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Sample records for glioma tumor volume

  1. Gliomas: Application of Cumulative Histogram Analysis of Normalized Cerebral Blood Volume on 3 T MRI to Tumor Grading

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    Kim, Hyungjin; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Ryoo, Inseon; Kim, Soo Chin; Yeom, Jeong A.; Shin, Hwaseon; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, A. Leum; Yun, Tae Jin; Park, Chul-Kee; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Sung-Hye

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioma grading assumes significant importance in that low- and high-grade gliomas display different prognoses and are treated with dissimilar therapeutic strategies. The objective of our study was to retrospectively assess the usefulness of a cumulative normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) histogram for glioma grading based on 3 T MRI. Methods From February 2010 to April 2012, 63 patients with astrocytic tumors underwent 3 T MRI with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted imaging. Regions of interest containing the entire tumor volume were drawn on every section of the co-registered relative CBV (rCBV) maps and T2-weighted images. The percentile values from the cumulative nCBV histograms and the other histogram parameters were correlated with tumor grades. Cochran’s Q test and the McNemar test were used to compare the diagnostic accuracies of the histogram parameters after the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Using the parameter offering the highest diagnostic accuracy, a validation process was performed with an independent test set of nine patients. Results The 99th percentile of the cumulative nCBV histogram (nCBV C99), mean and peak height differed significantly between low- and high-grade gliomas (P = histogram analysis of nCBV using 3 T MRI can be a useful method for preoperative glioma grading. The nCBV C99 value is helpful in distinguishing high- from low-grade gliomas and grade IV from III gliomas. PMID:23704910

  2. Reliability of tumor volume estimation from MR images in patients with malignant glioma. Results from the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) 6662 Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl-Wagner, Birgit B.; Blume, Jeffrey D.; Herman, Benjamin; Peck, Donald; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Levering, Anthony; Schmalfuss, Ilona M.

    2009-01-01

    Reliable assessment of tumor growth in malignant glioma poses a common problem both clinically and when studying novel therapeutic agents. We aimed to evaluate two software-systems in their ability to estimate volume change of tumor and/or edema on magnetic resonance (MR) images of malignant gliomas. Twenty patients with malignant glioma were included from different sites. Serial post-operative MR images were assessed with two software systems representative of the two fundamental segmentation methods, single-image fuzzy analysis (3DVIEWNIX-TV) and multi-spectral-image analysis (Eigentool), and with a manual method by 16 independent readers (eight MR-certified technologists, four neuroradiology fellows, four neuroradiologists). Enhancing tumor volume and tumor volume plus edema were assessed independently by each reader. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), variance components, and prediction intervals were estimated. There were no significant differences in the average tumor volume change over time between the software systems (p > 0.05). Both software systems were much more reliable and yielded smaller prediction intervals than manual measurements. No significant differences were observed between the volume changes determined by fellows/neuroradiologists or technologists.Semi-automated software systems are reliable tools to serve as outcome parameters in clinical studies and the basis for therapeutic decision-making for malignant gliomas, whereas manual measurements are less reliable and should not be the basis for clinical or research outcome studies. (orig.)

  3. Whole-tumor histogram analysis of the cerebral blood volume map: tumor volume defined by 11C-methionine positron emission tomography image improves the diagnostic accuracy of cerebral glioma grading.

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    Wu, Rongli; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Arisawa, Atsuko; Takahashi, Hiroto; Tanaka, Hisashi; Fujimoto, Yasunori; Watabe, Tadashi; Isohashi, Kayako; Hatazawa, Jun; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to compare the tumor volume definition using conventional magnetic resonance (MR) and 11C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET/PET) images in the differentiation of the pre-operative glioma grade by using whole-tumor histogram analysis of normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) maps. Thirty-four patients with histopathologically proven primary brain low-grade gliomas (n = 15) and high-grade gliomas (n = 19) underwent pre-operative or pre-biopsy MET/PET, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted at 3.0 T. The histogram distribution derived from the nCBV maps was obtained by co-registering the whole tumor volume delineated on conventional MR or MET/PET images, and eight histogram parameters were assessed. The mean nCBV value had the highest AUC value (0.906) based on MET/PET images. Diagnostic accuracy significantly improved when the tumor volume was measured from MET/PET images compared with conventional MR images for the parameters of mean, 50th, and 75th percentile nCBV value (p = 0.0246, 0.0223, and 0.0150, respectively). Whole-tumor histogram analysis of CBV map provides more valuable histogram parameters and increases diagnostic accuracy in the differentiation of pre-operative cerebral gliomas when the tumor volume is derived from MET/PET images.

  4. Tumor Metabolism of Malignant Gliomas

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    Ru, Peng; Williams, Terence M.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Guo, Deliang, E-mail: deliang.guo@osumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center & Arthur G James Cancer Hospital, Columbus, OH 43012 (United States)

    2013-11-08

    Constitutively activated oncogenic signaling via genetic mutations such as in the EGFR/PI3K/Akt and Ras/RAF/MEK pathways has been recognized as a major driver for tumorigenesis in most cancers. Recent insights into tumor metabolism have further revealed that oncogenic signaling pathways directly promote metabolic reprogramming to upregulate biosynthesis of lipids, carbohydrates, protein, DNA and RNA, leading to enhanced growth of human tumors. Therefore, targeting cell metabolism has become a novel direction for drug development in oncology. In malignant gliomas, metabolism pathways of glucose, glutamine and lipid are significantly reprogrammed. Moreover, molecular mechanisms causing these metabolic changes are just starting to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent studies revealing critical gene alterations that lead to metabolic changes in malignant gliomas, and also discuss promising therapeutic strategies via targeting the key players in metabolic regulation.

  5. Tumor Metabolism of Malignant Gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ru, Peng; Williams, Terence M.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Guo, Deliang

    2013-01-01

    Constitutively activated oncogenic signaling via genetic mutations such as in the EGFR/PI3K/Akt and Ras/RAF/MEK pathways has been recognized as a major driver for tumorigenesis in most cancers. Recent insights into tumor metabolism have further revealed that oncogenic signaling pathways directly promote metabolic reprogramming to upregulate biosynthesis of lipids, carbohydrates, protein, DNA and RNA, leading to enhanced growth of human tumors. Therefore, targeting cell metabolism has become a novel direction for drug development in oncology. In malignant gliomas, metabolism pathways of glucose, glutamine and lipid are significantly reprogrammed. Moreover, molecular mechanisms causing these metabolic changes are just starting to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent studies revealing critical gene alterations that lead to metabolic changes in malignant gliomas, and also discuss promising therapeutic strategies via targeting the key players in metabolic regulation

  6. Facing Contrast-Enhancing Gliomas: Perfusion MRI in Grade III and Grade IV Gliomas according to Tumor Area

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    Anna Luisa Di Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumoral neoangiogenesis characterizes high grade gliomas. Relative Cerebral Blood Volume (rCBV, calculated with Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast (DSC Perfusion-Weighted Imaging (PWI, allows for the estimation of vascular density over the tumor bed. The aim of the study was to characterize putative tumoral neoangiogenesis via the study of maximal rCBV with a Region of Interest (ROI approach in three tumor areas—the contrast-enhancing area, the nonenhancing tumor, and the high perfusion area on CBV map—in patients affected by contrast-enhancing glioma (grades III and IV. Twenty-one patients were included: 15 were affected by grade IV and 6 by grade III glioma. Maximal rCBV values for each patient were averaged according to glioma grade. Although rCBV from contrast-enhancement and from nonenhancing tumor areas was higher in grade IV glioma than in grade III (5.58 and 2.68; 3.01 and 2.2, resp., the differences were not significant. Instead, rCBV recorded in the high perfusion area on CBV map, independently of tumor compartment, was significantly higher in grade IV glioma than in grade III (7.51 versus 3.78, P=0.036. In conclusion, neoangiogenesis encompasses different tumor compartments and CBV maps appear capable of best characterizing the degree of neovascularization. Facing contrast-enhancing brain tumors, areas of high perfusion on CBV maps should be considered as the reference areas to be targeted for glioma grading.

  7. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from patients with glioma

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    Liu, Zhenjiang; Meng, Qingda; Bartek, Jiri

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) may represent a viable source of T cells for the biological treatment of patients with gliomas. Glioma tissue was obtained from 16 patients, tumor cell lines were established, and TILs were expanded in 16/16 cases using a combination of IL-2/IL-15/IL-21...

  8. Histogram analysis reveals a better delineation of tumor volume from background in 18F-FET PET compared to CBV maps in a hybrid PET–MR studie in gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filss, Christian P.; Stoffels, Gabriele; Galldiks, Norbert; Sabel, Michael; Wittsack, Hans J.; Coenen, Heinz H.; Shah, Nadim J.; Herzog, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Anatomical imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently the method of first choice for diagnostic investigation of glial tumors. However, different MR sequences may over- or underestimate tumor size and thus it may not be possible to delineate tumor from adjacent brain. In order to compensate this confinement additonal MR sequences like perfusion weighted MRI (PWI) with regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) or positron emission tomography (PET) with aminoacids are used to gain further information. Recent studies suggest that both of theses image modalities provide similar diagnostic information. For comparison tumor to brain ratios (TBR) with mean and maximum values are frequently used but results from different studies can often not be checked against each other. Furthermore, especially the maximum TBR in rCBV is at risk to be falsified by artifacts (e.g. blood vessels). These confinements are reduced by the use of histograms since all information of the VOIs are equally displayed. In this study we measured and compared the intersection of tumor and reference tissue histograms in 18 F-FET PET and rCBV maps in glioma patients. Methods: Twenty-seven glioma patients with contrast enhancing lesion on T1-weighted MR images were investigated using static 18 F-FET PET and rCBV in MRI using a PET–MR hybrid scanner. In all patients diagnosis was confirmed histologically (7 grade II gliomas, 6 grade III gliomas and 14 grade IV gliomas). We generated a set of tumor and reference tissue Volumes-of-Interest (VOIs) based on T1 weighted images in MRI with the tumor VOI defined by contrast enhancement and transferred these VOIs to the corresponding 18 F-FET PET scans and rCBV maps. From these VOIs we generated tumor and reference tissue histograms with a unity of one for each curve integral and measured the proportion of the area under the tumor curve that falls into the reference curve for 18 F-FET PET and rCBV maps for each patient. Results: The mean proportion

  9. Radiation tolerance of the spinal cord previously-damaged by tumor operation: long term neurological improvement and time-dose-volume relationships after irradiation of intraspinal gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopelson, G.

    1982-01-01

    Of 26 patients with intramedullary spinal cord gliomas (9 astrocytomas, 5 glioblastomas, 12 ependymomas) seen at the Massachusetts General Hospital from 1962-1980, 24 were irradiated (21 initially and 3 after post-surgical recurrence). Those 19 patients who survived at least 1 year after completion of irradiation were evaluated for post-irradiation neurological changes.No patient developed radiation myelopathy. Return to a permanently and completely normal neurological status occured for 33/51 (65%) of pre-irradiation neurological deficits. The major cause of post-irradiation neurological deterioration was tumor recurrence. Although 18/19 patients had their thoracic or lumbar spinal cords irradiated, each with field sizes greater than 10 cm, spinal cord doses approaching, equalling, or occasionally exceeding various definitions of spinal cord tolerance were tolerated well without evidence of radiation myelopathy. Spinal cords of patients with intramedullary gliomas, often with major neurological deficits prior to irradiation, may be treated safely to doses approaching or equalling spinal cord tolerance levels. These doses are expected to locally control most ependymomas and astrocytomas without an increased radiation myelopathy. Caution should be observed if doses higher than this are contemplated in an attempt to cure glioblastoma, because the 5% tolerance level of the damaged spinal remains to be defined

  10. Treatment Resistance Mechanisms of Malignant Glioma Tumor Stem Cells

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    Schmalz, Philip G.R.; Shen, Michael J.; Park, John K.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly lethal because of their resistance to conventional treatments. Recent evidence suggests that a minor subpopulation of cells with stem cell properties reside within these tumors. These tumor stem cells are more resistant to radiation and chemotherapies than their counterpart differentiated tumor cells and may underlie the persistence and recurrence of tumors following treatment. The various mechanisms by which tumor stem cells avoid or repair the damaging effects of cancer therapies are discussed

  11. Antiangiogenic Therapy and Mechanisms of Tumor Resistance in Malignant Glioma

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    Ruman Rahman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapeutics, patients with malignant glioma have a dismal prognosis. The formations of aberrant tumour vasculature and glioma cell invasion are major obstacles for effective treatment. Angiogenesis is a key event in the progression of malignant gliomas, a process involving endothelial cell proliferation, migration, reorganization of extracellular matrix and tube formation. Such processes are regulated by the homeostatic balance between proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors, most notably vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs produced by glioma cells. Current strategies targeting VEGF-VEGF receptor signal transduction pathways, though effective in normalizing abnormal tumor vasculature, eventually result in tumor resistance whereby a highly infiltrative and invasive phenotype may be adopted. Here we review recent anti-angiogenic therapy for malignant glioma and highlight implantable devices and nano/microparticles as next-generation methods for chemotherapeutic delivery. Intrinsic and adaptive modes of glioma resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy will be discussed with particular focus on the glioma stem cell paradigm.

  12. Molecular Subtyping of Tumors from Patients with Familial Glioma.

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    Ruiz, Vanessa Y; Praska, Corinne E; Armstrong, Georgina; Kollmeyer, Thomas M; Yamada, Seiji; Decker, Paul A; Kosel, Matthew L; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Consortium, The Gliogene; Lachance, Daniel H; Bainbridge, Matthew N; Melin, Beatrice S; Bondy, Melissa L; Jenkins, Robert B

    2017-10-10

    Single-gene mutation syndromes account for some familial glioma (FG); however, they make up only a small fraction of glioma families. Gliomas can be classified into 3 major molecular subtypes based on IDH mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion. We hypothesized that the prevalence of molecular subtypes might differ in familial versus sporadic gliomas, and that tumors in the same family should have the same molecular subtype. Participants in the FG study (Gliogene) provided samples for germline DNA analysis. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor was obtained for a subset of FG cases, and DNA was extracted. We analyzed tissue from 75 families, including 10 families containing a second affected family member. Copy number variation (CNV) data was obtained using a first-generation Affymetrix molecular inversion probe (MIP) array. Samples from 62 of 75 (83%) FG cases could be classified into the 3 subtypes. The prevalence of the molecular subtypes was: 30 (48%) IDH-wild type, 21 (34%) IDH-mutant non-codeleted, and 11 (19%) IDH-mutant and 1p/19q-codeleted. This distribution of molecular subtypes was not statistically different from that of sporadic gliomas (p=0.54). Of 10 paired FG samples, molecular subtypes were concordant for 7 (κ=0.59): 3 IDH-mutant non-codeleted, 2 IDH-wild type, and 2 IDH-mutant and 1p/19q-codeleted gliomas. Our data suggest that within individual families, patients develop gliomas of the same molecular subtype. However, we did not observe differences in the prevalence of the molecular subtypes in FG compared with sporadic gliomas. These observations provide further insight about the distribution of molecular subtypes in FG. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  13. Radiosurgery in gliomas (middle-line tumors)

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    Betti, O.O.; Rosler, R.

    1989-01-01

    The clinical experience is presented obtained from treatment with high-energy linac radiosurgery of 22 patients with stereotactically biopsed gliomas located in middle-line, from thalamus to brain stem and from infundibulum to pineo-tectal regions, during the period 1982-1987. (H.W.). 10 refs

  14. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

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    Ouchi, Rie; Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  15. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

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    Ouchi, Rie [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Nakano, Ichiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1824 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Seimiya, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hseimiya@jfcr.or.jp [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  16. Sequential Apparent Diffusion Coefficient for Assessment of Tumor Progression in Patients with Low-Grade Glioma.

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    Chen, I E; Swinburne, N; Tsankova, N M; Hefti, M M; Aggarwal, A; Doshi, A H; Hormigo, A; Delman, B N; Nael, K

    2018-04-19

    Early and accurate identification of tumor progression in patients with low-grade gliomas is challenging. We aimed to assess the role of quantitative ADC analysis in the sequential follow-up of patients with low-grade gliomas as a potential imaging marker of tumor stability or progression. In this retrospective study, patients with a diagnosis of low-grade glioma with at least 12 months of imaging follow-up were retrospectively reviewed. Two neuroradiologists independently reviewed sequential MR imaging in each patient to determine tumor progression using the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria. Normalized mean ADC (ADC mean ) and 10th percentile ADC (ADC 10 ) values from FLAIR hyperintense tumor volume were calculated for each MR image and compared between patients with stable disease versus tumor progression using univariate analysis. The interval change of ADC values between sequential scans was used to differentiate stable disease from progression using the Fisher exact test. Twenty-eight of 69 patients who were evaluated met our inclusion criteria. Fifteen patients were classified as stable versus 13 patients as having progression based on consensus reads of MRIs and the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria. The interval change of ADC values showed greater concordance with ultimate lesion disposition than quantitative ADC values at a single time point. The interval change in ADC 10 matched the expected pattern in 12/13 patients with tumor progression (overall diagnostic accuracy of 86%, P average, the ADC 10 interval change predicted progression 8 months before conventional MR imaging. The interval change of ADC 10 values can be used to identify progression versus stability of low-grade gliomas with a diagnostic accuracy of 86% and before apparent radiologic progression on conventional MR imaging. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  17. Electrophysiology of glioma: a Rho GTPase-activating protein reduces tumor growth and spares neuron structure and function.

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    Vannini, Eleonora; Olimpico, Francesco; Middei, Silvia; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; de Graaf, Erik L; McDonnell, Liam; Schmidt, Gudula; Fabbri, Alessia; Fiorentini, Carla; Baroncelli, Laura; Costa, Mario; Caleo, Matteo

    2016-12-01

    Glioblastomas are the most aggressive type of brain tumor. A successful treatment should aim at halting tumor growth and protecting neuronal cells to prevent functional deficits and cognitive deterioration. Here, we exploited a Rho GTPase-activating bacterial protein toxin, cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1), to interfere with glioma cell growth in vitro and vivo. We also investigated whether this toxin spares neuron structure and function in peritumoral areas. We performed a microarray transcriptomic and in-depth proteomic analysis to characterize the molecular changes triggered by CNF1 in glioma cells. We also examined tumor cell senescence and growth in vehicle- and CNF1-treated glioma-bearing mice. Electrophysiological and morphological techniques were used to investigate neuronal alterations in peritumoral cortical areas. Administration of CNF1 triggered molecular and morphological hallmarks of senescence in mouse and human glioma cells in vitro. CNF1 treatment in vivo induced glioma cell senescence and potently reduced tumor volumes. In peritumoral areas of glioma-bearing mice, neurons showed a shrunken dendritic arbor and severe functional alterations such as increased spontaneous activity and reduced visual responsiveness. CNF1 treatment enhanced dendritic length and improved several physiological properties of pyramidal neurons, demonstrating functional preservation of the cortical network. Our findings demonstrate that CNF1 reduces glioma volume while at the same time maintaining the physiological and structural properties of peritumoral neurons. These data indicate a promising strategy for the development of more effective antiglioma therapies. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Radiation immunomodulatory gene tumor therapy of rats with intracerebral glioma tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Bertil R R; Koch, Catrin Bauréus; Grafström, Gustav

    2010-01-01

    Single-fraction radiation therapy with 5 or 15 Gy (60)Co gamma radiation was combined with intraperitoneal injections of syngeneic interferon gamma (IFN-gamma)-transfected cells in rats with intracerebral N29 or N32 glioma tumors at days 7, 21 and 35 after inoculation. For intracerebral N29 tumor...

  19. Tipifarnib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Progressive High-Grade Glioma, Medulloblastoma, Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor, or Brain Stem Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-07

    Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma

  20. Elevation of the correlation between cerebral blood volume and permeability surface from CT perfusion images with glioma grade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Bei; Ling Huawei; Zhang Huan; Song Qi; Dong Haipeng; Chen Kemin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the correlation between cerebral blood volume and permeability surface by using multislice CT perfusion imaging with glioma grade. Methods: Ninteen patients with gliomas underwent conventional MR and multislice CT perfusion imaging preoperatively. These patients were divided into low grade and high grade groups which were correspond to WHO II grade gliomas and WHO III or IV grade gliomas respectively. CT data were transferred to on-line working station and processed to obtain time-signal curves, color perfusion maps and calculated perfusion parameters, including cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTF) and permeability surfaces (PS) in tumoral parenchyma. Kruskal-Wallis test and correlation of CBV and PS was assessed by using SPSS 11.0 software. Results: The median of CBV and PS in low-grade and high-grade glioma were 2.7, 6.5 ml/100 g; 0.389, 12.810 ml·100 g -1 ·min -1 respectively, corresponding t value were 12.907 13.500 with P<0.05. Pearson correlations between CBV and PS were as follows: in low-grade group, r=-0.058, in high-grade group, r=0.648. Conclusion: Both CBV and PS have obvious correlation with glioma grade. The correlation between CBV and PS in low-grade glioma was weaker, probably because of the focal high vascularity in oligodendroglioma. (authors)

  1. Functional response of tumor vasculature in rats' glioma to hypercarbia evaluated by MR perfusion weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qingbo; Feng Xiaoyuan; Liang Zonghui; Chen Shuan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of MR PWI in judging maturity and variability of tumor vasculature in gliomas in rats. Methods: Twenty male SD rats were randomly assigned to tumor group and control group. Four weeks after implantation of C6 glioma cells in the brains of tumor group and injection of saline in the brains of control group, all rats were examined using MR PWI before and after inhalation of a mixture of 10% CO2 and 90% air. PaCO 2 and blood pH values of rats were monitored. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and relative cerebral blood flow(rCBF) values of tumors and normal brain tissue were measured. Brain sample were examined histologically using HE and immunohistochemical staining for smooth muscle actin(SMA). The histological features of gliomas were observed and SMA positively stained vessels of each tumor were counted manually using a light microscope. Perfusion data and pathological findings were analyzed statistically with SPSS for Windows. Results: PaCO 2 increased significantly [from(4.69±0.62)kPa to (7.62±0.81) kPa in tumor group and from (4.67±0.51) kPa to (7.63±0.78) kPa in control group, P 0.05), while changing rate of rCBV, rCBF in normal brain tissue correlated well with number of positive SMA labeled vessels (r=0.721 and 0.525, P 2 increase in the normal brain and in the tumor. It may be a useful technique to measure maturity of tumor vessels. (authors)

  2. Tumor grading of adult astrocytic glioma on MR imaging

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    Chang, Kee Hyun; Choi, Choong Gon; Han, Moon Hee; Lee, Seon Kyu [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Jung Ho [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Kyu; Suh, Dae Chul [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyu Ho [Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Hong Sik [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Woo Suk [Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-09-15

    The purpose of this study is to determine predictive MR features for grading of astrocytic gliomas and to evaluate the accuracy of MR grading in these tumors. We retrospectively reviewed 135 cases of supratentorial astrocytic gliomas in adult (age > 15 years), all of which were proved by open biopsy. Two observers analysed MR images independently with criteria of margin, edema, mass effect, signal heterogeneity, necrosis, cyst formation, hemorrhage, tumor vascularity, enhancement degree, and enhancement size. The patterns of enhancement were categorized into no, homogeneous, heterogeneous, thin smooth rim, thin irregular rim, and thick irregular rim enhancement patterns. Observers finally diagnosed each case as one of low-grade astrocytoma, anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme. Statistically significant MR features for grading of these tumors were revealed as necrosis (p < 0.001), edema (0.008), and signal heterogeneity (p < 0.025). When compared with histopathologic grading, MR graded correctly 76%- 77% of cases in two tired system(low-grade astrocytoma versus high-grade astrocytoma), but only 67%-69% of cases in three tiered system(low-grade astrocytoma, anaplastic astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme). No contrast enhancement was seen in 45% and 23% of low-grade astrocytoma and anaplastic astrocytoma respectively. Glioblastoma multiforme frequently showed thick irregular rim enhancement (57%), but no enhancement at all in 8%. We have concluded that necrosis and edema are significant predictive MR features for grading of supratentorial astrocytic gliomas in adult, and MR was correct in 76%-77% of cases for predicting pathologic grading astrocytomas in two tiered system.

  3. Tumor grading of adult astrocytic glioma on MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Choi, Choong Gon; Han, Moon Hee; Lee, Seon Kyu; Suh, Jung Ho; Lee, Ho Kyu; Suh, Dae Chul; Choi, Kyu Ho; Byun, Hong Sik; Choi, Woo Suk

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine predictive MR features for grading of astrocytic gliomas and to evaluate the accuracy of MR grading in these tumors. We retrospectively reviewed 135 cases of supratentorial astrocytic gliomas in adult (age > 15 years), all of which were proved by open biopsy. Two observers analysed MR images independently with criteria of margin, edema, mass effect, signal heterogeneity, necrosis, cyst formation, hemorrhage, tumor vascularity, enhancement degree, and enhancement size. The patterns of enhancement were categorized into no, homogeneous, heterogeneous, thin smooth rim, thin irregular rim, and thick irregular rim enhancement patterns. Observers finally diagnosed each case as one of low-grade astrocytoma, anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme. Statistically significant MR features for grading of these tumors were revealed as necrosis (p < 0.001), edema (0.008), and signal heterogeneity (p < 0.025). When compared with histopathologic grading, MR graded correctly 76%- 77% of cases in two tired system(low-grade astrocytoma versus high-grade astrocytoma), but only 67%-69% of cases in three tiered system(low-grade astrocytoma, anaplastic astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme). No contrast enhancement was seen in 45% and 23% of low-grade astrocytoma and anaplastic astrocytoma respectively. Glioblastoma multiforme frequently showed thick irregular rim enhancement (57%), but no enhancement at all in 8%. We have concluded that necrosis and edema are significant predictive MR features for grading of supratentorial astrocytic gliomas in adult, and MR was correct in 76%-77% of cases for predicting pathologic grading astrocytomas in two tiered system

  4. Assessment of glioma response to radiotherapy using 3D pulsed-continuous arterial spin labeling and 3D segmented volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Li, Jianrui; Diao, Qiang; Lin, YuanKai; Zhang, Jun; Li, Lin; Yang, Gang; Fang, Xiaokun; Li, Xie; Chen, YingQi; Zheng, Ling, E-mail: lingzheng1989@yeah.net; Lu, Guangming, E-mail: guangminglu1905@163.com

    2016-11-15

    Background: Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors in adults, in some cases, radiotherapy may be the preferred treatment option especially for elderly people who cannot endure surgery. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the effects of radiotherapy on glioma. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MR imaging technique that allows for a quantitative determination of cerebral blood flow (CBF) noninvasively. Tumor volume is still an important determinant for evaluating treatment response. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the tumor perfusion parameters and tumor volume and assess the effects of radiotherapy on glioma using pulsed-continuous arterial spin labeling (pcASL) technique. Methods: 35 patients with gliomas, histologically classified as low-grade group (n = 16) and high-grade group (n = 19), treated with radiotherapy only or before using other therapies were included in this study. MR examinations, including T1 weighted image and pcASL, were performed before and 4, 8, 12, 16 weeks after radiotherapy. Regional CBF of normal tissue, mean tumor blood flow (TBF{sub mean}), maximum tumor blood flow (TBF{sub max}), and tumor volume were evaluated at each time point. Both the percentage change in CBF (CBF ratio), TBF{sub mean} (TBF{sub mean} ratio), TBF{sub max} (TBF{sub max} ratio) and the percentage change in tumor volume (volume ratio) were calculated using values obtained before and after radiotherapy. The correlation between the volume ratio and CBF ratio, TBF{sub mean} ratio, TBF{sub max} ratio was assessed using linear regression analysis and Pearson’s correlation. Results: The TBF{sub mean} and TBF{sub max} of high-grade gliomas were significantly higher than that of low-grade group. In high-grade group, a strong correlation was demonstrated between the tumor volume and the TBF{sub max} before radiotherapy (R{sup 2} = 0.35, r{sub s} = 0.59, p < 0.05). There was also a significant correlation between the TBF

  5. Tumor localization of boronated porphyrins in an intracerebral model of glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.S.; Kaye, A.H.; Gonzales, M.F.; Stylli, S.S.; Nakamura, Y.; Kahl, S.B.; Vardaxis, N.J.; Johnson, C.I.

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of the most common cerebral tumor, cerebral glioma, is unsatisfactory as the tumor recurs due to inadequate local control. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) offer some promise as adjuvant treatments for cerebral glioma. Several clinical trials have been reported utilizing PDT and BNCT to treat the high grade glioma, glioblastoma multiforme. The authors have investigated the pharmacokinetic tissue distribution of the photosensitizer Haematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), the nido carboranyl porphyrin, boron tetraphenyl porphine (BTPP) and the closo carboranyl monomeric protoporphyrin (BOPP) in CBA mice bearing the intracerebral C6 glioma xenograft

  6. The Value of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid in Low-grade Gliomas and High-grade Gliomas Lacking Glioblastoma Imaging Features: An Analysis Based on Fluorescence, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 18F-Fluoroethyl Tyrosine Positron Emission Tomography, and Tumor Molecular Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Mohammed; Wölfer, Johannes; Ewelt, Christian; Holling, Markus; Hasselblatt, Martin; Niederstadt, Thomas; Zoubi, Tarek; Weckesser, Matthias; Stummer, Walter

    2016-03-01

    Approximately 20% of grade II and most grade III gliomas fluoresce after 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) application. Conversely, approximately 30% of nonenhancing gliomas are actually high grade. The aim of this study was to identify preoperative factors (ie, age, enhancement, 18F-fluoroethyl tyrosine positron emission tomography [F-FET PET] uptake ratios) for predicting fluorescence in gliomas without typical glioblastomas imaging features and to determine whether fluorescence will allow prediction of tumor grade or molecular characteristics. Patients harboring gliomas without typical glioblastoma imaging features were given 5-ALA. Fluorescence was recorded intraoperatively, and biopsy specimens collected from fluorescing tissue. World Health Organization (WHO) grade, Ki-67/MIB-1 index, IDH1 (R132H) mutation status, O-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation status, and 1p/19q co-deletion status were assessed. Predictive factors for fluorescence were derived from preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and F-FET PET. Classification and regression tree analysis and receiver-operating-characteristic curves were generated for defining predictors. Of 166 tumors, 82 were diagnosed as WHO grade II, 76 as grade III, and 8 as glioblastomas grade IV. Contrast enhancement, tumor volume, and F-FET PET uptake ratio >1.85 predicted fluorescence. Fluorescence correlated with WHO grade (P fluorescing grade III gliomas was higher than in nonfluorescing tumors, whereas in fluorescing and nonfluorescing grade II tumors, no differences were noted. Age, tumor volume, and F-FET PET uptake are factors predicting 5-ALA-induced fluorescence in gliomas without typical glioblastoma imaging features. Fluorescence was associated with an increased Ki-67/MIB-1 index and high-grade pathology. Whether fluorescence in grade II gliomas identifies a subtype with worse prognosis remains to be determined.

  7. Sensitivity of MRI tumor biomarkers to VEGFR inhibitor therapy in an orthotopic mouse glioma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian T Farrar

    Full Text Available MRI biomarkers of tumor edema, vascular permeability, blood volume, and average vessel caliber are increasingly being employed to assess the efficacy of tumor therapies. However, the dependence of these biomarkers on a number of physiological factors can compromise their sensitivity and complicate the assessment of therapeutic efficacy. Here we examine the response of these MRI tumor biomarkers to cediranib, a potent vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR inhibitor, in an orthotopic mouse glioma model. A significant increase in the tumor volume and relative vessel caliber index (rVCI and a slight decrease in the water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC were observed for both control and cediranib treated animals. This contrasts with a clinical study that observed a significant decrease in tumor rVCI, ADC and volume with cediranib therapy. While the lack of a difference between control and cediranib treated animals in these biomarker responses might suggest that cediranib has no therapeutic benefit, cediranib treated mice had a significantly increased survival. The increased survival benefit of cediranib treated animals is consistent with the significant decrease observed for cediranib treated animals in the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV, relative microvascular blood volume (rMBV, transverse relaxation time (T2, blood vessel permeability (K(trans, and extravascular-extracellular space (ν(e. The differential response of pre-clinical and clinical tumors to cediranib therapy, along with the lack of a positive response for some biomarkers, indicates the importance of evaluating the whole spectrum of different tumor biomarkers to properly assess the therapeutic response and identify and interpret the therapy-induced changes in the tumor physiology.

  8. Tumor-specific binding of radiolabeled G-22 monoclonal antibody in glioma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Jun; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Mizuno, Masaaki; Sugita, Kenichiro; Oshima, Motoo; Tadokoro, Masanori; Sakuma, Sadayuki [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Seo, Hisao

    1992-03-01

    Iodine-131-labeled G-22 monoclonal antibody F(ab'){sub 2} fragment reacting specifically with a glioma-associated surface glycoprotein was administered to 12 glioma patients to investigate its use in radioimaging of intracranial gliomas. No immediate or delayed side effects were attributable to antibody injection. Nine patients received the radiolabeled complex intravenously. The images of low-grade gliomas were generally poor and disappeared within 4 days. High-contrast images were obtained beyond the 7th day in high-grade gliomas except one case in the pineal region. Three patients received intraventricular or intratumoral administration. Clear images of all tumors were demonstrated from the 2nd until later than the 7th day. One patient with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dissemination of brainstem glioma demonstrated negative CSF cytology after intraventricular administration. (author).

  9. Perfusion MRI derived indices of microvascular shunting and flow control correlate with tumor grade and outcome in patients with cerebral glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tietze, Anna; Mouridsen, Kim; Lassen-Ramshad, Yasmin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Deficient microvascular blood flow control is thought to cause tumor hypoxia and increase resistance to therapy. In glioma patients, we tested whether perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI) based indices of microvascular flow control provide more information on tumor grade and patient outcome...... than does the established PWI angiogenesis marker, cerebral blood volume (CBV). Material and Methods: Seventy-two glioma patients (sixty high-grade, twelve low-grade gliomas) were included. Capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH) and COV, its ratio to blood mean transit time, provide indices...... of microvascular flow control and the extent to which oxygen can be extracted by tumor tissue. The ability of these parameters and CBV to differentiate tumor grade were assessed by receiver operating characteristic curves and logistic regression. Their ability to predict time to progression and overall survival...

  10. PEGylated Polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugated with tumor homing peptide as a potential targeted delivery system for glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Lv, Lingyan; Shi, Huihui; Hua, Yabing; Lv, Wei; Wang, Xiuzhen; Xin, Hongliang; Xu, Qunwei

    2016-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary central nervous system (CNS) tumor with a short survival time. The failure of chemotherapy is ascribed to the low transport of chemotherapeutics across the Blood Brain Tumor Barrier (BBTB) and poor penetration into tumor tissue. In order to overcome the two barriers, small nanoparticles with active targeted capability are urgently needed for GBM drug delivery. In this study, we proposed PEGylated Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer nanoparticles conjugated with glioma homing peptides (Pep-1) as potential glioma targeting delivery system (Pep-PEG-PAMAM), where PEGylated PAMAM dendrimer nanoparticle was utilized as carrier due to its small size and perfect penetration into tumor and Pep-1 was used to overcome BBTB via interleukin 13 receptor α2 (IL-13Rα2) mediated endocytosis. The preliminary availability and safety of Pep-PEG-PAMAM as a nanocarrier for glioma was evaluated. In vitro results indicated that a significantly higher amount of Pep-PEG-PAMAM was endocytosed by U87 MG cells. In vivo fluorescence imaging of U87MG tumor-bearing mice confirmed that the fluorescence intensity at glioma site of targeted group was 2.02 folds higher than that of untargeted group (**p<0.01), and glioma distribution experiment further revealed that Pep-PEG-PAMAM exhibited a significantly enhanced accumulation and improved penetration at tumor site. In conclusion, Pep-1 modified PAMAM was a promising nanocarrier for targeted delivery of brain glioma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Extracellular Vesicles As Modulators of Tumor Microenvironment and Disease Progression in Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir Mondal

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse gliomas are lethal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS characterized by infiltrative growth, aggressive nature, and therapeutic resistance. The recent 2016 WHO classification for CNS tumors categorizes diffuse glioma into two major types that include IDH wild-type glioblastoma, which is the predominant type and IDH-mutant glioblastoma, which is less common and displays better prognosis. Recent studies suggest presence of a distinct cell population with stem cell features termed as glioma stem cells (GSCs to be causal in driving tumor growth in glioblastoma. The presence of a stem and progenitor population possibly makes glioblastoma highly heterogeneous. Significantly, tumor growth is driven by interaction of cells residing within the tumor with the surrounding milieu termed as the tumor microenvironment. It comprises of various cell types such as endothelial cells, secreted factors, and the surrounding extracellular matrix, which altogether help perpetuate the proliferation of GSCs. One of the important mediators critical to the cross talk is extracellular vesicles (EVs. These nano-sized vesicles play important roles in intercellular communication by transporting bioactive molecules into the surrounding milieu, thereby altering cellular functions and/or reprogramming recipient cells. With the growing information on the contribution of EVs in modulation of the tumor microenvironment, it is important to determine their role in both supporting as well as promoting tumor growth in glioma. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the role of EVs in tumor progression and glioma pathogenesis.

  12. Mechanisms of Glioma Formation: Iterative Perivascular Glioma Growth and Invasion Leads to Tumor Progression, VEGF-Independent Vascularization, and Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J. Baker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As glioma cells infiltrate the brain they become associated with various microanatomic brain structures such as blood vessels, white matter tracts, and brain parenchyma. How these distinct invasion patterns coordinate tumor growth and influence clinical outcomes remain poorly understood. We have investigated how perivascular growth affects glioma growth patterning and response to antiangiogenic therapy within the highly vascularized brain. Orthotopically implanted rodent and human glioma cells are shown to commonly invade and proliferate within brain perivascular space. This form of brain tumor growth and invasion is also shown to characterize de novo generated endogenous mouse brain tumors, biopsies of primary human glioblastoma (GBM, and peripheral cancer metastasis to the human brain. Perivascularly invading brain tumors become vascularized by normal brain microvessels as individual glioma cells use perivascular space as a conduit for tumor invasion. Agent-based computational modeling recapitulated biological perivascular glioma growth without the need for neoangiogenesis. We tested the requirement for neoangiogenesis in perivascular glioma by treating animals with angiogenesis inhibitors bevacizumab and DC101. These inhibitors induced the expected vessel normalization, yet failed to reduce tumor growth or improve survival of mice bearing orthotopic or endogenous gliomas while exacerbating brain tumor invasion. Our results provide compelling experimental evidence in support of the recently described failure of clinically used antiangiogenics to extend the overall survival of human GBM patients.

  13. Family History of Cancer in Benign Brain Tumor Subtypes Versus Gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrom, Quinn T.; McCulloh, Christopher; Chen, Yanwen; Devine, Karen; Wolinsky, Yingli

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Family history is associated with gliomas, but this association has not been established for benign brain tumors. Using information from newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients, we describe patterns of family cancer histories in patients with benign brain tumors and compare those to patients with gliomas. Methods: Newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients were identified as part of the Ohio Brain Tumor Study. Each patient was asked to participate in a telephone interview about personal medical history, family history of cancer, and other exposures. Information was available from 33 acoustic neuroma (65%), 78 meningioma (65%), 49 pituitary adenoma (73.1%), and 152 glioma patients (58.2%). The association between family history of cancer and each subtype was compared with gliomas using unconditional logistic regression models generating odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals. Results: There was no significant difference in family history of cancer between patients with glioma and benign subtypes. Conclusion: The results suggest that benign brain tumor may have an association with family history of cancer. More studies are warranted to disentangle the potential genetic and/or environmental causes for these diseases.

  14. Family History of Cancer in Benign Brain Tumor Subtypes Versus Gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrom, Quinn T. [Department of Anthropology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); McCulloh, Christopher [Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chen, Yanwen; Devine, Karen; Wolinsky, Yingli, E-mail: qto@case.edu [Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-02-28

    Purpose: Family history is associated with gliomas, but this association has not been established for benign brain tumors. Using information from newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients, we describe patterns of family cancer histories in patients with benign brain tumors and compare those to patients with gliomas. Methods: Newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients were identified as part of the Ohio Brain Tumor Study. Each patient was asked to participate in a telephone interview about personal medical history, family history of cancer, and other exposures. Information was available from 33 acoustic neuroma (65%), 78 meningioma (65%), 49 pituitary adenoma (73.1%), and 152 glioma patients (58.2%). The association between family history of cancer and each subtype was compared with gliomas using unconditional logistic regression models generating odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals. Results: There was no significant difference in family history of cancer between patients with glioma and benign subtypes. Conclusion: The results suggest that benign brain tumor may have an association with family history of cancer. More studies are warranted to disentangle the potential genetic and/or environmental causes for these diseases.

  15. Family history of cancer in benign brain tumor subtypes versus gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn eOstrom

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Family history is associated with gliomas, but this association has not ben established for benign brain tumors. Using information from newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients, we describe patterns of family cancer histories in patients with benign brain tumors and compare those to patients with gliomas. Methods: Newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients were identified as part of the Ohio Brain Tumor Study (OBTS. Each patient was asked to participate in a telephone interview about personal medical history, family history of cancer, and other exposures. Information was available from 33 acoustic neuroma (65%, 78 meningioma (65%, 49 pituitary adenoma (73.1% and 152 glioma patients (58.2%. The association between family history of cancer and each subtype was compared with gliomas using unconditional logistic regression models generating odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Results: There was no significant difference in family history of cancer between patients with glioma and benign subtypes. Conclusions: The results suggest that benign brain tumor may have an association with family history of cancer. More studies are warranted to disentangle the potential genetic and/or environmental causes for these diseases.

  16. Functional Response of Tumor Vasculature to PaCO2: Determination of Total and Microvascular Blood Volume by MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D. Packard

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify differences in functional activity, we compared the reactivity of glioma vasculature and the native cerebral vasculature to both dilate and constrict in response to altered PaCO2. Gliomas were generated by unilateral implantation of U87MGdEGFR human glioma tumor cells into the striatum of adult female athymic rats. Relative changes in total and microvascular cerebral blood volume were determined by steady state contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for transitions from normocarbia to hypercarbia and hypocarbia. Although hypercarbia induced a significant increase in both total and microvascular blood volume in normal brain and glioma, reactivity of glioma vasculature was significantly blunted in comparison to normal striatum; glioma total CBV increased by 0.6±0.1%/mm Hg CO2 whereas normal striatum increased by 1.5±0.2%/mm Hg CO2, (P < .0001, group t-test. Reactivity of microvascular blood volume was also significantly blunted. In contrast, hypocarbia decreased both total and microvascular blood volumes more in glioma than in normal striatum. These results indicate that cerebral blood vessels derived by tumor-directed angiogenesis do retain reactivity to CO2. Furthermore, reduced reactivity of tumor vessels to a single physiological perturbation, such as hypercarbia, should not be construed as a generalized reduction of functional activity of the tumor vascular bed.

  17. Type I collagen gene suppresses tumor growth and invasion of malignant human glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyata Teruo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasion is a hallmark of a malignant tumor, such as a glioma, and the progression is followed by the interaction of tumor cells with an extracellular matrix (ECM. This study examined the role of type I collagen in the invasion of the malignant human glioma cell line T98G by the introduction of the human collagen type I α1 (HCOL1A1 gene. Results The cells overexpressing HCOL1A1 were in a cluster, whereas the control cells were scattered. Overexpression of HCOL1A1 significantly suppressed the motility and invasion of the tumor cells. The glioma cell growth was markedly inhibited in vitro and in vivo by the overexpression of HCOL1A1; in particular, tumorigenicity completely regressed in nude mice. Furthermore, the HCOL1A1 gene induced apoptosis in glioma cells. Conclusion These results indicate that HCOL1A1 have a suppressive biological function in glioma progression and that the introduction of HCOL1A1 provides the basis of a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of malignant human glioma.

  18. Effective transvascular delivery of nanoparticles across the blood-brain tumor barrier into malignant glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Kamal

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective transvascular delivery of nanoparticle-based chemotherapeutics across the blood-brain tumor barrier of malignant gliomas remains a challenge. This is due to our limited understanding of nanoparticle properties in relation to the physiologic size of pores within the blood-brain tumor barrier. Polyamidoamine dendrimers are particularly small multigenerational nanoparticles with uniform sizes within each generation. Dendrimer sizes increase by only 1 to 2 nm with each successive generation. Using functionalized polyamidoamine dendrimer generations 1 through 8, we investigated how nanoparticle size influences particle accumulation within malignant glioma cells. Methods Magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging probes were conjugated to the dendrimer terminal amines. Functionalized dendrimers were administered intravenously to rodents with orthotopically grown malignant gliomas. Transvascular transport and accumulation of the nanoparticles in brain tumor tissue was measured in vivo with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Localization of the nanoparticles within glioma cells was confirmed ex vivo with fluorescence imaging. Results We found that the intravenously administered functionalized dendrimers less than approximately 11.7 to 11.9 nm in diameter were able to traverse pores of the blood-brain tumor barrier of RG-2 malignant gliomas, while larger ones could not. Of the permeable functionalized dendrimer generations, those that possessed long blood half-lives could accumulate within glioma cells. Conclusion The therapeutically relevant upper limit of blood-brain tumor barrier pore size is approximately 11.7 to 11.9 nm. Therefore, effective transvascular drug delivery into malignant glioma cells can be accomplished by using nanoparticles that are smaller than 11.7 to 11.9 nm in diameter and possess long blood half-lives.

  19. The melatonin-MT1 receptor axis modulates tumor growth in PTEN-mutated gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huihui; Wang, Zhen; Hu, Lei; Zhang, Shangrong; Zhao, Chenggang; Yang, Haoran; Wang, Hongzhi; Fang, Zhiyou; Wu, Lijun; Chen, Xueran

    2018-02-19

    More than 40% of glioma patients have tumors that harbor PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten) mutations; this disease is associated with poor therapeutic resistance and outcome. Such mutations are linked to increased cell survival and growth, decreased apoptosis, and drug resistance; thus, new therapeutic strategies focusing on inhibiting glioma tumorigenesis and progression are urgently needed. Melatonin, an indolamine produced and secreted predominantly by the pineal gland, mediates a variety of physiological functions and possesses antioxidant and antitumor properties. Here, we analyzed the relationship between PTEN and the inhibitory effect of melatonin in primary human glioma cells and cultured glioma cell lines. The results showed that melatonin can inhibit glioma cell growth both in culture and in vivo. This inhibition was associated with PTEN levels, which significantly correlated with the expression level of MT1 in patients. In fact, c-fos-mediated MT1 was shown to be a key modulator of the effect of melatonin on gliomas that harbor wild type PTEN. Taken together, these data suggest that melatonin-MT1 receptor complexes represent a potential target for the treatment of glioma. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tumor Restrictive Suicide Gene Therapy for Glioma Controlled by the FOS Promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqing Pan

    Full Text Available Effective suicide gene delivery and expression are crucial to achieving successful effects in gene therapy. An ideal tumor-specific promoter expresses therapeutic genes in tumor cells with minimal normal tissue expression. We compared the activity of the FOS (FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog promoter with five alternative tumor-specific promoters in glioma cells and non-malignant astrocytes. The FOS promoter caused significantly higher transcriptional activity in glioma cell lines than all alternative promoters with the exception of CMV. The FOS promoter showed 13.9%, 32.4%, and 70.8% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in three glioma cell lines (U87, U251, and U373. Importantly, however, the FOS promoter showed only 1.6% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in normal astrocytes. We also tested the biologic activity of recombinant adenovirus containing the suicide gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk driven by the FOS promoter, including selective killing efficacy in vitro and tumor inhibition rate in vivo. Adenoviral-mediated delivery of the HSV-tk gene controlled by the FOS promoter conferred a cytotoxic effect on human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. This study suggests that use of the FOS-tk adenovirus system is a promising strategy for glioma-specific gene therapy but still much left for improvement.

  1. 11C-CHO PET in optimization of target volume delineation and treatment regimens in postoperative radiotherapy for brain gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fangming; Nie Qing; Wang Ruimin; Chang, Susan M.; Zhao Wenrui; Zhu Qi; Liang Yingkui; Yang Ping; Zhang Jun; Jia Haiwei; Fang Henghu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We explored the clinical values of 11 C-choline ( 11 C-CHO) PET in optimization of target volume delineation and treatment regimens in postoperative radiotherapy for brain gliomas. Methods: Sixteen patients with the pathological confirmation of the diagnosis of gliomas prior to receiving radiotherapy (postoperative) were included, and on whom both MRI and CHO PET scans were performed at the same position for comparison of residual tumors with the two techniques. 11 C-CHO was used as the tracer in the PET scan. A plain T1-weighted, T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging scans were performed in the MRI scan sequence. The gliomas' residual tumor volume was defined as the area with CHO-PET high-affinity uptake and metabolism (V CHO ) and one with MRI T1-weighted imaging high signal intensity (V Gd ), and was determined by a group of experienced professionals and clinicians. Results: (1) In CHO-PET images, the tumor target volume, i.e., the highly metabolic area with a high concentration of isotopes (SUV 1.016–4.21) and the corresponding contralateral normal brain tissues (SUV0.1–0.62), was well contrasted, and the boundary between lesions and surrounding normal brain tissues was better defined compared with MRI and 18 F-FDG PET images. (2) For patients with brain gliomas of WHO Grade II, the SUV was 1.016–2.5; for those with WHO Grades III and IV, SUVs were >26–4.2. (3) Both CHO PET and MRI were positive for 10 patients and negative for 2 patients. The residual tumor consistency between these two studies was 75%. Four of the 10 CHO-PET-positive patients were negative on MRI scans. The maximum distance between V Gd and V CHO margins was 1.8 cm. (4) The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) and the ensuing treatment regimens were changed for 31.3% (5/16) of patients based on the CHO-PET high-affinity uptake and metabolism, in which the change rate was 80% (4/5), 14.3 % (1/7) and 0% (0/4) for patients with WHO Grade II III, and IV gliomas

  2. Tumor initiating cells in malignant gliomas: biology and implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjipanayis, Costas G; Van Meir, Erwin G

    2009-04-01

    A rare subpopulation of cells within malignant gliomas, which shares canonical properties with neural stem cells (NSCs), may be integral to glial tumor development and perpetuation. These cells, also known as tumor initiating cells (TICs), have the ability to self-renew, develop into any cell in the overall tumor population (multipotency), and proliferate. A defining property of TICs is their ability to initiate new tumors in immunocompromised mice with high efficiency. Mounting evidence suggests that TICs originate from the transformation of NSCs and their progenitors. New findings show that TICs may be more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation than the bulk of tumor cells, thereby permitting recurrent tumor formation and accounting for the failure of conventional therapies. The development of new therapeutic strategies selectively targeting TICs while sparing NSCs may provide for more effective treatment of malignant gliomas.

  3. The functional imaging in target volume delineation of radiotherapy planning for gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jingxiong; Wu Hua

    2007-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of important treatments for glioma. Functional imaging, such as PET, SPECT and MRI, may provide more valuable information not only in display of the evasion extent of glioma but also in demonstration of some biological characteristics of the tumor, such as perfusion, metabolism, hypoxia or proliferation. Thus it may play a role in making an individualized and more exact radiotherapy planning. (authors)

  4. CD4+ and Perivascular Foxp3+ T Cells in Glioma Correlate with Angiogenesis and Tumor Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyan Mu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAngiogenesis and immune cell infiltration are key features of gliomas and their manipulation of the microenvironment, but their prognostic significance remains indeterminate. We evaluate the interconnection between tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL and tumor blood-vasculatures in the context of glioma progression.MethodsPaired tumor tissues of 44 patients from three tumor-recurrent groups: diffuse astrocytomas (DA recurred as DA, DA recurred as glioblastomas (GBM, and GBM recurred as GBM were evaluated by genetic analysis, immunohistochemistry for tumor blood vessel density, TIL subsets, and clinical outcomes. These cells were geographically divided into perivascular and intratumoral TILs. Associations were examined between these TILs, CD34+ tumor blood vessels, and clinical outcomes. To determine key changes in TIL subsets, microarray data of 15-paired tumors from patients who failed antiangiogenic therapy- bevacizumab, and 16-paired tumors from chemo-naïve recurrent GBM were also evaluated and compared.ResultsUpon recurrence in primary gliomas, similar kinetic changes were found between tumor blood vessels and each TIL subset in all groups, but only CD4+ including Foxp3+ TILs, positively correlated with the density of tumor blood vessels. CD4 was the predominant T cell population based on the expression of gene-transcripts in primary GBMs, and increased activated CD4+ T cells were revealed in Bevacizumab-resistant recurrent tumors (not in chemo-naïve recurrent tumors. Among these TILs, 2/3 of them were found in the perivascular niche; Foxp3+ T cells in these niches not only correlated with the tumor vessels but were also an independent predictor of shortened recurrence-free survival (RFS (HR = 4.199, 95% CI 1.522–11.584, p = 0.006.ConclusionThe minimal intratumoral T cell infiltration and low detection of CD8 transcripts expression in primary GBMs can potentially limit antitumor response. CD4+ and perivascular Foxp3

  5. Cortical and Subcortical Structural Plasticity Associated with the Glioma Volumes in Patients with Cerebral Gliomas Revealed by Surface-Based Morphometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinping Xu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Postlesional plasticity has been identified in patients with cerebral gliomas by inducing a large functional reshaping of brain networks. Although numerous non-invasive functional neuroimaging methods have extensively investigated the mechanisms of this functional redistribution in patients with cerebral gliomas, little effort has been made to investigate the structural plasticity of cortical and subcortical structures associated with the glioma volume. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether the contralateral cortical and subcortical structures are able to actively reorganize by themselves in these patients. The compensation mechanism following contralateral cortical and subcortical structural plasticity is considered. We adopted the surface-based morphometry to investigate the difference of cortical and subcortical gray matter (GM volumes in a cohort of 14 healthy controls and 13 patients with left-hemisphere cerebral gliomas [including 1 patients with World Health Organization (WHO I, 8 WHO II, and 4 WHO III]. The glioma volume ranges from 5.1633 to 208.165 cm2. Compared to healthy controls, we found significantly increased GM volume of the right cuneus and the left thalamus, as well as a trend toward enlargement in the right globus pallidus in patients with cerebral gliomas. Moreover, the GM volumes of these regions were positively correlated with the glioma volumes of the patients. These results provide evidence of cortical and subcortical enlargement, suggesting the usefulness of surface-based morphometry to investigate the structural plasticity. Moreover, the structural plasticity might be acted as the compensation mechanism to better fulfill its functions in patients with cerebral gliomas as the gliomas get larger.

  6. Glioma Cells in the Tumor Periphery Have a Stem Cell Phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe, Sune; Petterson, Stine Asferg; Dahlrot, Rikke Hedegaard

    2016-01-01

    and a panel of markers was used. The panel comprised of six stem cell-related markers (CD133, Musashi-1, Bmi-1, Sox-2, Nestin and Glut-3), a proliferation marker (Ki-67) as well as a chemo-resistance marker (MGMT). Computer-based automated classifiers were designed to measure the mIDH1 positive nucleus area......-fraction of the chosen markers. Moreover, orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts from five different patient-derived spheroid cultures were obtained and the tumor cells identified by human specific immunohistochemical markers. The results showed that tumor cells in the periphery of patient gliomas expressed stem cell...... in the periphery of patient gliomas have a stem cell phenotype, although it is less pronounced than in the tumor core. Novel therapies aiming at preventing recurrence should therefore take tumor stemness into account. Migrating cells in orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts preserve expression and stem cell markers...

  7. Sixth nerve palsy - Window to a dreaded brain tumor in children (pontine glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Das

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pontine glioma is a rare tumor and exclusively occurs in children. It originates from the glial (connective/supporting cells of the brain. In children, they are the leading cause of deaths from brain tumors. The usual age of presentation is later half of first decade. Most of the children die within 18 months of diagnosis. It mostly affects 6th and 7th cranial nerves along with hearing defect.

  8. Comparative genomic and proteomic analysis of high grade glioma primary cultures and matched tumor in situ.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Howley, R

    2012-10-15

    Developing targeted therapies for high grade gliomas (HGG), the most common primary brain tumor in adults, relies largely on glioma cultures. However, it is unclear if HGG tumorigenic signaling pathways are retained under in-vitro conditions. Using array comparative genomic hybridization and immunohistochemical profiling, we contrasted the epidermal and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (EGFR\\/PDGFR) in-vitro pathway status of twenty-six primary HGG cultures with the pathway status of their original HGG biopsies. Genomic gains or amplifications were lost during culturing while genomic losses were more likely to be retained. Loss of EGFR amplification was further verified immunohistochemically when EGFR over expression was decreased in the majority of cultures. Conversely, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ were more abundantly expressed in primary cultures than in the original tumor (p<0.05). Despite these genomic and proteomic differences, primary HGG cultures retained key aspects of dysregulated tumorigenic signaling. Both in-vivo and in-vitro the presence of EGFR resulted in downstream activation of P70s6K while reduced downstream activation was associated with the presence of PDGFR and the tumor suppressor, PTEN. The preserved pathway dysregulation make this glioma model suitable for further studies of glioma tumorigenesis, however individual culture related differences must be taken into consideration when testing responsiveness to chemotherapeutic agents.

  9. The anti-tumor effect of ACNU and x-irradiation on mouse glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hidemitsu; Hori, Masaharu; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Mogami, Heitaro; Hayakawa, Toru.

    1979-01-01

    Anti-tumor activities of 1-(4-amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)methyl-3-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosourea hydrochloride (ACNU) and x-irradiation on methylcholanthrene induced glioma in C 57 BL mice were studied in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments using cultured glioma cells (MGB cells), the synchronization of cell cycle was done by excess addition of thymidine, and the anti-tumor cell effect were investigated by mean of determinations of DNA synthesis, mitotic index and the number of the living cells following the treatments. As the results, it appeared obvious that ACNU was most effective on MGB cells in S phase and x-irradiation in M phase. As to the combined therapy of ACNU and x-irradiation, the anti-tumor effect was most remarkable when the cells were treated by x-irradiation in the G 2 , M phase, which were hervested by addition of ACNU 44 hours before irradiation. However simultaneous treatment of ACNU and x-irradiation on the cells in G 1 phase was not so remarkable. In vivo experiments the anti-tumor effect of ACNU and x-irradiation on subcutaneously or intracranially transplanted glioma in mice was investigated. Either ACNU 10 mg/kg or local x-irradiation 1240 rads showed inhibitory effect on the tumor growth and prolonged the survival time of the tumor bearing mice. The combination therapy was more effective than ACNU or x-irradiation alone, particularly combination therapy of ACNU and repeated small doses irradiation of x-ray was remarkably effective. Evidence obtained indicated that the combination therapy of ACNU and x-irradiation have synergistic anti-tumor effect on experimental mouse glioma. (author)

  10. FTIR spectro-imaging of collagen scaffold formation during glioma tumor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Razia; Chien, Chia-Chi; Chen, Hsiang-Hsin; Bobroff, Vladimir; Moenner, Michel; Javerzat, Sophie; Hwu, Yeukuang; Petibois, Cyril

    2013-11-01

    Evidence has recently emerged that solid and diffuse tumors produce a specific extracellular matrix (ECM) for division and diffusion, also developing a specific interface with microvasculature. This ECM is mainly composed of collagens and their scaffolding appears to drive tumor growth. Although collagens are not easily analyzable by UV-fluorescence means, FTIR imaging has appeared as a valuable tool to characterize collagen contents in tissues, specially the brain, where ECM is normally devoid of collagen proteins. Here, we used FTIR imaging to characterize collagen content changes in growing glioma tumors. We could determine that C6-derived solid tumors presented high content of triple helix after 8-11 days of growth (typical of collagen fibrils formation; 8/8 tumor samples; 91 % of total variance), and further turned to larger α-helix (days 12-15; 9/10 of tumors; 94 % of variance) and β-turns (day 18-21; 7/8 tumors; 97 % of variance) contents, which suggest the incorporation of non-fibrillar collagen types in ECM, a sign of more and more organized collagen scaffold along tumor progression. The growth of tumors was also associated to the level of collagen produced (P < 0.05). This study thus confirms that collagen scaffolding is a major event accompanying the angiogenic shift and faster tumor growth in solid glioma phenotypes.

  11. PAI-1 and EGFR expression in adult glioma tumors: toward a molecular prognostic classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muracciole, Xavier; Romain, Sylvie; Dufour, Henri; Palmari, Jacqueline; Chinot, Olivier; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Grisoli, Francois; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Martin, Pierre-Marie

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Molecular classification of gliomas is a major challenge in the effort to improve therapeutic decisions. The plasminogen activator system, including plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1), plays a key role in tumor invasion and neoangiogenesis. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is involved in the control of proliferation. The contribution of PAI-1 and EGFR to the survival of gliomas was retrospectively investigated. Methods and Materials: Fifty-nine adult gliomas treated by neurosurgery and conventional irradiation were analyzed, including 9 low-grade (2) and 50 high-grade (3-4) tumors (WHO classification). PAI-1 was measured on cytosols and EGFR on solubilized membranes using ELISA methods. Results: High PAI-1 levels were strongly associated with high histologic grade (p<0.001) and histologic necrosis (p<0.001). PAI-1 also correlated positively with patient age (p=0.05) and negatively with Karnofsky index (p=0.01). By univariate analysis of the high-grade population, higher PAI-1 (p<0.0001) and EGFR values (p=0.02) were associated with shorter overall survival. Only PAI-1 was an independent factor in multivariate analysis. Grade 3 tumors with low PAI-1 (100% 3-year overall survival rate) presented the same clinical outcome as the low-grade tumors. Conclusions: In this prognostic study, PAI-1 and EGFR expression revealed similarities and differences between high-grade gliomas that were not apparent by traditional clinical criteria. These data strongly support that biologic factors should be included in glioma classification and the design of clinical trials to treat more homogeneous populations

  12. Modeling tumor-associated edema in gliomas during anti-angiogenic therapy and its impact on imageable tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eHawkins-Daarud

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor is predominantly assessed with gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1Gd and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Pixel intensity enhancement on the T1Gd image is understood to correspond to the gadolinium contrast agent leaking from the tumor-induced neovasculature, while hyperintensity on the T2/FLAIR images corresponds with edema and infiltrated tumor cells. None of these modalities directly show tumor cells; rather, they capture abnormalities in the microenvironment caused by the presence of tumor cells. Thus, assessing disease response after treatments impacting the microenvironment remains challenging through the obscuring lens of MR imaging. Anti-angiogenic therapies have been used in the treatment of gliomas with spurious results ranging from no apparent response to significant imaging improvement with the potential for extremely diffuse patterns of tumor recurrence on imaging and autopsy. Anti-angiogenic treatment normalizes the vasculature, effectively decreasing vessel permeability and thus reducing tumor-induced edema, drastically altering T2-weighted MRI. We extend a previously developed mathematical model of glioma growth to explicitly incorporate edema formation allowing us to directly characterize and potentially predict the effects of anti-angiogenics on imageable tumor growth. A comparison of simulated glioma growth and imaging enhancement with and without bevacizumab supports the current understanding that anti-angiogenic treatment can serve as a surrogate for steroids and the clinically-driven hypothesis that anti-angiogenic treatment may not have any significant effect on the growth dynamics of the overall tumor-cell populations. However, the simulations do illustrate a potentially large impact on the level of edematous extracellular fluid, and thus on what would be imageable on T2/FLAIR MR for tumors with lower proliferation rates.

  13. Chitosan-alginate 3D scaffolds as a mimic of the glioma tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kievit, Forrest M; Florczyk, Stephen J; Leung, Matthew C; Veiseh, Omid; Park, James O; Disis, Mary L; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-08-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding of its cell biology, glioma remains highly lethal. Development of effective therapies requires a cost-effective in vitro tumor model that more accurately resembles the in vivo tumor microenvironment as standard two-dimensional (2D) tissue culture conditions do so poorly. Here we report on the use of a three-dimensional (3D) chitosan-alginate (CA) scaffold to serve as an extracellular matrix that promotes the conversion of cultured cancer cells to a more malignant in vivo-like phenotype. Human U-87 MG and U-118 MG glioma cells and rat C6 glioma cells were chosen for the study. In vitro tumor cell proliferation and secretion of factors that promote tumor malignancy, including VEGF, MMP-2, fibronectin, and laminin, were assessed. The scaffolds pre-cultured with U-87 MG and C6 cells were then implanted into nude mice to evaluate tumor growth and blood vessel recruitment compared to the standard 2D cell culture and 3D Matrigel matrix xenograft controls. Our results indicate that while the behavior of C6 cells showed minimal differences due to their highly malignant and invasive nature, U-87 MG and U-118 MG cells exhibited notably higher malignancy when cultured in CA scaffolds. CA scaffolds provide a 3D microenvironment for glioma cells that is more representative of the in vivo tumor, thus can serve as a more effective platform for development and study of anticancer therapeutics. This unique CA scaffold platform may offer a valuable alternative strategy to the time-consuming and costly animal studies for a wide variety of experimental designs. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cyclic hexapeptide-conjugated nanoparticles enhance curcumin delivery to glioma tumor cells and tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang X

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Xuemei Zhang,1–3 Xuejuan Li,1,4 Hongchen Hua,1 Aiping Wang,1 Wanhui Liu,1–3 Youxin Li,1–3 Fenghua Fu,1–3 Yanan Shi,5 Kaoxiang Sun1 1School of Pharmacy, Yantai University, Yantai, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 2State Key Laboratory of Long-acting and Targeting Drug Delivery System, Yantai, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Luye Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 4National Engineering and Technology Research Center of Chirality Pharmaceutical, Lunan Pharmaceutical Group Co., Ltd., Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 5School of Pharmacy, Binzhou Medical University, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Glioma has one of the highest mortality rates among primary brain tumors. The clinical treatment for glioma is very difficult due to its infiltration and specific growth locations. To achieve improved drug delivery to a brain tumor, we report the preparation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of curcumin nanoparticles (Cur-NPs. The cyclic hexapeptide c(RGDf(N-meVK-C (cHP has increased affinity for cells that overexpress integrins and was designed to target Cur-NPs to tumors. Functional polyethyleneglycol-modified poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PEG-PLGA conjugated to cHP was synthesized, and targeted Cur-NPs were prepared using a self-assembly nanoprecipitation process. The physicochemical properties and the in vitro cytotoxicity, accuracy, and penetration capabilities of Cur-NPs targeting cells with high levels of integrin expression were investigated. The in vivo targeting and penetration capabilities of the NPs were also evaluated against glioma in rats using in vivo imaging equipment. The results showed that the in vitro cytotoxicity of the targeted cHP-modified curcumin nanoparticles (cHP/Cur-NPs was higher than that of either free curcumin or non-targeted Cur-NPs due to the superior ability of the cHP/Cur-NPs to target tumor cells

  15. Postoperative radiotherapy for glioma: improved delineation of the clinical target volume using the geodesic distance calculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DanFang Yan

    Full Text Available OBJECTS: To introduce a new method for generating the clinical target volume (CTV from gross tumor volume (GTV using the geodesic distance calculation for glioma. METHODS: One glioblastoma patient was enrolled. The GTV and natural barriers were contoured on each slice of the computer tomography (CT simulation images. Then, a graphic processing unit based on a parallel Euclidean distance transform was used to generate the CTV considering natural barriers. Three-dimensional (3D visualization technique was applied to show the delineation results. Speed of operation and precision were compared between this new delineation method and the traditional method. RESULTS: In considering spatial barriers, the shortest distance from the point sheltered from these barriers equals the sum of the distance along the shortest path between the two points; this consists of several segments and evades the spatial barriers, rather than being the direct Euclidean distance between two points. The CTV was generated irregularly rather than as a spherical shape. The time required to generate the CTV was greatly reduced. Moreover, this new method improved inter- and intra-observer variability in defining the CTV. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the traditional CTV delineation, this new method using geodesic distance calculation not only greatly shortens the time to modify the CTV, but also has better reproducibility.

  16. EG-07CELL CYCLE SIGNATURE AND TUMOR PHYLOGENY ARE ENCODED IN THE EVOLUTIONARY DYNAMICS OF DNA METHYLATION IN GLIOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Tali; Pankov, Aleksandr; Johnson, Brett E.; Hong, Chibo; Bell, Robert J.A.; Smirnov, Ivan V.; Reis, Gerald F.; Phillips, Joanna J.; Barnes, Michael; Bollen, Andrew W.; Taylor, Barry S.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Olshen, Adam B.; Song, Jun S.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Chang, Susan M.; Costello, Joseph F.

    2014-01-01

    The clonal evolution of tumor cell populations can be reconstructed from patterns of genetic alterations. In contrast, tumor epigenetic states, including DNA methylation, are reversible and sensitive to the tumor microenvironment, presumably precluding the use of epigenetics to discover tumor phylogeny. Here we examined the spatial and temporal dynamics of DNA methylation in a clinically and genetically characterized cohort of IDH1-mutant low-grade gliomas and their patient-matched recurrences. WHO grade II gliomas are diffuse, infiltrative tumors that frequently recur and may undergo malignant progression to a higher grade with a worse prognosis. The extent to which epigenetic alterations contribute to the evolution of low-grade gliomas, including malignant progression, is unknown. While all gliomas in the cohort exhibited the hypermethylation signature associated with IDH1 mutation, low-grade gliomas that underwent malignant progression to high-grade glioblastoma (GBM) had a unique signature of DNA hypomethylation enriched for active enhancers, as well as sites of age-related hypermethylation in the brain. Genes with promoter hypomethylation and concordant transcriptional upregulation during evolution to GBM were enriched in cell cycle function, evolving in concert with genetic alterations that deregulate the G1/S cell cycle checkpoint. Despite the plasticity of tumor epigenetic states, phyloepigenetic trees robustly recapitulated phylogenetic trees derived from somatic mutations in the same patients. These findings highlight widespread co-dependency of genetic and epigenetic events throughout the clonal evolution of initial and recurrent glioma.

  17. Correlation of Tumor Immunohistochemistry with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced and DSC-MRI Parameters in Patients with Gliomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.B.; Cron, G.O.; Bezzina, K.; Perdrizet, K.; Torres, C.H.; Chakraborty, S.; Woulfe, J.; Jansen, G.H.; Thornhill, R.E.; Zanette, B.; Cameron, I.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Tumor CBV is a prognostic and predictive marker for patients with gliomas. Tumor CBV can be measured noninvasively with different MR imaging techniques; however, it is not clear which of these techniques most closely reflects histologically-measured tumor CBV. Our aim was to

  18. Berberine enhances inhibition of glioma tumor cell migration and invasiveness mediated by arsenic trioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Tseng-Hsi; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Chou, Fen-Pi; Lu, Fung-Jou

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As 2 O 3 ) exhibits promising anticarcinogenic activity in acute promyelocytic leukemic patients and induces apoptosis in various tumor cells in vitro. Here, we investigated the effect of the natural alkaloid berberine on As 2 O 3 -mediated inhibition of cancer cell migration using rat and human glioma cell lines. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to determine the viability of rat C6 and human U-87 glioma cells after treatment with As 2 O 3 or berberine, and after co-treatment with As 2 O 3 and berberine. The wound scratch and Boyden chamber assays were applied to determine the effect of As 2 O 3 and berberine on the migration capacity and invasiveness of glioma cancer cells. Zymography and Western blot analyses provided information on the effect of As 2 O 3 and berberine on the intracellular translocation and activation of protein kinase C (PKC), and some PKC-related downstream factors. Most assays were performed three times, independently, and data were analyzed using ANOVA. The cell viability studies demonstrated that berberine enhances As 2 O 3 -mediated inhibition of glioma cell growth after 24 h incubation. Untreated control cells formed a confluent layer, the formation of which was inhibited upon incubation with 5 μM As 2 O 3 . The latter effect was even more pronounced in the presence of 10 μM berberine. The As 2 O 3 -mediated reduction in motility and invasion of glioma cells was enhanced upon co-treatment with berberine. Furthermore, it has been reported that PKC isoforms influence the morphology of the actin cytoskeleton, as well as the activation of metalloproteases MT1-MMP and MMP-2, reported to be involved in cancer cell migration. Treatment of glioma cells with As 2 O 3 and berberine significantly decreased the activation of PKC α and ε and led to actin cytoskeleton rearrangements. The levels of two downstream transcription factors, myc and jun, and MT1-MMP and MMP-2 were also

  19. Characterization of PD-1 upregulation on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in human and murine gliomas and preclinical therapeutic blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejaegher, Joost; Verschuere, Tina; Vercalsteren, Ellen; Boon, Louis; Cremer, Jonathan; Sciot, Raf; Van Gool, Stefaan W; De Vleeschouwer, Steven

    2017-11-01

    Blockade of the immune checkpoint molecule programmed-cell-death-protein-1 (PD-1) yielded promising results in several cancers. To understand the therapeutic potential in human gliomas, quantitative data describing the expression of PD-1 are essential. Moreover, due the immune-specialized region of the brain in which gliomas arise, differences between tumor-infiltrating and circulating lymphocytes should be acknowledged. In this study we have used flow cytometry to quantify PD-1 expression on tumor-infiltrating T cells of 25 freshly resected glioma cell suspensions (10 newly and 5 relapsed glioblastoma, 10 lower grade gliomas) and simultaneously isolated circulating T cells. A strong upregulation of PD-1 expression in the tumor microenvironment compared to the blood circulation was seen in all glioma patients. Additionally, circulating T cells were isolated from 15 age-matched healthy volunteers, but no differences in PD-1 expression were found compared to glioma patients. In the murine GL261 malignant glioma model, there was a similar upregulation of PD-1 on brain-infiltrating lymphocytes. Using a monoclonal PD-1 blocking antibody, we found a marked prolonged survival with 55% of mice reaching long-term survival. Analysis of brain-infiltrating cells 21 days after GL261 tumor implantation showed a shift in infiltrating lymphocyte subgroups with increased CD8+ T cells and decreased regulatory T cells. Together, our results suggest an important role of PD-1 in glioma-induced immune escape, and provide translational evidence for the use of PD-1 blocking antibodies in human malignant gliomas. © 2017 UICC.

  20. Establishment of 9L/F344 rat intracerebral glioma model of brain tumor stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong-yu XIAO

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish the 9L/F344 rat intracerebral glioma model of brain tumor stem cells.  Methods Rat 9L gliosarcoma stem-like cells were cultured in serum-free suspension. The expression of CD133 and nestin were tested by immunohistochemistry. A total of 48 inbredline male F344 rats were randomly divided into 2 groups, and 9L tumor sphere cells and 9L monolayer cells were respectively implanted into the right caudate nucleus of F344 rats in 2 groups. Survival time was observed and determined using the method of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Fourteen days after implantation or when the rats were dying, their brains were perfused and sectioned for HE staining, and CD133 and nestin were detected by immunohistochemistry.  Results Rat 9L tumor spheres were formed with suspension culture in serum-free medium. The gliomas formed in both groups were invasive without obvious capsule. More new vessels, bleeding and necrosis could be detected in 9L tumor spheres group. The tumor cells in both groups were positive for CD133 and nestin. There was no significant difference in the expression of CD133 and nestin between 2 groups (P > 0.05, for all. According to the expression of nestin, the tumors formed by 9L tumor sphere cells were more invasive. The median survival time of the rats bearing 9L tumor sphere cells was 15 d (95%CI: 15.219-15.781, and the median survival time of the rats bearing 9L monolayer cells was 21 d (95%CI: 20.395-21.605. There was significant difference between 2 groups (χ2 = 12.800, P = 0.000.  Conclusions 9L/F344 rat intracerebral glioma model of brain tumor stem cells is successfully established, which provides a glioma model for the future research. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.04.012

  1. Increased seroreactivity to glioma-expressed antigen 2 in brain tumor patients under radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina M Heisel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surgery and radiation are the mainstays of therapy for human gliomas that are the most common primary brain tumors. Most recently, cell culture and animal studies provided the first convincing evidence that radiation not only eliminates tumor cells, but also modulates the immune response and likely improves anti-tumor immunotherapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present an in vivo study that analyzes the effects of radiation on the immune response in tumor patients. As readout system, we utilized the reactivity of glioma patients' sera against antigen GLEA2 as the most frequent antigen immunogenic in glioblastoma patients. We established an ELISA assay to analyze reactivity of 24 glioblastoma patients over a period of several months. As control we used 30 sera from healthy donors as well as 30 sera from lung cancer patients. We compared the course of GLEA2 seroreactivity at different times prior, during and after radiation. The GLEA2 seroreactivity was increased by the time of surgery, decreased after surgery, increased again under radiation, and slightly decreased after radiation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide in vivo evidence for an increased antibody response against tumor antigens under radiation. Antigens that become immunogenic with an increased antibody response as result of radiation can serve as ideal targets for immunotherapy of human tumors.

  2. Profound tumor-specific Th2 bias in patients with malignant glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimato, Shinji; Maier, Lisa M; Maier, Richard; Bruce, Jeffrey N; Anderson, Richard CE; Anderson, David E

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination against tumor-associated antigens is one promising approach to immunotherapy against malignant gliomas. While previous vaccine efforts have focused exclusively on HLA class I-restricted peptides, class II-restricted peptides are necessary to induce CD4 + helper T cells and sustain effective anti-tumor immunity. In this report we investigated the ability of five candidate peptide epitopes derived from glioma-associated antigens MAGE and IL-13 receptor α2 to detect and characterize CD4 + helper T cell responses in the peripheral blood of patients with malignant gliomas. Primary T cell responses were determined by stimulating freshly isolated PBMCs from patients with primary glioblastoma (GBM) (n = 8), recurrent GBM (n = 5), meningioma (n = 7), and healthy controls (n = 6) with each candidate peptide, as well as anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and an immunodominant peptide epitope derived from myelin basic protein (MBP) serving as positive and negative controls, respectively. ELISA was used to measure IFN-γ and IL-5 levels, and the ratio of IFN-γ/IL-5 was used to determine whether the response had a predominant Th1 or Th2 bias. We demonstrate that novel HLA Class-II restricted MAGE-A3 and IL-13Rα2 peptides can detect T cell responses in patients with GBMs as well as in healthy subjects. Stimulation with a variety of peptide antigens over-expressed by gliomas is associated with a profound reduction in the IFN-γ/IL-5 ratio in GBM patients relative to healthy subjects. This bias is more pronounced in patients with recurrent GBMs. Therapeutic vaccine strategies to shift tumor antigen-specific T cell response to a more immunostimulatory Th1 bias may be needed for immunotherapeutic trials to be more successful clinically

  3. Effect of brain- and tumor-derived connective tissue growth factor on glioma invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lincoln A; Woolard, Kevin; Son, Myung Jin; Li, Aiguo; Lee, Jeongwu; Ene, Chibawanye; Mantey, Samuel A; Maric, Dragan; Song, Hua; Belova, Galina; Jensen, Robert T; Zhang, Wei; Fine, Howard A

    2011-08-03

    Tumor cell invasion is the principal cause of treatment failure and death among patients with malignant gliomas. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been previously implicated in cancer metastasis and invasion in various tumors. We explored the mechanism of CTGF-mediated glioma cell infiltration and examined potential therapeutic targets. Highly infiltrative patient-derived glioma tumor-initiating or tumor stem cells (TIC/TSCs) were harvested and used to explore a CTGF-induced signal transduction pathway via luciferase reporter assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblotting. Treatment of TIC/TSCs with small-molecule inhibitors targeting integrin β1 (ITGB1) and the tyrosine kinase receptor type A (TrkA), and short hairpin RNAs targeting CTGF directly were used to reduce the levels of key protein components of CTGF-induced cancer infiltration. TIC/TSC infiltration was examined in real-time cell migration and invasion assays in vitro and by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization in TIC/TSC orthotopic xenograft mouse models (n = 30; six mice per group). All statistical tests were two-sided. Treatment of TIC/TSCs with CTGF resulted in CTGF binding to ITGB1-TrkA receptor complexes and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcriptional activation as measured by luciferase reporter assays (mean relative luciferase activity, untreated vs CTGF(200 ng/mL): 0.53 vs 1.87, difference = 1.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.69 to 2, P < .001). NF-κB activation resulted in binding of ZEB-1 to the E-cadherin promoter as demonstrated by ChIP analysis with subsequent E-cadherin suppression (fold increase in ZEB-1 binding to the E-cadherin promoter region: untreated + ZEB-1 antibody vs CTGF(200 ng/mL) + ZEB-1 antibody: 1.5 vs 6.4, difference = 4.9, 95% CI = 4.8 to 5.0, P < .001). Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization revealed that TrkA is selectively expressed in the most infiltrative glioma cells in situ

  4. Paradoxical effect of aspirin on the growth of C6 rat glioma and on time of development of ENU-induced tumors of the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, O; Guevara, P; Reyes, S; Palencia, G; Rivera, E; Sotelo, J

    2001-11-01

    Administration of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), an inhibitor of the synthesis of prostaglandins and thrombzoxanes, decreases the incidence of colorectal cancer and other neoplasms and inhibits in vitro some tumor growth. We studied the effect of various doses of ASA on the growth of C6 glioma implanted in rats as well as the effect of chronic administration of ASA on time of development and incidence of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) induced by prenatal exposure to ethylnitrosourea (ENU). In a controlled study, various doses of ASA, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, and 400 mg/kg per day, were administered to Wistar rats in whom a subcutaneous C6 glioma had been transplanted. Changes in tumor size, histologic characteristics, mitotic index, cell proliferation, and vascular density were studied. In a parallel experiment, we administered ASA (70 mg/kg per day) to rats who were prenatally exposed to ENU; treatment started on day 50 of age, and continued until the end of the experiment at day 400. The time of tumor development as well as incidence, localization, and histological diagnosis were compared with matched controls. A paradoxical effect of ASA administration was observed on the dynamics of cell proliferation of C6 glioma. When high ASA doses were administered (200 or 400 mg/kg per day), tumor volume, cell proliferation, vascular density, and mitotic index increased. In contrast, when low doses were administered (12.5 or 25 mg/kg per day) the tumor size diminished. In the second experiment, localization and incidence of CNS tumors induced by ENU were similar in animals treated with ASA and in controls; however, in rats treated with ASA the time of tumor development was shortened. The growth-promoting effects of high doses of ASA found in the present study in both transplanted and chemically-induced brain tumors, might be due to the blockage of autocrine inhibitory factors dependent on the cyclooxygenase pathway or by increased vascular permeability and

  5. Astroblastoma: beside being a tumor entity, an occasional phenotype of astrocytic gliomas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mellai M

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Marta Mellai,1 Angela Piazzi,1 Cristina Casalone,2 Silvia Grifoni,2 Antonio Melcarne,3 Laura Annovazzi,1 Paola Cassoni,4 Tetyana Denysenko,1 Maria Consuelo Valentini,5 Angelina Cistaro,6,7 Davide Schiffer1 1Neuro-Bio-Oncology Center, Policlinico di Monza Foundation/Consorzio di Neuroscienze, University of Pavia, Vercelli, Italy; 2Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Piemonte, Liguria e Valle d'Aosta, Turin, Italy; 3Department of Neurosurgery, CTO Hospital/Città della Salute e della Scienza, Turin, Italy; 4Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy; 5Department of Neuroradiology, CTO Hospital/Città della Salute e della Scienza, Turin, Italy; 6Positron Emission Tomography Center IRMET S.p.A, Euromedic Inc., Turin, Italy; 7Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, National Research Council, Rome, Italy Abstract: The diagnosis of astroblastoma is based on a typical histological aspect with perivascular distribution of cells sending cytoplasmic extensions to the vessels and vascular hyalinization. These criteria are useful for standardizing the identification of the tumor, but, in spite of this, there are discrepancies in the literature concerning the age distribution and the benign or malignant nature of the tumor. Three cases are discussed in this study: Case 1 was a typical high-grade astroblastoma; Case 2 was an oligodendroglioma at the first intervention and an oligoastrocytoma at the second intervention with typical perivascular arrangements in the astrocytic component; Case 3 was a gemistocytic glioma with malignant features and typical perivascular arrangements. Genetic analysis showed genetic alterations that are typical of gliomas of all malignancy grades. Using the neurosphere assay, neurospheres and adherent cells were found to have developed in Case 1, while adherent cells only developed in Case 2, in line with the stemness potential of the tumors. The cases are discussed in relation to their

  6. Induction of selective blood-tumor barrier permeability and macromolecular transport by a biostable kinin B1 receptor agonist in a glioma rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Jérôme; Bovenzi, Veronica; Savard, Martin; Dubuc, Céléna; Fortier, Audrey; Neugebauer, Witold; Tremblay, Luc; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Tsanaclis, Ana-Maria; Lepage, Martin; Fortin, David; Gobeil, Fernand

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of malignant glioma with chemotherapy is limited mostly because of delivery impediment related to the blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB). B1 receptors (B1R), inducible prototypical G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) can regulate permeability of vessels including possibly that of brain tumors. Here, we determine the extent of BTB permeability induced by the natural and synthetic peptide B1R agonists, LysdesArg(9)BK (LDBK) and SarLys[dPhe(8)]desArg(9)BK (NG29), in syngeneic F98 glioma-implanted Fischer rats. Ten days after tumor inoculation, we detected the presence of B1R on tumor cells and associated vasculature. NG29 infusion increased brain distribution volume and uptake profiles of paramagnetic probes (Magnevist and Gadomer) at tumoral sites (T(1)-weighted imaging). These effects were blocked by B1R antagonist and non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors, but not by B2R antagonist and non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitors. Consistent with MRI data, systemic co-administration of NG29 improved brain tumor delivery of Carboplatin chemotherapy (ICP-Mass spectrometry). We also detected elevated B1R expression in clinical samples of high-grade glioma. Our results documented a novel GPCR-signaling mechanism for promoting transient BTB disruption, involving activation of B1R and ensuing production of COX metabolites. They also underlined the potential value of synthetic biostable B1R agonists as selective BTB modulators for local delivery of different sized-therapeutics at (peri)tumoral sites.

  7. Tumor angiogenesis--a new therapeutic target in gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, E L; Spang-Thomsen, M; Skovgaard-Poulsen, H

    1998-01-01

    significant angiogenic activity primarily by the expression of the angiogenic factor VEGF Anti-angiogenic therapy represents a new promising therapeutic modality in solid tumors. Several agents are currently under evaluation in clinical trials. The present review describes the principal inducers...

  8. Textural analysis of pre-therapeutic [18F]-FET-PET and its correlation with tumor grade and patient survival in high-grade gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyka, Thomas; Hiob, Daniela; Wester, Hans-Juergen [Klinikum Rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Gempt, Jens; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard [Klinikum Rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen, Neurosurgic Department, Munich (Germany); Schlegel, Juergen [Klinikum Rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen, Institute of Pathology and Neuropathology, Munich (Germany); Bette, Stefanie [Klinikum Rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen, Neuroradiologic department, Munich (Germany); Foerster, Stefan [Klinikum Rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Klinikum Rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen, TUM Neuroimaging Center (TUM-NIC), Munich (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Amino acid positron emission tomography (PET) with [18F]-fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine (FET) is well established in the diagnostic work-up of malignant brain tumors. Analysis of FET-PET data using tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) has been shown to be highly valuable for the detection of viable hypermetabolic brain tumor tissue; however, it has not proven equally useful for tumor grading. Recently, textural features in 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET have been proposed as a method to quantify the heterogeneity of glucose metabolism in a variety of tumor entities. Herein we evaluate whether textural FET-PET features are of utility for grading and prognostication in patients with high-grade gliomas. One hundred thirteen patients (70 men, 43 women) with histologically proven high-grade gliomas were included in this retrospective study. All patients received static FET-PET scans prior to first-line therapy. TBR (max and mean), volumetric parameters and textural parameters based on gray-level neighborhood difference matrices were derived from static FET-PET images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and discriminant function analyses were used to assess the value for tumor grading. Kaplan-Meier curves and univariate and multivariate Cox regression were employed for analysis of progression-free and overall survival. All FET-PET textural parameters showed the ability to differentiate between World Health Organization (WHO) grade III and IV tumors (p < 0.001; AUC 0.775). Further improvement in discriminatory power was possible through a combination of texture and metabolic tumor volume, classifying 85 % of tumors correctly (AUC 0.830). TBR and volumetric parameters alone were correlated with tumor grade, but showed lower AUC values (0.644 and 0.710, respectively). Furthermore, a correlation of FET-PET texture but not TBR was shown with patient PFS and OS, proving significant in multivariate analysis as well. Volumetric parameters were predictive for OS, but this correlation did not

  9. Glioma Surgical Aspirate: A Viable Source of Tumor Tissue for Experimental Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, Bryan W.; Stringer, Brett W.; Wilson, John; Jeffree, Rosalind L.; Jamieson, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Brain cancer research has been hampered by a paucity of viable clinical tissue of sufficient quality and quantity for experimental research. This has driven researchers to rely heavily on long term cultured cells which no longer represent the cancers from which they were derived. Resection of brain tumors, particularly at the interface between normal and tumorigenic tissue, can be carried out using an ultrasonic surgical aspirator (CUSA) that deposits liquid (blood and irrigation fluid) and resected tissue into a sterile bottle for disposal. To determine the utility of CUSA-derived glioma tissue for experimental research, we collected 48 CUSA specimen bottles from glioma patients and analyzed both the solid tissue fragments and dissociated tumor cells suspended in the liquid waste fraction. We investigated if these fractions would be useful for analyzing tumor heterogeneity, using IHC and multi-parameter flow cytometry; we also assessed culture generation and orthotopic xenograft potential. Both cell sources proved to be an abundant, highly viable source of live tumor cells for cytometric analysis, animal studies and in-vitro studies. Our findings demonstrate that CUSA tissue represents an abundant viable source to conduct experimental research and to carry out diagnostic analyses by flow cytometry or other molecular diagnostic procedures

  10. Fluorescent Affibody Molecule Administered In Vivo at a Microdose Level Labels EGFR Expressing Glioma Tumor Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Ana Luiza Ribeiro; Marra, Kayla; Gunn, Jason; Samkoe, Kimberley S; Hoopes, P Jack; Feldwisch, Joachim; Paulsen, Keith D; Pogue, Brian W

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence guidance in surgical oncology provides the potential to realize enhanced molecular tumor contrast with dedicated targeted tracers, potentially with a microdose injection level. For most glioma tumors, the blood brain barrier is compromised allowing some exogenous drug/molecule delivery and accumulation for imaging. The aberrant overexpression and/or activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with many types of cancers, including glioblastoma, and so the use of a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent molecule targeted to the EGFR receptor provides the potential for improving tumor contrast during surgery. Fluorescently labeled affibody molecule (ABY-029) has high EGFR affinity and high potential specificity with reasonably fast plasma clearance. In this study, ABY-29 was evaluated in glioma versus normal brain uptake from intravenous injection at a range of doses, down to a microdose injection level. Nude rats were inoculated with the U251 human glioma cell line in the brain. Tumors were allowed to grow for 3-4 weeks. ABY-029 fluorescence ex vivo imaging of brain slices was acquired at different time points (1-48 h) and varying injection doses from 25 to 122 μg/kg (from human protein microdose equivalent to five times microdose levels). The tumor was most clearly visualized at 1-h post-injection with 8- to 16-fold average contrast relative to normal brain. However, the tumor still could be identified after 48 h. In all cases, the ABY-029 fluorescence appeared to localize preferentially in EGFR-positive regions. Increasing the injected dose from a microdose level to five times, a microdose level increased the signal by 10-fold, and the contrast was from 8 to 16, showing that there was value in doses slightly higher than the microdose restriction. Normal tissue uptake was found to be affected by the tumor size, indicating that edema was a likely factor affecting the expected tumor to normal tissue contrast. These results suggest

  11. LncRNA TUG1 acts as a tumor suppressor in human glioma by promoting cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Meng; An, Gang; Ma, Qingfang

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have revealed multiple functional roles of long non-coding RNA taurine upregulated gene 1 in different types of malignant tumors, except for human glioma. Here, it was designed to study the potential function of taurine upregulated gene 1 in glioma pathogenesis focusing on its regulation on cell apoptosis. The expression of taurine upregulated gene 1 in glioma tissues was detected by quantitative RT-PCR and compared with that in adjacent normal tissues. Further correlation analysis was conducted to show the relationship between taurine upregulated gene 1 expression and different clinicopathologic parameters. Functional studies were performed to investigate the influence of taurine upregulated gene 1 on apoptosis and cell proliferation by using Annexin V/PI staining and cell counting kit-8 assays, respectively. And, caspase activation and Bcl-2 expression were analyzed to explore taurine upregulated gene 1-induced mechanism. taurine upregulated gene 1 expression was significantly inhibited in glioma and showed significant correlation with WHO Grade, tumor size and overall survival. Further experiments revealed that the dysregulation of taurine upregulated gene 1 affected the apoptosis and cell proliferation of glioma cells. Moreover, taurine upregulated gene 1 could induce the activation of caspase-3 and-9, with inhibited expression of Bcl-2, implying the mechanism in taurine upregulated gene 1-induced apoptosis. taurine upregulated gene 1 promoted cell apoptosis of glioma cells by activating caspase-3 and -9-mediated intrinsic pathways and inhibiting Bcl-2-mediated anti-apoptotic pathways, acting as a tumor suppressor in human glioma. This study provided new insights for the function of taurine upregulated gene 1 in cancer biology, and suggested a potent application of taurine upregulated gene 1 overexpression for glioma therapy. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  12. Reproducibility of O-(2-{sup 18}F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine uptake kinetics in brain tumors and influence of corticoid therapy: an experimental study in rat gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegmayr, Carina; Schoeneck, Michael; Oliveira, Dennis; Willuweit, Antje [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Filss, Christian; Coenen, Heinz H.; Langen, Karl-Josef [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); University of Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Galldiks, Norbert [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); University of Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); Shah, N. Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); University of Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain, Juelich (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using O-(2-{sup 18}F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ({sup 18}F-FET) is a well-established method for the diagnostics of brain tumors. This study investigates reproducibility of {sup 18}F-FET uptake kinetics in rat gliomas and the influence of the frequently used dexamethasone (Dex) therapy. F98 glioma or 9L gliosarcoma cells were implanted into the striatum of 31 Fischer rats. After 10-11 days of tumor growth, the animals underwent dynamic PET after injection of {sup 18}F-FET (baseline). Thereafter, animals were divided into a control group and a group receiving Dex injections, and all animals were reinvestigated 2 days later. Tumor-to-brain ratios (TBR) of {sup 18}F-FET uptake (18-61 min p.i.) and the slope of the time-activity-curves (TAC) (18-61 min p.i.) were evaluated using a Volume-of-Interest (VOI) analysis. Data were analyzed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and reproducibility by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The slope of the tumor TACs showed high reproducibility with an ICC of 0.93. A systematic increase of the TBR in the repeated scans was noted (3.7 ± 2.8 %; p < 0.01), and appeared to be related to tumor growth as indicated by a significant correlation of TBR and tumor volume (r = 0.77; p < 0.0001). After correction for tumor growth TBR showed high longitudinal stability with an ICC of 0.84. Dex treatment induced a significant decrease of the TBR (-8.2 ± 6.1 %; p < 0.03), but did not influence the slope of the tumor TAC. TBR of {sup 18}F-FET uptake and tracer kinetics in brain tumors showed high longitudinal stability. Dex therapy may induce a minor decrease of the TBR; this needs further investigation. (orig.)

  13. Matrix Metalloproteinase-9/Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin Complex Activity in Human Glioma Samples Predicts Tumor Presence and Clinical Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Fa Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinase-9/neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (MMP-9/NGAL complex activity is elevated in brain tumors and may serve as a molecular marker for brain tumors. However, the relationship between MMP-9/NGAL activity in brain tumors and patient prognosis and treatment response remains unclear. Here, we compared the clinical characteristics of glioma patients with the MMP-9/NGAL activity measured in their respective tumor and urine samples. Using gelatin zymography assays, we found that MMP-9/NGAL activity was significantly increased in tumor tissues (TT and preoperative urine samples (Preop-1d urine. Activity was reduced by seven days after surgery (Postop-1w urine and elevated again in cases of tumor recurrence. The MMP-9/NGAL status correlated well with MRI-based tumor assessments. These findings suggest that MMP-9/NGAL activity could be a novel marker to detect gliomas and predict the clinical outcome of patients.

  14. Induction of selective blood-tumor barrier permeability and macromolecular transport by a biostable kinin B1 receptor agonist in a glioma rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Côté

    Full Text Available Treatment of malignant glioma with chemotherapy is limited mostly because of delivery impediment related to the blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB. B1 receptors (B1R, inducible prototypical G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR can regulate permeability of vessels including possibly that of brain tumors. Here, we determine the extent of BTB permeability induced by the natural and synthetic peptide B1R agonists, LysdesArg(9BK (LDBK and SarLys[dPhe(8]desArg(9BK (NG29, in syngeneic F98 glioma-implanted Fischer rats. Ten days after tumor inoculation, we detected the presence of B1R on tumor cells and associated vasculature. NG29 infusion increased brain distribution volume and uptake profiles of paramagnetic probes (Magnevist and Gadomer at tumoral sites (T(1-weighted imaging. These effects were blocked by B1R antagonist and non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors, but not by B2R antagonist and non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitors. Consistent with MRI data, systemic co-administration of NG29 improved brain tumor delivery of Carboplatin chemotherapy (ICP-Mass spectrometry. We also detected elevated B1R expression in clinical samples of high-grade glioma. Our results documented a novel GPCR-signaling mechanism for promoting transient BTB disruption, involving activation of B1R and ensuing production of COX metabolites. They also underlined the potential value of synthetic biostable B1R agonists as selective BTB modulators for local delivery of different sized-therapeutics at (peritumoral sites.

  15. EG-03EXPRESSION OF PRMT5 CORRELATES WITH MALIGNANT GRADE IN GLIOMAS AND PLAYS A PIVOTAL ROLE IN TUMOR GROWTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaosi; Li, Rong; Zhang, Wenbin; Yang, Xiuhua; Fathallah-Shaykh, Hassan; Gillespie, Yancey; Nabors, Burt

    2014-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) catalyzes the formation of ω-NG,N′G-symmetric dimethylarginine residues on histones as well as other proteins. The modification play an important role in cell differentiation and tumor cell growth. However, the role of PRMT5 in human glioma cells has not been characterized. In this study, we assessed protein expression profiles of PRMT5 in control brain, WHO grade II astrocytomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) by immunohistochemistry. PRMT5 was low in glial cells in control brain tissues and low grade astrocytomas. Its expression increased in parallel with malignant progression, and was highly expressed in GBM. Knockdown of PRMT5 by small hairpin RNA caused alterations of p-ERK1/2 and significantly repressed the clonogenic potential and viability of glioma cells. These findings indicate that PRMT5 is a marker of malignant progression in glioma tumors and plays a pivotal role in tumor growth.

  16. MicroRNA-145 is downregulated in glial tumors and regulates glioma cell migration by targeting connective tissue growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae Kyung; Bier, Ariel; Cazacu, Simona; Finniss, Susan; Xiang, Cunli; Twito, Hodaya; Poisson, Laila M; Mikkelsen, Tom; Slavin, Shimon; Jacoby, Elad; Yalon, Michal; Toren, Amos; Rempel, Sandra A; Brodie, Chaya

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM), the most common and aggressive type of malignant glioma, are characterized by increased invasion into the surrounding brain tissues. Despite intensive therapeutic strategies, the median survival of GBM patients has remained dismal over the last decades. In this study we examined the expression of miR-145 in glial tumors and its function in glioma cells. Using TCGA analysis and real-time PCR we found that the expression of miR-145/143 cluster was downregulated in astrocytic tumors compared to normal brain specimens and in glioma cells and glioma stem cells (GSCs) compared to normal astrocytes and neural stem cells. Moreover, the low expression of both miR-145 and miR-143 in GBM was correlated with poor patient prognosis. Transfection of glioma cells with miR-145 mimic or transduction with a lentivirus vector expressing pre-miR 145 significantly decreased the migration and invasion of glioma cells. We identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) as a novel target of miR-145 in glioma cells; transfection of the cells with this miRNA decreased the expression of CTGF as determined by Western blot analysis and the expression of its 3'-UTR fused to luciferase. Overexpression of a CTGF plasmid lacking the 3'-UTR and administration of recombinant CTGF protein abrogated the inhibitory effect of miR-145 on glioma cell migration. Similarly, we found that silencing of CTGF decreased the migration of glioma cells. CTGF silencing also decreased the expression of SPARC, phospho-FAK and FAK and overexpression of SPARC abrogated the inhibitory effect of CTGF silencing on cell migration. These results demonstrate that miR-145 is downregulated in glial tumors and its low expression in GBM predicts poor patient prognosis. In addition miR-145 regulates glioma cell migration by targeting CTGF which downregulates SPARC expression. Therefore, miR-145 is an attractive therapeutic target for anti-invasive treatment of astrocytic tumors.

  17. MicroRNA-145 is downregulated in glial tumors and regulates glioma cell migration by targeting connective tissue growth factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Kyung Lee

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas (GBM, the most common and aggressive type of malignant glioma, are characterized by increased invasion into the surrounding brain tissues. Despite intensive therapeutic strategies, the median survival of GBM patients has remained dismal over the last decades. In this study we examined the expression of miR-145 in glial tumors and its function in glioma cells. Using TCGA analysis and real-time PCR we found that the expression of miR-145/143 cluster was downregulated in astrocytic tumors compared to normal brain specimens and in glioma cells and glioma stem cells (GSCs compared to normal astrocytes and neural stem cells. Moreover, the low expression of both miR-145 and miR-143 in GBM was correlated with poor patient prognosis. Transfection of glioma cells with miR-145 mimic or transduction with a lentivirus vector expressing pre-miR 145 significantly decreased the migration and invasion of glioma cells. We identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF as a novel target of miR-145 in glioma cells; transfection of the cells with this miRNA decreased the expression of CTGF as determined by Western blot analysis and the expression of its 3'-UTR fused to luciferase. Overexpression of a CTGF plasmid lacking the 3'-UTR and administration of recombinant CTGF protein abrogated the inhibitory effect of miR-145 on glioma cell migration. Similarly, we found that silencing of CTGF decreased the migration of glioma cells. CTGF silencing also decreased the expression of SPARC, phospho-FAK and FAK and overexpression of SPARC abrogated the inhibitory effect of CTGF silencing on cell migration. These results demonstrate that miR-145 is downregulated in glial tumors and its low expression in GBM predicts poor patient prognosis. In addition miR-145 regulates glioma cell migration by targeting CTGF which downregulates SPARC expression. Therefore, miR-145 is an attractive therapeutic target for anti-invasive treatment of astrocytic tumors.

  18. Alterations of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Regional Perfusion in Tumor Development: MRI Insights from a Rat C6 Glioma Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhndorf, Monika; Moussavi, Amir; Kramann, Nadine; Will, Olga; Hattermann, Kirsten; Stadelmann, Christine; Jansen, Olav; Boretius, Susann

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis and anti-angiogenetic medications play an important role in progression and therapy of glioblastoma. In this context, in vivo characterization of the blood-brain-barrier and tumor vascularization may be important for individual prognosis and therapy optimization. We analyzed perfusion and capillary permeability of C6-gliomas in rats at different stages of tumor-growth by contrast enhanced MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI at 7 Tesla. The analyses included maps of relative cerebral blood volume (CBV) and signal recovery derived from DSC data over a time period of up to 35 days after tumor cell injections. In all rats tumor progression was accompanied by temporal and spatial changes in CBV and capillary permeability. A leakage of the blood-brain barrier (slow contrast enhancement) was observed as soon as the tumor became detectable on T2-weighted images. Interestingly, areas of strong capillary permeability (fast signal enhancement) were predominantly localized in the center of the tumor. In contrast, the tumor rim was dominated by an increased CBV and showed the highest vessel density compared to the tumor center and the contralateral hemisphere as confirmed by histology. Substantial regional differences in the tumor highlight the importance of parameter maps in contrast or in addition to region-of-interest analyses. The data vividly illustrate how MRI including contrast-enhanced and DSC-MRI may contribute to a better understanding of tumor development.

  19. Implications of Rho GTPase signaling in glioma cell invasion and tumor progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Patricia Fortin Ensign

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GB is the most malignant of primary adult brain tumors, characterized by a highly locally-invasive cell population, as well as abundant proliferative cells, neoangiogenesis, and necrosis. Clinical intervention with chemotherapy or radiation may either promote or establish an environment for manifestation of invasive behavior. Understanding the molecular drivers of invasion in the context of glioma progression may be insightful in directing new treatments for patients with GB. Here, we review current knowledge on Rho family GTPases, their aberrant regulation in GB, and their effect on GB cell invasion and tumor progression. Rho GTPases are modulators of cell migration through effects on actin cytoskeleton rearrangement; in non-neoplastic tissue, expression and activation of Rho GTPases are normally under tight regulation. In GB, Rho GTPases are deregulated, often via hyperactivity or overexpression of their activators, Rho GEFs. Downstream effectors of Rho GTPases have been shown to promote invasiveness and, importantly, glioma cell survival. The study of aberrant Rho GTPase signaling in GB is thus an important investigation of cell invasion as well as treatment resistance and disease progression.

  20. Seizure control as a new metric in assessing efficacy of tumor treatment in low-grade glioma trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Marc; Schiff, David; Reijneveld, Jaap C.; Armstrong, Terri S.; Ruda, Roberta; Wen, Patrick Y.; Weller, Michael; Koekkoek, Johan A. F.; Mittal, Sandeep; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Choucair, Ali; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge; MacDonald, David R.; Nishikawa, Ryo; Shah, Aashit; Vecht, Charles J.; Warren, Paula; van den Bent, Martin J.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with low-grade glioma frequently have brain tumor–related epilepsy, which is more common than in patients with high-grade glioma. Treatment for tumor-associated epilepsy usually comprises a combination of surgery, anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Response to tumor-directed treatment is measured primarily by overall survival and progression-free survival. However, seizure frequency has been observed to respond to tumor-directed treatment with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. A review of the current literature regarding seizure assessment for low-grade glioma patients reveals a heterogeneous manner in which seizure response has been reported. There is a need for a systematic approach to seizure assessment and its influence on health-related quality-of-life outcomes in patients enrolled in low-grade glioma therapeutic trials. In view of the need to have an adjunctive metric of tumor response in these patients, a method of seizure assessment as a metric in brain tumor treatment trials is proposed. PMID:27651472

  1. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the distinction of high-grade cerebral gliomas from single metastatic brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, Andres; Schellhorn, Till; Haakonsen, Monika; Nakstad, Per H.; Josefsen, Roger; Kulle, Bettina; Maehlen, Jan; Kumar, Theresa; Gadmar, Oeystein; Langberg, Carl W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Brain metastases and primary high-grade gliomas, including glioblastomas multiforme (GBM) and anaplastic astrocytomas (AA), may be indistinguishable by conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Identification of these tumors may have therapeutic consequences. Purpose: To assess the value of MR spectroscopy (MRS) using short and intermediate echo time (TE) in differentiating solitary brain metastases and high-grade gliomas on the basis of differences in metabolite ratios in the intratumoral and peritumoral region. Material and Methods: We performed MR imaging and MRS in 73 patients with histologically verified intraaxial brain tumors: 53 patients with high-grade gliomas (34 GBM and 19 AA) and 20 patients with metastatic brain tumors. The metabolite ratios of Cho/Cr, Cho/NAA, and NAA/Cr at intermediate TE and the presence of lipids at short TE were assessed from spectral maps in the tumoral core, peritumoral edema, and contralateral normal-appearing white matter. The differences in the metabolite ratios between high-grade gliomas/GBM/AA and metastases were analyzed statistically. Cutoff values of Cho/Cr, Cho/NAA, and NAA/Cr ratios in the peritumoral edema, as well as Cho/Cr and NAA/Cr ratios in the tumoral core for distinguishing high-grade gliomas/GBM/AA from metastases were determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: Significant differences were noted in the peritumoral Cho/Cr, Cho/NAA, and NAA/ Cr ratios between high-grade gliomas/GBM/AA and metastases. ROC analysis demonstrated a cutoff value of 1.24 for peritumoral Cho/Cr ratio to provide sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV), and negative predictive values (NPV) of 100%, 88.9%, 80.0%, and 100%, respectively, for discrimination between high-grade gliomas and metastases. By using a cutoff value of 1.11 for peritumoral Cho/NAA ratio, the sensitivity was 100%, the specificity was 91.1%, the PPV was 83.3%, and the NPV was 100%. Conclusion: The results of this

  2. Perfusion MRI (dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging) with different measurement approaches for the evaluation of blood flow and blood volume in human gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, H. (Den Sundhedsfaglige Kandidatuddannelse, Aarhus Universitet Bygning 1264, Aarhus (Denmark); University College Nordjylland, Aalborg (Denmark)), Email: hnt@ucn.dk; Steffensen, E. (Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark)); Larsson, E. M. (Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark); Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2012-02-15

    Background. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in the evaluation of brain tumors. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) is usually obtained by dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI using normal appearing white matter as reference region. The emerging perfusion technique arterial spin labelling (ASL) presently provides measurement only of cerebral blood flow (CBF), which has not been widely used in human brain tumor studies. Purpose. To assess if measurement of blood flow is comparable with measurement of blood volume in human biopsy-proven gliomas obtained by DSC-MRI using two different regions for normalization and two different measurement approaches. Material and Methods. Retrospective study of 61 patients with different types of gliomas examined with DSC perfusion MRI. Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed in tumor portions with maximum perfusion on rCBF and rCBV maps, with contralateral normal appearing white matter and cerebellum as reference regions. Larger ROIs were drawn for histogram analyses. The type and grade of the gliomas were obtained by histopathology. Statistical comparison was made between diffuse astrocytomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, and glioblastomas. Results. rCBF and rCBV measurements obtained with the maximum perfusion method were correlated when normalized to white matter (r = 0.60) and to the cerebellum (r = 0.49). Histogram analyses of rCBF and rCBV showed that mean and median values as well as skewness and peak position were correlated (0.61 < r < 0.93), whereas for kurtosis and peak height, the correlation coefficient was about 0.3 when comparing rCBF and rCBV values for the same reference region. Neither rCBF nor rCBV quantification provided a statistically significant difference between the three types of gliomas. However, both rCBF and rCBV tended to increase with tumor grade and to be lower in patients who had undergone resection/treatment. Conclusion. rCBF measurements normalized to white matter

  3. Inhibition of tumor growth in a glioma model treated with boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.H.; McGregor, J.M.; Clendenon, N.R.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Barth, R.F.; Soloway, A.H.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This investigation attempts to determine whether increased survival time seen when the F98 glioma model is treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a result of inhibition of tumor growth caused by radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cells and normal tissue components. This indirect effect of radiation has been called the tumor bed effect. A series of tumor-bearing rats was studied, using a standardized investigational BNCT protocol consisting of 50 mg/kg of Na2B12H11SH injected intravenously 14 to 17 hours before neutron irradiation at 4 x 10(12) n/cm2. Ten rats, serving as controls, received no treatment either before or after tumor implantation. A second group of 10 rats was treated with BNCT 4 days before tumor implantation; these animals received no further treatment. The remaining group of 10 rats received no pretreatment but was treated with BNCT 10 days after implantation. Histological and ultrastructural analyses were performed in 2 animals from each group 17 days after implantation. Survival times of the untreated control animals (mean, 25.8 days) did not differ statistically from the survival times of the rats in the pretreated group (mean, 25.5 days). The rats treated with BNCT after implantation survived significantly longer (P less than 0.02; mean, 33.2 days) than the controls and the preirradiated animals. Tumor size indices calculated from measurements taken at the time of death were similar in all groups. These results indicate that, with this tumor model, BNCT does not cause a tumor bed effect in cerebral tissue. The therapeutic gains observed with BNCT result from direct effects on tumor cells or on the peritumoral neovascularity

  4. Pediatric High Grade Glioma: a Review and Update on Tumor Clinical Characteristics and Biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fangusaro, Jason

    2012-01-01

    High grade gliomas (HGG) are one of the most common central nervous system (CNS) tumors encountered in adults, but they only represent approximately 8–12% of all pediatric CNS tumors. Historically, pediatric HGG were thought to be similar to adult HGG since they appear histologically identical; however, molecular, genetic, and biologic data reveal that they are distinct. Similar to adults, pediatric HGG are very aggressive and malignant lesions with few patients achieving long-term survival despite a variety of therapies. Initial treatment strategies typically consist of a gross total resection (GTR) when feasible followed by focal radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy. Over the last few decades, a wealth of data has emerged from basic science and pre-clinical animal models helping to better define the common biologic, genetic, and molecular make-up of these tumors. These data have not only provided a better understanding of tumor biology, but they have also provided new areas of research targeting molecular and genetic pathways with the potential for novel treatment strategies and improved patient outcomes. Here we provide a review of pediatric non-brainstem HGG, including epidemiology, presentation, histology, imaging characteristics, treatments, survival outcomes, and an overview of both basic and translational research. An understanding of all relevant pre-clinical tumor models, including their strengths and pitfalls is essential in realizing improved patient outcomes in this population.

  5. Pediatric High Grade Glioma: a Review and Update on Tumor Clinical Characteristics and Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fangusaro, Jason, E-mail: jfangusaro@luriechildrens.org [Pediatric Neuro-Oncology, The Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-08-24

    High grade gliomas (HGG) are one of the most common central nervous system (CNS) tumors encountered in adults, but they only represent approximately 8–12% of all pediatric CNS tumors. Historically, pediatric HGG were thought to be similar to adult HGG since they appear histologically identical; however, molecular, genetic, and biologic data reveal that they are distinct. Similar to adults, pediatric HGG are very aggressive and malignant lesions with few patients achieving long-term survival despite a variety of therapies. Initial treatment strategies typically consist of a gross total resection (GTR) when feasible followed by focal radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy. Over the last few decades, a wealth of data has emerged from basic science and pre-clinical animal models helping to better define the common biologic, genetic, and molecular make-up of these tumors. These data have not only provided a better understanding of tumor biology, but they have also provided new areas of research targeting molecular and genetic pathways with the potential for novel treatment strategies and improved patient outcomes. Here we provide a review of pediatric non-brainstem HGG, including epidemiology, presentation, histology, imaging characteristics, treatments, survival outcomes, and an overview of both basic and translational research. An understanding of all relevant pre-clinical tumor models, including their strengths and pitfalls is essential in realizing improved patient outcomes in this population.

  6. Diffuse high-grade gliomas with H3 K27M mutations carry a dismal prognosis independent of tumor location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karremann, Michael; Gielen, Gerrit H; Hoffmann, Marion; Wiese, Maria; Colditz, Niclas; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Bison, Brigitte; Claviez, Alexander; van Vuurden, Dannis G; von Bueren, André O; Gessi, Marco; Kühnle, Ingrid; Hans, Volkmar H; Benesch, Martin; Sturm, Dominik; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Waha, Andreas; Pietsch, Torsten; Kramm, Christof M

    2018-01-10

    The novel entity of "diffuse midline glioma, H3 K27M-mutant" has been defined in the 2016 revision of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS). Tumors of this entity arise in CNS midline structures of predominantly pediatric patients and are associated with an overall dismal prognosis. They are defined by K27M mutations in H3F3A or HIST1H3B/C, encoding for histone 3 variants H3.3 and H3.1, respectively, which are considered hallmark events driving gliomagenesis. Here, we characterized 85 centrally reviewed diffuse gliomas on midline locations enrolled in the nationwide pediatric German HIT-HGG registry regarding tumor site, histone 3 mutational status, WHO grade, age, sex, and extent of tumor resection. We found 56 H3.3 K27M-mutant tumors (66%), 6 H3.1 K27M-mutant tumors (7%), and 23 H3-wildtype tumors (27%). H3 K27M-mutant gliomas shared an aggressive clinical course independent of their anatomic location. Multivariate regression analysis confirmed the significant impact of the H3 K27M mutation as the only independent parameter predictive of overall survival (P = 0.009). In H3 K27M-mutant tumors, neither anatomic midline location nor histopathological grading nor extent of tumor resection had an influence on survival. These results substantiate the clinical significance of considering diffuse midline glioma, H3 K27M-mutant, as a distinct entity corresponding to WHO grade IV, carrying a universally fatal prognosis. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. Reirradiation of Large-Volume Recurrent Glioma With Pulsed Reduced-Dose-Rate Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adkison, Jarrod B.; Tome, Wolfgang; Seo, Songwon; Richards, Gregory M.; Robins, H. Ian; Rassmussen, Karl; Welsh, James S.; Mahler, Peter A.; Howard, Steven P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Pulsed reduced-dose-rate radiotherapy (PRDR) is a reirradiation technique that reduces the effective dose rate and increases the treatment time, allowing sublethal damage repair during irradiation. Patients and Methods: A total of 103 patients with recurrent glioma underwent reirradiation using PRDR (86 considered to have Grade 4 at PRDR). PRDR was delivered using a series of 0.2-Gy pulses at 3-min intervals, creating an apparent dose rate of 0.0667 Gy/min to a median dose of 50 Gy (range, 20-60) delivered in 1.8-2.0-Gy fractions. The mean treatment volume was 403.5 ± 189.4 cm 3 according to T 2 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging and a 2-cm margin. Results: For the initial or upgraded Grade 4 cohort (n = 86), the median interval from the first irradiation to PRDR was 14 months. Patients undergoing PRDR within 14 months of the first irradiation (n = 43) had a median survival of 21 weeks. Those treated ≥14 months after radiotherapy had a median survival of 28 weeks (n = 43; p = 0.004 and HR = 1.82 with a 95% CI ranging from 1.25 to 3.10). These data compared favorably to historical data sets, because only 16% of the patients were treated at first relapse (with 46% treated at the second relapse, 32% at the third or fourth relapse, and 4% at the fourth or fifth relapse). The median survival since diagnosis and retreatment was 6.3 years and 11.4 months for low-grade, 4.1 years and 5.6 months for Grade 3, and 1.6 years and 5.1 months for Grade 4 tumors, respectively, according to the initial histologic findings. Multivariate analysis revealed age at the initial diagnosis, initial low-grade disease, and Karnofsky performance score of ≥80 to be significant predictors of survival after initiation of PRDR. Conclusion: PRDR allowed for safe retreatment of larger volumes to high doses with palliative benefit.

  8. Pembrolizumab in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Progressive, or Refractory High-Grade Gliomas, Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas, Hypermutated Brain Tumors, Ependymoma or Medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-06-18

    Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome; Lynch Syndrome; Malignant Glioma; Progressive Ependymoma; Progressive Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; Recurrent Medulloblastoma; Refractory Brain Neoplasm; Refractory Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; Refractory Ependymoma; Refractory Medulloblastoma

  9. Effects of anticancer drugs on glia-glioma brain tumor model characterized by acoustic impedance microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, Thomas Tiong Kwong; Chean, Tan Wei; Yamada, Hikari; Takahashi, Kenta; Hozumi, Naohiro; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yoshida, Sachiko

    2017-07-01

    An ultrasonic microscope is a useful tool for observing living tissue without chemical fixation or histochemical processing. Two-dimensional (2D) acoustic impedance microscopy developed in our previous study for living cell observation was employed to visualize intracellular changes. We proposed a brain tumor model by cocultivating rat glial cells and C6 gliomas to quantitatively analyze the effects of two types of anticancer drugs, cytochalasin B (CyB) and temozolomide (TMZ), when they were applied. We reported that CyB treatment (25 µg/ml, T = 90 min) significantly reduced the acoustic impedance of gliomas and has little effect on glial cells. Meanwhile, TMZ treatment (2 mg/ml, T = 90 min) impacted both cells equally, in which both cells’ acoustic impedances were decreased. As CyB targets the actin filament polymerization of the cells, we have concluded that the decrease in acoustic impedance was in fact due to actin filament depolymerization and the data can be quantitatively assessed for future studies in novel drug development.

  10. Simultaneous occurrence of a supra- and an infratentorial glioma in a patient with Ollier's disease : more evidence for non-mesodermal tumor predisposition in multiple enchondromatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeg, M; Klein, JP; Krikke, AP

    1998-01-01

    A case is presented in which two neuro-ectodermal tumors, an infra- and a supratentorial glioma, developed in a young man with multiple enchondromatosis of Ollier's disease. This is the third such case of multifocal low-grade glioma in Ollier's disease, suggesting a predisposition for non-mesodermal

  11. Glioma-secreted soluble factors stimulate microglial activation: The role of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ji-Sun; Jung, Eun-Hye; Kwon, Mi-Youn; Han, Inn-Oc

    2016-09-15

    We aimed to elucidate the effect of soluble factors secreted by glioma on microglial activation. Conditioned medium (CM) from glioma cells, CRT-MG and C6, significantly induced nitric oxide (NO) production and stimulated the mRNA expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in BV2 cells. Glioma CM stimulated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, and a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, suppressed CM-induced NO production in BV2 cells. In addition, CM stimulated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) DNA binding and transcriptional activity, which was repressed by SB203580. Gliomas displayed higher mRNA expression and release of TNF-α and IL-1β than primary astrocyte cells. Neutralization of TNF-α and IL-1β in C6-CM using a neutralizing antibody inhibited NO/iNOS expression in BV-2 cells. These results indicate potential contribution of diffusible tumor-derived factors to regulate microglial activation and subsequent tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Psychological consideration in patients with cerebral gliomas candidates for intra-operative radiation therapy based on tumor location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddighi, Afsoun; Akbari, Mohammad Esmaeil; Seddighi, Amir Saied; Nikouei, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Intra-operative Radiation Therapy (IORT) is gaining popularity as an adjuvant option to surgical resection, in treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) for increasing survival rate, which a highly aggressive cerebral tumor with poor prognosis. Τhe authors plan to investigate the effects of IORT combined with surgical resection on the psychological status of these patients based on tumor location. From December 2013 to February 2017, we have enrolled 109 patients with high grade cerebral gliomas, documented by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS). Patients with previous history of brain surgery or radiation, altered mental status and psychological content and patients diagnosed with metastases were excluded. Demographic data, tumor volume based on pre-operative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and psychological status were recorded based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria. The remaining 56 patients, were equally randomized into conventional (surgical resection-group A), and trial (surgical resection with IORT-group B) who underwent IORT using the 50kV INTRABEAM® system (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Germany). Psychological profiles of both groups were re-evaluated in the 3 rd post-operative month. Group A consisted of 18 males and 10 females with mean age of 54.4 years, while group B consisted of 16 males and 12 females with mean age of 57.8 years. Tumor volumetry revealed mean 81.52cc and 82.8cc for group A and B respectively. (P value 0.14) Patients were classified based on glioma location on pre-operative MRI: a) left parietal lobe (6 in group A, 5 in group B); b) left temporal lobe (7 in group A, 5 in group B); c) right parietal lobe (5 in group A, 6 in group B); d) left fronto-temporal lobe (4 in group A, 6 in group B); e) left parieto-temporal lobe (4 in group A, 5 in group B); and, f) right frontal lobe (2 in group A, 1 in group B). Group B received mean 8.05 Gy radiation for mean 11.2 minutes. Post

  13. A Distinct DNA Methylation Shift in a Subset of Glioma CpG Island Methylator Phenotypes during Tumor Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Ferreira de Souza

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Glioma diagnosis is based on histomorphology and grading; however, such classification does not have predictive clinical outcome after glioblastomas have developed. To date, no bona fide biomarkers that significantly translate into a survival benefit to glioblastoma patients have been identified. We previously reported that the IDH mutant G-CIMP-high subtype would be a predecessor to the G-CIMP-low subtype. Here, we performed a comprehensive DNA methylation longitudinal analysis of diffuse gliomas from 77 patients (200 tumors to enlighten the epigenome-based malignant transformation of initially lower-grade gliomas. Intra-subtype heterogeneity among G-CIMP-high primary tumors allowed us to identify predictive biomarkers for assessing the risk of malignant recurrence at early stages of disease. G-CIMP-low recurrence appeared in 9.5% of all gliomas, and these resembled IDH-wild-type primary glioblastoma. G-CIMP-low recurrence can be characterized by distinct epigenetic changes at candidate functional tissue enhancers with AP-1/SOX binding elements, mesenchymal stem cell-like epigenomic phenotype, and genomic instability. Molecular abnormalities of longitudinal G-CIMP offer possibilities to defy glioblastoma progression. : IDH-mutant lower-grade glioma glioblastoma often progresses to a more aggressive phenotype upon recurrence. de Souza et al. examines the intra-subtype heterogeneity of initial G-CIMP-high and use this information to identify predictive biomarkers for assessing the risk of recurrence and malignant transformation. Keywords: longitudinal gliomas, DNA methylation, IDH mutation, G-CIMP-high, intra-subtype heterogeneity, malignant transformation and recurrence, G-CIMP-low, stem cell-like glioblastoma, predictive biomarkers

  14. Low dose radiation enhance the anti-tumor effect of high dose radiation on human glioma cell U251

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chang; Wang Guanjun; Tan Yehui; Jiang Hongyu; Li Wei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To detect the effect on the growth of human glioma cell U251 induced by low dose irradiation and low dose irradiation combined with large dose irradiation. Methods: Human glioma cell line U251 and nude mice carried with human glioma were used. The tumor cells and the mice were treated with low dose, high dose, and low dose combined high dose radiation. Cells growth curve, MTT and flow cytometry were used to detect the proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of the cells; and the tumor inhibition rate was used to assess the growth of tumor in vivo. Results: After low dose irradiation, there was no difference between experimental group and control group in cell count, MTT and flow cytometry. Single high dose group and low dose combined high dose group both show significantly the suppressing effect on tumor cells, the apoptosis increased and there was cell cycle blocked in G 2 period, but there was no difference between two groups. In vivo apparent anti-tumor effect in high dose radiation group and the combining group was observed, and that was more significant in the combining group; the prior low dose radiation alleviated the injury of hematological system. There was no difference between single low dose radiation group and control. Conclusions: There is no significant effect on human glioma cell induced by low dose radiation, and low dose radiation could not induce adaptive response. But in vivo experience, low dose radiation could enhance the anti-tumor effect of high dose radiation and alleviated the injury of hematological system. (authors)

  15. A Distinct DNA Methylation Shift in a Subset of Glioma CpG Island Methylator Phenotypes during Tumor Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Camila Ferreira; Sabedot, Thais S; Malta, Tathiane M; Stetson, Lindsay; Morozova, Olena; Sokolov, Artem; Laird, Peter W; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Iavarone, Antonio; Snyder, James; deCarvalho, Ana; Sanborn, Zachary; McDonald, Kerrie L; Friedman, William A; Tirapelli, Daniela; Poisson, Laila; Mikkelsen, Tom; Carlotti, Carlos G; Kalkanis, Steven; Zenklusen, Jean; Salama, Sofie R; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Noushmehr, Houtan

    2018-04-10

    Glioma diagnosis is based on histomorphology and grading; however, such classification does not have predictive clinical outcome after glioblastomas have developed. To date, no bona fide biomarkers that significantly translate into a survival benefit to glioblastoma patients have been identified. We previously reported that the IDH mutant G-CIMP-high subtype would be a predecessor to the G-CIMP-low subtype. Here, we performed a comprehensive DNA methylation longitudinal analysis of diffuse gliomas from 77 patients (200 tumors) to enlighten the epigenome-based malignant transformation of initially lower-grade gliomas. Intra-subtype heterogeneity among G-CIMP-high primary tumors allowed us to identify predictive biomarkers for assessing the risk of malignant recurrence at early stages of disease. G-CIMP-low recurrence appeared in 9.5% of all gliomas, and these resembled IDH-wild-type primary glioblastoma. G-CIMP-low recurrence can be characterized by distinct epigenetic changes at candidate functional tissue enhancers with AP-1/SOX binding elements, mesenchymal stem cell-like epigenomic phenotype, and genomic instability. Molecular abnormalities of longitudinal G-CIMP offer possibilities to defy glioblastoma progression. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Upregulation of B23 promotes tumor cell proliferation and predicts poor prognosis in glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jianguo [Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, 1055 Sanxiang Road, Suzhou, 215004, Jiangsu Province (China); Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road, Nantong, 226001, Jiangsu Province (China); Sun, Jie; Yang, Liu; Yan, Yaohua; Shi, Wei; Shi, Jinlong; Huang, Qingfeng; Chen, Jian [Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road, Nantong, 226001, Jiangsu Province (China); Lan, Qing, E-mail: lanqingsj@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, 1055 Sanxiang Road, Suzhou, 215004, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-10-09

    B23 (also known as Nucleophosmin, NPM, numatrin or NO38) is a ubiquitously expressed phosphoprotein belonging to the nucleoplasmin family of chaperones. In this study we intended to investigate the clinical significance of B23 expression in human glioma and its biological function in glioma cells. Western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis showed that B23 was overexpressed in glioma tissues and glioma cell lines. In addition, the expression level of B23 was positively correlated with glioma pathological grade and Ki-67 expression. Kaplan–Meier analysis revealed that a higher B23 expression in patients with glioma was associated with a poorer prognosis. In vitro, after the release of glioma cell lines from serum starvation, the expression of B23 was upregulated, as well as PCNA (Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen) and cyclin A. In addition, knockdown of B23 by small interfering RNA transfection diminished the expression of PCNA, cyclin D1 and arrested cell growth at G1 phase. Taken together, our results implied that B23 could be a candidate prognostic biomarker as well as a potential therapeutical target of glioma. - Highlights: • B23 expression increased as the malignant degree of glioma increased, which was consistent with Ki-67 expression. • High expression of B23 could be a strong determinant of poor prognosis in glioma. • B23 may be involved in the proliferation of glioma in a cell-cycle-dependent pathway. • Knockdown of B23 expression by siRNA could affect the progression of glioma. • B23 may be a potential prognosis biomarker and a possible therapeutic target for glioma.

  17. Hypomethylation and Aberrant Expression of the Glioma Pathogenesis-Related 1 Gene in Wilms Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi Chilukamarri

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Wilms tumors (WTs have a complex etiology, displaying genetic and epigenetic changes, including loss of imprinting (LOI and tumor suppressor gene silencing. To identify new regions of epigenetic perturbation in WTs, we screened kidney and tumor DNA using CpG island (CGI tags associated with cancer-specific DNA methylation changes. One such tag corresponded to a paralog of the glioma pathogenesis-related 1/related to testis-specific, vespid, and pathogenesis proteins 1 (GLIPR1/RTVP-1 gene, previously reported to be a tumor-suppressor gene silenced by hypermethylation in prostate cancer. Here we report methylation analysis of the GLIPR1/RTVP-1 gene in WTs and normal fetal and pediatric kidneys. Hypomethylation of the GLIPR1/RTVP-1 5'-region in WTs relative to normal tissue is observed in 21/24 (87.5% of WTs analyzed. Quantitative analysis of GLIPR1/RTVP-1 expression in 24 WTs showed elevated transcript levels in 16/24 WTs (67%, with 12 WTs displaying in excess of 20-fold overexpression relative to fetal kidney (FK control samples. Immunohistochemical analysis of FK and WT corroborates the RNA expression data and reveals high GLIPR1/RTVP-1 in WT blastemal cells together with variable levels in stromal and epithelial components. Hypomethylation is also evident in the WT precursor lesions and nephrogenic rests (NRs, supporting a role for GLIPR1/RTVP-1 deregulation early in Wilms tumorigenesis. Our data show that, in addition to gene dosage changes arising from LOI and hypermethylation-induced gene silencing, gene activation resulting from hypomethylation is also prevalent in WTs.

  18. Tumores cerebrales primarios (gliomas) en relación con factores demográficos y ambientales

    OpenAIRE

    Montero, Guadalupe

    2010-01-01

    Objetivo del trabajo: Explorar la relación entre probables factores de riesgo ambientales de cáncer cerebral (gliomas) en pacientes mayores de 16 años con diagnóstico de tumor primario de cerebro que asistieron al Policlínico Neuquén durante enero del 2006 hasta octubre del 2011. Facultad de Ciencias Médicas

  19. Correlation of Tumor and Peritumoral Edema Volumes with Survival in Patients with Cerebral Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschbaumer, Johannes; Bauer, Marlies; Popovscaia, Marina; Grams, Astrid E; Thomé, Claudius; Freyschlag, Christian F

    2017-02-01

    Surgical resection in combination with radiotherapy in selected cases remains the best option for patients with cerebral metastases. Postoperative relapse of brain metastases occurs frequently and can be reduced by postoperative whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Continuous spread of tumor cells from the primary lesions is debated as a cause of recurrence. It is well known that in gliomas, infiltration takes place within the surrounding edema. Obviously, most brain metastases are usually associated with peritumoral edema, which may act as an indicator of infiltration and more aggressive tumor biology. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the correlation of tumor and edema volumes with overall survival in patients with cerebral metastases. A total of 143 patients diagnosed with brain metastasis (male:female=1.1:1) who underwent surgical resection were included retrospectively in this analysis. Clinical data were retrieved from electronic patient files. The volumes of tumor and edema calculated by manual delineation. The ratio of edema to tumor volume was calculated, leading to dichotomization of the patients. The median tumor volume was 20.1 cc (range=0.8-90.8 cc) and the median volume of edema 49.5 cc (range=0-179.9 cc). The volume of metastases did not significantly correlate with overall survival. The ratio of edema to tumor volume was also not a prognostic factor in terms of overall survival. Only surgical resection, preoperative recursive partitioning analysis class, and postoperative addition of WBRT, as well as female sex, demonstrated beneficial effects. The extent of edema surrounding cerebral metastases does not appear to influence overall survival in patients suffering from brain metastases, although it seems to be responsible for most of the patients' symptoms. The hypothesis that the extent of edema was disadvantageous concerning survival was supported by our data. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios

  20. High bone sialoprotein (BSP expression correlates with increased tumor grade and predicts a poorer prognosis of high-grade glioma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Xu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the expression and prognostic value of bone sialoprotein (BSP in glioma patients. METHODS: We determined the expression of BSP using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry in tissue microarrays containing 15 normal brain and 270 glioma samples. Cumulative survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and analyzed by the log-rank test. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed by the stepwise forward Cox regression model. RESULTS: Both BSP mRNA and protein levels were significantly elevated in high-grade glioma tissues compared with those of normal brain and low-grade glioma tissues, and BSP expression positively correlated with tumor grade (P<0.001. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed high BSP expression was an independent prognostic factor for a shorter progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS in both grade III and grade IV glioma patients [hazard ratio (HR = 2.549 and 3.154 for grade III glioma, and HR = 1.637 and 1.574 for grade IV glioma, respectively]. Patients with low BSP expression had a significantly longer median OS and PFS than those with high BSP expression. Small extent of resection and lineage of astrocyte served as independent risk factors of both shorter PFS and OS in grade III glioma patients; GBM patients without O(6-methylguanine (O(6-meG DNA methyltransferase (MGMT methylation and Karnofsky performance score (KPS less than 70 points were related to poor prognosis. Lack of radiotherapy related to shorter OS but not affect PFS in both grade III and grade IV glioma patients. CONCLUSION: High BSP expression occurs in a significant subset of high-grade glioma patients and predicts a poorer outcome. The study identifies a potentially useful molecular marker for the categorization and targeted therapy of gliomas.

  1. Differentiation of malignant glioma and metastatic brain tumor by thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Yasuhiro; Kuwana, Nobumasa; Noji, Masato; Tosa, Junichi [Yokohama Minami Kyosai Hospital (Japan)

    1994-09-01

    The use of superdelayed thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography ([sup 201]Tl SPECT) for differentiating malignant gliomas from cerebral metastases was investigated in 23 patients (7 with meningioma, 6 with glioma, 7 with cerebral metastasis, 1 with each of neurinoma, abscess, and necrosis). 4 mCi of [sup 201]Tl was injected intravenously, and gamma camera scans were performed after 10 minutes and 4, 24, 72, and 96 hours (superdelayed scan). The mean thallium index of meningiomas was significantly higher than those of gliomas and cerebral metastases after 10 minutes, while the mean thallium indices of meningiomas and gliomas were significantly higher than those of cerebral metastases after 96 hours. The combination of early and superdelayed [sup 201]Tl SPECT may be useful in differentiating malignant gliomas from cerebral metastases. (author).

  2. Comparative expression analysis reveals lineage relationships between human and murine gliomas and a dominance of glial signatures during tumor propagation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez, Nico V; Forshew, Tim; Tatevossian, Ruth; Ellis, Matthew; Richard-Loendt, Angela; Rogers, Hazel; Jacques, Thomas S; Reitboeck, Pablo Garcia; Pearce, Kerra; Sheer, Denise; Grundy, Richard G; Brandner, Sebastian

    2013-09-15

    Brain tumors are thought to originate from stem/progenitor cell populations that acquire specific genetic mutations. Although current preclinical models have relevance to human pathogenesis, most do not recapitulate the histogenesis of the human disease. Recently, a large series of human gliomas and medulloblastomas were analyzed for genetic signatures of prognosis and therapeutic response. Using a mouse model system that generates three distinct types of intrinsic brain tumors, we correlated RNA and protein expression levels with human brain tumors. A combination of genetic mutations and cellular environment during tumor propagation defined the incidence and phenotype of intrinsic murine tumors. Importantly, in vitro passage of cancer stem cells uniformly promoted a glial expression profile in culture and in brain tumors. Gene expression profiling revealed that experimental gliomas corresponded to distinct subclasses of human glioblastoma, whereas experimental supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET) correspond to atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT), a rare childhood tumor. ©2013 AACR.

  3. Assessment of various strategies for 18F-FET PET-guided delineation of target volumes in high-grade glioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vees, Hansjörg; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Miralbell, Raymond; Weber, Damien C; Ratib, Osman; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to assess the contribution of (18)F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine ((18)F-FET) positron emission tomography (PET) in the delineation of gross tumor volume (GTV) in patients with high-grade gliomas compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) alone. The study population consisted of 18 patients with high-grade gliomas. Seven image segmentation techniques were used to delineate (18)F-FET PET GTVs, and the results were compared to the manual MRI-derived GTV (GTV(MRI)). PET image segmentation techniques included manual delineation of contours (GTV(man)), a 2.5 standardized uptake value (SUV) cutoff (GTV(2.5)), a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity (GTV(40%) and GTV(50%)), signal-to-background ratio (SBR)-based adaptive thresholding (GTV(SBR)), gradient find (GTV(GF)), and region growing (GTV(RG)). Overlap analysis was also conducted to assess geographic mismatch between the GTVs delineated using the different techniques. Contours defined using GTV(2.5) failed to provide successful delineation technically in three patients (18% of cases) as SUV(max) segmentation algorithm is crucial, since it impacts both the volume and shape of the resulting GTV. The 2.5 SUV isocontour and GF segmentation techniques performed poorly and should not be used for GTV delineation. With adequate setting, the SBR-based PET technique may add considerably to conventional MRI-guided GTV delineation.

  4. Accuracy of high-field intraoperative MRI in the detectability of residual tumor in glioma grade IV resections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Mager, Ann-Kathrin [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Radiology/Neurologie; Goetz, Claudia; Kremer, Paul [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Detsch, Oliver [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine; Theisgen, Hannah-Katharina [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Friese, Michael; Gottschalk, Joachim [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology and Neuropathology; Schwindt, Wolfram [Univ. Hospital Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology

    2017-06-15

    To assess the sensitivity/specificity of tumor detection by T1 contrast enhancement in intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) in comparison to histopathological assessment as the gold standard in patients receiving surgical resection of grade IV glioblastoma. 68 patients with a primary or a recurrent glioblastoma scheduled for surgery including fluorescence guidance and neuronavigation were included (mean age: 59 years, 26 female, 42 male patients). The ioMRI after the first resection included transverse FLAIR, DWI, T2-FFE and T1 - 3 d FFE ± GD-DPTA. The second resection was performed whenever residual contrast-enhancing tissue was detected on ioMRI. Resected tissue samples were histopathologically evaluated (gold standard). Additionally, we evaluated the early postoperative MRI scan acquired within 48 h post-OP for remaining enhancing tissue and compared them with the ioMRI scan. In 43 patients ioMRI indicated residual tumorous tissue, which could be confirmed in the histological specimens of the second resection. In 16 (4 with recurrent, 12 with primary glioblastoma) cases, ioMRI revealed truly negative results without residual tumor and follow-up MRI confirmed complete resection. In 7 cases (3 with recurrent, 4 with primary glioblastoma) ioMRI revealed a suspicious result without tumorous tissue in the histopathological workup. In 2 (1 for each group) patients, residual tumorous tissue was detected in spite of negative ioMRI. IoMRI had a sensitivity of 95 % (94 % recurrent and 96 % for primary glioblastoma) and a specificity of 69.5 % (57 % and 75 %, respectively). The positive predictive value was 86 % (84 % for recurrent and 87 % for primary glioblastoma), and the negative predictive value was 88 % (80 % and 92 %, respectively). ioMRI is effective for detecting remaining tumorous tissue after glioma resection. However, scars and leakage of contrast agent can be misleading and limit specificity. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) presents with a high sensitivity for residual

  5. Accuracy of high-field intraoperative MRI in the detectability of residual tumor in glioma grade IV resections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Mager, Ann-Kathrin; Goetz, Claudia; Kremer, Paul; Detsch, Oliver; Theisgen, Hannah-Katharina; Friese, Michael; Gottschalk, Joachim; Schwindt, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    To assess the sensitivity/specificity of tumor detection by T1 contrast enhancement in intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) in comparison to histopathological assessment as the gold standard in patients receiving surgical resection of grade IV glioblastoma. 68 patients with a primary or a recurrent glioblastoma scheduled for surgery including fluorescence guidance and neuronavigation were included (mean age: 59 years, 26 female, 42 male patients). The ioMRI after the first resection included transverse FLAIR, DWI, T2-FFE and T1 - 3 d FFE ± GD-DPTA. The second resection was performed whenever residual contrast-enhancing tissue was detected on ioMRI. Resected tissue samples were histopathologically evaluated (gold standard). Additionally, we evaluated the early postoperative MRI scan acquired within 48 h post-OP for remaining enhancing tissue and compared them with the ioMRI scan. In 43 patients ioMRI indicated residual tumorous tissue, which could be confirmed in the histological specimens of the second resection. In 16 (4 with recurrent, 12 with primary glioblastoma) cases, ioMRI revealed truly negative results without residual tumor and follow-up MRI confirmed complete resection. In 7 cases (3 with recurrent, 4 with primary glioblastoma) ioMRI revealed a suspicious result without tumorous tissue in the histopathological workup. In 2 (1 for each group) patients, residual tumorous tissue was detected in spite of negative ioMRI. IoMRI had a sensitivity of 95 % (94 % recurrent and 96 % for primary glioblastoma) and a specificity of 69.5 % (57 % and 75 %, respectively). The positive predictive value was 86 % (84 % for recurrent and 87 % for primary glioblastoma), and the negative predictive value was 88 % (80 % and 92 %, respectively). ioMRI is effective for detecting remaining tumorous tissue after glioma resection. However, scars and leakage of contrast agent can be misleading and limit specificity. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) presents with a high sensitivity for residual

  6. Standardized orthotopic xenografts in zebrafish reveal glioma cell-line-specific characteristics and tumor cell heterogeneity

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    Alessandra M. Welker

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is a deadly brain cancer, for which few effective drug treatments are available. Several studies have used zebrafish models to study GBM, but a standardized approach to modeling GBM in zebrafish was lacking to date, preventing comparison of data across studies. Here, we describe a new, standardized orthotopic xenotransplant model of GBM in zebrafish. Dose-response survival assays were used to define the optimal number of cells for tumor formation. Techniques to measure tumor burden and cell spread within the brain over real time were optimized using mouse neural stem cells as control transplants. Applying this standardized approach, we transplanted two patient-derived GBM cell lines, serum-grown adherent cells and neurospheres, into the midbrain region of embryonic zebrafish and analyzed transplanted larvae over time. Progressive brain tumor growth and premature larval death were observed using both cell lines; however, fewer transplanted neurosphere cells were needed for tumor growth and lethality. Tumors were heterogeneous, containing both cells expressing stem cell markers and cells expressing markers of differentiation. A small proportion of transplanted neurosphere cells expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP or vimentin, markers of more differentiated cells, but this number increased significantly during tumor growth, indicating that these cells undergo differentiation in vivo. By contrast, most serum-grown adherent cells expressed GFAP and vimentin at the earliest times examined post-transplant. Both cell types produced brain tumors that contained Sox2+ cells, indicative of tumor stem cells. Transplanted larvae were treated with currently used GBM therapeutics, temozolomide or bortezomib, and this resulted in a reduction in tumor volume in vivo and an increase in survival. The standardized model reported here facilitates robust and reproducible analysis of glioblastoma tumor cells in real time and provides a

  7. Assessment of various strategies for 18F-FET PET-guided delineation of target volumes in high-grade glioma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vees, Hansjoerg; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Ratib, Osman; Miralbell, Raymond; Weber, Damien C.; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to assess the contribution of 18 F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine ( 18 F-FET) positron emission tomography (PET) in the delineation of gross tumor volume (GTV) in patients with high-grade gliomas compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) alone. The study population consisted of 18 patients with high-grade gliomas. Seven image segmentation techniques were used to delineate 18 F-FET PET GTVs, and the results were compared to the manual MRI-derived GTV (GTV MRI ). PET image segmentation techniques included manual delineation of contours (GTV man ), a 2.5 standardized uptake value (SUV) cutoff (GTV 2.5 ), a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity (GTV 40% and GTV 50% ), signal-to-background ratio (SBR)-based adaptive thresholding (GTV SBR ), gradient find (GTV GF ), and region growing (GTV RG ). Overlap analysis was also conducted to assess geographic mismatch between the GTVs delineated using the different techniques. Contours defined using GTV 2.5 failed to provide successful delineation technically in three patients (18% of cases) as SUV max MRI (67% of cases). Yet, PET detected frequently tumors that are not visible on MRI and added substantially tumor extension outside the GTV MRI in six patients (33% of cases). The selection of the most appropriate 18 F-FET PET-based segmentation algorithm is crucial, since it impacts both the volume and shape of the resulting GTV. The 2.5 SUV isocontour and GF segmentation techniques performed poorly and should not be used for GTV delineation. With adequate setting, the SBR-based PET technique may add considerably to conventional MRI-guided GTV delineation. (orig.)

  8. Tissue pO2 of Orthotopic 9L and C6 Gliomas and Tumor-Specific Response to Radiotherapy and Hyperoxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Nadeem; Li Hongbin; Hou, Huagang; Lariviere, Jean P.; Gladstone, David J.; Demidenko, Eugene; Swartz, Harold M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor hypoxia is a well-known therapeutic problem; however, a lack of methods for repeated measurements of glioma partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 ) limits the ability to optimize the therapeutic approaches. We report the effects of 9.3 Gy of radiation and carbogen inhalation on orthotopic 9L and C6 gliomas and on the contralateral brain pO 2 in rats using a new and potentially widely useful method, multisite in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry. Methods and Materials: Intracerebral 9L and C6 tumors were established in the left hemisphere of syngeneic rats, and electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry was successfully used for repeated tissue pO 2 measurements after 9.3 Gy of radiation and during carbogen breathing for 5 consecutive days. Results: Intracerebral 9L gliomas had a pO 2 of 30-32 mm Hg and C6 gliomas were relatively hypoxic, with a pO 2 of 12-14 mm Hg (p 2 of the contralateral brain was 40-45 mm Hg in rats with either 9L or C6 gliomas. Irradiation resulted in a significant increase in pO 2 of the 9L gliomas only. A significant increase in the pO 2 of the 9L and C6 gliomas was observed in rats breathing carbogen, but this effect decreased during 5 days of repeated experiments in the 9L gliomas. Conclusion: These results highlight the tumor-specific effect of radiation (9.3.Gy) on tissue pO 2 and the different responses to carbogen inhalation. The ability of electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry to provide direct repeated measurements of tissue pO 2 could have a vital role in understanding the dynamics of hypoxia during therapy that could then be optimized by scheduling doses at times of improved tumor oxygenation

  9. Stem-like tumor-initiating cells isolated from IL13Rα2 expressing gliomas are targeted and killed by IL13-zetakine-redirected T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christine E; Starr, Renate; Aguilar, Brenda; Shami, Andrew F; Martinez, Catalina; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Barish, Michael E; Forman, Stephen J; Jensen, Michael C

    2012-04-15

    To evaluate IL13Rα2 as an immunotherapeutic target for eliminating glioma stem-like cancer initiating cells (GSC) of high-grade gliomas, with particular focus on the potential of genetically engineered IL13Rα2-specific primary human CD8(+) CTLs (IL13-zetakine(+) CTL) to target this therapeutically resistant glioma subpopulation. A panel of low-passage GSC tumor sphere (TS) and serum-differentiated glioma lines were expanded from patient glioblastoma specimens. These glioblastoma lines were evaluated for expression of IL13Rα2 and for susceptibility to IL13-zetakine(+) CTL-mediated killing in vitro and in vivo. We observed that although glioma IL13Rα2 expression varies between patients, for IL13Rα2(pos) cases this antigen was detected on both GSCs and more differentiated tumor cell populations. IL13-zetakine(+) CTL were capable of efficient recognition and killing of both IL13Rα2(pos) GSCs and IL13Rα2(pos) differentiated cells in vitro, as well as eliminating glioma-initiating activity in an orthotopic mouse tumor model. Furthermore, intracranial administration of IL13-zetakine(+) CTL displayed robust antitumor activity against established IL13Rα2(pos) GSC TS-initiated orthotopic tumors in mice. Within IL13Rα2 expressing high-grade gliomas, this receptor is expressed by GSCs and differentiated tumor populations, rendering both targetable by IL13-zetakine(+) CTLs. Thus, our results support the potential usefullness of IL13Rα2-directed immunotherapeutic approaches for eradicating therapeutically resistant GSC populations. ©2012 AACR.

  10. Gene expression of fibroblast growth factors in human gliomas and meningiomas: Demonstration of cellular source of basic fibroblast growth factor mRNA and peptide in tumor tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, J.A.; Mori, Hirotaka; Fukumoto, Manabu; Oda, Yoshifumi; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Hatanaka, Masakazu; Igarashi, Koichi; Jaye, M.

    1990-01-01

    The growth autonomy of human tumor cells is considered due to the endogenous production of growth factors. Transcriptional expression of candidates for autocrine stimulatory factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), acidic FGF, and transforming growth factor type β were determined in human brain tumors. Basic FGF was expressed abundantly in 17 of 18 gliomas, 20 of 22 meningiomas, and 0 of 5 metastatic brain tumors. The level of mRNA expression of acidic FGF in gliomas was significant. In contrast, transforming growth factor type β1 was expressed in all the samples investigated. The mRNA for basic FGF and its peptide were localized in tumor cells in vivo by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, showing that basic FGF is actually produced in tumor cells. The results suggest that tumor-derived basic FGF is involved in the progression of gliomas and meningiomas in vivo, whereas acidic FGF is expressed in a tumor origin-specific manner, suggesting that acidic FGF works in tandem with basic FGF in glioma tumorigenesis

  11. Correlation between metabolic tumor volume and pathologic tumor volume in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, James D.; Chisholm, Karen M.; Daly, Megan E.; Wiegner, Ellen A.; Truong, Daniel; Iagaru, Andrei; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Graves, Edward E.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Kong, Christina; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the relationship between pathologic tumor volume and volume estimated from different tumor segmentation techniques on 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in oral cavity cancer. Materials and methods: Twenty-three patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue had PET–CT scans before definitive surgery. Pathologic tumor volume was estimated from surgical specimens. Metabolic tumor volume (MTV) was defined from PET–CT scans as the volume of tumor above a given SUV threshold. Multiple SUV thresholds were explored including absolute SUV thresholds, relative SUV thresholds, and gradient-based techniques. Results: Multiple MTV’s were associated with pathologic tumor volume; however the correlation was poor (R 2 range 0.29–0.58). The ideal SUV threshold, defined as the SUV that generates an MTV equal to pathologic tumor volume, was independently associated with maximum SUV (p = 0.0005) and tumor grade (p = 0.024). MTV defined as a function of maximum SUV and tumor grade improved the prediction of pathologic tumor volume (R 2 = 0.63). Conclusions: Common SUV thresholds fail to predict pathologic tumor volume in head and neck cancer. The optimal technique that allows for integration of PET–CT with radiation treatment planning remains to be defined. Future investigation should incorporate biomarkers such as tumor grade into definitions of MTV.

  12. The importance of tumor volume in the prognosis of patients with glioblastoma. Comparison of computerized volumetry and geometric models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliadis, Georgios; Misailidou, Despina; Selviaridis, Panagiotis; Chatzisotiriou, Athanasios; Kalogera-Fountzila, Anna; Fragkoulidi, Anna; Fountzilas, George; Baltas, Dimos; Tselis, Nikolaos; Zamboglou, Nikolaos

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: the importance of tumor volume as a prognostic factor in high-grade gliomas is highly controversial and there are numerous methods estimating this parameter. In this study, a computer-based application was used in order to assess tumor volume from hard copies and a survival analysis was conducted in order to evaluate the prognostic significance of preoperative volumetric data in patients harboring glioblastomas. Patients and methods: 50 patients suffering from glioblastoma were analyzed retrospectively. Tumor volume was determined by the various geometric models as well as by an own specialized software (Volumio). Age, performance status, type of excision, and tumor location were also included in the multivariate analysis. Results: the spheroid and rectangular models overestimated tumor volume, while the ellipsoid model offered the best approximation. Volume failed to attain any statistical significance in prognosis, while age and performance status confirmed their importance in progression-free and overall survival of patients. Conclusion: geometric models provide a rough approximation of tumor volume and should not be used, as accurate determination of size is of paramount importance in order to draw safe conclusions in oncology. Although the significance of volumetry was not disclosed, further studies are definitely required. (orig.)

  13. Measurements of diagnostic examination performance using quantitative apparent diffusion coefficient and proton MR spectroscopic imaging in the preoperative evaluation of tumor grade in cerebral gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, Andres; Kulle, Bettina; Gadmar, Oystein B.; Josefsen, Roger; Kumar, Theresa; Nakstad, Per H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor grading is very important both in treatment decision and evaluation of prognosis. While tissue samples are obtained as part of most therapeutic approaches, factors that may result in inaccurate grading due to sampling error (namely, heterogeneity in tissue sampling, as well as tumor-grade heterogeneity within the same tumor specimen), have led to a desire to use imaging better to ascertain tumor grade. The purpose in our study was to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), area under the curve (AUC), and accuracy of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI), proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) or both in grading primary cerebral gliomas. Materials and methods: We performed conventional MR imaging (MR), DWI, and MRSI in 74 patients with newly diagnosed brain gliomas: 59 patients had histologically verified high-grade gliomas: 37 glioblastomas multiform (GBM) and 22 anaplastic astrocytomas (AA), and 15 patients had low-grade gliomas. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of tumor and peritumoral edema, and ADC ratios (ADC in tumor or peritumoral edema to ADC of contralateral white matter, as well as ADC in tumor to ADC in peritumoral edema) were determined from three regions of interest. The average of the mean, maximum, and minimum for ADC variables was calculated for each patient. The metabolite ratios of Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA at intermediate TE were assessed from spectral maps in the solid portion of tumor, peritumoral edema and contralateral normal-appearing white matter. Tumor grade determined with the two methods was then compared with that from histopathologic grading. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were performed to determine optimum thresholds for tumor grading. Measures of diagnostic examination performance, such as sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, AUC, and accuracy for identifying high-grade gliomas were also calculated

  14. Longitudinal DSC-MRI for Distinguishing Tumor Recurrence From Pseudoprogression in Patients With a High-grade Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxerman, Jerrold L; Ellingson, Benjamin M; Jeyapalan, Suriya; Elinzano, Heinrich; Harris, Robert J; Rogg, Jeffrey M; Pope, Whitney B; Safran, Howard

    2017-06-01

    For patients with high-grade glioma on clinical trials it is important to accurately assess time of disease progression. However, differentiation between pseudoprogression (PsP) and progressive disease (PD) is unreliable with standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI (DSC-MRI) can measure relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and may help distinguish PsP from PD. A subset of patients with high-grade glioma on a phase II clinical trial with temozolomide, paclitaxel poliglumex, and concurrent radiation were assessed. Nine patients (3 grade III, 6 grade IV), with a total of 19 enhancing lesions demonstrating progressive enhancement (≥25% increase from nadir) on postchemoradiation conventional contrast-enhanced MRI, had serial DSC-MRI. Mean leakage-corrected rCBV within enhancing lesions was computed for all postchemoradiation time points. Of the 19 progressively enhancing lesions, 10 were classified as PsP and 9 as PD by biopsy/surgery or serial enhancement patterns during interval follow-up MRI. Mean rCBV at initial progressive enhancement did not differ significantly between PsP and PD (2.35 vs. 2.17; P=0.67). However, change in rCBV at first subsequent follow-up (-0.84 vs. 0.84; P=0.001) and the overall linear trend in rCBV after initial progressive enhancement (negative vs. positive slope; P=0.04) differed significantly between PsP and PD. Longitudinal trends in rCBV may be more useful than absolute rCBV in distinguishing PsP from PD in chemoradiation-treated high-grade gliomas with DSC-MRI. Further studies of DSC-MRI in high-grade glioma as a potential technique for distinguishing PsP from PD are indicated.

  15. Cilengitide-induced temporal variations in transvascular transfer parameters of tumor vasculature in a rat glioma model: identifying potential MRI biomarkers of acute effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavarekere N Nagaraja

    Full Text Available Increased efficacy of radiotherapy (RT 4-8 h after Cilengitide treatment has been reported. We hypothesized that the effects of Cilengitide on tumor transvascular transfer parameters might underlie, and thus predict, this potentiation. Athymic rats with orthotopic U251 glioma were studied at ~21 days after implantation using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-MRI. Vascular parameters, viz: plasma volume fraction (v(p, forward volume transfer constant (K(trans and interstitial volume fraction (v(e of a contrast agent, were determined in tumor vasculature once before, and again in cohorts 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h after Cilengitide administration (4 mg/kg; N = 31; 6-7 per cohort. Perfusion-fixed brain sections were stained for von Willebrand factor to visualize vascular segments. A comparison of pre- and post-treatment parameters showed that the differences between MR indices before and after Cilengitide treatment pivoted around the 8 h time point, with 2 and 4 h groups showing increases, 12 and 24 h groups showing decreases, and values at the 8 h time point close to the baseline. The vascular parameter differences between group of 2 and 4 h and group of 12 and 24 h were significant for K(trans (p = 0.0001 and v(e (p = 0,0271. Vascular staining showed little variation with time after Cilengitide. The vascular normalization occurring 8 h after Cilengitide treatment coincided with similar previous reports of increased treatment efficacy when RT followed Cilengitide by 8 h. Pharmacological normalization of vasculature has the potential to increase sensitivity to RT. Evaluating acute temporal responses of tumor vasculature to putative anti-angiogenic drugs may help in optimizing their combination with other treatment modalities.

  16. A ketogenic diet increases transport and oxidation of ketone bodies in RG2 and 9L gliomas without affecting tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Feyter, Henk M; Behar, Kevin L; Rao, Jyotsna U; Madden-Hennessey, Kirby; Ip, Kevan L; Hyder, Fahmeed; Drewes, Lester R; Geschwind, Jean-François; de Graaf, Robin A; Rothman, Douglas L

    2016-08-01

    The dependence of tumor cells, particularly those originating in the brain, on glucose is the target of the ketogenic diet, which creates a plasma nutrient profile similar to fasting: increased levels of ketone bodies and reduced plasma glucose concentrations. The use of ketogenic diets has been of particular interest for therapy in brain tumors, which reportedly lack the ability to oxidize ketone bodies and therefore would be starved during ketosis. Because studies assessing the tumors' ability to oxidize ketone bodies are lacking, we investigated in vivo the extent of ketone body oxidation in 2 rodent glioma models. Ketone body oxidation was studied using (13)C MR spectroscopy in combination with infusion of a (13)C-labeled ketone body (beta-hydroxybutyrate) in RG2 and 9L glioma models. The level of ketone body oxidation was compared with nontumorous cortical brain tissue. The level of (13)C-beta-hydroxybutyrate oxidation in 2 rat glioma models was similar to that of contralateral brain. In addition, when glioma-bearing animals were fed a ketogenic diet, the ketone body monocarboxylate transporter was upregulated, facilitating uptake and oxidation of ketone bodies in the gliomas. These results demonstrate that rat gliomas can oxidize ketone bodies and indicate upregulation of ketone body transport when fed a ketogenic diet. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that brain tumors are metabolically inflexible and show the need for additional research on the use of ketogenic diets as therapy targeting brain tumor metabolism. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Application of histogram analysis for the evaluation of vascular permeability in glioma by the K2 parameter obtained with the dynamic susceptibility contrast method: Comparisons with Ktrans obtained with the dynamic contrast enhance method and cerebral blood volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taoka, Toshiaki; Kawai, Hisashi; Nakane, Toshiki; Hori, Saeka; Ochi, Tomoko; Miyasaka, Toshiteru; Sakamoto, Masahiko; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Naganawa, Shinji

    2016-09-01

    The "K2" value is a factor that represents the vascular permeability of tumors and can be calculated from datasets obtained with the dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) method. The purpose of the current study was to correlate K2 with Ktrans, which is a well-established permeability parameter obtained with the dynamic contrast enhance (DCE) method, and determine the usefulness of K2 for glioma grading with histogram analysis. The subjects were 22 glioma patients (Grade II: 5, III: 6, IV: 11) who underwent DSC studies, including eight patients in which both DSC and DCE studies were performed on separate days within 10days. We performed histogram analysis of regions of interest of the tumors and acquired 20th percentile values for leakage-corrected cerebral blood volume (rCBV20%ile), K2 (K220%ile), and for patients who underwent a DCE study, Ktrans (Ktrans20%ile). We evaluated the correlation between K220%ile and Ktrans20%ile and the statistical difference between rCBV20%ile and K220%ile. We found a statistically significant correlation between K220%ile and Ktrans20%ile (r=0.717, pK220%ile showed a statistically significant (pK2 value calculated from the DSC dataset, which can be obtained with a short acquisition time, showed a correlation with Ktrans obtained with the DCE method and may be useful for glioma grading when analyzed with histogram analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Histogram analysis of T2*-based pharmacokinetic imaging in cerebral glioma grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Shan; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Hsu, Fei-Ting; Cho, Nai-Yu; Wang, Chao-Ying; Chou, Ming-Chung; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the feasibility of histogram analysis of the T2*-based permeability parameter volume transfer constant (K trans ) for glioma grading and to explore the diagnostic performance of the histogram analysis of K trans and blood plasma volume (v p ). We recruited 31 and 11 patients with high- and low-grade gliomas, respectively. The histogram parameters of K trans and v p , derived from the first-pass pharmacokinetic modeling based on the T2* dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2* DSC-PW-MRI) from the entire tumor volume, were evaluated for differentiating glioma grades. Histogram parameters of K trans and v p showed significant differences between high- and low-grade gliomas and exhibited significant correlations with tumor grades. The mean K trans derived from the T2* DSC-PW-MRI had the highest sensitivity and specificity for differentiating high-grade gliomas from low-grade gliomas compared with other histogram parameters of K trans and v p . Histogram analysis of T2*-based pharmacokinetic imaging is useful for cerebral glioma grading. The histogram parameters of the entire tumor K trans measurement can provide increased accuracy with additional information regarding microvascular permeability changes for identifying high-grade brain tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Diagnostic performance of whole brain volume perfusion CT in intra-axial brain tumors: Preoperative classification accuracy and histopathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xyda, Argyro; Haberland, Ulrike; Klotz, Ernst; Jung, Klaus; Bock, Hans Christoph; Schramm, Ramona; Knauth, Michael; Schramm, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the preoperative diagnostic power and classification accuracy of perfusion parameters derived from whole brain volume perfusion CT (VPCT) in patients with cerebral tumors. Methods: Sixty-three patients (31 male, 32 female; mean age 55.6 ± 13.9 years), with MRI findings suspected of cerebral lesions, underwent VPCT. Two readers independently evaluated VPCT data. Volumes of interest (VOIs) were marked circumscript around the tumor according to maximum intensity projection volumes, and then mapped automatically onto the cerebral blood volume (CBV), flow (CBF) and permeability Ktrans perfusion datasets. A second VOI was placed in the contra lateral cortex, as control. Correlations among perfusion values, tumor grade, cerebral hemisphere and VOIs were evaluated. Moreover, the diagnostic power of VPCT parameters, by means of positive and negative predictive value, was analyzed. Results: Our cohort included 32 high-grade gliomas WHO III/IV, 18 low-grade I/II, 6 primary cerebral lymphomas, 4 metastases and 3 tumor-like lesions. Ktrans demonstrated the highest sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value, with a cut-off point of 2.21 mL/100 mL/min, for both the comparisons between high-grade versus low-grade and low-grade versus primary cerebral lymphomas. However, for the differentiation between high-grade and primary cerebral lymphomas, CBF and CBV proved to have 100% specificity and 100% positive predictive value, identifying preoperatively all the histopathologically proven high-grade gliomas. Conclusion: Volumetric perfusion data enable the hemodynamic assessment of the entire tumor extent and provide a method of preoperative differentiation among intra-axial cerebral tumors with promising diagnostic accuracy.

  20. Combination of vatalanib and a 20-HETE synthesis inhibitor results in decreased tumor growth in an animal model of human glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar A

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adarsh Shankar,1 Thaiz F Borin,2 Asm Iskander,1 Nadimpalli RS Varma,3 Bhagelu R Achyut,1 Meenu Jain,1 Tom Mikkelsen,4 Austin M Guo,5 Wilson B Chwang,3 James R Ewing,6 Hassan Bagher-Ebadian,6 Ali S Arbab11Tumor Angiogenesis Laboratory, Cancer Center, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA, USA; 2Laboratory of Molecular Investigation of Cancer (LIMC, Faculty of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Brazil; 3Department of Radiology, Cellular and Molecular Imaging Laboratory, 4Department of Neurosurgery, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI, 5Department of Pharmacology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, 6Department of Neurology and Radiology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI, USA Background: Due to the hypervascular nature of glioblastoma (GBM, antiangiogenic treatments, such as vatalanib, have been added as an adjuvant to control angiogenesis and tumor growth. However, evidence of progressive tumor growth and resistance to antiangiogenic treatment has been observed. To counter the unwanted effect of vatalanib on GBM growth, we have added a new agent known as N-hydroxy-N'-(4-butyl-2 methylphenylformamidine (HET0016, which is a selective inhibitor of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE synthesis. The aims of the studies were to determine 1 whether the addition of HET0016 can attenuate the unwanted effect of vatalanib on tumor growth and 2 whether the treatment schedule would have a crucial impact on controlling GBM.Methods: U251 human glioma cells (4×105 were implanted orthotopically. Two different treatment schedules were investigated. Treatment starting on day 8 (8–21 days treatment of the tumor implantation was to mimic treatment following detection of tumor, where tumor would have hypoxic microenvironment and well-developed neovascularization. Drug treatment starting on the same day of tumor implantation (0–21 days treatment was to mimic cases following radiation therapy or surgery. There were four

  1. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  2. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Shih, Helen A; Menze, Bjoern H; Ayache, Nicholas; Konukoglu, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher–Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  3. Enhancement in blood-tumor barrier permeability and delivery of liposomal doxorubicin using focused ultrasound and microbubbles: evaluation during tumor progression in a rat glioma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Muna; Park, Juyoung; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; McDannold, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    Effective drug delivery to brain tumors is often challenging because of the heterogeneous permeability of the ‘blood tumor barrier’ (BTB) along with other factors such as increased interstitial pressure and drug efflux pumps. Focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with microbubbles can enhance the permeability of the BTB in brain tumors, as well as the blood-brain barrier in the surrounding tissue. In this study, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was used to characterize the FUS-induced permeability changes of the BTB in a rat glioma model at different times after implantation. 9L gliosarcoma cells were implanted in both hemispheres in male rats. At day 9, 14, or 17 days after implantation, FUS-induced BTB disruption using 690 kHz ultrasound and definity microbubbles was performed in one tumor in each animal. Before FUS, liposomal doxorubicin was administered at a dose of 5.67 mg kg-1. This chemotherapy agent was previously shown to improve survival in animal glioma models. The transfer coefficient Ktrans describing extravasation of the MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA was measured via DCE-MRI before and after sonication. We found that tumor doxorubicin concentrations increased monotonically (823  ±  600, 1817  ±  732 and 2432  ±  448 ng g-1) in the control tumors at 9, 14 and 17 d. With FUS-induced BTB disruption, the doxorubicin concentrations were enhanced significantly (P benefit from FUS-induced drug enhancement. Corresponding enhancements in Ktrans were found to be variable in large/late-stage tumors and not significantly different than controls, perhaps reflecting the size mismatch between the liposomal drug (~100 nm) and Gd-DTPA (molecular weight: 938 Da; hydrodynamic diameter: ≃2 nm). It may be necessary to use a larger MRI contrast agent to effectively evaluate the sonication-induced enhanced permeabilization in large/late-stage tumors when a large drug carrier such as a liposome is used.

  4. Long Non-coding RNA LINC00339 Stimulates Glioma Vasculogenic Mimicry Formation by Regulating the miR-539-5p/TWIST1/MMPs Axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqing Guo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioma is recognized as a highly angiogenic malignant brain tumor. Vasculogenic mimicry (VM greatly restricts the therapeutic effect of anti-angiogenic tumor therapy for glioma patients. However, the molecular mechanisms of VM formation in glioma remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that LINC00339 was upregulated in glioma tissue as well as in glioma cell lines. The expression of LINC00339 in glioma tissues was positively correlated with glioma VM formation. Knockdown of LINC00339 inhibited glioma cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation, meanwhile downregulating the expression of VM-related molecular MMP-2 and MMP-14. Furthermore, knockdown of LINC00339 significantly increased the expression of miR-539-5p. Both bioinformatics and luciferase reporter assay revealed that LINC00339 regulated the above effects via binding to miR-539-5p. Besides, overexpression of miR-539-5p resulted in decreased expression of TWIST1, a transcription factor known to play an oncogenic role in glioma and identified as a direct target of miR-539-5p. TWIST1 upregulated the promoter activities of MMP-2 and MMP-14. The in vivo study showed that nude mice carrying tumors with knockdown of LINC00339 and overexpression of miR-539-5p exhibited the smallest tumor volume through inhibiting VM formation. In conclusion, LINC00339 may be used as a novel therapeutic target for VM formation in glioma.

  5. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Oral 5-Fluorocytosine and Genetically-Modified Neural Stem Cells Expressing E.Coli Cytosine Deaminase for Treatment of Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-07

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Grade III Glioma; Recurrent Grade IV Glioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent High Grade Glioma

  6. Whole-Tumor Histogram and Texture Analyses of DTI for Evaluation of IDH1-Mutation and 1p/19q-Codeletion Status in World Health Organization Grade II Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y W; Han, K; Ahn, S S; Choi, Y S; Chang, J H; Kim, S H; Kang, S-G; Kim, E H; Lee, S-K

    2018-04-01

    Prediction of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1)-mutation and 1p/19q-codeletion status of World Health Organization grade ll gliomas preoperatively may assist in predicting prognosis and planning treatment strategies. Our aim was to characterize the histogram and texture analyses of apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy maps to determine IDH1 -mutation and 1p/19q-codeletion status in World Health Organization grade II gliomas. Ninety-three patients with World Health Organization grade II gliomas with known IDH1- mutation and 1p/19q-codeletion status (18 IDH1 wild-type, 45 IDH1 mutant and no 1p/19q codeletion, 30 IDH1- mutant and 1p/19q codeleted tumors) underwent DTI. ROIs were drawn on every section of the T2-weighted images and transferred to the ADC and the fractional anisotropy maps to derive volume-based data of the entire tumor. Histogram and texture analyses were correlated with the IDH1 -mutation and 1p/19q-codeletion status. The predictive powers of imaging features for IDH1 wild-type tumors and 1p/19q-codeletion status in IDH1 -mutant subgroups were evaluated using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator. Various histogram and texture parameters differed significantly according to IDH1 -mutation and 1p/19q-codeletion status. The skewness and energy of ADC, 10th and 25th percentiles, and correlation of fractional anisotropy were independent predictors of an IDH1 wild-type in the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator. The area under the receiver operating curve for the prediction model was 0.853. The skewness and cluster shade of ADC, energy, and correlation of fractional anisotropy were independent predictors of a 1p/19q codeletion in IDH1 -mutant tumors in the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator. The area under the receiver operating curve was 0.807. Whole-tumor histogram and texture features of the ADC and fractional anisotropy maps are useful for predicting the IDH1 -mutation and 1p/19q

  7. A Comparative Study of Survival Rate in High Grade Glioma Tumors Being Treated by Radiotherapy Alone Versus Chemoradiation With Nitrosourea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshyari, Mohammad; Hajalikhani, Farzaneh; Rakhsha, Afshin; Hajian, Parastoo

    2015-03-25

    In adults, malignant glioma (high-grade glioma) is one of the most common brain tumors. In spite of different types of treatment, the outcome is still not likely to be favorable. The aim of this study was to determine the difference between survival rate in adult patients with high grade glioma treated by radiotherapy only and those treated by a combination of radiotherapy and nitrosurea-based chemotherapy. This study was conducted using the records of 48 patients with grade 3 or 4 of glial brain tumor referred to the radiation-oncology ward of Shohada-e-Tajrish Hospital in Tehran, Iran from 2005 to 2012. The patients had undergone radiotherapy alone or adjuvant chemoradiation with nitrosourea. The median survival of patients after receiving the different types of treatment were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log -rank exam. Data were analyzed using univariate analysis for median survival regarding to the patients' age, gender, extent of surgery, Karnofsky performance status (KPS) with the Kaplan-Meier method, and the log-rank exam. We used the Cox-model for multivariate analysis. Records of 48 patients were studied (34 men and 14 women). The mean survival were 18 months for men and 15.2 months for women (P=0.05). Around 58% (28 patients) were more than 50 years old, and 42% (20 patients) were less than 50, and mean survival for the two age groups were 13 and 20 months, respectively (P<0.001). Then, the patients were divided into three groups according to the extent of surgery, i.e., excisional biopsy (11 patients), stereotactic biopsy (22 patients), and resection (15 patients), and the mean survival for the three groups were 14.7, 17.3, and 18.8 months, respectively. There was no significant statistical difference for mean survival between the three groups (P=0.23). The KPS was greater than 70% in 23 patients and less than 70% in 21 patients, and the mean survival for the former and latter groups were 17.6 and 16 months, respectively (P=0

  8. Effects of the nitric oxide donor JS-K on the blood-tumor barrier and on orthotopic U87 rat gliomas assessed by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidensteiner, Claudia; Reichardt, Wilfried; Shami, Paul J; Saavedra, Joseph E; Keefer, Larry K; Baumer, Brunhilde; Werres, Anna; Jasinski, Robert; Osterberg, Nadja; Weyerbrock, Astrid

    2013-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) released from NO donors can be cytotoxic in tumor cells and can enhance the transport of drugs into brain tumors by altering blood-tumor barrier permeability. The NO donor JS-K [O(2)-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) 1-[(4-ethoxycarbonyl)piperazin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate] releases NO upon enzymatic activation selectively in cells overexpressing glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) such as gliomas. Thus, JS-K-dependent NO effects - especially on cell viability and vascular permeability - were investigated in U87 glioma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic U87 xenograft model in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vitro experiments showed dose-dependent antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects in U87 cells. In addition, treatment of U87 cells with JS-K resulted in a dose-dependent activation of soluble guanylate cyclase and intracellular accumulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) which was irreversibly inhibited by the selective inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo(4,3a)quinoxaline-1-one). Using dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) as a minimally invasive technique, we demonstrated for the first time a significant increase in the DCE-MRI read-out initial area under the concentration curve (iAUC60) indicating an acute increase in blood-tumor barrier permeability after i.v. treatment with JS-K. Repeated MR imaging of animals with intracranial U87 gliomas under treatment with JS-K (3.5 μmol/kg JS-K 3×/week) and of untreated controls on day 12 and 19 after tumor inoculation revealed no significant changes in tumor growth, edema formation or tumor perfusion. Immunohistochemical workup of the brains showed a significant antiproliferative effect of JS-K in the gliomas. Taken together, in vitro and in vivo data suggest that JS-K has antiproliferative effects in U87 gliomas and opens the blood-tumor barrier by activation of the NO/cGMP signaling pathway. This might be a novel approach to facilitate entry of therapeutic

  9. Toxicity and efficacy of re-irradiation of high-grade glioma in a phase I dose- and volume escalation trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per; Costa, Junia

    2017-01-01

    .1-3.5) and the median overall survival was 7.0 months (95%CI: 3.5-10.5). Early side effects were mild and included headache and fatigue. Seven patients were progression-free beyond 10 weeks and were evaluable for late toxicity. Among these patients, three (43%) suffered late adverse events which included radionecrosis......INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of PET and MRI guided re-irradiation of recurrent high-grade glioma (HGG) and to assess the impact of radiotherapy dose, fractionation and irradiated volume. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with localized, recurrent HGG...... (grades III-IV) and no other treatment options were eligible for a prospective phase I trial. Gross tumor volumes for radiotherapy were defined using T1-contrast enhanced MRI and (18)F-fluoro-ethyl tyrosine PET. Radiotherapy was delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy with a 2-mm margin. The dose...

  10. SHMT2 drives glioma cell survival in the tumor microenvironment but imposes a dependence on glycine clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohoon; Fiske, Brian P.; Birsoy, Kivanc; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Kami, Kenjiro; Possemato, Richard; Chudnovsky, Yakov; Pacold, Michael E.; Chen, Walter W.; Cantor, Jason R.; Shelton, Laura M.; Gui, Dan Y.; Kwon, Manjae; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Ligon, Keith L.; Kang, Seong Woo; Snuderl, Matija; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancer cells adapt their metabolic processes to support rapid proliferation, but less is known about how cancer cells alter metabolism to promote cell survival in a poorly vascularized tumor microenvironment1–3. Here, we identify a key role for serine and glycine metabolism in the survival of brain cancer cells within the ischemic zones of gliomas. In human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), mitochondrial serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT2) and glycine decarboxylase (GLDC) are highly expressed in the pseudopalisading cells that surround necrotic foci. We find that SHMT2 activity limits that of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) and reduces oxygen consumption, eliciting a metabolic state that confers a profound survival advantage to cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions. GLDC inhibition impairs cells with high SHMT2 levels as the excess glycine not metabolized by GLDC can be converted to the toxic molecules aminoacetone and methylglyoxal. Thus, SHMT2 is required for cancer cells to adapt to the tumor environment, but also renders these cells sensitive to glycine cleavage system inhibition. PMID:25855294

  11. Brain tumor locating in 3D MR volume using symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Pavel; Bartusek, Karel

    2014-03-01

    This work deals with the automatic determination of a brain tumor location in 3D magnetic resonance volumes. The aim of this work is not the precise segmentation of the tumor and its parts but only the detection of its location. This work is the first step in the tumor segmentation process, an important topic in neuro-image processing. The algorithm expects 3D magnetic resonance volumes of brain containing a tumor. The detection is based on locating the area that breaks the left-right symmetry of the brain. This is done by multi-resolution comparing of corresponding regions in left and right hemisphere. The output of the computation is the probabilistic map of the tumor location. The created algorithm was tested on 80 volumes from publicly available BRATS databases containing 3D brain volumes afflicted by a brain tumor. These pathological structures had various sizes and shapes and were located in various parts of the brain. The locating performance of the algorithm was 85% for T1-weighted volumes, 91% for T1-weighted contrast enhanced volumes, 96% for FLAIR and T2-wieghted volumes and 95% for their combinations.

  12. FasL and FADD delivery by a glioma-specific and cell cycle-dependent HSV-1 amplicon virus enhanced apoptosis in primary human brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Paula Y

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme is the most malignant cancer of the brain and is notoriously difficult to treat due to the highly proliferative and infiltrative nature of the cells. Herein, we explored the combination treatment of pre-established human glioma xenograft using multiple therapeutic genes whereby the gene expression is regulated by both cell-type and cell cycle-dependent transcriptional regulatory mechanism conferred by recombinant HSV-1 amplicon vectors. Results We demonstrated for the first time that Ki67-positive proliferating primary human glioma cells cultured from biopsy samples were effectively induced into cell death by the dual-specific function of the pG8-FasL amplicon vectors. These vectors were relatively stable and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity in vivo. Intracranial implantation of pre-transduced glioma cells resulted in better survival outcome when compared with viral vectors inoculated one week post-implantation of tumor cells, indicating that therapeutic efficacy is dependent on the viral spread and mode of viral vectors administration. We further showed that pG8-FasL amplicon vectors are functional in the presence of commonly used treatment regimens for human brain cancer. In fact, the combined therapies of pG8-FasL and pG8-FADD in the presence of temozolomide significantly improved the survival of mice bearing intracranial high-grade gliomas. Conclusion Taken together, our results showed that the glioma-specific and cell cycle-dependent HSV-1 amplicon vector is potentially useful as an adjuvant therapy to complement the current gene therapy strategy for gliomas.

  13. Anatomical location differences between mutated and wild-type isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 in low-grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinhua; Shi, Zhifeng; Ji, Chunhong; Lian, Yuxi; Wang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Liang; Mao, Ying

    2017-10-01

    Anatomical location of gliomas has been considered as a factor implicating the contributions of a specific precursor cells during the tumor growth. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) is a pathognomonic biomarker with a significant impact on the development of gliomas and remarkable prognostic effect. The correlation between anatomical location of tumor and IDH1 states for low-grade gliomas was analyzed quantitatively in this study. Ninety-two patients diagnosed of low-grade glioma pathologically were recruited in this study, including 65 patients with IDH1-mutated glioma and 27 patients with wide-type IDH1. A convolutional neural network was designed to segment the tumor from three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging images. Voxel-based lesion symptom mapping was then employed to study the tumor location distribution differences between gliomas with mutated and wild-type IDH1. In order to characterize the location differences quantitatively, the Automated Anatomical Labeling Atlas was used to partition the standard brain atlas into 116 anatomical volumes of interests (AVOIs). The percentages of tumors with different IDH1 states in 116 AVOIs were calculated and compared. Support vector machine and AdaBoost algorithms were used to estimate the IDH1 status based on the 116 location features of each patient. Experimental results proved that the quantitative tumor location measurement could be a very important group of imaging features in biomarker estimation based on radiomics analysis of glioma.

  14. Genetically engineered rat gliomas: PDGF-driven tumor initiation and progression in tv-a transgenic rats recreate key features of human brain cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina P Connolly

    Full Text Available Previously rodent preclinical research in gliomas frequently involved implantation of cell lines such as C6 and 9L into the rat brain. More recently, mouse models have taken over, the genetic manipulability of the mouse allowing the creation of genetically accurate models outweighed the disadvantage of its smaller brain size that limited time allowed for tumor progression. Here we illustrate a method that allows glioma formation in the rat using the replication competent avian-like sarcoma (RCAS virus / tumor virus receptor-A (tv-a transgenic system of post-natal cell type-specific gene transfer. The RCAS/tv-a model has emerged as a particularly versatile and accurate modeling technology by enabling spatial, temporal, and cell type-specific control of individual gene transformations and providing de novo formed glial tumors with distinct molecular subtypes mirroring human GBM. Nestin promoter-driven tv-a (Ntv-a transgenic Sprague-Dawley rat founder lines were created and RCAS PDGFA and p53 shRNA constructs were used to initiate intracranial brain tumor formation. Tumor formation and progression were confirmed and visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and spectroscopy. The tumors were analyzed using histopathological and immunofluorescent techniques. All experimental animals developed large, heterogeneous brain tumors that closely resembled human GBM. Median survival was 92 days from tumor initiation and 62 days from the first point of tumor visualization on MRI. Each tumor-bearing animal showed time dependent evidence of malignant progression to high-grade glioma by MRI and neurological examination. Post-mortem tumor analysis demonstrated the presence of several key characteristics of human GBM, including high levels of tumor cell proliferation, pseudopalisading necrosis, microvascular proliferation, invasion of tumor cells into surrounding tissues, peri-tumoral reactive astrogliosis, lymphocyte infiltration, presence of numerous tumor

  15. Knock down of HIF-1α in glioma cells reduces migration in vitro and invasion in vivo and impairs their ability to form tumor spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esencay Mine

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common and malignant primary intracranial human neoplasm. GBMs are characterized by the presence of extensive areas of necrosis and hypoxia. Hypoxia and its master regulator, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1 play a key role in glioma invasion. Results To further elucidate the functional role of HIF-1α in glioma cell migration in vitro and in invasion in vivo, we used a shRNA approach to knock down HIF-1α expression complemented with genome-wide expression profiling, performed in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Our data show that knock down of HIF-1α in glioma cells significantly impairs their migration in vitro as well as their ability to invade into the brain parenchyma in vivo. Next, we assessed the role that HIF-1α plays in maintaining the characteristics of cancer stem cells (CSCs. By using the tumor sphere forming assay, we demonstrate that HIF-1α plays a role in the survival and self-renewal potential of CSCs. Finally, expression profiling experiments in glioma cells provided detailed insight into a broad range of specific biological pathways and processes downstream of HIF-1α. We discuss the role of these processes in the migratory and invasive properties, as well as the stem cell biology of glioblastomas Conclusions Our data show that knock down of HIF-1α in human and murine glioma cells impairs their migration in vitro and their invasion in vivo. In addition, our data suggest that HIF-1α plays a role in the survival and self-renewal potential of CSCs and identify genes that might further elucidate the role of HIF-1α in tumor migration, invasion and stem cell biology.

  16. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chapman, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rao, Aarti [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Davis, CA (United States); Shen, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Quinlan-Davidson, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Filion, Edith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Departement de Medecine, Service de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Whyte, Richard I. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Division of General Thoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  17. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy; Chapman, Christopher; Rao, Aarti; Shen, John; Quinlan-Davidson, Sean; Filion, Edith J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Whyte, Richard I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18–25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume ≥12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED ≥100 Gy (total dose, 50–60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  18. Antitumor effect of intra-arterial tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} in rats with transplanted intracerebral glioma and its evaluation by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Kunyu; Yoshida, Jun; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Sugita, Kenichiro [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Kurisu, Kaoru; Uozumi, Tohru; Zieroth, B.F.; Takahashi, Masaya; Yamanaka, Tsuyoshi

    1995-12-01

    Recombinant human TNF-{alpha} was administrated intra-arterially to rats with transplanted intracerebral glioma. 1 x 10{sup 6} of T9 rat glioma cells were transplanted into Fisher 344 rat brain stereotaxically and 1000 units of TNF-{alpha} was administrated at a rate of 100{mu}l/min via an internal carotid artery 1 or 3 weeks after the transplantation. The effects of TNF-{alpha} were evaluated by MRI and histopathological examinations. Neurological symptoms, i.e. hemiparesis, appeared after 9.0{+-}0.63 days and all rats died of tumor overloading 14.5{+-}0.84 days after the transplantation. Single injection of TNF-{alpha} on 7th day after the transplantation induced regression of the tumor size in one of six rats. The tumors were detected 3 days after transplantation by MRI and they were revealed as low/iso intensity mass in T1WI, iso/high intensity in T2WI, and were enhanced by Gd-DTPA heterogenously. On 7/14 days after the transplantation, the tumor grew approximately 7/10 mm in diameter. The single 1000 units of TNF-{alpha} were administrated via an internal carotid artery. Three days after the administration or TNF-{alpha}, regression of the tumor size was seen in one of six rats and decrease of peritumoral edema was seen in three. These effects of TNF-{alpha} were, however, transient and they were not demonstrated on day 7. Single injection of TNF-{alpha} was not effective for large tumors more than 10 mm in diameter seen 14 days after the transplantation. These data suggest that intra-arterial TNF-{alpha} should be administrated at an early stage of the tumor growth and several injections are needed to cause regression in the size of the gliomas. (author).

  19. Gene discovery in glioma in the context of molecular reclassification of tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushboo Irshad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventional classification of tumors, especially in terms of staging and grading is of immense importance for both prognostication as well as management strategies. However it is not a perfect system and there are many instances where tumor behaviour does not correspond to what is expected. In addition, with the onset of targeted therapy, the identification of the distinct molecular target in a subset of tumors becomes a marker of tumor behaviour as well as a target of therapy. This leads to the concept of molecular subclassification of tumors where molecular markers further refine and in some cases, alter conventional classification. We would be presenting this concept in relation to glial tumors, especially in the context of molecular markers discovered in our laboratory.

  20. Amide proton transfer imaging to discriminate between low- and high-grade gliomas: added value to apparent diffusion coefficient and relative cerebral blood volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Seong; Ahn, Sung Soo; Lee, Seung-Koo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Jong Hee; Kang, Seok-Gu [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se Hoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of MRI Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-08-15

    To evaluate the added value of amide proton transfer (APT) imaging to the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) from perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for discriminating between high- and low-grade gliomas. Forty-six consecutive adult patients with diffuse gliomas who underwent preoperative APT imaging, DTI and perfusion MRI were enrolled. APT signals were compared according to the World Health Organization grade. The diagnostic ability and added value of the APT signal to the ADC and rCBV for discriminating between low- and high-grade gliomas were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses and integrated discrimination improvement. The APT signal increased as the glioma grade increased. The discrimination abilities of the APT, ADC and rCBV values were not significantly different. Using both the APT signal and ADC significantly improved discrimination vs. the ADC alone (area under the ROC curve [AUC], 0.888 vs. 0.910; P = 0.007), whereas using both the APT signal and rCBV did not improve discrimination vs. the rCBV alone (AUC, 0.927 vs. 0.923; P = 0.222). APT imaging may be a useful imaging biomarker that adds value to the ADC for discriminating between low- and high-grade gliomas. (orig.)

  1. Efficacy of NGR peptide-modified PEGylated quantum dots for crossing the blood-brain barrier and targeted fluorescence imaging of glioma and tumor vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ning; Cheng, Si; Zhang, Xiang; Tian, Qi; Pi, Jiangli; Tang, Jun; Huang, Qing; Wang, Feng; Chen, Jin; Xie, Zongyi; Xu, Zhongye; Chen, Weifu; Zheng, Huzhi; Cheng, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Delivery of imaging agents to brain glioma is challenging because the blood-brain barrier (BBB) functions as a physiological checkpoint guarding the central nervous system from circulating large molecules. Moreover, the ability of existing probes to target glioma has been insufficient and needs to be improved. In present study, PEG-based long circulation, CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs)-based nanoscale and fluorescence, asparagines-glycine-arginine peptides (NGR)-based specific CD13 recognition were integrated to design and synthesize a novel nanoprobe by conjugating biotinylated NGR peptides to avidin-PEG-coated QDs. Our data showed that the NGR-PEG-QDs were nanoscale with less than 100 nm and were stable in various pH (4.0~8.0). These nanomaterials with non-toxic concentrations could cross the BBB and target CD13-overexpressing glioma and tumor vasculature in vitro and in vivo, contributing to fluorescence imaging of this brain malignancy. These achievements allowed groundbreaking technological advances in targeted fluorescence imaging for the diagnosis and surgical removal of glioma, facilitating potential transformation toward clinical nanomedicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Migrating glioma cells express stem cell markers and give rise to new tumors upon xenografting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe, Sune; Sørensen, Mia D; Thomassen, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most frequent and malignant brain tumor with an overall survival of only 14.6 months. Although these tumors are treated with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, recurrence is inevitable. A critical population of tumor cells in terms of therapy, the so-called cancer stem......-like phenotype is currently lacking. In the present study, the aim was to characterize the phenotype of migrating tumor cells using a novel migration assay based on serum-free stem cell medium and patient-derived spheroid cultures. The results showed pronounced migration of five different GBM spheroid cultures......-related genes and the HOX-gene list in migrating cells compared to spheroids. Determination of GBM molecular subtypes revealed that subtypes of spheroids and migrating cells were identical. In conclusion, migrating tumor cells preserve expression of stem cell markers and functional CSC characteristics. Since...

  3. Molecular markers in glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Kirsten; Kornblum, Harley I

    2017-09-01

    Gliomas are the most malignant and aggressive form of brain tumors, and account for the majority of brain cancer related deaths. Malignant gliomas, including glioblastoma are treated with radiation and temozolomide, with only a minor benefit in survival time. A number of advances have been made in understanding glioma biology, including the discovery of cancer stem cells, termed glioma stem cells (GSC). Some of these advances include the delineation of molecular heterogeneity both between tumors from different patients as well as within tumors from the same patient. Such research highlights the importance of identifying and validating molecular markers in glioma. This review, intended as a practical resource for both clinical and basic investigators, summarizes some of the more well-known molecular markers (MGMT, 1p/19q, IDH, EGFR, p53, PI3K, Rb, and RAF), discusses how they are identified, and what, if any, clinical relevance they may have, in addition to discussing some of the specific biology for these markers. Additionally, we discuss identification methods for studying putative GSC's (CD133, CD15, A2B5, nestin, ALDH1, proteasome activity, ABC transporters, and label-retention). While much research has been done on these markers, there is still a significant amount that we do not yet understand, which may account for some conflicting reports in the literature. Furthermore, it is unlikely that the investigator will be able to utilize one single marker to prospectively identify and isolate GSC from all, or possibly, any gliomas.

  4. Pharmacological doses of daily ascorbate protect tumors from radiation damage after a single dose of radiation in an intracranial mouse glioma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Carole; Fabre, Marie-Sophie; Collis, Sarah V; Castro, M Leticia; Field, Cameron S; Schleich, Nanette; McConnell, Melanie J; Herst, Patries M

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological ascorbate is currently used as an anti-cancer treatment, potentially in combination with radiation therapy, by integrative medicine practitioners. In the acidic, metal-rich tumor environment, ascorbate acts as a pro-oxidant, with a mode of action similar to that of ionizing radiation; both treatments kill cells predominantly by free radical-mediated DNA damage. The brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is very resistant to radiation; radiosensitizing GBM cells will improve survival of GBM patients. Here, we demonstrate that a single fraction (6 Gy) of radiation combined with a 1 h exposure to ascorbate (5 mM) sensitized murine glioma GL261 cells to radiation in survival and colony-forming assays in vitro. In addition, we report the effect of a single fraction (4.5 Gy) of whole brain radiation combined with daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (1 mg/kg) in an intracranial GL261 glioma mouse model. Tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: one group received a single dose of 4.5 Gy to the brain 8 days after tumor implantation, a second group received daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (day 8-45) after implantation, a third group received both treatments and a fourth control group received no treatment. While radiation delayed tumor progression, intraperitoneal ascorbate alone had no effect on tumor progression. Tumor progression was faster in tumor-bearing mice treated with radiation and daily ascorbate than in those treated with radiation alone. Histological analysis showed less necrosis in tumors treated with both radiation and ascorbate, consistent with a radio-protective effect of ascorbate in vivo. Discrepancies between our in vitro and in vivo results may be explained by differences in the tumor microenvironment, which determines whether ascorbate remains outside the cell, acting as a pro-oxidant, or whether it enters the cells and acts as an anti-oxidant.

  5. A new anti-glioma therapy, AG119: pre-clinical assessment in a mouse GL261 glioma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, Rheal A; Ihnat, Michael; Saunders, Debra; Bastian, Anja; Smith, Nataliya; Pavana, Roheeth Kumar; Gangjee, Aleem

    2015-07-17

    High grade gliomas (HGGs; grades III and IV) are the most common primary brain tumors in adults, and their malignant nature ranks them fourth in incidence of cancer death. Standard treatment for glioblastomas (GBM), involving surgical resection followed by radiation and chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ) and the anti-angiogenic therapy bevacizumab, have not substantially improved overall survival. New therapeutic agents are desperately needed for this devastating disease. Here we study the potential therapeutic agent AG119 in a pre-clinical model for gliomas. AG119 possesses both anti-angiogenic (RTK inhibition) and antimicrotubule cytotoxic activity in a single molecule. GL261 glioma-bearing mice were either treated with AG119, anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) antibody, anti c-Met antibody or TMZ, and compared to untreated tumor-bearing mice. Animal survival was assessed, and tumor volumes and vascular alterations were monitored with morphological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and perfusion-weighted imaging, respectively. Percent survival of GL261 HGG-bearing mice treated with AG119 was significantly higher (p mouse GL261 glioma model, and that AG119 is also not subject to methyl guanine transferase (MGMT) mediated resistance, as is the case with TMZ, indicating that AG119 may be potentially useful in treating resistant gliomas.

  6. EGFRvIII mCAR-modified T-cell therapy cures mice with established intracerebral glioma and generates host immunity against tumor-antigen loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, John H; Choi, Bryan D; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Suryadevara, Carter M; Snyder, David J; Flores, Catherine T; Schmittling, Robert J; Nair, Smita K; Reap, Elizabeth A; Norberg, Pamela K; Herndon, James E; Kuan, Chien-Tsun; Morgan, Richard A; Rosenberg, Steven A; Johnson, Laura A

    2014-02-15

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) transduced T cells represent a promising immune therapy that has been shown to successfully treat cancers in mice and humans. However, CARs targeting antigens expressed in both tumors and normal tissues have led to significant toxicity. Preclinical studies have been limited by the use of xenograft models that do not adequately recapitulate the immune system of a clinically relevant host. A constitutively activated mutant of the naturally occurring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) is antigenically identical in both human and mouse glioma, but is also completely absent from any normal tissues. We developed a third-generation, EGFRvIII-specific murine CAR (mCAR), and performed tests to determine its efficacy in a fully immunocompetent mouse model of malignant glioma. At elevated doses, infusion with EGFRvIII mCAR T cells led to cures in all mice with brain tumors. In addition, antitumor efficacy was found to be dependent on lymphodepletive host conditioning. Selective blockade with EGFRvIII soluble peptide significantly abrogated the activity of EGFRvIII mCAR T cells in vitro and in vivo, and may offer a novel strategy to enhance the safety profile for CAR-based therapy. Finally, mCAR-treated, cured mice were resistant to rechallenge with EGFRvIII(NEG) tumors, suggesting generation of host immunity against additional tumor antigens. All together, these data support that third-generation, EGFRvIII-specific mCARs are effective against gliomas in the brain and highlight the importance of syngeneic, immunocompetent models in the preclinical evaluation of tumor immunotherapies. ©2013 AACR

  7. Hypothalamic glioma masquerading as craniopharyngioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Vyas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic glioma account for 10-15% of supratentorial tumors in children. They usually present earlier (first 5 years of age than craniopharyngioma. Hypothalamic glioma poses a diagnostic dilemma with craniopharyngioma and other hypothalamic region tumors, when they present with atypical clinical or imaging patterns. Neuroimaging modalities especially MRI plays a very important role in scrutinizing the lesions in the hypothalamic region. We report a case of a hypothalamic glioma masquerading as a craniopharyngioma on imaging along with brief review of both the tumors.

  8. PET pharmacokinetic analysis to estimate boron concentration in tumor and brain as a guide to plan BNCT for malignant cerebral glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nariai, Tadashi [Department of Neurosurgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: nariai.nsrg@tmd.ac.jp; Ishiwata, Kiichi [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1, Nakacho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Kimura, Yuichi [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba (Japan); Inaji, Motoki; Momose, Toshiya [Department of Neurosurgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Igaraki (Japan); Ishii, Kenji [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1, Nakacho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Ohno, Kikuo [Department of Neurosurgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    Introduction: To plan the optimal BNCT for patients with malignant cerebral glioma, estimation of the ratio of boron concentration in tumor tissue against that in the surrounding normal brain (T/N ratio of boron) is important. We report a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging method to estimate T/N ratio of tissue boron concentration based on pharmacokinetic analysis of amino acid probes. Methods: Twelve patients with cerebral malignant glioma underwent 60 min dynamic PET scanning of brain after bolus injection of {sup 18}F-borono-phenyl-alanine (FBPA) with timed arterial blood sampling. Using kinetic parameter obtained by this scan, T/N ratio of boron concentration elicited by one-hour constant infusion of BPA, as performed in BNCT, was simulated on Runge-Kutta algorithm. {sup 11}C-methionine (MET) PET scan, which is commonly used in worldwide PET center as brain tumor imaging tool, was also performed on the same day to compare the image characteristics of FBPA and that of MET. Result: PET glioma images obtained with FBPA and MET are almost identical in all patients by visual inspection. Estimated T/N ratio of tissue boron concentration after one-hour constant infusion of BPA, T/N ratio of FBPA on static condition, and T/N ratio of MET on static condition showed significant linear correlation between each other. Conclusion: T/N ratio of boron concentration that is obtained by constant infusion of BPA during BNCT can be estimated by FBPA PET scan. This ratio can also be estimated by MET-PET imaging. As MET-PET study is available in many clinical PET center, selection of candidates for BNCT may be possible by MET-PET images. Accurate planning of BNCT may be performed by static images of FBPA PET. Use of PET imaging with amino acid probes may contribute very much to establish an appropriate application of BNCT for patients with malignant glioma.

  9. PET pharmacokinetic analysis to estimate boron concentration in tumor and brain as a guide to plan BNCT for malignant cerebral glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Tadashi; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Kimura, Yuichi; Inaji, Motoki; Momose, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira; Ishii, Kenji; Ohno, Kikuo

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: To plan the optimal BNCT for patients with malignant cerebral glioma, estimation of the ratio of boron concentration in tumor tissue against that in the surrounding normal brain (T/N ratio of boron) is important. We report a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging method to estimate T/N ratio of tissue boron concentration based on pharmacokinetic analysis of amino acid probes. Methods: Twelve patients with cerebral malignant glioma underwent 60 min dynamic PET scanning of brain after bolus injection of 18 F-borono-phenyl-alanine (FBPA) with timed arterial blood sampling. Using kinetic parameter obtained by this scan, T/N ratio of boron concentration elicited by one-hour constant infusion of BPA, as performed in BNCT, was simulated on Runge-Kutta algorithm. 11 C-methionine (MET) PET scan, which is commonly used in worldwide PET center as brain tumor imaging tool, was also performed on the same day to compare the image characteristics of FBPA and that of MET. Result: PET glioma images obtained with FBPA and MET are almost identical in all patients by visual inspection. Estimated T/N ratio of tissue boron concentration after one-hour constant infusion of BPA, T/N ratio of FBPA on static condition, and T/N ratio of MET on static condition showed significant linear correlation between each other. Conclusion: T/N ratio of boron concentration that is obtained by constant infusion of BPA during BNCT can be estimated by FBPA PET scan. This ratio can also be estimated by MET-PET imaging. As MET-PET study is available in many clinical PET center, selection of candidates for BNCT may be possible by MET-PET images. Accurate planning of BNCT may be performed by static images of FBPA PET. Use of PET imaging with amino acid probes may contribute very much to establish an appropriate application of BNCT for patients with malignant glioma.

  10. Utility of multiparametric 3-T MRI for glioma characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Bhaswati; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Maudsley, Andrew A.; Sheriff, Sulaiman; Awasthi, Rishi; Mohakud, Sudipta; Gu, Meng; Spielman, Daniel M.; Husain, Nuzhat; Behari, Sanjay; Pandey, Chandra M.; Rathore, Ram K.S.; Alger, Jeffry R.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate grading of cerebral glioma using conventional structural imaging techniques remains challenging due to the relatively poor sensitivity and specificity of these methods. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative sensitivity and specificity of structural magnetic resonance imaging and MR measurements of perfusion, diffusion, and whole-brain spectroscopic parameters for glioma grading. Fifty-six patients with radiologically suspected untreated glioma were studied with T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and volumetric whole-brain MR spectroscopic imaging. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis was performed using the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), apparent diffusion coefficient, fractional anisotropy, and multiple spectroscopic parameters to determine optimum thresholds for tumor grading and to obtain the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for identifying high-grade gliomas. Logistic regression was performed to analyze all the parameters together. The rCBV individually classified glioma as low and high grade with a sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 88 %, respectively, based on a threshold value of 3.34. On combining all parameters under consideration, the classification was achieved with 2 % error and sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 96 %, respectively. Individually, CBV measurement provides the greatest diagnostic performance for predicting glioma grade; however, the most accurate classification can be achieved by combining all of the imaging parameters. (orig.)

  11. Sublethal dose of irradiation enhances invasion of malignant glioma cells through p53-MMP 2 pathway in U87MG mouse brain tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Jian; Park, In-Ho; Ryu, Hyang-Hwa; Li, Song-Yuan; Li, Chun-Hao; Lim, Sa-Hoe; Wen, Min; Jang, Woo-Youl; Jung, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly lethal neoplasm that frequently recurs locally after radiotherapy, and most of these recurrences originate from near the irradiated target field. In the present study, we identified the effects of radiation on glioma invasion and p53, TIMP-2, and MMP-2 expression through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The U87MG (wt p53) and U251 (mt p53) human malignant glioma cell lines were prepared, and the U2OS (wt 53) and Saos2 (del p53) osteosarcoma cell lines were used as p53 positive and negative controls. The four cell lines and p53 knock-downed U87MG cells received radiation (2–6 Gy) and were analyzed for expression of p53 and TIMP-2 by Western blot, and MMP-2 activity was detected by zymography. In addition, the effects of irradiation on directional invasion of malignant glioma were evaluated by implanting nude mice with bioluminescent u87-Fluc in vivo followed by MMP-2, p53, and TIMP-2 immunohisto-chemistry and in situ zymography. MMP-2 activity and p53 expression increased in proportional to the radiation dose in cell lines with wt p53, but not in the cell lines with del or mt p53. TIMP-2 expression did not increase in U87MG cells. MMP-2 activity decreased in p53 knock-downed U87MG cells but increased in the control group. Furthermore, radiation enhanced MMP-2 activity and increased tumor margin invasiveness in vivo. Tumor cells invaded by radiation overexpressed MMP-2 and p53 and revealed high gelatinolytic activity compared with those of non-radiated tumor cells. Radiation-induced upregulation of p53 modulated MMP-2 activity, and the imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 may have an important role in glioblastoma invasion by degrading the extracellular matrix. Bioluminescent “U87-Fluc”was useful for observing tumor formation without sacrifice after implanting tumor cells in the mouse brain. These findings suggest that the radiotherapy involved field for malignant glioma needs to be reconsidered, and that future trials should investigate

  12. [Experimental tumors of the central nervous system: standardisation of a model in rats using the 9L glioma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailowsky, Custódio; Niura, Flavio Key; do Valle, Angela C; Sonohara, Shigueko; Meneguin, Thales D'Alessandro; Tsanaclis, Ana Maria C

    2003-06-01

    A number of experimental models have been established during the last decades in order to study tumor biology and the effects of treatment or manipulation of the microenvironment of malignant glial tumors. Even though those models have been well characterised and are, to a certain extent, easily reproducible, there are limitations as to their use and to the interpretation of the results. The aim of this study is to standardize a model of a malignant glial tumor and detect possible events able to modify its development. 9L cells were inoculated intracerebrally in 48 Sprague-Dawley rats; from these, 25 animals were also implanted with a device containing electrodes for the registration of the electroencephalogramm. Animals were daily evaluated by neurologic examination. Twenty four animals developed tumor - 10 animals died either in the immediate pos-operatory period or during evolution; 14 animals did not develop tumor. Macroscopically the tumor was well demarcated from the adjacent brain; by light microscopy the tumor exhibited malignant characteristics as well as extensive infiltration of the brain parenchyma. Diagnosis was that of a malignant astrocytoma. The use of the stereotaxic frame and care to infuse a small volume of liquid containing cells during a period of 120 seconds were the most important procedures to obtain sucess in the model. Additional care should be taken in counting cells in the Neubauer camera and in maintaining cells in constant agitation before injecting the tumor-containing solution. The model here developed was efficient besides being of low cost and of relatively easy execution.

  13. Single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shehaby, Amr M N; Reda, Wael A; Abdel Karim, Khaled M; Emad Eldin, Reem M; Nabeel, Ahmed M

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Because of their critical and central location, it is deemed necessary to fractionate when considering irradiating optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas. Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy is considered safer when dealing with gliomas in this location. In this study, the safety and efficacy of single-session stereotactic radiosurgery for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas were reviewed. METHODS Between December 2004 and June 2014, 22 patients with optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas were treated by single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Twenty patients were available for follow-up for a minimum of 1 year after treatment. The patients were 5 to 43 years (median 16 years) of age. The tumor volume was 0.15 to 18.2 cm 3 (median 3.1 cm 3 ). The prescription dose ranged from 8 to 14 Gy (median 11.5 Gy). RESULTS The mean follow-up period was 43 months. Five tumors involved the optic nerve only, and 15 tumors involved the chiasm/hypothalamus. Two patients died during the follow-up period. The tumors shrank in 12 cases, remained stable in 6 cases, and progressed in 2 cases, thereby making the tumor control rate 90%. Vision remained stable in 12 cases, improved in 6 cases, and worsened in 2 cases in which there was tumor progression. Progression-free survival was 83% at 3 years. CONCLUSIONS The initial results indicate that single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery is a safe and effective treatment option for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas.

  14. Glutamate/glutamine metabolism coupling between astrocytes and glioma cells: neuroprotection and inhibition of glioma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Pei-Sen; Kang, De-Zhi; Lin, Ru-Ying; Ye, Bing; Wang, Wei; Ye, Zu-Cheng

    2014-07-18

    Glioma glutamate release has been shown to promote the growth of glioma cells and induce neuronal injuries from epilepsy to neuronal death. However, potential counteractions from normal astrocytes against glioma glutamate release have not been fully evaluated. In this study, we investigated the glutamate/glutamine cycling between glioma cells and astrocytes and their impact on neuronal function. Co-cultures of glioma cells with astrocytes (CGA) in direct contact were established under different mix ratio of astrocyte/glioma. Culture medium conditioned in these CGAs were sampled for HPLC measurement, for neuronal ratiometric calcium imaging, and for neuronal survival assay. We found: (1) High levels of glutaminase expression in glioma cells, but not in astrocytes, glutaminase enables glioma cells to release large amount of glutamate in the presence of glutamine. (2) Glutamate levels in CGAs were directly determined by the astrocyte/glioma ratios, indicating a balance between glioma glutamate release and astrocyte glutamate uptake. (3) Culture media from CGAs of higher glioma/astrocyte ratios induced stronger neuronal Ca(2+) response and more severe neuronal death. (4) Co-culturing with astrocytes significantly reduced the growth rate of glioma cells. These results indicate that normal astrocytes in the brain play pivotal roles in glioma growth inhibition and in reducing neuronal injuries from glioma glutamate release. However, as tumor growth, the protective role of astrocytes gradually succumb to glioma cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic Alterations in Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bralten, Linda B. C.; French, Pim J.

    2011-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumor and have a dismal prognosis. Understanding the genetic alterations that drive glioma formation and progression may help improve patient prognosis by identification of novel treatment targets. Recently, two major studies have performed in-depth mutation analysis of glioblastomas (the most common and aggressive subtype of glioma). This systematic approach revealed three major pathways that are affected in glioblastomas: The receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathway, the TP53 pathway and the pRB pathway. Apart from frequent mutations in the IDH1/2 gene, much less is known about the causal genetic changes of grade II and III (anaplastic) gliomas. Exceptions include TP53 mutations and fusion genes involving the BRAF gene in astrocytic and pilocytic glioma subtypes, respectively. In this review, we provide an update on all common events involved in the initiation and/or progression across the different subtypes of glioma and provide future directions for research into the genetic changes

  16. Flavopiridol induces apoptosis in glioma cell lines independent of retinoblastoma and p53 tumor suppressor pathway alterations by a caspase-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Michelle; Tamasdan, Cristina; Miller, Douglas C; Newcomb, Elizabeth W

    2003-02-01

    Flavopiridol is a synthetic flavone, which inhibits growth in vitro and in vivo of several solid malignancies such as renal, prostate, and colon cancers. It is a potent cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor presently in clinical trials. In this study, we examined the effect of flavopiridol on a panel of glioma cell lines having different genetic profiles: five of six have codeletion of p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF); three of six have p53 mutations; and one of six shows overexpression of mouse double minute-2 (MDM2) protein. Independent of retinoblastoma and p53 tumor suppressor pathway alterations, flavopiridol induced apoptosis in all cell lines but through a caspase-independent mechanism. No cleavage products for caspase 3 or its substrate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase or caspase 8 were detected. The pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk did not inhibit flavopiridol-induced apoptosis. Mitochondrial damage measured by cytochrome c release and transmission electron microscopy was not observed in drug-treated glioma cells. In contrast, flavopiridol treatment induced translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor from the mitochondria to the nucleus. The proteins cyclin D(1) and MDM2 involved in the regulation of retinoblastoma and p53 activity, respectively, were down-regulated early after flavopiridol treatment. Given that MDM2 protein can confer oncogenic properties under certain circumstances, loss of MDM2 expression in tumor cells could promote increased chemosensitivity. After drug treatment, a low Bcl-2/Bax ratio was observed, a condition that may favor apoptosis. Taken together, the data indicate that flavopiridol has activity against glioma cell lines in vitro and should be considered for clinical development in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

  17. Microglia immunophenotyping in gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annovazzi, Laura; Mellai, Marta; Bovio, Enrica; Mazzetti, Samanta; Pollo, Bianca; Schiffer, Davide

    2018-01-01

    Microglia, once assimilated to peripheral macrophages, in gliomas has long been discussed and currently it is hypothesized to play a pro-tumor role in tumor progression. Uncertain between M1 and M2 polarization, it exchanges signals with glioma cells to create an immunosuppressive microenvironment and stimulates cell proliferation and migration. Four antibodies are currently used for microglia/macrophage identification in tissues that exhibit different cell forms and cell localization. The aim of the present work was to describe the distribution of the different cell forms and to deduce their significance on the basis of what is known on their function from the literature. Normal resting microglia, reactive microglia, intermediate and bumpy forms and macrophage-like cells can be distinguished by Iba1, CD68, CD16 and CD163 and further categorized by CD11b, CD45, c-MAF and CD98. The number of microglia/macrophages strongly increased from normal cortex and white matter to infiltrating and solid tumors. The ramified microglia accumulated in infiltration areas of both high- and low-grade gliomas, when hypertrophy and hyperplasia occur. In solid tumors, intermediate and bumpy forms prevailed and there is a large increase of macrophage-like cells in glioblastoma. The total number of microglia cells did not vary among the three grades of malignancy, but macrophage-like cells definitely prevailed in high-grade gliomas and frequently expressed CD45 and c-MAF. CD98+ cells were present. Microglia favors tumor progression, but many aspects suggest that the phagocytosing function is maintained. CD98+ cells can be the product of fusion, but also of phagocytosis. Microglia correlated with poorer survival in glioblastoma, when considering CD163+ cells, whereas it did not change prognosis in isocitrate dehydrogenase-mutant low grade gliomas. PMID:29399160

  18. Comprehensive Genomic Profiling of 282 Pediatric Low- and High-Grade Gliomas Reveals Genomic Drivers, Tumor Mutational Burden, and Hypermutation Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Adrienne; Severson, Eric; Gay, Laurie; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Elvin, Julia; Suh, James; Daniel, Sugganth; Covert, Mandy; Frampton, Garrett M; Hsu, Sigmund; Lesser, Glenn J; Stogner-Underwood, Kimberly; Mott, Ryan T; Rush, Sarah Z; Stanke, Jennifer J; Dahiya, Sonika; Sun, James; Reddy, Prasanth; Chalmers, Zachary R; Erlich, Rachel; Chudnovsky, Yakov; Fabrizio, David; Schrock, Alexa B; Ali, Siraj; Miller, Vincent; Stephens, Philip J; Ross, Jeffrey; Crawford, John R; Ramkissoon, Shakti H

    2017-12-01

    Pediatric brain tumors are the leading cause of death for children with cancer in the U.S. Incorporating next-generation sequencing data for both pediatric low-grade (pLGGs) and high-grade gliomas (pHGGs) can inform diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic decision-making. We performed comprehensive genomic profiling on 282 pediatric gliomas (157 pHGGs, 125 pLGGs), sequencing 315 cancer-related genes and calculating the tumor mutational burden (TMB; mutations per megabase [Mb]). In pLGGs, we detected genomic alterations (GA) in 95.2% (119/125) of tumors. BRAF was most frequently altered (48%; 60/125), and FGFR1 missense (17.6%; 22/125), NF1 loss of function (8.8%; 11/125), and TP53 (5.6%; 7/125) mutations were also detected. Rearrangements were identified in 35% of pLGGs, including KIAA1549-BRAF , QKI-RAF1 , FGFR3-TACC3 , CEP85L-ROS1 , and GOPC-ROS1 fusions. Among pHGGs, GA were identified in 96.8% (152/157). The genes most frequently mutated were TP53 (49%; 77/157), H3F3A (37.6%; 59/157), ATRX (24.2%; 38/157), NF1 (22.2%; 35/157), and PDGFRA (21.7%; 34/157). Interestingly, most H3F3A mutations (81.4%; 35/43) were the variant K28M. Midline tumor analysis revealed H3F3A mutations (40%; 40/100) consisted solely of the K28M variant. Pediatric high-grade gliomas harbored oncogenic EML4-ALK , DGKB-ETV1 , ATG7-RAF1 , and EWSR1-PATZ1 fusions. Six percent (9/157) of pHGGs were hypermutated (TMB >20 mutations per Mb; range 43-581 mutations per Mb), harboring mutations deleterious for DNA repair in MSH6, MSH2, MLH1, PMS2, POLE , and POLD1 genes (78% of cases). Comprehensive genomic profiling of pediatric gliomas provides objective data that promote diagnostic accuracy and enhance clinical decision-making. Additionally, TMB could be a biomarker to identify pediatric glioblastoma (GBM) patients who may benefit from immunotherapy. By providing objective data to support diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic decision-making, comprehensive genomic profiling is necessary for

  19. The progress of radiosensitive genes of human brain glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xi; Liu Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Human gliomas are one of the most aggressive tumors in brain which grow infiltrativly. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment. But as the tumor could not be entirely cut off, it is easy to relapse. Radiotherapy plays an important role for patients with gliomas after surgery. The efficacy of radiotherapy is associated with radio sensitivity of human gliomas. This paper makes a summary of current situation and progress for radiosensitive genes of human brain gliomas. (authors)

  20. Intra-lesional spatial correlation of static and dynamic FET-PET parameters with MRI-based cerebral blood volume in patients with untreated glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goettler, Jens; Preibisch, Christine [TU Muenchen, Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); TU Muenchen, TUM Neuroimaging Center (TUM-NIC), Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Lukas, Mathias; Mustafa, Mona; Schwaiger, Markus; Pyka, Thomas [TU Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Kluge, Anne; Kaczmarz, Stephan; Zimmer, Claus [TU Muenchen, Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Gempt, Jens; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard [TU Muenchen, Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Foerster, Stefan [TU Muenchen, TUM Neuroimaging Center (TUM-NIC), Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); TU Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Klinikum Bayreuth, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bayreuth (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    {sup 18}F-fluorethyltyrosine-(FET)-PET and MRI-based relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) have both been used to characterize gliomas. Recently, inter-individual correlations between peak static FET-uptake and rCBV have been reported. Herein, we assess the local intra-lesional relation between FET-PET parameters and rCBV. Thirty untreated glioma patients (27 high-grade) underwent simultaneous PET/MRI on a 3 T hybrid scanner obtaining structural and dynamic susceptibility contrast sequences. Static FET-uptake and dynamic FET-slope were correlated with rCBV within tumour hotspots across patients and intra-lesionally using a mixed-effects model to account for inter-individual variation. Furthermore, maximal congruency of tumour volumes defined by FET-uptake and rCBV was determined. While the inter-individual relationship between peak static FET-uptake and rCBV could be confirmed, our intra-lesional, voxel-wise analysis revealed significant positive correlations (median r = 0.374, p < 0.0001). Similarly, significant inter- and intra-individual correlations were observed between FET-slope and rCBV. However, rCBV explained only 12% of the static and 5% of the dynamic FET-PET variance and maximal overlap of respective tumour volumes was 37% on average. Our results show that the relation between peak values of MR-based rCBV and static FET-uptake can also be observed intra-individually on a voxel basis and also applies to a dynamic FET parameter, possibly determining hotspots of higher biological malignancy. However, just a small part of the FET-PET signal variance is explained by rCBV and tumour volumes determined by the two modalities showed only moderate overlap. These findings indicate that FET-PET and MR-based rCBV provide both congruent and complimentary information on glioma biology. (orig.)

  1. Intra-lesional spatial correlation of static and dynamic FET-PET parameters with MRI-based cerebral blood volume in patients with untreated glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göttler, Jens; Lukas, Mathias; Kluge, Anne; Kaczmarz, Stephan; Gempt, Jens; Ringel, Florian; Mustafa, Mona; Meyer, Bernhard; Zimmer, Claus; Schwaiger, Markus; Förster, Stefan; Preibisch, Christine; Pyka, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    18 F-fluorethyltyrosine-(FET)-PET and MRI-based relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) have both been used to characterize gliomas. Recently, inter-individual correlations between peak static FET-uptake and rCBV have been reported. Herein, we assess the local intra-lesional relation between FET-PET parameters and rCBV. Thirty untreated glioma patients (27 high-grade) underwent simultaneous PET/MRI on a 3 T hybrid scanner obtaining structural and dynamic susceptibility contrast sequences. Static FET-uptake and dynamic FET-slope were correlated with rCBV within tumour hotspots across patients and intra-lesionally using a mixed-effects model to account for inter-individual variation. Furthermore, maximal congruency of tumour volumes defined by FET-uptake and rCBV was determined. While the inter-individual relationship between peak static FET-uptake and rCBV could be confirmed, our intra-lesional, voxel-wise analysis revealed significant positive correlations (median r = 0.374, p dynamic FET-PET variance and maximal overlap of respective tumour volumes was 37% on average. Our results show that the relation between peak values of MR-based rCBV and static FET-uptake can also be observed intra-individually on a voxel basis and also applies to a dynamic FET parameter, possibly determining hotspots of higher biological malignancy. However, just a small part of the FET-PET signal variance is explained by rCBV and tumour volumes determined by the two modalities showed only moderate overlap. These findings indicate that FET-PET and MR-based rCBV provide both congruent and complimentary information on glioma biology.

  2. MiR-26b Mimic Inhibits Glioma Proliferation In Vitro and In Vivo Suppressing COX-2 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zheng-Gang; Zheng, Chuan-Yi; Cai, Wang-Qing; Li, Da-Wei; Ye, Fu-Yue; Zhou, Jian; Wu, Ran; Yang, Kun

    2017-08-11

    Glioma is the most common malignant tumor of the nervous system. Studies have shown the microRNA (miR)-26b/cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 axis in the development and progression in many tumor cells. Our study aims to investigate the effect and mechanism of miR-26b/COX-2 axis in glioma. Decreased expression of miR-26b with increased level of COX-2 was found in glioma tissues compared with matched normal tissues. A strong negative correlation was observed between the level of miR-26b and COX-2 in 30 glioma tissues. The miR-26b was then overexpressed by transfecting miR-26b mimic into U-373 cells. The invasive cell number and wounld closing rate were reduced in U-373 cells transfected with miR-26b mimic. Besides, COX2 siRNA enhanced the effect of miR-26b mimic in suppressing the expression of p-ERK1 and p-JNK. Finally, the in vivo experiment revealed that miR-26b mimic transfection strongly reduced the tumor growth, tumor volume and the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9). Taken together, our research indicated a miR-26b/COX-2/ERK/JNK axis in regulating the motility of glioma in vitro and in vivo, providing a new sight for treatment of glioma.

  3. Nasal Glioma: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Surmelioglu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Nasal gliomas are rare, benign, congenital tumors that are thought to be result of abnormality in embryonic development. Three types of clinical presentations have been recognized; extranasal, intranasal and combined. Clinically, these masses are non-pulsatile, gray or purple lesions that obstruct the nasal cavity and cause deformity extranasaly. Histologically, they are made up of astrocytic cells, fibrous and vascular connective tissue that is covered with nasal respiratory mucosa. Treatment of the nasal glioma requires a multidisciplinary approach including an radiologist, neurosurgeon and otorhinolaryngologist. Radiological investigation should be performed to describe intracranial extension. In this case, a 2 years old boy with nasal mass that was diagnosed as nasal glioma is reported. . [Cukurova Med J 2011; 36(1.000: 34-36

  4. Nasal Glioma: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Surmelioglu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Nasal gliomas are rare, benign, congenital tumors that are thought to be result of abnormality in embryonic development. Three types of clinical presentations have been recognized; extranasal, intranasal and combined. Clinically, these masses are non-pulsatile, gray or purple lesions that obstruct the nasal cavity and cause deformity extranasaly. Histologically, they are made up of astrocytic cells, fibrous and vascular connective tissue that is covered with nasal respiratory mucosa. Treatment of the nasal glioma requires a multidisciplinary approach including an radiologist, neurosurgeon and otorhinolaryngologist. Radiological investigation should be performed to describe intracranial extension. In this case, a 2 years old boy with nasal mass that was diagnosed as nasal glioma is reported. . [Cukurova Med J 2011; 36(1: 34-36

  5. Regrowth patterns of supratentorial gliomas: estimation from computed tomographic scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuboi, K.; Yoshii, Y.; Nakagawa, K.; Maki, Y.

    1986-12-01

    To clarify the regrowth patterns of benign and malignant gliomas, we chose 27 intervals (between two operations or between an operation and autopsy) from 21 patients with pathologically verified recurrent supratentorial gliomas. Serial computed tomographic (CT) scans of these cases were analyzed to determine the doubling time (Td) calculated from the change in volume of enhanced and low density areas, the enhancement effect graded from 0 to 4 according to the Hounsfield number, and the presence of dissemination and contralateral extension. We studied 5 benign gliomas (including 1 case of radiation necrosis), 8 malignant astrocytomas, and 8 glioblastomas. The Td's of enhanced areas on CT scans of benign gliomas, malignant astrocytomas, and glioblastomas were 937 +/- 66.5 days, 65.1 +/- 29.4 days, and 48.1 +/- 20.9 days, respectively. The Td's of low density areas were 895 +/- 130.6 days, 70.8 +/- 22.2 days, and 50.5 +/- 14.7 days. There was a significant correlation between the Td's of the enhanced and low density areas (0.97). The enhancement effect increased at recurrence in 55% of the cases, with an average increase of 1.1 grades. The increase in enhancement effect at recurrence showed a tendency to become smaller as the tumor's degree of anaplasia increased. Radiotherapy was effective in significantly retarding the growth rate of malignant gliomas, whose Td's were doubled. Although the Td's of both enhanced and low density areas of benign gliomas were significantly longer than those of malignant gliomas, there was no significant difference in the Td's of enhanced areas between malignant astrocytomas and glioblastomas.

  6. Regrowth patterns of supratentorial gliomas: estimation from computed tomographic scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, K.; Yoshii, Y.; Nakagawa, K.; Maki, Y.

    1986-01-01

    To clarify the regrowth patterns of benign and malignant gliomas, we chose 27 intervals (between two operations or between an operation and autopsy) from 21 patients with pathologically verified recurrent supratentorial gliomas. Serial computed tomographic (CT) scans of these cases were analyzed to determine the doubling time (Td) calculated from the change in volume of enhanced and low density areas, the enhancement effect graded from 0 to 4 according to the Hounsfield number, and the presence of dissemination and contralateral extension. We studied 5 benign gliomas (including 1 case of radiation necrosis), 8 malignant astrocytomas, and 8 glioblastomas. The Td's of enhanced areas on CT scans of benign gliomas, malignant astrocytomas, and glioblastomas were 937 +/- 66.5 days, 65.1 +/- 29.4 days, and 48.1 +/- 20.9 days, respectively. The Td's of low density areas were 895 +/- 130.6 days, 70.8 +/- 22.2 days, and 50.5 +/- 14.7 days. There was a significant correlation between the Td's of the enhanced and low density areas (0.97). The enhancement effect increased at recurrence in 55% of the cases, with an average increase of 1.1 grades. The increase in enhancement effect at recurrence showed a tendency to become smaller as the tumor's degree of anaplasia increased. Radiotherapy was effective in significantly retarding the growth rate of malignant gliomas, whose Td's were doubled. Although the Td's of both enhanced and low density areas of benign gliomas were significantly longer than those of malignant gliomas, there was no significant difference in the Td's of enhanced areas between malignant astrocytomas and glioblastomas

  7. Intrinsic molecular subtypes of glioma are prognostic and predict benefit from adjuvant procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine chemotherapy in combination with other prognostic factors in anaplastic oligodendroglial brain tumors: a report from EORTC study 26951

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erdem-Eraslan, L.; Gravendeel, L.A.; Rooi, J. de; Eilers, P.H.; Idbaih, A.; Spliet, W.G.; Dunnen, W. den; Teepen, J.L.; Wesseling, P.; Sillevis Smitt, P.A.; Kros, J.M.; Gorlia, T.; Bent, M.J. van den; French, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Intrinsic glioma subtypes (IGSs) are molecularly similar tumors that can be identified based on unsupervised gene expression analysis. Here, we have evaluated the clinical relevance of these subtypes within European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 26951, a

  8. Immune Response Generated With the Administration of Autologous Dendritic Cells Pulsed With an Allogenic Tumoral Cell-Lines Lysate in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Benitez-Ribas

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectiveDiffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG is a lethal brainstem tumor in children. Dendritic cells (DCs have T-cell stimulatory capacity and, therefore, potential antitumor activity for disease control. DCs vaccines have been shown to reactivate tumor-specific T cells in both clinical and preclinical settings. We designed a phase Ib immunotherapy (IT clinical trial with the use of autologous dendritic cells (ADCs pulsed with an allogeneic tumors cell-lines lysate in patients with newly diagnosed DIPG after irradiation (radiation therapy.MethodsNine patients with newly diagnosed DIPG met enrollment criteria. Autologous dendritic cell vaccines (ADCV were prepared from monocytes obtained by leukapheresis. Five ADCV doses were administered intradermally during induction phase. In the absence of tumor progression, patients received three boosts of tumor lysate every 3 months during the maintenance phase.ResultsVaccine fabrication was feasible in all patients included in the study. Non-specific KLH (9/9 patients and specific (8/9 patients antitumor response was identified by immunologic studies in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Immunological responses were also confirmed in the T lymphocytes isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of two patients. Vaccine administration resulted safe in all patients treated with this schema.ConclusionThese preliminary results demonstrate that ADCV preparation is feasible, safe, and generate a DIPG-specific immune response detected in PBMC and CSF. This strategy shows a promising backbone for future schemas of combination IT.

  9. Further Confirmation of Germline Glioma Risk Variant rs78378222 in TP53 and Its Implication in Tumor Tissues via Integrative Analysis of TCGA Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoming; Rajaraman, Preetha; Melin, Beatrice S.; Chung, Charles C.; Zhang, Weijia; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Michaud, Dominique; Yeager, Meredith; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Andersson, Ulrika; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary Ann; Carreón, Tania; Feychting, Maria; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Hallmans, Goran; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Inskip, Peter D.; Kitahara, Cari M.; Le Marchand, Loic; Linet, Martha S.; Li, Shengchao; Peters, Ulrike; Purdue, Mark P.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Stampfer, Meir; Stevens, Victoria L.; Visvanathan, Kala; Wang, Sophia S.; White, Emily; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Hoover, Robert; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Hartge, Patricia; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    We confirmed strong association of rs78378222:A>C (per allele odds ratio [OR] = 3.14; P = 6.48 × 10−11), a germline rare single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in TP53, via imputation of a genome-wide association study of glioma (1,856 cases and 4,955 controls). We subsequently performed integrative analyses on the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data for GBM (glioblastoma multiforme) and LUAD (lung adenocarcinoma). Based on SNP data, we imputed genotypes for rs78378222 and selected individuals carrying rare risk allele (C). Using RNA sequencing data, we observed aberrant transcripts with ~3 kb longer than normal for those individuals. Using exome sequencing data, we further showed that loss of haplotype carrying common protective allele (A) occurred somatically in GBM but not in LUAD. Our bioinformatic analysis suggests rare risk allele (C) disrupts mRNA termination, and an allelic loss of a genomic region harboring common protective allele (A) occurs during tumor initiation or progression for glioma. PMID:25907361

  10. Tumor response parameters for head and neck cancer derived from tumor-volume variation during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chvetsov, Alexei V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The main goal of this paper is to reconstruct a distribution of cell survival fractions from tumor-volume variation for a heterogeneous group of head and neck cancer patients and compare this distribution to the data from predictive assays. Methods: To characterize the tumor-volume variation during radiation therapy treatment, the authors use a two-level tumor-volume model of cell population that separates the entire tumor cell population into two subpopulations of viable cells and lethally damaged cells. This parameterized radiobiological model is integrated with a least squares objective function and a simulated annealing optimization algorithm to describe time-dependent tumor-volume variation rates in individual patients. Several constraints have been used in the optimization problem because tumor-volume variation during radiotherapy is described by a sum of exponentials; therefore, the problem of accurately fitting a model to measured data is ill-posed. The model was applied to measured tumor-volume variation curves from a clinical study on tumor-volume variation during radiotherapy for 14 head and neck cancer patients in which an integrated CT/linear particle accelerator (LINAC) system was used for tumor-volume measurements. Results: The two-level cell population tumor-volume modeling is capable of describing tumor-volume variation throughout the entire treatment for 11 of the 14 patients. For three patients, the tumor-volume variation was described only during the initial part of treatment, a fact that may be related to the neglected hypoxia in the two-level approximation. The predicted probability density distribution for the survival fractions agrees with the data obtained using in vitro studies with predictive assays. The mean value 0.35 of survival fraction obtained in this study is larger than the value 0.32 from in vitro studies, which could be expected because of greater repair in vivo. The mean half-life obtained in this study for the head

  11. Novel drugs in pediatric gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Dongli; Liu, Xiaoming; Fan, Conghai; Chen, Jiao

    2017-01-01

    Astrocytomas (gliomas) are the most common primary brain tumors among adults and second most frequent neoplasm among children. New ideas and novel approaches are being explored world over with aim to devise better management strategeies for this deadly pathological state. We searched the electronic database PubMed for pre-clinical as well as clinical controlled trials reporting importance of various therapeutic drugs against gliomas. It was observed clearly that this approach of using therape...

  12. Portable Intraoperative Computed Tomography Scan in Image-Guided Surgery for Brain High-grade Gliomas: Analysis of Technical Feasibility and Impact on Extent of Tumor Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagallo, Giuseppe M V; Palmucci, Stefano; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Paratore, Sabrina; Attinà, Giancarlo; Sortino, Giuseppe; Albanese, Vincenzo; Certo, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging is the gold standard among image-guided techniques for glioma surgery. Scant data are available on the role of intraoperative computed tomography (i-CT) in high-grade glioma (HGG) surgery. To verify the technical feasibility and usefulness of portable i-CT in image-guided surgical resection of HGGs. This is a retrospective series control analysis of prospectively collected data. Twenty-five patients (Group A) with HGGs underwent surgery using i-CT and 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) fluorescence. A second cohort of 25 patients (Group B) underwent 5-ALA fluorescence-guided surgery but without i-CT. We used a portable 8-slice CT scanner and, in both groups, neuronavigation. Extent of tumor resection (ETOR) and pre- and postoperative Karnofsky performance status (KPS) scores were measured; the impact of i-CT on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) was also analyzed. In 8 patients (32%) in Group A, i-CT revealed residual tumor, and in 4 of them it helped to also resect pathological tissue detached from the main tumor. EOTR in these 8 patients was 97.3% (96%-98.6%). In Group B, residual tumor was found in 6 patients, whose tumor's mean resection was 98% (93.5-99.7). The Student t test did not show statistically significant differences in EOTR in the 2 groups. The KPS score decreased from 67 to 69 after surgery in Group A and from 74 to 77 in Group B (P = .07 according to the Student t test). Groups A and B did not show statistically significant differences in OS and PFS (P = .61 and .46, respectively, by the log-rank test). No statistically significant differences in EOTR, KPS, PFS, and OS were observed in the 2 groups. However, i-CT helped to verify EOTR and to update the neuronavigator with real-time images, as well as to identify and resect pathological tissue in multifocal tumors. i-CT is a feasible and effective alternative to intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Portable i-CT can provide useful

  13. Frequent Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jun [School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Cai, Yu, E-mail: aihaozuqiu22@163.com [School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Liu, Pin [Med-X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Zhao, Weiguo [Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2016-08-05

    Never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase 1 (Nek1) regulates cell cycle progression to mitosis. Its expression and potential functions in human gliomas have not been studied. Here, our immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay and Western blot assay results showed that Nek1 expression was significantly upregulated in fresh and paraffin-embedded human glioma tissues. Its level in normal brain tissues was low. Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas was correlated with the proliferation marker (Ki-67), tumor grade, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) and more importantly, patients’ poor survival. Further studies showed that Nek1 expression level was also increased in multiple human glioma cell lines (U251-MG, U87-MG, U118, H4 and U373). Significantly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nek1 inhibited glioma cell (U87-MG/U251-MG) growth. Nek1 siRNA also sensitized U87-MG/U251-MG cells to temozolomide (TMZ), causing a profound apoptosis induction and growth inhibition. The current study indicates Nek1 might be a novel and valuable oncotarget of glioma, it is important for glioma cell growth and TMZ-resistance. - Highlights: • Nek1 is upregulated in multiple human glioma tissues and cell lines. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with glioma grades and patients’ KPS score. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with patients’ poor overall survival. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 inhibits glioma cell growth. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 sensitizes human glioma cells to temozolomide.

  14. Frequent Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Jun; Cai, Yu; Liu, Pin; Zhao, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    Never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase 1 (Nek1) regulates cell cycle progression to mitosis. Its expression and potential functions in human gliomas have not been studied. Here, our immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay and Western blot assay results showed that Nek1 expression was significantly upregulated in fresh and paraffin-embedded human glioma tissues. Its level in normal brain tissues was low. Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas was correlated with the proliferation marker (Ki-67), tumor grade, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) and more importantly, patients’ poor survival. Further studies showed that Nek1 expression level was also increased in multiple human glioma cell lines (U251-MG, U87-MG, U118, H4 and U373). Significantly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nek1 inhibited glioma cell (U87-MG/U251-MG) growth. Nek1 siRNA also sensitized U87-MG/U251-MG cells to temozolomide (TMZ), causing a profound apoptosis induction and growth inhibition. The current study indicates Nek1 might be a novel and valuable oncotarget of glioma, it is important for glioma cell growth and TMZ-resistance. - Highlights: • Nek1 is upregulated in multiple human glioma tissues and cell lines. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with glioma grades and patients’ KPS score. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with patients’ poor overall survival. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 inhibits glioma cell growth. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 sensitizes human glioma cells to temozolomide.

  15. SVM-based glioma grading. Optimization by feature reduction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoellner, Frank G.; Schad, Lothar R.; Emblem, Kyrre E.; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Oslo Univ. Hospital

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the predictive power of feature reduction analysis approaches in support vector machine (SVM)-based classification of glioma grade. In 101 untreated glioma patients, three analytic approaches were evaluated to derive an optimal reduction in features; (i) Pearson's correlation coefficients (PCC), (ii) principal component analysis (PCA) and (iii) independent component analysis (ICA). Tumor grading was performed using a previously reported SVM approach including whole-tumor cerebral blood volume (CBV) histograms and patient age. Best classification accuracy was found using PCA at 85% (sensitivity = 89%, specificity = 84%) when reducing the feature vector from 101 (100-bins rCBV histogram + age) to 3 principal components. In comparison, classification accuracy by PCC was 82% (89%, 77%, 2 dimensions) and 79% by ICA (87%, 75%, 9 dimensions). For improved speed (up to 30%) and simplicity, feature reduction by all three methods provided similar classification accuracy to literature values (∝87%) while reducing the number of features by up to 98%. (orig.)

  16. A new anti-glioma therapy, AG119: pre-clinical assessment in a mouse GL261 glioma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towner, Rheal A.; Ihnat, Michael; Saunders, Debra; Bastian, Anja; Smith, Nataliya; Pavana, Roheeth Kumar; Gangjee, Aleem

    2015-01-01

    High grade gliomas (HGGs; grades III and IV) are the most common primary brain tumors in adults, and their malignant nature ranks them fourth in incidence of cancer death. Standard treatment for glioblastomas (GBM), involving surgical resection followed by radiation and chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ) and the anti-angiogenic therapy bevacizumab, have not substantially improved overall survival. New therapeutic agents are desperately needed for this devastating disease. Here we study the potential therapeutic agent AG119 in a pre-clinical model for gliomas. AG119 possesses both anti-angiogenic (RTK inhibition) and antimicrotubule cytotoxic activity in a single molecule. GL261 glioma-bearing mice were either treated with AG119, anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) antibody, anti c-Met antibody or TMZ, and compared to untreated tumor-bearing mice. Animal survival was assessed, and tumor volumes and vascular alterations were monitored with morphological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and perfusion-weighted imaging, respectively. Percent survival of GL261 HGG-bearing mice treated with AG119 was significantly higher (p < 0.001) compared to untreated tumors. Tumor volumes (21–31 days following intracerebral implantation of GL261 cells) were found to be significantly lower for AG119 (p < 0.001), anti-VEGF (p < 0.05) and anti-c-Met (p < 0.001) antibody treatments, and TMZ-treated (p < 0.05) mice, compared to untreated controls. Perfusion data indicated that both AG119 and TMZ were able to reduce the effect of decreasing perfusion rates significantly (p < 0.05 for both), when compared to untreated tumors. It was also found that IC 50 values for AG119 were much lower than those for TMZ in T98G and U251 cells. These data support further exploration of the anticancer activity AG119 in HGG, as this compound was able to increase animal survival and decrease tumor volumes in a mouse GL261 glioma model, and that AG119 is also not subject to methyl guanine

  17. Measurement of tumor volumes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by computed tomography (CT). Correlation with several tumor markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneshima, Manabu; Sawabu, Norio; Toya, Daishu

    1984-09-01

    Tumor volumes of HCC were measured by CT using planimeter and the clinical value of this measurement was evaluated by comparing several tumor markers. Tumor volumes measured by CT roughly agreed with those measured by angiography. In some cases, volumes from ultrasonography were smaller than those from CT and angiography. Tumor volumes measured by CT correlated significantly with the levels of ..cap alpha..-fetoprotein (AFP) but didn't relate to the presence of hepatoma specific ..gamma..-GTP isoenzyme (novel ..gamma..-GTP) nor to the values and positivities of LAI assay. In small HCCs (<=30 cm/sup 3/), the presence of novel ..gamma..-GTP and the levels of AFP were significantly lower than for larger tumors of HCC, but LAI assay wasn't lower. The non-tumorous volumes and the ratio of the non-tumorous volume to the whole liver volume didn't relate to the tests of liver function except for the presence of ascites.

  18. Comparison of Allogeneic and Syngeneic Rat Glioma Models by Using MRI and Histopathologic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasibetti, Elena; Valazza, Alberto; Capucchio, Maria T; Annovazzi, Laura; Battaglia, Luigi; Chirio, Daniela; Gallarate, Marina; Mellai, Marta; Muntoni, Elisabetta; Peira, Elena; Riganti, Chiara; Schiffer, Davide; Panciani, Pierpaolo; Lanotte, Michele

    2017-03-01

    Research in neurooncology traditionally requires appropriate in vivo animal models, on which therapeutic strategies are tested before human trials are designed and proceed. Several reproducible animal experimental models, in which human physiologic conditions can be mimicked, are available for studying glioblastoma multiforme. In an ideal rat model, the tumor is of glial origin, grows in predictable and reproducible patterns, closely resembles human gliomas histopathologically, and is weakly or nonimmunogenic. In the current study, we used MRI and histopathologic evaluation to compare the most widely used allogeneic rat glioma model, C6-Wistar, with the F98-Fischer syngeneic rat glioma model in terms of percentage tumor growth or regression and growth rate. In vivo MRI demonstrated considerable variation in tumor volume and frequency between the 2 rat models despite the same stereotactic implantation technique. Faster and more reproducible glioma growth occurred in the immunoresponsive environment of the F98-Fischer model, because the immune response is minimized toward syngeneic cells. The marked inability of the C6-Wistar allogeneic system to generate a reproducible model and the episodes of spontaneous tumor regression with this system may have been due to the increased humoral and cellular immune responses after tumor implantation.

  19. A simple, quantitative method using alginate gel to determine rat colonic tumor volume in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Amy A; Young, Lindsay B; Pleiman, Jennifer K; Konrath, Michael J; Marzella, Blake; Nonte, Michael; Cacciatore, Justin; Ford, Madeline R; Clipson, Linda; Amos-Landgraf, James M; Dove, William F

    2014-04-01

    Many studies of the response of colonic tumors to therapeutics use tumor multiplicity as the endpoint to determine the effectiveness of the agent. These studies can be greatly enhanced by accurate measurements of tumor volume. Here we present a quantitative method to easily and accurately determine colonic tumor volume. This approach uses a biocompatible alginate to create a negative mold of a tumor-bearing colon; this mold is then used to make positive casts of dental stone that replicate the shape of each original tumor. The weight of the dental stone cast correlates highly with the weight of the dissected tumors. After refinement of the technique, overall error in tumor volume was 16.9% ± 7.9% and includes error from both the alginate and dental stone procedures. Because this technique is limited to molding of tumors in the colon, we utilized the Apc(Pirc/+) rat, which has a propensity for developing colonic tumors that reflect the location of the majority of human intestinal tumors. We have successfully used the described method to determine tumor volumes ranging from 4 to 196 mm³. Alginate molding combined with dental stone casting is a facile method for determining tumor volume in vivo without costly equipment or knowledge of analytic software. This broadly accessible method creates the opportunity to objectively study colonic tumors over time in living animals in conjunction with other experiments and without transferring animals from the facility where they are maintained.

  20. The Glioma International Case-Control Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, E. Susan; Armstrong, Georgina N; Zhou, Renke

    2016-01-01

    Decades of research have established only a few etiological factors for glioma, which is a rare and highly fatal brain cancer. Common methodological challenges among glioma studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity of tumor subtypes, and retrospective exposure assessment. Here, we briefly...... describe the Glioma International Case-Control (GICC) Study (recruitment, 2010-2013), a study being conducted by the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium that integrates data from multiple data collection sites, uses a common protocol and questionnaire, and includes biospecimen...

  1. The Art of Intraoperative Glioma Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Z Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A major dilemma in brain tumor surgery is the identification of tumor boundaries to maximize tumor excision and minimize postoperative neurological damage. Gliomas, especially low-grade tumors, and normal brain have a similar color and texture which poses a challenge to the neurosurgeon. Advances in glioma resection techniques combine the experience of the neurosurgeon and various advanced technologies. Intraoperative methods to delineate gliomas from normal tissue consist of 1 image-based navigation, 2 intraoperative sampling, 3 electrophysiological monitoring, and 4 enhanced visual tumor demarcation. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed. A combination of these methods is becoming widely accepted in routine glioma surgery. Gross total resection in conjunction with radiation, chemotherapy, or immune/gene therapy may increase the rates of cure in this devastating disease.

  2. Stereological quantification of tumor volume, mean nuclear volume and total number of melanoma cells correlated with morbidity and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke-Behrndtz, Marie Louise; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg

    2008-01-01

    potential indicators of prognosis. Sixty patients who underwent surgery at the Department of Plastic Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, from 1991 to 1994 were included in the study. Total tumor volume was estimated by the Cavalieri technique, total number of tumor cells by the optical dissector principle...... showed a significant impact on both disease-free survival (p=0.001) and mortality (p=0.009). In conclusion, tumor volume and total number of cancer cells were highly reproducible but did not add additional, independent prognostic information regarding the study population.......Stereological quantification of tumor volume, total number of tumor cells and mean nuclear volume provides unbiased data, regardless of the three-dimensional shape of the melanocytic lesion. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether these variables are reproducible and may represent...

  3. MicroRNA in Human Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mengfeng, E-mail: limf@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control (Sun Yat-sen University), Chinese Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Department of Microbiology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Li, Jun [Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control (Sun Yat-sen University), Chinese Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Department of Biochemistry, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Liu, Lei; Li, Wei [Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control (Sun Yat-sen University), Chinese Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Department of Microbiology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Yang, Yi [Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control (Sun Yat-sen University), Chinese Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Department of Pharmacology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Yuan, Jie [Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control (Sun Yat-sen University), Chinese Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Molecules from Oceanic Microorganisms (Sun Yat-sen University), Department of Education of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

    2013-10-23

    Glioma represents a serious health problem worldwide. Despite advances in surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and targeting therapy, the disease remains one of the most lethal malignancies in humans, and new approaches to improvement of the efficacy of anti-glioma treatments are urgently needed. Thus, new therapeutic targets and tools should be developed based on a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of glioma. In this context, microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, non-coding RNAs, play a pivotal role in the development of the malignant phenotype of glioma cells, including cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, tumor angiogenesis, and stem cell generation. This review will discuss the biological functions of miRNAs in human glioma and their implications in improving clinical diagnosis, prediction of prognosis, and anti-glioma therapy.

  4. MicroRNA in Human Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Mengfeng; Li, Jun; Liu, Lei; Li, Wei; Yang, Yi; Yuan, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Glioma represents a serious health problem worldwide. Despite advances in surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and targeting therapy, the disease remains one of the most lethal malignancies in humans, and new approaches to improvement of the efficacy of anti-glioma treatments are urgently needed. Thus, new therapeutic targets and tools should be developed based on a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of glioma. In this context, microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, non-coding RNAs, play a pivotal role in the development of the malignant phenotype of glioma cells, including cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, tumor angiogenesis, and stem cell generation. This review will discuss the biological functions of miRNAs in human glioma and their implications in improving clinical diagnosis, prediction of prognosis, and anti-glioma therapy

  5. SEMI–MATURE DENDRITIC CELLS AS A POTENTIAL BASIS FOR THE INDUCTION OF ANTI–TUMOR RESPONSE IN PATIENTS WITH MALIGNANT GLIOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Leplina

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The comparative analysis of phenotypical and functional features of dendritic cells (DCs, generated in presence of GM–CSF and IFNα from blood monocytes of patients with malignant gliomas (MG and healthy donors, was carried out in this research. The potential value of the DC–based immunotherapy in the induction of anti–tumor response in patients with MG was also examined. Our results show that within generated DCs of healthy donors 90 and 52% cells expressed correspondingly HLA–DR and CD86, only 17–18% cells were CD14+monocytes, whereas 38% cells exhibited the phenotype of mature CD83+ dendritic cells. The both monocyte conditioned medium (MCM, 30% v/v and Leukinferon® (250 IU of IFNα were comparably efficient as maturation–induced stimuli. Despite monocyte’s disturbances in malignant gliomas, the analogous population of DCs was efficiently generated in all examined patients with MG. However, the percentage of mature CD83+DCs was significantly decreased compared to that in healthy donors (24 vs 38%, and these data strongly suggest the delay maturation of DCs in MG. Nevertheless the patient’s DCs showed the allostimulatory activity, comparable with healthy donor’s DCs, and 52–62% cells maintained the ability for the receptor–dependent en–docytosis. Moreover, the patient’s DCs effectively presented bacterial and tumor–associated antigens (TAA. Immunotherapy with autologous DCs allowed to induce the TAA–specific immune reactions, both in skin test in vivo and in vitro, in 50% patients with MG. (Med. Immunol., 2005, vol.7, № 4, pp. 365–374

  6. Density overwrites of internal tumor volumes in intensity modulated proton therapy plans for mobile lung tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botas, Pablo; Grassberger, Clemens; Sharp, Gregory; Paganetti, Harald

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate internal tumor volume density overwrite strategies to minimize intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan degradation of mobile lung tumors. Four planning paradigms were compared for nine lung cancer patients. Internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) and internal clinical target volume (ICTV) structures were defined encompassing their respective volumes in every 4DCT phase. The paradigms use different planning CT (pCT) created from the average intensity projection (AIP) of the 4DCT, overwriting the density within the IGTV to account for movement. The density overwrites were: (a) constant filling with 100 HU (C100) or (b) 50 HU (C50), (c) maximum intensity projection (MIP) across phases, and (d) water equivalent path length (WEPL) consideration from beam’s-eye-view. Plans were created optimizing dose-influence matrices calculated with fast GPU Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in each pCT. Plans were evaluated with MC on the 4DCTs using a model of the beam delivery time structure. Dose accumulation was performed using deformable image registration. Interplay effect was addressed applying 10 times rescanning. Significantly less DVH metrics degradation occurred when using MIP and WEPL approaches. Target coverage (D99≥slant 70 Gy(RBE)) was fulfilled in most cases with MIP and WEPL (D{{99}WEPL}=69.2+/- 4.0 Gy (RBE)), keeping dose heterogeneity low (D5-D{{95}WEPL}=3.9+/- 2.0 Gy(RBE)). The mean lung dose was kept lowest by the WEPL strategy, as well as the maximum dose to organs at risk (OARs). The impact on dose levels in the heart, spinal cord and esophagus were patient specific. Overall, the WEPL strategy gives the best performance and should be preferred when using a 3D static geometry for lung cancer IMPT treatment planning. Newly available fast MC methods make it possible to handle long simulations based on 4D data sets to perform studies with high accuracy and efficiency, even prior to individual treatment planning.

  7. Apparent diffusion coefficient histogram metrics correlate with survival in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma: a report from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poussaint, Tina Young; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Ricci, Kelsey I.; Panigrahy, Ashok; Kocak, Mehmet; Kun, Larry E.; Boyett, James M.; Pollack, Ian F.; Fouladi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is associated with poor survival regardless of therapy. We used volumetric apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram metrics to determine associations with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at baseline and after radiation therapy (RT). Methods Baseline and post-RT quantitative ADC histograms were generated from fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images and enhancement regions of interest. Metrics assessed included number of peaks (ie, unimodal or bimodal), mean and median ADC, standard deviation, mode, skewness, and kurtosis. Results Based on FLAIR images, the majority of tumors had unimodal peaks with significantly shorter average survival. Pre-RT FLAIR mean, mode, and median values were significantly associated with decreased risk of progression; higher pre-RT ADC values had longer PFS on average. Pre-RT FLAIR skewness and standard deviation were significantly associated with increased risk of progression; higher pre-RT FLAIR skewness and standard deviation had shorter PFS. Nonenhancing tumors at baseline showed higher ADC FLAIR mean values, lower kurtosis, and higher PFS. For enhancing tumors at baseline, bimodal enhancement histograms had much worse PFS and OS than unimodal cases and significantly lower mean peak values. Enhancement in tumors only after RT led to significantly shorter PFS and OS than in patients with baseline or no baseline enhancement. Conclusions ADC histogram metrics in DIPG demonstrate significant correlations between diffusion metrics and survival, with lower diffusion values (increased cellularity), increased skewness, and enhancement associated with shorter survival, requiring future investigations in large DIPG clinical trials. PMID:26487690

  8. Aberrant paramagnetic signals outside the tumor volume on routine surveillance MRI of brain tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Inbar, Edna; Michaeli, Natalia; Limon, Dror; Siegal, Tali

    2017-09-01

    Late complications of cerebral radiation therapy (RT) involve vascular injury with acquired cavernous malformation, telangiectasias and damage to vascular walls which are well recognized in children. Its incidence in adults is unknown. Blood products and iron deposition that accompany vascular injury create paramagnetic effects on MRI. This study retrospectively investigated the frequency of paramagnetic lesions on routine surveillance MRI of adult brain tumor patients. MRI studies of 115 brain tumor patients were reviewed. Only studies containing sequences of either susceptibility weighted images or gradient echo or blood oxygenation level dependent imaging were included. Lesions inside the tumor volume were not considered. 68 studies fulfilled the above criteria and included 48 patients with previous RT (35 followed for >2 years and 13 for 1 year) and 20 patients who were not treated with RT. The median age at time of irradiation was 47 years. Aberrant paramagnetic lesions were found in 23/35 (65%) patients followed for >2 years after RT and in only 1/13 (8%) patients followed for 1-year after radiation (p = 0.03). The 1-year follow-up group did not differ from the control group [2/20 (9%)]. Most lesions were within the radiation field and none of the patients had related symptomatology. The number and incidence of these lesions increased with time and amounted to 75% over 3 years post RT. MRI paramagnetic signal aberrations are common findings in adult brain tumor patients that evolve over time after RT. The clinical significance of these lesions needs further investigation.

  9. Multiparametric analysis of magnetic resonance images for glioma grading and patient survival time prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzon, Benjamin; Emblem, Kyrre E.; Mouridsen, Kim; Nedregaard, Baard; Due-Toennessen, Paulina; Nome, Terje; Hald, John K.; Bjoernerud, Atle; Haaberg, Asta K.; Kvinnsland, Yngve

    2011-01-01

    Background. A systematic comparison of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) options for glioma diagnosis is lacking. Purpose. To investigate multiple MR-derived image features with respect to diagnostic accuracy in tumor grading and survival prediction in glioma patients. Material and Methods. T1 pre- and post-contrast, T2 and dynamic susceptibility contrast scans of 74 glioma patients with histologically confirmed grade were acquired. For each patient, a set of statistical features was obtained from the parametric maps derived from the original images, in a region-of-interest encompassing the tumor volume. A forward stepwise selection procedure was used to find the best combinations of features for grade prediction with a cross-validated logistic model and survival time prediction with a cox proportional-hazards regression. Results. Presence/absence of enhancement paired with kurtosis of the FM (first moment of the first-pass curve) was the feature combination that best predicted tumor grade (grade II vs. grade III-IV; median AUC 0.96), with the main contribution being due to the first of the features. A lower predictive value (median AUC = 0.82) was obtained when grade IV tumors were excluded. Presence/absence of enhancement alone was the best predictor for survival time, and the regression was significant (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Presence/absence of enhancement, reflecting transendothelial leakage, was the feature with highest predictive value for grade and survival time in glioma patients

  10. Multiparametric analysis of magnetic resonance images for glioma grading and patient survival time prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzon, Benjamin (Dept. of Circulation and Medical Imaging, NTNU, Trondheim (Norway)), email: benjamin.garzon@ntnu.no; Emblem, Kyrre E. (The Interventional Center, Rikshospitalet, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Dept. of Radiology, MGH-HST AA Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States)); Mouridsen, Kim (Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus Univ., Aarhus (Denmark)); Nedregaard, Baard; Due-Toennessen, Paulina; Nome, Terje; Hald, John K. (Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Rikshospitalet, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway)); Bjoernerud, Atle (The Interventional Center, Rikshospitalet, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway)); Haaberg, Asta K. (Dept. of Circulation and Medical Imaging, NTNU, Trondheim (Norway); Dept. of Medical Imaging, St Olav' s Hospital, Trondheim (Norway)); Kvinnsland, Yngve (NordicImagingLab, Bergen (Norway))

    2011-11-15

    Background. A systematic comparison of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) options for glioma diagnosis is lacking. Purpose. To investigate multiple MR-derived image features with respect to diagnostic accuracy in tumor grading and survival prediction in glioma patients. Material and Methods. T1 pre- and post-contrast, T2 and dynamic susceptibility contrast scans of 74 glioma patients with histologically confirmed grade were acquired. For each patient, a set of statistical features was obtained from the parametric maps derived from the original images, in a region-of-interest encompassing the tumor volume. A forward stepwise selection procedure was used to find the best combinations of features for grade prediction with a cross-validated logistic model and survival time prediction with a cox proportional-hazards regression. Results. Presence/absence of enhancement paired with kurtosis of the FM (first moment of the first-pass curve) was the feature combination that best predicted tumor grade (grade II vs. grade III-IV; median AUC 0.96), with the main contribution being due to the first of the features. A lower predictive value (median AUC = 0.82) was obtained when grade IV tumors were excluded. Presence/absence of enhancement alone was the best predictor for survival time, and the regression was significant (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Presence/absence of enhancement, reflecting transendothelial leakage, was the feature with highest predictive value for grade and survival time in glioma patients

  11. Terahertz reflectometry imaging for low and high grade gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Young Bin; Oh, Seung Jae; Kang, Seok-Gu; Heo, Jung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Choi, Yuna; Song, Seungri; Son, Hye Young; Kim, Se Hoon; Lee, Ji Hyun; Haam, Seung Joo; Huh, Yong Min; Chang, Jong Hee; Joo, Chulmin; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2016-01-01

    Gross total resection (GTR) of glioma is critical for improving the survival rate of glioma patients. One of the greatest challenges for achieving GTR is the difficulty in discriminating low grade tumor or peritumor regions that have an intact blood brain barrier (BBB) from normal brain tissues and delineating glioma margins during surgery. Here we present a highly sensitive, label-free terahertz reflectometry imaging (TRI) that overcomes current key limitations for intraoperative detection of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), and grade III and IV (high grade) gliomas. We demonstrate that TRI provides tumor discrimination and delineation of tumor margins in brain tissues with high sensitivity on the basis of Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained image. TRI may help neurosurgeons to remove gliomas completely by providing visualization of tumor margins in WHO grade II, III, and IV gliomas without contrast agents, and hence, improve patient outcomes. PMID:27782153

  12. The correlation between osteopontin level and radiation response of malignant gliomas at Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isnaniah Hasan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteopontin is an endogenous molecular marker for tumor hypoxia, and hypoxia is one of the factors that determine the aggressiveness of the disease. The purpose of this study is to determine the correlation between osteopontin levels and radiation response in malignant glioma. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 15 malignant glioma patients who underwent radiation therapy from July 2004 to May 2015 at the RSUPN Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. Osteopontin levels were measured from paraffin-embedded tissue using a commercial ELISA kit. Tumor volume was calculated using computed tomography (CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI images, based on three-dimensional volume measurements. Tumor response was evaluated by comparing pre- and post-radiation tumor volumes using CT scan and MRI images. The mean osteopontin level was 0.49 ± 0.45 ng/mL and the mean percentage change in tumor volume was 8.59 ± 54.22%, with a 60% enlargement in tumor volume. A progressive disease was found in 26.7% of patients. There was a weak but insignificant negative correlation (r = -0.39, p = 0.146 between the level of osteopontin and radiation response. In contrast, there was a strong but insignificant positive correlation (r = +0.68, p = 0.219 between the level of osteopontin and radiation response in the patient group that used the chemosensitizer temozolamide.

  13. SU-E-J-79: Internal Tumor Volume Motion and Volume Size Assessment Using 4D CT Lung Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurkovic, I [University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Stathakis, S; Li, Y; Patel, A; Vincent, J; Papanikolaou, N; Mavroidis, P [Cancer Therapy and Research Center University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess internal tumor volume change through breathing cycle and associated tumor motion using the 4DCT data. Methods: Respiration induced volume change through breathing cycle and associated motion was analyzed for nine patients that were scanned during the different respiratory phases. The examined datasets were the maximum and average intensity projections (MIP and AIP) and the 10 phases of the respiratory cycle. The internal target volume (ITV) was delineated on each of the phases and the planning target volume (PTV) was then created by adding setup margins to the ITV. Tumor motion through the phases was assessed using the acquired 4DCT dataset, which was then used to determine if the margins used for the ITV creation successfully encompassed the tumor in three dimensions. Results: Results showed that GTV motion along the superior inferior axes was the largest in all the cases independent of the tumor location and/or size or the use of abdomen compression. The extent of the tumor motion was found to be connected with the size of the GTV. The smallest GTVs exhibited largest motion vector independent of the tumor location. The motion vector size varied through the phases depending on the tumor size and location and it was smallest for phases 20 and 30. The smaller the volume of the delineated GTV, the greater its volume difference through the different respiratory phases was. The average GTV volume change was largest for the phases 60 and 70. Conclusion: Even if GTV is delineated using both AIP and MIP datasets, its motion extent will exceed the used margins especially for the very small GTV volumes. When the GTV size is less than 10 cc it is recommended to use fusion of the GTVs through all the phases to create the planning ITV.

  14. Anatomy, gross tumor volume and clinical target volume: tumors of the lower third of the esophagus and the gastro esophageal junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calais, G.; Asquier, E.; Louisot, P.

    2001-01-01

    The esophagus is divided into four regions: cervical esophagus, intrathoracic esophagus with upper, mid and lower thoracic portion. Cancer may occur on each of these regions. Computed tomography of the thorax and superior abdomen and endoscopic ultrasound are necessary for reliable staging. CT simulation allows accurate definition of tumor volume. GTV includes tumor volume and regional lymph nodes. CTV encompasses GTV plus safety margin and lymph nodes areas considered to harbor potential microscopic disease. The extent of prophylactic lymph node irradiation depends on the anatomic location of the primary tumor. (author)

  15. Neuronavigator-guided glioma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guhong; Zhou, Liangfu; Mao, Ying

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of neuronavigator-guided surgery for the resection of gliomas. A total of 80 patients with gliomas underwent surgical treatment under the StealthStation neuronavigator to estimate the extent of the tumors. In 27 cases, the measurements of brain shifts at the dura, cortical surface and lesion margin were recorded during the operations. A technique termed "micro-catheter fence post" was used in superficial gliomas to compensate for brain shift. Mean fiducial error and predicted accuracy in the 80 cases were 2.03 mm +/- 0.89 mm and 2.43 mm +/- 0.99 mm, respectively. The shifts at the dura, cortical surface and lesion margin were 3.44 mm +/- 2.39 mm, 7.58 mm +/- 3.75 mm, and 6.55 mm +/- 3.19 mm, respectively. Although neuronavigation revealed residual tumors, operations were discontinued in 5 cases of deep-seated gliomas. In the other 75 cases, total tumor removals were achieved in 62 (82.7%), and subtotal removals were achieved in 13 (17.3%). Post-operation, neurological symptoms were improved or unchanged in 68 cases (85.0%), and worsened in 12 (15.0%). No deaths occurred during the operations and post-operations. Intraoperative brain shifts mainly contribute to the fail of spatial accuracy during neuronavigator-guided glioma surgery. The "micro-catheter fence post" technique used for glioma surgery is shown to be useful for compensating for intraoperative brain shifts. This technique, thus, contributes to an increase in total tumor removal and a decrease in surgical complications.

  16. Predicting in vivo glioma growth with the reaction diffusion equation constrained by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hormuth II, David A; Weis, Jared A; Barnes, Stephanie L; Miga, Michael I; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Rericha, Erin C; Quaranta, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Reaction–diffusion models have been widely used to model glioma growth. However, it has not been shown how accurately this model can predict future tumor status using model parameters (i.e., tumor cell diffusion and proliferation) estimated from quantitative in vivo imaging data. To this end, we used in silico studies to develop the methods needed to accurately estimate tumor specific reaction–diffusion model parameters, and then tested the accuracy with which these parameters can predict future growth. The analogous study was then performed in a murine model of glioma growth. The parameter estimation approach was tested using an in silico tumor ‘grown’ for ten days as dictated by the reaction–diffusion equation. Parameters were estimated from early time points and used to predict subsequent growth. Prediction accuracy was assessed at global (total volume and Dice value) and local (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC) levels. Guided by the in silico study, rats (n = 9) with C6 gliomas, imaged with diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, were used to evaluate the model’s accuracy for predicting in vivo tumor growth. The in silico study resulted in low global (tumor volume error 0.92) and local (CCC values >0.80) level errors for predictions up to six days into the future. The in vivo study showed higher global (tumor volume error >11.7%, Dice <0.81) and higher local (CCC <0.33) level errors over the same time period. The in silico study shows that model parameters can be accurately estimated and used to accurately predict future tumor growth at both the global and local scale. However, the poor predictive accuracy in the experimental study suggests the reaction–diffusion equation is an incomplete description of in vivo C6 glioma biology and may require further modeling of intra-tumor interactions including segmentation of (for example) proliferative and necrotic regions. (paper)

  17. Novel systemic treatment options for advanced solid tumors with or without central nervous system metastases or malignant glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milojkovic Kerklaan, B.

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy is a very frequently used therapy in patients with advanced tumors with or without central nervous system (CNS) metastases or primary brain tumors. Despite the significant progress in drug development, the survival of patients is limited with an unmet need for more effective

  18. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy as a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong, E-mail: radiopiakim@hanmail.net [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Byung Chang; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Min Ju [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic significance of tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: In total, 430 primary LARC (cT3-4) patients who were treated with preoperative CRT and curative radical surgery between May 2002 and March 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. Pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest MR volumetry. Tumor volume reduction rate was determined using the equation TVRR (%) = (pre-CRT tumor volume - post-CRT tumor volume) Multiplication-Sign 100/pre-CRT tumor volume. The median follow-up period was 64 months (range, 27-99 months) for survivors. Endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: The median TVRR was 70.2% (mean, 64.7% {+-} 22.6%; range, 0-100%). Downstaging (ypT0-2N0M0) occurred in 183 patients (42.6%). The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 77.7% and 86.3%, respectively. In the analysis that included pre-CRT and post-CRT tumor volumes and TVRR as continuous variables, only TVRR was an independent prognostic factor. Tumor volume reduction rate was categorized according to a cutoff value of 45% and included with clinicopathologic factors in the multivariate analysis; ypN status, circumferential resection margin, and TVRR were significant prognostic factors for both DFS and OS. Conclusions: Tumor volume reduction rate was a significant prognostic factor in LARC patients receiving preoperative CRT. Tumor volume reduction rate data may be useful for tailoring surgery and postoperative adjuvant therapy after preoperative CRT.

  19. Effect of contrast leakage on the detection of abnormal brain tumor vasculature in high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaViolette, Peter S; Daun, Mitchell K; Paulson, Eric S; Schmainda, Kathleen M

    2014-02-01

    Abnormal brain tumor vasculature has recently been highlighted by a dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI processing technique. The technique uses independent component analysis (ICA) to separate arterial and venous perfusion. The overlap of the two, i.e. arterio-venous overlap or AVOL, preferentially occurs in brain tumors and predicts response to anti-angiogenic therapy. The effects of contrast agent leakage on the AVOL biomarker have yet to be established. DSC was acquired during two separate contrast boluses in ten patients undergoing clinical imaging for brain tumor diagnosis. Three components were modeled with ICA, which included the arterial and venous components. The percentage of each component as well as a third component were determined within contrast enhancing tumor and compared. AVOL within enhancing tumor was also compared between doses. The percentage of enhancing tumor classified as not arterial or venous and instead into a third component with contrast agent leakage apparent in the time-series was significantly greater for the first contrast dose compared to the second. The amount of AVOL detected within enhancing tumor was also significantly greater with the second dose compared to the first. Contrast leakage results in large signal variance classified as a separate component by the ICA algorithm. The use of a second dose mitigates the effect and allows measurement of AVOL within enhancement.

  20. Low grade gliomas: preliminary analysis of failure patterns among patients treated using 3D conformal external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu, Anthony T.; Sandler, Howard M.; Radany, Eric H.; Blaivas, Mila; Page, Michaelyn A.; Greenberg, Harry S.; Junck, Larry; Ross, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The pattern of failure of low grade gliomas following radiotherapy is less well known than that of the high grade gliomas. Stereotactic histologic studies have suggested that tumor cells extend beyond imaging abnormalities, and that large margins would be required for radiotherapy target volumes to encompass all of the neoplasm. Our experience using computerized tomography (CT)- and magnetic resonance (MR)-planned irradiation of low grade gliomas was reviewed to determine the pattern of tumor recurrence, in an effort to clinically define the minimum margin required. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with low grade supratentorial gliomas were treated between April 1985 and November 1992 using three-dimensional (3D) conformal CT- or MR-planned external beam radiotherapy. Fields were designed to encompass a target volume created by adding a margin to the tumor in three dimensions. Generally, patients were treated using shrinking fields with an initial target (tumor plus a 1 to 3 cm margin) treated to a dose of 45 to 50.4 (median 50.4) Gy, and a boost (tumor plus a 0 to 2 cm margin) treated to a total of 54 to 59.4 (median 59.4) Gy. Median follow-up was 32.9 months. Results: There have been 11 failures; all of these occurred within the radiographic abnormality (either T2 prolongation or CT hypodensity) visualized at the time of treatment planning (i.e., all failures were within the boost volume). Median time to failure was 53 months. Because all failures were local, there was no relationship between the amount by which the tumor volumes were expanded to create target volumes and the eventual outcome. Conclusion: Despite pathologic data suggesting that low grade glioma cells can be found outside the MR T2-signal abnormality in many cases, our results demonstrate that conformal external beam radiotherapy, in which the high dose volume is limited, does not result in increased marginal or out-of-field failures. Until control of tumor within the

  1. Assessment of interpatient heterogeneity in tumor radiosensitivity for nonsmall cell lung cancer using tumor-volume variation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chvetsov, Alexei V., E-mail: chvetsov2@gmail.com; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Mayr, Nina [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States); Yartsev, Slav [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 790 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario 46A 4L6 (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In our previous work, the authors showed that a distribution of cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} in a heterogeneous group of patients could be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. In this research study, the authors show that this algorithm can be applied to other tumors, specifically in nonsmall cell lung cancer. This new application includes larger patient volumes and includes comparison of data sets obtained at independent institutions. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage computed tomography. Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} and clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T{sub 1/2} have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population model of tumor response and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Nonsmall cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} for nonsmall cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Conclusions: The data obtained

  2. Endoscopic clipping for gastrointestinal tumors. A method to define the target volume more precisely

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riepl, M.; Klautke, G.; Fehr, R.; Fietkau, R.; Pietsch, A.

    2000-01-01

    Background: In many cases it is not possible to exactly define the extension of carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract with the help of computertomography scans made for 3-D-radiation treatment planning. Consequently, the planning of external beam radiotherapy is made more difficult for the gross tumor volume as well as, in some cases, also for the clinical target volume. Patients and Methods: Eleven patients with macrosocpic tumors (rectal cancer n = 5, cardiac cancer n = 6) were included. Just before 3-D planning, the oral and aboral border of the tumor was marked endoscopically with hemoclips. Subsequently, CT scans for radiotherapy planning were made and the clinical target volume was defined. Five to 6 weeks thereafter, new CT scans were done to define the gross tumor volume for boost planning. Two investigators independently assessed the influence of the hemoclips on the different planning volumes, and whether the number of clips was sufficient to define the gross tumor volume. Results: In all patients, the implantation of the clips was done without complications. Start of radiotherapy was not delayed. With the help of the clips it was possible to exactly define the position and the extension of the primary tumor. The clinical target volume was modified according to the position of the clips in 5/11 patients; the gross tumor volume was modified in 7/11 patients. The use of the clips made the documentation and verification of the treatment portals by the simulator easier. Moreover, the clips helped the surgeon to define the primary tumor region following marked regression after neoadjuvant therapy in 3 patients. Conclusions: Endoscopic clipping of gastrointestinal tumors helps to define the tumor volumes more precisely in radiation therapy. The clips are easily recognized on the portal films and, thus, contribute to quality control. (orig.) [de

  3. Comparison of T2 and FLAIR imaging for target delineation in high grade gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Robert W

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background FLAIR and T2 weighted MRIs are used based on institutional preference to delineate high grade gliomas and surrounding edema for radiation treatment planning. Although these sequences have inherent physical differences there is limited data on the clinical and dosimetric impact of using either or both sequences. Methods 40 patients with high grade gliomas consecutively treated between 2002 and 2008 of which 32 had pretreatment MRIs with T1, T2 and FLAIR available for review were selected for this study. These MRIs were fused with the treatment planning CT. Normal structures, clinical tumor volume (CTV and planning tumor volume (PTV were then defined on the T2 and FLAIR sequences. A Venn diagram analysis was performed for each pair of tumor volumes as well as a fractional component analysis to assess the contribution of each sequence to the union volume. For each patient the tumor volumes were compared in terms of total volume in cubic centimeters as well as anatomic location using a discordance index. The overlap of the tumor volumes with critical structures was calculated as a measure of predicted toxicity. For patients with MRI documented failures, the tumor volumes obtained using the different sequences were compared with the recurrent gross tumor volume (rGTV. Results The FLAIR CTVs and PTVs were significantly larger than the T2 CTVs and PTVs (p Conclusions Although both T2 and FLAIR MRI sequences are used to define high grade glial neoplasm and surrounding edema, our results show that the volumes generated using these techniques are different and not interchangeable. These differences have bearing on the use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and highly conformal treatment as well as on future clinical trials where the bias of using one technique over the other may influence the study outcome.

  4. Combination therapy of surgical tumor resection with implantation of a hydrogel containing camptothecin-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres in a C6 rat glioma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Tetsuya; Kaneko, Daiki; Hashizawa, Kosuke; Imai, Yoshihiro; Tagami, Tatsuaki; Okada, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a drug-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microsphere-containing thermoreversible gelation polymer (TGP) (drug/PLGA/TGP) formulation as a novel device for implantation after surgical glioma resection. TGP is a thermosensitive polymer that is a gel at body temperature and a sol at room temperature. When a drug/PLGA/TGP formulation is injected into a target site, PLGA microspheres in TGP gel localize at the injection site and do not diffuse across the entire brain tissue, and thus, sustained drug release from the PLGA microspheres at the target site is expected. Using in vivo imaging, we confirmed that the implantation of indocyanine green (ICG)/PLGA/TGP formulation exhibited a stronger localization of ICG at the injection site 28 d after injection compared with that of ICG/PLGA formulation. The therapeutic effect (mean survival) was evaluated in a C6 rat glioma model. Surgical tumor resection alone showed almost no effect on survival (controls, 18 d; surgical resection; 18.5 d). Survival was prolonged after the treatment with a camptothecin (CPT; 10 µg)/PLGA/TGP formulation (24 d). The combination treatment of surgical tumor resection and CPT/PLGA/TGP showed almost the same therapeutic effect (24 d) compared with CPT/PLGA/TGP alone, while the combination treatment produced long term survivors (>60 d). Therefore, the CPT/PLGA/TGP formulation can be an effective candidate for localized and sustained long-term glioma therapy.

  5. [Relationship between tumor volume and PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Momose, Akishi; Okamoto, Akiko; Yamamoto, Hayato; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Iwabuchi, Ikuya; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Koie, Takuya; Kamimura, Noritaka; Ohyama, Chikara

    2010-02-01

    We examined whether the tumor volume (TV) is a good predictor of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Data were collected for 158 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy without neoadjuvant hormonal therapy in our hospital since April 2005 to September 2007. Along with the routine pathological assessment, TV was assessed in all prostatectomy specimens. PSA recurrence was defined as PSA levels of greater than 0.2 ng/ml. The TVs were 1.81+/-1.66 ml (mean +/-SD) ranging from 0.02 to 8.20 ml. The TV in cT1c was 1.77+/-1.64, and 1.89+/-1.72 ml in cT2 (not significant). Significant differences were observed between TV and pT. The TVs in pT2a, pT2b and pT3/4 were 0.54+/-0.54, 1.63+/-1.47 and 2.67+/-1.80 ml, respectively. The median follow-up period was 32.3 months (range from 15 to 45) after radical prostatectomy, and PSA recurrence was observed in 32 cases. Patients with smaller TV (TV TV (TV > or = 1.3 ml, 66.7%) with a significant difference atp TV, pT, Gleason Score (GS), and surgical margins. Significant differences were observed for GS, and surgical margins, but not for TV. Clinically organ-confined disease in Japanese patients with prostate cancer included various cancers from clinically insignificant to locally advanced ones. In our series, TV was not regarded as a predictor of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

  6. Small gliomas; Metabolism and blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Masaru; Shibasaki, Takashi; Horikoshi, Satoru; Ono, Nobuo; Zama, Akira; Kakegawa, Tohru; Ishiuchi, Shogo [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1994-02-01

    Eight patients with small gliomas (6 low-grade and 2 high-grade) localized in a single gyrus or less than 2 cm diameter were investigated using positron tomography and single photon emission computed tomography. All three tumors examined demonstrated hypermetabolism of amino acids. High-grade gliomas demonstrated hypermetabolism of glucose and high blood flow, but normal or low oxygen metabolism. High-grade gliomas also showed accumulation of [sup 201]Tl chloride and high or low accumulation of [sup 123]I-isopropyl iodoamphetamine. These indications allow preoperative diagnosis of the malignancy of small gliomas, which is important because small gliomas with high-grade malignancy need more extensive removal and adjuvant therapy. (author).

  7. [Multidisciplinar approach to the management of gliomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Bianca; Migliorini, Denis; Bourhis, Jean; Daniel, Roy; Levivier, Marc; Hottinger, Andreas F

    2016-04-27

    Gliomas represent two thirds of all primary brain tumors. Their prognosis depends directly upon their level of differentiation. On MRI, tumoral aggressivity is highlighted by contrast uptake and the infiltrative nature of the lesion. Clinical suspicion must however be confirmed by histology and molecular markers become essential to refine the diagnosis and tailor the treatment. Isocytrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations, codeletion of 1p and 19q and the presence of methylation of the MGMT promoter identify a subgroup of gliomas with better prognosis and may help predict response to treatment. Management of patients with primary brain tumors should always be defined in multidisciplinar tumor boards involving neurosurgeons, oncologists, radiation oncologists, neuropathologists and neuroradiologists.

  8. Variation of gross tumor volume and clinical target volume definition for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jun; Li Minghui; Chen Dongdu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the variation of gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) definition for lung cancer between different doctors. Methods: Ten lung cancer patients with PET-CT simulation were selected from January 2008 to December 2009.GTV and CTV of these patients were defined by four professors or associate professors of radiotherapy independently. Results: The mean ratios of largest to smallest GTV and CTV were 1.66 and 1.65, respectively. The mean coefficients of variation for GTV and CTV were 0.20 and 0.17, respectively. System errors of CTV definition in three dimension were less than 5 mm, which was the largest in inferior and superior (0.48 cm, 0.37 cm, 0.32 cm; F=0.40, 0.60, 0.15, P=0.755, 0.618, 0.928). Conclusions: The variation of GTV and CTV definition for lung cancer between different doctors exist. The mean ratios of largest to smallest GTV and CTV were less than 1.7. The variation was in hilar and mediastinum lymphanode regions. System error of CTV definition was the largest (<5 mm) in cranio-caudal direction. (authors)

  9. Calculating the tumor volume of acoustic neuromas: comparison of ABC/2 formula with planimetry method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi-Lin; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Juan, Chun-Jung; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan

    2013-08-01

    The ABC/2 equation is commonly applied to measure the volume of intracranial hematoma. However, the precision of ABC/2 equation in estimating the tumor volume of acoustic neuromas is less addressed. The study is to evaluate the accuracy of the ABC/2 formula by comparing with planimetry method for estimating the tumor volumes. Thirty-two patients diagnosed with acoustic neuroma received contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of brain were recruited. The volume was calculated by the ABC/2 equation and planimetry method (defined as exact volume) at the same time. The 32 patients were divided into three groups by tumor volume to avoid volume-dependent overestimation (6 ml). The tumor volume by ABC/2 method was highly correlated to that calculated by planimetry method using linear regression analysis (R2=0.985). Pearson correlation coefficient (r=0.993, pABC/2 formula is an easy method in estimating the tumor volume of acoustic neuromas that is not inferior to planimetry method. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Glioma in a goat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, C.L.; Weinstock, D.; Kramer, R.W.; Bagley, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    An adult goat was examined because of behavioral changes and circling. Results of neurologic examination, CSF analysis, hematologic evaluation, and computed tomography of the brain were suggestive of an intra-axial mass. The goat was euthanatized because of worsening neurologic condition and poor prognosis. Necropsy revealed a large mass in the right cerebral hemisphere and caudal brain herniation through the foramen magnum. The mass was diagnosed as a glioma, with oligodendrocyte differentiation. Results of immunohistochemical evaluation were compatible with a malignant, poorly differentiated tumor

  11. An Interindividual Comparison of O-(2- [18F]Fluoroethyl)-L-Tyrosine (FET)– and L-[Methyl-11C]Methionine (MET)–PET in Patients With Brain Gliomas and Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Astner, Sabrina T.; Riedel, Eva; Nieder, Carsten; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Heinemann, Felix; Schwaiger, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: L-[methyl- 11 C]methionine (MET)–positron emission tomography (PET) has a high sensitivity and specificity for imaging of gliomas and metastatic brain tumors. The short half-life of 11 C (20 minutes) limits the use of MET-PET to institutions with onsite cyclotron. O-(2- [ 18 F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET) is labeled with 18 F (half-life, 120 minutes) and could be used much more broadly. This study compares the uptake of FET and MET in gliomas and metastases, as well as treatment-induced changes. Furthermore, it evaluates the gross tumor volume (GTV) of gliomas defined on PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: We examined 42 patients with pretreated gliomas (29 patients) or brain metastases (13 patients) prospectively by FET- and MET-PET on the same day. Uptake of FET and MET was quantified by standardized uptake values. Imaging contrast was assessed by calculating lesion–to–gray matter ratios. Tumor extension was quantified by contouring GTV in 17 patients with brain gliomas. Gross tumor volume on PET was compared with GTV on MRI. Sensitivity and specificity of MET- and FET-PET for differentiation of viable tumor from benign changes were evaluated by comparing the PET result with histology or clinical follow-up. Results: There was a strong linear correlation between standardized uptake values calculated for both tracers in cortex and lesions: r = 0.78 (p = 0.001) and r = 0.84 (p 18 F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine–PET and MET-PET provide comparable diagnostic information on gliomas and brain metastases. Like MET-PET, FET-PET can be used for differentiation of residual or recurrent tumor from treatment-related changes/pseudoprogression, as well as for delineation of gliomas.

  12. Glioma-related seizures in relation to histopathological subtypes: a report from the glioma international case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsson, Shala G; Merrell, Ryan T; Amirian, E Susan; Armstrong, Georgina N; Lachance, Daniel; Smits, Anja; Zhou, Renke; Jacobs, Daniel I; Wrensch, Margaret R; Olson, Sara H; Il'yasova, Dora; Claus, Elizabeth B; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Schildkraut, Joellen; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Houlston, Richard S; Jenkins, Robert B; Bernstein, Jonine L; Lai, Rose; Shete, Sanjay; Amos, Christopher I; Bondy, Melissa L; Melin, Beatrice S

    2018-04-23

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the distribution of glioma-related seizures and seizure control at the time of tumor diagnosis with respect to tumor histologic subtypes, tumor treatment and patient characteristics, and to compare seizure history preceding tumor diagnosis (or study enrollment) between glioma patients and healthy controls. The Glioma International Case Control study (GICC) risk factor questionnaire collected information on demographics, past medical/medication history, and occupational history. Cases from eight centers were also asked detailed questions on seizures in relation to glioma diagnosis; cases (n = 4533) and controls (n = 4171) were also asked about seizures less than 2 years from diagnosis and previous seizure history more than 2 years prior to tumor diagnosis, including childhood seizures. Low-grade gliomas (LGGs), particularly oligodendrogliomas/oligoastrocytomas, had the highest proportion of glioma-related seizures. Patients with low-grade astrocytoma demonstrated the most medically refractory seizures. A total of 83% of patients were using only one antiepileptic drug (AED), which was levetiracetam in 71% of cases. Gross total resection was strongly associated with reduced seizure frequency (p related seizures were most common in low-grade gliomas. Gross total resection was associated with lower seizure frequency. Additionally, having a history of childhood seizures is not a risk factor ***for developing glioma-related seizures or glioma.

  13. A dual function fusion protein of Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and firefly luciferase for noninvasive in vivo imaging of gene therapy in malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söling, Ariane; Theiss, Christian; Jungmichel, Stephanie; Rainov, Nikolai G

    2004-08-04

    BACKGROUND: Suicide gene therapy employing the prodrug activating system Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-TK)/ ganciclovir (GCV) has proven to be effective in killing experimental brain tumors. In contrast, glioma patients treated with HSV-TK/ GCV did not show significant treatment benefit, most likely due to insufficient transgene delivery to tumor cells. Therefore, this study aimed at developing a strategy for real-time noninvasive in vivo monitoring of the activity of a therapeutic gene in brain tumor cells. METHODS: The HSV-TK gene was fused to the firefly luciferase (Luc) gene and the fusion construct HSV-TK-Luc was expressed in U87MG human malignant glioma cells. Nude mice with subcutaneous gliomas stably expressing HSV-TK-Luc were subjected to GCV treatment and tumor response to therapy was monitored in vivo by serial bioluminescence imaging. Bioluminescent signals over time were compared with tumor volumes determined by caliper. RESULTS: Transient and stable expression of the HSV-TK-Luc fusion protein in U87MG glioma cells demonstrated close correlation of both enzyme activities. Serial optical imaging of tumor bearing mice detected in all cases GCV induced death of tumor cells expressing the fusion protein and proved that bioluminescence can be reliably used for repetitive and noninvasive quantification of HSV-TK/ GCV mediated cell kill in vivo. CONCLUSION: This approach may represent a valuable tool for the in vivo evaluation of gene therapy strategies for treatment of malignant disease.

  14. Molecular Diagnostics of Gliomas Using Next Generation Sequencing of a Glioma-Tailored Gene Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, Angela; Kaulich, Kerstin; Stepanow, Stefanie; Wolter, Marietta; Köhrer, Karl; Felsberg, Jörg; Malzkorn, Bastian; Reifenberger, Guido

    2017-03-01

    Current classification of gliomas is based on histological criteria according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system. Over the past years, characteristic genetic profiles have been identified in various glioma types. These can refine tumor diagnostics and provide important prognostic and predictive information. We report on the establishment and validation of gene panel next generation sequencing (NGS) for the molecular diagnostics of gliomas. We designed a glioma-tailored gene panel covering 660 amplicons derived from 20 genes frequently aberrant in different glioma types. Sensitivity and specificity of glioma gene panel NGS for detection of DNA sequence variants and copy number changes were validated by single gene analyses. NGS-based mutation detection was optimized for application on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens including small stereotactic biopsy samples. NGS data obtained in a retrospective analysis of 121 gliomas allowed for their molecular classification into distinct biological groups, including (i) isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (IDH) 1 or 2 mutant astrocytic gliomas with frequent α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) and tumor protein p53 (TP53) gene mutations, (ii) IDH mutant oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q codeletion, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation and frequent Drosophila homolog of capicua (CIC) gene mutation, as well as (iii) IDH wildtype glioblastomas with frequent TERT promoter mutation, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mutation and/or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification. Oligoastrocytic gliomas were genetically assigned to either of these groups. Our findings implicate gene panel NGS as a promising diagnostic technique that may facilitate integrated histological and molecular glioma classification. © 2016 International Society of Neuropathology.

  15. Influence of bladder and rectal volume on spatial variability of a bladder tumor during radical radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pos, Floris J.; Koedooder, Kees; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Gonzalez Gonzalez, Dionisio

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the spatial variability of a bladder tumor relative to the planning target volume boundaries during radical radiotherapy, and furthermore to develop strategies to reduce spatial variability. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with solitary T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were treated with a technique delivering 40 Gy/2 Gy in 20 fractions to the whole bladder with a concomitant boost to the bladder tumor of 20 Gy in 1 Gy fractions in an overall time of 4 weeks. CT scans were made weekly, immediately after treatment, and matched with the planning CT scan. Spatial variability of the tumor, as well as bladder volume and rectal diameter, were scored for each patient each week. Results: In 65% of patients, a part of the tumor appeared outside the planning target volume boundaries at least one time during the course of radiotherapy. No consistent relation of this variability with time was found. Bladder volumes and rectal diameters showed marked variability during the course of treatment. A large initial bladder volume and rectal diameter predicted a large volume variation and a large tumor spatial variability. Conclusion: In this study, a margin of 1.5 to 2 cm seemed to be inadequate in 65% of the patients with respect to spatial variability. Bladder volume and rectal diameter were found to be predictive for spatial variability of a bladder tumor during concomitant boost radiotherapy

  16. Influence of bladder and rectal volume on spatial variability of a bladder tumor during radical radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pos, Floris J; Koedooder, Kees; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Gonzalez Gonzalez, Dionisio

    2003-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the spatial variability of a bladder tumor relative to the planning target volume boundaries during radical radiotherapy, and furthermore to develop strategies to reduce spatial variability. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with solitary T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were treated with a technique delivering 40 Gy/2 Gy in 20 fractions to the whole bladder with a concomitant boost to the bladder tumor of 20 Gy in 1 Gy fractions in an overall time of 4 weeks. CT scans were made weekly, immediately after treatment, and matched with the planning CT scan. Spatial variability of the tumor, as well as bladder volume and rectal diameter, were scored for each patient each week. Results: In 65% of patients, a part of the tumor appeared outside the planning target volume boundaries at least one time during the course of radiotherapy. No consistent relation of this variability with time was found. Bladder volumes and rectal diameters showed marked variability during the course of treatment. A large initial bladder volume and rectal diameter predicted a large volume variation and a large tumor spatial variability. Conclusion: In this study, a margin of 1.5 to 2 cm seemed to be inadequate in 65% of the patients with respect to spatial variability. Bladder volume and rectal diameter were found to be predictive for spatial variability of a bladder tumor during concomitant boost radiotherapy.

  17. ULTRASOUND AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC DIAGNOSIS OF OPTIC NERVE TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Saakyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive examination was made in 93 patients, including 18 children, with tumors of the optic nerve (ON. Duplex ultrasound scanning was performed in 39 patients, of them there were 11 patients with ON gliomas and 28 with ON meningiomas. The specific computed tomographic and echographic signs of ON glioma and meningiomas were detected. The studies have shown that duplex ultrasound scanning and structural computed tomography of orbital sockets are highly informative complementary imaging procedures for ON tumors, which permits one to make their correct diagnosis, to specify surgical volume, and to plan adequate treatment.

  18. Neuroradiology of the normal and pathological anatomy of the rat brain. Pt. 2. Microangiographic investigations of the vascularisation of transplanted malignant brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, M; Weisser, G; Voigt, K; Mennel, H D

    1980-11-01

    70 BD-IX rats, in which chemically induced mixed gliomas have been transplanted intracerebrally, were investigated by microangiography. The pattern and the degree of tumor vascularisation of all animals was correlated with the histological findings. Dependent on the type of the tumor different localisations of tumor growth could be found: G XII-gliomas preferred the juxta-ventricular region and subarachnoid space whereas GL 2.2-gliomas mainly grew as solid intracerebral space occupying lesions. Microangiograms of all tumor stages from the 14th to 42nd day after transplantation revealed a typical vascular pattern consisting of lacunar glomerulose and netlike vessels. Further, necrosis, bleedings into the tumor, and irregularities of the capillary network could be demonstrated. The volume, age and vascularisation of the tumors are correlated and the results are discussed with regard to the principles of tumor growth and malignancy.

  19. Use of EF5 to Measure the Oxygen Level in Tumor Cells of Patients Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Malignant Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma

  20. Autocrine VEGF-VEGFR2-Neuropilin-1 signaling promotes glioma stem-like cell viability and tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamerlik, Petra; Lathia, Justin D; Rasmussen, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    Although vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is traditionally regarded as an endothelial cell protein, evidence suggests that VEGFRs may be expressed by cancer cells. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a lethal cancer characterized by florid vascularization and aberrantly...... elevated VEGF. Antiangiogenic therapy with the humanized VEGF antibody bevacizumab reduces GBM tumor growth; however, the clinical benefits are transient and invariably followed by tumor recurrence. In this study, we show that VEGFR2 is preferentially expressed on the cell surface of the CD133(+) human......, which is associated with VEGFR2-NRP1 recycling and a pool of active VEGFR2 within a cytosolic compartment of a subset of human GBM cells. Whereas bevacizumab failed to inhibit prosurvival effects of VEGFR2-mediated signaling, GSC viability under unperturbed or radiation-evoked stress conditions...

  1. Study on delineation of tumor volume of primary locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma after induction chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Jinhua; Dong Shi; Jin Feng; Wu Weili; Gan Jiaying; Chen Haixia; Li Yuanyuan; Gong Xiuyun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the delineation of gross tumor volume (GTV) in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (LANC) according to imageological changes before and after induction chemotherapy (IC) in order to decrease high dose area and protect normal tissue better. Methods: Between Mar 2010 to Jan 2011, 11 patients with LANC were enrolled and treated with TPF regimen followed by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy, target volumes were delineated based on fused CT imaging before and after IC following project determination. Tumor target volumes after and before IC were respectively delineated according to imaging tumor residues and were overlaid by CTV nx in order to ensure radical doses for the imaging tumor volume before IC, the resulting differences of tumor target volumes of IC before and after were measured and analyzed by paired t-test. Results: Before and after IC, the average volumes of GTV nx were respectively 44.72 cm 3 and 28.87 (t=3.89, P=0.003), the average volumes of GTV nd were respectively 32.76 cm 3 and 19.82 cm 3 (t=2.47, P=0.033), the volumes of maximum dose area in brainstem and spinal cord as well as eyeball decreased (t=2.93-4.59, all P<0.05). Conclusions: LANC treated by 3 cycle TPF regimen followed by IMRT with concurrent chemotherapy shows significant shrinkage of tumor volume. The volume of high dose region which caused by normally recovered tissues were decreased by re-delineation of target volume in brainstem and spinal cord as well as eyeball of CT images after IC. (authors)

  2. Tumor Volume Estimation and Quasi-Continuous Administration for Most Effective Bevacizumab Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sápi, Johanna; Kovács, Levente; Drexler, Dániel András; Kocsis, Pál; Gajári, Dávid; Sápi, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Bevacizumab is an exogenous inhibitor which inhibits the biological activity of human VEGF. Several studies have investigated the effectiveness of bevacizumab therapy according to different cancer types but these days there is an intense debate on its utility. We have investigated different methods to find the best tumor volume estimation since it creates the possibility for precise and effective drug administration with a much lower dose than in the protocol. We have examined C38 mouse colon adenocarcinoma and HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma. In both cases, three groups were compared in the experiments. The first group did not receive therapy, the second group received one 200 μg bevacizumab dose for a treatment period (protocol-based therapy), and the third group received 1.1 μg bevacizumab every day (quasi-continuous therapy). Tumor volume measurement was performed by digital caliper and small animal MRI. The mathematical relationship between MRI-measured tumor volume and mass was investigated to estimate accurate tumor volume using caliper-measured data. A two-dimensional mathematical model was applied for tumor volume evaluation, and tumor- and therapy-specific constants were calculated for the three different groups. The effectiveness of bevacizumab administration was examined by statistical analysis. In the case of C38 adenocarcinoma, protocol-based treatment did not result in significantly smaller tumor volume compared to the no treatment group; however, there was a significant difference between untreated mice and mice who received quasi-continuous therapy (p = 0.002). In the case of HT-29 adenocarcinoma, the daily treatment with one-twelfth total dose resulted in significantly smaller tumors than the protocol-based treatment (p = 0.038). When the tumor has a symmetrical, solid closed shape (typically without treatment), volume can be evaluated accurately from caliper-measured data with the applied two-dimensional mathematical model. Our results

  3. Iterative volume morphing and learning for mobile tumor based on 4DCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Songan; Wu, Huanmei; Sandison, George; Fang, Shiaofen

    2017-02-21

    During image-guided cancer radiation treatment, three-dimensional (3D) tumor volumetric information is important for treatment success. However, it is typically not feasible to image a patient's 3D tumor continuously in real time during treatment due to concern over excessive patient radiation dose. We present a new iterative morphing algorithm to predict the real-time 3D tumor volume based on time-resolved computed tomography (4DCT) acquired before treatment. An offline iterative learning process has been designed to derive a target volumetric deformation function from one breathing phase to another. Real-time volumetric prediction is performed to derive the target 3D volume during treatment delivery. The proposed iterative deformable approach for tumor volume morphing and prediction based on 4DCT is innovative because it makes three major contributions: (1) a novel approach to landmark selection on 3D tumor surfaces using a minimum bounding box; (2) an iterative morphing algorithm to generate the 3D tumor volume using mapped landmarks; and (3) an online tumor volume prediction strategy based on previously trained deformation functions utilizing 4DCT. The experimental performance showed that the maximum morphing deviations are 0.27% and 1.25% for original patient data and artificially generated data, which is promising. This newly developed algorithm and implementation will have important applications for treatment planning, dose calculation and treatment validation in cancer radiation treatment.

  4. Selective uptake of boronophenylalanine by glioma stem/progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Ting; Zhou, Youxin; Xie, Xueshun; Chen, Guilin; Li, Bin; Wei, Yongxin; Chen, Jinming; Huang, Qiang; Du, Ziwei

    2012-01-01

    The success of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) depends on the amount of boron in cells and the tumor/blood and tumor/(normal tissue) boron concentration ratios. For the first time, measurements of boron uptake in both stem/progenitor and differentiated glioma cells were performed along with measurements of boron biodistribution in suitable animal models. In glioma stem/progenitor cells, the selective accumulation of boronophenylalanine (BPA) was lower, and retention of boron after BPA removal was longer than in differentiated glioma cells in vitro. However, boron biodistribution was not statistically significantly different in mice with xenografts. - Highlights: ► Uptake of BPA was analyzed in stem/progenitor and differentiated glioma cells. ► Selective accumulation of BPA was lower in glioma stem/progenitor cells. ► Retention of boron after BPA removal was longer in glioma stem/progenitor cells. ► Boron biodistribution was not statistically different in mice with xenografts.

  5. Pseudo tumors of the lung after lung volume reduction surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oey, Inger F; Jeyapalan, Kanagaratnam; Entwisle, James J; Waller, David A

    2004-03-01

    We describe 2 patients who underwent lung volume reduction surgery, who postoperatively had computed tomographic scans that showed symptomatic mass lesions suggestive of malignancy and an inhaled foreign body. Investigations excluded these conditions with the remaining likely diagnosis of pseudotumor secondary to buttressing material. These potential sequelae of lung volume reduction surgery should be recognized in follow-up investigations.

  6. Grading of vestibular schwannomas and corresponding tumor volumes: ramifications for radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindermann, T; Schlegel, I

    2013-01-01

    Patients with vestibular schwannomas (VS) are either assigned to watchful waiting, microsurgical resection, or radiosurgery. Decision making on how to proceed is based on parameters such as age, tumor growth, loss of hearing, and the tumor's Koos grading. In order to correlate Koos grading with tumor volume, patient records of 235 patients with VS who underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) were retrospectively reviewed. From 1994 to 2009, 235 consecutive patients underwent GKRS for sporadic VS at the Zurich Gamma Knife Center. Median follow up was 62.8 ± 33.0 months. Of the 235 tumors, 32 (13.6 %) were graded Koos I with a volume of 0.25 ± 0.3 cc; 71 (30.2 %) were graded Koos II with a volume of 0.57 ± 0.54 cc; 70 (29.8 %) were graded Koos III with a volume of 1.82 ± 1.88 cc; and 62 (26.4 %) were graded Koos IV with a volume of 4.17 ± 2.75 cc. Tumor progression was defined as a volume increase > 20 % at 2 years or later following GKRS. Overall tumor progression occurred in 21/235 (8.9 %) patients at 3.4 ± 0.9 years. Tumor progression did not differ statistically significantly in the various Koos grades: 1/32 (3.1 %) patients with VS Koos Grade I, 7/71 (9.8 %) patients with VS Koos Grade II, 6/70 (8.6 %) patients with VS Koos Grade III, and 7/62 (11.3 %) patients with VS Koos Grade IV. To our knowledge, this is the first work correlating the various Koos grades of VS to their respective tumor volumes. In our patients, tumor volumes of VS Koos Grade IV were limited because all of our patients were eligible for radiosurgery. In our series, the outcome following GKRS for patients with VS Koos Grade IV tumors did not differ from patients with VS Koos Grades I-III. We therefore suggest to limit Koos Grade IV VS to tumor volumes 6 cc that may not be eligible for radiosurgery.

  7. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary.

  8. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary

  9. 5-Fluorouracil and 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) followed by hydroxyurea, misonidazole, and irradiation for brain stem gliomas: a pilot study of the Brain Tumor Research Center and the Childrens Cancer Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, V.A.; Edwards, M.S.; Wara, W.M.; Allen, J.; Ortega, J.; Vestnys, P.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-eight evaluable children with the diagnosis of brain stem glioma were treated with 5-fluorouracil and CCNU before posterior fossa irradiation (5500 rads); during irradiation, the children received hydroxyurea and misonidazole. The treatment was well tolerated, and minimal toxicity was produced. The median relapse-free survival was 32 weeks, and the median survival was 44 weeks. Analysis of covariates showed that, in patients between the ages of 2 and 19 years, survival was longest in the older children (P less than 0.02). Tumor histology, sex, extent of operation (if any), Karnofsky score, and radiation dose did not correlate with survival

  10. Overexpressed KDM5B is associated with the progression of glioma and promotes glioma cell growth via downregulating p21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Bin [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100038 (China); Hu, Zhiqiang, E-mail: zhiqhutg@126.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100038 (China); Huang, Hui; Zhu, Guangtong; Xiao, Zhiyong [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100038 (China); Wan, Weiqing; Zhang, Peng; Jia, Wang; Zhang, Liwei [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tian Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100050 (China)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • KDM5B is overexpressed in glioma samples. • KDM5B stimulated proliferation of glioma cells. • Inhibition of p21contributes to KDM5B-induced proliferation. - Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Upregulation of lysine (K)-specific demethylase 5B (KDM5B) has been reported in a variety of malignant tumors. However, the impact of KDM5B in glioma remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic value of KDM5B in glioma. In clinical glioma samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly upregulated in cancer lesions compared with normal brain tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with glioma and higher KDM5B expression tend to have shorter overall survival time. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in glioma cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted glioma proliferation partly via regulation of the expression of p21. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in glioma and may be a potential therapeutic target for glioma management.

  11. Synergistic effect of cisplatin and synchrotron irradiation on F98 gliomas growing in nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricard, Clement; Fernandez, Manuel [Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Requardt, Herwig [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Wion, Didier [Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Vial, Jean-Claude [Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire de Physique, St Martin d’Hères (France); Segebarth, Christoph; Sanden, Boudewijn van der, E-mail: boudewijn.vandersanden@ujf-grenoble.fr [Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France)

    2013-09-01

    Synchrotron photoactivation therapy of cisplatin relies on a synergistic effect of synchrotron X-rays and platinum and leads to tumor-cell-killing effects and reduction of the tumor blood perfusion. Among brain tumors, glioblastoma multiforme appears as one of the most aggressive forms of cancer with poor prognosis and no curative treatment available. Recently, a new kind of radio-chemotherapy has been developed using synchrotron irradiation for the photoactivation of molecules with high-Z elements such as cisplatin (PAT-Plat). This protocol showed a cure of 33% of rats bearing the F98 glioma but the efficiency of the treatment was only measured in terms of overall survival. Here, characterization of the effects of the PAT-Plat on tumor volume and tumor blood perfusion are proposed. Changes in these parameters may predict the overall survival. Firstly, changes in tumor growth of the F98 glioma implanted in the hindlimb of nude mice after the PAT-Plat treatment and its different modalities have been characterized. Secondly, the effects of the treatment on tumor blood perfusion have been observed by intravital two-photon microscopy. Cisplatin alone had no detectable effect on the tumor volume. A reduction of tumor growth was measured after a 15 Gy synchrotron irradiation, but the whole therapy (15 Gy irradiation + cisplatin) showed the largest decrease in tumor growth, indicating a synergistic effect of both synchrotron irradiation and cisplatin treatment. A high number of unperfused vessels (52%) were observed in the peritumoral area in comparison with untreated controls. In the PAT-Plat protocol the transient tumor growth reduction may be due to synergistic interactions of tumor-cell-killing effects and reduction of the tumor blood perfusion.

  12. Predictive value of brain SPECT with 99 technetium - MIBI for differentiation of histologic grade brain gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    León Castellón, Roberto; Martín Escuela, Juan Miguel; López Díaz, Ing. Adlin; Salva Camaño, Silvia; Gómez Viera, DrC. Nelson; San Pedro, Aley Palau; Castro Jiménez, Mayté

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of primary tumors of the nervous system remain difficult and are a challenge to be addressed in a multidisciplinary way. In order to determine the usefulness of brain SPECT 99 Tc MIBI to differentiate histologic grade brain gliomas - Frequently brain tumors - they were studied 68 patients with this technique. A dynamic study first step in AP and lateral view was performed, and a SPECT at 20 minutes post-administration and at 2 hours late views. the post-surgical histological study of injuries was used as control. several imaging parameters such as the absolute activity of 99m Tc-MIBI were calculated both early and late phase, cortex contralateral tumor rates; pituitary tumor; choroid plexus tumor and Reason Late / Early phase tumor index / contralateral cortex tumor volume functional phase, the volume concentration of MIBI activity in the tumor and the retention rate of the radiopharmaceutical. Of the 68 patients studied, 11 were high-grade tumors and 57 low grade. The cortex contralateral tumor in late stage index showed a negative satisfactory sensitivity of 98.6% and specificity 77.1%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 48.2% and (NPV) of 99.8%. The reason late stage / early in the index tumor / contralateral cortex showed values ​​in turn 96.3%, 98.7%, 98.8% and 98.8% sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV respectively. The retention rate showed a 99% sensitivity, 89% specificity and PPV, NPV of 95% and 99% respectively. Conclusion: The combination cortex contralateral tumor rate in late stage, the reason late stage / early stage tumor index / contralateral cortex and the retention rate of the radiopharmaceutical are the most useful parameters to predict histologic grade of brain gliomas. (author)

  13. Preliminary study of the internal margin of the gross tumor volume in thoracic esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jiancheng; Pan, Jianji; Wang, Linhua; Zhao, Yunhui; Liu, Di; Chen, Cheng; Zhang, He Ping; Wang, Xiaoliang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - To measure the displacement of the tumor of the gross tumor volume (GTV) of thoracic esophageal cancer in the calm states of end-inspiration and end-expiration for determining the internal margin of the GTV (IGTV). Methods. - Twenty-two patients with thoracic esophageal cancer who were unable to undergo surgery were identified in our hospital. The patients received radiotherapy. By using 16-slice spiral computed tomography (CT), we acquired the calm states of end-inspiration and end-expiration. The displacement and volume changes in tumor target volume were measured, and the changes were analyzed to determine if these were associated with the tidal volume and the location and length of the target volume V. In the end, we analyzed the displacement of tumor target volume and calculated the internal margin of the GTV by empirical formula. Results. - The average tidal volume was 463.6 ml. The average GTV at end-inspiration was 33.3 ml and at end-expiration was 33.35 ml. Three was not any significant between two groups (T -0.034, P > 0.05). The IGTV (X-axis direction) was 3.09 mm for the right sector and 4.08 mm for the left border; the IGTV (Z-axis direction) was 3.96 mm for the anterior border and 2.83 mm for the posterior border; and the IGTV (Y-axis direction) was 7.31 mm for the upper boundary (head direction) and 10.16 mm for the lower boundary (feet direction). The motion of the GTV showed no significant correlation with the tidal volume of patients and the length of the tumor, but in relation to the tumor location, the displacement of the lower thoracic and the middle thoracic target volumes occurred in the direction of the anterior and right, which were not significantly different (T = 0.859, 0.229, P > 0.05) The significant differences were observed for the other directions (P < 0.05). Conclusions. - Because of respiratory and organ movements, the displacement of the tumor target volume was different in all directions. Therefore, we recommend that

  14. Histogram analysis of diffusion kurtosis imaging estimates for in vivo assessment of 2016 WHO glioma grades: A cross-sectional observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Johann-Martin; Schittenhelm, Jens; Brendle, Cornelia; Bender, Benjamin; Bier, Georg; Skardelly, Marco; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Castaneda Vega, Salvador; Ernemann, Ulrike; Klose, Uwe

    2017-10-01

    To assess the diagnostic performance of histogram analysis of diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) maps for in vivo assessment of the 2016 World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System (2016 CNS WHO) integrated glioma grades. Seventy-seven patients with histopathologically-confirmed glioma who provided written informed consent were retrospectively assessed between 01/2014 and 03/2017 from a prospective trial approved by the local institutional review board. Ten histogram parameters of mean kurtosis (MK) and mean diffusivity (MD) metrics from DKI were independently assessed by two blinded physicians from a volume of interest around the entire solid tumor. One-way ANOVA was used to compare MK and MD histogram parameter values between 2016 CNS WHO-based tumor grades. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed on MK and MD histogram parameters for significant results. The 25th, 50th, 75th, and 90th percentiles of MK and average MK showed significant differences between IDH1/2 wild-type gliomas, IDH1/2 mutated gliomas, and oligodendrogliomas with chromosome 1p/19q loss of heterozygosity and IDH1/2 mutation (pHistogram analysis of DKI can stratify gliomas according to the integrated approach of 2016 CNS WHO. The 50th (median), 75th , and the 90th percentiles showed the highest diagnostic performance. However, the average MK is also robust and feasible in routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of a new software tool for the automatic volume calculation of hepatic tumors. First results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, S.; Mildenberger, P.; Pitton, M.; Thelen, M.; Schenk, A.; Bourquain, H.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: computed tomography has become the preferred method in detecting liver carcinomas. The introduction of spiral CT added volumetric assessment of intrahepatic tumors, which was unattainable in the clinical routine with incremental CT due to complex planimetric revisions and excessive computing time. In an ongoing clinical study, a new software tool was tested for the automatic detection of tumor volume and the time needed for this procedure. Materials and methods: we analyzed patients suffering from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). All patients underwent treatment with repeated transcatheter chemoembolization of the hepatic arteria. The volumes of the HCC lesions detected in CT were measured with the new software tool in HepaVison (MeVis, Germany). The results were compared with manual planimetric calculation of the volume performed by three independent radiologists. Results: our first results in 16 patients show a correlation between the automatically and the manually calculated volumes (up to a difference of 2 ml) of 96.8%. While the manual method of analyzing the volume of a lesion requires 2.5 minutes on average, the automatic method merely requires about 30 seconds of user interaction time. Conclusion: These preliminary results show a good correlation between automatic and manual calculations of the tumor volume. The new software tool requires less time for accurate determination of the tumor volume and can be applied in the daily clinical routine. (orig.) [de

  16. Estimation of tumor volume and its prognostic significance to study the biological behavior of carcinoma of cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leelavathi Dawson

    2016-01-01

    Results: The median age of the patients in this group was 47.5 years, with a range of 30–80 years. The major histological type of carcinoma among 40 cases is squamous cell carcinoma (SCC (in 90% of cases, and 10% had adenocarcinoma. Pathological staging of the carcinoma cervix showed stage Ib, IIa, IIb, and IVa (35%, 20%, 40%, and 5%. Tumor volume estimated on pathological specimens of 40 cases ranged from 230 cumm to 49,760 cumm with a mean of 14,844 cumm. 12 (30% cases had tumor volume more than 15,000 cumm, 12 (30% cases had tumor volume <5000 cumm and 16 (40% cases had tumor volume between 5000 and 15,000 cumm. 17% of the tumors with tumor volume <5000 cumm showed lymph node metastases, whereas 67% (out of 12cases of cases with tumor volume more than 15,000 cumm showed lymph node metastases. 67% of the tumors with tumor volume <5000 cumm showed 0/4 organs involvement, whereas all cases with tumor volume more than 15,000 cumm showed more than one organ involvement among vagina, uterus, parametrium or bladder/rectum. Fibronectin positivity was seen in 22 out of 44 cases (55%. Macrophages were seen surrounding the group of tumor cells by LN5 immunostaining. Conclusion: Tumor volume can be considered as an independent prognostic factor to assess the spread of the tumor. Cases with tumor volume <5000 cumm show low risk in terms of parametrial involvement and lymph node metastasis and those with tumor volume more than 15,000 cumm showed more organ spread. Fibronectin positivity carries some importance in low-risk cases. For macrophages, further detailed study needs to be carried out.

  17. Ring enhancement in recurrent gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogashiwa, Motohide; Takeuchi, Kazuo; Akai, Keiichiro

    1981-01-01

    The clinical courses,CT scans, and postmortem reports for 6 glioma patients treated by surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy were reviewed. They underwent reoperation and/or retreatment with radiation or chemotherapy for recurrent tumors. CT scans taken at the time of recurrence or about one month prior to death showed ring enhancement of varied size and form after intensive treatment. The cases were examined histologically in correlation with the CT features and divided into two groups based on the pathological findings in the centers surrounded by areas of ring enhancement. The 1st group demonstrated a large necrotic area in the center, and the 2nd group, a cystic tumor. Tumor cells were found to have spread throughout the high-density areas around the necrotic area or cyst. However, gross differentiation between tumor and necrosis was difficult. In addition to an increase in cellularity, all cases demonstrated vascular proliferation, and dilatation of vessels in the sulci or sulci adjacent to gyri invaded by the tumor. The contrast enhancement corresponded well with the vascular proliferation in these areas. It is concluded that vascular proliferation or dilatation of vessels in and around the tumor is an important factor in demonstrating high-density areas in ring enhancement, while a cyst or necrosis in the tumor center is revealed as a low-density area in the CT scan of recurrent gliomas. (author)

  18. Ring enhancement in recurrent gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogashiwa, M; Takeuchi, K; Akai, K [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1981-08-01

    The clinical courses,CT scans, and postmortem reports for 6 glioma patients treated by surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy were reviewed. They underwent reoperation and/or retreatment with radiation or chemotherapy for recurrent tumors. CT scans taken at the time of recurrence or about one month prior to death showed ring enhancement of varied size and form after intensive treatment. The cases were examined histologically in correlation with the CT features and divided into two groups based on the pathological findings in the centers surrounded by areas of ring enhancement. The 1st group demonstrated a large necrotic area in the center, and the 2nd group, a cystic tumor. Tumor cells were found to have spread throughout the high-density areas around the necrotic area or cyst. However, gross differentiation between tumor and necrosis was difficult. In addition to an increase in cellularity, all cases demonstrated vascular proliferation, and dilatation of vessels in the sulci or sulci adjacent to gyri invaded by the tumor. The contrast enhancement corresponded well with the vascular proliferation in these areas. It is concluded that vascular proliferation or dilatation of vessels in and around the tumor is an important factor in demonstrating high-density areas in ring enhancement, while a cyst or necrosis in the tumor center is revealed as a low-density area in the CT scan of recurrent gliomas.

  19. Co-clinical quantitative tumor volume imaging in ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishino, Mizuki, E-mail: Mizuki_Nishino@DFCI.HARVARD.EDU [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Sacher, Adrian G.; Gandhi, Leena; Chen, Zhao; Akbay, Esra [Department of Medical Oncology and Department of Medicine Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Fedorov, Andriy; Westin, Carl F.; Hatabu, Hiroto [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Johnson, Bruce E.; Hammerman, Peter; Wong, Kwok-kin [Department of Medical Oncology and Department of Medicine Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Role of co-clinical studies in precision cancer medicine is increasingly recognized. • This study compared tumor volume in co-clinical trials of ALK-rearranged NSCLC. • Similarities and differences of tumor volume changes in mice and humans were noted. • The study provides insights to optimize murine co-clinical trial designs. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate and compare the volumetric tumor burden changes during crizotinib therapy in mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Volumetric tumor burden was quantified on serial imaging studies in 8 bitransgenic mice with ALK-rearranged adenocarcinoma treated with crizotinib, and in 33 human subjects with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. The volumetric tumor burden changes and the time to maximal response were compared between mice and humans. Results: The median tumor volume decrease (%) at the maximal response was −40.4% (range: −79.5%–+11.7%) in mice, and −72.9% (range: −100%–+72%) in humans (Wilcoxon p = 0.03). The median time from the initiation of therapy to maximal response was 6 weeks in mice, and 15.7 weeks in humans. Overall volumetric response rate was 50% in mice and 97% in humans. Spider plots of tumor volume changes during therapy demonstrated durable responses in the human cohort, with a median time on therapy of 13.1 months. Conclusion: The present study described an initial attempt to evaluate quantitative tumor burden changes in co-clinical imaging studies of genomically-matched mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. Differences are noted in the degree of maximal volume response between the two cohorts in this well-established paradigm of targeted therapy, indicating a need for further studies to optimize co-clinical trial design and interpretation.

  20. Co-clinical quantitative tumor volume imaging in ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Mizuki; Sacher, Adrian G.; Gandhi, Leena; Chen, Zhao; Akbay, Esra; Fedorov, Andriy; Westin, Carl F.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Johnson, Bruce E.; Hammerman, Peter; Wong, Kwok-kin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Role of co-clinical studies in precision cancer medicine is increasingly recognized. • This study compared tumor volume in co-clinical trials of ALK-rearranged NSCLC. • Similarities and differences of tumor volume changes in mice and humans were noted. • The study provides insights to optimize murine co-clinical trial designs. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate and compare the volumetric tumor burden changes during crizotinib therapy in mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Volumetric tumor burden was quantified on serial imaging studies in 8 bitransgenic mice with ALK-rearranged adenocarcinoma treated with crizotinib, and in 33 human subjects with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. The volumetric tumor burden changes and the time to maximal response were compared between mice and humans. Results: The median tumor volume decrease (%) at the maximal response was −40.4% (range: −79.5%–+11.7%) in mice, and −72.9% (range: −100%–+72%) in humans (Wilcoxon p = 0.03). The median time from the initiation of therapy to maximal response was 6 weeks in mice, and 15.7 weeks in humans. Overall volumetric response rate was 50% in mice and 97% in humans. Spider plots of tumor volume changes during therapy demonstrated durable responses in the human cohort, with a median time on therapy of 13.1 months. Conclusion: The present study described an initial attempt to evaluate quantitative tumor burden changes in co-clinical imaging studies of genomically-matched mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. Differences are noted in the degree of maximal volume response between the two cohorts in this well-established paradigm of targeted therapy, indicating a need for further studies to optimize co-clinical trial design and interpretation.

  1. Beyond Alkylating Agents for Gliomas: Quo Vadimus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puduvalli, Vinay K; Chaudhary, Rekha; McClugage, Samuel G; Markert, James

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in therapies have yielded notable success in terms of improved survival in several cancers. However, such treatments have failed to improve outcome in patients with gliomas for whom surgery followed by radiation therapy and chemotherapy with alkylating agents remain the standard of care. Genetic and epigenetic studies have helped identify several alterations specific to gliomas. Attempts to target these altered pathways have been unsuccessful due to various factors, including tumor heterogeneity, adaptive resistance of tumor cells, and limitations of access across the blood-brain barrier. Novel therapies that circumvent such limitations have been the focus of intense study and include approaches such as immunotherapy, targeting of signaling hubs and metabolic pathways, and use of biologic agents. Immunotherapeutic approaches including tumor-targeted vaccines, immune checkpoint blockade, antibody-drug conjugates, and chimeric antigen receptor-expressing cell therapies are in various stages of clinical trials. Similarly, identification of key metabolic pathways or converging hubs of signaling pathways that are tumor specific have yielded novel targets for therapy of gliomas. In addition, the failure of conventional therapies against gliomas has led to a growing interest among patients in the use of alternative therapies, which in turn has necessitated developing evidence-based approaches to the application of such therapies in clinical studies. The development of these novel approaches bears potential for providing breakthroughs in treatment of more meaningful and improved outcomes for patients with gliomas.

  2. Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood brain stem glioma presents as a diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG; a fast-growing tumor that is difficult to treat and has a poor prognosis) or a focal glioma (grows more slowly, is easier to treat, and has a better prognosis). Learn about the diagnosis, cellular classification, staging, treatment, and clinical trials for pediatric brain stem glioma in this expert-reviewed summary.

  3. Artifacts in conventional computed tomography (CT) and free breathing four-dimensional CT induce uncertainty in gross tumor volume determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Gitte Fredberg; Nygaard, Ditte Eklund; Af Rosenschöld, Per Munck

    2011-01-01

    was to compare delineated gross tumor volume (GTV) sizes in 3DCT, 4DCT, and BHCT scans of patients with lung tumors. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A total of 36 patients with 46 tumors referred for stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumors were included. All patients underwent positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, 4DCT...

  4. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate Measured by Magnetic Resonance Volumetry Correlated With Pathologic Tumor Response of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Hong, Yong Sang; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Ji Won; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlates with the pathologic tumor response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study included 405 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3-T4) who had undergone preoperative CRT and radical proctectomy. The tumor volume was measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry before and after CRT but before surgery. We analyzed the correlation between the TVRR and the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and tumor regression grade (TRG). Downstaging was defined as ypStage 0-I (ypT0-T2N0M0), and the TRG proposed by Dworak et al. was used. Results: The mean TVRR was 65.0% ± 22.3%. Downstaging and complete regression occurred in 167 (41.2%) and 58 (14.3%) patients, respectively. The TVRRs according to ypT classification (ypT0-T2 vs. ypT3-T4), ypN classification (ypN0 vs. ypN1-N2), downstaging (ypStage 0-I vs. ypStage II-III), good regression (TRG 3-4 vs. TRG 1-2), and complete regression (TRG 4 vs. TRG 1-3) were all significantly different (p 80%), the rates of ypT0-T2, ypN0, downstaging, and good regression were all significantly greater for patients with a TVRR of ≥60%, as was the complete regression rate for patients with a TVRR >80% (p <.05). Conclusion: The TVRR measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlated significantly with the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and TRG after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer.

  5. Differentiation of grade II/III and grade IV glioma by combining ''T1 contrast-enhanced brain perfusion imaging'' and susceptibility-weighted quantitative imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Jitender; Gupta, Pradeep Kumar; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Sahoo, Prativa; Singh, Anup; Patir, Rana; Ahlawat, Suneeta; Beniwal, Manish; Thennarasu, K.; Santosh, Vani

    2018-01-01

    MRI is a useful method for discriminating low- and high-grade glioma using perfusion MRI and susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of T1-perfusion MRI and SWI in discriminating among grade II, III, and IV gliomas. T1-perfusion MRI was used to measure relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in 129 patients with glioma (70 grade IV, 33 grade III, and 26 grade II tumors). SWI was also used to measure the intratumoral susceptibility signal intensity (ITSS) scores for each tumor in these patients. rCBV and ITSS values were compared to seek differences between grade II vs. grade III, grade III vs. grade IV, and grade III+II vs. grade IV tumors. Significant differences in rCBV values of the three grades of the tumors were noted and pairwise comparisons showed significantly higher rCBV values in grade IV tumors as compared to grade III tumors, and similarly increased rCBV was seen in the grade III tumors as compared to grade II tumors (p < 0.001). Grade IV gliomas showed significantly higher ITSS scores on SWI as compared to grade III tumors (p < 0.001) whereas insignificant difference was seen on comparing ITSS scores of grade III with grade II tumors. Combining the rCBV and ITSS resulted in significant improvement in the discrimination of grade III from grade IV tumors. The combination of rCBV values derived from T1-perfusion MRI and SWI derived ITSS scores improves the diagnostic accuracy for discrimination of grade III from grade IV gliomas. (orig.)

  6. Differentiation of grade II/III and grade IV glioma by combining ''T1 contrast-enhanced brain perfusion imaging'' and susceptibility-weighted quantitative imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Jitender [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Neuroimaging and Interventional Radiology, Bangalore (India); Gupta, Pradeep Kumar; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar [Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Department of Radiology and Imaging, Gurugram (India); Sahoo, Prativa [Philips Health System, Philips India Limited, Bangalore (India); Beckman Research Institute, Mathematical Oncology, Duarte, CA (United States); Singh, Anup [Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Center for Biomedical Engineering, Delhi (India); Patir, Rana [Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Department of Neurosurgery, Gurugram (India); Ahlawat, Suneeta [Fortis Memorial Research Institute, SRL Diagnostics, Gurugram (India); Beniwal, Manish [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Department of Neurosurgery, Bangalore (India); Thennarasu, K. [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Department of Biostatistics, Bangalore (India); Santosh, Vani [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Department of Neuropathology, Bangalore (India)

    2018-01-15

    MRI is a useful method for discriminating low- and high-grade glioma using perfusion MRI and susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of T1-perfusion MRI and SWI in discriminating among grade II, III, and IV gliomas. T1-perfusion MRI was used to measure relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in 129 patients with glioma (70 grade IV, 33 grade III, and 26 grade II tumors). SWI was also used to measure the intratumoral susceptibility signal intensity (ITSS) scores for each tumor in these patients. rCBV and ITSS values were compared to seek differences between grade II vs. grade III, grade III vs. grade IV, and grade III+II vs. grade IV tumors. Significant differences in rCBV values of the three grades of the tumors were noted and pairwise comparisons showed significantly higher rCBV values in grade IV tumors as compared to grade III tumors, and similarly increased rCBV was seen in the grade III tumors as compared to grade II tumors (p < 0.001). Grade IV gliomas showed significantly higher ITSS scores on SWI as compared to grade III tumors (p < 0.001) whereas insignificant difference was seen on comparing ITSS scores of grade III with grade II tumors. Combining the rCBV and ITSS resulted in significant improvement in the discrimination of grade III from grade IV tumors. The combination of rCBV values derived from T1-perfusion MRI and SWI derived ITSS scores improves the diagnostic accuracy for discrimination of grade III from grade IV gliomas. (orig.)

  7. Multi-slice CT three dimensional volume measurement of tumors and livers in hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yuanlong; Li Liangcai; Tang Binghang; Hu Zemin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the accuracy of multi-slice CT (MSCT) three dimensional (3D) volume measurement of tumors and livers in hepatocellular carcinoma cases by using immersion method as the standard. Methods: (1) The volume of 25 porkling livers was measured using immersion method in experiment group in vitro. Then the models were built according to Matsumoto's method and CT scanning and special software were used to measure the volume of the livers. (2) The volume of the tumors in 25 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma was measured using diameter measurement method and special volume measurement software (tissue measurements). Two tumors of them were measured respectively using MSCT 3D measurement, diameter measurement before the operation and immersion method after the operation. The data of the two groups were examined using pairing t test. Results: (1) The volume range of 25 porkling livers was 68.50-1150.10 ml using immersion method and 69.78-1069.97 ml using MSCT 3D measurement. There was no significant difference of the data in these two groups using t-test (t=1.427, P>0.05). (2) The volume range of 25 hepatocellular tumors was 395.16-2747.7 ml using diameter measurement and 203.10-1463.19 ml using MSCT 3D measurement before the operation. There was significant difference of the data in these two groups using t-test (t=7.689, P<0.001). In 2 ablated tumors, 1 case's volume was (21.75±0.60) ml using MSCT 3D measurement and 33.73 ml using diameter measurement before the operation and 21.50 ml using immersion measurement after the operation. The other case's volume was (696.13±5.30) ml using MSCT 3D measurement and 1323.51 ml using diameter measurement before the operation and 685.50 ml using immersion measurement after the operation. Conclusion: MSCT 3D volume measurement can accurately measure the volume of tumor and liver and has important clinical application value. There is no significant difference between MSCT 3D volume measurement and immersion method

  8. Early effects of boron neutron capture therapy on rat glioma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, N.; Akai, F.; Fukawa, N.; Taneda, M.; Ono, K.; Suzuki, M.

    2006-01-01

    Early effects of boron neutron capture therapy on malignant gliomas are characterized by reduction of the enhanced area regression of the peritumoral edema radiologically. The aim of this study is to investigate the early histological changes of tumors and inflammatory cells after BNCT in the rat brain. The rats were treated with BNCT using boronophenyialanine (BPA) 7 days after implantation of C6 glioma cells. The tumors were assessed their sizes and configurations with magnetic resonance imaging, then killed 4 days after BNCT. The mean tumor volumes were 39mm 3 in BNCT-treated group, and 138 mm 3 in the control group. In the histological examination, tumors of the BNCT group showed less pleomorphic appearance with atypical nuclei and mitotic figures, compared with the control group. Necrosis and edematous changes in the neuropile were negligible. There existed remnant tumors adjacent to the lateral ventricle. The reactions of the inflammatory cells were examined with ED-1 of macrophage marker. ED-1 positive cells and their processes were reduced in the marginal area of tumor in the BNCT group. BNCT reduce the tumor progression by suppression of the proliferation. Inhibition of the activated macrophages may reduce peritumoral edema in early phase. (author)

  9. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging of intra-axial brain tumours: differentiation of high-grade gliomas from primary CNS lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, Peter; Xyda, Argyro; Knauth, Michael; Klotz, Ernst; Tronnier, Volker; Hartmann, Marius

    2010-01-01

    Perfusion computed tomography (PCT) allows to quantitatively assess haemodynamic characteristics of brain tissue. We investigated if different brain tumor types can be distinguished from each other using Patlak analysis of PCT data. PCT data from 43 patients with brain tumours were analysed with a commercial implementation of the Patlak method. Four patients had low-grade glioma (WHO II), 31 patients had glioblastoma (WHO IV) and eight patients had intracerebral lymphoma. Tumour regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn in a morphological image and automatically transferred to maps of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and permeability (K Trans ). Mean values were calculated, group differences were tested using Wilcoxon and Mann Whitney U-tests. In comparison with normal parenchyma, low-grade gliomas showed no significant difference of perfusion parameters (p > 0.05), whereas high-grade gliomas demonstrated significantly higher values (p Trans , p Trans values compared with unaffected cerebral parenchyma (p = 0.0078) but no elevation of CBV. High-grade gliomas show significant higher CBV values than lymphomas (p = 0.0078). PCT allows to reliably classify gliomas and lymphomas based on quantitative measurements of CBV and K Trans . (orig.)

  10. Genome-wide association study of glioma subtypes identifies specific differences in genetic susceptibility to glioblastoma and non-glioblastoma tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melin, Beatrice S; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have transformed our understanding of glioma susceptibility, but individual studies have had limited power to identify risk loci. We performed a meta-analysis of existing GWAS and two new GWAS, which totaled 12,496 cases and 18,190 controls. We identified fi...

  11. Contemporary management of high-grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Hao-Wen; Morgan, Erin R; Mason, Warren P

    2018-01-01

    High-grade gliomas, including glioblastoma, are the most common malignant brain tumors in adults. Despite intensive efforts to develop new therapies for these diseases, treatment options remain limited and prognosis is poor. Recently, there have been important advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of glioma, leading to refinements in our diagnostic and management approach. There is new evidence to guide the treatment of elderly patients. A multitude of new agents have been investigated, including targeted therapies, immunotherapeutics and tumor-treating fields. This review summarizes the key findings from this research, and presents a perspective on future opportunities to advance the field.

  12. The combination of cannabidiol and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol enhances the anticancer effects of radiation in an orthotopic murine glioma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Katherine A; Dalgleish, Angus G; Liu, Wai M

    2014-12-01

    High-grade glioma is one of the most aggressive cancers in adult humans and long-term survival rates are very low as standard treatments for glioma remain largely unsuccessful. Cannabinoids have been shown to specifically inhibit glioma growth as well as neutralize oncogenic processes such as angiogenesis. In an attempt to improve treatment outcome, we have investigated the effect of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) both alone and in combination with radiotherapy in a number of glioma cell lines (T98G, U87MG, and GL261). Cannabinoids were used in two forms, pure (P) and as a botanical drug substance (BDS). Results demonstrated a duration- and dose-dependent reduction in cell viability with each cannabinoid and suggested that THC-BDS was more efficacious than THC-P, whereas, conversely, CBD-P was more efficacious than CBD-BDS. Median effect analysis revealed all combinations to be hyperadditive [T98G 48-hour combination index (CI) at FU50, 0.77-1.09]. Similarly, pretreating cells with THC-P and CBD-P together for 4 hours before irradiation increased their radiosensitivity when compared with pretreating with either of the cannabinoids individually. The increase in radiosensitivity was associated with an increase in markers of autophagy and apoptosis. These in vitro results were recapitulated in an orthotopic murine model for glioma, which showed dramatic reductions in tumor volumes when both cannabinoids were used with irradiation (day 21: 5.5 ± 2.2 mm(3) vs. 48.7 ± 24.9 mm(3) in the control group; P < 0.01). Taken together, our data highlight the possibility that these cannabinoids can prime glioma cells to respond better to ionizing radiation, and suggest a potential clinical benefit for glioma patients by using these two treatment modalities. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Implant volume as a prognostic variable in brachytherapy decision-making for malignant gliomas stratified by the RTOG recursive partitioning analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Zamorano, Lucia; Stitt, Larry W.; Fontanesi, James; Levin, Kenneth J.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: When an initial retrospective review of malignant glioma patients (MG) undergoing brachytherapy was carried out using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) criteria, it revealed that glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cases benefit the most from implant. In the present study, we focused exclusively on these GBM patients stratified by RPA survival class and looked at the relationship between survival and implanted target volume, to distinguish the prognostic value of volume in general and for a given GBM class. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 1998, 75 MG patients were treated with surgery, external beam radiation, and stereotactic iodine-125 (I-125) implant. Of these, 53 patients (70.7%) had GBMs, with 52 (98%) having target volume (TV) data for analysis. Stratification by RPA criteria showed 12, 26, 13, and 1 patients in classes III to VI, respectively. For analysis purposes, classes V and VI were merged. There were 27 (51.9%) male and 25 (48.1%) female patients. Mean age was 57.5 years (range 14-79). Median Karnofsky performance status (KPS) was 90 (range 50-100). Median follow-up time was 11 months (range 2-79). Results: At analysis, 18 GBM patients (34.6%) were alive and 34 (65.4%) were dead. Two-year and 5-year survivals were 42% and 17.5%, respectively, with a median survival time (MST) of 16 months. Two-year survivals and MSTs for the implanted GBM patients compared to the RTOG database were as follows: 74% vs. 35% and 28 months vs. 17.9 months for class III; 32% vs. 15% and 16 months vs. 11.1 months for class IV; 29% vs. 6% and 11 months vs. 8.9 months for class V/VI. Mean implanted TV was 15.5 cc (range 0.8-78), which corresponds to a spherical implant diameter of 3.1 cm. Plotting survival as a function of 5-cc TV increments suggested a trend toward poorer survival as the implanted volume increases. The impact of incremental changes in TV on survival within a given RPA class of GBMs was compared to the

  14. Lung Volume Reduction After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors: Potential Application to Emphysema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkley, Michael S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Shrager, Joseph B. [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Leung, Ann N. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Popat, Rita [Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Trakul, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Atwood, Todd F.; Chaudhuri, Aadel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABR and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). Results: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, −0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, −3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r{sup 2}=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r{sup 2}=0.47, P<.0001). Conclusions: We identified a dose-volume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent across

  15. Identification of molecular pathways facilitating glioma cell invasion in situ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ido Nevo

    Full Text Available Gliomas are mostly incurable secondary to their diffuse infiltrative nature. Thus, specific therapeutic targeting of invasive glioma cells is an attractive concept. As cells exit the tumor mass and infiltrate brain parenchyma, they closely interact with a changing micro-environmental landscape that sustains tumor cell invasion. In this study, we used a unique microarray profiling approach on a human glioma stem cell (GSC xenograft model to explore gene expression changes in situ in Invading Glioma Cells (IGCs compared to tumor core, as well as changes in host cells residing within the infiltrated microenvironment relative to the unaffected cortex. IGCs were found to have reduced expression of genes within the extracellular matrix compartment, and genes involved in cell adhesion, cell polarity and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT processes. The infiltrated microenvironment showed activation of wound repair and tissue remodeling networks. We confirmed by protein analysis the downregulation of EMT and polarity related genes such as CD44 and PARD3 in IGCs, and EFNB3, a tissue-remodeling agent enriched at the infiltrated microenvironment. OLIG2, a proliferation regulator and glioma progenitor cell marker upregulated in IGCs was found to function in enhancing migration and stemness of GSCs. Overall, our results unveiled a more comprehensive picture of the complex and dynamic cell autonomous and tumor-host interactive pathways of glioma invasion than has been previously demonstrated. This suggests targeting of multiple pathways at the junction of invading tumor and microenvironment as a viable option for glioma therapy.

  16. Loss of heterozygosity of TRIM3 in malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulay, Jean-Louis; Stiefel, Urs; Taylor, Elisabeth; Dolder, Béatrice; Merlo, Adrian; Hirth, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are frequent primary brain tumors associated with poor prognosis and very limited response to conventional chemo- and radio-therapies. Besides sharing common growth features with other types of solid tumors, gliomas are highly invasive into adjacent brain tissue, which renders them particularly aggressive and their surgical resection inefficient. Therefore, insights into glioma formation are of fundamental interest in order to provide novel molecular targets for diagnostic purposes and potential anti-cancer drugs. Human Tripartite motif protein 3 (TRIM3) encodes a structural homolog of Drosophila brain tumor (brat) implicated in progenitor cell proliferation control and cancer stem cell suppression. TRIM3 is located within the loss of allelic heterozygosity (LOH) hotspot of chromosome segment 11p15.5, indicating a potential role in tumor suppression. ... Here we analyze 70 primary human gliomas of all types and grades and report somatic deletion mapping as well as single nucleotide polymorphism analysis together with quantitative real-time PCR of chromosome segment 11p15.5. Our analysis identifies LOH in 17 cases (24%) of primary human glioma which defines a common 130 kb-wide interval within the TRIM3 locus as a minimal area of loss. We further detect altered genomic dosage of TRIM3 in two glioma cases with LOH at 11p15.5, indicating homozygous deletions of TRIM3. Loss of heterozygosity of chromosome segment 11p15.5 in malignant gliomas suggests TRIM3 as a candidate brain tumor suppressor gene

  17. Epidemiology of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birthe Krogh; Hansen, Steinbjorn; Laursen, Rene J.

    2017-01-01

    in 15%. The overall male:female ratio was 3:2 and the mean age at onset was 60 years. Data for WHO grade I, II, III and IV glioma showed several important differences regarding age and sex distribution and symptomatology at presentation. The mean age increased with the grade of glioma and males...... duration, and headache rates for glioma grade I-IV showed decreasing survival with increasing grade. Glioma grade I-IV showed...

  18. Histopathological investigation of radiation necrosis. Coagulation necrosis in the irradiated and non-irradiated brain tumors and in the normal brain tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, N [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Brain Research Inst.

    1977-01-01

    Eighty four irradiated tumors (including 59 gliomas) and the surrounding brain tissue were analyzed. In 'normal' brain tissue, typical coagulation necrosis attributable to irradiation was observed in the cerebral white matter, presenting a whitish-yellow color but no remarkable changes in volume. Histologically there was complete desintegration of myelin and axon. Vascular changes included hyalinous thickening, concentric cleavage, fibrinoid degeneration, adventitial fibrosis and edema of small arteries, fibrin thrombi or occlusion of arterioles and capillaries, and telangiectasia of small veins and venules. While other tumors showed hyalinous or fibrous scar tissue and decrease in volume, the gliomas maintained their original volume without residual tumor cells. Massive coagulation necrosis was occasionally found even in full volume, non-irradiated gliomas (controls), although the changes were fewer and not so varied as in typical radiation necrosis. With small dosages, it was difficult to judge whether the necrosis was caused by irradiation or occurred spontaneously. Coagulation necrosis in tumor tissue was found in 25 of 59 cases (42%) of irradiated gliomas, but in only 2 of 49 cases (4%) of the nonirradiated gliomas. In 49 cases no coagulation necrosis of the surrounding tissue was found. Although histopathological judgement is difficult, it is suggested that there is a significant correlation between coagulation necrosis and irradiation. Discussion of the relationship between coagulation necrosis and NSD (nominal standard dose) led to the conclusion that coagulation necrosis will not be caused by irradiation of less than 1400 rets in NSD.

  19. Glioma cells on the run – the migratory transcriptome of 10 human glioma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holz David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary intracranial tumor and despite recent advances in treatment regimens, prognosis for affected patients remains poor. Active cell migration and invasion of GBM cells ultimately lead to ubiquitous tumor recurrence and patient death. To further understand the genetic mechanisms underlying the ability of glioma cells to migrate, we compared the matched transcriptional profiles of migratory and stationary populations of human glioma cells. Using a monolayer radial migration assay, motile and stationary cell populations from seven human long term glioma cell lines and three primary GBM cultures were isolated and prepared for expression analysis. Results Gene expression signatures of stationary and migratory populations across all cell lines were identified using a pattern recognition approach that integrates a priori knowledge with expression data. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed two discriminating patterns between migrating and stationary glioma cells: i global down-regulation and ii global up-regulation profiles that were used in a proband-based rule function implemented in GABRIEL to find subsets of genes having similar expression patterns. Genes with up-regulation pattern in migrating glioma cells were found to be overexpressed in 75% of human GBM biopsy specimens compared to normal brain. A 22 gene signature capable of classifying glioma cultures based on their migration rate was developed. Fidelity of this discovery algorithm was assessed by validation of the invasion candidate gene, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF. siRNA mediated knockdown yielded reduced in vitro migration and ex vivo invasion; immunohistochemistry on glioma invasion tissue microarray confirmed up-regulation of CTGF in invasive glioma cells. Conclusion Gene expression profiling of migratory glioma cells induced to disperse in vitro affords discovery of genomic signatures; selected

  20. Intraoperative detection of glioma invasion beyond MRI enhancement with Raman spectroscopy in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermyn, Michael; Mok, Kelvin; Mercier, Jeanne; Desroches, Joannie; Pichette, Julien; Saint-Arnaud, Karl; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    Cancer tissue is frequently impossible to distinguish from normal brain during surgery. Gliomas are a class of brain cancer which invade into the normal brain. If left unresected, these invasive cancer cells are the source of glioma recurrence. Moreover, these invasion areas do not show up on standard-of-care pre-operative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). This inability to fully visualize invasive brain cancers results in subtotal surgical resections, negatively impacting patient survival. To address this issue, we have demonstrated the efficacy of single-point in vivo Raman spectroscopy using a contact hand-held fiber optic probe for rapid detection of cancer invasion in 8 patients with low and high grade gliomas. Using a supervised machine learning algorithm to analyze the Raman spectra obtained in vivo, we were able to distinguish normal brain from the presence of cancer cells with sensitivity and specificity greater than 90%. Moreover, by correlating these results with pre-operative MRI we demonstrate the ability to detect low density cancer invasion up to 1.5cm beyond the cancer extent visible using MRI. This represents the potential for significant improvements in progression-free and overall patient survival, by identifying previously undetectable residual cancer cell populations and preventing the resection of normal brain tissue. While the importance of maximizing the volume of tumor resection is important for all grades of gliomas, the impact for low grade gliomas can be dramatic because surgery can even be curative. This convenient technology can rapidly classify cancer invasion in real-time, making it ideal for intraoperative use in brain tumor resection.

  1. Molecular and Genetic Determinants of Glioma Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Masui

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A diffusely invasive nature is a major obstacle in treating a malignant brain tumor, “diffuse glioma”, which prevents neurooncologists from surgically removing the tumor cells even in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. Recently updated classification of diffuse gliomas based on distinct genetic and epigenetic features has culminated in a multilayered diagnostic approach to combine histologic phenotypes and molecular genotypes in an integrated diagnosis. However, it is still a work in progress to decipher how the genetic aberrations contribute to the aggressive nature of gliomas including their highly invasive capacity. Here we depict a set of recent discoveries involving molecular genetic determinants of the infiltrating nature of glioma cells, especially focusing on genetic mutations in receptor tyrosine kinase pathways and metabolic reprogramming downstream of common cancer mutations. The specific biology of glioma cell invasion provides an opportunity to explore the genotype-phenotype correlation in cancer and develop novel glioma-specific therapeutic strategies for this devastating disease.

  2. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) for radiation therapy of benign skull base tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.P.; Liguoro, D.; San Galli, F.

    2001-01-01

    Skull base tumours represent a out 35 to 40% of all intracranial tumours. There are now many reports in the literature confirming the fact that about 80 to 90% of such tumours are controlled with fractionated radiotherapy. Stereotactic and 3-dimensional treatment planning techniques increase local control and central nervous system tolerance. Definition of the gross tumor volume (GTV) is generally easy with currently available medical imaging systems and computers for 3-dimensional dosimetry. The definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) is more difficult to appreciate: it is defined from the CTV plus a margin, which depends on the histology and anterior therapeutic history of the tumour. It is important to take into account the visible tumour and its possible extension pathways (adjacent bone, holes at the base of skull) and/or an anatomic region (sella turcica + adjacent cavernous sinus). It is necessary to evaluate these volumes with CT Scan and MRI to appreciate tumor extension in a 3-dimensional approach, in order to reduce the risk of marginal recurrences. The aim of this paper is to discuss volume definition as a function of tumour site and tumour type to be irradiated. (authors)

  3. Gold markers for tumor localization and target volume delineation in radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorwerk, Hilke; Christiansen, Hans; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Hermann, Robert Michael; Liersch, Thorsten; Ghadimi, Michael; Rothe, Hilka

    2009-01-01

    In locally advanced rectal cancer, neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy is indicated. To improve target volume definition for radiotherapy planning, the potential of implanted gold markers in the tumor region was evaluated. In nine consecutive patients, two to three gold markers were implanted in the tumor region during rigid rectoscopy. Computed tomography scans were performed during treatment planning. All electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) recorded during treatment series were analyzed. All patients underwent complete tumor resection with meticulous histopathologic examination. The gold markers could easily be implanted into the mesorectal tissue at the caudal tumor border without any complications. They were helpful in identifying the inferior border of the planning target volume in order to spare normal tissue (in particular anal structures). No significant shift of the markers was found during the course of therapy. Marker matching of the EPIDs did not improve patient positioning in comparison to bone structure matching. The former position of at least one marker could be identified in all patients during histopathologic examination. The use of gold marker enables a more precise definition of the target volume for radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. This could eventually allow a better protection of anal structures of patients with a tumor localization = 5 cm cranial of the anal sphincter. The implantation of the gold markers improved communication between the surgeon, the radiooncologist and the pathologist resulting in intensified exchange of relevant informations. (orig.)

  4. Automated lung tumor segmentation for whole body PET volume based on novel downhill region growing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballangan, Cherry; Wang, Xiuying; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2010-03-01

    We propose an automated lung tumor segmentation method for whole body PET images based on a novel downhill region growing (DRG) technique, which regards homogeneous tumor hotspots as 3D monotonically decreasing functions. The method has three major steps: thoracic slice extraction with K-means clustering of the slice features; hotspot segmentation with DRG; and decision tree analysis based hotspot classification. To overcome the common problem of leakage into adjacent hotspots in automated lung tumor segmentation, DRG employs the tumors' SUV monotonicity features. DRG also uses gradient magnitude of tumors' SUV to improve tumor boundary definition. We used 14 PET volumes from patients with primary NSCLC for validation. The thoracic region extraction step achieved good and consistent results for all patients despite marked differences in size and shape of the lungs and the presence of large tumors. The DRG technique was able to avoid the problem of leakage into adjacent hotspots and produced a volumetric overlap fraction of 0.61 +/- 0.13 which outperformed four other methods where the overlap fraction varied from 0.40 +/- 0.24 to 0.59 +/- 0.14. Of the 18 tumors in 14 NSCLC studies, 15 lesions were classified correctly, 2 were false negative and 15 were false positive.

  5. Definition of gross tumor volume in lung cancer: inter-observer variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Steene, Jan; Linthout, Nadine; de Mey, Johan; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Claassens, Cornelia; Noppen, Marc; Bel, Arjan; Storme, Guy

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To determine the inter-observer variation in gross tumor volume (GTV) definition in lung cancer, and its clinical relevance. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Five clinicians involved in lung cancer were asked to define GTV on the planning CT scan of eight patients. Resulting GTVs were

  6. Audiovisual biofeedback guided breath-hold improves lung tumor position reproducibility and volume consistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Lee, PhD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be used to improve the reproducibility and consistency of breath-hold lung tumor position and volume, respectively. These results may provide a pathway to achieve more accurate lung cancer radiation treatment in addition to improving various medical imaging and treatments by using breath-hold procedures.

  7. Podoplanin increases migration and angiogenesis in malignant glioma

    OpenAIRE

    Grau, Stefan J; Trillsch, Fabian; Tonn, Joerg-Christian; Goldbrunner, Roland H; Noessner, Elfriede; Nelson, Peter J; von Luettichau, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Expression of podoplanin in glial brain tumors is grade dependent. While serving as a marker for tumor progression and modulating invasion in various neoplasms, little is known about podoplanin function in gliomas. Therefore we stably transfected two human glioma cell lines (U373MG and U87MG) with expression plasmids encoding podoplanin. The efficacy of transfection was confirmed by FACS analysis, PCR and immunocytochemistry. Cells were then sorted for highly podoplanin expressing cells (U373...

  8. A Gaussian mixture model for definition of lung tumor volumes in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Penney, Bill C.; Martel, Mary K.; Pelizzari, Charles A.

    2007-01-01

    The increased interest in 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in radiation treatment planning in the past five years necessitated the independent and accurate segmentation of gross tumor volume (GTV) from FDG-PET scans. In some studies the radiation oncologist contours the GTV based on a computed tomography scan, while incorporating pertinent data from the PET images. Alternatively, a simple threshold, typically 40% of the maximum intensity, has been employed to differentiate tumor from normal tissue, while other researchers have developed algorithms to aid the PET based GTV definition. None of these methods, however, results in reliable PET tumor segmentation that can be used for more sophisticated treatment plans. For this reason, we developed a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) based segmentation technique on selected PET tumor regions from non-small cell lung cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a GMM-based tumor volume definition in a robust, reliable and reproducible way. A GMM relies on the idea that any distribution, in our case a distribution of image intensities, can be expressed as a mixture of Gaussian densities representing different classes. According to our implementation, each class belongs to one of three regions in the image; the background (B), the uncertain (U) and the target (T), and from these regions we can obtain the tumor volume. User interaction in the implementation is required, but is limited to the initialization of the model parameters and the selection of an ''analysis region'' to which the modeling is restricted. The segmentation was developed on three and tested on another four clinical cases to ensure robustness against differences observed in the clinic. It also compared favorably with thresholding at 40% of the maximum intensity and a threshold determination function based on tumor to background image intensities proposed in a recent paper. The parts of the

  9. Clinical application of tumor volume in advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma to predict outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ching-Chih; Huang, Tze-Ta; Lee, Moon-Sing; Hsiao, Shih-Hsuan; Lin, Hon-Yi; Su, Yu-Chieh; Hsu, Feng-Chun; Hung, Shih-Kai

    2010-01-01

    Current staging systems have limited ability to adjust optimal therapy in advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). This study aimed to delineate the correlation between tumor volume, treatment outcome and chemotherapy cycles in advanced NPC. A retrospective review of 110 patients with stage III-IV NPC was performed. All patients were treated first with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, then concurrent chemoradiation, and followed by adjuvant chemotherapy as being the definitive therapy. Gross tumor volume of primary tumor plus retropharyngeal nodes (GTVprn) was calculated to be an index of treatment outcome. GTVprn had a close relationship with survival and recurrence in advanced NPC. Large GTVprn (≧13 ml) was associated with a significantly poorer local control, lower distant metastasis-free rate, and poorer survival. In patients with GTVprn ≧ 13 ml, overall survival was better after ≧4 cycles of chemotherapy than after less than 4 cycles. The incorporation of GTVprn can provide more information to adjust treatment strategy

  10. Glioma epidemiology in the central Tunisian population: 1993-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, Saoussen; Brahim, Dorra H'mida-Ben; Ladib, Mohamed; Mama, Nadia; Harrabi, Imed; Tlili, Kalthoum; Yacoubi, Mohamed Tahar; Krifa, Hedi; Hmissa, Sihem; Saad, Ali; Mokni, Moncef

    2014-01-01

    Glioma is a heterogeneous central nervous system (CNS) tumor group that encompasses different histological subtypes with high variability in prognosis. The lesions account for almost 80% of primary malignant brain tumors. The aim of this study is to extend our understanding of the glioma epidemiology in the central Tunisian region. We analyzed 393 gliomas recorded in cancer registry of central Tunisia from 1993 to 2012. Crude incidence rates (CR) and world age-standardized rates (ASR) were estimated using annual population data size and age structure. Statistic correlations were established using Chi-square and Kaplan-Meier test. Tunisian glioma patients were identified with a mean age at diagnosis of 48 years and 1.5 sex ratio (male/female). During the 19 years period of study the highest incidence value was observed in male group between 1998 and 2002 (CR: 0.28, ASR: 0.3). Incidence results underline increasing high grade glioma occurring in the adulthood in the last period (2007-2012). Median survival was 27 months, with 1-, 2- and 5-year survival rates of 42%, 30% and 26%, respectively. Survival was greater in patients with younger age, lower tumor grade, infratentrial tumor location and undergoing a palliative treatment. This central Tunisia gliomas registry study provides important information that could improve glioma management and healthcare practice.

  11. SVM-based glioma grading. Optimization by feature reduction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoellner, Frank G.; Schad, Lothar R. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Emblem, Kyrre E. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Boston MA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Oslo Univ. Hospital (Norway). The Intervention Center

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the predictive power of feature reduction analysis approaches in support vector machine (SVM)-based classification of glioma grade. In 101 untreated glioma patients, three analytic approaches were evaluated to derive an optimal reduction in features; (i) Pearson's correlation coefficients (PCC), (ii) principal component analysis (PCA) and (iii) independent component analysis (ICA). Tumor grading was performed using a previously reported SVM approach including whole-tumor cerebral blood volume (CBV) histograms and patient age. Best classification accuracy was found using PCA at 85% (sensitivity = 89%, specificity = 84%) when reducing the feature vector from 101 (100-bins rCBV histogram + age) to 3 principal components. In comparison, classification accuracy by PCC was 82% (89%, 77%, 2 dimensions) and 79% by ICA (87%, 75%, 9 dimensions). For improved speed (up to 30%) and simplicity, feature reduction by all three methods provided similar classification accuracy to literature values ({proportional_to}87%) while reducing the number of features by up to 98%. (orig.)

  12. Cyclophosphamide Enhances Human Tumor Growth in Nude Rat Xenografted Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjen Jeffrey Wu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the immunomodulatory chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide (CTX on tumor growth was investigated in primary and metastatic intracerebral and subcutaneous rat xenograft models. Nude rats were treated with CTX (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally 24 hours before human ovarian carcinoma (SKOV3, small cell lung carcinoma (LX-1 SCLC, and glioma (UW28, U87MG, and U251 tumor cells were inoculated subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or in the right cerebral hemisphere or were infused into the right internal carotid artery. Tumor development was monitored and recorded. Potential mechanisms were further investigated. Only animals that received both CTX and Matrigel showed consistent growth of subcutaneous tumors. Cyclophosphamide pretreatment increased the percentage (83.3% vs 0% of animals showing intraperitoneal tumors. In intracerebral implantation tumor models, CTX pretreatment increased the tumor volume and the percentage of animals showing tumors. Cyclophosphamide increased lung carcinoma bone and facial metastases after intra-arterial injection, and 20% of animals showed brain metastases. Cyclophosphamide transiently decreased nude rat white blood cell counts and glutathione concentration, whereas serum vascular endothelial growth factor was significantly elevated. Cyclophosphamide also increased CD31 reactivity, a marker of vascular endothelium, and macrophage (CD68-positive infiltration into glioma cell-inoculated rat brains. Cyclophosphamide may enhance primary and metastatic tumor growth through multiple mechanisms, including immune modulation, decreased response to oxidative stress, increased tumor vascularization, and increased macrophage infiltration. These findings may be clinically relevant because chemotherapy may predispose human cancer subjects to tumor growth in the brain or other tissues.

  13. Gamma-glutamylcyclotransferase promotes the growth of human glioma cells by activating Notch-Akt signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Shang-Hang; Yu, Ning; Liu, Xi-Yao; Tan, Guo-Wei; Wang, Zhan-Xiang, E-mail: md_wzx7189@163.com

    2016-03-18

    Glioma as an aggressive type tumor is rapidly growing and has become one of the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. γ-Glutamylcyclotransferase (GGCT) has been shown as a diagnostic marker in various cancers. To reveal whether there is a correlation between GGCT and human glioma, GGCT expression in human glioma tissues and cell lines was first determined. We found that GGCT expression was up-regulated in human glioma tissues and cell lines. Further, we demonstrate that GGCT knockdown inhibits glioma cell T98G and U251 proliferation and colony formation, whereas GGCT overexpression leads to oppose effects. GGCT overexpression promotes the expression of Notch receptors and activates Akt signaling in glioma cells, and Notch-Akt signaling is activated in glioma tissues with high expression of GGCT. Finally, we show that inhibition of Notch-Akt signaling with Notch inhibitor MK-0752 blocks the effects of GGCT on glioma proliferation and colony formation. In conclusion, GGCT plays a critical role in glioma cell proliferation and may be a potential cancer therapeutic target. - Highlights: • GGCT expression is up-regulated in human glioma tissues and cell lines. • GGCT promotes glioma cell growth and colony formation. • GGCT promotes the activation of Notch-Akt signaling in glioma cells and tissues. • Notch inhibition blocks the role of GGCT in human glioma cells.

  14. Combinatorial therapy with adenoviral-mediated PTEN and a PI3K inhibitor suppresses malignant glioma cell growth in vitro and in vivo by regulating the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Yang; Guo, Liyun; Song, Yunpeng; Wang, Le; Yu, Kai; Huang, Qiang; Zhong, Yue

    2017-08-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly invasive and challenging tumor of the central nervous system. The mutation/deletion of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene is the main genetic change identified in glioblastomas. PTEN plays a critical role in tumorigenesis and has been shown to be an important therapeutic target. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 is commonly used to inhibit glioma cell growth via regulation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. In this study, we examined the growth inhibitory effects of a combinatorial therapy of adenoviral-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) and LY294002 on LN229 and U251 glioma cells in vitro and on tumor xenografts in vivo. In vitro, LN229 and U251 glioma cells were treated by combinatorial therapy with Ad-PTEN and LY294002. The growth ability was determined by MTT assay. The cell cycle distribution was analyzed by flow cytometry. Cell invasive ability was analyzed by transwell invasion assay and cell apoptosis analysis via FITC-Annexin V analysis. In vivo, U251 subcutaneous glioblastoma xenograft was used to assay anti-tumor effect of combinatorial therapy with Ad-PTEN and LY294002 by mean volume of tumors, immunohistochemistry and TUNEL method. The combinatorial treatment clearly suppressed cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle, reduced cell invasion and promoted cell apoptosis compared with the Ad-PTEN or LY294002 treatment alone. The treatment worked by inhibiting the PI3K/AKT pathway. In addition, the growth of U251 glioma xenografts treated with the combination of Ad-PTEN and LY294002 was significantly inhibited compared with those treated with Ad-PTEN or LY294002 alone. Our data indicated that the combination of Ad-PTEN and LY294002 effectively suppressed the malignant growth of human glioma cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts, suggesting a promising new approach for glioma gene therapy that warrants further investigation.

  15. Tumor and normal structures volume localization and quantitation in 3D radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmi, R.; Andreucci, L.

    1995-01-01

    Improvements in imaging technology have significantly enhanced the ability of the radiation oncologist to stage and to evaluate the response of tumor during and after treatment. Over the last few year, in fact, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging radiolabelled monoclonal tumor antibodies have allowed tumor definition and evaluation. Concerning the above mentioned techniques accurate methods for the integration of morphological (CT, MRI) and functional (PET, SPECT, MRS) information can be very useful for volumes definition. In fact three-dimensional treatment planning depends heavily on volume displays and calculation based on volumes to convey information to the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. The accuracy and reproducibility of the methods for creating these volumes are fundamental limitations of current treatment planning systems. Slice by slice manual contouring, which is extremely labor-intensive, and automatic edge detection, which has a high failure rate and requires human intervention are representative of the current standard of practice. The aim of our work is both to develop methods of image data integration and automatic segmentation, and to make the treatment planning system able to combine these multiple information in unified data set in order to get a better tumor volume definition and dose distribution calculation. Then the possibility of using morphological and functional images and other information coming from MR spectroscopy and electronic or confocal microscopy can allow the development into the treatment planning system of biological calculation models for evaluating tumor and normal tissue control probabilities (TCP, NTCP). The definitive use of these models into the 3-D treatment plannings will offer a considerable improvement in the biological efficacy of radiotherapy and it will constitute the object

  16. Predicting oropharyngeal tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy from pretreatment computed tomography data using general linear models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yock, Adam D; Rao, Arvind; Dong, Lei; Beadle, Beth M; Garden, Adam S; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Court, Laurence E

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate the accuracy of several predictive models of variation in tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy. Nineteen patients with oropharyngeal cancers were imaged daily with CT-on-rails for image-guided alignment per an institutional protocol. The daily volumes of 35 tumors in these 19 patients were determined and used to generate (1) a linear model in which tumor volume changed at a constant rate, (2) a general linear model that utilized the power fit relationship between the daily and initial tumor volumes, and (3) a functional general linear model that identified and exploited the primary modes of variation between time series describing the changing tumor volumes. Primary and nodal tumor volumes were examined separately. The accuracy of these models in predicting daily tumor volumes were compared with those of static and linear reference models using leave-one-out cross-validation. In predicting the daily volume of primary tumors, the general linear model and the functional general linear model were more accurate than the static reference model by 9.9% (range: -11.6%-23.8%) and 14.6% (range: -7.3%-27.5%), respectively, and were more accurate than the linear reference model by 14.2% (range: -6.8%-40.3%) and 13.1% (range: -1.5%-52.5%), respectively. In predicting the daily volume of nodal tumors, only the 14.4% (range: -11.1%-20.5%) improvement in accuracy of the functional general linear model compared to the static reference model was statistically significant. A general linear model and a functional general linear model trained on data from a small population of patients can predict the primary tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy with greater accuracy than standard reference models. These more accurate models may increase the prognostic value of information about the tumor garnered from pretreatment computed tomography images and facilitate improved treatment management.

  17. Clinical characteristics associated with the intracranial dissemination of gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xu; Qin, Jun-Jie; Hao, Shu-Yu; Li, Huan; Zeng, Chun; Sun, Sheng-Jun; Yu, Lan-Bing; Gao, Zhi-Xian; Xie, Jian

    2018-03-01

    Glioma is the most common malignant tumor of the brain and the intracranial dissemination of gliomas is the late stage of the development of the tumor. However, there is little research in literature on the occurrence of intracranial dissemination of gliomas. In order to provide a reference for clinical work, we carried out this study on intracranial dissemination of glioma. A total of 629 patients with gliomas received tumor resection by the same surgeon from August 2010 to September 2015 were included in this study. The authors performed a retrospective review of the patients and the information regarding clinical features, histopathological results, molecular pathologic results and clinical outcomes was collected and analyzed. In this retrospective study, we found that the intracranial dissemination phenomenon occurred in 53 patients (8.43%). We analyzed the clinical characteristics of patients and found that the age at diagnosis (P = 0.011), WHO grade of the tumor (P dissemination. The higher grade of the tumor, the more prone to disseminate. Deletion of 1p/19q had no significant correlation with the intracranial dissemination. MMP9, Ki-67, and EGFR were highly expressed in tumor cells that caused dissemination, and the level of Ki-67 expression had significance in statistics (P 40 years), high pathological grade, invasion of the corpus callosum and high levels of Ki-67 expression were risk factors associated with the intracranial dissemination of gliomas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Current status of cerebral glioma surgery in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-song; Zhang, Jie; Zhuang, Dong-xiao; Yao, Cheng-jun; Qiu, Tian-ming; Lu, Jun-feng; Zhu, Feng-ping; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liang-fu

    2011-09-01

    The treatment of gliomas is highly individualized. Surgery for gliomas is essentially for histological diagnosis, to alleviate mass effect, and most importantly, to favor longer survival expectancy. During the past two decades, many surgical techniques and adjuvants have been applied to glioma surgery in China, which lead to a rapid development in the field of cerebral glioma surgery. This article broadly and critically reviewed the existing studies on cerebral glioma surgery and to portrait the current status of glioma surgery in China. A literature search was conducted covering major innovative surgical techniques and adjuvants for glioma surgery in China. The following databases were searched: the Pubmed (January 1995 to date); China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (January 1995 to date) and VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals (January 1995 to date). A selection criterion was established to exclude duplicates and irrelevant studies. The outcome measures were extracted from included studies. A total of 3307 articles were initially searched. After excluded by abstracts and full texts, 69 studies conducted in the mainland of China were included and went through further analysis. The philosophy of surgical strategies for cerebral gliomas in China is undergoing tremendous change. Nowadays Chinese neurosurgeons pay more attention to the postoperative neurofunctional status of the patients. The aim of the glioma surgery is not only the more extensive tumor resection but also the maximal safety of intervention. The well balance of longer overall survival and higher quality of life should be judged with respect to each individual patient.

  19. Echo-planar MR cerebral blood volume mapping of glomas. Clinical utility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronen, H.J.; Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki; Glass, J.; Pardo, F.S.; Belliveau, J.W.; Gruber, M.L.; Buchbinder, B.R.; Gazit, I.E.; Linggood, R.M.; Fischman, A.J.; Rosen, F.S.; Hochberg, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    Neovascularization is a common phenomenon in gliomas. MR imaging cerebral blood volume (CBV) mapping utilizes ultrafast echo-planar imaging and simultaneous use of gadolinium-based contrast material. To determine the utility of MR CBV mapping in the clinical evaluation of gliomas, we followed 15 patients with serial studies. This technique provided functional information that was not evident with conventional CT or MR imaging. Low-grade tumors demonstrated homogeneously low CBV, while high-grade tumors often showed areas of both high and low CBV. The maximum tumor CBV/white matter ratio was compared between low- (n=3) and high-grade gliomas (n=5) in patients without previous treatment and with histologic verification (n=8) and was significantly higher in high-grade gliomas (p<0.01), High CBV foci in nonenhancing tumor areas were present in 2 cases. The distinction between radiation necrosis and active tumor could be made correctly in 3 of 4 cases. The information provided by MR CBV mapping has the potential to be an adjunct in the clinical care of glioma patients. (orig.)

  20. Postoperative radiotherapy of supratentorial anaplastic gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendt, T.G.; Bacherler, B.; Baumer, K.; Rohloff, R.; Willich, N.

    1986-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1983, 149 patients with high grade anaplastic supratentorial gliomas received a postoperative irradiation during primary treatment. 118 out of these patients had an anaplastic astrocytoma, 18 an anaplastic oligodendroglioma, and 13 an anaplastic ependymoma. Most of these patients were treated by irradiation of a great volume with 50 Gy within five weeks, the others by irradiation of the total brain with 50 Gy within five weeks and saturation with 10 Gy within one week. The one-year survival of the total group was 35.5% and the two-year survival 10.6%. Patients at an age of less than 40 years show a significantly longer survival than older patients (one-year survival rates 40% and 30.7%, respectively). Patients suffering from anaplastic tumors with astrocytic and oligodendrocytic differentiation have a comparable prognosis. Patients suffering from anaplastic tumors with ependymal differentiation, however, have prolonged survival times. The therapy results of different treatment methods are discussed using the communications of literature. (orig.) [de

  1. The effects of gene polymorphisms on glioma prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ying; Li, Guolin; Yan, Mengdan; Li, Jing; Jin, Tianbo; Li, Shanqu; Mu, Shijie

    2017-11-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Various genetic factors play important roles in the development and prognosis of glioma. The present study focuses on the impact of MPHOSPH6, TNIP1 and several other genes (ACYP2, NAF1, TERC, TERT, OBFC1, ZNF208 and RTEL1) on telomere length and how this affects the prognosis of glioma. Forty-three polymorphisms in nine genes from 605 glioma patients were selected. The association between genotype and survival outcome was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox regression analysis and the log-rank test. The 1-year overall survival (OS) rates of patients younger than 40 years of age was higher compared to those in patients older than 40 years of age. The 1-year OS rate of patients who underwent total resection was higher than that of patients whose gliomas were not completely resected. The 1-year OS rates of patients undergoing chemotherapy and of patients who did not undergo chemotherapy were 39.90% and 26.80%, respectively. Univariate analyses showed that ACYP2 rs12615793 and TERT rs2853676 loci affected progression-free survival in glioma patients; both ZNF208 rs8105767 and ACYP2 rs843720 affected the OS of patients with low-grade gliomas. Multivariate analyses suggested that MPHOSPH6 rs1056629 and rs1056654, and TERT rs2853676 loci were associated with good prognoses of patients with glioma or high-grade gliomas, whereas ZNF208 rs8105767 was associated with good prognosis of patients with low-grade glioma. Age, surgical resection and chemotherapy influenced the survival rates of glioma patients. TERT, MPHOSPH6, ACYP2 and ZNF208 genes were found to affect glioma prognosis. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. New insights into susceptibility to glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanhong; Shete, Sanjay; Hosking, Fay J; Robertson, Lindsay B; Bondy, Melissa L; Houlston, Richard S

    2010-03-01

    The study of inherited susceptibility to cancer has been one of the most informative areas of research in the past decade. Most of the cancer genetics studies have been focused on the common tumors such as breast and colorectal cancers. As the allelic architecture of these tumors is unraveled, research attention is turning to other rare cancers such as glioma, which are also likely to have a major genetic component as the basis of their development. In this brief review we discuss emerging data on glioma whole genome-association searches to identify risk loci. Two glioma genome-wide association studies have so far been reported. Our group identified 5 risk loci for glioma susceptibility (TERT rs2736100, CCDC26 rs4295627, CDKN2A/CDKN2B rs4977756, RTEL1 rs6010620, and PHLDB1 rs498872). Wrensch and colleagues provided further evidence to 2 risk loci (CDKN2B rs1412829 and RTEL1 rs6010620) for GBM and anaplastic astrocytoma. Although these data provide the strongest evidence to date for the role of common low-risk variants in the etiology of glioma, the single-nucleotide polymorphisms identified alone are unlikely to be candidates for causality. Identifying the causal variant at each specific locus and its biological impact now poses a significant challenge, contingent on a combination of fine mapping and functional analyses. Finally, we hope that a greater understanding of the biological basis of the disease will lead to the development of novel therapeutic interventions.

  3. Gross tumor volume and clinical target volume: soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lartigau, E.; Kantor, G.; Lagarde, P.; Taieb, S.; Ceugnart, L.; Vilain, M.O.; Penel, N.; Depadt, G.

    2001-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities are currently treated with more conservative and functional approaches, combining surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The role of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy has been defined through randomized studies performed in the 80's and 90's. However, the ubiquity of tumour location for these tumours makes difficult a systematic definition of local treatments. Tumour volume definition is based on pre and post surgical imaging (MRI) and on described pathological report. The clinical target volume will take into account quality of the resection and anatomical barriers and will be based on an anatomy and not only on safety margins around the tumour bed. General rules for this irradiation (doses, volumes) and principal results will be presented. (authors)

  4. Protein tyrosine phosphatases in glioma biology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navis, A.C.; Eijnden, M. van den; Schepens, J.T.G.; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, R.; Wesseling, P.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Gliomas are a diverse group of brain tumors of glial origin. Most are characterized by diffuse infiltrative growth in the surrounding brain. In combination with their refractive nature to chemotherapy this makes it almost impossible to cure patients using combinations of conventional therapeutic

  5. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lene; Friis, Søren; Hallas, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Several studies indicate that use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is associated with an increased risk of intracranial meningioma, while associations between HRT use and risk of other brain tumors have been less explored. We investigated the influence of HRT use on the risk of glioma...

  6. SU-F-207-06: CT-Based Assessment of Tumor Volume in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayyum, F; Armato, S; Straus, C; Husain, A; Vigneswaran, W; Kindler, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the potential utility of computed tomography (CT) scans in the assessment of physical tumor bulk in malignant pleural mesothelioma patients. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma were used for this study. A CT scan was acquired for each patient prior to surgical resection of the tumor (median time between scan and surgery: 27 days). After surgery, the ex-vivo tumor volume was measured by a pathologist using a water displacement method. Separately, a radiologist identified and outlined the tumor boundary on each CT section that demonstrated tumor. These outlines then were analyzed to determine the total volume of disease present, the number of sections with outlines, and the mean volume of disease per outlined section. Subsets of the initial patient cohort were defined based on these parameters, i.e. cases with at least 30 sections of disease with a mean disease volume of at least 3mL per section. For each subset, the R- squared correlation between CT-based tumor volume and physical ex-vivo tumor volume was calculated. Results: The full cohort of 28 patients yielded a modest correlation between CT-based tumor volume and the ex-vivo tumor volume with an R-squared value of 0.66. In general, as the mean tumor volume per section increased, the correlation of CT-based volume with the physical tumor volume improved substantially. For example, when cases with at least 40 CT sections presenting a mean of at least 2mL of disease per section were evaluated (n=20) the R-squared correlation increased to 0.79. Conclusion: While image-based volumetry for mesothelioma may not generally capture physical tumor volume as accurately as one might expect, there exists a set of conditions in which CT-based volume is highly correlated with the physical tumor volume. SGA receives royalties and licensing fees through the University of Chicago for computer-aided diagnosis technology

  7. SU-F-207-06: CT-Based Assessment of Tumor Volume in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qayyum, F; Armato, S; Straus, C; Husain, A; Vigneswaran, W; Kindler, H [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the potential utility of computed tomography (CT) scans in the assessment of physical tumor bulk in malignant pleural mesothelioma patients. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma were used for this study. A CT scan was acquired for each patient prior to surgical resection of the tumor (median time between scan and surgery: 27 days). After surgery, the ex-vivo tumor volume was measured by a pathologist using a water displacement method. Separately, a radiologist identified and outlined the tumor boundary on each CT section that demonstrated tumor. These outlines then were analyzed to determine the total volume of disease present, the number of sections with outlines, and the mean volume of disease per outlined section. Subsets of the initial patient cohort were defined based on these parameters, i.e. cases with at least 30 sections of disease with a mean disease volume of at least 3mL per section. For each subset, the R- squared correlation between CT-based tumor volume and physical ex-vivo tumor volume was calculated. Results: The full cohort of 28 patients yielded a modest correlation between CT-based tumor volume and the ex-vivo tumor volume with an R-squared value of 0.66. In general, as the mean tumor volume per section increased, the correlation of CT-based volume with the physical tumor volume improved substantially. For example, when cases with at least 40 CT sections presenting a mean of at least 2mL of disease per section were evaluated (n=20) the R-squared correlation increased to 0.79. Conclusion: While image-based volumetry for mesothelioma may not generally capture physical tumor volume as accurately as one might expect, there exists a set of conditions in which CT-based volume is highly correlated with the physical tumor volume. SGA receives royalties and licensing fees through the University of Chicago for computer-aided diagnosis technology.

  8. Perspectives in Intraoperative Diagnostics of Human Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Tyurikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amongst large a variety of oncological diseases, malignant gliomas represent one of the most severe types of tumors. They are also the most common type of the brain tumors and account for over half of the astrocytic tumors. According to different sources, the average life expectancy of patients with various glioblastomas varies between 10 and 12 months and that of patients with anaplastic astrocytic tumors between 20 and 24 months. Therefore, studies of the physiology of transformed glial cells are critical for the development of treatment methods. Modern medical approaches offer complex procedures, including the microsurgical tumor removal, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, supplemented with photodynamic therapy and immunotherapy. The most radical of them is surgical resection, which allows removing the largest part of the tumor, reduces the intracranial hypertension, and minimizes the degree of neurological deficit. However, complete removal of the tumor remains impossible. The main limitations are insufficient visualization of glioma boundaries, due to its infiltrative growth, and the necessity to preserve healthy tissue. This review is devoted to the description of advantages and disadvantages of modern intraoperative diagnostics of human gliomas and highlights potential perspectives for development of their treatment.

  9. Immunotherapy Approaches for Malignant Glioma From 2007 to 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant glioma is a deadly disease for which there have been few therapeutic advances over the past century. Although previous treatments were largely unsuccessful, glioma may be an ideal target for immune-based therapy. Recently, translational research led to several clinical trials based on tumor immunotherapy to treat patients with malignant glioma. Here we review 17 recent glioma immunotherapy clinical trials, published over the past 3 years. Various approaches were used, including passive transfer of naked and radiolabeled antibodies, tumor antigen-specific peptide immunization, and the use of patient tumor cells with or without dendritic cells as vaccines. We compare and discuss the current state of the art of clinical immunotherapy treatment, as well as its limited successes, pitfalls, and future potential. PMID:20424975

  10. The value of intraoperative sonography in low grade glioma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, Athanasios K; Anokhin, Maxim; Vavruska, Jan; Mahvash, Mehran; Scholz, Martin

    2015-04-01

    There is a number of different methods to localize a glioma intraoperatively. Neuronavigation, intraoperative MRI, 5-aminolevulinic acid, as well as intraoperative sonography. Every method has its advantages and disadvantages. Low grade gliomas do not show a specific signal with 5-aminolevulinic acid and are difficult to distinguish macroscopically from normal tissue. In the present study we stress out the importance of intraoperative diagnostic ultrasound for localization of low grade gliomas. We retrospectively evaluated the charts and MRIs of 34 patients with low grade gliomas operated in our department from 2011 until December 2014. The efficacy of ultrasound as an intraoperative navigational tool was assessed. In 15 patients ultrasound was used and in 19 not. Only histologically proven low grades gliomas (astrocytomas grade II) were evaluated. In none of the patients where ultrasound (combined with neuronavigation) was used (N=15) to find the tumors, the target was missed, whereas the exclusive use of neuronavigation missed the target in 5 of 19 cases of small subcortical low grade gliomas. Intraoperative ultrasound is an excellent tool in localizing low grade gliomas intraoperatively. It is an inexpensive, real time neuronavigational tool, which overcomes brain shift. Even when identifying the tumors with ultrasound is very reliable, the extend of resection and the decision to remove any residual tumor with the help of ultrasound is at the moment unreliable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. An immuno-wall microdevice exhibits rapid and sensitive detection of IDH1-R132H mutation specific to grade II and III gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamichi, Akane; Kasama, Toshihiro; Ohka, Fumiharu; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Kato, Akira; Motomura, Kazuya; Hirano, Masaki; Ranjit, Melissa; Chalise, Lushun; Kurimoto, Michihiro; Kondo, Goro; Aoki, Kosuke; Kaji, Noritada; Tokeshi, Manabu; Matsubara, Toshio; Senga, Takeshi; Kaneko, Mika K.; Suzuki, Hidenori; Hara, Masahito; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Baba, Yoshinobu; Kato, Yukinari; Natsume, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    World Health Organization grade II and III gliomas most frequently occur in the central nervous system (CNS) in adults. Gliomas are not circumscribed; tumor edges are irregular and consist of tumor cells, normal brain tissue, and hyperplastic reactive glial cells. Therefore, the tumors are not fully resectable, resulting in recurrence, malignant progression, and eventual death. Approximately 69-80% of grade II and III gliomas harbor mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 gene (IDH1), of which 83-90% are found to be the IDH1-R132H mutation. Detection of the IDH1-R132H mutation should help in the differential diagnosis of grade II and III gliomas from other types of CNS tumors and help determine the boundary between the tumor and normal brain tissue. In this study, we established a highly sensitive antibody-based device, referred to as the immuno-wall, to detect the IDH1-R132H mutation in gliomas. The immuno-wall causes an immunoreaction in microchannels fabricated using a photo-polymerizing polymer. This microdevice enables the analysis of the IDH1 status with a small sample within 15 min with substantially high sensitivity. Our results suggested that 10% content of the IDH1-R132H mutation in a sample of 0.33 μl volume, with 500 ng protein, or from 500 cells is theoretically sufficient for the analysis. The immuno-wall device will enable the rapid and highly sensitive detection of the IDH1-R132H mutation in routine clinical practice.

  12. Analysis of nodal coverage utilizing image guided radiation therapy for primary gynecologic tumor volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Faisal [University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Loma Linda University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Sarkar, Vikren; Gaffney, David K.; Salter, Bill [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Poppe, Matthew M., E-mail: matthew.poppe@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate radiation dose delivered to pelvic lymph nodes, if daily Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) was implemented with treatment shifts based on the primary site (primary clinical target volume [CTV]). Our secondary goal was to compare dosimetric coverage with patient outcomes. Materials and methods: A total of 10 female patients with gynecologic malignancies were evaluated retrospectively after completion of definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to their pelvic lymph nodes and primary tumor site. IGRT consisted of daily kilovoltage computed tomography (CT)-on-rails imaging fused with initial planning scans for position verification. The initial plan was created using Varian's Eclipse treatment planning software. Patients were treated with a median radiation dose of 45 Gy (range: 37.5 to 50 Gy) to the primary volume and 45 Gy (range: 45 to 64.8 Gy) to nodal structures. One IGRT scan per week was randomly selected from each patient's treatment course and re-planned on the Eclipse treatment planning station. CTVs were recreated by fusion on the IGRT image series, and the patient's treatment plan was applied to the new image set to calculate delivered dose. We evaluated the minimum, maximum, and 95% dose coverage for primary and nodal structures. Reconstructed primary tumor volumes were recreated within 4.7% of initial planning volume (0.9% to 8.6%), and reconstructed nodal volumes were recreated to within 2.9% of initial planning volume (0.01% to 5.5%). Results: Dosimetric parameters averaged less than 10% (range: 1% to 9%) of the original planned dose (45 Gy) for primary and nodal volumes on all patients (n = 10). For all patients, ≥99.3% of the primary tumor volume received ≥ 95% the prescribed dose (V95%) and the average minimum dose was 96.1% of the prescribed dose. In evaluating nodal CTV coverage, ≥ 99.8% of the volume received ≥ 95% the prescribed dose and the average minimum dose was 93%. In

  13. Epstein–Barr Virus in Gliomas: Cause, Association, or Artifact?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saghir Akhtar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common malignant brain tumors and account for around 60% of all primary central nervous system cancers. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a grade IV glioma associated with a poor outcome despite recent advances in chemotherapy. The etiology of gliomas is unknown, but neurotropic viruses including the Epstein–Barr virus (EBV that is transmitted via salivary and genital fluids have been implicated recently. EBV is a member of the gamma herpes simplex family of DNA viruses that is known to cause infectious mononucleosis (glandular fever and is strongly linked with the oncogenesis of several cancers, including B-cell lymphomas, nasopharyngeal, and gastric carcinomas. The fact that EBV is thought to be the causative agent for primary central nervous system (CNS lymphomas in immune-deficient patients has led to its investigations in other brain tumors including gliomas. Here, we provide a review of the clinical literature pertaining to EBV in gliomas and discuss the possibilities of this virus being simply associative, causative, or even an experimental artifact. We searched the PubMed/MEDLINE databases using the following key words such as: glioma(s, glioblastoma multiforme, brain tumors/cancers, EBV, and neurotropic viruses. Our literature analysis indicates conflicting results on the presence and role of EBV in gliomas. Further comprehensive studies are needed to fully implicate EBV in gliomagenesis and oncomodulation. Understanding the role of EBV and other oncoviruses in the etiology of gliomas, would likely open up new avenues for the treatment and management of these, often fatal, CNS tumors.

  14. Studies on the Roles of PDGFRA and EGFR in the Classification and Identification of Therapeutic Targets for Human Gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Dongfeng

    2013-01-01

    Glioma is the most common type of primary tumor in the adult central nervous system (CNS). However, the current classification of gliomas is highly subjective and even inaccurate in some cases, which leads to clinical confusion and hinders the development of targeted therapies. EGFR and PDGFRA play crucial roles in glia development and glioma pathogenesis. In this thesis we aim to establish a glial genesis-guided molecular classification scheme for gliomas based on the genes co-expressed with...

  15. Glioma grade assessment by using histogram analysis of diffusion tensor imaging-derived maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakab, Andras; Berenyi, Ervin; Molnar, Peter; Emri, Miklos

    2011-01-01

    Current endeavors in neuro-oncology include morphological validation of imaging methods by histology, including molecular and immunohistochemical techniques. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an up-to-date methodology of intracranial diagnostics that has gained importance in studies of neoplasia. Our aim was to assess the feasibility of discriminant analysis applied to histograms of preoperative diffusion tensor imaging-derived images for the prediction of glioma grade validated by histomorphology. Tumors of 40 consecutive patients included 13 grade II astrocytomas, seven oligoastrocytomas, six grade II oligodendrogliomas, three grade III oligoastrocytomas, and 11 glioblastoma multiformes. Preoperative DTI data comprised: unweighted (B 0 ) images, fractional anisotropy, longitudinal and radial diffusivity maps, directionally averaged diffusion-weighted imaging, and trace images. Sampling consisted of generating histograms for gross tumor volumes; 25 histogram bins per scalar map were calculated. The histogram bins that allowed the most precise determination of low-grade (LG) or high-grade (HG) classification were selected by multivariate discriminant analysis. Accuracy of the model was defined by the success rate of the leave-one-out cross-validation. Statistical descriptors of voxel value distribution did not differ between LG and HG tumors and did not allow classification. The histogram model had 88.5% specificity and 85.7% sensitivity in the separation of LG and HG gliomas; specificity was improved when cases with oligodendroglial components were omitted. Constructing histograms of preoperative radiological images over the tumor volume allows representation of the grade and enables discrimination of LG and HG gliomas which has been confirmed by histopathology. (orig.)

  16. Radical prostatectomy and positive surgical margins: tumor volume and Gleason score predicts cancer outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Roca, Ricardo L.R. Felts de; Fonseca, Francisco Paula da; Cunha, Isabela Werneck da; Bezerra, Stephania Martins

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: positive surgical margins (PSMs) are common adverse factors to predict the outcome of a patient submitted to radical prostatectomy (PR). However, not all of these men will follow with biochemical (BCR) or clinical (CR) recurrence. Relationship between PSMs with these recurrent events has to be correlated with other clinicopathological findings in order to recognize more aggressive tumors in order to recommend complementary treatment to these selected patients. Materials and methods: we retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 228 patients submitted to open retropubic RP between March 1991 and June 2008, where 161 had and 67 did not have PSMs. Minimum follow-up time was considered 2 years after surgery. BCR was considered when PSA ≥ 0.2 ng/ml. CR was determined when clinical evidence of tumor appeared. Chi-square test was used to correlate clinical and pathologic variables with PSMs. The estimated 5-year risk of BCR and CR in presence of PSMs was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to log-rank tests. Results: from the total of 228 patients, 161 (71%) had PSMs, while 67 (29%) had negative surgical margins (NSMs). Prostatic circumferential margin was the most common (43.4%) site. Univariate analysis showed statistically significant (p < 0.001) associations between the presence of PSMs and BCR, but not with CR (p = 0.06). Among 161 patients with PSMs, 61 (37.8%) presented BCR, while 100 (62.8%) did not. Predicting progression-free survival for 5 years, BCR was correlated with pathological stage; Gleason score; pre-treatment PSA; tumor volume in specimen; capsular and perineural invasion; presence and number of PSMs. RC correlated only with angiolymphatic invasion and Gleason score. Considering univariate analyses the clinicopathological factors predicting BCR for 5 years, results statistically significant links with prostate weight; pre-treatment PSA; Gleason score; pathological stage; tumor volume; PSMs; capsular and perineural

  17. Radical prostatectomy and positive surgical margins: tumor volume and Gleason score predicts cancer outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Roca, Ricardo L.R. Felts de, E-mail: Ricardo@delarocaurologia.com.br [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Francisco Paula da, E-mail: fpf@uol.com.br [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Urologia. Dept. de Cirurgia Pelvica; Cunha, Isabela Werneck da; Bezerra, Stephania Martins, E-mail: iwerneck@gmail.com, E-mail: stephaniab@gmail.com [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Patologia

    2013-07-01

    Introduction: positive surgical margins (PSMs) are common adverse factors to predict the outcome of a patient submitted to radical prostatectomy (PR). However, not all of these men will follow with biochemical (BCR) or clinical (CR) recurrence. Relationship between PSMs with these recurrent events has to be correlated with other clinicopathological findings in order to recognize more aggressive tumors in order to recommend complementary treatment to these selected patients. Materials and methods: we retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 228 patients submitted to open retropubic RP between March 1991 and June 2008, where 161 had and 67 did not have PSMs. Minimum follow-up time was considered 2 years after surgery. BCR was considered when PSA {>=} 0.2 ng/ml. CR was determined when clinical evidence of tumor appeared. Chi-square test was used to correlate clinical and pathologic variables with PSMs. The estimated 5-year risk of BCR and CR in presence of PSMs was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to log-rank tests. Results: from the total of 228 patients, 161 (71%) had PSMs, while 67 (29%) had negative surgical margins (NSMs). Prostatic circumferential margin was the most common (43.4%) site. Univariate analysis showed statistically significant (p < 0.001) associations between the presence of PSMs and BCR, but not with CR (p = 0.06). Among 161 patients with PSMs, 61 (37.8%) presented BCR, while 100 (62.8%) did not. Predicting progression-free survival for 5 years, BCR was correlated with pathological stage; Gleason score; pre-treatment PSA; tumor volume in specimen; capsular and perineural invasion; presence and number of PSMs. RC correlated only with angiolymphatic invasion and Gleason score. Considering univariate analyses the clinicopathological factors predicting BCR for 5 years, results statistically significant links with prostate weight; pre-treatment PSA; Gleason score; pathological stage; tumor volume; PSMs; capsular and perineural

  18. Edge Contrast of the FLAIR Hyperintense Region Predicts Survival in Patients with High-Grade Gliomas following Treatment with Bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, N; Piccioni, D; Karunamuni, R; Chang, Y-H; White, N; Delfanti, R; Seibert, T M; Hattangadi-Gluth, J A; Dale, A; Farid, N; McDonald, C R

    2018-04-05

    Treatment with bevacizumab is standard of care for recurrent high-grade gliomas; however, monitoring response to treatment following bevacizumab remains a challenge. The purpose of this study was to determine whether quantifying the sharpness of the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery hyperintense border using a measure derived from texture analysis-edge contrast-improves the evaluation of response to bevacizumab in patients with high-grade gliomas. MRIs were evaluated in 33 patients with high-grade gliomas before and after the initiation of bevacizumab. Volumes of interest within the FLAIR hyperintense region were segmented. Edge contrast magnitude for each VOI was extracted using gradients of the 3D FLAIR images. Cox proportional hazards models were generated to determine the relationship between edge contrast and progression-free survival/overall survival using age and the extent of surgical resection as covariates. After bevacizumab, lower edge contrast of the FLAIR hyperintense region was associated with poorer progression-free survival ( P = .009) and overall survival ( P = .022) among patients with high-grade gliomas. Kaplan-Meier curves revealed that edge contrast cutoff significantly stratified patients for both progression-free survival (log-rank χ 2 = 8.3, P = .003) and overall survival (log-rank χ 2 = 5.5, P = .019). Texture analysis using edge contrast of the FLAIR hyperintense region may be an important predictive indicator in patients with high-grade gliomas following treatment with bevacizumab. Specifically, low FLAIR edge contrast may partially reflect areas of early tumor infiltration. This study adds to a growing body of literature proposing that quantifying features may be important for determining outcomes in patients with high-grade gliomas. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  19. Comparison of different width detector on the gross tumor volume delineation of the solitary pulmonary lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongping Shang

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Different width detector had no impact on the volume and geometric position of GTV of SPL during 3DCT simulation. Using wide detector would save time and decrease radiation dose compared with the narrow one. 3DCT simulation using either 16 × 1.5 mm detector or 4 × 1.5 mm detector could not cover all tumor motion information that 4DCT offered under free breathing conditions.

  20. Clinical Relevance of Prognostic and Predictive Molecular Markers in Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Tali

    2016-01-01

    Sorting and grading of glial tumors by the WHO classification provide clinicians with guidance as to the predicted course of the disease and choice of treatment. Nonetheless, histologically identical tumors may have very different outcome and response to treatment. Molecular markers that carry both diagnostic and prognostic information add useful tools to traditional classification by redefining tumor subtypes within each WHO category. Therefore, molecular markers have become an integral part of tumor assessment in modern neuro-oncology and biomarker status now guides clinical decisions in some subtypes of gliomas. The routine assessment of IDH status improves histological diagnostic accuracy by differentiating diffuse glioma from reactive gliosis. It carries a favorable prognostic implication for all glial tumors and it is predictive for chemotherapeutic response in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas with codeletion of 1p/19q chromosomes. Glial tumors that contain chromosomal codeletion of 1p/19q are defined as tumors of oligodendroglial lineage and have favorable prognosis. MGMT promoter methylation is a favorable prognostic marker in astrocytic high-grade gliomas and it is predictive for chemotherapeutic response in anaplastic gliomas with wild-type IDH1/2 and in glioblastoma of the elderly. The clinical implication of other molecular markers of gliomas like mutations of EGFR and ATRX genes and BRAF fusion or point mutation is highlighted. The potential of molecular biomarker-based classification to guide future therapeutic approach is discussed and accentuated.

  1. Possible novel therapy for malignant gliomas with secretable trimeric TRAIL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonsup Jeong

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Despite intensive clinical investigation and many novel therapeutic approaches, average survival for the patients with malignant gliomas is only about 1 year. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL has shown potent and cancer-selective killing activity and drawn considerable attention as a promising therapy for cancers, but concerns over delivery and toxicity have limited progress. We have developed a secretable trimeric TRAIL (stTRAIL and here evaluated the therapeutic potential of this stTRAIL-based gene therapy in brain tumors. An adenovirus (Ad-stTRAIL delivering stTRAIL was injected into intra-cranial human glioma tumors established in nude mice and tumor growth monitored using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Ad-stTRAIL gene therapy showed potent tumor suppressor activity with no toxic side effects at therapeutically effective doses. When compared with 1, 3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU, a conventional therapy for malignant gliomas, Ad-stTRAIL suppressed tumor growth more potently. The combination of Ad-stTRAIL and BCNU significantly increased survival compared to the control mice or mice receiving Ad-stTRAIL alone. Our data indicate that Ad-stTRAIL, either alone or combined with BCNU, has promise as a novel therapy for malignant gliomas.

  2. Aberrant Signaling Pathways in Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Kita, Daisuke; Watanabe, Takuya; Hayashi, Yutaka; Teng, Lei; Pyko, Ilya V.; Hamada, Jun-Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a WHO grade IV malignant glioma, is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor in adults; few treatments are available. Median survival rates range from 12–15 months. The biological characteristics of this tumor are exemplified by prominent proliferation, active invasiveness, and rich angiogenesis. This is mainly due to highly deregulated signaling pathways in the tumor. Studies of these signaling pathways have greatly increased our understanding of the biology and clinical behavior of GBM. An integrated view of signal transduction will provide a more useful approach in designing novel therapies for this devastating disease. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of GBM signaling pathways with a focus on potential molecular targets for anti-signaling molecular therapies

  3. Prognostic role of tumor volume for radiotherapy outcome in patient with T2 laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, T.; Wygoda, A.; Skladowski, K.; Rutkowski, R.; Maciejewski, B.; Hejduk, B.; Kolosza, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Tumor volume (TV) is recognized as a prognostic factor of treatment outcome for head and neck tumors but is not routinely included in the treatment decision-making process. The purpose of the study was to define its prognostic role for patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. Material and methods: TV of 160 patients who underwent RT between 2002 and 2006 for T2 laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma were reviewed. The tumor was located in the glottis and epiglottis in 82 (51 %) and 78 (49 %) patients, respectively. TV was manually contoured on pretreatment, planning, contrast-enhanced CT scans and the volumetric measurement (cm 3 ) was calculated by the volume algorithm. Results: The median TV value was 2.01 cm 3 (range 0.15-21.68 cm 3 ). The median TV was significantly lower in patients with glottic tumors (p < 0.0001), N0 (p < 0.001), or well histopatologically differentiated tumors (p = 0.01). A significant correlation between TV, hemoglobin concentration (p < 0.01), and total dose (TD; p < 0.001) was observed. On univariate analyses, TV influenced local control (LC; p = 0.02) and overall survival (OS, p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, both age (HR 1.038, p = 0.03) and TV (HR = 1.075, p = 0.01) remained significantly related to LC and OS (age: HR 1.038, p = 0.005; TV: HR 1.097, p = 0.0001). Conclusion: Large TV worsen prognosis of patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. A large TV is more common for supraglottic, poorly differentiated tumors and may suggest higher risk of nodal spread. The routine estimation of TV prior to therapy may be essential in order to select the best treatment option for patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. (orig.)

  4. Astrocytes protect glioma cells from chemotherapy and upregulate survival genes via gap junctional communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qingtang; Liu, Zhao; Ling, Feng; Xu, Geng

    2016-02-01

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumor. Using current standard treatment regimens, the prognosis of patients with gliomas remains poor, which is predominantly due to the resistance of glioma cells to chemotherapy. The organ microenvironment has been implicated in the pathogenesis and survival of tumor cells. Thus, the aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that astrocytes (the housekeeping cells of the brain microenvironment) may protect glioma cells from chemotherapy and to investigate the underlying mechanism. Immunofluorescent and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that glioma cells were surrounded and infiltrated by activated astrocytes. In vitro co-culture of glioma cells with astrocytes significantly reduced the cytotoxic effects on glioma cells caused by various chemotherapeutic agents, as demonstrated by fluorescein isothiocyanate-propidium iodide flow cytometry. Transwell experiments indicated that this protective effect was dependent on physical contact and the gap junctional communication (GJC) between astrocytes and glioma cells. Microarray expression profiling further revealed that astrocytes upregulated the expression levels of various critical survival genes in the glioma cells via GJC. The results of the present study indicated that the organ microenvironment may affect the biological behavior of tumor cells and suggest a novel mechanism of resistance in glioma cells, which may be of therapeutic relevance clinically.

  5. [18F]-FMISO PET study of hypoxia in gliomas before surgery: correlation with molecular markers of hypoxia and angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekaert, Lien [CHU de Caen, Department of Neurology, Caen (France); Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/CERVOxy Group, Caen (France); CHU de Caen, Department of Neurosurgery, Caen (France); CHU de Caen, Service de Neurochirurgie, Caen (France); Valable, Samuel; Collet, Solene; Bordji, Karim; Petit, Edwige; Bernaudin, Myriam [Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/CERVOxy Group, Caen (France); Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele [Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/CERVOxy Group, Caen (France); CHU de Caen, Department of Pathology, Caen (France); Ponte, Keven [CHU de Caen, Department of Neurosurgery, Caen (France); Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/CERVOxy Group, Caen (France); Constans, Jean-Marc [Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/CERVOxy Group, Caen (France); CHU de Caen, Department of Neuroradiology, Caen (France); Levallet, Guenaelle [CHU de Caen, Department of Pathology, Caen (France); Branger, Pierre [CHU de Caen, Department of Neurology, Caen (France); Emery, Evelyne [CHU de Caen, Department of Neurosurgery, Caen (France); Manrique, Alain [CHU de Caen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); Barre, Louisa [Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/LDM-TEP group, Caen (France); Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien [CHU de Caen, Department of Neurology, Caen (France); Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/CERVOxy Group, Caen (France); CHU de Nimes, Department of Neurology, Nimes (France)

    2017-08-15

    Hypoxia in gliomas is associated with tumor resistance to radio- and chemotherapy. However, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of hypoxia remains challenging, and the validation of biological markers is, therefore, of great importance. We investigated the relationship between uptake of the PET hypoxia tracer [18F]-FMISO and other markers of hypoxia and angiogenesis and with patient survival. In this prospective single center clinical study, 33 glioma patients (grade IV: n = 24, III: n = 3, and II: n = 6) underwent [18F]-FMISO PET and MRI including relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps before surgery. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and hypoxic volume were calculated, defining two groups of patients based on the presence or absence of [18F]-FMISO uptake. After surgery, molecular quantification of CAIX, VEGF, Ang2 (rt-qPCR), and HIF-1α (immunohistochemistry) were performed on tumor specimens. [18F]-FMISO PET uptake was closely linked to tumor grade, with high uptake in glioblastomas (GB, grade IV). Expression of biomarkers of hypoxia (CAIX, HIF-1α), and angiogenesis markers (VEGF, Ang2, rCBV) were significantly higher in the [18F]-FMISO uptake group. We found correlations between the degree of hypoxia (hypoxic volume and SUVmax) and expression of HIF-1α, CAIX, VEGF, Ang2, and rCBV (p < 0.01). Patients without [18F]-FMISO uptake had a longer survival time than uptake positive patients (log-rank, p < 0.005). Tumor hypoxia as evaluated by [18F]-FMISO PET is associated with the expression of hypoxia markers on a molecular level and is related to angiogenesis. [18F]-FMISO uptake is a mark of an aggressive tumor, almost always a glioblastoma. Our results underline that [18F]-FMISO PET could be useful to guide glioma treatment, and in particular radiotherapy, since hypoxia is a well-known factor of resistance. (orig.)

  6. Quantification of Tumor Volume Changes During Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, Jana; Ford, Eric; Redmond, Kristin; Zhou, Jessica; Wong, John; Song, Danny Y.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Dose escalation for lung cancer is limited by normal tissue toxicity. We evaluated sequential computed tomography (CT) scans to assess the possibility of adaptively reducing treatment volumes by quantifying the tumor volume reduction occurring during a course of radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 22 patients underwent RT for Stage I-III non-small-cell lung cancer with conventional fractionation; 15 received concurrent chemotherapy. Two repeat CT scans were performed at a nominal dose of 30 Gy and 50 Gy. Respiration-correlated four-dimensional CT scans were used for evaluation of respiratory effects in 17 patients. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated on simulation and all individual phases of the repeat CT scans. Parenchymal tumor was evaluated unless the nodal volume was larger or was the primary. Subsequent image sets were spatially co-registered with the simulation data for evaluation. Results: The median GTV reduction was 24.7% (range, -0.3% to 61.7%; p 100 cm 3 vs. 3 , and hilar and/or mediastinal involvement vs. purely parenchymal or pleural lesions. A tendency toward a greater volume reduction with increasing dose was seen, although this did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The results of this study have demonstrated significant alterations in the GTV seen on repeat CT scans during RT. These observations raise the possibility of using an adaptive approach toward RT of non-small-cell lung cancer to minimize the dose to normal structures and more safely increase the dose directed at the target tissues.

  7. First experiences in treatment of low-grade glioma grade I and II with proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauswald, Henrik; Rieken, Stefan; Ecker, Swantje; Kessel, Kerstin A; Herfarth, Klaus; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2012-01-01

    To retrospectively assess feasibility and toxicity of proton therapy in patients with low-grade glioma (WHO °I/II). Proton beam therapy only administered in 19 patients (median age 29 years; 9 female, 10 male) for low-grade glioma between 2010 and 2011 was reviewed. In 6 cases proton therapy was performed due to tumor progression after biopsy, in 8 cases each due to tumor progression after (partial-) resection, and in 5 cases due to tumor progression after chemotherapy. Median total dose applied was 54 GyE (range, 48,6-54 GyE) in single fractions of median 1.8 GyE. Median clinical target volume was 99 cc (range, 6–463 cc) and treated using median 2 beams (range, 1–2). Proton therapy was finished as planned in all cases. At end of proton therapy, 13 patients showed focal alopecia, 6 patients reported mild fatigue, one patient with temporal tumor localization concentration deficits and speech errors and one more patient deficits in short-term memory. Four patients did not report any side effects. During follow-up, one patient presented with pseudo-progression showing worsening of general condition and brain edema 1–2 months after last irradiation and restitution after 6 months. In the present MR imaging (median follow-up 5 months; range 0–22 months) 12 patients had stable disease, 2 (1) patients partial (complete) remission, one more patient pseudo-progression (differential diagnosis: tumor progression) 4 weeks after irradiation without having had further follow-up imaging so far, and one patient tumor progression approximately 9 months after irradiation. Regarding early side effects, mild alopecia was the predominant finding. The rate of alopecia seems to be due to large treatment volumes as well as the anatomical locations of the target volumes and might be avoided by using multiple beams and the gantry in the future. Further evaluations including neuropsychological testing are in preparation

  8. 3D-conformal radiotherapy treatment of high grade gliomas of malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chon Rivas, Ivonne; Chi Ramirez, Daysi; Alert Silva, Jose; Roca Muchuli, Carlos; Leon Gonzalez, Roberto; Perez Penna, Lourdes

    2009-01-01

    Patients diagnosed with high grade gliomas of malignancy (A), have a high mortality rate, about 10% achieve survivals than one year due to poor local control resulting from the inability of high doses of radiation to tumor volume by dose-limiting provided by healthy peritumoral tissues and structures. 3D conformal radiotherapy (RT-3DC) achieves effective tumoricidal high doses with high precision on the tumor with minimal involvement of critical structures near the tumor target volume. From 2005 until 2008 at INOR, a total of 23 patients with histologically confirmed supratentorial gliomas location, histological subtypes of anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) in 8 patients (35%) and Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) in 15 patients (65%), aged between 18 and 65, Karnofski scale of 70 or more and total previous surgical resection in 10 patients (43%) or partial in 13 (57%) were included prospectively in this study. The total tumor dose of 66-70 Gy was prescribed with a daily fractionation of 1.8 Gy. All patients underwent CT images (CT) and MRI (MRI) cranial volumes were defined treatment planning according to the concepts of ICRU 50 and 62 with precise immobilization of the head by thermo deformed mask, CT 3mm cuts planning system and 3D treatment planning. Median survival was better in patients younger than 55 years, with high rates of Karnofski, histology of AA and higher percentage of surgical resection. Median survival (Kaplan-Meier method) obtained was 16 months. Survival at 1 and 2 years was 51% and 28% respectively. The RT-3DC can administer higher doses on the tumor with peritumoral healthy protection structures in selected patients with a diagnosis of AA or GBM, increasing local control and potentially overall survival without exacerbating toxicity, thus demonstrating the dose- response of malignant brain tumors. (Author)

  9. Impact of removed tumor volume and location on patient outcome in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Al-Wala; Karsy, Michael; Sanai, Nader; Spetzler, Robert; Zhang, Yue; Xu, Yizhe; Mahan, Mark A

    2017-10-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive primary brain tumor with devastatingly poor prognosis. Multiple studies have shown the benefit of wider extent of resection (EOR) on patient overall survival (OS) and worsened survival with larger preoperative tumor volumes. However, the concomitant impact of postoperative tumor volume and eloquent location on OS has yet to be fully evaluated. We performed a retrospective chart review of adult patients treated for glioblastoma from January 2006 through December 2011. Adherence to standardized postoperative chemoradiation protocols was used as an inclusion criterion. Detailed volumetric and location analysis was performed on immediate preoperative and immediate postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Cox proportional hazard modeling approach was employed to explore the modifying effects of EOR and eloquent location after adjusting for various confounders and associated characteristics, such as preoperative tumor volume and demographics. Of the 471 screened patients, 141 were excluded because they did not meet all inclusion criteria. The mean (±SD) age of the remaining 330 patients (60.6% male) was 58.9 ± 12.9 years; the mean preoperative and postoperative Karnofsky performance scores (KPSs) were 76.2 ± 10.3 and 80.0 ± 16.6, respectively. Preoperative tumor volume averaged 33.2 ± 29.0 ml, postoperative residual was 4.0 ± 8.1 ml, and average EOR was 88.6 ± 17.6%. The observed average follow-up was 17.6 ± 15.7 months, and mean OS was 16.7 ± 14.4 months. Survival analysis showed significantly shorter survival for patients with lesions in periventricular (16.8 ± 1.7 vs. 21.5 ± 1.4 mo, p = 0.03), deep nuclei/basal ganglia (11.6 ± 1.7 vs. 20.6 ± 1.2, p = 0.002), and multifocal (12.0 ± 1.4 vs. 21.3 ± 1.3 months, p = 0.0001) locations, but no significant influence on survival was seen for eloquent cortex sites (p = 0.14, range 0.07-0.9 for all individual

  10. Comparison of 18F-FET PET and perfusion-weighted MRI for glioma grading. A hybrid PET/MR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verger, Antoine; Filss, Christian P.; Lohmann, Philipp; Stoffels, Gabriele; Rota Kops, Elena; Sabel, Michael; Wittsack, Hans J.; Galldiks, Norbert; Fink, Gereon R.; Shah, Nadim J.; Langen, Karl-Josef

    2017-01-01

    Both perfusion-weighted MR imaging (PWI) and O-(2- 18 F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine PET ( 18 F-FET) provide grading information in cerebral gliomas. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of 18 F-FET PET and PWI for tumor grading in a series of patients with newly diagnosed, untreated gliomas using an integrated PET/MR scanner. Seventy-two patients with untreated gliomas [22 low-grade gliomas (LGG), and 50 high-grade gliomas (HGG)] were investigated with 18 F-FET PET and PWI using a hybrid PET/MR scanner. After visual inspection of PET and PWI maps (rCBV, rCBF, MTT), volumes of interest (VOIs) with a diameter of 16 mm were centered upon the maximum of abnormality in the tumor area in each modality and the contralateral unaffected hemisphere. Mean and maximum tumor-to-brain ratios (TBR mean , TBR max ) were calculated. In addition, Time-to-Peak (TTP) and slopes of time-activity curves were calculated for 18 F-FET PET. Diagnostic accuracies of 18 F-FET PET and PWI for differentiating low-grade glioma (LGG) from high-grade glioma (HGG) were evaluated by receiver operating characteristic analyses (area under the curve; AUC). The diagnostic accuracy of 18 F-FET PET and PWI to discriminate LGG from HGG was similar with highest AUC values for TBR mean and TBR max of 18 F-FET PET uptake (0.80, 0.83) and for TBR mean and TBR max of rCBV (0.80, 0.81). In case of increased signal in the tumor area with both methods (n = 32), local hot-spots were incongruent in 25 patients (78%) with a mean distance of 10.6 ± 9.5 mm. Dynamic FET PET and combination of different parameters did not further improve diagnostic accuracy. Both 18 F-FET PET and PWI discriminate LGG from HGG with similar diagnostic performance. Regional abnormalities in the tumor area are usually not congruent indicating that tumor grading by 18 F-FET PET and PWI is based on different pathophysiological phenomena. (orig.)

  11. Comparison of {sup 18}F-FET PET and perfusion-weighted MRI for glioma grading. A hybrid PET/MR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verger, Antoine [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3, -4), Juelich (Germany); Lorraine University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Nancyclotep Imaging Platform, CHRU Nancy, Nancy (France); Lorraine University, IADI, INSERM, UMR 947, Nancy (France); Filss, Christian P. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3, -4), Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Lohmann, Philipp; Stoffels, Gabriele; Rota Kops, Elena [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3, -4), Juelich (Germany); Sabel, Michael [University of Duesseldorf, Department of Neurosurgery, Duesseldorf (Germany); Wittsack, Hans J. [University Duesseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Galldiks, Norbert; Fink, Gereon R. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3, -4), Juelich (Germany); University of Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); University of Cologne and Bonn, Center of Integrated Oncology (CIO), Bonn (Germany); Shah, Nadim J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3, -4), Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Section JARA-Brain, Juelich (Germany); Langen, Karl-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3, -4), Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Section JARA-Brain, Juelich (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    Both perfusion-weighted MR imaging (PWI) and O-(2-{sup 18}F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine PET ({sup 18}F-FET) provide grading information in cerebral gliomas. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of {sup 18}F-FET PET and PWI for tumor grading in a series of patients with newly diagnosed, untreated gliomas using an integrated PET/MR scanner. Seventy-two patients with untreated gliomas [22 low-grade gliomas (LGG), and 50 high-grade gliomas (HGG)] were investigated with {sup 18}F-FET PET and PWI using a hybrid PET/MR scanner. After visual inspection of PET and PWI maps (rCBV, rCBF, MTT), volumes of interest (VOIs) with a diameter of 16 mm were centered upon the maximum of abnormality in the tumor area in each modality and the contralateral unaffected hemisphere. Mean and maximum tumor-to-brain ratios (TBR{sub mean}, TBR{sub max}) were calculated. In addition, Time-to-Peak (TTP) and slopes of time-activity curves were calculated for {sup 18}F-FET PET. Diagnostic accuracies of {sup 18}F-FET PET and PWI for differentiating low-grade glioma (LGG) from high-grade glioma (HGG) were evaluated by receiver operating characteristic analyses (area under the curve; AUC). The diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F-FET PET and PWI to discriminate LGG from HGG was similar with highest AUC values for TBR{sub mean} and TBR{sub max} of {sup 18}F-FET PET uptake (0.80, 0.83) and for TBR{sub mean} and TBR{sub max} of rCBV (0.80, 0.81). In case of increased signal in the tumor area with both methods (n = 32), local hot-spots were incongruent in 25 patients (78%) with a mean distance of 10.6 ± 9.5 mm. Dynamic FET PET and combination of different parameters did not further improve diagnostic accuracy. Both {sup 18}F-FET PET and PWI discriminate LGG from HGG with similar diagnostic performance. Regional abnormalities in the tumor area are usually not congruent indicating that tumor grading by {sup 18}F-FET PET and PWI is based on different pathophysiological phenomena. (orig.)

  12. A Novel Candidate Molecule in Pathological Grading Of Gliomas: ELABELA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artas, Gokhan; Ozturk, Sait; Kuloglu, Tuncay; Dagli, Adile Ferda; Gonen, Murat; Artas, Hakan; Aydin, Suleyman; Erol, Fatih Serhat

    2018-04-06

    This study aimed to investigate the possible role of ELABELA (ELA) in the histopathological grading of gliomas. We retrospectively assessed pathological specimens of patients who underwent surgery for intracranial space-occupying lesions. Only primary glioma specimens were included in this study. We enrolled 11 patients histologically diagnosed with low-grade glioma and 22 patients with high-grade glioma. The ELA antibody was applied to 4-6-µm-thick sections obtained from paraffin blocks. Histoscores were calculated using the distribution and intensity of staining immunoreactivity. An independent sample t-test was used for two-point inter-group assessments, whereas one-way analysis of variance was used for the other assessments. P 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The histoscores of the control brain, low-grade glioma, and high-grade glioma tissues were found to be 0.08, 0.37, and 0.92, respectively. The difference in ELA immunoreactivity between the control brain tissue and glioma tissue was statistically significant (p 0.05). In addition, a statistically significant increase was observed in ELA immunoreactivity in high-grade glioma tissues compared with that in low-grade glioma tissues (p 0.05). ELA has an angiogenetic role in the progression of glial tumors. ELA, which is an endogenous ligand of the apelin receptor, activates the apelinergic system and causes the progression of glial tumors. Further studies with a large number of patients are necessary to investigate the angiogenetic role of ELA in glial tumors.

  13. Impact of initial tumor volume on radiotherapy outcome in patients with T2 glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of initial tumor volume (TV) on radiotherapy (RT) outcome in patients with T2 glottic cancer. Initial TV was calculated for 115 consecutive patients with T2 glottic cancer who had been treated with definitive RT alone at a single institution. The results showed strong correlations of TV with 3-year local tumor control (LTC) and disease-free survival (DFS). For TV ≤ 0.7 cm 3 , 3-year LTC was 83 %; for TV 0.7-3.6 cm 3 this was 70 % and for TV 3.6-17 cm 3 44 %. Analysis of total dose vs. initial TV showed that larger T2 glottic tumors with a TV of around 5 cm 3 (2-2.5 cm in diameter with 10 10 cancer cells) need an extra 6.5 Gy to achieve similar 3-year LTC rates as for small tumors with a TV of 0.5 cm 3 (∝1 cm in diameter with 10 9 cancer cells). Although classification of tumors according to TV cannot replace TNM staging in daily practice, it could represent a valuable numerical supplement for planning the optimal dose fractionation scheme for individual patients. (orig.)

  14. Tumor Volume Decrease via Feeder Occlusion for Treating a Large, Firm Trigone Meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Takuma; Hatano, Norikazu; Kanamori, Fumiaki; Muraoka, Shinsuke; Kawabata, Teppei; Takasu, Syuntaro; Watanabe, Tadashi; Kojima, Takao; Nagatani, Tetsuya; Seki, Yukio

    2018-01-01

    Trigone meningiomas are considered a surgical challenge, as they tend to be considerably large and hypervascularized at the time of presentation. We experienced a case of a large and very hard trigone meningioma that was effectively treated using initial microsurgical feeder occlusion followed by surgery in stages. A 19-year-old woman who presented with loss of consciousness was referred to our hospital for surgical treatment of a brain tumor. Radiological findings were compatible with a left ventricular trigone meningioma extending laterally in proximity to the Sylvian fissure. At initial surgery using the transsylvian approach, main feeders originating from the anterior and lateral posterior choroidal arteries were occluded at the inferior horn; however, only a small section of the tumor could initially be removed because of its firmness. Over time, feeder occlusion resulted in tumor necrosis and a 20% decrease in its diameter; the mass effect was alleviated within 1 year. The residual meningioma was then totally excised in staged surgical procedures after resection became more feasible owing to ischemia-induced partial softening of the tumor. When a trigone meningioma is large and very hard, initial microsurgical feeder occlusion in the inferior horn can be a safe and effective option, and can lead to necrosis, volume decrease, and partial softening of the residual tumor to allow for its staged surgical excision.

  15. 18F-Fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography may differentiate glioblastoma multiforme from less malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Kenji; Shiga, Tohru; Tamaki, Nagara; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Hattori, Naoya; Magota, Keiichi; Tanaka, Shinya; Kuge, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor and its prognosis is significantly poorer than those of less malignant gliomas. Pathologically, necrosis is one of the most important characteristics that differentiate GBM from lower grade gliomas; therefore, we hypothesized that 18 F fluoromisonidazole (FMISO), a radiotracer for hypoxia imaging, accumulates in GBM but not in lower grade gliomas. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of FMISO positron emission tomography (PET) for the differential diagnosis of GBM from lower grade gliomas. This prospective study included 23 patients with pathologically confirmed gliomas. All of the patients underwent FMISO PET and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET within a week. FMISO images were acquired 4 h after intravenous administration of 400 MBq of FMISO. Tracer uptake in the tumor was visually assessed. Lesion to normal tissue ratios and FMISO uptake volume were calculated. Of the 23 glioma patients, 14 were diagnosed as having GBM (grade IV glioma in the 2007 WHO classification), and the others were diagnosed as having non-GBM (5 grade III and 4 grade II). In visual assessment, all GBM patients showed FMISO uptake in the tumor greater than that in the surrounding brain tissues, whereas all the non-GBM patients showed FMISO uptake in the tumor equal to that in the surrounding brain tissues (p ≤ 0.001). One GBM patient was excluded from FDG PET study because of hyperglycemia. All GBM patients and three of the nine (33%) non-GBM patients showed FDG uptake greater than or equal to that in the gray matter. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing GBM were 100 and 100% for FMISO, and 100 and 66% for FDG, respectively. The lesion to cerebellum ratio of FMISO uptake was higher in GBM patients (2.74 ± 0.60, range 1.71-3.81) than in non-GBM patients (1.22 ± 0.06, range 1.09-1.29, p ≤ 0.001) with no overlap between the groups. The lesion to gray matter ratio of FDG was also higher in GBM

  16. {sup 18}F-Fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography may differentiate glioblastoma multiforme from less malignant gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Kenji; Shiga, Tohru; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Terasaka, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Houkin, Kiyohiro [Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Neurosurgery, Sapporo (Japan); Hattori, Naoya [Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Molecular Imaging, Sapporo (Japan); Magota, Keiichi [Hokkaido University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sapporo (Japan); Tanaka, Shinya [Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Cancer Pathology, Sapporo (Japan); Kuge, Yuji [Hokkaido University, Central Institute of Isotope Science, Sapporo (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor and its prognosis is significantly poorer than those of less malignant gliomas. Pathologically, necrosis is one of the most important characteristics that differentiate GBM from lower grade gliomas; therefore, we hypothesized that {sup 18}F fluoromisonidazole (FMISO), a radiotracer for hypoxia imaging, accumulates in GBM but not in lower grade gliomas. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of FMISO positron emission tomography (PET) for the differential diagnosis of GBM from lower grade gliomas. This prospective study included 23 patients with pathologically confirmed gliomas. All of the patients underwent FMISO PET and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET within a week. FMISO images were acquired 4 h after intravenous administration of 400 MBq of FMISO. Tracer uptake in the tumor was visually assessed. Lesion to normal tissue ratios and FMISO uptake volume were calculated. Of the 23 glioma patients, 14 were diagnosed as having GBM (grade IV glioma in the 2007 WHO classification), and the others were diagnosed as having non-GBM (5 grade III and 4 grade II). In visual assessment, all GBM patients showed FMISO uptake in the tumor greater than that in the surrounding brain tissues, whereas all the non-GBM patients showed FMISO uptake in the tumor equal to that in the surrounding brain tissues (p {<=} 0.001). One GBM patient was excluded from FDG PET study because of hyperglycemia. All GBM patients and three of the nine (33%) non-GBM patients showed FDG uptake greater than or equal to that in the gray matter. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing GBM were 100 and 100% for FMISO, and 100 and 66% for FDG, respectively. The lesion to cerebellum ratio of FMISO uptake was higher in GBM patients (2.74 {+-} 0.60, range 1.71-3.81) than in non-GBM patients (1.22 {+-} 0.06, range 1.09-1.29, p {<=} 0.001) with no overlap between the groups. The lesion to gray matter ratio of FDG was also

  17. Nanotechnology Applications for Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredlau, Amy Lee; Dixit, Suraj; Chen, Chao; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) are invariably fatal tumors found in the pons of elementary school aged children. These tumors are grade II-IV gliomas, with a median survival of less than 1 year from diagnosis when treated with standard of care (SOC) therapy. Nanotechnology may offer therapeutic options for the treatment of DIPGs. Multiple nanoparticle formulations are currently being investigated for the treatment of DIPGs. Nanoparticles based upon stable elements, polymer nanoparticles, and organic nanoparticles are under development for the treatment of brain tumors, including DIPGs. Targeting of nanoparticles is now possible as delivery techniques that address the difficulty in crossing the blood brain barrier (BBB) are developed. Theranostic nanoparticles, a combination of therapeutics and diagnostic nanoparticles, improve imaging of the cancerous tissue while delivering therapy to the local region. However, additional time and attention should be directed to developing a nanoparticle delivery system for treatment of the uniformly fatal pediatric disease of DIPG.

  18. Comparison of adrenal tumor treatment results by different volume of surgical interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy J. Semenov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years detection of various adrenal tumors has increased greatly. Total adrenalectomy remains the standart of surgical managment for adrenal tumors, although, the vast majority of these tumors turn out to be benign on the routine histological examination. Performing organ-sparing surgery would allow to avoid hormone insufficiency after total adrenalectomy. Aim: to compare results of adrenal tumors treatment by different volume of surgical interventions. Materials and methods. We evaluated the short-term results of 237 patients treatment with various adrenal tumors. Total adrenalectomy were performed on 206 cases, 31 patients undergone adrenal resection. There were analyzed intraoperative and postoperative complications, assessed the hormonal status of the patients, depending on the extent of surgical treatment. Besides, the long-term results were evaluated in 141 patients underwent total adrenalectomy and 30 patients after organ-sparing surgery. Moreover, we analyzed the percentage of recurrenses, assessed the hormonal status of the patients and the effectiveness of treatment. Results. Performing the organ-sparing operations doesn't increase the risk of intraoperative complications. In all patients with hormone-active tumors we found decline of pathologically increased hormone levels and trend to regress of clinical manifestations of the disease in early postoperative period. We found no difference in local recurrences in both groups, and its occurrence did not exceed 3.33%. Refractory postoperative adrenal insufficiency was observed only in corticosteroma patients in spite of surgery volume. In case of both side adrenal tumors there was no need in replacement therapy after total adrenalectomy from there one side and resection from the other. Conclusions. In cases of adrenal tumor performing organ-sparing operations is advisable, if there are no preoperative sings of malignancy.

  19. Evaluation of D-isomers of 4-borono-2-18F-fluoro-phenylalanine and O-11C-methyl-tyrosine as brain tumor imaging agents: a comparative PET study with their L-isomers in rat brain glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Masakatsu; Nishiyama, Shingo; Hashimoto, Fumio; Kakiuchi, Takeharu; Tsukada, Hideo

    2018-06-13

    The potential of the D-isomerization of 4-borono-2- 18 F-fluoro-phenylalanine ( 18 F-FBPA) to improve its target tumor to non-target normal brain tissue ratio (TBR) was evaluated in rat brain glioma and compared with those of L- and D- 11 C-methyl-tyrosine ( 11 C-CMT). The L- or D-isomer of 18 F-FBPA was injected into rats through the tail vein, and their whole body kinetics and distributions were assessed using the tissue dissection method up to 90 min after the injection. The kinetics of L- and D- 18 F-FBPA or L- and D- 11 C-CMT in the C-6 glioma-inoculated rat brain were measured for 90 or 60 min, respectively, using high-resolution animal PET, and their TBRs were assessed. Tissue dissection analyses showed that D- 18 F-FBPA uptake was significantly lower than that of L- 18 F-FBPA in the brain and abdominal organs, except for the kidney and bladder, reflecting the faster elimination rate of D- 18 F-FBPA than L- 18 F-FBPA from the blood to the urinary tract. PET imaging using 18 F-FBPA revealed that although the brain uptake of D- 18 F-FBPA was significantly lower than that of L- 18 F-FBPA, the TBR of the D-isomer improved to 6.93 from 1.45 for the L-isomer. Similar results were obtained with PET imaging using 11 C-CMT with a smaller improvement in TBR to 1.75 for D- 11 C-CMT from 1.33 for L- 11 C-CMT. The present results indicate that D- 18 F-FBPA is a better brain tumor imaging agent with higher TBR than its original L-isomer and previously reported tyrosine-based PET imaging agents. This improved TBR of D- 18 F-FBPA without any pre-treatments, such as tentative blood-brain barrier disruption using hyperosmotic agents or sonication, suggests that the D-isomerization of BPA results in the more selective accumulation of 10 B in tumor cells that is more effective and less toxic than conventional L-BPA.

  20. Antibody directed against human YKL-40 increases tumor volume in a human melanoma xenograft model in scid mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salamon, Johannes; Hoffmann, Tatjana; Elies, Eva

    2014-01-01

    were treated with intraperitoneal injections of anti-YKL-40, isoptype control or PBS. Non-YKL-40 expressing human pancreatic carcinoma cell line PaCa 5061 served as additional control. MR imaging was used for evaluation of tumor growth. Two days after the first injections of anti-YKL-40, tumor volume...... had increased significantly compared with controls, whereas no effects were observed for control tumors from PaCa 5061 cells lacking YKL-40 expression. After 18 days, mean tumor size of the mice receiving repeated anti-YKL-40 injections was 1.82 g, >4 times higher than mean tumor size of the controls...

  1. Differentiation of Enhancing Glioma and Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma by Texture-Based Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaide-Leon, P; Dufort, P; Geraldo, A F; Alshafai, L; Maralani, P J; Spears, J; Bharatha, A

    2017-06-01

    Accurate preoperative differentiation of primary central nervous system lymphoma and enhancing glioma is essential to avoid unnecessary neurosurgical resection in patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of a machine-learning algorithm by using texture analysis of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images for differentiation of primary central nervous system lymphoma and enhancing glioma. Seventy-one adult patients with enhancing gliomas and 35 adult patients with primary central nervous system lymphomas were included. The tumors were manually contoured on contrast-enhanced T1WI, and the resulting volumes of interest were mined for textural features and subjected to a support vector machine-based machine-learning protocol. Three readers classified the tumors independently on contrast-enhanced T1WI. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves were estimated for each reader and for the support vector machine classifier. A noninferiority test for diagnostic accuracy based on paired areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve was performed with a noninferiority margin of 0.15. The mean areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve were 0.877 (95% CI, 0.798-0.955) for the support vector machine classifier; 0.878 (95% CI, 0.807-0.949) for reader 1; 0.899 (95% CI, 0.833-0.966) for reader 2; and 0.845 (95% CI, 0.757-0.933) for reader 3. The mean area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the support vector machine classifier was significantly noninferior to the mean area under the curve of reader 1 ( P = .021), reader 2 ( P = .035), and reader 3 ( P = .007). Support vector machine classification based on textural features of contrast-enhanced T1WI is noninferior to expert human evaluation in the differentiation of primary central nervous system lymphoma and enhancing glioma. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  2. MRI Evaluation of Non-Necrotic T2-Hyperintense Foci in Pediatric Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerk-Lamalice, O; Reddick, W E; Li, X; Li, Y; Edwards, A; Glass, J O; Patay, Z

    2016-05-19

    The conventional MR imaging appearance of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma suggests intralesional histopathologic heterogeneity, and various distinct lesion components, including T2-hypointense foci, have been described. Here we report the prevalence, conventional MR imaging semiology, and advanced MR imaging features of non-necrotic T2-hyperintense foci in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. Twenty-five patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas were included in this study. MR imaging was performed at 3T by using conventional and advanced MR imaging sequences. Perfusion (CBV), vascular permeability (v e , K trans ), and diffusion (ADC) metrics were calculated and used to characterize non-necrotic T2-hyperintense foci in comparison with other lesion components, namely necrotic T2-hyperintense foci, T2-hypointense foci, peritumoral edema, and normal brain stem. Statistical analysis was performed by using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Sixteen non-necrotic T2-hyperintense foci were found in 12 tumors. In these foci, ADC values were significantly higher than those in either T2-hypointense foci (P = .002) or normal parenchyma (P = .0002), and relative CBV values were significantly lower than those in either T2-hypointense (P = .0002) or necrotic T2-hyperintense (P = .006) foci. Volume transfer coefficient values in T2-hyperintense foci were lower than those in T2-hypointense (P = .0005) or necrotic T2-hyperintense (P = .0348) foci. Non-necrotic T2-hyperintense foci are common, distinct lesion components within diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas. Advanced MR imaging data suggest low cellularity and an early stage of angioneogenesis with leaky vessels resulting in expansion of the extracellular space. Because of the lack of biopsy validation, the underlying histoarchitectural and pathophysiologic changes remain unclear; therefore, these foci may correspond to a poorly understood biologic event in tumor evolution. © 2016 American Society of Neuroradiology.

  3. Probabilistic Multiple-Bias Modeling Applied to the Canadian Data From the Interphone Study of Mobile Phone Use and Risk of Glioma, Meningioma, Acoustic Neuroma, and Parotid Gland Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momoli, F; Siemiatycki, J; McBride, M L; Parent, M-É; Richardson, L; Bedard, D; Platt, R; Vrijheid, M; Cardis, E; Krewski, D

    2017-10-01

    We undertook a re-analysis of the Canadian data from the 13-country case-control Interphone Study (2001-2004), in which researchers evaluated the associations of mobile phone use with the risks of brain, acoustic neuroma, and parotid gland tumors. In the main publication of the multinational Interphone Study, investigators concluded that biases and errors prevented a causal interpretation. We applied a probabilistic multiple-bias model to address possible biases simultaneously, using validation data from billing records and nonparticipant questionnaires as information on recall error and selective participation. In our modeling, we sought to adjust for these sources of uncertainty and to facilitate interpretation. For glioma, when comparing those in the highest quartile of use (>558 lifetime hours) to those who were not regular users, the odds ratio was 2.0 (95% confidence interval: 1.2, 3.4). After adjustment for selection and recall biases, the odds ratio was 2.2 (95% limits: 1.3, 4.1). There was little evidence of an increase in the risk of meningioma, acoustic neuroma, or parotid gland tumors in relation to mobile phone use. Adjustments for selection and recall biases did not materially affect interpretation in our results from Canadian data. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Tumor-Volume Simulation During Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer Using a Four-Level Cell Population Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chvetsov, Alexei V.; Dong Lei; Palta, Jantinder R.; Amdur, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a fast computational radiobiologic model for quantitative analysis of tumor volume during fractionated radiotherapy. The tumor-volume model can be useful for optimizing image-guidance protocols and four-dimensional treatment simulations in proton therapy that is highly sensitive to physiologic changes. Methods: The analysis is performed using two approximations: (1) tumor volume is a linear function of total cell number and (2) tumor-cell population is separated into four subpopulations: oxygenated viable cells, oxygenated lethally damaged cells, hypoxic viable cells, and hypoxic lethally damaged cells. An exponential decay model is used for disintegration and removal of oxygenated lethally damaged cells from the tumor. Results: We tested our model on daily volumetric imaging data available for 14 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with an integrated computed tomography/linear accelerator system. A simulation based on the averaged values of radiobiologic parameters was able to describe eight cases during the entire treatment and four cases partially (50% of treatment time) with a maximum 20% error. The largest discrepancies between the model and clinical data were obtained for small tumors, which may be explained by larger errors in the manual tumor volume delineation procedure. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the change in gross tumor volume for head-and-neck cancer can be adequately described by a relatively simple radiobiologic model. In future research, we propose to study the variation of model parameters by fitting to clinical data for a cohort of patients with head-and-neck cancer and other tumors. The potential impact of other processes, like concurrent chemotherapy, on tumor volume should be evaluated.

  5. Plasma uric acid and tumor volume are highly predictive of outcome in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients receiving intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Hui; Lin, Huan-Xin; Ge, Nan; Wang, Hong-Zhi; Sun, Rui; Hu, Wei-Han

    2013-01-01

    The combined predictive value of plasma uric acid and primary tumor volume in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has not yet been determined. In this retrospective study, plasma uric acid level was measured after treatment in 130 histologically-proven NPC patients treated with IMRT. Tumor volume was calculated from treatment planning CT scans. Overall (OS), progression-free (PFS) and distant metastasis-free (DMFS) survival were compared using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the log rank test, and Cox multivariate and univariate regression models were created. Patients with a small tumor volume (<27 mL) had a significantly better DMFS, PFS and OS than patients with a large tumor volume. Patients with a high post-treatment plasma uric acid level (>301 μmol/L) had a better DMFS, PFS and OS than patients with a low post-treatment plasma uric acid level. Patients with a small tumor volume and high post-treatment plasma uric acid level had a favorable prognosis compared to patients with a large tumor volume and low post-treatment plasma uric acid level (7-year overall OS, 100% vs. 48.7%, P <0.001 and PFS, 100% vs. 69.5%, P <0.001). Post-treatment plasma uric acid level and pre-treatment tumor volume have predictive value for outcome in NPC patients receiving IMRT. NPC patients with a large tumor volume and low post-treatment plasma uric acid level may benefit from additional aggressive treatment after IMRT

  6. SU-E-T-429: Uncertainties of Cell Surviving Fractions Derived From Tumor-Volume Variation Curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chvetsov, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate uncertainties of cell surviving fraction reconstructed from tumor-volume variation curves during radiation therapy using sensitivity analysis based on linear perturbation theory. Methods: The time dependent tumor-volume functions V(t) have been calculated using a twolevel cell population model which is based on the separation of entire tumor cell population in two subpopulations: oxygenated viable and lethally damaged cells. The sensitivity function is defined as S(t)=[δV(t)/V(t)]/[δx/x] where δV(t)/V(t) is the time dependent relative variation of the volume V(t) and δx/x is the relative variation of the radiobiological parameter x. The sensitivity analysis was performed using direct perturbation method where the radiobiological parameter x was changed by a certain error and the tumor-volume was recalculated to evaluate the corresponding tumor-volume variation. Tumor volume variation curves and sensitivity functions have been computed for different values of cell surviving fractions from the practically important interval S 2 =0.1-0.7 using the two-level cell population model. Results: The sensitivity functions of tumor-volume to cell surviving fractions achieved a relatively large value of 2.7 for S 2 =0.7 and then approached zero as S 2 is approaching zero Assuming a systematic error of 3-4% we obtain that the relative error in S 2 is less that 20% in the range S2=0.4-0.7. This Resultis important because the large values of S 2 are associated with poor treatment outcome should be measured with relatively small uncertainties. For the very small values of S2<0.3, the relative error can be larger than 20%; however, the absolute error does not increase significantly. Conclusion: Tumor-volume curves measured during radiotherapy can be used for evaluation of cell surviving fractions usually observed in radiation therapy with conventional fractionation

  7. Postoperative radiation therapy for malignant glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Teruki; Inoue, Toshihiko; Chatani, Masashi; Hata, Kiyoshi; Taki, Takuyu; Nii, Yasuo; Nakagawa, Hidemitsu

    1987-01-01

    From December 1977 through September 1984, a total of 39 cases of malignant glioma were treated with radiation therapy (RT) postoperatively. Twenty-nine cases were classified into glioblastoma (GM) and 10 astrocytoma (AS) (low grade : 6 and anaplastic : 4) histologically. One third of cases received 50 Gy/25 FRX/5 WKS of whole brain RT. Another two thirds of cases underwent 60 Gy/30 FRX/6 WKS of whole brain or 50 Gy/25 FRX/5 WKS of whole brain + additional 20 Gy/10 FRX/2 WKS of localized field RT. Chemotherapy (BLM, MeCCNU and ACNU) was given for 34 cases. Survivals at 3 years for GM and AS were 12 % and 68 %, respectively (p < 0.01). Prognostic factors for GM were age (p < 0.02), neurologic function (RTOG) (p < 0.01), AJC-staging T-factor (p < 0.05), pre-RT LDH level (p < 0.05) and volume of residual tumor (p < 0.05). Corresponding factors for AS were histological subclassification (p < 0.05) and neurologic function (RTOG) (p < 0.05). However, RT dose and field did not impact on survival significantly. Acute adverse effects of RT were otitis media or externa (70 %) and conjunctivitis (8 %). Retinal bleeding was noted in three long-term survivors at 2 years after RT. (author)

  8. Quantitative study on lung volume and lung perfusion using SPECT and CT in thoracal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer-Enke, S.A.; Goerich, J.; Strauss, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    22 patients with space occupying lesions in the thoracal region were investigated by computer tomography and by perfusion scintigraphy using SPECT. In order to evaluate the CT images quantitatively, the lung volume was determined using approximation method and compared with the perfusion in the SPECT study. For this, anatomically equivalent transaxial SPECT slices had been coordinated to the CT slices. Between the determined lung volumes and the activity in the ocrresponding layers, a statistically significant correlation was found. It could be shown that the stronger perfusion, frequently observed at the right side of the healthy lung, may be explained by an higher volume of the right pulmonary lobe. Whereas in benign displacing processes the relation activity to volume was similar to the one of the healthy lung, a strongly reduced perfusion together with inconspicuous lung volumes became apparent with malignant tumors. In addition to the great morphological evidence of CT and SPECT studies, additional informations regarding the dignity of displacing processes may be derived from the quantitative evaluation of both methods. (orig.) [de

  9. UPA-sensitive ACPP-conjugated nanoparticles for multi-targeting therapy of brain glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yujie; Liao, Ziwei; Jiang, Ting; Zhao, Jingjing; Tuo, Yanyan; She, Xiaojian; Shen, Shun; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Xinguo; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2015-01-01

    Now it is well evidenced that tumor growth is a comprehensive result of multiple pathways, and glioma parenchyma cells and stroma cells are closely associated and mutually compensatory. Therefore, drug delivery strategies targeting both of them simultaneously might obtain more promising therapeutic benefits. In the present study, we developed a multi-targeting drug delivery system modified with uPA-activated cell-penetrating peptide (ACPP) for the treatment of brain glioma (ANP). In vitro experiments demonstrated nanoparticles (NP) decorated with cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) or ACPP could significantly improve nanoparticles uptake by C6 glioma cells and nanoparticles penetration into glioma spheroids as compared with traditional NP and thus enhanced the therapeutic effects of its payload when paclitaxel (PTX) was loaded. In vivo imaging experiment revealed that ANP accumulated more specifically in brain glioma site than NP decorated with or without CPP. Brain slides further showed that ACPP contributed to more nanoparticles accumulation in glioma site, and ANP could co-localize not only with glioma parenchyma cells, but also with stroma cells including neo-vascular cells and tumor associated macrophages. The pharmacodynamics results demonstrated ACPP could significantly improve the therapeutic benefits of nanoparticles by significantly prolonging the survival time of glioma bearing mice. In conclusion, the results suggested that nanoparticles modified with uPA-sensitive ACPP could reach multiple types of cells in glioma tissues and provide a novel strategy for glioma targeted therapy.

  10. Saw Palmetto Extract Inhibits Metastasis and Antiangiogenesis through STAT3 Signal Pathway in Glioma Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Hong; Shen, Jinglian; Yang, Yang; Che, Yuqin

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3) plays an important role in the proliferation and angiogenesis in human glioma. Previous research indicated that saw palmetto extract markedly inhibited the proliferation of human glioma cells through STAT3 signal pathway. But its effect on tumor metastasis and antiangiogenesis is not clear. This study is to further clear the impact of saw palmetto extract on glioma cell metastasis, antiangiogenesis, and its mechanism. TUNEL ass...

  11. Predicting oropharyngeal tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy from pretreatment computed tomography data using general linear models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yock, Adam D.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Rao, Arvind; Dong, Lei; Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S.; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate the accuracy of several predictive models of variation in tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy. Methods: Nineteen patients with oropharyngeal cancers were imaged daily with CT-on-rails for image-guided alignment per an institutional protocol. The daily volumes of 35 tumors in these 19 patients were determined and used to generate (1) a linear model in which tumor volume changed at a constant rate, (2) a general linear model that utilized the power fit relationship between the daily and initial tumor volumes, and (3) a functional general linear model that identified and exploited the primary modes of variation between time series describing the changing tumor volumes. Primary and nodal tumor volumes were examined separately. The accuracy of these models in predicting daily tumor volumes were compared with those of static and linear reference models using leave-one-out cross-validation. Results: In predicting the daily volume of primary tumors, the general linear model and the functional general linear model were more accurate than the static reference model by 9.9% (range: −11.6%–23.8%) and 14.6% (range: −7.3%–27.5%), respectively, and were more accurate than the linear reference model by 14.2% (range: −6.8%–40.3%) and 13.1% (range: −1.5%–52.5%), respectively. In predicting the daily volume of nodal tumors, only the 14.4% (range: −11.1%–20.5%) improvement in accuracy of the functional general linear model compared to the static reference model was statistically significant. Conclusions: A general linear model and a functional general linear model trained on data from a small population of patients can predict the primary tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy with greater accuracy than standard reference models. These more accurate models may increase the prognostic value of information about the tumor garnered from pretreatment computed tomography

  12. Aflac ST0901 CHOANOME - Sirolimus in Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-15

    Ewing's Sarcoma; Osteosarcoma; Astrocytoma; Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Ependymoma; Germ Cell Tumor; Glioma; Medulloblastoma; Rhabdoid Tumor; Retinoblastoma; Clear Cell Sarcoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Wilms Tumor; Hepatoblastoma; Neuroblastoma; Rhabdomyosarcoma

  13. Glioma Association and Balancing Selection of ZFPM2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shui-Ying Tsang

    Full Text Available ZFPM2, encoding a zinc finger protein and abundantly expressed in the brain, uterus and smooth muscles, plays important roles in cardiac and gonadal development. Abnormal expression of ZFPM2 in ovarian tumors and neuroblastoma has been reported but hitherto its genetic association with cancer and effects on gliomas have not been studied. In the present study, the hexamer insertion-deletion polymorphism rs71305152, located within a large haplotype block spanning intron 1 to intron 3 of ZFPM2, was genotyped in Chinese cohorts of glioma (n = 350, non-glioma cancer (n = 354 and healthy control (n = 463 by direct sequencing and length polymorphism in gel electrophoresis, and ZFPM2 expression in glioma tissues (n = 69 of different grades was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Moreover, potential natural selection pressure acting on the gene was investigated. Disease-association analysis showed that the overall genotype of rs71305152 was significantly associated with gliomas (P = 0.016, and the heterozygous genotype compared to the combined homozygous genotypes was less frequent in gliomas than in controls (P = 0.005 or non-glioma cancers (P = 0.020. ZFPM2 mRNA expression was negatively correlated with the grades of gliomas (P = 0.002, with higher expression levels in the low-grade gliomas. In the astrocytoma subtype, higher ZFPM2 expression was also correlated with the rs71305152 heterozygous genotype (P = 0.028. In addition, summary statistics tests gave highly positive values, demonstrating that the gene is under the influence of balancing selection. These findings suggest that ZFPM2 is a glioma susceptibility gene, its genotype and expression showing associations with incidence and severity, respectively. Moreover, the balancing selection acting on ZFPM2 may be related to the important roles it has to play in multiple organ development or associated disease etiology.

  14. Activation of glioma cells generates immune tolerant NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bo; Wu, Wei; Wei, Xiaowei; Li, Yang; Ren, Gang; Fan, Wenhai

    2014-12-12

    Therapeutic outcomes of glioma are currently not encouraging. Tumor tolerance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of glioma. It is reported that micro RNAs (miR) are associated with tumor development. This study aims to investigate the role of miR-92a in the development of tolerant natural killer T (NKT) cells. In this study, U87 cells (a human glioma cell line) and primary glioma cells were prepared. The assessment of miR-92a was performed by real time RT-PCR. The expression of interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-6 in NKT cells was evaluated by flow cytometry. Results showed that abundant IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells were detected in glioma tissue. Cultures of glioma cells and NKT cells induced the expression of IL-6 and IL-10 in NKT cells. Glioma cells expressed miR-92a; the latter played a critical role in the induction of IL-6 and IL-10 expression in NKT cells. The expression of the antitumor molecules, including perforin, Fas ligand, and interferon-γ, was significantly attenuated compared with control NKT cells. The IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells showed less capability in the induction of apoptosis in glioma cells, but showed the immune suppressor functions on CD8(+) T cell activities. We conclude that glioma-derived miR-92a induces IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells; this fraction of NKT cells can suppress cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Surgical benefits of combined awake craniotomy and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging for gliomas associated with eloquent areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motomura, Kazuya; Natsume, Atsushi; Iijima, Kentaro; Kuramitsu, Shunichiro; Fujii, Masazumi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Maesawa, Satoshi; Sugiura, Junko; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Maximum extent of resection (EOR) for lower-grade and high-grade gliomas can increase survival rates of patients. However, these infiltrative gliomas are often observed near or within eloquent regions of the brain. Awake surgery is of known benefit for the treatment of gliomas associated with eloquent regions in that brain function can be preserved. On the other hand, intraoperative MRI (iMRI) has been successfully used to maximize the resection of tumors, which can detect small amounts of residual tumors. Therefore, the authors assessed the value of combining awake craniotomy and iMRI for the resection of brain tumors in eloquent areas of the brain. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of 33 consecutive patients with glial tumors in the eloquent brain areas who underwent awake surgery using iMRI. Volumetric analysis of MRI studies was performed. The pre-, intra-, and postoperative tumor volumes were measured in all cases using MRI studies obtained before, during, and after tumor resection. RESULTS Intraoperative MRI was performed to check for the presence of residual tumor during awake surgery in a total of 25 patients. Initial iMRI confirmed no further tumor resection in 9 patients (36%) because all observable tumors had already been removed. In contrast, intraoperative confirmation of residual tumor during awake surgery led to further tumor resection in 16 cases (64%) and eventually an EOR of more than 90% in 8 of 16 cases (50%). Furthermore, EOR benefiting from iMRI by more than 15% was found in 7 of 16 cases (43.8%). Interestingly, the increase in EOR as a result of iMRI for tumors associated mainly with the insular lobe was significantly greater, at 15.1%, than it was for the other tumors, which was 8.0% (p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS This study revealed that combining awake surgery with iMRI was associated with a favorable surgical outcome for intrinsic brain tumors associated with eloquent areas. In particular, these benefits were

  16. CURRENT APPROACHES TO CHEMORADIOTHERAPY FOR MALIGNANT GLIOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. L. Choinzonov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-grade malignant gliomas (WHO grade G III–IV account for more than 50% of all primary brain tumors. Despite aggressive treatment, survival rates are still very low with a median reported survival of no more than 1.5 years.Radiation therapy is an integral part of the combined treatment, but often does not influence lethally on resistant tumor cells. Thereby, in recent decades there has been an active search for novel approaches to the treatment of malignant gliomas (chemotherapeutic drugs, biological modifiers, local hyperthermia. Experimental data showed that the effect of high temperatures has both a direct damaging effect on tumor cells and a sensitizing effect. Significant advantages are achieved when the complex treatment of different malignant tumorsincludes local hyperthermia. However data on the treatment of patients with primary and recurrent gliomas G III–IV using local hyperthermia are scarce.The literature review is given in the article provides an overview of the existing treatment methods for brain tumors.

  17. 测定脑胶质瘤患者神经肽、神经降压素的含量变化及意义%Clinical Significance and Detection of Neuro- Peptide and Neurotensin in Patients with Brain Glioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹秋霞; 司永兵; 齐法莲

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the change of neuropeptide Y(NPY)and neurotensin(NT)in pqtients with brain glioma.Method The concentration of NPY and NT in and around brain glioma tissue and plasma were detected with inequilibrant radio- imunology method.Result NPY concentrqtion in brain glioma tissue was obviously higher than that in tissue around the tumor(P<0.01).The Concentration of NT in brain glioma tissue was obviously higher that in tissue around the glioma(P<0.01).Conclusion Detection of NPY and NTin brain glion aprovides basis for further study on brain glioma and explainning dlinical and imaginal symiptom of brain glioma.

  18. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Oropharyngeal Carcinoma: Effect of Tumor Volume on Clinical Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lok, Benjamin H.; Setton, Jeremy; Caria, Nicola; Romanyshyn, Jonathan; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Park, Jeffery; Rowan, Nicholas; Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Ho, Alan; Pfister, David G.; Wong, Richard J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Zhang, Zhigang; Schupak, Karen D.; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Rao, Shyam D.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of primary gross tumor volume (pGTV) and nodal gross tumor volume (nGTV) on treatment outcomes in patients treated with definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, a total of 442 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx were treated with IMRT with curative intent at our center. Thirty patients treated postoperatively and 2 additional patients who started treatment more than 6 months after diagnosis were excluded. A total of 340 patients with restorable treatment plans were included in this present study. The majority of the patients underwent concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. The pGTV and nGTV were calculated using the original clinical treatment plans. Cox proportional hazards models and log-rank tests were used to evaluate the correlation between tumor volumes and overall survival (OS), and competing risks analysis tools were used to evaluate the correlation between local failure (LF), regional failure (RF), distant metastatic failure (DMF) vs. tumor volumes with death as a competing risk. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 34 months (range, 5-67). The 2-year cumulative incidence of LF, RF and DF in this cohort of patients was 6.1%, 5.2%, and 12.2%, respectively. The 2-year OS rate was 88.6%. Univariate analysis determined pGTV and T-stage correlated with LF (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.004, respectively), whereas nGTV was not associated with RF. On multivariate analysis, pGTV and N-stage were independent risk factors for overall survival (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.0073, respectively) and distant control (p = 0.0008 and p = 0.002, respectively). Conclusions: In this cohort of patients with OPC treated with IMRT, pGTV was found to be associated with overall survival, local failure, and distant metastatic failure.

  19. Loss of heterozygosity of TRIM3 in malignant gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolder Béatrice

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant gliomas are frequent primary brain tumors associated with poor prognosis and very limited response to conventional chemo- and radio-therapies. Besides sharing common growth features with other types of solid tumors, gliomas are highly invasive into adjacent brain tissue, which renders them particularly aggressive and their surgical resection inefficient. Therefore, insights into glioma formation are of fundamental interest in order to provide novel molecular targets for diagnostic purposes and potential anti-cancer drugs. Human Tripartite motif protein 3 (TRIM3 encodes a structural homolog of Drosophila brain tumor (brat implicated in progenitor cell proliferation control and cancer stem cell suppression. TRIM3 is located within the loss of allelic heterozygosity (LOH hotspot of chromosome segment 11p15.5, indicating a potential role in tumor suppression. ... Methods Here we analyze 70 primary human gliomas of all types and grades and report somatic deletion mapping as well as single nucleotide polymorphism analysis together with quantitative real-time PCR of chromosome segment 11p15.5. Results Our analysis identifies LOH in 17 cases (24% of primary human glioma which defines a common 130 kb-wide interval within the TRIM3 locus as a minimal area of loss. We further detect altered genomic dosage of TRIM3 in two glioma cases with LOH at 11p15.5, indicating homozygous deletions of TRIM3. Conclusion Loss of heterozygosity of chromosome segment 11p15.5 in malignant gliomas suggests TRIM3 as a candidate brain tumor suppressor gene.

  20. Gamma Knife treatment of low-grade gliomas in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Yılmaz, Baran; Akakın, Akın; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Kaur, Ahmet Cemil; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Kılıç, Türker

    2015-11-01

    Low-grade gliomas have good overall survival rates in pediatric patients compared to adults. There are some case series that reported the effectiveness and safety of Gamma Knife radiosurgery, yet they are limited in number of patients. We aimed to review the relevant literature for pediatric low-grade glial tumors treated with stereotactic radiosurgery, specifically Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and to present an exemplary case. A 6-year-old boy was admitted to clinic due to head trauma. He was alert, cooperative, and had no obvious motor or sensorial deficit. A head CT scan depicted a hypodense zone at the right caudate nucleus. The brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) depicted a mass lesion at the same location. A stereotactic biopsy was performed. Histopathological diagnosis was low-grade astrocytoma (grade II, World Health Organization (WHO) classification, 2007). Gamma Knife radiosurgery was applied to the tumor bed. Tumor volume was 21.85 cm(3). Fourteen gray was given to 50% isodose segment of the lesion (maximal dose of 28 Gy). The tumor has disappeared totally in 4 months, and the patient was tumor-free 21 months after the initial treatment. The presented literature review represents mostly single-center experiences with different patient and treatment characteristics. Accordingly, a mean/median margin dose of 11.3-15 Gy with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) is successful in treatment of pediatric and adult low-grade glial tumor patients. However, prospective studies with a large cohort of pediatric patients should be conducted to make a more comprehensive conclusion for effectiveness and safety of GKRS in pediatric low-grade glial tumors.

  1. Change of tumor target volume during waiting time for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bo; Yi Junlin; Gao Li; Xu Guozhen; Huang Xiaodong; Zhang Zhong; Luo Jingwei; Li Suyan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the influence of change in tumor target volume of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) while waiting for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: From March 2005 to December 2005, 31 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma received IMRT as the initial treatment at the Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academic of Medical Sciences. The original simulation CT scan was acquired before IMRT planning. A second CT scan was acquired before the start of radiotherapy. Wait- ing time was defined as the duration between CT simulation and start of radiotherapy. CT-CT fusion was used to minimize the error of delineation between the first tumor target volume (GTV) and the second tumor target volume (sGTV). Tumor target volume was calculated by treatment planning system. T test was carried out to analyse the difference between GTV and sGTV. Pearson correlation and multivariate linear regression was used to analyse the influence factor of the change betweent GTV and sGTV. Results: Median waiting time was 18 days (range, 9-27 days). There were significant differences between GTV and sGTV of both primary tumor (P=0.009) and metastatic lymphoma (P=0.005 ). Both Pearson correlation and multivariate linear regression showed that the change of primary tumor target volume had significant correlation with the first tumor target volume but had no significant correlation with the waiting time, sex, age, T stage and N stage (1992 Chinese Fuzhou Staging Classification). Conclusions: Within the range of the waiting time ob- served in our study, large volume primary tumor would have had a significant increase in volume, but whether the therapeutic effect would be influenced or not would need to be proved by study of large number of cases. Patients with large volume tumor should be considered to reduce the influence of waiting time by enlarging gross target volume and clinical targe volume and by neoadjuveant chemotherapy. For avoiding the unnecessary high-dose to normal

  2. Automatic segmentation of tumor-laden lung volumes from the LIDC database

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Walter G.

    2012-03-01

    The segmentation of the lung parenchyma is often a critical pre-processing step prior to application of computer-aided detection of lung nodules. Segmentation of the lung volume can dramatically decrease computation time and reduce the number of false positive detections by excluding from consideration extra-pulmonary tissue. However, while many algorithms are capable of adequately segmenting the healthy lung, none have been demonstrated to work reliably well on tumor-laden lungs. Of particular challenge is to preserve tumorous masses attached to the chest wall, mediastinum or major vessels. In this role, lung volume segmentation comprises an important computational step that can adversely affect the performance of the overall CAD algorithm. An automated lung volume segmentation algorithm has been developed with the goals to maximally exclude extra-pulmonary tissue while retaining all true nodules. The algorithm comprises a series of tasks including intensity thresholding, 2-D and 3-D morphological operations, 2-D and 3-D floodfilling, and snake-based clipping of nodules attached to the chest wall. It features the ability to (1) exclude trachea and bowels, (2) snip large attached nodules using snakes, (3) snip small attached nodules using dilation, (4) preserve large masses fully internal to lung volume, (5) account for basal aspects of the lung where in a 2-D slice the lower sections appear to be disconnected from main lung, and (6) achieve separation of the right and left hemi-lungs. The algorithm was developed and trained to on the first 100 datasets of the LIDC image database.

  3. Evaluation of the effect of prostate volume change on tumor control probability in LDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaup, Courtney; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Stathakis, Sotirios; Smith, Mark; Swanson, Gregory; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluates low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR) prostate plans to determine the biological effect of dose degradation due to prostate volume changes. In this study, 39 patients were evaluated. Pre-implant prostate volume was determined using ultrasound. These images were used with the treatment planning system (Nucletron Spot Pro 3.1(®)) to create treatment plans using (103)Pd seeds. Following the implant, patients were imaged using CT for post-implant dosimetry. From the pre and post-implant DVHs, the biologically equivalent dose and the tumor control probability (TCP) were determined using the biologically effective uniform dose. The model used RBE = 1.75 and α/β = 2 Gy. The prostate volume changed between pre and post implant image sets ranged from -8% to 110%. TCP and the mean dose were reduced up to 21% and 56%, respectively. TCP is observed to decrease as the mean dose decreases to the prostate. The post-implant tumor dose was generally observed to decrease, compared to the planned dose. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was established. Below this dose, TCP begins to fall-off. It was also determined that patients with a small prostates were more likely to suffer TCP decrease. The biological effect of post operative prostate growth due to operative trauma in LDR was evaluated using the concept. The post-implant dose was lower than the planned dose due to an increase of prostate volume post-implant. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was determined, below which TCP begun to decline.

  4. The translocator protein radioligand 18F-DPA-714 monitors antitumor effect of erufosine in a rat 9L intracranial glioma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awde, Ali R.; Boisgard, Raphael; Theze, Benoit; Dubois, Albertine; Zheng, Jinzi; Winkeler, Alexandra; Dolle, Frederic; Jacobs, Andreas H.; Tavitian, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    On the one hand, the translocator protein (TSPO) radioligand N,N-diethyl-2-(2-(4-(2- 18 F-fluoroethoxy)phenyl)-5,7-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidin-3-yl)acetamide ( 18 F-DPA-714) has been suggested to serve as an alternative radiotracer to image human glioma, and on the other hand the alkyl-phosphocholine erufosine (ErPC3) has been reported to induce apoptosis in otherwise highly apoptosis resistant glioma cell lines. The induction of apoptosis by ErPC3 requires TSPO, a mitochondrial membrane protein highly expressed in malignant gliomas. In this preclinical study, we monitored the effect of ErPC3 treatment in vivo using 18 F-DPA-714 PET. Methods: In vitro studies investigated the antitumor effect of ErPC3 in 9L rat gliosarcoma cells. In vivo, glioma-bearing rats were imaged with 18 F-DPA-714 for the time of treatment. Results: A significant decrease in 9L cell proliferation and viability and a significant increase in apoptosis and caspase-3 activation were demonstrated on ErPC3 treatment in cell culture. In the rat model, ErPC3 administration resulted in significant changes in 18 F-DPA-714 tumor uptake over the course of the treatment. Immunohistochemistry revealed reduced tumor volume and increased cell death in ErPC3-treated animals accompanied by infiltration of the tumor core by CD11b-positive micro-glia/macrophages and glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes. Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate a potent antitumor effect of ErPC3 in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo. PET imaging of TSPO expression using 18 F-DPA-714 allows effective monitoring and quantification of disease progression and response to ErPC3 therapy in intracranial 9L gliomas. (authors)

  5. Stereological estimates of nuclear volume and other quantitative variables in supratentorial brain tumors. Practical technique and use in prognostic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Braendgaard, H; Chistiansen, A O

    1991-01-01

    The use of morphometry and modern stereology in malignancy grading of brain tumors is only poorly investigated. The aim of this study was to present these quantitative methods. A retrospective feasibility study of 46 patients with supratentorial brain tumors was carried out to demonstrate...... the practical technique. The continuous variables were correlated with the subjective, qualitative WHO classification of brain tumors, and the prognostic value of the parameters was assessed. Well differentiated astrocytomas (n = 14) had smaller estimates of the volume-weighted mean nuclear volume and mean...... nuclear profile area, than those of anaplastic astrocytomas (n = 13) (2p = 3.1.10(-3) and 2p = 4.8.10(-3), respectively). No differences were seen between the latter type of tumor and glioblastomas (n = 19). The nuclear index was of the same magnitude in all three tumor types, whereas the mitotic index...

  6. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massi, Paola [Department of Pharmacology, Chemotherapy and Toxicology, University of Milan, Via Vanvitelli 32, 20129 Milan (Italy); Valenti, Marta; Solinas, Marta; Parolaro, Daniela [Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Section of Pharmacology, Center of Neuroscience, University of Insubria, Via A. da Giussano 10, 20152 Busto Arsizio, Varese (Italy)

    2010-05-26

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massi, Paola; Valenti, Marta; Solinas, Marta; Parolaro, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells

  8. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Massi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells.

  9. Characterizing Tumor Heterogeneity With Functional Imaging and Quantifying High-Risk Tumor Volume for Early Prediction of Treatment Outcome: Cervical Cancer as a Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayr, Nina A.; Huang Zhibin; Wang, Jian Z.; Lo, Simon S.; Fan, Joline M.; Grecula, John C.; Sammet, Steffen; Sammet, Christina L.; Jia Guang; Zhang Jun; Knopp, Michael V.; Yuh, William T.C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment response in cancer has been monitored by measuring anatomic tumor volume (ATV) at various times without considering the inherent functional tumor heterogeneity known to critically influence ultimate treatment outcome: primary tumor control and survival. This study applied dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) functional MRI to characterize tumors' heterogeneous subregions with low DCE values, at risk for treatment failure, and to quantify the functional risk volume (FRV) for personalized early prediction of treatment outcome. Methods and Materials: DCE-MRI was performed in 102 stage IB 2 –IVA cervical cancer patients to assess tumor perfusion heterogeneity before and during radiation/chemotherapy. FRV represents the total volume of tumor voxels with critically low DCE signal intensity ( 20, >13, and >5 cm 3 , respectively, significantly predicted unfavorable 6-year primary tumor control (p = 0.003, 7.3 × 10 −8 , 2.0 × 10 −8 ) and disease-specific survival (p = 1.9 × 10 −4 , 2.1 × 10 −6 , 2.5 × 10 −7 , respectively). The FRVs were superior to the ATVs as early predictors of outcome, and the differentiating power of FRVs increased during treatment. Discussion: Our preliminary results suggest that functional tumor heterogeneity can be characterized by DCE-MRI to quantify FRV for predicting ultimate long-term treatment outcome. FRV is a novel functional imaging heterogeneity parameter, superior to ATV, and can be clinically translated for personalized early outcome prediction before or as early as 2–5 weeks into treatment.

  10. Targeting of human glioma xenografts in vivo utilizing radiolabeled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.A.; Wessels, B.W.; Wharam, M.D.; Order, S.E.; Wanek, P.M.; Poggenburg, J.K.; Klein, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies provide a potential basis for selective radiotherapy of human gliomas. We have measured tumor targeting by radiolabeled monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies directed against neuroectodermal and tumor-associated antigens in nude mice bearing human glioma xenografts. Monoclonal P96.5, a mouse IgG2a immunoglobulin, defines an epitope of a human melanoma cell surface protein, and specifically binds the U-251 human glioma as measured by immunoperoxidase histochemistry. 111In-radiolabeled P96.5 specifically targets the U-251 human glioma xenograft and yields 87.0 microCuries (microCi) of tumor activity per gram per 100 microCi injected activity compared to 4.5 microCi following administration of radiolabeled irrelevant monoclonal antibody. Calculations of targeting ratios demonstrate deposited dose to be 11.6 times greater with radiolabeled P96.5 administration compared to irrelevant monoclonal antibody. The proportion of tumor dose found in normal organs is less than 10%, further supporting specific targeting of the human glioma xenograft by this antibody. Monoclonal antibody ZME018, which defines a second melanoma-associated antigen, and polyclonal rabbit antiferritin, which defines a tumor-associated antigen, demonstrate positive immunoperoxidase staining of the tumor, but comparatively decreased targeting. When compared to the 111In-radiolabeled antibody, 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5 demonstrates comparable tumor targeting and percentages of tumor dose found in normal organs. To test the therapeutic potential of 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5, tumors and normal sites were implanted with miniature thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Seven days following administration of 100 microCi 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5, average absorbed doses of 3770, 980, 353, and 274 cGy were observed in tumor, liver, contralateral control site, and total body, respectively

  11. Survival after stereotactic biopsy of malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, R.J.; Lunsford, L.D.; Taylor, F.H.

    1988-01-01

    For many patients with malignant gliomas in inaccessible or functionally important locations, stereotactic biopsy followed by radiation therapy (RT) may be a more appropriate initial treatment than craniotomy and tumor resection. We studied the long term survival in 91 consecutive patients with malignant gliomas diagnosed by stereotactic biopsy: 64 had glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and 27 had anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). Sixty-four per cent of the GBMs and 33% of the AAs involved deep or midline cerebral structures. The treatment prescribed after biopsy, the tumor location, the histological findings, and the patient's age at presentation (for AAs) were statistically important factors determining patient survival. If adequate RT (tumor dose of 5000 to 6000 cGy) was not prescribed, the median survival was less than or equal to 11 weeks regardless of tumor histology or location. The median survival for patients with deep or midline tumors who completed RT was similar in AA (19.4 weeks) and GBM (27 weeks) cases. Histology was an important predictor of survival only for patients with adequately treated lobar tumors. The median survival in lobar GBM patients who completed RT was 46.9 weeks, and that in lobar AA patients who completed RT was 129 weeks. Cytoreductive surgery had no statistically significant effect on survival. Among the clinical factors examined, age of less than 40 years at presentation was associated with prolonged survival only in AA patients. Constellations of clinical features, tumor location, histological diagnosis, and treatment prescribed were related to survival time

  12. Intraoperative radiation therapy for malignant glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Noboru; Yamada, Hiromu; Andoh, Takashi; Hirata, Toshifumi; Nishimura, Yasuaki; Miwa, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Kotoyuki; Yanagawa, Shigeo [Gifu Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1991-11-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) was used as part of the initial therapy for malignant glioma in 32 of 73 patients with histologically verified anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III astrocytoma) and glioblastoma multiforme. The initial treatment for all cases was subtotal or total tumor resection combined with external irradiation and chemotherapy. IORT was performed 1 week after tumor resection, with doses of 10-50 Gy (mean 26.7 Gy) in one session. Fourteen of 32 cases had IORT two times because of tumor recurrence. The IORT patients had survival rates at 24 and 36 months after initial treatment of 57.1 and 33.5% (median survival 26.2 months). The other 41 patients had 23.6 and 13.1% survivals (median survival 20.7 months), which were significantly lower (p<0.01). Tumor recurrence within the original lesion site was suspected because of clinical condition, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging studies in 65.6% of the IORT group (21 cases) 12 months after initial treatment. Twenty cases of death in the IORT group, including five autopsy cases, demonstrated regional tumor recurrence with a high incidence of intraventricular tumor invasion. The authors consider IORT is beneficial for selected malignant glioma patients, including tumor recurrence, because of prolonged survival. (author).

  13. Obtention of tumor volumes in PET images stacks using techniques of colored image segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Jose W.; Lopes Filho, Ferdinand J.; Vieira, Igor F.

    2014-01-01

    This work demonstrated step by step how to segment color images of the chest of an adult in order to separate the tumor volume without significantly changing the values of the components R (Red), G (Green) and B (blue) of the colors of the pixels. For having information which allow to build color map you need to segment and classify the colors present at appropriate intervals in images. The used segmentation technique is to select a small rectangle with color samples in a given region and then erase with a specific color called 'rubber' the other regions of image. The tumor region was segmented into one of the images available and the procedure is displayed in tutorial format. All necessary computational tools have been implemented in DIP (Digital Image Processing), software developed by the authors. The results obtained, in addition to permitting the construction the colorful map of the distribution of the concentration of activity in PET images will also be useful in future work to enter tumors in voxel phantoms in order to perform dosimetric assessments

  14. Adaptive Radiotherapy Planning on Decreasing Gross Tumor Volumes as Seen on Megavoltage Computed Tomography Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodford, Curtis; Yartsev, Slav; Dar, A. Rashid; Bauman, Glenn; Van Dyk, Jake

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate gross tumor volume (GTV) changes for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer by using daily megavoltage (MV) computed tomography (CT) studies acquired before each treatment fraction on helical tomotherapy and to relate the potential benefit of adaptive image-guided radiotherapy to changes in GTV. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were prescribed 30 fractions of radiotherapy on helical tomotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer at London Regional Cancer Program from Dec 2005 to March 2007. The GTV was contoured on the daily MVCT studies of each patient. Adapted plans were created using merged MVCT-kilovoltage CT image sets to investigate the advantages of replanning for patients with differing GTV regression characteristics. Results: Average GTV change observed over 30 fractions was -38%, ranging from -12 to -87%. No significant correlation was observed between GTV change and patient's physical or tumor features. Patterns of GTV changes in the 17 patients could be divided broadly into three groups with distinctive potential for benefit from adaptive planning. Conclusions: Changes in GTV are difficult to predict quantitatively based on patient or tumor characteristics. If changes occur, there are points in time during the treatment course when it may be appropriate to adapt the plan to improve sparing of normal tissues. If GTV decreases by greater than 30% at any point in the first 20 fractions of treatment, adaptive planning is appropriate to further improve the therapeutic ratio

  15. Radiosensitivity and TP 53, EGFR amplification and LOH10 analysis of primary glioma cell cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerlach, Bärbel; Harder, Anna H.; Hulsebos, Theo J. M.; Leenstra, Sieger; Slotman, Berend J.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Hartmann, Karl-Axel; Sminia, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Determination of in-vitro radiosensitivity and genetic alterations of cell cultures derived from human glioma biopsy tissue and established glioma cell lines. Material and Methods: Fresh brain tumor specimens of six patients were processed to early passage cell cultures. In addition the cell

  16. Identification of Predictive Response Markers and Novel Treatment Targets for Gliomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Erdem-Eraslan (Lale)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractGliomas are the most frequent primary brain tumors in adults. Despite multimodality treatment strategies, the survival of patients with a diffuse glioma remains poor. There has been an increasing use of molecular markers to assist diagnosis and predict prognosis and response to

  17. Definition of gross tumor volume in lung cancer: inter-observer variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Steene, Jan; Linthout, Nadine; Mey, Johan de; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Claassens, Cornelia; Noppen, Marc; Bel, Arjan; Storme, Guy

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the inter-observer variation in gross tumor volume (GTV) definition in lung cancer, and its clinical relevance. Material and methods: Five clinicians involved in lung cancer were asked to define GTV on the planning CT scan of eight patients. Resulting GTVs were compared on the base of geometric volume, dimensions and extensions. Judgement of invasion of lymph node (LN) regions was evaluated using the ATS/LCSG classification of LN. Clinical relevance of the variation was studied through 3D-dosimetry of standard conformal plans: volume of critical organs (heart, lungs, esophagus, spinal cord) irradiated at toxic doses, 95% isodose volumes of GTVs, normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) and tumor control probabilities (TCP) were compared for evaluation of observer variability. Results: Before evaluation of observer variability, critical review of planning CT scan led to up- (two cases) and downstaging (one case) of patients as compared to the respective diagnostic scans. The defined GTVs showed an inter-observer variation with a ratio up to more than 7 between maximum and minimum geometric content. The dimensions of the primary tumor had inter-observer ranges of 4.2 (transversal), 7.9 (cranio-caudal) and 5.4 (antero-posterior) cm. Extreme extensions of the GTVs (left, right, cranial, caudal, anterior and posterior) varied with ranges of 2.8-7.3 cm due to inter-observer variation. After common review, only 63% of involved lymph node regions were delineated by the clinicians (i.e. 37% are false negative). Twenty-two percent of drawn in lymph node regions were accepted to be false positive after review. In the conformal plans, inter-observer ranges of irradiated normal tissue volume were on average 12%, with a maximum of 66%. The probability (in the population of all conformal plans) of irradiating at least 95% of the GTV with at least 95% of the nominal treatment dose decreased from 96 to 88% when swapping the matched GTV

  18. Evaluation of PET/MRI for Tumor Volume Delineation for Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kyle; Mullins, Brandon T; Falchook, Aaron D; Lian, Jun; He, Kelei; Shen, Dinggang; Dance, Michael; Lin, Weili; Sills, Tiffany M; Das, Shiva K; Huang, Benjamin Y; Chera, Bhishamjit S

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT), combined positron emitted tomography and CT (PET/CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are commonly used in head and neck radiation planning. Hybrid PET/MRI has garnered attention for potential added value in cancer staging and treatment planning. Herein, we compare PET/MRI vs. planning CT for head and neck cancer gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation. We prospectively enrolled patients with head and neck cancer treated with definitive chemoradiation to 60-70 Gy using IMRT. We performed pretreatment contrast-enhanced planning CT and gadolinium-enhanced PET/MRI. Primary and nodal volumes were delineated on planning CT (GTV-CT) prospectively before treatment and PET/MRI (GTV-PET/MRI) retrospectively after treatment. GTV-PET/MRI was compared to GTV-CT using separate rigid registrations for each tumor volume. The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) metric evaluating spatial overlap and modified Hausdorff distance (mHD) evaluating mean orthogonal distance difference were calculated. Minimum dose to 95% of GTVs (D95) was compared. Eleven patients were evaluable (10 oropharynx, 1 larynx). Nine patients had evaluable primary tumor GTVs and seven patients had evaluable nodal GTVs. Mean primary GTV-CT and GTV-PET/MRI size were 13.2 and 14.3 cc, with mean intersection 8.7 cc, DSC 0.63, and mHD 1.6 mm. D95 was 65.3 Gy for primary GTV-CT vs. 65.2 Gy for primary GTV-PET/MRI. Mean nodal GTV-CT and GTV-PET/MRI size were 19.0 and 23.0 cc, with mean intersection 14.4 cc, DSC 0.69, and mHD 2.3 mm. D95 was 62.3 Gy for both nodal GTV-CT and GTV-PET/MRI. In this series of patients with head and neck (primarily oropharynx) cancer, PET/MRI and CT-GTVs had similar volumes (though there were individual cases with larger differences) with overall small discrepancies in spatial overlap, small mean orthogonal distance differences, and similar radiation doses.

  19. Analysis of Lung Tumor Motion in a Large Sample: Patterns and Factors Influencing Precise Delineation of Internal Target Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knybel, Lukas [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Cvek, Jakub, E-mail: Jakub.cvek@fno.cz [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Molenda, Lukas; Stieberova, Natalie; Feltl, David [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate lung tumor motion during respiration and to describe factors affecting the range and variability of motion in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Log file analysis from online respiratory tumor tracking was performed in 145 patients. Geometric tumor location in the lungs, tumor volume and origin (primary or metastatic), sex, and tumor motion amplitudes in the superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded. Tumor motion variability during treatment was described using intrafraction/interfraction amplitude variability and tumor motion baseline changes. Tumor movement dependent on the tumor volume, position and origin, and sex were evaluated using statistical regression and correlation analysis. Results: After analysis of >500 hours of data, the highest rates of motion amplitudes, intrafraction/interfraction variation, and tumor baseline changes were in the SI direction (6.0 ± 2.2 mm, 2.2 ± 1.8 mm, 1.1 ± 0.9 mm, and −0.1 ± 2.6 mm). The mean motion amplitudes in the lower/upper geometric halves of the lungs were significantly different (P<.001). Motion amplitudes >15 mm were observed only in the lower geometric quarter of the lungs. Higher tumor motion amplitudes generated higher intrafraction variations (R=.86, P<.001). Interfraction variations and baseline changes >3 mm indicated tumors contacting mediastinal structures or parietal pleura. On univariate analysis, neither sex nor tumor origin (primary vs metastatic) was an independent predictive factor of different movement patterns. Metastatic lesions in women, but not men, showed significantly higher mean amplitudes (P=.03) and variability (primary, 2.7 mm; metastatic, 4.9 mm; P=.002) than primary tumors. Conclusion: Online tracking showed significant irregularities in lung tumor movement during respiration. Motion amplitude was significantly lower in upper lobe

  20. Analysis of Lung Tumor Motion in a Large Sample: Patterns and Factors Influencing Precise Delineation of Internal Target Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knybel, Lukas; Cvek, Jakub; Molenda, Lukas; Stieberova, Natalie; Feltl, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate lung tumor motion during respiration and to describe factors affecting the range and variability of motion in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Log file analysis from online respiratory tumor tracking was performed in 145 patients. Geometric tumor location in the lungs, tumor volume and origin (primary or metastatic), sex, and tumor motion amplitudes in the superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded. Tumor motion variability during treatment was described using intrafraction/interfraction amplitude variability and tumor motion baseline changes. Tumor movement dependent on the tumor volume, position and origin, and sex were evaluated using statistical regression and correlation analysis. Results: After analysis of >500 hours of data, the highest rates of motion amplitudes, intrafraction/interfraction variation, and tumor baseline changes were in the SI direction (6.0 ± 2.2 mm, 2.2 ± 1.8 mm, 1.1 ± 0.9 mm, and −0.1 ± 2.6 mm). The mean motion amplitudes in the lower/upper geometric halves of the lungs were significantly different (P 15 mm were observed only in the lower geometric quarter of the lungs. Higher tumor motion amplitudes generated higher intrafraction variations (R=.86, P 3 mm indicated tumors contacting mediastinal structures or parietal pleura. On univariate analysis, neither sex nor tumor origin (primary vs metastatic) was an independent predictive factor of different movement patterns. Metastatic lesions in women, but not men, showed significantly higher mean amplitudes (P=.03) and variability (primary, 2.7 mm; metastatic, 4.9 mm; P=.002) than primary tumors. Conclusion: Online tracking showed significant irregularities in lung tumor movement during respiration. Motion amplitude was significantly lower in upper lobe tumors; higher interfraction amplitude variability indicated tumors in contact

  1. Intraoperative Cerebral Glioma Characterization with Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound

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    Francesco Prada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS is a dynamic and continuous modality providing real-time view of vascularization and flow distribution patterns of different organs and tumors. Nevertheless its intraoperative use for brain tumors visualization has been performed few times, and a thorough characterization of cerebral glioma had never been performed before. Aim. To perform the first characterization of cerebral glioma using CEUS and to possibly achieve an intraoperative differentiation of different gliomas. Methods. We performed CEUS in an off-label setting in 69 patients undergoing surgery for cerebral glioma. An intraoperative qualitative analysis was performed comparing iCEUS with B-mode imaging. A postprocedural semiquantitative analysis was then performed for each case, according to EFSUMB criteria. Results were related to histopathology. Results. We observed different CE patterns: LGG show a mild, dotted CE with diffuse appearance and slower, delayed arterial and venous phase. HGG have a high CE with a more nodular, nonhomogeneous appearance and fast perfusion patterns. Conclusion. Our study characterizes for the first time human brain glioma with CEUS, providing further insight regarding these tumors’ biology. CEUS is a fast, safe, dynamic, real-time, and economic tool that might be helpful during surgery in differentiating malignant and benign gliomas and refining surgical strategy.

  2. Extra-Neural Metastases of Malignant Gliomas: Myth or Reality?

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    Beauchesne, Patrick [Neuro-Oncology, CHU de NANCY, Hôpital Central, CO n°34, 54035 Nancy Cedex (France)

    2011-01-27

    Malignant gliomas account for approximately 60% of all primary brain tumors in adults. Prognosis for these patients has not significantly changed in recent years— despite debulking surgery, radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy—with a median survival of 9–12 months. Virtually no patients are cured of their illness. Malignant gliomas are usually locally invasive tumors, though extra-neural metastases can sometimes occur late in the course of the disease (median of two years). They generally appear after craniotomy although spontaneous metastases have also been reported. The incidence of these metastases from primary intra-cranial malignant gliomas is low; it is estimated at less than 2% of all cases. Extra-neural metastases from gliomas frequently occur late in the course of the disease (median of two years), and generally appear after craniotomy, but spontaneous metastases have also been reported. Malignant glioma metastases usually involve the regional lymph nodes, lungs and pleural cavity, and occasionally the bone and liver. In this review, we present three cases of extra-neural metastasis of malignant gliomas from our department, summarize the main reported cases in literature, and try to understand the mechanisms underlying these systemic metastases.

  3. Extra-Neural Metastases of Malignant Gliomas: Myth or Reality?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauchesne, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Malignant gliomas account for approximately 60% of all primary brain tumors in adults. Prognosis for these patients has not significantly changed in recent years— despite debulking surgery, radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy—with a median survival of 9–12 months. Virtually no patients are cured of their illness. Malignant gliomas are usually locally invasive tumors, though extra-neural metastases can sometimes occur late in the course of the disease (median of two years). They generally appear after craniotomy although spontaneous metastases have also been reported. The incidence of these metastases from primary intra-cranial malignant gliomas is low; it is estimated at less than 2% of all cases. Extra-neural metastases from gliomas frequently occur late in the course of the disease (median of two years), and generally appear after craniotomy, but spontaneous metastases have also been reported. Malignant glioma metastases usually involve the regional lymph nodes, lungs and pleural cavity, and occasionally the bone and liver. In this review, we present three cases of extra-neural metastasis of malignant gliomas from our department, summarize the main reported cases in literature, and try to understand the mechanisms underlying these systemic metastases

  4. Evaluation of the effect of prostate volume change on tumor control probability in LDR brachytherapy

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    Courtney Knaup

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluates low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR prostate plans to determine the biological effectof dose degradation due to prostate volume changes. Material and methods: In this study, 39 patients were evaluated. Pre-implant prostate volume was determinedusing ultrasound. These images were used with the treatment planning system (Nucletron Spot Pro 3.1® to create treatmentplans using 103Pd seeds. Following the implant, patients were imaged using CT for post-implant dosimetry. Fromthe pre and post-implant DVHs, the biologically equivalent dose and the tumor control probability (TCP were determinedusing the biologically effective uniform dose. The model used RBE = 1.75 and α/β = 2 Gy. Results: The prostate volume changed between pre and post implant image sets ranged from –8% to 110%. TCP andthe mean dose were reduced up to 21% and 56%, respectively. TCP is observed to decrease as the mean dose decreasesto the prostate. The post-implant tumor dose was generally observed to decrease, compared to the planned dose.A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was established. Below this dose, TCP begins to fall-off. It was also determined thatpatients with a small prostates were more likely to suffer TCP decrease. Conclusions: The biological effect of post operative prostate growth due to operative trauma in LDR was evaluatedusing the concept. The post-implant dose was lower than the planned dose due to an increase of prostate volumepost-implant. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was determined, below which TCP begun to decline.

  5. Dose-volume complication analysis for visual pathway structures of patients with advanced paranasal sinus tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martel, Mary Kaye; Sandler, Howard M.; Cornblath, Wayne T.; Marsh, Lon H.; Hazuka, Mark B.; Roa, Wilson H.; Fraass, Benedict A.; Lichter, Allen S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present work was to relate dose and volume information to complication data for visual pathway structures in patients with advanced paranasal sinus tumors. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions for chiasm, optic nerve, and retina were calculated and analyzed for 20 patients with advanced paranasal sinus malignant tumors. 3D treatment planning with beam's eye view capability was used to design beam and block arrangements, striving to spare the contralateral orbit (to lessen the chance of unilateral blindness) and frequently the ipsilateral orbit (to help prevent bilateral blindness). Point doses, dose-volume histogram analysis, and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) calculations were performed. Published tolerance doses that indicate significant risk of complications were used as guidelines for analysis of the 3D dose distributions. Results: Point doses, percent volume exceeding a specified published tolerance dose, and NTCP calculations are given in detail for patients with complications versus patients without complications. Two optic nerves receiving maximum doses below the published tolerance dose sustained damage (mild vision loss). Three patients (of 13) without optic nerve sparing and/or chiasm sparing had moderate or severe vision loss. Complication data, including individual patient analysis to estimate overall risk for loss of vision, are given. Conclusion: 3D treatment planning techniques were used successfully to provide bilateral sparing of the globe for most patients. It was more difficult to spare the optic nerves, especially on the ipsilateral side, when prescription dose exceeded the normal tissue tolerance doses. NTCP calculations may be useful in assessing complication risk better than point dose tolerance criteria for the chiasm, optic nerve, and retina. It is important to assess the overall risk of blindness for the patient in addition to the risk for individual visual pathway

  6. MRI in Glioma Immunotherapy: Evidence, Pitfalls, and Perspectives

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    Domenico Aquino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudophenomena, that is, imaging alterations due to therapy rather than tumor evolution, have an important impact on the management of glioma patients and the results of clinical trials. RANO (response assessment in neurooncology criteria, including conventional MRI (cMRI, addressed the issues of pseudoprogression after radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy and pseudoresponse during antiangiogenic therapy of glioblastomas (GBM and other gliomas. The development of cancer immunotherapy forced the identification of further relevant response criteria, summarized by the iRANO working group in 2015. In spite of this, the unequivocal definition of glioma progression by cMRI remains difficult particularly in the setting of immunotherapy approaches provided by checkpoint inhibitors and dendritic cells. Advanced MRI (aMRI may in principle address this unmet clinical need. Here, we discuss the potential contribution of different aMRI techniques and their indications and pitfalls in relation to biological and imaging features of glioma and immune system interactions.

  7. Influence of Residual Tumor Volume and Radiation Dose Coverage in Outcomes for Clival Chordoma

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    McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: markmcdonaldmd@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Linton, Okechukwu R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Moore, Michael G.; Ting, Jonathan Y. [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.; Shah, Mitesh V. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Goodman Campbell Brain and Spine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate factors associated with tumor control in clival chordomas. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 39 patients treated with surgery and proton therapy for clival chordomas between 2004 and 2014 was performed. The median prescribed dose was 77.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]); range was 70.2-79.2 Gy (RBE). Minimum and median doses to gross tumor volume (GTV), radiation dose received by 1 cm{sup 3} of GTV (D1cm{sup 3}), and the equivalent uniform dose were calculated. Receiver operating characteristics curves evaluated the predictive sensitivity and specificity for local failure of potential cutpoint values for GTV and D1cm{sup 3}. Results: After a median follow-up of 51 months, the 5-year estimate of local control (LC) was 69.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 50.0%-89.2%), and overall survival (OS) was 81.4% (95% CI: 65.3%-97.5%). Tumor histology, GTV at the time of radiation, and prescribed radiation dose were significantly associated with local control on multivariate analysis, whereas D1cm{sup 3} was associated with overall survival. Compared to those patients whose conditions remained controlled, patients experiencing tumor failure had statistically significant larger GTVs and lower D1cm{sup 3}, and prescribed and median doses to GTV. A subset of 21 patients with GTV of ≤20 cm{sup 3} and D1cm{sup 3} of >67 Gy (RBE) had a median follow-up of 47 months. The 5-year estimate of local control in this subset was 81.1% (95% CI: 61.7%-100%; P=.004, overall comparison by GTV ≤20 cm{sup 3} stratified by D1cm{sup 3}). A D1cm{sup 3} of 74.5 Gy (RBE) had 80% sensitivity for local control and 60% specificity, whereas a GTV of 9.3 cm{sup 3} had 80% sensitivity for local control and 66.7% specificity. Conclusions: Local control of clival chordomas was associated with both smaller size of residual tumor and more complete high-dose coverage of residual tumor. Multidisciplinary care should seek

  8. In vitro drug response and efflux transporters associated with drug resistance in pediatric high grade glioma and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

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    Susanna J E Veringa

    Full Text Available Pediatric high-grade gliomas (pHGG, including diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG, are the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. While it is clear that surgery (if possible, and radiotherapy are beneficial for treatment, the role of chemotherapy for these tumors is still unclear. Therefore, we performed an in vitro drug screen on primary glioma cells, including three DIPG cultures, to determine drug sensitivity of these tumours, without the possible confounding effect of insufficient drug delivery. This screen revealed a high in vitro cytotoxicity for melphalan, doxorubicine, mitoxantrone, and BCNU, and for the novel, targeted agents vandetanib and bortezomib in pHGG and DIPG cells. We subsequently determined the expression of the drug efflux transporters P-gp, BCRP1, and MRP1 in glioma cultures and their corresponding tumor tissues. Results indicate the presence of P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP1 in the tumor vasculature, and expression of MRP1 in the glioma cells themselves. Our results show that pediatric glioma and DIPG tumors per se are not resistant to chemotherapy. Treatment failure observed in clinical trials, may rather be contributed to the presence of drug efflux transporters that constitute a first line of drug resistance located at the blood-brain barrier or other resistance mechanism. As such, we suggest that alternative ways of drug delivery may offer new possibilities for the treatment of pediatric high-grade glioma patients, and DIPG in particular.

  9. Glia to glioma: A wrathful journey

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    Krishnendu Ghosh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Glial cells, unlike neurons in the brain, can undergo cellular division to maintain their functional continuity. However, sometimes this divisional attribute gets uncontrolled, which breaches tissue organization and transforms tissues into neoplasm. The proliferative abnormality of neuroglia results in one of the most dreaded neoplasm amounting to 30% of all brain tumors—the glioma. The abnormal proliferation, high level of progression and invasive potential makes glioma one of the most lethal killers in its class. The pathological scenario becomes more moribund owing to poor prognosis and high mortality rate of the menace. Conventional onco-therapies yield dismal results compared to other soft tissue tumors. In time, with the advent of newer trends of prognosis and treatment modalities in the field of oncology, a hope for betterment is expected, but not yet achieved. These advancements would fetch some better results with proper and minute understanding of the biology of glioma, both at physiological as well as molecular level. In the present context, we have tried to document an insight to glioma biology that can serve as a primer to understand this lethal killer and its killing spree, with some approaches to combat its carnage.

  10. Evaluation of potential internal target volume of liver tumors using cine-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akino, Yuichi; Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Masai, Norihisa; Shiomi, Hiroya; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2014-11-01

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is widely used for evaluating moving tumors, including lung and liver cancers. For patients with unstable respiration, however, the 4DCT may not visualize tumor motion properly. High-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences (cine-MRI) permit direct visualization of respiratory motion of liver tumors without considering radiation dose exposure to patients. Here, the authors demonstrated a technique for evaluating internal target volume (ITV) with consideration of respiratory variation using cine-MRI. The authors retrospectively evaluated six patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to hepatocellular carcinoma. Before acquiring planning CT, sagittal and coronal cine-MRI images were acquired for 30 s with a frame rate of 2 frames/s. The patient immobilization was conducted under the same condition as SBRT. Planning CT images were then acquired within 15 min from cine-MRI image acquisitions, followed by a 4DCT scan. To calculate tumor motion, the motion vectors between two continuous frames of cine-MRI images were calculated for each frame using the pyramidal Lucas-Kanade method. The target contour was delineated on one frame, and each vertex of the contour was shifted and copied onto the following frame using neighboring motion vectors. 3D trajectory data were generated with the centroid of the contours on sagittal and coronal images. To evaluate the accuracy of the tracking method, the motion of clearly visible blood vessel was analyzed with the motion tracking and manual detection techniques. The target volume delineated on the 50% (end-exhale) phase of 4DCT was translated with the trajectory data, and the distribution of the occupancy probability of target volume was calculated as potential ITV (ITV Potential). The concordance between ITV Potential and ITV estimated with 4DCT (ITV 4DCT) was evaluated using the Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC). The distance between blood vessel positions

  11. Evaluation of potential internal target volume of liver tumors using cine-MRI

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    Akino, Yuichi, E-mail: akino@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 5650871, Japan and Miyakojima IGRT Clinic, Miyakojima-ku, Osaka 5340021 (Japan); Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Masai, Norihisa; Shiomi, Hiroya; Inoue, Toshihiko [Miyakojima IGRT Clinic, Miyakojima-ku, Osaka 5340021 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is widely used for evaluating moving tumors, including lung and liver cancers. For patients with unstable respiration, however, the 4DCT may not visualize tumor motion properly. High-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences (cine-MRI) permit direct visualization of respiratory motion of liver tumors without considering radiation dose exposure to patients. Here, the authors demonstrated a technique for evaluating internal target volume (ITV) with consideration of respiratory variation using cine-MRI. Methods: The authors retrospectively evaluated six patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to hepatocellular carcinoma. Before acquiring planning CT, sagittal and coronal cine-MRI images were acquired for 30 s with a frame rate of 2 frames/s. The patient immobilization was conducted under the same condition as SBRT. Planning CT images were then acquired within 15 min from cine-MRI image acquisitions, followed by a 4DCT scan. To calculate tumor motion, the motion vectors between two continuous frames of cine-MRI images were calculated for each frame using the pyramidal Lucas–Kanade method. The target contour was delineated on one frame, and each vertex of the contour was shifted and copied onto the following frame using neighboring motion vectors. 3D trajectory data were generated with the centroid of the contours on sagittal and coronal images. To evaluate the accuracy of the tracking method, the motion of clearly visible blood vessel was analyzed with the motion tracking and manual detection techniques. The target volume delineated on the 50% (end-exhale) phase of 4DCT was translated with the trajectory data, and the distribution of the occupancy probability of target volume was calculated as potential ITV (ITV {sub Potential}). The concordance between ITV {sub Potential} and ITV estimated with 4DCT (ITV {sub 4DCT}) was evaluated using the Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC). Results

  12. Phase I study of vorinostat in combination with temozolomide in patients with high-grade gliomas: North American Brain Tumor Consortium Study 04-03.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eudocia Q; Puduvalli, Vinay K; Reid, Joel M; Kuhn, John G; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Chang, Susan M; Drappatz, Jan; Yung, W K Alfred; Gilbert, Mark R; Robins, H Ian; Lieberman, Frank S; Lassman, Andrew B; McGovern, Renee M; Xu, Jihong; Desideri, Serena; Ye, Xiabu; Ames, Matthew M; Espinoza-Delgado, Igor; Prados, Michael D; Wen, Patrick Y

    2012-11-01

    A phase I, dose-finding study of vorinostat in combination with temozolomide (TMZ) was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), safety, and pharmacokinetics in patients with high-grade glioma (HGG). This phase I, dose-finding, investigational study was conducted in two parts. Part 1 was a dose-escalation study of vorinostat in combination with TMZ 150 mg/m(2)/day for 5 days every 28 days. Part 2 was a dose-escalation study of vorinostat in combination with TMZ 150 mg/m(2)/day for 5 days of the first cycle and 200 mg/m(2)/day for 5 days of the subsequent 28-day cycles. In part 1, the MTD of vorinostat administered on days 1 to 7 and 15 to 21 of every 28-day cycle, in combination with TMZ, was 500 mg daily. Dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) included grade 3 anorexia, grade 3 ALT, and grade 5 hemorrhage in the setting of grade 4 thrombocytopenia. In part 2, the MTD of vorinostat on days 1 to 7 and 15 to 21 of every 28-day cycle, combined with TMZ, was 400 mg daily. No DLTs were encountered, but vorinostat dosing could not be escalated further due to thrombocytopenia. The most common serious adverse events were fatigue, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, and thromboembolic events. There were no apparent pharmacokinetic interactions between vorinostat and TMZ. Vorinostat treatment resulted in hyperacetylation of histones H3 and H4 in peripheral mononuclear cells. Vorinostat in combination with temozolomide is well tolerated in patients with HGG. A phase I/II trial of vorinostat with radiotherapy and concomitant TMZ in newly diagnosed glioblastoma is underway. ©2012 AACR.

  13. Distinction between glioma progression and post-radiation change by combined physiologic MR imaging

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    Matsusue, Eiji [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori (Japan); Fink, James R.; Maravilla, Kenneth R. [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Rockhill, Jason K. [University of Washington, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seattle, WA (United States); Ogawa, Toshihide [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion imaging (DSC), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) techniques provide specific physiologic information that may distinguish malignant glioma progression from post-radiation change, yet no single technique is completely reliable. We propose a simple, multiparametric scoring system to improve diagnostic accuracy beyond that of each technique alone. Fifteen subjects with lesions suspicious for glioma progression following radiation therapy who had also undergone 3-tesla DWI, DSC, and MRS studies of the lesion were retrospectively reviewed. Minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) ratio, maximum regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) ratio, and maximum MRS choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and choline/N-acetyl-aspartate (Cho/NAA) metabolic peak-height ratios were quantified within each lesion. Each parameter (ADC ratio, rCBV ratio, and combined Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA ratios) was scored as either glioma progression (one point) or radiation change (zero point) based upon thresholds derived from our own data. For each lesion, the combined parameters yielded a multiparametric score (0 to 3) for prediction of tumor progression or post-radiation change. Optimum thresholds for ADC ratio (1.30), rCBV ratio (2.10), and either combined Cho/Cr (1.29) and Cho/NAA (1.06) yielded diagnostic accuracies of 86.7%, 86.7%, and 84.6%, respectively (p < 0.05). A combined multiparametric score threshold of 2 improved diagnostic accuracy to 93.3% (p < 0.05). In this small series combining 3-T DWI, DSC, and MRS diagnostic results using a simple, multiparametric scoring system has potential to improve overall diagnostic accuracy in distinguishing glioma progression from post-radiation change beyond that of each technique alone. (orig.)

  14. Gliomas and the vascular fragility of the blood brain barrier

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    Luiz Gustavo eDubois

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes, members of the glial family, interact through the exchange of soluble factors or by directly contacting neurons and other brain cells, such as microglia and endothelial cells. Astrocytic projections interact with vessels and act as additional elements of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB. By mechanisms not fully understood, astrocytes can undergo oncogenic transformation and give rise to gliomas. The tumors take advantage of the BBB to ensure survival and continuous growth. A glioma can develop into a very aggressive tumor, the glioblastoma (GBM, characterized by a highly heterogeneous cell population (including tumor stem cells, extensive proliferation and migration. Nevertheless, gliomas can also give rise to slow growing tumors and in both cases, the afflux of blood, via BBB is crucial. Glioma cells migrate to different regions of the brain guided by the extension of blood vessels, colonizing the healthy adjacent tissue. In the clinical context, GBM can lead to tumor-derived seizures, which represent a challenge to patients and clinicians, since drugs used for its treatment must be able to cross the BBB. Uncontrolled and fast growth also leads to the disruption of the chimeric and fragile vessels in the tumor mass resulting in peritumoral edema. Although hormonal therapy is currently used to control the edema, it is not always efficient. In this review we comment the points cited above, considering the importance of the blood brain barrier and the concerns that arise when this barrier is affected.

  15. Pediatric glioma stem cells: biologic strategies for oncolytic HSV virotherapy

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    Gregory K Friedman

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available While glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common adult malignant brain tumor, GBMs in childhood represent less than 10% of pediatric malignant brain tumors and are phenotypically and molecularly distinct from adult GBMs. Similar to adult patients, outcomes for children with high-grade gliomas (HGGs remain poor. Furthermore, the significant morbidity and mortality yielded by pediatric GBM is compounded by neurotoxicity for the developing brain caused by current therapies. Poor outcomes have been attributed to a subpopulation of chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant cells, termed ‘glioma stem cells’ (GSCs, ‘glioma progenitor cells’, or ‘glioma-initiating cells', which have the ability to initiate and maintain the tumor and to repopulate the recurring tumor after conventional therapy. Future innovative therapies for pediatric HGGs must be able to eradicate these therapy-resistant GSCs. Oncolytic herpes simplex viruses, genetically engineered to be safe for normal cells and to express diverse foreign anti-tumor therapeutic genes, have been demonstrated in preclinical studies to infect and kill GSCs and tumor cells equally while sparing normal brain cells. In this review, we discuss the unique aspects of pediatric GSCs, including markers to identify them, the microenvironment they reside in, signaling pathways that regulate them, mechanisms of cellular resistance, and approaches to target GSCs, with a focus on the promising therapeutic, genetically engineered oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV.

  16. O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine uptake is an independent prognostic determinant in patients with glioma referred for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, Reinhart; Polat, Bülent; Flentje, Michael; Samnick, Samuel; Reiners, Christoph; Verburg, Frederik A.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value of O-(2-[ 18 F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine positron emission tomography (FET-PET) uptake intensity in World Health Organization (WHO) tumor grade II-IV gliomas. We studied 28 patients with WHO tumor grade II-IV gliomas who were referred to our department for radiation therapy. We acquired a FET-PET in all patients, as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain consisting of at least T2-weighted imaging, flair and pre- and post-contrast T1-weighted imaging. SUVmax was measured and the tumor-to-brain uptake ratio (TBR) of all lesions was calculated based on the SUVmax (TBRmax) or SUVmean (TBRmean) of the contralateral healthy tissue. For this study, volumes were calculated using MRI alone, MRI + the volume with a SUVmax on FET-PET ≥ 2.2 as well as MRI + the volume with an uptake of at least 40% of the SUVmax. Tumor volumes were a median (range) of 88.6 (2.6-467.4) ml (MRI alone), 84.2 (2.8-474.4) ml (MRI + SUVmax on FET-PET ≥ 2.2) and 101.5 (4.0-512.1) ml (MRI + FET-PET uptake ≥ 40% SUVmax), respectively. TBR-SUVmean was 2.36 (1.46-4.08); TBR-SUVmax was 1.71 (0.97-2.85). During a follow-up of 18.7 (2.5-36.1) months after FET-PET, 12 patients died of malignant glioma. Patients with a SUVmax ≥ 2.6 had a significantly worse tumor-related mortality (p=0.005) and progression-free survival (p=0.038) than those with a lower SUVmax. Multivariate analysis showed that WHO tumor grade (p=0.001) and SUVmax ≥ 2.6 (p < 0.001) were independent predictors for tumor-related mortality, but not tumor volume or TBRmax or TBRmean. SUVmax ≥ 2.6 (p=0.007) and being treated for a recurrence rather than for a primary tumor manifestation (p=0.014) were predictors for progression-free survival, but not TBRmax or TBRmean. In this heterogeneous patient population, higher tracer uptake in FET-PET appears to be associated with a worse tumor-related mortality and a shorter duration of the disease-free interval. (author)

  17. TCGA_LowerGradeGliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    TCGA researchers analyzed nearly 300 cases of diffuse low- and intermediate-grade gliomas, which together comprise lower-grade gliomas. LGGs occur mainly in adults and include astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas.

  18. Monochromatic Minibeams Radiotherapy: From Healthy Tissue-Sparing Effect Studies Toward First Experimental Glioma Bearing Rats Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deman, Pierre; Vautrin, Mathias; Edouard, Magali; Stupar, Vasile; Bobyk, Laure; Farion, Régine; Elleaume, Hélène; Rémy, Chantal; Barbier, Emmanuel L.; Estève, François; Adam, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate high-dose single fraction delivered with monochromatic X-rays minibeams for the radiotherapy of primary brain tumors in rats. Methods and Materials: Two groups of healthy rats were irradiated with one anteroposterior minibeam incidence (four minibeams, 123 Gy prescribed dose at 1 cm depth in the brain) or two interleaved incidences (54 Gy prescribed dose in a 5 × 5 × 4.8 mm 3 volume centered in the right hemisphere), respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) follow-up was performed over 1 year. T2-weighted (T2w) images, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and blood vessel permeability maps were acquired. F98 tumor bearing rats were also irradiated with interleaved minibeams to achieve a homogeneous dose of 54 Gy delivered to an 8 × 8 × 7.8 mm 3 volume centered on the tumor. Anatomic and functional MRI follow-up was performed every 10 days after irradiation. T2w images, ADC, and perfusion maps were acquired. Results: All healthy rats were euthanized 1 year after irradiation without any clinical alteration visible by simple examination. T2w and ADC measurements remain stable for the single incidence irradiation group. Localized Gd-DOTA permeability, however, was observed 9 months after irradiation for the interleaved incidences group. The survival time of irradiated glioma bearing rats was significantly longer than that of untreated animals (49 ± 12.5 days versus 23.3 ± 2 days, p < 0.001). The tumoral cerebral blood flow and blood volume tend to decrease after irradiation. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the sparing effect of minibeams on healthy tissue. The increased life span achieved for irradiated glioma bearing rats was similar to the one obtained with other radiotherapy techniques. This experimental tumor therapy study shows the feasibility of using X-ray minibeams with high doses in brain tumor radiotherapy.

  19. Monochromatic Minibeams Radiotherapy: From Healthy Tissue-Sparing Effect Studies Toward First Experimental Glioma Bearing Rats Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deman, Pierre [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Vautrin, Mathias [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); DOSIsoft, Cachan (France); Edouard, Magali [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Stupar, Vasile [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Bobyk, Laure; Farion, Regine [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Elleaume, Helene [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble (France); Remy, Chantal; Barbier, Emmanuel L. [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Esteve, Francois [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble (France); Adam, Jean-Francois, E-mail: adam@esrf.fr [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble (France)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate high-dose single fraction delivered with monochromatic X-rays minibeams for the radiotherapy of primary brain tumors in rats. Methods and Materials: Two groups of healthy rats were irradiated with one anteroposterior minibeam incidence (four minibeams, 123 Gy prescribed dose at 1 cm depth in the brain) or two interleaved incidences (54 Gy prescribed dose in a 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 Multiplication-Sign 4.8 mm{sup 3} volume centered in the right hemisphere), respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) follow-up was performed over 1 year. T2-weighted (T2w) images, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and blood vessel permeability maps were acquired. F98 tumor bearing rats were also irradiated with interleaved minibeams to achieve a homogeneous dose of 54 Gy delivered to an 8 Multiplication-Sign 8 Multiplication-Sign 7.8 mm{sup 3} volume centered on the tumor. Anatomic and functional MRI follow-up was performed every 10 days after irradiation. T2w images, ADC, and perfusion maps were acquired. Results: All healthy rats were euthanized 1 year after irradiation without any clinical alteration visible by simple examination. T2w and ADC measurements remain stable for the single incidence irradiation group. Localized Gd-DOTA permeability, however, was observed 9 months after irradiation for the interleaved incidences group. The survival time of irradiated glioma bearing rats was significantly longer than that of untreated animals (49 {+-} 12.5 days versus 23.3 {+-} 2 days, p < 0.001). The tumoral cerebral blood flow and blood volume tend to decrease after irradiation. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the sparing effect of minibeams on healthy tissue. The increased life span achieved for irradiated glioma bearing rats was similar to the one obtained with other radiotherapy techniques. This experimental tumor therapy study shows the feasibility of using X-ray minibeams with high doses in brain tumor radiotherapy.

  20. Glioma supratentorial de baixo grau em adulto: experiência com 23 pacientes operados Supratentorial low grade tumors in adults: an experience with 23 surgical cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Lynch

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Os astrocitomas e oligodendrogliomas supratentoriais dos adultos são tumores infrequentes. Analisamos retrospectivamente 23 pacientes com este tipo de neoplasia que foram operados entre 1986 e 2002. Não ocorreu nenhum óbito no pós-operatório. A sobrevida de 5 e 10 anos de todo o grupo foi 67 e 30% respectivamente, semelhante a outras experiências. Em 14 pacientes obtivemos a remoção completa da lesão (60,8% e em 9 (39,2% ocorreu remoção parcial do tumor. No subgrupo da ressecção total do tumor, 89% sobreviveram 5 anos e 45% alcançaram 10 anos de sobrevida, em contraste com o subgrupo da remoção parcial em que somente 35% alcançaram os 5 anos de sobrevida e nenhum, 10 anos. Devido aos efeitos deletérios da radioterapia, nós preferimos prescrevê-la apenas nos casos de recorrência tumoral.Low-grade supratentorial astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas in adults are uncommon tumors of the central nervous system. We analyzed retrospectively 23 patients with this type of neoplasia, who were operated on between 1986 and 2002. There were no post-operative deaths. The survival rate at 5 and 10 years post-surgery for the entire sample was 67 and 30% respectively, similar to other outcomes. With 14 patients we achieved a complete removal of the lesion (60.8% and with 9 (39.2% partial removal of the tumor. In the sub-group which underwent total resection of the tumor, 89% survived 5 years and 45% attained 10 years of survival, in contrast with the sub-group that underwent partial removal in which only 35% attained 5 years of survival and none 10 years. Due to the deleterious effects of radiation therapy, we preferred to prescribe it only in cases of tumor recurrence.

  1. Evaluation of 188Re-labeled PEGylated nanoliposome as a radionuclide therapeutic agent in an orthotopic glioma-bearing rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang FYJ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Feng-Yun J Huang,1 Te-Wei Lee,2 Chih-Hsien Chang,2 Liang-Cheng Chen,2 Wei-Hsin Hsu,2 Chien-Wen Chang,1 Jem-Mau Lo1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; 2Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan, Taiwan Purpose: In this study, the 188Re-labeled PEGylated nanoliposome (188Re-liposome was prepared and evaluated as a therapeutic agent for glioma.Materials and methods: The reporter cell line, F98luc was prepared via Lentivector expression kit system and used to set up the orthotopic glioma-bearing rat model for non-invasive bioluminescent imaging. The maximum tolerated dose applicable in Fischer344 rats was explored via body weight monitoring of the rats after single intravenous injection of 188Re-liposome with varying dosages before the treatment study. The OLINDA/EXM 1.1 software was utilized for estimating the radiation dosimetry. To assess the therapeutic efficacy, tumor-bearing rats were intravenously administered 188Re-liposome or normal saline followed by monitoring of the tumor growth and animal survival time. In addition, the histopathological examinations of tumors were conducted on the 188Re-liposome-treated rats.Results: By using bioluminescent imaging, the well-established reporter cell line (F98luc showed a high relationship between cell number and its bioluminescent intensity (R2=0.99 in vitro; furthermore, it could also provide clear tumor imaging for monitoring tumor growth in vivo. The maximum tolerated dose of 188Re-liposome in Fischer344 rats was estimated to be 333 MBq. According to the dosimetry results, higher equivalent doses were observed in spleen and kidneys while very less were in normal brain, red marrow, and thyroid. For therapeutic efficacy study, the progression of tumor growth in terms of tumor volume and/or tumor weight was significantly slower for the 188Re-liposome-treated group than the control group (P<0.05. As a result, the

  2. Residual Tumor After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Outside the Radiation Therapy Target Volume: A New Prognostic Factor for Survival in Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muijs, Christina; Smit, Justin; Karrenbeld, Arend; Beukema, Jannet; Mul, Veronique; Dam, Go van; Hospers, Geke; Kluin, Phillip; Langendijk, Johannes; Plukker, John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): The aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation and clinical target volume (CTV) margins for neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (neo-CRT) in esophageal carcinoma at pathologic examination and to determine the impact on survival. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 63 esophageal cancer patients treated with neo-CRT. GTV and CTV borders were demarcated in situ during surgery on the esophagus, using anatomical reference points to provide accurate information regarding tumor location at pathologic evaluation. To identify prognostic factors for disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS), a Cox regression analysis was performed. Results: After resection, macroscopic residual tumor was found outside the GTV in 7 patients (11%). Microscopic residual tumor was located outside the CTV in 9 patients (14%). The median follow-up was 15.6 months. With multivariate analysis, only microscopic tumor outside the CTV (hazard ratio [HR], 4.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-15.36), and perineural growth (HR, 5.77; 95% CI, 1.27-26.13) were identified as independent prognostic factors for OS. The 1-year OS was 20% for patients with tumor outside the CTV and 86% for those without (P<.01). For DFS, microscopic tumor outside the CTV (HR, 5.92; 95% CI, 1.89-18.54) and ypN+ (HR, 3.36; 95% CI, 1.33-8.48) were identified as independent adverse prognostic factors. The 1-year DFS was 23% versus 77% for patients with or without tumor outside the CTV (P<.01). Conclusions: Microscopic tumor outside the CTV is associated with markedly worse OS after neo-CRT. This may either stress the importance of accurate tumor delineation or reflect aggressive tumor behavior requiring new adjuvant treatment modalities

  3. Prognostic implications of tumor volume response and COX-2 expression change during radiotherapy in cervical cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Cho, Eun Yoon; Choi, Yoon La; Bae, Duk Soo; Kim, Byoung Gie

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between treatment outcomes, alteration of the expression of biological markers, and tumor volume response during radiotherapy (RT) in patients with uterine cervical cancer was analyzed. Twenty patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma received definitive RT with (n = 17) or without (n = 3) concurrent chemotherapy. Tumor volumes were measured by three serial magnetic resonance imaging scans at pre-, mid-, and post-RT. Two serial punch biopsies were performed at pre- and mid-RT, and immunohistochemical staining for cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor was performed. The median follow-up duration was 60 months. The median tumor volume response at mid-RT (V2R) was 0.396 (range, 0.136 to 0.983). At mid-RT, an interval increase in the distribution of immunoreactivity for COX-2 was observed in 8 patients, and 6 of them showed poor mid-RT tumor volume response (V2R ≥ 0.4). Four (20%) patients experienced disease progression after 10 to 12 months (median, 11 months). All 4 patients had poor mid-RT tumor volume response (p = 0.0867) and 3 of them had an interval increase in COX-2 expression. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) decreased in patients with V2R ≥ 0.4 (p 0.0291 for both). An interval increase in COX-2 expression at mid-RT was also associated with a decreased survival (p = 0.1878 and 0.1845 for OS and PFS, respectively). Poor tumor volume response and an interval increase in COX-2 expression at mid-RT decreased survival outcomes in patients with uterine cervical cancer.

  4. Understanding PSA and its derivatives in prediction of tumor volume: Addressing health disparities in prostate cancer risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinea, Felix M; Lyapichev, Kirill; Epstein, Jonathan I; Kwon, Deukwoo; Smith, Paul Taylor; Pollack, Alan; Cote, Richard J; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N

    2017-03-28

    To address health disparities in risk stratification of U.S. Hispanic/Latino men by characterizing influences of prostate weight, body mass index, and race/ethnicity on the correlation of PSA derivatives with Gleason score 6 (Grade Group 1) tumor volume in a diverse cohort. Using published PSA density and PSA mass density cutoff values, men with higher body mass indices and prostate weights were less likely to have a tumor volume PSA derivatives when predicting for tumor volume. In receiver operator characteristic analysis, area under the curve values for all PSA derivatives varied across race/ethnicity with lower optimal cutoff values for Hispanic/Latino (PSA=2.79, PSA density=0.06, PSA mass=0.37, PSA mass density=0.011) and Non-Hispanic Black (PSA=3.75, PSA density=0.07, PSA mass=0.46, PSA mass density=0.008) compared to Non-Hispanic White men (PSA=4.20, PSA density=0.11 PSA mass=0.53, PSA mass density=0.014). We retrospectively analyzed 589 patients with low-risk prostate cancer at radical prostatectomy. Pre-operative PSA, patient height, body weight, and prostate weight were used to calculate all PSA derivatives. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed for each PSA derivative per racial/ethnic group to establish optimal cutoff values predicting for tumor volume ≥0.5 cm3. Increasing prostate weight and body mass index negatively influence PSA derivatives for predicting tumor volume. PSA derivatives' ability to predict tumor volume varies significantly across race/ethnicity. Hispanic/Latino and Non-Hispanic Black men have lower optimal cutoff values for all PSA derivatives, which may impact risk assessment for prostate cancer.

  5. CD44 Interacts with HIF-2α to Modulate the Hypoxic Phenotype of Perinecrotic and Perivascular Glioma Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Elinn; Grassi, Elisa S.; Pantazopoulou, Vasiliki

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors enhance glioma stemness, and glioma stem cells have an amplified hypoxic response despite residing within a perivascular niche. Still, little is known about differential HIF regulation in stem versus bulk glioma cells. We show that the intracellular domain of stem cell...... marker CD44 (CD44ICD) is released at hypoxia, binds HIF-2α (but not HIF-1α), enhances HIF target gene activation, and is required for hypoxia-induced stemness in glioma. In a glioma mouse model, CD44 was restricted to hypoxic and perivascular tumor regions, and in human glioma, a hypoxia signature...... correlated with CD44. The CD44ICD was sufficient to induce hypoxic signaling at perivascular oxygen tensions, and blocking CD44 cleavage decreased HIF-2α stabilization in CD44-expressing cells. Our data indicate that the stem cell marker CD44 modulates the hypoxic response of glioma cells and that the pseudo-hypoxic...

  6. Cortical GABAergic excitation contributes to epileptic activities around human glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, Johan; Varlet, Pascale; Cresto, Noemie; Baulac, Michel; Duyckaerts, Charles; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chazal, Geneviève; Devaux, Bertrand; Rivera, Claudio; Miles, Richard; Capelle, Laurent; Huberfeld, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Diffuse brain gliomas induce seizures in a majority of patients. As in most epileptic disorders, excitatory glutamatergic mechanisms are involved in the generation of epileptic activities in the neocortex surrounding gliomas. However, chloride homeostasis is known to be perturbed in glial tumor cells. Thus the contribution of GABAergic mechanisms which depend on intracellular chloride and which are defective or pro-epileptic in other structural epilepsies merits closer study. Objective We studied in neocortical slices from the peritumoral security margin resected around human brain gliomas, the occurrence, networks, cells and signaling basis of epileptic activities. Results Postoperative glioma tissue from 69% of patients spontaneously generated interictal-like discharges. These events were synchronized, with a high frequency oscillation signature, in superficial layers of neocortex around glioma areas with tumor infiltration. Interictal-like events depended on both glutamatergic transmission and on depolarizing GABAergic signaling. About 65% of pyramidal cells were depolarized by GABA released by interneurons. This effect was related to perturbations in Chloride homeostasis, due to changes in expression of chloride co-transporters: KCC2 was reduced and expression of NKCC1 increased. Ictal-like activities were initiated by convulsant stimuli exclusively in these epileptogenic areas. Conclusions Epileptic activities are sustained by excitatory effects of GABA in the peritumoral human neocortex, as in temporal lobe epilepsies. Glutamate and GABA signaling are involved in oncogenesis and chloride homeostasis is perturbed. These same factors, induce an imbalance between synaptic excitatory and inhibition underly epileptic discharges in tumor patients. PMID:25009229

  7. Salvage immunotherapy of malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M; Jacques, S; Freshwater, D B; Techy, G B; Shelden, C H; Helsper, J T

    1987-12-01

    We present the preliminary results of a phase I trial of adoptive immunotherapy for recurrent or residual malignant glioma. The protocol is based on surgical debulking followed by implantation into the tumor bed of autologous lymphocytes that have been stimulated with phytohemagglutinin-P and then cultured in vitro in the presence of interleukin 2. Fifty-five patients with a mean Karnofsky rating of 64 were treated between February 1985 and March 1987. No significant toxicity was associated with the immunotherapy. Fifty patients had a positive initial response to therapy, nine patients had early recurrence (two to four months after treatment), and 22 patients died. We comment on major differences between the protocol described and other immunotherapy protocols.

  8. Influence of postsurgical residual tumor volume on local control in radiotherapy for maxillary sinus cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Ishikura, Satoshi; Nihei, Keiji; Ito, Yoshinori; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Ebihara, Satoshi [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan). Hospital East; Itai, Yuji

    2001-05-01

    The aim was to study the influence of postsurgical gross residual tumor volume on local control of maxillary sinus cancer treated with radiotherapy combined with debulking surgery. Forty-three patients who underwent combined surgery and radiotherapy (50-72 Gy, median 60 Gy) for squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus were reviewed. Gross residual tumor volume (GRTV) after surgery was measured on computed tomograms obtained during the radiotherapy planning. Patients were classified according to GRTV as follows: group AA, GRTV=0 (microscopic residual, n=2); group A, GRTV <10 cm{sup 3} (n=24); group B, 10-40 cm{sup 3} (n=9); and group C, {>=}40 cm{sup 3} (n=8). The relationship between local control and GRTV was analyzed using univariate and multivariate analysis. The 2-year local control rate for all patients was 62%. The differences in local control rates between groups AA, A and B were not significant (P<0.05), but the rate was significantly lower in group C than in the other groups (69% at 2 years vs 31% at 1 year, P<0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that GRTV (P=0.002) and histological differentiation (poorly differentiated histology was favorable, P=0.035) were independent prognostic factors and that intraarterial chemotherapy and administered total dose were not. Local control in groups A and B significantly depended on the total dose of radiotherapy, with 2-year control rates of patients receiving 50 Gy (n=6) and {>=}60 Gy (n=27) of 17% vs 79%, respectively (P<0.001). Our data suggest that adequate, not complete, debulking associated with a total radiotherapy dose of {>=}60 Gy can provide satisfactory local control for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. (author)

  9. Method and timing of tumor volume measurement for outcome prediction in cervical cancer using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayr, Nina A.; Taoka, Toshiaki; Yuh, William T.C.; Denning, Leah M.; Zhen, Weining K.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Gaston, Robert C.; Sorosky, Joel I.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Walker, Joan L.; Mannel, Robert S.; Buatti, John M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, imaging-based tumor volume before, during, and after radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to predict tumor response in cervical cancer. However, the effectiveness of different methods and timing of imaging-based tumor size assessment have not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to compare the predictive value for treatment outcome derived from simple diameter-based ellipsoid tumor volume measurement using orthogonal diameters (with ellipsoid computation) with that derived from more complex contour tracing/region-of-interest (ROI) analysis 3D tumor volumetry. Methods and Materials: Serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations were prospectively performed in 60 patients with advanced cervical cancer (Stages IB 2 -IVB/recurrent) at the start of RT, during early RT (20-25 Gy), mid-RT (45-50 Gy), and at follow-up (1-2 months after RT completion). ROI-based volumetry was derived by tracing the entire tumor region in each MR slice on the computer work station. For the diameter-based surrogate ''ellipsoid volume,'' the three orthogonal diameters (d 1 , d 2 , d 3 ) were measured on film hard copies to calculate volume as an ellipsoid (d 1 x d 2 x d 3 x π/6). Serial tumor volumes and regression rates determined by each method were correlated with local control, disease-free and overall survival, and the results were compared between the two measuring methods. Median post-therapy follow-up was 4.9 years (range, 2.0-8.2 years). Results: The best method and time point of tumor size measurement for the prediction of outcome was the tumor regression rate in the mid-therapy MRI examination (at 45-50 Gy) using 3D ROI volumetry. For the pre-RT measurement both the diameter-based method and ROI volumetry provided similar predictive accuracy, particularly for patients with small ( 3 ) and large (≥100 cm 3 ) pre-RT tumor size. However, the pre-RT tumor size measured by either method had much less predictive value for the intermediate-size (40

  10. “...those left behind.” Biology and Oncology of Invasive Glioma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Berens

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Although significant technical advances in surgical and radiation treatment for brain tumors have emerged in recent years, their impact on clinical outcome for patients has been disappointing. A fundamental source of the management challenge presented by glioma patients is the insidious propensity of the malignant cells to invade into adjacent normal brain. Invasive tumor cells escape surgical removal and geographically dodge lethal radiation exposure. Recent improved understanding of the biochemistry and molecular determinants of glioma cell invasion provide valuable insight to the underlying biological features of the disease, as well as illuminating possible new therapeutic targets. Heightened commitment to migrate and invade is accompanied by a glioma cell's reduced proliferative activity. The microenvironmental manipulations coincident to invasion and migration may also impact the glioma cell's response to cytotoxic treatments. These collateral aspects of the glioma cell invasive phenotype should be further explored and exploited as novel antiglioma therapies.

  11. Tumor Volume Changes Assessed by Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Volumetry in Rectal Cancer Patients After Preoperative Chemoradiation: The Impact of the Volume Reduction Ratio on the Prediction of Pathologic Complete Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Young Chul; Kim, Hyunki; Kim, Young Wan; Hur, Hyuk; Kim, Jin Soo; Min, Byung Soh; Kim, Hogeun; Lim, Joon Seok; Seong, Jinsil; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between tumor volume changes assessed by three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) volumetry and the histopathologic tumor response in rectal cancer patients undergoing preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 84 patients who underwent preoperative CRT followed by radical surgery were prospectively enrolled in the study. The post-treatment tumor volume and tumor volume reduction ratio (% decrease ratio), as shown by 3D MR volumetry, were compared with the histopathologic response, as shown by T and N downstaging and the tumor regression grade (TRG). Results: There were no significant differences in the post-treatment tumor volume and the volume reduction ratio shown by 3D MR volumetry with respect to T and N downstaging and the tumor regression grade. In a multivariate analysis, the tumor volume reduction ratio was not significantly associated with T and N downstaging. The volume reduction ratio (>75%, p = 0.01) and the pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen level (≤3 ng/ml, p = 0.01), but not the post-treatment volume shown by 3D MR (≤ 5ml), were, however, significantly associated with an increased pathologic complete response rate. Conclusion: More than 75% of the tumor volume reduction ratios were significantly associated with a high pathologic complete response rate. Therefore, limited treatment options such as local excision or simple observation might be considered after preoperative CRT in this patient population.

  12. Primary Tumor Volume Is an Important Predictor of Clinical Outcomes Among Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck Treated With Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strongin, Anna; Yovino, Susannah; Taylor, Rodney; Wolf, Jeffrey; Cullen, Kevin; Zimrin, Ann; Strome, Scott; Regine, William; Suntharalingam, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The tumor volume has been established as a significant predictor of outcomes among patients with head-and-neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy alone. The present study attempted to add to the existing data on tumor volume as a prognostic factor among patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients who had undergone definitive chemoradiotherapy for Stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the hypopharynx, oropharynx, and larynx were identified. The primary tumor volumes were calculated from the treatment planning computed tomography scans, and these were correlated to the survival and tumor control data obtained from the retrospective analysis. Results: The interval to progression correlated with the primary tumor volume (p = .007). The critical cutoff point for the tumor volume was identified as 35 cm 3 , and patients with a tumor volume 3 had a significantly better prognosis than those with a tumor volume >35 cm 3 at 5 years (43% vs. 71%, p = .010). Longer survival was also correlated with smaller primary tumor volumes (p = .022). Similarly, patients with a primary tumor volume 3 had a better prognosis in terms of both progression-free survival (61% vs. 33%, p = .004) and overall survival (84% vs. 41%, p = 3 larger than tumors without locoregional failure (p = .028) and 27.1-cm 3 larger than tumors that recurred as distant metastases (p = .020). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the primary tumor volume is a significant prognostic factor in patients with advanced cancer of the head and neck undergoing definitive chemoradiotherapy and correlated with the treatment outcomes better than the T or N stage.

  13. Dynamic 18F-FET PET in newly diagnosed astrocytic low-grade glioma identifies high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Nathalie L; Suchorska, Bogdana; Wenter, Vera; Eigenbrod, Sabina; Schmid-Tannwald, Christine; Zwergal, Andreas; Niyazi, Maximilian; Drexler, Mark; Bartenstein, Peter; Schnell, Oliver; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Thon, Niklas; Kreth, Friedrich-Wilhelm; la Fougère, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Because the clinical course of low-grade gliomas in the individual adult patient varies considerably and is unpredictable, we investigated the prognostic value of dynamic (18)F-fluorethyltyrosine ((18)F-FET) PET in the early diagnosis of astrocytic low-grade glioma (World Health Organization grade II). Fifty-nine patients with newly diagnosed low-grade glioma and dynamic (18)F-FET PET before histopathologic assessment were retrospectively investigated. (18)F-FET PET analysis comprised a qualitative visual classification of lesions; assessment of the semiquantitative parameters maximal, mean, and total standardized uptake value as ratio to background and biologic tumor volume; and dynamic analysis of intratumoral (18)F-FET uptake over time (increasing vs. decreasing time-activity curves). The correlation between PET parameters and progression-free survival, overall survival, and time to malignant transformation was investigated. (18)F-FET uptake greater than the background level was found in 34 of 59 tumors. Dynamic (18)F-FET uptake analysis was available for 30 of these 34 patients. Increasing and decreasing time-activity curves were found in 18 and 12 patients, respectively. Neither the qualitative factor presence or absence of (18)F-FET uptake nor any of the semiquantitative uptake parameters significantly influenced clinical outcome. In contrast, decreasing time-activity curves in the kinetic analysis were highly prognostic for shorter progression-free survival and time to malignant transformation (P dynamic (18)F-FET PET constitute an unfavorable prognostic factor in astrocytic low-grade glioma and, by identifying high-risk patients, may ease treatment decisions.

  14. Discrepant longitudinal volumetric and metabolic evolution of diffuse intrinsic Pontine gliomas during treatment: implications for current response assessment strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loebel, U. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States); Hwang, S.; Edwards, A.; Patay, Z. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States); Li, Y.; Li, X. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Memphis, TN (United States); Broniscer, A. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Pediatrics, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Based on clinical observations, we hypothesized that in infiltrative high-grade brainstem neoplasms, such as diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), longitudinal metabolic evaluation of the tumor by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may be more accurate than volumetric data for monitoring the tumor's biological evolution during standard treatment. We evaluated longitudinal MRS data and corresponding tumor volumes of 31 children with DIPG. We statistically analyzed correlations between tumor volume and ratios of Cho/NAA, Cho/Cr, and NAA/Cr at key time points during the course of the disease through the end of the progression-free survival period. By the end of RT, tumor volume had significantly decreased from the baseline (P <.0001) and remained decreased through the last available follow-up magnetic resonance imaging study (P =.007632). However, the metabolic profile of the tumor tissue (Cho/Cr, NAA/Cr, and Cho/NAA ratios) did not change significantly over time. Our data show that longitudinal tumor volume and metabolic profile changes are dissociated in patients with DIPG during progression-free survival. Volume changes, therefore, may not accurately reflect treatment-related changes in tumor burden. This study adds to the existing body of evidence that the value of conventional MRI metrics, including volumetric data, needs to be reevaluated critically and, in infiltrative tumors in particular, may not be useful as study end-points in clinical trials. We submit that advanced quantitative MRI data, including robust, MRS-based metabolic ratios and diffusion and perfusion metrics, may be better surrogate markers of key end-points in clinical trials. (orig.)

  15. Recommendations for standardized diagnostics, treatment and following care in tumor diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The paper present a series of articles developed by the specialized groups from various clinical and research sections of the Tumorzentrum Heidelberg/Mannheim. It consists of 10 volumes, as following: vol. 1 Early diagnosis. Diagnosis and therapy of cancer pains. Care by the family doctor. Geriatric patient with tumor disease; vol. 2 Breast carcinoma. Ovary carcinoma; vol. 3 Malignant tumors of salivary glands. Malignant tumors of larynx and pharynx; vol. 4 Thyroid carcinoma. Tumors of pituitary gland; 5. Malignant tumors of lung, pleura and thymus gland. Pancreas carcinoma. Hodgkins disease. Chronic myelo-proliferative diseases; 6. Rectum carcinoma. Colon carcinoma; 7. Prostate carcinoma. Malignant tumors of the urinary tract; 8. Brain tumors - gliomas and metastases; 9. Primary malignant tumors of bones. Tissue sarcomas in adults. 10. Stomach carcinoma

  16. A Novel Technique for Endovascular Removal of Large Volume Right Atrial Tumor Thrombus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickel, Barbara, E-mail: nickel.ba@gmail.com [US Teleradiology and Quantum Medical Radiology Group (United States); McClure, Timothy, E-mail: tmcclure@gmail.com; Moriarty, John, E-mail: jmoriarty@mednet.ucla.edu [UCLA Medical Center, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Venous thromboembolic disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the setting of large volume pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy has been shown to be a successful treatment modality; however, its use somewhat limited due to the risk of hemorrhage and potential for distal embolization in the setting of large mobile thrombi. In patients where either thrombolysis is contraindicated or unsuccessful, and conventional therapies prove inadequate, surgical thrombectomy may be considered. We present a case of percutaneous endovascular extraction of a large mobile mass extending from the inferior vena cava into the right atrium using the Angiovac device, a venovenous bypass system designed for high-volume aspiration of undesired endovascular material. Standard endovascular methods for removal of cancer-associated thrombus, such as catheter-directed lysis, maceration, and exclusion, may prove inadequate in the setting of underlying tumor thrombus. Where conventional endovascular methods either fail or are unsuitable, endovascular thrombectomy with the Angiovac device may be a useful and safe minimally invasive alternative to open resection.

  17. A Novel Technique for Endovascular Removal of Large Volume Right Atrial Tumor Thrombus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, Barbara; McClure, Timothy; Moriarty, John

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the setting of large volume pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy has been shown to be a successful treatment modality; however, its use somewhat limited due to the risk of hemorrhage and potential for distal embolization in the setting of large mobile thrombi. In patients where either thrombolysis is contraindicated or unsuccessful, and conventional therapies prove inadequate, surgical thrombectomy may be considered. We present a case of percutaneous endovascular extraction of a large mobile mass extending from the inferior vena cava into the right atrium using the Angiovac device, a venovenous bypass system designed for high-volume aspiration of undesired endovascular material. Standard endovascular methods for removal of cancer-associated thrombus, such as catheter-directed lysis, maceration, and exclusion, may prove inadequate in the setting of underlying tumor thrombus. Where conventional endovascular methods either fail or are unsuitable, endovascular thrombectomy with the Angiovac device may be a useful and safe minimally invasive alternative to open resection

  18. Cranial Tumor Surgical Outcomes at a High-Volume Academic Referral Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Desmond A; Himes, Benjamin T; Major, Brittny T; Mundell, Benjamin F; Kumar, Ravi; Kall, Bruce; Meyer, Fredric B; Link, Michael J; Pollock, Bruce E; Atkinson, John D; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Marsh, W Richard; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Bydon, Mohamad; Parney, Ian F

    2018-01-01

    To determine adverse event rates for adult cranial neuro-oncologic surgeries performed at a high-volume quaternary academic center and assess the impact of resident participation on perioperative complication rates. All adult patients undergoing neurosurgical intervention for an intracranial neoplastic lesion between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2013, were included. Cases were categorized as biopsy, extra-axial/skull base, intra-axial, or transsphenoidal. Complications were categorized as neurologic, medical, wound, mortality, or none and compared for patients managed by a chief resident vs a consultant neurosurgeon. A total of 6277 neurosurgical procedures for intracranial neoplasms were performed. After excluding radiosurgical procedures and pediatric patients, 4151 adult patients who underwent 4423 procedures were available for analysis. Complications were infrequent, with overall rates of 9.8% (435 of 4423 procedures), 1.7% (73 of 4423), and 1.4% (63 of 4423) for neurologic, medical, and wound complications, respectively. The rate of perioperative mortality was 0.3% (14 of 4423 procedures). Case performance and management by a chief resident did not negatively impact outcome. In our large-volume brain tumor practice, rates of complications were low, and management of cases by chief residents in a semiautonomous manner did not negatively impact surgical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Linac radiosurgery for high-grade gliomas: the University of Florida experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buatti, John M; Friedman, William A; Bova, Frank J; Mendenhall, William M

    1995-04-30

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery has been reported as a promising boost technique for the treatment of selected patients with high-grade glioma. The first 11 patients given this treatment at the University of Florida are reported. Methods and Materials: Six patients with glioblastoma multiforme and five with anaplastic astrocytoma were carefully selected for treatment with linac radiosurgery. All patients had a Karnofsky performance status {>=} 90%. Median age of patients was 42.1 years. External-beam radiotherapy delivered a median dose of 60 Gy. Stereotactic radiosurgery was delivered to the enhancing tumor volume without margin. Median treatment volume was 14 cm{sup 3} (equivalent sphere diameter, 3 cm). The maximum volume of any tumor treated was 22.5 cm{sup 3} (equivalent sphere diameter, 3.5 cm). Median stereotactic radiosurgery boost dose was 12.5 Gy, and median prescription sphere was the 80% isodose shell. Results: Despite rigorous selection and aggressive stereotactic boost irradiation, this patient cohort had a median actuarial survival of 17 months. All patients have had progression of intracranial disease within 1 year of radiosurgery, and only 3 of 11 remain alive with a median follow-up of 13 months. Conclusion: These results differ significantly from others reported. Comparative analysis suggests tumor volume may be an important prognostic factor in patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. Future studies need to define appropriate patient cohorts for the boost technique.

  20. [Volume changes to the neck lymph node metastases in head-neck tumors. The evaluation of radiotherapeutic treatment success].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liszka, G; Thalacker, U; Somogyi, A; Németh, G

    1997-08-01

    This work is engaged with the volume change of neck lymph node metastasis of malignant tumors in the head-neck region during radiotherapy. In 54 patients with head and neck tumors, the volume of neck lymph nodes before and after radiation was measured. The volumetry was done with CT planimetry. The total dose was 66 Gy (2 Gy/d) telecobalt from 2 lateral opponated fields. The time of volume change could be defined with measuring of the half-time and the doubling-time by the help of Schwartz formula. After 10 Gy the volume diminution was about 20% and half-time 24 to 26 days. Afterwards the time of volume diminution picked up speed and finally achieved 60 to 72%. Meanwhile the half-time decreased to the half value. The result was independent of the site of primary tumor, the patient's sex and age. In our opinion the effectivity of radiotherapy can best be judged with defining of the volume change of lymph nodes of the neck.