WorldWideScience

Sample records for global cerebral oxygenation

  1. Effects of Milrinone continuous intravenous infusion on global cerebral oxygenation and cerebral vasospasm after cerebral aneurysm surgical clipping

    Mohamed A. Ghanem

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Milrinone improved significantly the global cerebral oxygenation and reduced the incidence of cerebral vasospasm during the dangerous period of cerebral spasm after cerebral aneurysm clipping.

  2. Elevated global cerebral blood flow, oxygen extraction fraction and unchanged metabolic rate of oxygen in young adults with end-stage renal disease: an MRI study

    Zheng, Gang; Lou, Yaxian; Pan, Zhiying; Liu, Ya [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, College of Aivil Aviation, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Wen, Jiqiu; Li, Xue; Zhang, Zhe [Medical School of Nanjing University, National Clinical Research Center of Kidney Diseases, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Lu, Hanzhang [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Advanced Imaging Research Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Liu, Wei [Siemens Shenzhen Magnetic Resonance Ltd., Shenzhen, Guangdong (China); Liu, Hui [Siemens MR NEA Collaboration, Siemens Ltd., Shanghai (China); Chen, Huijuan; Kong, Xiang; Luo, Song; Jiang, Xiaolu; Zhang, Zongjun; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-06-15

    To noninvasively assess global cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) in young adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Thirty-six patients and 38 healthy volunteers were included and took part in MR examinations, blood and neuropsychological tests. CBF and OEF were measured by phase-contrast and T2-relaxation-under-spin-tagging MRI techniques, respectively. CMRO{sub 2} was computed from CBF, OEF and hematocrit according to Fick's principle. Correlations were performed between MR measurements, blood biochemistry measurements and neuropsychological test scores. Compared with controls, ESRD patients had elevated CBF (72.9 ± 12.5 vs. 63.8 ± 8.5 ml min{sup -1} 100 g{sup -1}, P < 0.001), elevated OEF (47.2 ± 10.2 vs. 35.8 ± 5.4 %, P < 0.001), but unaffected CMRO{sub 2} (199.5 ± 36.4 vs. 193.8 ± 28.6 μmol O{sub 2} min{sup -1} 100 g{sup -1}, P = 0.879). Hematocrit negatively correlated with CBF (r = -0.640, P < 0.001) and OEF (r = -0.701, P < 0.001), but not with CMRO{sub 2}. Altered neuropsychological test scores of ESRD patients were associated with OEF and CBF, but not with CMRO{sub 2}. There were weak relationships between eGFR and hematocrit (r = 0.308, P = 0.068) or CBF (r = 0.318, P = 0.059). Our findings suggested that anaemic young adults with ESRD may afford higher CBF and OEF to maintain a normal CMRO{sub 2}. Despite this compensatory process, however, cognitive function was still impaired and its severity was correlated with their CBF and OEF abnormality. (orig.)

  3. Elevated global cerebral blood flow, oxygen extraction fraction and unchanged metabolic rate of oxygen in young adults with end-stage renal disease: an MRI study

    Zheng, Gang; Lou, Yaxian; Pan, Zhiying; Liu, Ya; Wen, Jiqiu; Li, Xue; Zhang, Zhe; Lu, Hanzhang; Liu, Wei; Liu, Hui; Chen, Huijuan; Kong, Xiang; Luo, Song; Jiang, Xiaolu; Zhang, Zongjun; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming

    2016-01-01

    To noninvasively assess global cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ) in young adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Thirty-six patients and 38 healthy volunteers were included and took part in MR examinations, blood and neuropsychological tests. CBF and OEF were measured by phase-contrast and T2-relaxation-under-spin-tagging MRI techniques, respectively. CMRO 2 was computed from CBF, OEF and hematocrit according to Fick's principle. Correlations were performed between MR measurements, blood biochemistry measurements and neuropsychological test scores. Compared with controls, ESRD patients had elevated CBF (72.9 ± 12.5 vs. 63.8 ± 8.5 ml min -1 100 g -1 , P < 0.001), elevated OEF (47.2 ± 10.2 vs. 35.8 ± 5.4 %, P < 0.001), but unaffected CMRO 2 (199.5 ± 36.4 vs. 193.8 ± 28.6 μmol O 2 min -1 100 g -1 , P = 0.879). Hematocrit negatively correlated with CBF (r = -0.640, P < 0.001) and OEF (r = -0.701, P < 0.001), but not with CMRO 2 . Altered neuropsychological test scores of ESRD patients were associated with OEF and CBF, but not with CMRO 2 . There were weak relationships between eGFR and hematocrit (r = 0.308, P = 0.068) or CBF (r = 0.318, P = 0.059). Our findings suggested that anaemic young adults with ESRD may afford higher CBF and OEF to maintain a normal CMRO 2 . Despite this compensatory process, however, cognitive function was still impaired and its severity was correlated with their CBF and OEF abnormality. (orig.)

  4. Elevated global cerebral blood flow, oxygen extraction fraction and unchanged metabolic rate of oxygen in young adults with end-stage renal disease: an MRI study.

    Zheng, Gang; Wen, Jiqiu; Lu, Hanzhang; Lou, Yaxian; Pan, Zhiying; Liu, Wei; Liu, Hui; Li, Xue; Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Huijuan; Kong, Xiang; Luo, Song; Jiang, Xiaolu; Liu, Ya; Zhang, Zongjun; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming

    2016-06-01

    To noninvasively assess global cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in young adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Thirty-six patients and 38 healthy volunteers were included and took part in MR examinations, blood and neuropsychological tests. CBF and OEF were measured by phase-contrast and T2-relaxation-under-spin-tagging MRI techniques, respectively. CMRO2 was computed from CBF, OEF and hematocrit according to Fick's principle. Correlations were performed between MR measurements, blood biochemistry measurements and neuropsychological test scores. Compared with controls, ESRD patients had elevated CBF (72.9 ± 12.5 vs. 63.8 ± 8.5 ml min(-1) 100 g(-1), P < 0.001), elevated OEF (47.2 ± 10.2 vs. 35.8 ± 5.4 %, P < 0.001), but unaffected CMRO2 (199.5 ± 36.4 vs. 193.8 ± 28.6 μmol O2 min(-1) 100 g(-1), P = 0.879). Hematocrit negatively correlated with CBF (r = -0.640, P < 0.001) and OEF (r = -0.701, P < 0.001), but not with CMRO2. Altered neuropsychological test scores of ESRD patients were associated with OEF and CBF, but not with CMRO2. There were weak relationships between eGFR and hematocrit (r = 0.308, P = 0.068) or CBF (r = 0.318, P = 0.059). Our findings suggested that anaemic young adults with ESRD may afford higher CBF and OEF to maintain a normal CMRO2. Despite this compensatory process, however, cognitive function was still impaired and its severity was correlated with their CBF and OEF abnormality. • Anaemic young adults with ESRD may afford higher CBF and OEF. • Anaemic young adults with ESRD maintain a normal CMRO 2 . • Cognitive function was still impaired in young ESRD adults. • The severity of cognitive dysfunction correlated with CBF and OEF changes.

  5. Neuroprotective effects of the AMPA antagonist PNQX in oxygen-glucose deprivation in mouse hippocampal slice cultures and global cerebral ischemia in gerbils

    Montero, Maria; Nielsen, Marianne; Rønn, Lars Christian B

    2007-01-01

    PNQX (9-methyl-amino-6-nitro-hexahydro-benzo(F)quinoxalinedione) is a selective AMPA antagonist with demonstrated neuroprotective effects in focal ischemia in rats. Here we report corresponding effects in mouse hippocampal slice cultures subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) and in tr......PNQX (9-methyl-amino-6-nitro-hexahydro-benzo(F)quinoxalinedione) is a selective AMPA antagonist with demonstrated neuroprotective effects in focal ischemia in rats. Here we report corresponding effects in mouse hippocampal slice cultures subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD......) and in transient global cerebral ischemia in gerbils. For in vitro studies, hippocampal slice cultures derived from 7-day-old mice and grown for 14 days, were submersed in oxygen-glucose deprived medium for 30 min and exposed to PNQX for 24 h, starting together with OGD, immediately after OGD, or 2 h after OGD...... stained for the neurodegeneration marker Fluoro-Jade B and immunostained for the astroglial marker glial fibrillary acidic protein revealed a significant PNQX-induced decrease in neuronal cell death and astroglial activation. We conclude that, PNQX provided neuroprotection against both global cerebral...

  6. Persistent resetting of the cerebral oxygen/glucose uptake ratio by brain activation

    Madsen, P L; Hasselbalch, S G; Hagemann, L P

    1995-01-01

    fraction of the activation-induced excess glucose uptake. These data confirm earlier reports that brain activation can induce resetting of the cerebral oxygen/glucose consumption ratio, and indicate that the resetting persists for a long period after cerebral activation has been terminated and physiologic......Global cerebral blood flow (CBF), global cerebral metabolic rates for oxygen (CMRO2), and for glucose (CMRglc), and lactate efflux were measured during rest and during cerebral activation induced by the Wisconsin card sorting test. Measurements were performed in healthy volunteers using the Kety......-Schmidt technique. Global CMRO2 was unchanged during cerebral activation, whereas global CBF and global CMRglc both increased by 12%, reducing the molar ratio of oxygen to glucose consumption from 6.0 during baseline conditions to 5.4 during activation. Data obtained in the period following cerebral activation...

  7. Activation-induced resetting of cerebral oxygen and glucose uptake in the rat

    Madsen, P L; Linde, R; Hasselbalch, S G

    1998-01-01

    In the clinical setting it has been shown that activation will increase cerebral glucose uptake in excess of cerebral oxygen uptake. To study this phenomenon further, this study presents an experimental setup that enables precise determination of the ratio between cerebral uptake of glucose...... and oxygen in the awake rat. Global CBF was measured by the Kety-Schmidt technique, and the ratio between cerebral uptake rates for oxygen, glucose, and lactate was calculated from cerebral arterial-venous differences. During baseline conditions, rats were kept in a closed box designed to minimize...... interference. During baseline conditions CBF was 1.08 +/- 0.25 mL x g(-1) x minute(-1), and the cerebral oxygen to glucose uptake ratio was 5.5. Activation was induced by opening the sheltering box for 6 minutes. Activation increased CBF to 1.81 mL x g(-1) x minute(-1). During activation cerebral glucose...

  8. Cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen metabolism in thalamic hemorrhage

    Yasui, Nobuyuki; Asakura, Ken

    1987-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral oxygen consumption (CMRO 2 ), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) were studied in 20 cases of thalamic hemorrhage using positron CT and 15 O labeled gas steady-state inhalation method. CBF reduction was limited around the thalamus in the small sized hematoma. CBF were significantly diminished in the mean cortical, parietal, temporal, basal ganglia and thalamic area ipsilateral and cerebellar cortex contralateral to the medium sized hematoma. There was bilateral and diffuse CBF reduction in the large sized hematoma which was caused by increased intracranial pressure. CMRO 2 value were similary changed as CBF. OEF change showed within normal limit. Diffuse CBV reduction was observed in the large sized hematoma. This reduction was the result of decreased vascular bed caused by mass effect of the hematoma and hydrocephalus. Effect of surgical treatment such as ventricular drainage and hematoma evacuation were also discussed in correlation to CBF in some case using positron and single photon ECT. (author)

  9. Cerebral oxygenation is reduced during hyperthermic exercise in humans

    Rasmussen, Peter; Nybo, Lars; Volianitis, S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Cerebral mitochondrial oxygen tension (P(mito)O(2)) is elevated during moderate exercise, while it is reduced when exercise becomes strenuous, reflecting an elevated cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO(2)) combined with hyperventilation-induced attenuation of cerebral blood flo...

  10. Relationship Between Cerebral Oxygenation and Hemodynamic and Oxygen Transport Parameters in Surgery for Acquired Heart Diseases

    A. I. Lenkin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the relationship between cerebral oxygenation and hemodynamic and oxygen transport parameters in surgical correction of concomitant acquired heart diseases. Subjects and methods. Informed consent was received from 40 patients who required surgery because of concomitant (two or more acquired heart defects. During procedure, perioperative monitoring of oxygen transport and cerebral oxygenation was performed with the aid of PiCCO2 monitor (Pulsion Medical Systems, Germany and a Fore-Sight cerebral oximeter (CASMED, USA. Anesthesia was maintained with propofol and fen-tanyl, by monitoring the depth of anesthesia. Early postoperative intensive therapy was based on the protocol for early targeted correction of hemodynamic disorders. Oxygen transport and cerebral oxygenation parameters were estimated intraopera-tively and within 24 postoperative hours. A statistical analysis including evaluation of Spearman correlations was performed with the aid of SPSS 15.0. Results. During perfusion, there was a relationship between cerebral oximetry values and hemat-ocrit levels, and oxygen partial pressure in the venous blood. Furthermore, a negative correlation between cerebral oximetry values and blood lactate levels was found 30 minutes after initiation of extracorporeal circulation (EC. During the study, there was a positive correlation between cerebral oxygenation and values of cardiac index, central venous saturation, and oxygen delivery index. There was a negative relationship between cerebral oxygenation and extravascular lung water at the beginning of surgery and a correlation between cerebral oximetry values and oxygenation index by the end of the first 24 postoperative hours. Conclusion. The cerebral oxygenation values correlate -with the main determinants of oxygen transport during EC and after cardiac surgical procedures. Cerebral oximetry may be used in early targeted therapy for the surgical correction of acquired combined

  11. Inadequate cerebral oxygen delivery and central fatigue during strenuous exercise

    Nybo, Lars; Rasmussen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Under resting conditions, the brain is protected against hypoxia because cerebral blood flow increases when the arterial oxygen tension becomes low. However, during strenuous exercise, hyperventilation lowers the arterial carbon dioxide tension and blunts the increase in cerebral blood flow, which...... can lead to an inadequate oxygen delivery to the brain and contribute to the development of fatigue....

  12. Detection of cerebral arterial gas embolism using regional cerebral oxygen saturation, quantitative electroencephalography, and brain oxygen tension in the swine

    Weenink, R. P.; Hollmann, M. W.; Stevens, M. F.; Kager, J.; van Gulik, T. M.; van Hulst, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral air emboli occur as a complication of invasive medical procedures. The sensitivity of cerebral monitoring methods for the detection of air emboli is not known. This study investigates the utility of electroencephalography and non-invasively measured cerebral oxygen saturation in the

  13. Acetazolamide improves cerebral oxygenation during exercise at high altitude

    Vuyk, J.; Bos, J. van den; Terhell, K.; Bos, R. de; Vletter, A.; Valk, P.; Beuzekom, M. van; Kleef, J. van; Dahan, A.

    2006-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness is thought to be triggered by cerebral hypoxemia and be prevented by acetazolamide (Actz). The effect of Actz on cerebral oxygenation at altitude remains unknown. In 16 members of the 2005 Dutch Cho Oyu (8201 m, Tibet) expedition, the influence of Actz and exercise (750 mg PO

  14. Cerebral aspects of neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: a review.

    Mol, A.C. de; Liem, K.D.; Heijst, A.F.J. van

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a lifesaving therapeutic approach in newborns suffering from severe, but potentially reversible, respiratory insufficiency, mostly complicated by neonatal persistent pulmonary hypertension. However, cerebral damage, intracerebral

  15. Cerebral oxygen desaturation during beach chair position

    Moerman, Annelies T.; de Hert, Stefan G.; Jacobs, Tom F.; de Wilde, Lieven F.; Wouters, Patrick F.

    2012-01-01

    Cases of ischaemic brain damage have been reported in relatively healthy patients undergoing shoulder surgery in the beach chair position. Unrecognised cerebral hypoperfusion may have contributed to these catastrophic events, indicating that routine anaesthesia monitoring may not suffice.

  16. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Ito, Hidemichi; Sakurai, Takashi; Hayashi, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Takuo

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of reduction of cerebral circulation in the early phase of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has not yet been clarified. Previous studies have variously indicated that cerebral blood flow (CBF) reduction may be due to cerebral vasospasm, an elevation in intracranial pressure (ICP), constriction of intraparenchymal arterioles, or metabolic reduction. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between cerebral circulation and oxygen metabolism. In 36 patients with aneurysmal SAH, the values of mean cerebral blood flow (mCBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (GMRO 2 ) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) were measured by using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with arterial blood drawing and oxygen saturation of internal jugular bulb blood (SjO 2 ) in the acute stage (1-3 days after onset) and the spasm stage (7-10 days after onset). The patients in our study were selected by using the following criteria: no history of cerebrovascular or cardiopulmonary diseases; under the age of 70; the ruptured aneurysm was treated by clipping or coil embolization within 72 hours after onset; no symptoms of cerebral vasospasm; no signs of cerebral ischemic change on CT scans. These patients were divided into 2 groups according to the World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS) grading classification; the mild group (Grades I and II) consisted of 27 cases and the severe group (Grade IV) consisted of 9 cases. We studied differences in mCBF CMRO 2 , and OEF between the mild group and severe group. In the mild group, mCBF, CMRO 2 , and OEF were significantly higher than in the severe group during both the acute and the spasm stage. Also mCBF showed a direct correlation with CMRO 2 . All the patients were kept under the following conditions: the bed was positioned so that the upper body was raised at an angle at 30 deg; blood pressure was maintained at 130-150 mmHg and PaCO 2 of arterial blood was maintained at 35-40 mmHg; ICP

  17. Cerebral blood oxygenation measurements in neonates with optoacoustic technique

    Herrmann, Stephen; Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Richardson, C. Joan; Fonseca, Rafael A.; Prough, Donald S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral hypoxia is a major contributor to neonatal/infant mortality and morbidity including severe neurological complications such as mental retardation, cerebral palsy, motor impairment, and epilepsy. Currently, no technology is capable of accurate monitoring of neonatal cerebral oxygenation. We proposed to use optoacoustics for this application by probing the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), a large central cerebral vein. We developed and built a multi-wavelength, optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and laser diode optoacoustic systems for measurement of SSS blood oxygenation in the reflection mode through open anterior or posterior fontanelles and in the transmission mode through the skull in the occipital area. In this paper we present results of initial tests of the laser diode system for neonatal cerebral oxygenation measurements. First, the system was tested in phantoms simulating neonatal SSS. Then, using the data obtained in the phantoms, we optimized the system's hardware and software and tested it in neonates admitted in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The laser diode system was capable of detecting SSS signals in the reflection mode through the open anterior and posterior fontanelles as well as in the transmission mode through the skull with high signal-to-noise ratio. Using the signals measured at different wavelengths and algorithms developed for oxygenation measurements, the laser diode system provided real-time, continuous oxygenation monitoring with high precision at all these locations.

  18. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow in man during light sleep (stage 2)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Holm, S

    1991-01-01

    We measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during light sleep (stage 2) in 8 young healthy volunteers using the Kety-Schmidt technique with 133Xe as the inert gas. Measurements were performed during wakefulness and light sleep as verified by standard...... polysomnography. Unlike our previous study in man showing a highly significant 25% decrease in CMRO2 during deep sleep (stage 3-4) we found a modest but statistically significant decrease of 5% in CMRO2 during stage 2 sleep. Deep and light sleep are both characterized by an almost complete lack of mental activity....... They differ in respect of arousal threshold as a stronger stimulus is required to awaken a subject from deep sleep as compared to light sleep. Our results suggest that during non-rapid eye movement sleep cerebral metabolism and thereby cerebral synaptic activity is correlated to cerebral readiness rather than...

  19. Growth restriction and gender influence cerebral oxygenation in preterm neonates

    Cohen, Emily; Baerts, Willem; Alderliesten, Thomas; Derks, Jan; Lemmers, Petra; van Bel, Frank

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of fetal growth restriction and gender on cerebral oxygenation in preterm neonates during the first 3 days of life. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of the Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, The Netherlands. PATIENTS: 68 (41 males)

  20. Cerebral Microcirculation and Oxygen Tension in the Human Secondary Cortex

    Linninger, A. A.; Gould, I. G.; Marinnan, T.; Hsu, C.-Y.; Chojecki, M.; Alaraj, A.

    2013-01-01

    The three-dimensional spatial arrangement of the cortical microcirculatory system is critical for understanding oxygen exchange between blood vessels and brain cells. A three-dimensional computer model of a 3 × 3 × 3 mm3 subsection of the human secondary cortex was constructed to quantify oxygen advection in the microcirculation, tissue oxygen perfusion, and consumption in the human cortex. This computer model accounts for all arterial, capillary and venous blood vessels of the cerebral microvascular bed as well as brain tissue occupying the extravascular space. Microvessels were assembled with optimization algorithms emulating angiogenic growth; a realistic capillary bed was built with space filling procedures. The extravascular tissue was modeled as a porous medium supplied with oxygen by advection–diffusion to match normal metabolic oxygen demand. The resulting synthetic computer generated network matches prior measured morphometrics and fractal patterns of the cortical microvasculature. This morphologically accurate, physiologically consistent, multi-scale computer network of the cerebral microcirculation predicts the oxygen exchange of cortical blood vessels with the surrounding gray matter. Oxygen tension subject to blood pressure and flow conditions were computed and validated for the blood as well as brain tissue. Oxygen gradients along arterioles, capillaries and veins agreed with in vivo trends observed recently in imaging studies within experimental tolerances and uncertainty. PMID:23842693

  1. Marked reduction of cerebral oxygen metabolism in patients with advanced cirrhosis

    Kawatoko, Toshiharu; Murai, Koichiro; Ibayashi, Setsurou; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Nomiyama, Kensuke; Sadoshima, Seizo; Eujishima, Masatoshi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi

    1992-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (rCMRO 2 ), and oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) were measured using positron emission tomography (PET) in four patients with cirrhosis (two males and two females, aged 57 to 69 years) in comparison with those in five age matched controls with previous transient global amnesia. PET studies were carried out when the patients were fully alert and oriented after the episodes of encephalopathy. In the patients, rCBF tended to be lower, while rCMRO 2 was significantly lowered in almost all hemisphere cortices, more markedly in the frontal cortex. Our results suggest that the brain oxygen metabolism is diffusely impaired in patients with advanced cirrhosis, and the frontal cortex seems to be more susceptible to the systemic metabolic derangements induced by chronic liver disease. (author)

  2. Marked reduction of cerebral oxygen metabolism in patients with advanced cirrhosis; A positron emission tomography study

    Kawatoko, Toshiharu; Murai, Koichiro; Ibayashi, Setsurou; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Nomiyama, Kensuke; Sadoshima, Seizo; Eujishima, Masatoshi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1992-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (rCMRO{sub 2}), and oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) were measured using positron emission tomography (PET) in four patients with cirrhosis (two males and two females, aged 57 to 69 years) in comparison with those in five age matched controls with previous transient global amnesia. PET studies were carried out when the patients were fully alert and oriented after the episodes of encephalopathy. In the patients, rCBF tended to be lower, while rCMRO{sub 2} was significantly lowered in almost all hemisphere cortices, more markedly in the frontal cortex. Our results suggest that the brain oxygen metabolism is diffusely impaired in patients with advanced cirrhosis, and the frontal cortex seems to be more susceptible to the systemic metabolic derangements induced by chronic liver disease. (author).

  3. Influence of cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis on cerebral oxygenation during exercise

    Nagayama, Osamu; Koike, Akira; Hoshimoto, Masayo; Yamaguchi, Kaori; Tajima, Akihiko; Goda, Ayumi; Uejima, Tokuhisa; Aizawa, Tadanori; Itoh, Haruki

    2007-01-01

    Although it is assumed that cerebral oxygenation during exercise is influenced by both cardiopulmonary function and cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis, the latter factor has not been fully clarified. In the present study the relationship between the degree of cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis and cerebral oxygenation during exercise was investigated. A total of 109 patients (69 patients with coronary artery disease, 40 patients with hypertensive heart disease) (61.7±9.7 years) performed a symptom-limited exercise test with respiratory gas measurements (CPX). From the respiratory gas analysis, peak O 2 uptake (VO 2 ), the slope of the increase in VO 2 to the increase in work rate (ΔVO 2 /ΔWR), and the slope of the increase in ventilation to the increase in CO 2 output (VE/VCO 2 slope) were calculated. Oxyhemoglobin (O 2 Hb) at the forehead was monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy. The brain ischemic score was counted based upon fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images of magnetic resonance imaging and expressed from 0 to 4. When compared with patients with a lower ischemic score ( 2 Hb during exercise (-1.08±2.7 vs 0.77±4.1 μmol/L, p=0.011). Of brain ischemic score, left ventricular ejection fraction, peak VO 2 , ΔVO 2 /ΔWR, and the VE/VCO 2 slope, ΔVO 2 /ΔWR was found to be the sole independent index determining cerebral O 2 Hb during exercise. The CPX parameters were also significantly related to the degree of cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis. Although cerebral oxygenation during exercise is mainly related to cardiopulmonary function, the degree of cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis partly influences cerebral oxygenation in patients with risk factors for atherosclerosis. (author)

  4. Cerebral oxygenation and energy metabolism in bacterial meningitis

    Larsen, Lykke

    Introduction: In a recent retrospective study of patients with severe bacterial meningitis we demonstrated that cerebral oxidative metabolism was affected in approximately 50% of the cases. An increase of lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio above the upper normal limit, defined according to according...... bacterial meningitis; secondly to examine whether it is correct to separate the diagnosis of cerebral ischemia from mitochondrial dysfunction based exclusively on the biochemical pattern obtained during intracerebral microdialysis. Method: A prospective clinical study including patients with severe...... community acquired bacterial meningitis admitted to the Department of Infectious Diseases, Odense University Hospital, during the period January 2014 to June 2016. We relate data from measurements of brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2) to simultaneously recorded data reflecting cerebral cytoplasmic redox...

  5. Effect of hypoxia on cerebral blood flow regulation during rest and exercise : role of cerebral oxygen delivery on performance

    Fan, J.-L.

    2014-01-01

    Adequate supply of oxygen to the brain is critical for maintaining normal brain function. Severe hypoxia, such as that experienced during high altitude ascent, presents a unique challenge to brain oxygen (O2) supply. During high-intensity exercise, hyperventilation-induced hypocapnia leads to cerebral vasoconstriction, followed by reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen delivery (DO2), and tissue oxygenation. This reduced O2 supply to the brain could potentially account for the reduce...

  6. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the Rett syndrome

    Yoshikawa, Hideto; Fueki, Noboru; Suzuki, Hisaharu; Sakuragawa, Norio; Iio, Masaaki

    1992-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on six patients with the Rett syndrome and the results were compared with the concurrent clinical status of the patients. The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ) was low in five patients, and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) was low in four patients; both had a tendency to decline with advancing age. Although the cause is unknown, it is suggested that impaired oxidative metabolism exists in the Rett syndrome. An analysis of the distribution among brain regions showed that the ratios of values for the frontal cortex to those for the temporal cortex for both the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and CMRO 2 were lower than those for the controls, which may indicate the loss of of hyperfrontality in the Rett syndrome. Distribution of brain metabolism may be immature in the Rett syndrome. (author)

  7. Large arteriolar component of oxygen delivery implies a safe margin of oxygen supply to cerebral tissue.

    Sakadžić, Sava; Mandeville, Emiri T; Gagnon, Louis; Musacchia, Joseph J; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Yucel, Meryem A; Lefebvre, Joel; Lesage, Frédéric; Dale, Anders M; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Lo, Eng H; Devor, Anna; Boas, David A

    2014-12-08

    What is the organization of cerebral microvascular oxygenation and morphology that allows adequate tissue oxygenation at different activity levels? We address this question in the mouse cerebral cortex using microscopic imaging of intravascular O2 partial pressure and blood flow combined with numerical modelling. Here we show that parenchymal arterioles are responsible for 50% of the extracted O2 at baseline activity, and the majority of the remaining O2 exchange takes place within the first few capillary branches. Most capillaries release little O2 at baseline acting as an O2 reserve that is recruited during increased neuronal activity or decreased blood flow. Our results challenge the common perception that capillaries are the major site of O2 delivery to cerebral tissue. The understanding of oxygenation distribution along arterio-capillary paths may have profound implications for the interpretation of blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) contrast in functional magnetic resonance imaging and for evaluating microvascular O2 delivery capacity to support cerebral tissue in disease.

  8. Systematic review of near-infrared spectroscopy determined cerebral oxygenation during non-cardiac surgery

    Henning Bay Nielsen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS is used to monitor regional cerebral oxygenation (rScO2 during cardiac surgery but is less established during non-cardiac surgery. This systematic review aimed i to determine the non-cardiac surgical procedures that provoke a reduction in rScO2 and ii to evaluate whether an intraoperative reduction in rScO2 influences postoperative outcome. The PubMed and Embase database were searched from inception until April 30, 2013 and inclusion criteria were intraoperative NIRS determined rScO2 in adult patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery. The type of surgery and number of patients included were recorded. There was included 113 articles and evidence suggests that rScO2 is reduced during thoracic surgery involving single lung ventilation, major abdominal surgery, hip surgery, and laparascopic surgery with the patient placed in anti-Tredelenburg’s position. Shoulder arthroscopy in the beach chair and carotid endarterectomy with clamped internal carotid artery also cause pronounced cerebral desaturation. A >20% reduction in rScO2 coincides with indices of regional and global cerebral ischemia during carotid endarterectomy. Following thoracic surgery, major orthopedic and abdominal surgery the occurrence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction might be related to intraoperative cerebral desaturation. In conclusion, certain non-cardiac surgical procedures is associated with an increased risk for the occurrence of regional cerebral oxygenation. Evidence for an association between cerebral desaturation and postoperative outcome parameters other than cognitive dysfunction needs to be established.

  9. Value of cerebral blood flow rate and regional oxygen consumption studies in cerebral ischaemia

    Clanet, M

    1987-06-18

    Studies of experimentally-induced ischaemia have shown that the intensity of neuronal suffering is related to the fall in perfusion rate. Below a certain level, called functional threshold, cerebral function is reversibly altered, whereas at a lower level (tissue necrosis threshold) the damage inflicted on neurons is irreversible. Between these two thresholds lies a ''penumbra zone''. This concept of thresholds must be mitigated by 2 parameters: duration of ischaemia and selective vulnerability of the various structures affected. Variations in blood flow rate only indirectly affect the state of tissues. Techniques developed from positron emission tomography make it possible to evaluate the metabolic activity of brain tissue in vivo: oxygen consumption (CMRO/sub 2/), oxygen extraction (EO/sub 2/) and glucose consumption (CMRG) which are thus correlated to cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume, sometimes also to tissue pH. Normal relations between blood flow rate and metabolism may be altered. Misery perfusion reflects a fall in cerebral blood flow with an increase in EO/sub 2/ and often a decrease in CMRO/sub 2/, whereas luxury perfusion reflects an increase in cerebral blood flow rate with reduction of CMRO/sub 2/, EO/sub 2/ and CMRG. The type of alteration encountered in human ischaemia varies according to the nature of the accident: studies of transient accidents emphasize the different haemodynamic aspects of occlusion of the wider arteries. The metabolic and haemodynamic profiles of established ischaemic accidents vary according to their type and to the time of the study, reflecting the complexity of the physiopathological mechanisms involved; they are frequently associated with metabolic repercussions at a distance from the ischaemic focus, which supports the concept of diaschisis.

  10. Value of cerebral blood flow rate and regional oxygen consumption studies in cerebral ischaemia

    Clanet, M.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of experimentally-induced ischaemia have shown that the intensity of neuronal suffering is related to the fall in perfusion rate. Below a certain level, called functional threshold, cerebral function is reversibly altered, whereas at a lower level (tissue necrosis threshold) the damage inflicted on neurons is irreversible. Between these two thresholds lies a ''penumbra zone''. This concept of thresholds must be mitigated by 2 parameters: duration of ischaemia and selective vulnerability of the various structures affected. Variations in blood flow rate only indirectly affect the state of tissues. Techniques developed from positron emission tomography make it possible to evaluate the metabolic activity of brain tissue in vivo: oxygen consumption (CMRO 2 ), oxygen extraction (EO 2 ) and glucose consumption (CMRG) which are thus correlated to cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume, sometimes also to tissue pH. Normal relations between blood flow rate and metabolism may be altered. Misery perfusion reflects a fall in cerebral blood flow with an increase in EO 2 and often a decrease in CMRO 2 , whereas luxury perfusion reflects an increase in cerebral blood flow rate with reduction of CMRO 2 , EO 2 and CMRG. The type of alteration encountered in human ischaemia varies according to the nature of the accident: studies of transient accidents emphasize the different haemodynamic aspects of occlusion of the wider arteries. The metabolic and haemodynamic profiles of established ischaemic accidents vary according to their type and to the time of the study, reflecting the complexity of the physiopathological mechanisms involved; they are frequently associated with metabolic repercussions at a distance from the ischaemic focus, which supports the concept of diaschisis [fr

  11. Global fluctuations of cerebral blood flow indicate a global brain network independent of systemic factors.

    Zhao, Li; Alsop, David C; Detre, John A; Dai, Weiying

    2017-01-01

    Global synchronization across specialized brain networks is a common feature of network models and in-vivo electrical measurements. Although the imaging of specialized brain networks with blood oxygenation sensitive resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) has enabled detailed study of regional networks, the study of globally correlated fluctuations with rsfMRI is confounded by spurious contributions to the global signal from systemic physiologic factors and other noise sources. Here we use an alternative rsfMRI method, arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI, to characterize global correlations and their relationship to correlations and anti-correlations between regional networks. Global fluctuations that cannot be explained by systemic factors dominate the fluctuations in cerebral blood flow. Power spectra of these fluctuations are band limited to below 0.05 Hz, similar to prior measurements of regional network fluctuations in the brain. Removal of these global fluctuations prior to measurement of regional networks reduces all regional network fluctuation amplitudes to below the global fluctuation amplitude and changes the strength and sign of inter network correlations. Our findings support large amplitude, globally synchronized activity across networks that require a reassessment of regional network amplitude and correlation measures.

  12. Neonatal cerebral oxygenation is not linked to foetal vasculitis and predicts intraventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants

    Sørensen, Line Carøe; Maroun, Lisa Leth; Borch, K.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study was to compare the cerebral tissue oxygenation index (c-TOI) measured by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in infants with and without foetal vasculitis. METHODS: Twenty-four infants with placental signs of a foetal inflammatory response (FIR), foetal vasculitis, were.......002). CONCLUSION: Cerebral oxygenation was not affected in the first day of life in preterm infants born with foetal vasculitis, while cerebral oxygenation in infants that later developed intraventricular haemorrhage was impaired Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...

  13. Neonatal cerebral oxygenation is not linked to foetal vasculitis and predicts intraventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants

    Sorensen, Line C; Maroun, Lisa L; Borch, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to compare the cerebral tissue oxygenation index (c-TOI) measured by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in infants with and without foetal vasculitis. Methods: Twenty-four infants with placental signs of a foetal inflammatory response (FIR), foetal vasculitis, were.......002). Conclusion: Cerebral oxygenation was not affected in the first day of life in preterm infants born with foetal vasculitis, while cerebral oxygenation in infants that later developed intraventricular haemorrhage was impaired....

  14. Cerebral oxygenation decreases during exercise in humans with beta-adrenergic blockade

    Seifert, T.; Rasmussen, P.; Secher, Niels H.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Beta-blockers reduce exercise capacity by attenuated increase in cardiac output, but it remains unknown whether performance also relates to attenuated cerebral oxygenation. METHODS: Acting as their own controls, eight healthy subjects performed a continuous incremental cycle test to exhaustion...... attenuated the increase in cardiac output of consequence for cerebral perfusion and oxygenation. We suggest that a decrease in cerebral oxygenation limits exercise capacity Udgivelsesdato: 2009/7...... with or without administration of the non-selective beta-blocker propranolol. Changes in cerebral blood flow velocity were measured with transcranial Doppler ultrasound and those in cerebral oxygenation were evaluated using near-infrared spectroscopy and the calculated cerebral mitochondrial oxygen tension...

  15. Fetal cerebral responses to ventilation and oxygenation in utero

    Gleason, C.A.; Jones, M.D. Jr.; Traystman, R.J.; Notter, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that cerebral oxygen consumption (CMRO 2 ) increases by nearly 50% at birth. The perinatal factors responsible for this increase are unknown; however, one possibility is that fetal CMRO 2 is constrained by the normal intrauterine arterial Po 2 (Pa 0 2 ) of ∼20 mmHg. The authors investigated this possibility in seven near-term chronically instrumented fetal sheep (131-138 days gestation) in which they inserted vascular catheters and an endotracheal tube. After 1-3 days recovery, they measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) with radiolabeled microspheres and calculated CMRO 2 . Measurements were made in utero under three conditions for each fetus: (1) nonventilated control; (2) ventilation with 3% O 2 -5% CO 2 -92% N 2 ; and (3) ventilation with an inspired oxygen concentration sufficient to raise fetal Pa 0 2 to normal newborn levels. The results showed that increasing fetal arterial Po 2 to postnatal levels did not consistently increase CMRO 2 . CBF decreased as arterial O 2 content (Ca 0 2 ) rose, with an inverse hyperbolic response similar to that previously found to relate CBF to Ca 0 2 during fetal hypoxic hypoxia. This indicates that the normally low intrauterine Pa 0 2 does not intrinsically limit CMRO 2 and implies that the rapid increase in CMRO 2 at birth reflects the activation of specific cellular and physiological processes at (or near) this unique developmental event

  16. Oxygen, a key factor regulating cell behaviour during neurogenesis and cerebral diseases

    Kuan eZhang; Lingling eZhu; Ming eFan

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen is vital to maintain the normal functions of alomost all the organs, especially for brain which is one of the heaviest oxygen consumers in the body. The important roles of oxygen on the brain are not only reflected in the development, but also showed in the pathological processes of many cerebral diseases. In the current review, we summarized the oxygen levels in brain tissues tested by real-time measurements during the embryonic and adult neurogenesis, the cerebral diseases or in the ...

  17. Acute effect of glucose on cerebral blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxidative metabolism.

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Peiying; Pascual, Juan M; Xiao, Guanghua; Huang, Hao; Lu, Hanzhang

    2015-02-01

    While it is known that specific nuclei of the brain, for example hypothalamus, contain glucose-sensing neurons thus their activity is affected by blood glucose level, the effect of glucose modulation on whole-brain metabolism is not completely understood. Several recent reports have elucidated the long-term impact of caloric restriction on the brain, showing that animals under caloric restriction had enhanced rate of tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) cycle flux accompanied by extended life span. However, acute effect of postprandial blood glucose increase has not been addressed in detail, partly due to a scarcity and complexity of measurement techniques. In this study, using a recently developed noninvasive MR technique, we measured dynamic changes in global cerebral metabolic rate of O2 (CMRO2 ) following a 50 g glucose ingestion (N = 10). A time dependent decrease in CMRO2 was observed, which was accompanied by a reduction in oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) with unaltered cerebral blood flow (CBF). At 40 min post-ingestion, the amount of CMRO2 reduction was 7.8 ± 1.6%. A control study without glucose ingestion was performed (N = 10), which revealed no changes in CMRO2 , CBF, or OEF, suggesting that the observations in the glucose study was not due to subject drowsiness or fatigue after staying inside the scanner. These findings suggest that ingestion of glucose may alter the rate of cerebral metabolism of oxygen in an acute setting. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Drug abusers have impaired cerebral oxygenation and cognition during exercise.

    Kell Grandjean da Costa

    Full Text Available Individuals with Substance Use Disorder (SUD have lower baseline metabolic activity of the prefrontal cortex (PFC associated with impairment of cognitive functions in decision-making and inhibitory control. Aerobic exercise has shown to improve PFC function and cognitive performance, however, its effects on SUD individuals remain unclear.To verify the cognitive performance and oxygenation of the PFC during an incremental exercise in SUD individuals.Fourteen individuals under SUD treatment performed a maximum graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer with continuous measurements of oxygen consumption, PFC oxygenation, and inhibitory control (Stroop test every two minutes of exercise at different intensities. Fifteen non-SUD individuals performed the same protocol and were used as control group.Exercise increased oxyhemoglobin (O2Hb and total hemoglobin (tHb by 9% and 7%, respectively. However, when compared to a non-SUD group, this increase was lower at high intensities (p<0.001, and the inhibitory cognitive control was lower at rest and during exercise (p<0.007. In addition, PFC hemodynamics during exercise was inversely correlated with inhibitory cognitive performance (reaction time (r = -0.62, p = 0.001, and a lower craving perception for the specific abused substance (p = 0.0189 was reported immediately after exercise.Despite SUD individuals having their PFC cerebral oxygenation increased during exercise, they presented lower cognition and oxygenation when compared to controls, especially at elevated intensities. These results may reinforce the role of exercise as an adjuvant treatment to improve PFC function and cognitive control in individuals with SUD.

  19. Spatial sensitivity and penetration depth of three cerebral oxygenation monitors

    Gunadi, Sonny; Leung, Terence S.; Elwell, Clare E.; Tachtsidis, Ilias

    2014-01-01

    The spatial sensitivities of NIRO-100, ISS Oximeter and TRS-20 cerebral oxygenation monitors are mapped using the local perturbation method to inform on their penetration depths and susceptibilities to superficial contaminations. The results show that TRS-20 has the deepest mean penetration depth and is less sensitive than the other monitors to a localized absorption change in the superficial layer. However, an integration time of more than five seconds is required by the TRS-20 to achieve an acceptable level of signal-to-noise ratio, which is the poorest amongst the monitors. With the exception of NIRO-100 continuous wave method, the monitors are not significantly responsive to layer-wide absorption change that occurs in the superficial layer. PMID:25401006

  20. Extra-cerebral oxygenation influence on near-infrared-spectroscopy-determined frontal lobe oxygenation in healthy volunteers

    Sørensen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Peter; Siebenmann, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Frontal lobe oxygenation (Sc O2 ) is assessed by spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (SR-NIRS) although it seems influenced by extra-cerebral oxygenation. We aimed to quantify the impact of extra-cerebral oxygenation on two SR-NIRS derived Sc O2 . METHODS: Multiple...... regression analysis estimated the influence of extra-cerebral oxygenation as exemplified by skin oxygenation (Sskin O2 ) on Sc O2 in 21 healthy subjects exposed to whole-body exercise in hypoxia (Fi O2 = 12%; n = 10) and normoxia (n = 12), whole-body heating, hyperventilation (n = 21), administration...... of norepinephrine with and without petCO2 -correction (n = 15), phenylephrine and head-up tilt (n = 7). Sc O2 was assessed simultaneously by NIRO-200NX (Sniro O2 ) and INVOS-4100 (Sinvos O2 ). Arterial (Sa O2 ) and jugular bulb oxygen saturations (Sj O2 ) were obtained. RESULTS: The regression analysis indicated...

  1. Prognostic value of cerebral tissue oxygen saturation during neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    Marie-Philippine Clair

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support is indicated in severe and refractory respiratory or circulatory failures. Neurological complications are typically represented by acute ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions, which induce higher morbidity and mortality. The primary goal of this study was to assess the prognostic value of cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (StcO2 on mortality in neonates and young infants treated with ECMO. A secondary objective was to evaluate the association between StcO2 and the occurrence of cerebral lesions.This was a prospective study in infants < 3 months of age admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit and requiring ECMO support.The assessment of cerebral perfusion was made by continuous StcO2 monitoring using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS sensors placed on the two temporo-parietal regions. Neurological lesions were identified by MRI or transfontanellar echography.Thirty-four infants <3 months of age were included in the study over a period of 18 months. The ECMO duration was 10±7 days. The survival rate was 50% (17/34 patients, and the proportion of brain injuries was 20% (7/34 patients. The mean StcO2 during ECMO in the non-survivors was reduced in both hemispheres (p = 0.0008 right, p = 0.03 left compared to the survivors. StcO2 was also reduced in deceased or brain-injured patients compared to the survivors without brain injury (p = 0.002.StcO2 appears to be a strong prognostic factor of survival and of the presence of cerebral lesions in young infants during ECMO.

  2. The influence of systemic hemodynamics and oxygen transport on cerebral oxygen saturation in neonates after the Norwood procedure.

    Li, Jia; Zhang, Gencheng; Holtby, Helen; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie; Cai, Sally; Humpl, Tilman; Caldarone, Christopher A; Redington, Andrew N; Van Arsdell, Glen S

    2008-01-01

    Ischemic brain injury is an important morbidity in neonates after the Norwood procedure. Its relationship to systemic hemodynamic oxygen transport is poorly understood. Sixteen neonates undergoing the Norwood procedure were studied. Continuous cerebral oxygen saturation was measured by near-infrared spectroscopy. Continuous oxygen consumption was measured by respiratory mass spectrometry. Pulmonary and systemic blood flow, systemic vascular resistance, oxygen delivery, and oxygen extraction ratio were derived with measurements of arterial, and superior vena cava and pulmonary venous gases and pressures at 2- to 4-hour intervals during the first 72 hours in the intensive care unit. Mean cerebral oxygen saturation was 66% +/- 12% before the operation, reduced to 51% +/- 13% on arrival in the intensive care unit, and remained low during the first 8 hours; it increased to 56% +/- 9% at 72 hours, still significantly lower than the preoperative level (P blood flow and oxygen delivery (P blood flow (P = .001) and hemoglobin (P = .02) and negatively correlated with systemic vascular resistance (P = .003). It was not correlated with oxygen consumption (P > .05). Cerebral oxygen saturation decreased significantly in neonates during the early postoperative period after the Norwood procedure and was significantly influenced by systemic hemodynamic and metabolic events. As such, hemodynamic interventions to modify systemic oxygen transport may provide further opportunities to reduce the risk of cerebral ischemia and improve neurodevelopmental outcomes.

  3. Effects of spinal immobilization at a 20° angle on cerebral oxygen saturations measured by INVOS™.

    Aksel, Gökhan

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate whether performing the immobilization at 20° instead of 0° changes cerebral oxygenation. 33 volunteers were put in a hard cervical collar and backboard at 0° and immobilized for 30min. The cerebral oxygen saturations of the volunteers were measured at 1, 5, and 30min after the start of the procedure (Group 1). The volunteers were asked to return the day after the Group 1 procedure but at the same time. Serial cerebral oxygen saturations were obtained at the same time intervals as in Group 1, but for Group 2, the backboard was set to 20°. When the cerebral oxygen saturations of the two groups were compared, there was a slight decrease when the backboard position was changed from 0° to 20°, but it was not statistically significant (P=0.220 and P=0.768, respectively). The results revealed that immobilizing the patients with a spinal backboard at 20° instead of 0° did not alter the cerebral oxygen saturations. Our study results revealed that spinal immobilization at 20°, which was a new suggestion for spinal immobilization following a report that this position reduced the decrease in pulmonary function secondary to spinal immobilization, did not alter the cerebral oxygenation, so this suggestion is safe at least from the standpoint of cerebral oxygenation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Is cerebral oxygenation negatively affected by infusion of norepinephrine in healthy subjects?

    Brassard, P.; Seifert, T.; Secher, Niels H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vasopressor agents are commonly used to increase mean arterial pressure (MAP) in order to secure a pressure gradient to perfuse vital organs. The influence of norepinephrine on cerebral oxygenation is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the infusion of norep......BACKGROUND: Vasopressor agents are commonly used to increase mean arterial pressure (MAP) in order to secure a pressure gradient to perfuse vital organs. The influence of norepinephrine on cerebral oxygenation is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the infusion...... of norepinephrine on cerebral oxygenation in healthy subjects. METHODS: Three doses of norepinephrine (0.05, 0.1, and 0.15 microg kg(-1) min(-1) for 20 min each) were infused in nine healthy subjects [six males; 26 (6) yr, mean (SD)]. MAP, cerebral oxygenation characterized by frontal lobe oxygenation (Sc(O2...

  5. Higher cerebral oxygen saturation may provide higher urinary output during continuous regional cerebral perfusion

    Tomoyasu Takahiro

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective We examined the hypothesis that higher cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2 during RCP is correlated with urinary output. Methods Between December 2002 and August 2006, 12 patients aged 3 to 61 days and weighing 2.6 to 3.4 kg underwent aortic arch repair with RCP. Urinary output and rSO2 were analyzed retrospectively. Data were assigned to either of 2 groups according to their corresponding rSO2: Group A (rSO2 ≦ 75% and Group B (rSO2 Results Seven and 5 patients were assigned to Group A and Group B, respectively. Group A was characterized by mean radial arterial pressure (37.9 ± 9.6 vs 45.8 ± 7.8 mmHg; P = 0.14 and femoral arterial pressure (6.7 ± 6.1 vs 20.8 ± 14.6 mmHg; P = 0.09 compared to Group B. However, higher urinary output during CPB (1.03 ± 1.18 vs 0.10 ± 0.15 ml·kg-1·h-1; P = 0.03. Furthermore our results indicate that a higher dose of Chlorpromazine was used in Group A (2.9 ± 1.4 vs 1.7 ± 1.0 mg/kg; P = 0.03. Conclusion Higher cerebral oxygenation may provide higher urinary output due to higher renal blood flow through collateral circulation.

  6. Oxygenation and hemodynamics in left and right cerebral hemispheres during induction of veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    Heyst, A.F.J. van; Liem, D.; Hopman, J.C.W.; Staak, F.H.J.M. van der; Sengers, R.C.A.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Oxygenation and hemodynamics in the left and right cerebral hemispheres were measured during induction of veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO). STUDY DESIGN: Using near infrared spectrophotometry, effects of right common carotid artery (RCCA) and right internal

  7. Ductus arteriosus with left-to-right shunt during venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: effects on cerebral oxygenation and hemodynamics.

    Heyst, A.F.J. van; Staak, F.H.J.M. van der; Hopman, J.C.W.; Tanke, R.B.; Sengers, R.C.A.; Liem, K.D.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect on cerebral oxygenation and hemodynamics of a patent ductus arteriosus with left-to-right shunt during venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a lamb model. DESIGN: Prospective intervention study in animals. SETTING: Animal research laboratory of a

  8. Effect of propofol and remifentanil on cerebral perfusion and oxygenation in pigs

    Mikkelsen, Mai Louise Grandsgaard; Ambrus, Rikard; Miles, James Edward

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this review is to evaluate the existing literature with regard to the influence of propofol and remifentanil total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) on cerebral perfusion and oxygenation in healthy pigs. Anaesthesia has influence on cerebral haemodynamics and it is important not onl...

  9. Modeling of Cerebral Oxygen Transport Based on In vivo Microscopic Imaging of Microvascular Network Structure, Blood Flow, and Oxygenation.

    Gagnon, Louis; Smith, Amy F; Boas, David A; Devor, Anna; Secomb, Timothy W; Sakadžić, Sava

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is delivered to brain tissue by a dense network of microvessels, which actively control cerebral blood flow (CBF) through vasodilation and contraction in response to changing levels of neural activity. Understanding these network-level processes is immediately relevant for (1) interpretation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) signals, and (2) investigation of neurological diseases in which a deterioration of neurovascular and neuro-metabolic physiology contributes to motor and cognitive decline. Experimental data on the structure, flow and oxygen levels of microvascular networks are needed, together with theoretical methods to integrate this information and predict physiologically relevant properties that are not directly measurable. Recent progress in optical imaging technologies for high-resolution in vivo measurement of the cerebral microvascular architecture, blood flow, and oxygenation enables construction of detailed computational models of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen transport based on realistic three-dimensional microvascular networks. In this article, we review state-of-the-art optical microscopy technologies for quantitative in vivo imaging of cerebral microvascular structure, blood flow and oxygenation, and theoretical methods that utilize such data to generate spatially resolved models for blood flow and oxygen transport. These "bottom-up" models are essential for the understanding of the processes governing brain oxygenation in normal and disease states and for eventual translation of the lessons learned from animal studies to humans.

  10. Effects of Changes in Arterial Carbon Dioxide and Oxygen Partial Pressures on Cerebral Oximeter Performance.

    Schober, Andrew; Feiner, John R; Bickler, Philip E; Rollins, Mark D

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral oximetry (cerebral oxygen saturation; ScO2) is used to noninvasively monitor cerebral oxygenation. ScO2 readings are based on the fraction of reduced and oxidized hemoglobin as an indirect estimate of brain tissue oxygenation and assume a static ratio of arterial to venous intracranial blood. Conditions that alter cerebral blood flow, such as acute changes in PaCO2, may decrease accuracy. We assessed the performance of two commercial cerebral oximeters across a range of oxygen concentrations during normocapnia and hypocapnia. Casmed FORE-SIGHT Elite (CAS Medical Systems, Inc., USA) and Covidien INVOS 5100C (Covidien, USA) oximeter sensors were placed on 12 healthy volunteers. The fractional inspired oxygen tension was varied to achieve seven steady-state levels including hypoxic and hyperoxic PaO2 values. ScO2 and simultaneous arterial and jugular venous blood gas measurements were obtained with both normocapnia and hypocapnia. Oximeter bias was calculated as the difference between the ScO2 and reference saturation using manufacturer-specified weighting ratios from the arterial and venous samples. FORE-SIGHT Elite bias was greater during hypocapnia as compared with normocapnia (4 ± 9% vs. 0 ± 6%; P oxygen saturation and mixed venous oxygen tension, as well as increased oxygen extraction across fractional inspired oxygen tension levels (P oxygen extraction (P < 0.0001). Changes in PaCO2 affect cerebral oximeter accuracy, and increased bias occurs with hypocapnia. Decreased accuracy may represent an incorrect assumption of a static arterial-venous blood fraction. Understanding cerebral oximetry limitations is especially important in patients at risk for hypoxia-induced brain injury, where PaCO2 may be purposefully altered.

  11. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in patients with Parkinson's disease

    Kitamura, Shin; Ujike, Takashi; Kuroki, Soemu; Sakamoto, Shizuki; Soeda, Toshiyuki; Terashi, Akiro; Iio, Masaaki

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine functional changes in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia in Parkinson's disease (PD). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO/sub 2/) were determined using 0-15 positron emission tomography in 10 PD patients and five age-matched healthy volunteers. There was a tendency among PD patients towards a decreased CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia. These values were significantly lower in the frontal cortex in the PD group than the control group. There was no difference in OEF between the groups. A more decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism was observed in patients staged as severer on the scale of Hoehn and Yahr. There was no correlation between cerebral oxygen metabolism and tremor, rigidity, or bradykinesis. A decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism was associated with mental disorders, such as depression, hallucination, and dementia. These results may provide an important clue for the understanding of mesocortical dopaminergic pathway and the relationship between PD and dementia. (N.K.).

  12. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in patients with Parkinson's disease

    Kitamura, Shin; Ujike, Takashi; Kuroki, Soemu; Sakamoto, Shizuki; Soeda, Toshiyuki; Terashi, Akiro; Iio, Masaaki.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine functional changes in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia in Parkinson's disease (PD). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ) were determined using 0-15 positron emission tomography in 10 PD patients and five age-matched healthy volunteers. There was a tendency among PD patients towards a decreased CBF and CMRO 2 in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia. These values were significantly lower in the frontal cortex in the PD group than the control group. There was no difference in OEF between the groups. A more decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism was observed in patients staged as severer on the scale of Hoehn and Yahr. There was no correlation between cerebral oxygen metabolism and tremor, rigidity, or bradykinesis. A decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism was associated with mental disorders, such as depression, hallucination, and dementia. These results may provide an important clue for the understanding of mesocortical dopaminergic pathway and the relationship between PD and dementia. (N.K.)

  13. Cerebral oxygen delivery is reduced in newborns with congenital heart disease.

    Lim, Jessie Mei; Kingdom, Theodore; Saini, Brahmdeep; Chau, Vann; Post, Martin; Blaser, Susan; Macgowan, Christopher; Miller, Steven P; Seed, Mike

    2016-10-01

    To investigate preoperative cerebral hemodynamics in newborns with congenital heart disease. We hypothesized that cerebral blood flow and oxygen delivery would be decreased in newborns with congenital heart disease compared with controls. Using a "feed-and-sleep" approach to performing neonatal magnetic resonance imaging, we measured cerebral blood flow by using a slice prescription perpendicular to the right and left internal carotid arteries and basilar artery at the level of the clivus. We calculated brain volume by segmenting a 3-dimensional steady-state free procession acquisition of the whole brain, allowing quantification of cerebral blood flow indexed to brain volume. Cerebral oxygen delivery was calculated as the product of cerebral blood flow and preductal systemic arterial oxygen content obtained via a combination of conventional pulse oximetry and laboratory analysis of venous blood samples for hemoglobin concentration. A complete set of measurements were obtained in 32 newborns with heart disease and 31 controls. There was no difference in gestational age between the heart disease and control groups. There was no difference in cerebral blood flow compared with controls (103.5 ± 34.0 vs 119.7 ± 40.4 mL/min), whereas cerebral oxygen delivery was significantly lower in the congenital heart disease subjects (1881 ± 625.7 vs 2712 ± 915.7 mLO2/min). Ten newborns with congenital heart disease had diffuse excessive high signal intensity in their white matter and 2 had white matter injury whereas another 5 had both. Newborns with unrepaired cyanotic congenital heart disease have decreased cerebral oxygen delivery due to arterial desaturation. If brain growth and development are adversely affected through oxygen conformance, our findings could have clinical implications in terms of timing of surgical repair. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow in man during light sleep (stage 2)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Holm, S

    1991-01-01

    . They differ in respect of arousal threshold as a stronger stimulus is required to awaken a subject from deep sleep as compared to light sleep. Our results suggest that during non-rapid eye movement sleep cerebral metabolism and thereby cerebral synaptic activity is correlated to cerebral readiness rather than...

  15. Plateau Waves of Intracranial Pressure and Partial Pressure of Cerebral Oxygen.

    Lang, Erhard W; Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Smielewski, Peter; Pickard, John; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates 55 intracranial pressure (ICP) plateau waves recorded in 20 patients after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) with a focus on a moving correlation coefficient between mean arterial pressure (ABP) and ICP, called PRx, which serves as a marker of cerebrovascular reactivity, and a moving correlation coefficient between ABP and cerebral partial pressure of oxygen (pbtO2), called ORx, which serves as a marker for cerebral oxygen reactivity. ICP and ICPamplitude increased significantly during the plateau waves, whereas CPP and pbtO2 decreased significantly. ABP, ABP amplitude, and heart rate remained unchanged. In 73 % of plateau waves PRx increased during the wave. ORx showed an increase during and a decrease after the plateau waves, which was not statistically significant. Our data show profound cerebral vasoparalysis on top of the wave and, to a lesser extent, impairment of cerebral oxygen reactivity. The different behavior of the indices may be due to the different latencies of the cerebral blood flow and oxygen level control mechanisms. While cerebrovascular reactivity is a rapidly reacting mechanism, cerebral oxygen reactivity is slower.

  16. Cerebral tissue oxygen saturation and extraction in preterm infants before and after blood transfusion

    van Hoften, Jacorina C. R.; Verhagen, Elise A.; Keating, Paul; ter Horst, Hendrik J.; Bos, Arend F.

    Objective Preterm infants often need red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. The aim of this study was to determine whether haemoglobin levels before transfusion were associated with regional cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (r(c)SO(2)) and fractional tissue oxygen extraction (FTOE) and whether RBC

  17. Regional cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in normal pressure hydrocephalus after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Ishikawa, Masatsune; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Taki, Waro; Kobayashi, Akira; Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Konishi, Junji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1989-05-01

    To clarify the pathophysiology of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) after subarachnoid hemorrhage, the authors measured cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral oxygen metabolic rates (CMRO{sub 2}), the cerebral oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral blood volume (CBV) in eight normal volunteers, six SAH patients with NPH, and seven patients without NPH by {sup 15}O-labeled gas and positron emission tomography (PET). In the NPH group, PET revealed a decrease in CBF in the lower regions of the cerebral cortex and a diffuse decrease in CMRO{sub 2}. The decrease in CBF in the lower frontal, temporal, and occipital cortices was significantly greater in the NPH than in the non-NPH group. Reduction of CMRO{sub 2} was also more extensive in the NPH group, and both CBF and CMRO{sub 2} were more markedly decreased in the lower frontal region. OEF was increased in all areas in both of the patient groups, but the increase was not significant in most areas. CBF, CMRO{sub 2} and OEF did not significantly differ between the non-NPH group and the normal volunteers. There was no significant difference in CBV among the three groups. These results indicate that NPH involves impairment of cerebral oxygen metabolism in the lower regions of the cerebral cortex, particularly in the lower frontal region. (author).

  18. Cerebral oxygenation as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy in neonatal intensive care: correlation with arterial oxygenation.

    Hunter, Carol Lu; Oei, Ju Lee; Lui, Kei; Schindler, Timothy

    2017-07-01

    To assess correlation between cerebral oxygenation (rScO 2 ), as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and arterial oxygenation (PaO 2 ), as measured by arterial blood gases, in preterm neonates. Preterm neonates interpretation of NIRS values in neonatal intensive care, and further evaluation is needed to determine the applicability of NIRS to management of preterm infants. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Oxygen, a Key Factor Regulating Cell Behavior during Neurogenesis and Cerebral Diseases.

    Zhang, Kuan; Zhu, Lingling; Fan, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen is vital to maintain the normal functions of almost all the organs, especially for brain which is one of the heaviest oxygen consumers in the body. The important roles of oxygen on the brain are not only reflected in the development, but also showed in the pathological processes of many cerebral diseases. In the current review, we summarized the oxygen levels in brain tissues tested by real-time measurements during the embryonic and adult neurogenesis, the cerebral diseases, or in the hyperbaric/hypobaric oxygen environment. Oxygen concentration is low in fetal brain (0.076-7.6 mmHg) and in adult brain (11.4-53.2 mmHg), decreased during stroke, and increased in hyperbaric oxygen environment. In addition, we reviewed the effects of oxygen tensions on the behaviors of neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro cultures at different oxygen concentration (15.2-152 mmHg) and in vivo niche during different pathological states and in hyperbaric/hypobaric oxygen environment. Moderate hypoxia (22.8-76 mmHg) can promote the proliferation of NSCs and enhance the differentiation of NSCs into the TH-positive neurons. Next, we briefly presented the oxygen-sensitive molecular mechanisms regulating NSCs proliferation and differentiation recently found including the Notch, Bone morphogenetic protein and Wnt pathways. Finally, the future perspectives about the roles of oxygen on brain and NSCs were given.

  20. Oxygen, a key factor regulating cell behaviour during neurogenesis and cerebral diseases

    Kuan eZhang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen is vital to maintain the normal functions of alomost all the organs, especially for brain which is one of the heaviest oxygen consumers in the body. The important roles of oxygen on the brain are not only reflected in the development, but also showed in the pathological processes of many cerebral diseases. In the current review, we summarized the oxygen levels in brain tissues tested by real-time measurements during the embryonic and adult neurogenesis, the cerebral diseases or in the hyperbaric/hypobaric oxygen environment. Oxygen concentration is low in fetal brain (0.01%- 1% and in adult brain (1.5%-7%, decreased during stroke, and increased in hyperbaric oxygen environment. In addition, we reviewed the effects of oxygen tensions on the behaviors of neural stem cells (NSCs in vitro cultures at different oxygen concentration (2%-20% and in vivo niche during different pathological states and in hyperbaric/hypobaric oxygen environment. Moderate hypoxia (3%-10% is known can promote the proliferation of NSCs and enhance the differentiation of NSCs into the TH-positive neurons. Next, we briefly presented the oxygen-sensitive molecular mechanisms regulating NSCs proliferation and differentiation recently found including the Notch, BMP and Wnt pathways. Finally, the future perspectives about the roles of oxygen on brain and NSCs were given.

  1. Cerebral Pathophysiology in Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Pitfalls in Daily Clinical Management

    Syed Omar Kazmi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO is a life-saving technique that is widely being used in centers throughout the world. However, there is a paucity of literature surrounding the mechanisms affecting cerebral physiology while on ECMO. Studies have shown alterations in cerebral blood flow characteristics and subsequently autoregulation. Furthermore, the mechanical aspects of the ECMO circuit itself may affect cerebral circulation. The nature of these physiological/pathophysiological changes can lead to profound neurological complications. This review aims at describing the changes to normal cerebral autoregulation during ECMO, illustrating the various neuromonitoring tools available to assess markers of cerebral autoregulation, and finally discussing potential neurological complications that are associated with ECMO.

  2. Computer Modeling of Acceleration Effects on Cerebral Oxygen Saturation

    2007-04-01

    a significant physiological threat to etrate the cranium and enter the cerebral cortex. Hongo high-performance aircraft pilots since the development...et al. and Hongo et al. (7,8). blackened out and all that could be seen was the target, The primary focus of this effort was to build a model i.e...O6GInduced.html. 87:402. 12. Tripp LD, Arnold A, Bagian J, et al. Psychophysiological effects 8. Hongo K, Kobayashi S, Okudera H, et al. Noninvasive cerebral of

  3. Reduced deep regional cerebral venous oxygen saturation in hemodialysis patients using quantitative susceptibility mapping.

    Chai, Chao; Liu, Saifeng; Fan, Linlin; Liu, Lei; Li, Jinping; Zuo, Chao; Qian, Tianyi; Haacke, E Mark; Shen, Wen; Xia, Shuang

    2018-02-01

    Cerebral venous oxygen saturation (SvO 2 ) is an important indicator of brain function. There was debate about lower cerebral oxygen metabolism in hemodialysis patients and there were no reports about the changes of deep regional cerebral SvO 2 in hemodialysis patients. In this study, we aim to explore the deep regional cerebral SvO 2 from straight sinus using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and the correlation with clinical risk factors and neuropsychiatric testing . 52 hemodialysis patients and 54 age-and gender-matched healthy controls were enrolled. QSM reconstructed from original phase data of 3.0 T susceptibility-weighted imaging was used to measure the susceptibility of straight sinus. The susceptibility was used to calculate the deep regional cerebral SvO 2 and compare with healthy individuals. Correlation analysis was performed to investigate the correlation between deep regional cerebral SvO 2 , clinical risk factors and neuropsychiatric testing. The deep regional cerebral SvO 2 of hemodialysis patients (72.5 ± 3.7%) was significantly lower than healthy controls (76.0 ± 2.1%) (P deep regional cerebral SvO 2 in patients. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores of hemodialysis patients were significantly lower than healthy controls (P deep regional cerebral SvO 2 did not correlate with MMSE scores (P = 0.630). In summary, the decreased deep regional cerebral SvO 2 occurred in hemodialysis patients and dialysis duration, parathyroid hormone, hematocrit, hemoglobin and red blood cell may be clinical risk factors.

  4. Effects of head-up vs. supine CPR on cerebral oxygenation and cerebral metabolism - a prospective, randomized porcine study.

    Putzer, Gabriel; Braun, Patrick; Martini, Judith; Niederstätter, Ines; Abram, Julia; Lindner, Andrea Katharina; Neururer, Sabrina; Mulino, Miriam; Glodny, Bernhard; Helbok, Raimund; Mair, Peter

    2018-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) head-up position (HUP) as compared to standard supine position (SUP) decreases intracranial pressure (ICP) and increases cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). The impact of this manoeuvre on brain oxygenation and metabolism is not clear. We therefore investigated HUP as compared to SUP during basic life support (BLS) CPR for their effect on brain oxygenation and metabolism. Twenty pigs were anaesthetized and instrumented. After 8 min of cardiac arrest (CA) pigs were randomized to either HUP or SUP and resuscitated mechanically for 20 min. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), ICP, CPP, cerebral regional oxygen saturation (rSO 2 ) and brain tissue oxygen tension (P bt O 2 ) were measured at baseline, after CA and every 5 min during CPR. Cerebral venous oxygen saturation (S cv O 2 ) was measured at baseline, after CA and after 20 min of CPR. Cerebral microdialysis parameters, e.g. lactate/pyruvate ratio (L/P ratio) were taken at baseline and the end of the experiment. ICP was significantly lower in HUP compared to SUP animals after 5 min (18.0 ± 4.5 vs. 24.1 ± 5.2 mmHg; p = 0.033) and 20 min (12.0 ± 3.4 vs. 17.8 ± 4.3 mmHg; p = 0.023) of CPR. Accordingly, CPP was significantly higher in the HUP group after 5 min (11.2 ± 9.5 vs. 1.0 ± 9.2 mmHg; p = 0.045) and 20 min (3.4 ± 6.4 vs. -3.8 ± 2.8 mmHg; p = 0.023) of CPR. However, no difference was found in rSO 2 , P bt O 2 , S cv O 2 and L/P ratio between groups after 20 min of CPR. In this animal model of BLS CPR, HUP as compared to SUP did not improve cerebral oxygenation or metabolism. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Effect of interval training on cognitive functioning and cerebral oxygenation in obese patients: a pilot study.

    Drigny, Joffrey; Gremeaux, Vincent; Dupuy, Olivier; Gayda, Mathieu; Bherer, Louis; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil

    2014-11-01

    To assess the effect of a 4-month high-intensity interval training programme on cognitive functioning, cerebral oxygenation, central haemodynamic and cardiometabolic parameters and aerobic capacity in obese patients. Cognitive functioning, cerebral oxygenation, central haemodynamic, cardiometabolic and exercise para-meters were measured before and after a 4-month high-intensity interval training programme in 6 obese patients (mean age 49 years (standard deviation 8), fat mass percentage 31 ± 7%). Body composition (body mass, total and trunk fat mass, waist circumference) and fasting insulin were improved after the programme (p attention and processing speed, was significantly improved after training (p training (p training programme in obese patients improved both cognitive functioning and cere-bral oxygen extraction, in association with improved exercise capacity and body composition.

  6. [Regional cerebral oxygen saturation as a marker of hemodynamic state following cardiac surgery].

    García-Hernández, J A; Aldemira-Liz, A; Martínez-López, A I; Cayuela, A; Charlo-Molina, M T; Cano-Franco, J; Loscertales-Abril, M

    2013-10-01

    Regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO₂) is a measure of the general state of perfusion and oxygenation. We aim to analyze the relationship between this and various hemodynamic and respiratory parameters. Forty-three patients, operated on between October 2011 and July 2012, were included in this prospective observational descriptive study. The following parameters were measured: mean arterial pressure, both arterial and central venous oxygen saturation and partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide, and lactate levels. From these parameters, the oxygenation index and the oxygen extraction ratio were calculated. These measurements were studied to evaluate whether rSO₂ correlated significantly with the other parameters. The average age and weight of the patients were 27.3 months and 9.2 kg, respectively. The rSO₂ correlated positively with both central venous oxygen saturation (r=0.73, P 0.4) between the rSO₂ and central venous oxygen saturation, and between the rSO₂ and oxygen extraction ratio. Regional cerebral oxygen saturation correlates well with hemodynamic parameters - mean arterial pressure, venous saturation, and the tissue oxygen extraction. However, it does not correlate with respiratory parameters. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of hyperbaric treatment in cerebral air embolism on intracranial pressure, brain oxygenation, and brain glucose metabolism in the pig

    van Hulst, Robert A.; Drenthen, Judith; Haitsma, Jack J.; Lameris, Thomas W.; Visser, Gerhard H.; Klein, Jan; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of hyperbaric oxygen treatment after cerebral air embolism on intracranial pressure, brain oxygenation, brain glucose/lactate metabolism, and electroencephalograph. DESIGN: Prospective animal study. SETTING: Hyperbaric chamber. SUBJECTS: Eleven Landrace/Yorkshire

  8. Quantification of modulated blood oxygenation levels in single cerebral veins by investigating their MR signal decay

    Sedlacik, Jan [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States). Div. of Translational Imaging Research; University Clinics Jena (Germany). Medical Physics Group; Rauscher, Alexander [University Clinics Jena (Germany). Medical Physics Group; British Columbia Univ., Vancouver (Canada). MRI Research Centre; Reichenbach, Juergen R. [University Clinics Jena (Germany). Medical Physics Group

    2009-07-01

    The transverse magnetization of a single vein and its surrounding tissue is subject to spin dephasing caused by the local magnetic field inhomogeneity which is induced by the very same vessel. This phenomenon can be approximated and simulated by applying the model of an infinitely long and homogeneously magnetized cylinder embedded in a homogeneous tissue background. It is then possible to estimate the oxygenation level of the venous blood by fitting the simulated magnetization-time-course to the measured signal decay. In this work we demonstrate the ability of this approach to quantify the blood oxygenation level (Y) of small cerebral veins in vivo, not only under normal physiologic conditions (Y{sub native}=0.5-0.55) but also during induced changes of physiologic conditions which affect the cerebral venous blood oxygenation level. Changes of blood's oxygenation level induced by carbogen (5% CO{sub 2}, 95% O{sub 2}) and caffeine were observed and quantified, resulting in values of Y{sub carbogen}=0.7 and Y{sub caffeine}=0.42, respectively. The proposed technique may ultimately help to better understand local changes in cerebral physiology during neuronal activation by quantifying blood oxygenation in veins draining active brain areas. It may also be beneficial in clinical applications where it may improve diagnosis of cerebral pathologies as well as monitoring of responses to therapy. (orig.)

  9. Is cerebral oxygenation negatively affected by infusion of norepinephrine in healthy subjects?

    Brassard, P.; Seifert, T.; Secher, Niels H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vasopressor agents are commonly used to increase mean arterial pressure (MAP) in order to secure a pressure gradient to perfuse vital organs. The influence of norepinephrine on cerebral oxygenation is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the infusion of norep......BACKGROUND: Vasopressor agents are commonly used to increase mean arterial pressure (MAP) in order to secure a pressure gradient to perfuse vital organs. The influence of norepinephrine on cerebral oxygenation is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the infusion...... of norepinephrine on cerebral oxygenation in healthy subjects. METHODS: Three doses of norepinephrine (0.05, 0.1, and 0.15 microg kg(-1) min(-1) for 20 min each) were infused in nine healthy subjects [six males; 26 (6) yr, mean (SD)]. MAP, cerebral oxygenation characterized by frontal lobe oxygenation (Sc(O2...... infused at 0.1 microg kg(-1) min(-1) [Sc(O2): 78 (75-94) to 69 (61-83)%; P

  10. Photoacoustic microscopy of cerebral hemodynamic and oxygen-metabolic responses to anesthetics

    Cao, Rui; Li, Jun; Ning, Bo; Sun, Naidi; Wang, Tianxiong; Zuo, Zhiyi; Hu, Song

    2017-02-01

    General anesthetics are known to have profound effects on cerebral hemodynamics and neuronal activities. However, it remains a challenge to directly assess anesthetics-induced hemodynamic and oxygen-metabolic changes from the true baseline under wakefulness at the microscopic level, due to the lack of an enabling technology for high-resolution functional imaging of the awake mouse brain. To address this challenge, we have developed head-restrained photoacoustic microscopy (PAM), which enables simultaneous imaging of the cerebrovascular anatomy, total concentration and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin (CHb and sO2), and blood flow in awake mice. From these hemodynamic measurements, two important metabolic parameters, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2), can be derived. Side-by-side comparison of the mouse brain under wakefulness and anesthesia revealed multifaceted cerebral responses to isoflurane, a volatile anesthetic widely used in preclinical research and clinical practice. Key observations include elevated cerebral blood flow (CBF) and reduced oxygen extraction and metabolism.

  11. Cerebral oxygen saturation and cardiac output during anaesthesia in sitting position for neurosurgical procedures: a prospective observational study.

    Schramm, P; Tzanova, I; Hagen, F; Berres, M; Closhen, D; Pestel, G; Engelhard, K

    2016-10-01

    Neurosurgical operations in the dorsal cranium often require the patient to be positioned in a sitting position. This can be associated with decreased cardiac output and cerebral hypoperfusion, and possibly, inadequate cerebral oxygenation. In the present study, cerebral oxygen saturation was measured during neurosurgery in the sitting position and correlated with cardiac output. Perioperative cerebral oxygen saturation was measured continuously with two different monitors, INVOS ® and FORE-SIGHT ® . Cardiac output was measured at eight predefined time points using transoesophageal echocardiography. Forty patients were enrolled, but only 35 (20 female) were eventually operated on in the sitting position. At the first time point, the regional cerebral oxygen saturation measured with INVOS ® was 70 (sd 9)%; thereafter, it increased by 0.0187% min -1 (P<0.01). The cerebral tissue oxygen saturation measured with FORE-SIGHT ® started at 68 (sd 13)% and increased by 0.0142% min -1 (P<0.01). The mean arterial blood pressure did not change. Cardiac output was between 6.3 (sd 1.3) and 7.2 (1.8) litre min -1 at the predefined time points. Cardiac output, but not mean arterial blood pressure, showed a positive and significant correlation with cerebral oxygen saturation. During neurosurgery in the sitting position, the cerebral oxygen saturation slowly increases and, therefore, this position seems to be safe with regard to cerebral oxygen saturation. Cerebral oxygen saturation is stable because of constant CO and MAP, while the influence of CO on cerebral oxygen saturation seems to be more relevant. NCT01275898. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Real-time changes in brain tissue oxygen during endovascular treatment of cerebral vasospasm

    Rasmussen, Rune; Bache, Søren; Stavngaard, Trine

    2015-01-01

    pressure (PtiO₂) in target parenchyma. However, during the intervention, dangerously low levels of brain tissue oxygen, leading to cerebral infarction, may occur. Thus, no clinical improvement was seen in two of the patients and a dramatic worsening was observed in the third patient. Because the decrease...... minute-by-minute changes in brain tissue oxygen during balloon angioplasty and intraarterial administration of vasodilators in three patients.Our results confirm that endovascular intervention is capable of not only resolving angiographic vasospasm, but also of normalizing values of brain tissue oxygen...... in brain tissue oxygen was seen after administration of vasopressor agents, this may be a contributing factor....

  13. The evaluation of cerebral oxygenation by oximetry in patients with ischaemic stroke.

    Demet G

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To evaluate the clinical significance of estimation of the regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2 in the patients with ischaemic stroke by the cerebral oximetry during acute, sub-acute and chronic phases. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: In this prospective study, 24 patients with ischaemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory were included. A detailed clinical examination and appropriate laboratory investigations were carried out. The rSO2 was determined by oximetery (INVOS 3100-SD bilaterally on the first, third, seventh, and fifteenth days. The blood pressure, the peripheral capillary oxygen saturation and the arterial blood gas values were noted too. the changes were evaluated along with Glasgow coma scale (GCS using unpaired student t-test and one way ANOVA test. RESULTS: There were significant differences between the rSO2 values in acute, subacute and chronic phases on the side of the lesion (p value < 0.05. The values of oxygen saturation gradually increased throughout the chronic phase. These values showed a positive correlation with GCS, but the results were not significant statistically. The rSO2 values were also significantly higher on the non-lesional side than those on the lesion side in the acute phase (p= 0.0034, the discrepancy disappeared during the sub-acute and chronic phases. CONCLUSION: Cerebral oximetry can be used as a measure to evaluate the cerebral oxygenation during the various phases of ischaemic stroke. It has a potential to serve as a useful marker for detection of cerebral oxygenation imbalances, to judge the effectiveness of the management and for the follow-up of patients with ischaemic stroke.

  14. Cerebral oxygen metabolism in patients with early Parkinson's disease

    Borghammer, Per; Cumming, Paul; Østergaard, Karen

    2012-01-01

    ) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) PET scans from PD patients and healthy controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nine early-stage PD patients and 15 healthy age-matched controls underwent PET scans for quantitative mapping of CMRO(2) and CBF. Between-group differences were evaluated for absolute data and intensity...... in spatially contiguous cortical regions in early PD, and support the hypothesis that ETC dysfunction could be a primary pathogenic mechanism in early PD....

  15. Cerebral blood flow, oxygen and glucose metabolism with PET in progressive supranuclear palsy

    Otsuka, Makoto; Ichiya, Yuici; Kuwabara, Yasuo

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow, cerebral oxygen metabolic rate and cerebral glucose metabolic rate were measured with positron emission tomography (PET) in four patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Decreased blood flow and hypometabolism of oxygen and glucose were found in both subcortical and cortical regions, particularly in the striatum including the head of the caudate nucleus and the frontal cortex. The coupling between blood flow and metabolism was preserved even in the regions which showed decreased blood flow and hypometabolism. These findings indicated the hypofunction, as revealed by decreased blood flow and hypometablolism on PET, both in the striatum and the frontal cortex, and which may underlie the pathophysiological mechanism of motor and mental disturbance in PSP. (author)

  16. Cerebral arterial gas embolism from attempted mechanical thrombectomy: recovery following hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

    Segan, Louise; Permezel, Fiona; Ch'ng, Wei; Millar, Ian; Brooks, Mark; Lee-Archer, Matt; Cloud, Geoffrey

    2018-04-01

    Cerebral arterial gas embolism is a recognised complication of endovascular intervention with an estimated incidence of 0.08%. Its diagnosis is predominantly clinical, supported by neuroimaging. The treatment relies on alleviating mechanical obstruction and reversing the proinflammatory processes that contribute to tissue ischaemia. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is an effective treatment and has multiple mechanisms to reverse the pathological processes involved in cerebral arterial gas embolism. Symptomatic cerebral arterial gas embolism is a rare complication of endovascular intervention for acute ischaemic stroke. Although there are no previous descriptions of its successful treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy following mechanical thrombectomy, this is likely to become more common as mechanical thrombectomy is increasingly used worldwide to treat acute ischaemic stroke. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Influence of intranasal and carotid cooling on cerebral temperature balance and oxygenation

    Nybo, Lars; Wanscher, Michael; Secher, Niels H.

    2014-01-01

    temperatures were measured to assess the cerebral heat balance and corresponding paired blood samples were obtained to evaluate cerebral metabolism and oxygenation at rest, following 60 min of intranasal cooling, 5 min of nasal ventilation, and 15 min with carotid cooling. Intranasal cooling induced a parallel......The present study evaluated the influence of intranasal cooling with balloon catheters, increased nasal ventilation, or percutaneous cooling of the carotid arteries on cerebral temperature balance and oxygenation in six healthy male subjects. Aortic arch and internal jugular venous blood...... drop in jugular venous and arterial blood temperatures by 0.30 ± 0.08°C (mean ± SD), whereas nasal ventilation and carotid cooling failed to lower the jugular venous blood temperature. The magnitude of the arterio-venous temperature difference across the brain remained unchanged at -0.33 ± 0.05°C...

  18. Impaired cerebral blood flow and oxygenation during exercise in type 2 diabetic patients

    Kim, Yu-Sok; Seifert, Thomas; Brassard, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial vascular function and capacity to increase cardiac output during exercise are impaired in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We tested the hypothesis that the increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during exercise is also blunted and, therefore, that cerebral oxygenation becomes...... affected and perceived exertion increased in T2DM patients. We quantified cerebrovascular besides systemic hemodynamic responses to incremental ergometer cycling exercise in eight male T2DM and seven control subjects. CBF was assessed from the Fick equation and by transcranial Doppler-determined middle...... at higher workloads in T2DM patients and their work capacity and increase in cardiac output were only ~80% of that established in the control subjects. CBF and cerebral oxygenation were reduced during exercise in T2DM patients (P

  19. Comparison Between Cerebral Tissue Oxygen Tension and Energy Metabolism in Experimental Subdural Hematoma

    Nielsen, Troels Halfeld; Engell, Susanne I; Johnsen, Rikke Aagaard

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An experimental swine model (n = 7) simulating an acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) was employed (1) to explore the relation between the brain tissue oxygenation (PbtO(2)) and the regional cerebral energy metabolism as obtained by microdialysis, and (2) to define the lowest level of PbtO(2...

  20. Near-infrared spectroscopy determined cerebral oxygenation with eliminated skin blood flow in young males

    Hirasawa, Ai; Kaneko, Takahito; Tanaka, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    We estimated cerebral oxygenation during handgrip exercise and a cognitive task using an algorithm that eliminates the influence of skin blood flow (SkBF) on the near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signal. The algorithm involves a subtraction method to develop a correction factor for each subject. ...

  1. Effects of midazolam and morphine on cerebral oxygenation and hemodynamics in ventilated premature infants.

    Velden, A.A.E.M. van der; Hopman, J.C.W.; Klaessens, J.H.G.M.; Feuth, A.B.; Sengers, R.C.A.; Liem, K.D.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Midazolam sedation and morphine analgesia are commonly used in ventilated premature infants. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of midazolam versus morphine infusion on cerebral oxygenation and hemodynamics in ventilated premature infants. METHODS: 11 patients (GA 26.6-33.0 weeks, BW

  2. Phenobarbital and neonatal seizures affect cerebral oxygen metabolism: a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Sokoloff, Max D; Plegue, Melissa A; Chervin, Ronald D; Barks, John D E; Shellhaas, Renée A

    2015-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measures oxygen metabolism and is increasingly used for monitoring critically ill neonates. The implications of NIRS-recorded data in this population are poorly understood. We evaluated NIRS monitoring for neonates with seizures. In neonates monitored with video-electroencephalography, NIRS-measured cerebral regional oxygen saturation (rSO2) and systemic O2 saturation were recorded every 5 s. Mean rSO2 was extracted for 1-h blocks before, during, and after phenobarbital doses. For each electrographic seizure, mean rSO2 was extracted for a period of three times the duration of the seizure before and after the ictal pattern, as well as during the seizure. Linear mixed models were developed to assess the impact of phenobarbital administration and of seizures on rSO2 and fractional tissue oxygen extraction. For 20 neonates (estimated gestational age: 39.6 ± 1.5 wk), 61 phenobarbital doses and 40 seizures were analyzed. Cerebral rSO2 rose (P = 0.005), and fractional tissue oxygen extraction declined (P = 0.018) with increasing phenobarbital doses. rSO2 declined during seizures, compared with baseline and postictal phases (baseline 81.2 vs. ictal 77.7 vs. postictal 79.4; P = 0.004). Fractional tissue oxygen extraction was highest during seizures (P = 0.002). Cerebral oxygen metabolism decreases after phenobarbital administration and increases during seizures. These small, but clear, changes in cerebral oxygen metabolism merit assessment for potential clinical impact.

  3. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption during ethanol withdrawal in the rat.

    Hemmingsen, R; Barry, D I; Hertz, M M; Klinken, L

    1979-09-14

    The ethanol withdrawal syndrome in man and animals is characterized by signs of CNS hyperactivity although a direct measurement of a physiological variable reflecting this CNS hyperactivity has never been performed in untreated man or in animals. We induced ethanol dependence in the rat by means of intragastric intubation with a 20% w/v ethanol solution, thus keeping the animals in a state of continuous severe intoxication for 3--4 days; during the subsequent state of withdrawal characterized by tremor, rigidity, stereotyped movements and general seizures a 25% increase in cerebral oxygen consumption (CMRO2) could be measured; this increase was not due to catecholamines originating from adrenal medulla as adrenomedullectomized animals showed a similar increase in CMRO2 (28%); the withdrawing animals showed a corresponding cerebral blood flow (CBF) increase. The elevated CMRO2 and CBF could be reduced to normal by administration of a beta-adrenergic receptor blocker (propranolol 2 mg/kg i.v.), and hence the increased CMRO2 during ethanol withdrawal could be related to catecholaminergic systems in the brain, e.g. the noradrenergic locus coeruleus system which is anatomically well suited as a general activating system. This interpretation is supported by the earlier neurochemical finding of an increased cerebral noradrenaline turnover during ethanol withdrawal. The exact mechanism underlying the increased cerebral oxygen consumption during ethanol withdrawal and the effect of propranolol on cerebral function during this condition remains to be clarified.

  4. The prognostic value of cerebral oxygenation and retrograde pressure during carotid endarterectomy

    А. А. Карпенко

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study aimed to determine the predictive value of retrograde pressure (RP indicators and cerebral oxygenation in the evaluation of ischemic brain damage during carotid endarterectomy (CEA.Methods: This nonrandomized, prospective pilot study included 87 patients with asymptomatic stenosis greater than 70% who underwent carotid endarterectomy under general anesthesia. Brain tolerance to ischemia was determined by measuring and evaluating RP (∆rSO2 and cerebral oxygenation (rSO2 during a trial clamping of the carotid artery. Depending on the degree of reduction of cerebral oxygenation from the baseline (∆rSO2 during a trial clamping of the carotid artery, patients were divided into 3 groups: the first group (n = 35 - ∆rSO2 <9.9%, the second group (n = 35 - ∆rSO2 from 10 to 19.9%, the third group (n = 14 - ∆rSO2 ≥ 20%. The primary end-point of the study was to obtain the AUC value exceeding 0.70, which could mean a high predictive quality of research methods. Results: There were no perioperative strokes or myocardial infarctions during the study. Average time of carotid artery clamping was 28 (26-30 minutes. 3 patients who received temporary shunts were excluded from the study because of a simultaneous decrease in the rSO2 and ∆rSO2 indicators. It was found out that S-100 and NSE protein concentration in all groups did not significantly differ at different stages (p> 0.05. A temporary shutdown of blood flow in the carotid artery during CEA is accompanied by significant elevation of cerebral damage markers (S100, NSE concentration with their subsequent restoration at 3 days after surgery. ROC - analysis revealed that none of the methods for assessing cerebral ischemic tolerance (RP, ∆rSO2 and rSO2 is precise enough (AUC > 0.7 to predict brain injury during carotid endarterectomy. Satisfactory, but a poor quality (AUC< 0.7 of predicting an increase in the reference values of S-100 protein neuromarkers was demonstrated by

  5. PET imaging of cerebral perfusion and oxygen metabolism in stroke

    Pointon, O.; Yasaka, M.; Berlangieri, S.U.; Newton, M.R.; Thomas, D.L.; Chan, C.G.; Egan, G.F.; Tochon-Danguy, H.J.; O``Keefe, G.; Donnan, G.A.; McKay, W.J. [Austin Hospital, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Centre for PET and Depts of Nuclear Medicine and Neurology

    1998-03-01

    Full text: Stroke remains a devastating clinical event with few therapeutic options. In patients with acute stroke, we studied the cerebral perfusion and metabolic patterns with {sup 15}O-CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O and {sup 15}O-O{sub 2} positron emission tomography and correlated these findings to the clinical background. Forty three patients underwent 45 studies 0-23 days post-stroke (mean 7 days). Fifteen patients showed luxury perfusion (Group A), 10 had matched low perfusion and metabolism (B) and 3 showed mixed pattern including an area of misery perfusion (C). Seventeen showed no relevant abnormality (D) and there were no examples of isolated misery perfusion. Twelve of the 15 in Group A had either haemorrhagic transformation on CT, re-opening on angiography, or a cardioembolic mechanism. In contrast only 5/10 in Group B, 0/3 in Group C and 2/17 in Group D had these features. Although 7/10 in group B had moderate or large size infarcts on CT the incidence of haemorrhagic transformation was low (2/10) and significant carotid stenoses were more common in those studied (5/8) compared with the other groups. Misery perfusion was not seen beyond five days. Thus, luxury perfusion seems to be related to a cardio-embolic mechanism or reperfusion. Matched low perfusion and metabolism was associated with a low rate of haemorrhagic transformation despite a high incidence of moderate to large size infarcts. Misery perfusion is an early phenomenon in the evolution of ischaemic stroke.

  6. Changes in Cerebral Partial Oxygen Pressure and Cerebrovascular Reactivity During Intracranial Pressure Plateau Waves.

    Lang, Erhard W; Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Smielewski, Peter; Pickard, John; Czosnyka, Marek

    2015-08-01

    Plateau waves in intracranial pressure (ICP) are frequently recorded in neuro intensive care and are not yet fully understood. To further investigate this phenomenon, we analyzed partial pressure of cerebral oxygen (pbtO2) and a moving correlation coefficient between ICP and mean arterial blood pressure (ABP), called PRx, along with the cerebral oxygen reactivity index (ORx), which is a moving correlation coefficient between cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and pbtO2 in an observational study. We analyzed 55 plateau waves in 20 patients after severe traumatic brain injury. We calculated ABP, ABP pulse amplitude (ampABP), ICP, CPP, pbtO2, heart rate (HR), ICP pulse amplitude (ampICP), PRx, and ORx, before, during, and after each plateau wave. The analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc test was used to compare the differences in the variables before, during, and after the plateau wave. We considered all plateau waves, even in the same patient, independent because they are separated by long intervals. We found increases for ICP and ampICP according to our operational definitions for plateau waves. PRx increased significantly (p = 0.00026), CPP (p pressure remains stable in ICP plateau waves, while cerebral autoregulatory indices show distinct changes, which indicate cerebrovascular reactivity impairment at the top of the wave. PbtO2 decreases during the waves and may show a slight overshoot after normalization. We assume that this might be due to different latencies of the cerebral blood flow and oxygen level control mechanisms. Other factors may include baseline conditions, such as pre-plateau wave cerebrovascular reactivity or pbtO2 levels, which differ between studies.

  7. Ventilation onset prior to umbilical cord clamping (physiological-based cord clamping improves systemic and cerebral oxygenation in preterm lambs.

    Graeme R Polglase

    Full Text Available As measurement of arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2 is common in the delivery room, target SpO2 ranges allow clinicians to titrate oxygen therapy for preterm infants in order to achieve saturation levels similar to those seen in normal term infants in the first minutes of life. However, the influence of the onset of ventilation and the timing of cord clamping on systemic and cerebral oxygenation is not known.We investigated whether the initiation of ventilation, prior to, or after umbilical cord clamping, altered systemic and cerebral oxygenation in preterm lambs.Systemic and cerebral blood-flows, pressures and peripheral SpO2 and regional cerebral tissue oxygenation (SctO2 were measured continuously in apnoeic preterm lambs (126±1 day gestation. Positive pressure ventilation was initiated either 1 prior to umbilical cord clamping, or 2 after umbilical cord clamping. Lambs were monitored intensively prior to intervention, and for 10 minutes following umbilical cord clamping.Clamping the umbilical cord prior to ventilation resulted in a rapid decrease in SpO2 and SctO2, and an increase in arterial pressure, cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen extraction. Ventilation restored oxygenation and haemodynamics by 5-6 minutes. No such disturbances in peripheral or cerebral oxygenation and haemodynamics were observed when ventilation was initiated prior to cord clamping.The establishment of ventilation prior to umbilical cord clamping facilitated a smooth transition to systemic and cerebral oxygenation following birth. SpO2 nomograms may need to be re-evaluated to reflect physiological management of preterm infants in the delivery room.

  8. Local cerebral blood flow and local oxygen consumption in prolonged hemiplegic migraine

    Baron, J.C.; Lebrun-Grandie, P.; Serdaru, M.; Bousser, M.G.; Lhermitte, F.; Cabanis, E.

    1982-09-01

    This work gives the results of a study by positron emission tomography of the cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen-extraction rate (O 2 E) and oxygen consumption (CMRO 2 ) during severe and prolonged attack of hemiplegic migraine. The salient facts observed are a high (CBF) in the brain hemisphere affected (ruling out the hypothesis of a persistent cerebral ischemia), together with a collapsed O 2 E (''luxury perfusion'') and especially preservation of the CMRO 2 suggesting a decoupling not only between CBF and CMRO 2 but also between CMRO 2 and functional state of the tissue. Some time after the attack a new study showed the recoupling between CBF and CMRO 2 , but with the latter reduced in the affected hemisphere although the clinical and tomodensitometric state had returned to normal. These new observations should not however be improperly generalised to all migraines, given the unusual characteristics of the disorder in our patient [fr

  9. Hepatic encephalopathy is associated with decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism and blood flow, not increased ammonia uptake

    Dam, Gitte; Keiding, Susanne; Munk, Ole Lajord

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO(2)) and blood flow (CBF) in patients with cirrhosis with hepatic encephalopathy (HE). It remains unclear, however, whether these disturbances are associated with HE or with cirrhosis itself and how they may relate to arterial blood...... associated with HE rather than the liver disease as such. The changes in CMRO(2) and CBF could not be linked to blood ammonia concentration or CMRA....

  10. Cerebral oxygenation and metabolism during exercise following three months of endurance training in healthy overweight males

    Seifert, T; Rasmussen, P; Brassard, P

    2009-01-01

    /(glucose + (1/2) lactate); OCI], changes in mitochondrial oxygen tension (DeltaP(Mito)O(2)) and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) were calculated. For all subjects, resting OCI was higher at the 3-mo follow-up (6.3 +/- 1.3 compared with 4.7 +/- 0.9 at baseline, mean +/- SD; P ... with a lower plasma epinephrine concentration (P Mito)O(2) (-22 mmHg) decreased (P ... +/- 53 micromol x 100 x g(-1) min(-1) (P Mito)O(2) (-7 +/- 13 mmHg) did not decrease significantly from rest and when compared with values before training (P

  11. Transient global amnesia after cerebral angiography still occurs: Case report and literature review

    Foss-Skiftesvik, Jon; Snoer, Agneta Henriette; Wagner, Aase

    2014-01-01

    Transient global amnesia is considered a very rare complication of diagnostic cerebral angiography, and has only been reported in a limited number of case reports more than 15 years ago. We describe a patient experiencing transient global amnesia following cerebral digital subtraction angiography....... While the condition by definition is self-limiting, its differential diagnoses may cause severe morbidity and/or mortality if left untreated. It is therefore important to build and maintain awareness of transient global amnesia as a possible complication of cerebral angiography....

  12. Lung vital capacity and oxygen saturation in adults with cerebral palsy

    Lampe R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Renée Lampe,1,2 Tobias Blumenstein,2 Varvara Turova,2 Ana Alves-Pinto2 1Markus Würth Stiftungsprofessur, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany; 2Research Unit for Cerebral Palsy and Children Neuroorthopaedics of the Buhl-Strohmaier Foundation, Orthopedic Department of the Clinic “rechts der Isar” of the Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany Background: Individuals with infantile cerebral palsy have multiple disabilities. The most conspicuous syndrome being investigated from many aspects is motor movement disorder with a spastic gait pattern. The lung function of adults with spasticity attracts less attention in the literature. This is surprising because decreased thoracic mobility and longstanding scoliosis should have an impact on lung function. With increasing age and the level of disability, individuals become susceptible to lung infections and reflux illness, and these are accompanied by increased aspiration risk. This study examined, with different methods, to what extent adults with congenital cerebral palsy and acquired spastic paresis – following traumatic brain injury – showed restriction of lung function. It also assessed the contribution of disability level on this restriction.Methods: The oxygen saturation of 46 adults with a diagnosis of cerebral palsy was measured with an oximeter. Lung vital capacity was measured with a mobile spirometer and excursion of the thorax was clinically registered. The gross motor function levels and the presence or absence of scoliosis were determined.Results: A significantly positive correlation between lung vital capacity and chest expansion was established. Both the lung vital capacity and the thorax excursion decreased with increases in gross motor function level. Oxygen saturation remained within the normal range in all persons, in spite of reduced values of the measured lung parameters. No statistically significant dependency between lung vital capacity and oxygen

  13. Relationship between relative cerebral blood flow, relative cerebral blood volume, and relative cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen in the preterm neonatal brain.

    Nourhashemi, Mina; Kongolo, Guy; Mahmoudzadeh, Mahdi; Goudjil, Sabrina; Wallois, Fabrice

    2017-04-01

    The mechanisms responsible for coupling between relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF), relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and relative cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen ([Formula: see text]), an important function of the microcirculation in preterm infants, remain unclear. Identification of a causal relationship between rCBF-rCBV and [Formula: see text] in preterms may, therefore, help to elucidate the principles of cortical hemodynamics during development. We simultaneously recorded rCBF and rCBV and estimated [Formula: see text] by two independent acquisition systems: diffuse correlation spectroscopy and near-infrared spectroscopy, respectively, in 10 preterms aged between 28 and 35 weeks of gestational age. Transfer entropy was calculated in order to determine the directionality between rCBF-rCBV and [Formula: see text]. The surrogate method was applied to determine statistical significance. The results show that rCBV and [Formula: see text] have a predominant driving influence on rCBF at the resting state in the preterm neonatal brain. Statistical analysis robustly detected the correct directionality of rCBV on rCBF and [Formula: see text] on rCBF. This study helps to clarify the early organization of the rCBV-rCBF and [Formula: see text] inter-relationship in the immature cortex.

  14. Effects of acetazolamide on cerebral blood flow and brain tissue oxygenation

    Lassen, N A; Friberg, L; Kastrup, J

    1987-01-01

    Oral administration of 1 g of acetazolamide to 8 normal subjects studied at sea level and in normoxia caused an acute increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF). During the subsequent prolonged oral treatment with 1 g of acetazolamide daily, CBF returned to normal within 2 days. The alveolar CO2 tension...... decreased gradually to 70% of the control value, indicating hyperventilation. At sea level hyperventilation will not increase brain oxygenation significantly in normal man, as the arterial oxygen content only increases minimally, while CBF is unchanged. At high altitude the beneficial effects...... of acetazolamide on the symptoms of acute mountain sickness may well be due to an improved oxygen supply to the brain, as hyperventilation will, at the low ambient PO2, cause a significant increase of the arterial oxygen content, while CBF presumably is unaffected by the drug. During hypoxia at high altitude...

  15. Cerebral interstitial tissue oxygen tension, pH, HCO3, CO2.

    Charbel, F T; Hoffman, W E; Misra, M; Hannigan, K; Ausman, J I

    1997-10-01

    There are many techniques for monitoring the injured brain following trauma, subarachnoid hemorrhage, or surgery. It is thought that the major determinants for recovery of injured cerebral tissue are oxygen, glucose delivery, and the clearance of metabolites. These factors, at optimal levels, are probably responsible for the regaining of neuronal functions. These parameters are in turn dependent on the tissue's blood flow and metabolism. We have been using a single, compact, polyethylene sensor, the Paratrend 7 for the measurement of cerebral oxygen tension, CO2, pH, and temperature. This sensor is designed for continuous blood gas analysis to aid in monitoring neurosurgical patients, both during surgery and in the intensive care unit. Using the Paratrend 7 sensor, we found the normal range of values to be: PO2 33 +/- 11 mm Hg; PCO2 48 +/- 7 mm Hg; pH 7.19 +/- 0.11. Critical measurements are considered to be tissue PO2 60 mm Hg, and pH effective method of measuring tissue cerebral oxygen tension, along with carbon dioxide levels, pH, and temperature.

  16. Systematic review of near-infrared spectroscopy determined cerebral oxygenation during non-cardiac surgery

    Nielsen, Henning B

    2014-01-01

    and number of patients included were recorded. There was included 113 articles and evidence suggests that rScO2 is reduced during thoracic surgery involving single lung ventilation, major abdominal surgery, hip surgery, and laparoscopic surgery with the patient placed in anti-Tredelenburg's position....... Shoulder arthroscopy in the beach chair and carotid endarterectomy with clamped internal carotid artery (ICA) also cause pronounced cerebral desaturation. A >20% reduction in rScO2 coincides with indices of regional and global cerebral ischemia during carotid endarterectomy. Following thoracic surgery...

  17. The effect of tourniquet deflation on hemodynamics and regional cerebral oxygen saturation in aged patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery

    Song, Inkyung; Kim, Dong Yeon; Kim, Youn Jin

    2012-01-01

    Background Inflation and deflation of a pneumatic tourniquet used in total knee replacement surgery induces various changes in patient's hemodynamic and metabolic status, which may result in serious complications, especially in aged patients. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a monitoring device designed to estimate the regional cerebral oxygen saturation. We evaluated the effect of tourniquet deflation on hemodynamics and regional cerebral oxygen saturation in aged patients undergoing tot...

  18. Positron emission tomography in cerebrovascular disease: The relationship between regional cerebral blood flow, blood volume and oxygen metabolism

    Herold, S.

    1985-03-01

    Positron emission tomography in cerebrovascular disease has demonstrated the importance of the relationship between regional cerebral blood flow and the cerebral metabolic activity. In acute stroke it has been found that within the first hours after the onset of symptoms cerebral blood flow in the affected area is more depressed than cerebral oxygen utilisation. This relative preservation of oxygen utilisation results from an increase in the oxygen extraction ratio far above its normal value. However, the oxygen extraction fraction subsequently falls in the following days indicating the transition from a situation of possibly reversible ischaemia to irreversible infarction. In patients with carotid occlusive disease an increase in the oxygen extraction ratio has been observed only in very few cases. It has been shown, however, that at an earlier stage the relationship between CBF and CBV (as CBF/CBV-ratio) provides a sensitive measure of diminished perfusion pressure which could be helpful for the selection of patients for EC-IC bypass surgery. In patients with sickle cell anaemia it has been found that oxygen delivery to the brain is maintained by an increase in cerebral blood flow, whereas the oxygen extraction ratio is not increased despite the presence of a low oxygen affinity haemoglobin. Preliminary observations in classical migraine suggest an ischaemic situation during the attack.

  19. Neuroprotection of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in sub-acute traumatic brain injury: not by immediately improving cerebral oxygen saturation and oxygen partial pressure.

    Zhou, Bao-Chun; Liu, Li-Jun; Liu, Bing

    2016-09-01

    Although hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy can promote the recovery of neural function in patients who have suffered traumatic brain injury (TBI), the underlying mechanism is unclear. We hypothesized that hyperbaric oxygen treatment plays a neuroprotective role in TBI by increasing regional transcranial oxygen saturation (rSO 2 ) and oxygen partial pressure (PaO 2 ). To test this idea, we compared two groups: a control group with 20 healthy people and a treatment group with 40 TBI patients. The 40 patients were given 100% oxygen of HBO for 90 minutes. Changes in rSO 2 were measured. The controls were also examined for rSO 2 and PaO 2 , but received no treatment. rSO 2 levels in the patients did not differ significantly after treatment, but levels before and after treatment were significantly lower than those in the control group. PaO 2 levels were significantly decreased after the 30-minute HBO treatment. Our findings suggest that there is a disorder of oxygen metabolism in patients with sub-acute TBI. HBO does not immediately affect cerebral oxygen metabolism, and the underlying mechanism still needs to be studied in depth.

  20. [Monitorization of the effects of spinal anaesthesia on cerebral oxygen saturation in elder patients using near-infrared spectroscopy].

    Kusku, Aysegul; Demir, Guray; Cukurova, Zafer; Eren, Gulay; Hergunsel, Oya

    2014-01-01

    Central blockage provided by spinal anaesthesia enables realization of many surgical procedures, whereas hemodynamic and respiratory changes influence systemic oxygen delivery leading to the potential development of series of problems such as cerebral ischemia, myocardial infarction and acute renal failure. This study was intended to detect potentially adverse effects of hemodynamic and respiratory changes on systemic oxygen delivery using cerebral oxymetric methods in patients who underwent spinal anaesthesia. Twenty-five ASA I-II Group patients aged 65-80 years scheduled for unilateral inguinal hernia repair under spinal anaesthesia were included in the study. Following standard monitorization baseline cerebral oxygen levels were measured using cerebral oximetric methods. Standardized Mini Mental Test (SMMT) was applied before and after the operation so as to determine the level of cognitive functioning of the cases. Using a standard technique and equal amounts of a local anaesthetic drug (15mg bupivacaine 5%) intratechal blockade was performed. Mean blood pressure (MBP), maximum heart rate (MHR), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and cerebral oxygen levels (rSO2) were preoperatively monitored for 60min. Pre- and postoperative haemoglobin levels were measured. The variations in data obtained and their correlations with the cerebral oxygen levels were investigated. Significant changes in pre- and postoperative measurements of haemoglobin levels and SMMT scores and intraoperative SpO2 levels were not observed. However, significant variations were observed in intraoperative MBP, MHR and rSO2 levels. Besides, a correlation between variations in rSO2, MBP and MHR was determined. Evaluation of the data obtained in the study demonstrated that post-spinal decline in blood pressure and also heart rate decreases systemic oxygen delivery and adversely effects cerebral oxygen levels. However, this downward change did not result in deterioration of cognitive functioning

  1. Monitorization of the effects of spinal anaesthesia on cerebral oxygen saturation in elder patients using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Kusku, Aysegul; Demir, Guray; Cukurova, Zafer; Eren, Gulay; Hergunsel, Oya

    2014-01-01

    Central blockage provided by spinal anaesthesia enables realization of many surgical procedures, whereas hemodynamic and respiratory changes influence systemic oxygen delivery leading to the potential development of series of problems such as cerebral ischemia, myocardial infarction and acute renal failure. This study was intended to detect potentially adverse effects of hemodynamic and respiratory changes on systemic oxygen delivery using cerebral oxymetric methods in patients who underwent spinal anaesthesia. Twenty-five ASA I-II Group patients aged 65-80 years scheduled for unilateral inguinal hernia repair under spinal anaesthesia were included in the study. Following standard monitorization baseline cerebral oxygen levels were measured using cerebral oximetric methods. Standardized Mini Mental Test (SMMT) was applied before and after the operation so as to determine the level of cognitive functioning of the cases. Using a standard technique and equal amounts of a local anaesthetic drug (15mg bupivacaine 5%) intratechal blockade was performed. Mean blood pressure (MBP), maximum heart rate (MHR), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and cerebral oxygen levels (rSO2) were preoperatively monitored for 60min. Pre- and postoperative haemoglobin levels were measured. The variations in data obtained and their correlations with the cerebral oxygen levels were investigated. Significant changes in pre- and postoperative measurements of haemoglobin levels and SMMT scores and intraoperative SpO2 levels were not observed. However, significant variations were observed in intraoperative MBP, MHR and rSO2 levels. Besides, a correlation between variations in rSO2, MBP and MHR was determined. Evaluation of the data obtained in the study demonstrated that post-spinal decline in blood pressure and also heart rate decreases systemic oxygen delivery and adversely effects cerebral oxygen levels. However, this downward change did not result in deterioration of cognitive functioning

  2. Effects of midazolam and morphine on cerebral oxygenation and hemodynamics in ventilated premature infants.

    van Alfen-van der Velden, A A E M; Hopman, J C W; Klaessens, J H G M; Feuth, T; Sengers, R C A; Liem, K D

    2006-01-01

    Midazolam sedation and morphine analgesia are commonly used in ventilated premature infants. To evaluate the effects of midazolam versus morphine infusion on cerebral oxygenation and hemodynamics in ventilated premature infants. 11 patients (GA 26.6-33.0 weeks, BW 780-2,335 g) were sedated with midazolam (loading dose 0.2 mg/kg, maintenance 0.2 mg/kg/h) and 10 patients (GA 26.4-33.3 weeks, BW 842-1,955 g) were sedated with morphine (loading dose 0.05 mg/kg, maintenance 0.01 mg/kg/h). Changes in oxyhemoglobin (Delta cO2Hb) and deoxyhemoglobin (Delta cHHb) were assessed using near infrared spectrophotometry. Changes in cHbD (= Delta cO(2)Hb - Delta cHHb) reflect changes in cerebral blood oxygenation and changes in concentration of total hemoglobin (Delta ctHb = Delta cO2Hb + Delta cHHb) represent changes in cerebral blood volume (DeltaCBV). Changes in cerebral blood flow velocity (DeltaCBFV) were intermittently measured using Doppler ultrasound. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), arterial oxygen saturation (saO2) and transcutaneous measured pO2 (tcpO2) and pCO2 (tcpCO2) were continuously registered. Statistical analyses were carried out using linear mixed models to account for the longitudinal character study design. Within 15 min after the loading dose of midazolam, a decrease in saO2, tcpO2 and cHbD was observed in 5/11 infants. In addition, a fall in MABP and CBFV was observed 15 min after midazolam administration. Immediately after morphine infusion a decrease in saO2, tcpO2 and cHbD was observed in 6/10 infants. Furthermore, morphine infusion resulted in a persistent increase in CBV. Administration of midazolam and morphine in ventilated premature infants causes significant changes in cerebral oxygenation and hemodynamics, which might be harmful. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. The effects of dexamethasone on post-asphyxial cerebral oxygenation in the preterm fetal sheep

    Lear, Christopher A; Koome, Miriam E; Davidson, Joanne O; Drury, Paul P; Quaedackers, Josine S; Galinsky, Robert; Gunn, Alistair J; Bennet, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to clinical doses of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone increases brain activity and causes seizures in normoxic preterm fetal sheep without causing brain injury. In contrast, the same treatment after asphyxia increased brain injury. We hypothesised that increased injury was in part mediated by a mismatch between oxygen demand and oxygen supply. In preterm fetal sheep at 0.7 gestation we measured cerebral oxygenation using near-infrared spectroscopy, electroencephalographic (EEG) activity, and carotid blood flow (CaBF) from 24 h before until 72 h after asphyxia induced by 25 min of umbilical cord occlusion. Ewes received dexamethasone intramuscularly (12 mg 3 ml–1) or saline 15 min after the end of asphyxia. Fetuses were studied for 3 days after occlusion. During the first 6 h of recovery after asphyxia, dexamethasone treatment was associated with a significantly greater fall in CaBF (P < 0.05), increased carotid vascular resistance (P < 0.001) and a greater fall in cerebral oxygenation as measured by the difference between oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin (delta haemoglobin; P < 0.05). EEG activity was similarly suppressed in both groups. From 6 to 10 h onward, dexamethasone treatment was associated with a return of CaBF to saline control levels, increased EEG power (P < 0.005), greater epileptiform transient activity (P < 0.001), increased oxidised cytochrome oxidase (P < 0.05) and an attenuated increase in [delta haemoglobin] (P < 0.05). In conclusion, dexamethasone treatment after asphyxia is associated with greater hypoperfusion in the critical latent phase, leading to impaired intracerebral oxygenation that may exacerbate neural injury after asphyxia. PMID:25384775

  4. The influence of norepinephrine and phenylephrine on cerebral perfusion and oxygenation during propofol-remifentanil and propofol-remifentanil-dexmedetomidine anaesthesia in piglets

    Mikkelsen, Mai Louise Grandsgaard; Ambrus, Rikard; Rasmussen, Rune

    2018-01-01

    of dexmedetomidine. Cerebral perfusion measured by laser speckle contrast imaging was related to cerebral oxygenation as measured by an intracerebral Licox probe (partial pressure of oxygen) and transcranial near infrared spectroscopy technology (NIRS) (cerebral oxygen saturation). Results During propofol......–remifentanil anaesthesia, increases in blood pressure by norepinephrine and phenylephrine did not change cerebral perfusion significantly, but cerebral partial pressure of oxygen (Licox) increased following vasopressors in both groups and increases following norepinephrine were significant (NBP: P = 0.04, LBP: P = 0......–remifentanil–dexmedetomidine anaesthesia was not followed by significant changes in cerebral perfusion. Licox measures increased significantly following both vasopressors in both groups, whereas the decreases in NIRS measures were only significant in the NBP group. Conclusions Cerebral partial pressure of oxygen measured by Licox...

  5. Effect of ephedrine and phenylephrine on brain oxygenation and microcirculation in anaesthetised patients with cerebral tumours

    Koch, Klaus Ulrik; Tietze, Anna; Aanerud, Joel

    2017-01-01

    extraction fraction. Surgery is initiated after MRI/PET measurements and subdural intracranial pressure is measured. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study was approved by the Central Denmark Region Committee on Health Research Ethics (12 June 2015; 1-10-72-116-15). Results will be disseminated via peer......INTRODUCTION: During brain tumour surgery, vasopressor drugs are commonly administered to increase mean arterial blood pressure with the aim of maintaining sufficient cerebral perfusion pressure. Studies of the commonly used vasopressors show that brain oxygen saturation is reduced after......, anaesthetised patients will be randomised to receive either phenylephrine or ephedrine infusion until mean arterial blood pressure increases to above 60 mm Hg or 20% above baseline. Twenty-four patients were allocated to MRI and another 24 patients to PET examination. MRI measurements include cerebral blood...

  6. Cerebral oxygenation is associated with neurodevelopmental outcome of preterm children at age 2 to 3 years

    Verhagen, Elise A.; Van Braeckel, Koenraad N. J. A.; van der Veere, Christa N.; Groen, Henk; Dijk, Peter H.; Hulzebos, Christian V.; Bos, Arend F.

    AIM: The aim of the study was to determine whether regional cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (rc SO2 ) and fractional tissue oxygen extraction (FTOE), using near-infrared spectroscopy, are associated with neurodevelopmental outcome of preterm infants. METHOD: We measured rc SO2 on days 1, 2, 3, 4,

  7. The importance of bilateral monitoring of cerebral oxygenation (NIRS): Clinical case of asymmetry during cardiopulmonary bypass secondary to previous cerebral infarction.

    Matcan, S; Sanabria Carretero, P; Gómez Rojo, M; Castro Parga, L; Reinoso-Barbero, F

    2018-03-01

    Cerebral oximetry based on near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology is used to determine cerebral tissue oxygenation. We hereby present the clinical case of a 12-month old child with right hemiparesis secondary to prior left middle cerebral artery stroke 8 months ago. The child underwent surgical enlargement of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) with cardiopulmonary bypass. During cardiopulmonary bypass, asymmetric NIRS results were detected between both hemispheres. The utilization of multimodal neuromonitoring (NIRS-BIS) allowed acting on both perfusion pressure and anesthetic depth to balance out the supply and demand of cerebral oxygen consumption. No new neurological sequelae were observed postoperatively. We consider bilateral NIRS monitoring necessary in order to detect asymmetries between cerebral hemispheres. Although asymmetries were not present at baseline, they can arise intraoperatively and its monitoring thus allows the detection and treatment of cerebral ischemia-hypoxia in the healthy hemisphere, which if undetected and untreated would lead to additional neurological damage. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of glycerol on regional cerebral blood flow, blood volume and oxygen metabolism

    Ishikawa, Masatsune; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Nagata, Izumi; Yamagata, Sen; Taki, Waro; Kobayashi, Akira; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Nishizawa, Sadahiko.

    1989-01-01

    Using positron emission tomography with 15 O-labelled CO 2 , O 2 and CO gases, the effects of glycerol on regional cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO 2 ) were investigated in 6 patients with meningioma accompanying peritumoral brain edema. The same study was done in 5 normal volunteers. The changes of blood gases, hematocrit and hemoglobin were also examined. After a drip infusion of glycerol, the regional CBF increased not only in the peritumoral cortex and white matter but also in the intact cortex and white matter on the contralateral side. The increase of CBF was extensive and substantially there were no regional differences. In contrast, the changes of CMRO 2 were not significant. This was derived from the increase in oxygen extraction fraction throughout extensive areas including the peritumoral area. There were no changes in CBV. Hematocrit and hemoglobin decreased to a small degree. In the normal volunteers, the same findings were noted. Thus, glycerol increases the functional reserve for cerebral oxygen metabolism, not only in the peritumoral regions but also in the intact regions. The effects of glycerol on hemodynamics and metabolism were discussed with reference to some differences from mannitol. (author)

  9. Effect of early rehabilitation training on oxygen free radical generation and nerve injury in patients with cerebral hemorrhage

    Zhao-Shu Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of early rehabilitation training combined with edaravone on oxygen free radical generation and nerve injury in patients with cerebral hemorrhage. Methods: A total of 56 patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage who were treated in Zigong Third People’s Hospital between July 2014 and March 2017 were selected and randomly divided into early rehabilitation group and routine rehabilitation group, the early rehabilitation group began the rehabilitation training 2 d after cerebral hemorrhage condition was stabilized, and routine rehabilitation group began the rehabilitation training 14 d after cerebral hemorrhage. Serum contents of oxygen free radicals, nerve injury markers and neurotrophic molecules were detected 28 d and 56 d after cerebral hemorrhage. Results: 28 d and 56 d after cerebral hemorrhage, serum MDA, AOPP, 8-OHdG, GFAP, NSE, Tf, Ft and S100B levels of early rehabilitation group were significantly lower than those of routine rehabilitation group while BDNF, NGF, NTF-α and IGF-I levels were significantly higher than those of routine rehabilitation group. Conclusion: Early rehabilitation training combined with edaravone for cerebral hemorrhage can inhibit the oxygen free radical generation, reduce the degree of nerve injury and improve the neurotrophic state.

  10. Global brain blood-oxygen level responses to autonomic challenges in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is accompanied by brain injury, perhaps resulting from apnea-related hypoxia or periods of impaired cerebral perfusion. Perfusion changes can be determined indirectly by evaluation of cerebral blood volume and oxygenation alterations, which can be measured rapidly and non-invasively with the global blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal, a magnetic resonance imaging procedure. We assessed acute BOLD responses in OSA subjects to pressor challenges that elicit cerebral blood flow changes, using a two-group comparative design with healthy subjects as a reference. We separately assessed female and male patterns, since OSA characteristics and brain injury differ between sexes. We studied 94 subjects, 37 with newly-diagnosed, untreated OSA (6 female (age mean ± std: 52.1±8.1 yrs; apnea/hypopnea index [AHI]: 27.7±15.6 events/hr and 31 male 54.3±8.4 yrs; AHI: 37.4±19.6 events/hr, and 20 female (age 50.5±8.1 yrs and 37 male (age 45.6±9.2 yrs healthy control subjects. We measured brain BOLD responses every 2 s while subjects underwent cold pressor, hand grip, and Valsalva maneuver challenges. The global BOLD signal rapidly changed after the first 2 s of each challenge, and differed in magnitude between groups to two challenges (cold pressor, hand grip, but not to the Valsalva maneuver (repeated measures ANOVA, p<0.05. OSA females showed greater differences from males in response magnitude and pattern, relative to healthy counterparts. Cold pressor BOLD signal increases (mean ± adjusted standard error at the 8 s peak were: OSA 0.14±0.08% vs. Control 0.31±0.06%, and hand grip at 6 s were: OSA 0.08±0.03% vs. Control at 0.30±0.02%. These findings, indicative of reduced cerebral blood flow changes to autonomic challenges in OSA, complement earlier reports of altered resting blood flow and reduced cerebral artery responsiveness. Females are more affected than males, an outcome which may contribute to the sex

  11. Somatosensory evoked changes in cerebral oxygen consumption measured non-invasively in premature neonates

    Roche-Labarbe, Nadege; Fenoglio, Angela; Radakrishnan, Harsha; Kocienski-Filip, Marcia; Carp, Stefan A.; Dubb, Jay; Boas, David A.; Grant, P. Ellen; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2013-01-01

    The hemodynamic functional response is used as a reliable marker of neuronal activity in countless studies of brain function and cognition. In newborns and infants, however, conflicting results have appeared in the literature concerning the typical response, and there is little information on brain metabolism and functional activation. Measurement of all hemodynamic components and oxygen metabolism is critical for understanding neurovascular coupling in the developing brain. To this end, we combined multiple near infrared spectroscopy techniques to measure oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations, cerebral blood volume (CBV), and relative cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the somatosensory cortex of 6 preterm neonates during passive tactile stimulation of the hand. By combining these measures we estimated relative changes in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (rCMRO2). CBF starts increasing immediately after stimulus onset, and returns to baseline before blood volume. This is consistent with the model of pre-capillary arteriole active dilation driving the CBF response, with a subsequent CBV increase influenced by capillaries and veins dilating passively to accommodate the extra blood. rCMRO2 estimated using the steady-state formulation shows a biphasic pattern: an increase immediately after stimulus onset, followed by a post-stimulus undershoot due to blood flow returning faster to baseline than oxygenation. However, assuming a longer mean transit time from the arterial to the venous compartment, due to the immature vascular system of premature infants, reduces the post-stimulus undershoot and increases the flow/consumption ratio to values closer to adult values reported in the literature. We are the first to report changes in local rCBF and rCMRO2 during functional activation in preterm infants. The ability to measure these variables in addition to hemoglobin concentration changes is critical for understanding neurovascular coupling in the developing

  12. Monitoring Cerebral and Renal Oxygenation Status during Neonatal Digestive Surgeries Using Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    Jonathan Beck

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDepending on the initial pathology, hypovolemia, intra-abdominal hypertension, and sepsis are often encountered in neonatal digestive surgery. Accurate newborn monitoring during and after surgery is essential to adapt resuscitation protocols. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS is non-invasive and can detect hypoperfusion which indicates a low circulatory blood flow, regardless of the cause.ObjectiveEvaluating changes in cerebral and renal regional oxygen saturation during neonatal digestive surgeries, conducted according to normal practices, with commonly used monitoring parameters. Analyzing retrospectively the inter-relationships between NIRS values and mean arterial pressure (MAP values as well as pre-ductal SpO2.MethodsProspective, descriptive, monocentric study. All neonates referred for surgery were included. NIRS allows the measurement of cerebral and renal oxygenation fluctuations, as well as calculating difference in intraoperative and postoperative values.ResultsNineteen patients were included. Cerebral regional oxygen saturation (C rSO2 values were stable while renal regional oxygen saturation (R rSO2 values tended to decrease with time during surgery. Indeed, 72% of rSO2 decline episodes occurred after the first 30 min of surgery, without any significant statistical differences for the next 90 min of surgery. After surgery, the lowest average C and R rSO2 values were evidenced during the first 6 h, with 60% of C rSO2 and R rSO2 anomalies occurring in that time frame. There was no significant statistical difference observed in the following 18 h. There was a significant correlation between R rSO2 and SpO2 values (p < 0.01, but not with C rSO2 values. There was no correlation with the MAP either for the C rSO2 values or R rSO2 ones.ConclusionNIRS is a promising non-invasive bedside tool to monitor cerebral and tissue perfusion, analyzing tissue microcirculation. NIRS has its interest to guide neonatal digestive

  13. Depressed cerebral oxygen metabolism in patients with chronic renal failure. A positron emission tomography study

    Hirakata, Hideki; Kanai, Hidetoshi; Nakane, Hiroshi; Fujii, Ken-ichiro; Hirakata, Eriko; Ibayashi, Setsuro; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Deenitchna, S.S.; Fujishima, Masatoshi

    2001-01-01

    In order to elucidate brain oxygen metabolism in uremic patients, the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction (rOEF) and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO 2 ) were measured by positron emission tomography (PET) in both 10 hemodialysis patients (HD: male [m]/female [f]=2/8, age of 49±3 [SEM] years old, HD duration of 113±26 months) and 13 pre-dialysis renal failure patients (CRF: m/f=10/3, age of 61±2 years old, serum creatinine (SCr) of 6.3±1.0 mg/dl). Data were compared with 20 non-uremic subjects (Control: m/f=7/13, age of 62±2 years old, SCr of 0.9±0.1 mg/dl). They had no neurological abnormalities, congestive heart failure, history of cerebrovascular accident, diabetes mellitus, or symptomatic brain lesion on magnetic resonance imaging. The age of HD was significantly younger than the other groups (p 2 in both HD (1.82±0.10 ml/min/100 g) and CRF (1.95±0.09) showed significantly lower values as compared to Control (2.23±0.05) (p<0.01, respectively). Hemispheric rCBF in HD (35.6±2.1 ml/100 g/min) and in CRF (36.1±2.1) were not different from that in Control (31.8±1.4). Hemispheric rOEF in CRF (45.7±1.6%) was significantly higher than that in Control (40.5±1.2%) (p<0.02), but that in HD (43.7±1.9%) did not increase significantly. These tendencies were similar in all regions of interest, especially in the cerebral cortices, but not in the cerebellum. All PET parameters in the frontal cortices tended to show the lowest value in renal failure patients. For all HD patients, rCBF in both the frontal cortex and the white matter correlated inversely with HD duration (frontal cortex: r=-0.649, p<0.05; white matter: r=-0.706, p<0.02). Based on these data, it is concluded that brain oxygen metabolism is depressed in renal failure patients on or before hemodialysis treatment. The cause for the depressed brain oxygen metabolism is considered to be due either to the dysregulation of cerebral circulation or to lower brain cell activity. (author)

  14. Smoking before isometric exercise amplifies myocardial stress and dysregulates baroreceptor sensitivity and cerebral oxygenation.

    Anyfanti, Panagiota; Triantafyllidou, Eleftheria; Papadopoulos, Stavros; Triantafyllou, Areti; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Kyparos, Antonios; Vrabas, Ioannis S; Douma, Stella; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Dipla, Konstantina

    2017-06-01

    This crossover study examined whether acute cardiovascular responses, baroreceptor sensitivity (BRS), and brain oxygenation during isometric exercise are altered after cigarette smoking. Twelve young, habitual smokers randomly performed a smoking and a control protocol, during which participants smoked one cigarette (0.9 mg nicotine) or a sham cigarette, before exercise. Testing involved baseline, a 5-minute smoking, a 10-minute post-smoking rest, 3-minute handgrip exercise (30% maximum voluntary contraction), and recovery. Beat-to-beat blood pressure, heart rate (HR), and cerebral oxygenation (near infrared spectroscopy) were continuously monitored. Double-product, stroke volume (SV), cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance and BRS were assessed. During post-smoking rest, systolic or diastolic blood pressure (140.8 ± 12.1/87.0 ± 6.9 vs. 125.9 ± 7.1/77.3 ± 5.5 mm Hg), HR, and double product were higher in the smoking versus the control protocol, whereas BRS was lower (P exercise, smoking resulted in greater HR and double product (17,240 ± 3893 vs. 15,424 ± 3173 mm Hg·bpm) and lower BRS versus the control protocol (P smoking elicited a delayed return of brain oxygenation indices, lower BRS, and higher double product. Smoking a cigarette shortly before the exercise session amplifies myocardial stress and dysregulates autonomic function and cerebral oxygenation during exercise and recovery, even in young habitual smokers, perceived as free from long-term cardiovascular effects of smoking. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fatty Acid Methyl Esters and Solutol HS 15 Confer Neuroprotection After Focal and Global Cerebral Ischemia

    Lin, Hung Wen; Saul, Isabel; Gresia, Victoria L.; Neumann, Jake T.; Dave, Kunjan R.; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    We previously showed that palmitic methyl ester (PAME) and stearic acid methyl ester (SAME) are simultaneously released from the sympathetic ganglion and PAME possesses potent vasodilatory properties which may be important in cerebral ischemia. Since PAME is a potent vasodilator simultaneously released with SAME, our hypothesis was that PAME/SAME confers neuroprotection in rat models of focal/global cerebral ischemia. We also examined the neuroprotective properties of Soluto...

  16. Transient global amnesia following cerebral angiography with non-ionic contrast medium

    Schamschula, R.G.; Soo, M.Y.S.

    1994-01-01

    Transit global amnesia (TGA) is an uncommon syndrome of recent memory deficit and inability to learn new data, usually resolving within 24 hours. Two cases following use of non-ionic contrast media in cerebral angiography are presented. The neuroanatomy of memory is reviewed. Possible aetiologies of TGA in relation to cerebral angiography include ischemia (embolic, arterial spasm), epilepsy that may be primary or tumour-related and direct toxic effects of contrast media. 19 refs., 1 fig

  17. PET imaging of cerebral perfusion and oxygen consumption in acute ischemic stroke: Relation to outcome

    Marchal, G.; Serrati, C.; Rioux, P.; Petit-Taboue, M.C.; Viader, F.; Sayette, V. de la; Doze, F. le; Lonchon, P; Derlon, J.M.; Orgogozo, J.M.; Baron, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The authors used positron emission tomography (PET) to assess the relation between combined imaging of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption 5-18 h after first middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke and neurological outcome at 2 months. All 18 patients could be classified into three visually defined PET patterns of perfusion and oxygen consumption changes. Pattern 1 suggested extensive irreversible damage and was consistently associated with poor outcome. Pattern 2 suggested continuing ischemia and was associated with variable outcome. Pattern 3 with hyperperfusion and little or no metabolic alteration, was associated with excellent recovery, which suggests that early reperfusion is beneficial. This relation between PET and outcome was highly significant. The results suggest that within 5-18 h of stroke onset, PET is a good predictor of outcome in patterns 1 and 3, for which therapy seems limited. The absence of predictive value for pattern 2 suggests that it is due to a reversible ischemic state that is possibly amenable to therapy. These findings may have important implications for acute MCA stroke management and for patients' selection for therapeutic trials

  18. Cerebral oxygenation monitoring in patients with bilateral carotid stenosis undergoing urgent cardiac surgery: Observational case series

    Dincer Aktuerk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with significant bilateral carotid artery stenosis requiring urgent cardiac surgery have an increased risk of stroke and death. The optimal management strategy remains inconclusive, and the available evidence does not support the superiority of one strategy over another. Materials and Methods: A number of noninvasive strategies have been developed for minimizing perioperative stroke including continuous real-time monitoring of cerebral oxygenation with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS. The number of patients presenting with this combination (bilateral significant carotid stenosis requiring urgent cardiac surgery in any single institution will be small and hence there is a lack of large randomized studies. Results: This case series describes our early experience with NIRS in a select group of patients with significant bilateral carotid stenosis undergoing urgent cardiac surgery (n = 8. In contrast to other studies, this series is a single surgeon, single center study, where the entire surgery (both distal ends and proximal ends was performed during single aortic clamp technique, which effectively removes several confounding variables. NIRS monitoring led to the early recognition of decreased cerebral oxygenation, and corrective steps (increased cardiopulmonary bypass flow, increased pCO 2 , etc., were taken. Conclusion: The study shows good clinical outcome with the use of NIRS. This is our "work in progress," and we aim to conduct a larger study.

  19. Alterations in the Cerebral Microvascular Proteome Expression Profile After Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia in Rat

    Spray, Stine; Johansson, Sara E; Edwards, Alistair V G

    2017-01-01

    . The proteomic profile of the isolated cerebral microvasculature 72 h after GCI (compared to sham) indicated that the main expressional changes could be divided into nine categories: (1) cellular respiration, (2) remodelling of the extracellular matrix, (3) decreased contractile phenotype, (4) clathrin...

  20. Noninvasive measurement of cerebral venous oxygenation in neonates with a multi-wavelength, fiber-coupled laser diode optoacoustic system

    Herrmann, Stephen; Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Fonseca, Rafael A.; Richardson, C. Joan; Shanina, Ekaterina; Prough, Donald S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2018-03-01

    Noninvasive measurement of cerebral venous oxygenation in neonates could provide critical information for clinicians such as cerebral hypoxia without the risks involved with invasive catheterization. Evaluation of cerebral hypoxia is important in many clinical settings such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, perfusion monitoring in cardiovascular surgery or in traumatic brain injury. By probing the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), a large central cerebral vein, we can obtain stable signals with our recently developed multi-wavelength, fiber-coupled laser diode optoacoustic system for measurement of SSS blood oxygenation. The neonatal SSS oxygenation was measured in the reflection mode through open anterior and posterior fontanelles without obscuration by the overlying calvarium. In the transmission mode it was measured through the skull in the occipital area. Our device is lightweight, easily maneuverable, and user friendly for physicians. We monitored the SSS oxygenation in neonates admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of UTMB with varying gestation, birth weight and clinical histories to identify normal range and difference between neonates with and without risk factors for cerebral hypoxia.

  1. Cerebral oxygenation in the beach chair position for shoulder surgery in regional anesthesia: impact on cerebral blood flow and neurobehavioral outcome.

    Aguirre, José A; Märzendorfer, Olivia; Brada, Muriel; Saporito, Andrea; Borgeat, Alain; Bühler, Philipp

    2016-12-01

    Beach chair position is considered a potential risk factor for central neurological events particularly if combined with low blood pressure. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of regional anesthesia on cerebral blood flow and neurobehavioral outcome. This is a prospective, assessor-blinded observational study evaluating patients in the beach chair position undergoing shoulder surgery under regional anesthesia. University hospital operating room. Forty patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists classes I-II physical status scheduled for elective shoulder surgery. Cerebral saturation and blood flow of the middle cerebral artery were measured prior to anesthesia and continued after beach chair positioning until discharge to the postanesthesia care unit. The anesthesiologist was blinded for these values. Controlled hypotension with systolic blood pressure≤100mm Hg was maintained during surgery. Neurobehavioral tests and values of regional cerebral saturation, bispectral index, the mean maximal blood flow of the middle cerebral artery, and invasive blood pressure were measured prior to regional anesthesia, and measurements were repeated after placement of the patient on the beach chair position and every 20 minutes thereafter until discharge to postanesthesia care unit. The neurobehavioral tests were repeated the day after surgery. The incidence of cerebral desaturation events was 5%. All patients had a significant blood pressure drop 5 minutes after beach chair positioning, measured at the heart as well as the acoustic meatus levels, when compared with baseline values (Psurgery (Pshoulder surgery had no major impact on cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygenation. However, some impact on neurobehavioral outcome 24 hours after surgery was observed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhanced deep ocean ventilation and oxygenation with global warming

    Froelicher, T. L.; Jaccard, S.; Dunne, J. P.; Paynter, D.; Gruber, N.

    2014-12-01

    Twenty-first century coupled climate model simulations, observations from the recent past, and theoretical arguments suggest a consistent trend towards warmer ocean temperatures and fresher polar surface oceans in response to increased radiative forcing resulting in increased upper ocean stratification and reduced ventilation and oxygenation of the deep ocean. Paleo-proxy records of the warming at the end of the last ice age, however, suggests a different outcome, namely a better ventilated and oxygenated deep ocean with global warming. Here we use a four thousand year global warming simulation from a comprehensive Earth System Model (GFDL ESM2M) to show that this conundrum is a consequence of different rates of warming and that the deep ocean is actually better ventilated and oxygenated in a future warmer equilibrated climate consistent with paleo-proxy records. The enhanced deep ocean ventilation in the Southern Ocean occurs in spite of increased positive surface buoyancy fluxes and a constancy of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds - circumstances that would otherwise be expected to lead to a reduction in deep ocean ventilation. This ventilation recovery occurs through a global scale interaction of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation undergoing a multi-centennial recovery after an initial century of transient decrease and transports salinity-rich waters inform the subtropical surface ocean to the Southern Ocean interior on multi-century timescales. The subsequent upwelling of salinity-rich waters in the Southern Ocean strips away the freshwater cap that maintains vertical stability and increases open ocean convection and the formation of Antarctic Bottom Waters. As a result, the global ocean oxygen content and the nutrient supply from the deep ocean to the surface are higher in a warmer ocean. The implications for past and future changes in ocean heat and carbon storage will be discussed.

  3. Database of normal human cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, cerebral oxygen extraction fraction and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen measured by positron emission tomography with {sup 15}O-labelled carbon dioxide or water, carbon monoxide and oxygen: a multicentre study in Japan

    Ito, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Akita Research Institute of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Division of Brain Sciences, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-Machi, 980-8575, Aoba-Ku, Sendai (Japan); Kanno, Iwao [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Akita Research Institute of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan); Kato, Chietsugu [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Sasaki, Toshiaki [Cyclotoron Research Center, Iwate Medical University, Morioka (Japan); Ishii, Kenji [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo (Japan); Ouchi, Yasuomi [Positron Medical Center, Hamamatsu Medical Center, Hamakita (Japan); Iida, Akihiko [Nagoya City Rehabilitation Center, Nagoya (Japan); Okazawa, Hidehiko [PET Unit, Research Institute, Shiga Medical Center, Moriyama (Japan); Hayashida, Kohei [Department of Radiology, National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Tsuyuguchi, Naohiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City University Medical School, Osaka (Japan); Ishii, Kazunari [Division of Imaging Research, Hyogo Institute for Aging Brain and Cognitive Disorders, Himeji, Hyogo (Japan); Kuwabara, Yasuo [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Senda, Michio [Department of Image-based Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan)

    2004-05-01

    Measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) by positron emission tomography (PET) with oxygen-15 labelled carbon dioxide (C{sup 15}O{sub 2}) or {sup 15}O-labelled water (H{sub 2}{sup 15}O), {sup 15}O-labelled carbon monoxide (C{sup 15}O) and {sup 15}O-labelled oxygen ({sup 15}O{sub 2}) is useful for diagnosis and treatment planning in cases of cerebrovascular disease. The measured values theoretically depend on various factors, which may differ between PET centres. This study explored the applicability of a database of {sup 15}O-PET by examining between-centre and within-centre variation in values. Eleven PET centres participated in this multicentre study; seven used the steady-state inhalation method, one used build-up inhalation and three used bolus administration of C{sup 15}O{sub 2} (or H{sub 2}{sup 15}O) and {sup 15}O{sub 2}. All used C{sup 15}O for measurement of CBV. Subjects comprised 70 healthy volunteers (43 men and 27 women; mean age 51.8{+-}15.1 years). Overall mean{+-}SD values for cerebral cortical regions were: CBF=44.4{+-}6.5 ml 100 ml{sup -1} min{sup -1}; CBV=3.8{+-}0.7 ml 100 ml{sup -1}; OEF=0.44{+-}0.06; CMRO{sub 2}=3.3{+-}0.5 ml 100 ml{sup -1} min{sup -1}. Significant between-centre variation was observed in CBV, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} by one-way analysis of variance. However, the overall inter-individual variation in CBF, CBV, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} was acceptably small. Building a database of normal cerebral haemodynamics obtained by the{sup 15}O-PET methods may be practicable. (orig.)

  4. Cerebral artery dilatation maintains cerebral oxygenation at extreme altitude and in acute hypoxia--an ultrasound and MRI study

    Wilson, Mark H.; Edsell, Mark E. G.; Davagnanam, Indran; Hirani, Shashivadan P.; Martin, Dan S.; Levett, Denny Z. H.; Thornton, John S.; Golay, Xavier; Strycharczuk, Lisa; Newman, Stanton P.; Montgomery, Hugh E.; Grocott, Mike P. W.; Imray, Christopher H. E.; Ahuja, V.; Aref-Adib, G.; Burnham, R.; Chisholm, A.; Clarke, K.; Coates, D.; Coates, M.; Cook, D.; Cox, M.; Dhillon, S.; Dougall, C.; Doyle, P.; Duncan, P.; Edsell, M.; Edwards, L.; Evans, L.; Gardiner, P.; Grocott, M.; Gunning, P.; Hart, N.; Harrington, J.; Harvey, J.; Holloway, C.; Howard, D.; Hurlbut, D.; Imray, C.; Ince, C.; Jonas, M.; van der Kaaij, J.; Khosravi, M.; Kolfschoten, N.; Levett, D.; Luery, H.; Luks, A.; Martin, D.; McMorrow, R.; Meale, P.

    2011-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler is a widely used noninvasive technique for assessing cerebral artery blood flow. All previous high altitude studies assessing cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the field that have used Doppler to measure arterial blood velocity have assumed vessel diameter to not alter. Here, we

  5. Affect during incremental exercise: The role of inhibitory cognition, autonomic cardiac function, and cerebral oxygenation.

    Weslley Quirino Alves da Silva

    Full Text Available Pleasure is a key factor for physical activity behavior in sedentary individuals. Inhibitory cognitive control may play an important role in pleasure perception while exercising, especially at high intensities. In addition, separate work suggests that autonomic regulation and cerebral hemodynamics influence the affective and cognitive responses during exercise.We investigated the effects of exercise intensity on affect, inhibitory control, cardiac autonomic function, and prefrontal cortex (PFC oxygenation.Thirty-seven sedentary young adults performed two experimental conditions (exercise and control in separate sessions in a repeated-measures design. In the exercise condition, participants performed a maximum graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer as we continuously measured oxygen consumption, heart rate variability (HRV, and PFC oxygenation. At each of 8 intensity levels we also measured inhibitory control (Stroop test, associative and dissociative thoughts (ADT, and affective/pleasure ratings. In the control condition, participants sat motionless on a cycle ergometer without active pedaling, and we collected the same measures at the same points in time as the exercise condition. We evaluated the main effects and interactions of exercise condition and intensity level for each measure using two-way repeated measures ANOVAs. Additionally, we evaluated the relationship between affect and inhibitory control, ADT, HRV, and PFC oxygenation using Pearson's correlation coefficients.For exercise intensities below and at the ventilatory threshold (VT, participants reported feeling neutral, with preservation of inhibitory control, while intensities above the VT were associated with displeasure (p<0.001, decreased inhibitory control and HRV (p<0.001, and increased PFC oxygenation (p<0.001. At the highest exercise intensity, pleasure was correlated with the low-frequency index of HRV (r = -0.34; p<0.05 and the low-frequency/high-frequency HRV ratio (r

  6. Regional cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption during normal human sleep

    Takahashi, Ken [Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1989-09-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional oxygen extraction fraction (rCEF) and regional cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (rCMRO{sub 2}) were measured using the continuous inhalation technique for {sup 15}O with positron emission tomography (PET) during both wakefulness and sleep. Ten paid volunteers, with a mean age of 21.6 yrs., were deprived of sleep for a period of approximately 20 hours, and the experiments were performed mostly in the morning. {sup 15}O activity of both whole blood and the plasma, pixel count of PET, total arterial blood oxygen content were used for analysis of rCBF, rOEF and rCMRO{sub 2}. PET scannings were carried out mostly during the very light non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, i.e. stage 1 and/or 2, and wakefulness. About 10 minutes after the start of continuous inhalation of {sup 15}O gas, the {sup 15}O activity of the brain was found to be in a steady-state condition. During this steady-state condition, PET scannings were performed for about 10 minutes. Regions of interest, square in shape and having an area of 2.8 cm{sup 3}, were set in each cortex on PET images of a horizontal cross-section of the brain, set at 45 mm above the orbitomeatal line. The rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} were analysed in 5 of 10 male subjects during both wakefulness and NREM sleep, and only 3 were done during three sleep stages, including REM sleep. Levels of rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} were found to be decreased in NREM sleep, and the decreasing rates were calculated at 10.2% and 7.6% from the level of wakefulness, respectively. There was no significant difference in the mean value of rOEF between wakefulness and NREM sleep. There were no significant regional differences found in the rate of decrease among the frontal, temporal and occipital cortices. It was considered that the decrease of rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} during NREM sleep suggested a decrease of the activity levels in the cerebral functions. (author).

  7. Regional cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption during normal human sleep

    Takahashi, Ken

    1989-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional oxygen extraction fraction (rCEF) and regional cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (rCMRO 2 ) were measured using the continuous inhalation technique for 15 O with positron emission tomography (PET) during both wakefulness and sleep. Ten paid volunteers, with a mean age of 21.6 yrs., were deprived of sleep for a period of approximately 20 hours, and the experiments were performed mostly in the morning. 15 O activity of both whole blood and the plasma, pixel count of PET, total arterial blood oxygen content were used for analysis of rCBF, rOEF and rCMRO 2 . PET scannings were carried out mostly during the very light non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, i.e. stage 1 and/or 2, and wakefulness. About 10 minutes after the start of continuous inhalation of 15 O gas, the 15 O activity of the brain was found to be in a steady-state condition. During this steady-state condition, PET scannings were performed for about 10 minutes. Regions of interest, square in shape and having an area of 2.8 cm 3 , were set in each cortex on PET images of a horizontal cross-section of the brain, set at 45 mm above the orbitomeatal line. The rCBF and rCMRO 2 were analysed in 5 of 10 male subjects during both wakefulness and NREM sleep, and only 3 were done during three sleep stages, including REM sleep. Levels of rCBF and rCMRO 2 were found to be decreased in NREM sleep, and the decreasing rates were calculated at 10.2% and 7.6% from the level of wakefulness, respectively. There was no significant difference in the mean value of rOEF between wakefulness and NREM sleep. There were no significant regional differences found in the rate of decrease among the frontal, temporal and occipital cortices. It was considered that the decrease of rCBF and rCMRO 2 during NREM sleep suggested a decrease of the activity levels in the cerebral functions. (author)

  8. Crouch severity is a poor predictor of elevated oxygen consumption in cerebral palsy.

    Steele, Katherine M; Shuman, Benjamin R; Schwartz, Michael H

    2017-07-26

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) expend more energy to walk compared to typically-developing peers. One of the most prevalent gait patterns among children with CP, crouch gait, is often singled out as especially exhausting. The dynamics of crouch gait increase external flexion moments and the demand on extensor muscles. This elevated demand is thought to dramatically increase energy expenditure. However, the impact of crouch severity on energy expenditure has not been investigated among children with CP. We evaluated oxygen consumption and gait kinematics for 573 children with bilateral CP. The average net nondimensional oxygen consumption during gait of the children with CP (0.18±0.06) was 2.9 times that of speed-matched typically-developing peers. Crouch severity was only modestly related to oxygen consumption, with measures of knee flexion angle during gait explaining only 5-20% of the variability in oxygen consumption. While knee moment and muscle activity were moderately to strongly correlated with crouch severity (r 2 =0.13-0.73), these variables were only weakly correlated with oxygen consumption (r 2 =0.02-0.04). Thus, although the dynamics of crouch gait increased muscle demand, these effects did not directly result in elevated energy expenditure. In clinical gait analysis, assumptions about an individual's energy expenditure should not be based upon kinematics or kinetics alone. Identifying patient-specific factors that contribute to increased energy expenditure may provide new pathways to improve gait for children with CP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The relationship between cerebral oxygen saturation changes and post operative neurologic complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    Negargar, S.; Mahmoudpour, A.; Taheri, R.; Sarvin, S.

    2007-01-01

    To study the relationship between cerebral oxygen saturation changes and postoperative neurologic complications. Seventy two adult patients with ASA class II, III who were scheduled for elective cardiac surgery, were randomized into three groups: Group I: with CPB (on -pump) Group II: without CPB (off- pump) Group III: valve surgery. Neuropsychological outcome was assessed by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Cerebral oxygen saturation was also measured. There was no statistical difference in desaturation of more than 20% among three groups (P=0.113) but it was significant between group I and II (P=0.042). Changes of rSo/sub 2/ in different hours of surgery was significant in group I and group II (P=0.0001 in both) but it was not significant in group III ( P=0.075) . Although cerebral oximetry is a noninvasive and useful method of monitoring during cardiac surgery, it has low accuracy to determine postoperative neurologic complications. (author)

  10. Carbon Dioxide Fluctuations Are Associated with Changes in Cerebral Oxygenation and Electrical Activity in Infants Born Preterm.

    Dix, Laura Marie Louise; Weeke, Lauren Carleen; de Vries, Linda Simone; Groenendaal, Floris; Baerts, Willem; van Bel, Frank; Lemmers, Petra Maria Anna

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of acute arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure changes on cerebral oxygenation and electrical activity in infants born preterm. This retrospective observational study included ventilated infants born preterm with acute fluctuations of continuous end-tidal CO 2 (etCO 2 ) as a surrogate marker for arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure, during the first 72 hours of life. Regional cerebral oxygen saturation and fractional tissue oxygen extraction were monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy. Brain activity was monitored with 2-channel electroencephalography. Spontaneous activity transients (SATs) rate (SATs/minute) and interval between SATs (in seconds) were calculated. Ten-minute periods were selected for analysis: before, during, and after etCO 2 fluctuations of ≥5  mm Hg. Thirty-eight patients (mean ± SD gestational age of 29 ± 1.8 weeks) were included, with 60 episodes of etCO 2 increase and 70 episodes of etCO 2 decrease. During etCO 2 increases, brain oxygenation increased (regional cerebral oxygen saturation increased, fractional tissue oxygen extraction decreased; P carbon dioxide partial pressure that may be harmful to the neonatal brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of tourniquet deflation on hemodynamics and regional cerebral oxygen saturation in aged patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery.

    Song, Inkyung; Kim, Dong Yeon; Kim, Youn Jin

    2012-11-01

    Inflation and deflation of a pneumatic tourniquet used in total knee replacement surgery induces various changes in patient's hemodynamic and metabolic status, which may result in serious complications, especially in aged patients. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a monitoring device designed to estimate the regional cerebral oxygen saturation. We evaluated the effect of tourniquet deflation on hemodynamics and regional cerebral oxygen saturation in aged patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery, using NIRS. Twenty-eight American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II patients, over the age of sixty-five years undergoing total knee replacement surgery, were included. Under general anesthesia, the mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), and regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO(2)) were recorded before induction of anesthesia and every 2 min after tourniquet deflation for 20 min. Arterial blood gas analysis was performed 5 min before, in addition to 0, and 10 min after tourniquet deflation. The decrease of rSO(2) was not significant during 20-min deflation period. MAP, CO and SV showed significant decrease during 2 to 12, 4 to 6 and 2 to 6-min period after tourniquet deflation, respectively (P deflation caused significant changes in hemodynamic and metabolic status, but not in regional cerebral oxygen saturation. It is recommended to monitor neurologic status, as well as hemodynamic and metabolic status to avoid serious complications, especially in aged patients.

  12. Under general anesthesia arginine vasopressin prevents hypotension but impairs cerebral oxygenation during arthroscopic shoulder surgery in the beach chair position.

    Cho, Soo Y; Kim, Seok J; Jeong, Cheol W; Jeong, Chang Y; Chung, Sung S; Lee, JongUn; Yoo, Kyung Y

    2013-12-01

    Patients undergoing surgery in the beach chair position (BCP) are at a risk of cerebral ischemia. We evaluated the effect of arginine vasopressin (AVP) on hemodynamics and cerebral oxygenation during surgery in the BCP. Thirty patients undergoing shoulder surgery in BCP under propofol-remifentanil anesthesia were randomly allocated either to receive IV AVP 0.07 U/kg (AVP group, N = 15) or an equal volume of saline (control group, N = 15) 2 minutes before taking BCP. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), jugular venous bulb oxygen saturation (SjvO2), and regional cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (SctO2) were measured after induction of anesthesia and before (presitting in supine position) and after patients took BCP. AVP itself given before the positioning increased MAP and decreased SjvO2 and SctO2 (P 20% SctO2 decrease from presitting value) (80% vs 13%; P = 0.0003) was higher in the AVP group. The incidence of jugular desaturation (SjvO2 shoulder surgery under general anesthesia. However, it was associated with regional cerebral but not jugular venous oxygen desaturation on upright positioning.

  13. Effects of rapid versus slow infusion of sodium bicarbonate on cerebral hemodynamics and oxygenation in preterm infants.

    Velden, A.A.E.M. van der; Hopman, J.C.W.; Klaessens, J.H.G.M.; Feuth, A.B.; Sengers, R.C.A.; Liem, K.D.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) is often used for correction of metabolic acidosis in preterm infants. The effects of NaHCO3 administration on cerebral hemodynamics and oxygenation are not well known. Furthermore, there is no consensus on infusion rate of NaHCO3. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the

  14. Cerebral misery perfusion diagnosed using hypercapnic blood-oxygenation-level-dependent contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging: a case report

    D'Souza Olympio

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cerebral misery perfusion represents a failure of cerebral autoregulation. It is an important differential diagnosis in post-stroke patients presenting with collapses in the presence of haemodynamically significant cerebrovascular stenosis. This is particularly the case when cortical or internal watershed infarcts are present. When this condition occurs, further investigation should be done immediately. Case presentation A 50-year-old Caucasian man presented with a stroke secondary to complete occlusion of his left internal carotid artery. He went on to suffer recurrent seizures. Neuroimaging demonstrated numerous new watershed-territory cerebral infarcts. No source of arterial thromboembolism was demonstrable. Hypercapnic blood-oxygenation-level-dependent-contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure his cerebrovascular reserve capacity. The findings were suggestive of cerebral misery perfusion. Conclusions Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent-contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging allows the inference of cerebral misery perfusion. This procedure is cheaper and more readily available than positron emission tomography imaging, which is the current gold standard diagnostic test. The most evaluated treatment for cerebral misery perfusion is extracranial-intracranial bypass. Although previous trials of this have been unfavourable, the results of new studies involving extracranial-intracranial bypass in high-risk patients identified during cerebral perfusion imaging are awaited. Cerebral misery perfusion is an important and under-recognized condition in which emerging imaging and treatment modalities present the possibility of practical and evidence-based management in the near future. Physicians should thus be aware of this disorder and of recent developments in diagnostic tests that allow its detection.

  15. Cerebral and lower limb near-infrared spectroscopy in adults on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    Wong, Joshua K; Smith, Thomas N; Pitcher, Harrison T; Hirose, Hitoshi; Cavarocchi, Nicholas C

    2012-08-01

    Percutaneous femoral venoarterial (VA) or jugular venovenous (VV) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can result in delivery of hypoxic blood to the brain, coronaries, and upper extremities. Additionally, VA-ECMO by percutaneous femoral artery cannulation may compromise perfusion to the lower limbs. Use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) detects regional ischemia and warns of impending hypoxic damage. We report the first known series with standardized monitoring of this parameter in adults on ECMO. This is an institutional review board-approved single institution retrospective review of patients with NIRS monitoring on ECMO from July 2010 until June 2011. Patients were analyzed for drops in NIRS tracings below 40 or >25% from baseline. VA-ECMO and VV-ECMO were initiated by percutaneous cannulation of the femoral vessels and the internal jugular vein, respectively. Sensors were placed on the patients' foreheads and on the lower limbs. NIRS tracings were recorded, analyzed, and correlated with clinical events. Twenty patients were analyzed (median age: 47.5 years): 17 patients were placed on VA-ECMO, and three patients on VV-ECMO. The median duration on ECMO was 7 days (range 2-26). One hundred percent of patients had a significant drop in bilateral cerebral oximetry tracings resulting in hemodynamic interventions, which involved increasing pressure, oxygenation, and/or ECMO flow. In 16 patients (80%), these interventions corrected the underlying ischemia. Four patients (20%) required further diagnostic intervention for persistent decreased bilateral and/or unilateral cerebral oximetry tracings, and were found to have a cerebrovascular accident (CVA). Six (30%) patients had persistent unilateral lower limb oximetry events, which resolved upon placement or replacement of a distal perfusion cannula. No patient was found to have either lower limb ischemia or a CVA with normal NIRS tracings. Use of NIRS with ECMO is important in detecting ischemic cerebral and

  16. Depressed cerebral oxygen metabolism in patients with chronic renal failure. A positron emission tomography study

    Hirakata, Hideki; Kanai, Hidetoshi; Nakane, Hiroshi; Fujii, Ken-ichiro; Hirakata, Eriko; Ibayashi, Setsuro; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Deenitchna, S.S.; Fujishima, Masatoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School of Medical Sciences

    2001-07-01

    In order to elucidate brain oxygen metabolism in uremic patients, the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction (rOEF) and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO{sub 2}) were measured by positron emission tomography (PET) in both 10 hemodialysis patients (HD: male [m]/female [f]=2/8, age of 49{+-}3 [SEM] years old, HD duration of 113{+-}26 months) and 13 pre-dialysis renal failure patients (CRF: m/f=10/3, age of 61{+-}2 years old, serum creatinine (SCr) of 6.3{+-}1.0 mg/dl). Data were compared with 20 non-uremic subjects (Control: m/f=7/13, age of 62{+-}2 years old, SCr of 0.9{+-}0.1 mg/dl). They had no neurological abnormalities, congestive heart failure, history of cerebrovascular accident, diabetes mellitus, or symptomatic brain lesion on magnetic resonance imaging. The age of HD was significantly younger than the other groups (p<0.02) and the hemoglobin (Hb) levels in both HD (10.5{+-}0.5 g/dl) and CRF (9.8{+-}0.9) were significantly lower than that in Control (13.3{+-}0.3) (p<0.02). In the hemisphere, rCMRO{sub 2} in both HD (1.82{+-}0.10 ml/min/100 g) and CRF (1.95{+-}0.09) showed significantly lower values as compared to Control (2.23{+-}0.05) (p<0.01, respectively). Hemispheric rCBF in HD (35.6{+-}2.1 ml/100 g/min) and in CRF (36.1{+-}2.1) were not different from that in Control (31.8{+-}1.4). Hemispheric rOEF in CRF (45.7{+-}1.6%) was significantly higher than that in Control (40.5{+-}1.2%) (p<0.02), but that in HD (43.7{+-}1.9%) did not increase significantly. These tendencies were similar in all regions of interest, especially in the cerebral cortices, but not in the cerebellum. All PET parameters in the frontal cortices tended to show the lowest value in renal failure patients. For all HD patients, rCBF in both the frontal cortex and the white matter correlated inversely with HD duration (frontal cortex: r=-0.649, p<0.05; white matter: r=-0.706, p<0.02). Based on these data, it is concluded that brain oxygen metabolism is depressed in renal failure

  17. Compromised Global and Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Congestive Heart Failure

    Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. J.; Im, K. C.; Moon, D. H. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    It has been known that cerebral perfusion is maintained in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) by a complex series of compensatory mechanisms. However cognitive impairment is a common problem experienced by patients with CHF and may result from deranged cerebral perfusion. We prospectively investigated the global and regional CBF of patients with CHF and compared the results with that of normal controls. Thirty two patients (M/F: 22/10, 4211 yr) with CHF (LVEF=218.1%) and 10 healthy controls (M/F: 6/4, 398 yr) were prospectively studied. No patients had cerebrovascular disease or other disease affecting cognitive function. All patients and normal controls underwent radionuclide angiography including cerebral hemispheres and aortic arch, and brain perfusion SPECT using Tc-99m ECD. Global CBF was measured non-invasively by the application of Patlak plot graphical analysis. Quantitative rCBF images were obtained from SPECT image using global CBF values, regional/global count ratios, and Lassen's linearization correction algorithm. Difference of regional CBF between CHF and normal control were assessed using a SPM99 without global count normalization (uncorrected p<0.0001, extent threshold>100 voxels). Global CBF (41.54.7 ml/min/100g) of the patients with CHF were significantly lower than those (49.15.7 ml/min/100g) of controls (p<0.001). Regional CBF was significantly decreased in frontal, temporal and parietal neocortex of both cerebral hemispheres compared to normal controls. Regional rCBF of basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem were preserved, even though global CBF was variably compromised. Our study show that global CBF is significantly decreased in CHF and regional CBF of frontal, parietal and temporal neocortex is compromised preferentially. Further studies would be needed to investigate the relationship of rCBF change and cognitive impairment in patients with CHF.

  18. Examination of dexamethasone sodium sulfate and hyperbaric oxygenation in experimentally produced cerebral edema. With special reference to their combination

    Kanaya, H; Onodera, H; Watanabe, M; Kamata, K [Iwate Medical Coll., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-06-01

    Dexamethasone sodium sulfate and hyperbaric oxygenation were used for experimentally produced cerebral edema for the examination of the water content of the brain and cerebrovascular permeability using /sup 203/Hg as the tracer. Although dexamethasone starts lowering vascular permeability of the edematous brain at one hour after the intravenous injection, a lapse of 24 hours is required until the water content returns to normal. Although hyperbaric oxygenation dose not reduce cerebrovascular permeability, it brings back the water content of the brain to normal immediately after pressurization. Since the combination of dexamethasone and hyperbaric oxygenation maintains the water content of the brain almost normal throughout the entire process, it is ideal for the treatment of cerebral edema.

  19. Preliminary EEG study of protective effects of Tebonin in transient global cerebral ischemia in rats

    Zagrean, L; Vatasescu, R; Munteanu, A M

    2000-01-01

    and metabolism. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of preventive treatment with Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761--Tebonin) in cerebral global ischemia and reperfusion in rats using computerized EEG analysis. Ginkgo biloba extract, known to be, in vitro, a free radicals scavanger and a PAF......--antagonist, was administrated in dose of 100 mg/kg over 24 hours, for 5 days before and 5 days after cerebral ischemia--reperfusion. The apparition of isoelectric EEG (flat-line) following 4-vessel occlusion was observed after a mean time of 25 sec. in Ginkgo biloba treated rats and after 18 sec. in control rats (p

  20. Cold-water immersion decreases cerebral oxygenation but improves recovery after intermittent-sprint exercise in the heat.

    Minett, G M; Duffield, R; Billaut, F; Cannon, J; Portus, M R; Marino, F E

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the effects of post-exercise cooling on recovery of neuromuscular, physiological, and cerebral hemodynamic responses after intermittent-sprint exercise in the heat. Nine participants underwent three post-exercise recovery trials, including a control (CONT), mixed-method cooling (MIX), and cold-water immersion (10 °C; CWI). Voluntary force and activation were assessed simultaneously with cerebral oxygenation (near-infrared spectroscopy) pre- and post-exercise, post-intervention, and 1-h and 24-h post-exercise. Measures of heart rate, core temperature, skin temperature, muscle damage, and inflammation were also collected. Both cooling interventions reduced heart rate, core, and skin temperature post-intervention (P recovery of voluntary force by 12.7 ± 11.7% (mean ± SD) and 16.3 ± 10.5% 1-h post-exercise compared to MIX and CONT, respectively (P  0.05). CWI reduced cerebral oxygenation compared to MIX and CONT post-intervention (P recovery after post-exercise cooling appear to be disassociated with cerebral oxygenation, rather reflecting reductions in thermoregulatory demands to sustain force production. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A Bovine Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carrier as Pump Prime for Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Reduced Systemic Lactic Acidosis and Improved Cerebral Oxygen Metabolism During Low-flow in a Porcine Model

    2010-11-10

    1 A bovine hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier as pump prime for cardiopulmonary bypass: reduced systemic lactic acidosis and improved cerebral...2010 2. REPORT TYPE Final Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) June 2007 - November 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A bovine hemoglobin-based oxygen...carrier as pump prime for cardiopulmonary bypass: reduced systemic lactic acidosis and improved cerebral oxygen metabolism during low-flow in a

  2. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H

    2014-01-01

    dioxide (PaCO2) and oxygen (PaO2) partial pressures so that hypercapnia/hypoxia increases and hypocapnia/hyperoxia reduces global cerebral blood flow. Cerebral hypoperfusion and TLOC have been associated with hypocapnia related to HV. Notwithstanding pronounced cerebrovascular effects of PaCO2...... the contribution of a low PaCO2 to the early postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is transient. HV together with postural stress does not reduce cerebral perfusion to such an extent that TLOC develops. However when HV is combined with cardiovascular stressors like cold immersion or reduced...... cardiac output brain perfusion becomes jeopardized. Whether, in patients with cardiovascular disease and/or defect, cerebral blood flow cerebral control HV-induced hypocapnia elicits cerebral hypoperfusion, leading to TLOC, remains to be established....

  3. Local cerebral blood flow (1CBF) and oxygen consumption (1CMRO2) in evolving irreversible ischemic infarction: a study with positron tomography and oxygen-15

    Baron, J.C.; Rougemont, D.; Lebrun-Grandie, P.; Comar, D.; Bousser, M.G.; Bories, J.; Castaigne, P.; Cabanis, E.

    1982-09-01

    In 25 patients suffering from cerebral ischemia set up in the area of the internal carotid artery the local cerebral blood flow (lCBF) and local cerebral oxygen consumption (lCMRO 2 ) were measured by the method of continuous inhalation of oxygen 15-labelled gas combined with positron emission tomography. These two local parameters and their ratio, the local oxygen extraction rate (lO 2 E), were studied inside the brain region tending spontaneously towards ischemic necrosis, a zone defined by means of repeated tomodensitometric examinations. The essential facts observed are the variability of the lCBF and the lO 2 E values, from extremely low to extremely high, whereas the collapse of the lCMRO 2 is constant. Consequently this last parameter alone would be a good prognostic index, an lCMRO 2 decrease to a level below about 70% of the controlateral value indicating that the necrosis is spontaneously irreparable. These results are discussed in the light of published data

  4. Effects of carbon dioxide insufflation on regional cerebral oxygenation during laparoscopic surgery in children: a prospective study.

    Tuna, Ayca Tas; Akkoyun, Ibrahim; Darcin, Sevtap; Palabiyik, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has become a popular surgical tool when compared to traditional open surgery. There are limited data on pediatric patients regarding whether pneumoperitoneum affects cerebral oxygenation although end-tidal CO2 concentration remains normal. Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the changes of cerebral oxygen saturation using near-infrared spectroscope during laparoscopic surgery in children. The study comprised forty children who were scheduled for laparoscopic (Group L, n=20) or open (Group O, n=20) appendectomy. Hemodynamic variables, right and left regional cerebral oxygen saturation (RrSO2 and LrSO2), fraction of inspired oxygen, end-tidal carbon dioxide pressure (PETCO2), peak inspiratory pressure (Ppeak), respiratory minute volume, inspiratory and end-tidal concentrations of sevoflurane and body temperature were recorded. All parameters were recorded after anesthesia induction and before start of surgery (T0, baseline), 15min after start of surgery (T1), 30min after start of surgery (T2), 45min after start of surgery (T3), 60min after start of surgery (T4) and end of the surgery (T5). There were progressive decreases in both RrSO2 and LrSO2 levels in both groups, which were not statistically significant at T1, T2, T3, T4. The RrSO2 levels of Group L at T5 were significantly lower than that of Group O. One patient in Group L had an rSO2 value <80% of the baseline value. Carbon dioxide insufflation during pneumoperitoneum in pediatric patients may not affect cerebral oxygenation under laparoscopic surgery. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. [Effects of carbon dioxide insufflation on regional cerebral oxygenation during laparoscopic surgery in children: a prospective study].

    Tuna, Ayca Tas; Akkoyun, Ibrahim; Darcin, Sevtap; Palabiyik, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has become a popular surgical tool when compared to traditional open surgery. There are limited data on pediatric patients regarding whether pneumoperitoneum affects cerebral oxygenation although end-tidal CO2 concentration remains normal. Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the changes of cerebral oxygen saturation using near-infrared spectroscope during laparoscopic surgery in children. The study comprised forty children who were scheduled for laparoscopic (Group L, n=20) or open (Group O, n=20) appendectomy. Hemodynamic variables, right and left regional cerebral oxygen saturation (RrSO2 and LrSO2), fraction of inspired oxygen, end-tidal carbon dioxide pressure (PETCO2), peak inspiratory pressure (Ppeak), respiratory minute volume, inspiratory and end-tidal concentrations of sevoflurane and body temperature were recorded. All parameters were recorded after anesthesia induction and before start of surgery (T0, baseline), 15min after start of surgery (T1), 30min after start of surgery (T2), 45min after start of surgery (T3), 60min after start of surgery (T4) and end of the surgery (T5). There were progressive decreases in both RrSO2 and LrSO2 levels in both groups, which were not statistically significant at T1, T2, T3, T4. The RrSO2 levels of Group L at T5 were significantly lower than that of Group O. One patient in Group L had an rSO2 value <80% of the baseline value. Carbon dioxide insufflation during pneumoperitoneum in pediatric patients may not affect cerebral oxygenation under laparoscopic surgery. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Is chlormethiazole neuroprotective in experimental global cerebral ischemia? A microdialysis and behavioral study.

    Thaminy, S; Reymann, J M; Heresbach, N; Allain, H; Lechat, P; Bentué-Ferrer, D

    1997-04-01

    Chlormethiazole, an anticonvulsive agent, has been shown to have a possible neuroprotective effect against cerebral ischemia. In addition, chlormethiazole inhibits methamphetamine-induced release of dopamine, protecting against this neurotransmitter's neurotoxicity. The aim of this work was to ascertain whether, in experimental cerebral ischemia, chlormethiazole administration attenuated the ischemia-induced rise of the extracellular concentration of aminergic neurotransmitters and whether it reduces ischemia-induced deficits in memory and learning. Histology for assessment of ischemic damage was a so included. The four-vessel occlusion rat model was used to induce global cerebral ischemia. Aminergic neurotransmitters and their metabolites in the striatal extracellular fluid obtained by microdialysis were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection. The drug was administered either IP (50 mg/kg-1) or directly through the dialysis probe (30 microM) 80 min before ischemia. For the behavioral test and histology, the drug was given IP (100 mg/kg-1) 1 h postischemia. The results obtained did not demonstrate any statistically significant evidence that chlormethiazole has an effect on the ischemia-induced rise in extracellular dopamine and serotonin levels. There was also no variation in metabolite levels. Behavioral measures (learning, recall) were not changed appreciably by the treatment. We observed no significant cell protection in the hippocampus (CA1, CA1), striatum, and entorhinal cortex in animals treated with chlormethiazole. We conclude that, under our experimental conditions, chlormethiazole has little or no effect on the neurochemical, neurobehavioral, and histological consequences of global cerebral ischemia.

  7. Cerebral time domain-NIRS: reproducibility analysis, optical properties, hemoglobin species and tissue oxygen saturation in a cohort of adult subjects.

    Giacalone, Giacomo; Zanoletti, Marta; Contini, Davide; Re, Rebecca; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Roveri, Luisa; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2017-11-01

    The reproducibility of cerebral time-domain near-infrared spectroscopy (TD-NIRS) has not been investigated so far. Besides, reference intervals of cerebral optical properties, of absolute concentrations of deoxygenated-hemoglobin (HbR), oxygenated-hemoglobin (HbO), total hemoglobin (HbT) and tissue oxygen saturation (StO 2 ) and their variability have not been reported. We have addressed these issues on a sample of 88 adult healthy subjects. TD-NIRS measurements at 690, 785, 830 nm were fitted with the diffusion model for semi-infinite homogenous media. Reproducibility, performed on 3 measurements at 5 minutes intervals, ranges from 1.8 to 6.9% for each of the hemoglobin species. The mean ± SD global values of HbR, HbO, HbT, StO 2 are respectively 24 ± 7 μM, 33.3 ± 9.5 μM, 57.4 ± 15.8 μM, 58 ± 4.2%. StO 2 displays the narrowest range of variability across brain regions.

  8. Quantitative measurement of cerebral oxygen extraction fraction using MRI in patients with MELAS.

    Lei Yu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify the cerebral OEF at different phases of stroke-like episodes in patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS by using MRI. METHODS: We recruited 32 patients with MELAS confirmed by gene analysis. Conventional MRI scanning, as well as functional MRI including arterial spin labeling and oxygen extraction fraction imaging, was undertaken to obtain the pathological and metabolic information of the brains at different stages of stroke-like episodes in patients. A total of 16 MRI examinations at the acute and subacute phase and 19 examinations at the interictal phase were performed. In addition, 24 healthy volunteers were recruited for control subjects. Six regions of interest were placed in the anterior, middle, and posterior parts of the bilateral hemispheres to measure the OEF of the brain or the lesions. RESULTS: OEF was reduced significantly in brains of patients at both the acute and subacute phase (0.266 ± 0.026 and at the interictal phase (0.295 ± 0.009, compared with normal controls (0.316 ± 0.025. In the brains at the acute and subacute phase of the episode, 13 ROIs were prescribed on the stroke-like lesions, which showed decreased OEF compared with the contralateral spared brain regions. Increased blood flow was revealed in the stroke-like lesions at the acute and subacute phase, which was confined to the lesions. CONCLUSION: MRI can quantitatively show changes in OEF at different phases of stroke-like episodes. The utilization of oxygen in the brain seems to be reduced more severely after the onset of episodes in MELAS, especially for those brain tissues involved in the episodes.

  9. Effects of race and sex on cerebral hemodynamics, oxygen delivery and blood flow distribution in response to high altitude

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Ren, Li-Hua; Li, Li; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Shan-Shan; Li, Su-Zhi; Cao, Tie-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    To assess racial, sexual, and regional differences in cerebral hemodynamic response to high altitude (HA, 3658 m). We performed cross-sectional comparisons on total cerebral blood flow (TCBF = sum of bilateral internal carotid and vertebral arterial blood flows = QICA + QVA), total cerebrovascular resistance (TCVR), total cerebral oxygen delivery (TCOD) and QVA/TCBF (%), among six groups of young healthy subjects: Tibetans (2-year staying) and Han (Han Chinese) at sea level, Han (2-day, 1-year and 5-year) and Tibetans at HA. Bilateral ICA and VA diameters and flow velocities were derived from duplex ultrasonography; and simultaneous measurements of arterial pressure, oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin concentration were conducted. Neither acute (2-day) nor chronic (>1 year) responses showed sex differences in Han, except that women showed lower TCOD compared with men. Tibetans and Han exhibited different chronic responses (percentage alteration relative to the sea-level counterpart value) in TCBF (-17% vs. 0%), TCVR (22% vs. 12%), TCOD (0% vs. 10%) and QVA/TCBF (0% vs. 2.4%, absolute increase), with lower resting TCOD found in SL- and HA-Tibetans. Our findings indicate racial but not sex differences in cerebral hemodynamic adaptations to HA, with Tibetans (but not Han) demonstrating an altitude-related change of CBF distribution.

  10. Reduced cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in extremely preterm neonates with low-grade germinal matrix- intraventricular hemorrhage

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Hagan, Katherine; Fenoglio, Angela; Grant, P. Ellen; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2016-05-01

    Low-grade germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage (GM-IVH) is the most common complication in extremely premature neonates. The occurrence of GM-IVH is highly associated with hemodynamic instability in the premature brain, yet the long-term impact of low-grade GM-IVH on cerebral blood flow and neuronal health have not been fully investigated. We used an innovative combination of frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (FDNIRS-DCS) to measure cerebral oxygen saturation (SO2) and an index of cerebral blood flow (CBFi) at the infant’s bedside and compute an index of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i). We enrolled twenty extremely low gestational age (ELGA) neonates (seven with low-grade GM-IVH) and monitored them weekly until they reached full-term equivalent age. During their hospital stay, we observed consistently lower CBFi and CMRO2i in ELGA neonates with low-grade GM-IVH compared to neonates without hemorrhages. Furthermore, lower CBFi and CMRO2i in the former group persists even after the resolution of the hemorrhage. In contrast, SO2 does not differ between groups. Thus, CBFi and CMRO2i may have better sensitivity than SO2 in detecting GM-IVH-related effects on infant brain development. FDNIRS-DCS methods may have clinical benefit for monitoring the evolution of GM-IVH, evaluating treatment response, and potentially predicting neurodevelopmental outcome.

  11. The effect of dexmedetomidine on cerebral perfusion and oxygenation in healthy piglets with normal and lowered blood pressure anaesthetized with propofol-remifentanil total intravenous anaesthesia

    Mikkelsen, Mai Louise Grandsgaard; Ambrus, Rikard; Rasmussen, Rune

    2017-01-01

    Background During anaesthesia and surgery, in particular neurosurgery, preservation of cerebral perfusion and oxygenation (CPO) is essential for normal postoperative brain function. The isolated effects on CPO of either individual anaesthetic drugs or entire anaesthetic protocols are of importance...

  12. Inhibition of nitrogenase by oxygen in marine cyanobacteria controls the global nitrogen and oxygen cycles

    Berman-Frank, I.; Chen, Y.-B.; Gerchman, Y.; Dismukes, G. C.; Falkowski, P. G.

    2005-03-01

    Cyanobacterial N2-fixation supplies the vast majority of biologically accessible inorganic nitrogen to nutrient-poor aquatic ecosystems. The process, catalyzed by the heterodimeric protein complex, nitrogenase, is thought to predate that of oxygenic photosynthesis. Remarkably, while the enzyme plays such a critical role in Earth's biogeochemical cycles, the activity of nitrogenase in cyanobacteria is markedly inhibited in vivo at a post-translational level by the concentration of O2 in the contemporary atmosphere leading to metabolic and biogeochemical inefficiency in N2 fixation. We illustrate this crippling effect with data from Trichodesmium spp. an important contributor of "new nitrogen" to the world's subtropical and tropical oceans. The enzymatic inefficiency of nitrogenase imposes a major elemental taxation on diazotrophic cyanobacteria both in the costs of protein synthesis and for scarce trace elements, such as iron. This restriction has, in turn, led to a global limitation of fixed nitrogen in the contemporary oceans and provides a strong biological control on the upper bound of oxygen concentration in Earth's atmosphere.

  13. Can the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen be estimated with near-infrared spectroscopy?

    Boas, D A; Strangman, G; Culver, J P; Hoge, R D; Jasdzewski, G; Poldrack, R A; Rosen, B R; Mandeville, J B

    2003-01-01

    We have measured the changes in oxy-haemoglobin and deoxy-haemoglobin in the adult human brain during a brief finger tapping exercise using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ) can be estimated from these NIRS data provided certain model assumptions. The change in CMRO 2 is related to changes in the total haemoglobin concentration, deoxy-haemoglobin concentration and blood flow. As NIRS does not provide a measure of dynamic changes in blood flow during brain activation, we relied on a Windkessel model that relates dynamic blood volume and flow changes, which has been used previously for estimating CMRO 2 from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Because of the partial volume effect we are unable to quantify the absolute changes in the local brain haemoglobin concentrations with NIRS and thus are unable to obtain an estimate of the absolute CMRO 2 change. An absolute estimate is also confounded by uncertainty in the flow-volume relationship. However, the ratio of the flow change to the CMRO 2 change is relatively insensitive to these uncertainties. For the finger tapping task, we estimate a most probable flow-consumption ratio ranging from 1.5 to 3 in agreement with previous findings presented in the literature, although we cannot exclude the possibility that there is no CMRO 2 change. The large range in the ratio arises from the large number of model parameters that must be estimated from the data. A more precise estimate of the flow-consumption ratio will require better estimates of the model parameters or flow information, as can be provided by combining NIRS with fMRI

  14. Extracellular levels of lactate, but not oxygen, reflect sleep homeostasis in the rat cerebral cortex.

    Dash, Michael B; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2012-07-01

    It is well established that brain metabolism is higher during wake and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep than in nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Most of the brain's energy is used to maintain neuronal firing and glutamatergic transmission. Recent evidence shows that cortical firing rates, extracellular glutamate levels, and markers of excitatory synaptic strength increase with time spent awake and decline throughout NREM sleep. These data imply that the metabolic cost of each behavioral state is not fixed but may reflect sleep-wake history, a possibility that is investigated in the current report. Chronic (4d) electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings in the rat cerebral cortex were coupled with fixed-potential amperometry to monitor the extracellular concentration of oxygen ([oxy]) and lactate ([lac]) on a second-by-second basis across the spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and in response to sleep deprivation. Basic sleep research laboratory. Wistar Kyoto (WKY) adult male rats. N/A. Within 30-60 sec [lac] and [oxy] progressively increased during wake and REM sleep and declined during NREM sleep (n = 10 rats/metabolite), but with several differences. [Oxy], but not [lac], increased more during wake with high motor activity and/or elevated EEG high-frequency power. Meanwhile, only the NREM decline of [lac] reflected sleep pressure as measured by slow-wave activity, mirroring previous results for cortical glutamate. The observed state-dependent changes in cortical [lac] and [oxy] are consistent with higher brain metabolism during waking and REM sleep in comparison with NREM sleep. Moreover, these data suggest that glycolytic activity, most likely through its link with glutamatergic transmission, reflects sleep homeostasis.

  15. Cerebral perfusion, oxygenation and metabolism during exercise in young and elderly individuals

    Fisher, James P; Hartwich, Doreen; Seifert, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    )), glucose and lactate across the brain. The molar ratio between the cerebral uptake of O(2) versus carbohydrate (O(2)-carbohydrate index; O(2) / [glucose + 0.5 lactate]; OCI), the cerebral metabolic rate of O(2) (CMRO(2)) and changes in mitochondrial O(2) tension (P(mito)O(2)) were calculated. W...

  16. Improved assessment of outcomes following transient global cerebral ischemia in mice

    Spray, Stine; Edvinsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    by limited neurological assessment protocols and present insufficient reporting of the cumulative survival rate. Therefore, we aim at developing a reproducible and easily implementable model of transient GCI in mice with minimal impact on normal mouse behavior. GCI was induced in male C57BL/6 mice......Mouse models of global cerebral ischemia (GCI) allow experimental examination of cerebral pathophysiology in genetically modified mice and fast screening of new treatment strategies. Various surgical protocols of GCI-induction in mice have been published; however, many of these studies are hindered...... and again daily for up to 7 days after GCI or sham operation and was found to be significantly decreased 1-7 days after GCI compared to sham. Furthermore, we found delayed neuronal cell death in the frontal cortex and hippocampus 5 and 7 days after GCI but not at day 3 or after sham operation. The survival...

  17. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in senile dementia of Alzheimer's type and vascular dementia with deep white matter changes

    Tohgi, H.; Yonezawa, H.; Takahashi, S.; Sato, N.; Kato, E.; Kudo, M.; Hatano, K.; Sasaki, T.

    1998-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (rCMRO 2 ), oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF), and cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were investigated using positron emission tomography (PET) in 16 patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT), and compared with those of 6 nondemented and 3 demented patients with deep white matter high signal (DWMH) on T2-weighted MRI and 6 controls. rCBF, rCMRO 2 and rCBV were determined using C 15 O 2 , 15 O 2 and C 15 O, respectively. rCBF and CMRO 2 were significantly decreased in the frontal, parietal and temporal cortex (P 2 was significantly reduced in only the frontal and temporal cortex of demented patients (P < 0.05). rOEF was significantly increased in the parietal cortex of patients with SDAT and in the white matter of patients with SDAT or DWMH (P < 0.05), and the increase in the frontal white matter significantly paralleled the progression of dementia in patients with SDAT (P < 0.05). rCBV was significantly decreased in the parietal and temporal cortex of patients with SDAT (P < 0.05), but not in any areas of those with DWMH. (orig.)

  18. A novel Bayesian approach to accounting for uncertainty in fMRI-derived estimates of cerebral oxygen metabolism fluctuations.

    Simon, Aaron B; Dubowitz, David J; Blockley, Nicholas P; Buxton, Richard B

    2016-04-01

    Calibrated blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging is a multimodal functional MRI technique designed to estimate changes in cerebral oxygen metabolism from measured changes in cerebral blood flow and the BOLD signal. This technique addresses fundamental ambiguities associated with quantitative BOLD signal analysis; however, its dependence on biophysical modeling creates uncertainty in the resulting oxygen metabolism estimates. In this work, we developed a Bayesian approach to estimating the oxygen metabolism response to a neural stimulus and used it to examine the uncertainty that arises in calibrated BOLD estimation due to the presence of unmeasured model parameters. We applied our approach to estimate the CMRO2 response to a visual task using the traditional hypercapnia calibration experiment as well as to estimate the metabolic response to both a visual task and hypercapnia using the measurement of baseline apparent R2' as a calibration technique. Further, in order to examine the effects of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) signal contamination on the measurement of apparent R2', we examined the effects of measuring this parameter with and without CSF-nulling. We found that the two calibration techniques provided consistent estimates of the metabolic response on average, with a median R2'-based estimate of the metabolic response to CO2 of 1.4%, and R2'- and hypercapnia-calibrated estimates of the visual response of 27% and 24%, respectively. However, these estimates were sensitive to different sources of estimation uncertainty. The R2'-calibrated estimate was highly sensitive to CSF contamination and to uncertainty in unmeasured model parameters describing flow-volume coupling, capillary bed characteristics, and the iso-susceptibility saturation of blood. The hypercapnia-calibrated estimate was relatively insensitive to these parameters but highly sensitive to the assumed metabolic response to CO2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A novel Bayesian approach to accounting for uncertainty in fMRI-derived estimates of cerebral oxygen metabolism fluctuations

    Simon, Aaron B.; Dubowitz, David J.; Blockley, Nicholas P.; Buxton, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Calibrated blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging is a multimodal functional MRI technique designed to estimate changes in cerebral oxygen metabolism from measured changes in cerebral blood flow and the BOLD signal. This technique addresses fundamental ambiguities associated with quantitative BOLD signal analysis; however, its dependence on biophysical modeling creates uncertainty in the resulting oxygen metabolism estimates. In this work, we developed a Bayesian approach to estimating the oxygen metabolism response to a neural stimulus and used it to examine the uncertainty that arises in calibrated BOLD estimation due to the presence of unmeasured model parameters. We applied our approach to estimate the CMRO2 response to a visual task using the traditional hypercapnia calibration experiment as well as to estimate the metabolic response to both a visual task and hypercapnia using the measurement of baseline apparent R2′ as a calibration technique. Further, in order to examine the effects of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) signal contamination on the measurement of apparent R2′, we examined the effects of measuring this parameter with and without CSF-nulling. We found that the two calibration techniques provided consistent estimates of the metabolic response on average, with a median R2′-based estimate of the metabolic response to CO2 of 1.4%, and R2′- and hypercapnia-calibrated estimates of the visual response of 27% and 24%, respectively. However, these estimates were sensitive to different sources of estimation uncertainty. The R2′-calibrated estimate was highly sensitive to CSF contamination and to uncertainty in unmeasured model parameters describing flow-volume coupling, capillary bed characteristics, and the iso-susceptibility saturation of blood. The hypercapnia-calibrated estimate was relatively insensitive to these parameters but highly sensitive to the assumed metabolic response to CO2. PMID:26790354

  20. Simultaneous imaging of cerebral partial pressure of oxygen and blood flow during functional activation and cortical spreading depression

    Sakadžić, Sava; Yuan, Shuai; Dilekoz, Ergin; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Ayata, Cenk; Boas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a novel imaging technique that provides real-time two-dimensional maps of the absolute partial pressure of oxygen and relative cerebral blood flow in rats by combining phosphorescence lifetime imaging with laser speckle contrast imaging. Direct measurement of blood oxygenation based on phosphorescence lifetime is not significantly affected by changes in the optical parameters of the tissue during the experiment. The potential of the system as a novel tool for quantitative analysis of the dynamic delivery of oxygen to support brain metabolism was demonstrated in rats by imaging cortical responses to forepaw stimulation and the propagation of cortical spreading depression waves. This new instrument will enable further study of neurovascular coupling in normal and diseased brain. PMID:19340106

  1. Effects of edaravone combined with hyperbaric oxygen on cerebral vascular dynamics, oxidative stress products and inflammatory factors in patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage

    Xia Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect of edaravone combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy on cerebral vasculature, oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines in patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage (ACH. Methods: A total of 96 patients with ACH were divided into control group (n=48 and observation group (n=48 according to the random number table. Both groups were treated routinely. On this basis, the control group was treated with edaravone injection, and the observation group was treated with edaravone injection combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The change of cerebrovascular dynamics, oxidative stress products and inflammatory factors were examined in all subjects before and after treatment. Results: There were no significant differences in cerebrovascular function between the two groups before treatment. After treatment, the levels of Vmean and Qmean in both groups were significantly higher than those before treatment. The levels of Vmean and Qmean in the observation group were higher than those of the control group after treatment. There was no significant difference in serum oxidative stress between the two groups before treatment. After treatment, the levels of SOD in two groups were significantly higher than those before treatment. The level of SOD in the observation group was higher than that in the control group after treatment. After treatment, the levels of MDA in the two groups were significantly lower than that before treatment. The level of MDA in the observation group was lower than that of the control group after treatment. There were no significant differences in the level of serum inflammatory factors between the two groups before treatment. After treatment, the level of TNF-α and IL-1β in two groups were significantly lower than before treatment. The level of TNF-α and IL-1β in the observation group was lower than those of the control group after treatment. Conclusion: Edaravone combined with hyperbaric oxygen

  2. Reduced Cerebral Oxygen Content in the DG and SVZ In Situ Promotes Neurogenesis in the Adult Rat Brain In Vivo.

    Kuan Zhang

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis in the adult brain occurs mainly within two neurogenic structures, the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ of the forebrain. It has been reported that mild hypoxia promoted the proliferation of Neural Stem Cells (NSCsin vitro. Our previous study further demonstrated that an external hypoxic environment stimulated neurogenesis in the adult rat brain in vivo. However, it remains unknown how external hypoxic environments affect the oxygen content in the brain and result in neurogenesis. Here we use an optical fiber luminescent oxygen sensor to detect the oxygen content in the adult rat brain in situ under normoxia and hypoxia. We found that the distribution of oxygen in cerebral regions is spatiotemporally heterogeneous. The Po2 values in the ventricles (45∼50 Torr and DG (approximately 10 Torr were much higher than those of other parts of the brain, such as the cortex and thalamus (approximately 2 Torr. Interestingly, our in vivo studies showed that an external hypoxic environment could change the intrinsic oxygen content in brain tissues, notably reducing oxygen levels in both the DG and SVZ, the major sites of adult neurogenesis. Furthermore, the hypoxic environment also increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF, two factors that have been reported to regulate neurogenesis, within the DG and SVZ. Thus, we have demonstrated that reducing the oxygen content of the external environment decreased Po2 levels in the DG and SVZ. This reduced oxygen level in the DG and SVZ might be the main mechanism triggering neurogenesis in the adult brain. More importantly, we speculate that varying oxygen levels may be the physiological basis of the regionally restricted neurogenesis in the adult brain.

  3. The SafeBoosC Phase II Randomised Clinical Trial : A Treatment Guideline for Targeted Near-Infrared-Derived Cerebral Tissue Oxygenation versus Standard Treatment in Extremely Preterm Infants

    Pellicer, Adelina; Greisen, Gorm; Benders, Manon; Claris, Olivier; Dempsey, Eugene; Fumagalli, Monica; Gluud, Christian; Hagmann, Cornelia; Hellstroem-Westas, Lena; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Lemmers, Petra; Naulaers, Gunnar; Pichler, Gerhard; Roll, Claudia; van Bel, Frank; van Oeveren, Wim; Skoog, Maria; Wolf, Martin; Austin, Topun

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy-derived regional tissue oxygen saturation of haemoglobin (rSto(2)) reflects venous oxygen saturation. If cerebral metabolism is stable, rSto(2) can be used as an estimate of cerebral oxygen delivery. The SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial hypothesises that the

  4. Cerebral tissue oxygenation index and superior vena cava blood flow in the very low birth weight infant.

    Moran, M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Superior vena cava (SVC) flow assesses blood flow from the upper body, including the brain. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) provides information on brain perfusion and oxygenation. AIM: To assess the relationship between cerebral tissue oxygenation index (cTOI) and cardiac output measures in the very low birth weight (VLBW) infant in the first day of life. METHODS: A prospective observational cohort study. Neonates with birth weight less than 1500 g (VLBW) were eligible for enrollment. Newborns with congenital heart disease, major congenital malformations and greater than Papile grade1 Intraventricular Haemorrhage on day 1 of life were excluded. Echocardiographic evaluation of SVC flow was performed in the first 24 h of life. Low SVC flow states were defined as a flow less than 40 mL\\/kg\\/min. cTOI was measured using NIRO 200 Hamamatsu. RESULTS: Twenty-seven VLBW neonates had both echocardiography and NIRS performed. The median (range) gestation was 29\\/40 (25 + 3 to 31 + 5 weeks) and median birth weight was 1.2 kg (0.57-1.48 kg). The mean (SD) TOI was 68.1 (7.9)%. The mean (SD) SVC flow was 70.36(39.5) mLs\\/kg\\/min. The correlation coefficient of cerebral tissue oxygenation and SVC flow was r = 0.53, p-value 0.005. There was a poor correlation between right and left ventricular output and cTOI which is not surprising considering the influence of intra- and extracardiac shunts. CONCLUSION: There is a positive relationship between cerebral TOI values and SVC flow in the very low birth infant on day one of life.

  5. The effects of arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure and sevoflurane on capillary venous cerebral blood flow and oxygen saturation during craniotomy.

    Klein, Klaus Ulrich; Glaser, Martin; Reisch, Robert; Tresch, Achim; Werner, Christian; Engelhard, Kristin

    2009-07-01

    Intraoperative routine monitoring of cerebral blood flow and oxygenation remains a technological challenge. Using the physiological principle of carbon dioxide reactivity of cerebral vasculature, we investigated a recently developed neuromonitoring device (oxygen-to-see, O2C device) for simultaneous measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rvCBF), blood flow velocity (rvVelo), oxygen saturation (srvO2), and hemoglobin amount (rvHb) at the capillary venous level in patients subjected to craniotomy. Twenty-six neurosurgical patients were randomly assigned to anesthesia with 1.4% or 2.0% sevoflurane end-tidal concentration. After craniotomy, a fiberoptic probe was applied on a macroscopically healthy surface of cerebral tissue next to the site of surgery. Simultaneous measurements in 2 and 8 mm cerebral depth were performed in each patient during lower (35 mm Hg) and higher (45 mm Hg) levels (random order) of arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2). The principle of these measurements relies on the combination of laser-Doppler flowmetry (rvCBF, rvVelo) and photo-spectrometry (srvO2, rvHb). Linear models were fitted to test changes of end points (rvCBF, rvVelo, srvO2, rvHb) in response to lower and higher levels of PaCO2, 1.4% and 2.0% sevoflurane end-tidal concentration, and 2 and 8 mm cerebral depth. RvCBF and rvVelo were elevated by PaCO2 independent of sevoflurane concentration in 2 and 8 mm depth of cerebral tissue (P oxygen was decreased by elevated PaCO2. Unchanged levels of rvHb signify that there was no blood loss during measurements. Data suggest that the device allows detection of local changes in blood flow and oxygen saturation in response to different PaCO2 levels in predominant venous cerebral microvessels.

  6. Cerebral Oxygenation of the Cortex and Striatum following Normobaric Hyperoxia and Mild Hypoxia in Rats by EPR Oximetry using Multi-Probe Implantable Resonators

    Hou, Huagang; Li, Hongbin; Dong, Ruhong; Mupparaju, Sriram; Khan, Nadeem; Swartz, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Multi-site electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry, using multi-probe implantable resonators, was used to measure the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in the brains of rats following normobaric hyperoxia and mild hypoxia. The cerebral tissue pO2 was measured simultaneously in the cerebral cortex and striatum in the same rats before, during, and after normobaric hyperoxia and mild hypoxia challenges. The baseline mean tissue pO2 values (±SE) were not significantly different between the cortex and striatum. During 30 min of 100% O2 inhalation, a statistically significant increase in tissue pO2 of all four sites was observed, however, the tissue pO2 of the striatum area was significantly higher than in the forelimb area of the cortex. Brain pO2 significantly decreased from the baseline value during 15 min of 15% O2 challenge. No differences in the recovery of the cerebral cortex and striatum pO2 were observed when the rats were allowed to breathe 30% O2. It appears that EPR oximetry using implantable resonators can provide information on pO2 under the experimental conditions needed for such a study. The levels of pO2 that occurred in these experiments are readily resolvable by multi-site EPR oximetry with multi-probe resonators. In addition, the ability to simultaneously measure the pO2 in several areas of the brain provides important information that could potentially help differentiate the pO2 changes that can occur due to global or local mechanisms. PMID:21445770

  7. Effects of Cortical Spreading Depression on Synaptic Activity, Blood Flow and Oxygen Consumption in Rat Cerebral Cortex

    Hansen, Henning Piilgaard

    2010-01-01

    As the title of this thesis indicates I have during my PhD studied the effects of cortical spreading depression (CSD) on synaptic activity, blood flow and oxygen consumption in rat cerebral cortex. This was performed in vivo using an open cranial window approach in anesthetized rats. I applied...... parameters of the whisker/infraorbital nerve etwork (IO) targeting the same cortical area. We tested the hypothesis that the relation between increases in CBF and CMRO2 evoked by stimulation and synaptic activity differed for the two activated networks and that activation of two distinct networks activate...

  8. Low Cerebral Oxygen Consumption and Blood Flow in Patients With Cirrhosis and an Acute Episode of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Iversen, Peter; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle Sønderby

    2009-01-01

    (15)O-water PET in 6 patients with liver cirrhosis and an acute episode of overt HE, 6 cirrhotic patients without HE, and 7 healthy subjects. RESULTS: Neither whole-brain CMRO(2) nor CBF differed significantly between cirrhotic patients without HE and healthy subjects, but were both significantly...... that the reductions in CMRO(2) and CBF in patients with HE were essentially generalized throughout the brain. CONCLUSIONS: The observations imply that reduced cerebral oxygen consumption and blood flow in cirrhotic patients with an acute episode of overt HE are associated with HE and not cirrhosis as such...

  9. Effects of the intraoperative application of dexmedetomidine on hemodynamics and cerebral oxygen metabolism of patients with cerebrovascular malformations

    Liang Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulatory stability of patients with cerebrovascular malformations during the surgery is critical to their prognosis. Anesthesia-induced intubation, tumor separation, clamping and other operations may cause severe fluctuations in blood pressure and even result in aneurysm rupture. As a highly efficient and selective adrenergic α2 receptor agonists, dexmedetomidine hydrochloride is able to regulate the release of catecholamine by means of negative feedback so as to control blood pressure. This study aims to assess the effects of dexmedetomidine hydrochloride on hemodynamics and cerebral oxygen metabolism of intraoperative patients with cerebrovascular malformations.

  10. Fatty acid methyl esters and Solutol HS 15 confer neuroprotection after focal and global cerebral ischemia.

    Lin, Hung Wen; Saul, Isabel; Gresia, Victoria L; Neumann, Jake T; Dave, Kunjan R; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A

    2014-02-01

    We previously showed that palmitic acid methyl ester (PAME) and stearic acid methyl ester (SAME) are simultaneously released from the sympathetic ganglion and PAME possesses potent vasodilatory properties which may be important in cerebral ischemia. Since PAME is a potent vasodilator simultaneously released with SAME, our hypothesis was that PAME/SAME confers neuroprotection in rat models of focal/global cerebral ischemia. We also examined the neuroprotective properties of Solutol HS15, a clinically approved excipient because it possesses similar fatty acid compositions as PAME/SAME. Asphyxial cardiac arrest (ACA, 6 min) was performed 30 min after PAME/SAME treatment (0.02 mg/kg, IV). Solutol HS15 (2 ml/kg, IP) was injected chronically for 14 days (once daily). Histopathology of hippocampal CA1 neurons was assessed 7 days after ACA. For focal ischemia experiments, PAME, SAME, or Solutol HS15 was administered following reperfusion after 2 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). 2,3,5-Triphenyltetrazolium staining of the brain was performed 24 h after MCAO and the infarct volume was quantified. Following ACA, the number of surviving hippocampal neurons was enhanced by PAME-treated (68%), SAME-treated (69%), and Solutol-treated HS15 (68%) rats as compared to ACA only-treated groups. Infarct volume was decreased by PAME (83%), SAME (68%), and Solutol HS15 (78%) as compared to saline (vehicle) in MCAO-treated animals. PAME, SAME, and Solutol HS15 provide robust neuroprotection in both paradigms of ischemia. This may prove therapeutically beneficial since Solutol HS15 is already administered as a solublizing agent to patients. With proper timing and dosage, administration of Solutol HS15 and PAME/SAME can be an effective therapy against cerebral ischemia.

  11. [Cerebral protection].

    Cattaneo, A D

    1993-09-01

    Cerebral protection means prevention of cerebral neuronal damage. Severe brain damage extinguishes the very "human" functions such as speech, consciousness, intellectual capacity, and emotional integrity. Many pathologic conditions may inflict injuries to the brain, therefore the protection and salvage of cerebral neuronal function must be the top priorities in the care of critically ill patients. Brain tissue has unusually high energy requirements, its stores of energy metabolites are small and, as a result, the brain is totally dependent on a continuous supply of substrates and oxygen, via the circulation. In complete global ischemia (cardiac arrest) reperfusion is characterized by an immediate reactive hyperemia followed within 20-30 min by a delayed hypoperfusion state. It has been postulated that the latter contributes to the ultimate neurologic outcome. In focal ischemia (stroke) the primary focus of necrosis is encircled by an area (ischemic penumbra) that is underperfused and contains neurotoxic substances such as free radicals, prostaglandins, calcium, and excitatory neurotransmitters. The variety of therapeutic effort that have addressed the question of protecting the brain reflects their limited success. 1) Barbiturates. After an initial enthusiastic endorsement by many clinicians and years of vigorous controversy, it can now be unequivocally stated that there is no place for barbiturate therapy following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. One presumed explanation for this negative statement is that cerebral metabolic suppression by barbiturates (and other anesthetics) is impossible in the absence of an active EEG. Conversely, in the event of incomplete ischemia EEG activity in usually present (albeit altered) and metabolic suppression and hence possibly protection can be induced with barbiturates. Indeed, most of the animal studies led to a number of recommendations for barbiturate therapy in man for incomplete ischemia. 2) Isoflurane. From a cerebral

  12. Mapping of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen using dynamic susceptibility contrast and blood oxygen level dependent MR imaging in acute ischemic stroke

    Gersing, Alexandra S.; Schwaiger, Benedikt J. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ankenbrank, Monika; Toth, Vivien; Bauer, Jan S.; Zimmer, Claus [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Janssen, Insa [Technical University Munich, Department of Neurosurgery, Munich (Germany); Kooijman, Hendrik [Philips Healthcare, Hamburg (Germany); Wunderlich, Silke [Technical University Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany); Preibisch, Christine [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Technical University Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    MR-derived cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen utilization (CMRO{sub 2}) has been suggested to be analogous to PET-derived CMRO{sub 2} and therefore may be used for detection of viable tissue at risk for infarction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate MR-derived CMRO{sub 2} mapping in acute ischemic stroke in relation to established diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging. In 23 patients (mean age 63 ± 18.7 years, 11 women) with imaging findings for acute ischemic stroke, relative oxygen extraction fraction was calculated from quantitative transverse relaxation times (T2, T2*) and relative cerebral blood volume using a quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) approach in order to detect a local increase of deoxyhemoglobin. Relative CMRO{sub 2} (rCMRO{sub 2}) maps were calculated by multiplying relative oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) by cerebral blood flow, derived from PWI. After co-registration, rCMRO{sub 2} maps were evaluated in comparison with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and time-to-peak (TTP) maps. Mean rCMRO{sub 2} values in areas with diffusion-restriction or TTP/ADC mismatch were compared with rCMRO{sub 2} values in the contralateral tissue. In tissue with diffusion restriction, mean rCMRO{sub 2} values were significantly decreased compared to perfusion-impaired (17.9 [95 % confidence interval 10.3, 25.0] vs. 58.1 [95 % confidence interval 50.1, 70.3]; P < 0.001) and tissue in the contralateral hemisphere (68.2 [95 % confidence interval 61.4, 75.0]; P < 0.001). rCMRO{sub 2} in perfusion-impaired tissue showed no significant change compared to tissue in the contralateral hemisphere (58.1 [95 % confidence interval 50.1, 70.3] vs. 66.7 [95 % confidence interval 53.4, 73.4]; P = 0.34). MR-derived CMRO{sub 2} was decreased within diffusion-restricted tissue and stable within perfusion-impaired tissue, suggesting that this technique may be adequate to reveal different pathophysiological stages in acute stroke. (orig.)

  13. White Matter Damage Relates to Oxygen Saturation in Children With Sickle Cell Anemia Without Silent Cerebral Infarcts.

    Kawadler, Jamie M; Kirkham, Fenella J; Clayden, Jonathan D; Hollocks, Matthew J; Seymour, Emma L; Edey, Rosanna; Telfer, Paul; Robins, Andrew; Wilkey, Olu; Barker, Simon; Cox, Tim C S; Clark, Chris A

    2015-07-01

    Sickle cell anemia is associated with compromised oxygen-carrying capability of hemoglobin and a high incidence of overt and silent stroke. However, in children with no evidence of cerebral infarction, there are changes in brain morphometry relative to healthy controls, which may be related to chronic anemia and oxygen desaturation. A whole-brain tract-based spatial statistics analysis was carried out in 25 children with sickle cell anemia with no evidence of abnormality on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (13 male, age range: 8-18 years) and 14 age- and race-matched controls (7 male, age range: 10-19 years) to determine the extent of white matter injury. The hypotheses that white matter damage is related to daytime peripheral oxygen saturation and steady-state hemoglobin were tested. Fractional anisotropy was found to be significantly lower in patients in the subcortical white matter (corticospinal tract and cerebellum), whereas mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity were higher in patients in widespread areas. There was a significant negative relationship between radial diffusivity and oxygen saturation (Plevel negative relationship between radial diffusivity and hemoglobin (Pcell anemia, and provides for the first time direct evidence of a relationship between brain microstructure and markers of disease severity (eg, peripheral oxygen saturation and steady-state hemoglobin). This study suggests that diffusion tensor imaging metrics may serve as a biomarker for future trials of reducing hypoxic exposure. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Intestinal and cerebral oxygenation during severe isovolemic hemodilution and subsequent hyperoxic ventilation in a pig model

    van Bommel, Jasper; Trouwborst, Adrianus; Schwarte, Lothar; Siegemund, Martin; Ince, Can; Henny, Ch Pieter

    2002-01-01

    Background: During severe isovolemic hemodilution, determination of critical hematocrit levels for the microvascular oxygenation of different organs might provide more insight into the effect of the redistribution of blood flow and oxygen delivery on the oxygenation of different organs. The effect

  15. Influence of the depth of sedation on regional cerebral oxygen saturation monitoring in neurosurgery of supratentorial gliomas

    ZHANG Kai⁃ying

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the influence on regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2 of sedation depth during anesthesia induction and maintenance in supratentorial glioma resections. Methods Thirty patients with Ⅰ - Ⅱ supratentorial glioma (graded by American Society of Anesthesiologists underwent elective supratentorial glioma resection were included in this study. Rocuronium, sufentanil and propofol were used for anesthesia induction. After trachea cannula, total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA was maintained with plasma concentration of propofol 2.80-3.20 μg/ml and remifentanil 0.10-0.20 μg/(kg·min. Thirty groups of rScO2, bispectral index (BIS, mean arterial pressure (MAP and heart rate (HR were recorded continuously till the incision. Results During anesthesia induction, BIS decreased along with the infusion of anesthetics, and there was significant negative correlation between BIS and rScO2 (r = ⁃0.803, P = 0.001. During anesthesia maintenance, rScO2 and BIS were not significantly related (r = 0.147, P = 0.396. Conclusion The rScO2 monitoring can reflect the influence of sedation depth on cerebral oxygen delivery and consumption balance during supratentorial glioma resection under TIVA.

  16. Examiner's finger-mounted near-infrared spectroscopy is feasible to analyze cerebral and skeletal muscle oxygenation in conscious Chihuahuas

    Hiwatashi, Keisuke; Doi, Kimiaki; Mizuno, Risuke; Yokosuka, Makoto

    2017-02-01

    To measure regional saturation of oxygen (rSO2) of hemoglobin and total hemoglobin index (HbI) in the brain (through the molera of the head) and skeletal muscle (musculus gracilis) of conscious Chihuahua dogs using an examiner's finger-mounted near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) device, Toccare, we investigated brain and skeletal muscle NIRS in 48 Chihuahuas without severe disease. To measure rSO2 and total HbI, a Toccare probe was placed on the molera of the head and musculus gracilis of each dog for real-time recording. Stable NIRS values were obtained within 10 s. We also examined the effect of anesthesia on rSO2 and total HbI of a Chihuahua. Cerebral rSO2 values (59%±7%) were significantly lower than those obtained at femoral regions (67%±6%), whereas total HbI values in the brain (0.38±0.09) were significantly higher than those of the musculus gracilis (0.20±0.05). Sedation with a combination of medetomidine and ketamine decreased cerebral rSO2 along with a corresponding reduction in heart rate. Sevoflurane anesthesia with 100% O2 maintained rSO2 in the brain with an even lower heart rate. In conclusions, we measured brain and skeletal muscle rSO2 of hemoglobin in conscious Chihuahuas using a newly developed NIRS device, Toccare, and found that changes in cerebral oxygenation levels were associated with administration of anesthetics.

  17. Anesthesia for arthroscopic shoulder surgery in the beach chair position: monitoring of cerebral oxygenation using combined bispectral index and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Kawano, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Tomomi

    2014-10-01

    Recent research has shown that cerebrovascular complications following shoulder surgery performed in the beach chair position under general anesthesia arise secondary to cerebral ischemia. Appropriate management of cerebral oxygenation is thus one of the primary goals of anesthetic management during such procedures. The present report describes the case of a 65-year-old male patient, in which both bispectral index (BIS) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) were used to monitor cerebral oxygenation. During the positioning, we observed an increased suppression ratio (SR) while BIS and regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2) were at adequate level. In view of the difference in blood pressure between the heart and the base of the brain, blood pressure was maintained to ensure adequate cerebral perfusion. Although intraoperative rSO2 was at or around the cut-off point (a 12% relative decrease from baseline), no marked decrease in BIS or further increase in the SR was observed. Monitoring of cerebral perfusion using combined BIS and NIRS optimized anesthetic management during the performance of arthroscopic shoulder surgery in the beach chair position.

  18. Cerebral oxygenation in patients undergoing shoulder surgery in beach chair position: comparing general to regional anesthesia and the impact on neurobehavioral outcome.

    Aguirre, J; Borgeat, A; Trachsel, T; Cobo Del Prado, I; De Andrés, J; Bühler, P

    2014-02-01

    Ischemic brain damage has been reported in healthy patients after beach chair position for surgery due to cerebral hypoperfusion. Near-infrared spectroscopy has been described as a non-invasive, continuous method to monitor cerebral oxygen saturation. However, its impact on neurobehavioral outcome comparing different anesthesia regimens has been poorly described. In this prospective, assessor-blinded study, 90 patients undergoing shoulder surgery in beach chair position following general (G-group, n=45) or regional anesthesia (R-group; n=45) were enrolled to assess the prevalence of cerebral desaturation events comparing anesthesia regimens and their impact on neurobehavioral and neurological outcome. Anesthesiologists were blinded to regional cerebral oxygen saturation values. Baseline data assessed the day before surgery included neurological and neurobehavioral tests, which were repeated the day after surgery. The baseline data for regional cerebral oxygen saturation/bispectral index and invasive blood pressure both at heart and auditory meatus levels were taken prior to anesthesia, 5 min after induction of anesthesia, 5 min after beach chair positioning, after skin incision and thereafter all 20 min until discharge. Patients in the R-group showed significantly less cerebral desaturation events (psurgery (pshoulder surgery in beach chair position influencing neurobehavioral test results at 24h. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of Acute Bleeding Followed by Hydroxyethyl Starch 130/0.4 or a Crystalloid on Propofol Concentrations, Cerebral Oxygenation, and Electroencephalographic and Haemodynamic Variables in Pigs

    Aura Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding changes the haemodynamics, compromising organ perfusion. In this study, the effects of bleeding followed by replacement with hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES or lactated Ringer’s (LR on cerebral oxygenation and electroencephalogram-derived parameters were investigated. Twelve young pigs under propofol-remifentanil anaesthesia were bled 30 mL/kg and, after a 20-minute waiting period, volume replacement was performed with HES (GHES; N=6 or LR (GRL; N=6. Bleeding caused a decrease of more than 50% in mean arterial pressure (P<0.01 and a decrease in cerebral oximetry (P=0.039, bispectral index, and electroencephalogram total power (P=0.04 and P<0.01, resp., while propofol plasma concentrations increased (P<0.01. Both solutions restored the haemodynamics and cerebral oxygenation similarly and were accompanied by an increase in electroencephalogram total power. No differences between groups were found. However, one hour after the end of the volume replacement, the cardiac output (P=0.03 and the cerebral oxygenation (P=0.008 decreased in the GLR and were significantly lower than in GHES (P=0.02. Volume replacement with HES 130/0.4 was capable of maintaining the cardiac output and cerebral oxygenation during a longer period than LR and caused a decrease in the propofol plasma concentrations.

  20. Early MEK1/2 Inhibition after Global Cerebral Ischemia in Rats Reduces Brain Damage and Improves Outcome by Preventing Delayed Vasoconstrictor Receptor Upregulation

    Johansson, Sara Ellinor; Larsen, Stine Schmidt; Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Global cerebral ischemia following cardiac arrest is associated with increased cerebral vasoconstriction and decreased cerebral blood flow, contributing to delayed neuronal cell death and neurological detriments in affected patients. We hypothesize that upregulation of contractile ETB...... and 5-HT1B receptors, previously demonstrated in cerebral arteries after experimental global ischemia, are a key mechanism behind insufficient perfusion of the post-ischemic brain, proposing blockade of this receptor upregulation as a novel target for prevention of cerebral hypoperfusion and delayed...... neuronal cell death after global cerebral ischemia. The aim was to characterize the time-course of receptor upregulation and associated neuronal damage after global ischemia and investigate whether treatment with the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 can prevent cerebrovascular receptor upregulation and thereby...

  1. Near-infrared spectroscopy assessed cerebral oxygenation during open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Sørensen, H.; Nielsen, Henning Morris Bay; Secher, N H

    2016-01-01

    During open abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) repair cerebral blood flow is challenged. Clamping of the aorta may lead to unintended hyperventilation as metabolism is reduced by perfusion of a smaller part of the body and reperfusion of the aorta releases vasodilatory substances including CO2. We i...

  2. Cerebral time domain-NIRS: Reproducibility analysis, optical properties, hemoglobin species and tissue oxygen saturation in a cohort of adult subjects

    Giacalone, Giacomo; Zanoletti, Marta; Contini, Davide; Rebecca, Re; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Roveri, Luisa; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    The reproducibility of cerebral time-domain near-infrared spectroscopy (TD-NIRS) has not been investigated so far. Besides, reference intervals of cerebral optical properties, of absolute concentrations of deoxygenated-hemoglobin (HbR), oxygenated-hemoglobin (HbO), total hemoglobin (HbT) and tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) and their variability have not been reported. We have addressed these issues on a sample of 88 adult healthy subjects. TD-NIRS measurements at 690, 785, 830 nm were fitted ...

  3. Influence of residual oxygen-15-labeled carbon monoxide radioactivity on cerebral blood flow and oxygen extraction fraction in a dual-tracer autoradiographic method.

    Iwanishi, Katsuhiro; Watabe, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Takuya; Miyake, Yoshinori; Minato, Kotaro; Iida, Hidehiro

    2009-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral blood volume (CBV) are quantitatively measured with PET with (15)O gases. Kudomi et al. developed a dual tracer autoradiographic (DARG) protocol that enables the duration of a PET study to be shortened by sequentially administrating (15)O(2) and C(15)O(2) gases. In this protocol, before the sequential PET scan with (15)O(2) and C(15)O(2) gases ((15)O(2)-C(15)O(2) PET scan), a PET scan with C(15)O should be preceded to obtain CBV image. C(15)O has a high affinity for red blood cells and a very slow washout rate, and residual radioactivity from C(15)O might exist during a (15)O(2)-C(15)O(2) PET scan. As the current DARG method assumes no residual C(15)O radioactivity before scanning, we performed computer simulations to evaluate the influence of the residual C(15)O radioactivity on the accuracy of measured CBF and OEF values with DARG method and also proposed a subtraction technique to minimize the error due to the residual C(15)O radioactivity. In the simulation, normal and ischemic conditions were considered. The (15)O(2) and C(15)O(2) PET count curves with the residual C(15)O PET counts were generated by the arterial input function with the residual C(15)O radioactivity. The amounts of residual C(15)O radioactivity were varied by changing the interval between the C(15)O PET scan and (15)O(2)-C(15)O(2) PET scan, and the absolute inhaled radioactivity of the C(15)O gas. Using the simulated input functions and the PET counts, the CBF and OEF were computed by the DARG method. Furthermore, we evaluated a subtraction method that subtracts the influence of the C(15)O gas in the input function and PET counts. Our simulations revealed that the CBF and OEF values were underestimated by the residual C(15)O radioactivity. The magnitude of this underestimation depended on the amount of C(15)O radioactivity and the physiological conditions. This underestimation

  4. Unchanged cerebral blood flow and oxidative metabolism after acclimatization to high altitude

    Møller, Kirsten; Paulson, Olaf B; Hornbein, Thomas F.

    2002-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of acclimatization to high altitude on cerebral blood flow and oxidative metabolism at rest and during exercise. Nine healthy, native sea-level residents were studied 3 weeks after arrival at Chacaltaya, Bolivia (5,260 m) and after reacclimatization to sea level....... At high altitude at rest, arterial carbon dioxide tension, oxygen saturation, and oxygen tension were significantly reduced, and arterial oxygen content was increased because of an increase in hemoglobin concentration. Global cerebral blood flow was similar in the four conditions. Cerebral oxygen delivery...... and cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen and glucose also remained unchanged, whereas cerebral metabolic rates of lactate increased slightly but nonsignificantly at high altitude during exercise compared with high altitude at rest. Reaction time was unchanged. The data indicate that cerebral blood flow...

  5. The effects of anticholinergic drugs on regional cerebral blood flow, and oxygen metabolism in previously untreated patients with Parkinson's disease

    Obara, Satoko; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yonezawa, Hisashi; Sato, Yoshitomo

    1998-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO 2 ) were measured using the steady-state 15 O technique and positron emission tomography (PET) in six previously untreated patients with Parkinson's disease before and after trihexyphenidyl (THP) treatment. The patients comprised of 4 men and 2 women with Hoehn-Yahr stage II-III. Their ages at the onset of the study ranged from 46 to 57 years (mean±SD, 51.8±3.7) and the duration of the illness ranged from 10 to 48 months (mean±SD, 28.8±15.5). The PET study, assessments of the disability and cognitive function were undergone twice. The first time assessments were done was when the patients were not receiving any drugs, and the second time was one to three months after administration of 6 mg THP. All patients showed clinical improvement after THP treatment. The mean disability score of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale decreased from 35.1 (SD±11.3) to 25.7 (SD±11.6). The cognitive function assessed by Hasegawa's dementia rating scale-revised, Mini-Mental State Examination, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised, and Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised, were not significantly different before and after the THP treatment. After the THP treatment, rCBF and rCMRO 2 decreased significantly in the striatum (about 15%) and all cerebral cortices (about 10%) on both sides contralateral and ipsilateral to the predominantly symptomatic limbs. We conclude that an anticholinergic THP decreases the rCBF and rCMRO 2 significantly in the cerebral cortices without cognitive impairment in early untreated patients with Parkinson's disease. (author)

  6. Effects of beach-chair position and induced hypotension on cerebral oxygen saturation in patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Min, Kyeong Tae; Chun, Yong-Min; Kim, Eun Jung; Choi, Seung Ho

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the effects of the beach-chair position and induced hypotension on regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO(2)) in patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery by using near-infrared spectroscopy. Twenty-eight patients scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery were enrolled prospectively. After induction of anesthesia, mechanical ventilation was controlled to maintain Paco(2) at 35 to 40 mm Hg. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. After radial artery cannulation, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured at the external auditory meatus level and maintained between 60 and 65 mm Hg. The rSO(2) was measured by use of near-infrared spectroscopy. MAP and rSO(2) were recorded at the following times: before induction (T(0)), immediately after induction (T(1) [baseline]), after beach-chair position (T(2)), immediately after induced hypotension (T(3)), 1 hour after induced hypotension (T(4)), and after supine position at the end of surgery (T(5)). Cerebral desaturation was defined as a reduction in rSO(2) to less than 80% of baseline value for 15 seconds or greater. A total of 27 patients were evaluated until the end of this study. The MAP at T(2) was significantly lower than that at T(1). The MAP values at T(3) and T(4) were significantly lower than those at T(1) and T(2). The rSO(2) at T(2) was significantly lower than that at T(1). Unlike the pattern of change in the MAP, there was no additional decrease in rSO(2) at T(3) and T(4). There were 2 patients who had an episode of cerebral desaturation. The beach-chair position combined with induced hypotension significantly decreases rSO(2) in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopic surgery under general anesthesia. Level IV, study of nonconsecutive patients without consistently applied reference gold standard. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cerebral oxygenation in contusioned vs. nonlesioned brain tissue: monitoring of PtiO2 with Licox and Paratrend.

    Sarrafzadeh, A S; Kiening, K L; Bardt, T F; Schneider, G H; Unterberg, A W; Lanksch, W R

    1998-01-01

    Brain tissue PO2 in severely head injured patients was monitored in parallel with two different PO2-microsensors (Licox and Paratrend). Three different locations of sensor placement were chosen: (1) both catheters into non lesioned tissue (n = 3), (2) both catheters into contusioned tissue (n = 2), and (3) one catheter (Licox) into pericontusional versus one catheter (Paratrend) into non lesioned brain tissue (n = 2). Mean duration of PtiO2-monitoring with both microsensors in parallel was 68.1 hours. Brain tissue PO2 varied when measured in lesioned and nonlesioned tissue. In non lesioned tissue both catheters closely correlated (delta Licox/Paratrend: mean PtiO2 delta lesioned/non lesioned: mean PtiO2: 10.3 mm Hg). In contusioned brain tissue PtiO2 was always below the "hypoxic threshold" of 10 mm Hg, independent of the type of microsensor used. During a critical reduction in cerebral perfusion pressure (PO2, only increased PtiO2 when measured in pericontusional and nonlesioned brain. To recognize critical episodes of hypoxia or ischemia, PtiO2-monitoring of cerebral oxygenation is recommended in nonlesioned brain tissue.

  8. Measurement of local blood flow and oxygen consumption in evolving irreversible cerebral infarction: an in vivo study in man

    Baron, J.C.; Rougemont, D.; Lebrun-Grandie, P.; Bousser, M.G.; Cabanis, E.; Bories, J.; Comar, D.; Castaigne, P.

    1982-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows in vivo measurement of local cerebral blood flow (1CBF), oxygen consumption rate (1CMRO 2 ) and glucose utilisation (1CMRG1c) in man. Although 1CMRG1c is accessible in animals, this is not the case for 1CMRO 2 , an excellent index of local functional state. PET imaging of the local interrelationship of CBF and metabolism in completed ischemic stroke has attracted considerable interest because of its potential to differentiate irreversibly damaged from viable tissue on the basis of the CBF- metabolism patterns. Several qualitative or semi-quantitative pioneering studies provided a limited insight into this question, while the single truly quantitative study was only briefly reported. We report here a detailed study of the local CBF-CMRO 2 quantitative patterns in irreversibly infarcted brain regions

  9. Cerebral Metabolic Rate of Oxygen (CMRO2 ) Mapping by Combining Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM) and Quantitative Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent Imaging (qBOLD).

    Cho, Junghun; Kee, Youngwook; Spincemaille, Pascal; Nguyen, Thanh D; Zhang, Jingwei; Gupta, Ajay; Zhang, Shun; Wang, Yi

    2018-03-07

    To map the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ) by estimating the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) from gradient echo imaging (GRE) using phase and magnitude of the GRE data. 3D multi-echo gradient echo imaging and perfusion imaging with arterial spin labeling were performed in 11 healthy subjects. CMRO 2 and OEF maps were reconstructed by joint quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) to process GRE phases and quantitative blood oxygen level-dependent (qBOLD) modeling to process GRE magnitudes. Comparisons with QSM and qBOLD alone were performed using ROI analysis, paired t-tests, and Bland-Altman plot. The average CMRO 2 value in cortical gray matter across subjects were 140.4 ± 14.9, 134.1 ± 12.5, and 184.6 ± 17.9 μmol/100 g/min, with corresponding OEFs of 30.9 ± 3.4%, 30.0 ± 1.8%, and 40.9 ± 2.4% for methods based on QSM, qBOLD, and QSM+qBOLD, respectively. QSM+qBOLD provided the highest CMRO 2 contrast between gray and white matter, more uniform OEF than QSM, and less noisy OEF than qBOLD. Quantitative CMRO 2 mapping that fits the entire complex GRE data is feasible by combining QSM analysis of phase and qBOLD analysis of magnitude. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Combined administration of hyperbaric oxygen and hydroxocobalamin improves cerebral metabolism after acute cyanide poisoning in rats

    Hansen, M B; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Hyldegaard, O

    2013-01-01

    -to-pyruvate ratio in rat brain by means of microdialysis during acute CN poisoning. Anesthetized rats were allocated to three groups: 1) vehicle (1.2 ml isotonic NaCl intra-arterially); 2) potassium CN (5.4 mg/kg intra-arterially); 3) potassium CN, OHCob (100 mg/kg intra-arterially) and subsequent HBOT (284 k......Pa in 90 min). OHCob and HBOT significantly attenuated the acute surges in interstitial cerebral lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations compared with the intoxicated rats given no treatment. Furthermore, the combined treatment resulted in consistent low lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations...

  11. Contribution of oxygen-sensitive neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla to hypoxic cerebral vasodilatation in the rat

    Golanov, E. V.; Reis, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. We sought to determine whether hypoxic stimulation of neurons of the rostral ventrolateral reticular nucleus (RVL) would elevate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in anaesthetized paralysed rats. 2. Microinjection of sodium cyanide (NaCN; 150-450 pmol) into the RVL rapidly (within 1-2 s), transiently, dose-dependently and site-specifically elevated rCBF1 measured by laser Doppler flowmetry, by 61.3 +/- 22.1% (P < 0.01), increased arterial pressure (AP; +30 +/- 8 mmHg; P < 0.01)1 and triggered a synchronized 6 Hz rhythm of EEG activity. 3. Following cervical spinal cord transection, NaCN and also dinitrophenol (DNP) significantly (P < 0.05) elevated rCBF and synchronized the EEG but did not elevate AP; the response to NaCN was attenuated by hyperoxia and deepening of anaesthesia. 4. Electrical stimulation of NaCN-sensitive sites in the RVL in spinalized rats increased rCBF measured autoradiographically with 14C iodoantipyrine (Kety method) in the mid-line thalamus (by 182.3 +/- 17.2%; P < 0.05) and cerebral cortex (by 172.6 +/- 15.6%; P < 0.05) regions, respectively, directly or indirectly innervated by RVL neurons, and in the remainder of the brain. In contrast regional cerebral glucose utilization (rCGU), measured autoradiographically with 14C-2-deoxyglucose (Sokoloff method), was increased in proportion to rCBF in the mid-line thalamus (165.6 +/- 17.8%, P < 0.05) but was unchanged in the cortex. 5. Bilateral electrolytic lesions of NaCN sensitive sites of RVL, while not altering resting rCBF or the elevation elicited by hypercarbia (arterial CO2 pressure, Pa,CO2, approximately 69 mmHg), reduced the vasodilatation elicited by normocapnic hypoxaemia (arterial O2 pressure, Pa,O2, approximately 27 mmHg) by 67% (P < 0.01) and flattened the slope of the Pa,O2-rCBF response curve. 6. We conclude that the elevation of rCBF produced in the cerebral cortex by hypoxaemia is in large measure neurogenic, mediated trans-synaptically over intrinsic neuronal pathways, and

  12. Global cerebral blood flow changes measured by brain perfusion SPECT immediately after whole brain irradiation

    Ohtawa, Nobuyuki; Machida, Kikuo; Honda, Norinari; Hosono, Makoto; Takahashi, Takeo

    2003-01-01

    Whole brain irradiation (WBI) is still a major treatment option for patients with metastatic brain tumor despite recent advances in chemotherapy and newer techniques of radiation therapy. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) of changes induced by whole brain radiation is not fully investigated, and the aim of the study was to measure CBF changes non-invasively with brain perfusion SPECT to correlate with treatment effect or prognosis. Total of 106 patients underwent WBI during April 1998 to March 2002. Both brain MRI and brain perfusion SPECT could be performed before (less than 1 week before or less than 10 Gy of WBI) and immediately after (between 1 week before and 2 weeks after the completion of WBI) the therapy in 17 of these patients. They, 10 men and 7 women, all had metastatic brain tumor with age range of 45 to 87 (mean of 61.4) years. Tc-99m brain perfusion agent (HMPAO in 4, ECD in 13) was rapidly administered in a 740-MBq dose to measure global and regional CBF according to Matsuda's method, which based on both Patlak plot and Lassens' linearity correction. Brain MRI was used to measure therapeutic response according to World Health Organization (WHO) classification as complete remission (CR), partial response (PR), no change (NC), and progressive disease (PD). Survival period was measured from the completion of WBI. Mean global CBF was 40.6 and 41.5 ml/100 g/min before and immediately after the WBI, respectively. Four patients increased (greater than 10%) their global mean CBF, 10 unchanged (less than 10% increase or decrease), and 3 decreased after the WBI. The WBI achieved CR in none, PR in 8, NC in 6, and PD in 3 on brain MRI. Change in global mean CBF (mean±SD) was significantly larger in PR (4.3±2.0 ml/100 g/min, p=0.002) and in NC (-0.1±4.5) than in PD (-3.9±6.4, P=0.002, P=0.016, respectively). Survival was not significantly (p>0.05) different among the patients with CR (20 weeks), NC (48 weeks), and PD (21 weeks). Change in global CBF and survival was

  13. The effect of Sub-maximal exercise-rehabilitation program on cardio-respiratory endurance indexes and oxygen pulse in patients with spastic cerebral palsy

    M Izadi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical or cardio-respiratory fitness are of the best important physiological variables in children with cerebral palsy (CP, but the researches on exercise response of individuals with CP are limited. Our aim was to determine the effect of sub-maximal rehabilitation program (aerobic exercise on maximal oxygen uptake, oxygen pulse and cardio- respiratory physiological variables of children with moderate to severe spastic cerebral palsy diplegia and compare with able-bodied children. Methods: In a controlled clinical trial study, 15 children with diplegia spastic cerebral palsy, were recruited on a voluntarily basis (experimental group and 18 subjects without neurological impairments selected as control group. In CP group, aerobic exercise program performed on the average of exercise intensity (144 beat per minute of heart rate, 3 times a week for 3 months. The time of each exercise session was 20-25 minutes. Dependent variables were measured in before (pretest and after (post test of rehabilitation program through Mac Master Protocol on Tantories cycle ergometer in CP group and compared with the control group. Results: The oxygen pulse (VO2/HR during ergometery protocol was significantly lower in CP group than normal group (P<0.05. No significant statistical difference in maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max was found between groups. The rehabilitation program leads to little increase of this variable in CP group. After sub-maximal exercise in pretest and post test, the heart rate of patient group was greater than control group, and aerobic exercise leads to significant decrease in heart rate in CP patients(P<0.05. Conclusion: The patients with spastic cerebral palsy, because of high muscle tone, severe spasticity and involuntarily movements have higher energy cost and lower aerobic fitness than normal people. The rehabilitation exercise program can improve physiological function of muscle and cardio-respiratory endurance in these

  14. Cerebral blood flow SPET in transient global amnesia with automated ROI analysis by 3DSRT

    Takeuchi, Ryo [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Nishi-Kobe Medical Center, Kohjidai 5-7-1, 651-2273, Nishi-ku, Kobe-City, Hyogo (Japan); Matsuda, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, National Center Hospital for Mental, Nervous and Muscular Disorders, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo (Japan); Yoshioka, Katsunori [Daiichi Radioisotope Laboratories, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yonekura, Yoshiharu [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan)

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the areas involved in episodes of transient global amnesia (TGA) by calculation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) using 3DSRT, fully automated ROI analysis software which we recently developed. Technetium-99m l,l-ethyl cysteinate dimer single-photon emission tomography ({sup 99m}Tc-ECD SPET) was performed during and after TGA attacks on eight patients (four men and four women; mean study interval, 34 days). The SPET images were anatomically standardized using SPM99 followed by quantification of 318 constant ROIs, grouped into 12 segments (callosomarginal, precentral, central, parietal, angular, temporal, posterior cerebral, pericallosal, lenticular nucleus, thalamus, hippocampus and cerebellum), in each hemisphere to calculate segmental CBF (sCBF) as the area-weighted mean value for each of the respective 12 segments based on the regional CBF in each ROI. Correlation of the intra- and post-episodic sCBF of each of the 12 segments of the eight patients was estimated by scatter-plot graphical analysis and Pearson's correlation test with Fisher's Z-transformation. For the control, {sup 99m}Tc-ECD SPET was performed on eight subjects (three men and five women) and repeated within 1 month; the correlation between the first and second sCBF values of each of the 12 segments was evaluated in the same way as for patients with TGA. Excellent reproducibility between the two sCBF values was found in all 12 segments of the control subjects. However, a significant correlation between intra- and post-episodic sCBF was not shown in the thalamus or angular segments of TGA patients. The present study was preliminary, but at least suggested that thalamus and angular regions are closely involved in the symptoms of TGA. (orig.)

  15. Cerebral blood flow SPET in transient global amnesia with automated ROI analysis by 3DSRT

    Takeuchi, Ryo; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Katsunori; Yonekura, Yoshiharu

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the areas involved in episodes of transient global amnesia (TGA) by calculation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) using 3DSRT, fully automated ROI analysis software which we recently developed. Technetium-99m l,l-ethyl cysteinate dimer single-photon emission tomography ( 99m Tc-ECD SPET) was performed during and after TGA attacks on eight patients (four men and four women; mean study interval, 34 days). The SPET images were anatomically standardized using SPM99 followed by quantification of 318 constant ROIs, grouped into 12 segments (callosomarginal, precentral, central, parietal, angular, temporal, posterior cerebral, pericallosal, lenticular nucleus, thalamus, hippocampus and cerebellum), in each hemisphere to calculate segmental CBF (sCBF) as the area-weighted mean value for each of the respective 12 segments based on the regional CBF in each ROI. Correlation of the intra- and post-episodic sCBF of each of the 12 segments of the eight patients was estimated by scatter-plot graphical analysis and Pearson's correlation test with Fisher's Z-transformation. For the control, 99m Tc-ECD SPET was performed on eight subjects (three men and five women) and repeated within 1 month; the correlation between the first and second sCBF values of each of the 12 segments was evaluated in the same way as for patients with TGA. Excellent reproducibility between the two sCBF values was found in all 12 segments of the control subjects. However, a significant correlation between intra- and post-episodic sCBF was not shown in the thalamus or angular segments of TGA patients. The present study was preliminary, but at least suggested that thalamus and angular regions are closely involved in the symptoms of TGA. (orig.)

  16. Comparable cerebral oxygenation patterns in younger and older adults during dual-task walking with increasing load

    Sarah A. Fraser

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The neuroimaging literature on dual-task gait clearly demonstrates increased prefrontal cortex (PFC involvement when performing a cognitive task while walking. However, findings from direct comparisons of the cerebral oxygenation patterns of younger (YA and older (OA adults during dual-task walking are mixed and it is unclear how YA and OA respond to increasing cognitive load (difficulty while walking. This functional near infra-red (fNIRS study examined cerebral oxygenation of YA and OA during self-paced dual-task treadmill walking at two different levels of cognitive load (auditory n-back. Changes in accuracy (% as well as oxygenated (HbO and deoxygenated (HbR hemoglobin were examined. For the HbO and HbR measures, eight regions of interest (ROIs were assessed: the anterior and posterior dorsolateral and ventrolateral PFC (aDLPFC, pDLPFC, aVLPFC, pVLPFC in each hemisphere. Nineteen YA (M = 21.83 yrs and 14 OA (M = 66.85 yrs walked at a self-selected pace while performing auditory 1-back and 2-back tasks. Walking alone (single motor: SM and performing the cognitive tasks alone (single cognitive: SC were compared to dual-task walking (DT = SM + SC. In the behavioural data, participants were more accurate in the lowest level of load (1-back compared to the highest (2-back; p ˂ .001. YA were more accurate than OA overall (p = .009, and particularly in the 2-back task (p = .048. In the fNIRS data, both younger and older adults had task effects (SM < DT in specific ROIs for ∆HbO (3 YA, 1 OA and ∆HbR (7 YA, 8 OA. After controlling for walk speed differences, direct comparisons between YA and OA did not reveal significant age differences, but did reveal a difficulty effect in HbO in the left aDLPFC (p = .028 and significant task effects (SM < DT in HbR for 6 of the 8 ROIs. Findings suggest that YA and OA respond similarly to manipulations of cognitive load when walking on a treadmill at a self-selected pace.

  17. Increased cerebral oxygen extraction capacity in patients with Alzheimer’s disease

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Gyldensted, Louise; Nagenthiraja, Kartheeban

    Vascular risk factors are suspected to play a role in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease. Recently, a model that relates capillary dysfunction to the development of AD was proposed [1]. The model predicts that increased capillary dysfunction leads to increased oxygen extraction in order to support...

  18. The relationship between the cerebral blood flow, oxygen consumption and glucose metabolism in primary degenerative dementia

    Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi; Ichimiya, Atsushi; Sasaki, Masayuki; Akashi, Yuko; Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Masada, Kouji

    1995-01-01

    The CBF, CMRO 2 and CMRGlu were measured in patients with primary degenerative dementia including 5 patients with dementia of Alzheimer's type and 4 patients with Pick's disease, and then the correlation between the cerebral blood flow and energy metabolism was evaluated. The control subjects consisted of 5 age-matched normal volunteers. The CBF, CMRO 2 and CMRGlu decreased in the bilateral frontal, temporal and parietal regions in the patients with Alzheimer's dementia, while they decreased in the bilateral frontal and temporal regions in the patients with Pick's disease. Both the CBF and CMRO 2 were closely correlated with each other. However, the CMRGlu was more severely impaired than the CBF or CMRO 2 in both pathological conditions. These results suggested that CMRGlu began to decrease before the reduction of the aerobic metabolism and thus measuring the CMRGlu is considered to be the most sensitive method for detecting abnormal regions in primary degenerative dementia. (author)

  19. MR vascular fingerprinting: A new approach to compute cerebral blood volume, mean vessel radius, and oxygenation maps in the human brain.

    Christen, T; Pannetier, N A; Ni, W W; Qiu, D; Moseley, M E; Schuff, N; Zaharchuk, G

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, we describe a fingerprinting approach to analyze the time evolution of the MR signal and retrieve quantitative information about the microvascular network. We used a Gradient Echo Sampling of the Free Induction Decay and Spin Echo (GESFIDE) sequence and defined a fingerprint as the ratio of signals acquired pre- and post-injection of an iron-based contrast agent. We then simulated the same experiment with an advanced numerical tool that takes a virtual voxel containing blood vessels as input, then computes microscopic magnetic fields and water diffusion effects, and eventually derives the expected MR signal evolution. The parameter inputs of the simulations (cerebral blood volume [CBV], mean vessel radius [R], and blood oxygen saturation [SO2]) were varied to obtain a dictionary of all possible signal evolutions. The best fit between the observed fingerprint and the dictionary was then determined by using least square minimization. This approach was evaluated in 5 normal subjects and the results were compared to those obtained by using more conventional MR methods, steady-state contrast imaging for CBV and R and a global measure of oxygenation obtained from the superior sagittal sinus for SO2. The fingerprinting method enabled the creation of high-resolution parametric maps of the microvascular network showing expected contrast and fine details. Numerical values in gray matter (CBV=3.1±0.7%, R=12.6±2.4μm, SO2=59.5±4.7%) are consistent with literature reports and correlated with conventional MR approaches. SO2 values in white matter (53.0±4.0%) were slightly lower than expected. Numerous improvements can easily be made and the method should be useful to study brain pathologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Smoking normalizes cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption after 12-hour abstention

    Seyedi Vafaee, Manouchehr; Gjedde, Albert; Imamirad, Nasrin

    2015-01-01

    Acute nicotine administration stimulates [14C]deoxyglucose trapping in thalamus and other regions of rat brain, but acute effects of nicotine and smoking on energy metabolism have rarely been investigated in human brain by positron emission tomography (PET). We obtained quantitative PET...... of the abstention period, global grey-matter CBF and CMRO2 were both reduced by 17% relative to nonsmokers. At 15 minutes after renewed smoking, global CBF had increased insignificantly, while global CMRO2 had increased by 11%. Regional analysis showed that CMRO2 had increased in the left putamen and thalamus......, and in right posterior cortical regions at this time. At 60 and 105 minutes after smoking resumption, CBF had increased by 8% and CMRO2 had increased by 11–12%. Thus, we find substantial and global impairment of CBF/CMRO2 in abstaining smokers, and acute restoration by resumption of smoking. The reduced CBF...

  1. Protective Effects and Mechanism of Puerarin on Learning-Memory Disorder after Global Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    WU Hai-qin; GUO He-na; WANG Hu-qing; CHANG Ming-ze; ZHANG Gui-lian; ZHAO Ying-xian

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of puerarin on the learning-memory disorder after global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats, and to explore its mechanism of action. Methods: The global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury model was established using the modified Pulsinelli four-vessel occlusion in Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were intraperitoneally injected with puerarin (100 mg/kg) 1 h before ischemia and once every 6 h afterwards. The learning-memory ability was evaluated by the passive avoidance test. The dynamic changes of the cell counts of apoptosis and positive expression of Bcl-2 in the hippocampus CA1 region were determined by the TUNEL and immunohistochemical methods, respectively. Results: (1) Compared with the reperfusion group, the step through latency (STL) in the passive avoidance test in the puerarin group was prolonged significantly (P<0.01). (2) The apoptotic neurons were injured most severely on the 3rd day in the hippocampal CA1 region after global ischemia and reperfusion. In the pueradn group, the number of apoptotic cells decreased at respective time points after ischemia-reperfusion (P<0.01). (3) The level of positive expression of Bcl-2 varied according to the duration of reperfusion and the peak level occurred on day 1 in the hippocampal CA1 region after global cerebral ischemia. Compared with the reperfusion group, the expression of Bcl-2 in the pueradn group was up-regulated at the respective time points after ischemia raperfusion (P<0.01), reaching the peak on day 1. Conclusions: Puerarin could improve the learning-memory ability after global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rats. The protective mechanism might be related to the effect of inhibiting or delaying the cell apoptosis through up-regulating the expression of Bcl-2 after ischemia and reperfusion.

  2. Edaravone, a Free Radical Scavenger, Mitigates Both Gray and White Matter Damages after Global Cerebral Ischemia in Rats

    Kubo, Kozue; Nakao, Shinichi; Jomura, Sachiko; Sakamoto, Sachiyo; Miyamoto, Etsuko; Xu, Yan; Tomimoto, Hidekazu; Inada, Takefumi; Shingu, Koh

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that similar to cerebral gray matter (mainly composed of neuronal perikarya), white matter (composed of axons and glias) is vulnerable to ischemia. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger, has neuroprotective effects against focal cerebral ischemia even in humans. In this study, we investigated the time course and the severity of both gray and white matter damage following global cerebral ischemia by cardiac arrest, and examined whether edaravone protected the gray and the white matter. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Global cerebral ischemia was induced by 5 minutes of cardiac arrest and resuscitation (CAR). Edaravone, 3 mg/kg, was administered intravenously either immediately or 60 minutes after CAR. The morphological damage was assessed by cresyl violet staining. The microtubule-associated protein 2 (a maker of neuronal perikarya and dendrites), the β amyloid precursor protein (the accumulation of which is a maker of axonal damage), and the ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (a marker of microglia) were stained for immunohistochemical analysis. Significant neuronal perikaryal damage and marked microglial activation were observed in the hippocampal CA1 region with little axonal damage one week after CAR. Two weeks after CAR, the perikaryal damage and microglial activation were unchanged, but obvious axonal damage occurred. Administration of edaravone 60 minutes after CAR significantly mitigated the perikaryal damage, the axonal damage, and the microglial activation. Our results show that axonal damage develops slower than perikaryal damage and that edaravone can protect both gray and white matter after CAR in rats. PMID:19410562

  3. S100B protein in serum is elevated after global cerebral ischemic injury

    Bao-di Sun; Hong-mei Liu; Shi-nan Nie

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:S100B protein in patients with cardiac arrest,hemorrhagic shock and other causes of global cerebral ischemic injury will be dramatically increased.Ischemic brain injury may elevate the level of serum S100 B protein and the severity of brain damage.METHODS:This article is a critical and descriptive review on S100 B protein in serum after ischemic brain injury.We searched Pubmed database with key words or terms such as 'S100B protein', 'cardiac arrest', 'hemorrhagic shock' and 'ischemia reperfusion injury' appeared in the last five years.RESULTS:S100B protein in patients with cardiac arrest,hemorrhagic shock and other causes of ischemic brain injury will be dramatically increased.Ischemic brain injury elevated the level of serum S100 B protein,and the severity of brain damage.CONCLUSION:The level of S100 B protein in serum is elevated after ischemic brain injury,but its mechanism is unclear.

  4. Anchusa italica extract: phytochemical and neuroprotective evaluation on global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion

    Akram Torki

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stroke is the third leading cause of mortality and disability in industrial countries. Treatment with herbs with antioxidant properties has been reported to be an alternative to the conventional treatments. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of Anchusa italica extract on hippocampal injury induced by transient global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in the rat. To do so, 50 rats were randomly assigned to five groups; control, sham, ischemia, and 50 or 100 mg/kg of Anchusa italica treated animals. Ischemia was induced by occlusion of carotid artery for 30 minutes. Afterward, behavioral tests and biochemical analyses were conducted. Induction of ischemia/reperfusion caused a decline in learning and passive avoidance memory in rats. Moreover, Anchusa italica caused an increase in learning and improved the passive avoidance memory. Induction of ischemia/reperfusion caused a decrease in the antioxidant capacity of the brain and serum as well as an increase in the malondialdehyde of the brain and serum. Anchusa italica led to an increase in the antioxidant capacity of the brain and serum and decrease in the malondialdehyde of the brain and serum. Overall, because of its protective effects on spatial memory, passive avoidance learning, antioxidant capacity, and lipid peroxidation during ischemia/reperfusion, Anchusa italica might be beneficial in ischemic patients.

  5. The relationship between the cerebral blood flow, oxygen consumption and glucose metabolism in primary degenerative dementia

    Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi; Ichimiya, Atsushi; Sasaki, Masayuki; Akashi, Yuko; Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Masada, Kouji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-03-01

    The CBF, CMRO{sub 2} and CMRGlu were measured in patients with primary degenerative dementia including 5 patients with dementia of Alzheimer`s type and 4 patients with Pick`s disease, and then the correlation between the cerebral blood flow and energy metabolism was evaluated. The control subjects consisted of 5 age-matched normal volunteers. The CBF, CMRO{sub 2} and CMRGlu decreased in the bilateral frontal, temporal and parietal regions in the patients with Alzheimer`s dementia, while they decreased in the bilateral frontal and temporal regions in the patients with Pick`s disease. Both the CBF and CMRO{sub 2} were closely correlated with each other. However, the CMRGlu was more severely impaired than the CBF or CMRO{sub 2} in both pathological conditions. These results suggested that CMRGlu began to decrease before the reduction of the aerobic metabolism and thus measuring the CMRGlu is considered to be the most sensitive method for detecting abnormal regions in primary degenerative dementia. (author).

  6. Pre- and posttreatment with edaravone protects CA1 hippocampus and enhances neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of dentate gyrus after transient global cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Lei, Shan; Zhang, Pengbo; Li, Weisong; Gao, Ming; He, Xijing; Zheng, Juan; Li, Xu; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Junfeng; Qi, Cunfang; Lu, Haixia; Chen, Xinlin; Liu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Edaravone is clinically used for treatment of patients with acute cerebral infarction. However, the effect of double application of edaravone on neurogenesis in the hippocampus following ischemia remains unknown. In the present study, we explored whether pre- and posttreatment of edaravone had any effect on neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) in the subgranular zone of hippocampus in a rat model of transient global cerebral ischemia and elucidated the potential mechanism of its effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated (n = 15), control (n = 15), and edaravone-treated (n = 15) groups. Newly generated cells were labeled by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect neurogenesis. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling was used to detect cell apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected by 2,7-dichlorofluorescien diacetate assay in NSPCs in vitro. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and cleaved caspase-3 proteins were quantified by western blot analysis. Treatment with edaravone significantly increased the number of NSPCs and newly generated neurons in the subgranular zone (p edaravone also decreased apoptosis of NSPCs (p edaravone significantly decreased ROS generation and inhibited HIF-1α and cleaved caspase-3 protein expressions. These findings indicate that pre- and posttreatment with edaravone enhances neurogenesis by protecting NSPCs from apoptosis in the hippocampus, which is probably mediated by decreasing ROS generation and inhibiting protein expressions of HIF-1α and cleaved caspase-3 after cerebral ischemia. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. Pre- and Posttreatment With Edaravone Protects CA1 Hippocampus and Enhances Neurogenesis in the Subgranular Zone of Dentate Gyrus After Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia in Rats

    Shan Lei

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Edaravone is clinically used for treatment of patients with acute cerebral infarction. However, the effect of double application of edaravone on neurogenesis in the hippocampus following ischemia remains unknown. In the present study, we explored whether pre- and posttreatment of edaravone had any effect on neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs in the subgranular zone of hippocampus in a rat model of transient global cerebral ischemia and elucidated the potential mechanism of its effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated (n = 15, control (n = 15, and edaravone-treated (n = 15 groups. Newly generated cells were labeled by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect neurogenesis. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling was used to detect cell apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS were detected by 2,7-dichlorofluorescien diacetate assay in NSPCs in vitro. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α and cleaved caspase-3 proteins were quantified by western blot analysis. Treatment with edaravone significantly increased the number of NSPCs and newly generated neurons in the subgranular zone (p < .05. Treatment with edaravone also decreased apoptosis of NSPCs (p < .01. Furthermore, treatment with edaravone significantly decreased ROS generation and inhibited HIF-1α and cleaved caspase-3 protein expressions. These findings indicate that pre- and posttreatment with edaravone enhances neurogenesis by protecting NSPCs from apoptosis in the hippocampus, which is probably mediated by decreasing ROS generation and inhibiting protein expressions of HIF-1α and cleaved caspase-3 after cerebral ischemia.

  8. Global cerebral blood flow and metabolism during acute hyperketonemia in the awake and anesthetized rat

    Linde, Rasmus; Hasselbalch, Steen G.; Topp, Simon

    2006-01-01

    and cerebral metabolism could not be explained by alterations in blood pH or arterial CO2 tension. By measuring cerebral intracellular pH by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, it could further be concluded that the brain pH was unchanged during acute hyperketonemia. These observations indicate......In the human setting, it has been shown that acute increase in the concentration of ketone bodies by infusion of beta-hydroxybutyrate increased the cerebral blood flow (CBF) without affecting the overall cerebral metabolic activity. The mechanism by which this effect of ketone bodies was mediated...... that the mechanism responsible for the increase in CBF is rather a direct effect on the cerebral endothelium than via some metabolic interactions...

  9. The effects of capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH on the cerebral uptake of glucose and glucose analogs:Application to FDG and comparison to oxygen uptake.

    Hugo Angleys

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glucose is the brain’s principal source of ATP, but the extent to which cerebral glucose consumption (CMRglc is coupled with its oxygen consumption (CMRO2 remains unclear. Measurements of the brain’s oxygen-glucose index OGI=CMRO2/CMRglc suggest that its oxygen uptake largely suffices for oxidative phosphorylation. Nevertheless, during functional activation and in some disease states, brain tissue seemingly produces lactate although cerebral blood flow (CBF delivers sufficient oxygen, so-called aerobic glycolysis. OGI measurements, in turn, are method-dependent in that estimates based on glucose analog uptake depend on the so-called lumped constant (LC to arrive at CMRglc. Capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH, which is believed to change during functional activation and some disease states, affects the extraction efficacy of oxygen from blood. We developed a three-compartment model of glucose extraction to examine whether CTH also affects glucose extraction into brain tissue. We then combined this model with our previous model of oxygen extraction to examine whether differential glucose and oxygen extraction might favor nonoxidative glucose metabolism under certain conditions. Our model predicts that glucose uptake is largely unaffected by changes in its plasma concentration, while changes in CBF and CTH affect glucose and oxygen uptake to different extents. Accordingly, functional hyperemia facilitates glucose uptake more than oxygen uptake, favoring aerobic glycolysis during enhanced energy demands. Applying our model to glucose analogs, we observe that LC depends on physiological state, with a risk of overestimating relative increases in CMRglc during functional activation by as much as 50%.

  10. Transmission of arterial oxygen partial pressure oscillations to the cerebral microcirculation in a porcine model of acute lung injury caused by cyclic recruitment and derecruitment.

    Klein, K U; Boehme, S; Hartmann, E K; Szczyrba, M; Heylen, L; Liu, T; David, M; Werner, C; Markstaller, K; Engelhard, K

    2013-02-01

    Cyclic recruitment and derecruitment (R/D) play a key role in the pathomechanism of acute lung injury (ALI) leading to respiration-dependent oscillations of arterial partial pressure of oxygen (Pa(O(2))). These Pa(O(2)) oscillations could also be forwarded to the cerebral microcirculation. In 12 pigs, partial pressure of oxygen was measured in the thoracic aorta (Pa(O(2))) and subcortical cerebral tissue (Pbr(O(2))). Cerebral cortical haemoglobin oxygen saturation (Sbr(O(2))), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and peripheral haemoglobin saturation (Sp(O(2))) were assessed by spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry. Measurements at different fractions of inspired oxygen (F(I(O(2)))) were performed at baseline and during cyclic R/D. frequency domain analysis, the Mann-Whitney test, linear models to test the influence of Pa(O(2)) and systolic arterial pressure (SAP) oscillations on cerebral measurements. Parameters [mean (SD)] remained stable during baseline. Pa(O(2)) oscillations [10.6 (8) kPa, phase(reference)], systemic arterial pressure (SAP) oscillations [20 (9) mm Hg, phase(Pa(O(2))-SAP) -33 (72)°], and Sp(O(2))oscillations [1.9 (1.7)%, phase(Pa(O(2))-Sp(O(2))) 264 (72)°] were detected during lung R/D at 1.0. Pa(O(2)) oscillations decreased [2.7 (3.5) kPa, P=0.0008] and Sp(O(2)) oscillations increased [6.8 (3.9)%, P=0.0014] at F(I(O(2))) 0.3. In the brain, synchronized Pbr(O(2)) oscillations [0.6 (0.4) kPa, phase(Pa(O(2))-Pbr(O(2))) 90 (39)°], Sbr(O(2)) oscillations [4.1 (1.5)%, phase(Pa(O(2))-Sbr(O(2))) 182 (54)°], and CBF oscillations [198 (176) AU, phase(Pa(O(2))-CBF) 201 (63)°] occurred that were dependent on Pa(O(2)) and SAP oscillations. Pa(O(2)) oscillations caused by cyclic R/D are transmitted to the cerebral microcirculation in a porcine model of ALI. These cyclic oxygen alterations could play a role in the crosstalk of acute lung and brain injury.

  11. Effects of variation in cerebral haemodynamics during aneurysm surgery on brain tissue oxygen and metabolism.

    Kett-White, R; Hutchinson, P J; Czosnyka, M; al-Rawi, P; Gupta, A; Pickard, J D; Kirkpatrick, P J

    2002-01-01

    This study explores the sensitivities of multiparameter tissue gas sensors and microdialysis to variations in blood pressure, CSF drainage and to well-defined periods of ischaemia accompanying aneurysm surgery, and their predictive value for infarction. A Neurotrend sensor [brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen (PBO2), carbon dioxide (PBCO2), brain pH (pHB) and temperature] and microdialysis catheter were inserted into the appropriate vascular territory prior to craniotomy. Baseline data showed a clear correlation between PBO2 and mean arterial pressure (MAP) below a threshold of 80 mmHg. PBO2 improved with CSF drainage in 20 out of 28 (Wilcoxon: P sensors can be sensitive to acute ischaemia. Microdialysis shows potential in the detection of metabolic changes during tissue hypoxia.

  12. Assessing the effects of subject motion on T2 relaxation under spin tagging (TRUST) cerebral oxygenation measurements using volume navigators.

    Stout, Jeffrey N; Tisdall, M Dylan; McDaniel, Patrick; Gagoski, Borjan; Bolar, Divya S; Grant, Patricia Ellen; Adalsteinsson, Elfar

    2017-12-01

    Subject motion may cause errors in estimates of blood T 2 when using the T 2 -relaxation under spin tagging (TRUST) technique on noncompliant subjects like neonates. By incorporating 3D volume navigators (vNavs) into the TRUST pulse sequence, independent measurements of motion during scanning permit evaluation of these errors. The effects of integrated vNavs on TRUST-based T 2 estimates were evaluated using simulations and in vivo subject data. Two subjects were scanned with the TRUST+vNav sequence during prescribed movements. Mean motion scores were derived from vNavs and TRUST images, along with a metric of exponential fit quality. Regression analysis was performed between T 2 estimates and mean motion scores. Also, motion scores were determined from independent neonatal scans. vNavs negligibly affected venous blood T 2 estimates and better detected subject motion than fit quality metrics. Regression analysis showed that T 2 is biased upward by 4.1 ms per 1 mm of mean motion score. During neonatal scans, mean motion scores of 0.6 to 2.0 mm were detected. Motion during TRUST causes an overestimate of T 2 , which suggests a cautious approach when comparing TRUST-based cerebral oxygenation measurements of noncompliant subjects. Magn Reson Med 78:2283-2289, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Effect of rehabilitation training combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy on the nerve cytokine secretion and oxidative stress in rehabilitation period of patients with cerebral infarction

    Ling Kong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the influence of rehabilitation training combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy on the nerve cytokine secretion and oxidative stress in rehabilitation period of patients with cerebral infarction. Methods: A total of 110 patients with cerebral infarction who received rehabilitation therapy in the hospital between January 2015 and May 2017 were divided into routine group (n=55 and hyperbaric oxygen group (n=55 according to random number table. Routine group received regular rehabilitation training, and hyperbaric oxygen group underwent rehabilitation training combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The differences in the serum contents of nerve factors, neurotransmitters and oxidative stress indexes were compared between the two groups at immediately after admission (T0 and after 14 d of treatment (T1. Results: At T0, there was no statistically significant difference in the serum contents of nerve factors, neurotransmitters and oxidative stress indexes between the two groups. At T1, serum nerve factors MBP and NSE contents of hyperbaric oxygen group were lower than those of routine group while NGF content was higher than that of routine group; serum neurotransmitter Glu content was lower than that of routine group while GABA content was higher than that of routine group; serum oxidative stress indexes ROS and LHP contents were lower than those of routine group while CAT and SOD contents were higher than those of routine group. Conclusion: Rehabilitation training combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy can effectively optimize the nerve function and inhibit the systemic oxidative stress response in rehabilitation period of patients with cerebral infarction.

  14. Measuring Steady-State Oxygen Uptake during the 6-Min Walk Test in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: Feasibility and Construct Validity

    Maltais, Desiree B.; Robitaille, Nancy-Michelle; Dumas, Francine; Boucher, Normand; Richards, Carol L.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of measuring steady-state oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O[subscript 2]) during the 6-min walk test (6MWT) in adults with cerebral palsy (CP) who walk without support and whether there is construct validity for net 6MWT V[Combining Dot Above]O[subscript 2] as a measure of their walking ability.…

  15. Cerebral and Renal Oxygen Saturation Are Not Compromised in the Presence of Retrograde Blood Flow in either the Ascending or Descending Aorta in Term or Near-Term Infants with Left-Sided Obstructive Lesions

    van der Laan, Michelle E.; Mebius, Mirthe J.; Roofthooft, Marcus T. R.; Bos, Arend F.; Berger, Rolf M. F.; Kooi, Elisabeth M. W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In infants with left-sided obstructive lesions (LSOL), the presence of retrograde blood flow in either the ascending or descending aorta may lead to diminished cerebral and renal blood flow, respectively. Objectives: Our aim was to compare cerebral and renal tissue oxygen saturation

  16. In vivo measurements of the influence of the skin on cerebral oxygenation changes measured with near-infrared spectrophotometry (NIRS)

    Klaessens, John H. G. M.; van Os, Sandra H. G.; Hopman, Jeroen C. W.; Liem, K. D.; van de Bor, Margot; Thijssen, Johan M.

    2004-07-01

    Goal: To investigate the influence of skin on the accuracy and precision of regional cerebral oxygenation measurements using CW-NIRS and to reduce the inter individual variability of NIRS measurements by normalization with data from an extra wavelength. Method: Three piglets (7.8-9.3 kg) were anesthetized, paralyzed and mechanically ventilated. Receiving optodes were placed over the left and right hemisphere (C3, C4 EEG placement code) and one emitting optode on Cz position (optode distance=1.8cm). Optical densities (OD) were measured for 3 wavelengths (767, 850, 905 nm) (OXYMON) during stable normoxic, mild and deep hypoxemic conditions (SaO2=100%, 80% and 60%) of one minute in each region. This was repeated 3 times: all optodes with skin (condition 1); one receiving optode directly on the skull (2); emitting and also receiving optode on the skull (3). The absolute cO2Hb, cHHb, ctHb concentrations (μmol/L) were calculated from the OD's and changes with respect to the SaO2=100% condition were estimated. Because ODs varied over a large range, the light intensity was externally attenuated to adapt to the range of the spectrophotometer. The data were then corrected for these attenuation effects and for pathlength changes caused by skin removal using the OD at the independent wavelength (λ=975nm). Results: Removal of the skin resulted in an increase of the absorption values (average 0.25 OD in condition 2 and 0.42 OD in condition 3 with respect to condition 1). The change from normoxic to medium, and to deep hypoxic conditions produced a decrease of cO2Hb (-15, and -29 μmol/L, respectively), an increase in cHHb (+16, and +35 μmol/L) and in ctHb (+1, and +5 μmol/L). Total skin removal yielded an extra change in cO2Hb (-5, -1 μmol/L), cHHb (+8, +9 μmol/L), and ctHb (+3, +8 μmol /L). The coefficient of variability of the absolute concentration changes was considerably decreased by the normalization of densities by the density obtained at 795 nm. Conclusion: Skin

  17. Responsiveness of the ACTIVLIM-CP questionnaire measuring global activity performance in children with cerebral palsy.

    Paradis, Julie; Arnould, Carlyne; Thonnard, Jean-Louis; Houx, Laëtitia; Pons-Becmeur, Christelle; Renders, Anne; Brochard, Sylvain; Bleyenheuft, Yannick

    2018-06-04

    To investigate the responsiveness of the ACTIVLIM-CP questionnaire after two evidence-based interventions for children with cerebral palsy (CP). Seventy-five children with CP either participated in an intensive motor-skill learning intervention (hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy including lower extremities [HABIT-ILE], n=47) or received botulinum neurotoxin-A (BoNT-A) injection(s) into lower extremities combined with conventional physical therapy (n=28). All children were assessed three times: at baseline (T 0 ; before HABIT-ILE/the day of BoNT-A injection), at T 1 (last day of HABIT-ILE/6wks after BoNT-A injection), and at follow-up (T 2 ; 3-4mo after the beginning of intervention). Parents completed ACTIVLIM-CP and three other activity questionnaires. Responsiveness was analysed using group (based on intervention), subgroup (based on gross motor function level), and individual approaches. For the HABIT-ILE group, significant improvements in ACTIVLIM-CP were observed for the T 0 -T 1 period (pCP demonstrated high responsiveness after HABIT-ILE, showing that this scale may be used to investigate global activity performance in clinical trials focusing on improving daily life activities. Good responsiveness of ACTIVLIM-CP questionnaire during intensive motor-skill learning intervention. Higher responsiveness for children in Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels III and IV versus I and II after intensive intervention. ACTIVLIM-CP is useful to identify children improving their performance after botulinum neurotoxin-A injection. © 2018 Mac Keith Press.

  18. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α mediates neuroprotection of hypoxic postconditioning against global cerebral ischemia.

    Zhu, Tingna; Zhan, Lixuan; Liang, Donghai; Hu, Jiaoyue; Lu, Zhiwei; Zhu, Xinyong; Sun, Weiwen; Liu, Liu; Xu, En

    2014-10-01

    Hypoxia administered after transient global cerebral ischemia (tGCI) has been shown to induce neuroprotection in adult rats, but the underlying mechanisms for this protection are unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that hypoxic postconditioning (HPC) induces neuroprotection through upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and that this involves phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) pathways. The expression of HIF-1α, VEGF, and cleaved caspase-9 were determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. As pharmacologic interventions, the HIF-1α inhibitor 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2), PI3K inhibitor LY294002, p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580, and MEK inhibitor U0126 were administered before HPC or after tGCI. We found that HPC maintained the higher expression of HIF-1α and VEGF and decreased cleaved caspase-9 levels in CA1 after tGCI. These effects were reversed by 2ME2 administered before HPC, and the neuroprotection of HPC was abolished. LY294002 and SB203580 decreased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF after HPC, whereas U0126 increased HIF-1α and VEGF after tGCI. These findings suggested that HIF-1α exerts neuroprotection induced by HPC against tGCI through VEGF upregulation and cleaved caspase-9 downregulation, and that the PI3K, p38 MAPK, and MEK pathways are involved in the regulation of HIF-1α and VEGF.

  19. Short-term sleep deprivation stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in rats following global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion.

    Oumei Cheng

    Full Text Available Sleep deprivation (SD plays a complex role in central nervous system (CNS diseases. Recent studies indicate that short-term SD can affect the extent of ischemic damage. The aim of this study was to investigate whether short-term SD could stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis in a rat model of global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (GCIR.One hundred Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into Sham, GCIR and short-term SD groups based on different durations of SD; the short-term SD group was randomly divided into three subgroups: the GCIR+6hSD*3d-treated, GCIR+12hSD-treated and GCIR+12hSD*3d-treated groups. The GCIR rat model was induced via the bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries and hemorrhagic hypotension. The rats were sleep-deprived starting at 48 h following GCIR. A Morris water maze test was used to assess learning and memory ability; cell proliferation and differentiation were analyzed via 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU and neuron-specific enolase (NSE, respectively, at 14 and 28 d; the expression of hippocampal BDNF was measured after 7 d.The different durations of short-term SD designed in our experiment exhibited improvement in cognitive function as well as increased hippocampal BDNF expression. Additionally, the short-term SD groups also showed an increased number of BrdU- and BrdU/NSE-positive cells compared with the GCIR group. Of the three short-term SD groups, the GCIR+12hSD*3d-treated group experienced the most substantial beneficial effects.Short-term SD, especially the GCIR+12hSD*3d-treated method, stimulates neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG of rats that undergo GCIR, and BDNF may be an underlying mechanism in this process.

  20. The Not-So-Global Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Signal.

    Billings, Jacob; Keilholz, Shella

    2018-04-01

    Global signal regression is a controversial processing step for resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, partly because the source of the global blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal remains unclear. On the one hand, nuisance factors such as motion can readily introduce coherent BOLD changes across the whole brain. On the other hand, the global signal has been linked to neural activity and vigilance levels, suggesting that it contains important neurophysiological information and should not be discarded. Any widespread pattern of coordinated activity is likely to contribute appreciably to the global signal. Such patterns may include large-scale quasiperiodic spatiotemporal patterns, known also to be tied to performance on vigilance tasks. This uncertainty surrounding the separability of the global BOLD signal from concurrent neurological processes motivated an examination of the global BOLD signal's spatial distribution. The results clarify that although the global signal collects information from all tissue classes, a diverse subset of the BOLD signal's independent components contribute the most to the global signal. Further, the timing of each network's contribution to the global signal is not consistent across volunteers, confirming the independence of a constituent process that comprises the global signal.

  1. The rate of cerebral utilization of glucose, ketone bodies, and oxygen: a comparative in vivo study of infant and adult rats.

    Dahlquist, G; Persson, B

    1976-11-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by means of Celabeled microspheres in infant (20-day-old) and adult (3-month-old) rats, anesthetised with Na-5-ethyl-5-(1-methylpropyl)2-thiobarbituric acid. Cerebral arteriovenous differences of acetoacetate, D-beta-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, lactate, and oxygen and brain DNA content were determined in other groups of similarly treated infant and adult animals fed or starved for 48 or 72 hr. The mean CBF values of 0.48+/-0.04 and 0.62+/-0.07 ml/(g X min), +/- SEM, in infant and adult animals, respectively, were not significantly different. CBF was unaffected by starvation. At any given arterial concentration the cerebral arteriovenous difference of acetoacetate was significantly higher in infant than adult rats. The same was true for D-beta-hydroxybutyrate at arterial concentrations above 1 mmol/liter. There was an approximately linear relationship between arterial concentration of acetoacetate and its cerebral arteriovenous difference in both infant and adult rats. A similar relationship was found for D-beta-hydroxybutyrate only in infant animals. In the fed state, the cerebral uptake of glucose and ketone bodies (micromoles per (mg DNA X min)) was not different in infant and adult rats. During starvation, cerebral uptake of ketone bodies expressed as micromoles per (mg DNA X min) was higher in infant than adult rats, indicating a higher rate of utilization of ketone bodies per cell in these animals. For glucose, no such difference was found in either fed or starved groups (Table 3). The average percentage of the total cerebral uptake of substrates (micromoles per min) accounted for by ketone bodies increased in both infant and adult rats during starvation. This percentage value was clearly higher in infant than adult rats during starvation. After 72 hr of starvation the values were 38.8% and 15.2% in infant and adult rats, respectively (Fig. 3). Calculated cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2), assuming complete

  2. Gadd45b prevents autophagy and apoptosis against rat cerebral neuron oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion injury.

    He, Guoqian; Xu, Wenming; Tong, Linyan; Li, Shuaishuai; Su, Shiceng; Tan, Xiaodan; Li, Changqing

    2016-04-01

    Autophagic (type II) cell death has been suggested to play pathogenetic roles in cerebral ischemia. Growth arrest and DNA damage response 45b (Gadd45b) has been shown to protect against rat brain ischemia injury through inhibiting apoptosis. However, the relationship between Gadd45b and autophagy in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury remains uncertain. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of Gadd45b on autophagy. We adopt the oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R) model of rat primary cortex neurons, and lentivirus interference used to silence Gadd45b expression. Cell viability and injury assay were performed using CCK-8 and LDH kit. Autophagy activation was monitored by expression of ATG5, LC3, Beclin-1, ATG7 and ATG3. Neuron apoptosis was monitored by expression of Bcl-2, Bax, cleaved caspase3, p53 and TUNEL assay. Neuron neurites were assayed by double immunofluorescent labeling with Tuj1 and LC3B. Here, we demonstrated that the expression of Gadd45b was strongly up-regulated at 24 h after 3 h OGD treatment. ShRNA-Gadd45b increased the expression of autophagy related proteins, aggravated OGD/R-induced neuron cell apoptosis and neurites injury. ShRNA-Gadd45b co-treatment with autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or Wortmannin partly inhibited the ratio of LC3II/LC3I, and slightly ameliorated neuron cell apoptosis under OGD/R. Furthermore, shRNA-Gadd45b inhibited the p-p38 level involved in autophagy, but increased the p-JNK level involved in apoptosis. ShRNA-Gadd45b co-treatment with p38 inhibitor obviously induced autophagy. ShRNA-Gadd45b co-treatment with JNK inhibitor alleviated neuron cell apoptosis. In conclusion, our data suggested that Gadd45b inhibited autophagy and apoptosis under OGD/R. Gadd45b may be a common regulatory protein to control autophagy and apoptosis.

  3. Large cerebral perfusion defects observed in brain perfusion SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients

    So, Young; Kim, Hahn Young; Roh, Hong Gee; Han, Seol Heui

    2007-01-01

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a memory disorder characterized by an episode of antegrade amnesia and bewilderment which persists for several hours. We analyzed brain perfusion SPECT findings and clinical outcome of patients who suffered from TGA. From September 2005 to August 2007, 12 patients underwent Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT for neuroimaging of TGA. All patients also underwent MRI and MRA including DWI (MRI). Among them, 10 patients who could be chased more than 6 months were included in this study. Their average age was 60.74.0 yrs (M: F = 2: 8) and the average duration of amnesia was 4.42.2 hrs (1 hr ∼ 7 hrs). Duration from episode of amnesia to SPECT was 4.32.4 days (1∼9 days). Precipitating factors could be identified in 6 patients: emotional stress 3, hair dyeing 1, taking a nap 1 and angioplasty 1. SPECT and MRI was visually assessed, No cerebral perfusion defect was observed on SPECT in 3 patients and their clinical outcome was all good. Among 7 patients who had cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT, 3 patients had good clinical outcome, while others did not: one had hypercholesterolemia, another had depression, and 2 patients with cerebral perfusion defects at both temporoparetal cortex was later diagnosed as early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). MRI was negative in 6 patients and 3 of them had excellent clinical outcome while other 3 were diagnosed as hypercholesterolemia, early AD and MCI. Among 4 patients with positive MRI, 3 showed good clinical outcome and their MRI showed lesions at medial temporal cortex and/or vertebral artery. One patient with microcalcification at left putamen was diagnosed to have depression. Large cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients which usually shows negative MRI

  4. Large cerebral perfusion defects observed in brain perfusion SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients

    So, Young; Kim, Hahn Young; Roh, Hong Gee; Han, Seol Heui [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a memory disorder characterized by an episode of antegrade amnesia and bewilderment which persists for several hours. We analyzed brain perfusion SPECT findings and clinical outcome of patients who suffered from TGA. From September 2005 to August 2007, 12 patients underwent Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT for neuroimaging of TGA. All patients also underwent MRI and MRA including DWI (MRI). Among them, 10 patients who could be chased more than 6 months were included in this study. Their average age was 60.74.0 yrs (M: F = 2: 8) and the average duration of amnesia was 4.42.2 hrs (1 hr {approx} 7 hrs). Duration from episode of amnesia to SPECT was 4.32.4 days (1{approx}9 days). Precipitating factors could be identified in 6 patients: emotional stress 3, hair dyeing 1, taking a nap 1 and angioplasty 1. SPECT and MRI was visually assessed, No cerebral perfusion defect was observed on SPECT in 3 patients and their clinical outcome was all good. Among 7 patients who had cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT, 3 patients had good clinical outcome, while others did not: one had hypercholesterolemia, another had depression, and 2 patients with cerebral perfusion defects at both temporoparetal cortex was later diagnosed as early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). MRI was negative in 6 patients and 3 of them had excellent clinical outcome while other 3 were diagnosed as hypercholesterolemia, early AD and MCI. Among 4 patients with positive MRI, 3 showed good clinical outcome and their MRI showed lesions at medial temporal cortex and/or vertebral artery. One patient with microcalcification at left putamen was diagnosed to have depression. Large cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients which usually shows negative MRI.

  5. Correlation between quantitative EEG and cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in patients with dementia of Alzheimer type

    Kudoh, Masako; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yonezawa, Hisashi

    1997-01-01

    Quantitative scalp EEG and cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO 2 ) measured by the steady-state 15 O technique and positron emission tomography were studied in 19 patients with mild to moderate dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT) and age-matched controls (EEG=19, PET=6). Scalp electrodes were placed according to the international 10-20 method except for Cz, T3, and T4. To evaluate the relative changes in power for each frequency band between the two groups, the percentage power fraction (percentage power for each frequency band at a site compared to the total power at that site; %delta for 2.0-3.8 Hz, %theta for 4.0-7.8 Hz, %alpha for 8.0-12.8 Hz, %beta for 13.0-25.4 Hz) was calculated. Compared with controls, DAT patients showed a significant decrease in %alpha, while significant increases in %theta at all electrodes, and significant increases in %delta at the temporal, parietal and occipital electrodes were observed. The patient group displayed a significant decrease in rCBF and rCMRO 2 in the parietal, temporal and frontal cortices, but the reduction in rCMRO 2 was less remarkable than that of rCBF. %Theta at P3, O1 and O2 showed a significant negative correlation with rCBF, and %theta at P3, O1showed a significant negative correlation with rCMRO 2 . %Delta at P3, P4 and T5 was significantly negatively correlated with rCBF in the corresponding regions, and %alpha at almost all the electrodes (except O1, F3, P3) was significantly positively correlated with rCBF in the corresponding regions. %Delta and %alpha did not show any significant correlation with rCMRO 2 . (author)

  6. Multimillennium changes in dissolved oxygen under global warming: results from an AOGCM and offline ocean biogeochemical model

    Yamamoto, A.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Shigemitsu, M.; Oka, A.; Takahashi, K.; Ohgaito, R.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Long-term oceanic oxygen change due to global warming is still unclear; most future projections (such as CMIP5) are only performed until 2100. Indeed, few previous studies using conceptual models project oxygen change in the next thousands of years, showing persistent global oxygen reduction by about 30% in the next 2000 years, even after atmospheric carbon dioxide stops rising. Yet, these models cannot sufficiently represent the ocean circulation change: the key driver of oxygen change. Moreover, considering serious effect oxygen reduction has on marine life and biogeochemical cycling, long-term oxygen change should be projected for higher validity. Therefore, we used a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) and an offline ocean biogeochemical model, investigating realistic long-term changes in oceanic oxygen concentration and ocean circulation. We integrated these models for 2000 years under atmospheric CO2 doubling and quadrupling. After global oxygen reduction in the first 500 years, oxygen concentration in deep ocean globally recovers and overshoots, despite surface oxygen decrease and weaker Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Deep ocean convection in the Weddell Sea recovers and overshoots, after initial cessation. Thus, enhanced deep convection and associated Antarctic Bottom Water supply oxygen-rich surface waters to deep ocean, resulting global deep ocean oxygenation. We conclude that the change in ocean circulation in the Southern Ocean potentially drives millennial-scale oxygenation in the deep ocean; contrary to past reported long-term oxygen reduction and general expectation. In presentation, we will discuss the mechanism of response of deep ocean convection in the Weddell Sea and show the volume changes of hypoxic waters.

  7. Discussion of the oxygen inhalation technique with O15 for the evaluation of cerebral metabolism/flow relationships in cerebro-vascular diseases

    Lenzi, G.L.; Jones, T.; Frackowiak, R.S.J.; Fieschi, C.

    1980-01-01

    The use of short lived radioisotopes, particularly 15 O, has opened up the possibility of studying both oxygen metabolism and blood flow in patients non-invasively. The results obtained with the oxygen inhalation technique (O.I.T.) and two dimensional imaging have been reported since 1976. Positron emission tomography represents an important technical advance on these initial studies. It permits the evaluation of regional CBF and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ) qualitatively and hopefully in the near future, in absolute quantitative terms using an essentially non-invasive technique. It will thus be possible to examine rCBF and rCMRO 2 across the spectrum of central nervous disorders systematically and longitudinally, though the necessity for having a cyclotron to produce the positron emitters will limit this to some extent. (Auth.)

  8. Global reduction of cerebral glucose metabolism in persons with symptomatic as well as asymptomatic lacunar infarction

    Takahashi, Wakoh; Takagi, Shigeharu; Shinohara, Yukito; Ide, Michiru; Shohtsu, Akira

    2000-01-01

    To clarify the hemodynamic changes in lacunar infarction, we evaluated cerebral glucose metabolism by using positron emission tomography with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) in patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic lacunar infarction and in persons without cerebral infarction on MRI. Subjects in this study were 27 patients with symptomatic lacunar infarction (SCI group), 73 subjects with asymptomatic lacunar infarction (ACI group), and 134 persons without infarction (NC group). CMRgI in the ACI group was significantly lower than that in the NC group in the cerebral cortex (P<0.05) and thalamus (P<0.05). CMRgI in the SCI group was significantly reduced from that in the NC group in the cerebral cortex (P<0.005), basal ganglia (P<0.001), thalamus (P<0.05) and white matter (P<0.005). The reduction in CMRgI in the SCI group was more severe than that in the ACI group in basal ganglia (P<0.05) and thalamus (P<0.05). Our results indicated that glucose metabolism in patients with asymptomatic lacunar infarction is reduced throughout the whole brain as compared with non-infarcted elderly persons. Follow-up and treatment of risk factors if present, may be necessary in such patients. (author)

  9. Alpha-MSH decreases core and brain temperature during global cerebral ischemia in rats

    Spulber, S.; Moldovan, Mihai; Oprica, M.

    2005-01-01

    -vessel occlusion forebrain ischemia on core temperature (CT) and brain temperature (BT), respectively. After 10 min cerebral ischemia, BT was lower in alpha-MSH- than in saline-injected animals. After 10 min reperfusion, both CT and BT were lower than the corresponding pre-ischemic levels after injection of alpha...

  10. Effects of the Oxygen-Carrying Solution OxyVita C on the Cerebral Microcirculation and Systemic Blood Pressures in Healthy Rats

    Rania Abutarboush

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOC as oxygen delivering therapies during hypoxic states has been hindered by vasoconstrictive side effects caused by depletion of nitric oxide (NO. OxyVita C is a promising oxygen-carrying solution that consists of a zero-linked hemoglobin polymer with a high molecular weight (~17 MDa. The large molecular weight is believed to prevent extravasation and limit NO scavenging and vasoconstriction. The aim of this study was to assess vasoactive effects of OxyVita C on systemic blood pressures and cerebral pial arteriole diameters. Anesthetized healthy rats received four intravenous (IV infusions of an increasing dose of OxyVita C (2, 25, 50, 100 mg/kg and hemodynamic parameters and pial arteriolar diameters were measured pre- and post-infusion. Normal saline was used as a volume-matched control. Systemic blood pressures increased (P ≤ 0.05 with increasing doses of OxyVita C, but not with saline. There was no vasoconstriction in small (<50 µm and medium-sized (50–100 µm pial arterioles in the OxyVita C group. In contrast, small and medium-sized pial arterioles vasoconstricted in the control group. Compared to saline, OxyVita C showed no cerebral vasoconstriction after any of the four doses evaluated in this rat model despite increases in blood pressure.

  11. Cerebral oxygenation after birth

    Hessel, Trine W; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Greisen, Gorm

    2014-01-01

    .19 p = standard deviation during steady-state repeated measurements was 4.8% ± 0.86 for INVOS and 2.8% ± 0.5 for FORE-SIGHT. CONCLUSION......, the mean cStO2 value increased from 53.4% (CI 36.8-69.9%) to 86.0% (CI 80.2-91.7%) for INVOS and from 61.6% (CI 55.4-67.8%) to 82.2% (CI 77.7-86.7%) for FORE-SIGHT. The Bland-Altman plot revealed decreasing difference (INVOS minus FORE-SIGHT) (D) in absolute values (A) with increasing cStO2 (D = 0.5A - 38...

  12. Inhibition of hypoxia-associated response and kynurenine production in response to hyperbaric oxygen as mechanisms involved in protection against experimental cerebral malaria.

    Bastos, Marcele F; Kayano, Ana Carolina A V; Silva-Filho, João Luiz; Dos-Santos, João Conrado K; Judice, Carla; Blanco, Yara C; Shryock, Nathaniel; Sercundes, Michelle K; Ortolan, Luana S; Francelin, Carolina; Leite, Juliana A; Oliveira, Rafaella; Elias, Rosa M; Câmara, Niels O S; Lopes, Stefanie C P; Albrecht, Letusa; Farias, Alessandro S; Vicente, Cristina P; Werneck, Claudio C; Giorgio, Selma; Verinaud, Liana; Epiphanio, Sabrina; Marinho, Claudio R F; Lalwani, Pritesh; Amino, Rogerio; Aliberti, Julio; Costa, Fabio T M

    2018-03-20

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a multifactorial syndrome involving an exacerbated proinflammatory status, endothelial cell activation, coagulopathy, hypoxia, and accumulation of leukocytes and parasites in the brain microvasculature. Despite significant improvements in malaria control, 15% of mortality is still observed in CM cases, and 25% of survivors develop neurologic sequelae for life-even after appropriate antimalarial therapy. A treatment that ameliorates CM clinical signs, resulting in complete healing, is urgently needed. Previously, we showed a hyperbaric oxygen (HBO)-protective effect against experimental CM. Here, we provide molecular evidence that HBO targets brain endothelial cells by decreasing their activation and inhibits parasite and leukocyte accumulation, thus improving cerebral microcirculatory blood flow. HBO treatment increased the expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor over hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α), an oxygen-sensitive cytosolic receptor, along with decreased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 expression and kynurenine levels. Moreover, ablation of HIF-1α expression in endothelial cells in mice conferred protection against CM and improved survival. We propose that HBO should be pursued as an adjunctive therapy in CM patients to prolong survival and diminish deleterious proinflammatory reaction. Furthermore, our data support the use of HBO in therapeutic strategies to improve outcomes of non-CM disorders affecting the brain.-Bastos, M. F., Kayano, A. C. A. V., Silva-Filho, J. L., Dos-Santos, J. C. K., Judice, C., Blanco, Y. C., Shryock, N., Sercundes, M. K., Ortolan, L. S., Francelin, C., Leite, J. A., Oliveira, R., Elias, R. M., Câmara, N. O. S., Lopes, S. C. P., Albrecht, L., Farias, A. S., Vicente, C. P., Werneck, C. C., Giorgio, S., Verinaud, L., Epiphanio, S., Marinho, C. R. F., Lalwani, P., Amino, R., Aliberti, J., Costa, F. T. M. Inhibition of hypoxia-associated response and kynurenine production in response to hyperbaric oxygen

  13. Increase in cerebral oxygenation during advanced life support in out-of-hospital patients is associated with return of spontaneous circulation.

    Genbrugge, Cornelia; Meex, Ingrid; Boer, Willem; Jans, Frank; Heylen, René; Ferdinande, Bert; Dens, Jo; De Deyne, Cathy

    2015-03-24

    By maintaining sufficient cerebral blood flow and oxygenation, the goal of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is to preserve the pre-arrest neurological state. To date, cerebral monitoring abilities during CPR have been limited. Therefore, we investigated the time-course of cerebral oxygen saturation values (rSO₂) during advanced life support in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Our primary aim was to compare rSO₂ values during advanced life support from patients with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) to patients who did not achieve ROSC. We performed an observational study to measure rSO₂ using Equanox (Nonin, Plymouth, MI) from the start of advanced life support in the pre-hospital setting. rSO₂ of 49 consecutive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients were analyzed. The total increase from initial rSO₂ value until two minutes before ROSC or end of advanced life support efforts was significantly larger in the group with ROSC 16% (9 to 36) compared to the patients without ROSC 10% (4 to 15) (P = 0.02). Mean rSO₂ from the start of measurement until two minutes before ROSC or until termination of advanced life support was higher in patients with ROSC than in those without, namely 39% ± 7 and 31% ± 4 (P = 0.05) respectively. During pre-hospital advanced life support, higher increases in rSO₂ are observed in patients attaining ROSC, even before ROSC was clinically determined. Our findings suggest that rSO₂ could be used in the future to guide patient tailored treatment during cardiac arrest and could therefore be a surrogate marker of the systemic oxygenation state of the patient.

  14. Protective Effects of Sodium (±-5-Bromo-2-(α-Hydroxypentyl Benzoate in a Rodent Model of Global Cerebral Ischemia

    Yuan Gao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to explore the protective effects of sodium (±-5-bromo-2-(α-hydroxypentyl benzoate (brand name: brozopine, BZP in a rat model of global cerebral ischemia. The rat model was established using a modified Winocur’s method; close postoperative observation was conducted at all times. Neurological function was detected through prehensile traction and beam-walking test. BZP reduced mortality and prolonged the survival time of rats with global cerebral ischemia, within 24 h. There was a decreased survival rate (60% in the Model group, while the survival rate of the BZP (3 and 12 mg/kg remarkably increased the survival rate (to 80 and 90%, respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. Compared with the Model group (survival time: 18.50 h, the administration of BZP (0.75, 3, and 12 mg/kg prolonged the survival time (to 20.38, 21.85, and 23.90 h, respectively, particularly in BZP 12 mg/kg group (P < 0.05. Additionally, the BZP (12 mg/kg group exhibited an improvement in their motor function (P < 0.05. The BZP groups (0.75, 3, and 12 mg/kg displayed significantly reduced necrosis and the percentage of apoptotic cells (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively. Compared with Model group, BZP (0.75, 3, and 12 mg/kg increased the NeuN optical density values (P < 0.01. Rats with global ischemia had a high expression of Cyt-c, caspase-3, and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio compared with sham group (P < 0.01. BZP (0.75, 3, and 12 mg/kg, however, reduced the expression of Cyt-c, caspase-3, and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.01. There was low expression of p-Akt and PI3K in Model group, compared with the sham group (P < 0.01. Meanwhile, BZP (0.75, 3, and 12 mg/kg increased the expression of p-Akt and PI3K in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.01. We also found the expression of Cyt-c, caspase-3, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, PI3K, p-Akt, and comprehensive score were directly related. In conclusion, BZP had therapeutic potential and prevented

  15. 5-HMF attenuates striatum oxidative damage via Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway following transient global cerebral ischemia.

    Ya, Bai-Liu; Li, Hong-Fang; Wang, Hai-Ying; Wu, Fei; Xin, Qing; Cheng, Hong-Ju; Li, Wen-Juan; Lin, Na; Ba, Zai-Hua; Zhang, Ru-Juan; Liu, Qian; Li, Ya-Nan; Bai, Bo; Ge, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF) has favorable biological effects, and its neuroprotection in a variety of neurological diseases has been noted. Our previous study showed that treatment of 5-HMF led to protection against permanent global cerebral ischemia. However, the underlying mechanisms in cerebral ischemic injury are not fully understood. This study was conducted to investigate the neuroprotective effect of 5-HMF and elucidate the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway mechanism in the striatum after transient global cerebral ischemia. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 20 min and sacrificed 24 h after reperfusion. 5-HMF (12 mg/kg) or an equal volume of vehicle was intraperitoneally injected 30 min before ischemia and 5 min after the onset of reperfusion. At 24 h after reperfusion, neurological function was evaluated by neurological disability status scale, locomotor activity test and inclined beam walking test. Histological injury of the striatum was observed by cresyl violet staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dNTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Oxidative stress was evaluated by the carbonyl groups introduced into proteins, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based measurement was used to detect Nrf2 DNA binding activity. Nrf2 and its downstream ARE pathway protein expression such as heme oxygenase-1, NAD (P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit and glutamate-cysteine ligase modulatory subunit were detected by western blot. Our results showed that 5-HMF treatment significantly ameliorated neurological deficits, reduced brain water content, attenuated striatum neuronal damage, decreased the carbonyl groups and MDA levels, and activated Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway. Taken together, these results demonstrated that

  16. Inhibition of P2X7 receptor ameliorates transient global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury via modulating inflammatory responses in the rat hippocampus

    Chu Ketan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroinflammation plays an important role in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R has been reported to be involved in the inflammatory response of many central nervous system diseases. However, the role of P2X7Rs in transient global cerebral I/R injury remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of inhibiting the P2X7R in a rat model of transient global cerebral I/R injury, and then to explore the association between the P2X7R and neuroinflammation after transient global cerebral I/R injury. Methods Immediately after infusion with the P2X7R antagonists Brilliant blue G (BBG, adenosine 5′-triphosphate-2′,3′-dialdehyde (OxATP or A-438079, 20 minutes of transient global cerebral I/R was induced using the four-vessel occlusion (4-VO method in rats. Survival rate was calculated, neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 region was observed using H & E staining, and DNA cleavage was observed by deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated UTP nick end labeling TUNEL. In addition, behavioral deficits were measured using the Morris water maze, and RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining were performed to measure the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6, and to identify activated microglia and astrocytes. Results The P2X7R antagonists protected against transient global cerebral I/R injury in a dosage-dependent manner. A high dosage of BBG (10 μg and A-0438079 (3 μg, and a low dosage of OxATP (1 μg significantly increased survival rates, reduced I/R-induced learning memory deficit, and reduced I/R-induced neuronal death, DNA cleavage, and glial activation and inflammatory cytokine overexpression in the hippocampus. Conclusions Our study indicates that inhibiting P2X7Rs protects against transient global cerebral I/R injury by reducing the I/R-induced inflammatory response, which suggests inhibition of P2X7Rs may be a promising therapeutic strategy for clinical treatment of

  17. Time-dependent correlation of cerebral blood flow with oxygen metabolism in activated human visual cortex as measured by fMRI.

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Fox, Peter T; Yang, Yihong; Lu, Hanzhang; Tan, Li-Hai; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between relative cerebral blood flow (delta CBF) and relative cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (delta CMRO(2)) during continuous visual stimulation (21 min at 8 Hz) with fMRI biophysical models by simultaneously measuring of BOLD, CBF and CBV fMRI signals. The delta CMRO(2) was determined by both a newly calibrated single-compartment model (SCM) and a multi-compartment model (MCM) and was in agreement between these two models (P>0.5). The duration-varying delta CBF and delta CMRO(2) showed a negative correlation with time (r=-0.97, PSCM, an incorrect and even an opposite appearance of the flow-metabolism relationship during prolonged visual stimulation (positively linear coupling) can result. The time-dependent negative correlation between flow and metabolism demonstrated in this fMRI study is consistent with a previous PET observation and further supports the view that the increase in CBF is driven by factors other than oxygen demand and the energy demands will eventually require increased aerobic metabolism as stimulation continues.

  18. Improving cerebral oxygenation, cognition and autonomic nervous system control of a chronic alcohol abuser through a three-month running program

    Daniel Aranha Cabral

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The abusive use of alcohol has shown to be associated to cerebral damage, impaired cognition, poor autonomic nervous control, impaired cardiovascular health, increased levels of stress and anxiety, depression symptoms and poor quality of life. Aerobic exercise has shown to be an efficient tool to reduce and overcome these issues. In this case report, a patient (forty-four years old, male under treatment in public psychiatric hospital, classified as having a substance use disorder, underwent a three-month running program. The maximal oxygen consumption increased from 24.2ml/kg/min to 30.1ml/kg/min, running time increased from 6min to 45min (650% and distance covered from 765m to 8700m (1037.2%. In prefrontal cortex oxygenation, oxyhemoglobin levels improved by 76.1%, deoxyhemoglobin decreased 96.9% and total hemoglobin increased 78.8% during exercise. Reaction time in the cognitive test during rest decreased 23%, and the number of correct answers increased by 266.6%. Parasympathetic cardiac parameters increased in several heart rate variability indices. Thus, we conclude that running exercise performed by an alcoholic patient hospitalized in a psychiatric hospital improves cerebral function, cognition and cardiovascular health. Keywords: Alcohol addiction, Near infrared spectroscopy, Prefrontal cortex, Running exercise, Treatment

  19. Pitavastatin treatment induces neuroprotection through the BDNF-TrkB signalling pathway in cultured cerebral neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Fu, Zhenqiang; Wang, Menghan; Nan, Xiaofei; Zhang, Boai

    2018-05-01

    Along with their lipid-lowering effect, statins have been reported to have neuroprotective function in both in vivo and in vitro models of neurodegenerative diseases. We conducted this study in order to uncover the he neuroprotective effect of the lipophilic statin pitavastatin (PTV) and investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms using primary cultured cerebral neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). The primary cultured cerebral neurons were randomly assigned into four groups: the control group, the pitavastatin treatment group, the OGD group and the OGD + pitavastatin treatment group. The pitavastatin's concentration were set as follows: 1μM, 15μM, 30μM. After 3 hours OGD treatment, we use MTT method to assessment cell viability, immunofluorescence to observe neuron morphology and western blot method analysis the BDNF, TrkB. PTV at concentrations of 1 μM and 15 μM elevated the survival rate of cortical neurons exposed to OGD, whereas 30 μM PTV did not show such an effect. Moreover, PTV promoted neuronal dendrite growth at concentrations of 1 μM and 15 μM. Increased expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) were observed in both of the following two scenarios: when neurons were treated with PTV for 48 hours and when PTV was added after the OGD procedure. Pitavastatin treatment induces neuroprotection in cultured cerebral neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation this neuroprotection induced by PTV involves the BDNF-TrkB signalling pathway.

  20. Effect of limb cooling on peripheral and global oxygen consumption in neonates.

    Hassan, I A-A; Wickramasinghe, Y A; Spencer, S A

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate peripheral oxygen consumption (VO(2)) measurements using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with arterial occlusion in healthy term neonates by studying the effect of limb cooling on peripheral and global VO(2). Twenty two healthy term neonates were studied. Peripheral VO(2) was measured by NIRS using arterial occlusion and measurement of the oxyhaemoglobin (HbO(2)) decrement slope. Global VO(2) was measured by open circuit calorimetry. Global and peripheral VO(2) was measured in each neonate before and after limb cooling. In 10 neonates, a fall in forearm temperature of 2.2 degrees C (mild cooling) decreased forearm VO(2) by 19.6% (p forearm temperature of 4 degrees C (moderate cooling) decreased forearm VO(2) by 34.7% (p cooling. The changes are more pronounced with moderate limb cooling when a concomitant rise in global VO(2) is observed. Change in peripheral temperature must be taken into consideration in the interpretation of peripheral VO(2) measurements in neonates.

  1. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity and cerebral blood flow and O2 uptake during dynamic exercise

    Madsen, P L; Sperling, B K; Warming, T

    1993-01-01

    Results obtained by the 133Xe clearance method with external detectors and by transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) suggest that dynamic exercise causes an increase of global average cerebral blood flow (CBF). These data are contradicted by earlier data obtained during less-well-defined conditions....... To investigate this controversy, we applied the Kety-Schmidt technique to measure the global average levels of CBF and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during rest and dynamic exercise. Simultaneously with the determination of CBF and CMRO2, we used TCD to determine mean maximal flow velocity...... in the middle cerebral artery (MCA Vmean). For values of CBF and MCA Vmean a correction for an observed small drop in arterial PCO2 was carried out. Baseline values for global CBF and CMRO2 were 50.7 and 3.63 ml.100 g-1.min-1, respectively. The same values were found during dynamic exercise, whereas a 22% (P

  2. Longevity of animals under reactive oxygen species stress and disease susceptibility due to global warming

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Panda, Sumana Kumari; Hati, Akshaya Kumar; Mohanty, Bobllina; Mohapatra, Manoj Kumar; Kanungo, Shyama; Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda

    2016-01-01

    The world is projected to experience an approximate doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentration in the next decades. Rise in atmospheric CO2 level as one of the most important reasons is expected to contribute to raise the mean global temperature 1.4 °C-5.8 °C by that time. A survey from 128 countries speculates that global warming is primarily due to increase in atmospheric CO2 level that is produced mainly by anthropogenic activities. Exposure of animals to high environmental temperatures is mostly accompanied by unwanted acceleration of certain biochemical pathways in their cells. One of such examples is augmentation in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent increase in oxidation of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids by ROS. Increase in oxidation of biomolecules leads to a state called as oxidative stress (OS). Finally, the increase in OS condition induces abnormality in physiology of animals under elevated temperature. Exposure of animals to rise in habitat temperature is found to boost the metabolism of animals and a very strong and positive correlation exists between metabolism and levels of ROS and OS. Continuous induction of OS is negatively correlated with survivability and longevity and positively correlated with ageing in animals. Thus, it can be predicted that continuous exposure of animals to acute or gradual rise in habitat temperature due to global warming may induce OS, reduced survivability and longevity in animals in general and poikilotherms in particular. A positive correlation between metabolism and temperature in general and altered O2 consumption at elevated temperature in particular could also increase the risk of experiencing OS in homeotherms. Effects of global warming on longevity of animals through increased risk of protein misfolding and disease susceptibility due to OS as the cause or effects or both also cannot be ignored. Therefore, understanding the physiological impacts of global warming in relation to

  3. Longevity of animals under reactive oxygen species stress and disease susceptibility due to global warming.

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Panda, Sumana Kumari; Hati, Akshaya Kumar; Mohanty, Bobllina; Mohapatra, Manoj Kumar; Kanungo, Shyama; Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda

    2016-02-26

    The world is projected to experience an approximate doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentration in the next decades. Rise in atmospheric CO2 level as one of the most important reasons is expected to contribute to raise the mean global temperature 1.4 °C-5.8 °C by that time. A survey from 128 countries speculates that global warming is primarily due to increase in atmospheric CO2 level that is produced mainly by anthropogenic activities. Exposure of animals to high environmental temperatures is mostly accompanied by unwanted acceleration of certain biochemical pathways in their cells. One of such examples is augmentation in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent increase in oxidation of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids by ROS. Increase in oxidation of biomolecules leads to a state called as oxidative stress (OS). Finally, the increase in OS condition induces abnormality in physiology of animals under elevated temperature. Exposure of animals to rise in habitat temperature is found to boost the metabolism of animals and a very strong and positive correlation exists between metabolism and levels of ROS and OS. Continuous induction of OS is negatively correlated with survivability and longevity and positively correlated with ageing in animals. Thus, it can be predicted that continuous exposure of animals to acute or gradual rise in habitat temperature due to global warming may induce OS, reduced survivability and longevity in animals in general and poikilotherms in particular. A positive correlation between metabolism and temperature in general and altered O2 consumption at elevated temperature in particular could also increase the risk of experiencing OS in homeotherms. Effects of global warming on longevity of animals through increased risk of protein misfolding and disease susceptibility due to OS as the cause or effects or both also cannot be ignored. Therefore, understanding the physiological impacts of global warming in relation to

  4. Simultaneous measurement of cerebral blood flow and oxygen extraction fraction by positron emission tomography: theoretical study and experimental evidence of cerebral blood flow measurement with the C15O2 continuous inhalation technique

    Steinling, M.

    1983-01-01

    The method of the continuous inhalation technique of oxygen-15 labelled CO 2 coupled with positron emission tomography for the measurement of cerebral blood flow (C.B.F.) is described. An indirect experimental verification that this technique allowed the measurement of C.B.F. has been carried out in baboons by showing the expected change in the measured parameter with variations in the PaCO 2 . A critical investigation of the C 15 O 2 model was performed. The amount of tracer present in the cerebral vascular pool has a negligible effect on C.B.F. value. The use of a mean brain-blood partition coefficient of water instead of that specific to gray or to white matter is commented upon, and its influence on the final C.B.F. value is studied. Lastly, the problem of the limited diffusion of water across the blood-brain-barrier is discussed. The study of the combined effects of gray-white mixing and limited wates extraction of the C.B.F. value shows that the C 15 O 2 technique tends to understimate real C.B.F., and that this error is more severe with high flows and even gray white mixing. These limitations do not depart from the possibility to estimate in the same brain locus not only C.B.F. but oxygen utilization as well by the consecutive inhalation of C 15 O 2 and 15 O 2 . The advantages of this possibility has already been shown in a number of clinical studies [fr

  5. The effects of anticholinergic drugs on regional cerebral blood flow, and oxygen metabolism in previously untreated patients with Parkinson`s disease

    Obara, Satoko; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yonezawa, Hisashi; Sato, Yoshitomo [Iwate Medical Univ., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-12-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO{sub 2}) were measured using the steady-state {sup 15}O technique and positron emission tomography (PET) in six previously untreated patients with Parkinson`s disease before and after trihexyphenidyl (THP) treatment. The patients comprised of 4 men and 2 women with Hoehn-Yahr stage II-III. Their ages at the onset of the study ranged from 46 to 57 years (mean{+-}SD, 51.8{+-}3.7) and the duration of the illness ranged from 10 to 48 months (mean{+-}SD, 28.8{+-}15.5). The PET study, assessments of the disability and cognitive function were undergone twice. The first time assessments were done was when the patients were not receiving any drugs, and the second time was one to three months after administration of 6 mg THP. All patients showed clinical improvement after THP treatment. The mean disability score of Unified Parkinson`s Disease Rating Scale decreased from 35.1 (SD{+-}11.3) to 25.7 (SD{+-}11.6). The cognitive function assessed by Hasegawa`s dementia rating scale-revised, Mini-Mental State Examination, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised, and Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised, were not significantly different before and after the THP treatment. After the THP treatment, rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} decreased significantly in the striatum (about 15%) and all cerebral cortices (about 10%) on both sides contralateral and ipsilateral to the predominantly symptomatic limbs. We conclude that an anticholinergic THP decreases the rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} significantly in the cerebral cortices without cognitive impairment in early untreated patients with Parkinson`s disease. (author)

  6. Improvement of oxygen supply by an artificial carrier in combination with normobaric oxygenation decreases the volume of tissue hypoxia and tissue damage from transient focal cerebral ischemia

    Seiffge, David J.; Lapina, Natalia E.; Tsagogiorgas, Charalambos; Theisinger, Bastian; Henning, Robert H.; Schilling, Lothar

    Tissue hypoxia may play an important role in the development of ischemic brain damage. In the present study we investigated in a rat model of transient focal brain ischemia the neuroprotective effects of increasing the blood oxygen transport capacity by applying a semifluorinated alkane

  7. Is impaired cerebral vasoreactivity an early marker of cognitive decline in multiple sclerosis patients?

    Metzger, Aude; Le Bars, Emmanuelle; Deverdun, Jeremy; Molino, François; Maréchal, Bénédicte; Picot, Marie-Christine; Ayrignac, Xavier; Carra, Clarisse; Bauchet, Luc; Krainik, Alexandre; Labauge, Pierre; Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas

    2018-03-01

    The link between cerebral vasoreactivity and cognitive status in multiple sclerosis remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate a potential decrease of cerebral vasoreactivity in multiple sclerosis patients and correlate it with cognitive status. Thirty-three patients with multiple sclerosis (nine progressive and 24 remitting forms, median age: 39 years, 12 males) and 22 controls underwent MRI with a hypercapnic challenge to assess cerebral vasoreactivity and a neuropsychological assessment. Cerebral vasoreactivity, measured as the cerebral blood flow percent increase normalised by end-tidal carbon dioxide variation, was assessed globally and by regions of interest using the blood oxygen level-dependent technique. Non-parametric statistics tests were used to assess differences between groups, and associations were estimated using linear models. Cerebral vasoreactivity was lower in patients with cognitive impairment than in cognitively normal patients (p=0.004) and was associated with education level in patients (R 2 = 0.35; p = 0.047). There was no decrease in cerebral vasoreactivity between patients and controls. Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis may be mediated through decreased cerebral vasoreactivity. Cerebral vasoreactivity could therefore be considered as a marker of cognitive decline in multiple sclerosis. • Cerebral vasoreactivity does not differ between multiple sclerosis patients and controls. • Cerebral vasoreactivity measure is linked to cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis. • Cerebral vasoreactivity is linked to level of education in multiple sclerosis.

  8. The responsible region and the symptomatic threshold of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism for Broca's aphasia using positron emission tomography

    Kato, Toshiaki; Ujike, Takashi; Kitamura, Shin; Soeda, Toshiyuki; Terashi, Akiro

    1987-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the responsible region and the symptomatic flow and metabolism threshold for Broca's aphasia. Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO 2 ) were measured by positron emission tomography (PET) using 15 O steady state method in eight patients with Broca's aphasia due to cerebral infarction and thirty patients without aphasia. During scanning, patients closed their eyes and were kept free from any stimuration. X-CT scan revealed abnormal low density in Broca's area which includes cortex and subcortex in the anterior region to Sylvian fissure in three patients with aphasia. In the other five patients with aphasia X-CT scan showed no abnormal low density in Broca's area, showed it in basal ganglionic region and subcortex. PET study revealed reduction of CBF and CMRO 2 in Broca's area in all cases with Broca's aphasia. CBF and CMRO 2 of Broca's area of aphasic patients were compared to those of non aphasic patients to obtain the symptomatic threshold in CBF and CMRO 2 . The values of symptomatic threshold were 20 - 27 ml/100 g/min in CBF and 2.0 ml/100 g/min in CMRO 2 . The symptomatic threshold differed from the threshold for development of abnormal low density on X-CT, therefore the measurement of CBF and CMRO 2 were useful in studying the responsible region for aphasia. (author)

  9. Influence of skin blood flow and source-detector distance on near-infrared spectroscopy-determined cerebral oxygenation in humans

    Hirasawa, Ai; Yanagisawa, Shintaro; Tanaka, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Most near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) apparatus fails to isolate cerebral oxygenation from an extracranial contribution although they use different source-detector distances. Nevertheless, the effect of different source-detector distances and change in extracranial blood flow on the NIRS signal...... in a semi-recumbent position, while extracranial blood flow was restricted by application of four different pressures (+20 to +80 mmHg) to the left temporal artery. The O2 Hb was measured at the forehead via a multidistance probe (source-detector distance; 15, 22·5 and 30 mm), and SkBF was determined...... by laser Doppler. Heart rate and blood pressure were unaffected by application of pressure to the temporal artery, while SkBF gradually decreased (Papplied pressure...

  10. GABAA Receptor-Mediated Bidirectional Control of Synaptic Activity, Intracellular Ca2+, Cerebral Blood Flow, and Oxygen Consumption in Mouse Somatosensory Cortex In Vivo

    Jessen, Sanne Barsballe; Brazhe, Alexey; Lind, Barbara Lykke

    2015-01-01

    Neural activity regulates local increases in cerebral blood flow (ΔCBF) and the cortical metabolic rate of oxygen (ΔCMRO2) that constitutes the basis of BOLD functional neuroimaging signals. Glutamate signaling plays a key role in brain vascular and metabolic control; however, the modulatory effect...... of GABA is incompletely understood. Here we performed in vivo studies in mice to investigate how THIP (which tonically activates extrasynaptic GABAARs) and Zolpidem (a positive allosteric modulator of synaptic GABAARs) impact stimulation-induced ΔCBF, ΔCMRO2, local field potentials (LFPs), and fluorescent...... cytosolic Ca2+ transients in neurons and astrocytes. Low concentrations of THIP increased ΔCBF and ΔCMRO2 at low stimulation frequencies. These responses were coupled to increased synaptic activity as indicated by LFP responses, and to Ca2+ activities in neurons and astrocytes. Intermediate and high...

  11. Global Plant Stress Signaling: Reactive Oxygen Species at the Cross-Road

    Nasser eSewelam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Current technologies have changed biology into a data-intensive field and significantly increased our understanding of signal transduction pathways in plants. However, global defense signaling networks in plants have not been established yet. Considering the apparent intricate nature of signaling mechanisms in plants (due to their sessile nature, studying the points at which different signaling pathways converge, rather than the branches, represents a good start to unravel global plant signaling networks. In this regard, growing evidence shows that the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS is one of the most common plant responses to different stresses, representing a point at which various signaling pathways come together. In this review, the complex nature of plant stress signaling networks will be discussed. An emphasis on different signaling players with a specific attention to ROS as the primary source of the signaling battery in plants will be presented. The interactions between ROS and other signaling components, e.g. calcium, redox homeostasis, membranes, G-proteins, MAPKs, plant hormones and transcription factors will be assessed. A better understanding of the vital roles ROS are playing in plant signaling would help innovate new strategies to improve plant productivity under the circumstances of the increasing severity of environmental conditions and the high demand of food and energy worldwide

  12. Cerebral and Renal Oxygen Saturation Are Not Compromised in the Presence of Retrograde Blood Flow in either the Ascending or Descending Aorta in Term or Near-Term Infants with Left-Sided Obstructive Lesions.

    van der Laan, Michelle E; Mebius, Mirthe J; Roofthooft, Marcus T R; Bos, Arend F; Berger, Rolf M F; Kooi, Elisabeth M W

    2017-01-01

    In infants with left-sided obstructive lesions (LSOL), the presence of retrograde blood flow in either the ascending or descending aorta may lead to diminished cerebral and renal blood flow, respectively. Our aim was to compare cerebral and renal tissue oxygen saturation (rSO2) between infants with LSOL with antegrade and retrograde blood flow in the ascending aorta and with and without diastolic backflow in the descending aorta. Based on 2 echocardiograms, the study group was categorized according to the direction of blood flow in the ascending and descending aorta. We measured cerebral and renal rSO2 using near-infrared spectroscopy and calculated fractional tissue oxygen extraction (FTOE). Nineteen infants with LSOL, admitted to the NICU between 0 and 28 days after birth, were included. Infants with antegrade blood flow (n = 12) and infants with retrograde blood flow in the ascending aorta (n = 7) had similar cerebral rSO2 and FTOE during both echocardiograms. Only during the first echocardiogram, infants with retrograde blood flow in the ascending aorta had lower renal FTOE (0.14 vs. 0.32, p = 0.04) and tended to have higher renal rSO2 (80 vs. 65%, p = 0.09). The presence of diastolic backflow in the descending aorta was not associated with cerebral or renal rSO2 and FTOE during the first (n = 8) as well as the second echocardiogram (n = 10). Retrograde blood flow in the ascending aorta was not associated with cerebral oxygenation, while diastolic backflow in the descending aorta was not associated with renal oxygenation in infants with LSOL. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Acupuncture elicits neuroprotective effect by inhibiting NAPDH oxidase-mediated reactive oxygen species production in cerebral ischaemia.

    Shi, Guang-Xia; Wang, Xue-Rui; Yan, Chao-Qun; He, Tian; Yang, Jing-Wen; Zeng, Xiang-Hong; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Wen; Du, Si-Qi; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-12-10

    In the current study, we aimed to investigate whether NADPH oxidase, a major ROS-producing enzyme, was involved in the antioxidant effect of acupuncture on cognitive impairment after cerebral ischaemia. The cognitive function, infract size, neuron cell loss, level of superoxide anion and expression of NADPH oxidase subunit in hippocampus of two-vessel occlusion (2VO) rats were determined after 2-week acupuncture. Furthermore, the cognitive function and production of O2(-) were determined in the presence and absence of NADPH oxidase agonist (TBCA) and antagonist (Apocynin). The effect of acupuncture on cognitive function after cerebral ischaemia in gp91phox-KO mice was evaluated by Morris water maze. Acupuncture reduced infarct size, attenuated overproduction of O2(-), and reversed consequential cognitive impairment and neuron cell loss in 2VO rats. The elevations of gp91phox and p47phox after 2VO were significantly decreased after acupuncture treatment. However, no differences of gp91phox mRNA were found among any experimental groups. Furthermore, these beneficial effects were reversed by TBCA, whereas apocynin mimicked the effect of acupuncture by improving cognitive function and decreasing O2(-) generation. Acupuncture failed to improve the memory impairment in gp91phox KO mice. Full function of the NADPH oxidase enzyme plays an important role in neuroprotective effects against cognitive impairment via inhibition of NAPDH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress.

  14. Dehydration affects cerebral blood flow but not its metabolic rate for oxygen during maximal exercise in trained humans

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Stock, Christopher G

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is associated with a reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), but regulation of CBF during strenuous exercise in the heat with dehydration is unclear. We assessed internal (ICA) and common carotid artery (CCA) haemodynamics (indicative of CBF and extra-cranial blood flow), middle...... cerebral artery velocity (MCA Vmean), arterial-venous differences and blood temperature in 10 trained males during incremental cycling to exhaustion in the heat (35°C) in control, dehydrated and rehydrated states. Dehydration reduced body mass (75.8 ± 3 vs. 78.2 ± 3 kg), increased internal temperature (38.......3 ± 0.1 vs. 36.8 ± 0.1°C), impaired exercise capacity (269 ± 11 vs. 336 ± 14 W), and lowered ICA and MCA Vmean by 12-23% without compromising CCA blood flow. During euhydrated incremental exercise on a separate day, however, exercise capacity and ICA, MCA Vmean and CCA dynamics were preserved. The fast...

  15. The effect of voluntarily ingested buprenorphine on rats subjected to surgically induced global cerebral ischaemia

    Kalliokoski, Otto Henrik; Abelson, Klas; Koch, Janne

    2010-01-01

    in buprenorphine-treated and untreated animals. A part from a slightly higher hyperthermia immediately after surgery and typical opiate-associated behaviour, the buprenorphine treatment had no apparent adverse effects on the experimental model. In contrast, the analgesic treatment improved the model by minimizing......The effect of perioperatively administered buprenorphine analgesia on rats subjected to surgically induced global ischaemia was assessed. Rats supplied with buprenorphine, mixed in nut paste for voluntary ingestion, displayed significant reductions in postoperative excretions of faecal...

  16. High dose infusion of activated protein C (rhAPC) fails to improve neuronal damage and cognitive deficit after global cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Brückner, Melanie; Lasarzik, Irina; Jahn-Eimermacher, Antje; Peetz, Dirk; Werner, Christian; Engelhard, Kristin; Thal, Serge C

    2013-09-13

    Recent studies demonstrated anticoagulatory, antiinflammatory, antiapoptotic, and neuroprotective properties of activated protein C (APC) in rodent models of acute neurodegenerative diseases, suggesting APC as promising broad acting therapeutic agent. Unfortunately, continuous infusion of recombinant human APC (rhAPC) failed to improve brain damage following cardiac arrest in rats. The present study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effect after global cerebral ischemia (GI) with an optimized infusion protocol. Rats were subjected to bilateral clip occlusion of the common carotid arteries (BCAO) and controlled hemorrhagic hypotension to 40 mm Hg for 14 min and a subsequent 5h-infusion of rhAPC (2mg/kg bolus+6 mg/kg/h continuous IV) or vehicle (0.9% NaCl). The dosage was calculated to maintain plasma hAPC activity at 150%. Cerebral inflammation, apoptosis and neuronal survival was determined at day 10. rhAPC infusion did not influence cortical cerebral perfusion during reperfusion and failed to reduce neuronal cell loss, microglia activation, and caspase 3 activity. Even an optimized rhAPC infusion protocol designed to maintain a high level of APC plasma activity failed to improve the sequels following GI. Despite positive reports about protective effects of APC following, e.g., ischemic stroke, the present study supports the notion that infusion of APC during the early reperfusion phase does not result in sustained neuroprotection and fails to improve outcome after global cerebral ischemia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modelling radiation-induced cell death and tumour re-oxygenation: local versus global and instant versus delayed cell death

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Espinoza, Ignacio; Sánchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Aguiar, Pablo; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The resistance of hypoxic cells to radiation, due to the oxygen dependence of radiosensitivity, is well known and must be taken into account to accurately calculate the radiation induced cell death. A proper modelling of the response of tumours to radiation requires deriving the distribution of oxygen at a microscopic scale. This usually involves solving the reaction-diffusion equation in tumour voxels using a vascularization distribution model. Moreover, re-oxygenation arises during the course of radiotherapy, one reason being the increase of available oxygen caused by cell killing, which can turn hypoxic tumours into oxic. In this work we study the effect of cell death kinetics in tumour oxygenation modelling, analysing how it affects the timing of re-oxygenation, surviving fraction and tumour control. Two models of cell death are compared, an instantaneous cell killing, mimicking early apoptosis, and a delayed cell death scenario in which cells can die shortly after being damaged, as well as long after irradiation. For each of these scenarios, the decrease in oxygen consumption due to cell death can be computed globally (macroscopic voxel average) or locally (microscopic). A re-oxygenation model already used in the literature, the so called full re-oxygenation, is also considered. The impact of cell death kinetics and re-oxygenation on tumour responses is illustrated for two radiotherapy fractionation schemes: a conventional schedule, and a hypofractionated treatment. The results show large differences in the doses needed to achieve 50% tumour control for the investigated cell death models. Moreover, the models affect the tumour responses differently depending on the treatment schedule. This corroborates the complex nature of re-oxygenation, showing the need to take into account the kinetics of cell death in radiation response models. (paper)

  18. Study of cerebral blood flow and oxygen utilization in the edematous area and ipsilateral hemispheric gray matter using positron emission tomography in brain tumors

    Ikeda, Yusuke

    1990-01-01

    We measured the cerebral blood flow and oxygen utilization of the peritumoral white matter and ipsilateral hemispheric gray matter in 50 patients with brain tumors using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The intraaxial tumors consisted of 34 cases (25 of gliomas, 6 of metastatic tumors, and 3 others), white the extraaxial tumors (all of meningiomas) were 16 cases. The cases were divided into 2 groups on the basis of the Xray CT scan findings. The cases of Edema (+) group showed moderate or large peritumoral edema in the white matter on the Xray CT scan, while Edema (-) group showed no or small edema. The method of PET study was the 15 O steady state inhalation technique by Frackoviak's method. ROIs (region of interest) were set on the peritumoral white matter and the ipsilateral hemispheric gray matter, and the mean CBF, OEF and CMRO2 values of the white and gray matter were calculated. In the Edema (+) group, the mean values of blood flow and oxygen utilization were low in the peritumoral white matter, and there were no obvious differences of values between intra and extraaxial tumors. But, the values in the ipsilateral hemispheric gray matter of intraaxial tumors were lower than those of extraaxial tumor. In the Edema (-) group, the mean values were almost normal in the white and gray matter, and there were no differences between intra and extraaxial tumors. The consideration about significance of the above stated results was discussed added with literature. (author)

  19. A mesenteric traction syndrome affects near-infrared spectroscopy evaluated cerebral oxygenation because skin blood flow increases

    Olesen, Niels D; Sørensen, Henrik; Ambrus, Rikard

    2018-01-01

    During abdominal surgery manipulation of internal organs may induce a "mesenteric traction syndrome" (MTS) including a triad of flushing, hypotension, and tachycardia that lasts for about 30 min. We evaluated whether MTS affects near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) assessed frontal lobe oxygenation ...

  20. [Application of locomotor activity test to evaluate functional injury after global cerebral ischemia in C57BL/6 mice].

    Zhang, Li-quan; Xu, Jia-ni; Wang, Zhen-zhen; Zeng, Li-jun; Ye, Yi-lu; Zhang, Wei-ping; Wei, Er-qing; Zhang, Qi

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the application of locomotor activity test in functional injury after global cerebral ischemia (GCI) in C57BL/6 mice. GCI was induced by bilateral carotid arteries occlusion for 30 min in C57BL/6 mice. Mice were divided into sham group, GCI group and minocycline group. Saline or minocycline (45 mg/kg) was i.p. injected once daily for 6 d after ischemia. At Day 6 after ischemia, locomotor activity was recorded for 1 h in open field test. Total distance, central distance, central distance ratio, periphery distance, periphery distance ratio, central time and periphery time were used to evaluate the behavior characteristics of locomotor activity in C57BL/6 mice after ischemia. The survival neuron density was detected by Nissl staining in hippocampus, cortex and striatum. Compared with sham group, total distance, central distance and central time increased and periphery time decreased in C57BL/6 mice after GCI (PsLocomotor activity in open field test can objectively evaluate the behavior injury after GCI in mice. Central distance and central time can be used as indexes of quantitative assessment.

  1. Forced treadmill exercise can induce stress and increase neuronal damage in a mouse model of global cerebral ischemia

    Martina Svensson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Physical exercise is known to be a beneficial factor by increasing the cellular stress tolerance. In ischemic stroke, physical exercise is suggested to both limit the brain injury and facilitate behavioral recovery. In this study we investigated the effect of physical exercise on brain damage following global cerebral ischemia in mice. We aimed to study the effects of 4.5 weeks of forced treadmill running prior to ischemia on neuronal damage, neuroinflammation and its effect on general stress by measuring corticosterone in feces. We subjected C57bl/6 mice (n = 63 to either treadmill running or a sedentary program prior to induction of global ischemia. Anxious, depressive, and cognitive behaviors were analyzed. Stress levels were analyzed using a corticosterone ELISA. Inflammatory and neurological outcomes were analyzed using immunohistochemistry, multiplex electrochemoluminescence ELISA and Western blot. To our surprise, we found that forced treadmill running induced a stress response, with increased anxiety in the Open Field test and increased levels of corticosterone. In accordance, mice subjected to forced exercise prior to ischemia developed larger neuronal damage in the hippocampus and showed higher cytokine levels in the brain and blood compared to non-exercised mice. The extent of neuronal damage correlated with increased corticosterone levels. To compare forced treadmill with voluntary wheel running, we used a different set of mice that exercised freely on running wheels. These mice did not show any anxiety or increased corticosterone levels. Altogether, our results indicate that exercise pre-conditioning may not be beneficial if the animals are forced to run as it can induce a detrimental stress response.

  2. Global and regional associations of smaller cerebral gray and white matter volumes with gait in older people.

    Michele L Callisaya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gait impairments increase with advancing age and can lead to falls and loss of independence. Brain atrophy also occurs in older age and may contribute to gait decline. We aimed to investigate global and regional relationships of cerebral gray and white matter volumes with gait speed, and its determinants step length and cadence, in older people. METHODS: In a population-based study, participants aged >60 years without Parkinson's disease or brain infarcts underwent magnetic resonance imaging and gait measurements using a computerized walkway. Linear regression was used to study associations of total gray and white matter volumes with gait, adjusting for each other, age, sex, height and white matter hyperintensity volume. Other covariates considered in analyses included weight and vascular disease history. Voxel-based morphometry was used to study regional relationships of gray and white matter with gait. RESULTS: There were 305 participants, mean age 71.4 (6.9 years, 54% male, mean gait speed 1.16 (0.22 m/s. Smaller total gray matter volume was independently associated with poorer gait speed (p = 0.001 and step length (p<0.001, but not cadence. Smaller volumes of cortical and subcortical gray matter in bilateral regions important for motor control, vision, perception and memory were independently associated with slower gait speed and shorter steps. No global or regional associations were observed between white matter volume and gait independent of gray matter volume, white matter hyperintensity volume and other covariates. CONCLUSION: Smaller gray matter volume in bilaterally distributed brain networks serving motor control was associated with slower gait speed and step length, but not cadence.

  3. Equimolar mixture of nitroux oxyde and oxygen during post-operative physiotherapy in patients with cerebral palsy: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Delafontaine, A; Presedo, A; Mohamed, D; Lopes, D; Wood, C; Alberti, C

    2017-11-01

    The administration of an equimolar mixture of nitrous oxide and oxygen (N2O) is recommended during painful procedures. However, the evaluation of its use during physiotherapy after surgery has not been reported, although pain may hamper physiotherapy efficiency. This study investigated whether the use of N2O improves the efficacy of post-operative physiotherapy after multilevel surgery in patients with cerebral palsy. It was a randomized 1:1, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. All patients had post-operative physiotherapy starting the day after surgery. Patients received either N2O or placebo gas during the rehabilitation sessions. All patients had post-operative pain management protocol, including pain medication as needed for acute pain. The primary objective was to reach angles of knee flexion of 110° combined with hip extension of 10°, with the patient lying prone, within six or less physiotherapy sessions. Secondary evaluation criteria were the number of sessions required to reach the targeted angles, the session-related pain intensity and the analgesics consumption for managing post-operative pain. Sixty-four patients were enrolled. Targeted angles were achieved more often in the N2O group (23 of 32, 72%, vs. Placebo: 13/ of 32, 41%; p = 0.01). The administration of N2O during post-operative physiotherapy can help to achieve more quickly an improved range of motion, and, although not significant in our study, to alleviate the need for pain medication. Further studies evaluating the administration of N2O in various settings are warranted. During this randomized placebo-controlled double-blind study, children receiving nitrous oxide and oxygen (N2O) achieved more often the targeted range of motion during physiotherapy sessions after multilevel surgery. Compared to placebo, nitrous oxide and oxygen (N2O) enabled a better management of acute pain related to physiotherapy procedures. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  4. Biochemical changes related to hypoxia during cerebral aneurysm surgery: combined microdialysis and tissue oxygen monitoring: case report.

    Hutchinson, P J; Al-Rawi, P G; O'Connell, M T; Gupta, A K; Pickard, J D; Kirkpatrick, P J

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to monitor brain metabolism on-line during aneurysm surgery, by combining the use of a multiparameter (brain tissue oxygen, brain carbon dioxide, pH, and temperature) sensor with microdialysis (extracellular glucose, lactate, pyruvate, and glutamate). The case illustrates the potential value of these techniques by demonstrating the effects of adverse physiological events on brain metabolism and the ability to assist in both intraoperative and postoperative decision-making. A 41-year-old woman presented with a World Federation of Neurological Surgeons Grade I subarachnoid hemorrhage. Angiography revealed a basilar artery aneurysm that was not amenable to coiling, so the aneurysm was clipped. Before the craniotomy was performed, a multiparameter sensor and a microdialysis catheter were inserted to monitor brain metabolism. During the operation, the brain oxygen level decreased, in relation to biochemical changes, including the reduction of extracellular glucose and pyruvate and the elevation of lactate and glutamate. These changes were reversible. However, when the craniotomy was closed, a second decrease in brain oxygen occurred in association with brain swelling, which immediately prompted a postoperative computed tomographic scan. The scan demonstrated acute hydrocephalus, requiring external ventricular drainage. The patient made a full recovery. The monitoring techniques influenced clinical decision-making in the treatment of this patient. On-line measurement of brain tissue gases and extracellular chemistry has the potential to assist in the perioperative and postoperative management of patients undergoing complex cerebrovascular surgery and to establish the effects of intervention on brain homeostasis.

  5. Neuroprotection by methanol extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla against global cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Suk, Kyoungho; Kim, Sun Yeou; Leem, Kanghyun; Kim, Young Ock; Park, Sun Young; Hur, Jinyoung; Baek, Jihwoon; Lee, Kang Jin; Zheng, Hu Zhan; Kim, Hocheol

    2002-04-21

    In traditional Oriental medicine, Uncaria rhynchophylla has been used to lower blood pressure and to relieve various neurological symptoms. However, scientific evidence related to its effectiveness or precise modes of action has not been available. Thus, in the current study, we evaluated neuroprotective effects of U. rhynchophylla after transient global ischemia using 4-vessel occlusion model in rats. Methanol extract of U. rhynchophylla administered intraperitoneally (100-1000 mg/kg at 0 and 90 min after reperfusion) significantly protected hippocampal CA1 neurons against 10 min transient forebrain ischemia. Measurement of neuronal cell density in CA1 region at 7 days after ischemia by Nissl staining revealed more than 70% protection in U. rhynchophylla-treated rats compared to saline-treated animals. In U. rhynchophylla-treated animals, induction of cyclooxygenase-2 in hippocampus at 24 hr after ischemia was significantly inhibited at both mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, U. rhynchophylla extract inhibited TNF-alpha and nitric oxide production in BV-2 mouse microglial cells in vitro. These anti-inflammatory actions of U. rhynchophylla extract may contribute to its neuroprotective effects.

  6. Two-photon high-resolution measurement of partial pressure of oxygen in cerebral vasculature and tissue

    Sakadžić, Sava; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Mandeville, Emiri T.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Arai, Ken; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Devor, Anna; Lo, Eng H.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to measure oxygen partial pressure (pO2) with high temporal and spatial resolution in three dimensions is crucial for understanding oxygen delivery and consumption in normal and diseased brain. Among existing pO2 measurement methods, phosphorescence quenching is optimally suited for the task. However, previous attempts to couple phosphorescence with two-photon laser scanning microscopy have faced substantial difficulties because of extremely low two-photon absorption cross-sections of conventional phosphorescent probes. Here, we report the first practical in vivo two-photon high-resolution pO2 measurements in small rodents’ cortical microvasculature and tissue, made possible by combining an optimized imaging system with a two-photon-enhanced phosphorescent nanoprobe. The method features a measurement depth of up to 250 µm, sub-second temporal resolution and requires low probe concentration. Most importantly, the properties of the probe allowed for the first direct high-resolution measurement of cortical extravascular (tissue) pO2, opening numerous possibilities for functional metabolic brain studies. PMID:20693997

  7. Two-photon high-resolution measurement of partial pressure of oxygen in cerebral vasculature and tissue.

    Sakadzić, Sava; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Mandeville, Emiri T; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Arai, Ken; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Devor, Anna; Lo, Eng H; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Boas, David A

    2010-09-01

    Measurements of oxygen partial pressure (pO(2)) with high temporal and spatial resolution in three dimensions is crucial for understanding oxygen delivery and consumption in normal and diseased brain. Among existing pO(2) measurement methods, phosphorescence quenching is optimally suited for the task. However, previous attempts to couple phosphorescence with two-photon laser scanning microscopy have faced substantial difficulties because of extremely low two-photon absorption cross-sections of conventional phosphorescent probes. Here we report to our knowledge the first practical in vivo two-photon high-resolution pO(2) measurements in small rodents' cortical microvasculature and tissue, made possible by combining an optimized imaging system with a two-photon-enhanced phosphorescent nanoprobe. The method features a measurement depth of up to 250 microm, sub-second temporal resolution and requires low probe concentration. The properties of the probe allowed for direct high-resolution measurement of cortical extravascular (tissue) pO(2), opening many possibilities for functional metabolic brain studies.

  8. Effects of aging on cerebral oxygenation during working-memory performance: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Anouk Vermeij

    Full Text Available Working memory is sensitive to aging-related decline. Evidence exists that aging is accompanied by a reorganization of the working-memory circuitry, but the underlying neurocognitive mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we examined aging-related changes in prefrontal activation during working-memory performance using functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS, a noninvasive neuroimaging technique. Seventeen healthy young (21-32 years and 17 healthy older adults (64-81 years performed a verbal working-memory task (n-back. Oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration changes were registered by two fNIRS channels located over the left and right prefrontal cortex. Increased working-memory load resulted in worse performance compared to the control condition in older adults, but not in young participants. In both young and older adults, prefrontal activation increased with rising working-memory load. Young adults showed slight right-hemispheric dominance at low levels of working-memory load, while no hemispheric differences were apparent in older adults. Analysis of the time-activation curve during the high working-memory load condition revealed a continuous increase of the hemodynamic response in the young. In contrast to that, a quadratic pattern of activation was found in the older participants. Based on these results it could be hypothesized that young adults were better able to keep the prefrontal cortex recruited over a prolonged period of time. To conclude, already at low levels of working-memory load do older adults recruit both hemispheres, possibly in an attempt to compensate for the observed aging-related decline in performance. Also, our study shows that aging effects on the time course of the hemodynamic response must be taken into account in the interpretation of the results of neuroimaging studies that rely on blood oxygen levels, such as fMRI.

  9. Regional cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in patients with ischemic stroke studied with high resolution pet and the O-15 labelled gas steady-state method

    Uemura, K.; Shishido, F.; Inugami, A.; Yamaguchi, T.; Ogawa, T.; Murakami, M.; Kanno, I.; Tagawa, K.; Yasui, N.

    1986-01-01

    Although regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies have considerably increased pathophysiological knowledge in ischemic cerebrovascular disease, sometimes the results of such studies do not correlate with neurological abnormalities observed in the subjects being examined. Because regional neuronal activities always couple to the regional energy metabolism of brain tissue, simultaneous observation of rCBF and regional energy metabolism, such as regional oxygen consumption (rCMRO/sub 2/) and regional glucose consumption (rCMRG1), will provide greater understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease than rCBF study alone. Positron emission tomography (PET) using the 0-15 labelled gas steady-state method offers simultaneous measurement of rCBF and rCMRO/sub 2/ in vivo, and demonstrates imbalance between rCBF and rCMRO/sub 2/ in an ischemic lesion in a human brain. However, clinical PET studies in ischemic cerebrovascular disease reported previously, have been carried out using low resolution (more than 15 mm in the full width at half maximum; FWHM) PET. This report presents preliminary results using a high resolution tomograph; Headtome III and 0-15 labelled gas steady state method to investigate ischemic cerebrovascular disease

  10. Regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism in patients with transient global amnesia. A study using SPECT and {sup 1}H-MRS

    Ishihara, Tetsuya; Hirata, Koichi; Tatsumoto, Muneto; Yamazaki, Kaoru [Dokkyo Univ., Tochigi (Japan). School of Medicine; Sato, Toshihiko

    1997-06-01

    In 13 patients with transient global amnesia (TGA), we studied the clinical course and changes over time by means of imaging techniques such as SPECT. MRI, and proton MR spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS). In the case of SPECT, a cerebral blood flow decrease at the time center of the temporal lobe persisted at least for more than one month. In many patients, no abnormal signs were found on MRI. Despite the presence of intracranial impairment of energy metabolism, no evidence of cerebral ischemia was obtained using {sup 1}H-MRS at the acute and subacute stages. There were thus discrepancies between the symptoms and the findings of SPECT as well as the findings of {sup 1}H-MRS. These data suggest that TGA may not necessarily be caused by cerebra1 ischemia. (author)

  11. Regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism in patients with transient global amnesia. A study using SPECT and 1H-MRS

    Ishihara, Tetsuya; Hirata, Koichi; Tatsumoto, Muneto; Yamazaki, Kaoru; Sato, Toshihiko.

    1997-01-01

    In 13 patients with transient global amnesia (TGA), we studied the clinical course and changes over time by means of imaging techniques such as SPECT. MRI, and proton MR spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS). In the case of SPECT, a cerebral blood flow decrease at the time center of the temporal lobe persisted at least for more than one month. In many patients, no abnormal signs were found on MRI. Despite the presence of intracranial impairment of energy metabolism, no evidence of cerebral ischemia was obtained using 1 H-MRS at the acute and subacute stages. There were thus discrepancies between the symptoms and the findings of SPECT as well as the findings of 1 H-MRS. These data suggest that TGA may not necessarily be caused by cerebra1 ischemia. (author)

  12. Relationship between intraoperative regional cerebral oxygen saturation trends and cognitive decline after total knee replacement: a post-hoc analysis.

    Salazar, Fátima; Doñate, Marta; Boget, Teresa; Bogdanovich, Ana; Basora, Misericordia; Torres, Ferran; Gracia, Isabel; Fàbregas, Neus

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral regional brain oxygen saturation (rSO2) trends, reflecting intraoperative brain oxygen imbalance, could warn of brain dysfunction. Various types of cognitive impairment, such as memory decline, alterations in executive function or subjective complaints, have been described three months after surgery. Our aim was to explore the potential utility of rSO2 values as a warning sign for the development of different types of decline in postoperative psychological function. Observational post-hoc analysis of data for the patient sample (n = 125) of a previously conducted clinical trial in patients over the age of 65 years undergoing total knee replacement under spinal anesthesia. Demographic, hemodynamic and bilateral rSO2 intraoperative values were recorded. An absolute rSO2 value of 20% or >25% below baseline were chosen as relevant cutoffs. Composite function test scores were created from baseline to three months for each patient and adjusted for the mean (SD) score changes for a control group (n = 55). Tests were used to assess visual-motor coordination and executive function (VM-EF) (Wechsler Digit Symbol-Coding and Visual Reproduction, Trail Making Test) and memory (Auditory Verbal Learning, Wechsler Memory Scale); scales were used to assess psychological symptoms. We observed no differences in baseline rSO2 values; rSO2 decreased significantly in all patients during surgery (P Left and right rSO2 values were asymmetric in patients who had memory decline (mean [SD] left-right ratio of 95.03 [8.51] vs 101.29 [6.7] for patients with no changes, P = 0.0012). The mean right-left difference in rSO2 was also significant in these patients (-2.87% [4.73%], lower on the right, P = 0.0034). Detection of a trend to asymmetry in rSO2 values can warn of possible postoperative onset of memory decline. Psychological symptoms and memory decline were common three months after knee replacement in our patients over the age of 65 years.

  13. Determination of cerebral metabolic patterns in dementia using positron emission tomography

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    With the introduction of the Kety-Schmidt method whole brain measurements of blood flow and metabolism were first applied to normal aged and demented patients. Chronically demented patients were consistently found to have marked reductions in cerebral blood flow, oxygen utilization, and glucose utilization when dementia was severe, and lesser reductions when it was mild. Others found that cerebral blood flow, oxygen utilization, and glucose utilization were decreased in parallel in late stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and multiple infarct dementia (MID). The intraarterial /sup 133/Xe method has been used to determine abnormalities in regional cerebral blood flow that correlate with cognitive deficits in patients with organic dementia, mostly Alzheimer's cases. Positron emission tomography (PET) and the /sup 18/F fluorodeoxyglycose (FDG) method have been applied to small numbers of demented patients with advanced AD. In general, decreases were found in global cerebral glucose utilization, but especially in temporal and parietal cortex. Others, using PET and the /sup 15/O/sub 2/ steady-state method, found a coupled decline in global cerebral blood flow and oxygen utilization that was correlated with increasing severity of dementia in both AD and MID, but there was no increase in oxygen extraction ratio, and therefore no evidence to support the existence of a chronic ischemic brain process. In this chapter, the author reviews some of the recent findings at UCLA using PET and the method in the study of normal aging and dementing disorders

  14. The antioxidant and antiapoptotic effects of crocin pretreatment on global cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury induced by four vessels occlusion in rats.

    Oruc, Serdar; Gönül, Yücel; Tunay, Kamil; Oruc, Oya Akpinar; Bozkurt, Mehmet Fatih; Karavelioğlu, Ergün; Bağcıoğlu, Erman; Coşkun, Kerem Senol; Celik, Sefa

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury is a process in which oxidative and apoptotic mechanisms play a part. Neuroprotective agents to be found could work out well for the efficient and safe minimization of cerebral IR injury. Crocin is a strong antioxidant agent; however the influence of this agent on the experimental cerebral ischemia model has not been studied extensively and thus it is not well-known. The objective of our study was to investigate the antioxidant, antiapoptotic and protective effects of crocin on the global cerebral IR induced by four-vessel occlusion. A total of 30 adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were equally and randomly separated into three groups as follows: sham, IR and IR+crocin (40mg/kg/day orally for 10days). 24h after electrocauterization of bilateral vertebral arteries, bilateral common carotid arteries were occluded for 30min and reperfused for 30min. Oxidative stress parameters (TAS, TOS, OSI), haematoxylin and eosin staining, caspase-3 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) expressions and TUNEL methods were investigated. There was a significant difference between the IR and sham groups by means of OSI level, histopathological scoring, caspase-3, HIF-1α and TUNEL-positive cell parameters. We have also observed that pre-treatment with crocin reduced these parameter levels back to the baseline. The data obtained from the present study suggest that crocin may exert antiapoptotic, antioxidant and protective effects in IR-mediated brain injury induced by four-vessel occlusion. To the best of our knowledge, this would be the first study to be conducted in this field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of hyperoxia on 18F-fluoro-misonidazole brain uptake and tissue oxygen tension following middle cerebral artery occlusion in rodents: Pilot studies.

    Tim D Fryer

    Full Text Available Mapping brain hypoxia is a major goal for stroke diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment monitoring. 18F-fluoro-misonidazole (FMISO positron emission tomography (PET is the gold standard hypoxia imaging method. Normobaric hyperoxia (NBO is a promising therapy in acute stroke. In this pilot study, we tested the straightforward hypothesis that NBO would markedly reduce FMISO uptake in ischemic brain in Wistar and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs, two rat strains with distinct vulnerability to brain ischemia, mimicking clinical heterogeneity.Thirteen adult male rats were randomized to distal middle cerebral artery occlusion under either 30% O2 or 100% O2. FMISO was administered intravenously and PET data acquired dynamically for 3hrs, after which magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and tetrazolium chloride (TTC staining were carried out to map the ischemic lesion. Both FMISO tissue uptake at 2-3hrs and FMISO kinetic rate constants, determined based on previously published kinetic modelling, were obtained for the hypoxic area. In a separate group (n = 9, tissue oxygen partial pressure (PtO2 was measured in the ischemic tissue during both control and NBO conditions.As expected, the FMISO PET, MRI and TTC lesion volumes were much larger in SHRs than Wistar rats in both the control and NBO conditions. NBO did not appear to substantially reduce FMISO lesion size, nor affect the FMISO kinetic rate constants in either strain. Likewise, MRI and TTC lesion volumes were unaffected. The parallel study showed the expected increases in ischemic cortex PtO2 under NBO, although these were small in some SHRs with very low baseline PtO2.Despite small samples, the apparent lack of marked effects of NBO on FMISO uptake suggests that in permanent ischemia the cellular mechanisms underlying FMISO trapping in hypoxic cells may be disjointed from PtO2. Better understanding of FMISO trapping processes will be important for future applications of FMISO imaging.

  16. Assessment of cerebral blood flow reserve using blood oxygen level-dependent echo planar imaging after acetazolamide administration in patients post-STA-MCA anastomosis surgery

    Zenke, Kiichiro; Kusunoki, Katsusuke; Saito, Masahiro; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko; Ohta, Shinsuke; Kumon, Yoshiaki; Sakaki, Saburo; Nagasawa, Kiyoshi

    1998-01-01

    Recently, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) echo planar imaging (EPI) has been used to estimate blood flow changes. Theoretically, a relative decrement of deoxyhemoglobin in cerebral blood supply induces a MR signal change after neuronal stimulation. In the present study, we have attempted to evaluate CBF reserve capacity by the BOLD EPI in patients who had undergone STA-MCA anastomosis surgery. Then, we compared with the signal intensity changes obtained by this procedure with the CBF changes by Xe-SPECT after acetazolamide administration. Six patients, post-STA-MCA anastomosis surgery, were studied. Pre-operatively, MR signal intensity and CBF, by Xe-SPECT, were increased in the intact side after acetazolamide administration in all patients, and MR signal intensities were decreased in low flow regions after acetazolamide administration in all four patients in whom so-called steal phenomenon was demonstrated by Xe-SPECT study. Post-operatively, poor response was shown after acetazolamide administration with both Xe-SPECT and BOLD EPI in the two patients who had unsuccessful anastomoses. In the successfully anastomosed patients, improved vascular reactivity was demonstrated on BOLD EPI after acetazolamide administration in 3 of 4 patients in whom an improvement of vascular reactivity was demonstrated on Xe-SPECT. In one patient, MRI studies were considered to have technical artifacts, because the MR signal intensity did not increase, even in the intact side after acetazolamide administration. In conclusion, BOLD EPI after acetazolamide administration is an useful procedure for the pre- and post-operative of vascular reserve in patients with ischemic stroke. (author)

  17. Improved cerebral oxygenation response and executive performance as a function of cardiorespiratory fitness in older women: a fNIRS study

    Cédric T Albinet

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiorespiratory fitness has been shown to protect and enhance cognitive and brain functions, but little is known about the cortical mechanisms that underlie these changes in older adults. In this study, functional NIRS was used to investigate variations in oxyhemoglobin ([HbO2] and in deoxyhemoglobin ([HHb] in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC during the performance of an executive control task in older women with different levels of cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max. Thirty-four women aged 60-77 years were classified as high-fit and low-fit based on VO2max measures. They all performed a control counting task and the Random Number Generation (RNG task at two different paces (1 number / 1 s and 1 number / 1.5 s, allowing to manipulate task difficulty, while hemodynamic responses in the bilateral DLPFCs were recorded using continuous-wave NIRS. The behavioral data revealed that the high-fit women showed significantly better performance on the RNG tasks compared with the low-fit women. The high-fit women showed significant increases in [HbO2] responses in both left and right DLPFCs during the RNG task, while the low-fit women showed significantly less activation in the right DLPFC compared with the right DLPFC of the high-fit women and compared with their own left DLPFC. At the level of the whole sample, increases in the [HbO2] responses in the right DLPFC were found to mediate in part the relationship between VO2max level and executive performance during the RNG task at 1.5 s but not at 1 s. These results provide support for the cardiorespiratory fitness hypothesis and suggest that higher levels of aerobic fitness in older women are related to increased cerebral oxygen supply to the DLPFC, sustaining better cognitive performance.

  18. Genomic and non-genomic regulation of PGC1 isoforms by estrogen to increase cerebral vascular mitochondrial biogenesis and reactive oxygen species protection

    Kemper, Martin F.; Stirone, Chris; Krause, Diana N.; Duckles, Sue P.; Procaccio, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    We previously found that estrogen exerts a novel protective effect on mitochondria in brain vasculature. Here we demonstrate in rat cerebral blood vessels that 17β-estradiol (estrogen), both in vivo and ex vivo, affects key transcriptional coactivators responsible for mitochondrial regulation. Treatment of ovariectomized rats with estrogen in vivo lowered mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) but increased levels of the other PGC-1 isoforms: PGC-1β and PGC-1 related coactivator (PRC). In vessels ex vivo, estrogen decreased protein levels of PGC-1α via activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Estrogen treatment also increased phosphorylation of forkhead transcription factor, FoxO1, a known pathway for PGC-1α downregulation. In contrast to the decrease in PGC-1α, estrogen increased protein levels of nuclear respiratory factor 1, a known PGC target and mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis. The latter effect of estrogen was independent of PI3K, suggesting a separate mechanism consistent with increased expression of PGC-1β and PRC. We demonstrated increased mitochondrial biogenesis following estrogen treatment in vivo; cerebrovascular levels of mitochondrial transcription factor A and electron transport chain subunits as well as the mitochondrial/ nuclear DNA ratio were increased. We examined a downstream target of PGC-1β, glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), the rate-limiting enzyme for glutathione synthesis. In vivo estrogen increased protein levels of both GCL subunits and total glutathione levels. Together these data show estrogen differentially regulates PGC-1 isoforms in brain vasculature, underscoring the importance of these coactivators in adapting mitochondria in specific tissues. By upregulating PGC-1β and/or PRC, estrogen appears to enhance mitochondrial biogenesis, function and reactive oxygen species protection. PMID:24275351

  19. Vß profiles in African children with acute cerebral or uncomplicated malaria: very focused changes among a remarkable global stability

    Loizon, Séverine; Boeuf, Philippe; Tetteh, John K A

    2007-01-01

    T cells are thought to play a critical role in cerebral malaria pathogenesis. However, available evidences are restricted to rodent models in which V beta specific T cell expansion has been associated with neurological syndrome suggesting involvement of superantigens or dominant antigens. Using f...

  20. Glacial-interglacial variability in ocean oxygen and phosphorus in a global biogeochemical model

    V Palastanga

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Increased transfer of particulate matter from continental shelves to the open ocean during glacials may have had a major impact on the biogeochemistry of the ocean. Here, we assess the response of the coupled oceanic cycles of oxygen, carbon, phosphorus, and iron to the input of particulate organic carbon and reactive phosphorus from shelves. We use a biogeochemical ocean model and specifically focus on the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM. When compared to an interglacial reference run, our glacial scenario with shelf input shows major increases in ocean productivity and phosphorus burial, while mean deep-water oxygen concentrations decline. There is a downward expansion of the oxygen minimum zones (OMZs in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean, while the extension of the OMZ in the Pacific is slightly reduced. Oxygen concentrations below 2000 m also decline but bottom waters do not become anoxic. The model simulations show when shelf input of particulate organic matter and particulate reactive P is considered, low oxygen areas in the glacial ocean expand, but concentrations are not low enough to generate wide scale changes in sediment biogeochemistry and sedimentary phosphorus recycling. Increased reactive phosphorus burial in the open ocean during the LGM in the model is related to dust input, notably over the southwest Atlantic and northwest Pacific, whereas input of material from shelves explains higher burial fluxes in continental slope and rise regions. Our model results are in qualitative agreement with available data and reproduce the strong spatial differences in the response of phosphorus burial to glacial-interglacial change. Our model results also highlight the need for additional sediment core records from all ocean basins to allow further insight into changes in phosphorus, carbon and oxygen dynamics in the ocean on glacial-interglacial timescales.

  1. Is impaired cerebral vasoreactivity an early marker of cognitive decline in multiple sclerosis patients?

    Metzger, Aude; Le Bars, Emmanuelle; Deverdun, Jeremy; Molino, Francois; Marechal, Benedicte; Picot, Marie-Christine; Ayrignac, Xavier; Carra, Clarisse; Labauge, Pierre; Bauchet, Luc; Krainik, Alexandre; Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    The link between cerebral vasoreactivity and cognitive status in multiple sclerosis remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate a potential decrease of cerebral vasoreactivity in multiple sclerosis patients and correlate it with cognitive status. Thirty-three patients with multiple sclerosis (nine progressive and 24 remitting forms, median age: 39 years, 12 males) and 22 controls underwent MRI with a hypercapnic challenge to assess cerebral vasoreactivity and a neuropsychological assessment. Cerebral vasoreactivity, measured as the cerebral blood flow percent increase normalised by end-tidal carbon dioxide variation, was assessed globally and by regions of interest using the blood oxygen level-dependent technique. Non-parametric statistics tests were used to assess differences between groups, and associations were estimated using linear models. Cerebral vasoreactivity was lower in patients with cognitive impairment than in cognitively normal patients (p=0.004) and was associated with education level in patients (R 2 = 0.35; p = 0.047). There was no decrease in cerebral vasoreactivity between patients and controls. Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis may be mediated through decreased cerebral vasoreactivity. Cerebral vasoreactivity could therefore be considered as a marker of cognitive decline in multiple sclerosis. (orig.)

  2. Is impaired cerebral vasoreactivity an early marker of cognitive decline in multiple sclerosis patients?

    Metzger, Aude [University Hospital Center, Department of Neurology, Montpellier (France); University Hospital Center, Department of Neurology, Memory Ressource and Research Center, Montpellier (France); Le Bars, Emmanuelle; Deverdun, Jeremy [Centre Hospitalier Regional Universitaire de Montpellier, Departement de Neuroradiologie, Hopital Gui de Chauliac, Montpellier (France); Centre Hospitalier Regional Universitaire de Montpellier, Institut d' Imagerie Fonctionnelle Humaine (I2FH), Hopital Gui de Chauliac, Montpellier (France); Universite de Montpellier, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, CNRS UMR 5221, Montpellier (France); Molino, Francois [Universite de Montpellier, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, CNRS UMR 5221, Montpellier (France); Universite de Montpellier, Institut de Genomique Fonctionnelle, CNRS UMR 5203, INSERM U661, Montpellier (France); Marechal, Benedicte [Siemens Healthcare, Advanced Clinical Imaging Technology, Lausanne (Switzerland); CHUV, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); LTS5, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland); Picot, Marie-Christine [Centre Hospitalier Regional Universitaire de Montpellier, Departement de Biostatistiques, Montpellier (France); Ayrignac, Xavier; Carra, Clarisse; Labauge, Pierre [University Hospital Center, Department of Neurology, Montpellier (France); Bauchet, Luc [Centre Hospitalier Regional Universitaire de Montpellier, Departement de Neurochirurgie, Hopital Gui de Chauliac, Montpellier (France); Hopital Saint Eloi, Institut de Neurosciences de Montpellier, INSERM U1051, Montpellier (France); Krainik, Alexandre [University Hospital of Grenoble, MR Unit CS 10217, Grenoble (France); Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas [Centre Hospitalier Regional Universitaire de Montpellier, Departement de Neuroradiologie, Hopital Gui de Chauliac, Montpellier (France); Centre Hospitalier Regional Universitaire de Montpellier, Institut d' Imagerie Fonctionnelle Humaine (I2FH), Hopital Gui de Chauliac, Montpellier (France); Universite de Montpellier, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, CNRS UMR 5221, Montpellier (France); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Caremeau, Departement d' Imagerie Medicale, Nimes (France)

    2018-03-15

    The link between cerebral vasoreactivity and cognitive status in multiple sclerosis remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate a potential decrease of cerebral vasoreactivity in multiple sclerosis patients and correlate it with cognitive status. Thirty-three patients with multiple sclerosis (nine progressive and 24 remitting forms, median age: 39 years, 12 males) and 22 controls underwent MRI with a hypercapnic challenge to assess cerebral vasoreactivity and a neuropsychological assessment. Cerebral vasoreactivity, measured as the cerebral blood flow percent increase normalised by end-tidal carbon dioxide variation, was assessed globally and by regions of interest using the blood oxygen level-dependent technique. Non-parametric statistics tests were used to assess differences between groups, and associations were estimated using linear models. Cerebral vasoreactivity was lower in patients with cognitive impairment than in cognitively normal patients (p=0.004) and was associated with education level in patients (R{sup 2} = 0.35; p = 0.047). There was no decrease in cerebral vasoreactivity between patients and controls. Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis may be mediated through decreased cerebral vasoreactivity. Cerebral vasoreactivity could therefore be considered as a marker of cognitive decline in multiple sclerosis. (orig.)

  3. Glacial-interglacial variability in ocean oxygen and phosphorus in a global biogeochemical model

    Palastanga, V.; Slomp, C.P.; Heinze, C.

    2013-01-01

    Increased transfer of particulate matter from continental shelves to the open ocean during glacials may have had a major impact on the biogeochemistry of the ocean. Here, we assess the response of the coupled oceanic cycles of oxygen, carbon, phosphorus, and iron to the input of particulate organic

  4. Data on the effect of target temperature management at 32–34 °C in cardiac arrest patients considering assessment by regional cerebral oxygen saturation: A multicenter retrospective cohort study

    Yuka Nakatani

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This data article contains raw data and supplementary analyzed data regarding to the article entitled “Effect of target temperature management at 32–34 °C in cardiac arrest patients considering assessment by regional cerebral oxygen saturation: A multicenter retrospective cohort study”. We examined the effectiveness of target temperature management (TTM at 32–34 °C considering degrees of patients’ cerebral injury and cerebral circulation assessed by regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2. The research is a secondary analysis of prospectively collected registry, in which comatose patients who were transferred to 15 hospitals in Japan after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA, and we included 431 study patients. Propensity score analysis revealed that TTM at 32–34 °C decreased all-cause mortality in patients with rSO2 41–60%, and increased favorable neurological outcomes in patients with rSO2 41–60% in the original research article. With regard to the balance of covariates of propensity-score matching (PSM and inverse-probability weighting (IPW analyses, some covariates were not well balanced after the analyses between groups. The overlap plots indicate the overlap of densities of the propensity scores are low in group rSO2 41–60% and group rSO2 ≥ 61%. When patients were limited to those who achieved return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC until/on hospitals arrival, TTM still tended to decrease all-cause mortality and increase favorable outcomes in group rSO2 41–60%.

  5. Global Inhibition of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Inhibits Paclitaxel-Induced Painful Peripheral Neuropathy

    Fidanboylu, Mehmet; Griffiths, Lisa A.; Flatters, Sarah J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol (R)) is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent that has a major dose limiting side-effect of painful peripheral neuropathy. Currently there is no effective therapy for the prevention or treatment of chemotherapy-induced painful peripheral neuropathies. Evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction during paclitaxel-induced pain was previously indicated with the presence of swollen and vacuolated neuronal mitochondria. As mitochondria are a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS...

  6. Comparison of cerebral tissue oxygenation values in full term and preterm newborns by the simultaneous use of two near-infrared spectroscopy devices: an absolute and a relative trending oximeter

    Szczapa, Tomasz; Karpiński, Łukasz; Moczko, Jerzy; Weindling, Michael; Kornacka, Alicja; Wróblewska, Katarzyna; Adamczak, Aleksandra; Jopek, Aleksandra; Chojnacka, Karolina; Gadzinowski, Janusz

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study is to compare a two-wavelength light emitting diode-based tissue oximeter (INVOS), which is designed to show trends in tissue oxygenation, with a four-wavelength laser-based oximeter (FORE-SIGHT), designed to deliver absolute values of tissue oxygenation. Simultaneous values of cerebral tissue oxygenation (StO2) are measured using both devices in 15 term and 15 preterm clinically stable newborns on the first and third day of life. Values are recorded simultaneously in two periods between which oximeter sensor positions are switched to the contralateral side. Agreement between StO2 values before and after the change of sensor position is analyzed. We find that mean cerebral StO2 values are similar between devices for term and preterm babies, but INVOS shows StO2 values spread over a wider range, with wider standard deviations than shown by the FORE-SIGHT. There is relatively good agreement with a bias up to 3.5% and limits of agreement up to 11.8%. Measurements from each side of the forehead show better repeatability for the FORE-SIGHT monitor. We conclude that performance of the two devices is probably acceptable for clinical purposes. Both performed sufficiently well, but the use of FORE-SIGHT may be associated with tighter range and better repeatability of data.

  7. Evaluation of biochar powder on oxygen supply efficiency and global warming potential during mainstream large-scale aerobic composting.

    He, Xueqin; Chen, Longjian; Han, Lujia; Liu, Ning; Cui, Ruxiu; Yin, Hongjie; Huang, Guangqun

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of biochar powder on oxygen supply efficiency and global warming potential (GWP) in the large-scale aerobic composting pattern which includes cyclical forced-turning with aeration at the bottom of composting tanks in China. A 55-day large-scale aerobic composting experiment was conducted in two different groups without and with 10% biochar powder addition (by weight). The results show that biochar powder improves the holding ability of oxygen, and the duration time (O 2 >5%) is around 80%. The composting process with above pattern significantly reduce CH 4 and N 2 O emissions compared to the static or turning-only styles. Considering the average GWP of the BC group was 19.82% lower than that of the CK group, it suggests that rational addition of biochar powder has the potential to reduce the energy consumption of turning, improve effectiveness of the oxygen supply, and reduce comprehensive greenhouse effects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Heterogeneity of cerebral vasoreactivity in preterm infants supported by mechanical ventilation

    Pryds, O.; Greisen, G.; Lou, H.; Friis-Hansen, B.

    1989-01-01

    The reaction of cerebral blood flow to acute changes in arterial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO2) and mean arterial blood pressure was determined in 57 preterm infants supported by mechanical ventilation (mean gestational age 30.1 weeks) during the first 48 hours of life. All infants had normal brain sonograms at the time of the investigation. In each infant, global cerebral blood flow was determined by xenon-133 clearance two to five times within a few hours at different levels of PaCO2. Changes in PaCO2 followed adjustments of the ventilator settings. Arterial oxygen pressure was intended to be kept constant, and mean arterial blood pressure fluctuated spontaneously between measurements. The data were analyzed by stepwise multiple regression, with changes in global cerebral blood flow, PaCO2, mean arterial blood pressure, and postnatal age or intracranial hemorrhage used as variables. In infants with persistently normal brain sonograms, the global cerebral blood flow-carbon dioxide reactivity was markedly lower during the first day of life (mean 11.2% to 11.8%/kPa PaCO2) compared with the second day of life (mean 32.6/kPa PaCO2), and pressure-flow autoregulation was preserved. Similarly, global cerebral blood flow-carbon dioxide reactivity and pressure-flow autoregulation were present in infants in whom mild intracranial hemorrhage developed after the study. In contrast, global cerebral blood flow reactivity to changes in PaCO2 and mean arterial blood pressure was absent in infants in whom ultrasonographic signs of severe intracranial hemorrhage subsequently developed. These infants also had about 20% lower global cerebral blood flow before hemorrhage, in comparison with infants whose sonograms were normal, a finding that suggests functional disturbances of cerebral blood flow regulation

  9. Análisis comparativo de marcadores de lesión en modelos de isquemia cerebral focal y global en ratas

    Ángel Enrique Céspedes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Los indicadores espacio-temporales de lesión son esenciales en el estudio neuropatológico y terapéutico de la isquemia cerebral. Objetivo. Optimizar la técnica de dos modelos de isquemia cerebral (focal y global y hacer un análisis comparativo de la progresión del daño cerebral, mediante marcadores de neurodegeneración. Materiales y métodos. Se sometieron ratas Wistar a oclusión temporal de la arteria cerebral media o aoclusión de cuatro vasos, y se evaluaron comparativamente el tiempo quirúrgico, la tasa de supervivenciay la recuperación neurológica. Se utilizó trifenilo de tetrazolio para establecer la distribución del infarto y tinción con Fluoro-Jade B® como marcador de neurodegeneración. La inmunorreacción de la astroglía  se evaluó con el anticuerpo contra la proteína acídica fibrilar de la glía (Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein,GFAP y el anticuerpo AT-8 contra la proteína tau hiperfosforilada, 24, 48 y 72 horas después de la isquemia. Resultados. Los modelos de isquemia utilizados requirieron menor tiempo quirúrgico y hubo menorriesgo de muerte, respecto a estudios previos. En el modelo focal, las células positivas con Fluoro-Jade B® y los astrocitos reactivos, se evidenciaron en corteza e hipocampo a las 24 horas después de la isquemia. En el modelo global, se observó tinción Fluoro-Jade B® positiva a las 24 horas, aumentando significativamente la reacción de la GFAP a las 72 horas en corteza y a las 48 horas en el hipocampo. La reacción contra la proteína tau hiperfosforilada aumentó progresivamente y fue máxima a las 72horas en ambos modelos. Conclusiones. Los dos modelos de isquemia cerebral, oclusión temporal de la arteria cerebral media y oclusión de cuatro vasos, fueron optimizados. En estos modelos, los marcadores la tinción Fluoro-Jade B® y la GFAP permitieron detectar procesos de neurodegeneración 24 horas después de la isquemia, en tanto el marcador de proteína tau

  10. Evolution of cerebral blood flow between the acute stage and one month after a global transient amnesia: a study of 18 patients

    Philippon, B.; Houzard, C.; Cinotti, L.; Croisile, B.

    2001-01-01

    We studied 18 patients within 24 hours of an idiopathic transient global amnesia and one month later using 133 Xe et 99m Tc-HMPAO for CBF measurements. Absolute hemispheric CBF obtained with the 133 Xe were initially: (right) = 46.9 ml/mn/100 g (s.d 6.6) and (left) = 47.9 (s.d 6.8). One month later, a significant increase of the right hemispheric CBF occurred (52.0 ± 6.9). Accordingly, absolute CBF increased bilaterally in the cerebellar and temporal regions. Local relative cerebral blood flow ( 99m Tc-HMPAO) allowed to reinforce these findings with increased resolution. They can also provide quantitative values thanks to the 133 Xe calibration. (authors)

  11. [Effect of hemodilution with 10% hydroxyethyl starch solution (MW 200,000/9.5) on the flow properties of blood, arterial blood gases and conjunctival oxygen partial pressure in patients with cerebral infarct].

    Staedt, U; Hütt, M; Herrmann, B; Seufzer, U; Leweling, H

    1989-06-01

    Hemorheological parameters, arterial blood gases and conjunctival oxygen tension were measured in 15 patients with acute ischemic stroke and compared with values obtained in an age matched reference group. Since the conjunctival capillary bed is perfused by the ophthalmic artery, it reflects the oxygen delivery to the areas supplied by the internal carotid artery. Measurements of conjunctival oxygen tension are simple and safe. Patients with acute ischemic stroke showed a lowered conjunctival oxygen tension; this holds true especially to the ipsilateral side, i.e. the side where the attack occurred, and to a lesser extent to the other side. By contrast, the ratio of arterial/conjunctival pO2 was disturbed only on the ipsilateral side. Furthermore, these patients had pathologically elevated values for red cell aggregation, whole blood and plasma viscosity. After infusing 500 ml 10% middle-molecular-weight hydroxyethyl starch (10% HAES-steril) and phlebotomy (250 ml) blood fluidity was normalized, although the hematokrit was only slightly reduced. Arterial pO2 improved slightly while pCO2 remained unchanged. Conjunctival oxygen tension improved by 30% on the ipsilateral and by 10% on the contralateral side, the ipsilateral values always remaining significantly lower. The ratio conjunctival/arterial pO2 raised only on the ipsilateral side where it was below the reference range before hemodilution. In addition to the well known improvement of blood fluidity and augmentation of cerebral blood flow following hemodilution in patients with acute ischemic stroke, there seems to be an increase in oxygen supply in the territories of both internal carotid arteries, especially on the ipsilateral side as indicated by the values of conjunctival oxygen tension and the ratio of conjunctival to arterial pO2.

  12. Cerebral Oximetry in Cardiac Surgery

    A. N. Shepelyuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the data of numerous current references, the review describes different neuromonitoring methods during cardiac surgery under extracorporeal circulation. It shows that it is important and necessary to make neuromonitoring for the early diagnosis and prevention of neurological complications after cardiac surgery. Particular attention is given to cerebral oximetry; the possibilities and advantages of this technique are described. Correction of cerebral oximetric values is shown to improve survival rates and to reduce the incidence of postoperative complications. Lack of cerebral oximetry monitoring denudes a clinician of important information and possibilities to optimize patient status and to prevent potentially menacing complications, which allows one to conclude that it is necessary to use cerebral oximetry procedures within neu-romonitoring in cardiac surgery. Key words: extracorporeal circulation, cerebral oximetry, neurological dysfunction, cerebral oxygenation.

  13. Delayed hippocampal neuronal death in young gerbil following transient global cerebral ischemia is related to higher and longer-term expression of p63 in the ischemic hippocampus

    Eun Joo Bae

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor p63 is one of p53 family members and plays a vital role as a regulator of neuronal apoptosis in the development of the nervous system. However, the role of p63 in mature neuronal death has not been addressed yet. In this study, we first compared ischemia-induced effects on p63 expression in the hippocampal regions (CA1- 3 between the young and adult gerbils subjected to 5 minutes of transient global cerebral ischemia. Neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 region of young gerbils was significantly slow compared with that in the adult gerbils after transient global cerebral ischemia. p63 immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in the sham-operated young group was significantly low compared with that in the sham-operated adult group. p63 immunoreactivity was apparently changed in ischemic hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in both ischemia-operated young and adult groups. In the ischemia-operated adult groups, p63 immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons was significantly decreased at 4 days post-ischemia; however, p63 immunoreactivity in the ischemia-operated young group was significantly higher than that in the ischemia-operated adult group. At 7 days post-ischemia, p63 immunoreactivity was decreased in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in both ischemia-operated young and adult groups. Change patterns of p63 level in the hippocampal CA1 region of adult and young gerbils after ischemic damage were similar to those observed in the immunohistochemical results. These findings indicate that higher and longer-term expression of p63 in the hippocampal CA1 region of the young gerbils after ischemia/reperfusion may be related to more delayed neuronal death compared to that in the adults.

  14. Comparison of Global Cerebral Blood Flow Measured by Phase-Contrast Mapping MRI with O-15-H2O Positron Emission Tomography

    Vestergaard, Mark Bitsch; Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare mean global cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured by phase-contrast mapping magnetic resonance imaging (PCM MRI) and by 15O-H2O positron emission tomography (PET) in healthy subjects. PCM MRI is increasingly being used to measure mean global CBF, but has not been validated in vivo...... against an accepted reference technique. Materials and Methods Same-day measurements of CBF by 15O-H2O PET and subsequently by PCM MRI were performed on 22 healthy young male volunteers. Global CBF by PET was determined by applying a one-tissue compartment model with measurement of the arterial input...... function. Flow was measured in the internal carotid and vertebral arteries by a noncardiac triggered PCM MRI sequence at 3T. The measured flow was normalized to total brain weight determined from a volume-segmented 3D T1-weighted anatomical MR-scan. Results Mean CBF was 34.9 ± 3.4 mL/100 g/min measured...

  15. Cerebral Palsy. Fact Sheet = La Paralisis Cerebral. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet on cerebral palsy is written in both English and Spanish. First, it provides a definition of cerebral palsy and considers various causes (e.g., an insufficient amount of oxygen reaching the fetal or newborn brain). The fact sheet then offers incidence figures and explains characteristics of the three main types of cerebral palsy:…

  16. Cerebral Palsy

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  17. Effects of hyperthermia on cerebral blood flow and metabolism during prolonged exercise in humans

    Nybo, Lars; Møller, Kirsten; Volianitis, Stefanos

    2002-01-01

    The development of hyperthermia during prolonged exercise in humans is associated with various changes in the brain, but it is not known whether the cerebral metabolism or the global cerebral blood flow (gCBF) is affected. Eight endurance-trained subjects completed two exercise bouts on a cycle...... ergometer. The gCBF and cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen, glucose, and lactate were determined with the Kety-Schmidt technique after 15 min of exercise when core temperature was similar across trials, and at the end of exercise, either when subjects remained normothermic (core temperature = 37.9 degrees C...... with control at the end of exercise (43 +/- 4 vs. 51 +/- 4 ml. 100 g(-1). min(-1); P glucose, and the cerebral metabolic rate was therefore higher at the end...

  18. Cerebral near infrared spectroscopy oximetry in extremely preterm infants

    Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Pellicer, Adelina; Alderliesten, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if it is possible to stabilise the cerebral oxygenation of extremely preterm infants monitored by cerebral near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) oximetry. DESIGN: Phase II randomised, single blinded, parallel clinical trial. SETTING: Eight tertiary neonatal intensive care unit...

  19. Absolute measurement of cerebral optical coefficients, hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation in old and young adults with near-infrared spectroscopy

    We present near-infrared spectroscopy measurement of absolute cerebral hemoglobin concentration and saturation in a large sample of 36 healthy elderly (mean age, 85 ± 6 years) and 19 young adults (mean age, 28 ± 4 years). Non-invasive measurements were obtained on the forehead using a commercially a...

  20. Global inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS inhibits paclitaxel-induced painful peripheral neuropathy.

    Mehmet Fidanboylu

    Full Text Available Paclitaxel (Taxol® is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent that has a major dose limiting side-effect of painful peripheral neuropathy. Currently there is no effective therapy for the prevention or treatment of chemotherapy-induced painful peripheral neuropathies. Evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction during paclitaxel-induced pain was previously indicated with the presence of swollen and vacuolated neuronal mitochondria. As mitochondria are a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS, the aim of this study was to examine whether pharmacological inhibition of ROS could reverse established paclitaxel-induced pain or prevent the development of paclitaxel-induced pain. Using a rat model of paclitaxel-induced pain (intraperitoneal 2 mg/kg paclitaxel on days 0, 2, 4 & 6, the effects of a non-specific ROS scavenger, N-tert-Butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN and a superoxide selective scavenger, 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPOL were compared. Systemic 100 mg/kg PBN administration markedly inhibited established paclitaxel-induced mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 8 g and 15 g stimulation and cold hypersensitivity to plantar acetone application. Daily systemic administration of 50 mg/kg PBN (days -1 to 13 completely prevented mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 4 g and 8 g stimulation and significantly attenuated mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 15 g. Systemic 100 mg/kg TEMPOL had no effect on established paclitaxel-induced mechanical or cold hypersensitivity. High dose (250 mg/kg systemic TEMPOL significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 8 g & 15 g, but to a lesser extent than PBN. Daily systemic administration of 100 mg/kg TEMPOL (day -1 to 12 did not affect the development of paclitaxel-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. These data suggest that ROS play a causal role in the development and maintenance of paclitaxel-induced pain, but such effects cannot be attributed to superoxide radicals

  1. Malaria cerebral Cerebral malaria

    Carlos Hugo Zapata Zapata

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available La malaria Cerebral (MC es la complicación más frecuente de la malaria por P. falciparum; aproximadamente el 90% de las personas que la han padecido se recuperan completamente sin secuelas neurológicas. Aún no se conoce con claridad su patogénesis pero se han postulado cuatro hipótesis o mecanismos posibles: 1 citoadherencia y secuestro de glóbulos rojos parasitados en la microvasculatura cerebral; 2 formación de rosetas y aglutinación de glóbulos rojos parasitados; 3 producción de citoquinas y activación de segundos mensajeros y, 4 apertura de la barrera hematoencefálica. Sin embargo, queda un interrogante sin resolver aún: ¿qué proceso se lleva a cabo para que el parásito, desde el espacio microvascular, pueda interferir transitoriamente con la función cerebral? Recientemente se ha utilizado el precursor de la proteína b-Amiloide como un marcador de daño neuronal en MC; este precursor será de gran ayuda en futuras investigaciones realizadas en nuestro medio que aporten información para comprender la patogénesis de la MC. Is the most common complication of P. falciparum malaria; nearly 90% of people who have suffered CM can recover without neurological problems. Currently there are four hypotheses that explain pathogenesis of CM: cytoadherence and sequestering of parasitized red blood cells to cerebral capillaries; rosette formation and parasitized red blood cells agglutination; production of cytokines and activation of second messengers and opening of the blood-brain barrier. However the main question remains to be answered; how the host-parasite interaction in the vascular space interferes transiently with cerebral function? Recently, the beta amyloid precursor peptide has been employed as marker of neural injury in CM. It is expected that the beta amyloid precursor peptide will help to understand the pathogenesis of CM in complicated patients of endemic areas of Colombia.

  2. Cerebral microangiopathies

    Linn, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral microangiopathies are a very heterogenous group of diseases characterized by pathological changes of the small cerebral vessels. They account for 20 - 30 % of all ischemic strokes. Degenerative microangiopathy and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiography represent the typical acquired cerebral microangiopathies, which are found in over 90 % of cases. Besides, a wide variety of rare, hereditary microangiopathy exists, as e.g. CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy), Fabrys disease and MELAS syndrome (Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes). (orig.)

  3. Amelioration of cognitive, motor and endogenous defense functions with silymarin, piracetam and protocatechuic acid in the cerebral global ischemic rat model.

    Muley, Milind M; Thakare, Vishnu N; Patil, Rajesh R; Bafna, Pallavi A; Naik, Suresh R

    2013-07-19

    The neuroprotective activities of silymarin, piracetam and protocatechuic acid ethyl ester (PCA) on cerebral global ischemic/reperfusion were evaluated in a rat model. A midline ventral incision was made in the throat region. The right and left common carotid arteries were located and a bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) was performed for 30min using atraumatic clamps followed by a 24h period of reperfusion. Neurological/behavioral functions (cognitive and motor), endogenous defense systems (lipid peroxidation, glutathione, catalase, and superoxide dismutase), reduced water content and infarct size and histopathological alterations were then studied. Silymarin and PCA treatments significantly improved cognitive, motor and endogenous defense functions, histopathological alterations, and, reduced both water content and infarct size compared to the vehicle-treated ischemic control group. Piracetam treatment improved neurological and histopathological alterations, reduced water content and infarct size, but failed to restore/prevent the impaired endogenous defense functions significantly. Silymarin showed better neuroprotection than piracetam and PCA in experimentally induced global ischemic/reperfusion and was able to facilitate mnemonic performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. 17-AAG post-treatment ameliorates memory impairment and hippocampal CA1 neuronal autophagic death induced by transient global cerebral ischemia.

    Li, Jianxiong; Yang, Fei; Guo, Jia; Zhang, Rongrong; Xing, Xiangfeng; Qin, Xinyue

    2015-06-12

    Neuro-inflammation plays an important role in global cerebral ischemia (GCI). The 72-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) has been reported to be involved in the inflammatory response of many central nervous system diseases. Preclinical findings implicate that 17-allylamino-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), an anticancer drug in clinical, provide neuroprotection actions in a rat model of traumatic brain injury, and the beneficial effects of 17-AAG were specifically due to up-regulation of Hsp70. However, no experiments have tested whether 17-AAG has beneficial or harmful effects in the setting of GCI. The present study was designed to determine the hypothesis that administration of 17-AAG could attenuate cerebral infarction and improve neuronal survival, thereby ameliorating memory impairment in a rat model of GCI. Furthermore, to test whether any neuroprotective effect of 17-AAG was associated with inflammatory response and neuronal autophagy, we examined the expression of multiplex inflammatory cytokine levels as well as autophagy-associate protein in hippocampal CA1 of rat brain. Our results showed that post-GCI administration of 17-AAG significantly protected rats against GCI induced brain injury, and 17-AAG is also an effective antagonist of the inflammatory response and thereby ameliorates hippocampal CA1 neuronal autophagic death. We therefore believe that the present study provides novel clues in understanding the mechanisms by which 17-AAG exerts its neuroprotective activity in GCI. All data reveal that 17-AAG might be a potential neuroprotective agent for ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Black Rice (Oryza sativa L., Poaceae) Extract Reduces Hippocampal Neuronal Cell Death Induced by Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia in Mice.

    Hwang, Sun-Nyoung; Kim, Jae-Cheon; Bhuiyan, Mohammad Iqbal Hossain; Kim, Joo Youn; Yang, Ji Seon; Yoon, Shin Hee; Yoon, Kee Dong; Kim, Seong Yun

    2018-04-01

    Rice is the most commonly consumed grain in the world. Black rice has been suggested to contain various bioactive compounds including anthocyanin antioxidants. There is currently little information about the nutritional benefits of black rice on brain pathology. Here, we investigated the effects of black rice ( Oryza sativa L ., Poaceae) extract (BRE) on the hippocampal neuronal damage induced by ischemic insult. BRE (300 mg/kg) was orally administered to adult male C57BL/6 mice once a day for 21 days. Bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) was performed for 23 min on the 8th day of BRE or vehicle administration. Histological analyses conducted on the 22nd day of BRE or vehicle administration revealed that administering BRE profoundly attenuated neuronal cell death, inhibited reactive astrogliosis, and prevented loss of glutathione peroxidase expression in the hippocampus when compared to vehicle treatment. In addition, BRE considerably ameliorated BCCAO-induced memory impairment on the Morris water maze test from the 15th day to the 22nd day of BRE or vehicle administration. These results indicate that chronic administration of BRE is potentially beneficial in cerebral ischemia.

  6. Nicotinamide mononucleotide inhibits post-ischemic NAD(+) degradation and dramatically ameliorates brain damage following global cerebral ischemia.

    Park, Ji H; Long, Aaron; Owens, Katrina; Kristian, Tibor

    2016-11-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is an essential cofactor for multiple cellular metabolic reactions and has a central role in energy production. Brain ischemia depletes NAD(+) pools leading to bioenergetics failure and cell death. Nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) is utilized by the NAD(+) salvage pathway enzyme, nicotinamide adenylyltransferase (Nmnat) to generate NAD(+). Therefore, we examined whether NMN could protect against ischemic brain damage. Mice were subjected to transient forebrain ischemia and treated with NMN or vehicle at the start of reperfusion or 30min after the ischemic insult. At 2, 4, and 24h of recovery, the proteins poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR), hippocampal NAD(+) levels, and expression levels of NAD(+) salvage pathway enzymes were determined. Furthermore, animal's neurologic outcome and hippocampal CA1 neuronal death was assessed after six days of reperfusion. NMN (62.5mg/kg) dramatically ameliorated the hippocampal CA1 injury and significantly improved the neurological outcome. Additionally, the post-ischemic NMN treatment prevented the increase in PAR formation and NAD(+) catabolism. Since the NMN administration did not affect animal's temperature, blood gases or regional cerebral blood flow during recovery, the protective effect was not a result of altered reperfusion conditions. These data suggest that administration of NMN at a proper dosage has a strong protective effect against ischemic brain injury. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Neuroprotective Effect of Matricaria chamomilla Extract on Motor Dysfunction Induced by Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion in Rat

    Azam Moshfegh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Stroke can cause paralysis, muscle weakness, and loss of balance that may affect walking and routine activities. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethyl alcohol extract of Matricaria chamomilla on cerebral ischemia-induced motor dysfunctions in rats. Methods In this experimental study, forty two male Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups consisting of control group, sham group, ischemia/reperfusion group and three treatment groups [treated with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg doses of M. chamomilla extract and undergoing ischemia/reperfusion(I/R]. Motor coordination and balance were evaluated using Rotarod test. Total antioxidant capacity, malondialdehyde (MDA, and nitric oxide (NO levels of serum and brain were also determined. Results The extract of M. chamomilla significantly improved I/R-induced motor dysfunction. Induction of I/R led to increase serum MDA, while the extract of M, chamomlla significantly reduced it. Administration all doses of M. chamomilla extract to the ischemic rats did not reduce the hippocampus MDA levels (P > 0.05. The extract of M. chamomilla at dose of 200 mg/kg slightly decreased cortex MDA (P > 0.01. It had no significant effects on the total antioxidant capacity of the brain (hippocampus and cortex and serum. Injection of Matricaria chamomilla extract also did not change serum NO level. Conclusions Our findings suggested that the Matricaria chamomilla extract could improve motor dysfunction.

  8. GOME-2 observations of oxygenated VOCs: what can we learn from the ratio glyoxal to formaldehyde on a global scale?

    M. Vrekoussis

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Collocated data sets of glyoxal (CHO.CHO and formaldehyde (HCHO were retrieved for the first time from measurements of the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2 during the first two years of operation in 2007 and 2008. Both oxygenated Volatile Organic Compounds, OVOC, are key intermediate species produced during the oxidation of precursor hydrocarbons. Their short lifetime of a few hours in the lower troposphere links them to emission sources and makes them useful tracers of photochemical activity. The global composite maps of GOME-2 HCHO and CHO.CHO have strong similarities confirming their common atmospheric and/or surface sources. The highest column amounts of these OVOCs are recorded over regions with enhance biogenic emissions (e.g. tropical forests in South America, Africa and Indonesia. Enhanced OVOC values are also present over areas of anthropogenic activity and biomass burning (e.g. over China, N. America, Europe and Australia. The ratio of CHO.CHO to HCHO, RGF, has been used, for the first time on a global scale, to classify the sources according to biogenic and/or anthropogenic emissions of the precursors; RGF between 0.040 to 0.060 point to the existence of biogenic emissions with the highest values being observed at the highest Enhanced Vegetation Index, EVI. RGFs below 0.040 are indicative of anthropogenic emissions and associated with high levels of NO2. This decreasing tendency of RGF with increasing NO2 is also observed when analyzing data for individual large cities, indicating that it is a common feature. The results obtained for RGF from GOME-2 data are compared with the findings based on regional SCIAMACHY observations showing good agreement. This is explained by the excellent correlation of the global retrieved column amounts of CHO.CHO and HCHO from the GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY instruments for the period 2007

  9. Therapeutic interventions in cerebral palsy.

    Patel, Dilip R

    2005-11-01

    Various therapeutic interventions have been used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. Traditional physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely used interventions and have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of cerebral palsy. Evidence in support of the effectiveness of the neurodevelopmental treatment is equivocal at best. There is evidence to support the use and effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in children with cerebral palsy. The effectiveness of many other interventions used in the treatment of cerebral palsy has not been clearly established based on well-controlled trials. These include: sensory integration, body-weight support treadmill training, conductive education, constraint-induced therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and the Vojta method. This article provides an overview of salient aspects of popular interventions used in the management of children with cerebral palsy.

  10. Forward Modeling of Carbonate Proxy Data from Planktonic Foraminifera using Oxygen Isotope Tracers in a Global Ocean Model

    Schmidt, Gavin A.

    1999-01-01

    The distribution and variation of oxygen isotopes in seawater are calculated using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies global ocean model. Simple ecological models are used to estimate the planktonic foraminiferal abundance as a function of depth, column temperature, season, light intensity, and density stratification. These models are combined to forward model isotopic signals recorded in calcareous ocean sediment. The sensitivity of the results to the changes in foraminiferal ecology, secondary calcification, and dissolution are also examined. Simulated present-day isotopic values for ecology relevant for multiple species compare well with core-top data. Hindcasts of sea surface temperature and salinity are made from time series of the modeled carbonate isotope values as the model climate changes. Paleoclimatic inferences from these carbonate isotope records are strongly affected by erroneous assumptions concerning the covariations of temperature, salinity, and delta (sup 18)O(sub w). Habitat-imposed biases are less important, although errors due to temperature-dependent abundances can be significant.

  11. Cerebral hematocrit decreases with hemodynamic compromise in carotid artery occlusion: a PET study.

    Yamauchi, H; Fukuyama, H; Nagahama, Y; Katsumi, Y; Okazawa, H

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated whether in patients with internal carotid artery occlusion the regional cerebral hematocrit correlates with cerebral hemodynamics or metabolic state and, if so, how the regional cerebral hematocrit changes in the hemodynamically compromised region. We used positron emission tomography to study seven patients with unilateral internal carotid artery occlusion and no cortical infarction in the chronic stage. The distributions of red blood cell and plasma volumes were assessed using oxygen-15-labeled carbon monoxide and copper-62-labeled human serum albumin-dithiosemicarbazone tracers, respectively. The calculated hematocrit value was compared with the hemodynamic and metabolic parameters measured with the oxygen-15 steady-state technique. In the cerebral cortex, the value of the cerebral hematocrit varied but was correlated with the hemodynamic and metabolic status. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that the large vessel hematocrit, the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen, and the cerebral blood flow or the oxygen extraction fraction accounted for a significant proportion of variance of the cerebral hematocrit. The oxygen extraction fraction and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen negatively correlated with the cerebral hematocrit, whereas the cerebral blood flow correlated positively: patients with reduced blood supply relative to metabolic demand (decreased blood flow with increased oxygen extraction fraction) showed low hematocrit values. In carotid artery occlusion in the chronic stage, regional cerebral hematocrit may vary according to cerebral hemodynamics and metabolic status. Regional cerebral hematocrit may decrease with hemodynamic compromise unless oxygen metabolism concomitantly decreases.

  12. Cerebral energy metabolism during induced mitochondrial dysfunction

    Nielsen, T H; Bindslev, TT; Pedersen, S M

    2013-01-01

    In patients with traumatic brain injury as well as stroke, impaired cerebral oxidative energy metabolism may be an important factor contributing to the ultimate degree of tissue damage. We hypothesize that mitochondrial dysfunction can be diagnosed bedside by comparing the simultaneous changes...... in brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO(2)) and cerebral cytoplasmatic redox state. The study describes cerebral energy metabolism during mitochondrial dysfunction induced by sevoflurane in piglets....

  13. Cerebral blood flow response to functional activation

    Paulson, Olaf B; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Rostrup, Egill

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate are normally coupled, that is an increase in metabolic demand will lead to an increase in flow. However, during functional activation, CBF and glucose metabolism remain coupled as they increase in proportion, whereas oxygen metabolism only inc...... the cerebral tissue's increased demand for glucose supply during neural activation with recent evidence supporting a key function for astrocytes in rCBF regulation....

  14. Two dose investigation of the 5-HT-agonist psilocybin on relative and global cerebral blood flow.

    Lewis, Candace R; Preller, Katrin H; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Michels, Lars; Staempfli, Philipp; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2017-10-01

    Psilocybin, the active compound in psychedelic mushrooms, is an agonist of various serotonin receptors. Seminal psilocybin positron emission tomography (PET) research suggested regional increases in glucose metabolism in frontal cortex (hyperfrontality). However, a recent arterial spin labeling (ASL) study suggests psilocybin may lead to hypo-perfusion in various brain regions. In this placebo-controlled, double-blind study we used pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) to measure perfusion changes, with and without adjustment for global brain perfusion, after two doses of oral psilocybin (low dose: 0.160 mg/kg; high dose: 0.215 mg/kg) in two groups of healthy controls (n = 29 in both groups, total N = 58) during rest. We controlled for sex and age and used family-wise error corrected p values in all neuroimaging analyses. Both dose groups reported profound subjective drug effects as measured by the Altered States of Consciousness Rating Scale (5D-ASC) with the high dose inducing significantly larger effects in four out of the 11 scales. After adjusting for global brain perfusion, psilocybin increased relative perfusion in distinct right hemispheric frontal and temporal regions and bilaterally in the anterior insula and decreased perfusion in left hemispheric parietal and temporal cortices and left subcortical regions. Whereas, psilocybin significantly reduced absolute perfusion in frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes, and bilateral amygdalae, anterior cingulate, insula, striatal regions, and hippocampi. Our analyses demonstrate consistency with both the hyperfrontal hypothesis of psilocybin and the more recent study demonstrating decreased perfusion, depending on analysis method. Importantly, our data illustrate that relative changes in perfusion should be understood and interpreted in relation to absolute signal variations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cerebral vasculitis

    Greenan, T.J.; Grossman, R.I.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews retrospectively MR, CT, and angiographic findings in patients with cerebral vasculitis in order to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the various imaging modalities, as well as the spectrum of imaging abnormalities in this disease entity. Studies were retrospectively reviewed in 12 patients with cerebral vasculitis proved by means of angiography and/or brain biopsy

  16. MRI of sickle cell cerebral infarction

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Goldberg, H.I.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hackney, D.B.; Johnson, M.; Grossman, R.I.; Hecht-Leavitt, C.; Gill, F.; Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia

    1987-01-01

    Eleven patients with sickle cell disease and neurological symptoms underwent MRI examination. Cerebral infarcts of two types were found, those in the vascular distribution of the middle cerebral artery and those in the deep white matter. In the patient whose hydration and whose oxygenation of erythrocytes has been treated, MRI offers diagnostic advantages over arteriography and CT. (orig.)

  17. Severe cerebral desaturation during shoulder arthroscopy in the beach-chair position

    Dippmann, Christian; Winge, Søren; Nielsen, Henning Bay

    2010-01-01

    During shoulder arthroscopy in the beach-chair position, cerebral ischemia may be a serious complication because prolonged hypotension may affect regional cerebral oxygen supply. We present the cases of 2 patients in whom a reduction in mean arterial pressure after anesthesia provoked a decrease...... cerebral oxygenation. During surgery in the beach-chair position, hypotension must be avoided, and in all patients regional, cerebral oxygenation should be monitored and optimized....

  18. Modelling of an intermediate pressure microwave oxygen discharge reactor: from stationary two-dimensional to time-dependent global (volume-averaged) plasma models

    Kemaneci, Efe; Graef, Wouter; Rahimi, Sara; Van Dijk, Jan; Kroesen, Gerrit; Carbone, Emile; Jimenez-Diaz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A microwave-induced oxygen plasma is simulated using both stationary and time-resolved modelling strategies. The stationary model is spatially resolved and it is self-consistently coupled to the microwaves (Jimenez-Diaz et al 2012 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45 335204), whereas the time-resolved description is based on a global (volume-averaged) model (Kemaneci et al 2014 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 23 045002). We observe agreement of the global model data with several published measurements of microwave-induced oxygen plasmas in both continuous and modulated power inputs. Properties of the microwave plasma reactor are investigated and corresponding simulation data based on two distinct models shows agreement on the common parameters. The role of the square wave modulated power input is also investigated within the time-resolved description. (paper)

  19. Long-term MRI cell tracking after intraventricular delivery in a patient with global cerebral ischemia and prospects for magnetic navigation of stem cells within the CSF.

    Miroslaw Janowski

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to evaluate the long-term clinical tracking of magnetically labeled stem cells after intracerebroventricular transplantation as well as to investigate in vitro feasibility for magnetic guidance of cell therapy within large fluid compartments.After approval by our Institutional Review Board, an 18-month-old patient, diagnosed as being in a vegetative state due to global cerebral ischemia, underwent cell transplantation to the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle, with umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO contrast agent. The patient was followed over 33 months with clinical examinations and MRI. To evaluate the forces governing the distribution of cells within the fluid compartment of the ventricular system in vivo, a gravity-driven sedimentation assay and a magnetic field-driven cell attraction assay were developed in vitro.Twenty-four hours post-transplantation, MR imaging (MRI was able to detect hypointense cells in the occipital horn of the lateral ventricle. The signal gradually decreased over 4 months and became undetectable at 33 months. In vitro, no significant difference in cell sedimentation between SPIO-labeled and unlabeled cells was observed (p = NS. An external magnet was effective in attracting cells over distances comparable to the size of human lateral ventricles.MR imaging of SPIO-labeled cells allows monitoring of cells within lateral ventricles. While the initial biodistribution is governed by gravity-driven sedimentation, an external magnetic field may possibly be applied to further direct the distribution of labeled cells within large fluid compartments such as the ventricular system.

  20. Enhanced neuroprotective efficacy of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells co-overexpressing BDNF and VEGF in a rat model of cardiac arrest-induced global cerebral ischemia

    Zhou, Lili; Lin, Qingming; Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Leong, Kahong; Tan, Zhiqun; Huang, Zitong

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac arrest-induced global cerebral ischemia injury (CA-GCII) usually leads to a poor neurological outcome without an effective treatment. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) may provide a potential cell-based therapy against neurologic disorders through induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). To optimize the neuroprotective efficacy of BMMSCs further, in this study we have derived BMMSCs, which co-overexpress both BDNF and VEGF, and tested them for the treatment of CA-GCII in a rat model. Lentiviruses that express rat BDNF exon IV or VEGF-A were created using the bicistronic shuttle vectors of pLVX-IRES-ZsGreen1 and pLVX-IRES-tdTomato, respectively. BMMSCs that were co-transduced with the engineered lentiviruses with co-overexpression of both BDNF and VEGF along with corresponding fluorescent protein reporters were injected via jugular vein of rats that just recovered from a cardiac arrest. Animals were then scored for neurofunctional deficits and examined for brain pathology and gene expression relevant to the engraftment seven days after the treatments. We demonstrate that anchorage of lentiviral vector-transduced BMMSCs, which co-overexpressed both BDNF and VEGF in the hippocampus and temporal cortex along with significantly ameliorated brain pathology and improved neurofunctional performance in CA-GCII rats after transplantation. These findings provide a proof of concept for the further validation of engineered BMMSCs for the treatment of CA-GCII patients in clinical practice in the future. PMID:28492549

  1. Globalization

    Tulio Rosembuj

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available There is no singular globalization, nor is the result of an individual agent. We could start by saying that global action has different angles and subjects who perform it are different, as well as its objectives. The global is an invisible invasion of materials and immediate effects.

  2. Globalization

    Tulio Rosembuj

    2006-01-01

    There is no singular globalization, nor is the result of an individual agent. We could start by saying that global action has different angles and subjects who perform it are different, as well as its objectives. The global is an invisible invasion of materials and immediate effects.

  3. Dynamic FDG PET for assessing early effects of cerebral hypoxia and resuscitation in new-born pigs

    Lange, Charlotte de; Malinen, Eirik; Qu, Hong; Johnsrud, Kjersti; Skretting, Arne; Saugstad, Ola Didrik; Munkeby, Berit H.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in cerebral glucose metabolism may be an early prognostic indicator of perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic injury. In this study dynamic 18 F-FDG PET was used to evaluate cerebral glucose metabolism in piglets after global perinatal hypoxia and the impact of the resuscitation strategy using room air or hyperoxia. New-born piglets (n = 16) underwent 60 min of global hypoxia followed by 30 min of resuscitation with a fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO 2 ) of 0.21 or 1.0. Dynamic FDG PET, using a microPET system, was performed at baseline and repeated at the end of resuscitation under stabilized haemodynamic conditions. MRI at 3 T was performed for anatomic correlation. Global and regional cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMR gl ) were assessed by Patlak analysis for the two time-points and resuscitation groups. Global hypoxia was found to cause an immediate decrease in cerebral glucose metabolism from a baseline level (mean ± SD) of 21.2 ± 7.9 to 12.6 ± 4.7 μmol/min/100 g (p gl but no significant differences in global or regional CMR gl between the resuscitation groups were found. Dynamic FDG PET detected decreased cerebral glucose metabolism early after perinatal hypoxia in piglets. The decrease in CMR gl may indicate early changes of mild cerebral hypoxia-ischaemia. No significant effect of hyperoxic resuscitation on the degree of hypometabolism was found in this early phase after hypoxia. Cerebral FDG PET can provide new insights into mechanisms of perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic injury where early detection plays an important role in instituting therapy. (orig.)

  4. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during exercise: implications for fatigue

    Seifert, T.; Lieshout, J.J. van; Secher, Niels

    2008-01-01

    During exercise: the Kety-Schmidt-determined cerebral blood flow (CBF) does not change because the jugular vein is collapsed in the upright position. In contrast, when CBF is evaluated by (133)Xe clearance, by flow in the internal carotid artery, or by flow velocity in basal cerebral arteries......, a approximately 25% increase is detected with a parallel increase in metabolism. During activation, an increase in cerebral O(2) supply is required because there is no capillary recruitment within the brain and increased metabolism becomes dependent on an enhanced gradient for oxygen diffusion. During maximal...... whole body exercise, however, cerebral oxygenation decreases because of eventual arterial desaturation and marked hyperventilation-related hypocapnia of consequence for CBF. Reduced cerebral oxygenation affects recruitment of motor units, and supplemental O(2) enhances cerebral oxygenation and work...

  5. Biogeochemistry: Oxygen burrowed away

    Meysman, F.J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular animals probably evolved at the seafloor after a rise in oceanic oxygen levels. Biogeochemical model simulations suggest that as these animals started to rework the seafloor, they triggered a negative feedback that reduced global oxygen.

  6. Oxygen consumption and blood flow coupling in human motor cortex during intense finger tapping

    Seyedi Vafaee, Manouchehr; Vang, Kim; Bergersen, Linda H

    2012-01-01

    Rates of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and glucose consumption (CMR(glc)) rise in cerebral cortex during continuous stimulation, while the oxygen-glucose index (OGI) declines as an index of mismatched coupling of oxygen consumption (cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen-CMRO(2)) to CBF and CMR(glc). To t...

  7. Globalization

    Andru?cã Maria Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The field of globalization has highlighted an interdependence implied by a more harmonious understanding determined by the daily interaction between nations through the inducement of peace and the management of streamlining and the effectiveness of the global economy. For the functioning of the globalization, the developing countries that can be helped by the developed ones must be involved. The international community can contribute to the institution of the development environment of the gl...

  8. The coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism with brain activation is similar for simple and complex stimuli in human primary visual cortex.

    Griffeth, Valerie E M; Simon, Aaron B; Buxton, Richard B

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative functional MRI (fMRI) experiments to measure blood flow and oxygen metabolism coupling in the brain typically rely on simple repetitive stimuli. Here we compared such stimuli with a more naturalistic stimulus. Previous work on the primary visual cortex showed that direct attentional modulation evokes a blood flow (CBF) response with a relatively large oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) response in comparison to an unattended stimulus, which evokes a much smaller metabolic response relative to the flow response. We hypothesized that a similar effect would be associated with a more engaging stimulus, and tested this by measuring the primary human visual cortex response to two contrast levels of a radial flickering checkerboard in comparison to the response to free viewing of brief movie clips. We did not find a significant difference in the blood flow-metabolism coupling (n=%ΔCBF/%ΔCMRO2) between the movie stimulus and the flickering checkerboards employing two different analysis methods: a standard analysis using the Davis model and a new analysis using a heuristic model dependent only on measured quantities. This finding suggests that in the primary visual cortex a naturalistic stimulus (in comparison to a simple repetitive stimulus) is either not sufficient to provoke a change in flow-metabolism coupling by attentional modulation as hypothesized, that the experimental design disrupted the cognitive processes underlying the response to a more natural stimulus, or that the technique used is not sensitive enough to detect a small difference. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cerebral circulation and metabolism with recovery of chronic poststroke aphasia

    Yamada, Tomoyuki; Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Matsubara, Michitaka; Hibino, Hiroaki; Kamimoto, Kaoru; Fukagawa, Kazutoshi

    2004-01-01

    The recruitment of cerebral circulation and oxygen metabolism in the particular brain areas responsible for poststroke aphasia are necessary for recovery. This study was undertaken to investigate changes in cerebral circulation and oxygen metabolism corresponding to improvement of aphasia. Twenty-nine right-handed chronic aphasic patients with left hemispheric stroke were studied. Aphasia was evaluated as the score of fluency, comprehension, repetition and naming by the Western Aphasia Battery (Japanese version). Concurrent with the evaluation of aphasia, positron emission tomography (PET) scans were performed. After several months of speech therapy, PET scans and evaluation of aphasia were reperformed. Both regional cerebral blood flow and the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen significantly increased in the left upper superior and middle temporal gyri, and in the left upper inferior frontal gyrus in the fair recovery group for comprehension, repetition and naming. In the fair recovery group for fluency, the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen significantly increased in the left upper superior and middle temporal gyri, but regional cerebral blood flow increased insignificantly in these areas. In the lower white matter of the right parietal lobe, both the regional cerebral blood flow and the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen were significantly increased in the fair recovery group for all aphasic features. The recruitment of cerebral circulation and oxygen metabolism in the left temporo-parietal area, in the left inferior frontal area, and in the right deep parietal area are essentially responsible for the recovery of aphasia. (author)

  10. Effects of reactive oxygen species on metabolism monitored by longitudinal 1H single voxel MRS follow-up in patients with mitochondrial disease or cerebral tumors

    Constans, J M; Collet, S; Hossu, G; Courtheoux, P; Guillamo, J S; Lechapt-Zalcman, E; Valable, S; Lacombe, S; Houee Levin, C; Gauduel, Y A; Dou, W; Ruan, S; Barre, L; Rioult, F; Derlon, J M; Chapon, F; Fong, V; Kauffmann, F

    2011-01-01

    Free radicals, or Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), have an effect on energy and glycolytic metabolism, mitochondrial function, lipid metabolism, necrosis and apoptosis, cell proliferation, and infiltration. These changes could be monitored longitudinally (every 4 months over 6 years) in humans with glial brain tumors (low and high grade) after therapy, using conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) and MR perfusion. Some examples of early clinical data from longitudinal follow-up monitoring in humans of energy and glycolytic metabolism, lipid metabolism, necrosis, proliferation, and infiltration measured by conventional MRI, MRS and perfusion, and positron emission tomography (PET) are shown in glial brain tumors after therapy. Despite the difficulty, the variability and unknown factors, these repeated measurements give us a better insight into the nature of the different processes, tumor progression and therapeutic response.

  11. Effects of reactive oxygen species on metabolism monitored by longitudinal {sup 1}H single voxel MRS follow-up in patients with mitochondrial disease or cerebral tumors

    Constans, J M; Collet, S; Hossu, G; Courtheoux, P [MRI Unit, Caen University Hospital, Caen, Normandy (France); Guillamo, J S; Lechapt-Zalcman, E; Valable, S [CERVOxy Group, CI-NAPS, UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Cyceron, Caen, Normandy (France); Lacombe, S; Houee Levin, C [Paris-Sud 11 University-CNRS, Orsay (France); Gauduel, Y A [LOA, Ecole Polytechnique - ENSTA ParisTech, Palaiseau (France); Dou, W [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Ruan, S [CReSTIC EA 3804, IUT Troyes, Troyes (France); Barre, L [GDMTEP, Group CI-NAPS, UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Cyceron, Caen (France); Rioult, F [CNRS UMR 6072, GREYC, Caen, Normandy (France); Derlon, J M [Neurosurgery and Neurology, Caen University Hospital, Caen, Normandy (France); Chapon, F [Pathology, Caen University Hospital, Caen, Normandy (France); Fong, V [Caen University (France); Kauffmann, F, E-mail: constans-jm@chu-caen.fr [Mathematics LMNO CNRS UMR 6139, Caen University, Caen, Normandy (France)

    2011-01-01

    Free radicals, or Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), have an effect on energy and glycolytic metabolism, mitochondrial function, lipid metabolism, necrosis and apoptosis, cell proliferation, and infiltration. These changes could be monitored longitudinally (every 4 months over 6 years) in humans with glial brain tumors (low and high grade) after therapy, using conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) and MR perfusion. Some examples of early clinical data from longitudinal follow-up monitoring in humans of energy and glycolytic metabolism, lipid metabolism, necrosis, proliferation, and infiltration measured by conventional MRI, MRS and perfusion, and positron emission tomography (PET) are shown in glial brain tumors after therapy. Despite the difficulty, the variability and unknown factors, these repeated measurements give us a better insight into the nature of the different processes, tumor progression and therapeutic response.

  12. Changes of regional cerebral blood oxygenation in recognizing Chinese characters in children with Chinese dyslexia%汉语阅读障碍儿童汉字识别过程中脑血氧的变化

    宋然然; 吴汉荣

    2006-01-01

    化量明显高于对照组(0.073 0,-0.072 1,F=15.59,P<0.01).结论:汉字认知过程阅读障碍儿童左前额叶皮层虽然激活,但相对正常儿童,激活的程度和激活模式均有差异,提示特定脑区功能异常可能是阅读障碍发生的生物学基础.%BACKGROUND: Dyslexia is the most common in the study of learning disabilities, it can affect various aspects of children, including behaviors,cognition, emotion, social adaptation, etc., and seriously block their obtaining of knowledge and improvement of ability in children.OBJECTIVE: To study the changing law of regional cerebral blood oxygenation in children with Chinese dyslexia in the process of recognizing Chinese characters, and investigate the neurophysiological basis of dyslexia in children.DESIGN: A case-control study.SETTING: Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Maternal Care, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology.PARTICIPANTS: The study was carried out in Huazhong University of Science and Technology from June to September in 2003. Forty-five primary students of 8 to 12 years old, who were grade 3 to 5 in Wuhan city,were enrolled in this study, including 26 dyslexic children (dyslexia group)and 19 normal readers (control group). All the enrolled children were righthanded. Informed consents were obtained from all the participants and their parents (guardians) after explanation of aims and steps of this study.METHODS: The functional near-infrared imager (fNIRI) was applied to detect the changes of cerebral blood oxygenation in left prefrontal lobe of dyslexic children and normal children in the primary processing (viewing passively, reading aloud, producing an action word) and secondary processing of Chinese characters (outputting task, action words association) of Chinese characters.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The changes of cerebral blood oxygenation in the primary processing and secondary processing of Chinese characters were observed in both

  13. Early biomarkers of brain injury and cerebral hypo- and hyperoxia in the SafeBoosC II trial

    Plomgaard, Anne M.; Alderliesten, Thomas; Austin, Topun

    2017-01-01

    Background The randomized clinical trial, SafeBoosC II, examined the effect of monitoring of cerebral oxygenation by near-infrared spectroscopy combined with a guideline on treatment when cerebral oxygenation was out of the target range. Data on cerebral oxygenation was collected in both the inte......Background The randomized clinical trial, SafeBoosC II, examined the effect of monitoring of cerebral oxygenation by near-infrared spectroscopy combined with a guideline on treatment when cerebral oxygenation was out of the target range. Data on cerebral oxygenation was collected in both......, and the biomarkers of brain injury from birth till term equivalent age that was collected as secondary and explorative outcomes in the SafeBoosC II trial. Methods Cerebral oxygenation was continuously monitored during the first 72h of life in 166 extremely preterm infants. Cranial ultrasound was performed at day 1...

  14. Propofol prevents autophagic cell death following oxygen and glucose deprivation in PC12 cells and cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    Derong Cui

    Full Text Available Propofol exerts protective effects on neuronal cells, in part through the inhibition of programmed cell death. Autophagic cell death is a type of programmed cell death that plays elusive roles in controlling neuronal damage and metabolic homeostasis. We therefore studied whether propofol could attenuate the formation of autophagosomes, and if so, whether the inhibition of autophagic cell death mediates the neuroprotective effects observed with propofol.The cell model was established by depriving the cells of oxygen and glucose (OGD for 6 hours, and the rat model of ischemia was introduced by a transient two-vessel occlusion for 10 minutes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed that the formation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes in both neuronal PC12 cells and pyramidal rat hippocampal neurons after respective OGD and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R insults. A western blot analysis revealed that the autophagy-related proteins, such as microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3-II, Beclin-1 and class III PI3K, were also increased accordingly, but cytoprotective Bcl-2 protein was decreased. The negative effects of OGD and I/R, including the formation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes, the increase in LC3-II, Beclin-1 and class III PI3K expression and the decline in Bcl-2 production were all inhibited by propofol and specific inhibitors of autophagy, such as 3-methyladenine (3-MA, LY294002 and Bafilomycin A1 (Baf,. Furthermore, in vitro OGD cultures and in vivo I/R rats showed an increase in cell survival following the administration of propofol, as assessed by an MTT assay or histochemical analyses.Our data suggest that propofol can markedly attenuate autophagic processes via the decreased expression of autophagy-related proteins in vitro and in vivo. This inhibition improves cell survival, which provides a novel explanation for the pleiotropic effects of propofol that benefit the nervous system.

  15. Combined oxygen- and carbon-isotope records through the Early Jurassic: multiple global events and two modes of carbon-cycle/temperature coupling

    Hesselbo, Stephen P.; Korte, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    , to the extent that meaningful comparisons between these events can begin to be made. Here we present new carbon and oxygen isotope data from mollusks (bivalves and belemnites) and brachiopods collected through the marine Early Jurassic succession of NE England, including the Sinemurian-Plienbachian boundary...... GSSP. All materials have been screened by chemical analysis and scanning electron microscopy to check for diagenetic alteration. Analysis of carbon isotopes from marine calcite is supplemented by analysis of carbon-isotope values from fossil wood collected through the same section. It is demonstrated...... that both long-term and short-term carbon-isotope shifts from the UK Early Jurassic represent global changes in carbon cycle balances. The Sinemurian-Pliensbachian boundary event is an event of global significance and shows several similarities to the Toarcian OAE (relative sea-level change, carbon-isotope...

  16. Regulation of cerebral circulation in spontaneous hypertension. Abstract. [Intraarterial xanon-133 technique]. Regulacja krazenia mozgowego krwi w genetycznie uwarunkowanym nadcisnieniu tetniczym (streszczenie pracy habilitacyjnej)

    Kozniewska-Kolodziejska, E. (Akademia Medyczna, Warsaw (Poland))

    1991-01-01

    The study was undertaken in order to determine global cerebral blood flow (intraarterial xenon-133 technique), cerebral oxygen utilization and cerebrovascular resistance and to estimate cerebrocortical microcirculation (Clark-type surface microelectrodes, corrosion casts) during normo- and hypoxemia in normotensive, spontaneously hypertensive stroke-resistant and stroke-prone rats. The reactivity of cerebral circulation to the changes in the arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide and to calcium channel blockade was also determined. The results of the study suggest that cerebrovascular resistance in spontaneously hypertensive rats under resting conditions depends, to a great extend, upon the increase of the permeability of cerebral blood vessel to calcium ions and upon the ratification of microvascular bed. Cerebral blood flow in spontaneously hypertensive rats is maintained at a normotensive level during normoxia and normocapnia. The reactivity of cerebral circulation to moderate changes of the arterial partial pressure of oxygen and carbon dioxide is well preserved in both strains of hypertensive rats in comparison with normotensive ones, but is diminished during severe hypocapnia. (author).

  17. Globalization

    Plum, Maja

    Globalization is often referred to as external to education - a state of affair facing the modern curriculum with numerous challenges. In this paper it is examined as internal to curriculum; analysed as a problematization in a Foucaultian sense. That is, as a complex of attentions, worries, ways...... of reasoning, producing curricular variables. The analysis is made through an example of early childhood curriculum in Danish Pre-school, and the way the curricular variable of the pre-school child comes into being through globalization as a problematization, carried forth by the comparative practices of PISA...

  18. Globalization

    F. Gerard Adams

    2008-01-01

    The rapid globalization of the world economy is causing fundamental changes in patterns of trade and finance. Some economists have argued that globalization has arrived and that the world is “flat†. While the geographic scope of markets has increased, the author argues that new patterns of trade and finance are a result of the discrepancies between “old†countries and “new†. As the differences are gradually wiped out, particularly if knowledge and technology spread worldwide, the t...

  19. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging in cerebral ischemia

    Rijen, P.C. van.

    1991-01-01

    In-vivo proton and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to detect changes in cerebral metabolism during ischemia and other types of metabolic stress. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in an animal model to observe morphological alterations during focal cerebral ischemia. Spectroscopy was performed in animal models with global ischemia, in volunteers during hyperventilation and pharmaco-logically altered cerebral perfusion, and in patients with acute and prolonged focal cerebral ischemia. (author). 396 refs.; 44 figs.; 14 tabs

  20. Bedside Monitoring of Cerebral Energy State During Cardiac Surgery

    Mölström, Simon; Nielsen, Troels H; Andersen, Claus

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study investigated whether the lactate-to-pyruvate (LP) ratio obtained by microdialysis (MD) of the cerebral venous outflow reflected a derangement of global cerebral energy state during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). DESIGN: Interventional, prospective, randomized study. SETTING...... in either group during CPB. In each group, 50% of the patients showed significant cognitive decline (mini-mental state examination, 3 points) 2 days after surgery. CONCLUSION: The LP ratio of cerebral venous blood increased significantly during CPB, indicating compromised cerebral oxidative metabolism...

  1. Cerebral oximetry in preterm infants

    Greisen, Gorm; Andresen, Bjørn; Plomgaard, Anne Mette

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth constitutes a major cause of death before 5 years of age and it is a major cause of neurodevelopmental impairment across the world. Preterm infants are most unstable during the transition between fetal and newborn life during the first days of life and most brain damage occurs...... in this period. The brain of the preterm infant is accessible for tissue oximetry by near-infrared spectroscopy. Cerebral oximetry has the potential to improve the long-term outcome by helping to tailor the support of respiration and circulation to the individual infant's needs, but the evidence is still lacking....... The goals for research include testing the benefit and harms of cerebral oximetry in large-scale randomized trials, improved definition of the hypoxic threshold, better understanding the effects of intensive care on cerebral oxygenation, as well as improved precision of oximeters and calibration among...

  2. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism in patients with aphasia due to basal ganglionic lesion

    Kitamura, Shin; Kato, Toshiaki; Ujike, Takashi; Kuroki, Soemu; Terashi, Akiro

    1987-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow and metabolism in right handed eight patients with subcortical lesion and aphasia were measured to investigate the correlation between aphasia and functional changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral oxygen consumption (CMRO 2 ) in the cortex and the basal ganglionic region. All patients had no lesion in the cortex, but in the basal ganglionic region (putamen, caudate nucleus, internal capsule, and periventricular white matter) on CT images. Patients with bilateral lesion were excluded in this study. Six patients with cerebral infarction in the left basal ganglionic region and two patients with the left putammal hemorrhage were examined. Five patients had non fluent Broca's type speech, two patients had poor comprehension, fluent Wernicke-type speech and one patient was globally aphasic. CBF, CMRO 2 , and oxygen extraction fraction were measured by the positron emission tomography using 15 O 2 , C 15 O 2 inhalation technique. In addition to reduction of CBF and CMRO 2 in the basal ganglionic region, CBF and CMRO 2 decreased in the left frontal cortex especially posterior part in four patients with Broca's aphasia. In two patients with Wernicke type aphasia, CBF and CMRO 2 decreased in the basal ganglionic region and the left temporal cortex. In a globally aphasic patient, marked reduction of CBF and CMRO 2 was observed in the left frontal and temporal cortex, in addition to the basal ganglionic region. These results suggest that dysfunction of cortex as well as that of basal ganglionic region might be related to the occurence of aphasia. However, in one patient with Broca's ahasia, CBF and CMRO 2 were preserved in the cortex and metabolic reduction was observed in only basal ganglia. This case indicates the relation between basal ganglionic lesion and the occurrence of aphasia. These results suggest that measurements of cerebral blood flow and metabolism were necessary to study the responsible lesion for aphasia. (author)

  3. Bedside Monitoring of Cerebral Energy State During Cardiac Surgery-A Novel Approach Utilizing Intravenous Microdialysis.

    Mölström, Simon; Nielsen, Troels H; Andersen, Claus; Nordström, Carl H; Toft, Palle

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated whether the lactate-to-pyruvate (LP) ratio obtained by microdialysis (MD) of the cerebral venous outflow reflected a derangement of global cerebral energy state during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Interventional, prospective, randomized study. Single-center, university teaching hospital. The study included 10 patients undergoing primary, elective coronary artery bypass grafting. Patients were randomized blindly to low mean arterial pressure (MAP) (40-60 mmHg; n = 5) or high MAP (60-80 mmHg; n = 5) during CPB. The MD catheters were positioned in a retrograde direction into the jugular bulb, and a reference catheter was inserted into the brachial artery. The correlations among LP ratio, MAP, data obtained from bifrontal near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and postoperative neurologic outcome measures were assessed. The correlated difference between pooled LP ratio (low and high MAP) of the jugular venous and the arterial blood was significant (LP arterial 17 [15-20] v LP venous 26 [23-27]; p = 0.0001). No cerebral desaturations (decrease in rSO 2 >20% from baseline) were observed in either group during CPB. In each group, 50% of the patients showed significant cognitive decline (mini-mental state examination, 3 points) 2 days after surgery. The LP ratio of cerebral venous blood increased significantly during CPB, indicating compromised cerebral oxidative metabolism. Conventional monitoring of rSO 2 by NIRS did not show a corresponding decrease in cerebral oxygenation. As the patients exhibited decreased cognitive functions after CPB, increases in jugular venous LP ratio may be a sensitive indicator of impending cerebral damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lignin Contribution to the Global Carbon Pool: Investigating the Abiotic Modification of Lignin by Reactive Oxygen Species

    Waggoner, Derek Charles

    Evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS), largely generated through photochemical processes, are important in transforming the chemical composition of the large pool of terrestrially-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) exported from land to water annually. However, due to the challenges inherent in isolating the effects of individual ROS on DOM composition, the role of ROS in the photochemical alteration of DOM remains poorly characterized. The main focus of the studies within this dissertation aim to more thoroughly characterize the alterations to lignin, used as an analog for terrestrial DOM, resulting from reactions with ROS. To investigate the possibility that the alteration of lignin, through reactions involving ROS, could lead to the production of compounds not recognized as having terrestrial origin, lignin-derived DOM was prepared from a sample of Atlantic white cedar (Chamaecyparis thyoides) and used for a number of studies. Lignin-derived DOM was independently exposed to hydroxyl radical (•OH) generated by Fenton reaction, singlet oxygen (1O2) produced using the photosensitizer Rose Bengal, and superoxide (O2-•) via stable potassium superoxide solution, under controlled laboratory conditions to accentuate how each ROS is responsible for the alteration of lignin. Advanced analytical techniques including high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS), were employed to characterize alteration to lignin taking place following various ROS treatments. Results of these studies have shown distinct differences in the types of new compounds observed from exposure to each ROS as well as ROS reactivity. The alteration of lignin to compounds not typically associated with terrestrial DOM has been demonstrated upon exposure to ROS. It is also suggested that ROS could selectively react with different fractions of lignin like compounds based

  5. United Cerebral Palsy

    ... your local affiliate Find your local affiliate United Cerebral Palsy United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is a trusted resource for individuals with Cerebral Palsy and other disabilities and their networks. Individuals with ...

  6. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  7. Birth Defects: Cerebral Palsy

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Cerebral palsy (also called CP) is a group of conditions ...

  8. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during isoflurane-induced hypotension in patients subjected to surgery for cerebral aneurysms

    Madsen, J B; Cold, G E; Hansen, E S

    1987-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen were measured during isoflurane-induced hypotension in 10 patients subjected to craniotomy for clipping of a cerebral aneurysm. Flow and metabolism were measured 5-13 days after the subarachnoid haemorrhage by a modification of the classi......Cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen were measured during isoflurane-induced hypotension in 10 patients subjected to craniotomy for clipping of a cerebral aneurysm. Flow and metabolism were measured 5-13 days after the subarachnoid haemorrhage by a modification......). Controlled hypotension to an average MAP of 50-55 mm Hg was induced by increasing the dose of isoflurane, and maintained at an inspired concentration of 2.2 +/- 0.2%. This resulted in a significant decrease in CMRO2 (to 1.73 +/- 0.16 ml/100 g min-1), while CBF was unchanged. After the clipping...

  9. Cerebral palsy

    Truwit, C.L.; Barkovich, A.J.; Koch, T.; Ferreiro, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews cranial MR findings in patients with cerebral palsy (CP) to clarify and categorize this disorder. The MR images of 40 patients with clinical CP were retrospectively reviewed. All patients suffered either varying spastic plegias, hypotonicity, or choreoathetosis. Concomitantly, the patients suffered from static encephalopathy, developmental delay, and/or microcephaly. Twenty-four patients were born at or near term, 10 were premature, and incomplete birth histories were available in six. The MR images revealed mild to severe degrees of white matter damage in 24 patients (12 term, nine premature, three unknown)

  10. Crew Cerebral Oxygen Monitor, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR proposal is aimed at developing a non-invasive, optical method for monitoring the state of consciousness of crew members in operational...

  11. Crew Cerebral Oxygen Monitor, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II SBIR proposal is aimed at developing a non-invasive, optical method for monitoring crew member state of awareness in operational environments. All...

  12. Cerebral oxygenation in the preterm neonate

    Dix, L.M.L.

    2017-01-01

    Although survival rates of preterm infants are improving, preterm birth is still associated with significant morbidity.The brain is one of the most vulnerable organs in preterm infants. Neonatal brain injury can have a large impact on the quality of life. Monitoring the immature brain is therefore

  13. Cerebral Palsy: General Information. Fact Sheet Number 2 = La Paralisis Cerebral: Informacion General. Fact Sheet Number 18.

    Interstate Research Associates, McLean, VA.

    This fact sheet on cerebral palsy is offered in both English and Spanish. First, it provides a definition and considers various causes (e.g., an insufficient amount of oxygen reaching the fetal or newborn brain). The fact sheet then offers incidence figures and explains characteristics of the three main types of cerebral palsy: spastic, athetoid,…

  14. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth / For Teens / Cerebral Palsy What's in this ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  15. Hemodynamic disturbances in cerebral ischemia; Correlation between positron emission tomographic and angiographic findings

    Tenjin, Hiroshi; Ueda, Satoshi; Mizukawa, Norihiko; Imahori, Yoshio; Hino, Akihiko; Ohmori, Yoshio [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan); Nakahashi, Hisamitsu

    1993-04-01

    Proper treatment of ischemic stroke requires better understanding of cerebral hemodynamic changes. The hemodynamic changes associated with ischemia were measured using positron emission tomography and related to angiographic findings in the subacute and chronic stages of 17 ischemia patients who showed symptoms of main trunk stenosis of the internal carotid artery system. The hemodynamic factors, cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen, oxygen extraction fraction, and flow/volume ratio, were measured in regions of interest determined from the angiographic stenosis (over 50%) and compared in each stage. The cerebral blood flow and flow/volume ratio in the territory downstream of the main trunk stenosis and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen in the whole cortex were decreased in the subacute stage. In the chronic stage, cerebral blood flow and flow/volume ratio decreased mainly in borderzone areas. (author).

  16. Spatially extended versus frontal cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy during cardiac surgery: a case series identifying potential advantages

    Rummel, Christian; Basciani, Reto; Nirkko, Arto; Schroth, Gerhard; Stucki, Monika; Reineke, David; Eberle, Balthasar; Kaiser, Heiko A.

    2018-01-01

    Stroke due to hypoperfusion or emboli is a devastating adverse event of cardiac surgery, but early detection and treatment could protect patients from an unfavorable postoperative course. Hypoperfusion and emboli can be detected with transcranial Doppler of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). The measured blood flow velocity correlates with cerebral oxygenation determined clinically by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) of the frontal cortex. We tested the potential advantage of a spatially extended NIRS in detecting critical events in three cardiac surgery patients with a whole-head fiber holder of the FOIRE-3000 continuous-wave NIRS system. Principle components analysis was performed to differentiate between global and localized hypoperfusion or ischemic territories of the middle and anterior cerebral arteries. In one patient, we detected a critical hypoperfusion of the right MCA, which was not apparent in the frontal channels but was accompanied by intra- and postoperative neurological correlates of ischemia. We conclude that spatially extended NIRS of temporal and parietal vascular territories could improve the detection of critically low cerebral perfusion. Even in severe hemispheric stroke, NIRS of the frontal lobe may remain normal because the anterior cerebral artery can be supplied by the contralateral side directly or via the anterior communicating artery.

  17. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism in patients with aphasia due to basal ganglionic lesion

    Kitamura, Shin; Kato, Toshiaki; Ujike, Takashi; Kuroki, Soemu; Terashi, Akiro

    1987-03-01

    Cerebral blood flow and metabolism in right handed eight patients with subcortical lesion and aphasia were measured to investigate the correlation between aphasia and functional changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral oxygen consumption (CMRO/sub 2/) in the cortex and the basal ganglionic region. All patients had no lesion in the cortex, but in the basal ganglionic region (putamen, caudate nucleus, internal capsule, and periventricular white matter) on CT images. Patients with bilateral lesion were excluded in this study. Six patients with cerebral infarction in the left basal ganglionic region and two patients with the left putammal hemorrhage were examined. Five patients had non fluent Broca's type speech, two patients had poor comprehension, fluent Wernicke-type speech and one patient was globally aphasic. CBF, CMRO/sub 2/, and oxygen extraction fraction were measured by the positron emission tomography using /sup 15/O/sub 2/, C/sup 15/O/sub 2/ inhalation technique. In addition to reduction of CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ in the basal ganglionic region, CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ decreased in the left frontal cortex especially posterior part in four patients with Broca's aphasia. In two patients with Wernicke type aphasia, CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ decreased in the basal ganglionic region and the left temporal cortex. In a globally aphasic patient, marked reduction of CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ was observed in the left frontal and temporal cortex, in addition to the basal ganglionic region. These results suggest that dysfunction of cortex as well as that of basal ganglionic region might be related to the occurence of aphasia. However, in one patient with Broca's ahasia, CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ were preserved in the cortex and metabolic reduction was observed in only basal ganglia. This case indicates the relation between basal ganglionic lesion and the occurrence of aphasia.

  18. Evaluation of oxygen species during E-H transition in inductively coupled RF plasmas: combination of experimental results with global model

    Meichsner, Jürgen; Wegner, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Inductively coupled RF plasmas (ICP) in oxygen at low pressure have been intensively studied as a molecular and electronegative model system in the last funding period of the Collaborative Research Centre 24 "Fundamentals of Complex Plasmas". The ICP configuration consists of a planar coil inside a quartz cylinder as dielectric barrier which is immersed in a large stainless steel vacuum chamber. In particular, the E-H mode transition has been investigated, combining experimental results from comprehensive plasma diagnostics as input for analytical rate equation calculation of a volume averaged global model. The averaged density was determined for electrons, negative ions O-, molecular oxygen ground state O2(X3 Σg-) and singlet metastable state O2(a1 Δg) from line-integrated measurements using 160 GHz Gaussian beam microwave interferometry coupled with laser photodetachment experiment and VUV absorption spectroscopy, respectively. Taking into account the relevant elementary processes and rate coefficients from literature together with the measured temperatures and averaged density of electrons, O2(X3 Σg-) and O2(a1 Δg) the steady state density was calculated for O(3P), O2(b1 Σg+), O(1D), O(1S), O3, O-, O2-, and O3-, respectively. The averaged density of negative ions O- from the rate equation calculation is compared with the measured one. The normalized source and loss rates are discussed for O(3P), O2(b1 Σg+) and O-. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Fundamentals of Complex Plasmas", edited by Jürgen Meichsner, Michael Bonitz, Holger Fehske, Alexander Piel.

  19. Glycopyrrolate abolishes the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion in humans

    Seifert, Thomas; Fisher, James P; Young, Colin N

    2010-01-01

    Brain blood vessels contain muscarinic receptors that are important for cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, but whether a cholinergic receptor mechanism is involved in the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion or affects cerebral metabolism remains unknown. We evaluated CBF and cerebral......(mean) during ergometer cycling (n = 8). Separate, randomized and counterbalanced trials were performed in control (no drug) conditions and following muscarinic cholinergic receptor blockade by glycopyrrolate. Glycopyrrolate increased resting heart rate from approximately 60 to approximately 110 beats min(-1...... abolished by glycopyrrolate (P important for the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion without affecting the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen....

  20. Cerebral gas embolism due to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    ter Laan, Mark; Totte, Erik; van Hulst, Rob A; van der Linde, Klaas; van der Kamp, Wim; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E

    2009-07-01

    Cerebral gas embolism as a result of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is a rare complication and bares a high morbidity. A patient is presented who underwent an upper endoscopy for evaluation of a gastric-mediastinal fistula after subtotal oesophagectomy and gastric tube reconstruction because of oesophageal cancer. During the procedure, cerebral gas emboli developed resulting in an acute left-sided hemiparesis. After hyperbaric oxygen therapy, the patient recovered almost completely. The aetiology and treatment is discussed based on the reviewed literature. Once cerebral gas emboli are recognized, patient outcome can be improved by hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

  1. Gemfibrozil pretreatment affecting antioxidant defense system and inflammatory, but not Nrf-2 signaling pathways resulted in female neuroprotection and male neurotoxicity in the rat models of global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion.

    Mohagheghi, Fatemeh; Khalaj, Leila; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan; Rahmani, Behrouz

    2013-04-01

    Two important pathophysiological mechanisms involved during cerebral ischemia are oxidative stress and inflammation. In pathological conditions such as brain ischemia the ability of free radicals production is greater than that of elimination by endogenous antioxidative systems, so brain is highly injured due to oxidation and neuroinflammation. Fibrates as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α ligands, are reported to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions. In this study, gemfibrozil, a fibrate is investigated for its therapeutic potential against global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury of male and female rats. This study particularly has focused on inflammatory and antioxidant signaling pathways, such as nuclear factor erythroid-related factor (Nrf)-2, as well as the activity of some endogenous antioxidant agents. It was found that pretreatment of animals with gemfibrozil prior to I/R resulted in a sexually dimorphic outcome. Within females it proved to be protective, modulating inflammatory factors and inducing antioxidant defense system including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, as well as glutathione level. However, Nrf-2 signaling pathway was not affected. It also decreased malondialdehyde level as an index of lipid peroxidation. In contrast, gemfibrozil pretreatment was toxic to males, enhancing the expression of inflammatory factors such as tumor necrosis factor-α, nuclear factor-κB, and cyclooxygenase-2, and decreasing Nrf-2 expression and SOD activity, leading to hippocampal neurodegeneration. Considering that gemfibrozil is a commonly used anti-hyperlipidemic agent in clinic, undoubtedly more investigations are crucial to exactly unravel its sex-dependent neuroprotective/neurodegenerative potential.

  2. Cerebral Vasculitis

    Fariborz Khorvash

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vasculitis is an inflammation systems may be involved of blood vessels due to various origins. Vessels of the peripheral and/or central nervous. Vasculitis of the CNS is rare and occurs in the context of systemic diseases or as primary angiitis of the CNS. Epidemiology: The overall incidence of primary vasculitis is about 40/1,000,000 persons [excluding giant cell (temporal arteritis, GCA]. Its incidence increases with age. The incidence of GCA is much higher (around 200/1,000,000 persons in the age group[50 years. Clinical Presentation: Clinical and pathological presentation in CNS vasculitis represents a wide spectrum. Among others, headache, cranial nerve affections, encephalopathy, seizures, psychosis, myelitis, stroke, intracranial haemorrhage and aseptic meningoencephalitis are described. Primary and secondary vasculitides leading more frequently to CNS manifestations are discussed. Primary and secondary Vasculitides: Including Giant Cell (Temporal Arteritis , Takayasu arteritis, Polyarteritis nodosa, Primary angiitis of the CNS, Wegener’s granulomatosis, and Connective tissue diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, mixed connective disease and Sjögren syndrome, are systemic immune-mediated diseases that lead to multiple organ affections. Cerebral Vasculitis: Imaging and Differential Diagnosis: Vasculitides represent a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases that affect blood vessel walls of varying calibers (inflammatory vasculopathy. Since the devastating symptoms of CNS vasculitis are at least partially reversible, early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are important. In order to establish a differential diagnosis clinical features, disease progression, age of onset, blood results, as well as CSF examinations have to be taken into consideration. Neuroimaging techniques, such as MRI and DSA, play a central role in the diagnosis and disease monitoring .The diagnostic

  3. Effects of the cryptochrome CryB from Rhodobacter sphaeroides on global gene expression in the dark or blue light or in the presence of singlet oxygen.

    Sebastian Frühwirth

    Full Text Available Several regulators are controlling the formation of the photosynthetic apparatus in the facultatively photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Among the proteins affecting photosynthesis gene expression is the blue light photoreceptor cryptochrome CryB. This study addresses the effect of CryB on global gene expression. The data reveal that CryB does not only influence photosynthesis gene expression but also genes for the non-photosynthetic energy metabolism like citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. In addition several genes involved in RNA processing and in transcriptional regulation are affected by a cryB deletion. Although CryB was shown to undergo a photocycle it does not only affect gene expression in response to blue light illumination but also in response to singlet oxygen stress conditions. While there is a large overlap in these responses, some CryB-dependent effects are specific for blue-light or photooxidative stress. In addition to protein-coding genes some genes for sRNAs show CryB-dependent expression. These findings give new insight into the function of bacterial cryptochromes and demonstrate for the first time a function in the oxidative stress response.

  4. Heat-Wave Effects on Oxygen, Nutrients, and Phytoplankton Can Alter Global Warming Potential of Gases Emitted from a Small Shallow Lake.

    Bartosiewicz, Maciej; Laurion, Isabelle; Clayer, François; Maranger, Roxane

    2016-06-21

    Increasing air temperatures may result in stronger lake stratification, potentially altering nutrient and biogenic gas cycling. We assessed the impact of climate forcing by comparing the influence of stratification on oxygen, nutrients, and global-warming potential (GWP) of greenhouse gases (the sum of CH4, CO2, and N2O in CO2 equivalents) emitted from a shallow productive lake during an average versus a heat-wave year. Strong stratification during the heat wave was accompanied by an algal bloom and chemically enhanced carbon uptake. Solar energy trapped at the surface created a colder, isolated hypolimnion, resulting in lower ebullition and overall lower GWP during the hotter-than-average year. Furthermore, the dominant CH4 emission pathway shifted from ebullition to diffusion, with CH4 being produced at surprisingly high rates from sediments (1.2-4.1 mmol m(-2) d(-1)). Accumulated gases trapped in the hypolimnion during the heat wave resulted in a peak efflux to the atmosphere during fall overturn when 70% of total emissions were released, with littoral zones acting as a hot spot. The impact of climate warming on the GWP of shallow lakes is a more complex interplay of phytoplankton dynamics, emission pathways, thermal structure, and chemical conditions, as well as seasonal and spatial variability, than previously reported.

  5. Quantification of extra-cerebral and cerebral hemoglobin concentrations during physical exercise using time-domain near infrared spectroscopy.

    Auger, Héloïse; Bherer, Louis; Boucher, Étienne; Hoge, Richard; Lesage, Frédéric; Dehaes, Mathieu

    2016-10-01

    Fitness is known to have beneficial effects on brain anatomy and function. However, the understanding of mechanisms underlying immediate and long-term neurophysiological changes due to exercise is currently incomplete due to the lack of tools to investigate brain function during physical activity. In this study, we used time-domain near infrared spectroscopy (TD-NIRS) to quantify and discriminate extra-cerebral and cerebral hemoglobin concentrations and oxygen saturation ( SO 2 ) in young adults at rest and during incremental intensity exercise. In extra-cerebral tissue, an increase in deoxy-hemoglobin ( HbR ) and a decrease in SO 2 were observed while only cerebral HbR increased at high intensity exercise. Results in extra-cerebral tissue are consistent with thermoregulatory mechanisms to dissipate excess heat through skin blood flow, while cerebral changes are in agreement with cerebral blood flow ( CBF ) redistribution mechanisms to meet oxygen demand in activated regions during exercise. No significant difference was observed in oxy- ( HbO 2 ) and total hemoglobin ( HbT ). In addition HbO 2 , HbR and HbT increased with subject's peak power output (equivalent to the maximum oxygen volume consumption; VO 2 peak) supporting previous observations of increased total mass of red blood cells in trained individuals. Our results also revealed known gender differences with higher hemoglobin in men. Our approach in quantifying both extra-cerebral and cerebral absolute hemoglobin during exercise may help to better interpret past and future continuous-wave NIRS studies that are prone to extra-cerebral contamination and allow a better understanding of acute cerebral changes due to physical exercise.

  6. [Cerebral aspergillosis].

    Tattevin, P; Jauréguiberry, S; Gangneux, J-P

    2004-05-01

    The brain is almost always a localization of invasive aspergillosis, after hematogenous spread from pulmonary aspergillosis. Brain aspergilosis is not rare and is one of the worst prognosis factors of invasive aspergillosis. The incidence of this severe mycosis is currently on the rise due to the development of major immunosuppressive treatments. Brain aspergillosis is noteworthy for its vascular tropism, leading to infectious cerebral vasculitis, mainly involving thalamoperforating and lenticulostriate arteries, with a high frequency of thalamic or basal nuclei lesions. Extra-neurologic features that suggest this diagnosis are: i) risk factors for invasive aspergillosis (major or prolonged neutropenia, hematologic malignancies, prolonged corticosteroid treatment, bone marrow or solid organ transplant, AIDS); ii) persistent fever not responding to presumptive antibacterial treatment; iii) respiratory signs (brain aspergillosis is associated with pulmonary aspergillosis in 80 to 95 p. 100 of cases). Perspectives. Two recent major improvements in brain aspergillosis management must be outlined: i) for diagnostic purposes, the development of testing for Aspergillus antigenemia (a non-invasive procedure with good diagnostic value for invasive aspergillosis); ii) for therapeutic purposes, the demonstration that voriconazole is better than amphotericin B in terms of clinical response, tolerance and survival, for all types of invasive aspergillosis, the benefit being probably even greater in case of brain aspergillosis because of the good diffusion of voriconazole into the central nervous system. Brain aspergillosis is a severe emerging opportunistic infection for which diagnostic and therapeutic tools have recently improved. Thus, this diagnostic must be suspected early, especially in the immunocompromised patient, in the event of respiratory symptoms and when the brain lesions are localized in the central nuclei and the thalamus.

  7. Determinants of resting cerebral blood flow in sickle cell disease

    Bush, Adam M.; Borzage, Matthew T.; Choi, Soyoung; Václavů, Lena; Tamrazi, Benita; Nederveen, Aart J.; Coates, Thomas D.; Wood, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is common in children with sickle cell disease and results from an imbalance in oxygen supply and demand. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is increased in patients with sickle cell disease to compensate for their anemia, but adequacy of their oxygen delivery has not been systematically demonstrated.

  8. Cerebral perfusion characteristics show differences in younger versus older children with sickle cell anaemia: Results from a multiple-inflow-time arterial spin labelling study.

    Kawadler, Jamie M; Hales, Patrick W; Barker, Simon; Cox, Timothy C S; Kirkham, Fenella J; Clark, Chris A

    2018-03-30

    Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is associated with chronic anaemia and oxygen desaturation, which elevate cerebral blood flow (CBF) and increase the risk of neurocognitive complications. Arterial spin labelling (ASL) provides a methodology for measuring CBF non-invasively; however, ASL techniques using only a single inflow time are not sufficient to fully characterize abnormal haemodynamic behaviour in SCA. This study investigated haemodynamic parameters from a multi-inflow-time ASL acquisition in younger (8-12 years) and older (13-18 years) children with SCA with and without silent cerebral infarction (SCI+/-) (n = 20 and 19 respectively, 6 and 4 SCI+ respectively) and healthy controls (n = 9 and 7 respectively). Compared with controls, CBF was elevated globally in both groups of patients. In the younger SCA patients, blood oxygen content was negatively correlated with CBF in the middle and posterior cerebral artery territories and significantly positively correlated with bolus arrival time (BAT) in the anterior and middle cerebral artery territories. In older children, SCA patients had significantly shorter BAT than healthy controls and there was a significant negative correlation between CBF and oxygen content only in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery, with a trend for a correlation in the anterior cerebral artery but no relationship for the middle cerebral artery territory. In the younger group, SCI+ patients had significantly higher CBF in the posterior cerebral artery territory (SCI+ mean = 92.78 ml/100 g/min; SCI- mean = 72.71 ml/100 g/min; F = 4.28, p = 0.04), but this no longer reached significance when two children with abnormal transcranial Doppler and one with haemoglobin SC disease were excluded, and there were no significant differences between patients with and without SCI in the older children. With age, there appears to be increasing disparity between patients and controls in terms of the relationship between CBF and oxygen

  9. Dynamic digitized cerebral parenchymography

    Theron, J.; Alachkar, F.; Nelson, M.; Mazia, D.

    1992-01-01

    Aortic arch injections centred on the head have been performed routinely in patients with cerebral ischaemia. Digital angiograms with modified windowing (low and narrow) have been used. This 'cerebral' arch injection allows much improved analysis of the cerebral parenchymal vascularization, giving better understanding of hemispheric ischaemia and making the decision about revascularization more rational. (orig.)

  10. Reduced muscle activation during exercise related to brain oxygenation and metabolism in humans

    Rasmussen, Peter; Nielsen, Jannie; Overgaard, M

    2010-01-01

    Maximal exercise may be limited by central fatigue defined as an inability of the central nervous system to fully recruit the involved muscles. This study evaluated whether a reduction in the cerebral oxygen-to-carbohydrate index (OCI) and in the cerebral mitochondrial oxygen tension relate to th...... indicating that reduced cerebral oxygenation may play a role in the development of central fatigue and may be an exercise capacity limiting factor.......Maximal exercise may be limited by central fatigue defined as an inability of the central nervous system to fully recruit the involved muscles. This study evaluated whether a reduction in the cerebral oxygen-to-carbohydrate index (OCI) and in the cerebral mitochondrial oxygen tension relate...... of perceived exertion (RPE), arm maximal voluntary force (MVC), and voluntary activation of elbow flexor muscles assessed with transcranial magnetic stimulation. Low intensity exercise did not produce any indication of central fatigue or marked cerebral metabolic deviations. Exercise in hypoxia (0.10) reduced...

  11. Gemfibrozil pretreatment resulted in a sexually dimorphic outcome in the rat models of global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion via modulation of mitochondrial pro-survival and apoptotic cell death factors as well as MAPKs.

    Mohagheghi, Fatemeh; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan; Rahmani, Behrouz; Moradi, Fatemeh; Romond, Nathalie; Khalaj, Leila

    2013-07-01

    Inducers of mitochondrial biogenesis are widely under investigation for use in a novel therapeutic approach in neurodegenerative disorders. The ability of Gemfibrozil, a fibrate, is investigated for the first time to modulate mitochondrial pro-survival factors involved in the mitochondrial biogenesis signaling pathway, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor (NRF-1), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) in the brain. Gemfibozil is clinically administered to control hyperlipidemia. It secondarily prevents cardiovascular events such as cardiac arrest in susceptible patients. In this study, pretreatment of animals with gemfibrozil prior to ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) resulted in a sexually dimorphic outcome. While the expression of NRF-1 and TFAM were induced in gemfibrozil-pretreated met-estrous females, they were suppressed in males. Gemfibrozil also proved to be neuroprotective in met-estrous females, as it inhibited caspase-dependent apoptosis while in males it led to hippocampal neurodegeneration via activation of both the caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptosis. In the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) pathway, gemfibrozil pretreatment induced the expression of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) in met-estrous females and reduced it in males. These findings correlatively point to the sexual-dimorphic effects of gemfibrozil in global cerebral I/R context by affecting important factors involved in the mitochondrial biogenesis, MAPKs, and apoptotic cell death pathways.

  12. Effect of graded hyperventilation on cerebral metabolism in a cisterna magna blood injection model of subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    Ma, Xiaodong; Bay-Hansen, Rikke; Hauerberg, John

    2006-01-01

    In subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with cerebrovascular instability, hyperventilation may induce a risk of inducing or aggravating cerebral ischemia. We measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen (CMRO2), glucose (CMRglc), and lactate (CMRlac) at different PaCO2 level...

  13. Metabolic and circulatory evaluation of acute cerebral ischaemic accidents in man by positron emission tomography

    Depresseux, J C; Franck, G., Van Cauwenberge, H.

    1987-06-18

    Positron emission tomography and oxygen-15 were used to evaluate the effects of an almitrine-raubasine combination on cerebral blood flow and oxydative metabolism in patients with acute cerebral ischaemia. In 5 patients, aged between 58 and 74 years, with cerebral ischaemic accident in the territory of the middle cerebral artery, blood flow rate, oxygen consumption and brain oxygen extraction were measured before and after a 90-min intravenous infusion of almitrine bismesilate 15 mg and raubasine 5 mg. Only one patient presented with initial relative luxury perfusion, the intensity of which was reduced by the combined treatment. The other 4 patients had focal reduction of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption prior to treatment. Satistical analysis conducted on three cerebral areas (epicentre of the lesion, anterior and posterior juxtalesional areas and homologous heterolateral areas) showed a significant 3.6% increase of oxygen consumption in the epicentre, both hemispheres included, and a significant increase of cerebral blood flow in all three areas (3% on the healthy side, 13% on the diseased side). No significant change in oxygen extraction was demonstrated. The authors conclude that acute almitrine-raubasine treatment has beneficial effects on the brain immediately after a cerebral vascular accident, reflecting respect of the circulation-metabolism couple.

  14. Metabolic and circulatory evaluation of acute cerebral ischaemic accidents in man by positron emission tomography

    Depresseux, J.C.; Franck, G.; Van Cauwenberge, H.

    1987-01-01

    Positron emission tomography and oxygen-15 were used to evaluate the effects of an almitrine-raubasine combination on cerebral blood flow and oxydative metabolism in patients with acute cerebral ischaemia. In 5 patients, aged between 58 and 74 years, with cerebral ischaemic accident in the territory of the middle cerebral artery, blood flow rate, oxygen consumption and brain oxygen extraction were measured before and after a 90-min intravenous infusion of almitrine bismesilate 15 mg and raubasine 5 mg. Only one patient presented with initial relative luxury perfusion, the intensity of which was reduced by the combined treatment. The other 4 patients had focal reduction of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption prior to treatment. Satistical analysis conducted on three cerebral areas (epicentre of the lesion, anterior and posterior juxtalesional areas and homologous heterolateral areas) showed a significant 3.6% increase of oxygen consumption in the epicentre, both hemispheres included, and a significant increase of cerebral blood flow in all three areas (3% on the healthy side, 13% on the diseased side). No significant change in oxygen extraction was demonstrated. The authors conclude that acute almitrine-raubasine treatment has beneficial effects on the brain immediately after a cerebral vascular accident, reflecting respect of the circulation-metabolism couple [fr

  15. Cerebral microcirculation during experimental normovolaemic anaemia

    Judith eBellapart

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anaemia is accepted amongst critically ill patients as an alternative to elective blood transfusion. This practice has been extrapolated to head injury patients with only one study comparing the effects of mild anaemia on neurological outcome. There are no studies quantifying microcirculation during anaemia. Experimental studies suggest that anaemia leads to cerebral hypoxia and increased rates of infarction, but the lack of clinical equipoise when testing the cerebral effects of transfusion amongst critically injured patients, supports the need of experimental studies. The aim of this study was to quantify cerebral microcirculation and the potential presence of axonal damage in an experimental model exposed to normovolaemic anaemia, with the intention of describing possible limitations within management practices in critically ill patients. Under non-recovered anaesthesia, six Merino sheep were instrumented using an intracardiac transeptal catheter to inject coded microspheres into the left atrium to ensure systemic and non-chaotic distribution. Cytometric analyses quantified cerebral microcirculation at specific regions of the brain. Amyloid precursor protein staining was used as an indicator of axonal damage. Animals were exposed to normovolaemic anaemia by blood extractions from the indwelling arterial catheter with simultaneous fluid replacement through a venous central catheter. Simultaneous data recording from cerebral tissue oxygenation, intracranial pressure and cardiac output was monitored. A regression model was used to examine the effects of anaemia on microcirculation with a mixed model to control for repeated measures. Homogeneous and normal cerebral microcirculation with no evidence of axonal damage was present in all cerebral regions, with no temporal variability, concluding that acute normovolaemic anaemia does not result in short term effects on cerebral microcirculation in the ovine brain.

  16. Microembolism after cerebral angiography

    Manaka, Hiroshi; Sakai, Hideki; Nagata, Izumi

    2000-01-01

    Acute microemboli are detected more precisely with the recently developed diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI). We happened to obtain 24 DWIs after 350 diagnostic cerebral angiographies in 1999. DWIs after cerebral angiographies showed bright lesions in 7 patients (28%), of whom 6 had no neurological symptoms after cerebral angiography. Seven of the 24 patients had risk factors for arteriosclerosis. Only one patient had embolic events due to angiography. Microemboli related to cerebral angiographies are inevitable in some patients. Most are silent, however, we should investigate the cause of microemboli and should make cerebral angiography safer. (author)

  17. Animal models of cerebral ischemia

    Khodanovich, M. Yu.; Kisel, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral ischemia remains one of the most frequent causes of death and disability worldwide. Animal models are necessary to understand complex molecular mechanisms of brain damage as well as for the development of new therapies for stroke. This review considers a certain range of animal models of cerebral ischemia, including several types of focal and global ischemia. Since animal models vary in specificity for the human disease which they reproduce, the complexity of surgery, infarct size, reliability of reproduction for statistical analysis, and adequate models need to be chosen according to the aim of a study. The reproduction of a particular animal model needs to be evaluated using appropriate tools, including the behavioral assessment of injury and non-invasive and post-mortem control of brain damage. These problems also have been summarized in the review.

  18. Bilateral cerebral hemispheric infarction associated with sildenafil citrate (Viagra) use.

    Kim, K-K; Kim, D G; Ku, Y H; Lee, Y J; Kim, W-C; Kim, O J; Kim, H S

    2008-03-01

    Sildenafil citrate (Viagra) is one of the frequently prescribed drugs for men with erectile dysfunction. We describe a 52-year-old man with bilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory infarction after sildenafil use. He ingested 100 mg of sildenafil and about 1 h later, he complained of chest discomfort, palpitation and dizziness followed by mental obtundation, global aphasia and left hemiparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging documented acute bilateral hemispheric infarction, and cerebral angiography showed occluded bilateral MCA. Despite significant bilateral MCA stenosis and cerebral infarction, systemic hypotension persisted for a day. We presume that cerebral infarction was caused by cardioembolism with sildenafil use.

  19. Sympathetic influence on cerebral blood flow and metabolism during exercise in humans

    Seifert, Thomas; Secher, Niels H

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the possibility that autonomic activity influences cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism during exercise in humans. Apart from cerebral autoregulation, the arterial carbon dioxide tension, and neuronal activation, it may be that the autonomic nervous system influences CBF...... perfusion and reduces the near-infrared determined cerebral oxygenation at rest, but not during exercise associated with an increased cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO(2)), suggesting competition between CMRO(2) and sympathetic control of CBF. CMRO(2) does not change during even intense handgrip...

  20. Monitoring the oxygenation of the preterm brain : What is there to gain?

    Alderliesten, T.

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in perinatal care, preterm birth is still associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcome, often caused by cerebral injury. The most common forms of cerebral injury are all associated with disturbances in cerebral oxygen and blood supply. Traditionally, infant wellbeing is

  1. [Research on brain white matter network in cerebral palsy infant].

    Li, Jun; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Yuanjun; Nie, Shengdong

    2017-10-01

    Present study used diffusion tensor image and tractography to construct brain white matter networks of 15 cerebral palsy infants and 30 healthy infants that matched for age and gender. After white matter network analysis, we found that both cerebral palsy and healthy infants had a small-world topology in white matter network, but cerebral palsy infants exhibited abnormal topological organization: increased shortest path length but decreased normalize clustering coefficient, global efficiency and local efficiency. Furthermore, we also found that white matter network hub regions were located in the left cuneus, precuneus, and left posterior cingulate gyrus. However, some abnormal nodes existed in the frontal, temporal, occipital and parietal lobes of cerebral palsy infants. These results indicated that the white matter networks for cerebral palsy infants were disrupted, which was consistent with previous studies about the abnormal brain white matter areas. This work could help us further study the pathogenesis of cerebral palsy infants.

  2. Oxygen toxicity

    C. A. van der Westhuizen

    1990-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen has been discovered about 200 years ago. Since then the vital physiological involvement of oxygen in various biologi­cal processes, mainly energy production, has been established. However, in the body molecular oxygen can be converted to toxic oxygen metabolites such as superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, the hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen. These toxic metabolites are produced mainly in the mitochondria, plasma membranes and endoplasmic reticulum.

  3. Multi-modal assessment of neurovascular coupling during cerebral ischaemia and reperfusion using remote middle cerebral artery occlusion

    Sutherland, Brad A; Fordsmann, Jonas C; Martin, Chris

    2017-01-01

    . Male Wistar rats were subjected to remote middle cerebral artery occlusion, where a long filament was advanced intraluminally through a guide cannula in the common carotid artery. Transcallosal stimulation evoked increases in blood flow, tissue oxygenation and neuronal activity, which were diminished...... that neurovascular dysfunction was not sustained. These data show for the first time that the rat remote middle cerebral artery occlusion model coupled with transcallosal stimulation provides a novel method for continuous assessment of hyperacute neurovascular coupling changes during ischaemia and reperfusion......Hyperacute changes in cerebral blood flow during cerebral ischaemia and reperfusion are important determinants of injury. Cerebral blood flow is regulated by neurovascular coupling, and disruption of neurovascular coupling contributes to brain plasticity and repair problems. However, it is unknown...

  4. Quantification of extra-cerebral and cerebral hemoglobin concentrations during physical exercise using time-domain near infrared spectroscopy

    Auger, Héloïse; Bherer, Louis; Boucher, Étienne; Hoge, Richard; Lesage, Frédéric; Dehaes, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Fitness is known to have beneficial effects on brain anatomy and function. However, the understanding of mechanisms underlying immediate and long-term neurophysiological changes due to exercise is currently incomplete due to the lack of tools to investigate brain function during physical activity. In this study, we used time-domain near infrared spectroscopy (TD-NIRS) to quantify and discriminate extra-cerebral and cerebral hemoglobin concentrations and oxygen saturation (SO2) in young adults...

  5. Global Aphasia As A Predictor Of Mortality In The Acute Phase Of A First Stroke [afasia Global Prediz Mortalidade Na Fase Aguda De Um Primeiro Acidente Vascular Cerebral Isquêmico

    de Oliveira F.F.; Damasceno B.P.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish whether vascular aphasic syndromes can predict stroke outcomes. METHOD: Thirty-seven adults were evaluated for speech and language within 72 hours after a single first-ever ischemic brain lesion, in blind association to CT and/or MR. RESULTS: Speech or language disabilities were found in seven (87.5%) of the eight deceased patients and twenty-six (89.7%) of the twenty-nine survivors. Global aphasia was identified in eleven patients, all with left hemisphere lesions (ni...

  6. Hemodynamics in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia

    Yamaguchi, Shinya; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kimura, Jun

    1991-01-01

    We examined ten healthy volunteers using positron emission tomography (PET) in order to elucidate regional changes and correlations in the cerebral circulation and oxygen metabolism. We also studied eight lacunar stroke patients so as to disclose the influences of vascular risk factors and aging on the cerebral blood flow and metabolism. We can conclude from our result as follows: (1) Cerebral blood volume (CBV) was minimum in the basal ganglia and cerebral blood flow (CBF)/CBV ratio was higher than that of cerebral cortex in healthy volunteers; (2) CBF of gray matter in healthy volunteers correlated with CBV and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen where oxygen extraction fraction inversely correlated with CBF, CBV, and CBF/CBV; and (3) the basal ganglia CBF/CBV ratio in lacunar stroke patients was lower than that of healthy volunteers. These findings suggested that the perfusion pressure in the basal ganglia was so high in the normal condition than the angionecrosis or occlusion in the perforating arteries would be induced, especially in the aged and hypertensive patients. (author)

  7. A system for oxygen-15 labeled blood for medical applications

    Subramanyam, R.; Bucelewicz, W.M.; Hoop, B. Jr.; Jones, S.C.

    1977-01-01

    Oxygen-15 labeled compounds in blood have been used successfully for cerebral circulation and cerebral oxygen metabolism measurements. The present paper describes a system for the rapid sequential production of 15 O-HgB, C 15 O-Hgb and H 2 15 O in blood under sterile and pyrogen-free conditions. A tonometer has been adopted for labeling blood without hemolysis and foam production. (author)

  8. Sympathetic influence on cerebral blood flow and metabolism during exercise in humans

    Seifert, Thomas; Secher, Niels H

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the possibility that autonomic activity influences cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism during exercise in humans. Apart from cerebral autoregulation, the arterial carbon dioxide tension, and neuronal activation, it may be that the autonomic nervous system influences CBF...... perfusion and reduces the near-infrared determined cerebral oxygenation at rest, but not during exercise associated with an increased cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO(2)), suggesting competition between CMRO(2) and sympathetic control of CBF. CMRO(2) does not change during even intense handgrip......-oxidative carbohydrate uptake during exercise. Adrenaline appears to accelerate cerebral glycolysis through a beta2-adrenergic receptor mechanism since noradrenaline is without such an effect. In addition, the exercise-induced cerebral non-oxidative carbohydrate uptake is blocked by combined beta 1/2-adrenergic blockade...

  9. Distraction decreases prefrontal oxygenation: A NIRS study.

    Ozawa, Sachiyo; Hiraki, Kazuo

    2017-04-01

    When near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is used to measure emotion-related cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in the prefrontal cortex regions, the functional distinction of CBF changes is often difficult because NIRS is unable to measure neural activity in deeper brain regions that play major roles in emotional processing. The CBF changes could represent cognitive control of emotion and emotional responses to emotional materials. Supposing that emotion-related CBF changes in the prefrontal cortex regions during distraction are emotional responses, we examined whether oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb) decreases. Attention-demanding tasks cause blood flow decreases, and we thus compared the effects of visually paced tapping with different tempos, on distraction. The results showed that the oxyHb level induced by emotional stimulation decreased with fast-tempo tapping significantly more than slow-tempo tapping in ventral medial prefrontal cortex regions. Moreover, a Global-Local task following tapping showed significantly greater local-minus-global response time (RT) difference scores in the fast- and mid-tempo condition compared with those in the slow-tempo, suggesting an increased attentional focus, and decreased negative emotion. The overall findings indicate that oxyHb changes in a relatively long distraction task, as measured by NIRS, are associated with emotional responses, and oxyHb can be decreased by successfully performing attention-demanding distraction tasks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during sleep

    Madsen, Peter Lund; Vorstrup, S

    1991-01-01

    A review of the current literature regarding sleep-induced changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate (CMR) is presented. Early investigations have led to the notion that dreamless sleep was characterized by global values of CBF and CMR practically at the level of wakefulness......, while rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (dream sleep) was a state characterized by a dramatically increased level of CBF and possibly also of CMR. However, recent investigations firmly contradict this notion. Investigations on CBF and CMR performed during non-REM sleep, taking the effect of different...... current state identify the physiological processes involved in sleep or the physiological role of sleep....

  11. Oxygen Therapy

    ... their breathing to dangerously low levels. Will I need oxygen when I sleep? Usually if you use supplemental oxygen during the ... your health care provider tells you you only need to use oxygen for exercise or sleep. Even if you feel “fine” off of your ...

  12. Cerebral venous angioma

    Inagawa, Tetsuji; Taguchi, Haruyoshi; Kamiya, Kazuko; Yano, Takashi; Nakajima, Reiko

    1984-01-01

    This report presents a 27-year-old male patient who was diagnosed as having cerebral venous angioma in the postero-temporal area by CT scan and cerebral angiography. The patient improved by removing angioma with electrocoagulation of medullary veins. (Namekawa, K.)

  13. Effects of normobaric versus hyperbaric oxygen on cell injury induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation in acute brain slices

    Laurent Chazalviel; Jean-Eric Blatteau; Nicolas Vallée; Jean-Jacques Risso; Stéphane Besnard; Jacques H Abraini

    2016-01-01

    Normobaric oxygen (NBO) and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) are emerging as a possible co-treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Both have been shown to reduce infarct volume, to improve neurologic outcome, to promote endogenous tissue plasminogen activator-induced thrombolysis and cerebral blood flow, and to improve tissue oxygenation through oxygen diffusion in the ischemic areas, thereby questioning the interest of HBO compared to NBO. In the present study, in order to investigate and compare the oxy...

  14. Cerebral venous system and anatomical predisposition to high-altitude headache

    Wilson, Mark H.; Davagnanam, Indran; Holland, Graeme; Dattani, Raj S.; Tamm, Alexander; Hirani, Shashivadan P.; Kolfschoten, Nicky; Strycharczuk, Lisa; Green, Cathy; Thornton, John S.; Wright, Alex; Edsell, Mark; Kitchen, Neil D.; Sharp, David J.; Ham, Timothy E.; Murray, Andrew; Holloway, Cameron J.; Clarke, Kieran; Grocott, Mike P. W.; Montgomery, Hugh; Imray, Chris; Ahuja, V.; Aref-Adib, G.; Burnham, R.; Chisholm, A.; Clarke, K.; Coates, D.; Coates, M.; Cook, D.; Cox, M.; Dhillon, S.; Dougall, C.; Doyle, P.; Duncan, P.; Edsell, M.; Edwards, L.; Evans, L.; Gardiner, P.; Grocott, M.; Gunning, P.; Hart, N.; Harrington, J.; Harvey, J.; Holloway, C.; Howard, D.; Hurlbut, D.; Imray, C.; Ince, C.; Jonas, M.; van der Kaaij, J.

    2013-01-01

    As inspired oxygen availability falls with ascent to altitude, some individuals develop high-altitude headache (HAH). We postulated that HAH results when hypoxia-associated increases in cerebral blood flow occur in the context of restricted venous drainage, and is worsened when cerebral compliance

  15. Cerebral hemodynamics measured with simultaneous PET and near-infrared spectroscopy in humans

    Rostrup, Egill; Law, Ian; Pott, Frank

    2002-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) enables continuous non-invasive quantification of blood and tissue oxygenation, and may be useful for quantification of cerebral blood volume (CBV) changes. In this study, changes in cerebral oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin were compared to corresponding changes in CBF ...

  16. Severe cerebral desaturation during shoulder arthroscopy in the beach-chair position

    Dippmann, Christian; Winge, Søren; Nielsen, Henning Bay

    2010-01-01

    During shoulder arthroscopy in the beach-chair position, cerebral ischemia may be a serious complication because prolonged hypotension may affect regional cerebral oxygen supply. We present the cases of 2 patients in whom a reduction in mean arterial pressure after anesthesia provoked a decrease...

  17. Cerebral near infrared spectroscopy oximetry in extremely preterm infants : Phase II randomised clinical trial

    Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Pellicer, Adelina; Alderliesten, Thomas; Austin, Topun; Van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon; Claris, Olivier; Dempsey, Eugene; Franz, Axel R.; Fumagalli, Monica; Gluud, Christian; Grevstad, Berit; Hagmann, Cornelia; Lemmers, Petra; Van Oeveren, Wim; Pichler, Gerhard; Plomgaard, Anne Mette; Riera, Joan; Sanchez, Laura; Winkel, Per; Wolf, Martin; Greisen, Gorm

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine if it is possible to stabilise the cerebral oxygenation of extremely preterm infants monitored by cerebral near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) oximetry. Design: Phase II randomised, single blinded, parallel clinical trial. Setting Eight tertiary neonatal intensive care units in

  18. Oxygen Therapy

    Bonnie Solmes

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available LTOT is prescribed for people with chronic lung disease in whom there is a decrease in the ability of the lungs to supply enough oxygen to the body. The heart is obliged to pump faster to meet the body's oxygen requirements. This may place undue stress on the heart, resulting in palpitations, dizziness and fatigue. A low oxygen level in arterial blood is also harmful to the heart, the brain and the pulmonary blood vessels. Oxygen therapy is used to break this cycle. A person with low blood oxygen will often be able to accomplish more with less fatigue with the help of supplemental oxygen therapy. Shortness of breath is a mechanical problem resulting from the effects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Oxygen therapy may or may not reduce shortness of breath, but it will help the lungs and heart to function with less stress.

  19. Brain oxygen saturation assessment in neonates using T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation and near-infrared spectroscopy

    Alderliesten, Thomas; De Vis, Jill B; Lemmers, Petra Ma

    2017-01-01

    saturation in the sagittal sinus (R(2 )= 0.49, p = 0.023), but no significant correlations could be demonstrated with frontal and whole brain cerebral blood flow. These results suggest that measuring oxygen saturation by T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation is feasible, even in neonates. Strong...... sinus. A strong linear relation was found between the oxygen saturation measured by magnetic resonance imaging and the oxygen saturation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (R(2 )= 0.64, p ..., and magnetic resonance imaging measures of frontal cerebral blood flow, whole brain cerebral blood flow and venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus (R(2 )= 0.71, 0.50, 0.65; p 

  20. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during exercise: implications for fatigue.

    Secher, Neils H; Seifert, Thomas; Van Lieshout, Johannes J

    2008-01-01

    During exercise: the Kety-Schmidt-determined cerebral blood flow (CBF) does not change because the jugular vein is collapsed in the upright position. In contrast, when CBF is evaluated by (133)Xe clearance, by flow in the internal carotid artery, or by flow velocity in basal cerebral arteries, a approximately 25% increase is detected with a parallel increase in metabolism. During activation, an increase in cerebral O(2) supply is required because there is no capillary recruitment within the brain and increased metabolism becomes dependent on an enhanced gradient for oxygen diffusion. During maximal whole body exercise, however, cerebral oxygenation decreases because of eventual arterial desaturation and marked hyperventilation-related hypocapnia of consequence for CBF. Reduced cerebral oxygenation affects recruitment of motor units, and supplemental O(2) enhances cerebral oxygenation and work capacity without effects on muscle oxygenation. Also, the work of breathing and the increasing temperature of the brain during exercise are of importance for the development of so-called central fatigue. During prolonged exercise, the perceived exertion is related to accumulation of ammonia in the brain, and data support the theory that glycogen depletion in astrocytes limits the ability of the brain to accelerate its metabolism during activation. The release of interleukin-6 from the brain when exercise is prolonged may represent a signaling pathway in matching the metabolic response of the brain. Preliminary data suggest a coupling between the circulatory and metabolic perturbations in the brain during strenuous exercise and the ability of the brain to access slow-twitch muscle fiber populations.

  1. Unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy

    Hayakawa, Katsumi [Department of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital, 1-2 Higashi-Takada-cho, Mibu, Nakagyo-ku, 604-8845 Kyoto (Japan); Kanda, Toyoko; Yamori, Yuriko [Department of Pediatric Neurology, St. Joseph Hospital for Handicapped Children, 603-8323 Kyoto (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    We evaluated six children in whom MR imaging showed unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral atrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy. The aim of this study was to clarify whether this disorder based on neuroimaging constitutes a new homogeneous clinical entity. The subjects were six children whose ages at the time of MR imaging ranged from 8 months to 11 years. Their clinical and MR features were analyzed. All of the children were born between 38 and 42 weeks gestation, without any significant perinatal events. Spastic hemiplegia and epilepsy were observed in all of the patients, and mental retardation was observed in four. The MR findings included unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy in all patients. The ipsilateral sylvian fissure was hypoplastic in four patients. These patients showed relatively homogeneous clinical and neuroimaging features. Although the additional clinical features varied according to the site and the extent affected by the polymicrogyria, this disorder could constitute a new relatively homogeneous clinical entity. (orig.)

  2. Unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy

    Hayakawa, Katsumi; Kanda, Toyoko; Yamori, Yuriko

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated six children in whom MR imaging showed unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral atrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy. The aim of this study was to clarify whether this disorder based on neuroimaging constitutes a new homogeneous clinical entity. The subjects were six children whose ages at the time of MR imaging ranged from 8 months to 11 years. Their clinical and MR features were analyzed. All of the children were born between 38 and 42 weeks gestation, without any significant perinatal events. Spastic hemiplegia and epilepsy were observed in all of the patients, and mental retardation was observed in four. The MR findings included unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy in all patients. The ipsilateral sylvian fissure was hypoplastic in four patients. These patients showed relatively homogeneous clinical and neuroimaging features. Although the additional clinical features varied according to the site and the extent affected by the polymicrogyria, this disorder could constitute a new relatively homogeneous clinical entity. (orig.)

  3. Environmental science: Oceans lose oxygen

    Gilbert, Denis

    2017-02-01

    Oxygen is essential to most life in the ocean. An analysis shows that oxygen levels have declined by 2% in the global ocean over the past five decades, probably causing habitat loss for many fish and invertebrate species. See Letter p.335

  4. Dynamic change in cerebral microcirculation and focal cerebral metabolism in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rabbits.

    Song, Jin-Ning; Chen, Hu; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Yong-Lin; Ma, Xu-Dong

    2013-03-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the cerebral metabolism and energy metabolism measurements can be used to assess blood flow of brain cells and to detect cell activity. Changes of rCBF in the cerebral microcirculation and energy metabolism were determined in an experimental model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model in 56 large-eared Japanese rabbits about 12 to 16-month old. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to detect the blood supply to brain cells. Internal carotid artery and vein blood samples were used for duplicate blood gas analysis to assess the energy metabolism of brain cells. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was detected by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion imaging using Tc-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (Tc-99m ECD) as an imaging reagent. The percentage of injected dose per gram of brain tissue was calculated and analyzed. There were positive correlations between the percentage of radionuclide injected per gram of brain tissue and rCBF supply and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (P brain cells after SAH, and also found that deterioration of energy metabolism of brain cells played a significant role in the development of SAH. There are matched reductions in CBF and metabolism. Thus, SPECT imaging could be used as a noninvasive method to detect CBF.

  5. Glycopyrrolate prevents extreme bradycardia and cerebral deoxygenation during electroconvulsive therapy

    Rasmussen, Peter; Andersson, John-Erik; Koch, Palle

    2007-01-01

    The stimulation phase of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) induces bradycardia. We evaluated the effect of this bradycardia on cerebral perfusion and oxygenation by administration of the anticholinergic drug glycopyrrolate (Glp). Cerebral perfusion was estimated by transcranial ultrasound......) during the stimulation phase of ECT (P cerebral artery V(mean) decreased 43% (9%-71%; P ....8) to 0.0 (-4.2 to 0.8) microM (P stimulation phase of ECT, maintaining HR at 78 (40-94) beats min(-1), MCA V(mean) at 53 (37-77) cm s(-1), and O(2)Hb at 5.6 (10.6-38.5) microM (P cerebral perfusion...

  6. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    ... Going to an Occupational Therapist Scoliosis In the Band: Jens' Story Cerebral ... KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- ...

  7. Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations

    ... Contusions and Lacerations Concussion Diffuse Axonal Injury Intracranial Hematomas Skull Fracture Sports-Related Concussion Cerebral contusions are ... Contusions and Lacerations Concussion Diffuse Axonal Injury Intracranial Hematomas Skull Fracture Sports-Related Concussion NOTE: This is ...

  8. Cerebral venous angiomas

    Agnoli, A.L.; Hildebrandt, G.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical symptoms and radiological signs in 15 patients with cerebral venous malformations are presented and the diagnostic problems discussed. The circulation time in combination with cerebral malformations and angiomas of the scalp are described. CT findings in cases of venous malformations of the brain stem are evaluated. Spot-like enhancement, as well as sharply demarcated round shaped enhancement are characteristic for venous angiomas. Cavernous angiomas usually present as homogenous or inhomogenous round shaped enhanced areas. (Author)

  9. Cerebral cartography and connectomics

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamic...

  10. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. PMID:24204146

  11. Contribution of positron emission tomography to physiopathological study of cerebral ischemia in man

    Baron, J C; Bousser, M G; Comar, D; Rougemont, D; Lebrun-Grandie, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, 91 - Orsay (France); Castaigne, P [Hopital de la Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France)

    1983-12-29

    The development of positron emission tomography now allows the local study of cerebral blood flow, oxygen consumption and glucose utilization in ischemic stroke patients. In recent cerebral infarction, a disruption of the normal couple between flow and metabolism is almost constantly observed: in the first few days cerebral blood flow is either inadequate (persistant ischemia) or over-abundant (''luxury perfusion''), whereas a late ''luxury perfusion'' is almost constant within the necrotic area between the 10th and the 40th day. Threshold values for cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption that are ultimately associated with necrosis or tissue integrity have been determined. A metabolic depression without C.T. Scan counterpart has been observed in various brain structures remote from the infarcted area per se. Lastly, the hemodynamic and metabolic effects of superficial-temporal-middle-cerebral-artery anastomosis have been studied.

  12. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  13. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    Balakrishnan B

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bindu Balakrishnan,1 Elizabeth Nance,1 Michael V Johnston,2 Rangaramanujam Kannan,3 Sujatha Kannan1 1Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Department of Neurology and Pediatrics, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. Keywords: dendrimer, cerebral palsy, neuroinflammation, nanoparticle, neonatal brain injury, G4OH-PAMAM

  14. Diabetic patients have abnormal cerebral autoregulation during cardiopulmonary bypass

    Croughwell, N.; Lyth, M.; Quill, T.J.; Newman, M.; Greeley, W.J.; Smith, L.R.; Reves, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that insulin-dependent diabetic patients with coronary artery bypass graft surgery experience altered coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption. In a study of 23 patients (11 diabetics and 12 age-matched controls), cerebral blood flow was measured using 133Xe clearance during nonpulsatile, alpha-stat blood gas managed cardiopulmonary bypass at the conditions of hypothermia and normothermia. In diabetic patients, the cerebral blood flow at 26.6 +/- 2.42 degrees C was 25.3 +/- 14.34 ml/100 g/min and at 36.9 +/- 0.58 degrees C it was 27.3 +/- 7.40 ml/100 g/min (p = NS). The control patients increased cerebral blood flow from 20.7 +/- 6.78 ml/100 g/min at 28.4 +/- 2.81 degrees C to 37.6 +/- 8.81 ml/100 g/min at 36.5 +/- 0.45 degrees C (p less than or equal to 0.005). The oxygen consumption was calculated from jugular bulb effluent and increased from hypothermic values of 0.52 +/- 0.20 ml/100 g/min in diabetics to 1.26 +/- 0.28 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.001) at normothermia and rose from 0.60 +/- 0.27 to 1.49 +/- 0.35 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.0005) in the controls. Thus, despite temperature-mediated changes in oxygen consumption, diabetic patients did not increase cerebral blood flow as metabolism increased. Arteriovenous oxygen saturation gradients and oxygen extraction across the brain were calculated from arterial and jugular bulb blood samples. The increase in arteriovenous oxygen difference between temperature conditions in diabetic patients and controls was significantly different (p = 0.01). These data reveal that diabetic patients lose cerebral autoregulation during cardiopulmonary bypass and compensate for an imbalance in adequate oxygen delivery by increasing oxygen extraction

  15. Monitoring of cerebral haemodynamics in newborn infants

    Liem, K Djien; Greisen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    The most important cerebrovascular injuries in newborn infants, particularly in preterm infants, are cerebral haemorrhage and ischemic injury. The typical cerebral vascular anatomy and the disturbance of cerebral haemodynamics play important roles in the pathophysiology. The term 'cerebral haemod...

  16. Cerebral oxygen transport failure?: decreasing hemoglobin and hematocrit levels after ischemic stroke predict poor outcome and mortality: STroke: RelevAnt Impact of hemoGlobin, Hematocrit and Transfusion (STRAIGHT)--an observational study.

    Kellert, Lars; Martin, Evgenia; Sykora, Marek; Bauer, Harald; Gussmann, Philipp; Diedler, Jennifer; Herweh, Christian; Ringleb, Peter A; Hacke, Werner; Steiner, Thorsten; Bösel, Julian

    2011-10-01

    Although conceivably relevant for penumbra oxygenation, the optimal levels of hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct) in patients with acute ischemic stroke are unknown. We identified patients from our prospective local stroke database who received intravenous thrombolysis based on multimodal magnet resonance imaging during the years 1998 to 2009. A favorable outcome at 3 months was defined as a modified Rankin Scale score≤2 and a poor outcome as a modified Rankin Scale score≥3. The dynamics of Hemoglobin (Hb), Hematocrit (Hct), and other relevant laboratory parameters as well as cardiovascular risk factors were retrospectively assessed and analyzed between these 2 groups. Of 217 patients, 114 had a favorable and 103 a poor outcome. In a multivariable regression model, anemia until day 5 after admission (odds ratio [OR]=2.61; 95% CI, 1.33 to 5.11; P=0.005), Hb nadir (OR=0.81; 95% CI, 0.67 to 0.99; P=0.038), and Hct nadir (OR=0.93; 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.99; P=0.038) remained independent predictors for poor outcome at 3 months. Mortality after 3 months was independently associated with Hb nadir (OR=0.80; 95% CI, 0.65 to 0.98; P=0.028) and Hb decrease (OR=1.34; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.76; P=0.04) as well as Hct decrease (OR=1.12; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.23; P=0.027). Poor outcome and mortality after ischemic stroke are strongly associated with low and further decreasing Hb and Hct levels. This decrease of Hb and Hct levels after admission might be more relevant and accessible to treatment than are baseline levels.

  17. Effects of forskolin on cerebral blood flow: implications for a role of adenylate cyclase

    Wysham, D.G.; Brotherton, A.F.; Heistad, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    We have studied cerebral vascular effects of forskolin, a drug which stimulates adenylate cyclase and potentiates dilator effects of adenosine in other vascular beds. Our goals were to determine whether forskolin is a cerebral vasodilator and whether it potentiates cerebral vasodilator responses to adenosine. We measured cerebral blood flow with microspheres in anesthetized rabbits. Forskolin (10 micrograms/kg per min) increased blood flow (ml/min per 100 gm) from 39 +/- 5 (mean +/- S.E.) to 56 +/- 9 (p less than 0.05) in cerebrum, and increased flow to myocardium and kidney despite a decrease in mean arterial pressure. Forskolin did not alter cerebral oxygen consumption, which indicates that the increase in cerebral blood flow is a direct vasodilator effect and is not secondary to increased metabolism. We also examined effects of forskolin on the response to infusion of adenosine. Cerebral blood flow was measured during infusion of 1-5 microM/min adenosine into one internal carotid artery, under control conditions and during infusion of forskolin at 3 micrograms/kg per min i.v. Adenosine alone increased ipsilateral cerebral blood flow from 32 +/- 3 to 45 +/- 5 (p less than 0.05). Responses to adenosine were not augmented during infusion of forskolin. We conclude that forskolin is a direct cerebral vasodilator and forskolin does not potentiate cerebral vasodilator responses to adenosine

  18. Cerebral autoregulation and flow/metabolism coupling during cardiopulmonary bypass: the influence of PaCO/sub 2/

    Murkin, J.M.; Farrar, J.K.; Tweed, W.A.; McKenzie, F.N.; Guiraudon, G.

    1987-09-01

    Measurement of /sup 133/Xe clearance and effluent cerebral venous blood sampling were used in 38 patients to determine the effects of cardiopulmonary bypass, and of maintaining temperature corrected or noncorrected PaCO/sub 2/ at 40 mm Hg on regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and flow/metabolism coupling. After induction of anesthesia with diazepam and fentanyl, mean CBF was 25 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1 and cerebral oxygen consumption, 1.67 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1. Cerebral oxygen consumption during nonpulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass at 26 degrees C was reduced to 0.42 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1 in both groups. CBF was reduced to 14-15 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1 in the non-temperature-corrected group (n = 21), was independent of cerebral perfusion pressure over the range of 20-100 mm Hg, but correlated with cerebral oxygen consumption. In the temperature-corrected group (n = 17), CBF varied from 22 to 32 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1, and flow/metabolism coupling was not maintained (i.e., CBF and cerebral oxygen consumption varied independently). However, variation in CBF correlated significantly with cerebral perfusion pressure over the pressure range of 15-95 mm Hg. This study demonstrates a profound reduction in cerebral oxygen consumption during hypothermic nonpulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass. When a non-temperature-corrected PaCO/sub 2/ of approximately 40 mm Hg was maintained, CBF was lower, and analysis of pooled data suggested that CBF regulation was better preserved, i.e., CBF was independent of pressure changes and dependent upon cerebral oxygen consumption.

  19. Cerebral autoregulation and flow/metabolism coupling during cardiopulmonary bypass: the influence of PaCO2

    Murkin, J.M.; Farrar, J.K.; Tweed, W.A.; McKenzie, F.N.; Guiraudon, G.

    1987-01-01

    Measurement of 133 Xe clearance and effluent cerebral venous blood sampling were used in 38 patients to determine the effects of cardiopulmonary bypass, and of maintaining temperature corrected or noncorrected PaCO 2 at 40 mm Hg on regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and flow/metabolism coupling. After induction of anesthesia with diazepam and fentanyl, mean CBF was 25 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1 and cerebral oxygen consumption, 1.67 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1. Cerebral oxygen consumption during nonpulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass at 26 degrees C was reduced to 0.42 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1 in both groups. CBF was reduced to 14-15 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1 in the non-temperature-corrected group (n = 21), was independent of cerebral perfusion pressure over the range of 20-100 mm Hg, but correlated with cerebral oxygen consumption. In the temperature-corrected group (n = 17), CBF varied from 22 to 32 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1, and flow/metabolism coupling was not maintained (i.e., CBF and cerebral oxygen consumption varied independently). However, variation in CBF correlated significantly with cerebral perfusion pressure over the pressure range of 15-95 mm Hg. This study demonstrates a profound reduction in cerebral oxygen consumption during hypothermic nonpulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass. When a non-temperature-corrected PaCO 2 of approximately 40 mm Hg was maintained, CBF was lower, and analysis of pooled data suggested that CBF regulation was better preserved, i.e., CBF was independent of pressure changes and dependent upon cerebral oxygen consumption

  20. Neuroimaging of cerebral vasculitis

    Wengenroth, M.; Saam, T.; Haehnel, S.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vasculitis can have a variety of origins. Furthermore, there are no vasculitis-specific symptoms or imaging signs and vasculitis of the CNS can mimic many other neurological diseases, which require different treatment approaches. Thus, the clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis is challenging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR angiography (MRA) should be the radiological imaging methods of choice to assess the degree of parenchymal damage and to detect vessel wall changes. If the results are unclear digital subtraction angiography (DSA) should be pursued in order to also detect changes in medium sized vessels. Vasculitis of small vessels cannot be detected by vascular imaging and requires brain or leptomeningeal biopsy. In this review we present the current diagnostic approach and a variety of imaging findings in cerebral vasculitis and discuss the main radiological differential diagnoses. (orig.) [de

  1. Duplicated middle cerebral artery

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion. PMID:22140405

  2. Diaschisis with cerebral infarction

    Slater, R.; Reivich, M.; Goldberg, H.; Banka, R.; Greenberg, J.

    1977-01-01

    Fifteen patients admitted to Philadelphia General Hospital with acute strokes had repeated measurements of cerebral blood flow measured by the /sup 133/X inhalation method. A progressive decline in cerebral blood flow in both hemispheres was observed during the first week after infarction in twelve of these patients. This decline could be partially explained by loss of autoregulation, but could not be correlated with level of consciousness, clinical status of PCO2. This progressive decline in flow in the non-ischemic hemisphere indicates a process more complex than a simple destruction of axonal afferants to neurons as implied by the term diaschisis. The flow changes in the non-ischemic hemisphere are likely caused by a combination of the immediate effects of decreased neuronal stimulation modified by loss of autoregulation, release of vasoactive substances, cerebral edema, and other factors.

  3. Cerebral hemodynamics in migraine

    Hachinski, V C; Olesen, Jes; Norris, J W

    1977-01-01

    Clinical and angiographic findings in migraine are briefly reviewed in relation to cerebral hemodynamic changes shown by regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies. Three cases of migraine studied by the intracarotid xenon 133 method during attacks are reported. In classic migraine, with typical...... prodromal symptoms, a decrease in cerebral blood flow has been demonstrated during the aura. Occasionally, this flow decrease persists during the headache phase. In common migraine, where such prodromata are not seen, a flow decrease has not been demonstrated. During the headache phase of both types...... of migraine, rCBF has usually been found to be normal or in the high range of normal values. The high values may represent postischemic hyperemia, but are probably more frequently secondary to arousal caused by pain. Thus, during the headache phase rCBF may be subnormal, normal or high. These findings do...

  4. Cerebral fat embolism

    Sakamoto, Toshihisa; Sawada, Yusuke; Yukioka, Tetsuo; Nishide, Kazuyuki; Yoshioka, Toshiharu

    1982-01-01

    A case of cerebral fat embolism is reported. A 18-year-old patient with multiple bone fractures was in semiconma immediately after an injury. Brain CT showed no brain swelling or intracranial hematoma. Hypoxemia and alcoholemia were noted on admission, which returned to normal without improvement of consciousness level. In addition, respiratory symptoms with positive radiographic changes, tachycardia, pyrexia, sudden drop in hemoglobin level, and sudden thrombocytopenia developed. These symptoms were compatible with Gurd's criteria of systemic fat embolism. Eight days after injury, multiple low density areas appeared on CT and disappeared within the subsequent two weeks, and subdural effusion with cerebral atrophy developed. These CT findings were not considered due to cerebral trauma. Diagnosis of cerebral fat embolism was made. The subdural effusion was drained. Neurologic and pulmonary recoveries took place slowly and one month following the injury the patient became alert and exhibited fully coordinated limb movement. The CT scans of the present case well corresponded with hitherto reported pathological findings. Petechiae in the white matter must have developed on the day of injury, which could not be detected by CT examination. It is suggested that some petechial regions fused to purpuras and then gradually resolved when they were detected as multiple low density areas on CT. CT in the purpuras phase would have shown these lesions as high density areas. These lesions must have healed with formation of tiny scars and blood pigment which were demonstrated as the disappearance of multiple low density areas by CT examination. Cerebral atrophy and subsequent subdural effusion developed as a result of demyelination. The patient took the typical clinical course of cerebral fat embolism and serial CT scans served for its assessment. (author)

  5. Reduced cerebral oxygen–carbohydrate index during endotracheal intubation in vascular surgical patients

    Fabricius-Bjerre, Andreas; Overgaard, Anders; Winther-Olesen, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Brain activation reduces balance between cerebral consumption of oxygen versus carbohydrate as expressed by the so-called cerebral oxygen-carbohydrate-index (OCI). We evaluated whether preparation for surgery, anaesthesia including tracheal intubation and surgery affect OCI. In patients undergoing...... aortic surgery, arterial to internal jugular venous (a-v) concentration differences for oxygen versus lactate and glucose were determined from before anaesthesia to when the patient left the recovery room. Intravenous anaesthesia was supplemented with thoracic epidural anaesthesia for open aortic surgery...

  6. Gammagraphy of cerebral perfusion

    Vazquez, Silvia

    2003-01-01

    Important aspects of the gammagraphy of cerebral perfusion and the diverse clinical applications in the neurological diseases are comment in this article. We focus in the usefulness of the photon emission cerebral tomography (SPECT) and its capacity to cross the hemato encephalic barrier through the use of radiopharmacons like 99 mTc-H M-PAO and 99mTc-EDC, thus managing to offer functional data on the captantes neurons of the radiopharmacon. The clinical applications of SPECT are studied; cerebrovascular disease, transient ischemic attacks, dementias, Alzheimer disease, as well as other neurological diseases are referred. (The author)

  7. Experimental Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    Christensen, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Focal cerebral ischemia due to occlusion of a major cerebral artery is the cause of ischemic stroke which is a major reason of mortality, morbidity and disability in the populations of the developed countries. In the seven studies summarized in the thesis focal ischemia in rats induced by occlusion...... in the penumbra is recruited in the infarction process leading to a progressive growth of the infarct. The penumbra hence constitutes an important target for pharmacological treatment because of the existence of a therapeutic time window during which treatment with neuroprotective compounds may prevent...

  8. Influence of upper body position on middle cerebral artery blood velocity during continuous positive airway pressure breathing

    Højlund Rasmussen, J; Mantoni, T; Belhage, B

    2007-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a treatment modality for pulmonary oxygenation difficulties. CPAP impairs venous return to the heart and, in turn, affects cerebral blood flow (CBF) and augments cerebral blood volume (CBV). We considered that during CPAP, elevation of the upper body ...

  9. Cerebral (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and systemic acid-base balance during hypoxia in fetal sheep.

    Cappellen van Walsum, A.M. van; Rijpkema, M.J.P.; Heerschap, A.; Oeseburg, B.; Nijhuis, J.G.; Jongsma, H.W.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cerebral energy metabolism and acid-base homeostasis during impaired oxygen supply in fetal sheep. Systemic acid-base balance was correlated with the sequence in changes of cerebral phosphorus metabolite ratios and intracellular pH. Phosphorus magnetic

  10. Health-related physical fitness for children with cerebral palsy

    Maltais, Désirée B.; Wiart, Lesley; Fowler, Eileen; Verschuren, Olaf; Damiano, Diane L.

    2014-01-01

    Low levels of physical activity are a global health concern for all children. Children with cerebral palsy have even lower physical activity levels than their typically developing peers. Low levels of physical activity, and thus an increased risk for related chronic diseases, are associated with deficits in health-related physical fitness. Recent research has provided therapists with the resources to effectively perform physical fitness testing and physical activity training in clinical settings with children who have cerebral palsy, although most testing and training data to date pertains to those who walk. Nevertheless, based on the present evidence, all children with cerebral palsy should engage, to the extent they are able, in aerobic, anaerobic and muscle strengthening activities. Future research is required to determine the best ways to evaluate health-related physical fitness in non-ambulatory children with cerebral palsy and foster long-term changes in physical activity behavior in all children with this condition. PMID:24820339

  11. Cerebral desaturation during exercise reversed by O2 supplementation

    Nielsen, H B; Boushel, Robert Christopher; Madsen, P

    1999-01-01

    microM) and DeltaHbO2 (-12 +/- 3 microM) were similar to those established without O2 supplementation, work capacity increased from 389 +/- 11 to 413 +/- 10 W (P cerebral......The combined effects of hyperventilation and arterial desaturation on cerebral oxygenation (ScO2) were determined using near-infrared spectroscopy. Eleven competitive oarsmen were evaluated during a 6-min maximal ergometer row. The study was randomized in a double-blind fashion with an inspired O2...

  12. The role of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response following cerebral ischemia.

    Hadley, Gina; Neuhaus, Ain A; Couch, Yvonne; Beard, Daniel J; Adriaanse, Bryan A; Vekrellis, Kostas; DeLuca, Gabriele C; Papadakis, Michalis; Sutherland, Brad A; Buchan, Alastair M

    2018-06-01

    Background Cornu ammonis 3 (CA3) hippocampal neurons are resistant to global ischemia, whereas cornu ammonis (CA1) 1 neurons are vulnerable. Hamartin expression in CA3 neurons mediates this endogenous resistance via productive autophagy. Neurons lacking hamartin demonstrate exacerbated endoplasmic reticulum stress and increased cell death. We investigated endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in CA1 and CA3 regions following global cerebral ischemia, and whether pharmacological modulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress or autophagy altered neuronal viability . Methods In vivo: male Wistar rats underwent sham or 10 min of transient global cerebral ischemia. CA1 and CA3 areas were microdissected and endoplasmic reticulum stress protein expression quantified at 3 h and 12 h of reperfusion. In vitro: primary neuronal cultures (E18 Wistar rat embryos) were exposed to 2 h of oxygen and glucose deprivation or normoxia in the presence of an endoplasmic reticulum stress inducer (thapsigargin or tunicamycin), an endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor (salubrinal or 4-phenylbutyric acid), an autophagy inducer ([4'-(N-diethylamino) butyl]-2-chlorophenoxazine (10-NCP)) or autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine). Results In vivo, decreased endoplasmic reticulum stress protein expression (phospho-eIF2α and ATF4) was observed at 3 h of reperfusion in CA3 neurons following ischemia, and increased in CA1 neurons at 12 h of reperfusion. In vitro, endoplasmic reticulum stress inducers and high doses of the endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitors also increased cell death. Both induction and inhibition of autophagy also increased cell death. Conclusion Endoplasmic reticulum stress is associated with neuronal cell death following ischemia. Neither reduction of endoplasmic reticulum stress nor induction of autophagy demonstrated neuroprotection in vitro, highlighting their complex role in neuronal biology following ischemia.

  13. Cerebral atrophic and degenerative changes following various cerebral diseases, (1)

    Kino, Masao; Anno, Izumi; Yano, Yuhiko; Anno, Yasuro.

    1980-01-01

    Patients having cerebral atrophic and degenerative changes following hypoglycemia, cerebral contusion, or cerebral hypoxia including cerebrovascular disorders were reported. Description was made as to cerebral changes visualized on CT images and clinical courses of a patient who revived 10 minutes after heart stoppage during neurosurgery, a newborn with asphyxia, a patient with hypoglycemia, a patient who suffered from asphyxia by an accident 10 years before, a patient with carbon monoxide poisoning at an acute stage, a patient who had carbon monoxide poisoning 10 years before, a patient with diffuse cerebral ischemic changes, a patient with cerebral edema around metastatic tumor, a patient with respiration brain, a patient with neurological sequelae after cerebral contusion, a patient who had an operation to excise right parietal lobe artery malformation, and a patient who was shooted by a machine gun and had a lead in the brain for 34 years. (Tsunoda, M.)

  14. Effects of Steroid Hormones on Sex Differences in Cerebral Perfusion.

    Carmen Ghisleni

    Full Text Available Sex differences in the brain appear to play an important role in the prevalence and progression of various neuropsychiatric disorders, but to date little is known about the cerebral mechanisms underlying these differences. One widely reported finding is that women demonstrate higher cerebral perfusion than men, but the underlying cause of this difference in perfusion is not known. This study investigated the putative role of steroid hormones such as oestradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS as underlying factors influencing cerebral perfusion. We acquired arterial spin labelling perfusion images of 36 healthy adult subjects (16 men, 20 women. Analyses on average whole brain perfusion levels included a multiple regression analysis to test for the relative impact of each hormone on the global perfusion. Additionally, voxel-based analyses were performed to investigate the sex difference in regional perfusion as well as the correlations between local perfusion and serum oestradiol, testosterone, and DHEAS concentrations. Our results replicated the known sex difference in perfusion, with women showing significantly higher global and regional perfusion. For the global perfusion, DHEAS was the only significant predictor amongst the steroid hormones, showing a strong negative correlation with cerebral perfusion. The voxel-based analyses revealed modest sex-dependent correlations between local perfusion and testosterone, in addition to a strong modulatory effect of DHEAS in cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. We conclude that DHEAS in particular may play an important role as an underlying factor driving the difference in cerebral perfusion between men and women.

  15. Cerebral effects of commonly used vasopressor-inotropes: a study in newborn piglets.

    Gitte H Hahn

    Full Text Available Despite widespread use in sick infants, it is still debated whether vasopressor-inotropes have direct cerebral effects that might affect neurological outcome. We aimed to test direct cerebrovascular effects of three commonly used vasopressor-inotropes (adrenaline, dopamine and noradrenaline by comparing the responses to those of nonpharmacologically induced increases in blood pressure. We also searched for reasons for a mismatch between the response in perfusion and oxygenation.Twenty-four piglets had long and short infusions of the three vasopressor-inotropes titrated to raise mean arterial blood pressure (MAP 10 mmHg in random order. Nonpharmacological increases in MAP were induced by inflation of a balloon in the descending aorta. We measured cerebral oxygenation (near-infrared spectroscopy, perfusion (laser-Doppler, oxygen consumption (co-oximetry of arterial and superior sagittal sinus blood, and microvascular heterogeneity (side stream dark field video microscopy.Vasopressor-inotropes increased cerebral oxygenation significantly less (p≤0.01 compared to non-pharmacological MAP increases, whereas perfusion was similar. Furthermore, cerebral total hemoglobin concentration increased significantly less during vasopressor-inotrope infusions (p = 0.001. These physiologic responses were identical between the three vasopressor-inotropes (p>0.05. Furthermore, they induced a mild, although insignificant increase in cerebral metabolism and microvascular heterogeneity (p>0.05. Removal of the scalp tissue did not influence the mismatch (p>0.05.We demonstrated a moderate vasopressor-inotrope induced mismatch between cerebral perfusion and oxygenation. Scalp removal did not affect this mismatch, why vasopressor-inotropes appear to have direct cerebral actions. The statistically nonsignificant increases in cerebral metabolism and/or microvascular heterogeneity may explain the mismatch. Alternatively, it may simply reflect a vasopressor

  16. Utility of the cerebral SPECT in schizophrenia

    Heuguerot, C.H.; Lopez-Lerena, J.J.; Quagliata, A.; Hermida, J.C.; Oliveira, M.C.; Anastasia, H.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare cortical and subcortical cerebral perfusion in schizophrenics patients with normal controls, and analyze the relation to clinical patterns and neuroleptic treatment. Method: 18 patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia under neuroleptic treatment (except 3 cases), evaluated with clinical scales (BPRS and PANSS). The control group included 5 subjects in good health. All subjects were studied with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using technetium-99 etilencisteinato (99mTc-ECD) as a tracer. Region of interest (ROI) were defined in cerebral cortex and thalamus-basal ganglia areas. The cortical cerebral blood flow was measured with a quantitative analysis, expressed as a ratio of regional tracer uptake to occipital cortex uptake. In basal ganglia and thalamus, regional blood flow was evaluated with a semiquantitative methodology, defining categories. Results: Schizophrenics patients showed a significant reduction of perfusion on a left anterior frontal cortex ('hipofrontality') and global decrease of perfusion on left hemisphere. The interhemispheric (left/right) ratio of perfusion was incremented respect control group. In thalamic-basal ganglia complex, a significant hypoperfusion was found in neuroleptic-free patients and control group. On the other hand, neuroleptic-treated patients revealed normal or increased regional blood flow in thalamus and basal ganglia. Only the clinical item 'thought disorder' had significant high correlation with perfusion on left structures (left anterior frontal, left lateral frontal, left temporo-parietal); the other items correlated with right structures. Conclusions: The findings suggest a pattern o left cerebral hypoperfusion in patients with an incremented interhemispheric ratio of cerebral blood flow. The pivotal role of thalamic and basal ganglia areas in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and neuroleptic action was reaffirmed; apparently, perfusion in thalamic-basal ganglia

  17. Cerebral malaria: susceptibility weighted MRI

    Vinit Baliyan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria is one of the fatal complications of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Pathogenesis involves cerebral microangiopathy related to microvascular plugging by infected red blood cells. Conventional imaging with MRI and CT do not reveal anything specific in case of cerebral malaria. Susceptibility weighted imaging, a recent advance in the MRI, is very sensitive to microbleeds related to microangiopathy. Histopathological studies in cerebral malaria have revealed microbleeds in brain parenchyma secondary to microangiopathy. Susceptibility weighted imaging, being exquisitely sensitive to microbleeds may provide additional information and improve the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in cerebral malaria.

  18. High Altitude Cerebral Edema

    1986-03-01

    described neuropathological findings of cerebral edema and wi4espread petechial hemorrhages in two HAPE fatalities and later reported (52...lethargy, thirst, indigestion, hysterical outburst o: other behavior disturbances, decreased concentration, fever , couhh and peripheral edema (52...autopsy results from the two fatalities in their series. In both cases multiple, widespread petechial hemorrhages were noted throughout the brain. One

  19. What makes children with cerebral palsy vulnerable to malnutrition? Findings from the Bangladesh cerebral palsy register (BCPR).

    Jahan, Israt; Muhit, Mohammad; Karim, Tasneem; Smithers-Sheedy, Hayley; Novak, Iona; Jones, Cheryl; Badawi, Nadia; Khandaker, Gulam

    2018-04-16

    vulnerable groups should be focused in designing nutrition intervention and rehabilitation programs. Disability inclusive and focused nutrition intervention programme need to be kept as priority in national nutrition policies and nutrition action plans specially in low- and middle-income countries. Community-based management of malnutrition has the potential to overcome this poor nutritional scenario of children with disability (i.e., cerebral palsy). The global leaders such as World Health Organization, national and international organizations should take this in account and conduct further research to develop nutritional guidelines for this vulnerable group of population.

  20. Non-invasive diagnosis in cerebral ischemia by means of magnetic resonance imaging and near-infrared spectroscopy

    Piepgras, A.; Gueckel, F.; Laemmler, B.; Weigel, R.; Schmiedek, P.

    1994-01-01

    We describe the non-invasive assessment of cerebrovascular reserve capacity by means of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and magnetic resonance imaging. Both methods are compared with transcranial Doppler sonography. There is a good correlation of the three methods in the changes in cerebral oxygen saturation and in blood velocity following acetazolamide stimulation of cerebral blood flow, except found in one patient with unilateral carotid artery occlusion. In this patient we found a decreased cerebrovascular reserve capacity, revealed by a magnetic resonance technique designed to quantify CBV and CBF. We postulate a raised oxygen extraction as raised oxygen extraction as the cause of his changes in oxygen saturation. (orig.) [de

  1. Recurrent cerebral thrombosis

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Abe, Shin-e; Kubo, Hideki; Hanyu, Haruo; Takasaki, Masaru

    1992-01-01

    Neuroradiological techniques were used to elucidate pathophysiology of recurrent cerebral thrombosis. Twenty-two patients with cerebral thrombosis who suffered a second attack under stable conditions more than 22 days after the initial stroke were studied. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia were also seen in 20, 8, and 12 patients, respectively. The patients were divided into three groups according to their symptoms: (I) symptoms differed between the first and second strokes (n=12); (II) initial symptoms were suddenly deteriorated (n=6); and (III) symptoms occurring in groups I and II were seen (n=4). In group I, contralateral hemiparesis or suprabulbar palsy was often associated with the initial hemiparesis. The time of recurrent stroke varied from 4 months to 9 years. CT and MRI showed not only lacunae in both hemispheres, but also deep white-matter ischemia of the centrum semi-ovale. In group II, hemiparesis or visual field defect was deteriorated early after the initial stroke. In addition, neuroimaging revealed that infarction in the posterior cerebral artery was progressed on the contralateral side, or that white matter lesion in the middle artery was enlarged in spite of small lesion in the left cerebral hemisphere. All patients in group III had deterioration of right hemiparesis associated with aphasia. CT, MRI, SPECT, and angiography indicated deep white-matter ischemia caused by main trunk lesions in the left hemisphere. Group III seemed to be equivalent to group II, except for laterality of the lesion. Neuroradiological assessment of the initial stroke may help to predict the mode of recurrence, although pathophysiology of cerebral thrombosis is complicated and varies from patient to patient. (N.K.)

  2. The Coupling of Cerebral Metabolic Rate of Glucose and Cerebral Blood Flow In Vivo

    Hasselbalch, Steen; Paulson, Olaf Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    The energy supplied to the brain by metabolic substrate is largely utilized for maintaining synaptic transmission. In this regulation cerebral blood flow and glucose consumption is tightly coupled as well in the resting condition as during activation. Quantification of cerebral blood flow...... not used for aerobic metabolism. Although some of the excess glucose uptake can be explained by lactate production, this phenomenon can still not account for the excess glucose uptake. Thus, more complex metabolic patterns in the brain might be reflected in the excess glucose uptake during activation......, and especially temporal relationships must be taken into account. What triggers the flow increase during functional brain activation is not entirely elucidated. The demand for excess glucose uptake may be important and a possible oxygen deficit in tissue distant from the capillaries is probably of minor...

  3. Oxygen safety

    ... sure you have working smoke detectors and a working fire extinguisher in your home. If you move around the house with your oxygen, you may need more than one fire extinguisher in different locations. Smoking can be very dangerous. No one should smoke ...

  4. Oxygen therapy - infants

    ... breathe increased amounts of oxygen to get normal levels of oxygen in their blood. Oxygen therapy provides babies with the extra oxygen. Information Oxygen is a gas that the cells in your body need to work properly. The ...

  5. Global low perfusion and latent ischemic lesions desclosed by PET and MRI in polycythermia hypertonica

    Harada, Kiyoshi; Kameyama, Masakuni; Akiguchi, Ichiro; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Nabatame, Hidehiko

    1987-01-01

    Polycythemia hypertonica was first reported by Geisboeck in 1905 (Geisboeck's syndrome), which has been well known to accompany a high risk for cerebrovascular disorders, and relatively poor prognosis. We performed PET and MRI study on two patients with Geisboeck's syndrome. In both cases, PET study revealed that there were no focal abnormalities in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2), but global CBF and CMRO2 decreased to low levels. On MRI study, we also found multiple small ischemic lesions in the deep structures in the cerebral hemisphere as well as brain stem, which were considered to be coincided with the perfusion territories of perforating arteries. Many of the lesions revealed by MRI were not apparent on X-ray CT scan, and were asymptomatic clinically. We consider that global low perfusion and many small latent ischemic lesions are characteristic for Geisboeck's syndrome. Therefore, it is necessary to control high hematocrit values and hypertension from an early stage of the patients with Geisboeck's syndrome. (author)

  6. Global low perfusion and latent ischemic lesions desclosed by PET and MRI in polycythemia hypertonica

    Harada, K.; Kameyama, M.; Akiguchi, I.; Fukuyama, H.; Nabatame, H.

    1987-04-01

    Polycythemia hypertonica, first reported by Geisboeck in 1905 (Geisboeck's syndrome), has been known for an accompanying high risk of cerebrovascular disorders and relatively poor prognosis. We performed PET and MRI study on two patients with Geisboeck's syndrome. In both cases, PET study revealed that there were no focal abnormalities in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO/sub 2/), but global CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ decreased to low levels. On MRI study, we also found multiple small ischemic lesions in the deep structures in the cerebral hemisphere as well as brain stem, which were considered to be coincided with the perfusion territories of perforating arteries. Many of the lesions revealed by MRI were not apparent on X-ray CT scan, and were asymptomatic clinically. We consider that global low perfusion and many small latent ischemic lesions are characteristic of Geisboeck's syndrome. Therefore, it is necessary to control high hematocrit values and hypertension from an early stage of the patients with Geisboeck's syndrome.

  7. Evolution of cerebral blood flow between the acute stage and one month after a global transient amnesia: a study of 18 patients; Evolution des debits sanguins cerebraux entre la phase aigue et un mois apres un ictus amnesique: etude chez 18 patients

    Philippon, B.; Houzard, C.; Cinotti, L. [Hopital Neuro Cardiologique, Centre de Medecine Nucleaire, 69 - Lyon (France); Croisile, B. [Hopital Neuro Cardiologique, Lab. de Neuropsychologie, Fonctions Cognitives, Langage et Memoire, 69 - Lyon (France)

    2001-03-01

    We studied 18 patients within 24 hours of an idiopathic transient global amnesia and one month later using {sup 133}Xe et {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO for CBF measurements. Absolute hemispheric CBF obtained with the {sup 133}Xe were initially: (right) = 46.9 ml/mn/100 g (s.d 6.6) and (left) = 47.9 (s.d 6.8). One month later, a significant increase of the right hemispheric CBF occurred (52.0 {+-} 6.9). Accordingly, absolute CBF increased bilaterally in the cerebellar and temporal regions. Local relative cerebral blood flow ( {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO) allowed to reinforce these findings with increased resolution. They can also provide quantitative values thanks to the{sup 133}Xe calibration. (authors)

  8. Optimal oxygen saturation in premature infants

    Meayoung Chang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a delicate balance between too little and too much supplemental oxygen exposure in premature infants. Since underuse and overuse of supplemental oxygen can harm premature infants, oxygen saturation levels must be monitored and kept at less than 95% to prevent reactive oxygen species-related diseases, such as retinopathy of prematurity and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. At the same time, desaturation below 80 to 85% must be avoided to prevent adverse consequences, such as cerebral palsy. It is still unclear what range of oxygen saturation is appropriate for premature infants; however, until the results of further studies are available, a reasonable target for pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2 is 90 to 93% with an intermittent review of the correlation between SpO2 and the partial pressure of arterial oxygen tension (PaO2. Because optimal oxygenation depends on individuals at the bedside making ongoing adjustments, each unit must define an optimal target range and set alarm limits according to their own equipment or conditions. All staff must be aware of these values and adjust the concentration of supplemental oxygen frequently.

  9. Role of cerebral blood flow in extreme breath holding.

    Bain, Anthony R; Ainslie, Philip N; Hoiland, Ryan L; Willie, Chris K; MacLeod, David B; Madden, Dennis; Maslov, Petra Zubin; Drviš, Ivan; Dujić, Željko

    2016-01-01

    The role of cerebral blood flow (CBF) on a maximal breath-hold (BH) in ultra-elite divers was examined. Divers (n = 7) performed one control BH, and one BH following oral administration of the non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (1.2 mg/kg). Arterial blood gases and CBF were measured prior to (baseline), and at BH termination. Compared to control, indomethacin reduced baseline CBF and cerebral delivery of oxygen (CDO 2 ) by about 26% (p tension was higher following oral administration of indomethacin compared to control (4.05 ± 0.45 vs. 3.44 ± 0.32 kPa). The absolute increase in CBF from baseline to the termination of apnea was lower with indomethacin (p = 0.01). These findings indicate that the impact of CBF on maximal BH time is likely attributable to its influence on cerebral H + washout, and therefore central chemoreceptive drive to breathe, rather than to CDO 2 .

  10. Positron emission tomographic measurement of acute hemodynamic changes in primate middle cerebral artery occlusion

    Tenjin, Hiroshi; Ueda, Satoshi; Mizukawa, Norihiko [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan); and others

    1992-10-01

    Specific hemodynamic changes in acute ischemia were investigated using a middle cerebral artery occlusion primate model and positron emission tomography. The cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen were measured 1, 3, and 9 hours after occlusion. OEF showed an increase in ischemic areas, and especially where CBF was below 18 ml/100 gm/min 1 hour after occlusion the OEF increased significantly (0.69[+-]0.20, p<0.05). Nine hours after occlusion, the OEF values were lower compared to those 1 and 3 hours after occlusion. Areas where CBF ranged from 18 to 31 ml/100 gm/min showed an increase in OEF at all times (p<0.05). Clearly, OEF changes remarkably in the acute stage. (author).

  11. Cerebral O2 metabolism and cerebral blood flow in humans during deep and rapid-eye-movement sleep

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Wildschiødtz, Gordon

    1991-01-01

    on examination of this question. We have now measured CBF and CMRO2 in young healthy volunteers using the Kety-Schmidt technique with 133Xe as the inert gas. Measurements were performed during wakefulness, deep sleep (stage 3/4), and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep as verified by standard polysomnography...... associated with light anesthesia. During REM sleep (dream sleep) CMRO2 was practically the same as in the awake state. Changes in CBF paralleled changes in CMRO2 during both deep and REM sleep.......It could be expected that the various stages of sleep were reflected in variation of the overall level of cerebral activity and thereby in the magnitude of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) and cerebral blood flow (CBF). The elusive nature of sleep imposes major methodological restrictions...

  12. Pressure modulation algorithm to separate cerebral hemodynamic signals from extracerebral artifacts.

    Baker, Wesley B; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B; Ko, Tiffany S; Busch, David R; Abramson, Kenneth; Tzeng, Shih-Yu; Mesquita, Rickson C; Durduran, Turgut; Greenberg, Joel H; Kung, David K; Yodh, Arjun G

    2015-07-01

    We introduce and validate a pressure measurement paradigm that reduces extracerebral contamination from superficial tissues in optical monitoring of cerebral blood flow with diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS). The scheme determines subject-specific contributions of extracerebral and cerebral tissues to the DCS signal by utilizing probe pressure modulation to induce variations in extracerebral blood flow. For analysis, the head is modeled as a two-layer medium and is probed with long and short source-detector separations. Then a combination of pressure modulation and a modified Beer-Lambert law for flow enables experimenters to linearly relate differential DCS signals to cerebral and extracerebral blood flow variation without a priori anatomical information. We demonstrate the algorithm's ability to isolate cerebral blood flow during a finger-tapping task and during graded scalp ischemia in healthy adults. Finally, we adapt the pressure modulation algorithm to ameliorate extracerebral contamination in monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation and blood volume by near-infrared spectroscopy.

  13. Cerebral localization in antiquity.

    Rose, F Clifford

    2009-07-01

    Fragments of neurology can be found in the oldest medical writings in antiquity. Recognizable cerebral localization is seen in Egyptian medical papyri. Most notably, the Edwin Smith papyrus describes hemiplegia after a head injury. Similar echoes can be seen in Homer, the Bible, and the pre-Hippocratic writer Alcmaeon of Croton. While Biblical writers thought that the heart was the seat of the soul, Hippocratic writers located it in the head. Alexandrian anatomists described the nerves, and Galen developed the ventricular theory of cognition whereby mental functions are classified and localized in one of the cerebral ventricles. Medieval scholars, including the early Church Fathers, modified Galenic ventricular theory so as to make it a dynamic model of cognition. Physicians in antiquity subdivided the brain into separate areas and attributed to them different functions, a phenomenon that connects them with modern neurologists.

  14. Cerebral venous thrombosis

    Soralova, T.; Sevcikova, H.; Petersky, D.

    2014-01-01

    We decided to process this theme due to its nonspecific clinical features as they often cause diagnostic problems not only to clinicians but also to diagnostic. It is important to think of this disease mainly in young women who administer hormonal contraception. Imaging methods play the crucial role in diagnostic of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The gold standard is a native CT of brain which shows the venous sinus thrombosis as a hyperdense lesion in the locus of the sinus (dense triangle sign), CT venography shows the sinus thrombosis as a defect in a contrast filling of the venous sinus (empty delta sign). Other investigative methods are magnetic resonance imaging or MRA. In short we also mention quite a rare but more serious thrombosis of profound cerebral veins v. cerebri magna-Galeni, vv. cerebri internae). The importance of early diagnostic and non specificity of symptoms is presented in 3 clinical cases that are the part of this work. (author)

  15. Applications of cerebral SPECT

    McArthur, C., E-mail: claire.mcarthur@nhs.net [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Jampana, R.; Patterson, J.; Hadley, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can provide three-dimensional functional images of the brain following the injection of one of a series of radiopharmaceuticals that crosses the blood-brain barrier and distributes according to cerebral perfusion, neurotransmitter, or cell density. Applications include differentiating between the dementias, evaluating cerebrovascular disease, preoperative localization of epileptogenic foci, diagnosing movement disorders, and evaluation of intracerebral tumours, while also proving a useful research tool. Unlike positronemission tomography (PET), SPECT imaging is widely available and can be performed in any department that has access to a rotating gamma camera. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the utility of cerebral SPECT and increase awareness of its role in the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  16. Cerebral ketone body metabolism.

    Morris, A A M

    2005-01-01

    Ketone bodies (KBs) are an important source of energy for the brain. During the neonatal period, they are also precursors for the synthesis of lipids (especially cholesterol) and amino acids. The rate of cerebral KB metabolism depends primarily on the concentration in blood; high concentrations occur during fasting and on a high-fat diet. Cerebral KB metabolism is also regulated by the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which depends on the abundance of monocarboxylic acid transporters (MCT1). The BBB's permeability to KBs increases with fasting in humans. In rats, permeability increases during the suckling period, but human neonates have not been studied. Monocarboxylic acid transporters are also present in the plasma membranes of neurons and glia but their role in regulating KB metabolism is uncertain. Finally, the rate of cerebral KB metabolism depends on the activities of the relevant enzymes in brain. The activities vary with age in rats, but reliable results are not available for humans. Cerebral KB metabolism in humans differs from that in the rat in several respects. During fasting, for example, KBs supply more of the brain's energy in humans than in the rat. Conversely, KBs are probably used more extensively in the brain of suckling rats than in human neonates. These differences complicate the interpretation of rodent studies. Most patients with inborn errors of ketogenesis develop normally, suggesting that the only essential role for KBs is as an alternative fuel during illness or prolonged fasting. On the other hand, in HMG-CoA lyase deficiency, imaging generally shows asymptomatic white-matter abnormalities. The ability of KBs to act as an alternative fuel explains the effectiveness of the ketogenic diet in GLUT1 deficiency, but its effectiveness in epilepsy remains unexplained.

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals for cerebral studies

    Leon Cabana, Alba

    1994-01-01

    For obtain good brain scintillation images in nuclear medicine must be used several radiopharmaceuticals. Cerebral studies give a tumors visual image as well as brain anomalities detection and are helpful in the diagnostic diseases . Are described in this work: a cerebrum radiopharmaceuticals classification,labelled compounds proceeding and Tc 99m good properties in for your fast caption, post administration and blood purification for renal way

  18. Ameliorating effects of traditional Chinese medicine preparation, Chinese materia medica and active compounds on ischemia/reperfusion-induced cerebral microcirculatory disturbances and neuron damage

    Sun, Kai; Fan, Jingyu; Han, Jingyan

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic stroke and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury induced by thrombolytic therapy are conditions with high mortality and serious long-term physical and cognitive disabilities. They have a major impact on global public health. These disorders are associated with multiple insults to the cerebral microcirculation, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, leukocyte adhesion and infiltration, brain blood barrier (BBB) disruption, and capillary hypoperfusion, ultimately resulting in tissue edema, hemorrhage, brain injury and delayed neuron damage. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used in China, Korea, Japan and other Asian countries for treatment of a wide range of diseases. In China, the usage of compound TCM preparation to treat cerebrovascular diseases dates back to the Han Dynasty. Even thousands of years earlier, the medical formulary recorded many classical prescriptions for treating cerebral I/R-related diseases. This review summarizes current information and underlying mechanisms regarding the ameliorating effects of compound TCM preparation, Chinese materia medica, and active components on I/R-induced cerebral microcirculatory disturbances, brain injury and neuron damage. PMID:26579420

  19. Neonatal cerebral infarction

    Fujimoto, Shinji; Togari, Hajime; Sobajima, Hisanori; Suzuki, Shigesumi; Wada, Yoshiro; Yokochi, Kenji; Nishimura, Yutaka; Inukai, Kazuhisa; Futamura, Masahide.

    1992-01-01

    In a retrospective multi-center study, we investigated eighteen infants with unilateral cerebral infarctions confirmed by computed tomography (CT) scans. The initial symptoms were observed in all the patients between 0 and 3 days of age. Convulsions or apneic attacks were the initial symptoms in all but one. Only 4 patients had complicated obstetric histories and none showed polycythemia or electrolyte abnormalities. All of the initial CT scans revealed unilaterally localized hypodense areas. In 10, the initial CT scans were performed within 24 hours after the clinical onset. In 16, the lesions were within the territory of the middle cerebral artery, 9 of which also involved the cortico-spinal tract (CST). In the remaining 2 patients, the lesions were located whithin the territory of the posterior cerebral artery. None of the 9 patients without CST involvement developed hemiplegia, whereas 5 (56%) of the 9 with CST involvement had hemiplegia, which is a fairly low incidence compared with that in adult cases. This difference was thought to be related to neonatal brain plasticity. (author)

  20. Diffusion-weighted MRI in acute cerebral stroke

    Takayama, Hideichi; Kobayashi, Masahito; Suga, Sadao; Kawase, Takeshi; Nagasawa, Masakazu; Sadanaga, Humiko; Okamura, Miyuki; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Mihara, Ban [Mihara Memorial Hospital, Isezaki, Gunma (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRI has been demonstrated to be valuable in the assessment of cerebral stroke. Recent advance in MR systems of hardware with larger maximum gradient amplitude and faster imaging strategies, such as EPI, has made it possible to acquire whole brain diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in less that one minute. The purposes of this study are to evaluate clinical usefulness of DWI and to clarify pitfalls in the diagnosis of acute cerebral stroke. Seventeen patients with 18 ischemic lesions were studied. DWI were taken with 1.5 Tesla MRI (Magnetom Vision, Siemens, Germany) using EPI sequence. Fifteen lesions out of them (3 in cerebral cortex, 9 in basal ganglia/deep white matter and 3 in cerebellum) were studied serially at various times up to 147 days. Acute cerebral infarction was seen clearly as an area of hyperintensity with DWI and as hypointensity in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps which are indicative of decreased diffusion. DWI detected areas of hyperintense acute infarcts, as early as 2.5 hours after onset, which were not visualized on T{sub 2}-weighted image (T2WI). The lesion of cerebral infarction became isointense in ADC maps at 14-28 days after onset, whereas with DWI it became isointense at about 2 months. Because ADC changed earlier than DWI, ADC maps were useful for differentiate acute from nonacute lesion in cases of recurrent stroke within a short period. In a patient with transient global amnesia for 7 hours, DWI did not show any lesion at 8 hours. In terms of cerebral hemorrhage, lesions were seen as area of hyperintensity in DWI at 3 days and were not distinguishable from that of infarct. Despite limitations in the diagnosis of transient ischemia and cerebral hemorrhage, DWI is a useful technique for early detection of cerebral infarction, especially within the first 6 hours after stroke onset. (author)

  1. Diffusion-weighted MRI in acute cerebral stroke

    Takayama, Hideichi; Kobayashi, Masahito; Suga, Sadao; Kawase, Takeshi; Nagasawa, Masakazu; Sadanaga, Humiko; Okamura, Miyuki; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Mihara, Ban

    1999-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRI has been demonstrated to be valuable in the assessment of cerebral stroke. Recent advance in MR systems of hardware with larger maximum gradient amplitude and faster imaging strategies, such as EPI, has made it possible to acquire whole brain diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in less that one minute. The purposes of this study are to evaluate clinical usefulness of DWI and to clarify pitfalls in the diagnosis of acute cerebral stroke. Seventeen patients with 18 ischemic lesions were studied. DWI were taken with 1.5 Tesla MRI (Magnetom Vision, Siemens, Germany) using EPI sequence. Fifteen lesions out of them (3 in cerebral cortex, 9 in basal ganglia/deep white matter and 3 in cerebellum) were studied serially at various times up to 147 days. Acute cerebral infarction was seen clearly as an area of hyperintensity with DWI and as hypointensity in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps which are indicative of decreased diffusion. DWI detected areas of hyperintense acute infarcts, as early as 2.5 hours after onset, which were not visualized on T 2 -weighted image (T2WI). The lesion of cerebral infarction became isointense in ADC maps at 14-28 days after onset, whereas with DWI it became isointense at about 2 months. Because ADC changed earlier than DWI, ADC maps were useful for differentiate acute from nonacute lesion in cases of recurrent stroke within a short period. In a patient with transient global amnesia for 7 hours, DWI did not show any lesion at 8 hours. In terms of cerebral hemorrhage, lesions were seen as area of hyperintensity in DWI at 3 days and were not distinguishable from that of infarct. Despite limitations in the diagnosis of transient ischemia and cerebral hemorrhage, DWI is a useful technique for early detection of cerebral infarction, especially within the first 6 hours after stroke onset. (author)

  2. Cerebral malformations without antenatal diagnosis

    Girard, Nadine J. [Diagnostic Neuroradiology, Hopital Timone, Marseille (France)

    2010-06-15

    Cerebral malformations are usually described following the different steps in development. Disorders of neurulation (dysraphisms), or diverticulation (holoprosencephalies and posterior fossa cysts), and total commissural agenesis are usually diagnosed in utero. In contrast, disorders of histogenesis (proliferation-differentiation, migration, organization) are usually discovered in infants and children. The principal clinical symptoms that may be a clue to cerebral malformation include congenital hemiparesis, epilepsy and mental or psychomotor retardation. MRI is the imaging method of choice to assess cerebral malformations. (orig.)

  3. Erythrocytes Are Oxygen-Sensing Regulators of the Cerebral Microcirculation

    Wei, Helen Shinru; Kang, Hongyi; Rasheed, Izad-Yar Daniel

    2016-01-01

    and neuronal activity. Since capillaries are embedded in the O2-consuming neuropil, we have here examined whether activity-dependent dips in O2 tension drive capillary hyperemia. In vivo analyses showed that transient dips in tissue O2 tension elicit capillary hyperemia. Ex vivo experiments revealed that red...

  4. Effects of nitrous oxide on cerebral haemodynamics and metabolism during isoflurane anaesthesia in man

    Algotsson, L.; Messeter, K.; Rosen, I.; Holmin. T.

    1992-01-01

    Seven normoventilated and five hyperventilated healthy adults undergoing cholecystectomy and anaesthetized with methohexitone, fentanyl and pancuronium were studied with measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cereal metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRo 2 ), and quantified electroencephalography (EEG) under two sets of conditions: 1) 1.7% end-tidal concentration of isoflurane in air/oxygen: 2) 0.85% end-tidal concentration of isoflurane in nitrous oxide (N 2 O)/oxygen. The object was to study the effects of N 2 O during isoflurane anaesthesia on cerebral circulation, metabolism and neuroelectric activity. N 2 O in the anaesthetic gas mixture caused a 43% (P 2 was not significantly altered by N 2 O. EEG demonstrated an activated pattern with decreased low frequency activity and increased high frequency activity. The results confirm that N 2 O is a potent cerebral vasodilator in man, although the mechanisms underlying the effects on CBF are still unclear. (au)

  5. Massive Cerebral Gas Embolism under Discectomy due to Hydrogen Peroxide Irrigation

    Junjie Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Massive cerebral and spinal gas embolism occurs rarely as a complication of discectomy. We report a 54-year-old female who had undergone a discectomy (L3/4 and L4/5 under epidural anesthesia in a local hospital developed multiple massive gas embolisms. At closure, surgeons irrigated the incision wound with hydrogen peroxide. Soon after the irrigation, the patient suddenly developed tachycardia, hypotension, and rapid oxygen desaturation. Subsequently, patient progressed into unconsciousness and right hemianopsia quadriplegia. Computed tomography (CT scan showed multiple hypointensity spots around the brain due to cerebral gas embolism, which indicated the pneumoencephalos. The likely mechanism was the absorption of hydrogen peroxide into blood. When the amount of oxygen evolved exceeded its maximal blood solubility, venous embolization occurred. Though the patient was treated with supportive treatments and hyperbaric oxygen, she did not get full recovery and was left with severe long-term cerebral injury.

  6. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  7. Optoacoustic technique for noninvasive monitoring of blood oxygenation: a feasibility study

    Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Larina, Irina V.; Larin, Kirill V.; Deyo, Donald J.; Motamedi, Massoud; Prough, Donald S.

    2002-08-01

    Replacement of invasive monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation with noninvasive techniques offers great promise in the management of life-threatening neurologic illnesses including traumatic brain injury. We developed and built an optoacoustic system to noninvasively monitor cerebral venous oxygenation; the system includes a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser and a specially designed optoacoustic probe. We tested the system in vitro in sheep blood with experimentally varied oxygenation. Our results demonstrated that (1) the amplitude and temporal profile of the optoacoustic waves increase with blood oxygenation in the range from 24% to 92%, (2) optoacoustic signals can be detected despite optical and acoustic attenuation by thick bone, and (3) the system is capable of real-time and continuous measurements. These results suggest that the optoacoustic technique is technically feasible for continuous, noninvasive monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation.

  8. Effectiveness of sugammadex for cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Ozbilgin, Sule; Yılmaz, Osman; Ergur, Bekir Ugur; Hancı, Volkan; Ozbal, Seda; Yurtlu, Serhan; Gunenc, Sakize Ferim; Kuvaki, Bahar; Kucuk, Burcu Ataseven; Sisman, Ali Rıza

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral ischemia may cause permanent brain damage and behavioral dysfunction. The efficacy and mechanisms of pharmacological treatments administered immediately after cerebral damage are not fully known. Sugammadex is a licensed medication. As other cyclodextrins have not passed the necessary phase tests, trade preparations are not available, whereas sugammadex is frequently used in clinical anesthetic practice. Previous studies have not clearly described the effects of the cyclodextrin family on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) damage. The aim of this study was to determine whether sugammadex had a neuroprotective effect against transient global cerebral ischemia. Animals were assigned to control, sham-operated, S 16 and S 100 groups. Transient global cerebral ischemia was induced by 10-minute occlusion of the bilateral common carotid artery, followed by 24-hour reperfusion. At the end of the experiment, neurological behavior scoring was performed on the rats, followed by evaluation of histomorphological and biochemical measurements. Sugammadex 16 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg improved neurological outcome, which was associated with reductions in both histological and neurological scores. The hippocampus TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling) and caspase results in the S 16 and S 100 treatment groups were significantly lower than those of the I/R group. Neurological scores in the treated groups were significantly higher than those of the I/R group. The study showed that treatment with 16 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg sugammadex had a neuroprotective effect in a transient global cerebral I/R rat model. However, 100 mg/kg sugammadex was more neuroprotective in rats. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  9. Effectiveness of sugammadex for cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Sule Ozbilgin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemia may cause permanent brain damage and behavioral dysfunction. The efficacy and mechanisms of pharmacological treatments administered immediately after cerebral damage are not fully known. Sugammadex is a licensed medication. As other cyclodextrins have not passed the necessary phase tests, trade preparations are not available, whereas sugammadex is frequently used in clinical anesthetic practice. Previous studies have not clearly described the effects of the cyclodextrin family on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R damage. The aim of this study was to determine whether sugammadex had a neuroprotective effect against transient global cerebral ischemia. Animals were assigned to control, sham-operated, S 16 and S 100 groups. Transient global cerebral ischemia was induced by 10-minute occlusion of the bilateral common carotid artery, followed by 24-hour reperfusion. At the end of the experiment, neurological behavior scoring was performed on the rats, followed by evaluation of histomorphological and biochemical measurements. Sugammadex 16 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg improved neurological outcome, which was associated with reductions in both histological and neurological scores. The hippocampus TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling and caspase results in the S 16 and S 100 treatment groups were significantly lower than those of the I/R group. Neurological scores in the treated groups were significantly higher than those of the I/R group. The study showed that treatment with 16 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg sugammadex had a neuroprotective effect in a transient global cerebral I/R rat model. However, 100 mg/kg sugammadex was more neuroprotective in rats.

  10. External carotid compression: a novel technique to improve cerebral perfusion during selective antegrade cerebral perfusion for aortic arch surgery.

    Grocott, Hilary P; Ambrose, Emma; Moon, Mike

    2016-10-01

    Selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP) involving cannulation of either the axillary or innominate artery is a commonly used technique for maintaining cerebral blood flow (CBF) during the use of hypothermic cardiac arrest (HCA) for operations on the aortic arch. Nevertheless, asymmetrical CBF with hypoperfusion of the left cerebral hemisphere is a common occurrence during SACP. The purpose of this report is to describe an adjunctive maneuver to improve left hemispheric CBF during SACP by applying extrinsic compression to the left carotid artery. A 77-yr-old male patient with a history of aortic valve replacement presented for emergent surgical repair of an acute type A aortic dissection of a previously known ascending aortic aneurysm. His intraoperative course included cannulation of the right axillary artery, which was used as the aortic inflow during cardiopulmonary bypass and also allowed for subsequent SACP during HCA. After the onset of HCA, the innominate artery was clamped at its origin to allow for SACP. Shortly thereafter, however, the left-sided cerebral oxygen saturation (SrO2) began to decrease. Augmenting the PaO2, PaCO2 and both SACP pressure and flow failed to increase left hemispheric SrO2. Following the use of ultrasound guidance to confirm the absence of atherosclerotic disease in the carotid artery, external pressure was applied partially compressing the artery. With the carotid compression, the left cerebral saturation abruptly increased, suggesting pressurization of the left cerebral hemispheric circulation and augmentation of CBF. Direct ultrasound visualization and cautious partial compression of the left carotid artery may address asymmetrical CBF that occurs with SACP during HCA for aortic arch surgery. This strategy may lead to improved symmetry of CBF and corresponding cerebral oximetry measurements during aortic arch surgery.

  11. Cerebral CT of ischaemic lesions

    Aulich, A

    1981-11-25

    The diagnosis of stroke must first be established by clinical examination. CT has proved useful for confirmation of the diagnosis and provides a global intracranial picture of morphological changes in cerebral vascular diseases. A hemorrhage can be recognized with certainty at the first CT examination as the cause of the stroke, but in the detection of a lesion due to ischemia an important role is played by the correct choice of the time of examination, and in some cases also of the check-up with contrast medium. The differential diagnosis between infarct in the acute stage and encephalitis or gliomas of low-grade malignity can be difficult. A decision can often only be made after a series of examinations. Postmalacial conditions are often difficult to differentiate from defects due to other causes, such as hemorrhage, head injury, postoperative states and after encephalitis. A knowledge of the anamnesis and the clinical findings is indispensable for CT evaluation. In assessing the prognosis before vascular surgery on the extracranial brain-supplying vessels the performance of a CT examination should be advised. A warning is given against the use of CT as a screening method.

  12. Improvement of Brain Tissue Oxygenation by Inhalation of Carbogen

    Ashkanian, M.; Borghammer, P.; Gjedde, A.

    2008-01-01

    tomography (PET) to measure CBF and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) during inhalation of test gases (O(2), CO(2), carbogen and atmospheric air) in 10 healthy volunteers. Arterial blood gases were recorded during administration of each gas. The data were analyzed with volume-of-interest and voxel...... is sufficient for optimal oxygenation of healthy brain tissue, whereas carbogen induces concomitant increases of CBF and Sa(O2)....

  13. Cerebral haemodynamic and metabolic changes in carotid artery occlusion: a PET study

    Samson, Y.; Loc'h, C.; Ottaviani, M.; Baron, J.C.; Bousser, M.

    1984-09-01

    Using the positron emission tomography, with the O 15 inhalation technique, the cerebral blood flow (CBF), the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ) were studied in 37 patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion. In the territory of the occluded ICA, two pattern of focal anomaly have been observed: a CBF decrease with a ''compensatory'' OEF increase or a matched CBF and CMRO 2 decrease. On the other hand, as compared to age matched control values, CMRO 2 is significantly decreased in the territory of the occluded carotid only in patients with extensive neck vessels obstructive disease

  14. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    Mahmut Edip Gürol

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid beta-peptides (Ab in the walls of leptomeningeal arteries, arterioles, and veins. Despite the fact that these pathological changes were first described in 1909, major advancement in our understanding of the clinicoradiological manifestations, neurobiology, and course of CAA has occurred only during the last 30 years. No significant associations have been shown between CAA and other systemic/visceral amyloidoses or vascular risk factors, including hypertension. CAA is well known as the most common cause of spontaneous and anticoagulant-related lobar parenchymal ICH in the elderly. It also causes lobar cerebral microbleeds (CMBs, small dot-like dark susceptibility artifacts visible with gradient recalled echo (GRE-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. CMBs are important markers of disease severity and predictors of CAA progression. Amyloid angiopathy is also a common cause of ischemic microvascular white matter disease (WMD and deep cerebral infarctions. Such WMD is defined as subcortical and periventricular white matter changes without obvious infarction, as well as a dark appearance on computerized tomography (CT and a bright appearance on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR-MRI. CAA-related vascular dysfunction, with its hemorrhagic and ischemic complications, is a recognized contributor to vascular cognitive impairment in the elderly, an independent effect that is synergistically increased by Alzheimer pathologies, such as plaques and tangles. A set of clinicoradiological criteria was established for the accurate diagnosis of CAA. According to the Boston Criteria, patients aged 55 years and older with multiple hemorrhages (on CT or GRE-MRI restricted to the lobar, cortical, or corticosubcortical regions (cerebellar hemorrhage allowed are diagnosed as probable CAA when no other etiology is found; a single hemorrhage in the same region is classified as possible

  15. Effects of Mild Blast Traumatic Brain Injury on Cerebral Vascular, Histopathological, and Behavioral Outcomes in Rats

    Zeng, Yaping; Deyo, Donald; Parsley, Margaret A.; Hawkins, Bridget E.; Prough, Donald S.; DeWitt, Douglas S.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract To determine the effects of mild blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI), several groups of rats were subjected to blast injury or sham injury in a compressed air-driven shock tube. The effects of bTBI on relative cerebral perfusion (laser Doppler flowmetry [LDF]), and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) cerebral vascular resistance were measured for 2 h post-bTBI. Dilator responses to reduced intravascular pressure were measured in isolated middle cerebral arterial (MCA) segments, ex vivo, 30 and 60 min post-bTBI. Neuronal injury was assessed (Fluoro-Jade C [FJC]) 24 and 48 h post-bTBI. Neurological outcomes (beam balance and walking tests) and working memory (Morris water maze [MWM]) were assessed 2 weeks post-bTBI. Because impact TBI (i.e., non-blast TBI) is often associated with reduced cerebral perfusion and impaired cerebrovascular function in part because of the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species such as peroxynitrite (ONOO−), the effects of the administration of the ONOO− scavenger, penicillamine methyl ester (PenME), on cerebral perfusion and cerebral vascular resistance were measured for 2 h post-bTBI. Mild bTBI resulted in reduced relative cerebral perfusion and MCA dilator responses to reduced intravascular pressure, increases in cerebral vascular resistance and in the numbers of FJC-positive cells in the brain, and significantly impaired working memory. PenME administration resulted in significant reductions in cerebral vascular resistance and a trend toward increased cerebral perfusion, suggesting that ONOO− may contribute to blast-induced cerebral vascular dysfunction. PMID:29160141

  16. Interfaces para control cerebral

    Spinelli, Enrique Mario

    2000-01-01

    La función de una interfaz para control cerebral basada en señales de electroencefalograma (EEG), en forma general denominada BCI (Brain control Interface), es establecer un enlace directo entre el cerebro y una máquina, sin utilizar acciones motoras directas. Una BCI permite realizar operaciones simples a partir de la interpretación de las señales de EEG. Su desarrollo está principalmente orientado hacia la ayuda a personas con discapacidades motoras severas, que poseen deterioros en el sist...

  17. Techniques in cerebral protection.

    Fanelli, Fabrizio; Bezzi, Mario; Boatta, Emanuele; Passariello, Roberto

    2006-10-01

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting is a valid alternative option to conventional carotid endarterectomy in the treatment of carotid artery stenosis. During the stenting process, however, distal embolization can occur with neurological consequences. To avoid this, cerebral protection devices have been introduced. Three principal types of protection system have been developed: distal balloon occlusion, distal filters and proximal protection with or without reversal of flow. As protection devices became the focus of interest by manufactures and physicians, several trials are going on worldwide to analyze the characteristics of each of them and to evaluate their efficacy to reduce the rate of distal embolization.

  18. Association Between Serum Triglycerides and Cerebral Amyloidosis in Cognitively Normal Elderly.

    Choi, Hyo Jung; Byun, Min Soo; Yi, Dahyun; Choe, Young Min; Sohn, Bo Kyung; Baek, Hye Won; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Hyun Jung; Han, Ji Young; Yoon, Eun Jin; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Woo, Jong Inn; Lee, Dong Young

    2016-08-01

    Although many preclinical studies have suggested the possible linkage between dyslipidemia and cerebral amyloid deposition, the association between serum lipid measures and cerebral amyloid-beta (Aβ) deposition in human brain is still poorly known. We aimed to investigate the association in cognitively normal (CN) elderly individuals. Cross-sectional study. University hospital dementia clinic. 59 CN elderly. The study measures included comprehensive clinical and neuropsychological assessment based on the CERAD protocol, magnetic resonance imaging and (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh Compound B positron emission tomography scans, and quantification for serum lipid biomarkers. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that a higher serum triglycerides level was associated with heavier global cerebral Aβ deposition even after controlling age, sex, and apolipoprotein E ε4 genotype. Serum apolipoprotein B also showed significant positive association with global cerebral Aβ deposition, but the significance disappeared after controlling serum triglycerides level. No association was found between other lipid measures and global cerebral Aβ deposition. The findings suggest that serum triglycerides are closely associated with cerebral amyloidosis, although population-based prospective studies are needed to provide further evidence of the causative effect of triglycerides on cerebral amyloidosis. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cerebral aneurysms – an audit

    Enrique

    Abstract. We performed an audit to determine the profile of cerebral aneurysms at the Universitas Hospital Bloem- fontein, the only government hospital with a vascular suite in the Free State and Northern Cape area. Two hun- dred and twenty-three government patients, diagnosed with cerebral aneurysms during the period.

  20. Brain Oxygenation During Thoracoscopic Repair of Long Gap Esophageal Atresia

    Stolwijk, Lisanne J; van der Zee, David C; Tytgat, Stefaan; van der Werff, Desiree; Benders, Manon J N L; van Herwaarden, Maud Y A; Lemmers, Petra M A

    2017-01-01

    Background: Elongation and repair of long gap esophageal atresia (LGEA) can be performed thoracoscopically, even directly after birth. The effect of thoracoscopic CO2-insufflation on cerebral oxygenation (rScO2) during the consecutive thoracoscopic procedures in repair of LGEA was evaluated.

  1. The Neuroprotection Effect of Oxygen Therapy: A Systematic Review ...

    2018-04-04

    Apr 4, 2018 ... NBO on oxidative cerebral metabolism and oxygen treatment for severe TBI was not an all or nothing phenomenon but represented a graduated effect.[27] In the following clinical trial, they evaluated the combination of HBO and NBO as a single treatment. Compared with standard care (control treatment), ...

  2. Regional effects of craniotomy on cerebral circulation and metabolism

    Abumiya, Takeo; Sayama, Ichiro; Asakura, Ken; Hadeishi, Hiromu; Mizuno, Makoto; Suzuki, Akifumi; Yasui, Nobuyuki; Shishido, Fumio; Uemura, Kazuo

    1990-01-01

    Regional effects of craniotomy on cerebral circulation and metabolism, such as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional cerebral oxygen consumption (rCMRO 2 ), regional oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF), and regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were examined by a PET (positron emission tomography) study concerning surgery that was performed on un-ruptured aneurysm patients. Eight patients with intracranial un-ruptured aneurysms were studied pre- and post-operatively by the 15 O labelled-gas steady-state method, using HEADTOME-III. All patients underwent aneurysmal surgery performed by the transsylvian approach. There was a significant increase in the mean OEF values taken from the whole-brains of 8 patients, but there was not a significant change in CBF, CMRO 2 or CBV. The increase in OEF was caused by decrease of O 2 content, which was caused by post-operative decrease in the Hb value. So, this OEF increase was not the direct effect of craniotomy. In 2 patients, the rCBF and rCMRO 2 , in the fronto-temporal region (where craniotomy was performed) increased post-operatively. This regional effect suggests transient reactive hyperemia following compressive ischemia during the operative procedure, and metabolic demands for recovery of brain function. In 2 other patients, who had relatively low rCBFs during the pre-operative study, rCBF and rCMRO 2 in the bi-frontal region had decreased more at the post-operative study. This change appears to have been caused by removal of cerebrospinal fluid and depression of the frontal lobe. From this study, it becomes evident that the regional effect of craniotomy on cerebral circulation and metabolism is not so great, when adequate microsurgical techniques are used. (author)

  3. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    Gordon, I.

    1998-01-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics

  4. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    Gordon, I [London, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (United Kingdom)

    1998-06-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics.

  5. Cerebral cartography and connectomics.

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-05-19

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Cerebral Gluconeogenesis and Diseases

    Yip, James; Geng, Xiaokun; Shen, Jiamei; Ding, Yuchuan

    2017-01-01

    The gluconeogenesis pathway, which has been known to normally present in the liver, kidney, intestine, or muscle, has four irreversible steps catalyzed by the enzymes: pyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and glucose 6-phosphatase. Studies have also demonstrated evidence that gluconeogenesis exists in brain astrocytes but no convincing data have yet been found in neurons. Astrocytes exhibit significant 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 activity, a key mechanism for regulating glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Astrocytes are unique in that they use glycolysis to produce lactate, which is then shuttled into neurons and used as gluconeogenic precursors for reduction. This gluconeogenesis pathway found in astrocytes is becoming more recognized as an important alternative glucose source for neurons, specifically in ischemic stroke and brain tumor. Further studies are needed to discover how the gluconeogenesis pathway is controlled in the brain, which may lead to the development of therapeutic targets to control energy levels and cellular survival in ischemic stroke patients, or inhibit gluconeogenesis in brain tumors to promote malignant cell death and tumor regression. While there are extensive studies on the mechanisms of cerebral glycolysis in ischemic stroke and brain tumors, studies on cerebral gluconeogenesis are limited. Here, we review studies done to date regarding gluconeogenesis to evaluate whether this metabolic pathway is beneficial or detrimental to the brain under these pathological conditions. PMID:28101056

  7. Cerebral Gluconeogenesis and Diseases.

    Yip, James; Geng, Xiaokun; Shen, Jiamei; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-01-01

    The gluconeogenesis pathway, which has been known to normally present in the liver, kidney, intestine, or muscle, has four irreversible steps catalyzed by the enzymes: pyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and glucose 6-phosphatase. Studies have also demonstrated evidence that gluconeogenesis exists in brain astrocytes but no convincing data have yet been found in neurons. Astrocytes exhibit significant 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 activity, a key mechanism for regulating glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Astrocytes are unique in that they use glycolysis to produce lactate, which is then shuttled into neurons and used as gluconeogenic precursors for reduction. This gluconeogenesis pathway found in astrocytes is becoming more recognized as an important alternative glucose source for neurons, specifically in ischemic stroke and brain tumor. Further studies are needed to discover how the gluconeogenesis pathway is controlled in the brain, which may lead to the development of therapeutic targets to control energy levels and cellular survival in ischemic stroke patients, or inhibit gluconeogenesis in brain tumors to promote malignant cell death and tumor regression. While there are extensive studies on the mechanisms of cerebral glycolysis in ischemic stroke and brain tumors, studies on cerebral gluconeogenesis are limited. Here, we review studies done to date regarding gluconeogenesis to evaluate whether this metabolic pathway is beneficial or detrimental to the brain under these pathological conditions.

  8. T2-prepared velocity selective labelling : A novel idea for full-brain mapping of oxygen saturation

    Alderliesten, Thomas; De Vis, Jill B; Lemmers, Petra M A; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon J N L; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Petersen, Esben T

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Disturbances in cerebral oxygenation saturation (SO2) have been linked to adverse outcome in adults, children, and neonates. In intensive care, the cerebral SO2 is increasingly being monitored by Near-InfraRed Spectroscopy (NIRS). Unfortunately NIRS has a limited penetration

  9. Activity-dependent increases in local oxygen consumption correlate with postsynaptic currents in the mouse cerebellum in vivo

    Mathiesen, Claus; Caesar, Kirsten; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund

    2011-01-01

    Evoked neural activity correlates strongly with rises in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) and cerebral blood flow (CBF). Activity-dependent rises in CMRO(2) fluctuate with ATP turnover due to ion pumping. In vitro studies suggest that increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) stimulate oxidative m...

  10. Activity-dependent increases in local oxygen consumption correlate with post-synaptic currents in the mouse cerebellum in vivo

    Mathiesen, Claus; Caesar, Kirsten; Thomsen, Kirsten Joan

    2011-01-01

    Evoked neural activity correlates strongly with rises in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) and cerebral blood flow. Activity-dependent rises in CMRO2 fluctuate with ATP turnover due to ion pumping. In vitro studies suggest that increases in cytosolic Ca2+ stimulate oxidative metabolism vi...

  11. Glucose and oxygen metabolism after penetrating ballistic-like brain injury

    Gajavelli, Shyam; Kentaro, Shimoda; Diaz, Julio; Yokobori, Shoji; Spurlock, Markus; Diaz, Daniel; Jackson, Clayton; Wick, Alexandra; Zhao, Weizhao; Leung, Lai Y; Shear, Deborah; Tortella, Frank; Bullock, M Ross

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability in all age groups. Among TBI, penetrating traumatic brain injuries (PTBI) have the worst prognosis and represent the leading cause of TBI-related morbidity and death. However, there are no specific drugs/interventions due to unclear pathophysiology. To gain insights we looked at cerebral metabolism in a PTBI rat model: penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI). Early after injury, regional cerebral oxygen tension and consumption significantly decreased in the ipsilateral cortex in the PBBI group compared with the control group. At the same time point, glucose uptake was significantly reduced globally in the PBBI group compared with the control group. Examination of Fluorojade B-stained brain sections at 24 hours after PBBI revealed an incomplete overlap of metabolic impairment and neurodegeneration. As expected, the injury core had the most severe metabolic impairment and highest neurodegeneration. However, in the peri-lesional area, despite similar metabolic impairment, there was lesser neurodegeneration. Given our findings, the data suggest the presence of two distinct zones of primary injury, of which only one recovers. We anticipate the peri-lesional area encompassing the PBBI ischemic penumbra, could be salvaged by acute therapies. PMID:25669903

  12. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Can Induce Angiogenesis and Regeneration of Nerve Fibers in Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

    Sigal Tal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent clinical studies in stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI victims suffering chronic neurological injury present evidence that hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT can induce neuroplasticity.Objective: To assess the neurotherapeutic effect of HBOT on prolonged post-concussion syndrome (PPCS due to TBI, using brain microstructure imaging.Methods: Fifteen patients afflicted with PPCS were treated with 60 daily HBOT sessions. Imaging evaluation was performed using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast-Enhanced (DSC and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI MR sequences. Cognitive evaluation was performed by an objective computerized battery (NeuroTrax.Results: HBOT was initiated 6 months to 27 years (10.3 ± 3.2 years from injury. After HBOT, DTI analysis showed significantly increased fractional anisotropy values and decreased mean diffusivity in both white and gray matter structures. In addition, the cerebral blood flow and volume were increased significantly. Clinically, HBOT induced significant improvement in the memory, executive functions, information processing speed and global cognitive scores.Conclusions: The mechanisms by which HBOT induces brain neuroplasticity can be demonstrated by highly sensitive MRI techniques of DSC and DTI. HBOT can induce cerebral angiogenesis and improve both white and gray microstructures indicating regeneration of nerve fibers. The micro structural changes correlate with the neurocognitive improvements.

  13. Factors which affect cerebral uptake and retention of 13NH3

    Phelps, M.E.; Raichle, M.E.; Hoffman, E.J.; Raybaud, C.

    1977-01-01

    The single pass extraction of ammonia (E) by cerebral capillaries was studied in vivo in Rhesus monkeys with 13 N. The value of E for 13 N-ammonia was found to be less than 100%, inversely related to cerebral blood flow and to be limited by the permeability of the blood brain barrier for ammonia. A vaue of the permeability surface area product was determined to be 0.0040 x 10 -4 cm 3 /sec/gm. The single pass extraction fraction, E, for 13 N-ammonia was found to be independent of arterial blood pH (in the range of 7.2 to 7.6) and of arterial blood ammonia concentration (in the range of 80-1400 μgms/100 cc). An insulin induced hypoglycemic reduction in the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose and oxygen of 54% produced a reduction in E of about 24%. When a condition of elevated arterial blood ammonia was added to hypoglycemia, the value of E and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen remained low while the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose increased by a factor of 2.5 indicating the presence of a detoxification shunt for ammonia. Positron tomographic images of the equilibrium cross section distribution of 13 N-ammonia appeared to reflect regional differences in capillary density of the cerebral tissue

  14. Comparison of cerebral blood flow and metabolism to flumazenil binding potential in patients with hemodynamic ischemia

    Yukawa, Hirotsugu; Ogasawara, Kuniaki

    2003-01-01

    Because benzodiazepine receptors (BZR) are abundant in the cortex, an accumulation of 11 C-flumazenil which selectively bind to BZR may be useful as markers of neuron density. The aims of this study were to clarify the relationship between neuron density and cerebral oxygen metabolism and to investigate the usefulness of 11 C-flumazenil PET for detecting misery perfusion. The subjects were 16 patients with either internal carotid or middle cerebral arterial occlusive disease who underwent PET. Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF), regional cerebral oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), regional cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO 2 ) and regional cerebrovascular reserve capacity (CVRC) to acetazolamide were calculated. After CBF study, flumazenil binding potential was measured using the [ 11 C] flumazenil bolus injection method. Forty-eight regions of interests (ROIs) were obtained in 16 patients. Flumazenil binding potential was correlated to CMRO 2 (r=0.337, p=0.0069), but in 7 of 48 ROIs, CMRO 2 decreased, whereas flumazenil binding potential did not change. Seventeen of 29 ROIs with decreased CVRC showed high OEF and the remaining 12 showed normal OEF. Flumazenil binding potential in ROIs with normal OEF was significantly lower than in those with high OEF (p=0.0003). This study demonstrated that 11 C-flumazenil PET is useful for detecting misery perfusion in patients with hemodynamic ischemia. (author)

  15. Cerebral toxoplasmosis in AIDS

    Christ, F.; Steudel, H.; Klotz, D.; Bonn Univ.; Bonn Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Since 1982 (Hauser and co-workers), literature has reported focal cerebral tissue charges in AIDS patients whose diagnosis was unclear at first but which could be identified finally as florid toxoplasmosis encephalitis by biopsy and autopsy. It was found that the value of otherwise reliable serological tests (KBR, Sabin-Feldmann tests, etc.) is questionable in patients with severely impaired or incompetent immune systems, and, in particular, that a negative or uncharacteristic test result may not preclude any opportunistic infection process. Furthermore, isolation of Toxoplasma gondii or specific antibodies from the cerebrospinal fluid will be successful in exceptional cases only. In patients with AIDS or lymphadenopathy syndrome, the differential diagnosis will have to include - first and foremost - reactivated toxoplasma infection (not newly acquired, as a rule) if central neurological symptoms occur. (orig.) [de

  16. Cerebral white matter hypoplasia

    Dietrich, R.B.; Shields, W.D.; Sankar, R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the MR imaging findings in children with cerebral white matter hypoplasia (CWMH). The MR studies of four children, aged 3-7 y (mean age, 2.3 y) with a diagnosis of CWMH were reviewed. In all cases multiplanar T1-weighted and T2-weighted spin-echo images were obtained. All children had similar histories of severe developmental delay and nonprogressive neurologic deficits despite normal gestational and birth histories. In two cases there was a history of maternal cocaine abuse. Autopsy correlation was available in one child. The MR images of all four children demonstrated diffuse lack of white matter and enlarged ventricles but normal-appearing gray matter. The corpus callosum, although completely formed, was severely thinned. There was no evidence of gliosis or porencephaly, and the distribution of myelin deposition was normal for age in all cases. Autopsy finding in one child correlated exactly with the MR finding

  17. Multiple cerebral hydatid cysts

    Banzo, J.; Pina, J.I.; Abos, M.D.; Rios, G.; Garcia, D.; Marin, F.; Diaz, F.J.

    1984-12-01

    A 39-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with headaches, vomiting, psychic impairment and diplopia. Three hydatid cysts of the lung had been previously removed. An avascular mass in the left hemisphere with left-to-right displacement of the anterior cerebral arteries was noted during a brain angioscintigraphy. A cerebralthrombosis (CT) brain scan showed two cystic lesions situated in the left-frontal and occipital regions. A CT abdominal scan showed multiple cysts in the liver, spleen and both kidneys. At operation, two brain cysts were totally extirpated without rupture. The definite pathological diagnosis was secondry hydatid cysts. The headaches, vomiting and diplopia were persistent in the post-operative period. Seven days after the operation, a CT brain scan showed an infratenrorial cyst. The patient rejected any surgical intervention.

  18. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during cardiopulmonary bypass with special reference to effects of hypotension induced by prostacyclin

    Feddersen, K.; Aren, C.; Nilsson, N.J.; Radegran, K.

    1986-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow and metabolism of oxygen, glucose, and lactate were studied in 43 patients undergoing aortocoronary bypass. Twenty-five patients received prostacyclin infusion, 50 ng per kilogram of body weight per minute, during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and 18 patients served as a control group. Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was studied by intraarterially injected xenon 133 and a single scintillation detector. Oxygen tension, carbon dioxide tension, oxygen saturation, glucose, and lactate were measured in arterial and cerebral venous blood. Mean arterial blood pressure decreased during hypothermia and prostacyclin infusion to less than 30 mm Hg. The regional CBF was, on average, 22 (standard deviation [SD] 4) ml/100 gm/min before CPB. It increased in the control group during hypothermia to 34 (SD 12) ml/100 gm/min, but decreased in the prostacyclin group to 15 (SD 5) ml/100 gm/min. It increased during rewarming in the prostacyclin group. After CPB, regional CBF was about 40 ml/100 gm/min in both groups. The cerebral arteriovenous oxygen pressure difference decreased more in the control group than in the prostacyclin group during hypothermia. The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen decreased in both groups from approximately 2 ml/100 gm/min to about 1 ml/100 gm/min during hypothermia, increased again during rewarming, and after CPB was at the levels measured before bypass in both groups. There was no difference between the groups in regard to glucose and lactate metabolism

  19. Analysis of human cerebral functions using positron emission tomography (PET)

    Shibasaki, Takashi

    1984-01-01

    Positron emission tomography has two major advantages to analyse human cerebral functions in vivo. First, we can see the distribution of a variety of substance in the living (and doing something) human brain. Positron emitters, 11 C, 13 N, 15 O and 18 F, are made by medical cyclotron and are elements of natural substrates or easily tagged to substrate. Second, the distribution of the tracer is calculated to make a quantitative functional map in a reasonable spatial resolution over the entire brain in the same time. Not only cortical areas but also deeper structures show regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) or local cerebral metabolic rates (LCMRs). Nowadays, PET is put to practical use for determination of mainly rCBF, LCMR for glucose (LCMRsub(glu)), LCMR for oxygen (LCMRsub(o2)) and regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV). There have been many other pilot studies, such as estimation of distribution of given neurotransmitters or modulators in the brain which also confirms the substances' role in the neuronal function, and observation of protein synthesis relating to memory function. (J.P.N.)

  20. Clinical application of iopamidol (pamiray 300) for cerebral angiography

    Park, Sung Ho; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jin Na; Kim, Eung Yeop; Kim, Dong Joon; Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Dong Ik

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical safety and efficacy of Pamiray 300 (Iopamidol; Dongkook Pharm, Seoul, Korea) as a nonionic contrast medium for cerebral angiography. One hundred patients undergoing cerebral angiography were randomly assigned to receive Pamiray 300 after written consent had been obtained. Patients with adverse reactions were divided into two groups. One group consisted of patients with minor adverse events such as heat sensation and pain, and the other group consisted of patients with major adverse events such as dyspnea, laryngeal edema and shock. The qualities of the radiographic images were stratified into five grades by three independent radiologists. No abnormality induced by Pamiray 300 was seen by a physical and neurological examination, blood pressure measurement, electrocardiogram, respiration rate measurement and partial fraction of arterial oxygen recording. No major and severe adverse events occurred throughout the study. Patient sex, age, disease category, underlying disease and administered contrast dosage showed no statistical significance with regards to the occurrence of adverse events. The opacification of blood vessels in all patients was 'good' or 'excellent'. Based on the results of this study, Pamiray 300 is a safe, efficacious and well-tolerated contrast medium for use in cerebral angiography. Thus, Pamiray 300 can be used as a competitive medium in cerebral angiography