WorldWideScience

Sample records for global clinical benefit

  1. Onions--a global benefit to health.

    Griffiths, Gareth; Trueman, Laurence; Crowther, Timothy; Thomas, Brian; Smith, Brian

    2002-11-01

    Onion (Allium cepa L.) is botanically included in the Liliaceae and species are found across a wide range of latitudes and altitudes in Europe, Asia, N. America and Africa. World onion production has increased by at least 25% over the past 10 years with current production being around 44 million tonnes making it the second most important horticultural crop after tomatoes. Because of their storage characteristics and durability for shipping, onions have always been traded more widely than most vegetables. Onions are versatile and are often used as an ingredient in many dishes and are accepted by almost all traditions and cultures. Onion consumption is increasing significantly, particularly in the USA and this is partly because of heavy promotion that links flavour and health. Onions are rich in two chemical groups that have perceived benefits to human health. These are the flavonoids and the alk(en)yl cysteine sulphoxides (ACSOs). Two flavonoid subgroups are found in onion, the anthocyanins, which impart a red/purple colour to some varieties and flavanols such as quercetin and its derivatives responsible for the yellow and brown skins of many other varieties. The ACSOs are the flavour precursors, which, when cleaved by the enzyme alliinase, generate the characteristic odour and taste of onion. The downstream products are a complex mixture of compounds which include thiosulphinates, thiosulphonates, mono-, di- and tri-sulphides. Compounds from onion have been reported to have a range of health benefits which include anticarcinogenic properties, antiplatelet activity, antithrombotic activity, antiasthmatic and antibiotic effects. Here we review the agronomy of the onion crop, the biochemistry of the health compounds and report on recent clinical data obtained using extracts from this species. Where appropriate we have compared the data with that obtained from garlic (Allium sativum L.) for which more information is widely available. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons

  2. Spatial and Temporal Trends of Global Pollination Benefit

    Lautenbach, Sven; Seppelt, Ralf; Liebscher, Juliane; Dormann, Carsten F.

    2012-01-01

    Pollination is a well-studied and at the same time a threatened ecosystem service. A significant part of global crop production depends on or profits from pollination by animals. Using detailed information on global crop yields of 60 pollination dependent or profiting crops, we provide a map of global pollination benefits on a 5′ by 5′ latitude-longitude grid. The current spatial pattern of pollination benefits is only partly correlated with climate variables and the distribution of cropland. The resulting map of pollination benefits identifies hot spots of pollination benefits at sufficient detail to guide political decisions on where to protect pollination services by investing in structural diversity of land use. Additionally, we investigated the vulnerability of the national economies with respect to potential decline of pollination services as the portion of the (agricultural) economy depending on pollination benefits. While the general dependency of the agricultural economy on pollination seems to be stable from 1993 until 2009, we see increases in producer prices for pollination dependent crops, which we interpret as an early warning signal for a conflict between pollination service and other land uses at the global scale. Our spatially explicit analysis of global pollination benefit points to hot spots for the generation of pollination benefits and can serve as a base for further planning of land use, protection sites and agricultural policies for maintaining pollination services. PMID:22563427

  3. Potential benefits and risks of clinical xenotransplantation

    Cooper DKC

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available David KC Cooper,1 David Ayares21Thomas E Starzl Transplantation Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Revivicor, Blacksburg, VA, USAAbstract: The transplantation of organs and cells from pigs into humans could overcome the critical and continuing problem of the lack of availability of deceased human organs and cells for clinical transplantation. Developments in the genetic engineering of pigs have enabled considerable progress to be made in the experimental laboratory in overcoming the immune barriers to successful xenotransplantation. With regard to pig organ xenotransplantation, antibody- and cell-mediated rejection have largely been overcome, and the current major barrier is the development of coagulation dysregulation. This is believed to be due to a combination of immune activation of the vascular endothelial cells of the graft and molecular incompatibilities between the pig and primate coagulation–anticoagulation systems. Pigs with new genetic modifications specifically directed to this problem are now becoming available. With regard to less complex tissues, such as islets (for the treatment of diabetes, neuronal cells (for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and corneas, the remaining barriers are less problematic, and graft survival in nonhuman primate models extends for >1 year in all three cases. In planning the initial clinical trials, consideration will be concentrated on the risk–benefit ratio, based to a large extent on the results of preclinical studies in nonhuman primates. If the benefit to the patient is anticipated to be high, eg, insulin-independent control of glycemia, and the potential risks low, eg, minimal risk of transfer of a porcine infectious agent, then a clinical trial would be justified.Keywords: infection, pigs, genetically-engineered, xenotransplantation, islets, xenotransplantation, organs

  4. Benefits of rebuilding global marine fisheries outweigh costs.

    Sumaila, Ussif Rashid; Cheung, William; Dyck, Andrew; Gueye, Kamal; Huang, Ling; Lam, Vicky; Pauly, Daniel; Srinivasan, Thara; Swartz, Wilf; Watson, Reginald; Zeller, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Global marine fisheries are currently underperforming, largely due to overfishing. An analysis of global databases finds that resource rent net of subsidies from rebuilt world fisheries could increase from the current negative US$13 billion to positive US$54 billion per year, resulting in a net gain of US$600 to US$1,400 billion in present value over fifty years after rebuilding. To realize this gain, governments need to implement a rebuilding program at a cost of about US$203 (US$130-US$292) billion in present value. We estimate that it would take just 12 years after rebuilding begins for the benefits to surpass the cost. Even without accounting for the potential boost to recreational fisheries, and ignoring ancillary and non-market values that would likely increase, the potential benefits of rebuilding global fisheries far outweigh the costs.

  5. Potential Global Benefits of Improved Ceiling Fan Energy Efficiency

    Sathaye, Nakul [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Phadke, Amol [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shah, Nihar [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Letschert, Virginie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-10-31

    Ceiling fans contribute significantly to residential electricity consumption, both in an absolute sense and as a proportion of household consumption in many locations, especially in developing countries in warm climates. However, there has been little detailed assessment of the costs and benefits of efficiency improvement options for ceiling fans and the potential resulting electricity consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions. We analyze the costs and benefits of several options to improve the efficiency of ceiling fans and assess the global potential for electricity savings and GHG emission reductions with more detailed assessments for India, China, and the U.S. We find that ceiling fan efficiency can be cost-effectively improved by at least 50% using commercially available technology. If these efficiency improvements are implemented in all ceiling fans sold by 2020, 70 terrawatt hours per year (TWh/year) could be saved and 25 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per year could be avoided, globally. We assess how policies and programs such as standards, labels, and financial incentives can be used to accelerate the adoption of efficient ceiling fans in order to realize this savings potential.

  6. Hydroelectric power and global environmental problems: benefits and environmental impacts

    Chabot, B.

    1992-01-01

    The risk of global warming is one of the most serious global environmental problems. It is due to the increase of greenhouse gases emissions, mainly because of the use of fossil fuels in the energy sector, particularly for electricity generation. At an international level, experts now agree that measures are to be taken to reduce this risk. In the energy sector, an improvement of energy efficiency and an increase of nuclear electricity generation are often presented as the best available solutions. Renewable energy sources are often presented as a solution with a negligible potential impact, and sometimes, hydro power is even forgotten, or its coasts and its potential impacts on local environment are presented as an obstacle to its positive contribution to the reduction of global warming risk. Without denying the positive impacts of other solutions, this paper explains the possibilities and the benefits of an increased use of hydroelectric power, when implemented with a minimum impact on local environment and with a synergistic effect with the rational use of generated energy, in order to have access to a sustainable development. 19 refs., 6 figs

  7. The globalization of ayahuasca: harm reduction or benefit maximization?

    Tupper, Kenneth W

    2008-08-01

    Ayahuasca is a tea made from two plants native to the Amazon, Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis, which, respectively, contain the psychoactive chemicals harmala alkaloids and dimethyltryptamine. The tea has been used by indigenous peoples in countries such as Brazil, Ecuador and Peru for medicinal, spiritual and cultural purposes since pre-Columbian times. In the 20th century, ayahuasca spread beyond its native habitat and has been incorporated into syncretistic practices that are being adopted by non-indigenous peoples in modern Western contexts. Ayahuasca's globalization in the past few decades has led to a number of legal cases which pit religious freedom against national drug control laws. This paper explores some of the philosophical and policy implications of contemporary ayahuasca use. It addresses the issue of the social construction of ayahuasca as a medicine, a sacrament and a "plant teacher." Issues of harm reduction with respect to ayahuasca use are explored, but so too is the corollary notion of "benefit maximization."

  8. Clinical Evidence of Exercise Benefits for Stroke.

    Han, Peipei; Zhang, Wen; Kang, Li; Ma, Yixuan; Fu, Liyuan; Jia, Liye; Yu, Hairui; Chen, Xiaoyu; Hou, Lin; Wang, Lu; Yu, Xing; Kohzuki, Masahiro; Guo, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Even though stroke is the third, not the first, most common cause of disability-adjusted life years in developed countries, it is one of the most expensive to treat. Part of the expense is due to secondary problems in the post-stroke period including: cognition, memory, attention span, pain, sensation loss, psychological issues, and problems with mobility and balance. Research has identified that exercise has both positive physical and psychosocial effects for post-stroke patients. Therefore, this scientific statement provides an overview on exercise rehabilitation for post-stroke patients.We will use systematic literature reviews, clinical and epidemiology reports, published morbidity and mortality studies, clinical and public health guidelines, patient files, and authoritative statements to support this overview.Evidence clearly supports the use of various kinds of exercise training (e.g., aerobic, strength, flexibility, neuromuscular, and traditional Chinese exercise) for stroke survivors. Aerobic exercise, the main form of cardiac rehabilitation, may play an important role in improving aerobic fitness, cardiovascular fitness, cognitive abilities, walking speed and endurance, balance, quality of life, mobility, and other health outcomes among stroke patients. Strength exercise, included in national stroke guidelines and recommended for general health promotion for stroke survivors, can lead to improvements in functionality, psychosocial aspects, and quality of life for post-stroke patients. Flexibility exercises can relieve muscle spasticity problems, improve motor function, range of motion, and prevent contractures. Stretching exercises can also prevent joint contractures, muscle shortening, decrease spasticity, reduce joint stiffness and improve a post-stroke patient's overall function. Neuromuscular exercises can improve activities of daily living (ADL) through coordination and balance activities. Traditional Chinese exercises are used to improve walking and

  9. Miniaturization and globalization of clinical laboratory activities.

    Melo, Murilo R; Clark, Samantha; Barrio, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    Clinical laboratories provide an invaluable service to millions of people around the world in the form of quality diagnostic care. Within the clinical laboratory industry the impetus for change has come from technological development (miniaturization, nanotechnology, and their collective effect on point-of-care testing; POCT) and the increasingly global nature of laboratory services. Potential technological gains in POCT include: the development of bio-sensors, microarrays, genetics and proteomics testing, and enhanced web connectivity. In globalization, prospective opportunities lie in: medical tourism, the migration of healthcare workers, cross-border delivery of testing, and the establishment of accredited laboratories in previously unexplored markets. Accompanying these impressive opportunities are equally imposing challenges. Difficulty transitioning from research to clinical use, poor infrastructure in developing countries, cultural differences and national barriers to global trade are only a few examples. Dealing with the issues presented by globalization and the impact of developing technology on POCT, and on the clinical laboratory services industry in general, will be a daunting task. Despite such concerns, with appropriate countermeasures it will be possible to address the challenges posed. Future laboratory success will be largely dependent on one's ability to adapt in this perpetually shifting landscape.

  10. Clinical imaging guidelines part 2: Risks, benefits, barriers, and solutions.

    Malone, James; del Rosario-Perez, Maria; Van Bladel, Lodewijk; Jung, Seung Eun; Holmberg, Ola; Bettmann, Michael A

    2015-02-01

    A recent international meeting was convened by two United Nations bodies to focus on international collaboration on clinical appropriateness/referral guidelines for use in medical imaging. This paper, the second of 4 from this technical meeting, addresses barriers to the successful development/deployment of clinical imaging guidelines and means of overcoming them. It reflects the discussions of the attendees, and the issues identified are treated under 7 headings: ■ Practical Strategy for Development and Deployment of Guidelines; ■ Governance Arrangements and Concerns with Deployment of Guidelines; ■ Finance, Sustainability, Reimbursement, and Related Issues; ■ Identifying Benefits and Radiation Risks from Radiological Examinations; ■ Information Given to Patients and the Public, and Consent Issues; ■ Special Concerns Related to Pregnancy; and ■ The Research Agenda. Examples of topics identified include the observation that guideline development is a global task and there is no case for continuing it as the project of the few professional organizations that have been brave enough to make the long-term commitment required. Advocacy for guidelines should include the expectations that they will facilitate: (1) better health care delivery; (2) lower cost of that delivery; with (3) reduced radiation dose and associated health risks. Radiation protection issues should not be isolated; rather, they should be integrated with the overall health care picture. The type of dose/radiation risk information to be provided with guidelines should include the uncertainty involved and advice on application of the precautionary principle with patients. This principle may be taken as an extension of the well-established medical principle of "first do no harm." Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Clinical benefit and preservation of flavonols in dark chocolate manufacturing.

    McShea, Andrew; Ramiro-Puig, Emma; Munro, Sandra B; Casadesus, Gemma; Castell, Margarida; Smith, Mark A

    2008-11-01

    The consumption of high-cacao-content chocolate has been associated with positive health benefits ascribed to flavanol [corrected] antioxidants derived from the ground, fermented cocoa seeds of Theobroma cacao. However, flavanols [corrected] impart a bitter, astringent flavor to foodstuffs, frequently masked in chocolates and confections by aggressive processing and adulteration with other flavors. Recent reports have implied that not all varieties of dark chocolate are created equally, and significant caveats exist regarding its potential health benefits. It is perhaps not surprising that extensive processing, dilution, and the addition of flavor modifiers may improve the palatability of chocolate, but could have negative nutritional and clinical benefits. This article examines the chemical composition of chocolate and the clinical data associated with the consumption of flavonoid-rich cocoa. We review the steps in chocolate manufacturing that directly affect the antioxidant levels in chocolate products, and the caveats associated with claims of health benefits from the consumption of dark chocolate.

  12. Benefits and Burdens of Participation in a Longitudinal Clinical Trial

    Lazovski, Jaime; Losso, Marcelo; Krohmal, Benjamin; Emanuel, Ezekiel J.; Grady, Christine; Wendler, David

    2010-01-01

    systematic data on the impact that longitudinal clinical trials have on patient participants are needed to ensure that all the risks and potential benefits of participating in clinical research are properly evaluated and disclosed. Recognizing the lack of systematic data on this topic, we surveyed 582 individuals from Argentina, Brazil, and Thailand who were participating in the ESPRIT study, a Phase III randomized trial of interleukin-2 in HIV disease. Respondents were asked about the benefits and burdens of participating in ESPRIT using a self-administered survey. We found that 91% of respondents in the IL-2 treatment arm and 79% in the no IL-2 control arm reported medical benefits from their participation. In addition, 68% in the IL-2 treatment arm and 60% of the no IL-2 controls reported non-medical benefits. Thirteen percent of the IL-2 respondents and 5% of the non-IL2 respondents reported problems with their jobs due to study participation. Given that respondents, including those in the control arm, reported medical and non-medical benefits and burdens from their research participation, investigators and review committees should be aware of and respond to the potential for research participants to experience benefits and burdens that are unrelated to the intervention being tested. PMID:19754238

  13. A Survey of the Non-clinical Benefits of EBVM

    Sarah Hauser

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to add non-clinical benefits to the virtues for adopting Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine (EBVM. The objective is to quantify the commercial benefits of EBVM through an online survey of veterinary professionals, giving clear indications of the key areas of non-clinical benefits of EBVM. Further, the study aims to outline barriers to the wider implementation of EBVM and find preferred ways of overcoming those barriers.Background: A PICO-based literature review (Hauser and Jackson, 2016 found that while there are some papers suggesting a link between the practice of EBVM and better non-clinical benefits such as client satisfaction, a single study, focusing on the non-clinical benefits of EBVM, had yet to be conducted. This study builds on the findings of an exploratory study (Jackson and Hauser, 2017 outlining key areas of non-clinical benefits of EBVM: increased client satisfaction and retention, improved reputation, confidence, as well as employee engagement.Evidentiary value: This online survey of veterinary professionals (n=407 provides evidence for practitioners, universities and other veterinary staff regarding the non-clinical benefits of EBVM, the barriers to a wider adoption of the practice and ways of overcoming those barriers.Methods: The online survey of veterinary professionals was conducted during September – October 2016 and contained 23 questions. Survey participation was voluntary and the data used for analysis were de-identified.Results: The survey responses of 407 veterinary professionals provide quantitative evidence of how EBVM is put into practice, how EBVM is perceived to impact client behaviour and employee engagement, what the barriers are to practising EBVM and how these could be overcome. Key findings are that veterinary professionals are more likely to practise EBVM if they have been taught how to do so at vet school. EBVM is a way to provide value to and build trust with clients. Survey

  14. Targeting small airways in asthma: Improvement in clinical benefit?

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aim:  Disease control is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients with asthma. Recent advances in aerosol formulations and delivery devices may offer more effective therapy. This review will focus on the importance and potential clinical benefit of targeting the lung...... half the daily dose with no increased risk of systemic effects. Clinical studies of adults with asthma have shown a greater effect of ultrafine ICS, compared with non-ultrafine ICS, on quality of life, small airway patency, and markers of pulmonary and systemic inflammation, but no difference...... with regard to conventional clinical indices of lung function and asthma control. Conclusions:  Asthma patients treated with ultrafine ICS, compared with non-ultrafine ICS, have at least similar chance of achieving asthma control at a lower daily dose. Further clinical studies are needed to explore whether...

  15. Targeting small airways in asthma: Improvement in clinical benefit?

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aim: Disease control is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients with asthma. Recent advances in aerosol formulations and delivery devices may offer more effective therapy. This review will focus on the importance and potential clinical benefit of targeting the lung...... half the daily dose with no increased risk of systemic effects. Clinical studies of adults with asthma have shown a greater effect of ultrafine ICS, compared with non-ultrafine ICS, on quality of life, small airway patency, and markers of pulmonary and systemic inflammation, but no difference...... with regard to conventional clinical indices of lung function and asthma control. Conclusions: Asthma patients treated with ultrafine ICS, compared with non-ultrafine ICS, have at least similar chance of achieving asthma control at a lower daily dose. Further clinical studies are needed to explore whether...

  16. Evidence based exercise - clinical benefits of high intensity interval training.

    Shiraev, Tim; Barclay, Gabriella

    2012-12-01

    Aerobic exercise has a marked impact on cardiovascular disease risk. Benefits include improved serum lipid profiles, blood pressure and inflammatory markers as well as reduced risk of stroke, acute coronary syndrome and overall cardiovascular mortality. Most exercise programs prescribed for fat reduction involve continuous, moderate aerobic exercise, as per Australian Heart Foundation clinical guidelines. This article describes the benefits of exercise for patients with cardiovascular and metabolic disease and details the numerous benefits of high intensity interval training (HIIT) in particular. Aerobic exercise has numerous benefits for high-risk populations and such benefits, especially weight loss, are amplified with HIIT. High intensity interval training involves repeatedly exercising at a high intensity for 30 seconds to several minutes, separated by 1-5 minutes of recovery (either no or low intensity exercise). HIT is associated with increased patient compliance and improved cardiovascular and metabolic outcomes and is suitable for implementation in both healthy and 'at risk' populations. Importantly, as some types of exercise are contraindicated in certain patient populations and HIIT is a complex concept for those unfamiliar to exercise, some patients may require specific assessment or instruction before commencing a HIIT program.

  17. Climate Prediction Center(CPC)Global Tropics Hazards and Benefits Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Tropics Hazards and Benefits Assessment (GTH) is an outlook product for the areas in the Tropics. Forecasts for the Week-1 and Week-2 period are given for...

  18. The ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) -for societal benefit -

    Hato, M.; Tsu, H.; Tachikawa, T.; Abrams, M.; Bailey, B.

    2009-12-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) was developed jointly by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) of Japan and the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under the agreement of contribution to GEOSS and a public release was started on June 29th. ASTER GDEM can be downloaded to users from the Earth Remote Sensing Data Analysis Center (ERSDAC) of Japan and NASA’s Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) free of charge. The ASTER instrument was built by METI and launched onboard NASA’s Terra spacecraft in December 1999. It has an along-track stereoscopic capability using its near infrared spectral band (NIR) and its nadir-viewing and backward-viewing telescopes to acquire stereo image data with a base-to-height ratio of 0.6. The ASTER GDEM was produced by applying newly-developed automated algorithm to more than 1.2 million NIR data Produced DEMs of all scene data was stacked after cloud masking and finally partitioned into 1° x 1°unit (called ‘tile’) data for convenience of distribution and handling by users. Before start of public distribution, ERSDAC and USGS/NASA together with many volunteers did validation and characterization by using a preliminary product of the ASTER GDEM. As a result of validation, METI and NASA evaluated that Version 1 of the ASTER GDEM has enough quality to be used as “experimental” or “research grade” data and consequently decided to release it. The ASTER GDEM covering almost all land area of from 83N to 83S on the earth represents as an important contribution to the global earth observation community. We will show our effort of development of ASTER GDEM and its accuracy and character.

  19. Economic impact analysis for global warming: Sensitivity analysis for cost and benefit estimates

    Ierland, E.C. van; Derksen, L.

    1994-01-01

    Proper policies for the prevention or mitigation of the effects of global warming require profound analysis of the costs and benefits of alternative policy strategies. Given the uncertainty about the scientific aspects of the process of global warming, in this paper a sensitivity analysis for the impact of various estimates of costs and benefits of greenhouse gas reduction strategies is carried out to analyze the potential social and economic impacts of climate change

  20. Electronic clinical safety reporting system: a benefits evaluation.

    Elliott, Pamela; Martin, Desmond; Neville, Doreen

    2014-06-11

    Eastern Health, a large health care organization in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), started a staged implementation of an electronic occurrence reporting system (used interchangeably with "clinical safety reporting system") in 2008, completing Phase One in 2009. The electronic clinical safety reporting system (CSRS) was designed to replace a paper-based system. The CSRS involves reporting on occurrences such as falls, safety/security issues, medication errors, treatment and procedural mishaps, medical equipment malfunctions, and close calls. The electronic system was purchased from a vendor in the United Kingdom that had implemented the system in the United Kingdom and other places, such as British Columbia. The main objective of the new system was to improve the reporting process with the goal of improving clinical safety. The project was funded jointly by Eastern Health and Canada Health Infoway. The objectives of the evaluation were to: (1) assess the CSRS on achieving its stated objectives (particularly, the benefits realized and lessons learned), and (2) identify contributions, if any, that can be made to the emerging field of electronic clinical safety reporting. The evaluation involved mixed methods, including extensive stakeholder participation, pre/post comparative study design, and triangulation of data where possible. The data were collected from several sources, such as project documentation, occurrence reporting records, stakeholder workshops, surveys, focus groups, and key informant interviews. The findings provided evidence that frontline staff and managers support the CSRS, identifying both benefits and areas for improvement. Many benefits were realized, such as increases in the number of occurrences reported, in occurrences reported within 48 hours, in occurrences reported by staff other than registered nurses, in close calls reported, and improved timelines for notification. There was also user satisfaction with the tool regarding ease of use

  1. Benefits of Outsourcing Strategy and IT Technology in Clinical Trials.

    Stamenovic, Milorad; Dobraca, Amra

    2017-09-01

    Aim of this paper is to describe some of models of outsourcing (numerous and response to different types of risks and increment of quality is based on individual problem and situation). Defining whether to outsource or not and whether to build or buy new information technology (IT) is question for contract research organization (CRO) and Pharma companies dealing with clinical trials, so the aim of this paper is to show business model that could make process of decision making less time consuming, less segmented and more efficient. This paper has a descriptive character, and represents a review of the literature that deals with the described issues. Outsourcing should enable optimal capacity flexibility (technology that is outsourced should be done only optimally not entirely). The goal with CRO partners is to establish equivalent levels of global quality, as extensions of other research and development activities (by unification of standards of performance of alliance partners with best standards of industry). IT is gaining greater significance at each stage of clinical study and represent an inevitable element of the quality of a clinical study (for the purpose of monitoring of clinical site activities, data collection and management, medical monitoring, statistical programming, statistical analysis, clinical study reporting). CROs are able to maximize work within the CRO global development, to support the notion of a fully integrated outsourced company; facilitate the use of similar business processes and norms, reusing established CRO standards and improve CRO operational decision making within outsourced studies by providing consistent and current information across outsourced and in-house activities.

  2. Benefits of Outsourcing Strategy and IT Technology in Clinical Trials

    Stamenovic, Milorad; Dobraca, Amra

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Aim of this paper is to describe some of models of outsourcing (numerous and response to different types of risks and increment of quality is based on individual problem and situation). Defining whether to outsource or not and whether to build or buy new information technology (IT) is question for contract research organization (CRO) and Pharma companies dealing with clinical trials, so the aim of this paper is to show business model that could make process of decision making less time consuming, less segmented and more efficient. Material and methods: This paper has a descriptive character, and represents a review of the literature that deals with the described issues. Results: Outsourcing should enable optimal capacity flexibility (technology that is outsourced should be done only optimally not entirely). The goal with CRO partners is to establish equivalent levels of global quality, as extensions of other research and development activities (by unification of standards of performance of alliance partners with best standards of industry). IT is gaining greater significance at each stage of clinical study and represent an inevitable element of the quality of a clinical study (for the purpose of monitoring of clinical site activities, data collection and management, medical monitoring, statistical programming, statistical analysis, clinical study reporting). Conclusion: CROs are able to maximize work within the CRO global development, to support the notion of a fully integrated outsourced company; facilitate the use of similar business processes and norms, reusing established CRO standards and improve CRO operational decision making within outsourced studies by providing consistent and current information across outsourced and in-house activities. PMID:29114116

  3. [3D imaging benefits in clinical pratice of orthodontics].

    Frèrejouand, Emmanuel

    2016-12-01

    3D imaging possibilities raised up in the last few years in the orthodontic field. In 2016, it can be used for diagnosis improvement and treatment planning by using digital set up combined to CBCT. It is relevant for orthodontic mechanic updating by creating visible or invisible customised appliances. It forms the basis of numerous scientific researches. The author explains the progress 3D imaging brings to diagnosis and clinics but also highlights the requirements it creates. The daily use of these processes in orthodontic clinical practices needs to be regulated regarding the benefit/risk ratio and the patient satisfaction. The command of the digital work flow created by these technics requires habits modifications from the orthodontist and his staff. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2016.

  4. Roflumilast: clinical benefit in patients suffering from COPD

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Calverley, Peter Michael Anthony

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality and is characterised by persistent airway inflammation, which leads to impaired airway function, quality of life and intermittent exacerbations. In spite of recent advances...... in the treatment of COPD, new treatment options for COPD are clearly necessary. The oral phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) inhibitor roflumilast represents a new class of drugs that has shown efficacy and acceptable tolerability in preclinical and short-term clinical studies in patients with COPD. METHODS AND RESULTS......) , and a reduction in frequency and severity of COPD exacerbations, as well as a positive effect on several patient-reported outcomes. The clinical benefit of roflumilast appears to be greatest in patients with more symptomatic and severe disease who experience exacerbations. The most common adverse effects...

  5. Roflumilast: clinical benefit in patients suffering from COPD

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Calverley, Peter Michael Anthony

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS:  Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality and is characterised by persistent airway inflammation, which leads to impaired airway function, quality of life and intermittent exacerbations. In spite of recent advances...... in the treatment of COPD, new treatment options for COPD are clearly necessary. The oral phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) inhibitor roflumilast represents a new class of drugs that has shown efficacy and acceptable tolerability in preclinical and short-term clinical studies in patients with COPD. METHODS AND RESULTS......) , and a reduction in frequency and severity of COPD exacerbations, as well as a positive effect on several patient-reported outcomes. The clinical benefit of roflumilast appears to be greatest in patients with more symptomatic and severe disease who experience exacerbations. The most common adverse effects...

  6. An Approach for Assessing the Benefits of IT Investments in Global Supply Chains

    Betz, Michaela; Henningsson, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    -duced by the technology as an isolated product. In contrast, research on global supply chains has shown that benefits generated from IT investments in this domain are typically generated by the coor-dinated use of many stakeholders and by technologies producing complimentary effects in systemic relationships......This paper develops and demonstrates a novel approach for ex-ante assessment of business benefits from IT investments in global supply chains. Extant IT assessment approaches are typically based on the assumption that benefit realization from IT investments involves a single stakeholder and are pro....... The assessment approach in this paper brings the contingent inter-organizational and technological dependencies of IT investments to the forefront of the assessment. It provides actors in industries relating to global supply chains the means to better apprehend the possible benefits from an IT investment...

  7. Clinical benefit of antiangiogenic therapy in advanced and metastatic chondrosarcoma.

    Jones, Robin L; Katz, Daniela; Loggers, Elizabeth T; Davidson, Darin; Rodler, Eve T; Pollack, Seth M

    2017-08-29

    Chondrosarcoma is the most common bone sarcoma in adults. Conventional chondrosarcoma, the commonest histological subtype, is largely resistant to anthracycline-based chemotherapy. There have been anecdotal reports of durable clinical benefit with antiangiogenic agents in this disease. A retrospective search of patients treated at three sarcoma referral centers was performed to identify patients with advanced chondrosarcoma treated with antiangiogenic agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of antiangiogenic agents in advanced chondrosarcoma. Ten patients were identified; seven with conventional, one each with clear cell, extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma and extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma. The median progression-free survival for patients with conventional and clear cell sarcoma was 22.6 months. Median overall survival has not been met. Antiangiogenic therapy was well tolerated in this series of patients. Our retrospective data suggest that antiangiogenic therapy can provide prolonged clinical benefit in advanced chondrosarcoma patients. Further prospective trials are required to precisely define the role of this class of agent in advanced chondrosarcoma.

  8. Coalition for Global Clinical Surgical Education: The Alliance for Global Clinical Training.

    Graf, Jahanara; Cook, Mackenzie; Schecter, Samuel; Deveney, Karen; Hofmann, Paul; Grey, Douglas; Akoko, Larry; Mwanga, Ali; Salum, Kitembo; Schecter, William

    Assessment of the effect of the collaborative relationship between the high-income country (HIC) surgical educators of the Alliance for Global Clinical Training (Alliance) and the low-income country surgical educators at the Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences/Muhimbili National Hospital (MUHAS/MNH), Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, on the clinical global surgery training of the HIC surgical residents participating in the program. A retrospective qualitative analysis of Alliance volunteer HIC faculty and residents' reports, volunteer case lists and the reports of Alliance academic contributions to MUHAS/MNH from 2012 to 2017. In addition, a survey was circulated in late 2016 to all the residents who participated in the program since its inception. Twelve HIC surgical educators provided rotating 1-month teaching coverage at MUHAS/MNH between academic years 2012 and 2017 for a total of 21 months. During the same time period 11 HIC residents accompanied the HIC faculty for 1-month rotations. HIC surgery residents joined the MUHAS/MNH Department of Surgery, made significant teaching contributions, performed a wide spectrum of "open procedures" including hand-sewn intestinal anastomoses. Most had had either no or limited previous exposure to hand-sewn anastomoses. All of the residents commented that this was a maturing and challenging clinical rotation due to the complexity of the cases, the limited resources available and the ethical and emotional challenges of dealing with preventable complications and death in a resource constrained environment. The Alliance provides an effective clinical global surgery rotation at MUHAS/MNH for HIC Surgery Departments wishing to provide such an opportunity for their residents and faculty. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Can emergency medicine research benefit from adaptive design clinical trials?

    Flight, Laura; Julious, Steven A; Goodacre, Steve

    2017-04-01

    Adaptive design clinical trials use preplanned interim analyses to determine whether studies should be stopped or modified before recruitment is complete. Emergency medicine trials are well suited to these designs as many have a short time to primary outcome relative to the length of recruitment. We hypothesised that the majority of published emergency medicine trials have the potential to use a simple adaptive trial design. We reviewed clinical trials published in three emergency medicine journals between January 2003 and December 2013. We determined the proportion that used an adaptive design as well as the proportion that could have used a simple adaptive design based on the time to primary outcome and length of recruitment. Only 19 of 188 trials included in the review were considered to have used an adaptive trial design. A total of 154/165 trials that were fixed in design had the potential to use an adaptive design. Currently, there seems to be limited uptake in the use of adaptive trial designs in emergency medicine despite their potential benefits to save time and resources. Failing to take advantage of adaptive designs could be costly to patients and research. It is recommended that where practical and logistical considerations allow, adaptive designs should be used for all emergency medicine clinical trials. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Global costs and benefits of reaching universal coverage of sanitation and drinking-water supply.

    Hutton, Guy

    2013-03-01

    Economic evidence on the cost and benefits of sanitation and drinking-water supply supports higher allocation of resources and selection of efficient and affordable interventions. The study aim is to estimate global and regional costs and benefits of sanitation and drinking-water supply interventions to meet the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target in 2015, as well as to attain universal coverage. Input data on costs and benefits from reviewed literature were combined in an economic model to estimate the costs and benefits, and benefit-cost ratios (BCRs). Benefits included health and access time savings. Global BCRs (Dollar return per Dollar invested) were 5.5 for sanitation, 2.0 for water supply and 4.3 for combined sanitation and water supply. Globally, the costs of universal access amount to US$ 35 billion per year for sanitation and US$ 17.5 billion for drinking-water, over the 5-year period 2010-2015 (billion defined as 10(9) here and throughout). The regions accounting for the major share of costs and benefits are South Asia, East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Improved sanitation and drinking-water supply deliver significant economic returns to society, especially sanitation. Economic evidence should further feed into advocacy efforts to raise funding from governments, households and the private sector.

  11. Biochemical Benefits, Diagnosis, and Clinical Risks Evaluation of Kratom

    Dimy Fluyau

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundKratom (Mitragyna speciosa is a tropical tree with a long history of traditional use in parts of Africa and Southeast Asia. Kratom is also known as Thom, Thang, and Biak. Its leaves and the teas brewed from them have long been used by people in that region to manage pain and opioid withdrawal and to stave off fatigue. Kratom is actually consumed throughout the world for its stimulant effects and as an opioid substitute (in form of tea, chewed, smoked, or ingested in capsules. Some case reports have associated kratom exposure with psychosis, seizures, intrahepatic cholestasis, other medical conditions, and deaths. The clinical manifestations of kratom effects are not well defined and the clinical studies are limited. Data research suggest that both stimulant and sedative dose-dependent effects do exist, in addition to antinociceptive, antidepressant activity, anxiolytic-like effects, and anorectic effects, but a growing concern for the drug’s effects and safety of use has resulted in national and international attention primarily due to an increase in hospital visits and deaths in several countries that are believed to have been caused by extracts of the plant. There is a dearth of double blind controlled studies. In this study, we aim to use existing literature to clarify both benefits and risks of kratom as well as its diagnosis evaluation as kratom misuse is an emerging trend in the Western world.MethodsLiterature review using databases such as Embase, Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Mendeley from 2007 to 2017 were evaluated by all authors to analyze current state on benefits, risks, and diagnosis evaluation of kratom (M. speciosa.ResultsData analysis suggested that kratom possesses some benefits such as stimulant and sedative effects as wells as antinociceptive effects. It seems to inhibit pro-inflammatory mediator release and vascular permeability and can enhance immunity. In addition, it may be an antidepressant and

  12. Global health training and international clinical rotations during residency: current status, needs, and opportunities.

    Drain, Paul K; Holmes, King K; Skeff, Kelley M; Hall, Thomas L; Gardner, Pierce

    2009-03-01

    Increasing international travel and migration have contributed to globalization of diseases. Physicians today must understand the global burden and epidemiology of diseases, the disparities and inequities in global health systems, and the importance of cross-cultural sensitivity. To meet these needs, resident physicians across all specialties have expressed growing interest in global health training and international clinical rotations. More residents are acquiring international experience, despite inadequate guidance and support from most accreditation organizations and residency programs. Surveys of global health training, including international clinical rotations, highlight the benefits of global health training as well as the need for a more coordinated approach. In particular, international rotations broaden a resident's medical knowledge, reinforce physical examination skills, and encourage practicing medicine among underserved and multicultural populations. As residents recognize these personal and professional benefits, a strong majority of them seek to gain international clinical experience. In conclusion, with feasible and appropriate administrative steps, all residents can receive global health training and be afforded the accreditation and programmatic support to participate in safe international rotations. The next steps should address accreditation for international rotations and allowance for training away from continuity clinics by residency accreditation bodies, and stipend and travel support for six or more weeks of call-free elective time from residency programs.

  13. Antibiotics in aggressive periodontitis, is there a clinical benefit?

    Rajendra, Anjana; Spivakovsky, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    Data sourcesMedline, Embase and CENTRAL databases were searched up to December 2014. Unpublished data were sought by searching a database listing unpublished studies OpenGray [http://www.opengrey.eu/], formerly OpenSIGLE.Study selectionRandomised clinical trials assessing treatment of patients with AgP comparing scaling and root planing (SRP) alone with SRP plus a single antibiotic or a combination of drugs with a minimum of three months follow-up were considered. Studies specifically designed to evaluate smokers or subjects with diabetes mellitus and HIV/AIDS were not included.Data extraction and synthesisTwo researchers independently screened titles, abstracts and full texts of the search results. The studies, which fulfilled inclusion criteria, underwent validity assessment and data extraction using a specifically designed form. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Cochranes collaboration tool for risk of bias. Only two of the 11 included trials were considered at a low risk of bias. The data extracted from ten studies was analysed by pair-wise meta-analyses and the data extracted from five studies was included in Bayesian network meta-analyses pooled estimates. The six studies evaluated in the pairwise meta-analyses were excluded in the pooled estimates because four studies included patients with advanced disease only and one study did not present average data for pocket depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) and another one for using a different mechanical treatment.ResultsFourteen studies reporting 11 randomised clinical trials with a total of 388 patients were included in the review. Nine of 11 studies reported a statistically significant greater gain in full mouth mean clinical attachment (CA) and reduction in probing depth (PD) when a systemic antibiotic was used. From those studies the calculated mean difference for CA gained was 1.08 mm (p benefits in CA gain and PD reduction when SRP was associated with systemic antibiotics

  14. Co-benefits of global and regional greenhouse gas mitigation for US air quality in 2050

    Zhang, Yuqiang; Bowden, Jared H.; Adelman, Zachariah; Naik, Vaishali; Horowitz, Larry W.; Smith, Steven J.; West, J. Jason

    2016-08-01

    Policies to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will not only slow climate change but can also have ancillary benefits of improved air quality. Here we examine the co-benefits of both global and regional GHG mitigation for US air quality in 2050 at fine resolution, using dynamical downscaling methods, building on a previous global co-benefits study (West et al., 2013). The co-benefits for US air quality are quantified via two mechanisms: through reductions in co-emitted air pollutants from the same sources and by slowing climate change and its influence on air quality, following West et al. (2013). Additionally, we separate the total co-benefits into contributions from domestic GHG mitigation vs. mitigation in foreign countries. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to dynamically downscale future global climate to the regional scale and the Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) program to directly process global anthropogenic emissions to the regional domain, and we provide dynamical boundary conditions from global simulations to the regional Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. The total co-benefits of global GHG mitigation from the RCP4.5 scenario compared with its reference are estimated to be higher in the eastern US (ranging from 0.6 to 1.0 µg m-3) than the west (0–0.4 µg m-3) for fine particulate matter (PM2.5), with an average of 0.47 µg m-3 over the US; for O3, the total co-benefits are more uniform at 2–5 ppb, with a US average of 3.55 ppb. Comparing the two mechanisms of co-benefits, we find that reductions in co-emitted air pollutants have a much greater influence on both PM2.5 (96 % of the total co-benefits) and O3 (89 % of the total) than the second co-benefits mechanism via slowing climate change, consistent with West et al. (2013). GHG mitigation from foreign countries contributes more to the US O3 reduction

  15. Global collective dose commitments from release of long-lived radionuclides. Differential cost-benefit considerations

    Gjoerup, H.L.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of global collective dose commitment as a measure of total detriment from the release of radioactivity to the environment is outlined. Estimates are given of global collective dose commitments resulting from the release of 14 C and uranium daughter products from the nuclear fuel cycle. Comparisons are made with similar estimates of global collective dose commitments resulting from the use of fossil fuels and certain fertilizers due to their content of uranium and its daughter products. In the case of long-lived radionuclides that remain in circulation in the biosphere, it is shown that the use of global collective dose commitments in differential cost-benefit analysis can lead to questionable results. In differential cost-benefit analysis it is suggested that population exposures should not simply be integrated irrespective of their time of occurrence, but that a certain discount rate should be applied for future doses. This suggestion is examined. (author)

  16. Study on generation investment decision-making considering multi-agent benefit for global energy internet

    Li, Pai; Huang, Yuehui; Jia, Yanbing; Liu, Jichun; Niu, Yi

    2018-02-01

    Abstract . This article has studies on the generation investment decision in the background of global energy interconnection. Generation investment decision model considering the multiagent benefit is proposed. Under the back-ground of global energy Interconnection, generation investors in different clean energy base not only compete with other investors, but also facing being chosen by the power of the central area, therefor, constructing generation investment decision model considering multiagent benefit can be close to meet the interests demands. Using game theory, the complete information game model is adopted to solve the strategies of different subjects in equilibrium state.

  17. Benefits and challenges of international clinical education from a US-based physiotherapist faculty perspective.

    Pechak, Celia; Black, Jill D

    2013-12-01

    The influence of internationalization on physiotherapist education in at least North American-based programmes has become more apparent. Faculty and students have been involved in various international activities. One category of activities includes international clinical education (ICE), where students earn clinical education credit for their learning activities at international sites. Although this educational strategy appears to be increasingly used in at least the United States and Canada, the related literature is limited in scope. The purpose of this portion of the present study was to investigate the benefits and challenges of ICE for US-based students, US-based physiotherapy programmes and international partners from the perspective of US-based faculty sending students for clinical education internationally. Content analysis was used for this qualitative study. Fifteen US-based faculty members who had experience in sending physiotherapist students for ICE were recruited. The primary researcher conducted semi-structured phone interviews, averaging approximately 60 minutes in length. The primary and secondary researchers completed data analysis using NVivo 8 software (QSR International Inc., Cambridge, MA). Benefits of ICE to the students included exposure to alternate health systems, broadening of student perspectives and clinical competence. Challenges consisted of funding and possible language barrier. Increased visibility, expanded global perspective and faculty collaborations were benefits to the programme. Ensuring a quality learning experience was the greatest programme challenge. Benefits to the international site included education and faculty collaborations/exchanges; challenges were language, student clinical preparation and unfamiliarity with the student evaluation tool. Because the sample was limited to 15 US-based faculty members, the results may not be relevant to all programmes inside or outside of the United States. Additionally, the study

  18. Nuclear Power Learning and Deployment Rates; Disruption and Global Benefits Forgone

    Peter A. Lang

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents evidence of the disruption of a transition from fossil fuels to nuclear power, and finds the benefits forgone as a consequence are substantial. Learning rates are presented for nuclear power in seven countries, comprising 58% of all power reactors ever built globally. Learning rates and deployment rates changed in the late-1960s and 1970s from rapidly falling costs and accelerating deployment to rapidly rising costs and stalled deployment. Historical nuclear global capacit...

  19. Designer policy for carbon and biodiversity co-benefits under global change

    Bryan, Brett A.; Runting, Rebecca K.; Capon, Tim; Perring, Michael P.; Cunningham, Shaun C.; Kragt, Marit E.; Nolan, Martin; Law, Elizabeth A.; Renwick, Anna R.; Eber, Sue; Christian, Rochelle; Wilson, Kerrie A.

    2016-03-01

    Carbon payments can help mitigate both climate change and biodiversity decline through the reforestation of agricultural land. However, to achieve biodiversity co-benefits, carbon payments often require support from other policy mechanisms such as regulation, targeting, and complementary incentives. We evaluated 14 policy mechanisms for supplying carbon and biodiversity co-benefits through reforestation of carbon plantings (CP) and environmental plantings (EP) in Australia’s 85.3 Mha agricultural land under global change. The reference policy--uniform payments (bidders are paid the same price) with land-use competition (both CP and EP eligible for payments), targeting carbon--achieved significant carbon sequestration but negligible biodiversity co-benefits. Land-use regulation (only EP eligible) and two additional incentives complementing the reference policy (biodiversity premium, carbon levy) increased biodiversity co-benefits, but mostly inefficiently. Discriminatory payments (bidders are paid their bid price) with land-use competition were efficient, and with multifunctional targeting of both carbon and biodiversity co-benefits increased the biodiversity co-benefits almost 100-fold. Our findings were robust to uncertainty in global outlook, and to key agricultural productivity and land-use adoption assumptions. The results suggest clear policy directions, but careful mechanism design will be key to realising these efficiencies in practice. Choices remain for society about the amount of carbon and biodiversity co-benefits desired, and the price it is prepared to pay for them.

  20. Nuclear power and global warming: a first cost-benefit calculation

    Hope, C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper investigates the costs and benefits of a modest nuclear power programme in the European Union to combat the threat of global warming. The nuclear programme is found to bring a double benefit. The first and more obvious benefit is that the economic impacts of global warming are reduced. The second benefit is counter-intuitive; most people would expect it to be a cost. It comes from the stimulus to the economy from the construction of the nuclear plant, which, with the recycling of carbon tax revenues, offsets its construction and operating costs, and may even cause consumers' expenditure to rise. Calculations in this paper show that over the period to 2100 the mean net present value of the first benefit is 6 billion European Currency Units (ECU; 1 ECU is about Dollars 1), while the second benefit has a mean net present value of 159 billion ECU. However both benefits, particularly the second, are still very uncertain, to the extent that even their sign is not yet definitely established. (author)

  1. Global warming response options in Brazil's forest sector: comparison of project-level costs and benefits

    Fearnside, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    A project-level assessment of monetary and carbon costs and benefits for five classes of global warming response options in the forest sector is attempted for typical Brazilian conditions. Options considered are: silvicultural plantations (for pulp, charcoal and sawlogs), sustainable timber management and reduction of deforestation. Comparison of pulpwood and sawlog plantations with the vegetation characteristic of deforested areas indicates of modest carbon benefit. Plantations for charcoal can produce a substantial carbon benefit through fossil fuel substitution, but much of this calculated benefit disappears if discount rates greater than zero are applied to carbon. Sustainable timber management, when compared with existing forest, represents a net carbon loss, accumulation of carbon in wood products being insufficient to compensate for biomass reduction over a 100 year time scale. Reduction of deforestation has great potential as a global warming response option, its per-hectare carbon benefits being approximately four times that of silvicultural plantation establishment for pulp and sawlogs over a 100 year period. The costs of reducing deforestation are difficult to assess, however, due to the importance of government policy changes such as removal of land speculation and land tenure establishment as motives for clearing. Although these changes would not cost money and would have tremendous carbon and other benefits, they have not yet occurred. (Author)

  2. Global health benefits of mitigating ozone pollution with methane emission controls.

    West, J Jason; Fiore, Arlene M; Horowitz, Larry W; Mauzerall, Denise L

    2006-03-14

    Methane (CH(4)) contributes to the growing global background concentration of tropospheric ozone (O(3)), an air pollutant associated with premature mortality. Methane and ozone are also important greenhouse gases. Reducing methane emissions therefore decreases surface ozone everywhere while slowing climate warming, but although methane mitigation has been considered to address climate change, it has not for air quality. Here we show that global decreases in surface ozone concentrations, due to methane mitigation, result in substantial and widespread decreases in premature human mortality. Reducing global anthropogenic methane emissions by 20% beginning in 2010 would decrease the average daily maximum 8-h surface ozone by approximately 1 part per billion by volume globally. By using epidemiologic ozone-mortality relationships, this ozone reduction is estimated to prevent approximately 30,000 premature all-cause mortalities globally in 2030, and approximately 370,000 between 2010 and 2030. If only cardiovascular and respiratory mortalities are considered, approximately 17,000 global mortalities can be avoided in 2030. The marginal cost-effectiveness of this 20% methane reduction is estimated to be approximately 420,000 US dollars per avoided mortality. If avoided mortalities are valued at 1 US dollars million each, the benefit is approximately 240 US dollars per tone of CH(4) ( approximately 12 US dollars per tone of CO(2) equivalent), which exceeds the marginal cost of the methane reduction. These estimated air pollution ancillary benefits of climate-motivated methane emission reductions are comparable with those estimated previously for CO(2). Methane mitigation offers a unique opportunity to improve air quality globally and can be a cost-effective component of international ozone management, bringing multiple benefits for air quality, public health, agriculture, climate, and energy.

  3. India's growing clinical research sector: opportunity for global companies.

    Varawalla, Nermeen

    2007-06-01

    Backed by a compelling foundation of essential requirements necessary for effective clinical trial conduct, and aided by initiatives that address concerns of data quality, regulatory timelines and IP protection, the clinical development sector in India has experienced annual revenue growth rates of 25% in the past two to three years, and is poised to participate substantially in global drug development. As both clinical trial sponsors and CROs increase their research capabilities in India, the clinical development sector is facing challenges with staff resourcing and facilities. Existing initiatives in the clinical sector must continue, and further investment must be made by stakeholders to overcome the current limitations in sector growth. Furthermore, global organizations seeking to derive long-term sustainable revenue growth and competitive advantage in the global marketplace from their business units in India must establish an appropriate organizational culture and an effective intra-organizational and industry interface for their operations.

  4. Challenges in Measuring Benefit of Clinical Research Training Programs--the ASH Clinical Research Training Institute Example.

    Sung, Lillian; Crowther, Mark; Byrd, John; Gitlin, Scott D; Basso, Joe; Burns, Linda

    2015-12-01

    The American Society of Hematology developed the Clinical Research Training Institute (CRTI) to address the lack of training in patient-oriented research among hematologists. As the program continues, we need to consider metrics for measuring the benefits of such a training program. This article addresses the benefits of clinical research training programs. The fundamental and key components are education and mentorship. However, there are several other benefits including promotion of collaboration, job and advancement opportunities, and promotion of work-life balance. The benefits of clinical research training programs need to be measured so that funders and society can judge if they are worth the investment in time and resources. Identification of elements that are important to program benefit is essential to measuring the benefit of the program as well as program planning. Future work should focus on the constructs which contribute to benefits of clinical research training programs such as CRTI.

  5. The cost and benefit of energy technology in the global context - the case of fusion power

    Clarke, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to evaluate the economical and environmental consequences of fusion power for the next century. For this evaluation, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory global energy/economy model is used. In applying the model to analyse costs and benefits of fusion energy, the author compares the projections of the model for a world with and without fusion. (TEC). 5 tabs., 7 figs., 18 refs

  6. The global conduct of cancer clinical trials: challenges and opportunities.

    Barrios, Carlos H; Werutsky, Gustavo; Martinez-Mesa, Jeovany

    2015-01-01

    The nature of clinical research has changed substantially over the last 2 decades, evolving from being centered almost exclusively in developed countries to a more global scenario that is increasingly involving less developed regions of the world. Pharmaceutical companies and some academic cooperative groups have been conducting challenging, large pivotal registration studies with multinational participation. The much more needed globalization of academic research demands particular attention and represents a worthwhile subject for a more profound discussion. The requirement of large sample sizes and the potential for fast recruitment leading to a speedy completion of clinical studies are probably the most important factors that have fueled globalization of studies. Reduced operational costs and the ability to expedite the regulatory approval of drugs in various countries or regions are also important drivers. Globalization of research should be seen as having a much wider effect in the societies involved, in particular, when we consider public health, economic, social, and ethical implications. Most importantly, the process of expanding the network of clinical research sites also fosters the integration and the development of closer relationships among investigators at a global level. We consider this an essential element that should remain a prominent element in the discussion. In this article, we address the underlying reasons for globalization and we highlight some of the scientific and ethical concerns arising as a consequence. Finally, some strategies to address and mitigate the challenges of conducting multinational clinical research are proposed.

  7. Reaping Environmental Benefits of a Global Hydrogen Economy: How Large, Fow Soon, and at What Risks?

    Dubey, M. K.; Horowitz, L. W.; Rahn, T. A.; Kinnison, D. E.

    2004-12-01

    The Western world has taken an aggressive posture to transition to a global hydrogen economy. While numerous technical challenges need to be addressed to achieve this it is timely to examine the environmental benefits and risks of this transition. Hydrogen provides an efficient energy carrier that promises to enhance urban and regional air quality that will benefit human health. It could also reduce risks of climate change if large-scale hydrogen production by renewable or nuclear energy sources becomes viable. While it is well known that the byproduct of energy produced from hydrogen is water vapor, it is not well known that the storage and transfer of hydrogen is inevitably accompanied by measurable leakage of hydrogen. Unintended consequences of hydrogen leakage include reduction in global oxidative capacity, changes in tropospheric ozone, and increase in stratospheric water that would exacerbate halogen induced ozone losses as well as impact the earth's radiation budget and climate. We construct plausible global hydrogen energy use and leak scenarios and assess their impacts using global 3-D simulations by the Model for Ozone And Related Trace species (MOZART). The hydrogen fluxes and photochemistry in our model successfully reproduce the contemporary hydrogen cycle as observed by a network of remote global stations. Our intent is to determine environmentally tolerable leak rates and also facilitate a gradual phasing in of a hydrogen economy over the next several decades as the elimination of the use of halocarbons gradually reduces halogen induced stratospheric ozone loss rates. We stress that the leak rates in global hydrogen infrastructure and the future evolution of microbial soil sink of hydrogen that determines its current lifetime (about 2 years) are principal sources of uncertainty in our assessment.

  8. Global assessment of river flood protection benefits and corresponding residual risks under climate change

    Lim, Wee Ho; Yamazaki, Dai; Koirala, Sujan; Hirabayashi, Yukiko; Kanae, Shinjiro; Dadson, Simon J.; Hall, Jim W.

    2016-04-01

    Global warming increases the water-holding capacity of the atmosphere and this could lead to more intense rainfalls and possibly increasing natural hazards in the form of flooding in some regions. This implies that traditional practice of using historical hydrological records alone is somewhat limited for supporting long-term water infrastructure planning. This has motivated recent global scale studies to evaluate river flood risks (e.g., Hirabayashi et al., 2013, Arnell and Gosling, 2014, Sadoff et al., 2015) and adaptations benefits (e.g., Jongman et al., 2015). To support decision-making in river flood risk reduction, this study takes a further step to examine the benefits and corresponding residual risks for a range of flood protection levels. To do that, we channelled runoff information of a baseline period (forced by observed hydroclimate conditions) and each CMIP5 model (historic and future periods) into a global river routing model called CaMa-Flood (Yamazaki et al., 2011). We incorporated the latest global river width data (Yamazaki et al., 2014) into CaMa-Flood and simulate the river water depth at a spatial resolution of 15 min x 15 min. From the simulated results of baseline period, we use the annual maxima river water depth to fit the Gumbel distribution and prepare the return period-flood risk relationship (involving population and GDP). From the simulated results of CMIP5 model, we also used the annual maxima river water depth to obtain the Gumbel distribution and then estimate the exceedance probability (historic and future periods). We apply the return period-flood risk relationship (above) to the exceedance probability and evaluate the flood protection benefits. We quantify the corresponding residual risks using a mathematical approach that is consistent with the modelling structure of CaMa-Flood. Globally and regionally, we find that the benefits of flood protection level peak somewhere between 20 and 500 years; residual risks diminish

  9. Generating Evidence for Clinical Benefit of PET/CT in Diagnosing Cancer Patients

    Vach, Werner; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Gerke, Oke

    2011-01-01

    For diagnostic methods such as PET/CT, not only diagnostic accuracy but also clinical benefit must be demonstrated. However, there is a lack of consensus about how to approach this task. Here we consider 6 clinical scenarios to review some basic approaches to demonstrating the clinical benefit...... of PET/CT in cancer patients: replacement of an invasive procedure, improved accuracy of initial diagnosis, improved accuracy of staging for curative versus palliative treatment, improved accuracy of staging for radiation versus chemotherapy, response evaluation, and acceleration of clinical decisions....... We also develop some guidelines for the evaluation of clinical benefit. First, it should be clarified whether there is a direct benefit of the use of PET/CT or an indirect benefit because of improved diagnostic accuracy. If there is an indirect benefit, then decision modeling should be used initially...

  10. Global value of GM rice: a review of expected agronomic and consumer benefits.

    Demont, Matty; Stein, Alexander J

    2013-06-25

    Unlike the other major crops, no genetically modified (GM) varieties of rice have been commercialized at a large scale. Within the next 2-3 years new transgenic rice varieties could be ready for regulatory approval and subsequent commercialization, though. Given the importance of rice as staple crop for many of the world's poorest people, this will have implications for the alleviation of poverty, hunger and malnutrition. Thus, policy-makers need to be aware of the potential benefits of GM rice. We provide an overview of the literature and discuss the evidence on expected agronomic and consumer benefits of genetically engineered rice. We find that while GM rice with improved agronomic traits could deliver benefits similar to already commercialized biotechnology crops, expected benefits of consumer traits could be higher by an order of magnitude. By aggregating the expected annual benefits, we estimate the global value of GM rice to be US$64 billion per year. This is only an indicative value, as more GM varieties will become available in future. Nevertheless, such a figure can help guide policy-makers when deciding on the approval or funding of biotechnology crops and it may also raise awareness among consumers about what is at stake for their societies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Monitoring worksite clinic performance using a cost-benefit tool.

    Tao, Xuguang; Chenoweth, David; Alfriend, Amy S; Baron, David M; Kirkland, Tracie W; Scherb, Jill; Bernacki, Edward J

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the usefulness of continuously assessing the return on investment (ROI) of worksite medical clinics as a means of evaluating clinic performance. Visit data from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2008, were collected from all the on-site clinics operated for the Pepsi Bottling Group. An average system-wide ROI was calculated from the time of each clinic's opening and throughout the study period. A multivariate linear regression model was used to determine the association of average ROI with penetration/utilization rate and plant size. A total of 26 on-site clinics were actively running as of December 2008. The average ROI at the time of start up was 0.4, which increased to 1.2 at approximately 4 months and 1.6 at the end of the first year of operation. Overall, it seems that the cost of operating a clinic becomes equal to the cost of similar care purchased in the community (ROI = 1) at approximately 3 months after a clinic's opening and flattens out at the end of the first year. The magnitude of the ROI was closely related to the number of visits (a function of the penetration/utilization rate) and the size of the plant population served. Serial monitoring of ROIs is a useful metric in assessing on-site clinic performance and quantifying the effect of new initiatives aimed at increasing a clinic's cost effectiveness.

  12. The economic benefits resulting from the first 8 years of the Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (2000-2007.

    Brian K Chu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Between 2000-2007, the Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF delivered more than 1.9 billion treatments to nearly 600 million individuals via annual mass drug administration (MDA of anti-filarial drugs (albendazole, ivermectin, diethylcarbamazine to all at-risk for 4-6 years. Quantifying the resulting economic benefits of this significant achievement is important not only to justify the resources invested in the GPELF but also to more fully understand the Programme's overall impact on some of the poorest endemic populations.To calculate the economic benefits, the number of clinical manifestations averted was first quantified and the savings associated with this disease prevention then analyzed in the context of direct treatment costs, indirect costs of lost-labor, and costs to the health system to care for affected individuals. Multiple data sources were reviewed, including published literature and databases from the World Health Organization, International Monetary Fund, and International Labour OrganizationAn estimated US$21.8 billion of direct economic benefits will be gained over the lifetime of 31.4 million individuals treated during the first 8 years of the GPELF. Of this total, over US$2.3 billion is realized by the protection of nearly 3 million newborns and other individuals from acquiring lymphatic filariasis as a result of their being born into areas freed of LF transmission. Similarly, more than 28 million individuals already infected with LF benefit from GPELF's halting the progression of their disease, which results in an associated lifetime economic benefit of approximately US$19.5 billion. In addition to these economic benefits to at-risk individuals, decreased patient services associated with reduced LF morbidity saves the health systems of endemic countries approximately US$2.2 billion.MDA for LF offers significant economic benefits. Moreover, with favorable program implementation costs (largely a result of

  13. ESMO-Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale version 1.1

    Cherny, N. I.; Dafni, U.; Bogaerts, J.; Latino, N. J.; Pentheroudakis, G.; Douillard, J. -Y.; Tabernero, J.; Zielinski, C.; Piccart, M. J.; de Vries, E. G. E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The ESMO Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS) version 1.0 (v1.0) was published in May 2015 and was the first version of a validated and reproducible tool to assess the magnitude of clinical benefit from new cancer therapies. The ESMO-MCBS was designed to be a dynamic tool with

  14. Environmental and Health Benefits and Risks of a Global Hydrogen Economy

    Dubey, M.; Horowitz, L. W.; Rahn, T. A.; Kinnison, D. E.

    2003-12-01

    Rapid development in hydrogen fuel-cell technologies will create a strong impetus for a massive hydrogen supply and distribution infrastructure in the coming decades. Hydrogen provides an efficient energy carrier that promises to enhance urban and regional air quality that will benefit human health. It could also reduce risks of climate change if large-scale hydrogen production by renewable or nuclear energy sources becomes viable. While it is well known that the byproduct of energy produced from hydrogen is water vapor, it is not well known that the storage and transfer of hydrogen is inevitably accompanied by measurable leakage of hydrogen. Unintended consequences of hydrogen leakage include reduction in global oxidative capacity, changes in tropospheric ozone, and increase in stratospheric water that would exacerbate halogen induced ozone losses as well as impact the earth's radiation budget and climate. Stratospheric ozone depletion would increase exposure to harmful ultraviolet radiation and increased risk to melanoma. We construct plausible global hydrogen energy use and leak scenarios and assess their impacts using global 3-D simulations by the Model for Ozone And Related Trace species (MOZART). The hydrogen fluxes and photochemistry in our model successfully reproduce the contemporary hydrogen cycle as observed by a network of remote global stations. Our intent is to determine environmentally tolerable leak rates and also facilitate a gradual phasing in of a hydrogen economy over the next several decades as the elimination of the use of halocarbons gradually reduces halogen induced stratospheric ozone loss rates. We stress that the future evolution of microbial soil sink of hydrogen that determines its current lifetime (about 2 years) is the principal source of uncertainty in our assessment. We propose global monitoring of hydrogen and its deuterium content to define a baseline and track its budget to responsibly prepare for a global hydrogen economy.

  15. Nonconsensual clinical trials: a foreseeable risk of offshoring under global corporatism.

    Spielman, Bethany

    2015-03-01

    This paper explores the connection of offshoring and outsourcing to nonconsensual global pharmaceutical trials in low-income countries. After discussing reasons why the topic of nonconsensual offshored clinical trials may be overlooked in bioethics literature, I suggest that when pharmaceutical corporations offshore clinical trials today, nonconsensual experiments are often foreseeable and not simply the result of aberrant ethical conduct by a few individuals. Offshoring of clinical trials is structured so that experiments can be presented as health care in a unique form of outsourcing from the host country to pharmaceutical corporations. Bioethicists' assessments of the risks and potential benefits of offshore corporate pharmaceutical trials should therefore systematically include not only the hoped for benefits and the risks of the experimental drug but also the risk that subjects will not have consented, as well as the broader international consequences of nonconsensual experimentation.

  16. Model for investigating the benefits of clinical supervision in psychiatric nursing

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2011-01-01

    with the effectiveness of clinical supervision, as measured by the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS). Furthermore, MCSS scores were associated with benefits, such as increased job satisfaction, vitality, rational coping and less stress, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization. Multivariate analyses......The objective of this study was to test a model for analysing the possible benefits of clinical supervision. The model suggested a pathway from participation to effectiveness to benefits of clinical supervision, and included possible influences of individual and workplace factors. The study sample...

  17. Costs and benefits of nursing clinical education for hospital institutions

    Olivério Ribeiro

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: The inferences show that the presence of students in Clinical Teachings in the hospitals leads to a positive balance of 21.57 € per day and service, with a positive reinforcement associated to the resulting citizens satisfaction facing student rendered cares.

  18. Benefits of a Clinical Planning and Coordination Module

    Jensen, Sanne; Vingtoft, Søren; Nøhr, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Digital Clinical Practice Guidelines are commonly used in Danish health care. Planning and decision support are particularly important to patients with chronic diseases, who often are in contact with General Practitioners, Community Nurses and hospitals. In the Capital Region of Denmark...

  19. Benefits of a clinical pharmacokinetic service in optimising ...

    before the termination of the study (test period). Patients kept a seizure diary throughout the study. The MichaelisMenten model was used to calculate doses and predict steady-state serum concentrations. Setting. ine epilepsy clinics. Subjects. One hundred and ninety-five (113 black and 82 coloured) compliant people with ...

  20. Multi-regional clinical trials and global drug development

    Premnath Shenoy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug development has been globalized, and multi-regional clinical trial (MRCT for regulatory submission has widely been conducted by many discovery based global pharmaceutical companies with the objective of reducing the time lag of launch in key markets and improve patient access to new and innovative treatments. Sponsors are facing several challenges while conducting multiregional clinical trials. Challenges under the heads statistics, clinical, regulatory operational, and ethics have been discussed. Regulators in different countries such as USA, EU-Japan, and China have issued guidance documents in respect of MRCT's. Lack of harmonization in the design and planning of MRCT is perceived to create a difficult situation to sponsors adversely affecting progressing MRCT in more and more discoveries. International conference on hormonisation (ICH has initiated the process for having a harmonized guidance document on MRCT. This document is likely to be issued in early 2017.

  1. Climate change impacts on US agriculture and forestry: benefits of global climate stabilization

    Beach, Robert H.; Cai, Yongxia; Thomson, Allison; Zhang, Xuesong; Jones, Russell; McCarl, Bruce A.; Crimmins, Allison; Martinich, Jeremy; Cole, Jefferson; Ohrel, Sara; DeAngelo, Benjamin; McFarland, James; Strzepek, Kenneth; Boehlert, Brent

    2015-09-01

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, higher temperatures, altered precipitation patterns, and other climate change impacts have already begun to affect US agriculture and forestry, with impacts expected to become more substantial in the future. There have been numerous studies of climate change impacts on agriculture or forestry, but relatively little research examining the long-term net impacts of a stabilization scenario relative to a case with unabated climate change. We provide an analysis of the potential benefits of global climate change mitigation for US agriculture and forestry through 2100, accounting for landowner decisions regarding land use, crop mix, and management practices. The analytic approach involves a combination of climate models, a crop process model (EPIC), a dynamic vegetation model used for forests (MC1), and an economic model of the US forestry and agricultural sector (FASOM-GHG). We find substantial impacts on productivity, commodity markets, and consumer and producer welfare for the stabilization scenario relative to unabated climate change, though the magnitude and direction of impacts vary across regions and commodities. Although there is variability in welfare impacts across climate simulations, we find positive net benefits from stabilization in all cases, with cumulative impacts ranging from $32.7 billion to $54.5 billion over the period 2015-2100. Our estimates contribute to the literature on potential benefits of GHG mitigation and can help inform policy decisions weighing alternative mitigation and adaptation actions.

  2. Climate change impacts on US agriculture and forestry: benefits of global climate stabilization

    Beach, Robert H.; Cai, Yongxia; Thomson, Allison; Zhang, Xuesong; Jones, Russell; McCarl, Bruce A.; Crimmins, Allison; Martinich, Jeremy; Cole, Jefferson; Ohrel, Sara; DeAngelo, Benjamin; McFarland, James; Strzepek, Kenneth; Boehlert, Brent

    2015-09-01

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, higher temperatures, altered precipitation patterns, and other climate change impacts have already begun to affect US agriculture and forestry, with impacts expected to become more substantial in the future. There have been numerous studies of climate change impacts on agriculture or forestry, but relatively little research examining the long-term net impacts of a stabilization scenario relative to a case with unabated climate change. We provide an analysis of the potential benefits of global climate change mitigation for US agriculture and forestry through 2100, accounting for landowner decisions regarding land use, crop mix, and management practices. The analytic approach involves a combination of climate models, a crop process model (EPIC), a dynamic vegetation model used for forests (MC1), and an economic model of the US forestry and agricultural sector (FASOM-GHG). We find substantial impacts on productivity, commodity markets, and consumer and producer welfare for the stabilization scenario relative to unabated climate change, though the magnitude and direction of impacts vary across regions and commodities. Although there is variability in welfare impacts across climate simulations, we find positive net benefits from stabilization in all cases, with cumulative impacts ranging from 32.7 billion to 54.5 billion over the period 2015-2100. Our estimates contribute to the literature on potential benefits of GHG mitigation and can help inform policy decisions weighing alternative mitigation and adaptation actions.

  3. Absorbable stent: focus on clinical applications and benefits.

    Gonzalo, Nieves; Macaya, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Coronary stents have improved very significantly the immediate and long-term results of percutaneous coronary interventions. However, once the vessel has healed, the scaffolding function of the stent is no longer needed, and the presence of a permanent metallic prosthesis poses important disadvantages. This has led to the idea of creating new devices that are able to provide mechanical support for a determined period and then disappear from the vessel, allowing its natural healing and avoiding the risks associated with having a permanent metallic cage, such as stent thrombosis. Absorbable stents currently appear as one of the most promising fields in interventional cardiology. The present article will review the available clinical evidence regarding these devices at present and their future perspectives.

  4. Assessing the Benefits of Global Climate Stabilization Within an Integrated Modeling Framework

    Beach, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, higher temperatures, altered precipitation patterns, and other climate change impacts have already begun to affect US agriculture and forestry, with impacts expected to become more substantial in the future. There have been a number of studies of climate change impacts on agriculture or forestry. However, relatively few studies explore climate change impacts on both agriculture and forests simultaneously, including the interactions between alternative land uses and implications for market outcomes. Additionally, there is a lack of detailed analyses of the effects of stabilization scenarios relative to unabated emissions scenarios. Such analyses are important for developing estimates of the benefits of those stabilization scenarios, which can play a vital role in assessing tradeoffs associated with allocating resources across alternative mitigation and adaptation activities. We provide an analysis of the potential benefits of global climate change mitigation for US agriculture and forestry through 2100, accounting for landowner decisions regarding land use, crop mix, and management practices. The analytic approach involves a combination of climate models, a crop process model (EPIC), a dynamic vegetation model used for forests (MC1), and an economic model of the US forestry and agricultural sector (FASOM-GHG). We find substantial impacts on productivity, commodity markets, and consumer and producer welfare for the stabilization scenario relative to unabated climate change, though the magnitude and direction of impacts vary across regions and commodities. Although there is variability in welfare impacts across climate simulations, we find positive net benefits from stabilization in all cases, with cumulative impacts ranging from 32.7 billion to 54.5 billion over the period 2015-2100. Our estimates contribute to the literature on potential benefits of GHG mitigation and can help inform policy decisions weighing alternative

  5. A multi-model assessment of the co-benefits of climate mitigation for global air quality

    Rao, Shilpa; Klimont, Zbigniew; Leitao, Joana; Riahi, Keywan; van Dingenen, Rita; Aleluia Reis, Lara; Calvin, Katherine; Dentener, Frank; Drouet, Laurent; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Harmsen, Mathijs; Luderer, Gunnar; Heyes, Chris; Strefler, Jessica; Tavoni, Massimo; van Vuuren, Detlef P.

    2016-01-01

    We present a model comparison study that combines multiple integrated assessment models with a reduced-form global air quality model to assess the potential co-benefits of global climate mitigation policies in relation to the World Health Organization (WHO) goals on air quality and health. We

  6. The Risks and Benefits of Cannabis in the Dermatology Clinic.

    Dhadwal, Gurbir; Kirchhof, Mark G

    Cannabis ( Cannabis sativa/indica), also known as marijuana, has been used for medicinal and recreational purposes for millennia. There has been a recent trend to legalize the use of cannabis, as illustrated by the recent legalization votes in numerous states in the United States and legislation in Canada to allow recreational cannabis use. With this increasing consumption of cannabis, dermatologists will see increased pressure to prescribe cannabis and will see the side effects of cannabis use with greater frequency. There are several approved medical indications for cannabis use, including psoriasis, lupus, nail-patella syndrome, and severe pain. In addition, very preliminary studies have suggested cannabis and its derivatives might have use in acne, dermatitis, pruritus, wound healing, and skin cancer. Further well-controlled studies are required to explore these potential uses. Conversely, the side effects of cannabis use are relatively well documented, and dermatologists should be aware of these presentations. Side effects of cannabis use include cannabis allergy manifesting as urticaria and pruritus, cannabis arteritis presenting with necrosis and ulcers, and oral cancers from cannabis smoke. In this review, we summarize some of the studies and reports regarding the medicinal uses of cannabis in the dermatology clinic and some of the side effects that might present more often to dermatologists as the use of cannabis increases.

  7. Absorbable stent: focus on clinical applications and benefits

    Gonzalo N

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Nieves Gonzalo, Carlos MacayaInterventional Cardiology, Cardiovascular Institute. Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Coronary stents have improved very significantly the immediate and long-term results of percutaneous coronary interventions. However, once the vessel has healed, the scaffolding function of the stent is no longer needed, and the presence of a permanent metallic prosthesis poses important disadvantages. This has led to the idea of creating new devices that are able to provide mechanical support for a determined period and then disappear from the vessel, allowing its natural healing and avoiding the risks associated with having a permanent metallic cage, such as stent thrombosis. Absorbable stents currently appear as one of the most promising fields in interventional cardiology. The present article will review the available clinical evidence regarding these devices at present and their future perspectives.Keywords: absorbable stent, bioresorbable stent, absorb, percutaneous coronary intervention

  8. Overview of digital breast tomosynthesis: Clinical cases, benefits and disadvantages.

    Nguyen, T; Levy, G; Poncelet, E; Le Thanh, T; Prolongeau, J F; Phalippou, J; Massoni, F; Laurent, N

    2015-09-01

    In France, the national breast cancer-screening program is based on mammography combined with clinical breast examination, and sometimes breast ultrasound for patients with high breast density. Digital breast tomosynthesis is a currently assessed 3D imaging technique in which angular projections of the stationary compressed breast are acquired automatically. When combined with mammography, clinicians can review both conventional (2D) as well as three-dimensional (3D) data. The purpose of this article is to review recent reports on this new breast imaging technique and complements this information with our personal experience. The main advantages of tomosynthesis are that it facilitates the detection and characterization of breast lesions, as well as the diagnosis of occult lesions in dense breasts. However, to do this, patients are exposed to higher levels of radiation than with 2D mammography. In France, the indications for tomosynthesis and its use in breast cancer-screening (individual and organized) are yet to be defined, as is its role in the diagnosis and staging of breast cancer (multiple lesions). Further studies assessing in particular the combined reconstruction of the 2D view using 3D tomosynthesis data acquired during a single breast compression event, and therefore reducing patient exposure to radiation, are expected to provide valuable insight. Copyright © 2015 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. How to estimate the health benefits of additional research and changing clinical practice

    Claxton, Karl; Griffin, Susan; Koffijberg, Hendrik; McKenna, Claire

    2015-01-01

    A simple extension of standard meta-analysis can provide quantitative estimates of the potential health benefits of further research and of implementing the findings of existing research, which can help inform research prioritisation and efforts to change clinical practice

  10. How to estimate the health benefits of additional research and changing clinical practice

    Claxton, Karl; Griffin, Susan; Koffijberg, Hendrik; McKenna, Claire

    2015-01-01

    A simple extension of standard metaanalysis can provide quantitative estimates of the potential health benefits of further research and of implementing the findings of existing research, which can help inform research prioritisation and efforts to change clinical practice

  11. Individualized cardiovascular disease prevention in clinical practice : Estimation of benefit and cost

    Slob, MC

    2017-01-01

    For treatment decisions in clinical practice, group-level treatment effects need to be translated into benefit for an individual patient. In both the primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention setting (Chapter 2), patients differ widely in the risk for cardiovascular events, and the benefit

  12. An Exploratory Study Investigating the Non-Clinical Benefits of Evidence-Based Veterinary Medicine

    Elizabeth Jackson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: As little prior research exists about the non-clinical benefits of evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM, this exploratory study was conducted to identify non-clinical benefits of EBVM to veterinary practices, as well as highlighting the barriers to further implementation, and ways to overcome them.Background: A PICO-based literature review (Hauser and Jackson, 2016 was conducted to establish current knowledge about the non-clinical benefits of EBVM. It found that while there are some papers suggesting a link between the practice of EBVM and better non-clinical benefits such as client satisfaction and client retention, a single study, focusing on the non-clinical benefits of EBVM, had yet to be conducted.Evidentiary value: This exploratory study provides a solid basis for the further development of a confirmatory study of the themes identified in the interviews. The impact on practice from our findings is significant as it details the key areas where the use of EBVM can yield commercial benefits from the perspective of a group of EBVM experts via interview. It is entirely possible that international veterinary environments which mirror that of the UK will find this research beneficial.Methods: Due to the paucity of data about the non-clinical benefits of EBVM, an exploratory, qualitative approach was taken to this research in order to build a platform for further confirmatory, quantitative investigation (Zikmund, 2003. In February and March 2016 interviews with 16 RCVS Knowledge Group chairs[1] were conducted. The interview guide contained broad, open-ended questions to explore existing tacit knowledge about the non-commercial benefits of EBVM. The interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim and subsequently analysed using NVivo 11 software.Results: This qualitative enquiry showed that the key areas where the use of EBVM can yield non-clinical benefits are through increased client satisfaction and retention, improved

  13. A global framework for future costs and benefits of river-flood protection in urban areas

    Ward, Philip J.; Jongman, Brenden; Aerts, Jeroen C. J. H.; Bates, Paul D.; Botzen, Wouter J. W.; Diaz Loaiza, Andres; Hallegatte, Stephane; Kind, Jarl M.; Kwadijk, Jaap; Scussolini, Paolo; Winsemius, Hessel C.

    2017-09-01

    Floods cause billions of dollars of damage each year, and flood risks are expected to increase due to socio-economic development, subsidence, and climate change. Implementing additional flood risk management measures can limit losses, protecting people and livelihoods. Whilst several models have been developed to assess global-scale river-flood risk, methods for evaluating flood risk management investments globally are lacking. Here, we present a framework for assessing costs and benefits of structural flood protection measures in urban areas around the world. We demonstrate its use under different assumptions of current and future climate change and socio-economic development. Under these assumptions, investments in dykes may be economically attractive for reducing risk in large parts of the world, but not everywhere. In some regions, economically efficient investments could reduce future flood risk below today’s levels, in spite of climate change and economic growth. We also demonstrate the sensitivity of the results to different assumptions and parameters. The framework can be used to identify regions where river-flood protection investments should be prioritized, or where other risk-reducing strategies should be emphasized.

  14. Benefits and risks of adopting the global code of practice for recreational fisheries

    Arlinghaus, Robert; Beard, T. Douglas; Cooke, Steven J.; Cowx, Ian G.

    2012-01-01

    Recreational fishing constitutes the dominant or sole use of many fish stocks, particularly in freshwater ecosystems in Western industrialized countries. However, despite their social and economic importance, recreational fisheries are generally guided by local or regional norms and standards, with few comprehensive policy and development frameworks existing across jurisdictions. We argue that adoption of a recently developed Global Code of Practice (CoP) for Recreational Fisheries can provide benefits for moving recreational fisheries toward sustainability on a global scale. The CoP is a voluntary document, specifically framed toward recreational fisheries practices and issues, thereby complementing and extending the United Nation's Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries by the Food and Agricultural Organization. The CoP for Recreational Fisheries describes the minimum standards of environmentally friendly, ethically appropriate, and—depending on local situations—socially acceptable recreational fishing and its management. Although many, if not all, of the provisions presented in the CoP are already addressed through national fisheries legislation and state-based fisheries management regulations in North America, adopting a common framework for best practices in recreational fisheries across multiple jurisdictions would further promote their long-term viability in the face of interjurisdictional angler movements and some expanding threats to the activity related to shifting sociopolitical norms.

  15. Sauces, spices, and condiments: definitions, potential benefits, consumption patterns, and global markets.

    García-Casal, Maria Nieves; Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; Malavé, Heber Gómez-

    2016-09-01

    Spices and condiments are an important part of human history and nutrition, and have played an important role in the development of most cultures around the world. According to the Codex Alimentarius, the category of salts, spices, soups, sauces, salads, and protein products includes substances added to foods to enhance aroma and taste. Spices have been reported to have health benefits as antioxidant, antibiotic, antiviral, anticoagulant, anticarcinogenic, and anti-inflammatory agents. Health claims about the benefits of condiments for disease prevention or health improvement need to be science based and extensively supported by evidence; data on their preventive or protective potential in humans are currently limited. The condiments market has been growing continuously over the last few years, with the quantity of products sold under the category of sauces, dressings, and condiments during the period 2008-2013 increasing from 31,749,000 to 35,795,000 metric tons. About 50 of the 86 spices produced in the world are grown in India. From 2008 to 2013, the United States was the largest importer of spices, followed by Australia, the United Kingdom, Canada, and Russia. The main buyers of fish sauce are Vietnam and Thailand, with purchases of 333,000 and 284,000 metric tons in 2013, respectively. The sauces and condiments category is dynamic, with large differences in consumption in habits and practices among countries. This paper aims to establish definitions and discuss potential health benefits, consumption patterns, and global markets for sauces, spices, and condiments. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  16. Global mortality consequences of climate change accounting for adaptation costs and benefits

    Rising, J. A.; Jina, A.; Carleton, T.; Hsiang, S. M.; Greenstone, M.

    2017-12-01

    Empirically-based and plausibly causal estimates of the damages of climate change are greatly needed to inform rapidly developing global and local climate policies. To accurately reflect the costs of climate change, it is essential to estimate how much populations will adapt to a changing climate, yet adaptation remains one of the least understood aspects of social responses to climate. In this paper, we develop and implement a novel methodology to estimate climate impacts on mortality rates. We assemble comprehensive sub-national panel data in 41 countries that account for 56% of the world's population, and combine them with high resolution daily climate data to flexibly estimate the causal effect of temperature on mortality. We find the impacts of temperature on mortality have a U-shaped response; both hot days and cold days cause excess mortality. However, this average response obscures substantial heterogeneity, as populations are differentially adapted to extreme temperatures. Our empirical model allows us to extrapolate response functions across the entire globe, as well as across time, using a range of economic, population, and climate change scenarios. We also develop a methodology to capture not only the benefits of adaptation, but also its costs. We combine these innovations to produce the first causal, micro-founded, global, empirically-derived climate damage function for human health. We project that by 2100, business-as-usual climate change is likely to incur mortality-only costs that amount to approximately 5% of global GDP for 5°C degrees of warming above pre-industrial levels. On average across model runs, we estimate that the upper bound on adaptation costs amounts to 55% of the total damages.

  17. Clinically Relevant Physical Benefits of Exercise Interventions in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Kirkham, Amy A; Bland, Kelcey A; Sayyari, Sarah; Campbell, Kristin L; Davis, Margot K

    2016-02-01

    Evidence is currently limited for the effect of exercise on breast cancer clinical outcomes. However, several of the reported physical benefits of exercise, including peak oxygen consumption, functional capacity, muscle strength and lean mass, cardiovascular risk factors, and bone health, have established associations with disability, cardiovascular disease risk, morbidity, and mortality. This review will summarize the clinically relevant physical benefits of exercise interventions in breast cancer survivors and discuss recommendations for achieving these benefits. It will also describe potential differences in intervention delivery that may impact outcomes and, lastly, describe current physical activity guidelines for cancer survivors.

  18. Co-benefits of global, domestic, and sectoral greenhouse gas mitigation for US air quality and human health in 2050

    Zhang, Yuqiang; Smith, Steven J.; Bowden, Jared H.; Adelman, Zachariah; West, J. Jason

    2017-11-01

    Policies to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions can bring ancillary benefits of improved air quality and reduced premature mortality, in addition to slowing climate change. Here we study the co-benefits of global and domestic GHG mitigation on US air quality and human health in 2050 at fine resolution using dynamical downscaling, and quantify for the first time the co-benefits from foreign GHG mitigation. Relative to a reference scenario, global GHG reductions in RCP4.5 avoid 16000 PM2.5-related all-cause deaths yr-1 (90% confidence interval, 11700-20300), and 8000 (3600-12400) O3-related respiratory deaths yr-1 in the US in 2050. Foreign GHG mitigation avoids 15% and 62% of PM2.5- and O3-related total avoided deaths, highlighting the importance of foreign GHG mitigation on US human health benefits. GHG mitigation in the US residential sector brings the largest co-benefits for PM2.5-related deaths (21% of total domestic co-benefits), and industry for O3 (17%). Monetized benefits, for avoided deaths from ozone, PM2.5, and heat stress from a related study, are $148 ($96-201) per ton CO2 at high valuation and $49 ($32-67) at low valuation, of which 36% are from foreign GHG reductions. These benefits likely exceed the marginal cost of GHG reductions in 2050. The US gains significantly greater co-benefits when coordinating GHG reductions with foreign countries. Similarly, previous studies estimating co-benefits locally or regionally may greatly underestimate the full co-benefits of coordinated global actions.

  19. Mutational and putative neoantigen load predict clinical benefit of adoptive T cell therapy in melanoma

    Lauss, Martin; Donia, Marco; Harbst, Katja

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT) is a highly intensive immunotherapy regime that has yielded remarkable response rates and many durable responses in clinical trials in melanoma; however, 50-60% of the patients have no clinical benefit. Here, we searched for predictive biomarkers to ACT in melanoma. ...

  20. Visual form-processing deficits: a global clinical classification.

    Unzueta-Arce, J; García-García, R; Ladera-Fernández, V; Perea-Bartolomé, M V; Mora-Simón, S; Cacho-Gutiérrez, J

    2014-10-01

    Patients who have difficulties recognising visual form stimuli are usually labelled as having visual agnosia. However, recent studies let us identify different clinical manifestations corresponding to discrete diagnostic entities which reflect a variety of deficits along the continuum of cortical visual processing. We reviewed different clinical cases published in medical literature as well as proposals for classifying deficits in order to provide a global perspective of the subject. Here, we present the main findings on the neuroanatomical basis of visual form processing and discuss the criteria for evaluating processing which may be abnormal. We also include an inclusive diagram of visual form processing deficits which represents the different clinical cases described in the literature. Lastly, we propose a boosted decision tree to serve as a guide in the process of diagnosing such cases. Although the medical community largely agrees on which cortical areas and neuronal circuits are involved in visual processing, future studies making use of new functional neuroimaging techniques will provide more in-depth information. A well-structured and exhaustive assessment of the different stages of visual processing, designed with a global view of the deficit in mind, will give a better idea of the prognosis and serve as a basis for planning personalised psychostimulation and rehabilitation strategies. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Re-Engineering Alzheimer Clinical Trials: Global Alzheimer's Platform Network.

    Cummings, J; Aisen, P; Barton, R; Bork, J; Doody, R; Dwyer, J; Egan, J C; Feldman, H; Lappin, D; Truyen, L; Salloway, S; Sperling, R; Vradenburg, G

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug development is costly, time-consuming, and inefficient. Trial site functions, trial design, and patient recruitment for trials all require improvement. The Global Alzheimer Platform (GAP) was initiated in response to these challenges. Four GAP work streams evolved in the US to address different trial challenges: 1) registry-to-cohort web-based recruitment; 2) clinical trial site activation and site network construction (GAP-NET); 3) adaptive proof-of-concept clinical trial design; and 4) finance and fund raising. GAP-NET proposes to establish a standardized network of continuously funded trial sites that are highly qualified to perform trials (with established clinical, biomarker, imaging capability; certified raters; sophisticated management system. GAP-NET will conduct trials for academic and biopharma industry partners using standardized instrument versions and administration. Collaboration with the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) European Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease (EPAD) program, the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging (CCNA) and other similar international initiatives will allow conduct of global trials. GAP-NET aims to increase trial efficiency and quality, decrease trial redundancy, accelerate cohort development and trial recruitment, and decrease trial costs. The value proposition for sites includes stable funding and uniform training and trial execution; the value to trial sponsors is decreased trial costs, reduced time to execute trials, and enhanced data quality. The value for patients and society is the more rapid availability of new treatments for AD.

  2. Factors Contributing to Exacerbating Vulnerabilities in Global Clinical Trials

    da Silva, Ricardo E.; Amato, Angélica A.; Guilhem, Dirce B.; de Carvalho, Marta R.; Lima, Elisangela da C.; Novaes, Maria Rita C. G.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Although policies and guidelines make use of the concept of vulnerability, few define it. The European Union's directive for clinical trials does not include explanations for or the reasoning behind the designation of certain groups as vulnerable. Emerging economies from lower middle-income countries have, in recent years, had the largest average annual growth rate, as well as increase, in number of clinical trials registered in the US government's database. Nevertheless, careful supervision of research activities has to be ensured. Objective: To describe and analyze the features of the clinical trials involving vulnerable populations in various countries classified by development status and geographic region. Methods: Retrospective study that involved analysis of data obtained from the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) database between 01/2014 and 12/2014 from countries with (i) highest trial densities during 2005 to 2012, (ii) highest average growth rate in clinical trials, and (iii) greatest trial capabilities. Results: Statistical analysis of this study showed that patients incapable of giving consent personally are 11.4 times more likely to be vulnerable patients than patients who are capable, and that patients in upper-middle-income countries are 1.7 times more likely to be vulnerable patients than patients from high-income countries when participating in global clinical trials. Malaysia (21%), Egypt (20%), Turkey (19%), Israel (18%), and Brazil (17%) had the highest percentages of vulnerable populations involving children. Conclusions: Although the inability to provide consent personally was a factor associated with vulnerability, arbitrary criteria may have been considered when classifying the populations of clinical trials as vulnerable. The EU Clinical Trials Register should provide guidance regarding exactly what aspects or factors should be taken into account to frame given populations as vulnerable, because

  3. Can REDD+ Reconcile Local Priorities and Needs with Global Mitigation Benefits? Lessons from Angai Forest, Tanzania

    Irmeli Mustalahti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The scope of the reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD mechanism has broadened REDD+ to accommodate different country interests such as natural forests, protected areas, as well as forests under community-based management. In Tanzania the REDD+ mechanism is still under development and pilot projects are at an early stage. In this paper, we seek to understand how local priorities and needs could be met in REDD+ implementation and how these expectations match with global mitigation benefits. We examine the local priorities and needs in the use of land and forest resources in the Angai Villages Land Forest Reserve (AVLFR in the Liwale District of Lindi Region in Tanzania. Primary data was collected in two villages, Mihumo and Lilombe, using semistructured key informant interviews and participatory rural appraisal methods. In addition, the key informant interviews were conducted with other village, district, and national level actors, as well as international donors. Findings show that in the two communities REDD+ is seen as something new and is generating new expectations among communities. However, the Angai villagers highlight three key priorities that have yet to be integrated into the design of REDD+: water scarcity, rural development, and food security. At the local level improved forest governance and sustainable management of forest resources have been identified as one way to achieve livelihood diversification. Although the national goals of REDD+ include poverty reduction, these goals are not necessarily conducive to the goals of these communities. There exist both structural and cultural limits to the ability of the Angai villages to implement these goals and to improve forestry governance. Given the vulnerability to current and future climate variability and change it will be important to consider how the AVLFR will be managed and for whose benefit?

  4. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Clinical Global Impression for Schizoaffective Disorder Scale

    Allen, Michael H; Daniel, David G; Revicki, Dennis A; Canuso, Carla M; Turkoz, Ibrahim; Fu, Dong-Jing; Alphs, Larry; Ishak, K. Jack; Bartko, John J; Lindenmayer, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The Clinical Global Impression for Schizoaffective Disorder scale is a new rating scale adapted from the Clinical Global Impression scale for use in patients with schizoaffective disorder. The psychometric characteristics of the Clinical Global Impression for Schizoaffective Disorder are described.

  5. Model for investigating the benefits of clinical supervision in psychiatric nursing: a survey study.

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was to test a model for analysing the possible benefits of clinical supervision. The model suggested a pathway from participation to effectiveness to benefits of clinical supervision, and included possible influences of individual and workplace factors. The study sample was 136 nursing staff members in permanent employment on nine general psychiatric wards and at four community mental health centres at a Danish psychiatric university hospital. Data were collected by means of a set of questionnaires. Participation in clinical supervision was associated with the effectiveness of clinical supervision, as measured by the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS). Furthermore, MCSS scores were associated with benefits, such as increased job satisfaction, vitality, rational coping and less stress, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization. Multivariate analyses indicated that certain individual and workplace factors were related to subscales of the MCSS, as well as some of the benefits. The study supported the suggested model, but methodological limitations apply. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  6. Benefits of Leapfrogging to Superefficiency and Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants in Room Air Conditioning

    Shah, Nihar [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area; Wei, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area; Letschert, Virginie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area; Phadke, Amol [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area

    2015-10-01

    Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) emitted from uses such as refrigerants and thermal insulating foam, are now the fastest growing greenhouse gases (GHGs), with global warming potentials (GWP) thousands of times higher than carbon dioxide (CO2). Because of the short lifetime of these molecules in the atmosphere, mitigating the amount of these short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) provides a faster path to climate change mitigation than control of CO2 alone. This has led to proposals from Africa, Europe, India, Island States, and North America to amend the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (Montreal Protocol) to phase-down high-GWP HFCs. Simultaneously, energy efficiency market transformation programs such as standards, labeling and incentive programs are endeavoring to improve the energy efficiency for refrigeration and air conditioning equipment to provide life cycle cost, energy, GHG, and peak load savings. In this paper we provide an estimate of the magnitude of such GHG and peak electric load savings potential, for room air conditioning, if the refrigerant transition and energy efficiency improvement policies are implemented either separately or in parallel. We find that implementing HFC refrigerant transition and energy efficiency improvement policies in parallel for room air conditioning, roughly doubles the benefit of either policy implemented separately. We estimate that shifting the 2030 world stock of room air conditioners from the low efficiency technology using high-GWP refrigerants to higher efficiency technology and low-GWP refrigerants in parallel would save between 340-790 gigawatts (GW) of peak load globally, which is roughly equivalent to avoiding 680-1550 peak power plants of 500MW each. This would save 0.85 GT/year annually in China equivalent to over 8 Three Gorges dams and over 0.32 GT/year annually in India equivalent to roughly twice India’s 100GW solar mission target. While there is some uncertainty associated with

  7. Effect of amifostine on patient assessed clinical benefit in irradiated head and neck cancer

    Wasserman, Todd; Mackowiak, John I.; Brizel, David M.; Oster, Wolfgang; Zhang, Jianliang; Peeples, Patricia J.; Sauer, Rolf

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if head and neck (H/N) cancer patients receiving daily amifostine during radiation therapy (RT) experienced clinical benefit (improvement in their ability to carry out normal functions with reduced discomfort) compared to nonamifostine treated patients. Methods and Materials: This was an open-label, multi-institutional randomized trial in 303 H/N cancer patients treated with RT +amifostine. Clinical benefit was measured using an 8-item validated Patient Benefit Questionnaire (PBQ) during and up to 11 months after RT. Results: 301 patients completed one or more PBQ assessments. Amifostine patients had significantly better PBQ scores (p < 0.05) than controls. The improvement in PBQ scores was most significant during chronic xerostomia. Conclusions: Amifostine use results in improved Patient Benefit Questionnaire (PBQ) scores, which is indicative of improved oral toxicity related outcomes and improved clinical benefit. Less oral toxicity should lead to preservation of late dental and oral health, and improvements in activities such as diet, nutrition, and sleep

  8. Creating a Global Law Graduate: The Need, Benefits and Practical Approaches to Internationalise the Curriculum

    O'Sullivan, Carmel; McNamara, Judith

    2015-01-01

    The increasingly integrated world has facilitated important international and trans-border trends, such as a progressively connected global economy, a significant growth in transnational business transactions and an increase in global regulation of global issues. Such globalisation has had a transformational impact on the legal profession in a…

  9. Decision theory and the evaluation of risks and benefits of clinical trials.

    Bernabe, Rosemarie D C; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M W; Raaijmakers, Jan A M; van Delden, Johannes J M

    2012-12-01

    Research ethics committees (RECs) are tasked to assess the risks and the benefits of a clinical trial. In previous studies, it was shown that RECs find this task difficult, if not impossible, to do. The current approaches to benefit-risk assessment (i.e. Component Analysis and the Net Risk Test) confound the various risk-benefit tasks, and as such, make balancing impossible. In this article, we show that decision theory, specifically through the expected utility theory and multiattribute utility theory, enable for an explicit and ethically weighted risk-benefit evaluation. This makes a balanced ethical justification possible, and thus a more rationally defensible decision making. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Net Clinical Benefit of Antithrombotic Therapy in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Bonde, A. N.; Lip, G. Y. H.; Kamper, A. L.

    2014-01-01

    (Congestive heart failure; Hypertension; Age >= 75 years; Diabetes mellitus; previous Stroke, transient ischemic attack, or thromboembolism; Vascular disease; Age 65 to 74 years; Sex category) strata and the net clinical benefit of warfarin in patients with AF and CKD in a nationwide cohort. METHODS...

  11. Human Genome Editing in the Clinic: New Challenges in Regulatory Benefit-Risk Assessment.

    Abou-El-Enein, Mohamed; Cathomen, Toni; Ivics, Zoltán; June, Carl H; Renner, Matthias; Schneider, Christian K; Bauer, Gerhard

    2017-10-05

    As genome editing rapidly progresses toward the realization of its clinical promise, assessing the suitability of current tools and processes used for its benefit-risk assessment is critical. Although current regulations may initially provide an adequate regulatory framework, improvements are recommended to overcome several existing technology-based safety and efficacy issues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A counterfactual p-value approach for benefit-risk assessment in clinical trials.

    Zeng, Donglin; Chen, Ming-Hui; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Wei, Rachel; Ding, Beiying; Ke, Chunlei; Jiang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials generally allow various efficacy and safety outcomes to be collected for health interventions. Benefit-risk assessment is an important issue when evaluating a new drug. Currently, there is a lack of standardized and validated benefit-risk assessment approaches in drug development due to various challenges. To quantify benefits and risks, we propose a counterfactual p-value (CP) approach. Our approach considers a spectrum of weights for weighting benefit-risk values and computes the extreme probabilities of observing the weighted benefit-risk value in one treatment group as if patients were treated in the other treatment group. The proposed approach is applicable to single benefit and single risk outcome as well as multiple benefit and risk outcomes assessment. In addition, the prior information in the weight schemes relevant to the importance of outcomes can be incorporated in the approach. The proposed CPs plot is intuitive with a visualized weight pattern. The average area under CP and preferred probability over time are used for overall treatment comparison and a bootstrap approach is applied for statistical inference. We assess the proposed approach using simulated data with multiple efficacy and safety endpoints and compare its performance with a stochastic multi-criteria acceptability analysis approach.

  13. Forms of benefit sharing in global health research undertaken in resource poor settings: a qualitative study of stakeholders' views in Kenya

    Lairumbi Geoffrey M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increase in global health research undertaken in resource poor settings in the last decade though a positive development has raised ethical concerns relating to potential for exploitation. Some of the suggested strategies to address these concerns include calls for providing universal standards of care, reasonable availability of proven interventions and more recently, promoting the overall social value of research especially in clinical research. Promoting the social value of research has been closely associated with providing fair benefits to various stakeholders involved in research. The debate over what constitutes fair benefits; whether those that addresses micro level issues of justice or those focusing on the key determinants of health at the macro level has continued. This debate has however not benefited from empirical work on what stakeholders consider fair benefits. This study explores practical experiences of stakeholders involved in global health research in Kenya, over what benefits are fair within a developing world context. Methods and results We conducted in-depth interviews with key informants drawn from within the broader health research system in Kenya including researchers from the mainstream health research institutions, networks and universities, teaching hospitals, policy makers, institutional review boards, civil society organisations and community representative groups. The range of benefits articulated by stakeholders addresses both micro and macro level concerns for justice by for instance, seeking to engage with interests of those facilitating research, and the broader systemic issues that make resource poor settings vulnerable to exploitation. We interpret these views to suggest a need for global health research to engage with current crises that face people in these settings as well as the broader systemic issues that produce them. Conclusion Global health research should provide benefits that

  14. Forms of benefit sharing in global health research undertaken in resource poor settings: a qualitative study of stakeholders' views in Kenya.

    Lairumbi, Geoffrey M; Parker, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Raymond; English, Michael C

    2012-01-17

    Increase in global health research undertaken in resource poor settings in the last decade though a positive development has raised ethical concerns relating to potential for exploitation. Some of the suggested strategies to address these concerns include calls for providing universal standards of care, reasonable availability of proven interventions and more recently, promoting the overall social value of research especially in clinical research. Promoting the social value of research has been closely associated with providing fair benefits to various stakeholders involved in research. The debate over what constitutes fair benefits; whether those that addresses micro level issues of justice or those focusing on the key determinants of health at the macro level has continued. This debate has however not benefited from empirical work on what stakeholders consider fair benefits. This study explores practical experiences of stakeholders involved in global health research in Kenya, over what benefits are fair within a developing world context. We conducted in-depth interviews with key informants drawn from within the broader health research system in Kenya including researchers from the mainstream health research institutions, networks and universities, teaching hospitals, policy makers, institutional review boards, civil society organisations and community representative groups.The range of benefits articulated by stakeholders addresses both micro and macro level concerns for justice by for instance, seeking to engage with interests of those facilitating research, and the broader systemic issues that make resource poor settings vulnerable to exploitation. We interpret these views to suggest a need for global health research to engage with current crises that face people in these settings as well as the broader systemic issues that produce them. Global health research should provide benefits that address both the micro and macro level issues of justice in order to

  15. Balancing the benefits and risks of public-private partnerships to address the global double burden of malnutrition.

    Kraak, Vivica I; Harrigan, Paige B; Lawrence, Mark; Harrison, Paul J; Jackson, Michaela A; Swinburn, Boyd

    2012-03-01

    Transnational food, beverage and restaurant companies, and their corporate foundations, may be potential collaborators to help address complex public health nutrition challenges. While UN system guidelines are available for private-sector engagement, non-governmental organizations (NGO) have limited guidelines to navigate diverse opportunities and challenges presented by partnering with these companies through public-private partnerships (PPP) to address the global double burden of malnutrition. We conducted a search of electronic databases, UN system websites and grey literature to identify resources about partnerships used to address the global double burden of malnutrition. A narrative summary provides a synthesis of the interdisciplinary literature identified. We describe partnership opportunities, benefits and challenges; and tools and approaches to help NGO engage with the private sector to address global public health nutrition challenges. PPP benefits include: raising the visibility of nutrition and health on policy agendas; mobilizing funds and advocating for research; strengthening food-system processes and delivery systems; facilitating technology transfer; and expanding access to medications, vaccines, healthy food and beverage products, and nutrition assistance during humanitarian crises. PPP challenges include: balancing private commercial interests with public health interests; managing conflicts of interest; ensuring that co-branded activities support healthy products and healthy eating environments; complying with ethical codes of conduct; assessing partnership compatibility; and evaluating partnership outcomes. NGO should adopt a systematic and transparent approach using available tools and processes to maximize benefits and minimize risks of partnering with transnational food, beverage and restaurant companies to effectively target the global double burden of malnutrition.

  16. Global Health Education: a cross-sectional study among German medical students to identify needs, deficits and potential benefits (Part 2 of 2: Knowledge gaps and potential benefits).

    Bozorgmehr, Kayvan; Menzel-Severing, Johannes; Schubert, Kirsten; Tinnemann, Peter

    2010-10-08

    In Germany, educational deficits or potential benefits involved in global health education have not been analysed till now. We assess the importance medical students place on learning about social determinants of health (SDH) and assess their knowledge of global health topics in relation to (i) mobility patterns, their education in (ii) tropical medicine or (iii) global health. Cross-sectional study among medical students from all 36 medical schools in Germany using a web-based, semi-structured questionnaire. Participants were recruited via mailing-lists of students' unions, all medical students registered in 2007 were eligible to participate in the study. We captured international mobility patterns, exposure to global health learning opportunities and attitudes to learning about SDH. Both an objective and subjective knowledge assessment were performed. 1126 online-replies were received and analysed. International health electives in developing countries correlated significantly with a higher importance placed on all provided SDH (p ≤ 0.006). Participation in tropical medicine (p educational system' (p = 0.007) and the 'health system structure' (p = 0.007), while the item 'politics' was marginally significant (p = 0.053).In the knowledge assessment students achieved an average score of 3.6 (SD 1.5; Mdn 4.0), 75% achieved a score of 4.0 or less (Q25 = 3.0; Q75 = 4.0) from a maximum achievable score of 8.0. A better performance was associated with international health electives (p = 0.032), participation in tropical medicine (p = 0.038) and global health (p = 0.258) courses. The importance medical students in our sample placed on learning about SDH strongly interacts with students' mobility, and participation in tropical medicine and global health courses. The knowledge assessment revealed deficits and outlined needs to further analyse education gaps in global health. Developing concerted educational interventions aimed at fostering students' engagement with SDH

  17. Use of online clinical videos for clinical skills training for medical students: benefits and challenges.

    Jang, Hye Won; Kim, Kyong-Jee

    2014-03-21

    Multimedia learning has been shown effective in clinical skills training. Yet, use of technology presents both opportunities and challenges to learners. The present study investigated student use and perceptions of online clinical videos for learning clinical skills and in preparing for OSCE (Objective Structured Clinical Examination). This study aims to inform us how to make more effective us of these resources. A mixed-methods study was conducted for this study. A 30-items questionnaire was administered to investigate student use and perceptions of OSCE videos. Year 3 and 4 students from 34 Korean medical schools who had access to OSCE videos participated in the online survey. Additionally, a semi-structured interview of a group of Year 3 medical students was conducted for an in-depth understanding of student experience with OSCE videos. 411 students from 31 medical schools returned the questionnaires; a majority of them found OSCE videos effective for their learning of clinical skills and in preparing for OSCE. The number of OSCE videos that the students viewed was moderately associated with their self-efficacy and preparedness for OSCE (p mobile devices; they agreed more with the statement that it was convenient to access the video clips than their peers who accessed the videos using computers (p students reported lack of integration into the curriculum and lack of interaction as barriers to more effective use of OSCE videos. The present study confirms the overall positive impact of OSCE videos on student learning of clinical skills. Having faculty integrate these learning resources into their teaching, integrating interactive tools into this e-learning environment to foster interactions, and using mobile devices for convenient access are recommended to help students make more effective use of these resources.

  18. Closing the Global Energy and Nutrient Cycles through Application of Biogas Residue to Agricultural Land – Potential Benefits and Drawback

    Veronica Arthurson

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion is an optimal way to treat organic waste matter, resulting in biogas and residue. Utilization of the residue as a crop fertilizer should enhance crop yield and soil fertility, promoting closure of the global energy and nutrient cycles. Consequently, the requirement for production of inorganic fertilizers will decrease, in turn saving significant amounts of energy, reducing greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, and indirectly leading to global economic benefits. However, application of this residue to agricultural land requires careful monitoring to detect amendments in soil quality at the early stages.

  19. First-Annual Global Clean Energy Manufacturing Report Shows Strong Domestic Benefits for the United States

    EERE Office of Strategic Programs, Strategic Priorities and Impact Analysis Team

    2017-02-01

    The Energy Department’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) commissioned the Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center to conduct the first-ever annual assessment of the economic state of global clean energy manufacturing. The report, Benchmarks of Global Clean Energy Manufacturing, makes economic data on clean energy technology widely available.

  20. Balancing individual and organizational goals in global talent management : A mutual-benefits perspective

    Farndale, E.; Pai, A.; Sparrow, P.; Scullion, H.

    2014-01-01

    Drawing from the talent management and global mobility literatures, there is simultaneous pressure to address both organizational goals to place talent internationally, and individual goals of self-initiated expatriation. This raises important questions for the future of global talent management

  1. A multi-model assessment of the co-benefits of climate mitigation for global air quality

    Rao, Shilpa; Klimont, Zbigniew; Leitao, Joana; Riahi, Keywan; van Dingenen, Rita; Reis, Lara Aleluia; Calvin, Katherine; Dentener, Frank; Drouet, Laurent; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Harmsen, Mathijs; Luderer, Gunnar; Heyes, Chris; Strefler, Jessica; Tavoni, Massimo; van Vuuren, Detlef P.

    2016-12-01

    The recent International Panel on Climate change (IPCC) report identifies significant co-benefits from climate policies on near-term ambient air pollution and related human health outcomes [1]. This is increasingly relevant for policy making as the health impacts of air pollution are a major global concern- the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study identifies outdoor air pollution as the sixth major cause of death globally [2]. Integrated assessment models (IAMs) are an effective tool to evaluate future air pollution outcomes across a wide range of assumptions on socio-economic development and policy regimes. The Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) [3] were the first set of long-term global scenarios developed across multiple integrated assessment models that provided detailed estimates of a number of air pollutants until 2100. However these scenarios were primarily designed to cover a defined range of radiative forcing outcomes and thus did not specifically focus on the interactions of long-term climate goals on near-term air pollution impacts. More recently, [4] used the RCP4.5 scenario to evaluate the co-benefits of global GHG reductions on air quality and human health in 2030. [5-7] have further examined the interactions of more diverse pollution control regimes with climate policies. This paper extends the listed studies in a number of ways. Firstly it uses multiple IAMs to look into the co-benefits of a global climate policy for ambient air pollution under harmonized assumptions on near-term air pollution control. Multi-model frameworks have been extensively used in the analysis of climate change mitigation pathways, and the structural uncertainties regarding the underlying mechanisms (see for example [8-10]. This is to our knowledge the first time that a multi-model evaluation has been specifically designed and applied to analyze the co-benefits of climate change policy on ambient air quality, thus enabling a better understanding of at a detailed

  2. A Clinical Update and Global Economic Burden of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Fazal, Syed Ali; Khan, Mohammad; Nishi, Shamima E; Alam, Fahmida; Zarin, Nowshin; Bari, Mohammad T; Ashraf, Ghulam Md

    2018-02-13

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a predominant inflammatory autoimmune disorder. The incidence and prevalence of RA is increasing with considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pathophysiology of RA has become clearer due to many significant research outputs during the last two decades. Many inflammatory cytokines involved in RA pathophysiology and the presence of autoantibodies are being used as potential biomarkers via the use of effective diagnostic techniques for the early diagnosis of RA. Currently, several disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs are being prescribed targeting RA pathophysiology, which have shown significant contributions in improving the disease outcomes. Even though innovations in treatment strategies and monitoring are helping the patients to achieve early and sustained clinical and radiographic remission, the high cost of drugs and limited health care budgets are restricting the easy access of RA treatment. Both direct and indirect high cost of treatment are creating economic burden for the patients and affecting their quality of life. The aim of this review is to describe the updated concept of RA pathophysiology and highlight current diagnostic tools used for the early detection as well as prognosis - targeting several biomarkers of RA. Additionally, we explored the updated treatment options with side effects besides discussing the global economic burden. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Mobile phone based clinical microscopy for global health applications.

    David N Breslauer

    Full Text Available Light microscopy provides a simple, cost-effective, and vital method for the diagnosis and screening of hematologic and infectious diseases. In many regions of the world, however, the required equipment is either unavailable or insufficiently portable, and operators may not possess adequate training to make full use of the images obtained. Counterintuitively, these same regions are often well served by mobile phone networks, suggesting the possibility of leveraging portable, camera-enabled mobile phones for diagnostic imaging and telemedicine. Toward this end we have built a mobile phone-mounted light microscope and demonstrated its potential for clinical use by imaging P. falciparum-infected and sickle red blood cells in brightfield and M. tuberculosis-infected sputum samples in fluorescence with LED excitation. In all cases resolution exceeded that necessary to detect blood cell and microorganism morphology, and with the tuberculosis samples we took further advantage of the digitized images to demonstrate automated bacillus counting via image analysis software. We expect such a telemedicine system for global healthcare via mobile phone -- offering inexpensive brightfield and fluorescence microscopy integrated with automated image analysis -- to provide an important tool for disease diagnosis and screening, particularly in the developing world and rural areas where laboratory facilities are scarce but mobile phone infrastructure is extensive.

  4. Analysis of the clinical benefit of 5-fluorouracil and radiation treatment in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    Fisher, Barbara J.; Perera, Francisco E.; Kocha, Walter; Tomiak, Anna; Taylor, Marianne; Vincent, Mark; Bauman, Glenn S.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the palliative benefit of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and radiotherapy in patients with surgically unresectable localized pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with locally advanced surgically unresectable symptomatic pancreatic cancer received 5-FU chemotherapy and local radiation therapy. They were retrospectively reviewed in regard to their clinical benefit response (a composite of measurement of pain assessment, weight, and Karnofsky performance status [KPS]), as well as radiological response, time to progression, and overall survival. Results: Median survival for the 25 patients was 9 months and median progression-free survival was 6 months. Thirty-two percent of patients survived in excess of 1 year. Analgesic requirements increased >50% in 2 patients and KPS deteriorated in 10 patients. Of the 13 remaining patients, 2 sustained a >7% weight loss and 2 gained weight post-treatment. Six patients improved in one parameter of analgesic consumption, weight loss or KPS without deteriorating in any others. Thus, the clinical benefit response index for 5-FU-radiation was 6/25 (24%). In terms of tumor response, 8 patients (44%) demonstrated a reduction in tumor volume post-treatment, 4 of whom (22%) experienced a >50% reduction. Four additional patients had radiologically stable disease. Conclusion: In this retrospective analysis, the clinical benefit response index for 5-FU-radiation was 24%, a value similar to the 23.8% reported for single agent gemcitabine. The median survival of 7 months was also similar to the 5.65 months reported for gemcitabine. The radiological partial response rate of 22% and the 1-year survival of 32% were higher for 5-FU-radiation than the reported values for gemcitabine. A randomized trial would be necessary to compare 5-FU-radiation to gemcitabine directly; however, from this review it did not appear that the overall palliative benefit of 5-FU-radiation was inferior to gemcitabine

  5. Achieving global environmental benefits through local development of clean energy? The case of small hilly hydel in India

    Reddy, V. Ratna; Uitto, Juha I.; Frans, Dirk R.; Matin, Nilufar

    2006-01-01

    Energy and development are closely intertwined. Yet, increasing fossil fuel-based energy consumption contributes significantly to environmental problems both locally and globally. This article explores the interlinkages between local livelihood and environmental benefits from the provision of energy to remote rural households through small hydropower development. The analysis is based on research carried out around a large development project designed to assist the Government of India in the optimum utilization of small hydropower resources in the Himalayan and sub-Himalayan regions. There are about 100,000 villages in India that are not connected to electricity supply, many of them in the hilly regions with ample hydropower potential. The project aimed to demonstrate the utility of and options for providing electricity to such villages through clean mini-hydro. The article addresses the nature of the impacts of the demonstration small hydel schemes on the local communities, to what extent they translate into environmental benefits both locally and globally, and the perceptions and participation of the local communities in these small hydro schemes. The study explores the impacts of the schemes on financial capital, natural capital, social capital, physical capital, human capital, and gender equity in the local communities. It further provides a discussion on the links between local and global environmental benefits. Overall, it is found that the schemes' impacts both on the local communities and the environment are mostly marginally positive or neutral, although achieving clearly demonstrable benefits would require major upscaling of the effort involving broader changes than possible under this project. Furthermore, it is argued that some of the assumptions behind the project design were faulty. Involvement of the local communities and direct livelihood benefits to them are essential for the long-term sustainability of the small hydro schemes. The discussion and

  6. When Veterinarians Support Canine Therapy: Bidirectional Benefits for Clinics and Therapy Programs

    John-Tyler Binfet

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a mutually beneficial model of collaboration between veterinarians and canine therapy programs. Veterinarians and the clinics for whom they work routinely establish collaborations with multiple and varied stakeholders. This might include a laboratory for processing samples and the corresponding courier company needed to deliver samples to the lab or a partnership with a local dog rescue organization for whom discounted rates are offered. One community partnership that stands to benefit both the clinic and the community agency, is for veterinarians to work in tandem with a local canine-assisted therapy program. The benefits to such an alliance are multifold and address aspects of veterinary medicine including client recruitment, community education, and access to a network of devoted dog enthusiasts.

  7. Cooperative study of clinical benefits from use of the fully portable blood irradiator

    Hungate, F.P.

    1994-10-01

    This report looks at the clinical benefits from use of a fully portable blood irradiator, techniques developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Significant accomplishments included the following: blood irradiators were successfully fabricated by PNL; irradiators were activated at the University of Missouri and quality tested at PNL; A-V shunts for irradiators were successfully fabricated in the PNL plastics shop; all activities necessary for experimental work on animals using the blood irradiators were completed

  8. Cooperative study of clinical benefits from use of the fully portable blood irradiator

    Hungate, F.P.

    1994-10-01

    This report looks at the clinical benefits from use of a fully portable blood irradiator, techniques developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Significant accomplishments included the following: blood irradiators were successfully fabricated by PNL; irradiators were activated at the University of Missouri and quality tested at PNL; A-V shunts for irradiators were successfully fabricated in the PNL plastics shop; all activities necessary for experimental work on animals using the blood irradiators were completed.

  9. Benefits and harms in clinical trials of duloxetine for treatment of major depressive disorder

    Maund, Emma; Tendal, Britta; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn

    2014-01-01

    , with respect to benefits and major harms. DESIGN: Data on primary efficacy analysis and major harms extracted from each data source and compared. SETTING: Nine randomised placebo controlled trials of duloxetine (total 2878 patients) submitted to the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for marketing approval.......gov and the manufacturer's online clinical trial registry were searched for trial results. RESULTS: Clinical study reports fully described the primary efficacy analysis and major harms (deaths (including suicides), suicide attempts, serious adverse events, and discontinuations because of adverse events). There were minor......, respectively. We also found publication bias in relation to beneficial effects. CONCLUSION: Clinical study reports contained extensive data on major harms that were unavailable in journal articles and in trial registry reports. There were inconsistencies between protocols and clinical study reports and within...

  10. Assessing climate change impacts, benefits of mitigation, and uncertainties on major global forest regions under multiple socioeconomic and emissions scenarios

    Kim, John B.; Monier, Erwan; Sohngen, Brent; Pitts, G. Stephen; Drapek, Ray; McFarland, James; Ohrel, Sara; Cole, Jefferson

    2017-04-01

    We analyze a set of simulations to assess the impact of climate change on global forests where MC2 dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM) was run with climate simulations from the MIT Integrated Global System Model-Community Atmosphere Model (IGSM-CAM) modeling framework. The core study relies on an ensemble of climate simulations under two emissions scenarios: a business-as-usual reference scenario (REF) analogous to the IPCC RCP8.5 scenario, and a greenhouse gas mitigation scenario, called POL3.7, which is in between the IPCC RCP2.6 and RCP4.5 scenarios, and is consistent with a 2 °C global mean warming from pre-industrial by 2100. Evaluating the outcomes of both climate change scenarios in the MC2 model shows that the carbon stocks of most forests around the world increased, with the greatest gains in tropical forest regions. Temperate forest regions are projected to see strong increases in productivity offset by carbon loss to fire. The greatest cost of mitigation in terms of effects on forest carbon stocks are projected to be borne by regions in the southern hemisphere. We compare three sources of uncertainty in climate change impacts on the world’s forests: emissions scenarios, the global system climate response (i.e. climate sensitivity), and natural variability. The role of natural variability on changes in forest carbon and net primary productivity (NPP) is small, but it is substantial for impacts of wildfire. Forest productivity under the REF scenario benefits substantially from the CO2 fertilization effect and that higher warming alone does not necessarily increase global forest carbon levels. Our analysis underlines why using an ensemble of climate simulations is necessary to derive robust estimates of the benefits of greenhouse gas mitigation. It also demonstrates that constraining estimates of climate sensitivity and advancing our understanding of CO2 fertilization effects may considerably reduce the range of projections.

  11. The m-Health revolution: Exploring perceived benefits of WhatsApp use in clinical practice.

    Ganasegeran, Kurubaran; Renganathan, Pukunan; Rashid, Abdul; Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman

    2017-01-01

    The dawn of m-Health facilitates new horizons of professional communication through WhatsApp, allowing health professionals to interact fast and efficiently for effective patient management. This preliminary study aimed to investigate perceived benefits, if any, of WhatsApp use across general medical and emergency teams during clinical practice in Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a universal sample of 307 health professionals comprising of nurses, medical assistants, medical residents, medical officers and physicians across medical and casualty departments in a Malaysian public hospital. The self-administered questionnaire consisted of items on socio-demographics, WhatsApp usage characteristics and the type of communication events during clinical practice. The majority of respondents (68.4%) perceived WhatsApp as beneficial during clinical practice. In multivariate analysis, perceived benefits was significantly higher amongst the clinical management group (aOR=2.6, 95% CI 1.5-4.6, p=0.001), those using WhatsApp for >12months (aOR=1.7, 95% CI 1.0-3.0, p=0.047), those receiving response ≤15min to a new communication (aOR=1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.2, p=0.017), and frequent information giving events (aOR=2.4, 95% CI 1.2-4.8, p=0.016). Perceived benefits of WhatsApp use in clinical practice was significantly associated with usage characteristics and type of communication events. This study lays the foundation for quality improvement innovations in patient management delivered through m-Health technology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The geographical distribution of leadership in globalized clinical trials.

    Jarno Hoekman

    manuscript writing is modest. This division of labor has significant implications for the scientific and ethical integrity of global clinical research.

  13. The geographical distribution of leadership in globalized clinical trials.

    Hoekman, Jarno; Frenken, Koen; de Zeeuw, Dick; Heerspink, Hiddo Lambers

    2012-01-01

    significant implications for the scientific and ethical integrity of global clinical research.

  14. Clinician-Reported Outcome Assessments of Treatment Benefit: Report of the ISPOR Clinical Outcome Assessment Emerging Good Practices Task Force.

    Powers, John H; Patrick, Donald L; Walton, Marc K; Marquis, Patrick; Cano, Stefan; Hobart, Jeremy; Isaac, Maria; Vamvakas, Spiros; Slagle, Ashley; Molsen, Elizabeth; Burke, Laurie B

    2017-01-01

    A clinician-reported outcome (ClinRO) assessment is a type of clinical outcome assessment (COA). ClinRO assessments, like all COAs (patient-reported, observer-reported, or performance outcome assessments), are used to 1) measure patients' health status and 2) define end points that can be interpreted as treatment benefits of medical interventions on how patients feel, function, or survive in clinical trials. Like other COAs, ClinRO assessments can be influenced by human choices, judgment, or motivation. A ClinRO assessment is conducted and reported by a trained health care professional and requires specialized professional training to evaluate the patient's health status. This is the second of two reports by the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment-Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force. The first report provided an overview of COAs including definitions important for an understanding of COA measurement practices. This report focuses specifically on issues related to ClinRO assessments. In this report, we define three types of ClinRO assessments (readings, ratings, and clinician global assessments) and describe emerging good measurement practices in their development and evaluation. The good measurement practices include 1) defining the context of use; 2) identifying the concept of interest measured; 3) defining the intended treatment benefit on how patients feel, function, or survive reflected by the ClinRO assessment and evaluating the relationship between that intended treatment benefit and the concept of interest; 4) documenting content validity; 5) evaluating other measurement properties once content validity is established (including intra- and inter-rater reliability); 6) defining study objectives and end point(s) objectives, and defining study end points and placing study end points within the hierarchy of end points; 7) establishing interpretability in trial results; and 8) evaluating operational considerations for the implementation of

  15. The synergy of the whole: building a global system for clinical trials to accelerate medicines development.

    Koski, Greg; Tobin, Mary F; Whalen, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The pharmaceutical industry, once highly respected, productive, and profitable, is in the throes of major change driven by many forces, including economics, science, regulation, and ethics. A variety of initiatives and partnerships have been launched to improve efficiency and productivity but without significant effect because they have failed to consider the process as a system. Addressing the challenges facing this complex endeavor requires more than modifications of individual processes; it requires a fully integrated application of systems thinking and an understanding of the desired goals and complex interactions among essential components and stakeholders of the whole. A multistakeholder collaborative effort, led by the Alliance for Clinical Research Excellence and Safety (ACRES), a global nonprofit organization operating in the public interest, is now under way to build a shared global system for clinical research. Its systems approach focuses on the interconnection of stakeholders at critical points of interaction within 4 operational domains: site development and support, quality management, information technology, and safety. The ACRES initiatives, Site Accreditation and Standards, Product Safety Culture, Global Ethical Review and Regulatory Innovation, and Quality Assurance and Safety, focus on building and implementing systems solutions. Underpinning these initiatives is an open, shared, integrated technology (site and optics and quality informatics initiative). We describe the rationale, challenges, progress, and successes of this effort to date and lessons learned. The complexity and fragmentation of the intensely proprietary ecosystem of drug development, challenging regulatory climate, and magnitude of the endeavor itself pose significant challenges, but the economic, social, and scientific rewards will more than justify the effort. An effective alliance model requires a willingness of multiple stakeholders to work together to build a shared system

  16. Do invasive alien plants benefit more from global environmental change than native plants?

    Liu, Yanjie; Oduor, Ayub M O; Zhang, Zhen; Manea, Anthony; Tooth, Ifeanna M; Leishman, Michelle R; Xu, Xingliang; van Kleunen, Mark

    2017-08-01

    Invasive alien plant species threaten native biodiversity, disrupt ecosystem functions and can cause large economic damage. Plant invasions have been predicted to further increase under ongoing global environmental change. Numerous case studies have compared the performance of invasive and native plant species in response to global environmental change components (i.e. changes in mean levels of precipitation, temperature, atmospheric CO 2 concentration or nitrogen deposition). Individually, these studies usually involve low numbers of species and therefore the results cannot be generalized. Therefore, we performed a phylogenetically controlled meta-analysis to assess whether there is a general pattern of differences in invasive and native plant performance under each component of global environmental change. We compiled a database of studies that reported performance measures for 74 invasive alien plant species and 117 native plant species in response to one of the above-mentioned global environmental change components. We found that elevated temperature and CO 2 enrichment increased the performance of invasive alien plants more strongly than was the case for native plants. Invasive alien plants tended to also have a slightly stronger positive response to increased N deposition and increased precipitation than native plants, but these differences were not significant (N deposition: P = 0.051; increased precipitation: P = 0.679). Invasive alien plants tended to have a slightly stronger negative response to decreased precipitation than native plants, although this difference was also not significant (P = 0.060). So while drought could potentially reduce plant invasion, increases in the four other components of global environmental change considered, particularly global warming and atmospheric CO 2 enrichment, may further increase the spread of invasive plants in the future. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Estimating the clinical benefits of vaccinating boys and girls against HPV-related diseases in Europe

    Marty, Rémi; Roze, Stéphane; Bresse, Xavier; Largeron, Nathalie; Smith-Palmer, Jayne

    2013-01-01

    HPV is related to a number of cancer types, causing a considerable burden in both genders in Europe. Female vaccination programs can substantially reduce the incidence of HPV-related diseases in women and, to some extent, men through herd immunity. The objective was to estimate the incremental benefit of vaccinating boys and girls using the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in Europe versus girls-only vaccination. Incremental benefits in terms of reduction in the incidence of HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18-related diseases (including cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile, and head and neck carcinomas and genital warts) were assessed. The analysis was performed using a model constructed in Microsoft®Excel, based on a previously-published dynamic transmission model of HPV vaccination and published European epidemiological data on incidence of HPV-related diseases. The incremental benefits of vaccinating 12-year old girls and boys versus girls-only vaccination was assessed (70% vaccine coverage were assumed for both). Sensitivity analyses around vaccine coverage and duration of protection were performed. Compared with screening alone, girls-only vaccination led to 84% reduction in HPV 16/18-related carcinomas in females and a 61% reduction in males. Vaccination of girls and boys led to a 90% reduction in HPV 16/18-related carcinomas in females and 86% reduction in males versus screening alone. Relative to a girls-only program, vaccination of girls and boys led to a reduction in female and male HPV-related carcinomas of 40% and 65%, respectively and a reduction in the incidence of HPV 6/11-related genital warts of 58% for females and 71% for males versus girls-only vaccination. In Europe, the vaccination of 12-year old boys and girls against HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18 would be associated with substantial additional clinical benefits in terms of reduced incidence of HPV-related genital warts and carcinomas versus girls-only vaccination. The incremental benefits of adding boys vaccination are

  18. A Case of Appendiceal Adenocarcinoma with Clinical Benefit from FOLFOX and Bevacizumab

    Erin D. Powell

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A 44-year-old woman presented with lower abdominal pain and bilateral ovarian masses on ultrasound. Exploratory laparotomy revealed extensive peritoneal and intra-abdominal disease and an abnormal appendix. Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, infracolic omentectomy, ileocolic resection and primary anastomosis were performed. Final pathology revealed a primary appendiceal adenocarcinoma, poorly differentiated, of signet ring cell type. CT scan postoperatively revealed gross residual disease. The patient was treated with FOLFOX chemotherapy combined with bevacizumab. Repeat CT scan showed a decrease in residual disease and the patient clinically improved. After her treatment has been continued for 13 months, she remains clinically well and her CT scan shows sustained disease stability. Disseminated appendiceal carcinoma is generally considered to be refractory to 5-FU-based chemotherapy and, to our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a patient with appendiceal adenocarcinoma demonstrating clinical benefit and sustained stability of disease with combination chemotherapy plus bevacizumab.

  19. Clinical Benefits of Memantine Treatment for Alzheimer's Disease in the Okayama Memantine Study II (OMS II).

    Matsuzono, Kosuke; Yamashita, Toru; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Koike, Makoto; Sato, Kota; Kono, Syoichiro; Deguchi, Kentaro; Nakano, Yumiko; Abe, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The clinical benefits of memantine, depending on the baseline cognitive and affective conditions in real world dementia clinics, have not been completely examined. We performed the "Okayama Memantine Study II (OMS II)" to retrospectively evaluate the clinical effects of memantine monotherapy (n = 38) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients using seven batteries to assess dementia at the baseline, at 3, 6, and 12 months. Additionally, we divided 163 AD patients treated with memantine into two subgroups depending on the baseline cognitive score of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE): the MMSE OMS II showed that memantine monotherapy improved BPSD until 12 months. The higher baseline cognitive subgroup (MMSE ≥15) and the worse baseline BPSD subgroup were expected to show better effects with memantine.

  20. Analyzing the blood-brain barrier: the benefits of medical imaging in research and clinical practice.

    Chassidim, Yoash; Vazana, Udi; Prager, Ofer; Veksler, Ronel; Bar-Klein, Guy; Schoknecht, Karl; Fassler, Michael; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Shelef, Ilan

    2015-02-01

    A dysfunctional BBB is a common feature in a variety of brain disorders, a fact stressing the need for diagnostic tools designed to assess brain vessels' permeability in space and time. Biological research has benefited over the years various means to analyze BBB integrity. The use of biomarkers for improper BBB functionality is abundant. Systemic administration of BBB impermeable tracers can both visualize brain regions characterized by BBB impairment, as well as lead to its quantification. Additionally, locating molecular, physiological content in regions from which it is restricted under normal BBB functionality undoubtedly indicates brain pathology-related BBB disruption. However, in-depth research into the BBB's phenotype demands higher analytical complexity than functional vs. pathological BBB; criteria which biomarker based BBB permeability analyses do not meet. The involvement of accurate and engineering sciences in recent brain research, has led to improvements in the field, in the form of more accurate, sensitive imaging-based methods. Improvements in the spatiotemporal resolution of many imaging modalities and in image processing techniques, make up for the inadequacies of biomarker based analyses. In pre-clinical research, imaging approaches involving invasive procedures, enable microscopic evaluation of BBB integrity, and benefit high levels of sensitivity and accuracy. However, invasive techniques may alter normal physiological function, thus generating a modality-based impact on vessel's permeability, which needs to be corrected for. Non-invasive approaches do not affect proper functionality of the inspected system, but lack in spatiotemporal resolution. Nevertheless, the benefit of medical imaging, even in pre-clinical phases, outweighs its disadvantages. The innovations in pre-clinical imaging and the development of novel processing techniques, have led to their implementation in clinical use as well. Specialized analyses of vessels' permeability

  1. Post graduate clinical placements: evaluating benefits and challenges with a mixed methods cross sectional design.

    Yiend, Jenny; Tracy, Derek K; Sreenan, Brian; Cardi, Valentina; Foulkes, Tina; Koutsantoni, Katerina; Kravariti, Eugenia; Tchanturia, Kate; Willmott, Lucy; Shergill, Sukhi; Reedy, Gabriel

    2016-02-16

    Systematic evaluations of clinical placements are rare, especially when offered alongside academic postgraduate courses. An evidence-based approach is important to allow pedagogically-driven provision, rather than that solely governed by opinion or market demand. Our evaluation assessed a voluntary clinical placement scheme allied to a mental health course. Data were collected over academic years 2010/11- 2013/14, from participating students (n = 20 to 58) and clinician supervisors (n = 10-12), using a mixed-methods cross-sectional design. Quantitative evaluation captured information on uptake, dropout, resource use, attitudes and experience, using standardized (the Placement Evaluation Questionnaire; the Scale To Assess the Therapeutic Relationship - Clinical version and the University of Toronto Placement Supervisor Evaluation) and bespoke questionnaires and audit data. Qualitative evaluation comprised two focus groups (5 clinicians, 5 students), to investigate attitudes, experience, perceived benefits, disadvantages and desired future developments. Data were analysed using framework analysis to identify a priori and emergent themes. High uptake (around 70 placements per annum), low dropout (2-3 students per annum; 5 %) and positive focus group comments suggested placements successfully provided added value and catered sufficiently to student demand. Students' responses confirmed that placements met expectations and the perception of benefit remained after completion with 70 % (n = 14) reporting an overall positive experience, 75 % (n = 15) reporting a pleasant learning experience, 60 % (n = 12) feeling that their clinical skills were enhanced and 85 % (n = 17) believing that it would benefit other students. Placements contributed the equivalent of seven full time unskilled posts per annum to local health care services. While qualitative data revealed perceived 'mutual benefit' for both students and clinicians, this was qualified by

  2. Can agile software tools bring the benefits of a task board to globally distributed teams?

    Katsma, Christiaan; Amrit, Chintan Amrit; van Hillegersberg, Jos; Sikkel, Nicolaas; Oshri, Ilan; Kotlarsky, Julia; Willcocks, Leslie P.

    Software-based tooling has become an essential part of globally disitrbuted software development. In this study we focus on the usage of such tools and task boards in particular. We investigate the deployment of these tools through a field research in 4 different companies that feature agile and

  3. Environmental globalization, organizational form, and expected benefits from protected areas in Central America

    Max J. Pfeffer; John W. Schelhas; Catherine Meola

    2006-01-01

    Environmental globalization has led to the implementation of conservation efforts like the creation of protected areas that often promote the interests of core countries in poorer regions. The creation of protected areas in poor areas frequently creates tensions between human needs like - food and shelter and environmental conservation. Support for such conservation...

  4. Environmental Globalization, Organizational Form, and Expected Benefits from Protected Areas in Central America

    Pfeffer, Max J.; Schelhas, John W.; Meola, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Environmental globalization has led to the implementation of conservation efforts like the creation of protected areas that often promote the interests of core countries in poorer regions. The creation of protected areas in poor areas frequently creates tensions between human needs like food and shelter and environmental conservation. Support for…

  5. Declining vulnerability to river floods and the global benefits of adaptation.

    Jongman, Brenden; Winsemius, Hessel C; Aerts, Jeroen C J H; Coughlan de Perez, Erin; van Aalst, Maarten K; Kron, Wolfgang; Ward, Philip J

    2015-05-05

    The global impacts of river floods are substantial and rising. Effective adaptation to the increasing risks requires an in-depth understanding of the physical and socioeconomic drivers of risk. Whereas the modeling of flood hazard and exposure has improved greatly, compelling evidence on spatiotemporal patterns in vulnerability of societies around the world is still lacking. Due to this knowledge gap, the effects of vulnerability on global flood risk are not fully understood, and future projections of fatalities and losses available today are based on simplistic assumptions or do not include vulnerability. We show for the first time (to our knowledge) that trends and fluctuations in vulnerability to river floods around the world can be estimated by dynamic high-resolution modeling of flood hazard and exposure. We find that rising per-capita income coincided with a global decline in vulnerability between 1980 and 2010, which is reflected in decreasing mortality and losses as a share of the people and gross domestic product exposed to inundation. The results also demonstrate that vulnerability levels in low- and high-income countries have been converging, due to a relatively strong trend of vulnerability reduction in developing countries. Finally, we present projections of flood losses and fatalities under 100 individual scenario and model combinations, and three possible global vulnerability scenarios. The projections emphasize that materialized flood risk largely results from human behavior and that future risk increases can be largely contained using effective disaster risk reduction strategies.

  6. Opioid growth factor improves clinical benefit and survival in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

    Jill P Smith

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Jill P Smith1, Sandra I Bingaman1, David T Mauger2, Harold H Harvey1, Laurence M Demers3, Ian S Zagon41Departments of Medicine, 2Public Health Sciences, 3Pathology, and 4Neurosciences and Anatomy, Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USABackground: Advanced pancreatic cancer carries the poorest prognosis of all gastrointestinal malignancies. Once the tumor has spread beyond the margins of the pancreas, chemotherapy is the major treatment modality offered to patients; however, chemotherapy does not significantly improve survival.Objective: Opioid growth factor (OGF; [Met5]-enkephalin is a natural peptide that has been shown to inhibit growth of pancreatic cancer in cell culture and in nude mice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of OGF biotherapy on subjects with advanced pancreatic cancer who failed chemotherapy.Methods: In a prospective phase II open-labeled clinical trial, 24 subjects who failed standard chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer were treated weekly with OGF 250 μg/kg intravenously. Outcomes measured included clinical benefit, tumor response by radiographic imaging, quality of life, and survival.Results: Clinical benefit response was experienced by 53% of OGF-treated patients compared to historical controls of 23.8% and 4.8% for gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, respectively. Of the subjects surviving more than eight weeks, 62% showed either a decrease or stabilization in tumor size by computed tomography. The median survival time for OGF-treated patients was three times that of untreated patients (65.5 versus 21 days, p < 0.001. No adverse effects on hematologic or chemistry parameters were noted, and quality of life surveys suggested improvement with OGF. Limitations: Measurements other than survival were not allowed in control patients, and clinical benefit comparisons were made to historical controls.Conclusion: OGF biotherapy improves the

  7. Delivering maximum clinical benefit at an affordable price: engaging stakeholders in cancer care.

    Kelly, Ronan J; Smith, Thomas J

    2014-03-01

    Cancer costs continue to increase alarmingly despite much debate about how they can be reduced. The oncology community needs to take greater responsibility for our own practice patterns, especially when using expensive tests and treatments with marginal value: we cannot continue to accept novel therapeutics with very small benefits for exorbitant prices. Patients, payers, and pharmaceutical communities should be constructively engaged to communicate medically and economically possible goals, and eventually, to reduce use and costs. Diagnostic tests and treatments should have to show true value to be added to existing protocols. In this article, we discuss three key drivers of costs: end-of-life care patterns, medical imaging, and drugs. We propose health-care models that have the potential to decrease costs and discuss solutions to maintain clinical benefit at an affordable price. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Increasing clinical relevance in oral radiology: Benefits and challenges when implementing digital assessment.

    de Lange, T; Møystad, A; Torgersen, G R

    2018-02-13

    The aims of the study were to investigate benefits and challenges in implementing a digital examination and study the clinical relevance of the digital examination in relation to clinical training and practice. The study was based on semi-structured focus-group interviews from two distinct student populations (2016 and 2017) in a bachelor programme in dental hygiene. In addition, conversational data from a plenary discussion from the whole second student population (2017) were collected and analysed. The data were approached on basis of content analysis. A benefit experienced in the digital examination was the ease in typing and editing answers on the computer. This suggests an increased effectiveness in computer-based compared to analogue examinations. An additional advantage was the experienced relevance of the examination related to the clinic. This finding refers not only to the digital presentations of images, but also to the entire setting in the clinic and dental practice. The limitations reported by the students were non-optimal viewing conditions for presenting radiographic images and difficulties in obtaining an overview of the assignments compared to paper-based examinations due to the linear digital examination format. The last finding on lacking overview revealed an influence on student performances which should be taken seriously in designing digital examinations. In conclusion, the digital layout increases efficiency and clinical relevance of examinations to a certain extent. Obstacles were found in limitations related to image presentation and lack of overview of the examination. The latter challenge raises questions related to developing suitable assessment software. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. How Sustainable are Benefits from Global Production Networks? Malaysia's Upgrading Prospects in the Electronics Industry

    Dieter Ernst

    2003-01-01

    The paper introduces an operational definition of industrial upgrading (IU and documents the emergence of complex, multi-tier "networks of networks" which provide new opportunities for IU, but which also raise threshold requirements for participating in these networks. I highlight structural weaknesses of the Malaysian electronics industry that constrain its upgrading prospects; assess current policies that try to link cluster development and global network integration; discuss adjustments in...

  10. GHG Mitigation Potential, Costs and Benefits in Global Forests: ADynamic Partial Equilibrium Approach

    Sathaye, Jayant; Makundi, Willy; Dale, Larry; Chan, Peter; Andrasko, Kenneth

    2005-03-22

    This paper reports on the global potential for carbonsequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbonemissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenariosfrom 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typicallyseen in global integrated assessment models. The world forest sector wasdisaggregated into tenregions, four largely temperate, developedregions: the European Union, Oceania, Russia, and the United States; andsix developing, mostly tropical, regions: Africa, Central America, China,India, Rest of Asia, and South America. Three mitigation options -- long-and short-rotation forestry, and the reduction of deforestation -- wereanalyzed using a global dynamic partial equilibrium model (GCOMAP). Keyfindings of this work are that cumulative carbon gain ranges from 50.9 to113.2 Gt C by 2100, higher carbon prices early lead to earlier carbongain and vice versa, and avoided deforestation accounts for 51 to 78percent of modeled carbon gains by 2100. The estimated present value ofcumulative welfare change in the sector ranges from a decline of $158billion to a gain of $81 billion by 2100. The decline is associated witha decrease in deforestation.

  11. Benefits of economic criteria for water scarcity management under global changes: insights from a large-scale hydroeconomic framework

    Neverre, Noémie; Dumas, Patrice; Nassopoulos, Hypatia

    2016-04-01

    Global changes are expected to exacerbate water scarcity issues in the Mediterranean region in the next decades. In this work, we investigate the impacts of reservoirs operation rules based on an economic criterion. We examine whether can they help reduce the costs of water scarcity, and whether they become more relevant under future climatic and socioeconomic conditions. We develop an original hydroeconomic model able to compare future water supply and demand on a large scale, while representing river basin heterogeneity. On the demand side, we focus on the two main sectors of water use: the irrigation and domestic sectors. Demands are projected in terms of both quantity and economic value. Irrigation requirements are computed for 12 types of crops, at the 0.5° spatial resolution, under future climatic conditions (A1B scenario). The computation of the economic benefits of irrigation water is based on a yield comparison approach between rainfed and irrigated crops. For the domestic sector, we project the combined effects of demographic growth, economic development and water cost evolution on future demands. The economic value of domestic water is defined as the economic surplus. On the supply side, we evaluate the impacts of climate change on water inflows to the reservoirs. Operating rules of the reservoirs are set up using a parameterisation-simulation-optimisation approach. The objective is to maximise water benefits. We introduce prudential parametric rules in order to take into account spatial and temporal trade-offs. The methodology is applied to Algeria at the 2050 horizon. Overall, our results show that the supply-demand imbalance and its costs will increase in most basins under future climatic and socioeconomic conditions. Our results suggest that the benefits of operating rules based on economic criteria are not unequivocally increased with global changes: in some basins the positive impact of economic prioritisation is higher under future conditions

  12. Report on OCDE’s tax bases erosion and shifting benefits: origin and implementation within international and global framework

    Fernando Serrano Antón

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This work is intended to analyze circumstances leading to OCDE’s report on tax bases erosion and shifting benefits. Inconsistency of tax systems and unilateralism in current economic globalization framework might have led to asymmetric tax situations, mostly exploited by multinational companies. Means and tools used and proposed by several international institutions in order to implement legally binding actions through soft law and acceptance by different countries as method used in the fight against tax avoidance and fraud are also discussed.

  13. Perceived Benefits of Pre-Clinical Simulation-based Training on Clinical Learning Outcomes among Omani Undergraduate Nursing Students

    Girija Madhavanprabhakaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to explore the benefits perceived by Omani undergraduate maternity nursing students regarding the effect of pre-clinical simulation-based training (PSBT on clinical learning outcomes. Methods: This non-experimental quantitative survey was conducted between August and December 2012 among third-year baccalaureate nursing students at Sultan Qaboos University in Muscat, Oman. Voluntary participants were exposed to faculty-guided PSBT sessions using low- and medium-fidelity manikins, standardised scenarios and skill checklists on antenatal, intranatal, postnatal and newborn care and assessment. Participants answered a purposely designed self-administered questionnaire on the benefits of PSBT in enhancing learning outcomes. Items were categorised into six subscales: knowledge, skills, patient safety, academic safety, confidence and satisfaction. Scores were rated on a four-point Likert scale. Results: Of the 57 participants, the majority (95.2% agreed that PSBT enhanced their knowledge. Most students (94.3% felt that their patient safety practices improved and 86.5% rated PSBT as beneficial for enhancing skill competencies. All male students and 97% of the female students agreed that PSBT enhanced their confidence in the safe holding of newborns. Moreover, 93% of participants were satisfied with PSBT. Conclusion: Omani undergraduate nursing students perceived that PSBT enhanced their knowledge, skills, patient safety practices and confidence levels in providing maternity care. These findings support the use of simulation training as a strategy to facilitate clinical learning outcomes in future nursing courses in Oman, although further research is needed to explore the objective impact of PSBT on learning outcomes.

  14. Sustainable Benefits of a Community Hospital-Based Paediatric Asthma Clinic.

    Kuzik, Brian A; Chen, Chee P; Hansen, Miriam J; Montgomery, Paula L

    2017-01-01

    In 2011, we reported that our paediatric asthma clinic (PAC) appeared to significantly reduce the burden of paediatric asthma in our community. Supported by these results, the PAC underwent a gradual threefold expansion while maintaining the same model of care. We now report on the outcome of that expansion and demonstrate that our PAC continues to significantly reduce the burden of paediatric asthma in our community. As previously, newly enrolled PAC patients continue to show a 12-month reduction in asthma-related emergency department (ED) visits and admissions exceeding 60% and 80%, respectively. This consistent short-term benefit, coupled with clinic expansion, has contributed to a significant improvement in our rate of paediatric asthma-related ED visits or hospitalizations when compared to other Ontario hospitals.

  15. POSTSURGICAL RECURRENT CUSHING DISEASE: CLINICAL BENEFIT OF EARLY INTERVENTION IN PATIENTS WITH NORMAL URINARY FREE CORTISOL.

    Carroll, Ty B; Javorsky, Bradley R; Findling, James W

    2016-10-01

    To assess the performance of biochemical markers in the detection of recurrent Cushing disease (CD), as well as the potential benefit of early intervention in recurrent CD patients with elevated late-night salivary cortisol (LNSC) and normal urinary free cortisol (UFC). The design was a single-center, retrospective chart review. Patients treated by the authors from 2008-2013 were included. Recurrence was defined by postsurgical remission of CD with subsequent abnormal LNSC, UFC, or dexamethasone suppression test (DST). We identified 15 patients with postsurgical recurrent CD after initial remission; all but one underwent testing with LNSC, DST, and UFC. Although 12 of 15 patients had normal UFC at time of recurrence, DST was abnormal in 11 of 15, and all 14 patients with LNSC results had ≥1 elevated measurement. Nine patients (7 with normal UFC) showed radiologic evidence of a pituitary tumor at time of recurrence. Among the 14 patients with available follow-up data, 12 have demonstrated significant improvement since receiving treatment. Five patients underwent repeat pituitary surgery and 4 achieved clinical and biochemical remission. Eight patients received mifepristone or cabergoline, and 6 showed clinical and/or biochemical improvement. Three patients (2 with prior mifepristone) underwent bilateral adrenalectomy and 2 demonstrated significant clinical improvements. LNSC is more sensitive than UFC or DST for detection of CD recurrence. Prompt intervention when LNSC is elevated, despite normal UFC, may yield significant clinical benefit for many patients with CD. Early treatment for patients with recurrent CD should be prospectively evaluated, utilizing LNSC elevation as an early biochemical marker. ACTH = adrenocorticotropic hormone CD = Cushing disease CS = Cushing syndrome CV = coefficient of variation DST = dexamethasone suppression test IPSS = inferior petrosal sinus sampling LNSC = late-night salivary cortisol QoL = quality of life TSS = transsphenoidal

  16. Clinical benefit from ipilimumab therapy in melanoma patients may be associated with serum CTLA4 levels

    Anna M. Leung

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Stage IV metastatic melanoma patients historically have a poor prognosis with 5-10% 5-year survival. Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody against cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4, is one of the first treatments to provide beneficial durable responses in advanced melanoma. However, less than 25% of those treated benefit, treatment is expensive, and side effects can be fatal. Since soluble (s CTLA4 may mediate inhibitory effects previously ascribed to the membrane-bound isoform (mCTLA4, we hypothesized patients benefiting from ipilimumab have higher serum levels of sCTLA4. We found that higher sCTLA4 levels correlated both with response and improved survival in patients treated with ipilimumab in a small patient cohort (patients with (n=9 and without (n=5 clinical benefit. sCTLA4 levels were statistically higher in ipilimumab-treated patients with response to ipilimumab. In contrast, sCTLA4 levels did not correlate with survival in patients who did not receive ipilimumab (n=11. These preliminary observations provide a previously unrecognized link between serum sCTLA-4 levels and response to ipilimumab as well as to improved survival in ipilimumab-treated melanoma patients and a potential mechanism by which ipilimumab functions.

  17. Korean Cancer Patients' Awareness of Clinical Trials, Perceptions on the Benefit and Willingness to Participate.

    Lim, Yoojoo; Lim, Jee Min; Jeong, Won Jae; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Keam, Bhumsuk; Kim, Tae-Yong; Kim, Tae Min; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do Youn; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Tae-You; Heo, Dae Seog; Bang, Yung-Jue; Im, Seock-Ah

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess current levels of awareness of clinical trials (CTs), perceptions regarding their benefits and willingness to participate to CTs among Korean cancer patients. From December 2012 to August 2015, we distributed questionnaires to cancer patients receiving systemic anti-cancer therapy at Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea. A total of 397 out of 520 requested patients (76.3%) responded to the survey. Among the 397 patients, 62.5% were female and the median age was 52 years. Overall, 97.4% (387/397) answered that they have at least heard of CTs. When asked about their level of awareness, 23.8% (92/387) answered that they could more than roughly explain about CTs. The average visual analogue scale score of CT benefit in all patients was 6.43 (standard deviation, 2.20). Patients who were only familiar with the term without detailed knowledge of the contents had the least expectation of benefit from CTs (p=0.015). When asked about their willingness to participate in CTs, 56.7% (225/397) answered positively. Patients with higher levels of awareness of CTs showed higher willingness to participate (p awareness regarding CTs was positively related to the positive perception and willingness to participate. Although the general awareness of CTs was high, a relatively large proportion of patients did not have accurate knowledge; therefore, proper and accurate patient education is necessary.

  18. Korean Cancer Patients’ Awareness of Clinical Trials, Perceptions on the Benefit and Willingness to Participate

    Lim, Yoojoo; Lim, Jee Min; Jeong, Won Jae; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Keam, Bhumsuk; Kim, Tae-Yong; Kim, Tae Min; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do Youn; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Tae-You; Heo, Dae Seog; Bang, Yung-Jue; Im, Seock-Ah

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess current levels of awareness of clinical trials (CTs), perceptions regarding their benefits and willingness to participate to CTs among Korean cancer patients. Materials and Methods From December 2012 to August 2015, we distributed questionnaires to cancer patients receiving systemic anti-cancer therapy at Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea. Results A total of 397 out of 520 requested patients (76.3%) responded to the survey. Among the 397 patients, 62.5% were female and the median age was 52 years. Overall, 97.4% (387/397) answered that they have at least heard of CTs. When asked about their level of awareness, 23.8% (92/387) answered that they could more than roughly explain about CTs. The average visual analogue scale score of CT benefit in all patients was 6.43 (standard deviation, 2.20). Patients who were only familiar with the term without detailed knowledge of the contents had the least expectation of benefit from CTs (p=0.015). When asked about their willingness to participate in CTs, 56.7% (225/397) answered positively. Patients with higher levels of awareness of CTs showed higher willingness to participate (p awareness regarding CTs was positively related to the positive perception and willingness to participate. Although the general awareness of CTs was high, a relatively large proportion of patients did not have accurate knowledge; therefore, proper and accurate patient education is necessary. PMID:28392549

  19. The Globalization of Pediatric Research: An Analysis of Clinical Trials Completed for Pediatric Exclusivity

    Pasquali, Sara K.; Burstein, Danielle S.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Smith, P. Brian; Li, Jennifer S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies have examined the globalization of clinical research. These studies focused on adult trials, and the globalization of pediatric research has not been examined to date. We evaluated the setting of published studies conducted under the US Pediatric Exclusivity Program, which provides economic incentives to pharmaceutical companies to conduct drug studies in children. Methods Published studies containing the main results of trials conducted from 1998–2007 under the Pediatric Exclusivity Provision were included. Data were extracted from each study and described, including the therapeutic area of drug studied, number of patients enrolled, number of sites, and location where the study was conducted, if reported. Results Overall, 174 trials were included (sample size 8–27,065 patients); 9% did not report any information regarding the location or number of sites where the study was conducted. Of those that did report this information, 65% were conducted in at least one country outside the US, and 11% did not have any sites in the US. Fifty-four different countries were represented and 38% of trials enrolled patients in at least one site located in a developing/transition country, including more than one third of infectious disease, cardiovascular, and allergy/immunology trials. Conclusions The majority of published pediatric trials conducted under the Pediatric Exclusivity Provision included sites outside of the US, and over a third of trials enrolled patients in developing/transition countries. While there are many potential benefits to the globalization of pediatric research, this trend also raises certain scientific and ethical concerns which require further evaluation. PMID:20732941

  20. [Secondary benefits of cognitive rehabilitation for a chronic ethylic patient: effects on disorder consciousness, motivation, and global therapeutic cooperation].

    Siccardi, L; Vautel-Pons, D; dos Santos, M Teixera; Camus, N; Louchart de la Chapelle, S

    2014-06-01

    Alcoholism causes psychological, behavioral and cognitive symptoms that need to be addressed together. The neuropsychological alterations among alcohol-dependent people are considered to make the therapeutic work complex and longer. A cognitive rehabilitation program is sometimes difficult to achieve with these patients. Functional results are often difficult to anticipate. However, the consequences of this therapeutic approach are multiple and there are many interactions between psycho-affective, behavioral and cognitive components. A neuropsychological approach can be used like a tool to improve metacognition. A bad contribution to treatment programs is often secondary to the illusion of a satisfying intellectual functioning. Patients' motivation for the therapeutic work is very changeable. A complete consciousness of impairments can help them to stay involved. The following case shows the cognitive effects and secondary benefits associated with a neuropsychological work, which was carried out by a chronic ethylic patient with severe physical and cognitive symptoms. The patient aged 50, with a good qualification level (scientific section in the final year of secondary school, with no diploma, then attended a training program to become a croupier) was suffering from chronic alcoholism since his adolescence. He arrived in the closed unit after many hospitalizations in psychiatric and hepato-gastroenterology units. He had been showing mental confusion. He presented a frontal and subcortical profile of alcohol-related dementia according to Oslin's criteria. MRI revealed global cerebral atrophy, more pronounced on the fronto-parietal cortex with cerebellar leukoencephalopathy, but no pontine central myelinolysis. The neurocognitive program had two main lines: reducing attentional, executive and graphical deficits with training exercises (individual and group sessions) and compensating memory, and executive disorders with an external aid. The cognitive program had been

  1. Benefits, pitfalls and risks of phytotherapy in clinical practice in otorhinolaryngology.

    Laccourreye, O; Werner, A; Laccourreye, L; Bonfils, P

    2017-04-01

    To elucidate the benefits, pitfalls and risks of phytotherapy in the clinical practice of otorhinolaryngology. The PubMed and Cochrane databases were searched using the following keywords: phytotherapy, phytomedicine, herbs, otology, rhinology, laryngology, otitis, rhinitis, laryngitis and otorhinolaryngology. Seventy-two articles (18 prospective randomized studies, 4 Cochrane analyses, 4 meta-analysis and 15 reviews of the literature) devoted to clinical studies were analyzed. Articles devoted to in vitro or animal studies, biochemical analyses or case reports (including fewer than 10 patients) and articles dealing with honey, aromatherapy or minerals were excluded. Per os ginkgo biloba has no indications in tinnitus, presbycusis or anosmia following viral rhinitis. Traditional Asian medicine has no proven benefit in sudden deafness or laryngeal papillomatosis. Per os mistletoe extracts associated to conventional treatment for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma does not increase 5-year survival. Extracts of various herbs, notably echinacea, eucalyptus, petasites hybridus, pelargonium sidoides, rosemary, spirulina and thyme, show superiority over placebo for rhinosinusitis and allergic rhinitis, as does gingko biloba for selected vertigo. There have been encouraging preliminary results for intratumoral injection of mistletoe in head and neck carcinoma and acupoint herbal patching for allergic rhinitis. Herb intake should be screened for in case of certain unexplained symptoms such as epistaxis, headache or dizziness, or signs suggesting allergy. Phytotherapy should be interrupted ahead of surgery and/or chemotherapy. Scientific proof of the benefit of phytotherapy in otorhinolaryngology remains to be established but, given its widespread use and the reported data, knowledge of this form of treatment needs to be developed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Development and psychometric evaluation of a clinical global impression for schizoaffective disorder scale.

    Allen, Michael H; Daniel, David G; Revicki, Dennis A; Canuso, Carla M; Turkoz, Ibrahim; Fu, Dong-Jing; Alphs, Larry; Ishak, K Jack; Bartko, John J; Lindenmayer, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The Clinical Global Impression for Schizoaffective Disorder scale is a new rating scale adapted from the Clinical Global Impression scale for use in patients with schizoaffective disorder. The psychometric characteristics of the Clinical Global Impression for Schizoaffective Disorder are described. Content validity was assessed using an investigator questionnaire. Inter-rater reliability was determined with 12 sets of videotaped interviews rated independently by two trained individuals. Test-retest reliability was assessed using 30 randomly selected raters from clinical trials who evaluated the same videos on separate occasions two weeks apart. Convergent and divergent validity and effect size were evaluated by comparing scores between the Clinical Global Impression for Schizoaffective Disorder and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, 21-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and Young Mania Rating Scale scales using pooled patient data from two clinical trials. Clinical Global Impression for Schizoaffective Disorder scores were then linked to corresponding Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale scores. Content validity was strong. Inter-rater agreement was good to excellent for most scales and subscales (intra-class correlation coefficient ≥ 0.50). Test-retest showed good reproducibility, with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.444 to 0.898. Spearman correlations between Clinical Global Impression for Schizoaffective Disorder domains and corresponding symptom scales were 0.60 or greater, and effect sizes for Clinical Global Impression for Schizoaffective Disorder overall and domain scores were similar to Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale Young Mania Rating Scale, and 21-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression scores. Raters anticipated that the scale might be less effective in distinguishing negative from depressive symptoms, and, in fact, the results here may reflect that clinical reality. Multiple lines of evidence support the

  3. EGO: Towards a global glider infrastructure for the benefit of marine research and operational oceanography

    Testor, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    In the 1990 s, while gliders were being developed and successfully passing first tests, their potential use for ocean research started to be discussed in international conferences because they could help us improve the cost-effectiveness, sampling, and distribution of the ocean observations (see OceanObs'99 Conference Statement - UNESCO). After the prototype phase, in the 2000 s, one could only witness the growing glider activity throughout the world. The first glider experiments in Europe brought together several teams that were interested in the technology and a consortium formed naturally from these informal collaborations. Since 2006, Everyone's Gliding Observatories (EGO - http://www.ego-network.org) Workshops and Glider Schools have been organized, whilst becoming the international forum for glider activities. Some key challenges have emerged from the expansion of the glider system and require now setting up a sustainable European as well as a global system to operate glider and to ensure a smooth and sustained link to the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS). Glider technology faces many scientific, technological and logistical issues. In particular, it approaches the challenge of controlling many steerable probes in a variable environment for better sampling. It also needs the development of new formats and procedures in order to build glider observatories at a global level. Several geographically distributed teams of oceanographers now operate gliders, and there is a risk of fragmentation. We will here present results from our consortium who intends to solve most of these issues through scientific and technological coordination and networking. This approach is supported by the ESF through Cooperation in the field of Scientific and Technical Research (COST). The COST Action ES0904 "EGO" started in July 2010 aiming to build international cooperation and capacities at the scientific, technological, and organizational levels, for sustained observations of the

  4. The benefits of global scaling in multi-criteria decision analysis

    Jamie P. Monat

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available When there are multiple competing objectives in a decision-making process, Multi-Attribute Choice scoring models are excellent tools, permitting the incorporation of both subjective and objective attributes. However, their accuracy depends upon the subjective techniques used to construct the attribute scales and their concomitant weights. Conventional techniques using local scales tend to overemphasize small differences in attribute measures, which may yield erroneous conclusions. The Range Sensitivity Principle (RSP is often invoked to adjust attribute weights when local scales are used. In practice, however, decision makers often do not follow the prescriptions of the Range Sensitivity Principle and under-adjust the weights, resulting in potentially poor decisions. Examples are discussed as is a proposed solution: the use of global scales instead of local scales.

  5. Calculating Clinically Significant Change: Applications of the Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) Scale to Evaluate Client Outcomes in Private Practice

    Kelly, Peter James

    2010-01-01

    The Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) scale is a therapist-rated measure of client outcome that has been widely used within the research literature. The current study aimed to develop reliable and clinically significant change indices for the CGI, and to demonstrate its application in private psychological practice. Following the guidelines…

  6. Humidification during laparoscopic surgery: overview of the clinical benefits of using humidified gas during laparoscopic surgery.

    Binda, Maria Mercedes

    2015-11-01

    The peritoneum is the serous membrane that covers the abdominal cavity and most of the intra-abdominal organs. It is a very delicate layer highly susceptible to damage and it is not designed to cope with variable conditions such as the dry and cold carbon dioxide (CO2) during laparoscopic surgery. The aim of this review was to evaluate the effects caused by insufflating dry and cold gas into the abdominal cavity after laparoscopic surgery. A literature search using the Pubmed was carried out. Articles identified focused on the key issues of laparoscopy, peritoneum, morphology, pneumoperitoneum, humidity, body temperature, pain, recovery time, post-operative adhesions and lens fogging. Insufflating dry and cold CO2 into the abdomen causes peritoneal damage, post-operative pain, hypothermia and post-operative adhesions. Using humidified and warm gas prevents pain after surgery. With regard to hypothermia due to desiccation, it can be fully prevented using humidified and warm gas. Results relating to the patient recovery are still controversial. The use of humidified and warm insufflation gas offers a significant clinical benefit to the patient, creating a more physiologic peritoneal environment and reducing the post-operative pain and hypothermia. In animal models, although humidified and warm gas reduces post-operative adhesions, humidified gas at 32 °C reduced them even more. It is clear that humidified gas should be used during laparoscopic surgery; however, a question remains unanswered: to achieve even greater clinical benefit to the patient, at what temperature should the humidified gas be when insufflated into the abdomen? More clinical trials should be performed to resolve this query.

  7. The influence of spatial resolution on human health risk co-benefit estimates for global climate policy assessments.

    Shih, Hsiu-Ching; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Ma, Hwong-wen

    2015-03-15

    Assessment of the ability of climate policies to produce desired improvements in public health through co-benefits of air pollution reduction can consume resources in both time and research funds. These resources increase significantly as the spatial resolution of models increases. In addition, the level of spatial detail available in macroeconomic models at the heart of climate policy assessments is much lower than that available in traditional human health risk modeling. It is therefore important to determine whether increasing spatial resolution considerably affects risk-based decisions; which kinds of decisions might be affected; and under what conditions they will be affected. Human health risk co-benefits from carbon emissions reductions that bring about concurrent reductions in Particulate Matter (PM10) emissions is therefore examined here at four levels of spatial resolution (Uniform Nation, Uniform Region, Uniform County/city, Health Risk Assessment) in a case study of Taiwan as one of the geographic regions of a global macroeceonomic model, with results that are representative of small, industrialized nations within that global model. A metric of human health risk mortality (YOLL, years of life lost in life expectancy) is compared under assessments ranging from a "uniform simulation" in which there is no spatial resolution of changes in ambient air concentration under a policy to a "highly spatially resolved simulation" (called here Health Risk Assessment). PM10 is chosen in this study as the indicator of air pollution for which risks are assessed due to its significance as a co-benefit of carbon emissions reductions within climate mitigation policy. For the policy examined, the four estimates of mortality in the entirety of Taiwan are 747 YOLL, 834 YOLL, 984 YOLL and 916 YOLL, under Uniform Taiwan, Uniform Region, Uniform County and Health Risk Assessment respectively; or differences of 18%, 9%, 7% if the HRA methodology is taken as the baseline. While

  8. Do benefits accrue from longer rotations for students in Rural Clinical Schools?

    Denz-Penhey, Harriet; Shannon, Susan; Murdoch, Campbell J; Newbury, Jonathon W

    2005-01-01

    The Australian Government has provided funding for Rural Clinical Schools (RCS) to provide substantial rural clinical experience to medical students. The strategy aims to acculturate students into rural living with the intended long-term outcome of increasing the availability and viability of rural health services. When evaluators from two of the Rural Clinical Schools discussed findings and insights relating to rural rotations from their in-depth evaluation studies of their respective schools they found a range of similarities. This article is a collaboration that articulates parallel findings from evaluations over 2 years, using three different approaches to students' placements across the two RCS: (1) students based long term in one centre (with only a few days away at a time); (2) students based long term in one centre with short-term rotations of 3-6 weeks away from home base; and (3) week rotations without a home base. The two RCS, as part of their initial establishment, put comprehensive internal evaluation processes in place, including the employment of dedicated evaluators extant from the teaching and assessment of the rural medical curriculum. Data were collected and analysed according to standard education evaluation procedures. Home-base preference: most students preferred having a home base in one centre and having as little time as possible away from that centre, while recognising that sometimes the requirement to go and learn elsewhere was useful. The reasons for this were three-fold: academic, clinical and social. Academic benefits: students enjoyed the excellence of teaching and learning opportunities in their rural sites and did not want their discipline of learning interrupted by what they perceived as unnecessary change. Students with a home base used their learning opportunities qualitatively differently from those students who had 6 week rotations. Their learning became self-directed and students sought opportunities to extend and consolidate

  9. Biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored global clinical trials in emerging countries.

    Alvarenga, Lenio Souza; Martins, Elisabeth Nogueira

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials placed in countries previously described as emerging regions for clinical research, and potential differences for those placed in Brazil. Data regarding recruitment of subjects for clinical trials were retrieved from www.clinicaltrials.gov on February 2nd 2009. Proportions of sites in each country were compared among emerging countries. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to evaluate whether trial placement in Brazil could be predicted by trial location in other countries and/or by trial features. A total of 8,501 trials were then active and 1,170 (13.8%) included sites in emerging countries (i.e., Argentina, Brazil, China, Czech Republic, Hungary, India, Mexico, Poland, Russia, South Korea, and South Africa). South Korea and China presented a significantly higher proportion of sites when compared to other countries (pattractiveness for biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials.

  10. A systematic review on clinical benefits of continuous administration of beta-lactam antibiotics.

    Roberts, Jason A; Webb, Steven; Paterson, David; Ho, Kwok M; Lipman, Jeffrey

    2009-06-01

    The clinical benefits of extended infusion or continuous infusion of beta-lactam antibiotics remain controversial. We systematically reviewed the literature to determine whether any clinical benefits exist for administration of beta-lactam antibiotics by extended or continuous infusion. PubMed (January 1950 to November 2007), EMBASE (1966 to November 2007), and the Cochrane Controlled Trial Register were searched (updated November 2007). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were meta-analyzed, and observational studies were described by two unblinded reviewers. A total of 846 patients from eligible prospective randomized controlled studies were included in the meta-analysis. Two observational studies were deemed appropriate for description. A meta-analysis of prospective RCTs was undertaken using Review Manager. Among a total of 59 potentially relevant studies, 14 RCTs involving a total of 846 patients from nine countries were deemed appropriate for meta-analysis. The use of continuous infusion of a beta-lactam antibiotic was not associated with an improvement in clinical cure (n = 755 patients; odds ratio: 1.04, 95% confidence interval: 0.74-1.46, p = 0.83, I = 0%) or mortality (n = 541 patients; odds ratio: 1.00, 95% confidence interval: 0.48-2.06, p = 1.00, I = 14.8%). All RCTs except one used a higher antibiotic dose in the bolus administration group. Two observational studies, not pooled because they did not meet the a priori criteria for meta-analysis, showed that beta-lactam administration by extended or continuous infusion was associated with an improvement in clinical cure. The difference in the results between the meta-analysis results and the observational studies could be explained by the bias created by a higher dose of antibiotic in the bolus group in the RCTs and because many of the RCTs only recruited patients with a low acuity of illness. The limited data available suggest that continuous infusion of beta-lactam antibiotics leads to the same

  11. Chyawanprash: A review of therapeutic benefits as in authoritative texts and documented clinical literature.

    Narayana, D B Anantha; Durg, Sharanbasappa; Manohar, P Ram; Mahapatra, Anita; Aramya, A R

    2017-02-02

    Chyawanprash (CP), a traditional immune booster recipe, has a long history of ethnic origin, development, household preparation and usage. There are even mythological stories about the origin of this recipe including its nomenclature. In the last six decades, CP, because of entrepreneurial actions of some research Vaidyas (traditional doctors) has grown to industrial production and marketing in packed forms to a large number of consumers/patients like any food or health care product. Currently, CP has acquired a large accepted user base in India and in a few countries out-side India. Authoritative texts, recognized by the Drugs and Cosmetics Act of India, describe CP as an immunity enhancer and strength giver meant for improving lung functions in diseases with compromised immunity. This review focuses on published clinical efficacy and safety studies of CP for correlation with health benefits as documented in the authoritative texts, and also briefs on its recipes and processes. Authoritative texts were searched for recipes, processes, and other technical details of CP. Labels of marketing CP products (Indian) were studied for the health claims. Electronic search for studies of CP on efficacy and safety data were performed in PubMed/MEDLINE and DHARA (Digital Helpline for Ayurveda Research Articles), and Ayurvedic books were also searched for clinical studies. The documented clinical studies from electronic databases and Ayurvedic books evidenced that individuals who consume CP regularly for a definite period of time showed improvement in overall health status and immunity. However, most of the clinical studies in this review are of smaller sample size and short duration. Further, limitation to access and review significant data on traditional products like CP in electronic databases was noted. Randomized controlled trials of high quality with larger sample size and longer follow-up are needed to have significant evidence on the clinical use of CP as immunity

  12. Current Global Pricing For Human Papillomavirus Vaccines Brings The Greatest Economic Benefits To Rich Countries.

    Herlihy, Niamh; Hutubessy, Raymond; Jit, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Vaccinating females against human papillomavirus (HPV) prior to the debut of sexual activity is an effective way to prevent cervical cancer, yet vaccine uptake in low- and middle-income countries has been hindered by high vaccine prices. We created an economic model to estimate the distribution of the economic surplus-the sum of all health and economic benefits of a vaccine, minus the costs of development, production, and distribution-among different country income groups and manufacturers for a cohort of twelve-year-old females in 2012. We found that manufacturers may have received economic returns worth five times their original investment in HPV vaccine development. High-income countries gained the greatest economic surplus of any income category, realizing over five times more economic value per vaccinated female than low-income countries did. Subsidizing vaccine prices in low- and middle-income countries could both reduce financial barriers to vaccine adoption and still allow high-income countries to retain their economic surpluses and manufacturers to retain their profits. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  13. Review of nanomaterials in dentistry: interactions with the oral microenvironment, clinical applications, hazards, and benefits.

    Besinis, Alexandros; De Peralta, Tracy; Tredwin, Christopher J; Handy, Richard D

    2015-03-24

    Interest in the use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) as either nanomedicines or dental materials/devices in clinical dentistry is growing. This review aims to detail the ultrafine structure, chemical composition, and reactivity of dental tissues in the context of interactions with ENMs, including the saliva, pellicle layer, and oral biofilm; then describes the applications of ENMs in dentistry in context with beneficial clinical outcomes versus potential risks. The flow rate and quality of saliva are likely to influence the behavior of ENMs in the oral cavity, but how the protein corona formed on the ENMs will alter bioavailability, or interact with the structure and proteins of the pellicle layer, as well as microbes in the biofilm, remains unclear. The tooth enamel is a dense crystalline structure that is likely to act as a barrier to ENM penetration, but underlying dentinal tubules are not. Consequently, ENMs may be used to strengthen dentine or regenerate pulp tissue. ENMs have dental applications as antibacterials for infection control, as nanofillers to improve the mechanical and bioactive properties of restoration materials, and as novel coatings on dental implants. Dentifrices and some related personal care products are already available for oral health applications. Overall, the clinical benefits generally outweigh the hazards of using ENMs in the oral cavity, and the latter should not prevent the responsible innovation of nanotechnology in dentistry. However, the clinical safety regulations for dental materials have not been specifically updated for ENMs, and some guidance on occupational health for practitioners is also needed. Knowledge gaps for future research include the formation of protein corona in the oral cavity, ENM diffusion through clinically relevant biofilms, and mechanistic investigations on how ENMs strengthen the tooth structure.

  14. Can Small Countries Benefit from the E-waste Global Value Chain?

    Meine Pieter, Dijk van

    2016-01-01

    E-waste is a term used to cover items of all types of electrical and electronic equipment and its parts that have been discarded by the owners as waste without the intention of re-use, because this equipment has ceased to be of any value to its owners. E-waste is one of the fastestgrowing waste streams globally. Since the Rio Summit Earth summit organized by the United Nations in 1992, the concept of sustainability extends to rendering basic services such as Solid Waste Management and dealing with e-waste. People are afraid of e-waste because of its possible negative effects on health and because it could pollute the environment. Indicators of unsustainable service provision concerninge-waste include irregular collection, open dumping, burning of solid and e-waste in open spaces. Often collection covers a small part of the country, cost recovery is limited or not existent, and one notes poor utilization of available resources with no or very limited reuse and recycling

  15. Benefits of Leapfrogging to Superefficiency and Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants in Room Air Conditioning

    Shah, Nihar K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wei, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Letschert, Virginie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Phadke, Amol A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) emitted from uses such as refrigerants and thermal insulating foam, are now the fastest growing greenhouse gases (GHGs), with global warming potentials (GWP) thousands of times higher than carbon dioxide (CO2). Because of the short lifetime of these molecules in the atmosphere,1 mitigating the amount of these short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) provides a faster path to climate change mitigation than control of CO2 alone. This has led to proposals from Africa, Europe, India, Island States, and North America to amend the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (Montreal Protocol) to phase-down high-GWP HFCs. Simultaneously, energy efficiency market transformation programs such as standards, labeling and incentive programs are endeavoring to improve the energy efficiency for refrigeration and air conditioning equipment to provide life cycle cost, energy, GHG, and peak load savings. In this paper we provide an estimate of the magnitude of such GHG and peak electric load savings potential, for room air conditioning, if the refrigerant transition and energy efficiency improvement policies are implemented either separately or in parallel.

  16. Global Precipitation Measurement. Report 2; Benefits of Partnering with GPM Mission

    Stocker, Erich F.; Smith, Eric A. (Editor); Adams, W. James (Editor); Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An important goal of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is to maximize participation by non-NASA partners both domestic and international. A consequence of this objective is the provision for NASA to provide sufficient incentives to achieve partner buy-in and commitment to the program. NASA has identified seven specific areas in which substantive incentives will be offered: (1) partners will be offered participation in governance of GPM mission science affairs including definition of data products; (2) partners will be offered use of NASA's TDRSS capability for uplink and downlink of commands and data in regards to partner provided spacecraft; (3) partners will be offered launch support for placing partner provided spacecraft in orbit conditional upon mutually agreeable co-manifest arrangements; (4) partners will be offered direct data access at the NASA-GPM server level rather than through standard data distribution channels; (5) partners will be offered the opportunity to serve as regional data archive and distribution centers for standard GPM data products; and (6) partners will be offered the option to insert their own specialized filtering and extraction software into the GPM data processing stream or to obtain specialized subsets and products over specific areas of interest (7) partners will be offered GPM developed software tools that can be run on their platforms. Each of these incentives, either individually or in combination, represents a significant advantage to partners who may wish to participate in the GPM mission.

  17. Can Small Countries Benefit from the E-waste Global Value Chain?

    Meine Pieter, Dijk van, E-mail: mpvandijk@iss.nl [UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Erasmus University in Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-01-09

    E-waste is a term used to cover items of all types of electrical and electronic equipment and its parts that have been discarded by the owners as waste without the intention of re-use, because this equipment has ceased to be of any value to its owners. E-waste is one of the fastestgrowing waste streams globally. Since the Rio Summit Earth summit organized by the United Nations in 1992, the concept of sustainability extends to rendering basic services such as Solid Waste Management and dealing with e-waste. People are afraid of e-waste because of its possible negative effects on health and because it could pollute the environment. Indicators of unsustainable service provision concerninge-waste include irregular collection, open dumping, burning of solid and e-waste in open spaces. Often collection covers a small part of the country, cost recovery is limited or not existent, and one notes poor utilization of available resources with no or very limited reuse and recycling.

  18. Additionality of global benefits and financial additionality in the context of the AIJ negotiations

    Puhl, I.

    1996-12-31

    The Conference of the Party at their first meeting (COP1) took a decision regarding criteria for joint implementation as indicated in Art. 4.2 (a) of the FCCC which established a pilot phase for activities implemented jointly (AIJ) under the pilot phase. Besides some more technical issues this decision specified that such measures should bring about real, measurable and long-term environmental benefits related to the mitigation of climate change that would not have occurred in the absence of such activities. It also established that the financing of AIJ shall be additional to the financial obligations of developed country parties. These two requirements are called the additionality criteria for AIJ. The first refers to the realness of GHG emission abatement (which means reduction compared to a baseline) whereas the second describes that funds earmarked for AIJ have no other objective (i.e. profit making, export promotion) but to reduce GHG emissions to avoid the free-riding of investors and subsequently developed country parties. The reporting framework as well as the reporting requirements under national programs do not specify further the two types of additionality and even though research focuses on issues like baseline determination there has been no attempt so far to identify approaches which contribute towards defining strict and practicable methods and guidelines to frame additionality criteria. The first FCCC assessment of pilot project reporting revealed that in the reporting of activities, emissions additionality often remained unclear, especially in cases where AIJ was only a portion of an existing or already planned project, and that there is a point about how to account for financial additionality. It subsequently proposed to develop a uniform approach to baseline determination and the assessment of emission (reduction) additionality and financial additionality.

  19. Clinical Benefit of Valvular Surgery in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Chen, Yan; Au, Wing-Kuk; Chan, Daniel; Sit, Ko-Yung; Zhen, Zhe; Ho, Kar-Lai; Wong, Debbie; Ho, Lai-Ming; Yap, Desmond; Lam, Yui-Ming; Lau, Chu-Pak; Tse, Hung-Fat; Chan, Tak-Mao; Yiu, Kai-Hang

    2018-06-20

    Concomitant chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common in patients with significant valvular heart disease (VHD). This study sought to evaluate the clinical benefit of valvular surgery in patients with concomitant CKD.We evaluated 349 patients with significant VHD who were referred for surgery. Patients were divided into those with CKD stage ≥ 3 (CKD patients; n = 88) and those with CKD stage 1 or 2 (no CKD patients; n = 261). 63 patients did not receive surgery, of which 20 patients had CKD and 43 had no CKD. Mortality and change in eGFR were assessed after a median follow-up of 21 months.In the whole study population, 25% of the patients had CKD and these patients had higher mortality than those with no CKD. The annual mortality rates of patients with CKD who did and did not undergo surgery were 7.9% and 28.0%, respectively. In patients with no CKD, the annual mortality rates of those who did and did not undergo surgery were 1.8% and 2.3%, respectively. Importantly, surgery was associated with significant survival benefit in patients with CKD (log-rank test, P < 0.01), but was neutral in patients with no CKD. Multivariable analysis confirmed the survival benefit of valvular surgery in all patients, which was most significant in patients with CKD. Furthermore, eGFR was preserved in patients who underwent valvular surgery but declined significantly in those who did not.CKD is common in patients with significant VHD and, if left untreated surgically, these patients exhibit a high mortality.

  20. The Benefits and Limitations of Crowdsourced Information for Rapid Damage Assessment of Global Earthquakes

    Bossu, R.; Landès, M.; Roussel, F.

    2017-12-01

    The Internet has fastened the collection of felt reports and macroseismic data after global earthquakes. At the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC), where the traditional online questionnaires have been replace by thumbnail-based questionnaires, an average of half of the reports are collected within 10 minutes of an earthquake's occurrence. In regions where EMSC is well identified this goes down to 5 min. The user simply specifies the thumbnail corresponding to observed effects erasing languages barriers and improving collection via small smartphone screens. A previous study has shown that EMSC data is well correlated with "Did You Feel It" (DYFI) data and 3 independent, manually collected datasets. The efficiency and rapidity of felt report collection through thumbnail-based questionnaires does not necessarily mean that they offer a complete picture of the situation for all intensities values, especially the higher ones. There are several potential limitations. Demographics probably play a role but so might eyewitnesses' behaviors: it is probably not their priority to report when their own safety and that of their loved ones is at stake. We propose to test this hypothesis on EMSC felt reports and to extend the study to LastQuake smartphone application uses. LastQuake is a free smartphone app providing very rapid information on felt earthquakes. There are currently 210 000 active users around the world covering almost every country except for a few ones in Sub-Saharan Africa. Along with felt reports we also analyze the characteristics of LastQuake app launches. For both composite datasets created from 108 earthquakes, we analyze the rapidity of eyewitnesses' reaction and how it changes with intensity values and surmise how they reflect different types of behaviors. We will show the intrinsic limitations of crowdsourced information for rapid situation awareness. More importantly, we will show in which cases the lack of crowdsourced information could

  1. RELATIONAL NEEDS OF THE THERAPIST: COUNTERTRANSFERENCE, CLINICAL WORK AND SUPERVISION. BENEFITS AND DISRUPTIONS IN PSYCHOTHERAPY

    Lindsay Stewart

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Relational needs are the emotional needs which underlie our social connectedness and help sustain and nurture our attachments to others. In doing psychotherapy, therapists must be attuned not only to the needs of the client, but also to their own relational needs. Through self awareness and knowledge of healthy and appropriate boundaries, therapists can ensure the best interest of the client is kept foremost. In this article, the influence of the therapist’s own relational needs in the psychotherapy process is examined in terms of the possible benefits and disruptions to the client’s emotional growth. This is discussed in the context of the Integrative Psychotherapy model based on the core concepts of inquiry, involvement and attunement. Clinical supervision is seen as an important part of working through counter-transference.

  2. Advance MRI for pediatric brain tumors with emphasis on clinical benefits

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Ra, Young Shin [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Conventional anatomic brain MRI is often limited in evaluating pediatric brain tumors, the most common solid tumors and a leading cause of death in children. Advanced brain MRI techniques have great potential to improve diagnostic performance in children with brain tumors and overcome diagnostic pitfalls resulting from diverse tumor pathologies as well as nonspecific or overlapped imaging findings. Advanced MRI techniques used for evaluating pediatric brain tumors include diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI, perfusion imaging, spectroscopy, susceptibility-weighted imaging, and chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging. Because pediatric brain tumors differ from adult counterparts in various aspects, MRI protocols should be designed to achieve maximal clinical benefits in pediatric brain tumors. In this study, we review advanced MRI techniques and interpretation algorithms for pediatric brain tumors.

  3. The Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy Global Study

    Bucuras, Viorel; Gopalakrishnam, Ganesh; Wolf, J Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The study compared characteristics and outcomes in patients with solitary and bilateral kidneys who were treated with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PCNL Global Study.......The study compared characteristics and outcomes in patients with solitary and bilateral kidneys who were treated with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PCNL Global Study....

  4. Large benefits to marine fisheries of meeting the 1.5°C global warming target.

    Cheung, William W L; Reygondeau, Gabriel; Frölicher, Thomas L

    2016-12-23

    Translating the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to 1.5°C above preindustrial level into impact-related targets facilitates communication of the benefits of mitigating climate change to policy-makers and stakeholders. Developing ecologically relevant impact-related targets for marine ecosystem services, such as fisheries, is an important step. Here, we use maximum catch potential and species turnover as climate-risk indicators for fisheries. We project that potential catches will decrease by more than 3 million metric tons per degree Celsius of warming. Species turnover is more than halved when warming is lowered from 3.5° to 1.5°C above the preindustrial level. Regionally, changes in maximum catch potential and species turnover vary across ecosystems, with the biggest risk reduction in the Indo-Pacific and Arctic regions when the Paris Agreement target is achieved. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Escitalopram—translating molecular properties into clinical benefit: reviewing the evidence in major depression

    Leonard, Brian; Taylor, David

    2010-01-01

    The majority of currently marketed drugs contain a mixture of enantiomers; however, recent evidence suggests that individual enantiomers can have pharmacological properties that differ importantly from enantiomer mixtures. Escitalopram, the S-enantiomer of citalopram, displays markedly different pharmacological activity to the R-enantiomer. This review aims to evaluate whether these differences confer any significant clinical advantage for escitalopram over either citalopram or other frequently used antidepressants. Searches were conducted using PubMed and EMBASE (up to January 2009). Abstracts of the retrieved studies were reviewed independently by both authors for inclusion. Only those studies relating to depression or major depressive disorder were included. The search identified over 250 citations, of which 21 studies and 18 pooled or meta-analyses studies were deemed suitable for inclusion. These studies reveal that escitalopram has some efficacy advantage over citalopram and paroxetine, but no consistent advantage over other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Escitalopram has at least comparable efficacy to available serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, venlafaxine XR and duloxetine, and may offer some tolerability advantages over these agents. This review suggests that the mechanistic advantages of escitalopram over citalopram translate into clinical efficacy advantages. Escitalopram may have a favourable benefit-risk ratio compared with citalopram and possibly with several other antidepressant agents. PMID:20147575

  6. Benefits of whole body vibration training in patients hospitalised for COPD exacerbations - a randomized clinical trial.

    Greulich, Timm; Nell, Christoph; Koepke, Janine; Fechtel, Juliane; Franke, Maja; Schmeck, Bernd; Haid, Daniel; Apelt, Sandra; Filipovic, Silke; Kenn, Klaus; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Vogelmeier, Claus; Koczulla, Andreas Rembert

    2014-04-11

    Patients with stable COPD show improvements in exercise capacity and muscular function after the application of whole body vibration. We aimed to evaluate whether this modality added to conventional physiotherapy in exacerbated hospitalised COPD patients would be safe and would improve exercise capacity and quality of life. 49 hospitalised exacerbated COPD patients were randomized (1:1) to undergo physiotherapy alone or physiotherapy with the addition of whole body vibration. The primary endpoint was the between-group difference of the 6-minute walking test (day of discharge - day of admission). Secondary assessments included chair rising test, quality of life, and serum marker analysis. Whole body vibration did not cause procedure-related adverse events. Compared to physiotherapy alone, it led to significantly stronger improvements in 6-minute walking test (95.55 ± 76.29 m vs. 6.13 ± 81.65 m; p = 0.007) and St. Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (-6.43 ± 14.25 vs. 5.59 ± 19.15, p = 0.049). Whole body vibration increased the expression of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator receptor gamma coactivator-1-α and serum levels of irisin, while it decreased serum interleukin-8. Whole body vibration during hospitalised exacerbations did not cause procedure-related adverse events and induced clinically significant benefits regarding exercise capacity and health-related quality of life that were associated with increased serum levels of irisin, a marker of muscle activity. German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00005979. Registered 17 March 2014.

  7. Benefits of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) in skin photodamage: clinical response and histological assessment.

    Díaz-Ley, B; Cuevast, J; Alonso-Castro, L; Calvo, M I; Ríos-Buceta, L; Orive, G; Anitua, E; Jaén, P

    2015-01-01

    Skin ageing is characterized by small and fine wrinkles, roughness, laxity, and pigmentation as a result of epidermal thinning, collagen degradation, dermal atrophy, and fewer fibroblasts. Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) is an autologous plasma preparation enriched in proteins obtained from patient's own blood aimed at accelerating tissue repair and regeneration. To evaluate the benefits of PRGF in skin photodamage, 10 healthy volunteers were treated with three consecutive intradermal injections of PRGF in the facial area. Clinical outcomes and histological analysis were performed. A statistically significant increase in the epidermis and papillary dermis thickness was seen after PRGF treatment (p PRGF treatment, a reduction of the average area fraction of solar elastosis was observed in patients with clinical and histological signs of skin photodamage (p PRGF use was 0.75 (9/12) for the group of patients with signs of skin photodamage. Intradermal PRGF infiltration appears to be an effective treatment for the photodamaged skin. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. FOXM1 coming of age: Time for translation into clinical benefits?

    Muy-Teck eTeh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A decade since the first evidence implicating the cell cycle transcription factor FOXM1 in human tumourigenesis, a slew of subsequent studies revealed an oncogenic role of FOXM1 in the majority of human cancers including oral, nasopharynx, oropharynx, oesophagus, breast, ovary, prostate, lung, liver, pancreas, kidney, colon, brain, cervix, thyroid, bladder, uterus, testis, stomach, skin and blood. Its aberrant upregulation in almost all different cancer types suggests a fundamental role for FOXM1 in tumourigenesis. Its dose-dependent expression pattern correlated well with tumour progression starting from cancer predisposition and initiation, early premalignancy and progression, to metastatic invasion. In addition, emerging studies have demonstrated a causal link between FOXM1 and chemotherapeutic drug resistance. Despite the well-established multifaceted roles for FOXM1 in all stages of oncogenesis, its translation into clinical benefit is yet to materialise. In this contribution, I reviewed and discussed how our current knowledge on the oncogenic mechanisms of FOXM1 could be exploited for clinical use as biomarker for risk prediction, early cancer screening, molecular diagnostics/prognostics and/or companion diagnostics for pers

  9. Escitalopram--translating molecular properties into clinical benefit: reviewing the evidence in major depression.

    Leonard, Brian

    2010-08-01

    The majority of currently marketed drugs contain a mixture of enantiomers; however, recent evidence suggests that individual enantiomers can have pharmacological properties that differ importantly from enantiomer mixtures. Escitalopram, the S-enantiomer of citalopram, displays markedly different pharmacological activity to the R-enantiomer. This review aims to evaluate whether these differences confer any significant clinical advantage for escitalopram over either citalopram or other frequently used antidepressants. Searches were conducted using PubMed and EMBASE (up to January 2009). Abstracts of the retrieved studies were reviewed independently by both authors for inclusion. Only those studies relating to depression or major depressive disorder were included. The search identified over 250 citations, of which 21 studies and 18 pooled or meta-analyses studies were deemed suitable for inclusion. These studies reveal that escitalopram has some efficacy advantage over citalopram and paroxetine, but no consistent advantage over other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Escitalopram has at least comparable efficacy to available serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, venlafaxine XR and duloxetine, and may offer some tolerability advantages over these agents. This review suggests that the mechanistic advantages of escitalopram over citalopram translate into clinical efficacy advantages. Escitalopram may have a favourable benefit-risk ratio compared with citalopram and possibly with several other antidepressant agents.

  10. Pellagra-like condition is xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome complex and niacin confers clinical benefit.

    Hijazi, H; Salih, M A; Hamad, M H A; Hassan, H H; Salih, S B M; Mohamed, K A; Mukhtar, M M; Karrar, Z A; Ansari, S; Ibrahim, N; Alkuraya, F S

    2015-01-01

    An extremely rare pellagra-like condition has been described, which was partially responsive to niacin and associated with a multisystem involvement. The condition was proposed to represent a novel autosomal recessive entity but the underlying mutation remained unknown for almost three decades. The objective of this study was to identify the causal mutation in the pellagra-like condition and investigate the mechanism by which niacin confers clinical benefit. Autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing were used to identify the causal mutation, and comet assay on patient fibroblasts before and after niacin treatment to assess its effect on DNA damage. We identified a single disease locus that harbors a novel mutation in ERCC5, thus confirming that the condition is in fact xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome (XP/CS) complex. Importantly, we also show that the previously described dermatological response to niacin is consistent with a dramatic protective effect against ultraviolet-induced DNA damage in patient fibroblasts conferred by niacin treatment. Our findings show the power of exome sequencing in reassigning previously described novel clinical entities, and suggest a mechanism for the dermatological response to niacin in patients with XP/CS complex. This raises interesting possibilities about the potential therapeutic use of niacin in XP. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Will high-resolution global ocean models benefit coupled predictions on short-range to climate timescales?

    Hewitt, Helene T.; Bell, Michael J.; Chassignet, Eric P.; Czaja, Arnaud; Ferreira, David; Griffies, Stephen M.; Hyder, Pat; McClean, Julie L.; New, Adrian L.; Roberts, Malcolm J.

    2017-12-01

    As the importance of the ocean in the weather and climate system is increasingly recognised, operational systems are now moving towards coupled prediction not only for seasonal to climate timescales but also for short-range forecasts. A three-way tension exists between the allocation of computing resources to refine model resolution, the expansion of model complexity/capability, and the increase of ensemble size. Here we review evidence for the benefits of increased ocean resolution in global coupled models, where the ocean component explicitly represents transient mesoscale eddies and narrow boundary currents. We consider lessons learned from forced ocean/sea-ice simulations; from studies concerning the SST resolution required to impact atmospheric simulations; and from coupled predictions. Impacts of the mesoscale ocean in western boundary current regions on the large-scale atmospheric state have been identified. Understanding of air-sea feedback in western boundary currents is modifying our view of the dynamics in these key regions. It remains unclear whether variability associated with open ocean mesoscale eddies is equally important to the large-scale atmospheric state. We include a discussion of what processes can presently be parameterised in coupled models with coarse resolution non-eddying ocean models, and where parameterizations may fall short. We discuss the benefits of resolution and identify gaps in the current literature that leave important questions unanswered.

  12. Current globalization of drug interventional clinical trials: characteristics and associated factors, 2011-2013.

    Jeong, Sohyun; Sohn, Minji; Kim, Jae Hyun; Ko, Minoh; Seo, Hee-Won; Song, Yun-Kyoung; Choi, Boyoon; Han, Nayoung; Na, Han-Sung; Lee, Jong Gu; Kim, In-Wha; Oh, Jung Mi; Lee, Euni

    2017-06-21

    Clinical trial globalization is a major trend for industry-sponsored clinical trials. There has been a shift in clinical trial sites towards emerging regions of Eastern Europe, Latin America, Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. Our study objectives were to evaluate the current characteristics of clinical trials and to find out the associated multiple factors which could explain clinical trial globalization and its implications for clinical trial globalization in 2011-2013. The data elements of "phase," "recruitment status," "type of sponsor," "age groups," and "design of trial" from 30 countries were extracted from the ClinicalTrials.gov website. Ten continental representative countries including the USA were selected and the design elements were compared to those of the USA. Factors associated with trial site distribution were chosen for a multilinear regression analysis. The USA, Germany, France, Canada, and United Kingdom were the "top five" countries which frequently held clinical trials. The design elements from nine continental representative countries were quite different from those of the USA; phase 1 trials were more prevalent in India (OR 1.517, p globalization of clinical trials in the emerging regions of Asia, South Africa, and Eastern Europe developed in parallel with the factors of economic drive, population for recruitment, and regulatory constraints.

  13. Cost-benefit assessment of using electronic health records data for clinical research versus current practices: Contribution of the Electronic Health Records for Clinical Research (EHR4CR) European Project.

    Beresniak, Ariel; Schmidt, Andreas; Proeve, Johann; Bolanos, Elena; Patel, Neelam; Ammour, Nadir; Sundgren, Mats; Ericson, Mats; Karakoyun, Töresin; Coorevits, Pascal; Kalra, Dipak; De Moor, Georges; Dupont, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    The widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHR) provides a new opportunity to improve the efficiency of clinical research. The European EHR4CR (Electronic Health Records for Clinical Research) 4-year project has developed an innovative technological platform to enable the re-use of EHR data for clinical research. The objective of this cost-benefit assessment (CBA) is to assess the value of EHR4CR solutions compared to current practices, from the perspective of sponsors of clinical trials. A CBA model was developed using an advanced modeling approach. The costs of performing three clinical research scenarios (S) applied to a hypothetical Phase II or III oncology clinical trial workflow (reference case) were estimated under current and EHR4CR conditions, namely protocol feasibility assessment (S1), patient identification for recruitment (S2), and clinical study execution (S3). The potential benefits were calculated considering that the estimated reduction in actual person-time and costs for performing EHR4CR S1, S2, and S3 would accelerate time to market (TTM). Probabilistic sensitivity analyses using Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to manage uncertainty. Should the estimated efficiency gains achieved with the EHR4CR platform translate into faster TTM, the expected benefits for the global pharmaceutical oncology sector were estimated at €161.5m (S1), €45.7m (S2), €204.5m (S1+S2), €1906m (S3), and up to €2121.8m (S1+S2+S3) when the scenarios were used sequentially. The results suggest that optimizing clinical trial design and execution with the EHR4CR platform would generate substantial added value for pharmaceutical industry, as main sponsors of clinical trials in Europe, and beyond. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pleiotropic benefit of monomeric and oligomeric flavanols on vascular health--a randomized controlled clinical pilot study.

    Antje R Weseler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular diseases are expanding to a major social-economic burden in the Western World and undermine man's deep desire for healthy ageing. Epidemiological studies suggest that flavanol-rich foods (e.g. grapes, wine, chocolate sustain cardiovascular health. For an evidenced-based application, however, sound clinical data on their efficacy are strongly demanded. METHODS: In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled intervention study we supplemented 28 male smokers with 200 mg per day of monomeric and oligomeric flavanols (MOF from grape seeds. At baseline, after 4 and 8 weeks we measured macro- and microvascular function and a cluster of systemic biomarkers for major pathological processes occurring in the vasculature: disturbances in lipid metabolism and cellular redox balance, and activation of inflammatory cells and platelets. RESULTS: In the MOF group serum total cholesterol and LDL decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05 by 5% (n = 11 and 7% (n = 9, respectively in volunteers with elevated baseline levels. Additionally, after 8 weeks the ratio of glutathione to glutathione disulphide in erythrocytes rose from baseline by 22% (n = 15, P<0.05 in MOF supplemented subjects. We also observed that MOF supplementation exerts anti-inflammatory effects in blood towards ex vivo added bacterial endotoxin and significantly reduces expression of inflammatory genes in leukocytes. Conversely, alterations in macro- and microvascular function, platelet aggregation, plasma levels of nitric oxide surrogates, endothelin-1, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, prostaglandin F2alpha, plasma antioxidant capacity and gene expression levels of antioxidant defense enzymes did not reach statistical significance after 8 weeks MOF supplementation. However, integrating all measured effects into a global, so-called vascular health index revealed a significant improvement of overall vascular health by MOF compared to placebo (P ≤ 0.05. CONCLUSION: Our

  15. Global Fluoroquinolone Resistance Epidemiology and Implictions for Clinical Use

    Dalhoff, Axel

    2012-01-01

    This paper on the fluoroquinolone resistance epidemiology stratifies the data according to the different prescription patterns by either primary or tertiary caregivers and by indication. Global surveillance studies demonstrate that fluoroquinolone resistance rates increased in the past years in almost all bacterial species except S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae, causing community-acquired respiratory tract infections. However, 10 to 30% of these isolates harbored first-step mutations conferring low level fluoroquinolone resistance. Fluoroquinolone resistance increased in Enterobacteriaceae causing community acquired or healthcare associated urinary tract infections and intraabdominal infections, exceeding 50% in some parts of the world, particularly in Asia. One to two-thirds of Enterobacteriaceae producing extended spectrum β-lactamases were fluoroquinolone resistant too. Furthermore, fluoroquinolones select for methicillin resistance in Staphylococci. Neisseria gonorrhoeae acquired fluoroquinolone resistance rapidly; actual resistance rates are highly variable and can be as high as almost 100%, particularly in Asia, whereas resistance rates in Europe and North America range from 30% in established sexual networks. In general, the continued increase in fluoroquinolone resistance affects patient management and necessitates changes in some guidelines, for example, treatment of urinary tract, intra-abdominal, skin and skin structure infections, and traveller's diarrhea, or even precludes the use in indications like sexually transmitted diseases and enteric fever. PMID:23097666

  16. Clinical benefit and cost effectiveness of total knee arthroplasty in the older patient

    Krummenauer F

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is an effective, but also cost-intensive health care procedure for the elderly. Furthermore, bearing demographic changes in Western Europe in mind, TKA-associated financial investment for health care insurers will increase notably and thereby catalyze discussions on ressource allocation to Orthopedic surgery. To derive a quantitative rationale for such discussions within Western Europe's health care systems, a prospective assessment of both the benefit of TKA from a patient's perspective as well as its cost effectiveness from a health care insurer's perspective was implemented. Methods A prospective cost effectiveness trial recruited a total of 65 patients (60% females, who underwent TKA in 2006; median age of patients was 66 years (interquartile range 61 - 74 years. Before and three months after surgery patients were interviewed by means of the EuroQol-5D and the WOMAC questionnaires to assess their individual benefit due to TKA and the subsequent inpatient rehabilitation. Both questionnaires' benefit estimates were transformed into the number of gained quality adjusted life years [QALYs]. Total direct cost estimates for the overall care were based on German DRG and rehabilitation cost rates [€]. The primary clinical endpoint of the investigation was the individual number of QALYs gained by TKA based on the WOMAC interview; the primary health economic endpoint was the marginal cost effectiveness ratio (MCER relating the costs to the associated gain in quality of life [€/QALY]. Results Total direct costs for the overall procedure were estimed 9549 € in median. The WOMAC based interview revealed an overall gain of 4.59 QALYs (interquartile range 2.39 - 6.21 QALYs, resulting in marginal costs of 1795 €/QALY (1488 - 3288 €/QALY. The corresponding EuroQol based estimates were 2.93 QALYs (1.75 - 5.59 QALYs and 3063 €/QALY (1613 - 5291 €/QALY. Logistic regression modelling identified the

  17. Ensuring on-time quality data management deliverables from global clinical data management teams

    Zia Haque

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing emphasis on off-site and off-shore clinical data management activities mandates a paramount need for adequate solutions geared toward on-time, quality deliverables. The author has been leading large teams that have been involved in successful global clinical data management endeavors. While each study scenario is unique and has to be approached as such, there are several elements in defining strategy and team structure in global clinical data management that can be applied universally. In this article, key roles, practices, and high-level procedures are laid out as a road map to ensure success with the model.

  18. Two approaches to incorporate clinical data uncertainty into multiple criteria decision analysis for benefit-risk assessment of medicinal products.

    Wen, Shihua; Zhang, Lanju; Yang, Bo

    2014-07-01

    The Problem formulation, Objectives, Alternatives, Consequences, Trade-offs, Uncertainties, Risk attitude, and Linked decisions (PrOACT-URL) framework and multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) have been recommended by the European Medicines Agency for structured benefit-risk assessment of medicinal products undergoing regulatory review. The objective of this article was to provide solutions to incorporate the uncertainty from clinical data into the MCDA model when evaluating the overall benefit-risk profiles among different treatment options. Two statistical approaches, the δ-method approach and the Monte-Carlo approach, were proposed to construct the confidence interval of the overall benefit-risk score from the MCDA model as well as other probabilistic measures for comparing the benefit-risk profiles between treatment options. Both approaches can incorporate the correlation structure between clinical parameters (criteria) in the MCDA model and are straightforward to implement. The two proposed approaches were applied to a case study to evaluate the benefit-risk profile of an add-on therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (drug X) relative to placebo. It demonstrated a straightforward way to quantify the impact of the uncertainty from clinical data to the benefit-risk assessment and enabled statistical inference on evaluating the overall benefit-risk profiles among different treatment options. The δ-method approach provides a closed form to quantify the variability of the overall benefit-risk score in the MCDA model, whereas the Monte-Carlo approach is more computationally intensive but can yield its true sampling distribution for statistical inference. The obtained confidence intervals and other probabilistic measures from the two approaches enhance the benefit-risk decision making of medicinal products. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cost-benefit analysis of childhood asthma management through school-based clinic programs.

    Tai, Teresa; Bame, Sherry I

    2011-04-01

    Asthma is a leading chronic illness among American children. School-based health clinics (SBHCs) reduced expensive ER visits and hospitalizations through better healthcare access and monitoring in select case studies. The purpose of this study was to examine the cost-benefit of SBHC programs in managing childhood asthma nationwide for reduction in medical costs of ER, hospital and outpatient physician care and savings in opportunity social costs of lowing absenteeism and work loss and of future earnings due to premature deaths. Eight public data sources were used to compare costs of delivering primary and preventive care for childhood asthma in the US via SBHC programs, including direct medical and indirect opportunity costs for children and their parents. The costs of nurse staffing for a nationwide SBHC program were estimated at $4.55 billion compared to the estimated medical savings of $1.69 billion, including ER, hospital, and outpatient care. In contrast, estimated total savings for opportunity costs of work loss and premature death were $23.13 billion. Medical savings alone would not offset the expense of implementing a SBHC program for prevention and monitoring childhood asthma. However, even modest estimates of reducing opportunity costs of parents' work loss would be far greater than the expense of this program. Although SBHC programs would not be expected to affect the increasing prevalence of childhood asthma, these programs would be designed to reduce the severity of asthma condition with ongoing monitoring, disease prevention and patient compliance.

  20. Clinical Benefit of Second-Line Palliative Chemotherapy in Advanced Soft-Tissue Sarcoma

    Anna Minchom

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This paper aimed to assess the utility of second-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced soft-tissue sarcoma. Materials and Methods. A retrospective search of a prospectively maintained database identified patients treated between 1991 and 2005. Patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours, small round cell tumours, and Ewing's sarcoma were excluded. Response was assessed using WHO and RECIST. Patients who achieved stable disease for 6 months or more were classified as having disease control. Results. Three hundred and seventy-nine patients received second-line chemotherapy. Eighty-six (22.7% achieved disease control. Median duration of response was 11 months (95% CI: 9–13. On multivariate analysis, pathological subtype, absence of lung metastases, and the use of combination chemotherapy were independent predictors of disease control. Twenty-eight (16.1% patients who failed to respond to first-line therapy achieved disease control. Eight (2.1% patients had sufficient downstaging to enable complete surgical resection. Progression-free survival was 23% at 6 months. Median overall survival was 8 months (95% CI: 7–10 months. On multivariate analysis, synovial histology and absence of lung metastases were associated with improved survival. Conclusion. Second-line chemotherapy can provide clinical benefit in over 20% of soft-tissue sarcoma patients.

  1. Clinical implications of globally emerging azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus

    Verweij, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fungi are the cause of an array of diseases affecting humans, animals and plants. The triazole antifungal agents itraconazole, voriconazole, isavuconazole and posaconazole are treatment options against diseases caused by Aspergillus. However, resistance to azoles has recently emerged as a new therapeutic challenge in six continents. Although de novo azole resistance occurs occasionally in patients during azole therapy, the main burden is the aquisition of resistance through the environment. In this setting, the evolution of resistance is attributed to the widespread use of azole-based fungicides. Although ubiquitously distributed, A. fumigatus is not a phytopathogen. However, agricultural fungicides deployed against plant pathogenic moulds such as Fusarium, Mycospaerella and A. flavus also show activity against A. fumigatus in the environment and exposure of non-target fungi is inevitable. Further, similarity in molecule structure between azole fungicides and antifungal drugs results in cross-resistance of A. fumigatus to medical azoles. Clinical studies have shown that two-thirds of patients with azole-resistant infections had no previous history of azole therapy and high mortality rates between 50% and 100% are reported in azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis. The resistance phenotype is associated with key mutations in the cyp51A gene, including TR34/L98H, TR53 and TR46/Y121F/T289A resistance mechanisms. Early detection of resistance is of paramount importance and if demonstrated, either with susceptibility testing or through molecular analysis, azole monotherapy should be avoided. Liposomal amphotericin B or a combination of voriconazole and an echinocandin are recomended for azole-resistant aspergillosis. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Tackling emerging fungal threats to animal health, food security and ecosystem resilience’. PMID:28080986

  2. Conflict-affected displaced persons need to benefit more from HIV and malaria national strategic plans and Global Fund grants

    Paik Eugene

    2010-01-01

    to care for refugees and this includes provision of health care. IDPs are citizens of their own country but like refugees may also not be a priority for Governments' NSPs and funding proposals. Besides legal obligations, Governments have a public health imperative to include these groups in NSPs and funding proposals. Governments may wish to add a component for refugees that is additional to the needs for their own citizens. The inclusion of forcibly displaced persons in funding proposals may have positive direct effects for host populations as international and United Nations agencies often have strong logistical capabilities that could benefit both populations. For NSPs, strong and concerted advocacy at global, regional and country levels needs to occur to successfully ensure that affected populations are included in their plans. It is essential for their inclusion to occur if we are to reach the stated goal of universal access and the Millennium Development Goals.

  3. Net clinical benefit of new oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban) versus no treatment in a 'real world' atrial fibrillation population

    Banerjee, A; Lane, D A; Torp-Pedersen, C

    2012-01-01

    The concept of net clinical benefit has been used to quantify the balance between risk of ischaemic stroke (IS) and risk of intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) with the use oral anticoagulant therapy (OAC) in the setting of non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF), and has shown that patients at highest ...... in AF. Using 'real world' data, our modelling analysis has shown that when the risk of bleeding and stroke are both high, all three new drugs appear to have a greater net clinical benefit compared to warfarin....

  4. Laboratory and software applications for clinical trials: the global laboratory environment.

    Briscoe, Chad

    2011-11-01

    The Applied Pharmaceutical Software Meeting is held annually. It is sponsored by The Boston Society, a not-for-profit organization that coordinates a series of meetings within the global pharmaceutical industry. The meeting generally focuses on laboratory applications, but in recent years has expanded to include some software applications for clinical trials. The 2011 meeting emphasized the global laboratory environment. Global clinical trials generate massive amounts of data in many locations that must be centralized and processed for efficient analysis. Thus, the meeting had a strong focus on establishing networks and systems for dealing with the computer infrastructure to support such environments. In addition to the globally installed laboratory information management system, electronic laboratory notebook and other traditional laboratory applications, cloud computing is quickly becoming the answer to provide efficient, inexpensive options for managing the large volumes of data and computing power, and thus it served as a central theme for the meeting.

  5. Regulatory challenges in the review of data from global clinical trials: the PMDA perspective.

    Asano, K; Tanaka, A; Sato, T; Uyama, Y

    2013-08-01

    Regulatory agencies face challenges in reviewing data from global clinical trials (GCTs) in the era of globalization of drug development. One major challenge is consideration of ethnic factors in evaluating GCT data so as to extrapolate foreign population data to one's own national population. Here, we present the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) perspective in reviewing GCT data in new drug applications (NDAs) and discuss future challenges for new drug approval.

  6. CURRENT PERSPECTIVES OF POTTER'S GLOBAL BIOETHICS AS A BRIDGE BETWEEN CLINICAL (PERSONALIZED) AND PUBLIC HEALTH ETHICS.

    Turina, Iva Sorta-Bilajac; Brkljacić, Morana; Grgas-Bile, Cecilija; Gajski, Domagoj; Racz, Aleksandar; Cengić, Tomislav

    2015-12-01

    In the context of modern scientific and technological developments in biomedicine and health care, and the potential consequences of their application on humans and the environment, Potter's global bioethics concept resurfaces. By actualizing Potter's original thoughts on individual bioethical issues, the universality of two of his books, which today represent the backbone of the world bioethical literature, "Bioethics--Bridge to the Future" and "Global Bioethics: Building on the Leopold Legacy", is emphasized. Potter's global bioethics today can legitimately be viewed as a bridge between clinical personalized ethics on the one hand and ethics of public health on the other.

  7. Does perioperative high-dose prednisolone have clinical benefits for generalized myasthenia gravis?

    Sekine, Yasuo; Kawaguchi, Naoki; Hamada, Chikuma; Sekiguchi, Hiromi; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Iyoda, Akira; Shibuya, Kiyoshi; Fujisawa, Takehiko

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the clinical benefits of perioperative administration of high-dose prednisolone (PSL) combined with extended thymectomy on the long-term outcomes of 116 consecutive patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (MG). A retrospective review was conducted on 116 patients diagnosed with generalized MG who received alternate-day oral administration of high-dose PSL (100 mg/alternate days) and had undergone transsternal extended thymectomy. Incidences of postoperative myasthenic crisis, adverse effects of steroid, long-term outcomes, such as complete stable remission (CSR), pharmacologic remission (PR) or improvement (Imp), and disease recurrence after CSR were evaluated. Six patients (5.2%) experienced post-thymectomy myasthenic crisis. Crude cumulative CSR and PR + CSR rates were 44.8 and 62.7%, respectively. Life table analysis showed that 41.8, 52.8 and 63.4% of the patients were in CSR at 3, 5 and 10 years, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that age and pretreatment classification according to the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA) criteria tended to be independent predictors of CSR. There were 6.9% with compressive vertebral fracture, 13.8% with cataract, and 5.2% with steroid-induced diabetes. Life table analysis revealed that recurrence rates after CSR were 36.8 and 46.0% at 3 and 5 years, respectively. Patients with thymoma had a significantly higher rate of recurrence than those without thymoma (p = 0.001). Alternate-day administration of high-dose prednisolone reduced the risk of post-thymectomy myasthenic crisis. Presence of thymoma was a risk factor for MG recurrence after CSR.

  8. Proven and potential clinical benefits of washing red blood cells before transfusion: current perspectives

    Schmidt AE

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Amy E Schmidt, Majed A Refaai, Scott A Kirkley, Neil Blumberg Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA Abstract: Red blood cells (RBCs are washed for a variety of reasons such as to remove excess potassium, cytokines, and other allergen proteins from the supernatant and/or to mitigate the effects of the storage lesion. The storage lesion is a product of RBC aging and include leakage of potassium and chloride from the RBCs, depletion of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and adenosine triphosphate, loss of phospholipids and cholesterol, exposure of phosphatidylserine, elaboration of lipid mediators, loss of glutathione, autoxidation of hemoglobin to methemoglobin contributing to decreased blood flow viscosity and adherence to endothelial cells, increased microparticle formation, and disruption of NO-mediated vasodilation. A storage lesion is thought to be caused in part by oxidative stress, which is characterized by functional and structural changes to the RBCs. The effects of the RBC storage lesion on patient morbidity and mortality have been studied intensively with mixed results. Here, we will summarize the potential benefits of RBC washing. Notably, all patient-based studies on washed RBCs are single-center, small randomized studies or observational data, which await replication and tests of generalizability. Some of the most promising preliminary data suggest that washed transfusions of red cells and platelets reduce mortality in low risk, younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia, mitigate lung injury, and substantially reduce mortality in cardiac surgery. Larger randomized trials to replicate or refute these findings are urgently needed and, most importantly, have the potential to strikingly improve clinical outcomes following transfusion. Keywords: washed blood, transfusion, immunomodulation, red blood cell

  9. Vacuum-assisted wound closure in vascular surgery - clinical and cost benefits in a developing country

    Končar Igor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Surgical and chronic wounds in vascular patients might contribute to limb loss and death. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC - Kinetic Concepts, Inc. (KCI, has been increasingly used in Western Europe and the USA clinical practice for 15 years. Advantages of this method are faster wound healing, wound approximation, lower wound related treatment costs and improved quality of life during treatment. Evidence related to the usage of VAC therapy in vascular patients and cost effectiveness of VAC therapy in a developing country are lacking. The aim of this study was to explore results of VAC therapy in vascular surgery comparing to conventional methods and to test cost effects in a developing country like Serbia. Methods. All patients with wound infection or dehiscence operated at the tertiary vascular university clinic in the period from January 2011 - January 2012, were treated with VAC therapy. The primary endpoint was wound closure, while secondary endpoints were hospital stay, the number of weekly dressings, costs of wound care, working time of medical personnel. The patients were divided into groups according to the wound type and location: wound with exposed synthetic vascular implant (25%, laparotomy (13%, foot amputation (29%, major limb amputation (21%, fasciotomy (13%. The results of primary and secondary endpoint were compared with the results of conventional treatment during the previous year. Results. There was one death (1/42, 2.38% and one limb loss (1/12, 2.38% in the VAC group, and 8 deaths (8/38, 21.05% and 5 (5/38, 13.15% limb losses in the patients treated with conventional therapy. In the VAC group there was one groin bleeding (1/12, 2.38%, one groin reinfection (1/12, 2.38% and one resistance to therapy with a consequent limb loss. Costs of hospital stay (p < 0.001 and nursing time (p < 0.001 were reduced with VAC therapy in the group with exposed graft. Conclusion. VAC therapy is the effective method for care of

  10. Which elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis benefit from surgical treatment? An aid to clinical decision making

    Bouma, Berto J.; van den Brink, Renee B.; Zwinderman, K.; Cheriex, Emile C.; Hamer, Hans H.; Lie, Kong I.; Tijssen, Jan G.

    2004-01-01

    Background and aim of the study: Clinical decision-making in an individual elderly patient with severe aortic stenosis (AS) is difficult. The prognosis is influenced by increased age and various cardiac morbidity and comorbidity, and the benefit of surgery is uncertain because the prognosis with

  11. Home intravenous antibiotic therapy in children with cystic fibrosis: clinical outcome, quality of life and economic benefit

    Chrysochoou, EA; Hatziagorou, E; Kirvassilis, F; Tsanakas, J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pediatric home care has improved therapeutic options for children with chronic disease. Home intravenous (IV) antibiotic treatment against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PsA) in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients has offered increased flexibility to these patients and family life. A prospective clinical study was conducted to compare safety, efficacy, and cost benefits of home versus hospital IV antibiotic treatment among CF children and adolescents.

  12. Globalization

    Tulio Rosembuj

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available There is no singular globalization, nor is the result of an individual agent. We could start by saying that global action has different angles and subjects who perform it are different, as well as its objectives. The global is an invisible invasion of materials and immediate effects.

  13. Globalization

    Tulio Rosembuj

    2006-01-01

    There is no singular globalization, nor is the result of an individual agent. We could start by saying that global action has different angles and subjects who perform it are different, as well as its objectives. The global is an invisible invasion of materials and immediate effects.

  14. The clinical research office of the endourological society percutaneous nephrolithotomy global study

    Desai, Mahesh; De Lisa, Antonello; Turna, Burak

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The study compared characteristics and outcomes in patients with staghorn or nonstaghorn stones who were treated with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) within the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PCNL Global Study. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data over a 1-year ...

  15. Risk Based Monitoring (RBM: A global study focusing on perception and merits among clinical investigational sites

    Prajna P. Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: This unique study performed across ten emerging and developed countries strongly supported the need for systematic global training, education, and implementation of RBM regulatory guidance, with an aim for better safety of subjects and improved quality of clinical trial data. Furthermore, studies with larger sample sizes are recommended to provide an evidence-based approach.

  16. Assessing climate change impacts, benefits of mitigation, and uncertainties on major global forest regions under multiple socioeconomic and emissions scenarios

    John B Kim; Erwan Monier; Brent Sohngen; G Stephen Pitts; Ray Drapek; James McFarland; Sara Ohrel; Jefferson Cole

    2016-01-01

    We analyze a set of simulations to assess the impact of climate change on global forests where MC2 dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM) was run with climate simulations from the MIT Integrated Global System Model-Community Atmosphere Model (IGSM-CAM) modeling framework. The core study relies on an ensemble of climate simulations under two emissions scenarios: a...

  17. Something has shifted: Nursing students' global perspective following international clinical placements.

    Gower, Shelley; Duggan, Ravani; Dantas, Jaya A R; Boldy, Duncan

    2017-10-01

    To examine understandings of global health issues among nursing students following participation in an international clinical placement during their pre-registration university education. Universities use international clinical placements, especially in developing countries, to develop cultural awareness in students; however, little is known about the longer term influences on students' understandings of global nursing. A retrospective cross-sectional design was used, using an exploratory, descriptive qualitative approach. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2014 with a purposive sample of 25 pre-registration nursing students from four Western Australian universities who undertook clinical placements across five countries. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Findings highlight that students developed new understandings around health systems including fragility of resource access, differences in clinical practice and variances in nursing roles between settings. Students also experienced challenges but were able to appreciate alternative world viewpoints. International clinical placements can develop greater awareness and help students form realistic strategies for using their nursing skills globally. Pre-placement training in cultural awareness and health system realities, along with strong supervisory support, is critical to success. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Impact of Site Selection and Study Conduct on Outcomes in Global Clinical Trials.

    Sarwar, Chaudhry M S; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Butler, Javed

    2017-08-01

    There are over 25 million patients living with heart failure globally. Overall, and especially post-discharge, clinical outcomes have remained poor in heart failure despite multiple trials, with both successes and failures over the last two decades. Matching therapies to the right patient population, identifying high-quality sites, and ensuring optimal trial design and execution represent important considerations in the development of novel therapeutics in this space. While clinical trials have undergone rapid globalization, this has come with regional variation in comorbidities, clinical parameters, and even clinical outcomes and treatment effects across international sites. These issues have now highlighted knowledge gaps about the conduct of trials, selection of study sites, and an unmet need to develop and identify "ideal" sites. There is a need for all stakeholders, including academia, investigators, healthcare organizations, patient advocacy groups, industry sponsors, research organizations, and regulatory authorities, to work as a multidisciplinary group to address these problems and develop practical solutions to improve trial conduct, efficiency, and execution. We review these trial-level issues using examples from contemporary studies to inform and optimize the design of future global clinical trials in heart failure.

  19. Globalization

    Andru?cã Maria Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The field of globalization has highlighted an interdependence implied by a more harmonious understanding determined by the daily interaction between nations through the inducement of peace and the management of streamlining and the effectiveness of the global economy. For the functioning of the globalization, the developing countries that can be helped by the developed ones must be involved. The international community can contribute to the institution of the development environment of the gl...

  20. "They put you on your toes": Physical Therapists' Perceived Benefits from and Barriers to Supervising Students in the Clinical Setting.

    Davies, Robyn; Hanna, Elizabeth; Cott, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    To identify the perceived benefits of and barriers to clinical supervision of physical therapy (PT) students. In this qualitative descriptive study, three focus groups and six key-informant interviews were conducted with clinical physical therapists or administrators working in acute care, orthopaedic rehabilitation, or complex continuing care. Data were coded and analyzed for common ideas using a constant comparison approach. Perceived barriers to supervising students tended to be extrinsic: time and space constraints, challenging or difficult students, and decreased autonomy or flexibility for the clinical physical therapists. Benefits tended to be intrinsic: teaching provided personal gratification by promoting reflective practice and exposing clinical educators to current knowledge. The culture of different health care institutions was an important factor in therapists' perceptions of student supervision. Despite different disciplines and models of supervision, there is considerable synchronicity in the issues reported by physical therapists and other disciplines. Embedding the value of clinical teaching in the institution, along with strong communication links among academic partners, institutions, and potential clinical faculty, may mitigate barriers and increase the commitment and satisfaction of teaching staff.

  1. On Thomas Pogge’s Theory of Global Justice. Why We Are Not Collectively Responsible for the Global Distribution of Benefits and Burdens between Individuals

    Midtgaard, Søren Flinch

    2012-01-01

    Thomas Pogge’s ingenious and influential Rawlsian theory of global justice asserts that principles of justice such as the difference principle or, alternatively, a universal criterion of human rights consisting of a subset of the principles of social justice apply to the global basic structure...

  2. A harmonized and efficient clinical research environment would benefit patients and enhance European competitiveness. Commentary.

    Amato, Antonino; Aringhieri, Eugenio; Boccia, Stefania; Buccella, Filippo; Gorini, Barbara; Gramaglia, Donatella; Masetti, Riccardo; Rossi, Paolo; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    The forthcoming implementation of the European Clinical Trial Regulation (Regulation (EU) No. 536/2014), which is expected to facilitate the conduct of clinical trials across the European Union, will require National Authorities to create the best conditions for the implementation of the new Regulation through national guidelines, so that sponsors may reconsider Europe as a prime location for planning clinical trials. During a meeting titled "Innovation in Clinical Research", an expert panel discussed potential local advances fostering competitiveness of European clinical research with representatives of the pharmaceutical industry, patient organisations and Italian regulatory agency in view of the forthcoming implementation of (EU) No. 536/2014 on clinical trials of medicinal products. In this article we summarise the findings of the meeting, describe features characterising clinical research patterns and offer some suggestions on the possible involvement of all stakeholders in order to foster research innovation and allow the timely access to novel medicines for patients.

  3. Development of free statistical software enabling researchers to calculate confidence levels, clinical significance curves and risk-benefit contours

    Shakespeare, T.P.; Mukherjee, R.K.; Gebski, V.J.

    2003-01-01

    Confidence levels, clinical significance curves, and risk-benefit contours are tools improving analysis of clinical studies and minimizing misinterpretation of published results, however no software has been available for their calculation. The objective was to develop software to help clinicians utilize these tools. Excel 2000 spreadsheets were designed using only built-in functions, without macros. The workbook was protected and encrypted so that users can modify only input cells. The workbook has 4 spreadsheets for use in studies comparing two patient groups. Sheet 1 comprises instructions and graphic examples for use. Sheet 2 allows the user to input the main study results (e.g. survival rates) into a 2-by-2 table. Confidence intervals (95%), p-value and the confidence level for Treatment A being better than Treatment B are automatically generated. An additional input cell allows the user to determine the confidence associated with a specified level of benefit. For example if the user wishes to know the confidence that Treatment A is at least 10% better than B, 10% is entered. Sheet 2 automatically displays clinical significance curves, graphically illustrating confidence levels for all possible benefits of one treatment over the other. Sheet 3 allows input of toxicity data, and calculates the confidence that one treatment is more toxic than the other. It also determines the confidence that the relative toxicity of the most effective arm does not exceed user-defined tolerability. Sheet 4 automatically calculates risk-benefit contours, displaying the confidence associated with a specified scenario of minimum benefit and maximum risk of one treatment arm over the other. The spreadsheet is freely downloadable at www.ontumor.com/professional/statistics.htm A simple, self-explanatory, freely available spreadsheet calculator was developed using Excel 2000. The incorporated decision-making tools can be used for data analysis and improve the reporting of results of any

  4. The communication of the radiation risk from CT in relation to its clinical benefit in the era of personalized medicine. Pt. 2. Benefits versus risk of CT

    Westra, Sjirk J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    In order to personalize the communication of the CT risk, we need to describe the risk in the context of the clinical benefit of CT, which will generally be much higher, provided a CT scan has a well-established clinical indication. However as pediatric radiologists we should be careful not to overstate the benefit of CT, being aware that medico-legal pressures and the realities of health care economics have led to overutilization of the technology. And even though we should not use previously accumulated radiation dose to a child as an argument against conducting a clinically indicated scan (the ''sunk-cost'' bias), we should consider patients' radiation history in the diagnostic decision process. As a contribution to future public health, it makes more sense to look for non-radiating alternatives to CT in the much larger group of basically healthy children who are receiving occasional scans for widely prevalent conditions such as appendicitis and trauma than to attempt lowering CT use in the smaller group of patients with chronic conditions with a limited life expectancy. When communicating the CT risk with individual patients and their parents, we should acknowledge and address their concerns within the framework of informed decision-making. When appropriate, we may express the individual radiation risk, based on estimates of summated absorbed organ dose, as an order of magnitude rather than as an absolute number, and compare this with the much larger natural cancer incidence over a child's lifetime, and with other risks in medicine and daily life. We should anticipate that many patients cannot make informed decisions on their own in this complex matter, and we should offer our guidance while maintaining respect for patient autonomy. Proper documentation of the informed decision process is important for future reference. In concert with our referring physicians, pediatric radiologists are well-equipped to tackle the complexities

  5. The communication of the radiation risk from CT in relation to its clinical benefit in the era of personalized medicine. Pt. 2. Benefits versus risk of CT

    Westra, Sjirk J.

    2014-01-01

    In order to personalize the communication of the CT risk, we need to describe the risk in the context of the clinical benefit of CT, which will generally be much higher, provided a CT scan has a well-established clinical indication. However as pediatric radiologists we should be careful not to overstate the benefit of CT, being aware that medico-legal pressures and the realities of health care economics have led to overutilization of the technology. And even though we should not use previously accumulated radiation dose to a child as an argument against conducting a clinically indicated scan (the ''sunk-cost'' bias), we should consider patients' radiation history in the diagnostic decision process. As a contribution to future public health, it makes more sense to look for non-radiating alternatives to CT in the much larger group of basically healthy children who are receiving occasional scans for widely prevalent conditions such as appendicitis and trauma than to attempt lowering CT use in the smaller group of patients with chronic conditions with a limited life expectancy. When communicating the CT risk with individual patients and their parents, we should acknowledge and address their concerns within the framework of informed decision-making. When appropriate, we may express the individual radiation risk, based on estimates of summated absorbed organ dose, as an order of magnitude rather than as an absolute number, and compare this with the much larger natural cancer incidence over a child's lifetime, and with other risks in medicine and daily life. We should anticipate that many patients cannot make informed decisions on their own in this complex matter, and we should offer our guidance while maintaining respect for patient autonomy. Proper documentation of the informed decision process is important for future reference. In concert with our referring physicians, pediatric radiologists are well-equipped to tackle the complexities associated with the communication

  6. Estimating the global clinical burden of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in 2007.

    Simon I Hay

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of malaria makes surveillance-based methods of estimating its disease burden problematic. Cartographic approaches have provided alternative malaria burden estimates, but there remains widespread misunderstanding about their derivation and fidelity. The aims of this study are to present a new cartographic technique and its application for deriving global clinical burden estimates of Plasmodium falciparum malaria for 2007, and to compare these estimates and their likely precision with those derived under existing surveillance-based approaches.In seven of the 87 countries endemic for P. falciparum malaria, the health reporting infrastructure was deemed sufficiently rigorous for case reports to be used verbatim. In the remaining countries, the mapped extent of unstable and stable P. falciparum malaria transmission was first determined. Estimates of the plausible incidence range of clinical cases were then calculated within the spatial limits of unstable transmission. A modelled relationship between clinical incidence and prevalence was used, together with new maps of P. falciparum malaria endemicity, to estimate incidence in areas of stable transmission, and geostatistical joint simulation was used to quantify uncertainty in these estimates at national, regional, and global scales. Combining these estimates for all areas of transmission risk resulted in 451 million (95% credible interval 349-552 million clinical cases of P. falciparum malaria in 2007. Almost all of this burden of morbidity occurred in areas of stable transmission. More than half of all estimated P. falciparum clinical cases and associated uncertainty occurred in India, Nigeria, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC, and Myanmar (Burma, where 1.405 billion people are at risk. Recent surveillance-based methods of burden estimation were then reviewed and discrepancies in national estimates explored. When these cartographically derived national estimates were ranked

  7. Benefits and harms in clinical trials of duloxetine for treatment of major depressive disorder

    Maund, Emma; Tendal, Britta; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn

    2014-01-01

    , respectively. We also found publication bias in relation to beneficial effects. CONCLUSION: Clinical study reports contained extensive data on major harms that were unavailable in journal articles and in trial registry reports. There were inconsistencies between protocols and clinical study reports and within.......gov and the manufacturer's online clinical trial registry were searched for trial results. RESULTS: Clinical study reports fully described the primary efficacy analysis and major harms (deaths (including suicides), suicide attempts, serious adverse events, and discontinuations because of adverse events). There were minor...... clinical study reports. Clinical study reports should be used as the data source for systematic reviews of drugs, but they should first be checked against protocols and within themselves for accuracy and consistency....

  8. Prostate cancer mortality in screen and clinically detected prostate cancer : Estimating the screening benefit

    van Leeuwen, Pim J.; Connolly, David; Gavin, Anna; Roobol, Monique J.; Black, Amanda; Bangma, Chris H.; Schroder, Fritz H.

    Background: To estimate the benefits of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening on prostate cancer (Pca) metastasis and Pca-specific mortality, we compared two populations with a well-defined difference in intensity of screening. Methods: Between 1997 and 1999, a total of 11,970 men, aged 55-74

  9. Quantification of human motion: gait analysis-benefits and limitations to its application to clinical problems.

    Simon, Sheldon R

    2004-12-01

    The technology supporting the analysis of human motion has advanced dramatically. Past decades of locomotion research have provided us with significant knowledge about the accuracy of tests performed, the understanding of the process of human locomotion, and how clinical testing can be used to evaluate medical disorders and affect their treatment. Gait analysis is now recognized as clinically useful and financially reimbursable for some medical conditions. Yet, the routine clinical use of gait analysis has seen very limited growth. The issue of its clinical value is related to many factors, including the applicability of existing technology to addressing clinical problems; the limited use of such tests to address a wide variety of medical disorders; the manner in which gait laboratories are organized, tests are performed, and reports generated; and the clinical understanding and expectations of laboratory results. Clinical use is most hampered by the length of time and costs required for performing a study and interpreting it. A "gait" report is lengthy, its data are not well understood, and it includes a clinical interpretation, all of which do not occur with other clinical tests. Current biotechnology research is seeking to address these problems by creating techniques to capture data rapidly, accurately, and efficiently, and to interpret such data by an assortment of modeling, statistical, wave interpretation, and artificial intelligence methodologies. The success of such efforts rests on both our technical abilities and communication between engineers and clinicians.

  10. The improved Clinical Global Impression Scale (iCGI: development and validation in depression

    Kadouri Alane

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI is frequently used in medical care and clinical research because of its face validity and practicability. This study proposes to improve the reliability of the Clinical Global Impression (CGI scale in depressive disorders by the use of a semi-standardized interview, a new response format, and a Delphi procedure. Methods Thirty patients hospitalised for a major depressive episode were filmed at T1 (first week in hospital and at T2 (2 weeks later during a 5' specific interview. The Hamilton Depressive Rating Scale and the Symptom Check List were also rated. Eleven psychiatrists rated these videos using either the usual CGI response format or an improved response format, with or without a Delphi procedure. Results The new response format slightly improved (but not significantly the interrater agreement, the Delphi procedure did not. The best results were obtained when ratings by 4 independent raters were averaged. In this situation, intraclass correlation coefficients were about 0.9. Conclusion The Clinical Global Impression is a useful approach in psychiatry since it apprehends patients in their entirety. This study shows that it is possible to quantify such impressions with a high level of interrater agreement.

  11. [Benefits of using rapid HIV testing at the PMU-FLON walk-in clinic in Lausanne].

    Gilgien, W; Aubert, J; Bischoff, T; Herzig, L; Perdrix, J

    2012-05-16

    Lab tests are frequently used in primary care to guide patient care. This is particularly the case when a severe disorder, or one that will affect patients' initial care, needs to be excluded rapidly. At the PMU-FLON walk-in clinic the use of HIV testing as recommended by the Swiss Office of Public Health was hampered by the delay in obtaining test results. This led us to introduce rapid HIV testing which provides results within 30 minutes. Following the first 250 tests the authors discuss the results as well as the benefits of rapid HIV testing in an urban walk-in clinic.

  12. Clinical Benefit of Pazopanib in a Patient with Metastatic Chondrosarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Onoufrios Tsavaris

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcoma is a rare malignancy characterized by the production of cartilage matrix, displaying heterogeneous histopathology and clinical behavior. Due to lack of effective treatment for advanced disease, the clinical management of metastatic chondrosarcoma is exceptionally challenging. Chondrosarcomas harbor molecular abnormalities, such as overexpression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR-alpha and PDGFR-beta, which are required for cancer development, progression, and metastasis. Pazopanib is a potent and selective multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, which co-inhibits stem cell growth factor receptor (c-KIT, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR, PDGFR, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR and has demonstrated clinical activity in patients with advanced previously treated soft tissue sarcoma. Herein, we describe the unique case of a patient with metastatic chondrosarcoma who derived clinical benefit from pazopanib after first-line chemotherapy failure.

  13. Clinical benefit response of concurrent chemoradiotherapy with protracted 5-fluorouracil infusion in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    Okusaka, Takuji; Okada, Shuichi; Ishii, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly virulent disease with a poor prognosis. Although objective tumor response to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy is low, some patients show an improvement in their symptoms after treatments, without obvious tumor regression. We assessed the clinical benefit of concurrent chemoradiotherapy with protracted 5-fluorouracil infusion in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Sixteen patients were enrolled in this study. The clinical benefit response to the chemoradiotherapy was evaluated by 2 indicators, including pain (intensity of pain and consumption of morphine) and performance status. A patient was defined to be a clinical benefit responder if 1 of these 2 variables was positive, and the other variable was positive or stable. Seven patients (44%) responded. Six patients (38%) were classified as stable, and 3 (19%) as nonresponders. The survival period in responders was significantly longer than that in nonresponders and stable patients. Concurrent external-beam radiation therapy, with protracted 5-fluorouracil infusion, may be a meaningful treatment for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. (author)

  14. Global Air Quality and Health Co-benefits of Mitigating Near-term Climate Change Through Methane and Black Carbon Emission Controls

    Anenberg, Susan C.; Schwartz, Joel; Shindell, Drew Todd; Amann, Markus; Faluvegi, Gregory S.; Klimont, Zbigniew; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Pozzoli, Luca; Dingenen, Rita Van; Vignati, Elisabetta; hide

    2012-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone and black carbon (BC), a component of fine particulate matter (PM health benefits of 14 specific emission control measures targeting BC and methane, an ozone precursor, that were selected because of their potential to reduce the rate of climate change over the next 20-40 years. Methods: We simulated the impacts of mitigation measures on outdoor concentrations of PM2.5 and ozone using two composition-climate models, and calculated associated changes in premature PM2.5- and ozone-related deaths using epidemiologically derived concentration-response functions. Results: We estimated that, for PM2.5 and ozone, respectively, fully implementing these measures could reduce global population-weighted average surface concentrations by 23-34% and 7-17% and avoid 0.6-4.4 and 0.04-0.52 million annual premature deaths globally in 2030. More than 80% of the health benefits are estimated to occur in Asia. We estimated that BC mitigation measures would achieve approximately 98% of the deaths that would be avoided if all BC and methane mitigation measures were implemented, due to reduced BC and associated reductions of nonmethane ozone precursor and organic carbon emissions as well as stronger mortality relationships for PM2.5 relative to ozone. Although subject to large uncertainty, these estimates and conclusions are not strongly dependent on assumptions for the concentration-response function. Conclusions: In addition to climate benefits, our findings indicate that the methane and BC emission control measures would have substantial co-benefits for air quality and public health worldwide, potentially reversing trends of increasing air pollution concentrations and mortality in Africa and South, West, and Central Asia. These projected benefits are independent of carbon dioxide mitigation measures. Benefits of BC measures are underestimated because we did not account for benefits from reduced indoor exposures and because outdoor exposure estimates were limited by

  15. The NIAID Division of AIDS enterprise information system: integrated decision support for global clinical research programs

    Gupta, Nitin; Varghese, Suresh; Virkar, Hemant

    2011-01-01

    The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Division of AIDS (DAIDS) Enterprise Information System (DAIDS-ES) is a web-based system that supports NIAID in the scientific, strategic, and tactical management of its global clinical research programs for HIV/AIDS vaccines, prevention, and therapeutics. Different from most commercial clinical trials information systems, which are typically protocol-driven, the DAIDS-ES was built to exchange information with those types of systems and integrate it in ways that help scientific program directors lead the research effort and keep pace with the complex and ever-changing global HIV/AIDS pandemic. Whereas commercially available clinical trials support systems are not usually disease-focused, DAIDS-ES was specifically designed to capture and incorporate unique scientific, demographic, and logistical aspects of HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention, and vaccine research in order to provide a rich source of information to guide informed decision-making. Sharing data across its internal components and with external systems, using defined vocabularies, open standards and flexible interfaces, the DAIDS-ES enables NIAID, its global collaborators and stakeholders, access to timely, quality information about NIAID-supported clinical trials which is utilized to: (1) analyze the research portfolio, assess capacity, identify opportunities, and avoid redundancies; (2) help support study safety, quality, ethics, and regulatory compliance; (3) conduct evidence-based policy analysis and business process re-engineering for improved efficiency. This report summarizes how the DAIDS-ES was conceptualized, how it differs from typical clinical trial support systems, the rationale for key design choices, and examples of how it is being used to advance the efficiency and effectiveness of NIAID's HIV/AIDS clinical research programs. PMID:21816958

  16. Global Trends in Alzheimer Disease Clinical Development: Increasing the Probability of Success.

    Sugino, Haruhiko; Watanabe, Akihito; Amada, Naoki; Yamamoto, Miho; Ohgi, Yuta; Kostic, Dusan; Sanchez, Raymond

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a growing global health and economic issue as elderly populations increase dramatically across the world. Despite the many clinical trials conducted, currently no approved disease-modifying treatment exists. In this commentary, the present status of AD drug development and the grounds for collaborations between government, academia, and industry to accelerate the development of disease-modifying AD therapies are discussed. Official government documents, literature, and news releases were surveyed by MEDLINE and website research. Currently approved anti-AD drugs provide only short-lived symptomatic improvements, which have no effect on the underlying pathogenic mechanisms or progression of the disease. The failure to approve a disease-modifying drug for AD may be because the progression of AD in the patient populations enrolled in clinical studies was too advanced for drugs to demonstrate cognitive and functional improvements. The US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency recently published draft guidance for industry which discusses approaches for conducting clinical studies with patients in early AD stages. For successful clinical trials in early-stage AD, however, it will be necessary to identify biomarkers highly correlated with the clinical onset and the longitudinal progress of AD. In addition, because of the high cost and length of clinical AD studies, support in the form of global initiatives and collaborations between government, industry, and academia is needed. In response to this situation, national guidance and international collaborations have been established. Global initiatives are focusing on 2025 as a goal to provide new treatment options, and early signs of success in biomarker and drug development are already emerging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of amitriptyline vs. physiotherapy in management of fibromyalgia syndrome: What predicts a clinical benefit?

    Joshi M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Fibromyalgia is a chronic disabling condition, and physicians treat it using a number of different treatment modalities. It is not known if one or more of such modalities are better than the others. We compared the efficacy of physiotherapy and amitriptyline in disability reduction in patients of fibromyalgia syndrome in a rural tertiary care hospital in Central India. Design : Open-label alternate patient treatment allocation. Materials and Methods : A six-month follow-up was done to assess the benefit of amitriptyline and physiotherapy for disability reduction in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. Primary outcome measure was improvement in fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ score. Statistical Analysis Used : Predictors of benefit were determined using multivariate logistic regression. Results : A total of 175 outpatients were assigned to either amitriptyline (n=87 or structured physiotherapy (n=88 treatments. There was a significant but similar (P=0.82 improvement in disability in both groups. High FIQ score at baseline and low socioeconomic status scores were significant predictors of benefit. Conclusions : Therapy with amitriptyline or physiotherapy is equally effective in improving outcome in patients of fibromyalgia over a period of six months.

  18. Clinical symptoms predict concurrent social and global functioning in an early psychosis sample.

    Cacciotti-Saija, Cristina; Langdon, Robyn; Ward, Philip B; Hickie, Ian B; Guastella, Adam J

    2018-04-01

    Although well established in chronic schizophrenia, the key determinants of functioning remain unknown during the early phase of a psychotic disorder. The aim of this study was to comprehensively examine the social cognitive, basic neurocognitive and clinical predictors of concurrent social functioning and global functioning in an early psychosis sample. This study examined the relationship between social cognition, basic neurocognition and clinical symptoms with concurrent functioning in 51 early psychosis individuals. Assessments included a range of self-report, observational and clinician-rated measures of cognitive, symptom severity and functioning domains. Results revealed a significant association between self-reported social function and lower levels of both social interaction anxiety and negative psychotic symptoms. A significant association was also observed between lower levels of negative psychotic symptoms and observed social functioning. Lastly, results demonstrated a significant association between reduced negative psychotic symptoms and clinician-rated global functioning. Clinical domains such as negative symptoms and social interaction anxiety significantly contribute to an optimal model predicting outcome during the early phase of a psychotic disorder. These clinical features may also provide useful markers of an individual's capacity for social participation. Clinical implications include the need for early targeted intervention to address social anxiety and negative psychotic symptoms to facilitate optimum patient outcome. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Weighing the evidence: risks and benefits of participatory documentary in corporatized clinics.

    Hansen, Helena

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the effects of one U.S.-based public psychiatry clinic's shift to a centralized, corporate style of management, in response to pressures to cut expenditures by focusing on "evidence based" treatments. Participant observation research conducted between 2008 and 2012 for a larger study involving 127 interviews with policy makers, clinic managers, clinical practitioners and patients revealed that the shift heralded the decline of arts based therapies in the clinic, and of the social networks that had developed around them. It also inspired a participatory video self-documentary project among art group members, to portray the importance of arts-based therapies and garner public support for such therapies. Group members found a way to take action in the face of unilateral decision making, but experienced subsequent restrictions on clinic activities and discharge of core members from the clinic. The paper ends with a discussion of biopolitics, central legibility through corporate standardization, and the potential and risks of participatory documentaries to resist these trends. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Cost and economic benefit of clinical decision support systems for cardiovascular disease prevention: a community guide systematic review.

    Jacob, Verughese; Thota, Anilkrishna B; Chattopadhyay, Sajal K; Njie, Gibril J; Proia, Krista K; Hopkins, David P; Ross, Murray N; Pronk, Nicolaas P; Clymer, John M

    2017-05-01

    This review evaluates costs and benefits associated with acquiring, implementing, and operating clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods developed for the Community Guide were used to review CDSS literature covering the period from January 1976 to October 2015. Twenty-one studies were identified for inclusion. It was difficult to draw a meaningful estimate for the cost of acquiring and operating CDSSs to prevent CVD from the available studies ( n  = 12) due to considerable heterogeneity. Several studies ( n  = 11) indicated that health care costs were averted by using CDSSs but many were partial assessments that did not consider all components of health care. Four cost-benefit studies reached conflicting conclusions about the net benefit of CDSSs based on incomplete assessments of costs and benefits. Three cost-utility studies indicated inconsistent conclusions regarding cost-effectiveness based on a conservative $50,000 threshold. Intervention costs were not negligible, but specific estimates were not derived because of the heterogeneity of implementation and reporting metrics. Expected economic benefits from averted health care cost could not be determined with confidence because many studies did not fully account for all components of health care. We were unable to conclude whether CDSSs for CVD prevention is either cost-beneficial or cost-effective. Several evidence gaps are identified, most prominently a lack of information about major drivers of cost and benefit, a lack of standard metrics for the cost of CDSSs, and not allowing for useful life of a CDSS that generally extends beyond one accounting period. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. Benefits of a transfer clinic in adolescent and young adult kidney transplant patients.

    McQuillan, Rory F; Toulany, Alene; Kaufman, Miriam; Schiff, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent and young adult kidney transplant recipients have worse graft outcomes than older and younger age groups. Difficulties in the process of transition, defined as the purposeful, planned movement of adolescents with chronic health conditions from child to adult-centered health care systems, may contribute to this. Improving the process of transition may improve adherence post-transfer to adult care services. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether a kidney transplant transfer clinic for adolescent and young adult kidney transplant recipients transitioning from pediatric to adult care improves adherence post-transfer. We developed a joint kidney transplant transfer clinic between a pediatric kidney transplant program, adult kidney transplant program, and adolescent medicine at two academic health centers. The transfer clinic facilitated communication between the adult and pediatric transplant teams, a face-to-face meeting of the patient with the adult team, and a meeting with the adolescent medicine physician. We compared the outcomes of 16 kidney transplant recipients transferred before the clinic was established with 16 patients who attended the clinic. The primary outcome was a composite measure of non-adherence. Non-adherence was defined as either self-reported medication non-adherence or displaying two of the following three characteristics: non-attendance at clinic, non-attendance for blood work appointments, or undetectable calcineurin inhibitor levels within 1 year post-transfer. The two groups were similar at baseline, with non-adherence identified in 43.75 % of patients. Non-adherent behavior in the year post-transfer, which included missing clinic visits, missing regular blood tests, and undetectable calcineurin inhibitor levels, was significantly lower in the cohort which attended the transfer clinic (18.8 versus 62.5 %, p = 0.03). The median change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in the year following transfer

  2. Benefits of a Transfer Clinic in Adolescent and Young Adult Kidney Transplant Patients

    Rory F. McQuillan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adolescent and young adult kidney transplant recipients have worse graft outcomes than older and younger age groups. Difficulties in the process of transition, defined as the purposeful, planned movement of adolescents with chronic health conditions from child to adult-centered health care systems, may contribute to this. Improving the process of transition may improve adherence post-transfer to adult care services. Objective: The purpose of this study is to investigate whether a kidney transplant transfer clinic for adolescent and young adult kidney transplant recipients transitioning from pediatric to adult care improves adherence post-transfer. Methods: We developed a joint kidney transplant transfer clinic between a pediatric kidney transplant program, adult kidney transplant program, and adolescent medicine at two academic health centers. The transfer clinic facilitated communication between the adult and pediatric transplant teams, a face-to-face meeting of the patient with the adult team, and a meeting with the adolescent medicine physician. We compared the outcomes of 16 kidney transplant recipients transferred before the clinic was established with 16 patients who attended the clinic. The primary outcome was a composite measure of non-adherence. Non-adherence was defined as either self-reported medication non-adherence or displaying two of the following three characteristics: non-attendance at clinic, non-attendance for blood work appointments, or undetectable calcineurin inhibitor levels within 1 year post-transfer. Results: The two groups were similar at baseline, with non-adherence identified in 43.75 % of patients. Non-adherent behavior in the year post-transfer, which included missing clinic visits, missing regular blood tests, and undetectable calcineurin inhibitor levels, was significantly lower in the cohort which attended the transfer clinic (18.8 versus 62.5 %, p = 0.03. The median change in estimated glomerular

  3. Does carbetocin for prevention of postpartum haemorrhage at caesarean section provide clinical or financial benefit compared with oxytocin?

    Higgins, L; Mechery, J; Tomlinson, A J

    2011-11-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. A recent Cochrane review of carbetocin (long-acting oxytocin analogue) concluded that its use decreased additional uterotonic requirements, however, no included studies compared its use against intravenous bolus oxytocin. The majority of studies of carbetocin have considered its use in vaginal delivery; no studies have examined the economic implications of its use. This study describes a clinical and financial evaluation undertaken at a United Kingdom District General Hospital surrounding the introduction of carbetocin for prophylaxis against postpartum haemorrhage at caesarean deliveries. A range of clinical outcomes were observed including frequency of postpartum haemorrhage, estimated blood loss, transfusion requirements, change in haemoglobin or haemodynamics, use of additional uterotonics and perioperative recovery. Finally, a composite financial analysis was performed. No clinically significant benefit was found, however associated costs increased by £18.52/patient.

  4. Considering benefits and harms of duloxetine for treatment of stress urinary incontinence: a meta-analysis of clinical study reports

    Maund, Emma; Guski, Louise Schow; Gøtzsche, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Medicines Agency makes clinical study reports publicly available and publishes reasons for not approving applications for marketing authorization. Duloxetine has been approved in Europe for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women. The reported adverse effects...... of duloxetine include mental health problems and suicidality. We obtained clinical study reports from the European Medicines Agency concerning use of this drug for stress urinary incontinence. METHODS: We performed a meta-analysis of 4 randomized placebo-controlled trials of duloxetine (involving a total...... of 1913 patients) submitted to the European Medicines Agency for marketing approval for the indication of stress urinary incontinence in women. We used data from the clinical study reports (totalling 6870 pages and including individual patient data) to assess benefits (including frequency of incontinence...

  5. Randomized, blinded, controlled clinical trial shows no benefit of homeopathic mastitis treatment in dairy cows.

    Ebert, Fanny; Staufenbiel, Rudolf; Simons, Julia; Pieper, Laura

    2017-06-01

    Mastitis is one of the most common diseases in dairy production, and homeopathic remedies have been used increasingly in recent years to treat it. Clinical trials evaluating homeopathy have often been criticized for their inadequate scientific approach. The objective of this triple-blind, randomized controlled trial was to assess the efficacy of homeopathic treatment in bovine clinical mastitis. The study was conducted on a conventionally managed dairy farm between June 2013 and May 2014. Dairy cows with acute mastitis were randomly allocated to homeopathy (n = 70) or placebo (n = 92), for a total of 162 animals. The homeopathic treatment was selected based on clinical symptoms but most commonly consisted of a combination of nosodes with Streptococcinum, Staphylococcinum, Pyrogenium, and Escherichia coli at a potency of 200c. Treatment was administered to cows in the homeopathy group at least once per day for an average of 5 d. The cows in the placebo group were treated similarly, using a placebo preparation instead (lactose globules without active ingredients). If necessary, we also used allopathic drugs (e.g., antibiotics, udder creams, and anti-inflammatory drugs) in both groups. We recorded data relating to the clinical signs of mastitis, treatment, time to recovery, milk yield, somatic cell count at first milk recording after mastitis, and culling. We observed cows for up to 200 d after clinical recovery. Base-level data did not differ between the homeopathy and placebo groups. Mastitis lasted for an average of 6 d in both groups. We observed no significant differences in time to recovery, somatic cell count, risk of clinical cure within 14 d after disease occurrence, mastitis recurrence risk, or culling risk. The results indicated no additional effect of homeopathic treatment compared with placebo. The advantages or disadvantages of homeopathy should be carefully assessed for individual farms. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by

  6. Benefits of Exercise on the Executive Functions in People with Parkinson Disease: A Controlled Clinical Trial.

    de Oliveira, Renata Terra; Felippe, Lilian Assunção; Bucken Gobbi, Lilian Teresa; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto; Christofoletti, Gustavo

    2017-05-01

    We have made a 3-arm trial (group vs. individual exercise vs. no treatment) to test the effects of a 6-month exercise program upon the executive functions in participants with Parkinson disease. Twenty-four subjects were randomly allocated in 3 groups and undertook individualized exercises (G1, n = 8), group exercises (G2, n = 8), or monitoring (G3, n = 8). Executive functions were evaluated by means of the Wisconsin card sorting test and the Raven colored matrices, both assessed at the beginning of the program and after 6 months. The statistical analyses consisted of the application of repeated measurement tests, with a significant level of 5%. The findings showed similar behavior of groups in terms of the Wisconsin card sorting test (P = 0.792), reporting no benefit of the program on such instrument. Differently, Raven colored matrices evidenced a significant benefit provided by the intervention (P = 0.032). Compared with the control group, individuals from G1 had a substantial improvement on executive functions (P = 0.031) and from G2 had a trend of significance (P = 0.072). Findings of this study show that 6 months of exercise improved some aspects of executive functions when compared with control peers. Individual therapy seems to have a more prominent improvement than group therapy.

  7. Globalization

    Plum, Maja

    Globalization is often referred to as external to education - a state of affair facing the modern curriculum with numerous challenges. In this paper it is examined as internal to curriculum; analysed as a problematization in a Foucaultian sense. That is, as a complex of attentions, worries, ways...... of reasoning, producing curricular variables. The analysis is made through an example of early childhood curriculum in Danish Pre-school, and the way the curricular variable of the pre-school child comes into being through globalization as a problematization, carried forth by the comparative practices of PISA...

  8. Globalization

    F. Gerard Adams

    2008-01-01

    The rapid globalization of the world economy is causing fundamental changes in patterns of trade and finance. Some economists have argued that globalization has arrived and that the world is “flat†. While the geographic scope of markets has increased, the author argues that new patterns of trade and finance are a result of the discrepancies between “old†countries and “new†. As the differences are gradually wiped out, particularly if knowledge and technology spread worldwide, the t...

  9. Diagnostic outcome following routine genetics clinic referral for the assessment of global developmental delay.

    Shahdadpuri, R

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the diagnostic yield following a routine genetics clinic referral for the assessment of global developmental delay. Detailed retrospective review of 119 complete consecutive case notes of patients referred to one single clinical geneticist over a 14 month time period was undertaken (n = 119; 54 males, 65 females). The age at initial review ranged from 2 months to 37 years 3 months (mean 8 y 3 mo [SD 7 y 10 mo]). We made a diagnosis in 36\\/119 (30%); 21\\/36 were new diagnoses and 15\\/36 were confirmations of diagnoses. We removed a wrong diagnostic label in 8\\/119 (7%). In 3\\/8 we were able to achieve a diagnosis but in 5\\/8 no alternative diagnosis was reached. We had a better diagnostic rate where the patients were dysmorphic (odds ratio [OR] 1.825; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.065 to 3.128, p = 0.044). In the majority, the diagnosis was made by clinical examination only. Molecular diagnosis was reached in seven cases. Five cases were confirmed by cytogenetic analysis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a diagnosis in three cases. This study confirms the importance of a clinical genetics assessment in the investigation of global developmental delay.

  10. The benefits of a Neurogenetics clinic in an adult Academic Teaching Hospital.

    Olszewska, Diana A; McVeigh, Terri; Fallon, Emer M; Pastores, Gregory M; Lynch, Tim

    2018-03-09

    Genetics is the backbone of Neurology, where a number of disorders have a genetic aetiology and are complex, requiring a dedicated Neurogenetics clinic. Genetics in the Republic of Ireland is under-resourced, with the lowest number of consultants per million of population in Europe. In November 2014, we established the monthly adult Neurogenetics clinic in Ireland, staffed by 2 consultants and 2 registrars from each speciality. We see patients with complex rare neurological conditions that may potentially have an underlying genetic basis, in the presence or absence of a family history. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis, reviewing symptoms and work-up data. Twenty-seven patients attended a pilot clinic over 12 months. Conditions encountered included Parkin-related PD, leucodystrophy, ataxia, fronto-temporal lobar degeneration, spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) and ataxia-telangiectasia. Identification of pathogenic mutations directed screening, treatment and facilitated onward genetic counselling (n = 10, 33%). A number of novel mutations were identified in MAPT gene ("missing tau mutation" McCarthy et al., Brain, 2015), SLCA1 gene and GRN (progranulin). Phenotypic features not previously reported were seen; e.g. writer's cramp in SCA6; paroxysmal myoclonus in the glucose transporter protein type 1 (GLUT1) deficiency. Breast cancer screening for ATM mutations carriers and referral to international experts in two undiagnosed patients were arranged. The establishment of a Neurogenetics clinic has addressed a gap in service and allowed identification of rare and atypical diagnoses.

  11. Benefits of a clinical planning and coordination module: a simulation study

    Jensen, Sanne; Vingtoft, Søren; Nøhr, Christian

    2013-01-01

    igital Clinical Practice Guidelines are commonly used in Danish health care. Planning and decision support are particularly important to patients with chronic diseases, who often are in contact with General Practitioners, Community Nurses and hospitals. In the Capital Region of Denmark...

  12. Global regulatory developments for clinical stem cell research: diversification and challenges to collaborations.

    Rosemann, Achim; Bortz, Gabriela; Vasen, Federico; Sleeboom-Faulkner, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    In this article, we explore regulatory developments in stem cell medicine in seven jurisdictions: Japan, China, India, Argentina, Brazil, the USA and the EU. We will show that the research methods, ethical standards and approval procedures for the market use of clinical stem cell interventions are undergoing an important process of global diversification. We will discuss the implications of this process for international harmonization and the conduct of multicountry clinical research collaborations. It will become clear that the increasing heterogeneity of research standards and regulations in the stem cell field presents a significant challenge to international clinical trial partnerships, especially with countries that diverge from the regulatory models that have been developed in the USA and the EU.

  13. Electronically implemented clinical indicators based on a data warehouse in a tertiary hospital: its clinical benefit and effectiveness.

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Kim, Seok; Lee, Kee-Hyuck; Jeong, Chang Wook; Youn, Sang Woong; Park, Kyoung Un; Moon, So Young; Hwang, Hee

    2014-07-01

    Assessing and monitoring care and service using clinical indicators (CIs) can allow the measurement of and lead to improvements in the quality of care. However, the management and maintenance of CI data has been shown to be difficult because the data are usually collected and provided manually. In this study, for the purpose of efficient managing quality indicators, a data warehouse (DW)-based CI monitoring system was developed. The clinical effectiveness and efficiency of a DW-based CI monitoring was investigated through several case studies of the system's operation at a tertiary hospital. This study analyzed the CIs that have been developed over the past 8 years at a 1340-bed tertiary general university hospital in South Korea to improve and monitor the quality of care and patient safety. The hospital was opened as a fully digital hospital in 2003, and the CIs were computerized in 2005 by implementing a DW-based CI monitoring system. We classified the computerized CIs and evaluated the monitoring results for several representative CIs, such as the optimal prescribing of preventive antibiotics, the average length of stay, the mortality rate, and the rehospitalization rate. During the development of the system in 2005, 12 of 19 CIs were computerized, and this number gradually increased until 299 of 335 CIs were computerized by 2012. In addition, among the CIs built computationally through the CI task force team, focal CIs subject to monitoring were selected annually, and the results of this monitoring were shared with all of the staff or the related department and its staff. By providing some examples of our CI monitoring results, we showed the feasibility of improving the quality of care, and maintaining the optimum level of patient care with less labor. The results of this study provide evidence regarding the clinical effectiveness and efficiency as well as the systems operation experience of a DW-based CI monitoring system. These findings may aid medical

  14. Review of endoscopic radiofrequency in biliopancreatic tumours with emphasis on clinical benefits, controversies and safety

    Alvarez-Sánchez, María-Victoria; Napoléon, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Most pancreatic cancers and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas are unresectable at the time of diagnosis, and even in case of a resectable cancer, for elderly or patients with coexistent comorbidities, surgery is not an option. Current treatment alternatives in these scenarios are very limited. Biliary stenting with self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) is the mainstay palliative treatment of biliary obstruction due to unresectable pancreatic cancer or cholangiocarcinoma. Nevertheless, more than 50% of SEMS become occluded after 6 mo due to tumour over- and ingrowth, leading to hospital readmissions and reinterventions that significantly impair quality of life. Regimes of chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy also provide minimal survival benefits. Therefore, novel therapies are eagerly awaited. Radiofrequency (RF) energy causes coagulative necrosis leading to local destruction of the accessed malignant tissue and has an established role in the treatment of malignancies in several solid organs, especially liver cancers. However, pancreatic and extrahepatic biliary cancers are not easily accessed by a percutaneous route, making the procedure dangerous. Over the past five years, the development of dedicated devices compatible with endoscopic instruments has offered a minimally invasive option for RF energy delivery in biliopancreatic cancers. Emerging experience with endoscopic RF ablation (RFA) in this setting has been reported in the literature, but little is known about its feasibility, efficacy and safety. A literature review makes it clear that RFA in biliopancreatic tumours is feasible with high rates of technical success and acceptable safety profile. Although available data suggest a benefit of survival with RFA, there is not enough evidence to draw a firm conclusion about its efficacy. For this reason, prospective randomized trials comparing RFA with standard palliative treatments with quality-of-life and survival endpoints are required. Anecdotal reports have also

  15. Clinical benefit of gluten-free diet in screen-detected older celiac disease patients

    Vilppula Anitta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The utility of serologic screening for celiac disease is still debatable. Evidence suggests that the disorder remains undetected even in the older population. It remains obscure whether screening makes good or harm in subjects with long-standing gluten ingestion. We evaluated whether older subjects benefit from active detection and subsequent gluten free dietary treatment of celiac disease. Methods Thirty-five biopsy-proven patients aged over 50 years had been detected by serologic mass screening. We examined the disease history, dietary compliance, symptoms, quality of life and bone mineral density at baseline and 1-2 years after the commencement of a gluten-free diet. Symptoms were evaluated by gastrointestinal symptom rating scale and quality of life by psychological general well-being questionnaires. Small bowel biopsy, serology, laboratory parameters assessing malabsorption, and bone mineral density were investigated. Results Dietary compliance was good. The patients had initially low mean serum ferritin values indicating subclinical iron deficiency, which was restored by a gluten-free diet. Vitamin B12, vitamin D and erythrocyte folic acid levels increased significantly on diet. Celiac patients had a history of low-energy fractures more often than the background population, and the diet had a beneficial effect on bone mineral density. Alleviation in gastrointestinal symptoms was observed, even though the patients reported no or only subtle symptoms at diagnosis. Quality of life remained unchanged. Of all the cases, two thirds would have been diagnosed even without screening if the family history, fractures or concomitant autoimmune diseases had been taken carefully into account. Conclusions Screen-detected patients benefited from a gluten-free diet. We encourage a high index of suspicion and active case-finding in celiac disease as an alternative to mass screening in older patients.

  16. Association of global weather changes with acute coronary syndromes: gaining insights from clinical trials data

    Bakal, Jeffrey A.; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Westerhout, Cynthia M.; Boersma, Eric; Armstrong, Paul W.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method for the identification of global weather parameters and patient characteristics associated with a type of heart attack in which there is a sudden partial blockage of a coronary artery. This type of heart attack does not demonstrate an elevation of the ST segment on an electrocardiogram and is defined as a non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS). Data from the Global Summary of the Day database was linked with the enrollment and baseline data for a phase III international clinical trial in NSTE-ACS in four 48-h time periods covering the week prior to the clinical event that prompted enrollment in the study. Meteorological events were determined by standardizing the weather data from enrollment dates against an empirical distribution from the month prior. These meteorological events were then linked to the patients' geographic region, demographics and comorbidities to identify potential susceptible populations. After standardization, changes in temperature and humidity demonstrated an association with the enrollment event. Additionally there appeared to be an association with gender, region and a history of stroke. This methodology may provide a useful global insight into assessing the biometeorologic component of diseases from international data.

  17. [Who benefits from the night clinic? - Value of a part-time treatment facility].

    Stutz, Constanze; Kawohl, Wolfram; Platz, Christoph; Warnke, Ingeborg; Jäger, Matthias

    2017-12-01

    The night clinic which is part of the psychiatric department of the University of Zurich is a part-time treatment option with psychiatric treatment and support in the evening. This study aimed to characterize the patients and detect different functions of the treatment setting. Data of 253 patients covering a six-year period from 2008 up to 2013 were retrospectively assessed using descriptive methods. Subgroups according to the situation before admission and after discharge were compared. Patients admitted from home differed considerably from those who were transferred from a psychiatric ward concerning sociodemographic and clinical factors. They were more frequently single, unemployed, received disability funds and suffered from a psychotic disorder. They were also more likely to be discharged in a supported housing condition. The night clinic serves as an alternative to full inpatient treatment for individuals who have work as well as a rehabilitative option for homeless patients with severe mental illness. It contributes to a reduction of avoidance of inpatients stays for those groups of patients.

  18. Benefits, Barriers, and Motivators to Training Dietetic Interns in Clinical Settings: A Comparison between Preceptors and Nonpreceptors.

    AbuSabha, Rayane; Muller, Colette; MacLasco, Jacqueline; George, Mary; Houghton, Erica; Helm, Alison

    2018-03-01

    The shortage of supervised practice sites in dietetics is associated with fewer numbers of preceptors available to supervise interns, especially in the clinical setting. To identify clinical dietitians' perceived benefits and challenges of training dietetic interns and to determine key motivators that would entice nonpreceptors to volunteer for the role. Registered dietitian nutritionists working in clinical settings completed a semi-structured, audiotaped interview followed by a brief questionnaire. Clinical dietitians working in hospitals, long-term care facilities, and outpatient clinics (n=100) participated: 54 preceptors and 46 nonpreceptors. Qualitative analysis was conducted using an iterative process to identify and code common themes. T tests were used to compare mean differences between the opinions of preceptors and nonpreceptors. Preceptors had approximately 5 more years of experience (mean=14.27±12.09 years) than nonpreceptors (mean=8.83±9.72 years) (Pmotivator for taking on interns. Incentive programs should be developed to entice nonpreceptors to take on interns. These programs should include extensive training on the preceptor role and how to alleviate the burden of time spent supervising interns and should provide a significant number of CPEUs to make the added workload worthwhile. Copyright © 2018 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Applying global cost-benefit analysis methods to indoor air pollution mitigation interventions in Nepal, Kenya and Sudan: Insights and challenges

    Malla, Min Bikram; Bruce, Nigel; Bates, Elizabeth; Rehfuess, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Indoor air pollution from burning solid fuels for cooking is a major environmental health problem in developing countries, predominantly affecting children and women. Traditional household energy practices also contribute to substantial time loss and drudgery among households. While effective interventions exist, levels of investment to date have been very low, in part due to lack of evidence on economic viability. Between 2004 and 2007, different combinations of interventions – improved stoves, smoke hoods and a switch to liquefied petroleum gas – were implemented in poor communities in Nepal, Sudan and Kenya. The impacts were extensively evaluated and provided the basis for a household-level cost-benefit analysis, which essentially followed the methodology proposed by the World Health Organization. The results suggest that interventions are justified on economic grounds with estimated internal rates of return of 19%, 429% and 62% in Nepal, Kenya and Sudan, respectively. Time savings constituted by far the most important benefit followed by fuel cost savings; direct health improvements were a small component of the overall benefit. This paper describes the methodology applied, discusses the findings and highlights the methodological challenges that arise when a global approach is applied to a local programme. - Highlights: ► A project to alleviate indoor smoke from cooking fires in Sudan, Kenya and Nepal was evaluated. ► Investments for improving indoor air quality are shown to be justifiable on economic grounds. ► Savings in time and fuel costs, as well as health improvements are key benefits. ► The challenges of applying a global cost-benefit approach to a local programme are examined.

  20. Use of global assays to understand clinical phenotype in congenital factor VII deficiency.

    Greene, L A; Goldenberg, N A; Simpson, M L; Villalobos-Menuey, E; Bombardier, C; Acharya, S S; Santiago-Borrero, P J; Cambara, A; DiMichele, D M

    2013-09-01

    Congenital factor VII (FVII) deficiency is characterized by genotypic variability and phenotypic heterogeneity. Traditional screening and factor assays are unable to reliably predict clinical bleeding phenotype and guide haemorrhage prevention strategy. Global assays of coagulation and fibrinolysis may better characterize overall haemostatic balance and aid in haemorrhagic risk assessment. We evaluated the ability of novel global assays to better understand clinical bleeding severity in congenital FVII deficiency. Subjects underwent central determination of factor VII activity (FVII:C) as well as clot formation and lysis (CloFAL) and simultaneous thrombin and plasmin generation (STP) global assay analysis. A bleeding score was assigned to each subject through medical chart review. Global assay parameters were analysed with respect to bleeding score and FVII:C. Subgroup analyses were performed on paediatric subjects and subjects with FVII ≥ 1 IU dL(-1). CloFAL fibrinolytic index (FI2 ) inversely correlated with FVII:C while CloFAL maximum amplitude (MA) and STP maximum velocity of thrombin generation (VT max) varied directly with FVII:C. CloFAL FI2 directly correlated with bleeding score among subjects in both the total cohort and paediatric subcohort, but not among subjects with FVII ≥ 1 IU dL(-1) . Among subjects with FVII ≥ 1 IU dL(-1), STP time to maximum velocity of thrombin generation and time to maximum velocity of plasmin generation inversely correlated with bleeding score. These preliminary findings suggest a novel potential link between a hyperfibrinolytic state in bleeding severity and congenital FVII deficiency, an observation that should be further explored. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Clinical and economic benefit of general practitioner integration to a symptomatic breast service.

    Beecher, S M; Donlan, C; O'Leary, D P; Kerin, M J; McLaughlin, R

    2016-11-01

    Integration of general practitioners (GPs) into a tertiary care team is a model used internationally to assist with provision of patient care. Symptomatic breast clinics have seen significant increases in attendances and consequential staffing issues. We wished to analyze the integration of GPs into a tertiary breast care team and establish whether their inclusion is a cost-effective approach. A prospectively maintained database was used to identify 1614 new and 1453 review patients seen in the clinic between September and December 2013. The triple assessment clinical, radiological, and biopsy scores of patients assessed by GPs were compared to those assessed by registrars and to the overall number of patients seen. A cost analysis was performed based on the hourly rates of GPs and registrars. 1614 new patients seen over the 4-month period. GPs reviewed a mean of 153.6 new patients and registrars reviewed a mean of 97.8. Registrars reviewed patients who were allocated higher 'S' scores, with 46 % of patients allocated an S4 and 21 % of patients allocated an S5 score. GPs reviewed a mean of 115.6 return patients and registrars reviewed a mean of 110.1 return patients. The weekly cost of employing 3 GPs for 15 h was €835. This compares favorably to the cost of employing a full-time registrar. This study demonstrates that GPs can play a substantial role in the provision of a symptomatic breast service. In addition, the incorporation of GPs in this setting can prove cost-effective.

  2. [Clinical benefit of HCV core antigen assay in patients receiving interferon and ribavirin combination therapy].

    Higashimoto, Makiko; Takahashi, Masahiko; Jokyu, Ritsuko; Saito, Hidetsugu

    2006-02-01

    A highly sensitive second generation HCV core antigen assay has recently been developed. We compared viral disappearance and kinetics data between commercially available core antigen assays, Lumipulse Ortho HCV Ag, and a quantitative HCV RNA PCR assay, Cobas Amplicor HCV Monitor Test, Version 2 to estimate the predictive benefit of sustained viral response (SVR) and non-SVR in 59 patients treated with interferon and ribavirin combination therapy. We found a good correlation between HCV core Ag and HCV RNA level regardless of genotype. Although the sensitivity of the core antigen assay was lower than PCR, the dynamic range was broader than that of the PCR assay, so that we did not need to dilute the samples in 59 patients. We detected serial decline of core Ag levels in 24 hrs, 7 days and 14 days after interferon combination therapy. The decline of core antigen levels was significant in SVR patients compared to non-SVR as well as in genotype 2a, 2b patients compared to 1b. Core antigen-negative on day 1 could predict all 10 SVR patients (PPV = 100%), whereas RNA-negative could predict 22 SVR out of 25 on day 14 (PPV = 88.0%). None of the patients who had detectable serum core antigen on day 14 became SVR(NPV = 100%), although NPV was 91.2% on RNA negativity. An easy, simple, low cost new HCV core antigen detecting system seems to be useful for assessing and monitoring IFN treatment for HCV.

  3. The Costa Rica GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment) Project as a Learning Science Environment

    Castro Rojas, María Dolores; Zuñiga, Ana Lourdes Acuña; Ugalde, Emmanuel Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    GLOBE is a global educational program for elementary and high school levels, and its main purpose in Costa Rica is to develop scientific thinking and interest for science in high school students through hydrology research projects that allow them to relate science with environmental issues in their communities. Youth between 12 and 17 years old…

  4. Net benefits: assessing the effectiveness of clinical networks in Australia through qualitative methods

    Cunningham Frances C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the 21st century, government and industry are supplementing hierarchical, bureaucratic forms of organization with network forms, compatible with principles of devolved governance and decentralization of services. Clinical networks are employed as a key health policy approach to engage clinicians in improving patient care in Australia. With significant investment in such networks in Australia and internationally, it is important to assess their effectiveness and sustainability as implementation mechanisms. Methods In two purposively selected, musculoskeletal clinical networks, members and stakeholders were interviewed to ascertain their perceptions regarding key factors relating to network effectiveness and sustainability. We adopted a three-level approach to evaluating network effectiveness: at the community, network, and member levels, across the network lifecycle. Results Both networks studied are advisory networks displaying characteristics of the ‘enclave’ type of non-hierarchical network. They are hybrids of the mandated and natural network forms. In the short term, at member level, both networks were striving to create connectivity and collaboration of members. Over the short to medium term, at network level, both networks applied multi-disciplinary engagement in successfully developing models of care as key outputs, and disseminating information to stakeholders. In the long term, at both community and network levels, stakeholders would measure effectiveness by the broader statewide influence of the network in changing and improving practice. At community level, in the long term, stakeholders acknowledged both networks had raised the profile, and provided a ‘voice’ for musculoskeletal conditions, evidencing some progress with implementation of the network mission while pursuing additional implementation strategies. Conclusions This research sheds light on stakeholders’ perceptions of assessing clinical

  5. Net benefits: assessing the effectiveness of clinical networks in Australia through qualitative methods.

    Cunningham, Frances C; Ranmuthugala, Geetha; Westbrook, Johanna I; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2012-11-02

    In the 21st century, government and industry are supplementing hierarchical, bureaucratic forms of organization with network forms, compatible with principles of devolved governance and decentralization of services. Clinical networks are employed as a key health policy approach to engage clinicians in improving patient care in Australia. With significant investment in such networks in Australia and internationally, it is important to assess their effectiveness and sustainability as implementation mechanisms. In two purposively selected, musculoskeletal clinical networks, members and stakeholders were interviewed to ascertain their perceptions regarding key factors relating to network effectiveness and sustainability. We adopted a three-level approach to evaluating network effectiveness: at the community, network, and member levels, across the network lifecycle. Both networks studied are advisory networks displaying characteristics of the 'enclave' type of non-hierarchical network. They are hybrids of the mandated and natural network forms. In the short term, at member level, both networks were striving to create connectivity and collaboration of members. Over the short to medium term, at network level, both networks applied multi-disciplinary engagement in successfully developing models of care as key outputs, and disseminating information to stakeholders. In the long term, at both community and network levels, stakeholders would measure effectiveness by the broader statewide influence of the network in changing and improving practice. At community level, in the long term, stakeholders acknowledged both networks had raised the profile, and provided a 'voice' for musculoskeletal conditions, evidencing some progress with implementation of the network mission while pursuing additional implementation strategies. This research sheds light on stakeholders' perceptions of assessing clinical network effectiveness at community, network, and member levels during the network

  6. Main technical aspects and clinical benefits of respiratory Gating for radiotherapy of lung neoplasm

    Benites, Rafaela Freitas Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    The concern with the irradiation of lung tumors is that many of them can move along the breathing, which can cause problems in defining accurately the target and increases the irradiation of normal tissues. The objectives are to present the 4D CT principles, image acquisition, reconstruction and application in planning of the radiotherapy. It justifies the quick implantation, improvements in acquisition and images, the possibility in quantify the tumor movement, verifying strategies and delivery treatment. It's concluded that the toxicity risk is reduced with the respiratory gating, and the results suggests that the closed RT will be of clinical relevance. (author)

  7. Driving clinical study efficiency by using a productivity breakdown model: comparative evaluation of a global clinical study and a similar Japanese study.

    Takahashi, K; Sengoku, S; Kimura, H

    2011-02-01

    A fundamental management imperative of pharmaceutical companies is to contain surging costs of developing and launching drugs globally. Clinical studies are a research and development (R&D) cost driver. The objective of this study was to develop a productivity breakdown model, or a key performance indicator (KPI) tree, for an entire clinical study and to use it to compare a global clinical study with a similar Japanese study. We, thereby, hope to identify means of improving study productivity. We developed the new clinical study productivity breakdown model, covering operational aspects and cost factors. Elements for improving clinical study productivity were assessed from a management viewpoint by comparing empirical tracking data from a global clinical study with a Japanese study with similar protocols. The following unique and material differences, beyond simple international difference in cost of living, that could affect the efficiency of future clinical trials were identified: (i) more frequent site visits in the Japanese study, (ii) head counts at the Japanese study sites more than double those of the global study and (iii) a shorter enrollment time window of about a third that of the global study at the Japanese study sites. We identified major differences in the performance of the two studies. These findings demonstrate the potential of the KPI tree for improving clinical study productivity. Trade-offs, such as those between reduction in head count at study sites and expansion of the enrollment time window, must be considered carefully. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. A Novel Glycinate-based Body Wash: Clinical Investigation Into Ultra-mildness, Effective Conditioning, and Improved Consumer Benefits.

    Regan, Jamie; Mollica, Leonel-Maximo; Ananthapadmanabhan, K P

    2013-06-01

    To assess the properties of a novel body wash containing the mild surfactant glycinate. Biochemical and clinical assays. Research laboratories and clinical sites in the United States and Canada. Women 18 to 65 years of age (cleansing efficacy); male and female subjects 26 to 63 years of age with mild or moderate dryness and erythema (leg-controlled application test); subjects 5 to 65 years of age with mild-to-moderate eczema (eczema compatibility); and women 18 to 64 years of age (home use). Assessments across studies included colorimetric dye exclusion to assess skin damage potential (corneosurfametry), efficacy of cosmetic product removal from skin, change from baseline in visual dryness, change from baseline in Eczema Area and Severity Index, and self-perceived eczema attributes and self-reported product preference. The glycinate-based cleanser demonstrated mildness to skin components when evaluated in a corneosurfametry assay. Short-term use under exaggerated wash conditions in subjects with dryness scores benefits.

  9. Depression and Anxiety During Pregnancy: Evaluating the Literature in Support of Clinical Risk-Benefit Decision-Making.

    Dalke, Katharine Baratz; Wenzel, Amy; Kim, Deborah R

    2016-06-01

    Depression and anxiety during pregnancy are common, and patients and providers are faced with complex decisions regarding various treatment modalities. A structured discussion of the risks and benefits of options with the patient and her support team is recommended to facilitate the decision-making process. This clinically focused review, with emphasis on the last 3 years of published study data, evaluates the major risk categories of medication treatments, namely pregnancy loss, physical malformations, growth impairment, behavioral teratogenicity, and neonatal toxicity. Nonpharmacological treatment options, including neuromodulation and psychotherapy, are also briefly reviewed. Specific recommendations, drawn from the literature and the authors' clinical experience, are also offered to help guide the clinician in decision-making.

  10. Clinical benefit of ertapenem compared to flomoxef for the treatment of cefotaxime-resistant Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia.

    Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Chen, I-Ling; Li, Chia-Chin; Chien, Chun-Chih

    2018-01-01

    Cefotaxime-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CE) infections are intractable, with limited treatment options. Though carbapenems are frequently prescribed for CE infections, the emergence of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae is of huge concern. Flomoxef is effective against CE in vitro, and some clinical data on its demonstrated effectiveness against CE bloodstream infections (BSIs) exists. We conducted a retrospective study on adults with BSI caused by flomoxef-susceptible CE to investigate the efficacy of flomoxef compared with that of ertapenem. The outcome was evaluated with propensity score-based matching and logistic regression analysis. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients treated with flomoxef (n = 58) or ertapenem (n = 188) were compared. In the multivariate analysis, severe sepsis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-12.78; p = 0.03), high BSI mortality score (AOR = 5.59; 95% CI, 2.37-13.21; p flomoxef-treated patients were matched to 116 ertapenem-treated patients. There were no intergroup differences in BSI severity, comorbidity, or BSI sources. The 28-day mortality rates (20.7% vs 13.8%, p = 0.28) did not differ significantly. However, hospitalization length was shorter in the ertapenem group (10.2 ± 8.5 vs. 14.6 ± 9.4 days, p < 0.01). Although similar outcomes were observed between the groups, ertapenem therapy was associated with a shorter hospitalization time in adults after CE BSI.

  11. SGLT2 inhibitors with cardiovascular benefits: Transforming clinical care in Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    d'Emden, Michael; Amerena, John; Deed, Gary; Pollock, Carol; Cooper, Mark E

    2018-02-01

    Cardiovascular risk reduction in individuals with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a key part of clinical management. Sodium-glucose co-transporter (SGLT2) inhibitors improve glycaemic control, reduce body weight and decrease blood pressure. In addition, the SGLT2 inhibitors empagliflozin and canagliflozin reduced the risk of composite cardiovascular events in high-risk individuals with T2DM in the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial and the CANVAS Program, respectively. Empagliflozin also reduced cardiovascular deaths and improved renal outcomes. This class of agents should be considered in people with established cardiovascular disease, usually in combination with other glucose lowering medications, when satisfactory glycaemic control has not been achieved. The dose of insulin or sulfonylureas may need to be lowered when used with SGLT2 inhibitors, to reduce the risk of hypoglycaemia. Genitourinary infections can occur with SGLT2 inhibitors in a small proportion of people. In people with osteoporosis or prior amputation, it may be prudent to use empagliflozin rather than canagliflozin, based on the increased risk for bone fractures and amputations observed with canagliflozin in the CANVAS Program. SGLT2 inhibitors have the potential to transform the clinical care of persons with T2DM by not only improving glycaemic control but also reducing blood pressure, body weight and diabetes-related end-organ complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential Globalization of Industry- and Non-Industry-Sponsored Clinical Trials.

    Atal, Ignacio; Trinquart, Ludovic; Porcher, Raphaël; Ravaud, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mapping the international landscape of clinical trials may inform global health research governance, but no large-scale data are available. Industry or non-industry sponsorship may have a major influence in this mapping. We aimed to map the global landscape of industry- and non-industry-sponsored clinical trials and its evolution over time. We analyzed clinical trials initiated between 2006 and 2013 and registered in the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). We mapped single-country and international trials by World Bank's income groups and by sponsorship (industry- vs. non- industry), including its evolution over time from 2006 to 2012. We identified clusters of countries that collaborated significantly more than expected in industry- and non-industry-sponsored international trials. 119,679 clinical trials conducted in 177 countries were analysed. The median number of trials per million inhabitants in high-income countries was 100 times that in low-income countries (116.0 vs. 1.1). Industry sponsors were involved in three times more trials per million inhabitants than non-industry sponsors in high-income countries (75.0 vs. 24.5) and in ten times fewer trials in low- income countries (0.08 vs. 1.08). Among industry- and non-industry-sponsored trials, 30.3% and 3.2% were international, respectively. In the industry-sponsored network of collaboration, Eastern European and South American countries collaborated more than expected; in the non-industry-sponsored network, collaboration among Scandinavian countries was overrepresented. Industry-sponsored international trials became more inter-continental with time between 2006 and 2012 (from 54.8% to 67.3%) as compared with non-industry-sponsored trials (from 42.4% to 37.2%). Based on trials registered in the WHO ICTRP we documented a substantial gap between the globalization of industry- and non-industry-sponsored clinical research. Only 3% of academic trials but 30% of industry trials are

  13. Differential Globalization of Industry- and Non-Industry–Sponsored Clinical Trials

    Atal, Ignacio; Trinquart, Ludovic; Porcher, Raphaël; Ravaud, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background Mapping the international landscape of clinical trials may inform global health research governance, but no large-scale data are available. Industry or non-industry sponsorship may have a major influence in this mapping. We aimed to map the global landscape of industry- and non-industry–sponsored clinical trials and its evolution over time. Methods We analyzed clinical trials initiated between 2006 and 2013 and registered in the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). We mapped single-country and international trials by World Bank's income groups and by sponsorship (industry- vs. non- industry), including its evolution over time from 2006 to 2012. We identified clusters of countries that collaborated significantly more than expected in industry- and non-industry–sponsored international trials. Results 119,679 clinical trials conducted in 177 countries were analysed. The median number of trials per million inhabitants in high-income countries was 100 times that in low-income countries (116.0 vs. 1.1). Industry sponsors were involved in three times more trials per million inhabitants than non-industry sponsors in high-income countries (75.0 vs. 24.5) and in ten times fewer trials in low- income countries (0.08 vs. 1.08). Among industry- and non-industry–sponsored trials, 30.3% and 3.2% were international, respectively. In the industry-sponsored network of collaboration, Eastern European and South American countries collaborated more than expected; in the non-industry–sponsored network, collaboration among Scandinavian countries was overrepresented. Industry-sponsored international trials became more inter-continental with time between 2006 and 2012 (from 54.8% to 67.3%) as compared with non-industry–sponsored trials (from 42.4% to 37.2%). Conclusions Based on trials registered in the WHO ICTRP we documented a substantial gap between the globalization of industry- and non-industry–sponsored clinical research. Only 3% of

  14. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis: Lack of Clinical Benefit of Long-term Valacyclovir Therapy.

    Gnann, John W; Sköldenberg, Birgit; Hart, John; Aurelius, Elisabeth; Schliamser, Silvia; Studahl, Marie; Eriksson, Britt-Marie; Hanley, Daniel; Aoki, Fred; Jackson, Alan C; Griffiths, Paul; Miedzinski, Lil; Hanfelt-Goade, Diane; Hinthorn, Daniel; Ahlm, Clas; Aksamit, Allen; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Dale, Ilet; Cloud, Gretchen; Jester, Penelope; Whitley, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Despite the proven efficacy of acyclovir (ACV) therapy, herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) continues to cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Among patients with HSE treated with ACV, the mortality rate is approximately 14%-19%. Among survivors, 45%-60% have neuropsychological sequelae at 1 year. Thus, improving therapeutic approaches to HSE remains a high priority. Following completion of a standard course of intravenous ACV, 87 adult patients with HSE (confirmed by positive polymerase chain reaction [PCR] for herpes simplex virus DNA in cerebrospinal fluid) were randomized to receive either valacyclovir (VACV) 2 g thrice daily (n = 40) or placebo tablets (n = 47) for 90 days (12 tablets of study medication daily). The primary endpoint was survival with no or mild neuropsychological impairment at 12 months, as measured by the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale (MDRS). Logistic regression was utilized to assess factors related to the primary endpoint. The demographic characteristics of the 2 randomization groups were statistically similar with no significant differences in age, sex, or race. At 12 months, there was no significant difference in the MDRS scoring for VACV-treated vs placebo recipients, with 85.7% and 90.2%, respectively, of patients demonstrating no or mild neuropsychological impairment (P = .72). No significant study-related adverse events were encountered in either treatment group. Following standard treatment with intravenous ACV for PCR-confirmed HSE, an additional 3-month course of oral VACV therapy did not provide added benefit as measured by neuropsychological testing 12 months later in a population of relatively high-functioning survivors. NCT00031486. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Clinical benefits of tight glycaemic control: focus on the intensive care unit.

    Mesotten, Dieter; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2009-12-01

    While stress hyperglycaemia has traditionally been regarded as an adaptive, beneficial response, it is clear that hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia are associated with increased risk of death in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Recent studies on blood-glucose control failed to fully clarify whether this association is causal. Early proof-of-concept single-centre randomised controlled studies found that maintaining normoglycaemia by intensive insulin therapy, as compared with tolerating hyperglycaemia as an adaptive response, improved patient outcome. However, recent large multicentre studies VISEP, GLUCONTROL and NICE-SUGAR) could not confirm this survival benefit. Methodological disparity in the execution of the complex intervention of tight glycaemic control may have contributed significantly to the contradicting results. First, different target ranges for blood glucose were used in the control group of the GLUCONTROL and 'Normoglycemia in intensive care evaluation and survival using glucose algorithm' regulation' (NICE-SUGAR) studies. Second, problems to steer blood-glucose levels within target range in the intervention group resulted in a significant overlap of the treatment groups. Third, allowing inaccurate blood-glucose measurement devices, in combination with different blood sampling sites and types of infusion pumps, may have led to unnoticed swings in blood-glucose levels. Fourth, the level of expertise of the intensive care nurses with the therapy may have been variable due to low number of study patients per centre. Finally, the studies on tight blood-glucose control were done with vastly different nutritional and end-of-life strategies. The currently available studies do not allow to confidently recommend one optimal target for glucose in heterogeneous ICU patient groups and settings. Provided that adequate devices for blood-glucose measurement and insulin administration are available, together with an extensive experience of the

  16. How Can the Evidence from Global Large-scale Clinical Trials for Cardiovascular Diseases be Improved?

    Sawata, Hiroshi; Tsutani, Kiichiro

    2011-06-29

    Clinical investigations are important for obtaining evidence to improve medical treatment. Large-scale clinical trials with thousands of participants are particularly important for this purpose in cardiovascular diseases. Conducting large-scale clinical trials entails high research costs. This study sought to investigate global trends in large-scale clinical trials in cardiovascular diseases. We searched for trials using clinicaltrials.gov (URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/) using the key words 'cardio' and 'event' in all fields on 10 April, 2010. We then selected trials with 300 or more participants examining cardiovascular diseases. The search revealed 344 trials that met our criteria. Of 344 trials, 71% were randomized controlled trials, 15% involved more than 10,000 participants, and 59% were funded by industry. In RCTs whose results were disclosed, 55% of industry-funded trials and 25% of non-industry funded trials reported statistically significant superiority over control (p = 0.012, 2-sided Fisher's exact test). Our findings highlighted concerns regarding potential bias related to funding sources, and that researchers should be aware of the importance of trial information disclosures and conflicts of interest. We should keep considering management and training regarding information disclosures and conflicts of interest for researchers. This could lead to better clinical evidence and further improvements in the development of medical treatment worldwide.

  17. How Can the Evidence from Global Large-scale Clinical Trials for Cardiovascular Diseases be Improved?

    Tsutani Kiichiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical investigations are important for obtaining evidence to improve medical treatment. Large-scale clinical trials with thousands of participants are particularly important for this purpose in cardiovascular diseases. Conducting large-scale clinical trials entails high research costs. This study sought to investigate global trends in large-scale clinical trials in cardiovascular diseases. Findings We searched for trials using clinicaltrials.gov (URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ using the key words 'cardio' and 'event' in all fields on 10 April, 2010. We then selected trials with 300 or more participants examining cardiovascular diseases. The search revealed 344 trials that met our criteria. Of 344 trials, 71% were randomized controlled trials, 15% involved more than 10,000 participants, and 59% were funded by industry. In RCTs whose results were disclosed, 55% of industry-funded trials and 25% of non-industry funded trials reported statistically significant superiority over control (p = 0.012, 2-sided Fisher's exact test. Conclusions Our findings highlighted concerns regarding potential bias related to funding sources, and that researchers should be aware of the importance of trial information disclosures and conflicts of interest. We should keep considering management and training regarding information disclosures and conflicts of interest for researchers. This could lead to better clinical evidence and further improvements in the development of medical treatment worldwide.

  18. Global distribution of Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus among clinically healthy sea turtles

    Alfaro Nuñez, Luis Alonso; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Bojesen, Anders Miki

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundFibropapillomatosis (FP) is a neoplastic disease characterized by cutaneous tumours that has been documented to infect all sea turtle species. Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV) is believed to be the aetiological agent of FP, based principally on consistent PCR......-based detection of herpesvirus DNA sequences from FP tumours. We used a recently described PCR-based assay that targets 3 conserved CFPHV genes, to survey 208 green turtles (Chelonia mydas). This included both FP tumour exhibiting and clinically healthy individuals. An additional 129 globally distributed...

  19. Clinical benefit from pharmacological elevation of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol: meta-regression analysis.

    Hourcade-Potelleret, F; Laporte, S; Lehnert, V; Delmar, P; Benghozi, Renée; Torriani, U; Koch, R; Mismetti, P

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological evidence that the risk of coronary heart disease is inversely associated with the level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) has motivated several phase III programmes with cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors. To assess alternative methods to predict clinical response of CETP inhibitors. Meta-regression analysis on raising HDL-C drugs (statins, fibrates, niacin) in randomised controlled trials. 51 trials in secondary prevention with a total of 167,311 patients for a follow-up >1 year where HDL-C was measured at baseline and during treatment. The meta-regression analysis showed no significant association between change in HDL-C (treatment vs comparator) and log risk ratio (RR) of clinical endpoint (non-fatal myocardial infarction or cardiac death). CETP inhibitors data are consistent with this finding (RR: 1.03; P5-P95: 0.99-1.21). A prespecified sensitivity analysis by drug class suggested that the strength of relationship might differ between pharmacological groups. A significant association for both statins (p<0.02, log RR=-0.169-0.0499*HDL-C change, R(2)=0.21) and niacin (p=0.02, log RR=1.07-0.185*HDL-C change, R(2)=0.61) but not fibrates (p=0.18, log RR=-0.367+0.077*HDL-C change, R(2)=0.40) was shown. However, the association was no longer detectable after adjustment for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol for statins or exclusion of open trials for niacin. Meta-regression suggested that CETP inhibitors might not influence coronary risk. The relation between change in HDL-C level and clinical endpoint may be drug dependent, which limits the use of HDL-C as a surrogate marker of coronary events. Other markers of HDL function may be more relevant. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Colchicine in Pericardial Disease: from the Underlying Biology and Clinical Benefits to the Drug-Drug Interactions in Cardiovascular Medicine.

    Schenone, Aldo L; Menon, Venu

    2018-06-14

    This is an in-depth review on the mechanism of action, clinical utility, and drug-drug interactions of colchicine in the management of pericardial disease. Recent evidence about therapeutic targets on pericarditis has demonstrated that NALP3 inflammasome blockade is the cornerstone in the clinical benefits of colchicine. Such benefits extend from acute and recurrent pericarditis to transient constriction and post-pericardiotomy syndrome. Despite the increased utilization of colchicine in cardiovascular medicine, safety concerns remains unsolved regarding the long-term use of colchicine in the cardiac patient. Moreover, recent evidence has demonstrated that numerous cardiovascular medications, ranging from antihypertensive medication to antiarrhythmics, are known to interact with the CYP3A4 and/or P-gp system increasing the toxicity potential of colchicine. The use of adjunctive colchicine in the management of inflammatory pericardial diseases is standard of care in current practice. It is advised that a careful medication reconciliation with emphasis on pharmacokinetic is completed before prescribing colchicine in order to avoid harmful interaction by finding an alternative regimen or adjusting colchicine dosing.

  1. PET with coincidence gamma cameras - clinical benefit from the radiooncologists' point of view

    Richter, E.; Feyerabend, T.; Stallmann, C.; Lauer, I.; Baehre, M.

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with FDG (FDG-PET) is a new technique, which displays the cellular metabolic activity. Since tumors exhibit an increased metabolic activity when compared to normal tissue, this imaging modality has a particularly high importance. FDG-PET is not only useful for localizing and staging of malignant tumors, but also to evaluate therapy response. In this context, PET is superior to morphologically orientated modalities, because therapeutically induced changes in glucose metabolism precede morphologic alterations. Numerous studies indicate, that PET will play an important role in radiooncology concerning therapy planning and monitoring the effects of therapy during and after treatment. Further clinical studies are necessary to evaluate the information provided by FDG-PET more precisely. Coincidence gamma cameras with adequate imaging characteristics will gain enhanced importance to meet these increasing demands. (orig.) [de

  2. Estimated clinical benefit of protecting neurogenesis in the developing brain during radiation therapy for pediatric medulloblastoma

    Blomstrand, M.; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per Martin

    2012-01-01

    to the whole-brain irradiation that is part of standard management. Neurogenesis is very sensitive to radiation, and limiting the radiation dose to the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ) may preserve neurocognitive function. Radiotherapy plans were created using 4 techniques: standard opposing...... fields, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT), and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Mean dose to the hippocampus and SVZ (mean for both sites) could be limited to 88.3% (range, 83.6%-91.0%), 77.1% (range, 71.5%-81.3%), and 42.3% (range, 26......-modulated proton therapy, thus making this an attractive option to be tested in a prospective clinical trial....

  3. Clinical outcomes and benefits for staging of surgical lymph node mapping after esophagectomy.

    Lagarde, S M; Phillips, A W; Navidi, M; Disep, B; Griffin, S M

    2017-12-01

    Dissection of lymph nodes (LN) immediately after esophagectomy is utilized by some surgeons to aid determination of LN stations involved in esophageal cancer. Some suggest that this increases LN yield and gives information regarding the pattern of lymphatic spread, others feel that this may compromise a circumferential resection margin (CRM) assessment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of ex vivo dissection on the assessment of the CRM and the pattern of lymph node dissemination in patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) undergoing radical surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and their prognostic impact. Data from consecutive patients with potentially curable adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus and GEJ who received neoadjuvant treatment followed by surgery were analyzed. Clinical and pathological findings were reviewed and LN burden and location correlated with clinical outcome. Pathology specimens were dissected into individual LN groups 'ex-vivo' by the surgeon. A total of 301 patients were included: 295 had a radical proximal and distal resection margin however in 62(20.6%) CRM could not be assessed. A median of 33(10-77) nodes were recovered. A 117(38.9%) patients were ypN0 while 184(61.1%) were LN positive (ypN1-N3). LN stations close to the tumor were most frequently involved. Twenty-seven (14.7%) patients had only thoracic stations involved, 48(26.1%) only abdominal stations and 109 (59.2%) had both. Median survival for yN0 patients was 171 months compared to 24 months for those LN positive (PCRM assessment in up to 20% of cases. It also provides valuable information regarding the pattern of nodal spread. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Clinical and economic benefits of fidaxomicin compared to vancomycin for Clostridium difficile infection.

    Gallagher, Jason C; Reilly, Joseph P; Navalkele, Bhagyashri; Downham, Gemma; Haynes, Kevin; Trivedi, Manish

    2015-11-01

    We studied the clinical and economic impact of a protocol encouraging the use of fidaxomicin as a first-line drug for treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients hospitalized during a 2-year period. This study evaluated patients who received oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for the treatment of CDI during a 2-year period. All included patients were eligible for administration of fidaxomicin via a protocol that encouraged its use for selected patients. The primary clinical endpoint was 90-day readmission with a diagnosis of CDI. Hospital charges and insurance reimbursements for readmissions were calculated along with the cost of CDI therapy to estimate the financial impact of the choice of therapy. Recurrences were seen in 10/49 (20.4%) fidaxomicin patients and 19/46 (41.3%) vancomycin patients (P = 0.027). In a multivariate analysis that included determinations of severity of CDI, serum creatinine increases, and concomitant antibiotic use, only fidaxomicin was significantly associated with decreased recurrence (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.12 to 0.93). The total lengths of stay of readmitted patients were 183 days for vancomycin and 87 days for fidaxomicin, with costs of $454,800 and $196,200, respectively. Readmissions for CDI were reimbursed on the basis of the severity of CDI, totaling $151,136 for vancomycin and $107,176 for fidaxomicin. Fidaxomicin drug costs totaled $62,112, and vancomycin drug costs were $6,646. We calculated that the hospital lost an average of $3,286 per fidaxomicin-treated patient and $6,333 per vancomycin-treated patient, thus saving $3,047 per patient with fidaxomicin. Fidaxomicin use for CDI treatment prevented readmission and decreased hospital costs compared to use of oral vancomycin. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. How a modified approach to dental coding can benefit personal and professional development with improved clinical outcomes.

    Lam, Raymond; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2014-12-01

    One disadvantage of the remarkable achievements in dentistry is that treatment options have never been more varied or confusing. This has made the concept of Evidenced Based Dentistry more applicable to modern dental practice. Despite merit in the concept whereby clinical decisions are guided by scientific evidence, there are problems with establishing a scientific base. This is no more challenging than in modern dentistry where the gap between rapidly developing products/procedures and its evidence base are widening. Furthermore, the burden of oral disease continues to remain high at the population level. These problems have prompted new approaches to enhancing research. The aim of this paper is to outline how a modified approach to dental coding may benefit clinical and population level research. Using publically assessable data obtained from the Australian Chronic Disease Dental Scheme and item codes contained within the Australian Schedule of Dental Services and Glossary, a suggested approach to dental informatics is illustrated. A selection of item codes have been selected and expanded with the addition of suffixes. These suffixes provided circumstantial information that will assist in assessing clinical outcomes such as success rates and prognosis. The use of item codes in administering the CDDS yielded a large database of item codes. These codes are amenable to dental informatics which has been shown to enhance research at both the clinical and population level. This is a cost effective method to supplement existing research methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Clinical Nurse Leader--new nursing role with global implications.

    Baernholdt, M; Cottingham, S

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes the development of the Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL ©) role and education, the CNL's impact and potential to improve quality globally. The need for clinical nurse leadership to improve the quality of health care systems while controlling costs is recognized in reports internationally. In the USA, a new nursing role, the CNL, was developed in response to such reports. CNLs are master's level nurse graduates (although not necessarily recruited from a nursing background) with the skills and knowledge to create change within complex systems and improve outcomes while they remain direct care providers. This innovative role can be adapted worldwide to improve the quality of health care systems. © 2010 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2010 International Council of Nurses.

  7. Can Repeat Injection Provide Clinical Benefit in Patients with Lumbosacral Diseases When First Epidural Injection Results Only in Partial Response?

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-02-01

    Epidural steroid injection (ESI) is known to be an effective treatment for lower back or radicular pain due to herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) and spinal stenosis (SS). Although repeat ESI has generally been indicated to provide more pain relief in partial responders after a single ESI, there has been little evidence supporting the usefulness of repeat injections in cumulative clinical pain reduction. The purpose of this study was to determine whether repeat ESI at a prescribed interval of 2 to 3 weeks after the first injection would provide greater clinical benefit in patients with partial pain reduction than that provided by intermittent injection performed only when pain was aggravated. An Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved retrospective chart review. Spine hospital. Two hundred and four patients who had underwent transforaminal ESI (TFESI) for treatment of lower back and radicular pain due to HIVD or SS and could be followed-up for one year were enrolled. We divided the patients into 2 groups. Group A (N = 108) comprised partial responders (NRS = 3 after first injection) who underwent repeat injection at a prescribed interval of 2 to 3 weeks after the first injection. Group B (N = 96) comprised partial responders who did not receive a repeat injection at the prescribed interval, but received repeat injections only for aggravation of pain. Various clinical data including total number of injections during one year, duration of NRS group A, or after first injection in group B (time to reinjection), were assessed. These data were compared between groups A and B in terms of total population, HIVD, and SS. In the whole population, the mean time to reinjection was 6.09 ± 3.02 months in group A and 3.69 ± 2.07 months in group B. The NRS groups A and B, respectively. In HIVD patients, the mean time to reinjection was 5.82 ± 3.23 months in group A and 3.84 ± 2.34 months in group B, and NRS groups A and B, respectively. In SS patients, the mean time to

  8. Clinical benefits of incorporating doxycycline into a canine heartworm treatment protocol

    C. Thomas Nelson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of heartworm treatment is to improve the clinical condition of the patient and to eliminate pre-cardiac, juvenile, and adult worm stages with minimal complications. Pulmonary thromboembolisms are an inevitable consequence of worm death and can result in severe pulmonary reactions and even death of the patient. To minimize these reactions, various treatment protocols involving melarsomine, the only adulticidal drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administrations (FDA, in conjunction with macrocyclic lactone heartworm preventives and glucocorticosteroids have been advocated. The discovery of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia in Dirofilaria immitis has led to several experimental studies examining the effects of administering doxycycline to reduce or eliminate Wolbachia organism. These studies have shown a decrease in gross and microscopic pathology of pulmonary parenchyma in experimental heartworm infections pretreated with doxycycline before melarsomine administration. Methods Electronic medical records from a large veterinary practice in northeast Alabama were searched to identify dogs treated for heartworms with melarsomine from January 2005 through December 2012. The search was refined further to select for dogs that met the following criteria: 1 received two or three doses of ivermectin heartworm preventive prior to melarsomine injections, 2 received one injection of melarsomine followed by two injections 4 to 8 weeks later, and 3 were treated with prednisone following melarsomine injections. The dogs were then divided into those that also were treated with doxycycline 10 mg/kg BID for 4 weeks (Group A, n = 47 and those that did not receive doxycycline (Group B, n = 47. The medical notes of all 94 cases were then reviewed for comments concerning coughing, dyspnea, or hemoptysis in the history, physical exam template, or from telephone conversations with clients the week following each visit. Any

  9. Clinical benefits of incorporating doxycycline into a canine heartworm treatment protocol.

    Nelson, C Thomas; Myrick, Elizabeth S; Nelson, Thomas A

    2017-11-09

    The objective of heartworm treatment is to improve the clinical condition of the patient and to eliminate pre-cardiac, juvenile, and adult worm stages with minimal complications. Pulmonary thromboembolisms are an inevitable consequence of worm death and can result in severe pulmonary reactions and even death of the patient. To minimize these reactions, various treatment protocols involving melarsomine, the only adulticidal drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administrations (FDA), in conjunction with macrocyclic lactone heartworm preventives and glucocorticosteroids have been advocated. The discovery of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia in Dirofilaria immitis has led to several experimental studies examining the effects of administering doxycycline to reduce or eliminate Wolbachia organism. These studies have shown a decrease in gross and microscopic pathology of pulmonary parenchyma in experimental heartworm infections pretreated with doxycycline before melarsomine administration. Electronic medical records from a large veterinary practice in northeast Alabama were searched to identify dogs treated for heartworms with melarsomine from January 2005 through December 2012. The search was refined further to select for dogs that met the following criteria: 1) received two or three doses of ivermectin heartworm preventive prior to melarsomine injections, 2) received one injection of melarsomine followed by two injections 4 to 8 weeks later, and 3) were treated with prednisone following melarsomine injections. The dogs were then divided into those that also were treated with doxycycline 10 mg/kg BID for 4 weeks (Group A, n = 47) and those that did not receive doxycycline (Group B, n = 47). The medical notes of all 94 cases were then reviewed for comments concerning coughing, dyspnea, or hemoptysis in the history, physical exam template, or from telephone conversations with clients the week following each visit. Any dog that died within one year of treatment

  10. Clinical benefit of ertapenem compared to flomoxef for the treatment of cefotaxime-resistant Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia

    Lee C

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Chen-Hsiang Lee,1,2 I-Ling Chen,3 Chia-Chin Li,4 Chun-Chih Chien4 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial, Hospital, 2Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, 3Department of Pharmacy, 4Department of Laboratory Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan Objectives: Cefotaxime-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CE infections are intractable, with limited treatment options. Though carbapenems are frequently prescribed for CE infections, the emergence of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae is of huge concern. Flomoxef is effective against CE in vitro, and some clinical data on its demonstrated effectiveness against CE bloodstream infections (BSIs exists.Patients and methods: We conducted a retrospective study on adults with BSI caused by flomoxef-susceptible CE to investigate the efficacy of flomoxef compared with that of ertapenem. The outcome was evaluated with propensity score-based matching and logistic regression analysis.Results: Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients treated with flomoxef (n = 58 or ertapenem (n = 188 were compared. In the multivariate analysis, severe sepsis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16–12.78; p = 0.03, high BSI mortality score (AOR = 5.59; 95% CI, 2.37–13.21; p < 0.01, ultimately or rapidly fatal comorbidity (AOR = 10.60; 95% CI, 3.43–32.75; p < 0.01, and pneumonia (AOR = 10.11; 95% CI, 3.43–29.81; p < 0.01 were independently associated with 28-day mortality. Using propensity scores, 58 flomoxef-treated patients were matched to 116 ertapenem-treated patients. There were no intergroup differences in BSI severity, comorbidity, or BSI sources. The 28-day mortality rates (20.7% vs 13.8%, p = 0.28 did not differ significantly. However, hospitalization length was shorter in the ertapenem group (10.2 ± 8.5 vs. 14.6 ± 9.4 days, p < 0.01.Conclusion: Although similar outcomes were

  11. Comparison of clinical benefits and outcome in patients with programmable and nonprogrammable implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    Mehta, D; Saksena, S; Krol, R B; Makhija, V

    1992-09-01

    Technological advances in implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) have provided a variety of programmable parameters and antitachycardia therapies whose utility and impact on clinical outcome is presently unknown. ICDs have capabilities for cardioversion defibrillation alone (first generation ICDs), or in conjunction with demand ventricular pacing (second generation ICDs), or with demand pacing and antitachycardia pacing (third generation ICDs). We examined the pattern of antitachycardia therapy use and long-term survival in 110 patients with sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). Group I included 62 patients with nonprogrammable first generation ICDs that delivered committed shock therapy after ventricular tachyarrhythmia detection based on electrogram rate and/or morphology was satisfied. Group II included 48 patients with multiprogrammable ICDs (including second and third generation ICDs) that had programmable tachyarrhythmia detection based on rate and tachycardia confirmation prior to delivery of electrical treatment with either programmable shocks and/or, as in the third generation ICDs, antitachycardia pacing. Incidence and patterns of antitachycardia therapy use and long-term survival were compared in the two groups. The incidence of appropriate shocks in patients who completed 1 year of follow-up was significantly greater in group I (30 of 43 patients = 70% vs 11 of 26 patients = 42%; P less than 0.05). In the total follow-up period, a significantly larger proportion of group I patients as compared to group II patients used the shock therapies (46 of 62 patients = 74% vs 25 of 48 patients = 52%; P less than 0.01), with the majority doing so within the first year of implantation (96% and 92%, respectively). Although the frequency of antitachycardia therapy activation was similar, the number of shocks delivered per patient was lower in group II, particularly in the initial 3 months of follow-up (P = 0.06). No clinical

  12. Clinical benefits, costs, and cost-effectiveness of neonatal intensive care in Mexico.

    Jochen Profit

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal intensive care improves survival, but is associated with high costs and disability amongst survivors. Recent health reform in Mexico launched a new subsidized insurance program, necessitating informed choices on the different interventions that might be covered by the program, including neonatal intensive care. The purpose of this study was to estimate the clinical outcomes, costs, and cost-effectiveness of neonatal intensive care in Mexico.A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted using a decision analytic model of health and economic outcomes following preterm birth. Model parameters governing health outcomes were estimated from Mexican vital registration and hospital discharge databases, supplemented with meta-analyses and systematic reviews from the published literature. Costs were estimated on the basis of data provided by the Ministry of Health in Mexico and World Health Organization price lists, supplemented with published studies from other countries as needed. The model estimated changes in clinical outcomes, life expectancy, disability-free life expectancy, lifetime costs, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs for neonatal intensive care compared to no intensive care. Uncertainty around the results was characterized using one-way sensitivity analyses and a multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analysis. In the base-case analysis, neonatal intensive care for infants born at 24-26, 27-29, and 30-33 weeks gestational age prolonged life expectancy by 28, 43, and 34 years and averted 9, 15, and 12 DALYs, at incremental costs per infant of US$11,400, US$9,500, and US$3,000, respectively, compared to an alternative of no intensive care. The ICERs of neonatal intensive care at 24-26, 27-29, and 30-33 weeks were US$1,200, US$650, and US$240, per DALY averted, respectively. The findings were robust to variation in parameter values over wide ranges in sensitivity analyses

  13. Clinical benefits of drug-eluting stent implantation in septuagenarians with coronary artery disease

    Fang Yuehua; Shen Weifeng; Zhang Ruiyan; Zhang Jiansheng; Hu Jian; Zhang Xian; Zheng Aifang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the safety and long-term outcomes of drug-eluting stents in septuagenarians with coronary artery disease. Methods: Two hundred and thirty-nine consecutive patients with coronary artery disease underwent drug-eluting stenting, including 88 patients aged ≥70 years (group A) and 151 aged <70 years (group B). Baseline clinical characteristics, procedural success rate, occurrence of cardiac events during follow-up were recorded and compared between the two groups. Results: Procedural success rate and complications were similar for the two groups. During follow-up, group A had higher recurrence rate of chest pain than group B (23.9% vs. 7.3%, P<0.001), and occurrence of cardiac events was higher in group A than in group B (5.7% vs. 2.7%, P<0.296). There was no significant difference in the frequency of restenosis between the two groups. Conclusions: Drug-eluting stent implantation for septuagenarians with coronary artery disease is safe but may have more recurrence of angina than younger ones during long-term follow-up. (authors)

  14. Hypnosis in the Perioperative Management of Breast Cancer Surgery: Clinical Benefits and Potential Implications

    Roelants, Fabienne; Pospiech, Audrey; Momeni, Mona; Watremez, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize data published on the use of perioperative hypnosis in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery (BCS). Indeed, the majority of BCS patients experience stress, anxiety, nausea, vomiting, and pain. Correct management of the perioperative period and surgical removal of the primary tumor are clearly essential but can affect patients on different levels and hence have a negative impact on oncological outcomes. This review examines the effect of clinical hypnosis performed during the perioperative period. Thanks to its specific properties and techniques allowing it to be used as complementary treatment preoperatively, hypnosis has an impact most notably on distress and postoperative pain. During surgery, hypnosis may be applied to limit immunosuppression, while, in the postoperative period, it can reduce pain, anxiety, and fatigue and improve wound healing. Moreover, hypnosis is inexpensive, an important consideration given current financial concerns in healthcare. Of course, large randomized prospective studies are now needed to confirm the observed advantages of hypnosis in the field of oncology. PMID:27635132

  15. What are the potential benefits of clinical beta-cell imaging in diabetes mellitus?

    Göke, Burkhard

    2010-05-01

    Previously, studies of the endocrine pancreatic beta-cell were mainly performed ex vivo by morphological means. This data supported the analysis of pathophysiological changes in the pancreatic islet during insults such as diabetes mellitus. Metabolic testing of the pancreatic islet by assaying hormone parameters such als plasma insulin or C-peptide combined with more or less sophisticated calculations allowed conclusions about states of insulin resistance or secretory failure. It also allowed certain correlations of endocrine function with beta-cell mass. Today, with firmer pathophysiological concepts about beta-cell failure, modern protocols of islet transplantation, and drugs on the market coming with promises of preservation or even expansion of beta-cell mass in diabetes mellitus it has become very attractive to search for tools measuring beta-cell mass, if possible even repeatingly in the same organism in vivo. From a clinical point of view, the potential of pancreatic beta-cell mass imaging technologies is looked upon with high expectations. Methodologically, the decisive question is whether it is likely that future beta-cell imaging will provide significant advantages over the metabolic methods already in hand. With new in vivo tools, studies of beta-cell mass and function may offer even new approaches stratifying patients to anti-diabetic therapies.

  16. [Medical short stay unit for geriatric patients in the emergency department: clinical and healthcare benefits].

    Pareja, Teresa; Hornillos, Mercedes; Rodríguez, Miriam; Martínez, Javier; Madrigal, María; Mauleón, Coro; Alvarez, Bárbara

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of comprehensive geriatric assessment and management of high-risk elders in a medical short stay unit located in the emergency department of a general hospital. We performed a descriptive, prospective study of patients admitted to the medical short stay unit for geriatric patients of the emergency department in 2006. A total of 749 patients were evaluated, with a mean (standard deviation) stay in the unit of 37 (16) h. The mean age was 86 (7) years; 57% were women, and 50% had moderate-severe physical impairment and dementia. Thirty-five percent lived in a nursing home. The most frequent reason for admission was exacerbation of chronic cardiopulmonary disease. Multiple geriatric syndromes were identified. The most frequent were immobility, pressure sores and behavioral disorders related to dementia. Seventy percent of the patients were discharged to home after being stabilized and were followed-up by the geriatric clinic and day hospital (39%), the home care medical team (11%), or the nursing home or primary care physician (20%). During the month after discharge, 17% were readmitted and 7.7% died, especially patients with more advanced age or functional impairment. After the unit was opened, admissions to the acute geriatric unit fell by 18.2%. Medical short stay units for geriatric patients in emergency departments may be useful for geriatric assessment and treatment of exacerbations of chronic diseases. These units can help to reduce the number of admissions and optimize the care provided in other ambulatory and domiciliary geriatric settings.

  17. The American Society of Clinical Oncology's Efforts to Support Global Cancer Medicine

    El-Saghir, Nagi S.; Cufer, Tanja; Cazap, Eduardo; de Guzman, Roselle; Othieno-Abinya, Nicholas Anthony; Sanchez, Jose Angel; Pyle, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Despite much progress in the management of malignant diseases, the number of new cases and cancer-related deaths continues to rise around the world. More than half of new cases occur in economically developing countries, where more than two thirds of cancer deaths are expected. However, implementation of all necessary steps to accomplish the dissemination of state-of-the-art prevention, diagnosis, and management will require increased allocation of resources, and, more importantly, harmonization of the efforts of hundreds of national and international public health agencies, policy-setting bodies, governments, pharmaceutical companies, and philanthropic organizations. More than 30% of the members of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) reside and practice outside US borders, and more than half of attendees at all of the scientific congresses and symposia organized by ASCO are international. As cancer has become an increasingly global disease, ASCO has evolved as a global organization. The ASCO Board of Directors currently includes members from France, Brazil, and Canada. In 2013, the ASCO Board of Directors identified a number of strategic priorities for the future. Recognizing the importance of non-US members to the society, their first strategic priority was improving the society's service to non-US members and defining these members' identity in the international oncology community. This article reviews current ASCO activities in the international arena and its future plans in global oncology. PMID:26578614

  18. Correlation between vitiligo occurrence and clinical benefit in advanced melanoma patients treated with nivolumab: A multi-institutional retrospective study.

    Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Ryota; Asami, Yuri; Teramoto, Yukiko; Imamura, Taichi; Sato, Sayuri; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Matsuya, Taisuke; Fujimoto, Manabu; Yamamoto, Akifumi

    2017-02-01

    Vitiligo is occasionally seen in melanoma patients. Although several studies indicate a correlation between vitiligo occurrence and clinical response in melanoma patients receiving immunotherapy, most studies have included heterogeneous patient and treatment settings. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between the occurrence of vitiligo and clinical benefit of nivolumab treatment in advanced melanoma patients. We retrospectively reviewed unresectable stage III or IV melanoma patients treated with nivolumab. Of 35 melanoma patients treated with nivolumab, 25.7% (9/35) developed vitiligo during treatment. The time from the start of nivolumab treatment to occurrence of vitiligo ranged 2-9 months (mean, 5.2). Of nine patients who developed vitiligo, two (22.2%) had a complete response to nivolumab and two (22.2%) had a partial response. The objective response rate was significantly higher in patients with vitiligo than in patients without vitiligo (4/9 [44.4%] vs 2/26 [7.7%]; P = 0.027). The mean time to vitiligo occurrence in patients achieving an objective response was significantly less than that in patients who showed no response (3.1 vs 6.8 months, P = 0.004). Vitiligo occurrence was significantly associated with prolonged progression-free and overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.24 and 0.16; 95% confidence interval, 0.11-0.55 and 0.03-0.79; P = 0.005, and 0.047, respectively). At the 20-week landmark analysis, however, vitiligo was not associated with a statistically significant overall survival benefit (P = 0.28). The occurrence of vitiligo during nivolumab treatment may be correlated with favorable clinical outcome. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  19. Global Distribution, Public Health and Clinical Impact of the Protozoan Pathogen Cryptosporidium

    Lorenza Putignani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium spp. are coccidians, oocysts-forming apicomplexan protozoa, which complete their life cycle both in humans and animals, through zoonotic and anthroponotic transmission, causing cryptosporidiosis. The global burden of this disease is still underascertained, due to a conundrum transmission modality, only partially unveiled, and on a plethora of detection systems still inadequate or only partially applied for worldwide surveillance. In children, cryptosporidiosis encumber is even less recorded and often misidentified due to physiological reasons such as early-age unpaired immunological response. Furthermore, malnutrition in underdeveloped countries or clinical underestimation of protozoan etiology in developed countries contribute to the underestimation of the worldwide burden. Principal key indicators of the parasite distribution were associated to environmental (e.g., geographic and temporal clusters, etc. and host determinants of the infection (e.g., age, immunological status, travels, community behaviours. The distribution was geographically mapped to provide an updated picture of the global parasite ecosystems. The present paper aims to provide, by a critical analysis of existing literature, a link between observational epidemiological records and new insights on public health, and diagnostic and clinical impact of cryptosporidiosis.

  20. Rééducation Posturale Globale in musculoskeletal diseases: scientific evidence and clinical practice

    D. Tosarelli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Several studies on the treatment of musculoskeletal diseases with physiotherapy and clinical experiences on the basis of a method called Rééducation Posturale Globale (RPG, have highlighted the usefulness of this treatment. Although such treatment technique is commonly used in physical therapy practice, only few studies support its therapeutic effectiveness. Objective: To search the literature for evidence of RPG effectiveness, in order to identify the most appropriate therapeutic contexts for its use. Methods: A review of the literature through the following databases: PubMed, Embase, Cinahl, Pedro, and Medscape. The keywords used for the search in the databases are: Rééducation Posturale Globale, Souchard, Posture, and Manual Therapy. The following clinical studies were selected: randomized controlled studies, non-randomized controlled studies, observation studies, and case reports, in English, Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian. Results: Out of 18 studies found, 9 were analyzed: 2 randomized controlled studies, 2 non-randomized controlled studies, 3 non-controlled studies, and 2 case reports. Conclusions: The RPG method has been shown to be an effective treatment technique for musculoskeletal diseases, in particular for ankylosing spondylitis, acute and chronic low back pain, and lumbar discherniation. Although the scarcity of rigorous experimental trials on a large scale does not allow the drawing of undisputable conclusions, the results gathered up to now are an encouragement to carry on research in the field of conservative treatment.

  1. Clinical benefits of new immobilization system for hypofractionated radiotherapy of intrahepatic hepatocellular carcinoma by helical tomotherapy

    Hu, Yong; Zhou, Yong-Kang; Chen, Yi-Xing; Shi, Shi-Ming; Zeng, Zhao-Chong, E-mail: zeng.zhaochong@zs-hospital.sh.cn

    2017-04-01

    Objective: A comprehensive clinical evaluation was conducted, assessing the Body Pro-Lok immobilization and positioning system to facilitate hypofractionated radiotherapy of intrahepatic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), using helical tomotherapy to improve treatment precision. Methods: Clinical applications of the Body Pro-Lok system were investigated (as above) in terms of interfractional and intrafractional setup errors and compressive abdominal breath control. To assess interfractional setup errors, a total of 42 patients who were given 5 to 20 fractions of helical tomotherapy for intrahepatic HCC were analyzed. Overall, 15 patients were immobilized using simple vacuum cushion (group A), and the Body Pro-Lok system was used in 27 patients (group B), performing megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scans 196 times and 435 times, respectively. Pretreatment MVCT scans were registered to the planning kilovoltage computed tomography (KVCT) for error determination, and group comparisons were made. To establish intrafractional setup errors, 17 patients with intrahepatic HCC were selected at random for immobilization by Body Pro-Lok system, undergoing MVCT scans after helical tomotherapy every week. A total of 46 MVCT re-scans were analyzed for this purpose. In researching breath control, 12 patients, randomly selected, were immobilized by Body Pro-Lok system and subjected to 2-phase 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) scans, with compressive abdominal control or in freely breathing states, respectively. Respiratory-induced liver motion was then compared. Results: Mean interfractional setup errors were as follows: (1) group A: X, 2.97 ± 2.47 mm; Y, 4.85 ± 4.04 mm; and Z, 3.77 ± 3.21 mm; pitch, 0.66 ± 0.62°; roll, 1.09 ± 1.06°; and yaw, 0.85 ± 0.82°; and (2) group B: X, 2.23 ± 1.79 mm; Y, 4.10 ± 3.36 mm; and Z, 1.67 ± 1.91 mm; pitch, 0.45 ± 0.38°; roll, 0.77 ± 0.63°; and yaw, 0.52 ± 0.49°. Between-group differences were statistically significant in 6 directions (p

  2. Clinical benefits of new immobilization system for hypofractionated radiotherapy of intrahepatic hepatocellular carcinoma by helical tomotherapy

    Hu, Yong; Zhou, Yong-Kang; Chen, Yi-Xing; Shi, Shi-Ming; Zeng, Zhao-Chong

    2017-01-01

    Objective: A comprehensive clinical evaluation was conducted, assessing the Body Pro-Lok immobilization and positioning system to facilitate hypofractionated radiotherapy of intrahepatic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), using helical tomotherapy to improve treatment precision. Methods: Clinical applications of the Body Pro-Lok system were investigated (as above) in terms of interfractional and intrafractional setup errors and compressive abdominal breath control. To assess interfractional setup errors, a total of 42 patients who were given 5 to 20 fractions of helical tomotherapy for intrahepatic HCC were analyzed. Overall, 15 patients were immobilized using simple vacuum cushion (group A), and the Body Pro-Lok system was used in 27 patients (group B), performing megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scans 196 times and 435 times, respectively. Pretreatment MVCT scans were registered to the planning kilovoltage computed tomography (KVCT) for error determination, and group comparisons were made. To establish intrafractional setup errors, 17 patients with intrahepatic HCC were selected at random for immobilization by Body Pro-Lok system, undergoing MVCT scans after helical tomotherapy every week. A total of 46 MVCT re-scans were analyzed for this purpose. In researching breath control, 12 patients, randomly selected, were immobilized by Body Pro-Lok system and subjected to 2-phase 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) scans, with compressive abdominal control or in freely breathing states, respectively. Respiratory-induced liver motion was then compared. Results: Mean interfractional setup errors were as follows: (1) group A: X, 2.97 ± 2.47 mm; Y, 4.85 ± 4.04 mm; and Z, 3.77 ± 3.21 mm; pitch, 0.66 ± 0.62°; roll, 1.09 ± 1.06°; and yaw, 0.85 ± 0.82°; and (2) group B: X, 2.23 ± 1.79 mm; Y, 4.10 ± 3.36 mm; and Z, 1.67 ± 1.91 mm; pitch, 0.45 ± 0.38°; roll, 0.77 ± 0.63°; and yaw, 0.52 ± 0.49°. Between-group differences were statistically significant in 6 directions (p

  3. Clinical outcomes and immune benefits of anti-epileptic drug therapy in HIV/AIDS

    Krentz Hartmut B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs are frequently prescribed to persons with HIV/AIDS receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART although the extent of AED use and their interactions with cART are uncertain. Herein, AED usage, associated toxicities and immune consequences were investigated. Methods HIV replication was analysed in proliferating human T cells during AED exposure. Patients receiving AEDs in a geographically-based HIV care program were assessed using clinical and laboratory variables in addition to assessing AED indication, type, and cumulative exposures. Results Valproate suppressed proliferation in vitro of both HIV-infected and uninfected T cells (p 0.05 but AED exposures did not affect HIV production in vitro. Among 1345 HIV/AIDS persons in active care between 2001 and 2007, 169 individuals were exposed to AEDs for the following indications: peripheral neuropathy/neuropathic pain (60%, seizure/epilepsy (24%, mood disorder (13% and movement disorder (2%. The most frequently prescribed AEDs were calcium channel blockers (gabapentin/pregabalin, followed by sodium channel blockers (phenytoin, carbamazepine, lamotrigine and valproate. In a nested cohort of 55 AED-treated patients receiving cART and aviremic, chronic exposure to sodium and calcium channel blocking AEDs was associated with increased CD4+ T cell levels (p 0.05 with no change in CD8+ T cell levels over 12 months from the beginning of AED therapy. Conclusions AEDs were prescribed for multiple indications without major adverse effects in this population but immune status in patients receiving sodium or calcium channel blocking drugs was improved.

  4. PACS: Do clinical users benefit from it as a training adjunct?

    J van Heerden

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Over the past four years, Steve Biko Academic Hospital has been in the process of implementing and refining the use of a picture archiving and communications system (PACS. As part of a post-implementation refining process, it is necessary to evaluate user-perceptions in order to improve on good system qualities and correct flaws. Aim. The aim of this study was to assess whether medical clinicians perceived PACS as a positive adjunct to training and teaching opportunities – specifically those opportunities related to radiological image viewing and interpretation as part of patient case discussions. Method. Standardised questionnaires with ‘free text’ and ‘option selection’ questions were distributed to clinicians who, as part of their training, rotated at Steve Biko Academic Hospital (where a PACS is in place as well as other teaching hospitals without a PACS. Between February 2009 and May 2009, approximately 400 questionnaires were distributed. As a result of constant academic rotations, leave schedules of medical staff and posts vacated, questionnaires could not be distributed to the entire target population that was estimated to be in the region of 550 medical clinicians (comprising senior medical students, interns, medical officers, registrars and consultants. Of the 400 questionnaires distributed, 189 completed questionnaires were returned. Completion of the questionnaires was voluntary and anonymous. Results and conclusion. Although a PACS relates specifically to the archiving and retrieval of radiological images and reports, it became clear from the feedback received from medical clinicians (who are ward-based, theatre-based or clinic-based users of a digital system that many other factors, such as lack of adequate hardware and sub-optimal personal IT proficiency, contributed to some of the negative PACS-related perceptions and ‘lost teaching opportunities’ reported. Negative comments specifically related to PACS

  5. Global distribution of Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus among clinically healthy sea turtles.

    Alfaro-Núñez, Alonzo; Frost Bertelsen, Mads; Bojesen, Anders Miki; Rasmussen, Isabel; Zepeda-Mendoza, Lisandra; Tange Olsen, Morten; Gilbert, Marcus Thomas Pius

    2014-10-25

    Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is a neoplastic disease characterized by cutaneous tumours that has been documented to infect all sea turtle species. Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV) is believed to be the aetiological agent of FP, based principally on consistent PCR-based detection of herpesvirus DNA sequences from FP tumours. We used a recently described PCR-based assay that targets 3 conserved CFPHV genes, to survey 208 green turtles (Chelonia mydas). This included both FP tumour exhibiting and clinically healthy individuals. An additional 129 globally distributed clinically healthy individual sea turtles; representing four other species were also screened. CFPHV DNA sequences were obtained from 37/37 (100%) FP exhibiting green turtles, and 45/300 (15%) clinically healthy animals spanning all five species. Although the frequency of infected individuals per turtle population varied considerably, most global populations contained at least one CFPHV positive individual, with the exception of various turtle species from the Arabian Gulf, Northern Indian Ocean and Puerto Rico. Haplotype analysis of the different gene markers clustered the CFPHV DNA sequences for two of the markers (UL18 and UL22) in turtles from Turks and Caicos separate to all others, regardless of host species or geographic origin. Presence of CFPHV DNA within globally distributed samples for all five species of sea turtle was confirmed. While 100% of the FP exhibiting green turtles yielded CFPHV sequences, surprisingly, so did 15% of the clinically healthy turtles. We hypothesize that turtle populations with zero (0%) CFPHV frequency may be attributed to possible environmental differences, diet and/or genetic resistance in these individuals. Our results provide first data on the prevalence of CFPHV among seemingly healthy turtles; a factor that may not be directly correlated to the disease incidence, but may suggest of a long-term co-evolutionary latent infection interaction between

  6. Cost Benefit Analysis of Using Clean Energy Supplies to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Global Automotive Manufacturing

    Xiang Zhao

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Automotive manufacturing is energy-intensive. The consumed energy contributes to the generation of significant amounts of greenhouse gas (GHG emissions by the automotive manufacturing industry. In this paper, a study is conducted on assessing the application potential of such clean energy power systems as solar PV, wind and fuel cells in reducing the GHG emissions of the global auto manufacturing industry. The study is conducted on the representative solar PV, wind and fuel cell clean energy systems available on the commercial market in six representative locations of GM’s global facilities, including the United States, Mexico, Brazil, China, Egypt and Germany. The results demonstrate that wind power is superior to other two clean energy technologies in the economic performance of the GHG mitigation effect. Among these six selected countries, the highest GHG emission mitigation potential is in China, through wind power supply. The maximum GHG reduction could be up to 60 tons per $1,000 economic investment on wind energy supply in China. The application of wind power systems in the United States and Germany could also obtain relatively high GHG reductions of between 40–50 tons per $1,000 economic input. When compared with wind energy, the use of solar and fuel cell power systems have much less potential for GHG mitigation in the six countries selected. The range of median GHG mitigation values resulting from solar and wind power supply are almost at the same level.

  7. Global carbon benefits of material substitution in passenger cars until 2050 and the impact on the steel and aluminum industries.

    Modaresi, Roja; Pauliuk, Stefan; Løvik, Amund N; Müller, Daniel B

    2014-09-16

    Light-weighting of passenger cars using high-strength steel or aluminum is a common emissions mitigation strategy. We provide a first estimate of the global impact of light-weighting by material substitution on GHG emissions from passenger cars and the steel and aluminum industries until 2050. We develop a dynamic stock model of the global car fleet and combine it with a dynamic MFA of the associated steel, aluminum, and energy supply industries. We propose four scenarios for substitution of conventional steel with high-strength steel and aluminum at different rates over the period 2010-2050. We show that light-weighting of passenger cars can become a "gigaton solution": Between 2010 and 2050, persistent light-weighting of passenger cars can, under optimal conditions, lead to cumulative GHG emissions savings of 9-18 gigatons CO2-eq compared to development business-as-usual. Annual savings can be up to 1 gigaton per year. After 2030, enhanced material recycling can lead to further reductions: closed-loop metal recycling in the automotive sector may reduce cumulative emissions by another 4-6 gigatons CO2-eq. The effectiveness of emissions mitigation by material substitution significantly depends on how the recycling system evolves. At present, policies focusing on tailpipe emissions and life cycle assessments of individual cars do not consider this important effect.

  8. Clinical Benefit of Allogeneic Melanoma Cell Lysate-Pulsed Autologous Dendritic Cell Vaccine in MAGE-Positive Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Toh, Han Chong; Wang, Who-Whong; Chia, Whay Kuang

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: We evaluated the clinical benefit of an allogeneic melanoma cell lysate (MCL)-pulsed autologous dendritic cell (DC) vaccine in advanced colorectal cancer patients expressing at least one of six MAGE-A antigens overexpressed by the cell line source of the lysate. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: DCs...... were cultured from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), pulsed with the allogeneic MCL, and matured using cytokines that achieved high CD83- and CCR7-expressing DCs. Each patient received up to 10 intradermal vaccinations (3-5 x 10(6) cells per dose) at biweekly intervals. RESULTS: Twenty......-free for >27 and >37 months, respectively. This result is particularly meaningful as all patients had progressive disease before treatment. Overall, DC vaccination was associated with a serial decline in regulatory T cells. Using an antibody array, we characterized plasma protein profiles in responding...

  9. Contractualist reasoning, HIV cure clinical trials, and the moral (ir)relevance of the risk/benefit ratio.

    Kumar, Rahul

    2017-02-01

    Institutional review boards (IRB) normally require of a morally defensible clinical trial that any trial participant will benefit from the inquiry, or at least not be exposed to a significant risk of having their prospects worsened by participating. Stage 1 HIV cure trials tend not to meet this requirement. Does that show them to be morally indefensible? Utilitarian thinking about this question supports a negative answer. But one might reasonably expect a Kantian moral theory to support the conclusion that exposing trial participants to a significant risk of their prospects being worsened by their participation to be morally indefensible, on grounds that this would be a clear case of using a person as a mere means. In this paper, I argue, drawing on Kantian contractualist thinking, that requiring the risk/benefit ratio for participants be positive if a trial is to be morally defensible does not in fact gain any support from Kantian thinking about morality. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Integrated life-cycle assessment of electricity-supply scenarios confirms global environmental benefit of low-carbon technologies.

    Hertwich, Edgar G; Gibon, Thomas; Bouman, Evert A; Arvesen, Anders; Suh, Sangwon; Heath, Garvin A; Bergesen, Joseph D; Ramirez, Andrea; Vega, Mabel I; Shi, Lei

    2015-05-19

    Decarbonization of electricity generation can support climate-change mitigation and presents an opportunity to address pollution resulting from fossil-fuel combustion. Generally, renewable technologies require higher initial investments in infrastructure than fossil-based power systems. To assess the tradeoffs of increased up-front emissions and reduced operational emissions, we present, to our knowledge, the first global, integrated life-cycle assessment (LCA) of long-term, wide-scale implementation of electricity generation from renewable sources (i.e., photovoltaic and solar thermal, wind, and hydropower) and of carbon dioxide capture and storage for fossil power generation. We compare emissions causing particulate matter exposure, freshwater ecotoxicity, freshwater eutrophication, and climate change for the climate-change-mitigation (BLUE Map) and business-as-usual (Baseline) scenarios of the International Energy Agency up to 2050. We use a vintage stock model to conduct an LCA of newly installed capacity year-by-year for each region, thus accounting for changes in the energy mix used to manufacture future power plants. Under the Baseline scenario, emissions of air and water pollutants more than double whereas the low-carbon technologies introduced in the BLUE Map scenario allow a doubling of electricity supply while stabilizing or even reducing pollution. Material requirements per unit generation for low-carbon technologies can be higher than for conventional fossil generation: 11-40 times more copper for photovoltaic systems and 6-14 times more iron for wind power plants. However, only two years of current global copper and one year of iron production will suffice to build a low-carbon energy system capable of supplying the world's electricity needs in 2050.

  11. Clinical benefits of oral nutritional supplementation for elderly hip fracture patients: a single blind randomised controlled trial.

    Myint, Ma Wai Wai; Wu, Jenny; Wong, Euann; Chan, Suk Ping; To, Tze Shing Jess; Chau, Mei Wa Rosanna; Ting, Kwai Hing; Fung, Pui Man; Au, Kit Sing Derrick

    2013-01-01

    malnutrition is an important risk factor for poor outcome in patients recovering after hip fracture surgery. This study aimed to investigate the clinical, nutritional and rehabilitation effects of an oral nutritional supplementation (ONS) in an inpatient rehabilitation setting. this was an observer-blinded randomised controlled trial of elderly post-surgical proximal femoral fracture patients. A ready-to-use oral liquid nutritional supplementation (18-24 g protein and 500 kcal per day) in addition to hospital diet was compared with hospital diet only. Both groups received usual rehabilitation therapy and oral calcium and vitamin D supplements. Outcomes were compared at discharge from rehabilitation and after 4 weeks of discharge. The primary outcome parameters were the serum albumin level, the body mass index (BMI), the functional independence measure (FIM) and the elderly mobility scale (EMS). Secondary outcome parameters were frequency of complications, inpatient length of stay, mortality and acute hospital use within 6 months after discharge. a total of 126 patients were recruited, 65 in the supplementation arm and 61 in the control arm. There was a significant difference in change in BMI with a decrease of 0.25 and 0.03 kg/m(2) in the ONS group and 0.72 and 0.49 kg/m(2) in the control group at hospital discharge and follow-up, respectively (P = 0.012). The length of stay in rehabilitation ward was shortened by 3.80 (SE = 1.81, P = 0.04) days favouring the ONS group. The total number of infection episodes was also reduced significantly. No difference was observed in the rate of change of the serum albumin level, the FIM and the EMS. clinical and nutritional benefits were seen in this trial but rehabilitation benefits could not be demonstrated.

  12. Negative argininosuccinate synthetase expression in melanoma tumours may predict clinical benefit from arginine-depleting therapy with pegylated arginine deiminase

    Feun, L G; Marini, A; Walker, G; Elgart, G; Moffat, F; Rodgers, S E; Wu, C J; You, M; Wangpaichitr, M; Kuo, M T; Sisson, W; Jungbluth, A A; Bomalaski, J; Savaraj, N

    2012-01-01

    Background: Arginine-depleting therapy with pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20) was reported to have activity in advanced melanoma in early phase I–II trial, and clinical trials are currently underway in other cancers. However, the optimal patient population who benefit from this treatment is unknown. Methods: Advanced melanoma patients with accessible tumours had biopsy performed before the start of treatment with ADI-PEG20 and at the time of progression or relapse when amenable to determine whether argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) expression in tumour was predictive of response to ADI-PEG20. Results: Twenty-seven of thirty-eight patients treated had melanoma tumours assessable for ASS staining before treatment. Clinical benefit rate (CBR) and longer time to progression were associated with negative expression of tumour ASS. Only 1 of 10 patients with ASS-positive tumours (ASS+) had stable disease, whereas 4 of 17 (24%) had partial response and 5 had stable disease, when ASS expression was negative (ASS−), giving CBR rates of 52.9 vs 10%, P=0.041. Two responding patients with negative ASS expression before therapy had rebiopsy after tumour progression and the ASS expression became positive. The survival of ASS− patients receiving at least four doses at 320 IU m−2 was significantly better than the ASS+ group at 26.5 vs 8.5 months, P=0.024. Conclusion: ADI-PEG20 is safe and the drug is only efficacious in melanoma patients whose tumour has negative ASS expression. Argininosuccinate synthetase tumour positivity is associated with drug resistance and tumour progression. PMID:22472884

  13. Green Care: A Review of the Benefits and Potential of Animal-Assisted Care Farming Globally and in Rural America.

    Artz, Brianna; Bitler Davis, Doris

    2017-04-13

    The term Green Care includes therapeutic, social or educational interventions involving farming; farm animals; gardening or general contact with nature. Although Green Care can occur in any setting in which there is interaction with plants or animals, this review focuses on therapeutic practices occurring on farms. The efficacy of care farming is discussed and the broad utilization of care farming and farm care communities in Europe is reviewed. Though evidence from care farms in the United States is included in this review, the empirical evidence which could determine its efficacy is lacking. For example, the empirical evidence supporting or refuting the efficacy of therapeutic horseback riding in adults is minimal, while there is little non-equine care farming literature with children. The health care systems in Europe are also much different than those in the United States. In order for insurance companies to cover Green Care techniques in the United States, extensive research is necessary. This paper proposes community-based ways that Green Care methods can be utilized without insurance in the United States. Though Green Care can certainly be provided in urban areas, this paper focuses on ways rural areas can utilize existing farms to benefit the mental and physical health of their communities.

  14. International clinical volunteering in Tanzania: A postcolonial analysis of a Global Health business.

    Sullivan, Noelle

    2018-03-01

    This article traces how scarcities characteristic of health systems in low-income countries (LICs), and increasing popular interest in Global Health, have inadvertently contributed to the popularisation of a specific Global Health business: international clinical volunteering through private volunteer placement organisations (VPOs). VPOs market neglected health facilities as sites where foreigners can 'make a difference', regardless of their skill set. Drawing on online investigation and ethnographic research in Tanzania over four field seasons from 2011 to 2015, including qualitative interviews with 41 foreign volunteers and 90 Tanzanian health workers, this article offers a postcolonial analysis of VPO marketing and volunteer action in health facilities of LICs. Two prevalent postcolonial racialised tropes inform both VPO marketing and foreign volunteers' discourses and practices in Tanzania. The first trope discounts Tanzanian expertise in order to envision volunteers in expert roles despite lacking training, expertise, or contextual knowledge. The second trope envisions Tanzanian patients as so impoverished that insufficiently trained volunteer help is 'better than nothing at all'. These two postcolonial racialised tropes inform the conceptual work undertaken by VPO marketing schemes and foreign volunteers in order to remake Tanzanian health professionals and patients into appropriate and justifiable sites for foreign volunteer intervention.

  15. Benefits of a comprehensive quality program for cryopreserved PBMC covering 28 clinical trials sites utilizing an integrated, analytical web-based portal.

    Ducar, Constance; Smith, Donna; Pinzon, Cris; Stirewalt, Michael; Cooper, Cristine; McElrath, M Juliana; Hural, John

    2014-07-01

    The HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) is a global network of 28 clinical trial sites dedicated to identifying an effective HIV vaccine. Cryopreservation of high-quality peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is critical for the assessment of vaccine-induced cellular immune functions. The HVTN PBMC Quality Management Program is designed to ensure that viable PBMC are processed, stored and shipped for clinical trial assays from all HVTN clinical trial sites. The program has evolved by developing and incorporating best practices for laboratory and specimen quality and implementing automated, web-based tools. These tools allow the site-affiliated processing laboratories and the central Laboratory Operations Unit to rapidly collect, analyze and report PBMC quality data. The HVTN PBMC Quality Management Program includes five key components: 1) Laboratory Assessment, 2) PBMC Training and Certification, 3) Internal Quality Control, 4) External Quality Control (EQC), and 5) Assay Specimen Quality Control. Fresh PBMC processing data is uploaded from each clinical site processing laboratory to a central HVTN Statistical and Data Management Center database for access and analysis on a web portal. Samples are thawed at a central laboratory for assay or specimen quality control and sample quality data is uploaded directly to the database by the central laboratory. Four year cumulative data covering 23,477 blood draws reveals an average fresh PBMC yield of 1.45×10(6)±0.48 cells per milliliter of useable whole blood. 95% of samples were within the acceptable range for fresh cell yield of 0.8-3.2×10(6) cells/ml of usable blood. Prior to full implementation of the HVTN PBMC Quality Management Program, the 2007 EQC evaluations from 10 international sites showed a mean day 2 thawed viability of 83.1% and a recovery of 67.5%. Since then, four year cumulative data covering 3338 specimens used in immunologic assays shows that 99.88% had acceptable viabilities (>66%) for use in

  16. The Costa Rica GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment) Project as a Learning Science Environment

    Castro Rojas, María Dolores; Zuñiga, Ana Lourdes Acuña; Ugalde, Emmanuel Fonseca

    2015-12-01

    GLOBE is a global educational program for elementary and high school levels, and its main purpose in Costa Rica is to develop scientific thinking and interest for science in high school students through hydrology research projects that allow them to relate science with environmental issues in their communities. Youth between 12 and 17 years old from public schools participate in science clubs outside of their regular school schedule. A comparison study was performed between different groups, in order to assess GLOBE's applicability as a learning science atmosphere and the motivation and interest it generates in students toward science. Internationally applied scales were used as tools for measuring such indicators, adapted to the Costa Rican context. The results provide evidence statistically significant that the students perceive the GLOBE atmosphere as an enriched environment for science learning in comparison with the traditional science class. Moreover, students feel more confident, motivated and interested in science than their peers who do not participate in the project. However, the results were not statistically significant in this last respect.

  17. Head and neck cancers: clinical benefits of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and of intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Giraud, P.; Jaulerry, C.; Brunin, F.; Zefkili, S.; Helfre, S.; Chauvet, I.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The conformal radiotherapy approach, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), is based on modern imaging modalities, efficient 3-D treatment planning systems, sophisticated immobilization systems and rigorous quality assurance and treatment verification. The central objective of conformal radiotherapy is to ensure a high dose distribution tailored to the limits of the target volume while reducing exposure of normal tissues. These techniques would then allow further tumor dose escalation. Head-and-neck tumors are some of the most attractive localizations to test conformal radiotherapy. They combine ballistic difficulties due to particularly complex shapes (nasopharynx, ethmoid) and problems due to the number and low tolerance of neighbouring organs like parotids, eyes, brainstem and spinal cord. The therapeutic irradiation of head-and-neck tumors thus remains a challenge for the radiation oncologist. Conformal radiotherapy does have a significant potential for improving local control and reducing toxicity when compared to standard radiotherapy. However, in the absence of prospective randomized trials, it is somewhat difficult at present to evaluate the real benefits drawn from 3DCRT and IMRT. The published clinical reports on the use of conformal radiotherapy are essentially dealing with dosimetric comparisons on relatively small numbers of patients. Recently, a few publications have emphasized the clinical experience several precursor teams with a suitable follow-up. This paper describes the current state-of-the-art of 3DCRT and IMRT in order to evaluate the impact of these techniques on head-and-neck cancers irradiation. (authors)

  18. A systematic review on recurrent respiratory papillomatosis: clinical effect and duration of benefit of different treatment modalities

    Elina Kiverniti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to compare different modalities used for the treatment of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP in adults and children in terms of their clinical effect and the duration of benefit. Systematic review of papers was written in the English language and published between 1977 and 2007. Outcomes are number of patients with a clinical response and length of time the response lasted for. We found 28 useful studies. There were 1,045 subjects, 416 children and 339 adults who underwent different treatments for RRP between 1976 and 2007. The methods used consisted of cidofovir, interferon, surgical excision, indole-3-carbinol, acyclovir, mumps vaccine, and photodynamic therapy. 62.5% of patients had a complete response on cidofovir (11 studies, 45.14% on interferon (8 studies, 33.33% on I3C (2 studies, 44.36% after surgery (5 studies, 77.55% after the mumps vaccine (1 study, 100% on acyclovir (1 study, and 9.09% after photodynamic therapy (1 study. The effect of different modalities lasted between 9 and 27 months. In conclusion, it is impossible to reach any reliable conclusions as to which method is the most durable and effective. There is a great need for randomised control multicentre trials on the treatment of RRP, so that reliable results can be produced.

  19. Personalized Symptom Goals and Patient Global Impression on Clinical Changes in Advanced Cancer Patients.

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Adile, Claudio; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Maltoni, Marco; Soares, Luiz Guilherme; De Santis, Stefano; Ferrera, Patrizia; Valenti, Marco; Rosati, Marta; Rossi, Romina; Cortegiani, Andrea; Masedu, Francesco; Marinangeli, Franco; Aielli, Federica

    2018-05-16

    The aim of this study was to assess the patients' global impression (PGI) after symptom management, as well as the achievement of personalized symptom goals (PSG). The secondary outcome was to assess related factors. Subjects, Materials, and Methods . Advanced cancer patients admitted to palliative care units rated symptom intensity by using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Score (ESAS) at admission and then after 1 week. For each symptom, patient-reported PGI and PSG, as well as the rate of PSG response, were evaluated. Eight hundred seventy-six patients were taken into consideration for this study. A mean of 1.71-2.16 points was necessary to perceive a bit better improvement of symptom intensity. Most patients had a PSG of ≤3. A statistically significant number of patients achieved their PSG after starting palliative care. Patients with high intensity of ESAS items at admission achieved a more favorable PGI response. In the multivariate analysis, symptom intensity and PSG were the most frequent factors independently associated to a best PGI, whereas high levels of Karnofsky had a lower odd ratio. PSG and PGI seem to be relevant for patients' assessment and decision-making process, translating in terms of therapeutic intervention. Some factors may be implicated in determining the individual target and clinical response. Personalized symptom goals and global impression of change are relevant for patients' assessment and decision-making process, translating in terms of therapeutic intervention. Some factors may be implicated in determining the individual target and clinical response. © AlphaMed Press 2018.

  20. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Defraene, Gilles; Van den Bergh, Laura; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Haustermans, Karin; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011–0.013) clinical factor was “previous abdominal surgery.” As second significant (p = 0.012–0.016) factor, “cardiac history” was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including “diabetes” was significant (p = 0.039–0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003–0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D 50 . Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints. Conclusions

  1. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Defraene, Gilles, E-mail: gilles.defraene@uzleuven.be [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Van den Bergh, Laura [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Al-Mamgani, Abrahim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center - Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Haustermans, Karin [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Heemsbergen, Wilma [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van den Heuvel, Frank [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Lebesque, Joos V. [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011-0.013) clinical factor was 'previous abdominal surgery.' As second significant (p = 0.012-0.016) factor, 'cardiac history' was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including 'diabetes' was significant (p = 0.039-0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003-0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D{sub 50}. Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints

  2. Green Care: A Review of the Benefits and Potential of Animal-Assisted Care Farming Globally and in Rural America

    Artz, Brianna; Bitler Davis, Doris

    2017-01-01

    methods can be utilized without insurance in the United States. Though Green Care can certainly be provided in urban areas, this paper focuses on ways rural areas can utilize existing farms to benefit the mental and physical health of their communities. PMID:28406428

  3. Challenges in the Clinical Application of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Value Framework: A Medicare Cost-Benefit Analysis in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Seymour, Erlene K; Schiffer, Charles A; de Souza, Jonas A

    2017-12-01

    The ASCO Value Framework calculates the value of cancer therapies. Given costly novel therapeutics for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, we used the framework to compare net health benefit (NHB) and cost within Medicare of all regimens listed in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. The current NCCN guidelines for chronic lymphocytic leukemia were reviewed. All referenced studies were screened, and only randomized controlled prospective trials were included. The revised ASCO Value Framework was used to calculate NHB. Medicare drug pricing was used to calculate the cost of therapies. Forty-nine studies were screened. The following observations were made: only 10 studies (20%) could be evaluated; when comparing regimens studied against the same control arm, ranking NHB scores were comparable to their preference in guidelines; NHB scores varied depending on which variables were used, and there were no clinically validated thresholds for low or high values; treatment-related deaths were not weighted in the toxicity scores; and six of the 10 studies used less potent control arms, ranked as the least-preferred NCCN-recommended regimens. The ASCO Value Framework is an important initial step to quantify value of therapies. Essential limitations include the lack of clinically relevant validated thresholds for NHB scores and lack of incorporation of grade 5 toxicities/treatment-related mortality into its methodology. To optimize its application for clinical practice, we urge investigators/sponsors to incorporate and report the required variables to calculate the NHB of regimens and encourage trials with stronger comparator arms to properly quantify the relative value of therapies.

  4. Global impacts from improved tropical forages: A meta-analysis revealing overlooked benefits and costs, evolving values and new priorities

    Douglas S. White

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available El uso más amplio y el desempeño mejorado de forrajes tropicales sembrados pueden cambiar sustancialmente los paisajes social, económico y ambiental. Mediante la revisión de estudios relacionados con el impacto de forrajes tropicales publicados en las últimas dos décadas, este artículo muestra cómo las prioridades de desarrollo cambiantes han influido en los tipos de impactos que se están documentando. Se utilizó un meta-análisis para examinar 98 estudios de acuerdo con: (i la envergadura de los efectos reportados en relación con los objetivos de desarrollo de equidad social, crecimiento económico y sostenibilidad ambiental; (ii el alcance de los efectos, que van desde impactos a mediano plazo a más largo plazo; y (iii la precisión de medición (identificación, descripción o cuantificación de los impactos. Se han evaluado impactos para menos de la mitad de los 118 millones de hectáreas con forrajes mejorados que se encuentran documentados. Aunque Brasil representa el 86% de la superficie sembrada que se conoce, los informes de adopción de tecnología son, en general, irregulares, lo cual afecta a la precisión de las estimaciones globales. Más del 80% de los estudios relacionados con el impacto de forrajes tropicales reportaron efectos económicos, mientras que menos del 20% son estimaciones cuantitativas del impacto económico a largo plazo. Métodos y supuestos de valoración inconsistentes impidieron sumar, en forma válida, el impacto económico total. Se reportaron efectos sociales en menos del 60% de los estudios, y se enfatizaron los resultados a nivel de los hogares en cuanto a género y trabajo. La mayoría de los efectos reportados fueron no cuantitativos. Los efectos ambientales fueron reportados un poco más frecuentemente que los efectos sociales, con aumentos recientes en las estimaciones cuantitativas de la acumulación de carbono. Pocos estudios analizaron las ventajas y desventajas. Aproximadamente el 15% de

  5. 21 CFR 50.53 - Clinical investigations involving greater than minimal risk and no prospect of direct benefit to...

    2010-04-01

    ... minimal risk and no prospect of direct benefit to individual subjects, but likely to yield generalizable... minimal risk and no prospect of direct benefit to individual subjects, but likely to yield generalizable... intervention or procedure that does not hold out the prospect of direct benefit for the individual subject, or...

  6. The Near-Term Viability and Benefits of eLabels for Patients, Clinical Sites, and Sponsors.

    Smith-Gick, Jodi; Barnes, Nicola; Barone, Rocco; Bedford, Jeff; James, Jason R; Reisner, Stacy Frankovitz; Stephenson, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Current clinical trial labels are designed primarily to meet regulatory requirements. These labels have low patient and site utility, few are opened, and they have limited space and small fonts. As our world transitions from paper to electronic, an opportunity exists to provide patients with information about their investigational clinical trial product in a way that is more easily accessible, meets Health Authority requirements, and provides valuable additional information for the patient and caregiver. A TransCelerate initiative was launched to understand the current regulatory and technology landscape for the potential use an electronic label (eLabel) for investigational medicinal products (IMPs). Concepts and an example proof of concept were developed intended to show the "art of the possible" for a foundational eLabel and a "universal printed label." In addition, possible patient-centric enhancements were captured in the eLabel proof of concept. These concepts were shared with Health Authorities as well as patient and site advisory groups to gather feedback and subsequently enhance the concepts. Feedback indicated that the concept of an eLabel provides value and concepts should continue to be pursued. While the Health Authorities engaged with did not express issues with the use of an eLabel per se, the reduction in the content on the paper label is not possible in some geographic locations due to existing regulations. There is nothing that prevents transmitting the label electronically in conjunction with current conventional labeling. While there are still some regulatory barriers that need to be addressed for reducing what is on the paper label, advancement toward a more patient-centric approach benefits stakeholders and will enable a fully connected patient-centric experience. The industry must start now to build the foundation.

  7. Addition of meloxicam to the treatment of bovine clinical mastitis results in a net economic benefit to the dairy farmer.

    van Soest, Felix J S; Abbeloos, Elke; McDougall, Scott; Hogeveen, Henk

    2018-04-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the addition of meloxicam to standard antimicrobial therapy for clinical mastitis (CM) improves the conception rate of dairy cows contracting CM in the first 120 d in milk. The objective of our study was to assess whether this improved reproduction through additional treatment with meloxicam would result in a positive net economic benefit for the farmer. We developed a stochastic bio-economic simulation model, in which a dairy cow with CM in the first 120 d in milk was simulated. Two scenarios were simulated in which CM cases were treated with meloxicam in conjunction with antimicrobial therapy or with antimicrobial therapy alone. The scenarios differed for conception rates (31% with meloxicam or 21% without meloxicam) and for the cost of CM treatment. Sensitivity analyses were undertaken for the biological and economic components of the model to assess the effects of a wide range of inputs on inferences about the cost effectiveness of meloxicam treatment. Model results showed an average net economic benefit of €42 per CM case per year in favor of the meloxicam scenario. Cows in the no-meloxicam treatment scenario had higher returns on milk production, lower costs upon calving, and reduced costs of treatment. However, these did not outweigh the savings associated with lower feed intake, reduced number of inseminations, and the reduced culling rate. The net economic benefit favoring meloxicam therapy was a consequence of the better reproductive performance in the meloxicam scenario in which cows had a shorter calving to conception interval (132 vs. 143 d), a shorter intercalving interval (405 vs. 416 d), and fewer inseminations per conception (2.9 vs. 3.7) compared with cows in the no-meloxicam treatment scenario. This resulted in a shorter lactation, hence a lower lactational milk production (8,441 vs. 8,517 kg per lactation) with lower feeding costs in the meloxicam group. A lower culling rate (12 vs. 25%) resulted in lower

  8. Benefit and outcome of using temozolomide-based chemoradiotherapy followed by temozolomide alone for glioblastoma in clinical practice.

    Salma, Svetlana; Djan, Igor; Bjelan, Mladen; Vulekovic, Petar; Novakovic, Mico; Vidovic, Vladimir; Lucic, Milos

    2017-01-01

    Temozolomide (TEM), an oral alkylating agent, has shown promising activity in the last 10 years in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Our goal was to show the benefit of concomitant therapy involving 3D conformal radiotherapy and temozolomide in clinical practice. This was a retrospective/prospective study and included a total of 113 patients with GBM diagnosis. Forty- seven patients received postoperative radiotherapy and 66 received concomitant temozolomide plus 3D conformal radiotherapy. The mean overall survival of patients who received postoperative radiotherapy alone was 9.93±6.475 months, compared to statistically longer overall survival in the group of patients who received radiotherapy plus temozolomide (13.89±8.049 months) (p=0.006). The latter group was divided into two subgroups, one consisting of patients who received 6 complete cycles of temozolomide, and a second with patients who received incomplete treatment. Statistically significant longer overall survival was registered in the first subgroup compared to the second (p=0.006). The concomitant usage of temozolomide and radiotherapy was beneficial, and statistically significant difference among groups and subgroups was observed regarding overall survival.

  9. Clinical benefit, complication patterns and cost effectiveness of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in moderate myopia: results of independent meta analyses on clinical outcome and postoperative complication profiles.

    Lamparter, J; Dick, H B; Krummenauer, Frank

    2005-09-12

    Laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) means a patient investment of 2426 Euro per eye, which usually cannot be funded by European health care insurers. In the context of recent resource allocation discussions, however, the cost effectiveness of LASIK could become an important indication of allocation decisions. Therefore an evidence based estimation of its incremental cost effectiveness was intended. Three independent meta analyses were implemented to estimate the refractive gain (dpt) due to conventional LASIK procedures as well as the predictability of the latter (%) (fraction of eyes achieving a postoperative refraction with maximum deviation of +/- 0.5 dpt from the target refraction). Study reports of 1995 - 2004 (English or German language) were screened for appropriate key words. Meta effects in refractive gain and predictability were estimated by means and standard deviations of reported effect measures. Cost data were estimated by German DRG rates and individual clinical pathway calculations; cost effectiveness was then computed in terms of the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) for both clinical benefit endpoints. A sensitivity analysis comprised cost variations of +/- 10 % and utility variations alongside the meta effects' 95% confidence intervals. Total direct costs from the patients' perspective were estimated at 2426 Euro per eye, associated with a refractive meta benefit of 5.93 dpt (95% meta confidence interval 5.32 - 6.54 dpt) and a meta predictability of 67% (43% - 91%). In terms of incremental costs, the unilateral LASIK implied a patient investion of 409 Euro (sensitivity range 351 - 473 Euro) per gained refractive unit or 36 Euro (27 - 56 Euro) per gained percentage point in predictability. When LASIK associated complication patterns were considered, the total direct costs amounted up to 3075 Euro, resulting in incremental costs of 519 Euro / dpt (sensitivity range 445 - 600 Euro / dpt) or 46 Euro / % (34 - 72 Euro / %). Most frequently

  10. A randomized clinical trial of high-dosage coenzyme Q10 in early Parkinson disease: no evidence of benefit.

    Beal, M Flint; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Henchcliffe, Claire; Galpern, Wendy R; Haas, Richard; Juncos, Jorge L; Nutt, John G; Voss, Tiffini Smith; Ravina, Bernard; Shults, Clifford M; Helles, Karen; Snively, Victoria; Lew, Mark F; Griebner, Brian; Watts, Arthur; Gao, Shan; Pourcher, Emmanuelle; Bond, Louisette; Kompoliti, Katie; Agarwal, Pinky; Sia, Cherissa; Jog, Mandar; Cole, Linda; Sultana, Munira; Kurlan, Roger; Richard, Irene; Deeley, Cheryl; Waters, Cheryl H; Figueroa, Angel; Arkun, Ani; Brodsky, Matthew; Ondo, William G; Hunter, Christine B; Jimenez-Shahed, Joohi; Palao, Alicia; Miyasaki, Janis M; So, Julie; Tetrud, James; Reys, Liza; Smith, Katharine; Singer, Carlos; Blenke, Anita; Russell, David S; Cotto, Candace; Friedman, Joseph H; Lannon, Margaret; Zhang, Lin; Drasby, Edward; Kumar, Rajeev; Subramanian, Thyagarajan; Ford, Donna Stuppy; Grimes, David A; Cote, Diane; Conway, Jennifer; Siderowf, Andrew D; Evatt, Marian Leslie; Sommerfeld, Barbara; Lieberman, Abraham N; Okun, Michael S; Rodriguez, Ramon L; Merritt, Stacy; Swartz, Camille Louise; Martin, W R Wayne; King, Pamela; Stover, Natividad; Guthrie, Stephanie; Watts, Ray L; Ahmed, Anwar; Fernandez, Hubert H; Winters, Adrienna; Mari, Zoltan; Dawson, Ted M; Dunlop, Becky; Feigin, Andrew S; Shannon, Barbara; Nirenberg, Melissa Jill; Ogg, Mattson; Ellias, Samuel A; Thomas, Cathi-Ann; Frei, Karen; Bodis-Wollner, Ivan; Glazman, Sofya; Mayer, Thomas; Hauser, Robert A; Pahwa, Rajesh; Langhammer, April; Ranawaya, Ranjit; Derwent, Lorelei; Sethi, Kapil D; Farrow, Buff; Prakash, Rajan; Litvan, Irene; Robinson, Annette; Sahay, Alok; Gartner, Maureen; Hinson, Vanessa K; Markind, Samuel; Pelikan, Melisa; Perlmutter, Joel S; Hartlein, Johanna; Molho, Eric; Evans, Sharon; Adler, Charles H; Duffy, Amy; Lind, Marlene; Elmer, Lawrence; Davis, Kathy; Spears, Julia; Wilson, Stephanie; Leehey, Maureen A; Hermanowicz, Neal; Niswonger, Shari; Shill, Holly A; Obradov, Sanja; Rajput, Alex; Cowper, Marilyn; Lessig, Stephanie; Song, David; Fontaine, Deborah; Zadikoff, Cindy; Williams, Karen; Blindauer, Karen A; Bergholte, Jo; Propsom, Clara Schindler; Stacy, Mark A; Field, Joanne; Mihaila, Dragos; Chilton, Mark; Uc, Ergun Y; Sieren, Jeri; Simon, David K; Kraics, Lauren; Silver, Althea; Boyd, James T; Hamill, Robert W; Ingvoldstad, Christopher; Young, Jennifer; Thomas, Karen; Kostyk, Sandra K; Wojcieszek, Joanne; Pfeiffer, Ronald F; Panisset, Michel; Beland, Monica; Reich, Stephen G; Cines, Michelle; Zappala, Nancy; Rivest, Jean; Zweig, Richard; Lumina, L Pepper; Hilliard, Colette Lynn; Grill, Stephen; Kellermann, Marye; Tuite, Paul; Rolandelli, Susan; Kang, Un Jung; Young, Joan; Rao, Jayaraman; Cook, Maureen M; Severt, Lawrence; Boyar, Karyn

    2014-05-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an antioxidant that supports mitochondrial function, has been shown in preclinical Parkinson disease (PD) models to reduce the loss of dopamine neurons, and was safe and well tolerated in early-phase human studies. A previous phase II study suggested possible clinical benefit. To examine whether CoQ10 could slow disease progression in early PD. A phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial at 67 North American sites consisting of participants 30 years of age or older who received a diagnosis of PD within 5 years and who had the following inclusion criteria: the presence of a rest tremor, bradykinesia, and rigidity; a modified Hoehn and Yahr stage of 2.5 or less; and no anticipated need for dopaminergic therapy within 3 months. Exclusion criteria included the use of any PD medication within 60 days, the use of any symptomatic PD medication for more than 90 days, atypical or drug-induced parkinsonism, a Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) rest tremor score of 3 or greater for any limb, a Mini-Mental State Examination score of 25 or less, a history of stroke, the use of certain supplements, and substantial recent exposure to CoQ10. Of 696 participants screened, 78 were found to be ineligible, and 18 declined participation. The remaining 600 participants were randomly assigned to receive placebo, 1200 mg/d of CoQ10, or 2400 mg/d of CoQ10; all participants received 1200 IU/d of vitamin E. Participants were observed for 16 months or until a disability requiring dopaminergic treatment. The prospectively defined primary outcome measure was the change in total UPDRS score (Parts I-III) from baseline to final visit. The study was powered to detect a 3-point difference between an active treatment and placebo. The baseline characteristics of the participants were well balanced, the mean age was 62.5 years, 66% of participants were male, and the mean baseline total UPDRS score was 22.7. A total of 267 participants

  11. Global Harmonization of Quality Assurance Naming Conventions in Radiation Therapy Clinical Trials

    Melidis, Christos, E-mail: christos.melidis@eortc.be [European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer–Radiation Oncology Group (EORTC-ROG), Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance (RTQA), Brussels (Belgium); Bosch, Walther R. [Washington University, representing Advanced Technology Consortium, Radiation Oncology, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Izewska, Joanna [Dosimetry Laboratory, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Fidarova, Elena; Zubizarreta, Eduardo [Applied Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Ulin, Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Representing Quality Assurance Review Center, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Ishikura, Satoshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University, Representing Japan Clinical Oncology Group, RTQA, Tokyo (Japan); Followill, David [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Representing Radiological Physics Center, RTQA, Houston, Texas (United States); Galvin, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Representing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, RTQA, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, representing TransTasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) Cancer Research, Newcastle (Australia); Besuijen, Deidre [North West Cancer Centre, Representing TROG Cancer Research, Newcastle (Australia); Clark, Clark H. [Department of Medical Physics, St. Luke' s Cancer Centre, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey and National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex, representing Radiation Therapy Trials Quality Assurance (RTTQA) (United Kingdom); Miles, Elizabeth; Aird, Edwin [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood, Middlesex representing RTTQA (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To review the various radiation therapy quality assurance (RTQA) procedures used by the Global Clinical Trials RTQA Harmonization Group (GHG) steering committee members and present the harmonized RTQA naming conventions by amalgamating procedures with similar objectives. Methods and Materials: A survey of the GHG steering committee members' RTQA procedures, their goals, and naming conventions was conducted. The RTQA procedures were classified as baseline, preaccrual, and prospective/retrospective data capture and analysis. After all the procedures were accumulated and described, extensive discussions took place to come to harmonized RTQA procedures and names. Results: The RTQA procedures implemented within a trial by the GHG steering committee members vary in quantity, timing, name, and compliance criteria. The procedures of each member are based on perceived chances of noncompliance, so that the quality of radiation therapy planning and treatment does not negatively influence the trial measured outcomes. A comparison of these procedures demonstrated similarities among the goals of the various methods, but the naming given to each differed. After thorough discussions, the GHG steering committee members amalgamated the 27 RTQA procedures to 10 harmonized ones with corresponding names: facility questionnaire, beam output audit, benchmark case, dummy run, complex treatment dosimetry check, virtual phantom, individual case review, review of patients' treatment records, and protocol compliance and dosimetry site visit. Conclusions: Harmonized RTQA harmonized naming conventions, which can be used in all future clinical trials involving radiation therapy, have been established. Harmonized procedures will facilitate future intergroup trial collaboration and help to ensure comparable RTQA between international trials, which enables meta-analyses and reduces RTQA workload for intergroup studies.

  12. Brain natriuretic peptide precursor (NT-pro-BNP) levels predict for clinical benefit to sunitinib treatment in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Papazisis, Konstantinos T; Kortsaris, Alexandros H; Kontovinis, Lukas F; Papandreou, Christos N; Kouvatseas, George; Lafaras, Christos; Antonakis, Evangelos; Christopoulou, Maria; Andreadis, Charalambos; Mouratidou, Despoina

    2010-01-01

    Sunitinib is an oral, multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has been approved for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Although the majority of sunitinib-treated patients receive a clinical benefit, almost a third of the patients will not respond. Currently there is no available marker that can predict for response in these patients. We estimated the plasma levels of NT-pro-BNP (the N-terminal precursor of brain natriuretic peptide) in 36 patients that were treated with sunitinib for metastatic clear-cell renal carcinoma. From the 36 patients, 9 had progressive disease and 27 obtained a clinical benefit (objective response or disease stabilization). Increases in plasma NT-pro-BNP were strongly correlated to clinical outcome. Patients with disease progression increased plasma BNP at statistically significant higher levels than patients that obtained a clinical benefit, and this was evident from the first 15 days of treatment (a three-fold increase in patients with progressive disease compared to stable NT-pro-BNP levels in patients with clinical benefit, p < 0.0001). Median progression-free survival was 12.0 months in patients with less than 1.5 fold increases (n = 22) and 3.9 months in patients with more than 1.5 fold increases in plasma NT-pro-BNP (n = 13) (log-rank test, p = 0.001). This is the first time that a potential 'surrogate marker' has been reported with such a clear correlation to clinical benefit at an early time of treatment. Due to the relative small number of accessed patients, this observation needs to be further addressed on larger cohorts. More analyses, including multivariate analyses are needed before such an observation can be used in clinical practice

  13. Economic Cost of Ovine Johne’s Disease in Clinically Affected New Zealand Flocks and Benefit-Cost of Vaccination

    Gautam, Milan; Anderson, Peter; Ridler, Anne; Wilson, Peter; Heuer, Cord

    2018-01-01

    The aims of this study were to estimate the on-fam economic cost of ovine Johne’s disease (OJD) based on collected incidence and mortality data, and the benefit-cost of OJD vaccination in typical OJD affected flocks in New Zealand after having vaccinated for a number of years. Owners of 20 sheep breeding and finishing farms known to be clinically affected by ovine Johne’s disease in New Zealand participated in the study and were monitored for up to two years. Farms were categorized as fine-wool (Merino, Half-Bred, Corriedale, n = 15), and other breeds (Romney, composite breeds, n = 5). Ovine JD was confirmed by gross- and histo-pathology in 358 ewes culled due to chronic progressive wasting. An additional 228 ewes with low body condition score (BCS), but not targeted for culling, were tested with ELISA to estimate the proportion of OJD in ewes in the lower 5% BCS of the flock. Calculations were done separately for fine-wool and other breeds. Based on the data, mortality due to OJD, its associated cost and the benefit-cost of vaccination were evaluated for a hypothetical farm with 2000 ewes by stochastic simulation. Total ewe mortality was similar in fine-wool and other breeds, but the estimated mortality due to OJD was 2.7 times as high in fine-wool (median 1.8%, interquartile range IQR 1.2–2.7%) than other breeds (median 0.69%, IQR 0.3–1.2%), but with large variation between farms. ELISA results demonstrated fine-wool sheep had a higher seroprevalence than other breeds (39%, 95% CI 18–61% vs. 9%, 95% CI 0–22%). Stochastic modelling indicated that the average annual cost of mortality due to OJD in a flock of 2000 ewes was NZD 13,100 (IQR 8900–18,600) in fine-wool and NZD 4300 (IQR 2200–7600) in other breeds. Vaccinating replacement lambs against OJD may be cost-effective in most flocks when the pre-vaccination annual ewe mortality due to OJD is >1%. To make the best-informed decision about vaccination it is therefore essential for farmers to

  14. Determining clinical benefits of drug-eluting coronary stents according to the population risk profile: a meta-regression from 31 randomized trials.

    Moreno, Raul; Martin-Reyes, Roberto; Jimenez-Valero, Santiago; Sanchez-Recalde, Angel; Galeote, Guillermo; Calvo, Luis; Plaza, Ignacio; Lopez-Sendon, Jose-Luis

    2011-04-01

    The use of drug-eluting stents (DES) in unfavourable patients has been associated with higher rates of clinical complications and stent thrombosis, and because of that concerns about the use of DES in high-risk settings have been raised. This study sought to demonstrate that the clinical benefit of DES increases as the risk profile of the patients increases. A meta-regression analysis from 31 randomized trials that compared DES and bare-metal stents, including overall 12,035 patients, was performed. The relationship between the clinical benefit of using DES (number of patients to treat [NNT] to prevent one episode of target lesion revascularization [TLR]), and the risk profile of the population (rate of TLR in patients allocated to bare-metal stents) in each trial was evaluated. The clinical benefit of DES increased as the risk profile of each study population increased: NNT for TLR=31.1-1.2 (TLR for bare-metal stents); prisk profile of each study population, since the effect of DES in mortality, myocardial infarction, and stent thrombosis, was not adversely affected by the risk profile of each study population (95% confidence interval for β value 0.09 to 0.11, -0.12 to 0.19, and -0.03 to-0.15 for mortality, myocardial infarction, and stent thrombosis, respectively). The clinical benefit of DES increases as the risk profile of the patients increases, without affecting safety. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Examining Pediatric Cases From the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society Ureteroscopy Global Study.

    Guven, Selcuk; Basiri, Abbas; Varshney, Anil Kumar; Aridogan, Ibrahim Atilla; Miura, Hiroyasu; White, Mark; Kilinc, Mehmet; de la Rosette, Jean

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the characteristics and outcomes of ureteroscopy (URS) in children treated in several hospitals participating in the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) Study, and to present the overall results of pediatric URS compared with adults. The CROES Study collected data on consecutive patients treated with URS for urolithiasis at each participating center over a 1-year period. The collected prospective global database includes data for 11,885 patients who received URS at 114 centers in 32 countries. Of these URS-treated patients, 192 were ≤18 years old. Of the 114 centers participating in the study, 42% had conducted pediatric URS. Among the pediatric cases, 7 were infants, 53 were small children, 59 were school-aged children, and 73 were adolescents. A considerable number (37%) of the pediatric cases had previously undergone URS treatment. No differences in the surgical outcomes of the adults and children were reported. The URS-treated children had a greater number of positive preoperative urine cultures when compared with adult cases treated. A semirigid scope was used in the vast majority of pediatric cases (85%). According to the present data, within the group of URS-treated children, the younger the child, the more readmissions occurred. URS is as efficient and safe in children as it is in adults. The data suggest that readmissions among URS-treated children are associated with age, with the likelihood of readmissions greater among younger age groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A review of content-based image retrieval systems in medical applications-clinical benefits and future directions.

    Müller, Henning; Michoux, Nicolas; Bandon, David; Geissbuhler, Antoine

    2004-02-01

    content-based access methods into picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) have been created. This article gives an overview of available literature in the field of content-based access to medical image data and on the technologies used in the field. Section 1 gives an introduction into generic content-based image retrieval and the technologies used. Section 2 explains the propositions for the use of image retrieval in medical practice and the various approaches. Example systems and application areas are described. Section 3 describes the techniques used in the implemented systems, their datasets and evaluations. Section 4 identifies possible clinical benefits of image retrieval systems in clinical practice as well as in research and education. New research directions are being defined that can prove to be useful. This article also identifies explanations to some of the outlined problems in the field as it looks like many propositions for systems are made from the medical domain and research prototypes are developed in computer science departments using medical datasets. Still, there are very few systems that seem to be used in clinical practice. It needs to be stated as well that the goal is not, in general, to replace text-based retrieval methods as they exist at the moment but to complement them with visual search tools.

  17. Methylphenidate treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in young people with learning disability and difficult-to-treat epilepsy: Evidence of clinical benefit

    Fosi, Tangunu; Lax-Pericall, Maria T; Scott, Rod C; Neville, Brian G; Aylett, Sarah E

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To establish the efficacy and safety of methylphenidate (MPH) treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a group of children and young people with learning disability and severe epilepsy. Methods This retrospective study systematically reviewed the case notes of all patients treated with methylphenidate (MPH) for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) ADHD at a specialist epilepsy center between 1998 and 2005. Treatment efficacy was ascertained using clinical global impressions (CGI) scores, and safety was indexed by instances of >25% increase in monthly seizure count within 3 months of starting MPH. Key Findings Eighteen (18) patients were identified with refractory epilepsies (14 generalized, 4 focal), IQ <70, and ADHD. Male patients predominated (13:5) and ADHD was diagnosed at a median age of 11.5 years (range 6–18 years). With use of a combination of a behavioral management program and MPH 0.3–1 mg/kg/day, ADHD symptoms improved in 61% of patients (11/18; type A intraclass correlation coefficient of CGI 0.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.69–0.94). Daily MPH dose, epilepsy variables, and psychiatric comorbidity did not relate to treatment response across the sample. MPH adverse effects led to treatment cessation in three patients (dysphoria in two, anxiety in one). There was no statistical evidence for a deterioration of seizure control in this group with the use of MPH. Significance Methylphenidate with behavioral management was associated with benefit in the management of ADHD in more than half of a group of children with severe epilepsy and additional cognitive impairments. Eighteen percent had significant side effects but no attributable increase in seizures. Methylphenidate is useful in this group and is likely to be under employed. PMID:24304474

  18. Is there a clinical benefit with a smooth compensator design compared with a plunged compensator design for passive scattered protons?

    Tabibian, Art A., E-mail: art.tabibian@gmail.com [University of Texas School of Allied Health-Medical Dosimetry, Houston, TX (United States); Powers, Adam; Dolormente, Keith; Oommen, Sneha; Tiwari, Akhil [University of Texas School of Allied Health-Medical Dosimetry, Houston, TX (United States); Palmer, Matt [MD Anderson Department of Radiation Oncology, Houston, TX (United States); Zhu, Xiaorong R.; Li, Heng; Sahoo, Narayan; Wisdom, Paul [MD Anderson Department of Radiation Physics, Houston, TX (United States); Velasco, Kyle [Radiation Oncology Resources, Goshen, IN (United States); Erhart, Kevin; Stanley, Henry [Decimal, Inc, Sanford, FL (United States); Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc T. [MD Anderson Department of Radiation Oncology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-04-01

    In proton therapy, passive scattered proton plans use compensators to conform the dose to the distal surface of the planning volume. These devices are custom made from acrylic or wax for each treatment field using either a plunge-drilled or smooth-milled compensator design. The purpose of this study was to investigate if there is a clinical benefit of generating passive scattered proton radiation treatment plans with the smooth compensator design. We generated 4 plans with different techniques using the smooth compensators. We chose 5 sites and 5 patients for each site for the range of dosimetric effects to show adequate sample. The plans were compared and evaluated using multicriteria (MCA) plan quality metrics for plan assessment and comparison using the Quality Reports [EMR] technology by Canis Lupus LLC. The average absolute difference for dosimetric metrics from the plunged-depth plan ranged from −4.7 to +3.0 and the average absolute performance results ranged from −6.6% to +3%. The manually edited smooth compensator plan yielded the best dosimetric metric, +3.0, and performance, + 3.0% compared to the plunged-depth plan. It was also superior to the other smooth compensator plans. Our results indicate that there are multiple approaches to achieve plans with smooth compensators similar to the plunged-depth plans. The smooth compensators with manual compensator edits yielded equal or better target coverage and normal tissue (NT) doses compared with the other smooth compensator techniques. Further studies are under investigation to evaluate the robustness of the smooth compensator design.

  19. Benefits of a clinical data warehouse with data mining tools to collect data for a radiotherapy trial.

    Roelofs, Erik; Persoon, Lucas; Nijsten, Sebastiaan; Wiessler, Wolfgang; Dekker, André; Lambin, Philippe

    2013-07-01

    Collecting trial data in a medical environment is at present mostly performed manually and therefore time-consuming, prone to errors and often incomplete with the complex data considered. Faster and more accurate methods are needed to improve the data quality and to shorten data collection times where information is often scattered over multiple data sources. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possible benefit of modern data warehouse technology in the radiation oncology field. In this study, a Computer Aided Theragnostics (CAT) data warehouse combined with automated tools for feature extraction was benchmarked against the regular manual data-collection processes. Two sets of clinical parameters were compiled for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and rectal cancer, using 27 patients per disease. Data collection times and inconsistencies were compared between the manual and the automated extraction method. The average time per case to collect the NSCLC data manually was 10.4 ± 2.1 min and 4.3 ± 1.1 min when using the automated method (pdata collected for NSCLC and 5.3% for rectal cancer, there was a discrepancy between the manual and automated method. Aggregating multiple data sources in a data warehouse combined with tools for extraction of relevant parameters is beneficial for data collection times and offers the ability to improve data quality. The initial investments in digitizing the data are expected to be compensated due to the flexibility of the data analysis. Furthermore, successive investigations can easily select trial candidates and extract new parameters from the existing databases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Review of existing experimental approaches for the clinical evaluation of the benefits of plant food supplements on cardiovascular function.

    Meoni, Paolo; Restani, Patrizia; Mancama, Dalu T

    2013-06-01

    We conducted a survey of the National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) PubMed database to identify methods most commonly used for the evaluation of the effect of plant food supplements on the cardiovascular system and their relevance to the regulatory status of these products. Particularly, our search strategy was aimed at the selection of studies concerning the clinical evaluation of the beneficial effects of the most commonly studied plant food supplements acting on the cardiovascular system. Following the screening of 3839 papers for inclusion criteria, 48 published reports were retained for this review. Most studies included in this review used a double blind controlled design, and evaluated the effect of plant food supplements on individuals affected by a disease of the cardiovascular system. The majority of the studies were found to be of low methodological quality on the Jadad scale, mainly because of inadequate reporting of adverse events and of patient withdrawals. In comparison, measures used for the evaluation of benefits included mostly cardiovascular risk factors as recommended in international guidelines and in accordance with principles laid down for the evaluation of health claims in food. The risk factors most frequently evaluated belonged to the category of "lipid function and levels", "heart function" and "blood pressure". For the absolute majority of the studies, the study period did not exceed one month. This review highlights critical factors to be considered in the design of studies evaluating the health effects of plant food supplements on the cardiovascular system. Between others, the inclusion of healthy individuals, better reporting and description of the characteristics of the product used could improve the quality and relevance of these studies.

  1. Clinical update on benefit versus risks of oral paracetamol alone or with codeine: still a good option?

    Kress, Hans Georg; Untersteiner, Gerald

    2017-02-01

    After decades of worldwide use of paracetamol/acetaminophen as a popular and apparently safe prescription and over-the-counter medicine, the future role of this poorly understood analgesic has been seriously questioned by recent concerns about prenatal, cardiovascular (CV) and hepatic safety, and also about its analgesic efficacy. At the same time the usefulness of codeine in combination products has come under debate. Based on a PubMed database literature search on the terms efficacy, safety, paracetamol, acetaminophen, codeine and their combinations up to and including June 2016, this clinical update reviews the current evidence of the benefit and risks of oral paracetamol alone and with codeine for mild-to-moderate pain in adults, and compares the respective efficacy and safety profiles with those of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Whereas there is a clear strong association of NSAID use and gastrointestinal (GI) and CV morbidity and mortality, evidence for paracetamol with and without codeine supports the recommended use even in most vulnerable individuals, such as the elderly, pregnant women, alcoholics, and compromised GI and CV patients. The controversies and widespread misconceptions about the complex hepatic metabolism and potential hepatotoxicity have been corrected by recent reviews, and paracetamol remains the first-line nonopioid analgesic in patients with liver diseases if notes of caution are applied. Due to its safety and tolerability profile paracetamol remained a first-line treatment in many international guidelines. Alone and with codeine it is a safe and effective option in adults, whilst NSAIDs are obviously less safe as alternatives, given the risk of potentially fatal GI and CV adverse effects.

  2. Intravitreal bevacizumab has initial clinical benefit lasting eight weeks in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    P William Conrad

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available P William Conrad, David N Zacks, Mark W JohnsonDepartment of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kellogg Eye Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USAPurpose: To determine whether the effect of a single initial intravitreal injection of bevacizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD persists for 8 weeks.Methods: We reviewed the records of 25 consecutive patients with neovascular AMD treated with intravitreal bevacizumab. Patients were included (n = 15 if follow up data were available from 4 and 8 week visits after a single initial injection. Additionally, optical coherence tomography (OCT images were graded qualitatively in a masked fashion by a single reader.Results: Baseline mean visual acuity was 20/200, improving to 20/125 at 4 weeks (p = 0.0153 and 20/100 at 8 weeks (p = 0.0027. Mean central retinal thickness was 316 ± 107 µm at baseline and decreased to 223 ± 70 µm and 206 ± 45 µm at 4 and 8 weeks post-injection, respectively (p = 0.0003 and 0.0005. By masked OCT grading, macular fluid was resolved in 10/15 (66.7% and 11/15 (73.3% eyes at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, and 3/15 (20% eyes had continued reduction in residual macular fluid between 4 and 8 weeks.Conclusions: A single initial bevacizumab injection has persistent clinical benefit lasting 8 weeks in most eyes with neovascular AMD. Results of prospective randomized studies are needed before changes in treatment regimens can be recommended.Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, bevacizumab, choroidal neovascular membrane, optical coherence tomography

  3. Benefits of a clinical data warehouse with data mining tools to collect data for a radiotherapy trial

    Roelofs, Erik; Persoon, Lucas; Nijsten, Sebastiaan; Wiessler, Wolfgang; Dekker, André; Lambin, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Collecting trial data in a medical environment is at present mostly performed manually and therefore time-consuming, prone to errors and often incomplete with the complex data considered. Faster and more accurate methods are needed to improve the data quality and to shorten data collection times where information is often scattered over multiple data sources. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possible benefit of modern data warehouse technology in the radiation oncology field. Material and methods: In this study, a Computer Aided Theragnostics (CAT) data warehouse combined with automated tools for feature extraction was benchmarked against the regular manual data-collection processes. Two sets of clinical parameters were compiled for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and rectal cancer, using 27 patients per disease. Data collection times and inconsistencies were compared between the manual and the automated extraction method. Results: The average time per case to collect the NSCLC data manually was 10.4 ± 2.1 min and 4.3 ± 1.1 min when using the automated method (p < 0.001). For rectal cancer, these times were 13.5 ± 4.1 and 6.8 ± 2.4 min, respectively (p < 0.001). In 3.2% of the data collected for NSCLC and 5.3% for rectal cancer, there was a discrepancy between the manual and automated method. Conclusions: Aggregating multiple data sources in a data warehouse combined with tools for extraction of relevant parameters is beneficial for data collection times and offers the ability to improve data quality. The initial investments in digitizing the data are expected to be compensated due to the flexibility of the data analysis. Furthermore, successive investigations can easily select trial candidates and extract new parameters from the existing databases

  4. SU-F-T-92: Clinical Benefit for Breast and Chest Wall Setup in Using a Breast Board

    Li, S; Miyamoto, C; Serratore, D; Liang, Q; Dziemianowicz, E [Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To validate benefit of using a breast board (BB) by analyzing the geometry and dosimetry changes of the regions of interest (ROIs) between CT scans with and without BB. Methods: Seven patients, two chest walls (CW) and five breasts, use BB at CT simulation and no BB at diagnostic CT were included. By using deformable image registration software (Velocity AI), diagnostic CT and planning CT were rigidly co-registered according to the thoracic cage at the target. The heart and the target were then deformedly matched and the contours of the planned ROIs were transferred to the diagnostic CT. Which were brought back to the planning CT data set though the initial rigid co-registration in order to keep the deformed ROIs redefined in the diagnostic CT. Anatomic shifts and volume changes of a ROI beyond the rigid translation were recorded and dosimetry changes to ROIs were compared with recalculated DVHs. Results: Patient setup without the BB had small but systematic heart shifts superiorly by ∼5 mm. Torso rotations in two cases moved the heart in opposite directions by ∼10 mm. The breast target volume, shape, and locations were significantly changed with arm extension over the head but not in cases with the arm extended laterally. Breast setup without BB could increase the mean dose to the heart and the maximal dose to the anterior ventricle wall by 1.1 and 6.7 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: A method for evaluation of breast setup technique is introduced and applied for patients. Results of systematic heart displacement without using the BB and the potential increase of heart doses encourage us to further investigate the current trend of not using a BB for easy setup and CT scans. Using a BB would likely increase patient sag during prolonged IMRT and real-time patient position monitoring is clinically desired.

  5. A framework to assess the value of application of formal criteria to check clinical relevance in RCTs as part of a benefit assessment strategy.

    Vach, Werner; Gladstone, Beryl Primrose

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the topic of assessing clinical relevance on top of statistical significance in the analysis of randomized control trials (RCTs) has got increasing attention, in particular as part of benefit assessments. Several formal criteria to serve this purpose have been published. In this paper, we present a framework to assess the value of the application of such criteria. We propose to quantify the need for the assessment of clinical relevance by the actual risk of having accepted a benefit for a treatment with an irrelevant effect in a successful RCT. We then study how this risk can be controlled by two popular criteria based on comparing the effect estimate or the lower bound of the confidence interval with a given threshold. We further propose to quantify the impact of using formal criteria by considering the expected costs when specifying error-specific costs for each of the three possible types of errors: A benefit may be accepted for a treatment, which is actually inferior, or which is not inferior, but only implies an irrelevant improvement, or a benefit may be rejected for a treatment implying a relevant improvement. This way we can demonstrate that the impact depends on parameters which are typically not explicitly defined in the frame of benefit assessments. Depending on the values of these parameters, formal checks of clinical relevance may imply better decisions on average, but they may also imply more harm than good on average. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Clinical benefits and oncologic equivalence of self-expandable metallic stent insertion for right-sided malignant colonic obstruction.

    Ji, Woong Bae; Kwak, Jung Myun; Kang, Dong Woo; Kwak, Han Deok; Um, Jun Won; Lee, Sun-Il; Min, Byung-Wook; Sung, Nak Song; Kim, Jin; Kim, Seon Hahn

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of stenting for right-sided malignant colonic obstruction is unknown. This study aimed to evaluate the safety, feasibility, and clinical benefits of self-expandable metallic stent insertion for right-sided malignant colonic obstruction. Clinical data from patients who underwent right hemicolectomy for right colon cancer from January 2006 to July 2014 at three Korea University hospitals were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 39 patients who developed malignant obstruction in the right-sided colon were identified, and their data were analyzed. Stent insertion was attempted in 16 patients, and initial technical success was achieved in 14 patients (87.5 %). No stent-related immediate complications were reported. Complete relief from obstruction was achieved in all 14 patients. Twenty-five patients, including two patients who failed stenting, underwent emergency surgery. In the stent group, 93 % (13/14) of patients underwent elective laparoscopic surgery, and only one surgery was converted to an open procedure. All patients in the emergency group underwent emergency surgery within 24 h of admission. In the emergency group, only 12 % (3/25) of patients underwent laparoscopic surgery, with one surgery converted to an open procedure. All patients in both groups underwent either laparoscopy-assisted or open right/extended right hemicolectomy with primary anastomoses as the first operation. The operative times, retrieved lymph nodes, and pathologic stage did not differ between the two groups. Postoperative hospital stay (9.4 ± 3.4 days in the stent group vs. 12.4 ± 5.9 in the emergency group, p = 0.089) and time to resume oral food intake (3.2 ± 2.1 days in the stent group vs. 5.7 ± 3.4 in the emergency group, p = 0.019) were shorter in the stent group. And there were no significant differences in disease-free survival and overall survival between the two groups. Stent insertion appears to be safe and feasible in patients with right

  7. Estimating the clinical and economic benefit associated with incremental improvements in sustained virologic response in chronic hepatitis C.

    McEwan, Phil; Ward, Thomas; Bennett, Hayley; Kalsekar, Anupama; Webster, Samantha; Brenner, Michael; Yuan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the principle causes of chronic liver disease. Successful treatment significantly decreases the risk of hepatic morbidity and mortality. Current standard of care achieves sustained virologic response (SVR) rates of 40-80%; however, the HCV therapy landscape is rapidly evolving. The objective of this study was to quantify the clinical and economic benefit associated with increasing levels of SVR. A published Markov model (MONARCH) that simulates the natural history of hepatitis C over a lifetime horizon was used. Discounted and non-discounted life-years (LYs), quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and cost of complication management were estimated for various plausible SVR rates. To demonstrate the robustness of projections obtained, the model was validated to ten UK-specific HCV studies. QALY estimates ranged from 18.0 years for those treated successfully in fibrosis stage F0 to 7.5 years (discounted) for patients in fibrosis stage F4 who remain untreated. Predicted QALY gains per 10% improvement in SVR ranged from 0.23 (F0) to 0.64 (F4) and 0.58 (F0) to 1.35 (F4) in 40 year old patients (discounted and non-discounted results respectively). In those aged 40, projected discounted HCV-related costs are minimised with successful treatment in F0/F1 (at approximately £ 300), increasing to £ 49,300 in F4 patients who remain untreated. Validation of the model to published UK cost-effectiveness studies produce R2 goodness of fit statistics of 0.988, 0.978 and of 0.973 for total costs, QALYs and incremental cost effectiveness ratios, respectively. Projecting the long-term clinical and economic consequences associated with chronic hepatitis C is a necessary requirement for the evaluation of new treatments. The principle analysis demonstrates the significant impact on expected costs, LYs and QALYs associated with increasing SVR. A validation analysis demonstrated the robustness of the results reported.

  8. Vacuum-assisted wound closure in vascular surgery--clinical and cost benefits in a developing country.

    Koncar, Igor; Cvetković, Slobodan; Dragas, Marko; Pejkić, Sinisa; Lazović, Goran; Banzić, Igor; Zuvela, Marinko; Marković, Miroslav; Davidović, Lazar

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM. Surgical and chronic wounds in vascular patients might contribute to limb loss and death. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC)--Kinetic Concepts, Inc. (KCI), has been increasingly used in Western Europe and the U.S.A. clinical practice for 15 years. Advantages of this method are faster wound healing, wound approximation, lower wound related treatment costs and improved quality of life during treatment. Evidence related to the usage of VAC therapy in vascular patients and cost effectiveness of VAC therapy in a developing country are lacking. The aim of this study was to explore results of VAC therapy in vascular surgery comparing to conventional methods and to test cost effects in a developing country like Serbia. All patients with wound infection or dehiscence operated at the tertiary vascular university clinic in the period from January 2011-January 2012, were treated with VAC therapy. The primary endpoint was wound closure, while secondary endpoints were hospital stay, the number of weekly dressings, costs of wound care, working time of medical personnel. The patients were divided into groups according to the wound type and location: wound with exposed synthetic vascular implant (25%), laparotomy (13%), foot amputation (29%), major limb amputation (21%), fasciotomy (13%). The results of primary and secondary endpoint were compared with the results of conventional treatment during the previous year. There was one death (1/42, 2.38%) and one limb loss (1/12, 2.38%) in the VAC group, and 8 deaths (8/38, 21.05%) and 5 (5/38, 13.15%) limb losses in the patients treated with conventional therapy. In the VAC group there was one groin bleeding (1/12, 2.38%), one groin reinfection (1/12, 2.38%) and one resistance to therapy with a consequent limb loss. Costs of hospital stay (p VAC therapy in the group with exposed graft. VAC therapy is the effective method for care of complicated wounds in vascular surgery. Patients with infection of wound with the exposed

  9. Student Reflection Papers on a Global Clinical Experience: A Qualitative Study.

    Margolis, Carmi Z; Rohrbaugh, Robert M; Tsang, Luisa; Fleischer, Jennifer; Graham, Mark J; Kellett, Anne; Hafler, Janet P

    Many of the 70,000 graduating US medical students [per year] have reported participating in a global health activity at some stage of medical school. This case study design provided a method for understanding the student's experience that included student's learning about culture, health disparities, exposure and reaction to a range of diseases actually encountered. The broad diversity of themes among students indicated that the GCE provided a flexible, personalized experience. We need to understand the student's experience in order to help design appropriate curricular experiences [and valid student assessment]. Our research aim was to analyze medical student reflection papers to understand how they viewed their Global Clinical Experience (GCE). A qualitative case study design was used to analyze student reflection papers. All 28 students who participated in a GCE from 2008-2010 and in 2014-2015 and submitted a reflection paper on completion of the GCE were eligible to participate in the study. One student did not submit a reflection paper and was not included in the study. All 27 papers were coded by paragraph for reflection and for themes. System of Care/Range of Care was mentioned most often, Aids to Adjustment Process was mentioned least. The theme, "Diseases," referred to any mention of a disease in the reflection papers, and 44 diseases were mentioned in the papers. The analysis for depth of reflection yielded the following data: Observation, 81/248 paragraphs; Observation and Interpretation, 130/248 paragraphs; and Observation, Interpretation, and Suggestions for change, 36/248 paragraphs; 9 reflection papers contained 27 separate accounts of a transformational experience. This study provided a method for understanding the student's experience that included student's learning about culture, health disparities, and exposure and reaction to a range of diseases actually encountered. The broad diversity of themes among students indicated that the GCE provided a

  10. Ambulatory and Non-Ambulatory Benefits of Lower Limb Exoskeleton Use, with and without FES, in Clinical and Community Settings

    2017-10-01

    research investigates the extent to which regular walking in an exoskeleton will provide mobility, health , and recovery benefits to individuals with spinal...15. SUBJECT TERMS spinal cord injury, paraplegia, exoskeleton, physical medicine and rehabilitation, rehabilitation research, legged mobility...regular walking in an exoskeleton will provide mobility, health , and recovery benefits to individuals with spinal cord injury. The research is comprised

  11. Investment Success in Public Health: An Analysis of the Cost-Effectiveness and Cost-Benefit of the Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis.

    Turner, Hugo C; Bettis, Alison A; Chu, Brian K; McFarland, Deborah A; Hooper, Pamela J; Mante, Sunny D; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Bradley, Mark H

    2017-03-15

    It has been estimated that $154 million per year will be required during 2015-2020 to continue the Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF). In light of this, it is important to understand the program's current value. Here, we evaluate the cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit of the preventive chemotherapy that was provided under the GPELF between 2000 and 2014. In addition, we also investigate the potential cost-effectiveness of hydrocele surgery. Our economic evaluation of preventive chemotherapy was based on previously published health and economic impact estimates (between 2000 and 2014). The delivery costs of treatment were estimated using a model developed by the World Health Organization. We also developed a model to investigate the number of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted by a hydrocelectomy and identified the cost threshold under which it would be considered cost-effective. The projected cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit of preventive chemotherapy were very promising, and this was robust over a wide range of costs and assumptions. When the economic value of the donated drugs was not included, the GPELF would be classed as highly cost-effective. We projected that a typical hydrocelectomy would be classed as highly cost-effective if the surgery cost less than $66 and cost-effective if less than $398 (based on the World Bank's cost-effectiveness thresholds for low income countries). Both the preventive chemotherapy and hydrocele surgeries provided under the GPELF are incredibly cost-effective and offer a very good investment in public health. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  12. Investment Success in Public Health: An Analysis of the Cost-Effectiveness and Cost-Benefit of the Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis

    Bettis, Alison A.; Chu, Brian K.; McFarland, Deborah A.; Hooper, Pamela J.; Mante, Sunny D.; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Bradley, Mark H.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. It has been estimated that $154 million per year will be required during 2015–2020 to continue the Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF). In light of this, it is important to understand the program’s current value. Here, we evaluate the cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit of the preventive chemotherapy that was provided under the GPELF between 2000 and 2014. In addition, we also investigate the potential cost-effectiveness of hydrocele surgery. Methods. Our economic evaluation of preventive chemotherapy was based on previously published health and economic impact estimates (between 2000 and 2014). The delivery costs of treatment were estimated using a model developed by the World Health Organization. We also developed a model to investigate the number of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted by a hydrocelectomy and identified the cost threshold under which it would be considered cost-effective. Results. The projected cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit of preventive chemotherapy were very promising, and this was robust over a wide range of costs and assumptions. When the economic value of the donated drugs was not included, the GPELF would be classed as highly cost-effective. We projected that a typical hydrocelectomy would be classed as highly cost-effective if the surgery cost less than $66 and cost-effective if less than $398 (based on the World Bank’s cost-effectiveness thresholds for low income countries). Conclusions. Both the preventive chemotherapy and hydrocele surgeries provided under the GPELF are incredibly cost-effective and offer a very good investment in public health. PMID:27956460

  13. PET and diagnostic technology evaluation in a global clinical process. DGN's point of view

    Kotzerke, J.; Dietlein, M.; Gruenwald, F.; Bockisch, A.

    2010-01-01

    The German Society of Nuclear Medicine (DGN) criticizes the methodological approach of the IQWiG for evaluation of PET and the conclusions, which represent the opposite point of view compared to the most other European countries and health companies in the USA: (1) Real integration of experienced physicians into the interpretation of data and the evaluation of effectiveness should be used for best possible reporting instead of only formal hearing. (2) Data of the National Oncologic PET Registry (NOPR) from the USA have shown, that PET has changed the therapeutic management in 38% of patients. (3) The decision of the IQWiG to accept outcome data only for their benefit analyses, is controversial. Medical knowledge is generated by different methods, and an actual analysis of the scientific guidelines has shown that only 15% out of all guidelines are based on the level of evidence demanded by the IQWiG. Health economics has created different assessment methods for the evaluation of a diagnostic procedure. The strategy chosen by the IQWiG overestimated the perspective of the population and undervalue the benefit for an individual patient. (4) PET evaluates the effectiveness of a therapeutic procedure, but does not create an effective therapy. When the predictive value of PET is already implemented in a specific study design and the result of PET define a specific management, the trial evaluate the whole algorithm and PET is part of this algorithm only. When PET is implemented as test during chemotherapy or by the end of chemotherapy, the predictive value of PET will depend decisively on the effectiveness of the therapy: The better the therapy, the smaller the differences in survival detected by PET. (5) The significance of an optimal staging by the integration of PET will increase. Rationale is the actual development of ''titration'' of chemotherapy intensity and radiation dose towards the lowest possible, just about effective dosage. (6) The medical therapy of

  14. Global transcriptional profiling of longitudinal clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis exhibiting rapid accumulation of drug resistance.

    Anirvan Chatterjee

    Full Text Available The identification of multidrug resistant (MDR, extensively and totally drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, in vulnerable sites such as Mumbai, is a grave threat to the control of tuberculosis. The current study aimed at explaining the rapid expression of MDR in Directly Observed Treatment Short Course (DOTS compliant patients, represents the first study comparing global transcriptional profiles of 3 pairs of clinical Mtb isolates, collected longitudinally at initiation and completion of DOTS. While the isolates were drug susceptible (DS at onset and MDR at completion of DOTS, they exhibited identical DNA fingerprints at both points of collection. The whole genome transcriptional analysis was performed using total RNA from H37Rv and 3 locally predominant spoligotypes viz. MANU1, CAS and Beijing, hybridized on MTBv3 (BuG@S microarray, and yielded 36, 98 and 45 differentially expressed genes respectively. Genes encoding transcription factors (sig, rpoB, cell wall biosynthesis (emb genes, protein synthesis (rpl and additional central metabolic pathways (ppdK, pknH, pfkB were found to be down regulated in the MDR isolates as compared to the DS isolate of the same genotype. Up regulation of drug efflux pumps, ABC transporters, trans-membrane proteins and stress response transcriptional factors (whiB in the MDR isolates was observed. The data indicated that Mtb, without specific mutations in drug target genes may persist in the host due to additional mechanisms like drug efflux pumps and lowered rate of metabolism. Furthermore this population of Mtb, which also showed reduced DNA repair activity, would result in selection and stabilization of spontaneous mutations in drug target genes, causing selection of a MDR strain in the presence of drug pressures. Efflux pump such as drrA may play a significant role in increasing fitness of low level drug resistant cells and assist in survival of Mtb till acquisition of drug resistant mutations with

  15. [Quantifying the additional clinical benefit of new medicines: little - considerable - significant - 6 remarks from a biometrician's point of view].

    Vach, Werner

    2014-11-01

    According to the German Pharmaceutical Market Reorganisation Act [Arzneimittelmarktneuordnungsgesetz (AMNOG)] of 22.12.2010, the benefit assessment of a new drug should include an evaluation of the "degree of additional benefit". A corresponding regulation of the German Ministry of Health states that the quantification of the degree of additional benefit should be made in the terms "major additional benefit", "considerable additional benefit" and "little additional benefit". In September 2011 the IQWiG undertook and explained in appendix A of the dossier evaluation of Ticagrelor an "operationalisation of the extent of additional benefit according to AM-NutzenV". Therein a distinction was made between the target categories "survival time (mortality)", "serious (or, respectively, severe) symptoms", "quality of life", and "not serious (or, respectively, not severe) symptoms". In the operationalisation of the IQWiG, the categorisation of the additional benefit with regard to mortality was addressed by definition of threshold values for the upper limit of the 95% confidence interval for the relative risk (RR). The statutory regulations and the operationalisation of the IQWiG will have direct long-term effects on the provision of medical care since they have a say as to which drugs are to be available at which prices. By introduction of terms such as "major additional benefit", "considerable additional benefit" or "desired effects" and linking them to statistical parameters and algorithms, they also open a series of further fundamental questions as to if and how we should handle these terms in the future and what consequences are inherent to the use of statistical criteria in their "definition". In the present article 6 of the questions that arise in this context are discussed: Can a "considerable additional benefit" be defined with statistical methods? Can a classification of the additional benefit on the basis of an estimated RR be reliable? What are the fundamental

  16. Senior Benefits

    Information Medicaid Public Health Centers Temporary "Cash" Assistance Senior Benefits Program GovDelivery Skip Navigation Links Health and Social Services > Public Assistance > Senior Benefits Page Content Senior Benefits Senior Benefits Logo Senior Benefits Fact Sheet - June, 2016 Reduction Information

  17. “They put you on your toes”: Physical Therapists' Perceived Benefits from and Barriers to Supervising Students in the Clinical Setting

    Hanna, Elizabeth; Cott, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To identify the perceived benefits of and barriers to clinical supervision of physical therapy (PT) students. Method: In this qualitative descriptive study, three focus groups and six key-informant interviews were conducted with clinical physical therapists or administrators working in acute care, orthopaedic rehabilitation, or complex continuing care. Data were coded and analyzed for common ideas using a constant comparison approach. Results: Perceived barriers to supervising students tended to be extrinsic: time and space constraints, challenging or difficult students, and decreased autonomy or flexibility for the clinical physical therapists. Benefits tended to be intrinsic: teaching provided personal gratification by promoting reflective practice and exposing clinical educators to current knowledge. The culture of different health care institutions was an important factor in therapists' perceptions of student supervision. Conclusions: Despite different disciplines and models of supervision, there is considerable synchronicity in the issues reported by physical therapists and other disciplines. Embedding the value of clinical teaching in the institution, along with strong communication links among academic partners, institutions, and potential clinical faculty, may mitigate barriers and increase the commitment and satisfaction of teaching staff. PMID:22379263

  18. The Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society Ureteroscopy Global Study: Indications, Complications, and Outcomes in 11885 Patients

    De La Rosette, Jean; Denstedt, John D; Geavlete, Petrisor A

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the current indications for ureteroscopy (URS) treatment, outcome in terms of stone-free rate, and intra- and postoperative complications using the modified Clavien grading system. Patients and Methods: The Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) collected...... prospective data as part of the URS Global Study for consecutive patients treated with URS at centers around the world for 1 year. URS was performed according to study protocol and local clinical practice guidelines. Stone size and location were recorded and postoperative outcome and complications, graded...

  19. Prediction of renal mass aggressiveness using clinical and radiographic features: a global, multicentre prospective study

    Golan, Shay; Eggener, Scott; Subotic, Svetozar; Barret, Eric; Cormio, Luigi; Naito, Seiji; Tefekli, Ahmet; Pilar Laguna Pes, M.

    2016-01-01

    To examine the ability of preoperative clinical characteristics to predict histological features of renal masses (RMs). Data from consecutive patients with clinical stage I RMs treated surgically between 2010 and 2011 in the Clinical Research Office of Endourology Society (CROES) Renal Mass Registry

  20. Moderate efficiency of clinicians' predictions decreased for blurred clinical conditions and benefits from the use of BRASS index. A longitudinal study on geriatric patients' outcomes.

    Signorini, Giulia; Dagani, Jessica; Bulgari, Viola; Ferrari, Clarissa; de Girolamo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prognosis is an essential aspect of good clinical practice and efficient health services, particularly for chronic and disabling diseases, as in geriatric populations. This study aims to examine the accuracy of clinical prognostic predictions and to devise prediction models combining clinical variables and clinicians' prognosis for a geriatric patient sample. In a sample of 329 consecutive older patients admitted to 10 geriatric units, we evaluated the accuracy of clinicians' prognosis regarding three outcomes at discharge: global functioning, length of stay (LoS) in hospital, and destination at discharge (DD). A comprehensive set of sociodemographic, clinical, and treatment-related information were also collected. Moderate predictive performance was found for all three outcomes: area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.79 and 0.78 for functioning and LoS, respectively, and moderate concordance, Cohen's K = 0.45, between predicted and observed DD. Predictive models found the Blaylock Risk Assessment Screening Score together with clinicians' judgment relevant to improve predictions for all outcomes (absolute improvement in adjusted and pseudo-R(2) up to 19%). Although the clinicians' estimates were important factors in predicting global functioning, LoS, and DD, more research is needed regarding both methodological aspects and clinical measurements, to improve prognostic clinical indices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Fanconi Anemia BRCA Pathway as a Predictor of Benefit from Bevacizumab in a Large Phase 3 Clinical Trial in Ovarian Cancer

    2014-12-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0421 TITLE: The Fanconi Anemia BRCA Pathway as a Predictor of Benefit from Bevacizumab in a Large Phase III Clinical...DATES COVERED 30Sep2013 - 29Sep2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0421 The Fanconi Anemia BRCA Pathway as a Predictor of...another upfront clinical trial GOG262. We found that germline or somatic mutations in the BRCA- Fanconi anemia pathway was significantly associated with

  2. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Incremental Value in a Series of 361 Patients Demonstrating Cost Savings and Clinical Benefits: An Outcome-Based Study.

    Hegde, Vinayak A; Biederman, Robert Ww; Mikolich, J Ronald

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the clinical impact and cost-benefit of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). In the face of current health care cost concerns, cardiac imaging modalities have come under focused review. Data related to CMR clinical impact and cost-benefit are lacking. Retrospective review of 361 consecutive patients (pts) who underwent CMR exams was conducted. Indications for CMR were tabulated for appropriateness criteria. Components of the CMR exam were identified along with evidence of clinical impact. The cost of each CMR exam was ascertained along with cost savings attributable to the CMR exam for calculation of an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. A total of 354 of 361 pts (98%) had diagnostic quality studies. Of the 361 pts, 350 (97%) had at least 1 published Appropriateness Criterion for CMR. A significant clinical impact attributable to CMR exam results was observed in 256 of 361 pts (71%). The CMR exam resulted in a new diagnosis in 69 of 361 (27%) pts. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging results avoided invasive procedures in 38 (11%) pts and prevented additional diagnostic testing in 26 (7%) pts. Comparison of health care savings using CMR as opposed to current standards of care showed a net cost savings of $833 037, ie, per patient cost savings of $2308. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging provides diagnostic image quality in >98% of cases. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging findings have documentable clinical impact on patient management in 71% of pts undergoing the exam, in a cost beneficial manner.

  3. "Meaningful use" of EHR in dental school clinics: how to benefit from the U.S. HITECH Act's financial and quality improvement incentives.

    Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Walji, Muhammad; Ramoni, Rachel B

    2013-04-01

    Through the 2009 HITECH (Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health) Act, the U.S. government committed $27 billion to incentivize the adoption and "meaningful use" of certified electronic health records (EHRs) by providers, including dentists. Given their patient profiles, dental school clinics are in a position to benefit from this time-delimited commitment to support the adoption and use of certified EHR technology under the Medicaid-based incentive. The benefits are not merely financial: rather, the meaningful use objectives and clinical quality measures can drive quality improvement initiatives within dental practices and help develop a community of medical and dental professionals focused on quality. This article describes how dentists can qualify as eligible providers and the set of activities that must be undertaken and attested to in order to obtain this incentive. Two case studies describe the approaches that can be used to meet the Medicaid threshold necessary to be eligible for the incentive. Dentists can and have successfully applied for meaningful use incentive payments. Given the diverse set of patients who are treated at dental schools, these dental practices are among those most likely to benefit from the incentive programs.

  4. Are there long-term benefits in following stable heart failure patients in a heart failure clinic?

    Leetmaa, Tina; Villadsen, Henrik; Mikkelsen, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    Objectives and Design. This study describes the long-term outcome of 163 patients with stable mild to moderate heart failure (NYHA II-III), who already were enrolled in a heart failure clinic and now were randomized to continued follow-up in the heart failure (HF) clinic or else to usual care (UC...

  5. Systematic review of the global epidemiology, clinical and laboratory profile of enteric fever

    Asma Azmatullah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Children suffer the highest burden of enteric fever among populations in South Asian countries. The clinical features are non–specific, vary in populations, and are often difficult to distinguish clinically from other febrile illnesses, leading to delayed or inappropriate diagnosis and treatment. We undertook a systematic review to assess the clinical profile and laboratory features of enteric fever across age groups, economic regions, level of care and antibiotic susceptibility patterns.

  6. Durable Clinical Benefit in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients Who Discontinue PD-1/PD-L1 Therapy for Immune-Related Adverse Events.

    Martini, Dylan J; Hamieh, Lana; McKay, Rana R; Harshman, Lauren C; Brandao, Raphael; Norton, Craig K; Steinharter, John A; Krajewski, Katherine M; Gao, Xin; Schutz, Fabio A; McGregor, Bradley; Bossé, Dominick; Lalani, Aly-Khan A; De Velasco, Guillermo; Michaelson, M Dror; McDermott, David F; Choueiri, Toni K

    2018-04-01

    The current standard of care for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients is PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors until progression or toxicity. Here, we characterize the clinical outcomes for 19 mRCC patients who experienced an initial clinical response (any degree of tumor shrinkage), but after immune-related adverse events (irAE) discontinued all systemic therapy. Clinical baseline characteristics, outcomes, and survival data were collected. The primary endpoint was time to progression from the date of treatment cessation (TTP). Most patients had clear cell histology and received anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy as second-line or later treatment. Median time on PD-1/PD-L1 therapy was 5.5 months (range, 0.7-46.5) and median TTP was 18.4 months (95% CI, 4.7-54.3) per Kaplan-Meier estimation. The irAEs included arthropathies, ophthalmopathies, myositis, pneumonitis, and diarrhea. We demonstrate that 68.4% of patients ( n = 13) experienced durable clinical benefit off treatment (TTP of at least 6 months), with 36% ( n = 7) of patients remaining off subsequent treatment for over a year after their last dose of anti-PD-1/PD-L1. Three patients with tumor growth found in a follow-up visit, underwent subsequent surgical intervention, and remain off systemic treatment. Nine patients (47.4%) have ongoing irAEs. Our results show that patients who benefitted clinically from anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy can experience sustained beneficial responses, not needing further therapies after the initial discontinuation of treatment due to irAEs. Investigation of biomarkers indicating sustained benefit to checkpoint blockers are needed. Cancer Immunol Res; 6(4); 402-8. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Rapid Globalization of Medical Device Clinical Development Programs in Japan - The Case of Drug-Eluting Stents.

    Murakami, Madoka; Suzuki, Yuka; Tominaga, Toshiyoshi

    2018-02-23

    Delays in the introduction to the Japanese market of drug-eluting stents (DES) developed overseas (i.e., "device lag") decreased sharply between 2004 and 2012. The reduction accompanied a shift in clinical development from a succession pattern (initial product development and approval overseas followed by eventual entrance into the Japanese market) to parallel development (employing multiregional clinical trials (MRCTs)). Although resource-intensive in the short-term, MRCTs are proving to be an effective tool in simultaneous global product development. Creative study designs and the absence of significant ethnic differences in Japanese subjects regarding DES safety and efficacy and the pharmacokinetic behavior of their coating drugs propel this process. More general factors such as medical need and industry incentivization also encourage this shift. Physicians' preference for DES over other percutaneous coronary interventions, the expanding global DES market, and streamlined development and approval prospects each motivate industry to continue investing in DES product development. The efforts of various stakeholders were also integral to overcoming practical obstacles, and contributions by 'Harmonization by Doing' and a premarket collaboration initiative between the USA and Japan were particularly effective. Today, USA/Japan regulatory cooperation is routine, and Japan is now integrated into global medical device development. MRCTs including Japanese subjects, sites, and investigators are now commonplace.

  8. Employee use and perceived benefit of a complementary and alternative medicine wellness clinic at a major military hospital: evaluation of a pilot program.

    Duncan, Alaine D; Liechty, Janet M; Miller, Cathy; Chinoy, Gail; Ricciardi, Richard

    2011-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the feasibility of a weekly on-site complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) wellness clinic for staff at a military hospital, and to describe employees' perceptions of program effectiveness. The study setting was the Restore & Renew(®) Wellness Clinic at a United States Department of Defense hospital. The subjects were hospital nurses, physicians, clinicians, support staff, and administrators. The walk-in wellness clinic was open 8:00 am-2:00 pm 1 day a week. Participants selected one or more modalities each visit: ear acupuncture, clinical acupressure, and Zero Balancing.(®) A self-report survey was done after each clinic visit to evaluate clinic features and perceived impact on stress-related symptoms, compassion for patients, sleep, and workplace or personal relationships. Surveys completed after first-time and repeat visits (n=2,756 surveys) indicated that most participants agreed or strongly agreed they felt more relaxed after sessions (97.9%), less stress (94.5%), more energy (84.3%), and less pain (78.8%). Ninety-seven percent (97%) would recommend it to a co-worker. Among surveys completed after five or more visits, more than half (59%-85%) strongly agreed experiencing increased compassion with patients, better sleep, improved mood, and more ease in relations with co-workers. Perceived benefits were sustained and enhanced by number of visits. The most frequently reported health habit changes were related to exercise, stress reduction, diet/nutrition, and weight loss. This evaluation suggests that a hospital-based wellness clinic based on CAM principles and modalities is feasible, well-utilized, and perceived by most participants to have positive health benefits related to stress reduction at work, improved mood and sleep, and lifestyle.

  9. No benefit of intraoperative whole blood sequestration and autotransfusion during coronary artery bypass grafting : results of a randomized clinical trial

    Ramnath, A N; Naber, H R; de Boer, A; Leusink, J A

    OBJECTIVES: In a randomized clinical trial of patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting, we evaluated the effect of intraoperative whole blood sequestration and autotransfusion on postoperative blood loss and the use of allogeneic blood products. METHODS: Male patients were

  10. Clinical benefit of drugs targeting mitochondrial function as an adjunct to reperfusion in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    Campo, Gianluca; Pavasini, Rita; Morciano, Giampaolo

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials (RCT) comparing the effectiveness of drugs targeting mitochondrial function vs. placebo in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing mechanical coronary reperfusion. METHODS...

  11. The clinical benefits of antiretroviral therapy in severely immunocompromised HIV-1-infected patients with and without complete viral suppression

    Mocroft, Amanda; Bannister, Wendy P; Kirk, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a protective effect of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on the development of clinical events in patients with ongoing severe immunosuppression.......The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a protective effect of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on the development of clinical events in patients with ongoing severe immunosuppression....

  12. Safety-related Innovative Nuclear Reactor Technology Elements R and D (SINTER) Network and Global HTGR R and D Network (GHTRN). Strategic benefits of international networking

    Von Lensa, W.

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear industries and the nuclear research and development (R and D) programmes world-wide have undergone considerable changes over recent years which have resulted in the formation of international industrial consortiums on the one hand and the need for synergistic collaboration in the R and D area due to the reductions of national R and D activities in the nuclear field on the other hand. International networking starting from precompetitive medium- or long-term oriented R and D could be an efficient mean to overcome the problems nuclear energy is facing today with respect to the lack of public acceptance and economic attractivity in a joint effort. Additional motivation is provided by the fact that there is not only a globalisation of markets but also a 'globalisation of problems' to be addressed internationally like reductions of environmental impacts and long-term availability of economic energy supply. The tools for telecommunication and telecollaboration are evolving in parallel and offer better conditions for closer collaboration of different R and D teams at distant locations than ever before. It is obvious that these trends and boundary conditions will drastically influence the structures of collaboration not only in the industries, but for R and D on an international level, too. The chances emerging from the creation of a European Union and from the globalisation trends have to be converted into strategic benefits by active response on these 'historic changes'. New initiatives have been undertaken in Europe to push for innovations of nuclear reactor technologies via international R and D Networks under the European R and D Framework Programmes (FWP). Innovative approaches are already addressed with limited funding under the actual 4th FWP and should be extended for complementing the commercial efforts on evolutionary LWR concepts by medium- and long-term oriented innovations and R and D. The MICHELANGELO initiative as well as the EU-funded Concerted

  13. Integrating Positive and Clinical Psychology: Viewing Human Functioning as Continua from Positive to Negative Can Benefit Clinical Assessment, Interventions and Understandings of Resilience

    Johnson, J; Wood, AM

    2017-01-01

    In this review we argue in favour of further integration between the disciplines of positive and clinical psychology. We argue that most of the constructs studied by both positive and clinical psychology exist on continua ranging from positive to negative (e.g., gratitude to ingratitude, anxiety to calmness) and so it is meaningless to speak of one or other field studying the “positive” or the “negative”. However, we highlight historical and cultural factors which have led positive and clinic...

  14. Using perceptual mapping methods to understand gender differences in perceived barriers and benefits of clinical research participation in urban minority HIV+ patients.

    Bass, Sarah Bauerle; Wolak, Caitlin; Greener, Judith; Tedaldi, Ellen; Nanavati, Aasit; Ruppert, Katey; Gordon, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    Minority participation in HIV clinical trials research is critical to understanding the impact of medications or behavioral interventions, but little is known about gender differences in perceptions of participation. We surveyed 50 minority HIV+ patients from an urban clinic to assess perceived risks/benefits of clinical trial research participation and used innovative marketing methods to analyze results. Perceptual mapping and vector message-modeling, a method that creates 3-D models representing how groups conceptualize elements, were used to assess how male and female participants could be motivated to participate. Results showed men farther away from participation and more concerned with HIV disclosure and experimentation than women. Men expressed distrust of the medical system, doubted HIV's origin, and knew less about research implementation. Women were closer to participation in both behavior and medical trials and perceived medication issues as more significant, including fear of losing medication stability, medications not working, being in the placebo group, and experiencing side effects. Vector modeling shows that messages would need to focus on different aspects of clinical research for men and women and that interventions aimed at minority HIV+ patients to encourage clinical trial participation would need to be targeted to their unique perceptions. Understanding gender perceptions of HIV clinical research has significant implications for targeting messages to increase minority participation.

  15. The Benefits of Multidisciplinary Learning in Clinical Practice for Law, Finance, and Social Work Students: An Australian Experience

    Hyams, Ross; Brown, Grace; Foster, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In July 2010, the faculties of Law, Business and Economics, and Medicine at Monash University, Australia commenced placing law, finance, and social work students in a multidisciplinary clinic at a community legal service operated by the University. Students from the three disciplines began seeing legal service clients at the same time as a team.…

  16. Addition of meloxicam to the treatment of bovine clinical mastitis results in a net economic benefit to the dairy farmer

    Soest, van Felix J.S.; Abbeloos, Elke; McDougall, Scott; Hogeveen, Henk

    2018-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the addition of meloxicam to standard antimicrobial therapy for clinical mastitis (CM) improves the conception rate of dairy cows contracting CM in the first 120 d in milk. The objective of our study was to assess whether this improved reproduction through additional

  17. Clinical benefit of steroid use in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass: a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    Whitlock, R.P.; Chan, S.; Devereaux, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    We sought to establish the efficacy and safety of prophylactic steroids in adult patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). We performed a meta-analysis of randomized trials reporting the effects of prophylactic steroids on clinical outcomes after CPB. Outcomes examined were mortality...

  18. Supine Versus Prone Position During Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: A Report from the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy Global Study

    G. Vadivia, José; M. Scarpa, Roberto; Duvdevani, Mordechai

    2011-01-01

    To determine differences in patients' characteristics, operative time and procedures, and perioperative outcomes between prone and supine positioning in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) using the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PCNL Global Study database....

  19. A randomised trial of differentiated prednisolone treatment in active rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical benefits and skeletal side effects

    Hansen, M; Podenphant, J; Florescu, A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study benefits and skeletal side effects of carefully monitored prednisolone treatment in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: One hundred and two patients with active rheumatoid arthritis were randomly allocated to treatment with disease modifying anti......-inflammatory drug (DMARD) alone or DMARD and prednisolone in a one year follow up study. Prednisolone was given in a dose regimen adapted to the disease activity of the individual patient. The mean dose was 6 mg and the mean cumulated dose was 2160 mg. Patients were followed up with disease activity parameters......, radiograph of the hands (Larsen score), and bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine, distal forearm and hand. At one year 26 patients had withdrawn from the investigation leaving 76 patients for evaluation. RESULTS: The results showed that disease activity in the prednisolone treated group was reduced...

  20. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy among patients with renal anomalies: patient characteristics and outcomes; a subgroup analysis of the clinical research office of the endourological society global percutaneous nephrolithotomy study

    Osther, Palle Jörn; Razvi, Hassan; Liatsikos, Evangelos; Averch, Timothy; Crisci, Alfonso; Garcia, Juan Lòpez; Mandal, Arup; de la Rosette, Jean

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the characteristics and outcomes of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in patients with and without renal malformations using the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PCNL Global Study database. The CROES PCNL Global Study collected prospective data for

  1. Validity and reliability problems with patient global as a component of the ACR/EULAR remission criteria as used in clinical practice.

    Masri, Karim R; Shaver, Timothy S; Shahouri, Shadi H; Wang, Shirley; Anderson, James D; Busch, Ruth E; Michaud, Kaleb; Mikuls, Ted R; Caplan, Liron; Wolfe, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    To investigate what factors influence patient global health assessment (PtGlobal), and how those factors and the reliability of PtGlobal affect the rate, reliability, and validity of recently published American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remission criteria when used in clinical practice. We examined consecutive patients with RA in clinical practice and identified 77 who met ACR/EULAR joint criteria for remission (≤ 1 swollen joint and ≤ 1 tender joint). We evaluated factors associated with a PtGlobal > 1, because a PtGlobal ≤ 1 defined ACR/EULAR remission in this group of patients who had already met ACR/EULAR joint criteria. Of the 77 patients examined, only 17 (22.1%) had PtGlobal ≤ 1 and thus fully satisfied ACR/EULAR criteria. A large proportion of patients not in remission by ACR/EULAR criteria had high PtGlobal related to noninflammatory issues, including low back pain, fatigue, and functional limitations, and a number of patients clustered in the range of PtGlobal > 1 and ≤ 2. However, the minimal detectable difference for PtGlobal was 2.3. In addition, compared with a PtGlobal severity score, a PtGlobal activity score was 3.3% less likely to be abnormal (> 1). Noninflammatory factors contribute to the level of PtGlobal and result in the exclusion of many patients who would otherwise be in "true" remission according to the ACR/EULAR definition. Reliability problems associated with PtGlobal can also result in misclassification, and may explain the observation of low longterm remission rates in RA. As currently constituted, the use of the ACR/EULAR remission criteria in clinical practice appears to be problematic.

  2. Global Mindset

    Sørensen, Olav Jull

    2016-01-01

    The concept of Global Mindset (GM) – the way to think about the global reality – is on the agenda of multinational companies concomitant with the increase in global complexity, uncertainty and diversity. In spite of a number of studies, the concept is still fluid and far from a managerial.......e. the capability to sense (quickly), reflect (constructively) and act purposefully (for mutual benefit). A case on an MNC is used at the end to show the organizational manifestations of a GM....

  3. The Global Health Service Partnership: An Academic–Clinical Partnership to Build Nursing and Medical Capacity in Africa

    Eileen M. Stuart-Shor

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization estimates a global deficit of about 12.9 million skilled health professionals (midwives, nurses, and physicians by 2035. These shortages limit the ability of countries, particularly resource-constrained countries, to deliver basic health care, to respond to emerging and more complex needs, and to teach, graduate, and retain their future health professionals—a vicious cycle that is perpetuated and has profound implications for health security. The Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP is a unique collaboration between the Peace Corps, President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, Seed and host-country institutions, which aims to strengthen the breadth and quality of medical and nursing education and care delivery in places with dire shortages of health professionals. Nurse and physician educators are seconded to host institutions to serve as visiting faculty alongside their local colleagues. They serve for 1 year with many staying longer. Educational and clinical best practices are shared, emphasis is placed on integration of theory and practice across the academic–clinical domains and the teaching and learning environment is expanded to include implementation science and dissemination of locally tailored and sustainable practice innovations. In the first 3 years (2013–2016 GHSP placed 97 nurse and physician educators in three countries (Malawi, Tanzania, and Uganda. These educators have taught 454 courses and workshops to 8,321 trainees, faculty members, and practicing health professionals across the curriculum and in myriad specialties. Mixed-methods evaluation included key stakeholder interviews with host institution faculty and students who indicate that the addition of GHSP enhanced clinical teaching (quality and breadth resulting in improved clinical skills, confidence, and ability to connect theory to practice and critical thinking. The outputs and outcomes from four exemplars which focus on the

  4. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis and its impact on Chinese clinical practice.

    Chen, Qi; Lu, Hong

    2016-06-01

    The Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) gastritis has had a great effect on the field of H. pylori studies worldwide. For the first time H. pylori gastritis was defined entirely as an infectious disease and H. pylori-associated dyspepsia as a new category of organic dyspepsia apart from functional dyspepsia, together with a proposed diagnostic algorithm. Accordingly, the report states that the eradication of H. pylori should be regarded as the first-line treatment for dyspepsia. Moreover, H. pylori eradication before the development of pre-neoplastic changes is recommended to reduce the risk of more serious complications of H. pylori gastritis. Despite the recommendations of this new global consensus, the task of transforming them into feasible and practical recommendations for individual countries will require them to become region-specific, which requires further discussion. © 2016 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging—Incremental Value in a Series of 361 Patients Demonstrating Cost Savings and Clinical Benefits: An Outcome-Based Study

    Hegde, Vinayak A; Biederman, Robert WW; Mikolich, J Ronald

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study was designed to assess the clinical impact and cost-benefit of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). In the face of current health care cost concerns, cardiac imaging modalities have come under focused review. Data related to CMR clinical impact and cost-benefit are lacking. METHODS AND RESULTS Retrospective review of 361 consecutive patients (pts) who underwent CMR exams was conducted. Indications for CMR were tabulated for appropriateness criteria. Components of the CMR exam were identified along with evidence of clinical impact. The cost of each CMR exam was ascertained along with cost savings attributable to the CMR exam for calculation of an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. A total of 354 of 361 pts (98%) had diagnostic quality studies. Of the 361 pts, 350 (97%) had at least 1 published Appropriateness Criterion for CMR. A significant clinical impact attributable to CMR exam results was observed in 256 of 361 pts (71%). The CMR exam resulted in a new diagnosis in 69 of 361 (27%) pts. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging results avoided invasive procedures in 38 (11%) pts and prevented additional diagnostic testing in 26 (7%) pts. Comparison of health care savings using CMR as opposed to current standards of care showed a net cost savings of $833 037, ie, per patient cost savings of $2308. CONCLUSIONS Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging provides diagnostic image quality in >98% of cases. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging findings have documentable clinical impact on patient management in 71% of pts undergoing the exam, in a cost beneficial manner. PMID:28579858

  6. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging—Incremental Value in a Series of 361 Patients Demonstrating Cost Savings and Clinical Benefits: An Outcome-Based Study

    Vinayak A Hegde

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was designed to assess the clinical impact and cost-benefit of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR. In the face of current health care cost concerns, cardiac imaging modalities have come under focused review. Data related to CMR clinical impact and cost-benefit are lacking. Methods and Results: Retrospective review of 361 consecutive patients (pts who underwent CMR exams was conducted. Indications for CMR were tabulated for appropriateness criteria. Components of the CMR exam were identified along with evidence of clinical impact. The cost of each CMR exam was ascertained along with cost savings attributable to the CMR exam for calculation of an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. A total of 354 of 361 pts (98% had diagnostic quality studies. Of the 361 pts, 350 (97% had at least 1 published Appropriateness Criterion for CMR. A significant clinical impact attributable to CMR exam results was observed in 256 of 361 pts (71%. The CMR exam resulted in a new diagnosis in 69 of 361 (27% pts. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging results avoided invasive procedures in 38 (11% pts and prevented additional diagnostic testing in 26 (7% pts. Comparison of health care savings using CMR as opposed to current standards of care showed a net cost savings of $833 037, ie, per patient cost savings of $2308. Conclusions: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging provides diagnostic image quality in >98% of cases. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging findings have documentable clinical impact on patient management in 71% of pts undergoing the exam, in a cost beneficial manner.

  7. Growing insights into the potential benefits and risks of activated protein C administration in sepsis: a review of preclinical and clinical studies

    Laith Altaweel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Laith Altaweel, Daniel Sweeney, Xizhong Cui, Amisha Barochia, Charles Natanson, Peter Q EichackerCritical Care Medicine Department, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC was developed to reduce excessive coagulant and inflammatory activity during sepsis. Basic and clinical research has suggested these pathways contribute to the pathogenesis of this lethal syndrome and are inhibited by rhAPC. Based in large part on the results of a single multicenter randomized controlled trial, rhAPC was first approved in 2001 by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA as adjunctive therapy in septic patients with a high risk of death. This was followed closely by approval in Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. At the original FDA review of rhAPC, concerns were raised as to whether a confirmatory trial should be done before final regulatory approval because of concerns that rhAPCs bleeding risk might outweigh its potential benefit during clinical use. Since 2001, continuing basic and clinical research has further elucidated the complex role activated protein C may have in both adaptive and maladaptive responses during sepsis. Moreover, subsequent controlled trials in other types of septic patients and observational studies appear to support earlier concerns that the benefit-to-risk ratio of rhAPC may not support its clinical use. This experience has prompted additional trials presently underway, to define whether treatment with rhAPC as it was originally indicated in septic patients with persistent shock, is safe and effective. Until such trials are complete, physicians employing this agent must carefully consider which patients may be appropriate candidates for rhAPC administration.Keywords: rhAPC, treatment, sepsis

  8. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy among patients with renal anomalies: patient characteristics and outcomes; a subgroup analysis of the clinical research office of the endourological society global percutaneous nephrolithotomy study

    Osther, Palle Jörn; Razvi, Hassan; Liatsikos, Evangelos

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the characteristics and outcomes of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in patients with and without renal malformations using the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PCNL Global Study database.......This study compared the characteristics and outcomes of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in patients with and without renal malformations using the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PCNL Global Study database....

  9. Noncontrast chest computed tomography immediately after transarterial chemoembolization in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: Clinical benefits and effect of radiation reduction on image quality in low-dose scanning

    Choi, Joon-Il; Kim, Hyun Beom; Kim, Min Ju; Lee, Jong Seok; Koh, Young Whan; An, Sang Bu; Ko, Heung-kyu; Park, Joong-Won

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical benefits of noncontrast chest computed tomography (CT) immediately after transarterial chemoembolization in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and to assess the effect of radiation reduction on image quality in low-dose scanning. Materials and methods: From June to October 2010, we performed standard-dose, noncontrast chest CTs immediately after transarterial chemoembolization in 160 patients and low-dose CTs in 88 patients. We reviewed the entire noncontrast chest CTs and follow-up CTs to reveal the clinical benefits of CT evaluation immediately after transarterial chemoembolization. Using two independent readers, we also retrospectively evaluated the radiation dose and image quality in terms of the image noise, contrast between the liver parenchyma and iodized oil and diagnostic acceptability for the evaluation of treatment response after transarterial chemoembolization. Results: In 5.2% of the patients, additional treatment was performed immediately after the interpretation of the noncontrast chest CT, and additional pulmonary lesions were found in 8.5% of the patients. The measured mean dose-length product for the low-dose scanning was 18.4% of that of the standard-dose scanning. The image noise was significantly higher with the low-dose scanning (p < 0.001). However, all of the low-dose CT scans were diagnostically acceptable, and the mean scores for the subjective assessments of the contrast and diagnostic acceptability showed no significant differences for either reader. Conclusion: A noncontrast chest CT immediately after transarterial chemoembolization has some clinical benefits for immediate decision making and detecting pulmonary lesions. Low-dose, noncontrast chest CTs immediately after transarterial chemoembolization consistently provide diagnostically acceptable images and information on treatment response in patients who have undergone transarterial chemoembolization.

  10. The clinical research office of the endourological society percutaneous nephrolithotomy global study

    Fuller, Andrew; Razvi, Hassan; Denstedt, John D

    2014-01-01

    in morbidly obese patients was assessed using a prospective database administered by the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES). A multidimensional match of 97 morbidly obese patients with those of normal weight was created using propensity score matching. Student's t-test and Chi...

  11. Setting global standards for stem cell research and clinical translation : The 2016 ISSCR guidelines

    Daley, George Q.; Hyun, Insoo; Apperley, Jane F.; Barker, Roger A.; Benvenisty, Nissim; Bredenoord, Annelien L.; Breuer, Christopher K.; Caulfield, Timothy; Cedars, Marcelle I.; Frey-Vasconcells, Joyce; Heslop, Helen E.; Jin, Ying; Lee, Richard T.; McCabe, Christopher; Munsie, Megan; Murry, Charles E.; Piantadosi, Steven; Rao, Mahendra; Rooke, Heather M.; Sipp, Douglas; Studer, Lorenz; Sugarman, Jeremy; Takahashi, Masayo; Zimmerman, Mark; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) presents its 2016 Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation (ISSCR, 2016). The 2016 guidelines reflect the revision and extension of two past sets of guidelines (ISSCR, 2006; ISSCR, 2008) to address new and emerging areas of

  12. [Beta lactam antibiotics and the question of dose regimen for severe infection. Prolonged infusion theoretically appealing--yet no evidence of clinical benefit].

    Leander, Gunilla; Eliasson, Erik; Hanberger, Håkan; Giske, Christian

    2015-03-24

    Patients with severe sepsis/septic shock have a high mortality. Beta-lactam antibiotics are normally first line treatment. This antimicrobial class has been associated with time-dependent efficacy. It is therefore plausible that administration as prolonged infusion will increase the therapeutic effect, as compared to short term bolus injections, which is the most common practice today. We have reviewed 14 randomized controlled studies to investigate whether prolonged infusion provides lower mortality and/or increased clinical cure. In summary, convincing advantages with prolonged infusion could not be found, however randomized studies are heterogeneous, and it cannot be excluded that some subgroups of critically ill patients could benefit from such treatment.

  13. Experience as a doctor in the developing world: does it benefit the clinical and organisational performance in general practice?

    de Wit Niek J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many physicians have medical experience in developing countries early in their career, but its association with their medical performance later is not known. To explore possible associations we compared primary care physicians (GPs with and without professional experience in a developing country in performance both clinical and organisational. Methods A retrospective survey using two databases to analyse clinical and organisational performance respectively. Analysis was done at the GP level and practice level. 517 GPs received a questionnaire regarding relevant working experience in a developing country. Indicators for clinical performance were: prescription, referral, external diagnostic procedures and minor procedures. We used the district health insurance data base covering 570.000 patients. Explorative secondary analysis of practice visits of 1004 GPs in 566 practices in the Netherlands from 1999 till 2001. We used a validated practice visit method (VIP; 385 indicators in 51 dimensions of practice management to compare having experience in a developing country or not. Results Almost 8% of the GPs had experience in a developing country of at least two years. These GPs referred 9,5% less than their colleagues and did more surgical procedures. However, in the multivariate analysis 'experience in a developing country' was not significantly associated with clinical performance or with other GP- and practice characteristics. 16% of the practices a GP or GPs with at least two years experience in a developing country. They worked more often in group and rural practices with less patients per fte GP and more often part-time. These practices are more hygienic, collaborate more with the hospital and score better on organisation of the practice. These practices score less on service and availability, spend less time on patients in the consultation and the quality of recording in the EMD is lower. Conclusions We found interesting

  14. Clinical laboratory markers of inflammation as determinants of chronic graft-versus-host disease activity and NIH global severity.

    Grkovic, L; Baird, K; Steinberg, S M; Williams, K M; Pulanic, D; Cowen, E W; Mitchell, S A; Hakim, F T; Martires, K J; Avila, D N; Taylor, T N; Salit, R B; Rowley, S D; Zhang, D; Fowler, D H; Bishop, M R; Gress, R E; Pavletic, S Z

    2012-04-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) remains a major cause of non-relapse morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Currently there are no accepted measures of cGVHD activity to aid in clinical management and disease staging. We analyzed clinical markers of inflammation in the sera of patients with established cGVHD and correlated those with definitions of disease activity. In all, 189 adults with cGVHD (33% moderate and 66% severe according to National Institutes of Health (NIH) global scoring) were consecutively enrolled onto a cross-sectional prospective cGVHD natural history study. At the time of evaluation, 80% were receiving systemic immunosuppression and failed a median of four prior systemic therapies (PST) for their cGVHD. Lower albumin (P<0.0001), higher C-reactive protein (P = 0.043), higher platelets (P = 0.030) and higher number of PST (P<0.0001) were associated with active disease defined as clinician's intention to intensify or alter systemic therapy due to the lack of response. Higher platelet count (P = 0.021) and higher number of PST (P<0.0001) were associated with more severe diseased defined by NIH global score. This study identified common laboratory indicators of inflammation that can serve as markers of cGVHD activity and severity.

  15. Benefits of switching from latanoprost to preservative-free tafluprost eye drops: a meta-analysis of two Phase IIIb clinical trials

    Uusitalo H

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hannu Uusitalo,1 Evgeniy Egorov,2 Kai Kaarniranta,3 Yuri Astakhov,4 Auli Ropo5 On behalf of the Switch Study Tafluprost Study Groups 1Department of Ophthalmology, SILK, University of Tampere, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; 2Department of Ophthalmology, The Russian National Research Medical University, Moscow, Russia; 3Department of Ophthalmology, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland, 4Department of Ophthalmology, First Pavlov State Medical University of St Petersburg, Saint Petersburg, Russia, 5Global Medical Affairs, Santen Oy, Tampere, Finland Introduction: Glaucoma patients frequently exhibit ocular surface side effects during treatment with prostaglandin eye drops. The present work investigated whether glaucoma patients suffering from signs and symptoms of ocular surface disease while using preserved latanoprost eye drops benefited from switching to preservative-free tafluprost eye drops. Patients and methods: The analysis was based on 339 glaucoma patients enrolled in two Phase IIIb trials. The patients were required to have two symptoms, or one sign and one symptom of ocular surface disease at baseline, and at least 6 months preceding treatment with latanoprost eye drops preserved with benzalkonium chloride. All eligible patients were switched from latanoprost to preservative-free tafluprost for a total of 12 weeks. Ocular symptoms and ocular signs were evaluated at baseline and at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks after commencing treatment with tafluprost. Intraocular pressure (IOP, drop discomfort, and treatment preference were evaluated to investigate the clinical efficacy and patient-related outcomes. Results: After 12 weeks of treatment with preservative-free tafluprost, the incidences of irritation/burning/stinging, foreign body sensation, tearing, itching, and dry eye sensation had diminished to one-third of those reported for preserved latanoprost at baseline. The incidences

  16. Setting Global Standards for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation: The 2016 ISSCR Guidelines

    George Q. Daley

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR presents its 2016 Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation (ISSCR, 2016. The 2016 guidelines reflect the revision and extension of two past sets of guidelines (ISSCR, 2006; ISSCR, 2008 to address new and emerging areas of stem cell discovery and application and evolving ethical, social, and policy challenges. These guidelines provide an integrated set of principles and best practices to drive progress in basic, translational, and clinical research. The guidelines demand rigor, oversight, and transparency in all aspects of practice, providing confidence to practitioners and public alike that stem cell science can proceed efficiently and remain responsive to public and patient interests. Here, we highlight key elements and recommendations in the guidelines and summarize the recommendations and deliberations behind them.

  17. Glocal clinical registries: pacemaker registry design and implementation for global and local integration--methodology and case study.

    Kátia Regina da Silva

    Full Text Available The ability to apply standard and interoperable solutions for implementing and managing medical registries as well as aggregate, reproduce, and access data sets from legacy formats and platforms to advanced standard formats and operating systems are crucial for both clinical healthcare and biomedical research settings.Our study describes a reproducible, highly scalable, standard framework for a device registry implementation addressing both local data quality components and global linking problems.We developed a device registry framework involving the following steps: (1 Data standards definition and representation of the research workflow, (2 Development of electronic case report forms using REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture, (3 Data collection according to the clinical research workflow and, (4 Data augmentation by enriching the registry database with local electronic health records, governmental database and linked open data collections, (5 Data quality control and (6 Data dissemination through the registry Web site. Our registry adopted all applicable standardized data elements proposed by American College Cardiology / American Heart Association Clinical Data Standards, as well as variables derived from cardiac devices randomized trials and Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium. Local interoperability was performed between REDCap and data derived from Electronic Health Record system. The original data set was also augmented by incorporating the reimbursed values paid by the Brazilian government during a hospitalization for pacemaker implantation. By linking our registry to the open data collection repository Linked Clinical Trials (LinkedCT we found 130 clinical trials which are potentially correlated with our pacemaker registry.This study demonstrates how standard and reproducible solutions can be applied in the implementation of medical registries to constitute a re-usable framework. Such approach has the potential to

  18. Glocal Clinical Registries: Pacemaker Registry Design and Implementation for Global and Local Integration – Methodology and Case Study

    da Silva, Kátia Regina; Costa, Roberto; Crevelari, Elizabeth Sartori; Lacerda, Marianna Sobral; de Moraes Albertini, Caio Marcos; Filho, Martino Martinelli; Santana, José Eduardo; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Barros, Jacson V.

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to apply standard and interoperable solutions for implementing and managing medical registries as well as aggregate, reproduce, and access data sets from legacy formats and platforms to advanced standard formats and operating systems are crucial for both clinical healthcare and biomedical research settings. Purpose Our study describes a reproducible, highly scalable, standard framework for a device registry implementation addressing both local data quality components and global linking problems. Methods and Results We developed a device registry framework involving the following steps: (1) Data standards definition and representation of the research workflow, (2) Development of electronic case report forms using REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture), (3) Data collection according to the clinical research workflow and, (4) Data augmentation by enriching the registry database with local electronic health records, governmental database and linked open data collections, (5) Data quality control and (6) Data dissemination through the registry Web site. Our registry adopted all applicable standardized data elements proposed by American College Cardiology / American Heart Association Clinical Data Standards, as well as variables derived from cardiac devices randomized trials and Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium. Local interoperability was performed between REDCap and data derived from Electronic Health Record system. The original data set was also augmented by incorporating the reimbursed values paid by the Brazilian government during a hospitalization for pacemaker implantation. By linking our registry to the open data collection repository Linked Clinical Trials (LinkedCT) we found 130 clinical trials which are potentially correlated with our pacemaker registry. Conclusion This study demonstrates how standard and reproducible solutions can be applied in the implementation of medical registries to constitute a re-usable framework

  19. The Clinical and Economic Benefits of Co-Testing Versus Primary HPV Testing for Cervical Cancer Screening: A Modeling Analysis.

    Felix, Juan C; Lacey, Michael J; Miller, Jeffrey D; Lenhart, Gregory M; Spitzer, Mark; Kulkarni, Rucha

    2016-06-01

    Consensus United States cervical cancer screening guidelines recommend use of combination Pap plus human papillomavirus (HPV) testing for women aged 30 to 65 years. An HPV test was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2014 for primary cervical cancer screening in women age 25 years and older. Here, we present the results of clinical-economic comparisons of Pap plus HPV mRNA testing including genotyping for HPV 16/18 (co-testing) versus DNA-based primary HPV testing with HPV 16/18 genotyping and reflex cytology (HPV primary) for cervical cancer screening. A health state transition (Markov) model with 1-year cycling was developed using epidemiologic, clinical, and economic data from healthcare databases and published literature. A hypothetical cohort of one million women receiving triennial cervical cancer screening was simulated from ages 30 to 70 years. Screening strategies compared HPV primary to co-testing. Outcomes included total and incremental differences in costs, invasive cervical cancer (ICC) cases, ICC deaths, number of colposcopies, and quality-adjusted life years for cost-effectiveness calculations. Comprehensive sensitivity analyses were performed. In a simulation cohort of one million 30-year-old women modeled up to age 70 years, the model predicted that screening with HPV primary testing instead of co-testing could lead to as many as 2,141 more ICC cases and 2,041 more ICC deaths. In the simulation, co-testing demonstrated a greater number of lifetime quality-adjusted life years (22,334) and yielded $39.0 million in savings compared with HPV primary, thereby conferring greater effectiveness at lower cost. Model results demonstrate that co-testing has the potential to provide improved clinical and economic outcomes when compared with HPV primary. While actual cost and outcome data are evaluated, these findings are relevant to U.S. healthcare payers and women's health policy advocates seeking cost-effective cervical cancer screening

  20. Clinical and economic benefit of enzymatic debridement of pressure ulcers compared to autolytic debridement with a hydrogel dressing.

    Waycaster, Curtis; Milne, Catherine T

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cost-effectiveness of enzymatic debridement using collagenase relative to autolytic debridement with a hydrogel dressing for the treatment of pressure ulcers. A 3-stage Markov model was used to determine the expected costs and outcomes of wound care for collagenase and hydrogel dressings. Outcome data used in the analysis were taken from a randomized clinical trial that directly compared collagenase and hydrogel dressings. The primary outcome in the clinical trial was the proportion of patients achieving a closed epithelialized wound. Transition probabilities for the Markov states were estimated from the clinical trial. A 1-year time horizon was used to determine the expected number of closed wound days and the expected costs for the two alternative debridement therapies. Resource utilization was based on the wound care treatment regimen used in the clinical trial. Resource costs were derived from standard cost references and medical supply wholesalers. The economic perspective taken was that of the long-term care facility. No cost discounting was performed due to the short time horizon of the analysis. A deterministic sensitivity analysis was conducted to analyze economic uncertainty. The number of expected wound days for the collagenase and hydrogel cohorts are estimated at 48 and 147, respectively. The expected direct cost per patient for pressure ulcer care was $2003 for collagenase and $5480 for hydrogel debridement. The number of closed wound days was 1.5-times higher for collagenase (317 vs 218 days) than with the hydrogel. The estimated cost/closed wound day was 4-times higher for the hydrogel ($25) vs collagenase ($6). In this Markov model based on a randomized trial of pressure ulcer care in a long-term care setting collagenase debridement was economically dominant over autolytic debridement, yielding better outcomes at a lower total cost. Since it was a single institution study with a small sample size, the

  1. Pleiotropic benefit of monomeric and oligomeric flavanols on vascular health--a randomized controlled clinical pilot study.

    Weseler, Antje R; Ruijters, Erik J B; Drittij-Reijnders, Marie-José; Reesink, Koen D; Haenen, Guido R M M; Bast, Aalt

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are expanding to a major social-economic burden in the Western World and undermine man's deep desire for healthy ageing. Epidemiological studies suggest that flavanol-rich foods (e.g. grapes, wine, chocolate) sustain cardiovascular health. For an evidenced-based application, however, sound clinical data on their efficacy are strongly demanded. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled intervention study we supplemented 28 male smokers with 200 mg per day of monomeric and oligomeric flavanols (MOF) from grape seeds. At baseline, after 4 and 8 weeks we measured macro- and microvascular function and a cluster of systemic biomarkers for major pathological processes occurring in the vasculature: disturbances in lipid metabolism and cellular redox balance, and activation of inflammatory cells and platelets. In the MOF group serum total cholesterol and LDL decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05) by 5% (n = 11) and 7% (n = 9), respectively in volunteers with elevated baseline levels. Additionally, after 8 weeks the ratio of glutathione to glutathione disulphide in erythrocytes rose from baseline by 22% (n = 15, Pbenefit of an 8 weeks supplementation with 200 mg/d MOF in humans. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00742287.

  2. Feasibility of resistance training in adult McArdle patients: Clinical outcomes and muscle strength and mass benefits

    Alfredo eSantalla

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the effects of a 4-month resistance (weight lifting training program followed by a 2-month detraining period in 7 adult McArdle patients (5 female on: muscle mass (assessed by DXA, strength, serum creatine kinase (CK activity and clinical severity. Adherence to training was ≥ 84% in all patients and no major contraindication or side effect was noted during the training or strength assessment sessions. The training program had a significant impact on total and lower extremities’ lean mass (P0.05 was noted for baseline or post strength assessment values of serum CK activity, which remained essentially within the range reported in our laboratory for McArdle patients. All the patients changed to a lower severity class with training, such that none of them were in the highest disease severity class (3 after the intervention and, as such, they did not have fixed muscle weakness after training. Clinical improvements were retained, in all but one patient, after detraining, such that after detraining all patients were classed as class 1 for

  3. Clinical and economic benefits of professional CGM among people with type 2 diabetes in the United States: analysis of claims and lab data.

    Sierra, Joseph A; Shah, Mona; Gill, Max S; Flores, Zachery; Chawla, Hiten; Kaufman, Francine R; Vigersky, Robert

    2018-03-01

    It is estimated that one in 10 people in the US have a diagnosis of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 95% of all cases in the US, with annual costs estimated to be $246 billion per year. This study investigated the impact of a glucose-measuring intervention to the burden of type 2 diabetes. This analysis seeks to understand how professional continuous glucose monitoring (professional CGM) impacts clinical and economic outcomes when compared to patients who are not prescribed professional CGM. This study utilized a large healthcare claims and lab dataset from the US, and identified a cohort of patients who were prescribed professional CGM as identified by CPT codes 95250 and 95251. It calculated economic and clinical outcomes 1 year before and 1 year after the use of professional CGM, using a generalized linear model. Patients who utilized professional CGM saw an improvement in hemoglobin A1C. The "difference-in-difference" calculation for A1C was shown to be -0.44%. There was no statistically significant difference in growth of total annual costs for people who used professional CGM compared to those who did not ($1,270, p = .08). Patients using professional CGM more than once per year had a -$3,376 difference in the growth of total costs (p = .05). Patients who used professional CGM while changing their diabetes treatment regimen also had a difference of -$3,327 in growth of total costs (p = .0023). Significant clinical benefits were observed for patients who used professional CGM. Economic benefits were observed for patients who utilized professional CGM more than once within a 1-year period or who used it during a change of diabetes therapy. This suggests that professional CGM may help decrease rising trends in healthcare costs for people with type 2 diabetes, while also improving clinical outcomes.

  4. A sequential erythropoietin and GM-CSF schedule offers clinical benefits in the treatment of anaemia in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Bernell, P; Stenke, L; Wallvik, J; Hippe, E; Hast, R

    1996-08-01

    In order to reduce anaemia in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) a stepwise treatment protocol including erythropoietin (EP) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was designed. Thirty-seven MDS patients (stages I-III) with symptomatic anaemia were first given EPO 10,000 U s.c. 3 times weekly for 6 weeks. Those not responding, i.e. increased their haemoglobin levels > 15 g/l, proceeded into the second phase of the study where GM-CSF (200 micrograms/d. s.c. on weeks 1-6) was combined with EPO (10,000 U s.c. 3 times weekly on weeks 5-14). Following the initial EPO treatment phase, 14 of the 37 patients (38%) responded with increased haemoglobin levels. Responders were significantly different from non-responders in that their pre-treatment values of s-EPO, s-LDH and bone marrow blast cell counts were lower, their baseline haemoglobin levels higher and their transfusion dependency less pronounced. Eighteen of the 23 non-responders proceeded into the second phase, 13 of those were evaluable having completed the entire schedule. Three of the 13 initially EPO resistant patients (23%) responded to the GM-CSF/EPO combination with increased haemoglobin levels, suggesting a positive synergy between the two cytokines. Thus, the overall response rate to the present protocol was 46% (17 of 37 cases), but only a limited subset of the patients did clearly benefit from the combined GM-CSF/EPO administration. Therefore, we believe this step-wise approach to multiple growth factor treatment in MDS, starting with EPO alone and reserving the combination for refractory cases, has considerable advantages, taking into account both medical and socio-economical aspects.

  5. [Breastfeeding (part one): Frequency, benefits and drawbacks, optimal duration and factors influencing its initiation and prolongation. Clinical guidelines for practice].

    Chantry, A A; Monier, I; Marcellin, L

    2015-12-01

    The objectives were to on assess the frequency and the duration of breastfeeding in France. On the other hand, the objectives were to identify its benefits and drawbacks, and to study the factors influencing its initiation and its extension. Bibliographic research in Medline, Google Scholar and in the Cochrane Library. Breastfeeding concerns in France about 70% of children at birth (EL2). Its median duration is about 15 weeks and 3 weeks ½ for exclusive breastfeeding. At three months, only one third of children breastfed at birth are still being breastfed (EL2). Whether this is due to the composition of breast milk or the behavior of mothers with their children or their socio-cultural level, or even by all these components at once, breastfeeding is associated with better cognitive development children (EL2). This effect is even more reinforced that mothers breastfeed exclusively and prolonged (EL2). As part of the prevention of many diseases (ear infections, gastrointestinal infections, atopic diseases, obesity and cardiovascular diseases…), exclusive and prolonged breastfeeding (grade B) between 4 to 6 months is recommended (professional consensus). Breastfeeding is not a means of preventing postpartum depression (professional consensus). To reduce the incidence of breast cancer, prolonged breastfeeding is recommended (grade B). In order to increase the rate of initiation of breastfeeding as well as its duration, it is recommended that health professionals work closely with mothers in their project (grade A), the breastfeeding promotion messages include message to husbands (grade B), and to promote breastfeeding on demand without fixed interval between feedings (grade B). However, there is not enough data to recommend the use of a specific position during breastfeeding, or the use of one or two breast or to early start breastfeeding or not (professional consensus). Exclusive and extended breastfeeding is recommended (grade B) between 4 to 6 months (professional

  6. Clinical benefit of a gluten-free diet in type 1 diabetic children with screening-detected celiac disease

    Hansen, Dorte; Brock-Jacobsen, Bendt; Lund, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to 1) determine the prevalence of celiac disease in Danish children with type 1 diabetes and 2) estimate the clinical effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) in patients with diabetes and celiac disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In a region comprising 24......% of the Danish population, all patients diabetes were identified and 269 (89%) were included in the study. The diagnosis of celiac disease was suspected in patients with endomysium and tissue transglutaminase antibodies in serum and confirmed by intestinal biopsy. Patients with celiac...... a lower SD score (SDS) for height (P diabetes onset (P = 0.041). A GFD was obtained in 31 of 33 patients. After 2 years of follow-up, there was an increase in weight SDS (P = 0.006) and in children

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging for assessing hamstring injuries: clinical benefits and pitfalls – a review of the current literature

    Greenky M

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Max Greenky, Steven B Cohen Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Hamstring injuries are common injuries in all levels of athletics. Hamstring injuries can cause prolonged absence from sports and have a notorious rate of reinjury. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is being increasingly utilized following a hamstring injury. Physicians are being increasingly asked to utilize MRI to predict clinical outcomes, including time frame for return to play and risk of reinjury. In spite of numerous studies in this area, no clear consensus exists. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the literature and evidence regarding the role of MRI in treating hamstring injuries. Keywords: hamstring injury, MRI, return to play

  8. Differential benefits of amoxicillin-metronidazole in different phases of periodontal therapy in a randomized controlled crossover clinical trial.

    Mombelli, Andrea; Almaghlouth, Adnan; Cionca, Norbert; Courvoisier, Delphine S; Giannopoulou, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    The specific advantage of administering systemic antibiotics during initial, non-surgical therapy or in the context of periodontal surgery is unclear. This study assesses the differential outcomes of periodontal therapy supplemented with amoxicillin-metronidazole during either the non-surgical or the surgical treatment phase. This is a single-center, randomized placebo-controlled crossover clinical trial with a 1-year follow-up. Eighty participants with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-associated moderate to advanced periodontitis were randomized into two treatment groups: group A, antibiotics (500 mg metronidazole plus 375 mg amoxicillin three times per day for 7 days) during the first, non-surgical phase of periodontal therapy (T1) and placebo during the second, surgical phase (T2); and group B, placebo during T1 and antibiotics during T2. The number of sites with probing depth (PD) >4 mm and bleeding on probing (BOP) per patient was the primary outcome. A total of 11,212 sites were clinically monitored on 1,870 teeth. T1 with antibiotics decreased the number of sites with PD >4 mm and BOP per patient significantly more than without (group A: from 34.5 to 5.7, 84%; group B: from 28.7 to 8.7, 70%; P antibiotics, but only eight treated with placebo, achieved a 10-fold reduction of diseased sites (P = 0.007). Consequently, fewer patients of group A needed additional therapy, the mean number of surgical interventions was lower, and treatment time in T2 was shorter. Six months after T2, the mean number of residual pockets (group A: 2.8 ± 5.2; group B: 2.2 ± 5.0) was not significantly different and was sustained over 12 months in both groups. Giving the antibiotics during T1 or T2 yielded similar long-term outcomes, but antibiotics in T1 resolved the disease quicker and thus reduced the need for additional surgical intervention.

  9. Clinical and economic benefits of integrated pump/CGM technology therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes in Colombia.

    Gomez, Ana Maria; Alfonso-Cristancho, Rafael; Orozco, John Jairo; Lynch, Peter Matthew; Prieto, Diana; Saunders, Rhodri; Roze, Stephane; Valencia, Juan Esteban

    2016-11-01

    To assess the long-term clinical and economic impact of integrated pump/CGM technology therapy as compared to multiple daily injections (MDI), for the treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in Colombia. The CORE Diabetes Model was used to simulate a hypothetical cohort of patients with T1D. Mean baseline characteristics were taken from a clinical study conducted in Colombia and a healthcare payer perspective was adopted, with a 5% annual discount rate applied to both costs and outcomes. The integrated pump/CGM improved mean life expectancy by 3.51 years compared with MDI. A similar increase occurred in mean quality-adjusted life expectancy with an additional 3.81 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Onset of diabetes-related complications was also delayed as compared to MDI, and mean survival time free of complication increased by 1.74 years with integrated pump/CGM. Although this increased treatment costs of diabetes as compared to MDI, savings were achieved thanks to reduced expenditure on diabetes-related complications. The estimated incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for SAP was Colombian Pesos (COP) 44,893,950 (approximately USD$23,200) per QALY gained. Improved blood glucose control associated to integrated pump/CGM results in a decreased incidence of diabetes-related complications and improves life expectancy as compared to MDI. Using recommended thresholds from the World Health Organization and previous coverage decisions about health technologies in Colombia, it is a cost-effective alternative to MDI for the treatment of type 1 diabetes in Colombia. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Feasibility of resistance training in adult McArdle patients: clinical outcomes and muscle strength and mass benefits.

    Santalla, Alfredo; Munguía-Izquierdo, Diego; Brea-Alejo, Lidia; Pagola-Aldazábal, Itziar; Díez-Bermejo, Jorge; Fleck, Steven J; Ara, Ignacio; Lucia, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of a 4-month resistance (weight lifting) training program followed by a 2-month detraining period in 7 adult McArdle patients (5 female) on: muscle mass (assessed by DXA), strength, serum creatine kinase (CK) activity and clinical severity. Adherence to training was ≥84% in all patients and no major contraindication or side effect was noted during the training or strength assessment sessions. The training program had a significant impact on total and lower extremities' lean mass (P training by +855 g (95% confidence interval (CI): 30, 1679) and +547 g (95%CI: 116, 978), respectively, and significantly decreasing with detraining. Body fat showed no significant changes over the study period. Bench press and half-squat performance, expressed as the highest value of average muscle power (W) or force (N) in the concentric-repetition phase of both tests showed a consistent increase over the 4-month training period, and decreased with detraining. Yet muscle strength and power detraining values were significantly higher than pre-training values, indicating that a training effect was still present after detraining. Importantly, all the participants, with no exception, showed a clear gain in muscle strength after the 4-month training period, e.g., bench press: +52 W (95% CI: 13, 91); half-squat: +173 W (95% CI: 96, 251). No significant time effect (P > 0.05) was noted for baseline or post strength assessment values of serum CK activity, which remained essentially within the range reported in our laboratory for McArdle patients. All the patients changed to a lower severity class with training, such that none of them were in the highest disease severity class (3) after the intervention and, as such, they did not have fixed muscle weakness after training. Clinical improvements were retained, in all but one patient, after detraining, such that after detraining all patients were classed as class 1 for disease severity.

  11. Risk of Recurrence and Chemotherapy Benefit for Patients With Node-Negative, Estrogen Receptor–Positive Breast Cancer: Recurrence Score Alone and Integrated With Pathologic and Clinical Factors

    Tang, Gong; Cuzick, Jack; Costantino, Joseph P.; Dowsett, Mitch; Forbes, John F.; Crager, Michael; Mamounas, Eleftherios P.; Shak, Steven; Wolmark, Norman

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The 21-gene breast cancer assay recurrence score (RS) is widely used for assessing recurrence risk and predicting chemotherapy benefit in patients with estrogen receptor (ER) –positive breast cancer. Pathologic and clinical factors such as tumor size, grade, and patient age also provide independent prognostic utility. We developed a formal integration of these measures and evaluated its prognostic and predictive value. Patients and Methods From the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel (NSABP) B-14 and translational research cohort of the Arimidex, Tamoxifen Alone or in Combination (TransATAC) studies, we included patients who received hormonal monotherapy, had ER-positive tumors, and RS and traditional clinicopathologic factors assessed (647 and 1,088, respectively). Individual patient risk assessments from separate Cox models were combined using meta-analysis to form an RS-pathology-clinical (RSPC) assessment of distant recurrence risk. Risk assessments by RS and RSPC were compared in node-negative (N0) patients. RSPC was compared with RS for predicting chemotherapy benefit in NSABP B-20. Results RSPC had significantly more prognostic value for distant recurrence than did RS (P < .001) and showed better separation of risk in the study population. RSPC classified fewer patients as intermediate risk (17.8% v 26.7%, P < .001) and more patients as lower risk (63.8% v 54.2%, P < .001) than did RS among 1,444 N0 ER-positive patients. In B-20, the interaction of RSPC with chemotherapy was not statistically significant (P = .10), in contrast to the previously reported significant interaction of RS with chemotherapy (P = .037). Conclusion RSPC refines the assessment of distant recurrence risk and reduces the number of patients classified as intermediate risk. Adding clinicopathologic measures did not seem to enhance the value of RS alone nor the individual biology RS identifies in predicting chemotherapy benefit. PMID:22010013

  12. Risk of recurrence and chemotherapy benefit for patients with node-negative, estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer: recurrence score alone and integrated with pathologic and clinical factors.

    Tang, Gong; Cuzick, Jack; Costantino, Joseph P; Dowsett, Mitch; Forbes, John F; Crager, Michael; Mamounas, Eleftherios P; Shak, Steven; Wolmark, Norman

    2011-11-20

    The 21-gene breast cancer assay recurrence score (RS) is widely used for assessing recurrence risk and predicting chemotherapy benefit in patients with estrogen receptor (ER) -positive breast cancer. Pathologic and clinical factors such as tumor size, grade, and patient age also provide independent prognostic utility. We developed a formal integration of these measures and evaluated its prognostic and predictive value. From the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel (NSABP) B-14 and translational research cohort of the Arimidex, Tamoxifen Alone or in Combination (TransATAC) studies, we included patients who received hormonal monotherapy, had ER-positive tumors, and RS and traditional clinicopathologic factors assessed (647 and 1,088, respectively). Individual patient risk assessments from separate Cox models were combined using meta-analysis to form an RS-pathology-clinical (RSPC) assessment of distant recurrence risk. Risk assessments by RS and RSPC were compared in node-negative (N0) patients. RSPC was compared with RS for predicting chemotherapy benefit in NSABP B-20. RSPC had significantly more prognostic value for distant recurrence than did RS (P < .001) and showed better separation of risk in the study population. RSPC classified fewer patients as intermediate risk (17.8% v 26.7%, P < .001) and more patients as lower risk (63.8% v 54.2%, P < .001) than did RS among 1,444 N0 ER-positive patients. In B-20, the interaction of RSPC with chemotherapy was not statistically significant (P = .10), in contrast to the previously reported significant interaction of RS with chemotherapy (P = .037). RSPC refines the assessment of distant recurrence risk and reduces the number of patients classified as intermediate risk. Adding clinicopathologic measures did not seem to enhance the value of RS alone nor the individual biology RS identifies in predicting chemotherapy benefit.

  13. High-Risk Premenopausal Luminal A Breast Cancer Patients Derive no Benefit from Adjuvant Cyclophosphamide-based Chemotherapy: Results from the DBCG77B Clinical Trial.

    Nielsen, Torsten O; Jensen, Maj-Brit; Burugu, Samantha; Gao, Dongxia; Jørgensen, Charlotte L Tykjaer; Balslev, Eva; Ejlertsen, Bent

    2017-02-15

    Purpose: Luminal A breast cancers have better prognosis than other molecular subtypes. Luminal A cancers may also be insensitive to adjuvant chemotherapy, although there is little high-level evidence to confirm this concept. The primary hypothesis in this formal prospective-retrospective analysis was to assess interaction between subtype (Luminal A vs. other) and treatment (chemotherapy vs. not) for the primary endpoint (10-year invasive disease-free survival) of a breast cancer trial randomizing women to adjuvant chemotherapy, analyzed in multivariate Cox proportional hazards models using the Wald interaction test. Experimental Design: The Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group 77B clinical trial randomized 1,072 premenopausal women to no systematic treatment (control), levamisole, cyclophosphamide, or cyclophosphamide-methotrexate-fluorouracil arms. All arms included radiotherapy but no endocrine therapy. Researchers with no access to clinical data performed intrinsic subtype analysis on tissue microarrays using published immunohistochemical methods based on estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER2, Ki67, and basal markers. Results: Patients ( n = 709) had tissue available; chemotherapy benefit in these patients was similar to the original trial (HR, 0.56). Immunohistochemistry classified 165 as Luminal A, 319 Luminal B, 58 HER2-enriched, and 82 core basal (among 91 triple-negative). Patients with Luminal A breast tumors did not benefit from chemotherapy [HR, 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.53-2.14; P = 0.86], whereas patients with non-luminal A subtypes did (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.38-0.66; P benefit from adjuvant cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy. Clin Cancer Res; 23(4); 946-53. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Scaling ethics up and down: moral craft in clinical genetics and in global health research.

    Parker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper engages with the question of what it is to 'do good medical ethics' in two ways. It begins with an exploration of what it might mean to say that health professionals practise good medical ethics as part of practising good ethical medicine. Using the example of the Genethics Club, a well-established national ethics forum for genetics professionals in the UK, the paper develops an account of moral craftsmanship grounded in the concepts of shared moral commitments and practices, moral work, ethics and living morality. In the light of this discussion, the paper goes on to consider what it might mean for a specialist in medical ethics, a bioethicist, to do good medical ethics. Finally, a research agenda focusing on the challenges of thinking about good medical ethics in a global context and a proposal for an innovative approach to bioethics methodology is outlined. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Developing global citizenship online: an authentic alternative to overseas clinical placement.

    Strickland, Karen; Adamson, Elizabeth; McInally, Wendy; Tiittanen, Hannele; Metcalfe, Sharon

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents the findings of a pilot project to develop and evaluate an international nursing module delivered using a collaborative online platform between nursing programmes in Scotland, USA and Finland. The purpose of the project was to provide an authentic international nursing experience for nursing students, allowing them to explore and contrast the nursing and health care issues in an international context. The pilot cohort ran in September 2011 with a total of 22 students with a mix of students from both undergraduate and postgraduate programmes. A mixed methods research design was used to evaluate the students' experience using an anonymous online questionnaire and the collection of testimonials from students based on their experience. The results demonstrated high levels of satisfaction with the learning experience. Four key themes-learning together, widening horizons, developing autonomy and learning beyond frontiers-emerged from the qualitative data. Developing confidence from the shared learning experience has real implications for the global mobility of the nursing workforce as it helps to prepare nurses for a career beyond their own country's borders. The pilot module has clearly demonstrated that the use of Web 2.0 technology in the forms of a wiki may effectively be employed to provide an online learning environment to allow cross institutional learning. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Benefits of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS for Spastic Subjects: Clinical, Functional, and Biomechanical Parameters for Lower Limb and Walking in Five Hemiparetic Patients

    Luc Terreaux

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Spasticity is a disabling symptom resulting from reorganization of spinal reflexes no longer inhibited by supraspinal control. Several studies have demonstrated interest in repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in spastic patients. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind crossover study on five spastic hemiparetic patients to determine whether this type of stimulation of the premotor cortex can provide a clinical benefit. Material and Methods. Two stimulation frequencies (1 Hz and 10 Hz were tested versus placebo. Patients were assessed clinically, by quantitative analysis of walking and measurement of neuromechanical parameters (H and T reflexes, musculoarticular stiffness of the ankle. Results. No change was observed after placebo and 10 Hz protocols. Clinical parameters were not significantly modified after 1 Hz stimulation, apart from a tendency towards improved recruitment of antagonist muscles on the Fügl-Meyer scale. Only cadence and recurvatum were significantly modified on quantitative analysis of walking. Neuromechanical parameters were modified with significant decreases in Hmax⁡ /Mmax⁡ and T/Mmax⁡ ratios and stiffness indices 9 days or 31 days after initiation of TMS. Conclusion. This preliminary study supports the efficacy of low-frequency TMS to reduce reflex excitability and stiffness of ankle plantar flexors, while clinical signs of spasticity were not significantly modified.

  17. Benefits of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for spastic subjects: clinical, functional, and biomechanical parameters for lower limb and walking in five hemiparetic patients.

    Terreaux, Luc; Gross, Raphael; Leboeuf, Fabien; Desal, Hubert; Hamel, Olivier; Nguyen, Jean Paul; Pérot, Chantal; Buffenoir, Kévin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Spasticity is a disabling symptom resulting from reorganization of spinal reflexes no longer inhibited by supraspinal control. Several studies have demonstrated interest in repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in spastic patients. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind crossover study on five spastic hemiparetic patients to determine whether this type of stimulation of the premotor cortex can provide a clinical benefit. Material and Methods. Two stimulation frequencies (1 Hz and 10 Hz) were tested versus placebo. Patients were assessed clinically, by quantitative analysis of walking and measurement of neuromechanical parameters (H and T reflexes, musculoarticular stiffness of the ankle). Results. No change was observed after placebo and 10 Hz protocols. Clinical parameters were not significantly modified after 1 Hz stimulation, apart from a tendency towards improved recruitment of antagonist muscles on the Fügl-Meyer scale. Only cadence and recurvatum were significantly modified on quantitative analysis of walking. Neuromechanical parameters were modified with significant decreases in H max⁡ /M max⁡ and T/M max⁡ ratios and stiffness indices 9 days or 31 days after initiation of TMS. Conclusion. This preliminary study supports the efficacy of low-frequency TMS to reduce reflex excitability and stiffness of ankle plantar flexors, while clinical signs of spasticity were not significantly modified.

  18. Effect of brief training on reliability and applicability of Global Assessment of functioning scale by Psychiatric clinical officers in Uganda.

    Abbo, C; Okello, E S; Nakku, J

    2013-03-01

    The Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) is the standard method and an essential tool for representing a clinician's judgment of a patient's overall level of psychological, social and occupational functioning. As such, it is probably the single most widely used method for assessing impairment among the patients with psychiatric illnesses. To assess the effects of one-hour training on application of the GAF by Psychiatric Clinical Officers' in a Ugandan setting. Five Psychiatrists and five Psychiatric Clinical Officers (PCOs) or Assistant Medical Officers who hold a 2 year diploma in Clinical Psychiatry were randomly selected to independently rate a video-recorded psychiatric interview according to the DSM IV-TR. The PCOs were then offered a one-hour training on how to rate the GAF scale and asked to rate the video case interview again. All ratings were assigned on the basis of past one year, at admission and current functioning. Interclass correlations (ICC) were computed using two-way mixed models. The ICC between the psychiatrists and the PCOs before training in the past one year, at admission and current functioning were +0.48, +0.51 and +0.59 respectively. After training, the ICC coefficients were +0.60, +0.82 and +0.83. Brief training given to PCOs improved the applications of their ratings of GAF scale to acceptable levels. There is need for formal training to this cadre of psychiatric practitioners in the use of the GAF.

  19. 8D.04: CLINICAL BENEFITS OF ADMINISTERING SUPER-SELECTIVE SEGMENTAL ADRENAL VENOUS SAMPLING AND PERFORMING ADRENAL SPARING SURGERY IN THE PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY ALDOSTERONISM.

    Satoh, F; Morimoto, R; Ono, Y; Iwakura, Y; Omata, K; Kudo, M; Satani, N; Ota, H; Seiji, K; Takase, K; Nakamura, Y; Sasano, H; Ito, S

    2015-06-01

    Adrenal venous sampling (AVS) has been well known to play pivotal roles in clinical differential diagnosis of unilateral aldosterone producing adenoma (APA) from bilateral idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA). However, it is also true that a central vein AVS or c-AVS which collects the blood from right and left central adrenal veins can by no means discriminate bilateral APA from BHA. There have been no published studies reporting the reliable clinical differential diagnosis between bilateral APA and IHA, especially IHA cases with bilateral non-functioning adenomas (NFA), which has been considered practically impossible in clinical differential diagnosis. As an attempt to this clinical dilemma, segmental AVS (S-AVS), which could evaluate segmental effluents from adrenal tributary veins, has been recently developed. We have performed S-AVS in these patients above following C-AVS, via the insertion of a microcatheter in up to three intra-adrenal first-degree tributary veins on bilateral adrenals. S-AVS did enable us to evaluate the intra-adrenal localization of corticosteroidogenesis. These data did indicate that S-AVS should be performed in the PA patients who had increased aldosterone levels in bilateral central vein and demonstrated space occupying lesions in the bilateral adrenals in order to avoid bilateral adrenalectomy or long lasting medical treatment toward persistent PA. In addition to the situations above, we have administere S-AVS to the following patients; those who had clinically suspected APA but not sufficiently high lateralization indexes according to the results of C-AVS, very young ones with higher clinical probability of recurrence and those who could benefit from partial adrenalectomy by demonstrating the sites of specific steroidogenesis. However, it is also entirely true that S-AVS is more expensive, time-consuming and labor-intensive compared to C-AVS.(Figure is included in full-text article.)The angiography during S-AVS (A, B), the coronal CT

  20. Clinical global assessment of nutritional status as predictor of mortality in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Dai, Lu; Mukai, Hideyuki; Lindholm, Bengt; Heimbürger, Olof; Barany, Peter; Stenvinkel, Peter; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid

    2017-01-01

    The value of subjective global assessment (SGA) as nutritional assessor of protein-energy wasting (PEWSGA) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients depends on its mortality predictive capacity. We investigated associations of PEWSGA with markers of nutritional status and all-cause mortality in CKD patients. In 1031 (732 CKD1-5 non-dialysis and 299 dialysis) patients, SGA and body (BMI), lean (LBMI) and fat (FBMI) body mass indices, % handgrip strength (% HGS), serum albumin, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were examined at baseline. The five-year all-cause mortality predictive strength of baseline PEWSGA and during follow-up were investigated. PEWSGA was present in 2% of CKD1-2, 16% of CKD3-4, 31% of CKD5 non-dialysis and 44% of dialysis patients. Patients with PEWSGA (n = 320; 31%) had higher hsCRP and lower BMI, LBMI, FBMI, %HGS and serum albumin. But, using receiver operating characteristics-derived cutoffs, these markers could not classify (by kappa statistic) or explain variations of (by multinomial logistic regression analysis) presence of PEWSGA. In generalized linear models, SGA independently predicted mortality after adjustments of multiple confounders (RR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.11-1.23). Among 323 CKD5 patients who were re-assessed after median 12.6 months, 222 (69%) remained well-nourished, 37 (11%) developed PEWSGA de novo, 40 (12%) improved while 24 (8%) remained with PEWSGA. The latter independently predicted mortality (RR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.13-1.46). SGA, a valid assessor of nutritional status, is an independent predictor of all-cause mortality both in CKD non-dialysis and dialysis patients that outperforms non-composite nutritional markers as prognosticator.

  1. The economic impact of poor sample quality in clinical chemistry laboratories: results from a global survey.

    Erdal, Erik P; Mitra, Debanjali; Khangulov, Victor S; Church, Stephen; Plokhoy, Elizabeth

    2017-03-01

    Background Despite advances in clinical chemistry testing, poor blood sample quality continues to impact laboratory operations and the quality of results. While previous studies have identified the preanalytical causes of lower sample quality, few studies have examined the economic impact of poor sample quality on the laboratory. Specifically, the costs associated with workarounds related to fibrin and gel contaminants remain largely unexplored. Methods A quantitative survey of clinical chemistry laboratory stakeholders across 10 international regions, including countries in North America, Europe and Oceania, was conducted to examine current blood sample testing practices, sample quality issues and practices to remediate poor sample quality. Survey data were used to estimate costs incurred by laboratories to mitigate sample quality issues. Results Responses from 164 participants were included in the analysis, which was focused on three specific issues: fibrin strands, fibrin masses and gel globules. Fibrin strands were the most commonly reported issue, with an overall incidence rate of ∼3%. Further, 65% of respondents indicated that these issues contribute to analyzer probe clogging, and the majority of laboratories had visual inspection and manual remediation practices in place to address fibrin- and gel-related quality problems (55% and 70%, respectively). Probe maintenance/replacement, visual inspection and manual remediation were estimated to carry significant costs for the laboratories surveyed. Annual cost associated with lower sample quality and remediation related to fibrin and/or gel globules for an average US laboratory was estimated to be $100,247. Conclusions Measures to improve blood sample quality present an important step towards improved laboratory operations.

  2. Global women's health: current clinical trials in low- and middle-income countries.

    Merriel, A; Harb, H M; Williams, H; Lilford, R; Coomarasamy, A

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are necessary to develop evidence-based approaches to improve women's health. Understanding what research is currently being conducted will allow the identification of research gaps, avoidance of duplication, planning of future studies, collaboration amongst research groups, and geographical targeting for research investments. To provide an overview of active women's health trials in LMICs. The World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry Platform was searched for trials registered between 1 April 2012 and 31 March 2014. Selected trials were randomised, conducted in LMICs, active, and with a women's health intervention or a significant outcome for the woman. Two reviewers extracted data. Analysis included geographical spread, speciality areas, pre-enrolment registration, study size, and funders. Of the 8966 records, 509 were eligible for inclusion. Gynaecology trials made up 57% of the research, whereas the remaining 43% of trials were in obstetrics. Research activity focused on fertility (17%), the antenatal period (15%), benign gynaecology (14%), intrapartum care (9%), and pre-invasive disease and cancers (8%). The majority of trials (84%) took place in middle-income countries (MICs). In low-income countries (LICs) 83% of research investigated obstetrics, and in MICs 60% of research investigated gynaecology. Most trials (80%) had a sample size of 500 or fewer participants. The median size of trials in LICs was 815 compared with 128 in MICs. Pre-enrolment registration occurred in 54% of trials. The majority (62%) of trials were funded locally. Many LMICs are active in women's health research. The majority of registered trials are located in MICs; however, the trials in LICs are often larger. The focus of research in MICs may be driven by local priorities and funding, with fertility being highly researched. In LICs, pregnancy is the focus, perhaps reflecting the international

  3. The Agile Rapid Global Combat Support (ARGCS) System: A Cost and Benefit Analysis of Including the ARGCS Technologies in the Acquisition of the Enhanced Consolidated Support System (ECASS)

    Lund, John N

    2007-01-01

    ...). The ultimate goal of this project is to assist in the analysis of the ARGCS technologies and what benefit they would provide if included in the proposed next generation of Naval Aviation test equipment, currently called the Enhanced Consolidated Automated Support System (ECASS).

  4. Economic and clinical benefit of collagenase ointment compared to a hydrogel dressing for pressure ulcer debridement in a long-term care setting.

    Waycaster, Curtis; Milne, Catherine

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the cost-effectiveness of collagenase ointment relative to autolysis with a hydrogel dressing when debriding necrotic pressure ulcers in a long-term care setting. A Markov decision process model with 2 states (necrotic nonviable wound bed transitioning to a granulated viable wound bed) was developed using data derived from a prospective, randomized, 6-week, single-center trial of 27 institutionalized subjects with pressure ulcers that were ≥ 85% necrotic nonviable tissue. Direct medical costs from the payer perspective included study treatments, wound treatment supplies, and nursing time. Clinical benefit was measured as "granulation days" and was derived from the time-dependent debridement rates of the alternative products. The average cost per patient for 42 days of pressure ulcer care was $1,817 in 2012 for the collagenase group and $1,611 for the hydrogel group. Days spent with a granulated wound were 3.6 times higher for collagenase (23.4 vs 6.5) than with the hydrogel. The estimated cost per granulation day was > 3.2 times higher for hydrogel ($249) vs collagenase ($78). In this economic analysis based on a randomized, controlled clinical trial, collagenase ointment resulted in a faster time to complete debridement and was more cost-effective than hydrogel autolysis for pressure ulcers in a long-term care setting. Even though collagenase ointment has a higher acquisition cost than hydrogel, the clinical benefit offsets the initial cost difference, resulting in lower cost per granulation day to the nursing home over the course of the 42-day analysis.

  5. Can repeat injection provide clinical benefit in patients with cervical disc herniation and stenosis when the first epidural injection results only in partial response?

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-07-01

    Epidural steroid injection (ESI) is known to be an effective treatment for neck or radicular pain due to herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) and spinal stenosis (SS). Although repeat ESI has generally been indicated to provide more pain relief in partial responders after single ESI, there has been little evidence supporting the usefulness of this procedure. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine whether repeat ESI at a prescribed interval of 2 to 3 weeks after the first injection would provide greater clinical benefit in patients with partial pain reduction than intermittent ESI performed only when pain was aggravated. One hundred eighty-four patients who underwent transforaminal ESI (TFESI) for treatment of axial neck and radicular arm pain due to HIVD or SS and could be followed up for 1 year were enrolled. We divided the patients into 2 groups. Group A (N = 108) comprised partial responders (numeric rating scale (NRS) ≥ 3 after the first injection) who underwent repeat injection at a prescribed interval of 2 to 3 weeks after the first injection. Group B (N = 76) comprised partial responders who did not receive repeat injection at the prescribed interval, but received intermittent injections only for aggravation of pain. Various clinical data were assessed, including total number of injections during 1 year, NRS duration of Group A, or after first injection in Group B (time to reinjection). Groups A and B were compared in terms of total population, HIVD, and SS. In the whole population, HIVD subgroup, and SS subgroup, patients in Group A required significantly fewer injections to obtain satisfactory pain relief during the 1-year follow-up period. Group A showed a significantly longer time to reinjection and longer NRS Group B did. Repeat TFESI conducted at 2- to 3-week intervals after the first injection in partial responders contributed to greater clinical benefit compared with intermittent TFESI performed only upon pain

  6. Benefit of general anesthesia monitored by bispectral index compared with monitoring guided only by clinical parameters. Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Carlos Rogério Degrandi Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The bispectral index parameter is used to guide the titration of general anesthesia; however, many studies have shown conflicting results regarding the benefits of bispectral index monitoring. The objective of this systematic review with meta-analysis is to evaluate the clinical impact of monitoring with the bispectral index parameter. Methods: The search for evidence in scientific information sources was conducted during December 2013 to January 2015, the following primary databases: Medline/PubMed, LILACS, Cochrane, CINAHL, Ovid, SCOPUS and TESES. The criteria for inclusion in the study were randomized controlled trials, comparing general anesthesia monitored, with bispectral index parameter with anesthesia guided solely by clinical parameters, and patients aged over 18 years. The criteria for exclusion were studies involving anesthesia or sedation for diagnostic procedures, and intraoperative wake-up test for surgery of the spine. Results: The use of monitoring with the bispectral index has shown benefits reducing time to extubation, orientation in time and place, and discharge from both the operating room and post anesthetic care unit. The risk of nausea and vomiting after surgery was reduced by 12% in patients monitored with bispectral index. Occurred a reduction of 3% in the risk of cognitive impairment postoperatively at 3 months postoperatively and 6% reduction in the risk of postoperative delirium in patients monitored with bispectral index. Furthermore, the risk of intraoperative memory has been reduced by 1%. Conclusion: Clinically, anesthesia monitoring with the BIS can be justified because it allows advantages from reducing the recovery time after waking, mainly by reducing the administration of general anesthetics as well as the risk of adverse events.

  7. Anti-inflammatory effect as a mechanism of effectiveness underlying the clinical benefits of pelotherapy in osteoarthritis patients: regulation of the altered inflammatory and stress feedback response

    Ortega, E.; Gálvez, I.; Hinchado, M. D.; Guerrero, J.; Martín-Cordero, L.; Torres-Piles, S.

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate whether an anti-inflammatory effect together with an improvement of the regulation of the interaction between the inflammatory and stress responses underlies the clinical benefits of pelotherapy in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. This study evaluated the effects of a 10-day cycle of pelotherapy at the spa centre `El Raposo' (Spain) in a group of 21 OA patients diagnosed with primary knee OA. Clinical assessments included pain intensity using a visual analog scale; pain, stiffness and physical function using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index; and health-related quality of life using the EuroQol-5D questionnaire. Serum inflammatory cytokine levels (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-10 and TGF-β) were evaluated using the Bio-Plex® Luminex® system. Circulating neuroendocrine-stress biomarkers, such as cortisol and extracellular 72 kDa heat shock protein (eHsp72), were measured by ELISA. After the cycle of mud therapy, OA patients improved the knee flexion angle and OA-related pain, stiffness and physical function, and they reported a better health-related quality of life. Serum concentrations of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6 and TGF-β, as well as eHsp72, were markedly decreased. Besides, systemic levels of cortisol increased significantly. These results confirm that the clinical benefits of mud therapy may well be mediated, at least in part, by its systemic anti-inflammatory effects and neuroendocrine-immune regulation in OA patients. Thus, mud therapy could be an effective alternative treatment in the management of OA.

  8. Clinical Global Impression of Improvement (CGI-I) as a valid proxy measure for remission in schizophrenia: analyses of ziprasidone clinical study data.

    Masand, Prakash; O'Gorman, Cedric; Mandel, Francine S

    2011-03-01

    To determine the degree to which a proxy measure of remission in schizophrenia correlates with the criteria identified by the Remission in Schizophrenia Working Group, and how well early treatment response to ziprasidone predicts remission. Data from 10 ziprasidone studies were analyzed to determine rates of remission achieved with ziprasidone using a remission definition of Clinical Global Impression of Improvement (CGI-I) of 1, and compared with rates of remission achieved using the remission working group criteria. Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) scores were then investigated as predictors of remission. A CGI-I score of 1 correlated with the remission criteria developed by the remission working group. In the combined ziprasidone arms, BPRS scores at Weeks 1, 3, and 4 successfully predicted PANSS remission (pproxy measure for the assessment of remission should be easy to apply in a clinical setting and facilitates the prediction of remission in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical Response to Gefitinib Retreatment of Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients Who Benefited from An Initial Gefitinib Therapy: A Retrospective Analysis

    Junling LI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Gefitinib is an epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI that has been widely used for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. It is most effective in women, as well as in patients who have never smoked, have pulmonary adenocarcinomas, or are of Asian origin. Several treatment options are available for NSCLC patients who responded to initial gefitinib therapy but demonstrated tumor progression, of which gefitinib readministration is the chosen therapeutic option. The present study aims to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of gefitinib readministration. Methods The clinical data of 18 patients with NSCLC who had shown partial response (PR or achieved a stable disease (SD status after gefitinib administration and were retreated with gefitinib due to failure of the initial therapy were reviewed and retrospectively analyzed. Results Of the 18 patients studied, 1 (6% showed partial remission (PR, 11 (61% achieved SD, and 6 (33% experienced disease progression. The disease control rate was 67%, and the median progression-free survival was 5.16 months (range, 1 to 24.8 months. The median overall survival from the start of the gefitinib therapy was 39.4 months (range, 15.38 to 52.44 months. Moreover, the median overall survival from the beginning of the 2nd therapy was 12.41 months (range, 3.98 to 38.24 months. Mild toxicity was observed with the 2nd gefitinib therapy. Conclusion The results of the present study indicate that patients with NSCLC may still be expected to achieve prolonged survival through gefitinib readministration if they initially responded to gefitinib and underwent various subsequent treatments.

  10. Benefits and Challenges in Globalization in Christian Higher Education: A Comparative Case Study of English Medium Instruction of Two Universities in South Korea

    Lee, Minho

    2017-01-01

    Many Christian universities in Korea are pursuing the globalization of Christian higher education to promote maximization of institutional competition, improvement of students' English skills, and enhancement of professors' research development through English Medium Instruction (EMI). EMI's flaws in application are not at all uncommon, as many of…

  11. WHO/UNEP global surveys of PCDDs, PCDFs, PCBs and DDTs in human milk and benefit-risk evaluation of breastfeeding

    van den Berg, Martin|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08660466X; Kypke, Karin; Kotz, Alexander; Tritscher, Angelika; Lee, Seoung Yong; Magulova, Katarina; Fiedler, Heidelore; Malisch, Rainer

    Since 1987, the World Health Organization (WHO) carried out global surveys on polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in human milk. This study presents a review of the three most recent surveys from 2000 to 2010,

  12. The Children's Global Assessment Scale (CGAS) and Global Assessment of Psychosocial Disability (GAPD) in clinical practice--substance and reliability as judged by intraclass correlations

    Dyrborg, J; Larsen, F W; Nielsen, S

    2000-01-01

    Studies on the inter-rater reliability on the Children's Global Assessment Scale (CGAS) and the Global Assessment of Psychosocial Disability (GAPD) involving different subgroups of 145 outpatients from 4 to 16 years of age showed fair to substantial intraclass correlations of 0.59 to 0.90. Raters...

  13. Building Surgical Research Capacity Globally: Efficacy of a Clinical Research Course for Surgeons in Low-Resource Settings

    Theodore A. Miclau

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal injury confers an enormous burden of preventable disability and mortality in low- and moderate-income countries (LMICs. Appropriate orthopedic and trauma care services are lacking. Leading international health agencies emphasize the critical need to create and sustain research capacity in the developing world as a strategic factor in the establishment of functional, independent health systems. One aspect of building research capacity is partnership between developing and developed countries, and knowledge sharing via these collaborations. This study evaluated the efficacy of a short, intensive course designed to educate surgeons on fundamental aspects of clinical research using evidence-based medicine (EBM principles. Orthopedic surgeons from the United States and Canada presented a one-day course on the fundamentals of clinical research in Havana, Cuba. Knowledge acquisition was assessed on the part of course participants and surveyed current involvement with and attitudes toward clinical research. Questionnaires were presented to participants immediately preceding and following the course. The mean pre-test score was 43.9% (95% CI: 41.1–46.6%. The mean post-test score was 59.3% (95% CI: 56.5–62.1%. There were relative score increases in each subgroup based on professional level, subjective level of familiarity with EBM concepts, and subjective level of experience in research. This study establishes the short-term efficacy of an intensive course designed to impart knowledge in EBM and clinical research. Further study is necessary to determine the long-term benefits of this type of course. This may be a useful part of an overall strategy to build health research capacity in LMICs, ultimately contributing to improved access to high-quality surgical care.

  14. Modification of the Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) Scale for use in bipolar illness (BP): the CGI-BP.

    Spearing, M K; Post, R M; Leverich, G S; Brandt, D; Nolen, W

    1997-12-05

    The Clinical Global Impressions Scale (CGI) was modified specifically for use in assessing global illness severity and change in patients with bipolar disorder. Criticisms of the original CGI were addressed by correcting inconsistencies in scaling, identifying time frames for comparison, clarifying definitions of illness severity and change, and separating out assessment of treatment side effects from illness improvement during treatment. A Detailed User's Guide was developed to train clinicians in the use of the new CGI-Bipolar Version (CGI-BP) for rating severity of manic and depressive episodes and the degree of change from the immediately preceding phase and from the worst phase of illness. The revised scale and manual provide a focused set of instructions to facilitate the reliability of these ratings of mania, depression, and overall bipolar illness during treatment of an acute episode or in longer-term illness prophylaxis. Interrater reliability of the scale was demonstrated in preliminary analyses. Thus, the modified CGI-BP is anticipated to be more useful than the original CGI in studies of bipolar disorder.

  15. Net clinical benefit of new oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban) versus no treatment in a 'real world' atrial fibrillation population: a modelling analysis based on a nationwide cohort study.

    Banerjee, Amitava; Lane, Deirdre A; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2012-03-01

    The concept of net clinical benefit has been used to quantify the balance between risk of ischaemic stroke (IS) and risk of intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) with the use oral anticoagulant therapy (OAC) in the setting of non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF), and has shown that patients at highest risk of stroke and thromboembolism gain the greatest benefit from OAC with warfarin. There are no data for the new OACs, that is, dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban, as yet. We calculated the net clinical benefit balancing IS against ICH using data from the Danish National Patient Registry on patients with non-valvular AF between 1997-2008, for dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban on the basis of recent clinical trial outcome data for these new OACs. In patients with CHADS(2)=0 but at high bleeding risk, apixaban and dabigatran 110 mg bid had a positive net clinical benefit. At CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc=1, apixaban and both doses of dabigatran (110 mg and 150 mg bid) had a positive net clinical benefit. In patients with CHADS(2) score≥1 or CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc≥2, the three new OACs (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban) appear superior to warfarin for net clinical benefit, regardless of risk of bleeding. When risk of bleeding and stroke are both high, all three new drugs appear to have a greater net clinical benefit than warfarin. In the absence of head-to-head trials for these new OACs, our analysis may help inform decision making processes when all these new OACs become available to clinicians for stroke prevention in AF. Using 'real world' data, our modelling analysis has shown that when the risk of bleeding and stroke are both high, all three new drugs appear to have a greater net clinical benefit compared to warfarin.

  16. Long-term benefit of sunitinib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma in Latin America: retrospective analysis of patient clinical characteristics

    Smaletz O

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Oren Smaletz,1 Matias Chacón,2 Ludmila de Oliveira Koch,1 Daniela R de Carvalho Rocha,1 Fernanda C Cardoso1 1Department of Oncology, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Medical Oncology Department, Alexander Fleming Institute, Buenos Aires, Argentina Objective: To describe the clinical characteristics of Latin American patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC who experienced a progression-free survival (PFS for at least 15 months following treatment with sunitinib. Patients and methods: In this retrospective analysis, mRCC patients in two institutions in Latin America received sunitinib at a starting dose of either 50 mg/day for 4 weeks followed by 2 weeks off treatment (Schedule 4/2 in repeated 6-week cycles or sunitinib 37.5 mg on a continuous daily dosing schedule. Clinical characteristics, tolerability, and PFS data were collected. Results: Twenty-nine patients with long-term clinical benefit from sunitinib were identified between September 2005 and August 2009. Median PFS was 23 months (range: 15–54 months. Two of the 29 patients with prolonged PFS achieved a complete response and additional eleven had a partial response. Most patients were aged <60 years, had good performance status, favorable or intermediate Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center prognostic risk, and disease limited to one or two sites. Dose reduction was necessary in all patients who started sunitinib at 50 mg/day administered on Schedule 4/2. Adverse events leading to dose reduction included grade 3 hand–foot syndrome, mucositis, fatigue, and hypertension. At the time of data cutoff, four patients were still receiving sunitinib treatment. Conclusion: Extended PFS can be achieved in Latin American patients with mRCC treated with sunitinib. Although the small sample size and retrospective nature of this evaluation preclude the identification of pretreatment predictive factors contributing to this benefit, the current analysis warrants

  17. Quantification of physical and economic impacts of climate change on public infrastructure in Alaska and benefits of global greenhouse gas mitigation

    Melvin, A. M.; Larsen, P.; Boehlert, B.; Martinich, J.; Neumann, J.; Chinowsky, P.; Schweikert, A.; Strzepek, K.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change poses many risks and challenges for the Arctic and sub-Arctic, including threats to infrastructure. The safety and stability of infrastructure in this region can be impacted by many factors including increased thawing of permafrost soils, reduced coastline protection due to declining arctic sea ice, and changes in inland flooding. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is coordinating an effort to quantify physical and economic impacts of climate change on public infrastructure across the state of Alaska and estimate how global greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation may avoid or reduce these impacts. This research builds on the Climate Change Impacts and Risk Analysis (CIRA) project developed for the contiguous U.S., which is described in an EPA report released in June 2015. We are using a multi-model analysis focused primarily on the impacts of changing permafrost, coastal erosion, and inland flooding on a range of infrastructure types, including transportation (e.g. roads, airports), buildings and harbors, energy sources and transmission, sewer and water systems, and others. This analysis considers multiple global GHG emission scenarios ranging from a business as usual future to significant global action. These scenarios drive climate projections through 2100 spanning a range of outcomes to capture variability amongst climate models. Projections are being combined with a recently developed public infrastructure database and integrated into a version of the Infrastructure Planning Support System (IPSS) we are modifying for use in the Arctic and sub-Arctic region. The IPSS tool allows for consideration of both adaptation and reactive responses to climate change. Results of this work will address a gap in our understanding of climate change impacts in Alaska, provide estimates of the physical and economic damages we may expect with and without global GHG mitigation, and produce important insights about infrastructure vulnerabilities in response to

  18. A preliminary case series evaluating the safety and immediate to short-term clinical benefits of joint mobilization in hemophilic arthritis of the lower limb.

    Scaddan, Emma; Rowell, John; O'Leary, Shaun

    2017-09-01

    Arthritis resulting from recurrent intra-articular bleeding in individuals with hemophilia can be severely debilitating due to joint pain and stiffness with subsequent loss of mobility and function. Very limited studies have investigated the potential benefits of joint mobilization for this condition. This case series is a preliminary investigation of safety, as well as immediate and short-term clinical benefits, associated with gentle knee and ankle joint mobilization in people with hemophilic arthropathy. A single intervention of joint mobilization was applied to the affected knees and/or ankles of 16 individuals with severe or moderate hemophilia within a public hospital setting. Adverse events, as well as immediate (pain-free passive joint range, Timed Up and Go Test with maximum pain numerical rating scale) and short-term (Lower Extremity Functional Scale) effects of the intervention were evaluated with a repeated measures ANOVA. There were no adverse events. An immediate significant increase was observed in pain-free passive ankle joint range of motion ( p  < 0.05) following the joint mobilization intervention. The findings of this case series suggest that gentle joint mobilization techniques may be safely considered as part of a multimodal management approach for hemophilic arthropathy.

  19. A Multicenter, Prospective, Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Additional Benefit of a Multistrain Synbiotic (Prodefen® in the Clinical Management of Acute Viral Diarrhea in Children

    Emilia García-Menor MD

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This randomized, open-label study evaluated the additional benefits of the synbiotic Prodefen® in the clinical management of acute diarrhea of suspected viral origin in children between 6 months and 12 years of age. Study outcomes included the duration of diarrhea, the recovery from diarrhea, and the tolerability and acceptance of the treatment. The proportion of patients without diarrhea over the study period was greater in the synbiotic group than in the control group at all study time points, showing a statistically significant difference on the fifth day (95% vs 79%, p < 0.001. The duration of diarrhea (median and interquartile range was reduced by 1 day in the synbiotic-treated patients (3 [2-5] vs 4 [3-5], p = 0.377. The tolerability of the treatment regimen, as evaluated by the parents, was significantly better in those receiving the synbiotic than in the control group. Overall, 96% of the parents of children receiving the synbiotic reported being satisfied to very satisfied with the treatment regimen. The results of this study indicate that the addition of the synbiotic Prodefen® is a well-tolerated and well-accepted approach that provides an additional benefit to the standard supportive therapy in the management of acute viral diarrhea in children.

  20. Verification of the sensitivity of functional scores for treatment results - Substantial clinical benefit thresholds for the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ).

    Kasai, Yuichi; Fukui, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji; Takeuchi, Daisaku; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kanamori, Masahiko; Hosono, Noboru; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Wada, Eiji; Sekiguchi, Miho; Konno, Shinichi; Kawakami, Mamoru

    2017-07-01

    Validity and reliability of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ) had already been verified as the patients' self-rating assessment of low back pain and lumbar spinal disease and, the present study demonstrated the responsiveness of this measure. 192 subjects who were determined by medical instructors of the Japanese Society for Spine Surgery and Related Research were analyzed. They had completed a series of treatment and both surveys before and after the treatment. Authors investigated rates of concordance between assessment by physicians and subjective assessment by patients. The mean, standard deviation, minimum, 25th percentile, median, 75th percentile and maximum values for pre-treatment, post-treatment, and acquired points were calculated, and then, we also investigated the trend between subjective assessment by patients and mean acquired points for each JOABPEQ domain and substantial clinical benefit thresholds for the JOABPEQ. Symptom changes as assessed by physicians did not coincide with those by patients, and acquired points in each JOABPEQ domain were significantly increased with improved self-rating by patients. In addition, patients who rated symptom changes as "slightly improved" showed a mean acquired points of ≥20, and those reporting "improved" showed a 25th percentile points of the acquired points of ≥20 approximately. A significant correlation was noted between the self-rating of patients and acquired points JOABPEQ, suggesting that ≥20 acquired points can be interpreted as substantial clinical benefit thresholds for the JOABPEQ. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Global Health Education: a cross-sectional study among German medical students to identify needs, deficits and potential benefits (Part 1 of 2: Mobility patterns & educational needs and demands).

    Bozorgmehr, Kayvan; Schubert, Kirsten; Menzel-Severing, Johannes; Tinnemann, Peter

    2010-10-08

    In recent years, education and training in global health has been the subject of recurring debate in many countries. However, in Germany, there has been no analysis of the educational needs or demands of medical students, or the educational deficits or potential benefits involved in global health education. Our purpose is to analyse international health elective patterns of medical students enrolled at German universities and assess whether or how they prepare for their electives abroad. We examine the exposure of medical students enrolled at German universities to training courses in tropical medicine or global health and assess students' perceived needs and demands for education in global health. Cross-sectional study among medical students in Germany including all 36 medical schools during the second half of the year 2007. All registered medical students were eligible to participate in the study. Recruitment occurred via electronic mailing-lists of students' unions. We developed a web-based, semi-structured questionnaire to capture students' international mobility patterns, preparation before electives, destination countries, exposure to and demand for global health learning opportunities. 1126 online-replies were received and analysed from all registered medical students in Germany (N = 78.067). 33.0% of all respondents (370/1126) declared at least one international health elective and of these, 36.0% (133/370) completed their electives in developing countries. 36.0% (131/363) did not prepare specifically at all, 59.0% (214/363) prepared either by self-study or declared a participation in specific preparation programmes. 87.8% of 5th and 6th year students had never participated in a global health course and 72.6% (209/288) had not completed a course in tropical medicine. 94.0% (861/916) endorsed the idea of introducing global health into medical education. Students in our sample are highly mobile during their studies. International health electives are common

  2. Romidepsin for the treatment of relapsed/refractory peripheral T cell lymphoma: prolonged stable disease provides clinical benefits for patients in the pivotal trial

    Francine Foss

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Achievement of durable responses in patients with relapsed/refractory peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL is challenging with current therapies, and there are few data regarding the potential benefits of continuing treatment in patients with the best response of stable disease (SD. Histone deacetylase inhibitors are a novel class of drugs with activity in T cell malignancies. Romidepsin was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed/refractory PTCL based on a pivotal trial demonstrating an objective response rate of 25 % (33/130, including 15 % with confirmed/unconfirmed complete response and a median duration of response of 28 months. Our objective was to further study the clinical benefits of romidepsin in patients that had the best response of SD. Methods Patients with PTCL relapsed/refractory to ≥1 prior therapy were treated with the approved dose of 14 mg/m2 romidepsin on days 1, 8, and 15 of six 28-day cycles; patients with SD or response after cycle 6 were allowed to continue on study until progression. By protocol amendment, patients treated for ≥12 cycles could receive maintenance dosing twice per cycle; after cycle 24, dosing could be further reduced to once per cycle in those who had received maintenance dosing for ≥6 months. Results Of the 32 patients (25 % with the best response of SD, 22 had SD for ≥90 days (SD90; cycle 4 response assessment. The longest SD was >3 years in a patient who received maintenance dosing of 14 mg/m2 on days 1 and 15 beginning in cycle 13. Patients with the best response of SD90 or partial response achieved similar overall and progression-free survival. Prolonged dosing of romidepsin was well tolerated. Conclusions We concluded that patients who achieve SD may consider continuing treatment because the clinical benefits of romidepsin may extend beyond objective responses. Trial registration NCT00426764

  3. [Benefits of nursing care service in the assisted reproduction clinic to self-cycle-management and self-efficiency of infertility patients].

    Li, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Chao-Feng; Guo, Mei

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the benefits of nursing care service in the assisted reproduction clinic to self-cycle-management and self-efficiency of the outpatients with infertility. We randomly divided 600 females preliminarily diagnosed with infertility into a control and an experimental group, 288 in the former and 285 in the latter group excluding those whose husbands had azoospermia. For the women patients of the experimental group, we conducted nursing care intervention concerning related knowledge, skills, diet, excise, medication, and psychology, by one-to-one consultation, individualized or group communication, establishing files, telephone follow-up, and wechat guidance. After 3 months of intervention, we compared the compliance of medical visits, effectiveness of cycle management, sense of self-efficiency, satisfaction, and anxiety score between the two groups of patients. In comparison with the controls, the patients of the experimental group showed significantly better knowledge about assisted reproduction and higher effectiveness of self-cycle-management, self-efficiency, and satisfaction (P <0.05), but a markedly lower degree of anxiety (P <0.05). Nursing care service in the assisted reproduction clinic can improve the compliance of medical visits, effectiveness of self-cycle-management, self-efficiency, and satisfaction and reduce the anxiety of the patients.

  4. Formestane, a steroidal aromatase inhibitor after failure of non-steroidal aromatase inhibitors (anastrozole and letrozole): is a clinical benefit still achievable?

    Carlini, P; Frassoldati, A; De Marco, S; Casali, A; Ruggeri, E M; Nardi, M; Papaldo, P; Fabi, A; Paoloni, F; Cognetti, F

    2001-11-01

    There are few clinical data on the sequential use of aromatase inhibitors (AI). This paper focuses on the relevance of clinical benefit CB (CR + PR + SD > or = 6 months) in postmenopausal metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients treated with the steroidal aromatase inhibitor (SAI) formestane (FOR). who had already received non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor (nSAI): letrozole (LTZ) or anastrozole (ANZ). Twenty postmenopausal women with MBC were analysed in this retrospective two-centre study with the sequence nSAI-FOR. When receiving ANZ, 1 of 11 achieved a complete response and 9 of 11 a stable disease > or = 6 months, and receiving LTZ 1 of 9 achieved a partial response and 4 of 9 a stable disease > or = 6 months. The analysis of the entire population treated with FOR showed an overall CB of 55% (11 of 20) with a median duration of 15 months and median time to progression (TTP) of 6 months. Formestane 250 mg once bi-weekly seems to be an attractive alternative third-line hormonal therapy for the treatment of patients with MBC, previously treated with nSAI.

  5. Genetic risk, coronary heart disease events, and the clinical benefit of statin therapy: an analysis of primary and secondary prevention trials.

    Mega, J L; Stitziel, N O; Smith, J G; Chasman, D I; Caulfield, M; Devlin, J J; Nordio, F; Hyde, C; Cannon, C P; Sacks, F; Poulter, N; Sever, P; Ridker, P M; Braunwald, E; Melander, O; Kathiresan, S; Sabatine, M S

    2015-06-06

    Genetic variants have been associated with the risk of coronary heart disease. In this study, we tested whether or not a composite of these variants could ascertain the risk of both incident and recurrent coronary heart disease events and identify those individuals who derive greater clinical benefit from statin therapy. A community-based cohort study (the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study) and four randomised controlled trials of both primary prevention (JUPITER and ASCOT) and secondary prevention (CARE and PROVE IT-TIMI 22) with statin therapy, comprising a total of 48,421 individuals and 3477 events, were included in these analyses. We studied the association of a genetic risk score based on 27 genetic variants with incident or recurrent coronary heart disease, adjusting for traditional clinical risk factors. We then investigated the relative and absolute risk reductions in coronary heart disease events with statin therapy stratified by genetic risk. We combined data from the different studies using a meta-analysis. When individuals were divided into low (quintile 1), intermediate (quintiles 2-4), and high (quintile 5) genetic risk categories, a significant gradient in risk for incident or recurrent coronary heart disease was shown. Compared with the low genetic risk category, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio for coronary heart disease for the intermediate genetic risk category was 1·34 (95% CI 1·22-1·47, pgenetic risk category was 1·72 (1·55-1·92, pgenetic risk categories. Similarly, we noted greater absolute risk reductions in those individuals in higher genetic risk categories (p=0·0101), resulting in a roughly threefold decrease in the number needed to treat to prevent one coronary heart disease event in the primary prevention trials. Specifically, in the primary prevention trials, the number needed to treat to prevent one such event in 10 years was 66 in people at low genetic risk, 42 in those at intermediate genetic risk, and 25 in those at high

  6. Clinical characteristics predict benefits from eptifibatide therapy during coronary stenting: insights from the Enhanced Suppression of the Platelet IIb/IIIa Receptor With Integrilin Therapy (ESPRIT) trial.

    Puma, Joseph A; Banko, Lesan T; Pieper, Karen S; Sacchi, Terrence J; O'Shea, J Conor; Dery, Jean Pierre; Tcheng, James E

    2006-02-21

    In order to determine a differential benefit from treatment, we compared the long-term outcome of high-risk versus low-risk patients and evaluated survival free from death or myocardial infarction at one year. Newer anticoagulant strategies during percutaneous coronary intervention have necessitated a reanalysis of the role of intravenous GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors. The Enhanced Suppression of the Platelet IIb/IIIa Receptor with Integrilin Therapy trial randomized 2,064 patients undergoing nonurgent coronary stent implantation to eptifibatide or placebo. High-risk characteristics were defined as age >75 years, diabetes, elevated cardiac markers, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction within 7 days, or unstable angina within 48 h of randomization. Age <5 years, absence of diabetes, and any other reason for admission were considered low risk characterstics. There were 1,018 patients in the high-risk group (50.8% eptifibatide, 49.2% placebo) and 1,045 patients in the low-risk group (50.0% eptifibatide, 50.0% placebo). Baseline demographics were similar in both groups except for more hypertension (63% vs. 55%, respectively), peripheral vascular disease (8.2% vs. 5.2%, respectively), prior stroke (5.5% vs. 3.2%, respectively), and female gender (33% vs. 22%, respectively) in the high-risk than the low-risk group. At one year, the composite end point of death or myocardial infarction occurred in 15.89% of placebo patients and 7.99% of eptifibatide patients in the high-risk group and 9.02% of the placebo and 8.11% of eptifibatide patients in the low-risk group. Although eptifibatide treatment improved outcomes for all patients, preprocedural clinical characteristics can define a subgroup of patients who may derive greatest benefit from its use during coronary stent placement.

  7. Clinical evaluation of 64-slice CT assessment of global left ventricular function using automated cardiac phase selection

    Joemai, Raoul M.S.; Geleijns, Joemai; Veldkamp, Wouter J.H.; Kroft, Lucia J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) function provides prognostic information regarding the morbidity and mortality of patients. An automated cardiac phase selection algorithm has the potential to support the assessment of LV function with computed tomography (CT). This algorithm is clinically evaluated for 64-slice cardiac CT. Examinations of twenty consecutive patients were selected. Electrocardiogram gated contrast-enhanced CT was performed. Reconstructions were performed using an automated and a manual method, followed by the determination of the global LV function. Significances were tested using 2-sided Student's t-tests. Reduction in post processing time and storage capacity were estimated. A slightly smaller mean end-systolic volume was found with the automated method (52±18 ml vs 54±17 ml, p=0.02, r=0.99). The mean LV ejection fraction was slightly larger with the automated method (65±8% vs 64±8%, p=0.004, r=0.99). The estimated reduction in post processing time was maximal 5 min per patient with a potential 80% data storage reduction. Results of the automated phase selection algorithm are similar to the manual method. The automated tool reduces post processing time, reconstruction time and transfer time. (author)

  8. Monitoring Crohn's disease during anti-TNF-α therapy: validation of the magnetic resonance enterography global score (MEGS) against a combined clinical reference standard

    Prezzi, Davide; Bhatnagar, Gauraang; Makanyanga, Jesica; Halligan, Steve; Taylor, Stuart Andrew; Vega, Roser

    2016-01-01

    To assess the ability of magnetic resonance enterography global score (MEGS) to characterise Crohn's disease (CD) response to anti-TNF-α therapy. Thirty-six CD patients (median age 26 years, 20 males) commencing anti-TNF-α therapy with concomitant baseline MRI enterography (MRE) were identified retrospectively. Patients' clinical course was followed and correlated with subsequent MREs. Scan order was randomised and MEGS (a global activity score) was applied by two blinded radiologists. A physician's global assessment of the disease activity (remission, mild, moderate or severe) at the time of MRE was assigned. The cohort was divided into clinical responders and non-responders and MEGS compared according to activity status and treatment response. Interobserver agreement was assessed. Median MEGS decreased significantly between baseline and first follow-up in responders (28 versus 6, P < 0.001) but was unchanged in non-responders (26 versus 18, P = 0.28). The median MEGS was significantly lower in clinical remission (9) than in moderate (14) or severe (29) activity (P < 0.001). MEGS correlated significantly with clinical activity (r = 0.53; P < 0.001). Interobserver Bland-Altman limits of agreement (BA LoA) were -19.7 to 18.5. MEGS decreases significantly in clinical responders to anti-TNF-α therapy but not in non-responders, demonstrates good interobserver agreement and moderate correlation with clinical disease activity. (orig.)

  9. Clinical Trials

    Full Text Available ... medical centers and doctors' offices around the country. Benefits and Risks Possible Benefits Taking part in a clinical trial can have many benefits. For example, you may gain access to new ...

  10. QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN CLINICAL LABORATORIES ACCORDING TO THE ISO 15189:2007 STANDARD - EVALUATION OF THE BENEFITS OF IMPLEMENTATION IN AN ASSISTED REPRODUCTION LABORATORY

    A.D. Sialakouma

    2011-03-01

    in the provision of human resources, equipment, supplies and working environment and the resolution of organisational problems. This article deals with the planning and the implementation of a Quality Management System, in accordance with ISO 15189 (2007, in the Assisted Reproduction Laboratory in one of the biggest Maternity Clinics in Greece. The benefits resulted; both for medical laboratory service and patients are also presented and discussed.

  11. Reducing TNF receptor 2+ regulatory T cells via the combined action of azacitidine and the HDAC inhibitor, panobinostat for clinical benefit in acute myeloid leukemia patients.

    Govindaraj, Chindu; Tan, Peter; Walker, Patricia; Wei, Andrew; Spencer, Andrew; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2014-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) provides an environment that enables immune suppression, resulting in functionally defective effector T cells; regulatory T cells (Treg) are significant contributors to the impaired antitumor immune response. As TNF is present at high levels in AML and TNF receptor-2 (TNFR2)-expressing Tregs identify highly functional Tregs, we examine the hypothesis that TNFR2(+) Tregs are a relevant Treg subset in this cancer. We also determine the effect of the novel combinatorial therapy of the demethylating agent, azacitidine with the histone deacetylase inhibitor, panobinostat on Tregs, particularly TNFR2(+) Tregs. Thirty healthy donors and 14 patients with AML were enrolled in this study. Patients were treated with azacitidine and panobinostat for 28-day cycles. The frequency and functional relevance of TNFR2(+) Tregs were analyzed subsequently. We report that TNFR2(+) Tregs are increased in AML and have a high migration potential toward the bone marrow. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the level of TNFR2(+) Tregs in the peripheral blood and the bone marrow of patients are decreased in vivo after exposure to panobinostat and azacitidine. Reductions in TNFR2(+) Tregs were associated with increases in Interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 production by effector T cells within the bone marrow and beneficial clinical responses. In vitro mechanistic studies indicated panobinostat as the primary driver for the reduction of Tregs. Our study provides for the first time, in vivo validation of the ability of panobinostat in combination with azacitidine to suppress prevalent TNFR2(+) Tregs, resulting in clinical benefits within patients with AML. ©2013 AACR.

  12. Locoregional Confinement and Major Clinical Benefit of 188Re-Loaded CXCR4-Targeted Nanocarriers in an Orthotopic Human to Mouse Model of Glioblastoma.

    Séhédic, Delphine; Chourpa, Igor; Tétaud, Clément; Griveau, Audrey; Loussouarn, Claire; Avril, Sylvie; Legendre, Claire; Lepareur, Nicolas; Wion, Didier; Hindré, François; Davodeau, François; Garcion, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Gold standard beam radiation for glioblastoma (GBM) treatment is challenged by resistance phenomena occurring in cellular populations well prepared to survive or to repair damage caused by radiation. Among signals that have been linked with radio-resistance, the SDF1/CXCR4 axis, associated with cancer stem-like cell, may be an opportune target. To avoid the problem of systemic toxicity and blood-brain barrier crossing, the relevance and efficacy of an original system of local brain internal radiation therapy combining a radiopharmaceutical with an immuno-nanoparticle was investigated. The nanocarrier combined lipophilic thiobenzoate complexes of rhenium-188 loaded in the core of a lipid nanocapsule (LNC 188 Re) with a function-blocking antibody, 12G5 directed at the CXCR4, on its surface. The efficiency of 12G5-LNC 188 Re was investigated in an orthotopic and xenogenic GBM model of CXCR4-positive U87MG cells implanted in the striatum of Scid mice. We demonstrated that 12G5-LNC 188 Re single infusion treatment by convection-enhanced delivery resulted in a major clinical improvement in median survival that was accompanied by locoregional effects on tumor development including hypovascularization and stimulation of the recruitment of bone marrow derived CD11b- or CD68-positive cells as confirmed by immunohistochemistry analysis. Interestingly, thorough analysis by spectral imaging in a chimeric U87MG GBM model containing CXCR4-positive/red fluorescent protein (RFP)-positive- and CXCR4-negative/RFP-negative-GBM cells revealed greater confinement of DiD-labeled 12G5-LNCs than control IgG2a-LNCs in RFP compartments. Main conclusion: These findings on locoregional impact and targeting of disseminated cancer cells in tumor margins suggest that intracerebral active targeting of nanocarriers loaded with radiopharmaceuticals may have considerable benefits in clinical applications.

  13. Identifying who will benefit from non-invasive ventilation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neurone disease in a clinical cohort.

    Berlowitz, David J; Howard, Mark E; Fiore, Julio F; Vander Hoorn, Stephen; O'Donoghue, Fergal J; Westlake, Justine; Smith, Anna; Beer, Fiona; Mathers, Susan; Talman, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Respiratory failure is associated with significant morbidity and is the predominant cause of death in motor neurone disease/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (MND/ALS). This study aimed to determine the effect of non-invasive ventilatory (NIV) support on survival and pulmonary function decline across MND/ALS phenotypes. Cohort recruited via a specialist, multidisciplinary clinic. Patients were categorised into four clinical phenotypes (ALS, flail arm, flail leg and primary lateral sclerosis) according to site of presenting symptom and the pattern of upper versus lower motor neurone involvement. NIV was initiated according to current consensus practice guidelines. Between 1991 and 2011, 1198 patients diagnosed with ALS/MND were registered. 929 patients (77.5%) fulfilled the selection criteria and their data were analysed. Median tracheostomy free survival from symptom onset was 28 months in NIV-treated patients compared to 15 months in untreated (Univariate Cox regression HR=0.61 (0.51 to 0.73), pNIV persisted when the model was adjusted for age, gender, riluzole and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy use (HR=0.72 (0.60 to 0.88, p=0.001). In contrast with the only randomised controlled trial, NIV statistically significantly increased survival by 19 months in those with ALS-bulbar onset (Univariate HR=0.50 (0.36 to 0.70), multivariate HR=0.59 (0.41 to 0.83)). These data confirm that NIV improves survival in MND/ALS. The overall magnitude of benefit is 13 months and was largest in those with ALS-bulbar disease. Future research should explore the optimal timing of NIV initiation within phenotypes in order to optimise respiratory function, quality of life and survival. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Clinical benefit of liver stiffness measurement at 3 months after Kasai hepatoportoenterostomy to predict the liver related events in biliary atresia.

    Seung Min Hahn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The progression of hepatic fibrosis may result in decompensated hepatic failure with cirrhosis, liver related events (LRE such as ascites, variceal bleeding, and death after successful and timely Kasai hepatoportoenterostomy (HPE in biliary atresia. The aim of this study is to suggest clinical benefit of the liver stiffness measurement (LSM using transient elastography at 3 months after the Kasai operation to predict LRE. METHODS: Between January 2007 and December 2011, 69 eligible biliary atresia patients who underwent Kasai HPE and performed transient elastography before and 3 months after HPE were included. The occurrences of LRE were analyzed for all patients. All patients were divided into 2 groups (with and without LRE for comparison. Multivariate analysis was used to detect the independent risk factors of LRE. The area under the receiver operation characteristics curve (AUROC was used to establish the LSM optimal cutoff value of 3 months after Kasai operation in predicting LRE. RESULTS: LSM value, aminotransferase, albumin, bilirubin, and PT-INR significantly differed among the two groups. Multivariate analysis demonstrated LSM value as the most powerful independent factor of the development of LRE. The cut-off value of 19.9 kPa was calculated to be optimal for predicting LRE development with total sensitivity and specificity of 1.804. AUROC resulted in 0.943, with sensitivity of 85.3% and specificity of 95.2%. CONCLUSIONS: The LSM value of 3 months after Kasai HPE can be a useful predictor of LRE development.

  15. Who benefits most from therapist-assisted internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy in clinical practice? Predictors of symptom change and dropout.

    Edmonds, M; Hadjistavropoulos, H D; Schneider, L H; Dear, B F; Titov, N

    2018-03-01

    Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) is effective for treating anxiety and depression, but not for all patients. Predictors of dropout and outcomes from ICBT remain unclear and the literature could benefit from study of response to ICBT among larger community samples using advanced statistical techniques. In this study, we sought to identify predictors of dropout and symptom change in a large community sample (n = 1201) who received therapist-assisted transdiagnostic ICBT targeting anxiety and/or depression. Logistic regression was used to assess dropout, and showed that those who fully completed ICBT lessons (n = 880) were older and endorsed lower psychological distress at intake than those who only partially completed ICBT lessons (n = 321). During the course of therapy, patients responded to the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 at six time points. Autoregressive latent trajectory models were fitted to this data to assess the ability of demographic variables, program engagement, psychological and medical service usage, and psychological distress to explain individual variance in initial symptom levels and symptom change over time. Higher symptom scores at pre-treatment were predictive of greater symptom improvement. Symptom improvement was greater in those who were off work on disability and those without higher post-secondary education. Clinical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. A randomized clinical trial of diabetes self-management for Mexican Americans: Are there serendipitous health benefits for supporters of study participants?

    Sharon A Brown

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Studies of social support in diabetes have focused on the effects of support on the person with type 2 diabetes. We explored diabetes prevention effects of a culturally tailored diabetes self-management intervention in individuals without diabetes who were supporters of intervention participants. Methods: This is a secondary analysis of data from a randomized clinical trial that involved 256 Mexican Americans with diabetes. Each study participant designated a supporter—spouse, relative, friend—who attended intervention sessions and assisted participants in attaining effective diabetes self-management. Supporter’s glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C data were tracked for 1 year to determine diabetes conversion rates in supporters without diabetes at baseline. Results: Fewer individuals in the intervention group (n = 9 converted to an A1C above the 7% threshold, compared to the 1-year wait-listed control group (n = 16. We found a statistically significant difference (p = .021 at 12 months in the number of individuals whose A1C was ⩽8%, with fewer supporters above threshold in the intervention group (reduction of 48%. Supporters in the intervention group with prediabetes, based on baseline A1C, experienced a slight reduction in A1C, while control group supporters with prediabetes experienced an increase. Discussion: The results suggest that there are potential benefits for family members and other supporters of persons with diabetes who participated in diabetes self-management programs.

  17. Clinical Trials

    Full Text Available ... Children and Clinical Studies Program has been successfully developed and evaluated to fill an important gap in ... Possible Benefits Taking part in a clinical trial can have many benefits. For example, you may gain ...

  18. Clinical Trials

    Full Text Available ... and doctors' offices around the country. Benefits and Risks Possible Benefits Taking part in a clinical trial ... volunteer because they want to help others. Possible Risks Clinical trials do have risks and some downsides, ...

  19. PET and diagnostic technology evaluation in a global clinical process. DGN's point of view

    Kotzerke, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Dresden (Germany); Dietlein, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Koeln (Germany); Gruenwald, F. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Bockisch, A. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Essen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The German Society of Nuclear Medicine (DGN) criticizes the methodological approach of the IQWiG for evaluation of PET and the conclusions, which represent the opposite point of view compared to the most other European countries and health companies in the USA: (1) Real integration of experienced physicians into the interpretation of data and the evaluation of effectiveness should be used for best possible reporting instead of only formal hearing. (2) Data of the National Oncologic PET Registry (NOPR) from the USA have shown, that PET has changed the therapeutic management in 38% of patients. (3) The decision of the IQWiG to accept outcome data only for their benefit analyses, is controversial. Medical knowledge is generated by different methods, and an actual analysis of the scientific guidelines has shown that only 15% out of all guidelines are based on the level of evidence demanded by the IQWiG. Health economics has created different assessment methods for the evaluation of a diagnostic procedure. The strategy chosen by the IQWiG overestimated the perspective of the population and undervalue the benefit for an individual patient. (4) PET evaluates the effectiveness of a therapeutic procedure, but does not create an effective therapy. When the predictive value of PET is already implemented in a specific study design and the result of PET define a specific management, the trial evaluate the whole algorithm and PET is part of this algorithm only. When PET is implemented as test during chemotherapy or by the end of chemotherapy, the predictive value of PET will depend decisively on the effectiveness of the therapy: The better the therapy, the smaller the differences in survival detected by PET. (5) The significance of an optimal staging by the integration of PET will increase. Rationale is the actual development of ''titration'' of chemotherapy intensity and radiation dose towards the lowest possible, just about effective dosage. (6) The medical

  20. The world as the new local clinic: a critical analysis of three discourses of global medical competency.

    Martimianakis, Maria Athina Tina; Hafferty, Frederic W

    2013-06-01

    The effects of globalization on health are the focus of administrators, educators, policy makers and researchers as they work to consider how best to train and regulate health professionals to practice in a globalized world. This study explores what happens to constructs such as medical competence when the context of medical practice is discursively expanded to include the whole world. An archive of texts was assembled (1970-2011) totaling 1100 items and analyzed using a governmentality approach. Texts were included that articulated rationales for pursuing global education activities, and/or that implicitly or explicitly took a position on medical competencies in relation to practicing medicine in international or culturally diverse contexts, or in dealing with health issues as global concerns. The analysis revealed three distinct visions, representative of a primarily western mentality, for preparing physicians to practice in a globalized world: the universal global physician, the culturally versed global physician and the global physician advocate. Each has its own epistemological relationship to globalization and is supported by an evidence base. All three discourses are active and productive, sometimes within the same context. However, the discourse of the universal global physician is currently the most established. The challenge to policy makers and educators in evolving regulatory frameworks and curricula that are current and relevant necessitates a better understanding of the socio-political effects of globalization on medical education, and the ethical, political, cultural and scientific issues underlying efforts to prepare students to practice competently in a globalized world. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Multiple Benefits.

    Kreider, Beth

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of dome architecture for a community's middle- and high-school multi-purpose facility. The dome construction is revealed as being cost effective in construction and in maintenance and energy costs. (GR)

  2. Remote Digital Preoperative Assessments for Cleft Lip and Palate May Improve Clinical and Economic Impact in Global Plastic Surgery.

    Hughes, Christopher; Campbell, Jacob; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; McCormack, Susan; Silverman, Richard; Lalikos, Janice; Babigian, Alan; Castiglione, Charles

    2017-09-01

    Reconstructive surgical care can play a vital role in the resource-poor settings of low- and middle-income countries. Telemedicine platforms can improve the efficiency and effectiveness of surgical care. The purpose of this study is to determine whether remote digital video evaluations are reliable in the context of a short-term plastic surgical intervention. The setting for this study was a district hospital located in Latacunga, Ecuador. Participants were 27 consecutive patients who presented for operative repair of cleft lip and palate. We calculated kappa coefficients for reliability between in-person and remote digital video assessments for the classification of cleft lip and palate between two separate craniofacial surgeons. We hypothesized that the technology would be a reliable method of preoperative assessment for cleft disease. Of the 27 (81.4%) participants, 22 received operative treatment for their cleft disorder. Mean age was 11.1 ± 8.3 years. Patients presented with a spectrum of disorders, including cleft lip (24 of 27, 88.9%), cleft palate (19 of 27, 70.4%), and alveolar cleft (19 of 27, 70.4%). We found a 95.7% agreement between observers for cleft lip with substantial reliability (κ = .78, P cleft palate, with a moderate interrater reliability (κ = .55, P = .01). We found only a 47.8% agreement between observers for alveolar cleft with a nonsignificant, weak kappa agreement (κ = .06, P = .74). Remote digital assessments are a reliable way to preoperatively diagnose cleft lip and palate in the context of short-term plastic surgical interventions in low- and middle-income countries. Future work will evaluate the potential for real-time, telemedicine assessments to reduce cost and improve clinical effectiveness in global plastic surgery.

  3. Introduction to a Special Issue of the Journal of Immunological Methods: Building global resource programs to support HIV/AIDS clinical trial studies.

    Sanchez, Ana M; Denny, Thomas N; O'Gorman, Maurice

    2014-07-01

    This Special Issue of the Journal of Immunological Methods includes 16 manuscripts describing quality assurance activities related to virologic and immunologic monitoring of six global laboratory resource programs that support international HIV/AIDS clinical trial studies: Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery (CAVD); Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology (CHAVI); External Quality Assurance Program Oversight Laboratory (EQAPOL); HIV Vaccine Trial Network (HVTN); International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI); and Immunology Quality Assessment (IQA). The reports from these programs address the many components required to develop comprehensive quality control activities and subsequent quality assurance programs for immune monitoring in global clinical trials including: all aspects of processing, storing, and quality assessment of PBMC preparations used ubiquitously in HIV clinical trials, the development and optimization of assays for CD8 HIV responses and HIV neutralization, a comprehensive global HIV virus repository, and reports on the development and execution of novel external proficiency testing programs for immunophenotyping, intracellular cytokine staining, ELISPOT and luminex based cytokine measurements. In addition, there are articles describing the implementation of Good Clinical Laboratory Practices (GCLP) in a large quality assurance laboratory, the development of statistical methods specific for external proficiency testing assessment, a discussion on the ability to set objective thresholds for measuring rare events by flow cytometry, and finally, a manuscript which addresses a framework for the structured reporting of T cell immune function based assays. It is anticipated that this series of manuscripts covering a wide range of quality assurance activities associated with the conduct of global clinical trials will provide a resource for individuals and programs involved in improving the harmonization, standardization, accuracy, and sensitivity of

  4. Avoiding Extremes: Benefits of Staying below +1.5 °C Compared to +2.0 °C and +3.0 °C Global Warming

    Claas Teichmann

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The need to restrict global mean temperature to avoid irreversible climate change is supported by scientific evidence. The need became political practice at the Conference of the Parties in 2015, where the participants decided to limit global warming to not more than +2.0 °C compared to pre-industrial times and to rather aim for a limit of +1.5 °C global warming. Nevertheless, a clear picture of what European climate would look like under +1.5 °C, +2.0 °C and +3.0 °C global warming level (GWL is still missing. In this study, we will fill this gap by assessing selected climate indices related to temperature and precipitation extremes, based on state of the art regional climate information for Europe taken from the European branch of the World Climate Research Program Coordinated Regional Downscaling Experiment (EURO-CORDEX ensemble. To assess the impact of these indices under climate change, we investigate the spatial extent of the area of the climate change signal in relation to the affected population. This allows us to demonstrate which climate extremes could be avoided when global warming is kept well below +2.0 °C or even +1.5 °C compared to higher GWLs. The European north–south gradient of tropical nights and hot days is projected to be intensified with an increasing global warming level. For precipitation-related indices, an overall increase in precipitation extremes is simulated, especially under +3.0 °C GWL, for mid- and northern Europe, whereas an increase in dry days is projected for many regions in southern Europe. The benefit of staying below +1.5 °C GWL compared to +2.0 °C GWL is the avoidance of an additional increase in tropical nights and hot days parallel to an increase in dry days in parts of southern Europe as well as an increase in heavy precipitation in parts of Scandinavia. Compared to +3.0 °C GWL, the benefit of staying at +1.5 °C GWL is to avoid a substantial increase (i.e., an increase of more than five dry

  5. Similar clinical benefits from below-target and target dose enalapril in patients with heart failure in the SOLVD Treatment trial.

    Lam, Phillip H; Dooley, Daniel J; Fonarow, Gregg C; Butler, Javed; Bhatt, Deepak L; Filippatos, Gerasimos S; Deedwania, Prakash; Forman, Daniel E; White, Michel; Fletcher, Ross D; Arundel, Cherinne; Blackman, Marc R; Adamopoulos, Chris; Kanonidis, Ioannis E; Aban, Inmaculada B; Patel, Kanan; Aronow, Wilbert S; Allman, Richard M; Anker, Stefan D; Pitt, Bertram; Ahmed, Ali

    2018-02-01

    To examine associations of below-target and target dose of enalapril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, with outcomes in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) in the Studies of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD) Treatment trial. Two thousand five hundred and sixty-nine patients with HFrEF (ejection fraction ≤35%) were randomized to below-target (5-10 mg/day) dose placebo (n = 1284) or enalapril (n = 1285). One month post-randomization, blind up-titration to target (20 mg/day) dose was attempted for both study drugs in 2458 patients. Among the 1444 patients who achieved dose up-titration (placebo, n = 748; enalapril, n = 696; mean dose for both groups, 20.0 mg/day), target dose enalapril (vs. target dose placebo) was associated with a 9% absolute lower risk of the combined endpoint of heart failure hospitalization or all-cause mortality [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 0.70; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.60-0.81; P target dose (placebo, n = 486; enalapril, n = 528; mean dose for both groups, 8.8 mg/day), below-target dose enalapril (vs. below-target dose placebo) was associated with a 12% absolute lower risk of the combined endpoint of heart failure hospitalization or all-cause mortality (adjusted HR 0.68; 95% CI 0.57-0.81; P target (vs. below-target) dose had no association with the combined endpoint of heart failure hospitalization or all-cause mortality (adjusted HR 1.04; 95% CI 0.87-1.23; P = 0.695). In patients with HFrEF, the clinical benefits of ACE inhibitors appear to be similar at both below-target and target doses. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  6. Reduced benefit from mnemonic strategies in early-stage Alzheimer's disease: a brief testing-the-limits paradigm for clinical practice.

    Uttner, Ingo; Schurig, Niklas; von Arnim, Christine A F; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Christian; Tumani, Hayrettin; Riepe, Matthias W

    2010-10-01

    Discriminating incipient Alzheimer's disease (AD) from major depression (MD) and age related memory decline is a challenge in clinical practice. Since AD is characterized by an early loss of neuronal and functional plasticity, a dynamic test strategy, such as the testing-the-limits (TtL) approach, that measures learning capacity can be a helpful diagnostic tool. To evaluate this, a short recognition paradigm consisting of a pre-test (baseline) and two post-test conditions with an interposed encoding instruction was developed and administered to individuals with incipient AD (n = 19; Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) 26.5), patients with depressive disorders (n = 11; MMSE 30), and healthy controls (n = 11; MMSE 30). In addition, participants completed a set of traditional neuropsychological tests that focused on the subjects' cognitive baseline performance. Intergroup comparisons (Kruskal-Wallis, U test) revealed significantly higher post-test failure rates in AD patients. Pre-test performance of MD and AD patients did not differ. Intra-group comparisons (Friedman, Wilcoxon test) showed that all three subject samples benefit from intervention in post-test 1. In contrast to MD and healthy individuals, who revealed significantly lower failure rates in post-test 2 compared to the pre-test, AD patients did not improve. Out of the 15 traditional test scores obtained, only two discriminated simultaneously between AD and each of the other groups. Our data confirm the finding of an impaired cognitive plasticity already present in very early stages of AD and illustrate the efficiency of a dynamic test approach in identifying incipient dementia.

  7. Economic and clinical benefits of endometrial radiofrequency ablation compared with other ablation techniques in women with menorrhagia: a retrospective analysis with German health claims data

    Bischoff-Everding C

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Christoph Bischoff-Everding,1 Ruediger Soeder,2 Benno Neukirch3 1HGC GesundheitsConsult GmbH, Duesseldorf, Germany; 2Gynecological Joint Practice, Mainz, Germany; 3Faculty of Health Care, Hochschule Niederrhein – University of Applied Sciences, Krefeld, Germany Objective: To evaluate the economic and clinical benefits of endometrial radiofrequency ablation (RFA compared with other ablation techniques for the treatment of menorrhagia.Methods: Using German health claims data, women meeting defined inclusion criteria for the intervention group (RFA were selected. A comparable control group (other endometrial ablations was established using propensity score matching. These two groups were compared during the quarter of treatment (QoT and a follow-up of 2 years for the following outcomes: costs during QoT and during follow-up, repeated menorrhagia diagnoses during follow-up and necessary retreatments during follow-up. Results: After performing propensity score matching, 50 cases could be allocated to the intervention group, while 38 were identified as control cases. Patients in the RFA group had 5% fewer repeat menorrhagia diagnoses (40% vs 45%; not significant and 5% fewer treatments associated with recurrent menorrhagia (6% vs 11%; not significant than cases in the control group. During the QoT, the RFA group incurred €578 additional costs (€2,068 vs €1,490; ns. However, during follow-up, the control group incurred €1,254 additional costs (€4,561 vs €5,815; ns, with medication, outpatient physician consultations, and hospitals costs being the main cost drivers. However, none of the results were statistically significant. Conclusion: Although RFA was more cost-intensive in the QoT compared with other endometrial ablation techniques, an average total savings of €676 was generated during the follow-up period. While having evidence that RFA is clinically equivalent to other endometrial ablation procedures, we generated indications that

  8. Clinical benefit of bone-targeted radiometabolic therapy with 153Sm-EDTMP combined with chemotherapy in patients with metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer

    Ricci, Sergio; Pastina, Ilaria; Cianci, Claudia; Orlandini, Cinzia; Chioni, Aldo; Di Donato, Samantha; Boni, Giuseppe; Genovesi, Dario; Grosso, Mariano; AlSharif, Abedallatif; Mariani, Giuliano; Francesca, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    PSA response, with minimal toxicity. When it was administered in combination with chemotherapy, prolonged survival indicated actual clinical benefit, while there were no additive toxicities. These results provide the rationale for future prospective evaluation of combined therapeutic strategies. (orig.)

  9. WE-FG-BRA-05: Potential Clinical Benefit of LINAC Flattening-Filter-Free (FFF) Mode - Improvement of Treatment Therapeutic Ratio

    Chang, S; Rivera, J; Tian, H; Price, A; Santos, C; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-01

    the added clinical benefit of improving treatment therapeutic ratio. Animal Studies were performed within the LCCC Animal Studies Core Facility at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The LCCC Animal Studies Core is supported in part by an NCI Center Core Support Grant (CA16086) to the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center

  10. The clinical impact of continuing to prescribe antiretroviral therapy in patients with advanced AIDS who manifest no virologic or immunologic benefit.

    David A Wohl

    Full Text Available Despite the efficacy and tolerability of modern antiretroviral therapy (ART, many patients with advanced AIDS prescribed these regimens do not achieve viral suppression or immune reconstitution as a result of poor adherence, drug resistance, or both. The clinical outcomes of continued ART prescription for such patients have not been well characterized.We examined the causes and predictors of all-cause mortality, AIDS-defining conditions, and serious non-AIDS-defining events among a cohort of participants in a clinical trial of pre-emptive therapy for CMV disease. We focused on participants who, despite ART had failed to achieve virologic suppression and substantive immune reconstitution.233 ART-receiving participants entered with a median baseline CD4+ T cell count of 30/mm(3 and plasma HIV RNA of 5 log10 copies/mL. During a median 96 weeks of follow-up, 24.0% died (a mortality rate of 10.7/100 patient-years; 27.5% reported a new AIDS-defining condition, and 22.3% a new serious non-AIDS event. Of the deaths, 42.8% were due to an AIDS-defining condition, 44.6% were due to a non-AIDS-defining condition, and 12.5% were of unknown etiology. Decreased risk of mortality was associated with baseline CD4+ T cell count ≥25/mm(3 and lower baseline HIV RNA.Among patients with advanced AIDS prescribed modern ART who achieve neither virologic suppression nor immune reconstitution, crude mortality percentages appear to be lower than reported in cohorts of patients studied a decade earlier. Also, in contrast to the era before modern ART became available, nearly half of the deaths in our modern-era study were caused by serious non-AIDS-defining events. Even among the most advanced AIDS patients who were not obtaining apparent immunologic and virologic benefit from ART, continued prescription of these medications appears to alter the natural history of AIDS--improving survival and shifting the causes of death from AIDS- to non-AIDS-defining conditions.

  11. WE-FG-BRA-05: Potential Clinical Benefit of LINAC Flattening-Filter-Free (FFF) Mode - Improvement of Treatment Therapeutic Ratio

    Chang, S [Department of Radiation Oncology, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill/ North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Lineberger Clinical Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Rivera, J [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill/ North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Tian, H [Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu (China); Lineberger Clinical Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Price, A [Department of Radiation Oncology, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Santos, C [Lineberger Clinical Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Zhang, Y [Department of Radiation Oncology, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu (China); Lineberger Clinical Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    the added clinical benefit of improving treatment therapeutic ratio. Animal Studies were performed within the LCCC Animal Studies Core Facility at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The LCCC Animal Studies Core is supported in part by an NCI Center Core Support Grant (CA16086) to the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

  12. A Prospective, Descriptive Study to Assess the Clinical Benefits of Using Calendula officinalis Hydroglycolic Extract for the Topical Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    Buzzi, Marcelo; de Freitas, Franciele; Winter, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) have a significant impact on patient quality of life. A prospective, descriptive pilot study was conducted between May 2012 and December 2013 through the dermatology outpatient unit in a Brazilian hospital to evaluate the clinical benefits of using Calendula officinalis hydroglycolic extract in the treatment of DFUs. Patients diagnosed with a stable neuropathic ulcer of >3 months' duration; ranging in size from 0.5-40 cm(2); without osteomyelitis, gangrene, bone exposure, cancer, or deep tissue infection; ages 18-90 years; with adequate glycemic control and no history of an allergy to C. officinalis were enrolled. Patients provided demographic and diabetes-related information and were evaluated biweekly for 30 weeks or until healing (ie, full epithelialization with no wound drainage). DFUs were measured and clinically examined for microbiological flora and presence of odor, tissue type (eg, granulation, fibrin sloth, necrosis), exudate, and retraction rate using planimetry images. Patients' blood tests and neuropathic pain assessment (the latter by clinician-directed questionnaire) were performed at baseline and the end of treatment; pain also was assessed during dressing changes using a 10-point rating scale. Patients' ulcers were treated twice daily with C. officinalis hydroglycolic extract spray solution and covered with saline-moistened, sterile, nonadherent gauze and bandages followed by foot offloading with adequate protective footwear. Patients received their first treatment in the clinic then performed care at home. From a potential population of 109 patients, 25 did not meet the inclusion criteria. Of the remaining 84 participants enrolled, 43 withdrew before study completion; cited reasons included lost to follow-up (16), medical judgment (2), failure to attend >3 scheduled visits (17), protocol violation (5), and death (3). Forty-one (41) - 17 women, average age 62 years (range 44-82 years), average glycemic level 153 mg

  13. Benefits | NREL

    flexible work environment that enables and encourages a good work/life balance A growing, changing exceptional work. A woman riding her bike past the NREL entrance sign. Hundreds of NREL employees opt out of their cars, cycling to work, to take part in Bike To Work Day each year. Benefits Package NREL's

  14. Fringe Benefits.

    Podgursky, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Uses statistics from the National Center for Education Statistics and the Bureau of Labor Statistics to examine teacher salaries and benefits. Discusses compensation of teachers compared with nonteachers. Asserts that statistics from the American Federation of Teachers and the National Education Association underestimate teacher compensation…

  15. The Joint Committee for Traceability in Laboratory Medicine (JCTLM): A Global Approach to Promote the Standardisation of Clinical Laboratory Test Results

    Armbruster, David; Miller, Richard R

    2007-01-01

    Clinical laboratories are moving towards global standardisation to produce equivalent test results across space and time. Standardisation allows use of evidence-based medicine, eliminates the need of method-specific reference intervals, decision levels and cut-offs, and can be achieved by application of metrological principles. For example, in vitro diagnostics (IVD) manufacturers can make kit calibrators traceable to internationally recognised reference materials and reference methods.

  16. Concept and benefits of the Inverted Classroom method for a competency-based biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies.

    Kühl, Susanne J; Toberer, Matthias; Keis, Oliver; Tolks, Daniel; Fischer, Martin R; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medical students often have a problem recognising the relevance of basic science subjects for their later professional work in the pre-clinical stage of their studies. This can lead to a lower motivation to learn biochemical content and dissatisfaction in the courses amongst the students. Alternative teaching methods such as the Inverted Classroom (IC) method can address this deficiency. The goal of this study was: to analyse the motivation and satisfaction of the students in a biochemistry seminar through the use of the e-learning-based IC method, to investigate the acceptance against the IC teaching method in biochemistry, and to compare the learning success achieved using the IC approach with that of a traditional course. We also investigated how a biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies can be successfully organised according to the IC method. Furthermore, we examined the benefits of the IC method over conventional teaching formats. Method: The IC method was implemented in accordance with the guidelines of the GMA committee "New Media" [30] in a biochemistry seminar for two student IC intervention groups with 42 students. A part of the factual knowledge from the on-site phase in the form of teaching videos together with self-learning control tasks were provided online before the seminar for both IC intervention groups. Exporting content to the self-learning phase creates new free time in the on-site phase, during which the content can be critically considered and processed and additional competency-based learning objectives can be taught. Identical biochemistry teaching content was taught in parallel control groups (14 student groups with n=299 students), but no material was handed out beforehand for a self-learning phase. These students only received the materials after the on-site phase. Motivation and satisfaction as well as the acceptance for the teaching methods were recorded by questionnaires, the

  17. Concept and benefits of the Inverted Classroom method for a competency-based biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies

    Kühl, Susanne J.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical students often have a problem recognising the relevance of basic science subjects for their later professional work in the pre-clinical stage of their studies. This can lead to a lower motivation to learn biochemical content and dissatisfaction in the courses amongst the students. Alternative teaching methods such as the Inverted Classroom (IC method can address this deficiency. The goal of this study was: We also investigated how a biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies can be successfully organised according to the IC method. Furthermore, we examined the benefits of the IC method over conventional teaching formats. Method: The IC method was implemented in accordance with the guidelines of the GMA committee “New Media” in a biochemistry seminar for two student IC intervention groups with 42 students. A part of the factual knowledge from the on-site phase in the form of teaching videos together with self-learning control tasks were provided online before the seminar for both IC intervention groups. Exporting content to the self-learning phase creates new free time in the on-site phase, during which the content can be critically considered and processed and additional competency-based learning objectives can be taught. Identical biochemistry teaching content was taught in parallel control groups (14 student groups with n=299 students, but no material was handed out beforehand for a self-learning phase. These students only received the materials after the on-site phase. Motivation and satisfaction as well as the acceptance for the teaching methods were recorded by questionnaires, the acquisition of knowledge by MC exams.Results: On a Likert scale from 1 (strongly disagree to 6 (strongly agree, the students in the IC intervention groups could be seen to be much more motivated (5.53 than students in the control group (4.01. Students in the IC intervention groups also recognised the

  18. Clinical and Demographic Profile of Patients Receiving Fingolimod in Clinical Practice in Germany and the Benefit-Risk Profile of Fingolimod After 1 Year of Treatment: Initial Results From the Observational, Noninterventional Study PANGAEA.

    Ziemssen, Tjalf; Lang, Michael; Tackenberg, Björn; Schmidt, Stephan; Albrecht, Holger; Klotz, Luisa; Haas, Judith; Lassek, Christoph; Medin, Jennie; Cornelissen, Christian

    2018-01-01

    The population with multiple sclerosis receiving treatment in clinical practice differs from that in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). An assessment of the real-world benefit-risk profile of therapies is needed. This analysis used data from the large, noninterventional, observational German study Post-Authorization Non-interventional German sAfety study of GilEnyA (PANGAEA) to assess prospectively baseline characteristics and outcomes after 12 months (± 90 days) of fingolimod treatment. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts: fingolimod starter [first received fingolimod in PANGAEA (n = 3315)] and previous study [received fingolimod before enrollment in PANGAEA in RCTs (n = 875), some of whom also had baseline data at entry into RCTs (n = 505)]. At PANGAEA baseline, patients in the fingolimod starter versus the previous study cohort had a higher annualized relapse rate [ARR (95% confidence interval): 1.79 (1.75-1.83) vs 1.32 (1.25-1.40)] and Expanded Disability Status Scale score [3.11 (3.04-3.17) vs 2.55 (2.44-2.66)]. A greater proportion in the fingolimod starter versus previous study cohort had diabetes (2.0% vs 0.7%). After 12 months of fingolimod, ARRs were lower than in the 12 months before PANGAEA enrollment in the fingolimod starter [0.386 (0.360-0.414)] and previous study [0.276 (0.238-0.320)] cohorts. Expanded Disability Status Scale scores were stable versus baseline. Adverse events were experienced by similar proportions in both cohorts during fingolimod treatment. Relevant differences exist in disease activity and comorbidities between patients receiving fingolimod in clinical practice versus RCTs. Irrespective of baseline differences indicating a higher proportion at an advanced stage of multiple sclerosis in the real world versus RCTs, fingolimod remains effective, with a manageable safety profile.

  19. Trends in global clinical trial registration: an analysis of numbers of registered clinical trials in different parts of the world from 2004 to 2013

    Viergever, R.F.; Li, K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse developments (and their causes) in the number and proportion of clinical trials that were registered in different parts of the world after the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) announced in 2004 that it would require registration of clinical trials as

  20. Clinical benefits of antimicrobial de-escalation in adults with community-onset monomicrobial Escherichia coli, Klebsiella species and Proteus mirabilis bacteremia.

    Lee, Ching-Chi; Wang, Jiun-Ling; Lee, Chung-Hsun; Hung, Yuan-Pin; Hong, Ming-Yuan; Tang, Hung-Jen; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2017-09-01

    The clinical benefits of an antimicrobial de-escalation strategy were compared with those of a no-switch strategy in bacteremic patients. Adults with community-onset monomicrobial Escherichia coli, Klebsiella species and Proteus mirabilis bacteremia treated empirically using broad-spectrum beta-lactams, including third-generation cephalosporins (GCs), fourth-GC or carbapenems, were treated definitively with first- or second-GCs (de-escalation group), the same regimens as empirical antibiotics (no-switch group), or antibiotics with a broader-spectrum than empirical antibiotics (escalation group). The eligible 454 adults were categorized as the de-escalation (231 patients, 50.9%), no-switch (177, 39.0%), and escalation (46, 10.1%) groups. Patients with de-escalation therapy were more often female, had less critical illness and fatal comorbidity, and had a higher survival rate than patients in the other two groups. After propensity score matching in the de-escalation and no-switch groups, critical illness at onset (Pitt bacteremia score ≥ 4; 16.5% vs. 12.7%; P = 0.34) or day 3 (2.5% vs. 2.5%; P = 1.00), fatal comorbidity (16.5% vs. 21.5%; P = 0.25), time to defervescence (4.6 vs. 4.7 days; P = 0.89), hospital stays (11.5 vs. 10.3 days; P = 0.13) and 4-week crude mortality rate (4.4% vs. 4.4%; P = 1.00) were similar. However, lower antibiotic cost (mean: 212.1 vs. 395.6 US$, P <0.001) and fewer complications of bloodstream infections due to resistant pathogens (0% vs. 5.1%, P = 0.004) were observed in the de-escalation group. De-escalation to narrower-spectrum cephalosporins is safe and cost-effective for adults with community-onset EKP bacteremia stabilized by empirical broad-spectrum beta-lactams. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  1. SU-E-T-361: Clinical Benefit of Automatic Beam Gating Mixed with Breath Hold in Radiation Therapy of Left Breast

    Wu, J; Hill, G; Spiegel, J; Ye, J; Mehta, V

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical and dosimetric benefits of automatic gating of left breast mixed with breath-hold technique. Methods: Two Active Breathing Control systems, ABC2.0 and ABC3.0, were used during simulation and treatment delivery. The two systems are different such that ABC2.0 is a breath-hold system without beam control capability, while ABC3.0 has capability in both breath-hold and beam gating. At simulation, each patient was scanned twice: one with free breathing (FB) and one with breath hold through ABC. Treatment plan was generated on the CT with ABC. The same plan was also recalculated on the CT with FB. These two plans were compared to assess plan quality. For treatments with ABC2.0, beams with MU > 55 were manually split into multiple subfields. All subfields were identical and shared the total MU. For treatment with ABC3.0, beam splitting was unnecessary. Instead, treatment was delivered in gating mode mixed with breath-hold technique. Treatment delivery efficiency using the two systems was compared. Results: The prescribed dose was 50.4Gy at 1.8Gy/fraction. The maximum heart dose averaged over 10 patients was 46.0±2.5Gy and 24.5±12.2Gy for treatments with FB and with ABC respectively. The corresponding heart V10 was 13.2±3.6% and 1.0±1.6% respectively. The averaged MUs were 99.8±7.5 for LMT, 99.2±9.4 for LLT. For treatment with ABC2.0, normally the original beam was split into 2 subfields. The averaged total time to delivery all beams was 4.3±0.4min for treatments with ABC2.0 and 3.3±0.6min for treatments with ABC3.0 in gating mode. Conclusion: Treatment with ABC tremendously reduced heart dose. Compared to treatments with ABC2.0, gating with ABC3.0 reduced the total treatment time by 23%. Use of ABC3.0 improved the delivery efficiency, and eliminated the possibility of mistreatments. The latter may happen with ABC2.0 where beam is not terminated when breath signal falls outside of the treatment window

  2. Who benefits?

    Hjorth, Frederik Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cross-border welfare rights for citizens of European Union member states are intensely contested, yet there is limited research into voter opposition to such rights, sometimes denoted ‘welfare chauvinism’. We highlight an overlooked aspect in scholarly work: the role of stereotypes about benefici...... recipient identity. These effects are strongest among respondents high in ethnic prejudice and economic conservatism. The findings imply that stereotypes about who benefits from cross-border welfare rights condition public support for those rights....

  3. The clinical research office of the endourological society percutaneous nephrolithotomy global study: tract dilation comparisons in 5537 patients

    Lopes, Tomé; Sangam, Kandasami; Alken, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: The stu