, and reveal the effects of ultrasound on the structural evolution of NVP/C. Due to the cavitation effects generated from ultrasonic irradiation, the ultrasonic-assisted SCS can produce honeycomb precursor, which can be further transformed into porous Na{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C with reticular and hollow structures after thermal treatment. When used as cathode material for Na-ion batteries, the porous Na{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C delivers an initial discharge capacity of 118 mAh g{sup −1} at 0.1 C and an initial coulombic efficiency of 85%. It can retain 93.8% of the initial capacity after 120 cycles at 0.2 C. The results demonstrate that ultrasonic-assisted SCS can be a new strategy to design crystalline nanomaterials with tunable microstructures.

  1. New insights into strobe reactions: An intriguing oscillatory combustion phenomenon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Strobes are self-sustained oscillatory combustions that have various applications in the fireworks industry and also in the military area (signaling, missile decoys and crowd control). However, most of the strobe compositions were discovered using trial and error methods. The fundamentals mechanisms

  2. DBD plasma assisted combustion for 1D flat flame

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elkholy, A.H.E.

    2015-01-01

    The potential use of non-equilibrium plasma for ignition and combustion control has garnered increasing interest due to the possibility of plasma-assisted approaches for ignition and flame stabilization. During the past decade, significant progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms

  3. Carbon/Carbon Pistons for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Carbon/carbon piston performs same function as aluminum pistons in reciprocating internal combustion engines while reducing weight and increasing mechanical and thermal efficiencies of engine. Carbon/carbon piston concept features low piston-to-cylinder wall clearance - so low piston rings and skirts unnecessary. Advantages possible by negligible coefficient of thermal expansion of carbon/carbon.

  4. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  5. Microstructure, local and global mechanical properties of friction stir welds in aluminium alloy 6005A-T6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simar, A.; Brechet, Y.; Meester, B. de; Denquin, A.; Pardoen, T.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the welding speed on the microstructure, local and overall mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints has been investigated in the aluminium alloy 6005A-T6. The fine hardening precipitation within the heat-affected zone has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Post-welding heat treatments have been applied to obtain indications on the level of solid solution supersaturation in the as welded state. The local mechanical behaviour was determined using thin specimens extracted from various regions of the weld. The overall properties were measured on samples cut perpendicular to the weld. Specific attention was devoted to the relationship between the local microstructure and local hardening properties in the weakest region, which govern the overall strength and ductility of the welds

  6. HERCULES Advanced Combustion Concepts Test Facility: Spray/Combustion Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, K. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Labor fuer Aerothermochemie und Verbrennungssysteme, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    This yearly report for 2004 on behalf of the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) at the Laboratory for Aero-thermochemistry and Combustion Systems at the Federal Institute of Technology ETH in Zurich, Switzerland, presents a review of work being done within the framework of HERCULES (High Efficiency R and D on Combustion with Ultra Low Emissions for Ships) - the international R and D project concerning new technologies for ships' diesels. The work involves the use and augmentation of simulation models. These are to be validated using experimental data. The report deals with the development of an experimental set-up that will simulate combustion in large two-stroke diesel engines and allow the generation of reference data. The main element of the test apparatus is a spray / combustion chamber with extensive possibilities for optical observation under variable flow conditions. The results of first simulations confirm concepts and shall help in further work on the project. The potential offered by high-speed camera systems was tested using the institute's existing HTDZ combustion chamber. Further work to be done is reviewed.

  7. Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, Antoni K.; Maxson, James A.; Hensinger, David M.

    1993-01-01

    An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure.

  8. Globalization and Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayakawa, Kazunobu; Machikita, Tomohiro

    2012-01-01

    Recent empirical studies which utilize plant- or establishment-level data to examine globalization's impact on productivity have discovered many causal mechanisms involved in globalization's impact on firms’ productivity. Because these pathways have been broad, there have been few attempts...

  9. Timing of global regression and microbial bloom linked with the Permian-Triassic boundary mass extinction: implications for driving mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baresel, Bjoern; Bucher, Hugo; Bagherpour, Borhan; Brosse, Morgane; Guodun, Kuang; Schaltegger, Urs

    2017-04-01

    High-precision U-Pb dating of single-zircon crystals by chemical abrasion-isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (CA-ID-TIMS) is applied to volcanic beds that are intercalated in sedimentary sequences across the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB). By assuming that the zircon crystallization age closely approximate that of the volcanic eruption and subsequent deposition, U-Pb zircon geochronology is the preferred approach for dating abiotic and biotic events, such as the formational PTB and the Permian-Triassic boundary mass extinction (PTBME). We will present new U-Pb zircon dates for a series of volcanic ash beds in shallow-marine Permian-Triassic sections in the Nanpanjiang Basin, South China. These high-resolution U-Pb dates indicate a duration of 90 ± 38 kyr for the Permian sedimentary hiatus and a duration of 13 ± 57 kyr for the overlying Triassic microbial limestone in the shallow water settings of the Nanpanjiang pull apart Basin. The age and duration of the hiatus coincides with the formational PTB and the extinction interval in the Meishan Global Stratotype Section and Point, thus strongly supporting a glacio-eustatic regression, which best explains the genesis of the worldwide hiatus straddling the PTB in shallow water records. In adjacent deep marine troughs, rates of sediment accumulation display a six-fold decrease across the PTB compatible with a dryer and cooler climate during the Griesbachian as indicated by terrestrial plants. Our model of the PTBME hinges on the synchronicity of the hiatus with the onset of the Siberian Traps volcanism. This early eruptive phase likely released sulfur-rich volatiles into the stratosphere, thus simultaneously eliciting a short-lived ice age responsible for the global regression and a brief but intense acidification. Abrupt cooling, shrunk habitats on shelves and acidification may all have synergistically triggered the PTBME. Subsequently, the build-up of volcanic CO2 induced this transient cool

  10. Chemical kinetics and combustion modelling with CFX 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopford, P [AEA Technology, Computational Fluid Dynamics Services Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    The presentation describes some recent developments in combustion and kinetics models used in the CFX software of AEA Technology. Three topics are highlighted: the development of coupled solvers in a traditional `SIMPLE`-based CFD code, the use of detailed chemical kinetics mechanism via `look-up` tables and the application of CFD to large-scale multi-burner combustion plant. The aim is identify those physical approximations and numerical methods that are likely to be most useful in the future and those areas where further developments are required. (author) 6 refs.

  11. Chemical kinetics and combustion modelling with CFX 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopford, P. [AEA Technology, Computational Fluid Dynamics Services Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The presentation describes some recent developments in combustion and kinetics models used in the CFX software of AEA Technology. Three topics are highlighted: the development of coupled solvers in a traditional `SIMPLE`-based CFD code, the use of detailed chemical kinetics mechanism via `look-up` tables and the application of CFD to large-scale multi-burner combustion plant. The aim is identify those physical approximations and numerical methods that are likely to be most useful in the future and those areas where further developments are required. (author) 6 refs.

  12. On mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of chemical kinetics in turbulent lean premixed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilleberg, Bjorn

    2011-07-01

    This thesis investigates turbulent reacting lean premixed flows with detailed treatment of the chemistry. First, the fundamental equations which govern laminar and turbulent reacting flows are presented. A perfectly stirred reactor numerical code is developed to investigate the role of unmixedness and chemical kinetics in driving combustion instabilities. This includes both global single-step and detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms. The single-step mechanisms predict to some degree a similar behavior as the detailed mechanisms. However, it is shown that simple mechanisms can by themselves introduce instabilities. Magnussens Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) for turbulent combustion is implemented in the open source CFD toolbox OpenFOAM R for treatment of both fast and detailed chemistry. RANS turbulence models account for the turbulent compressible flow. A database of pre-calculated chemical time scales, which contains the influence of chemical kinetics, is coupled to EDC with fast chemistry to account for local extinction in both diffusion and premixed flames. Results are compared to fast and detailed chemistry calculations. The inclusion of the database shows significantly better results than the fast chemistry calculations while having a comparably small computational cost. Numerical simulations of four piloted lean premixed jet flames falling into the 'well stirred reactor/broken reaction zones' regime, with strong finite-rate chemistry effects, are performed. Measured and predicted scalars compare well for the two jets with the lowest velocities. The two jets with the highest velocities experience extinction and reignition, and the simulations are able to capture the decrease and increase of the OH mass fractions, but the peak values are higher than in the experiments. Also numerical simulations of a lean premixed lifted jet flame with high sensitivity to turbulence modeling and chemical kinetics are performed. Limitations of the applied turbulence and

  13. The evolution of international policies and mechanisms to advance sustainable forest management and mitigate global climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bologna, J.; Lyke, J.; Theophile, K.

    1995-01-01

    Scientific findings regarding global climate change and deforestation led industrialized nations to bring both issues to the forefront of an international dialogue on the environment. International institutional attention to deforestation began in 1985 with the Tropical Forestry Action Program which helped countries develop plans for sustainable forest management. A few years later, the International Tropical Timber Organization, though designed to facilitate tropical timber trade, adopted guidelines for sustainable management of tropical production forests. Next, the activities before and after UNCED established a general set of forest principles and regional efforts to define sustainable forest management. The World Bank has also sought to reduce past lending failures that led to deforestation and other environmental degradation, through programmatic redirections and macro-economic policy reforms. Finally, through innovative financial incentives, industrialized and developing countries are identifying opportunities to offset debts and increase economic development without depleting forest resources. Collectively, these efforts have let to some trends that support sustainable forest management and mitigate climate change. The upcoming years will see a proactive set of multilateral programs to address deforestation, an increasing link between trade and the environment, and more uses of financial incentives to encourage sustainable forest management

  14. CFD simulation of gas and particles combustion in biomass furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griselin, Nicolas

    2000-11-01

    In this thesis, gas and particle combustion in biomass furnaces is investigated numerically. The aim of this thesis is to use Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technology as an effective computer based simulation tool to study and develop the combustion processes in biomass furnaces. A detailed model for the numerical simulation of biomass combustion in a furnace, including fixed-bed modeling, gas-phase calculation (species distribution, temperature field, flow field) and gas-solid two-phase interaction for flying burning particles is presented. This model is used to understand the mechanisms of combustion and pollutant emissions under different conditions in small scale and large scale furnaces. The code used in the computations was developed at the Division of Fluid Mechanics, LTH. The flow field in the combustion enclosure is calculated by solving the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, with standard {kappa} - {epsilon} turbulence closure, together with the energy conservation equation and species transport equations. Discrete transfer method is used for calculating the radiation source term in the energy conservation equation. Finite difference is used to solve the general form of the equation yielding solutions for gas-phase temperatures, velocities, turbulence intensities and species concentrations. The code has been extended through this work in order to include two-phase flow simulation of particles and gas combustion. The Favre-averaged gas equations are solved in a Eulerian framework while the submodels for particle motion and combustion are used in the framework of a Lagrangian approach. Numerical simulations and measurement data of unburned hydrocarbons (UHC), CO, H{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and temperature on the top of the fixed bed are used to model the amount of tar and char formed during pyrolysis and combustion of biomass fuel in the bed. Different operating conditions are examined. Numerical calculations are compared with the measured data. It is

  15. The changing nicotine products landscape: time to outlaw sales of combustible tobacco products?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefler, Marita

    2018-01-01

    Combustible tobacco products are unique both for the extraordinary harm they cause, and the fact that more than 50 years after these harms became known, they continue to be widely and legally available globally. However, the rapid evolution of the nicotine product marketplace in recent years warrants a re-assessment of the viability of phasing out commercial sales of combustible tobacco, and presents an opportunity to end the exceptionalism of combustible tobacco being permitted for sale. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. FY1996 annual report on the advanced combustion science in microgravity field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Research was implemented continuously from the previous year on combustion equipment enabling advanced combustion technologies, by studying combustion in a microgravity field, for the purpose of preventing environmental pollution caused by diversification of energy sources and exhaust gasses. In joint studies with NASA, the themes of the previous year were continued, for which tests were conducted 37 times using Japanese drop test equipment and 131 times using NASA's. The evaluation and analysis of the experiments and test data by the microgravity test equipment were, in addition to the themes of the previous year, such that micro observation for ignition/combustion mechanism of fuel spray droplets was made, as well as studies on fuel droplets combustion by a laser diagnostic device, concerning combustion of fuel droplets and vaporization process, that flame spread on solid substances was researched in relation to combustion characteristics of high density fuels, and that mixed gas combustion on a solid surface was studied in connection with the research on flammability limits. Furthermore, a study on combustion technology for gas turbines was added for the purpose of studying an advanced combustor. (NEDO)

  17. Quantitative Measurement of Oxygen in Microgravity Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Joel A.

    1997-01-01

    A low-gravity environment, in space or in ground-based facilities such as drop towers, provides a unique setting for studying combustion mechanisms. Understanding the physical phenomena controlling the ignition and spread of flames in microgravity has importance for space safety as well as for better characterization of dynamical and chemical combustion processes which are normally masked by buoyancy and other gravity-related effects. Due to restrictions associated with performing measurements in reduced gravity, diagnostic methods which have been applied to microgravity combustion studies have generally been limited to capture of flame emissions on film or video, laser Schlieren imaging and (intrusive) temperature measurements using thermocouples. Given the development of detailed theoretical models, more sophisticated diagnostic methods are needed to provide the kind of quantitative data necessary to characterize the properties of microgravity combustion processes as well as provide accurate feedback to improve the predictive capabilities of the models. When the demands of space flight are considered, the need for improved diagnostic systems which are rugged, compact, reliable, and operate at low power becomes apparent. The objective of this research is twofold. First, we want to develop a better understanding of the relative roles of diffusion and reaction of oxygen in microgravity combustion. As the primary oxidizer species, oxygen plays a major role in controlling the observed properties of flames, including flame front speed (in solid or liquid flames), extinguishment characteristics, flame size and flame temperature. The second objective is to develop better diagnostics based on diode laser absorption which can be of real value in both microgravity combustion research and as a sensor on-board Spacelab as either an air quality monitor or as part of a fire detection system. In our prior microgravity work, an eight line-of-sight fiber optic system measured

  18. Global transcriptomic profiling of aspen trees under elevated [CO2] to identify potential molecular mechanisms responsible for enhanced radial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hairong; Gou, Jiqing; Yordanov, Yordan; Zhang, Huaxin; Thakur, Ramesh; Jones, Wendy; Burton, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Aspen (Populus tremuloides) trees growing under elevated [CO(2)] at a free-air CO(2) enrichment (FACE) site produced significantly more biomass than control trees. We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the observed increase in biomass by producing transcriptomic profiles of the vascular cambium zone (VCZ) and leaves, and then performed a comparative study to identify significantly changed genes and pathways after 12 years exposure to elevated [CO(2)]. In leaves, elevated [CO(2)] enhanced expression of genes related to Calvin cycle activity and linked pathways. In the VCZ, the pathways involved in cell growth, cell division, hormone metabolism, and secondary cell wall formation were altered while auxin conjugation, ABA synthesis, and cytokinin glucosylation and degradation were inhibited. Similarly, the genes involved in hemicellulose and pectin biosynthesis were enhanced, but some genes that catalyze important steps in lignin biosynthesis pathway were inhibited. Evidence from systemic analysis supported the functioning of multiple molecular mechanisms that underpin the enhanced radial growth in response to elevated [CO(2)].

  19. Global view of the mechanisms of improved learning and memory capability in mice with music-exposure by microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Bo; Zhu, Shujia; Li, Shijia; Zeng, Qingwen; Mei, Bing

    2009-08-28

    Music has been proved beneficial to improve learning and memory in many species including human in previous research work. Although some genes have been identified to contribute to the mechanisms, it is believed that the effect of music is manifold, behind which must concern a complex regulation network. To further understand the mechanisms, we exposed the mice to classical music for one month. The subsequent behavioral experiments showed improvement of spatial learning capability and elevation of fear-motivated memory in the mice with music-exposure as compared to the naïve mice. Meanwhile, we applied the microarray to compare the gene expression profiles of the hippocampus and cortex between the mice with music-exposure and the naïve mice. The results showed approximately 454 genes in cortex (200 genes up-regulated and 254 genes down-regulated) and 437 genes in hippocampus (256 genes up-regulated and 181 genes down-regulated) were significantly affected in music-exposing mice, which mainly involved in ion channel activity and/or synaptic transmission, cytoskeleton, development, transcription, hormone activity. Our work may provide some hints for better understanding the effects of music on learning and memory.

  20. Fundamental and Technical Challenges for a Compatible Design Scheme of Oxyfuel Combustion Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuguang Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxyfuel combustion with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS is a carbon-reduction technology for use in large-scale coal-fired power plants. Significant progress has been achieved in the research and development of this technology during its scaling up from 0.4 MWth to 3 MWth and 35 MWth by the combined efforts of universities and industries in China. A prefeasibility study on a 200 MWe large-scale demonstration has progressed well, and is ready for implementation. The overall research development and demonstration (RD&D roadmap for oxyfuel combustion in China has become a critical component of the global RD&D roadmap for oxyfuel combustion. An air combustion/oxyfuel combustion compatible design philosophy was developed during the RD&D process. In this paper, we briefly address fundamental research and technology innovation efforts regarding several technical challenges, including combustion stability, heat transfer, system operation, mineral impurities, and corrosion. To further reduce the cost of carbon capture, in addition to the large-scale deployment of oxyfuel technology, increasing interest is anticipated in the novel and next-generation oxyfuel combustion technologies that are briefly introduced here, including a new oxygen-production concept and flameless oxyfuel combustion.

  1. Fossil fuel power plant combustion control: Research in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasini, S.; Trebbi, G.

    1991-01-01

    Electric power demand forecasts for Italy to the year 2000 indicate an increase of about 50% which, due to the current moratorium on nuclear energy, should be met entirely by fossil fuel power plants. Now, there is growing public concern about possible negative health impacts due to the air pollution produced through the combustion of fossil fuels. In response to these concerns, ENEL (Italian National Electricity Board) is investing heavily in air pollution abatement technology R ampersand D. The first phase involves the investigation of pollution mechanisms in order to develop suitable mathematical models and diagnostic techniques. The validity of the models is being tested through through measurements made by sophisticated instrumentation placed directly inside the combustion chambers of steam generator systems. These are allowing engineers to develop improved combustion control methods designed to reduce air pollution at source

  2. Global Consumption of Flame Retardants and Related Environmental Concerns: A Study on Possible Mechanical Recycling of Flame Retardant Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail Yasin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Flame retardants (FRs have been around us for decades to increase the chances of survival against fire or flame by limiting its propagation. The FR textiles, irrespective of their atmospheric presence are used in baby clothing, pushchairs, car seats, etc. The overall FR market in Asia, Europe, and the United States in 2007 was around 1.8 million metric tonnes. It is estimated that the worldwide consumption of FRs will reach 2.8 million tonnes in 2018. Unfortunately, a sustainable approach for textile waste, especially in the case of FR textiles, is absent. Incineration and landfill of FR textiles are hindered by various toxic outcomes. To address the need for sustainable methods of discarding FR textiles, the mechanical recycling of cotton curtains was evaluated.

  3. Premixed combustion under electric field in a constant volume chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2012-12-01

    The effects of electric fields on outwardly propagating premixed flames in a constant volume chamber were experimentally investigated. An electric plug, subjected to high electrical voltages, was used to generate electric fields inside the chamber. To minimize directional ionic wind effects, alternating current with frequency of 1 kHz was employed. Lean and rich fuel/air mixtures for both methane and propane were tested to investigate various preferential diffusion conditions. As a result, electrically induced instability showing cracked structure on the flame surface could be observed. This cracked structure enhanced flame propagation speed for the initial period of combustion and led to reduction in flame initiation and overall combustion duration times. However, by analyzing pressure data, it was found that overall burning rates are not much affected from the electric field for the pressurized combustion period. The reduction of overall combustion time is less sensitive to equivalence ratio for methane/air mixtures, whereas the results demonstrate pronounced effects on a lean mixture for propane. The improvement of combustion characteristics in lean mixtures will be beneficial to the design of lean burn engines. Two hypothetical mechanisms to explain the electrically induced instability were proposed: 1) ionic wind initiated hydrodynamic instability and 2) thermodiffusive instability through the modification of transport property such as mass diffusivity. © 2012 IEEE.

  4. Numerical simulations of turbulent jet ignition and combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Validi, Abdoulahad; Irannejad, Abolfazl; Jaberi, Farhad

    2013-11-01

    The ignition and combustion of a homogeneous lean hydrogen-air mixture by a turbulent jet flow of hot combustion products injected into a colder gas mixture are studied by a high fidelity numerical model. Turbulent jet ignition can be considered as an efficient method for starting and controlling the reaction in homogeneously charged combustion systems used in advanced internal combustion and gas turbine engines. In this work, we study in details the physics of turbulent jet ignition in a fundamental flow configuration. The flow and combustion are modeled with the hybrid large eddy simulation/filtered mass density function (LES/FMDF) approach, in which the filtered form the compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a high-order finite difference scheme for the turbulent velocity and the FMDF transport equations are solved with a Lagrangian stochastic method to obtain the scalar (temperature and species mass fractions) field. The hydrogen oxidation is described by a detailed reaction mechanism with 37 elementary reactions and 9 species.

  5. Premixed combustion under electric field in a constant volume chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min; Lee, Yonggyu

    2012-01-01

    The effects of electric fields on outwardly propagating premixed flames in a constant volume chamber were experimentally investigated. An electric plug, subjected to high electrical voltages, was used to generate electric fields inside the chamber. To minimize directional ionic wind effects, alternating current with frequency of 1 kHz was employed. Lean and rich fuel/air mixtures for both methane and propane were tested to investigate various preferential diffusion conditions. As a result, electrically induced instability showing cracked structure on the flame surface could be observed. This cracked structure enhanced flame propagation speed for the initial period of combustion and led to reduction in flame initiation and overall combustion duration times. However, by analyzing pressure data, it was found that overall burning rates are not much affected from the electric field for the pressurized combustion period. The reduction of overall combustion time is less sensitive to equivalence ratio for methane/air mixtures, whereas the results demonstrate pronounced effects on a lean mixture for propane. The improvement of combustion characteristics in lean mixtures will be beneficial to the design of lean burn engines. Two hypothetical mechanisms to explain the electrically induced instability were proposed: 1) ionic wind initiated hydrodynamic instability and 2) thermodiffusive instability through the modification of transport property such as mass diffusivity. © 2012 IEEE.

  6. From simple receptors to complex multimodal percepts: a first global picture on the mechanisms involved in perceptual binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velik, Rosemarie

    2012-01-01

    The binding problem in perception is concerned with answering the question how information from millions of sensory receptors, processed by millions of neurons working in parallel, can be merged into a unified percept. Binding in perception reaches from the lowest levels of feature binding up to the levels of multimodal binding of information coming from the different sensor modalities and also from other functional systems. The last 40 years of research have shown that the binding problem cannot be solved easily. Today, it is considered as one of the key questions to brain understanding. To date, various solutions have been suggested to the binding problem including: (1) combination coding, (2) binding by synchrony, (3) population coding, (4) binding by attention, (5) binding by knowledge, expectation, and memory, (6) hardwired vs. on-demand binding, (7) bundling and binding of features, (8) the feature-integration theory of attention, and (9) synchronization through top-down processes. Each of those hypotheses addresses important aspects of binding. However, each of them also suffers from certain weak points and can never give a complete explanation. This article gives a brief overview of the so far suggested solutions of perceptual binding and then shows that those are actually not mutually exclusive but can complement each other. A computationally verified model is presented which shows that, most likely, the different described mechanisms of binding act (1) at different hierarchical levels and (2) in different stages of "perceptual knowledge acquisition." The model furthermore considers and explains a number of inhibitory "filter mechanisms" that suppress the activation of inappropriate or currently irrelevant information.

  7. From simple receptors to complex multimodal percepts: A first global picture on the mechanisms involved in perceptual binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemarie eVelik

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The binding problem in perception is concerned with answering the question how information from millions of sensory receptors, processed by millions of neurons working in parallel, can be merged into a unified percept. Binding in perception reaches from the lowest levels of feature binding up to the levels of multimodal binding of information coming from the different sensor modalities and also from other functional systems. The last 40 years of research have shown that the binding problem cannot be solved easily. Today, it is considered as one of the key questions to brain understanding. To date, various solutions have been suggested to the binding problem including: (1 combination coding, (2 binding by synchrony, (3 population coding, (4 binding by attention, (5 binding by knowledge, expectation, and memory, (6 hardwired versus on-demand binding, (7 bundling and binding of features, (8 the feature-integration theory of attention, (9 synchronization through top-down processes. Each of those hypotheses addresses important aspects of binding. However, each of them also suffers from certain weak points and can never give a complete explanation. This article gives a brief overview of the so far suggested solutions of perceptual binding and then shows that those are actually not mutually exclusive but can complement each other. A computationally verified model is presented which shows that, most likely, the different described mechanisms of binding act (1 at different hierarchical levels and (2 in different stages of perceptual knowledge acquisition. The model furthermore considers and explains a number of inhibitory filter mechanisms that suppress the activation of inappropriate or currently irrelevant information.

  8. Characterisation of wood combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto

    The combustion of wood chips and wood pellets for the production of renewable energy in Denmark increased from 5.7 PJ to 16 PJ during the period 2000-2015, and further increases are expected to occur within the coming years. In 2012, about 22,300 tonnes of wood ashes were generated in Denmark....... Currently, these ashes are mainly landfilled, despite Danish legislation allowing their application onto forest and agricultural soils for fertilising and/or liming purposes. During this PhD work, 16 wood ash samples generated at ten different Danish combustion plants were collected and characterised...... for their composition and leaching properties. Despite the relatively large variations in the contents of nutrients and trace metals, the overall levels were comparable to typical ranges reported in the literature for other wood combustion ashes, as well as with regards to leaching. In general, the composition...

  9. Novel Active Combustion Control Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspermeyer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This project presents an innovative solution for active combustion control. Relative to the state of the art, this concept provides frequency modulation (greater than 1,000 Hz) in combination with high-amplitude modulation (in excess of 30 percent flow) and can be adapted to a large range of fuel injector sizes. Existing valves often have low flow modulation strength. To achieve higher flow modulation requires excessively large valves or too much electrical power to be practical. This active combustion control valve (ACCV) has high-frequency and -amplitude modulation, consumes low electrical power, is closely coupled with the fuel injector for modulation strength, and is practical in size and weight. By mitigating combustion instabilities at higher frequencies than have been previously achieved (approximately 1,000 Hz), this new technology enables gas turbines to run at operating points that produce lower emissions and higher performance.

  10. FY1995 annual report on the advanced combustion science in microgravity field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Research was implemented continuously from the previous year on combustion equipment enabling advanced combustion technologies, by studying combustion in a microgravity field, for the purpose of preventing environmental pollution caused by diversification of energy sources and exhaust gasses. In joint studies with NASA, the 1995 themes were continued, for which tests were conducted 34 times using Japanese drop test equipment. Further, studies were added for flammability limits and flame dynamics of spherical flames in homogeneous and heterogeneous mixed fuels. The evaluation and analysis of the experiments and test data by the microgravity test equipment were such that laser ignitions of floating or fuel-oozing droplets, spherical/cylindrical combustion of liquid fuels, for example, were studied in regards to the combustion and vaporization process of fuel droplets, that high calorie fuel combustion in microgravitation field for example was investigated in relation to the combustion characteristics of high density fuels, that flame stability of lean premixed gasses for example was researched concerning flammability limit, and that NOx generation mechanism in liquid fuel combustion was looked into in connection with emission mechanisms of pollutant gaseous materials. (NEDO)

  11. Supersonic Combustion of Hydrogen Jets System in Hypersonic Stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhapbasbaev, U.K.; Makashev, E.P.

    2003-01-01

    The data of calculated theoretical investigations of diffusive combustion of plane supersonic hydrogen jets in hypersonic stream received with Navier-Stokes parabola equations closed by one-para metrical (k-l) model of turbulence and multiply staged mechanism of hydrogen oxidation are given. Combustion mechanisms depending on the operating parameters are discussing. The influences of air stream composition and ways off fuel feed to the length of ignition delay and level quantity of hydrogen bum-out have been defined. The calculated theoretical results of investigations permit to make the next conclusions: 1. The diffusive combustion of the system of plane supersonic hydrogen jets in hypersonic flow happens in the cellular structures with alternation zones of intensive running of chemical reactions with their inhibition zones. 2. Gas dynamic and heat Mach waves cause a large - scale viscous formation intensifying mixing of fuel with oxidizer. 3. The system ignition of plane supersonic hydrogen jets in hypersonic airy co-flow happens with the formation of normal flame front of hydrogen airy mixture with transition to the diffusive combustion. 4. The presence of active particles in the flow composition initiates the ignition of hydrogen - airy mixture, provides the intensive running of chemical reactions and shortens the length of ignition delay. 5. The supersonic combustion of hydrogel-airy mixture is characterized by two zones: the intensive chemical reactions with an active energy heat release is occurring in the first zone and in the second - a slow hydrogen combustion limited by the mixing of fuel with oxidizer. (author)

  12. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sheppard, E.J. [Tuskeggee Univ., Tuskegee, AL (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors. The present study represents a coordinated effort between industry, government and academia to investigate gas turbine combustion dynamics. Specific study areas include development of advanced diagnostics, definition of controlling phenomena, advancement of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities, and assessment of the current status of our ability to apply these tools to practical gas turbine combustors. The present work involves four tasks which address, respectively, (1) the development of a fiber-optic probe for fuel-air ratio measurements, (2) the study of combustion instability using laser-based diagnostics in a high pressure, high temperature flow reactor, (3) the development of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities for describing combustion instability which will be validated against experimental data, and (4) the preparation of a literature survey and establishment of a data base on practical experience with combustion instability.

  13. Mechanisms for the inversion of chirality: Global reaction route mapping of stereochemical pathways in a probable chiral extraterrestrial molecule, 2-aminopropionitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Ramanpreet; Vikas

    2015-01-01

    2-Aminopropionitrile (APN), a probable candidate as a chiral astrophysical molecule, is a precursor to amino-acid alanine. Stereochemical pathways in 2-APN are explored using Global Reaction Route Mapping (GRRM) method employing high-level quantum-mechanical computations. Besides predicting the conventional mechanism for chiral inversion that proceeds through an achiral intermediate, a counterintuitive flipping mechanism is revealed for 2-APN through chiral intermediates explored using the GRRM. The feasibility of the proposed stereochemical pathways, in terms of the Gibbs free-energy change, is analyzed at the temperature conditions akin to the interstellar medium. Notably, the stereoinversion in 2-APN is observed to be more feasible than the dissociation of 2-APN and intermediates involved along the stereochemical pathways, and the flipping barrier is observed to be as low as 3.68 kJ/mol along one of the pathways. The pathways proposed for the inversion of chirality in 2-APN may provide significant insight into the extraterrestrial origin of life

  14. Annual Report: DOE Advanced Combustion Systems & Fuels R&D; Light-Duty Diesel Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busch, Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Despite compliance issues in previous years, automakers have demonstrated that the newest generation of diesel power trains are capable of meeting all federal and state regulations (EPA, 2016). Diesels continue to be a cost-effective, efficient, powerful propulsion source for many light- and medium-duty vehicle applications (Martec, 2016). Even modest reductions in the fuel consumption of light- and medium duty diesel vehicles in the U.S. will eliminate millions of tons of CO2 emissions per year. Continued improvement of diesel combustion systems will play an important role in reducing fleet fuel consumption, but these improvements will require an unprecedented scientific understanding of how changes in engine design and calibration affect the mixture preparation, combustion, and pollutant formation processes that take place inside the cylinder. The focus of this year’s research is to provide insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for improved thermal efficiency observed with a stepped-lip piston. Understanding how piston design can influence efficiency will help engineers develop and optimize new diesel combustion systems.

  15. Improvement of fuel combustion technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumanovskii, A.G.; Babii, V.I.; Enyakin, Y.P.; Kotler, V.R.; Ryabov, G.V.; Verbovetskii, E.K.; Nadyrov, I.I. [All-Russian Thermal Engineering Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-07-01

    The main problems encountered in the further development of fuel combustion technologies at thermal power stations in Russia are considered. Experience is generalized and results are presented on the efficiency with which nitrogen oxide emissions are reduced by means of technological methods when burning natural gas, fuel oil, and coal. The problems that arise in the introduction of new combustion technologies and in using more promising grades of coal are considered. The results studies are presented that show that low grade Russian coals can be burnt in circulating fluidized bed boilers. 14 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  17. Application of the FIRST Combustion model to Spray Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, B.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.

    2004-01-01

    Liquid fuel is of interest to apply to gas turbines. The large advantage is that liquids are easily storable as compared to gaseous fuels. Disadvantage is that liquid fuel has to be sprayed, vaporized and mixed with air. Combustion occurs at some stage of mixing and ignition. Depending on the

  18. Development of a Premixed Combustion Capability for Scramjet Combustion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Robert D.; Goyne, Christopher P.; Rice, Brian E.; Chelliah, Harsha; McDaniel, James C.; Edwards, Jack R.; Cantu, Luca M. L.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic air-breathing engines rely on scramjet combustion processes, which involve high speed, compressible, and highly turbulent flows. The combustion environment and the turbulent flames at the heart of these engines are difficult to simulate and study in the laboratory under well controlled conditions. Typically, wind-tunnel testing is performed that more closely approximates engine testing rather than a careful investigation of the underlying physics that drives the combustion process. The experiments described in this paper, along with companion data sets being developed separately, aim to isolate the chemical kinetic effects from the fuel-air mixing process in a dual-mode scramjet combustion environment. A unique fuel injection approach is taken that produces a nearly uniform fuel-air mixture at the entrance to the combustor. This approach relies on the precombustion shock train upstream of the dual-mode scramjet combustor. A stable ethylene flame anchored on a cavity flameholder with a uniformly mixed combustor inflow has been achieved in these experiments allowing numerous companion studies involving coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), particle image velocimetry (PIV), and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to be performed.

  19. How memory mechanisms are a key component in the guidance of our eye movements: evidence from the global effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvis, J D; Van der Stigchel, S

    2014-04-01

    Investigating eye movements has been a promising approach to uncover the role of visual working memory in early attentional processes. Prior research has already demonstrated that eye movements in search tasks are more easily drawn toward stimuli that show similarities to working memory content, as compared with neutral stimuli. Previous saccade tasks, however, have always required a selection process, thereby automatically recruiting working memory. The present study was an attempt to confirm the role of working memory in oculomotor selection in an unbiased saccade task that rendered memory mechanisms irrelevant. Participants executed a saccade in a display with two elements, without any instruction to aim for one particular element. The results show that when two objects appear simultaneously, a working memory match attracts the first saccade more profoundly than do mismatch objects, an effect that was present throughout the saccade latency distribution. These findings demonstrate that memory plays a fundamental biasing role in the earliest competitive processes in the selection of visual objects, even when working memory is not recruited during selection.

  20. A mechanism for the formation and sustainment of the self-organized global profile and E   ×   B staircase in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Kishimoto, Y.; Imadera, K.; Li, J. Q.; Wang, Z. X.

    2018-05-01

    The mechanism for the formation and sustainment of a self-organized global profile and the ‘ E   ×   B staircase’ are investigated through simulations of a flux-driven ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence based on GKNET, a 5D global gyrokinetic code. The staircase is found to be initiated from the radially extended ITG mode structures with nearly up-down symmetry during the saturation phase, and is established as it evolves into a quasi-steady turbulence, leading to a self-organized global temperature profile and to meso-scale isomorphic profiles of the radial electric field and the temperature gradient. It is found that the quasi-regular E   ×   B shear flow pattern is primarily originated from an even-symmetrical zonal flow produced by the extended ITG mode, which flow pattern exhibits an in-phase relation with the mean flow variation induced by the temperature relaxation. Consequently, the staircase is initiated through the profiles of total electric field and temperature gradient with a self-organized manner. Since the sign of E   ×   B shear flow at the central part are opposite to that at both edges, it disintegrates the ITG mode into smaller scale eddies. Meanwhile, smaller scale eddies tend to be aligned radially by spontaneous phase matching, which can provide the growth of mode amplitude and the formation of radially extended mode structures, leading to the bursty heat transport. This process is repeated quasi-periodically, sustaining self-organized structures and the E   ×   B staircase. Moreover, the equilibrium mean field is found to be of specific importance in causing the structures and dynamics from meso- to macro scales in toroidal plasmas.