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Sample records for glioblastoma multiforme cells

  1. Nestin expression in the cell lines derived from glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veselska, Renata; Kuglik, Petr; Cejpek, Pavel; Svachova, Hana; Neradil, Jakub; Loja, Tomas; Relichova, Jirina

    2006-01-01

    Nestin is a protein belonging to class VI of intermediate filaments that is produced in stem/progenitor cells in the mammalian CNS during development and is consecutively replaced by other intermediate filament proteins (neurofilaments, GFAP). Down-regulated nestin may be re-expressed in the adult organism under certain pathological conditions (brain injury, ischemia, inflammation, neoplastic transformation). Our work focused on a detailed study of the nestin cytoskeleton in cell lines derived from glioblastoma multiforme, because re-expression of nestin together with down-regulation of GFAP has been previously reported in this type of brain tumor. Two cell lines were derived from the tumor tissue of patients treated for glioblastoma multiforme. Nestin and other cytoskeletal proteins were visualized using imunocytochemical methods: indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold-labelling. Using epifluorescence and confocal microscopy, we described the morphology of nestin-positive intermediate filaments in glioblastoma cells of both primary cultures and the derived cell lines, as well as the reorganization of nestin during mitosis. Our most important result came through transmission electron microscopy and provided clear evidence that nestin is present in the cell nucleus. Detailed information concerning the pattern of the nestin cytoskeleton in glioblastoma cell lines and especially the demonstration of nestin in the nucleus represent an important background for further studies of nestin re-expression in relationship to tumor malignancy and invasive potential

  2. Cyclophilin B supports Myc and mutant p53-dependent survival of glioblastoma multiforme cells.

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    Choi, Jae Won; Schroeder, Mark A; Sarkaria, Jann N; Bram, Richard J

    2014-01-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive, treatment-refractory type of brain tumor for which effective therapeutic targets remain important to identify. Here, we report that cyclophilin B (CypB), a prolyl isomerase residing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), provides an essential survival signal in glioblastoma multiforme cells. Analysis of gene expression databases revealed that CypB is upregulated in many cases of malignant glioma. We found that suppression of CypB reduced cell proliferation and survival in human glioblastoma multiforme cells in vitro and in vivo. We also found that treatment with small molecule inhibitors of cyclophilins, including the approved drug cyclosporine, greatly reduced the viability of glioblastoma multiforme cells. Mechanistically, depletion or pharmacologic inhibition of CypB caused hyperactivation of the oncogenic RAS-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, induction of cellular senescence signals, and death resulting from loss of MYC, mutant p53, Chk1, and Janus-activated kinase/STAT3 signaling. Elevated reactive oxygen species, ER expansion, and abnormal unfolded protein responses in CypB-depleted glioblastoma multiforme cells indicated that CypB alleviates oxidative and ER stresses and coordinates stress adaptation responses. Enhanced cell survival and sustained expression of multiple oncogenic proteins downstream of CypB may thus contribute to the poor outcome of glioblastoma multiforme tumors. Our findings link chaperone-mediated protein folding in the ER to mechanisms underlying oncogenic transformation, and they make CypB an attractive and immediately targetable molecule for glioblastoma multiforme therapy.

  3. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

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    Sudhansu Sekhar Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options, and the behavior of such malignant tumor is presented. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to make the differential diagnosis between the cerebellar GBM, and other diseases such as metastasis, anaplastic astrocytomas, and cerebellar infarct because their treatment modalities, prognosis, and outcome are different.

  4. Cancer stem cells from a rare form of glioblastoma multiforme involving the neurogenic ventricular wall

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    Li Shengwen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis posits that deregulated neural stem cells (NSCs form the basis of brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. GBM, however, usually forms in the cerebral white matter while normal NSCs reside in subventricular and hippocampal regions. We attempted to characterize CSCs from a rare form of glioblastoma multiforme involving the neurogenic ventricular wall. Methods We described isolating CSCs from a GBM involving the lateral ventricles and characterized these cells with in vitro molecular biomarker profiling, cellular behavior, ex vivo and in vivo techniques. Results The patient’s MRI revealed a heterogeneous mass with associated edema, involving the left subventricular zone. Histological examination of the tumor established it as being a high-grade glial neoplasm, characterized by polygonal and fusiform cells with marked nuclear atypia, amphophilic cytoplasm, prominent nucleoli, frequent mitotic figures, irregular zones of necrosis and vascular hyperplasia. Recurrence of the tumor occurred shortly after the surgical resection. CD133-positive cells, isolated from the tumor, expressed stem cell markers including nestin, CD133, Ki67, Sox2, EFNB1, EFNB2, EFNB3, Cav-1, Musashi, Nucleostemin, Notch 2, Notch 4, and Pax6. Biomarkers expressed in differentiated cells included Cathepsin L, Cathepsin B, Mucin18, Mucin24, c-Myc, NSE, and TIMP1. Expression of unique cancer-related transcripts in these CD133-positive cells, such as caveolin-1 and −2, do not appear to have been previously reported in the literature. Ex vivo organotypic brain slice co-culture showed that the CD133+ cells behaved like tumor cells. The CD133-positive cells also induced tumor formation when they were stereotactically transplanted into the brains of the immune-deficient NOD/SCID mice. Conclusions This brain tumor involving the neurogenic lateral ventricular wall was comprised of tumor-forming, CD133-positive cancer

  5. Modeling the Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme and Cancer Stem Cells with Ordinary Differential Equations.

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    Abernathy, Kristen; Burke, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Despite improvements in cancer therapy and treatments, tumor recurrence is a common event in cancer patients. One explanation of recurrence is that cancer therapy focuses on treatment of tumor cells and does not eradicate cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are postulated to behave similar to normal stem cells in that their role is to maintain homeostasis. That is, when the population of tumor cells is reduced or depleted by treatment, CSCs will repopulate the tumor, causing recurrence. In this paper, we study the application of the CSC Hypothesis to the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme by immunotherapy. We extend the work of Kogan et al. (2008) to incorporate the dynamics of CSCs, prove the existence of a recurrence state, and provide an analysis of possible cancerous states and their dependence on treatment levels.

  6. miR-124 and miR-137 inhibit proliferation of glioblastoma multiforme cells and induce differentiation of brain tumor stem cells

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    Costello Joseph F

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is an invariably fatal central nervous system tumor despite treatment with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Further insights into the molecular and cellular mechanisms that drive GBM formation are required to improve patient outcome. MicroRNAs are emerging as important regulators of cellular differentiation and proliferation, and have been implicated in the etiology of a variety of cancers, yet the role of microRNAs in GBM remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of microRNAs in regulating the differentiation and proliferation of neural stem cells and glioblastoma-multiforme tumor cells. Methods We used quantitative RT-PCR to assess microRNA expression in high-grade astrocytomas and adult mouse neural stem cells. To assess the function of candidate microRNAs in high-grade astrocytomas, we transfected miR mimics to cultured-mouse neural stem cells, -mouse oligodendroglioma-derived stem cells, -human glioblastoma multiforme-derived stem cells and -glioblastoma multiforme cell lines. Cellular differentiation was assessed by immunostaining, and cellular proliferation was determined using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Results Our studies revealed that expression levels of microRNA-124 and microRNA-137 were significantly decreased in anaplastic astrocytomas (World Health Organization grade III and glioblastoma multiforme (World Health Organization grade IV relative to non-neoplastic brain tissue (P erbB tumors and cluster of differentiation 133+ human glioblastoma multiforme-derived stem cells (SF6969. Transfection of microRNA-124 or microRNA-137 also induced G1 cell cycle arrest in U251 and SF6969 glioblastoma multiforme cells, which was associated with decreased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 and phosphorylated retinoblastoma (pSer 807/811 proteins. Conclusion microRNA-124 and microRNA-137 induce differentiation of adult mouse neural stem cells, mouse

  7. Simulation of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumor cells using ising model on the Creutz Cellular Automaton

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    Züleyha, Artuç; Ziya, Merdan; Selçuk, Yeşiltaş; Kemal, Öztürk M.; Mesut, Tez

    2017-11-01

    Computational models for tumors have difficulties due to complexity of tumor nature and capacities of computational tools, however, these models provide visions to understand interactions between tumor and its micro environment. Moreover computational models have potential to develop strategies for individualized treatments for cancer. To observe a solid brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we present a two dimensional Ising Model applied on Creutz cellular automaton (CCA). The aim of this study is to analyze avascular spherical solid tumor growth, considering transitions between non tumor cells and cancer cells are like phase transitions in physical system. Ising model on CCA algorithm provides a deterministic approach with discrete time steps and local interactions in position space to view tumor growth as a function of time. Our simulation results are given for fixed tumor radius and they are compatible with theoretical and clinic data.

  8. Comparison of vitamins K1, K2 and K3 effects on growth of rat glioma and human glioblastoma multiforme cells in vitro.

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    Oztopçu, Pinar; Kabadere, Selda; Mercangoz, Ayşe; Uyar, Ruhi

    2004-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is characterized as highly invasive and rapidly growing astrocytomas, and scientists have sought for efficient treatment against malignant gliomas for a long time. Therefore, we compared the respond of rat glioma (C6) and glioblastoma multiforme cells derived from two patients to vitamins K1, K2 and K3. The cells were exposed to 100, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 microM of vitamins K1 and K2, and 1, 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 microM of vitamin K3 for 24 hours in an incubator atmosphere of 5% CO2, 37 degrees C and 100% humidity. Cell viability was estimated by MTT assay. Vitamin K1 showed no growth effect on all the glioma cells examined. Vitamin K2 did not cause any change in number of C6, however induced growth inhibition in a dose-dependent manner on glioblastoma multiforme. The IC50 values of vitamin K2 were 960 microM and 970 microM for glioblastoma multiforme, respectively. Vitamin K3 had also growth inhibitory effect in a dose-dependent manner on both C6 and glioblastoma multiforme. The IC50 values were 41 microM, 24 microM and 23 microM for vitamin K3, respectively. We concluded that vitamin K3 is more effective than vitamin K2 for inhibition of cancer cell growth, and might have an alternative value as an anticancer drug against glioblastoma multiforme.

  9. Activation of PPARγ mediates icaritin-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in glioblastoma multiforme.

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    Liu, Yongji; Shi, Ling; Liu, Yuan; Li, Peng; Jiang, Guoping; Gao, Xiaoning; Zhang, Yongbin; Jiang, Chuanwu; Zhu, Weiping; Han, Hongxing; Ju, Fang

    2018-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most prevalent primary malignancy of the brain. This study was designed to investigate whether icaritin exerts anti-neoplastic activity against GBM in vitro. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was utilized to examine the viability of GBM cells. The apoptotic cell population was measured by flow cytometry analysis. Cell cycle distribution was detected by flow cytometry as well. Western blot analysis was performed to examine the level of biomarker proteins in GBM cells. Levels of PPARγ mRNA and protein were detected by qPCR and western blot analysis, respectively. To examine the role of PPARγ in the anti-neoplastic activity of icaritin, PPARγ antagonist GW9662 or PPARγ siRNA was used. The activity of PPARγ was determined by DNA binding and luciferase assays. Our findings revealed that icaritin markedly suppresses cell growth in a dose-dependent and time-dependent fashion. The cell population at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle was significantly increased following icaritin treatment. Meanwhile, icaritin promoted apoptotic cell death in T98G and U87MG cells. Further investigation showed upregulation of PPARγ played a key role in the anti-neoplastic activities of icaritin. Moreover, our result demonstrated activation of AMPK signaling by icaritin mediated the modulatory effect of icaritin on PPARγ. Our results suggest the PPARγ may mediate anti-neoplastic activities against GBM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Cyclophilin B Supports Myc and Mutant p53 Dependent Survival of Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Won; Schroeder, Mark A.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Bram, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive, treatment-refractory type of brain tumor for which effective therapeutic targets remain important to identify. Here we report that cyclophilin B (CypB), a prolyl isomerase residing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), provides an essential survival signal in GBM cells. Analysis of gene expression databases revealed that CypB is upregulated in many cases of malignant glioma. We found that suppression of CypB reduced cell proliferation and survival in human GBM cells in vitro and in vivo. We also found that treatment with small molecule inhibitors of cyclophilins, including the approved drug cyclosporine, greatly reduced the viability of GBM cells. Mechanistically, depletion or pharmacologic inhibition of CypB caused hyperactivation of the oncogenic RAS-MAPK pathway, induction of cellular senescence signals, and death resulting from loss of MYC, mutant p53, Chk1 and JAK/STAT3 signaling. Elevated reactive oxygen species, ER expansion and abnormal unfolded protein responses in CypB-depleted GBM cells indicated that CypB alleviates oxidative and ER stresses and coordinates stress adaptation responses. Enhanced cell survival and sustained expression of multiple oncogenic proteins downstream of CypB may thus contribute to the poor outcome of GBM tumors. Our findings link chaperone-mediated protein folding in the ER to mechanisms underlying oncogenic transformation, and they make CypB an attractive and immediately targetable molecule for GBM therapy. PMID:24272483

  11. Association of Glioblastoma Multiforme Stem Cell Characteristics, Differentiation, and Microglia Marker Genes with Patient Survival

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    Sandra Bien-Möller

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM are at high risk to develop a relapse despite multimodal therapy. Assumedly, glioma stem cells (GSCs are responsible for treatment resistance of GBM. Identification of specific GSC markers may help to develop targeted therapies. Here, we performed expression analyses of stem cell (ABCG2, CD44, CD95, CD133, ELF4, Nanog, and Nestin as well as differentiation and microglia markers (GFAP, Iba1, and Sparc in GBM compared to nonmalignant brain. Furthermore, the role of these proteins for patient survival and their expression in LN18 stem-like neurospheres was analyzed. At mRNA level, ABCG2 and CD95 were reduced, GFAP was unchanged; all other investigated markers were increased in GBM. At protein level, CD44, ELF4, Nanog, Nestin, and Sparc were elevated in GBM, but only CD133 and Nestin were strongly associated with survival time. In addition, ABCG2 and GFAP expression was decreased in LN18 neurospheres whereas CD44, CD95, CD133, ELF4, Nanog, Nestin, and Sparc were upregulated. Altogether only CD133 and Nestin were associated with survival rates. This raises concerns regarding the suitability of the other target structures as prognostic markers, but makes both CD133 and Nestin candidates for GBM therapy. Nevertheless, a search for more specific marker proteins is urgently needed.

  12. Association of Glioblastoma Multiforme Stem Cell Characteristics, Differentiation, and Microglia Marker Genes with Patient Survival

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    Balz, Ellen; Herzog, Susann; Plantera, Laura; Vogelgesang, Silke; Seifert, Carolin; Bialke, Angela; Venugopal, Chitra; Singh, Sheila K.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Henry W. S.

    2018-01-01

    Patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are at high risk to develop a relapse despite multimodal therapy. Assumedly, glioma stem cells (GSCs) are responsible for treatment resistance of GBM. Identification of specific GSC markers may help to develop targeted therapies. Here, we performed expression analyses of stem cell (ABCG2, CD44, CD95, CD133, ELF4, Nanog, and Nestin) as well as differentiation and microglia markers (GFAP, Iba1, and Sparc) in GBM compared to nonmalignant brain. Furthermore, the role of these proteins for patient survival and their expression in LN18 stem-like neurospheres was analyzed. At mRNA level, ABCG2 and CD95 were reduced, GFAP was unchanged; all other investigated markers were increased in GBM. At protein level, CD44, ELF4, Nanog, Nestin, and Sparc were elevated in GBM, but only CD133 and Nestin were strongly associated with survival time. In addition, ABCG2 and GFAP expression was decreased in LN18 neurospheres whereas CD44, CD95, CD133, ELF4, Nanog, Nestin, and Sparc were upregulated. Altogether only CD133 and Nestin were associated with survival rates. This raises concerns regarding the suitability of the other target structures as prognostic markers, but makes both CD133 and Nestin candidates for GBM therapy. Nevertheless, a search for more specific marker proteins is urgently needed. PMID:29535786

  13. Impact of CD133 positive stem cell proportion on survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kase, Marju; Minajeva, Ave; Niinepuu, Kristi; Kase, Sandra; Vardja, Markus; Asser, Toomas; Jaal, Jana

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the impact of CD133-positive (CD133+) cancer stem cell proportions on treatment results of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients. Patients with GBM (n = 42) received postoperative radiotherapy (± chemotherapy). Surgically excised GBM tissue sections were immunohistochemically examined for CD133 expression. The proportions of CD133+ GBM cells were determined (%). The proportion of CD133+ GBM stem cells was established by 2 independent researchers whose results were in good accordance (R = 0.8, p < 0.01). Additionally, CD133 expression levels were correlated with patients overall survival. The proportion of CD133+ cells varied between patients, being from 0.5% to 82%. Mean and median proportions of CD133+ cells of the entire study group were 33% ± 24% (mean ± SD) and 28%, respectively. Clinical data do not support the association between higher proportion of stem cells and the aggressiveness of GBM. Median survival time of the study group was 10.0 months (95% CI 9.0–11.0). The survival time clearly depended on the proportion of CD133+ cells (log rank test, p = 0.02). Median survival times for patients with low (< median) and high (≥ median) proportion of CD133+ cells were 9.0 months (95% CI 7.6–10.5) and 12.0 months (95% CI 9.3–14.7), respectively. In multivariate analysis, the proportion of CD133+ cells emerged as a significant independent predictor for longer overall survival (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.0–3.8, p = 0.04). In patients with higher stem cell proportion, significantly longer survival times after postoperative radiotherapy were achieved. Underlying reasons and possible higher sensitivity of GBM stem cells to fractionated radio-therapy should be clarified in further studies

  14. Differential Radiosensitizing Potential of Temozolomide in MGMT Promoter Methylated Glioblastoma Multiforme Cell Lines

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    Nifterik, Krista A. van; Berg, Jaap van den; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Lafleur, M. Vincent M.; Leenstra, Sieger; Slotman, Ben J.; Hulsebos, Theo J.M.; Sminia, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the radiosensitizing potential of temozolomide (TMZ) for human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines using single-dose and fractionated γ-irradiation. Methods and Materials: Three genetically characterized human GBM cell lines (AMC-3046, VU-109, and VU-122) were exposed to various single (0-6 Gy) and daily fractionated doses (2 Gy per fraction) of γ-irradiation. Repeated TMZ doses were given before and concurrent with irradiation treatment. Immediately plated clonogenic cell-survival curves were determined for both the single-dose and the fractionated irradiation experiments. To establish the net effect of clonogenic cell survival and cell proliferation, growth curves were determined, expressed as the number of surviving cells. Results: All three cell lines showed MGMT promoter methylation, lacked MGMT protein expression, and were sensitive to TMZ. The isotoxic TMZ concentrations used were in a clinically feasible range of 10 μmol/L (AMC-3046), 3 μmol/L (VU-109), and 2.5 μmol/L (VU-122). Temozolomide was able to radiosensitize two cell lines (AMC 3046 and VU-122) using single-dose irradiation. A reduction in the number of surviving cells after treatment with the combination of TMZ and fractionated irradiation was seen in all three cell lines, but only AMC 3046 showed a radiosensitizing effect. Conclusions: This study on TMZ-sensitive GBM cell lines shows that TMZ can act as a radiosensitizer and is at least additive to γ-irradiation. Enhancement of the radiation response by TMZ seems to be independent of the epigenetically silenced MGMT gene

  15. TSPO Imaging in Glioblastoma Multiforme

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    Jensen, Per; Feng, Ling; Law, Ian

    2015-01-01

    -CLINDE is superior to (18)F-FET in predicting progression of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) at follow-up. METHODS: Three patients with World Health Organization grade IV GBM were scanned with (123)I-CLINDE SPECT, (18)F-FET PET, and gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. Molecular imaging data were compared with follow......-CLINDE (15%-30%). In contrast, VOIs of increased contrast enhancement at follow-up compared with baseline overlapped to a greater extent with baseline (123)I-CLINDE VOIs than (18)F-FET VOIs (21% vs. 8% and 72% vs. 55%). CONCLUSION: Our preliminary results suggest that TSPO brain imaging in GBM may...... be a useful tool for predicting tumor progression at follow-up and may be less susceptible to changes in blood-brain barrier permeability than (18)F-FET. Larger studies are warranted to test the clinical potential of TSPO imaging in GBM, including presurgical planning and radiotherapy....

  16. Involvement of miRNAs in the differentiation of human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells.

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    Beatriz Aldaz

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM-initiating cells (GICs represent a tumor subpopulation with neural stem cell-like properties that is responsible for the development, progression and therapeutic resistance of human GBM. We have recently shown that blockade of NFκB pathway promotes terminal differentiation and senescence of GICs both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that induction of differentiation may be a potential therapeutic strategy for GBM. MicroRNAs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of GBM, but a high-throughput analysis of their role in GIC differentiation has not been reported. We have established human GIC cell lines that can be efficiently differentiated into cells expressing astrocytic and neuronal lineage markers. Using this in vitro system, a microarray-based high-throughput analysis to determine global expression changes of microRNAs during differentiation of GICs was performed. A number of changes in the levels of microRNAs were detected in differentiating GICs, including over-expression of hsa-miR-21, hsa-miR-29a, hsa-miR-29b, hsa-miR-221 and hsa-miR-222, and down-regulation of hsa-miR-93 and hsa-miR-106a. Functional studies showed that miR-21 over-expression in GICs induced comparable cell differentiation features and targeted SPRY1 mRNA, which encodes for a negative regulator of neural stem-cell differentiation. In addition, miR-221 and miR-222 inhibition in differentiated cells restored the expression of stem cell markers while reducing differentiation markers. Finally, miR-29a and miR-29b targeted MCL1 mRNA in GICs and increased apoptosis. Our study uncovers the microRNA dynamic expression changes occurring during differentiation of GICs, and identifies miR-21 and miR-221/222 as key regulators of this process.

  17. hERG1 channels are overexpressed in glioblastoma multiforme and modulate VEGF secretion in glioblastoma cell lines

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    Masi, A; Becchetti, A; Restano-Cassulini, R; Polvani, S; Hofmann, G; Buccoliero, A M; Paglierani, M; Pollo, B; Taddei, G L; Gallina, P; Di Lorenzo, N; Franceschetti, S; Wanke, E; Arcangeli, A

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies have led to considerable advancement in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the relentless cell growth and invasiveness of human gliomas. Partial understanding of these mechanisms has (1) improved the classification for gliomas, by identifying prognostic subgroups, and (2) pointed to novel potential therapeutic targets. Some classes of ion channels have turned out to be involved in the pathogenesis and malignancy of gliomas. We studied the expression and properties of K+ channels in primary cultures obtained from surgical specimens: human ether a gò-gò related (hERG)1 voltage-dependent K+ channels, which have been found to be overexpressed in various human cancers, and human ether a gò-gò-like 2 channels, that share many of hERG1's biophysical features. The expression pattern of these two channels was compared to that of the classical inward rectifying K+ channels, IRK, that are widely expressed in astrocytic cells and classically considered a marker of astrocytic differentiation. In our study, hERG1 was found to be specifically overexpressed in high-grade astrocytomas, that is, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). In addition, we present evidence that, in GBM cell lines, hERG1 channel activity actively contributes to malignancy by promoting vascular endothelial growth factor secretion, thus stimulating the neoangiogenesis typical of high-grade gliomas. Our data provide important confirmation for studies proposing the hERG1 channel as a molecular marker of tumour progression and a possible target for novel anticancer therapies. PMID:16175187

  18. Pim1 kinase is upregulated in glioblastoma multiforme and mediates tumor cell survival

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    Herzog, Susann; Fink, Matthias Alexander; Weitmann, Kerstin; Friedel, Claudius; Hadlich, Stefan; Langner, Sönke; Kindermann, Katharina; Holm, Tobias; Böhm, Andreas; Eskilsson, Eskil; Miletic, Hrvoje; Hildner, Markus; Fritsch, Michael; Vogelgesang, Silke; Havemann, Christoph; Ritter, Christoph Alexander; Meyer zu Schwabedissen, Henriette Elisabeth; Rauch, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Kroemer, Heyo Klaus; Schroeder, Henry; Bien-Möller, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Background The current therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and common primary brain tumor of adults, involves surgery and a combined radiochemotherapy that controls tumor progression only for a limited time window. Therefore, the identification of new molecular targets is highly necessary. Inhibition of kinases has become a standard of clinical oncology, and thus the oncogenic kinase Pim1 might represent a promising target for improvement of GBM therapy. Methods Expression of Pim1 and associated signaling molecules was analyzed in human GBM samples, and the potential role of this kinase in patients' prognosis was evaluated. Furthermore, we analyzed the in vivo role of Pim1 in GBM cell growth in an orthotopic mouse model and examined the consequences of Pim1 inhibition in vitro to clarify underlying pathways. Results In comparison with normal brain, a strong upregulation of Pim1 was demonstrated in human GBM samples. Notably, patients with short overall survival showed a significantly higher Pim1 expression compared with GBM patients who lived longer than the median. In vitro experiments with GBM cells and analysis of patients' GBM samples suggest that Pim1 regulation is dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor. Furthermore, inhibition of Pim1 resulted in reduced cell viability accompanied by decreased cell numbers and increased apoptotic cells, as seen by elevated subG1 cell contents and caspase-3 and -9 activation, as well as modulation of several cell cycle or apoptosis regulatory proteins. Conclusions Altogether, Pim1 could be a novel therapeutic target, which should be further analyzed to improve the outcome of patients with aggressive GBM. PMID:25155357

  19. Level of Notch activation determines the effect on growth and stem cell-like features in glioblastoma multiforme neurosphere cultures

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    Kristoffersen, Karina; Villingshøj, Mette; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2013-01-01

    Brain cancer stem-like cells (bCSC) are cancer cells with neural stem cell (NSC)-like properties found in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and they are assigned a central role in tumor initiation, progression and relapse. The Notch pathway is important for maintenance and cell fate decisions...... in the normal NSC population. Notch signaling is often deregulated in GBM and recent results suggest that this pathway plays a significant role in bCSC as well. We therefore wished to further elucidate the role of Notch activation in GBM-derived bCSC....

  20. The suppression of manganese superoxide dismutase decreased the survival of human glioblastoma multiforme T98G cells

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    Novi S. Hardiany

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a primary malignant brain tumor which has poor prognosis. High incidence of oxidative stress-based therapy resistance could be related to the high antioxidant status of GBM cells. Our previous study has reported that manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD antioxidant expression was significantly higher in high grade glioma than in low grade. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of MnSOD suppression toward GBM cell survival.Methods: This study is an experimental study using human glioblastoma multiforme T98G cell line. Suppression of MnSOD expression was performed using in vitro transfection MnSOD-siRNA. The MnSOD expression was analyzed by measuring the mRNA using real time RT-PCR, protein using ELISA technique, and specific activity of enzyme using inhibition of xantine oxidase. Concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS intracellular was determined by measuring superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide. Cell survival was analyzed by measuring viability, proliferation, and cell apoptosis.Results: In vitro transfection of MnSOD-siRNA suppressed the mRNA, protein, and specific activity of MnSOD. This treatment significantly increased the concentration of superoxide radical; however, it did not influence the concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, viability MnSOD-suppressing cell significantly decreased, accompanied by increase of cell apoptosis without affecting cell proliferation.Conclusion: The suppression of MnSOD expression leads to decrease glioblastoma multiforme cell survival, which was associated to the increase of cell apoptotic.

  1. Connection between cell phone use, p53 gene expression in different zones of glioblastoma multiforme and survival prognoses

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    Reza Akhavan-Sigari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate p53 gene expression in the central and peripheral zones of glioblastoma multiforme using a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR technique in patients who use cell phones ≥3 hours a day and determine its relationship to clinicopathological findings and overall survival. Sixty-three patients (38 males and 25 females, diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, underwent tumor resection between 2008 and 2011. Patient ages ranged from 25 to 88 years, with a mean age of 55. The levels of expression of p53 in the central and peripheral zone of the GBM were quantified by RT-PCR. Data on p53 gene expression from the central and peripheral zone, the related malignancy and the clinicopatholagical findings (age, gender, tumor location and size, as well as overall survival, were analyzed. Forty-one out of 63 patients (65% with the highest level of cell phone use (≥3 hours/day had higher mutant type p53 expression in the peripheral zone of the glioblastoma; the difference was statistically significant (P=0.034. Results from the present study on the use of mobile phones for ≥3 hours a day show a consistent pattern of increased risk for the mutant type of p53 gene expression in the peripheral zone of the glioblastoma, and that this increase was significantly correlated with shorter overall survival time. The risk was not higher for ipsilateral exposure. We found that the mutant type of p53 gene expression in the peripheral zone of the glioblastoma was increased in 65% of patients using cell phones ≥3 hours a day.

  2. Micro RNAs as molecular markers of glioblastoma multiform

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    Farace, M G [Department Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Finocchiaro, G [Istituto Neurologico Besta, Milan (Italy); Ricci Vitiani, L [Department of Hematology, Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this project was to unravel the role that miR-221 and miR-222, of which we had already demonstrated the specific differential expression in glioblastoma multiforme compared to normal brain, play in the control of cell proliferation, with the ultimate goal to provide new insights in the molecular basis of cancer. The results of our research allowed to identify an important molecular target for miRNA-221 and miR-222, highly expressed in glioblastoma multiforme tissues and cell lines, and to precisely recognize the mRNA regions responsible for this regulation.

  3. Micro RNAs as molecular markers of glioblastoma multiform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farace, M.G.; Finocchiaro, G.; Ricci Vitiani, L.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this project was to unravel the role that miR-221 and miR-222, of which we had already demonstrated the specific differential expression in glioblastoma multiforme compared to normal brain, play in the control of cell proliferation, with the ultimate goal to provide new insights in the molecular basis of cancer. The results of our research allowed to identify an important molecular target for miRNA-221 and miR-222, highly expressed in glioblastoma multiforme tissues and cell lines, and to precisely recognize the mRNA regions responsible for this regulation

  4. Investigation of platinum nanoparticle properties against U87 glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kutwin, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Slawomir

    2017-01-01

    a harmful influence on viability of U87 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells, but also showed genotoxic properties as well as a pro-apoptotic effect on cancer cells. It was found that NP-Pt decreased the weight and volume of U87 GBM tumor tissue and caused pathomorphological changes in the ultrastructure...

  5. Glioblastoma Multiforme and Lipid Nanocapsules: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio-Blanco, Juan; Torres-Suárez, Ana-Isabel

    2015-08-01

    Epidemiological data on central nervous system disorders call for a focus on the major hindrance to brain drug delivery, blood-central nervous system barriers. Otherwise, there is little chance of improving the short-term survival of patients with diseases such as glioblastoma multiforme, which is one of the brain disorders associated with many years of life lost. Targetable nanocarriers for treating malignant gliomas are a unique way to overcome low chemotherapeutic levels at target sites devoid of systemic toxicity. This review describes the currently available targetable nanocarriers, focusing particularly on one of the newest nanocarriers, lipid nanocapsules. All of the strategies that are likely to be exploited by lipid nanocapsules to bypass blood-central nervous system barriers, including the most recent targeting approaches (mesenchymal cells), and novel administration routes (convection enhanced delivery) are discussed, together with their most remarkable achievements in glioma-implanted animal models. Although these systems are promising, much research remains to be done in this field.

  6. Nanoparticles of carbon allotropes inhibit glioblastoma multiforme angiogenesis in ovo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodzik, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Wierzbicki, Mateusz

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of carbon nanoparticles produced by different methods on the growth of brain tumor and the development of blood vessels. Glioblastoma multiforme cells were cultured on the chrioallantoic membrane of chicken embryo and after 7 days of incubati...

  7. Investigating Ceria Nanocrystals Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells and its Related Effects: An Electron Microscopy Study

    KAUST Repository

    Aloufi, Bader

    2017-01-22

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles have been utilized widely nowadays in cancer research. It has been suggested by many studies that these nanoparticles are capable of having dual antioxidant behavior in healthy and cancer microenvironment; where in physiological condition, they act as antioxidant and do not affect the healthy cells, while in tumor-like condition; they act as an oxidase, and result in a selective killing for the cancer cells. In this experiment, the interaction of nanoceria with glioblastoma and healthy astrocyte cells was examined, and further correlated with the in vitro cytotoxic effects of various nanoceria concentrations (100 and 300 µg/ml) and exposure times (12, 24, and 48 hours). Electron microscopes were used to investigate the cellular-NPs interactions, and to examine the related cytotoxic effects in combination with trypan blue and propidium iodide viability assays. Our data suggest the following results. First, the two cell lines demonstrated capability of taken up the ceria through endocytosis pathway, where the NPs were recognized engulfed by double membrane vesicles at various regions over the cellular cytoplasm. Secondly, cerium oxide nanoparticles were found to affect the glioblastoma cells, but not so severely the corresponding healthy astrocytes at the various concentrations and incubation times, as revealed by the viability assays and the electron microscopy analysis. Thirdly, the viability of the glioblastoma cells after the treatment displayed a declined trend when increasing the ceria concentrations, but did not show such dependency with regard to the different time points. In all cases, the healthy astrocyte cells showed slight alterations in mitochondrial shape which did not influence their viability. Among the various nanoceria concentrations and exposure times, the most efficient dose of treatment was found to be with a concentration of 300 µg/ml at a time point of 24-hour, where higher reduction on the viability of

  8. Glioblastoma multiforme after radiotherapy for acromegaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piatt, J.H. Jr.; Blue, J.M.; Schold, S.C. Jr.; Burger, P.C.

    1983-07-01

    A case of glioblastoma multiforme that occurred 14 years after radiotherapy for acromegaly is presented. The striking correspondence between the anatomy of the tumor and the geometry of the radiation ports is suggestive of a causal relationship. Previously reported cases of radiation-associated glioma are reviewed, and a brief appraisal of the evidence for induction of these lesions by radiation is presented. The differentiation of radiation-associated neoplasms from radionecrosis is also discussed.

  9. Glioblastoma multiforme after radiotherapy for acromegaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piatt, J.H. Jr.; Blue, J.M.; Schold, S.C. Jr.; Burger, P.C.

    1983-01-01

    A case of glioblastoma multiforme that occurred 14 years after radiotherapy for acromegaly is presented. The striking correspondence between the anatomy of the tumor and the geometry of the radiation ports is suggestive of a causal relationship. Previously reported cases of radiation-associated glioma are reviewed, and a brief appraisal of the evidence for induction of these lesions by radiation is presented. The differentiation of radiation-associated neoplasms from radionecrosis is also discussed

  10. Nitric oxide released from JS-K induces cell death by mitotic catastrophe as part of necrosis in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günzle, Jessica; Osterberg, Nadja; Saavedra, Joseph E; Weyerbrock, Astrid

    2016-09-01

    The nitric oxide (NO) donor JS-K is specifically activated by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) in GST-overexpressing cells. We have shown the induction of cell death in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells at high JS-K doses but the mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether NO-induced cell death is triggered by induction of apoptotic or necrotic pathways. For the first time, we demonstrate that NO induces cell death via mitotic catastrophe (MC) with non-apoptotic mechanisms in GBM cells. Moreover, the level of morphological changes indicating MC correlates with increased necrosis. Therefore, we conclude that MC is the main mechanism by which GBM cells undergo cell death after treatment with JS-K associated with necrosis rather than apoptosis. In addition, we show that PARP1 is not an exclusive marker for late apoptosis but is also involved in MC. Activating an alternative way of cell death can be useful for the multimodal cancer therapy of GBM known for its strong anti-apoptotic mechanisms and drug resistance.

  11. Establishment and Biological Characterization of a Panel of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) and GBM Variant Oncosphere Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Zev A; Wilson, Kelli M; Salmasi, Vafi; Orr, Brent A; Eberhart, Charles G; Siu, I-Mei; Lim, Michael; Weingart, Jon D; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Bettegowda, Chetan; Kassam, Amin B; Olivi, Alessandro; Brem, Henry; Riggins, Gregory J; Gallia, Gary L

    2016-01-01

    Human tumor cell lines form the basis of the majority of present day laboratory cancer research. These models are vital to studying the molecular biology of tumors and preclinical testing of new therapies. When compared to traditional adherent cell lines, suspension cell lines recapitulate the genetic profiles and histologic features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with higher fidelity. Using a modified neural stem cell culture technique, here we report the characterization of GBM cell lines including GBM variants. Tumor tissue samples were obtained intra-operatively and cultured in neural stem cell conditions containing growth factors. Tumor lines were characterized in vitro using differentiation assays followed by immunostaining for lineage-specific markers. In vivo tumor formation was assayed by orthotopic injection in nude mice. Genetic uniqueness was confirmed via short tandem repeat (STR) DNA profiling. Thirteen oncosphere lines derived from GBM and GBM variants, including a GBM with PNET features and a GBM with oligodendroglioma component, were established. All unique lines showed distinct genetic profiles by STR profiling. The lines assayed demonstrated a range of in vitro growth rates. Multipotency was confirmed using in vitro differentiation. Tumor formation demonstrated histologic features consistent with high grade gliomas, including invasion, necrosis, abnormal vascularization, and high mitotic rate. Xenografts derived from the GBM variants maintained histopathological features of the primary tumors. We have generated and characterized GBM suspension lines derived from patients with GBMs and GBM variants. These oncosphere cell lines will expand the resources available for preclinical study.

  12. The effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on proliferation and apoptosis of in ovo cultured glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbańska, Kaja; Pająk, Beata; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz; Sokołowska, Justyna; Grodzik, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Szmidt, Maciej; Sysa, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) provide a unique approach to the treatment of tumors, especially those of neuroepithelial origin. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of AgNPs on proliferation and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells cultured in an in ovo model. Human GBM cells, line U-87, were placed on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane. After 8 days, the tumors were divided into three groups: control (non-treated), treated with colloidal AgNPs (40 μg/ml), and placebo (tumors supplemented with vehicle only). At the end of the experiment, all tumors were isolated. Assessment of cell proliferation and cell apoptosis was estimated by histological, immunohistochemical, and Western blot analyses. The results show that AgNPs can influence GBM growth. AgNPs inhibit proliferation of GBM cells and seem to have proapoptotic properties. Although there were statistically significant differences between control and AgNP groups in the AI and the levels of active caspase 9 and active caspase 3, the level of these proteins in GBM cells treated with AgNPs seems to be on the border between the spontaneous apoptosis and the induced. Our results indicate that the antiproliferative properties of silver nanoparticles overwhelm proapoptotic ones. Further research focused on the cytotoxic effect of AgNPs on tumor and normal cells should be conducted.

  13. Andrographolide suppresses the migratory ability of human glioblastoma multiforme cells by targeting ERK1/2-mediated matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Shih-Liang; Kuo, Fu-Hsuan; Chen, Pei-Ni; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Yu, Nuo-Yi; Yang, Wei-En; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) can be a fatal tumor because of difficulties in treating the related metastasis. Andrographolide is the bioactive component of the Andrographis paniculata. Andrographolide possesses the anti-inflammatory activity and inhibits the growth of various cancers; however, its effect on GBM cancer motility remains largely unknown. In this study, we examined the antimetastatic properties of andrographolide in human GBM cells. Our results revealed that andrographolide inhi...

  14. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofani, Gianni; Raffa, Vittoria; Menciassi, Arianna; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2008-11-25

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of (10)B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly-l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots) to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors.

  15. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciofani Gianni

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of10B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly-l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors.

  16. The role of glioma stem cells in chemotherapy resistance and glioblastoma multiforme recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffinger, Brenda; Spencer, Drew; Pytel, Peter; Ahmed, Atique U.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2016-01-01

    Glioma stem cells (GSCs) constitute a slow-dividing, small population within a heterogeneous glioblastoma. They are able to self-renew, recapitulate a whole tumor, and differentiate into other specific GBM subpopulations. Therefore, they have been held responsible for malignant relapse after primary standard therapy and the poor prognosis of recurrent GBM. The failure of current therapies to eliminate specific GSC subpopulations has been considered a major factor contributing to the inevitable recurrence in GBM patients following treatment. Here, we discuss the molecular mechanisms of chemoresistance of GSCs and the reasons why complete eradication of GSCs is so difficult to achieve. We will also describe the targeted therapies currently available towards GSCs and possible mechanisms to overcome such chemoresistance and avoid therapeutic relapse. PMID:26027432

  17. Raman spectroscopy for diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Candace Elise

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and most fatal malignant brain tumor, is highly infiltrative and incurable. Although improved prognosis has been demonstrated by surgically resecting the bulk tumor, a lack of clear borders at the tumor margins complicates the selection decision during surgery. This dissertation investigates the potential of Raman spectroscopy for distinguishing between normal and malignant brain tissue and sets the groundwork for a surgical diagnostic guide for resection of gross malignant gliomas. These studies revealed that Raman spectroscopy was capable of discriminating between normal scid mouse brain tissue and human xenograft tumors induced in those mice. The spectra of normal and malignant tissue were normalized by dividing by the respective magnitudes of the peaks near 1440 cm -1. Spectral differences include the shape of the broad peaks near 1440 cm-1 and 1660 cm-1 and the relative magnitudes of the peaks at 1264 cm-1, 1287 cm-1, 1297 cm-1, 1556 cm -1, 1586 cm-1, 1614 cm-1, and 1683 cm-1. From these studies emerged questions regarding how to objectively normalize and compare spectra for future automation. Some differences in the Raman spectra were shown to be inherent in the disease states of the cells themselves via differences in the Raman spectra of normal human astrocytes in culture and cultured cells derived from GBM tumors. The spectra of astrocytes and glioma cells were normalized by dividing by the respective magnitudes of the peaks near 1450 cm-1. The differences between the Raman spectra of normal and transformed cells include the ratio of the 1450 cm-1/1650 cm-1 peaks and the relative magnitudes of the peaks at 1181 cm-1, 1191 cm-1, 1225 cm-1, 1263 cm -1, 1300 cm-1, 1336 cm-1, 1477 cm-1, 1494 cm-1, and 1695 cm -1. Previous Raman spectroscopic studies of biological cells have shown that the magnitude of the Raman signal decreases over time, indicating sample damage. Cells exposed to laser excitation at similar power

  18. Radiotherapy Results of Brain Astrocytoma and Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Doo Ho; Kim, Il Han; Ha, Sung Whan; Chi, Je Geun

    1988-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed on 49 patients with astrocytoma of glioblastoma multiforme of brain who received postoperative radiotherapy in the period between February 1979 and December 1985. Fourteen patients had grade I astrocytoma, 11 patients grade II, 14 patients grade III, and 10 patients glioblastoma multiforme. Three year actuarial survival rates were 85.7%, 44.6% and 23.1% for grade I, II, and III astrocytomas, respectively. One and 2 year actuarial survival rates for patients with glioblastoma multiforme were 54.5% and 27.3%, respectively. Histologic grade, age, extent of operation and tumor location were revealed to be prognosticators

  19. Exploratory analysis of the copy number alterations in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Pablo; Vilela, Marco; Deus, Helena; Kim, Yong-Wan; Koul, Dimpy; Colman, Howard; Aldape, Kenneth D; Bogler, Oliver; Yung, W K Alfred; Coombes, Kevin; Mills, Gordon B; Vasconcelos, Ana T; Almeida, Jonas S

    2008-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas project (TCGA) has initiated the analysis of multiple samples of a variety of tumor types, starting with glioblastoma multiforme. The analytical methods encompass genomic and transcriptomic information, as well as demographic and clinical data about the sample donors. The data create the opportunity for a systematic screening of the components of the molecular machinery for features that may be associated with tumor formation. The wealth of existing mechanistic information about cancer cell biology provides a natural reference for the exploratory exercise. Glioblastoma multiforme DNA copy number data was generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas project for 167 patients using 227 aCGH experiments, and was analyzed to build a catalog of aberrant regions. Genome screening was performed using an information theory approach in order to quantify aberration as a deviation from a centrality without the bias of untested assumptions about its parametric nature. A novel Cancer Genome Browser software application was developed and is made public to provide a user-friendly graphical interface in which the reported results can be reproduced. The application source code and stand alone executable are available at (http://code.google.com/p/cancergenome) and (http://bioinformaticstation.org), respectively. The most important known copy number alterations for glioblastoma were correctly recovered using entropy as a measure of aberration. Additional alterations were identified in different pathways, such as cell proliferation, cell junctions and neural development. Moreover, novel candidates for oncogenes and tumor suppressors were also detected. A detailed map of aberrant regions is provided.

  20. TCGA Workshop: Genomics and Biology of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) - TCGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) held a workshop entitled, “Genomics and Biology of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM),” to review the initial GBM data from the TCGA pilot project.

  1. Statin use and survival following glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Hallas, Jesper; Friis, Søren

    2014-01-01

    with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). METHODS: We identified 1562 patients diagnosed with GBM during 2000-2009 from the Danish Cancer Registry and linked this cohort to Danish nationwide demographic and health registries. Within the GBM cohort, each patient recorded as using statins prior to diagnosis (defined as ≥2......-cause death associated with prediagnostic statin use. RESULTS: A total of 339 GBM patients were included in the analyses. Of these, 325 died during median follow-up of 6.9 months (interquartile range: 3.8-13.4 months). Prediagnostic statin use was associated with a reduced HR of death (0.79; 95% CI: 0......: 0.63-1.01). CONCLUSION: Long-term prediagnostic statin use may improve survival following GBM....

  2. Glioblastoma Multiforme Presenting as Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cagatay Ozdol

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors with concomitant intracerebral hemorrhage are rarely encountered. Hemorrhage as the initial presentation of a brain tumour may pose some diagnostic problems, especially if the tumour is small or the hemorrhage is abundant. We present a 47-year-old man who admitted to the emergency department with sudden onset headache, right blurred vision and gait disturbance. A non-contrast cranial computerized tomography scan performed immediately after his admission revealed a well circumscribed right occipitoparietal haematoma with intense peripheral edema causing compression of the ipsilateral ventricles. On 6th hour of his admission the patient%u2019s neurological status deteriorated and he subsequently underwent emergent craniotomy and microsurgical evacuation of the haematoma. The histopathological examination of the mass was consistent with a glioblastoma multiforme. Neoplasms may be hidden behind each case of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Histological sampling and investigation is mandatory in the presence of preoperative radiological features suggesting a neoplasm.

  3. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  4. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  5. Expression of S1P metabolizing enzymes and receptors correlate with survival time and regulate cell migration in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien-Möller, Sandra; Lange, Sandra; Holm, Tobias; Böhm, Andreas; Paland, Heiko; Küpper, Johannes; Herzog, Susann; Weitmann, Kerstin; Havemann, Christoph; Vogelgesang, Silke; Marx, Sascha; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Henry W S; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2016-03-15

    A signaling molecule which is involved in proliferation and migration of malignant cells is the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). There are hints for a potential role of S1P signaling in malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) which is characterized by a poor prognosis. Therefore, a comprehensive expression analysis of S1P receptors (S1P1-S1P5) and S1P metabolizing enzymes in human GBM (n = 117) compared to healthy brain (n = 10) was performed to evaluate their role for patient´s survival. Furthermore, influence of S1P receptor inhibition on proliferation and migration were studied in LN18 GBM cells. Compared to control brain, mRNA levels of S1P1, S1P2, S1P3 and S1P generating sphingosine kinase-1 were elevated in GBM. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated an association between S1P1 and S1P2 with patient´s survival times. In vitro, an inhibitory effect of the SphK inhibitor SKI-II on viability of LN18 cells was shown. S1P itself had no effect on viability but stimulated LN18 migration which was blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P2. The participation of S1P1 and S1P2 in LN18 migration was further supported by siRNA-mediated silencing of these receptors. Immunoblots and inhibition experiments suggest an involvement of the PI3-kinase/AKT1 pathway in the chemotactic effect of S1P in LN18 cells.In summary, our data argue for a role of S1P signaling in proliferation and migration of GBM cells. Individual components of the S1P pathway represent prognostic factors for patients with GBM. Perspectively, a selective modulation of S1P receptor subtypes could represent a therapeutic approach for GBM patients and requires further evaluation.

  6. Glioblastoma multiforme of the pineal region: case report Glioblastoma multiforme de região pineal: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Leandro Gasparetto

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: pineal region tumors are uncommon, and comprise more frequently three categories: germ cell, parenchymal cell and glial tumors. Most pineal gliomas are low-grade astrocytomas. Glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive and common brain tumor, is extremely rare at this location with only few cases reported. CASE DESCRIPTION: a 29-year-old woman with a two month history of headache, nuchal pain, fever, nausea and seizures and physical examination showing nuchal rigidity, generalized hypotony, hypotrophy and hyper-reflexia, Babinski sign and left VI cranial par palsy. CT scan examination revealed a ill-defined hypodense lesion at the pineal region with heterogeneous contrast enhancement. MRI showed a lesion at the pineal region infiltrating the right thalamic region. The patient underwent a right craniotomy with partial resection of the mass. The histological examination of paraffin-embedded material defined the diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme. Post-operative radiotherapy was indicated but the patient refused the treatment and died two months afterwards. CONCLUSION: in spite of its rarity at this location, glioblastoma multiforme should be considered in the differential diagnosis of aggressive lesions at the pineal region.OBJETIVO: Os tumores da região pineal são incomuns e podem ser divididos em três categorias de acordo com a sua origem: células germinativas, células do parênquima e células gliais. Em sua maioria, os gliomas de pineal são astrocitomas de baixo grau, sendo que o seu correspondente maligno, glioblastoma multiforme, é o mais comum e agressivo tumor encefálico e é extremamente raro nesta localização, com apenas alguns casos relatados na literatura. CASO: Mulher com 29 anos apresentando há 2 meses cefaléia, nucalgia, febre, náuseas e crises convulsivas. O exame físico mostrou rigidez de nuca, hipotonia, hipotrofia e hiperreflexia generalizadas, sinal de Babinski e paralisia do VI nervo craniano. A

  7. Osthole Suppresses the Migratory Ability of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells via Inhibition of Focal Adhesion Kinase-Mediated Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Fang Tsai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common type of primary and malignant tumor occurring in the adult central nervous system. GBM often invades surrounding regions of the brain during its early stages, making successful treatment difficult. Osthole, an active constituent isolated from the dried C. monnieri fruit, has been shown to suppress tumor migration and invasion. However, the effects of osthole in human GBM are largely unknown. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK is important for the metastasis of cancer cells. Results from this study show that osthole can not only induce cell death but also inhibit phosphorylation of FAK in human GBM cells. Results from this study show that incubating GBM cells with osthole reduces matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13 expression and cell motility, as assessed by cell transwell and wound healing assays. This study also provides evidence supporting the potential of osthole in reducing FAK activation, MMP-13 expression, and cell motility in human GBM cells.

  8. Exploratory analysis of the copy number alterations in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Freire

    Full Text Available The Cancer Genome Atlas project (TCGA has initiated the analysis of multiple samples of a variety of tumor types, starting with glioblastoma multiforme. The analytical methods encompass genomic and transcriptomic information, as well as demographic and clinical data about the sample donors. The data create the opportunity for a systematic screening of the components of the molecular machinery for features that may be associated with tumor formation. The wealth of existing mechanistic information about cancer cell biology provides a natural reference for the exploratory exercise.Glioblastoma multiforme DNA copy number data was generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas project for 167 patients using 227 aCGH experiments, and was analyzed to build a catalog of aberrant regions. Genome screening was performed using an information theory approach in order to quantify aberration as a deviation from a centrality without the bias of untested assumptions about its parametric nature. A novel Cancer Genome Browser software application was developed and is made public to provide a user-friendly graphical interface in which the reported results can be reproduced. The application source code and stand alone executable are available at (http://code.google.com/p/cancergenome and (http://bioinformaticstation.org, respectively.The most important known copy number alterations for glioblastoma were correctly recovered using entropy as a measure of aberration. Additional alterations were identified in different pathways, such as cell proliferation, cell junctions and neural development. Moreover, novel candidates for oncogenes and tumor suppressors were also detected. A detailed map of aberrant regions is provided.

  9. Nanoparticles containing allotropes of carbon have genotoxic effects on glioblastoma multiforme cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinzmann, Mateusz; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta

    2014-01-01

    of the U87 cancer cells. However, incubation with pristine graphene and reduced graphene oxide led to a significant decrease in cell viability, whereas incubation with graphene oxide, graphite, and ultradispersed detonation diamond led to a smaller decrease in cell viability. The results of a comet assay...... viability by Trypan blue assay and level of DNA fragmentation of U87 cells after 24 hours of incubation with 50 μg/mL carbon nanoparticles. DNA fragmentation was studied using single-cell gel electrophoresis. Incubation with nanoparticles containing the allotropes of carbon did not alter the morphology...

  10. Cellular and subcellular distribution of BSH in human glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, M.; Gabel, D.

    2000-01-01

    The cellular and subcellular distribution of mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate (BSH) in seven glioblastoma multiforme tissue sections of six patients having received BSH prior to surgery was investigated by light, fluorescence and electron microscopy. With use of specific antibodies against BSH its localization could be found in tissue sections predominantly (approx. 90%) in the cytoplasm of GFAP-positive cells of all but one patient. The latter was significantly younger (33 years in contrast of 46-71 (mean 60) years). In none of the tissue sections BSH could be found to a significant amount in the cell nuclei. In contrast, electron microscopy studies show BSH as well associated with the cell membrane as with the chromatin in the nucleus. (author)

  11. MicroRNA-139-5p acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting ELTD1 and regulating cell cycle in glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Shouping [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Linyi People' s Hospital, Linyi, Shandong 276000 (China); Wang, Xianjun [Department of Neurology, Linyi People' s Hospital, Linyi, Shandong 276000 (China); Li, Xiao [Department of Pathology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Cao, Yuandong, E-mail: yuandongcao@sina.com [Department of Radiotherapy, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-11-13

    MicroRNA-139-5p was identified to be significantly down-regulated in glioblastoma multiform (GBM) by miRNA array. In this report we aimed to clarify its biological function, molecular mechanisms and direct target gene in GBM. Twelve patients with GBM were analyzed for the expression of miR-139-5p by quantitative RT-PCR. miR-139-5p overexpression was established by transfecting miR-139-5p-mimic into U87MG and T98G cells, and its effects on cell proliferation were studied using MTT assay and colony formation assays. We concluded that ectopic expression of miR-139-5p in GBM cell lines significantly suppressed cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Bioinformatics coupled with luciferase and western blot assays also revealed that miR-139-5p suppresses glioma cell proliferation by targeting ELTD1 and regulating cell cycle. - Highlights: • miR-139-5p is downregulated in GBM. • miR-139-5p regulates cell proliferation through inducing apoptosis. • miR-139-5p regulates glioblastoma tumorigenesis by targeting 3′UTR of ELTD1. • miR-139-5p is involved in cell cycle regulation.

  12. A functional study of EGFR and Notch signaling in brain cancer stem-like cells from glioblastoma multiforme (Ph.d.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Karina

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive brain tumor in adults with a median survival for newly diagnosed GBM patients at less than 1.5 year. Despite intense treatment efforts the vast majority of patients will experience relapse and much research today is therefore searching...... for new molecular and cellular targets that can improve the prognosis for GBM patients. One such target is the brain cancer stem-like cells (bCSC) that are believed to be responsible for tumor initiation, progression, treatment resistance and ultimately relapse. bCSC are identified based...... on their resemblance to normal neural stem cells (NSC) and their tumorigenic potential. Like for NSC, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Notch receptor signaling pathways are believed to be important for the maintenance of bCSC. These pathways as such present promising targets in a future anti-bCSC GBM...

  13. Vacquinol-1 inducible cell death in glioblastoma multiforme is counter regulated by TRPM7 activity induced by exogenous ATP

    OpenAIRE

    Sander, Philip; Mostafa, Haouraa; Soboh, Ayman; Schneider, Julian M.; Pala, Andrej; Baron, Ann-Kathrin; Moepps, Barbara; Wirtz, C. Rainer; Georgieff, Michael; Schneider, Marion

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are the most malignant brain tumors in humans and have a very poor prognosis. New therapeutic options are urgently needed. A novel drug, Vacquinol-1 (Vac), a quinolone derivative, displays promising properties by inducing rapid cell death in GBM but not in non-transformed tissues. Features of this type of cell death are compatible with a process termed methuosis. Here we tested Vac on a highly malignant glioma cell line observed by long-term video microscopy. Human dental-...

  14. Glioblastoma multiforme of the cerebellum: description of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luccarelli, G

    1980-01-01

    Only 43 cases of glioblastoma multiforme of the cerebellum have been reported in the literature. This report is based on the findings of 3 cerebellar glioblastomas in a review of 1,206 consecutive confirmed cases of glioblastoma operated on between 1947 and 1977 at the Istituto Neurologico of Milan, giving an incidence of 0.24%. Clinical features are similar to those of any other fast-growing subtentorial tumour. Neuroradiological studies, including CAT, are of little help in predicting the exact nature of these tumours before surgery. A correct diagnosis can be reached only by microscopic examination. Histological patterns appear in no way to differ from those of cerebral glioblastoma. The biological behaviour of these tumours is in all respects identical to that of glioblastoma of cerebral hemispheres.

  15. Andrographolide suppresses the migratory ability of human glioblastoma multiforme cells by targeting ERK1/2-mediated matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-Liang; Kuo, Fu-Hsuan; Chen, Pei-Ni; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Yu, Nuo-Yi; Yang, Wei-En; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2017-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) can be a fatal tumor because of difficulties in treating the related metastasis. Andrographolide is the bioactive component of the Andrographis paniculata . Andrographolide possesses the anti-inflammatory activity and inhibits the growth of various cancers; however, its effect on GBM cancer motility remains largely unknown. In this study, we examined the antimetastatic properties of andrographolide in human GBM cells. Our results revealed that andrographolide inhibited the invasion and migration abilities of GBM8401 and U251 cells. Furthermore, andrographolide inhibited matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 activity and expression. Real-time PCR and promoter activity assays indicated that andrographolide inhibited MMP-2 expression at the transcriptional level. Such inhibitory effects were associated with the suppression of CREB DNA-binding activity and CREB expression. Mechanistically, andrographolide inhibited the cell motility of GBM8401 cells through the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 pathway, and the blocking of the ERK 1/2 pathway could reverse MMP-2-mediated cell motility. In conclusion, CREB is a crucial target of andrographolide for suppressing MMP-2-mediated cell motility in GBM cells. Therefore, a combination of andrographolide and an ERK inhibitor might be a good strategy for preventing GBM metastasis.

  16. Advanced case of glioblastoma multiforme and pregnancy. An ethical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rasheedy, Intisar M; Al-Hameed, Fahad M

    2015-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant form of the glial tumors. Advanced and treated GBM is rarely associated with pregnancy for many reasons. Glioblastoma multiforme presenting during pregnancy carries unique challenges to the patient, baby, family, and health care providers. We describe an unusual case of advanced GBM that was treated with maximum doses of chemotherapy and radiations, and she became pregnant and presented at eighteenth weeks of gestation. Her medical management was associated with a significant ethical dilemma. We managed to deliver the baby safely through cesarean section at week 28 despite the critical condition of the mother. Unfortunately, the mother died 2 weeks post delivery. We concluded that although recurrent and treated GBM is rarely associated with pregnancy and carries dismal prognosis, but if it occurs, it can still be carried, and a multidisciplinary team work is the key for successful outcome.

  17. A prospective PET study of patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Preben B.; Blinkenberg, M; Lassen, U

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the post-surgical metabolic and structural cerebral changes in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined ten patients prospectively with newly diagnosed GBM. All patients were primarily treated with surgery, followed by chemotherapy...... compared with structural imaging in the prospective evaluation of GBM. We found a difference in metabolic increase and tumor growth between the two treatment regimens, although this finding has limited relevance due to the design of the study....

  18. Survival benefit of surgery in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudry, Usama Khalid; Khan, Saad Akhtar; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2017-12-01

    There is an ongoing debate regarding role of surgery for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Older literature hinted at only modest survival benefits with surgery and a high rate of morbidity. However, more recent literature suggests better survival that may be attributed to better surgical techniques and better options in adjuvant treatment. Herein the authors review recent literature with regards to the possible role of surgery in recurrent GBM and also look into the key factors impacting second surgery. .

  19. Molecular Characteristics in MRI-classified Group 1 Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E Haskins

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous brain tumor. Previous study of MRI-classified GBM has revealed a spatial relationship between Group 1 GBM (GBM1 and the subventricular zone (SVZ. The SVZ is an adult neural stem cell niche and is also suspected to be the origin of a subtype of brain tumor. The intimate contact between GBM1 and the SVZ raises the possibility that tumor cells in GBM1 may be most related to SVZ cells. In support of this notion, we found that neural stem cell and neuroblast markers are highly expressed in GBM1. Additionally, we identified molecular characteristics in this type of GBM that include up-regulation of metabolic enzymes, ribosomal proteins, heat shock proteins, and c-Myc oncoprotein. As GBM1 often recurs at great distances from the initial lesion, the rewiring of metabolism and ribosomal biogenesis may facilitate cancer cells’ growth and survival during tumor migration. Taken together, combined our findings and MRI-based classification of GBM1 would offer better prediction and treatment for this multifocal GBM.

  20. A study of concurrent radiochemotherapy with paclitaxel in glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julka, P.K.; Awasthy, B.S.; Rath, G.K.; Agarwal, S.; Varna, T.; Mahapatra, A.K.; Singh, R.

    2000-01-01

    Despite advances in neurosurgery and radiotherapy, the prognosis of patients with glioblastoma multiforme remains poor. Reports in the literature about the radiosensitizing properties of paclitaxel stimulated the authors to conduct a study using paclitaxel concurrently with radiation in a group of 18 patients who had residual disease postoperatively. Paclitaxel was delivered weekly as an intravenous infusion in a dose of 60 mg/m 2 along with radiation to the primary lesion. A total of 108 cycles of paclitaxel was given. All the patients tolerated the treatment well. The main side effects were haematological, and neuropathy which was self-limiting. The overall 1-year survival rate was 70%, with 12 patients alive at 13 months. The median survival has not yet been reached although it is more than 13 months. Thus, paclitaxel can be safely delivered concomitantly with radiation in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Larger, randomized trials are required to establish the comparative efficacy of paclitaxel as a radiosensitizer in glioblastoma multiforme. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  1. Pre-clinical analysis of changes in intra-cellular biochemistry of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells due to c-Myc silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Vishal; Vaidyanathan, Muthukumar; Janardhanam, Vanisree Arambakkam; Bradner, James E

    2014-10-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive form of brain Tumor that has few cures. In this study, we analyze the anti-proliferative effects of a new molecule JQ1 against GBMs induced in Wistar Rats. JQ1 is essentially a Myc inhibitor. c-Myc is also known for altering the biochemistry of a tumor cell. Therefore, the study is intended to analyze certain other oncogenes associated with c-Myc and also the change in cellular biochemistry upon c-Myc inhibition. The quantitative analysis of gene expression gave a co-expressive pattern for all the three genes involved namely; c-Myc, Bcl-2, and Akt. The cellular biochemistry analysis by transmission electron microscopy revealed high glycogen and lipid aggregation in Myc inhibited cells and excessive autophagy. The study demonstrates the role of c-Myc as a central metabolic regulator and Bcl-2 and Akt assisting in extending c-Myc half-life as well as in regulation of autophagy, so as to regulate cell survival on the whole. The study also demonstrates that transient treatment by JQ1 leads to aggressive development of tumor and therefore, accelerating death, emphasizing the importance of dosage fixation, and duration for clinical use in future.

  2. Dual Inhibition of PDK1 and Aurora Kinase A: An Effective Strategy to Induce Differentiation and Apoptosis of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Simona; Sestito, Simona; Pietrobono, Deborah; Giacomelli, Chiara; Chiellini, Grazia; Di Maio, Danilo; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Martini, Claudia; Rapposelli, Simona

    2017-01-18

    The poor prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is mainly attributed to drug resistance mechanisms and to the existence of a subpopulation of glioma stem cells (GSCs). Multitarget compounds able to both affect different deregulated pathways and the GSC subpopulation could escape tumor resistance and, most importantly, eradicate the stem cell reservoir. In this respect, the simultaneous inhibition of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) and aurora kinase A (AurA), each one playing a pivotal role in cellular survival/migration/differentiation, could represent an innovative strategy to overcome GBM resistance and recurrence. Herein, the cross-talk between these pathways was investigated, using the single-target reference compounds MP7 (PDK1 inhibitor) and Alisertib (AurA inhibitor). Furthermore, a new ligand, SA16, was identified for its ability to inhibit the PDK1 and the AurA pathways at once, thus proving to be a useful tool for the simultaneous inhibition of the two kinases. SA16 blocked GBM cell proliferation, reduced tumor invasiveness, and triggered cellular apoptosis. Most importantly, the AurA/PDK1 blocker showed an increased efficacy against GSCs, inducing their differentiation and apoptosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on combined targeting of PDK1 and AurA. This drug represents an attractive multitarget lead scaffold for the development of new potential treatments for GBM and GSCs.

  3. Immune phenotypes predict survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haouraa Mostafa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, a common primary malignant brain tumor, rarely disseminates beyond the central nervous system and has a very bad prognosis. The current study aimed at the analysis of immunological control in individual patients with GBM. Methods Immune phenotypes and plasma biomarkers of GBM patients were determined at the time of diagnosis using flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Results Using descriptive statistics, we found that immune anomalies were distinct in individual patients. Defined marker profiles proved highly relevant for survival. A remarkable relation between activated NK cells and improved survival in GBM patients was in contrast to increased CD39 and IL-10 in patients with a detrimental course and very short survival. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA and Cox proportional hazards models substantiated the relevance of absolute numbers of CD8 cells and low numbers of CD39 cells for better survival. Conclusions Defined alterations of the immune system may guide the course of disease in patients with GBM and may be prognostically valuable for longitudinal studies or can be applied for immune intervention.

  4. Upregulation of miR-181a suppresses the formation of glioblastoma stem cells by targeting the Notch2 oncogene and correlates with good prognosis in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shi-Xiong; Zhao, Zhong-Yan; Weng, Guo-Hu; He, Xiang-Ying; Wu, Chan-Ji; Fu, Chuan-Yi; Sui, Zhi-Yan; Ma, Yu-Shui; Liu, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) are responsible for the initiation and progression of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and microRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in this disease. However, the mechanisms underlying the role of miRNAs in the stemness of GSCs have not been completely elucidated. We previously showed that miR-181a is downregulated in GBM and may predict prognosis in patients with this disease. Here, we demonstrate that the upregulation of miR-181a suppressed GSC formation and inhibited GBM tumorigenesis by targeting the Notch2 oncogene. We found that miR-181a was downregulated in GSCs derived from human glioblastoma U87MG and U373MG cells. The high expression of miR-181a inhibited the levels of stemness-related markers CD133 and BMI1, attenuated sphere proliferation, promoted cell apoptosis, and reduced the tumorigenicity of GSCs. MiR-181a decreased the expression of Notch2 by targeting the 3’-untranslated region of its mRNA. Notch2 overexpression inhibited the effects of miR-181a downregulation on GSCs, and was negatively correlated with miR-181a expression. Moreover, high Notch2 expression together with low miR-181a expression was correlated with a shorter median overall survival for GBM patients. Together, these data show that miR-181a may play an essential role in GSC formation and GBM progression by targeting Notch2, suggesting that Notch2 and miR-181a have potential prognostic value as tumor biomarkers in GBM patients. - Highlights: • MiR-181a suppressed GSC formation and GBM tumorigenesis by targeting Notch2. • Notch2 and miR-181a expression were correlated with OS for GBM patients. • Notch2 and miR-181a have potential prognostic value in GBM patients.

  5. Altered expression of polycomb group genes in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    Full Text Available The Polycomb group (PcG proteins play a critical role in histone mediated epigenetics which has been implicated in the malignant evolution of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. By systematically interrogating The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA, we discovered widespread aberrant expression of the PcG members in GBM samples compared to normal brain. The most striking differences were upregulation of EZH2, PHF19, CBX8 and PHC2 and downregulation of CBX7, CBX6, EZH1 and RYBP. Interestingly, changes in EZH2, PHF19, CBX7, CBX6 and EZH1 occurred progressively as astrocytoma grade increased. We validated the aberrant expression of CBX6, CBX7, CBX8 and EZH2 in GBM cell lines by Western blotting and qRT-PCR, and further the aberrant expression of CBX6 in GBM tissue samples by immunohistochemical staining. To determine if there was functional significance to the diminished CBX6 levels in GBM, CBX6 was overexpressed in GBM cells resulting in decreased proliferative capacity. In conclusion, aberrant expression of PcG proteins in GBMs may play a role in the development or maintenance of the malignancy.

  6. Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Look Inside Its Heterogeneous Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-del-Mar Inda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity is a hallmark of tumors and has a crucial role in the outcome of the malignancy, because it not only confounds diagnosis, but also challenges the design of effective therapies. There are two types of heterogeneity: inter-tumor and intra-tumor heterogeneity. While inter-tumor heterogeneity has been studied widely, intra-tumor heterogeneity has been neglected even though numerous studies support this aspect of tumor pathobiology. The main reason has been the technical difficulties, but with new advances in single-cell technology, intra-tumor heterogeneity is becoming a key area in the study of cancer. Several models try to explain the origin and maintenance of intra-tumor heterogeneity, however, one prominent model compares cancer with a tree where the ubiquitous mutations compose the trunk and mutations present in subpopulations of cells are represented by the branches. In this review we will focus on the intra-tumor heterogeneity of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most common brain tumor in adults that is characterized by a marked heterogeneity at the cellular and molecular levels. Better understanding of this heterogeneity will be essential to design effective therapies against this devastating disease to avoid tumor escape.

  7. Glioblastoma multiforme: a look inside its heterogeneous nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Maria-Del-Mar; Bonavia, Rudy; Seoane, Joan

    2014-01-27

    Heterogeneity is a hallmark of tumors and has a crucial role in the outcome of the malignancy, because it not only confounds diagnosis, but also challenges the design of effective therapies. There are two types of heterogeneity: inter-tumor and intra-tumor heterogeneity. While inter-tumor heterogeneity has been studied widely, intra-tumor heterogeneity has been neglected even though numerous studies support this aspect of tumor pathobiology. The main reason has been the technical difficulties, but with new advances in single-cell technology, intra-tumor heterogeneity is becoming a key area in the study of cancer. Several models try to explain the origin and maintenance of intra-tumor heterogeneity, however, one prominent model compares cancer with a tree where the ubiquitous mutations compose the trunk and mutations present in subpopulations of cells are represented by the branches. In this review we will focus on the intra-tumor heterogeneity of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common brain tumor in adults that is characterized by a marked heterogeneity at the cellular and molecular levels. Better understanding of this heterogeneity will be essential to design effective therapies against this devastating disease to avoid tumor escape.

  8. Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Look Inside Its Heterogeneous Nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inda, Maria-del-Mar; Bonavia, Rudy; Seoane, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity is a hallmark of tumors and has a crucial role in the outcome of the malignancy, because it not only confounds diagnosis, but also challenges the design of effective therapies. There are two types of heterogeneity: inter-tumor and intra-tumor heterogeneity. While inter-tumor heterogeneity has been studied widely, intra-tumor heterogeneity has been neglected even though numerous studies support this aspect of tumor pathobiology. The main reason has been the technical difficulties, but with new advances in single-cell technology, intra-tumor heterogeneity is becoming a key area in the study of cancer. Several models try to explain the origin and maintenance of intra-tumor heterogeneity, however, one prominent model compares cancer with a tree where the ubiquitous mutations compose the trunk and mutations present in subpopulations of cells are represented by the branches. In this review we will focus on the intra-tumor heterogeneity of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common brain tumor in adults that is characterized by a marked heterogeneity at the cellular and molecular levels. Better understanding of this heterogeneity will be essential to design effective therapies against this devastating disease to avoid tumor escape

  9. Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Look Inside Its Heterogeneous Nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inda, Maria-del-Mar, E-mail: mminda@vhio.net; Bonavia, Rudy [Translational Research Program, Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Vall d’Hebron University Hospital, 119-129 Passeig Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona 08035 (Spain); Seoane, Joan [Translational Research Program, Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Vall d’Hebron University Hospital, 119-129 Passeig Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona 08035 (Spain); Catalan Institution of Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), Barcelona 08035 (Spain)

    2014-01-27

    Heterogeneity is a hallmark of tumors and has a crucial role in the outcome of the malignancy, because it not only confounds diagnosis, but also challenges the design of effective therapies. There are two types of heterogeneity: inter-tumor and intra-tumor heterogeneity. While inter-tumor heterogeneity has been studied widely, intra-tumor heterogeneity has been neglected even though numerous studies support this aspect of tumor pathobiology. The main reason has been the technical difficulties, but with new advances in single-cell technology, intra-tumor heterogeneity is becoming a key area in the study of cancer. Several models try to explain the origin and maintenance of intra-tumor heterogeneity, however, one prominent model compares cancer with a tree where the ubiquitous mutations compose the trunk and mutations present in subpopulations of cells are represented by the branches. In this review we will focus on the intra-tumor heterogeneity of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common brain tumor in adults that is characterized by a marked heterogeneity at the cellular and molecular levels. Better understanding of this heterogeneity will be essential to design effective therapies against this devastating disease to avoid tumor escape.

  10. In vivo radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taghian, Alphonse; Freeman, Jill; Suit, Herman; DuBois, Willem; Budach, Wilfried; Baumann, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Human glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most resistant tumors to radiation. In previous reports, we have demonstrated a wide range of radiation sensitivity of GBM in vitro; that is, SF 2 values of 0.2 to 0.8. The great sensitivity of some of the cell lines is not in accord with the almost invariably fatal clinical outcome of patients with GBM. The sensitivity of cells in vitro pertains to cells cultured in optimal nutritional conditions. The TCD 50 (the radiation dose necessary to control 50% of the tumors locally) determined in lab animals is analogous to the use of radiation with curative intent in clinical radiation oncology. The aim of the present study was (a) to evaluate the sensitivity of GBM in vivo relative to that of other tumor types and (b) assess the relationship between the single dose TCD 50 of the xenografts and the sensitivity of the corresponding cell lines in vitro. Methods and Materials: The TCD 50 assay was used to study twelve human tumor lines. Four previously published values were added. A total of 10 GBM, 4 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 1 soft tissue sarcoma (STS), and 1 cancer colon (CC) are included in the analysis. For further suppression of the residual immune system, all the animals received 6 Gy whole-body irradiation 1 day before transplantation. Local tumor irradiations were given as a single dose, under conditions of clamp hypoxia using a Cs irradiator. Results: The TCD 50 values for the 10 GBM xenografts varied between 32.5 and 75.2 Gy, with an average of 47.2 ± 13.1 Gy. The TCD 50 values for the SCC were similar to those of the GBM and ranged from 40.7 and 54.4 Gy, with a mean of 46.8 ± 6.4. The difference between the average TCD 50 of GBM and SCC was not significant. The STS and CC xenografts had TCD 50 values of 46.0 and 49.2 Gy, respectively. No correlation was found between the TCD 50 in vivo and the SF 2 or D 0 in vitro. Conclusions: Our data on GBM xenografts showed a wide range of sensitivities to single dose

  11. In vivo radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taghian, Alphonse; Freeman, Jill; Suit, Herman; DuBois, Willem; Budach, Wilfried; Baumann, Michael

    1995-04-30

    Purpose: Human glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most resistant tumors to radiation. In previous reports, we have demonstrated a wide range of radiation sensitivity of GBM in vitro; that is, SF{sub 2} values of 0.2 to 0.8. The great sensitivity of some of the cell lines is not in accord with the almost invariably fatal clinical outcome of patients with GBM. The sensitivity of cells in vitro pertains to cells cultured in optimal nutritional conditions. The TCD{sub 50} (the radiation dose necessary to control 50% of the tumors locally) determined in lab animals is analogous to the use of radiation with curative intent in clinical radiation oncology. The aim of the present study was (a) to evaluate the sensitivity of GBM in vivo relative to that of other tumor types and (b) assess the relationship between the single dose TCD{sub 50} of the xenografts and the sensitivity of the corresponding cell lines in vitro. Methods and Materials: The TCD{sub 50} assay was used to study twelve human tumor lines. Four previously published values were added. A total of 10 GBM, 4 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 1 soft tissue sarcoma (STS), and 1 cancer colon (CC) are included in the analysis. For further suppression of the residual immune system, all the animals received 6 Gy whole-body irradiation 1 day before transplantation. Local tumor irradiations were given as a single dose, under conditions of clamp hypoxia using a Cs irradiator. Results: The TCD{sub 50} values for the 10 GBM xenografts varied between 32.5 and 75.2 Gy, with an average of 47.2 {+-} 13.1 Gy. The TCD{sub 50} values for the SCC were similar to those of the GBM and ranged from 40.7 and 54.4 Gy, with a mean of 46.8 {+-} 6.4. The difference between the average TCD{sub 50} of GBM and SCC was not significant. The STS and CC xenografts had TCD{sub 50} values of 46.0 and 49.2 Gy, respectively. No correlation was found between the TCD{sub 50} in vivo and the SF{sub 2} or D{sub 0} in vitro. Conclusions: Our data on GBM

  12. Vacquinol-1 inducible cell death in glioblastoma multiforme is counter regulated by TRPM7 activity induced by exogenous ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Philip; Mostafa, Haouraa; Soboh, Ayman; Schneider, Julian M; Pala, Andrej; Baron, Ann-Kathrin; Moepps, Barbara; Wirtz, C Rainer; Georgieff, Michael; Schneider, Marion

    2017-05-23

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are the most malignant brain tumors in humans and have a very poor prognosis. New therapeutic options are urgently needed. A novel drug, Vacquinol-1 (Vac), a quinolone derivative, displays promising properties by inducing rapid cell death in GBM but not in non-transformed tissues. Features of this type of cell death are compatible with a process termed methuosis. Here we tested Vac on a highly malignant glioma cell line observed by long-term video microscopy. Human dental-pulp stem cells (DPSCs) served as controls. A major finding was that an exogenous ATP concentration of as little as 1 μM counter regulated the Vac-induced cell death. Studies using carvacrol, an inhibitor of transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7), demonstrated that the ATP-inducible inhibitory effect is likely to be via TRPM7. Exogenous ATP is of relevance in GBM with large necrotic areas. Our results support the use of GBM cultures with different grades of malignancy to address their sensitivity to methuosis. The video-microscopy approach presented here allows decoding of signaling pathways as well as mechanisms of chemotherapeutic resistance by long-term observation. Before implementing Vac as a novel therapeutic drug in GBM, cells from each individual patient need to be assessed for their ATP sensitivity. In summary, the current investigation supports the concept of methuosis, described as non-apoptotic cell death and a promising approach for GBM treatment. Tissue-resident ATP/necrosis may interfere with this cell-death pathway but can be overcome by a natural compound, carvacrol that even penetrates the blood-brain barrier.

  13. Functional differences between PD-1+ and PD-1- CD4+ effector T cells in healthy donors and patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany A Goods

    Full Text Available Immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1 have been highly successful in the treatment of cancer. While PD-1 expression has been widely investigated, its role in CD4+ effector T cells in the setting of health and cancer remains unclear, particularly in the setting of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most aggressive and common form of brain cancer. We examined the functional and molecular features of PD-1+CD4+CD25-CD127+Foxp3-effector cells in healthy subjects and in patients with GBM. In healthy subjects, we found that PD-1+CD4+ effector cells are dysfunctional: they do not proliferate but can secrete large quantities of IFNγ. Strikingly, blocking antibodies against PD-1 did not rescue proliferation. RNA-sequencing revealed features of exhaustion in PD-1+ CD4 effectors. In the context of GBM, tumors were enriched in PD-1+ CD4+ effectors that were similarly dysfunctional and unable to proliferate. Furthermore, we found enrichment of PD-1+TIM-3+ CD4+ effectors in tumors, suggesting that co-blockade of PD-1 and TIM-3 in GBM may be therapeutically beneficial. RNA-sequencing of blood and tumors from GBM patients revealed distinct differences between CD4+ effectors from both compartments with enrichment in multiple gene sets from tumor infiltrating PD-1-CD4+ effectors cells. Enrichment of these gene sets in tumor suggests a more metabolically active cell state with signaling through other co-receptors. PD-1 expression on CD4 cells identifies a dysfunctional subset refractory to rescue with PD-1 blocking antibodies, suggesting that the influence of immune checkpoint inhibitors may involve recovery of function in the PD-1-CD4+ T cell compartment. Additionally, co-blockade of PD-1 and TIM-3 in GBM may be therapeutically beneficial.

  14. Nanoparticles of carbon allotropes inhibit glioblastoma multiforme angiogenesis in ovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grodzik M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Marta Grodzik1, Ewa Sawosz1, Mateusz Wierzbicki1, Piotr Orlowski1, Anna Hotowy2, Tomasz Niemiec1, Maciej Szmidt3, Katarzyna Mitura4, André Chwalibog21Division of Biotechnology and Biochemistry of Nutrition, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland; 2Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 3Division of Histology and Embryology, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland; 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, Koszalin University of Technology, Koszalin, PolandAbstract: The objective of the study was to determine the effect of carbon nanoparticles produced by different methods on the growth of brain tumor and the development of blood vessels. Glioblastoma multiforme cells were cultured on the chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryo and after 7 days of incubation, were treated with carbon nanoparticles administered in ovo to the tumor. Both types of nanoparticles significantly decreased tumor mass and volume, and vessel area. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed downregulated fibroblast growth factor-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor expression at the messenger ribonucleic acid level. The present results demonstrate antiangiogenic activity of carbon nanoparticles, making them potential factors for anticancer therapy.Keywords: cancer, nanoparticle, embryo, angiogenesis, FGF-2, VEGF

  15. Prognostic value of plasma transforming growth factor-beta in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, M. C.; Sminia, P.; Barten-van Rijbroek, A. D.; Gonzalez Gonzalez, D.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated whether the postoperative concentration of circulating transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) yields prognostic value in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (gbm). Blood was collected from 20 healthy volunteers and in 28 patients with mainly glioblastoma multiforme (gbm), both

  16. Systemic approaches identify a garlic-derived chemical, Z-ajoene, as a glioblastoma multiforme cancer stem cell-specific targeting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yuchae; Park, Heejoo; Zhao, Hui-Yuan; Jeon, Raok; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Kim, Woo-Young

    2014-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most common brain malignancies and has a very poor prognosis. Recent evidence suggests that the presence of cancer stem cells (CSC) in GBM and the rare CSC subpopulation that is resistant to chemotherapy may be responsible for the treatment failure and unfavorable prognosis of GBM. A garlic-derived compound, Z-ajoene, has shown a range of biological activities, including anti-proliferative effects on several cancers. Here, we demonstrated for the first time that Z-ajoene specifically inhibits the growth of the GBM CSC population. CSC sphere-forming inhibition was achieved at a concentration that did not exhibit a cytotoxic effect in regular cell culture conditions. The specificity of this inhibitory effect on the CSC population was confirmed by detecting CSC cell surface marker CD133 expression and biochemical marker ALDH activity. In addition, stem cell-related mRNA profiling and real-time PCR revealed the differential expression of CSC-specific genes, including Notch, Wnt, and Hedgehog, upon treatment with Z-ajoene. A proteomic approach, i.e., reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) and Western blot analysis, showed decreased SMAD4, p-AKT, 14.3.3 and FOXO3A expression. The protein interaction map (http://string-db.org/) of the identified molecules suggested that the AKT, ERK/p38 and TGFβ signaling pathways are key mediators of Z-ajoene's action, which affects the transcriptional network that includes FOXO3A. These biological and bioinformatic analyses collectively demonstrate that Z-ajoene is a potential candidate for the treatment of GBM by specifically targeting GBM CSCs. We also show how this systemic approach strengthens the identification of new therapeutic agents that target CSCs.

  17. Polish natural bee honeys are anti-proliferative and anti-metastatic agents in human glioblastoma multiforme U87MG cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Moskwa

    Full Text Available Honey has been used as food and a traditional medicament since ancient times. However, recently many scientists have been concentrating on the anti-oxidant, anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory and other properties of honey. In this study, we investigated for the first time an anticancer effect of different honeys from Poland on tumor cell line - glioblastoma multiforme U87MG. Anti-proliferative activity of honeys and its interferences with temozolomide were determined by a cytotoxicity test and DNA binding by [H3]-thymidine incorporation. A gelatin zymography was used to conduct an evaluation of metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in U87MG treatment with honey samples. The honeys were previously tested qualitatively (diastase activity, total phenolic content, lead and cadmium content. The data demonstrated that the examined honeys have a potent anti-proliferative effect on U87MG cell line in a time- and dose-dependent manner, being effective at concentrations as low as 0.5% (multifloral light honey - viability 53% after 72 h of incubation. We observed that after 48 h, combining honey with temozolomide showed a significantly higher inhibitory effect than the samples of honey alone. We observed a strong inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9 for the tested honeys (from 20 to 56% and from 5 to 58% compared to control, respectively. Our results suggest that Polish honeys have an anti-proliferative and anti-metastatic effect on U87MG cell line. Therefore, natural bee honey can be considered as a promising adjuvant treatment for brain tumors.

  18. Identification of repaglinide as a therapeutic drug for glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Zui Xuan; Chen, Ruo Qiao; Hu, Dian Xing; Xie, Xiao Qiang; Yu, Shang Bin; Chen, Xiao Qian

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain tumor with a median survival time of only 14 months after treatment. It is urgent to find new therapeutic drugs that increase survival time of GBM patients. To achieve this goal, we screened differentially expressed genes between long-term and short-term survived GBM patients from Gene Expression Omnibus database and found gene expression signature for the long-term survived GBM patients. The signaling networks of all those differentially expressed genes converged to protein binding, extracellular matrix and tissue development as revealed in BiNGO and Cytoscape. Drug repositioning in Connectivity Map by using the gene expression signature identified repaglinide, a first-line drug for diabetes mellitus, as the most promising novel drug for GBM. In vitro experiments demonstrated that repaglinide significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of human GBM cells. In vivo experiments demonstrated that repaglinide prominently prolonged the median survival time of mice bearing orthotopic glioma. Mechanistically, repaglinide significantly reduced Bcl-2, Beclin-1 and PD-L1 expression in glioma tissues, indicating that repaglinide may exert its anti-cancer effects via apoptotic, autophagic and immune checkpoint signaling. Taken together, repaglinide is likely to be an effective drug to prolong life span of GBM patients. - Highlights: • Gene expression signarue in long-term survived GBM patients are identified from Gene Expression Omnibus database. • Repaglinide is identified as a survival-related drug for GBM via drug repositioning in CMap. • Repaglinide effectively kills GBM cells, inhibits GBM cell migration and increases survival of mice bearing orthotopic glioma. • Repaglinide reduces Bcl-2, Beclin-1 and PD-L1 in GBM tissues.

  19. New extracellular factors in glioblastoma multiforme development: neurotensin, growth differentiation factor-15, sphingosine-1-phosphate and cytomegalovirus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbecki, Jan; Gutowska, Izabela; Kojder, Ireneusz; Jeżewski, Dariusz; Goschorska, Marta; Łukomska, Agnieszka; Lubkowska, Anna; Chlubek, Dariusz; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena

    2018-01-01

    Recent years have seen considerable progress in understanding the biochemistry of cancer. For example, more significance is now assigned to the tumor microenvironment, especially with regard to intercellular signaling in the tumor niche which depends on many factors secreted by tumor cells. In addition, great progress has been made in understanding the influence of factors such as neurotensin, growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15), sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), and infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV) on the ‘hallmarks of cancer’ in glioblastoma multiforme. Therefore, in the present work we describe the influence of these factors on the proliferation and apoptosis of neoplastic cells, cancer stem cells, angiogenesis, migration and invasion, and cancer immune evasion in a glioblastoma multiforme tumor. In particular, we discuss the effect of neurotensin, GDF-15, S1P (including the drug FTY720), and infection with CMV on tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), microglial cells, neutrophil and regulatory T cells (Treg), on the tumor microenvironment. In order to better understand the role of the aforementioned factors in tumoral processes, we outline the latest models of intratumoral heterogeneity in glioblastoma multiforme. Based on the most recent reports, we discuss the problems of multi-drug therapy in treating glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:29467963

  20. Understanding cytoskeleton regulators in glioblastoma multiforme for therapy design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumi S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Samaneh Masoumi,1,*, Aditya Harisankar,2,* Aileen Gracias,3 Fabian Bachinger,1 Temesgen Fufa,1,4 Gayathri Chandrasekar,5 Frank Gaunitz,4 Julian Walfridsson,2 Satish S Kitambi1 1Department of Microbiology Tumor and Cell Biology, 2Center for Hematology and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Medicine, 3Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; 4Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig, Germany; 5Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The cellular cytoskeleton forms the primary basis through which a cell governs the changes in size, shape, migration, proliferation, and forms the primary means through which the cells respond to their environment. Indeed, cell and tissue morphologies are used routinely not only to grade tumors but also in various high-content screening methods with an aim to identify new small molecules with therapeutic potential. This study examines the expression of various cytoskeleton regulators in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. GBM is a very aggressive disease with a low life expectancy even after chemo- and radiotherapy. Cancer cells of GBM are notorious for their invasiveness, ability to develop resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy, and to form secondary site tumors. This study aims to gain insight into cytoskeleton regulators in GBM cells and to understand the effect of various oncology drugs, including temozolomide, on cytoskeleton regulators. We compare the expression of various cytoskeleton regulators in GBM-derived tumor and normal tissue, CD133-postive and -negative cells from GBM and neural cells, and GBM stem-like and differentiated cells. In addition, the correlation between the expression of cytoskeleton regulators with the clinical outcome was examined to identify genes associated with longer patient survival. This was followed by a small molecule screening with US Food and Drug

  1. Small cell glioblastoma or small cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbrandt, Christine; Sathyadas, Sathya; Dahlrot, Rikke H

    2013-01-01

    was admitted to the hospital with left-sided loss of motor function. A MRI revealed a 6 cm tumor in the right temporoparietal area. The histology was consistent with both glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) but IHC was suggestive of a SCLC metastasis. PET-CT revealed...

  2. CircSMARCA5 Inhibits Migration of Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells by Regulating a Molecular Axis Involving Splicing Factors SRSF1/SRSF3/PTB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Barbagallo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Circular RNAs (circRNAs have recently emerged as a new class of RNAs, highly enriched in the brain and very stable within cells, exosomes and body fluids. To analyze their involvement in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM pathogenesis, we assayed the expression of twelve circRNAs, physiologically enriched in several regions of the brain, through real-time PCR in a cohort of fifty-six GBM patient biopsies and seven normal brain parenchymas. We focused on hsa_circ_0001445 (circSMARCA5: it was significantly downregulated in GBM biopsies as compared to normal brain tissues (p-value < 0.00001, student’s t-test, contrary to its linear isoform counterpart that did not show any differential expression (p-value = 0.694, student’s t-test. Analysis of a public dataset revealed a negative correlation between the expression of circSMARCA5 and glioma’s histological grade, suggesting its potential negative role in the progression to malignancy. Overexpressing circSMARCA5 in U87MG cells significantly decreased their migration, but not their proliferation rate. In silico scanning of circSMARCA5 sequence revealed an enrichment in binding motifs for several RNA binding proteins (RBPs, specifically involved in splicing. Among them, serine and arginine rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1, a splicing factor known to be a positive controller of cell migration and known to be overexpressed in GBM, was predicted to bind circSMARCA5 by three different prediction tools. Direct interaction between circSMARCA5 and SRSF1 is supported by enhanced UV crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (eCLIP data for SRSF1 in K562 cells from Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE. Consistently, U87MG overexpressing circSMARCA5 showed an increased expression of serine and arginine rich splicing factor 3 (SRSF3 RNA isoform containing exon 4, normally skipped in a SRSF1-dependent manner, resulting in a non-productive non-sense mediated decay (NMD substrate. Interestingly, SRSF3 is known to interplay

  3. Autopsy findings in a long-term survivor with glioblastoma multiforme. Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Shozo; Endo, Yuzo; Takada, Koji; Usui, Masaaki; Hara, Mitsuru [Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Hirose, Takanori

    1998-02-01

    Autopsy detected no tumor tissues in a patient who died 6.5 years after the diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme. A 54-year-old male developed left hemiparesis one month prior to admission. Computed tomography demonstrated a cystic lesion in the right frontal region with irregular ring-like enhancement. The tumor was extensively removed together with the surrounding tissues followed by irradiation (whole brain 32.4 Gy, local 28.8 Gy), and intravenous administration of interferon-{beta}. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of glioblastoma multiform. He died of accidental head trauma 6.5 years after surgery. Autopsy of the brain detected no evidence of glioblastoma multiform. The only findings were cerebral edema and hematoma caused by head trauma, as well as histological changes due to radiation damage. This case apparently confirms the histological disappearance of tumor tissue in a long-term survivor with glioblastoma multiform. (author)

  4. Autopsy findings in a long-term survivor with glioblastoma multiforme. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shozo; Endo, Yuzo; Takada, Koji; Usui, Masaaki; Hara, Mitsuru; Hirose, Takanori.

    1998-01-01

    Autopsy detected no tumor tissues in a patient who died 6.5 years after the diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme. A 54-year-old male developed left hemiparesis one month prior to admission. Computed tomography demonstrated a cystic lesion in the right frontal region with irregular ring-like enhancement. The tumor was extensively removed together with the surrounding tissues followed by irradiation (whole brain 32.4 Gy, local 28.8 Gy), and intravenous administration of interferon-β. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of glioblastoma multiform. He died of accidental head trauma 6.5 years after surgery. Autopsy of the brain detected no evidence of glioblastoma multiform. The only findings were cerebral edema and hematoma caused by head trauma, as well as histological changes due to radiation damage. This case apparently confirms the histological disappearance of tumor tissue in a long-term survivor with glioblastoma multiform. (author)

  5. Pediatric glioblastoma multiforme: A single-institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Mansour; Nasrolahi, Hamid; Kani, Amir-Abbas; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Ahmadloo, Niloofar; Omidvari, Shapour; Mosalaei, Ahmad

    2012-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common astrocytoma in adults and has a poor prognosis, with a median survival of about 12 months. But, it is rare in children. We report our experience on the pediatric population (20 years or younger) with GBM. Twenty-three patients with GBM who were treated at our hospital during 1990-2008 were evaluated. The mean age was 15.2 years, and the majority of them (14/23) were male. All had received radiotherapy and some had also received chemotherapy. The mean survival was 16.0 months. Two cases survived more than 5 years. Age, radiation dose and performance status were significantly related to survival. GBM in pediatric patients were not very common in our center, and prognosis was unfavorable.

  6. Protocols for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme at Brookhaven: Practical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanana, A.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Joel, D.D.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    In this report we discuss some issues considered in selecting initial protocols for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of human glioblastoma multiforme. First the tolerance of normal tissues, especially the brain, to the radiation field. Radiation doses limits were based on results with human and animal exposures. Estimates of tumor control doses were based on the results of single-fraction photon therapy and single fraction BNCT both in humans and experimental animals. Of the two boron compounds (BSH and BPA), BPA was chosen since a FDA-sanctioned protocol for distribution in humans was in effect at the time the first BNCT protocols were written and therapy studies in experimental animals had shown it to be more effective than BSH.

  7. Hemolytic anemia in two patients with glioblastoma multiforme: A possible interaction between vorinostat and dapsone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jennifer A; Petty, William J; Harmon, Michele; Peacock, James E; Valente, Kari; Owen, John; Pirmohamed, Munir; Lesser, Glenn J

    2015-06-01

    Patients undergoing treatment for glioblastoma multiforme are routinely placed on prophylactic treatment for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia because of significant therapy-induced lymphopenia. In patients with sulfa allergies, dapsone prophylaxis is often used due to its efficacy, long half-life, cost effectiveness, and general safety at low doses. However, dapsone may uncommonly induce a hemolytic anemia, particularly in patients deficient of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. This hemolysis is thought to be a result of oxidative stress on red blood cells induced by dapsone metabolites which produce reactive oxygen species that disrupt the red blood cell membrane and promote splenic sequestration. A single case report of dapsone-induced hemolytic anemia in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme has been reported. We present two patients with glioblastoma multiforme who developed severe hemolytic anemia shortly after initiating therapy with vorinostat, a pan-active histone deacetylase inhibitor, while on prophylactic dapsone. There are several potential mechanisms by which histone deacetylase inhibition may alter dapsone metabolism including changes in hepatic acetylation or N-glucuronidation leading to an increase in the bioavailability of dapsone's hematotoxic metabolites. In addition, vorinostat may lead to increased hemolysis through inhibition of heat shock protein-90, a chaperone protein that maintains the integrity of the red blood cell membrane cytoskeleton. The potential interaction between dapsone and vorinostat may have important clinical implications as more than 10 clinical trials evaluating drug combinations with vorinostat in patients with malignant glioma are either ongoing or planned in North America. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Inhibition of Notch signaling alters the phenotype of orthotopic tumors formed from glioblastoma multiforme neurosphere cells but does not hamper intracranial tumor growth regardless of endogene Notch pathway signature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Karina; Nedergaard, Mette Kjølhede; Villingshøj, Mette

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain cancer stem-like cells (bCSC) are cancer cells with neural stem cell (NSC)-like properties found in the devastating brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). bCSC are proposed a central role in tumor initiation, progression, treatment resistance and relapse and as such present...... a promising target in GBM research. The Notch signaling pathway is often deregulated in GBM and we have previously characterized GBM-derived bCSC cultures based on their expression of the Notch-1 receptor and found that it could be used as predictive marker for the effect of Notch inhibition. The aim...... of the present project was therefore to further elucidate the significance of Notch pathway activity for the tumorigenic properties of GBM-derived bCSC. METHODS: Human-derived GBM xenograft cells previously established as NSC-like neurosphere cultures were used. Notch inhibition was accomplished by exposing...

  9. Comparative proteomics as a tool for identifying specific alterations within interferon response pathways in human glioblastoma multiforme cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarasova, Irina A; Tereshkova, Alesya V; Lobas, Anna A

    2018-01-01

    An acquisition of increased sensitivity of cancer cells to viruses is a common outcome of malignant progression that justifies the development of oncolytic viruses as anticancer therapeutics. Studying molecular changes that underlie the sensitivity to viruses would help to identify cases where on...

  10. Tonsillary carcinoma after temozolomide treatment for glioblastoma multiforme: treatment-related or dual-pathology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binello, E; Germano, I M

    2009-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is a primary malignant brain tumor with a prognosis of typically less than 2 years. Standard treatment paradigms include surgery, radiation therapy and temozolomide. Little data exists for temozolomide recommendations after the first 6 months. We present a case of a patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with surgery, radiation and chronic temozolomide for 6 years. He continues to survive glioblastoma-recurrence-free, but developed tonsillary carcinoma. This case raises the question of whether this secondary solid-organ malignancy is treatment-related or dual pathology.

  11. A comprehensive characterization of mitochondrial DNA mutations in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidone, Michele; Clima, Rosanna; Santorsola, Mariangela; Calabrese, Claudia; Girolimetti, Giulia; Kurelac, Ivana; Amato, Laura Benedetta; Iommarini, Luisa; Trevisan, Elisa; Leone, Marco; Soffietti, Riccardo; Morra, Isabella; Faccani, Giuliano; Attimonelli, Marcella; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant brain cancer in adults, with a poor prognosis, whose molecular stratification still represents a challenge in pathology and clinics. On the other hand, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in most tumors as modifiers of the bioenergetics state, albeit in GBM a characterization of the mtDNA status is lacking to date. Here, a characterization of the burden of mtDNA mutations in GBM samples was performed. First, investigation of tumor-specific vs. non tumor-specific mutations was carried out with the MToolBox bioinformatics pipeline by analyzing 45 matched tumor/blood samples, from whole genome or whole exome sequencing datasets obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium. Additionally, the entire mtDNA sequence was obtained in a dataset of 104 fresh-frozen GBM samples. Mitochondrial mutations with potential pathogenic interest were prioritized based on heteroplasmic fraction, nucleotide variability, and in silico prediction of pathogenicity. A preliminary biochemical analysis of the activity of mitochondrial respiratory complexes was also performed on fresh-frozen GBM samples. Although a high number of mutations was detected, we report that the large majority of them does not pass the prioritization filters. Therefore, a relatively limited burden of pathogenic mutations is indeed carried by GBM, which did not appear to determine a general impairment of the respiratory chain. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Variegated colors of pediatric glioblastoma multiforme: what to expect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Immanuel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas account for 35-45% of primary brain tumors; among these glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common adult brain tumor constituting approximately 85%. Its incidence is quite less in the pediatric population and treatment of these patients is particularly challenging. Exposure to ionizing radiation is the only environmental factor found to have any significant association with GBM. Several genetic alterations associated with GBM in adults have been well documented such as epidermal growth factor receptor amplification, overexpression of mouse double minute 2 homolog also known as E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase, Phosphatase and tensin homolog gene mutation, loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 10p and isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 mutation. However, data on genetic mutations in pediatric GBM is still lacking. Exophytic brain stem gliomas are rare tumors and are usually associated with a poor prognosis. The most effective treatment in achieving long-term survival in such patients, is surgical excision of the tumor and then chemoradiotherapy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy by temozolomide. This schedule is the standard treatment for GBM patients. In view of the rarity of pediatric GBM, we report here a case of pontine GBM in a 5-year-old girl.

  13. Use of ERC-1671 Vaccine in a Patient with Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme after Progression during Bevacizumab Therapy: First Published Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bota, Daniela A; Alexandru-Abrams, Daniela; Pretto, Chrystel; Hofman, Florence M; Chen, Thomas C; Fu, Beverly; Carrillo, Jose A; Schijns, Virgil Ejc; Stathopoulos, Apostolos

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is a highy aggressive tumor that recurs despite resection, focal beam radiation, and temozolamide chemotherapy. ERC-1671 is an experimental treatment strategy that uses the patient's own immune system to attack the tumor cells. The authors report preliminary data on the first human administration of ERC-1671 vaccination under a single-patient, compassionate-use protocol. The patient survived for ten months after the vaccine administration without any other adjuvant therapy and died of complications related to his previous chemotherapies.

  14. Aplastic anemia as a cause of death in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with temozolomide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopecky, Jindrich; Priester, Peter; Slovacek, Ladislav; Petera, Jiri; Macingova, Zuzana; Kopecky, Otakar

    2010-01-01

    Background: Standard treatment of glioblastoma multiforme consists of postoperative radiochemotherapy with temozolomide, followed by a 6-month chemotherapy. Serious hematologic complications are rarely reported. Case Report and Results: The authors present the case of a 61-year-old female patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with external-beam radiation therapy and concomitant temozolomide. After completion of treatment, the patient developed symptoms of serious aplastic anemia that eventually led to death due to prolonged neutro- and thrombocytopenia followed by infectious complications. Conclusion: Lethal complications following temozolomide are, per se, extremely rare, however, a total of four other cases of aplastic anemia have been reported in the literature so far. (orig.)

  15. Aplastic anemia as a cause of death in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with temozolomide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopecky, Jindrich; Priester, Peter; Slovacek, Ladislav; Petera, Jiri; Macingova, Zuzana [Dept. of Clinical Oncology and Radiotherapy, Charles Univ. Hospital and Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Kopecky, Otakar [Clinical Oncology, Regional Hospital Nachod (Czech Republic)

    2010-08-15

    Background: Standard treatment of glioblastoma multiforme consists of postoperative radiochemotherapy with temozolomide, followed by a 6-month chemotherapy. Serious hematologic complications are rarely reported. Case Report and Results: The authors present the case of a 61-year-old female patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with external-beam radiation therapy and concomitant temozolomide. After completion of treatment, the patient developed symptoms of serious aplastic anemia that eventually led to death due to prolonged neutro- and thrombocytopenia followed by infectious complications. Conclusion: Lethal complications following temozolomide are, per se, extremely rare, however, a total of four other cases of aplastic anemia have been reported in the literature so far. (orig.)

  16. Prognostic relevance of cytochrome C oxidase in primary glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne E Griguer

    Full Text Available Patients with primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM have one of the lowest overall survival rates among cancer patients, and reliable biomarkers are necessary to predict patient outcome. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO promotes the switch from glycolytic to OXPHOS metabolism, and increased CcO activity in tumors has been associated with tumor progression after chemotherapy failure. Thus, we investigated the relationship between tumor CcO activity and the survival of patients diagnosed with primary GBM. A total of 84 patients with grade IV glioma were evaluated in this retrospective cohort study. Cumulative survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and analyzed by the log-rank test, and univariate and multivariate analyses were performed with the Cox regression model. Mitochondrial CcO activity was determined by spectrophotometrically measuring the oxidation of cytochrome c. High CcO activity was detected in a subset of glioma tumors (∼30%, and was an independent prognostic factor for shorter progression-free survival and overall survival [P = 0.0087 by the log-rank test, hazard ratio = 3.57 for progression-free survival; P<0.001 by the log-rank test, hazard ratio = 10.75 for overall survival]. The median survival time for patients with low tumor CcO activity was 14.3 months, compared with 6.3 months for patients with high tumor CcO activity. High CcO activity occurs in a significant subset of high-grade glioma patients and is an independent predictor of poor outcome. Thus, CcO activity may serve as a useful molecular marker for the categorization and targeted therapy of GBMs.

  17. Evaluation of early imaging response criteria in glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladwish, Adam; Koh, Eng-Siew; Hoisak, Jeremy; Lockwood, Gina; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Mason, Warren; Yu, Eugene; Laperriere, Normand J; Ménard, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    Early and accurate prediction of response to cancer treatment through imaging criteria is particularly important in rapidly progressive malignancies such as Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM). We sought to assess the predictive value of structural imaging response criteria one month after concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) in patients with GBM. Thirty patients were enrolled from 2005 to 2007 (median follow-up 22 months). Tumor volumes were delineated at the boundary of abnormal contrast enhancement on T1-weighted images prior to and 1 month after RT. Clinical Progression [CP] occurred when clinical and/or radiological events led to a change in chemotherapy management. Early Radiologic Progression [ERP] was defined as the qualitative interpretation of radiological progression one month post-RT. Patients with ERP were determined pseudoprogressors if clinically stable for ≥6 months. Receiver-operator characteristics were calculated for RECIST and MacDonald criteria, along with alternative thresholds against 1 year CP-free survival and 2 year overall survival (OS). 13 patients (52%) were found to have ERP, of whom 5 (38.5%) were pseudoprogressors. Patients with ERP had a lower median OS (11.2 mo) than those without (not reached) (p < 0.001). True progressors fared worse than pseudoprogressors (median survival 7.2 mo vs. 19.0 mo, p < 0.001). Volume thresholds performed slightly better compared to area and diameter thresholds in ROC analysis. Responses of > 25% in volume or > 15% in area were most predictive of OS. We show that while a subjective interpretation of early radiological progression from baseline is generally associated with poor outcome, true progressors cannot be distinguished from pseudoprogressors. In contrast, the magnitude of early imaging volumetric response may be a predictive and quantitative metric of favorable outcome

  18. Treatment outcome and prognostic factors of adult glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadloo, Niloofar; Kani, Amir-Abbas; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Nasrolahi, Hamid; Omidvari, Shapour; Mosalaei, Ahmad; Ansari, Mansour

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to report the characteristics, prognostic factors and treatment outcome of 223 patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This retrospective study was carried out by reviewing the medical records of 223 adult patients diagnosed at a tertiary academic hospital between 1990 and 2008. Patients' follow up ranged from 1 to 69 months (median 11 months). Surgery was attempted in all patients in whom complete resection in 15 patients (7%), subtotal resection in 77 patients (34%), partial resection in 73 patients (33%) and biopsy alone in 58 patients (26%) were done. In addition, we performed a literature review of PubMed to find out and analyze major related series. In all, we collected and analyzed the data of 33 major series including more than 11,000 patients with GBM. There were 141 men and 82 women. The median progression free- and overall survival were 6 (95% CI=5.711-8.289) and 11 (95% CI=9.304-12.696) months respectively. In univariate analysis for overall survival, age (P=0.003), tumor size (P<0.013), performance status (P<0.001), the extent of surgical resection (P=0.009), dose of radiation (P<0.001), and adjuvant chemotherapy (P<0.001) were prognostic factors. However, in multivariate analysis, only radiation dose, extent of surgical resection, and adjuvant chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors for overall survival. The prognosis of adult patients with GBM remains poor; however, complete surgical resection and adjuvant treatments improve progression-free and overall survival. Copyright © 2012. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Treatment outcome and prognostic factors of adult glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadloo, N.; Mohammadianpanah, M.; Nasrolahi, H.; Omidvari, Sh.; Ansari, M.; Kani, A.A.; Mosalaei, A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to report the characteristics, prognostic factors and treatment outcome of 223 patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Subjects and method: This retrospective study was carried out by reviewing the medical records of 223 adult patients diagnosed at a tertiary academic hospital between 1990 and 2008. Patients’ follow up ranged from 1 to 69 months (median 11 months). Surgery was attempted in all patients in whom complete resection in 15 patients (7%), subtotal resection in 77 patients (34%), partial resection in 73 patients (33%) and biopsy alone in 58 patients (26%) were done. In addition, we performed a literature review of Pub Med to find out and analyze major related series. In all, we collected and analyzed the data of 33 major series including more than 11,000 patients with GB M. Results: There were 141 men and 82 women. The median progression free- and overall survival were 6 (95% Cl = 5.711-8.289) and 11 (95% Cl = 9.304-12.696) months respectively. In univariate analysis for overall survival, age (P = 0.003), tumor size (P < 0.013), performance status (P < 0.001), the extent of surgical resection (P - 0.009), dose of radiation (P < 0.001), and adjuvant chemotherapy (P < 0.001) were prognostic factors. However, in multivariate analysis, only radiation dose, extent of surgical resection, and adjuvant chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Conclusion: The prognosis of adult patients with GBM remains poor; however, complete surgical resection and adjuvant treatments improve progression-free and overall survival

  20. Transcranial sonography: integration into target volume definition for glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vordermark, Dirk; Becker, Georg; Flentje, Michael; Richter, Susanne; Goerttler-Krauspe, Irene; Koelbl, Oliver

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Recent studies indicate that transcranial sonography (TCS) reliably displays the extension of malignant brain tumors. The effect of integrating TCS into radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was investigated herein. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients subtotally resected for GBM underwent TCS during radiotherapy planning and were conventionally treated (54 to 60 Gy). Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) and stereotactic boost planning target volumes (PTVs, 3-mm margin) were created, based on contrast enhancement on computed tomography (CT) only (PTV CT ) or the combined CT and TCS information (PTV CT+TCS ). Noncoplonar conformal treatment plans for both PTVs were compared. Tumor progression patterns and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were related to both PTVs. Results: A sufficient temporal bone window for TCS was present in 11 of 13 patients. GTVs as defined by TCS were considerably larger than the respective CT volumes: Of the composite GTV CT+TCS (median volume 42 ml), 23%, 13%, and 66% (medians) were covered by the overlap of both methods, CT only and TCS only, respectively. Median sizes of PTV CT and PTV CT+TCS were 34 and 74 ml, respectively. Addition of TCS to CT information led to a median increase of the volume irradiated within the 80% isodose by 32 ml (median factor 1.51). PTV CT+TCS volume was at median 24% of a 'conventional' MRI(T2)-based PTV. Of eight progressions analyzed, three and six occurred inside the 80% isodose of the plans for PTV CT and for PTV CT+TCS , respectively. Conclusion: Addition of TCS tumor volume to the contrast-enhancing CT volume in postoperative radiotherapy planning for GBM increases the treated volume by a median factor of 1.5. Since a high frequency of marginal recurrences is reported from dose-escalation trials of this disease, TCS may complement established methods in PTV definition

  1. Prognostic significance of IDH 1 mutation in patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Inamullah; Waqas, Muhammad; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2017-05-01

    Focus of brain tumour research is shifting towards tumour genesis and genetics, and possible development of individualized treatment plans. Genetic analysis shows recurrent mutation in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH1) gene in most Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells. In this review we evaluated the prognostic significance of IDH 1 mutation on the basis of published evidence. Multiple retrospective clinical analyses correlate the presence of IDH1 mutation in GBM with good prognostic outcomes compared to wild-type IDH1. A systematic review reported similar results. Based on the review of current literature IDH1 mutation is an independent factor for longer overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) in GBM patients when compared to wild-type IDH1. The prognostic significance opens up new avenues for treatment.

  2. Glioblastoma multiforme med intra- og ekstramedullær disseminering til spinalkanalen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Karin; Gutte Borgwardt, Henrik; Idris, Fadi

    2013-01-01

    Metastases to the spinal cord from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are uncommon, but important to have in mind when patients with a history of GBM present with symptoms that do not correlate with the primary disease pattern. We report a rare case, where a male with GBM, six months after tumour...

  3. Phase II open-label study of nintedanib in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhic, Aida; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard; Mau-Sørensen, Paul Morten

    2013-01-01

    glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who had previously failed radiotherapy plus temozolomide as first-line therapy (STUPP), or the same regimen with subsequent bevacizumab-based therapy as second-line treatment (BEV). Patients with a performance status of 0-1, histologically proven GBM, and measurable disease (by...... GBM who had failed 1-2 prior lines of therapy....

  4. Clinical variables serve as prognostic factors in a model for survival from glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Signe Regner; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Grunnet, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Although implementation of temozolomide (TMZ) as a part of primary therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has resulted in improved patient survival, the disease is still incurable. Previous studies have correlated various parameters to survival, although no single parameter has yet been...

  5. RNA expression patterns in serum microvesicles from patients with glioblastoma multiforme and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noerholm Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA from exosomes and other microvesicles contain transcripts of tumour origin. In this study we sought to identify biomarkers of glioblastoma multiforme in microvesicle RNA from serum of affected patients. Methods Microvesicle RNA from serum from patients with de-novo primary glioblastoma multiforme (N = 9 and normal controls (N = 7 were analyzed by microarray analysis. Samples were collected according to protocols approved by the Institutional Review Board. Differential expressions were validated by qRT-PCR in a separate set of samples (N = 10 in both groups. Results Expression profiles of microvesicle RNA correctly separated individuals in two groups by unsupervised clustering. The most significant differences pertained to down-regulated genes (121 genes > 2-fold down in the glioblastoma multiforme patient microvesicle RNA, validated by qRT-PCR on several genes. Overall, yields of microvesicle RNA from patients was higher than from normal controls, but the additional RNA was primarily of size Conclusions Serum microvesicle RNA from patients with glioblastoma multiforme has significantly down-regulated levels of RNAs coding for ribosome production, compared to normal healthy controls, but a large overabundance of RNA of unknown origin with size

  6. On the Concepts and History of Glioblastoma Multiforme - Morphology, Genetics and Epigenetics

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    Stoyanov George St.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a grade IV WHO malignant tumor with astrocytic differentiation. As one of the most common clinically diagnosed central nervous system (CNS oncological entries, there have been a wide variety of historical reports of the description and evolution of ideas regarding these tumors.

  7. RNA expression patterns in serum microvesicles from patients with glioblastoma multiforme and controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noerholm, Mikkel; Balaj, Leonora; Limperg, Tobias; Salehi, Afshin; Zhu, Lin Dan; Hochberg, Fred H; Breakefield, Xandra O; Carter, Bob S; Skog, Johan

    2012-01-01

    RNA from exosomes and other microvesicles contain transcripts of tumour origin. In this study we sought to identify biomarkers of glioblastoma multiforme in microvesicle RNA from serum of affected patients. Microvesicle RNA from serum from patients with de-novo primary glioblastoma multiforme (N = 9) and normal controls (N = 7) were analyzed by microarray analysis. Samples were collected according to protocols approved by the Institutional Review Board. Differential expressions were validated by qRT-PCR in a separate set of samples (N = 10 in both groups). Expression profiles of microvesicle RNA correctly separated individuals in two groups by unsupervised clustering. The most significant differences pertained to down-regulated genes (121 genes > 2-fold down) in the glioblastoma multiforme patient microvesicle RNA, validated by qRT-PCR on several genes. Overall, yields of microvesicle RNA from patients was higher than from normal controls, but the additional RNA was primarily of size < 500 nt. Gene ontology of the down-regulated genes indicated these are coding for ribosomal proteins and genes related to ribosome production. Serum microvesicle RNA from patients with glioblastoma multiforme has significantly down-regulated levels of RNAs coding for ribosome production, compared to normal healthy controls, but a large overabundance of RNA of unknown origin with size < 500 nt

  8. A Phase 1 trial of intravenous boronophenylalanine-fructose complex in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E.; Chadha, M.; Coderre, J.A.; Joel, D.

    1996-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of glioblastoma multiforme was initially performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in the early 1950's While this treatment for malignant brain tumors has continued in Japan, new worldwide interest has been stimulated by the development of new and more selective boron compounds. Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is a blood-brain barrier penetrating compound that has been used in BNCT of malignant melanomas. SPA has been employed experimentally in BNCT of rat gliosarcoma and has potential use in the treatment of human glioblastoma. As a preface to clinical BNCT trials, we studied the biodistribution of SPA in patients with glioblastoma

  9. Volumetric Spectroscopic Imaging of Glioblastoma Multiforme Radiation Treatment Volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, N. Andres [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Maudsley, Andrew A. [Department of Radiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Gupta, Rakesh K. [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Ishkanian, Fazilat; Huang, Kris [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Walker, Gail R. [Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core Resource, Sylvester Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Padgett, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Roy, Bhaswati [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Panoff, Joseph; Markoe, Arnold [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Stoyanova, Radka, E-mail: RStoyanova@med.miami.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) are used almost exclusively in radiation therapy planning of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), despite their well-recognized limitations. MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) can identify biochemical patterns associated with normal brain and tumor, predominantly by observation of choline (Cho) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) distributions. In this study, volumetric 3-dimensional MRSI was used to map these compounds over a wide region of the brain and to evaluate metabolite-defined treatment targets (metabolic tumor volumes [MTV]). Methods and Materials: Volumetric MRSI with effective voxel size of ∼1.0 mL and standard clinical MR images were obtained from 19 GBM patients. Gross tumor volumes and edema were manually outlined, and clinical target volumes (CTVs) receiving 46 and 60 Gy were defined (CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}, respectively). MTV{sub Cho} and MTV{sub NAA} were constructed based on volumes with high Cho and low NAA relative to values estimated from normal-appearing tissue. Results: The MRSI coverage of the brain was between 70% and 76%. The MTV{sub NAA} were almost entirely contained within the edema, and the correlation between the 2 volumes was significant (r=0.68, P=.001). In contrast, a considerable fraction of MTV{sub Cho} was outside of the edema (median, 33%) and for some patients it was also outside of the CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}. These untreated volumes were greater than 10% for 7 patients (37%) in the study, and on average more than one-third (34.3%) of the MTV{sub Cho} for these patients were outside of CTV{sub 60}. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of whole-brain MRSI for radiation therapy planning of GBM and revealed that areas of metabolically active tumor are not covered by standard RT volumes. The described integration of MTV into the RT system will pave the way to future clinical trials investigating outcomes in patients treated based on

  10. EGFR gene overexpression retained in an invasive xenograft model by solid orthotopic transplantation of human glioblastoma multiforme into nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Diao; Hua, Tian Xin; Lin, Huang Yan

    2011-03-01

    Orthotopic xenograft animal model from human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines often do not recapitulate an extremely important aspect of invasive growth and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene overexpression of human GBM. We developed an orthotopic xenograft model by solid transplantation of human GBM into the brain of nude mouse. The orthotopic xenografts sharing the same histopathological features with their original human GBMs were highly invasive and retained the overexpression of EGFR gene. The murine orthotopic GBM models constitute a valuable in vivo system for preclinical studies to test novel therapies for human GBM.

  11. Metástases intrarraquidianas de glioblastoma multiforme supratentorial da infância: relato de caso Spinal cord metastatic glioblastoma multiforme of childhood: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Imperatriz Porto Rondinelli

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos o caso de uma menina de onze anos de idade com glioblastoma multiforme na região têmporo-parietal direita, completamente ressecado cirurgicamente, submetida a radioterapia craniana pós-operatória. Houve recaída três meses após, em topografia distante do sítio primário, na porção caudal do canal raquidiano. Após, ocorreu evolução rápida para o óbito. A propósito desse caso, discutimos nossa experiência quanto à conduta nesses tumores e a literatura sobre o assunto.We report the case of an eleven years-old girl with a right temporo-parietal glioblastoma multiforme. The tumor was totally resected on neurossurgery, and cranial radioteraphy was applied at next. The tumor recurred three months later, far from primary site, in the caudal portion of the spinal canal. Death occurred in less than one month later. Taking into account the data of this case, we discuss our experience in the management of such tumors and the literature on the subject.

  12. Copper-64 Dichloride as Theranostic Agent for Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Preclinical Study

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    Cristina Ferrari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults with a median survival time less than one year. To date, there are only a limited number of effective agents available for GBM therapy and this does not seem to add much survival advantage over the conventional approach based on surgery and radiotherapy. Therefore, the development of novel therapeutic approaches to GBM is essential and those based on radionuclide therapy could be of significant clinical impact. Experimental evidence has clearly demonstrated that cancer cells have a particularly high fractional content of copper inside the nucleus compared to normal cells. This behavior can be conveniently exploited both for diagnosis and for delivering therapeutic payloads (theranostic of the radionuclide copper-64 into the nucleus of cancerous cells by intravenous administration of its simplest chemical form as dichloride salt [64Cu]CuCl2. To evaluate the potential theranostic role of [64Cu]CuCl2 in GBM, the present work reports results from a preclinical study carried out in a xenografted GBM tumor mouse model. Biodistribution data of this new agent were collected using a small-animal PET tomograph. Subsequently, groups of tumor implanted nude mice were treated with [64Cu]CuCl2 to simulate single- and multiple-dose therapy protocols, and results were analyzed to estimate therapeutic efficacy.

  13. Ultrastructural characterization of primary cilia in pathologically characterized human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Joanna J; Fritzler, Marvin J; Rattner, Jerome B

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are non-motile sensory cytoplasmic organelles that are involved in cell cycle progression. Ultrastructurally, the primary cilium region is complex, with normal ciliogenesis progressing through five distinct morphological stages in human astrocytes. Defects in early stages of ciliogenesis are key features of astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines and provided the impetus for the current study which describes the morphology of primary cilia in molecularly characterized human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors. Seven surgically resected human GBM tissue samples were molecularly characterized according to IDH1/2 mutation status, EGFR amplification status and MGMT promoter methylation status and were examined for primary cilia expression and structure using indirect immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. We report for the first time that primary cilia are disrupted in the early stages of ciliogenesis in human GBM tumors. We confirm that immature primary cilia and basal bodies/centrioles have aberrant ciliogenesis characteristics including absent paired vesicles, misshaped/swollen vesicular hats, abnormal configuration of distal appendages, and discontinuity of centriole microtubular blades. Additionally, the transition zone plate is able to form in the absence of paired vesicles on the distal end of the basal body and when a cilium progresses beyond the early stages of ciliogenesis, it has electron dense material clumped along the transition zone and a darkening of the microtubules at the proximal end of the cilium. Primary cilia play a role in a variety of human cancers. Previously primary cilia structure was perturbed in cultured cell lines derived from astrocytomas/glioblastomas; however there was always some question as to whether these findings were a cell culture phenomena. In this study we confirm that disruptions in ciliogenesis at early stages do occur in GBM tumors and that these ultrastructural findings bear resemblance to those previously

  14. The PEP-3-KLH (CDX-110) vaccine in glioblastoma multiforme patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimberger, Amy B.; Sampson, John H

    2009-01-01

    Conventional therapies for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) fail to target tumor cells exclusively resulting in non-specific toxicity. Immune targeting of tumor-specific mutations may allow for more precise eradication of neoplastic cells. The epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) is a tumor-specific mutation that is widely expressed on GBM and other neoplasms and its expression enhances tumorigenicity. This in-frame deletion mutation splits a codon resulting in a novel glycine at the fusion junction producing a tumor-specific epitope target for cellular or humoral immunotherapy. We have previously shown that vaccination with a peptide that spans the EGFRvIII fusion junction (PEPvIII-KLH/CDX-110) is an efficacious immunotherapy in syngeneic murine models. In this review, we summarize our results in GBM patients targeting this mutation in multiple, multi-institutional Phase II immunotherapy trials. These trials demonstrated that a selected population of GBM patients who received the vaccines targeting EGFRvIII had an unexpectedly long survival time. Further therapeutic strategies and potential pitfalls using this approach are discussed. PMID:19591631

  15. Strong adverse prognostic impact of hyperglycemic episodes during adjuvant chemoradiotherapy of glioblastoma multiforme

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    Mayer, Arnulf; Vaupel, Peter; Stockinger, Marcus; Schmidberger, Heinz [University Medical Center, Department of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Mainz (Germany); Struss, Hans-Garlich [University Medical Center, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Mainz (Germany); Giese, Alf [University Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Mainz (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    In comparison to normal brain tissue, glioblastomas exhibit significantly increased glucose uptake. Brain edema is a common complication during adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, leading to a requirement for glucocorticoid treatment. Glucocorticoid treatment frequently causes considerable deregulation of blood glucose levels. Therefore, episodes of hyperglycemia may contribute to radio- and/or chemoresistance. This study comprises a retrospective analysis of the influence of hyperglycemic episodes (HEs) during adjuvant therapy on the overall survival of 106 glioblastoma multiforme patients. The occurrence of one or more deregulated blood glucose value(s) > 10 mM is associated with a reduction in median overall survival from 16.7 to 8.8 months. A significantly poorer overall survival of patients with hyperglycemia could also be detected in subgroup analyses of patients with complete tumor resection and complete treatment according to the EORTC 22891/26891 trial protocol, as well as in a multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis. A history of diabetes mellitus had no influence on prognosis. Our data suggest that the observed negative impact of elevated blood glucose levels on overall survival may not solely be explained by the patients' poorer general condition; the elevated blood glucose concentration itself may play a pathogenetic role. This could be due to increased activity of antioxidant systems, elevated expression of DNA damage response proteins and protection of hypoxic tumor cells against apoptosis combined with hypoxia-mediated radioresistance. A possible prognostic impact of elevated blood glucose levels during the period of adjuvant (chemo-) radiotherapy of glioblastoma should be evaluated in a prospective clinical trial. (orig.) [German] Glioblastome zeigen im Vergleich mit normalem Gehirngewebe eine deutlich vermehrte Glukoseaufnahme. Im Rahmen der adjuvanten Radio(chemo)therapie von Glioblastomen treten vielfach Hirnoedeme auf, die eine

  16. Differentiation of glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells leads to downregulation of EGFR and EGFRvIII and decreased tumorigenic and stem-like cell potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Kristoffersen, Karina; Stobbe, Louise

    2014-01-01

    cancer stem-like cells (bCSC), to play a pivotal role in GBM malignancy. bCSC are identified by their resemblance to normal neural stem cells (NSC), and it is speculated that the bCSC have to be targeted in order to improve treatment outcome for GBM patients. One hallmark of GBM is aberrant expression...

  17. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling in glioblastoma multiforme-A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan-Thakur, Shailaja; Bien-Möller, Sandra; Marx, Sascha; Schroeder, Henry; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2017-11-17

    The multifunctional sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a lipid signaling molecule and central regulator in the development of several cancer types. In recent years, intriguing information has become available regarding the role of S1P in the progression of Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and common brain tumor in adults. S1P modulates numerous cellular processes in GBM, such as oncogenesis, proliferation and survival, invasion, migration, metastasis and stem cell behavior. These processes are regulated via a family of five G-protein-coupled S1P receptors (S1PR1-5) and may involve mainly unknown intracellular targets. Distinct expression patterns and multiple intracellular signaling pathways of each S1PR subtype enable S1P to exert its pleiotropic cellular actions. Several studies have demonstrated alterations in S1P levels, the involvement of S1PRs and S1P metabolizing enzymes in GBM pathophysiology. While the tumorigenic actions of S1P involve the activation of several kinases and transcription factors, the specific G-protein (Gi, Gq, and G12/13)-coupled signaling pathways and downstream mediated effects in GBM remain to be elucidated in detail. This review summarizes the recent findings concerning the role of S1P and its receptors in GBM. We further highlight the current insights into the signaling pathways considered fundamental for regulating the cellular processes in GMB and ultimately patient prognosis.

  18. Can high-dose fotemustine reverse MGMT resistance in glioblastoma multiforme?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Chiara; Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Romeo, Valeria; De Placido, Sabino; Marinelli, Alfredo

    2010-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the highest grade malignant glioma, is associated with a grim prognosis-median overall survival is in the range 12-15 months, despite optimum treatment. Surgery to the maximum possible extent, external beam radiotherapy, and systemic temozolomide chemotherapy are current standard treatments for newly diagnosed GBM, with intracerebral delivery of carmustine wafers (Gliadel). Unfortunately, the effectiveness of chemotherapy can be hampered by the DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT), which confers resistance both to temozolomide and nitrosoureas, for example fotemustine and carmustine. MGMT activity can be measured by PCR and immunohistochemistry, with the former being the current validated technique. High-dose chemotherapy can deplete MGMT levels in GBM cells and has proved feasible in various trials on temozolomide, in both newly diagnosed and recurrent GBM. We here report the unique case of a GBM patient, with high MGMT expression by immunohistochemistry, who underwent an experimental, high-dose fotemustine schedule after surgery and radiotherapy. Although treatment caused two episodes of grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia, a complete response and survival of more than three years were achieved, with a 30% increase in dose intensity compared with the standard fotemustine schedule.

  19. Human glioblastoma multiforme: p53 reactivation by a novel MDM2 inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Costa

    Full Text Available Cancer development and chemo-resistance are often due to impaired functioning of the p53 tumor suppressor through genetic mutation or sequestration by other proteins. In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, p53 availability is frequently reduced because it binds to the Murine Double Minute-2 (MDM2 oncoprotein, which accumulates at high concentrations in tumor cells. The use of MDM2 inhibitors that interfere with the binding of p53 and MDM2 has become a valid approach to inhibit cell growth in a number of cancers; however little is known about the efficacy of these inhibitors in GBM. We report that a new small-molecule inhibitor of MDM2 with a spirooxoindolepyrrolidine core structure, named ISA27, effectively reactivated p53 function and inhibited human GBM cell growth in vitro by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In immunoincompetent BALB/c nude mice bearing a human GBM xenograft, the administration of ISA27 in vivo activated p53, inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in tumor tissue. Significantly, ISA27 was non-toxic in an in vitro normal human cell model and an in vivo mouse model. ISA27 administration in combination with temozolomide (TMZ produced a synergistic inhibitory effect on GBM cell viability in vitro, suggesting the possibility of lowering the dose of TMZ used in the treatment of GBM. In conclusion, our data show that ISA27 releases the powerful antitumor capacities of p53 in GBM cells. The use of this MDM2 inhibitor could become a novel therapy for the treatment of GBM patients.

  20. Activation of p53 by nutlin-3a induces apoptosis and cellular senescence in human glioblastoma multiforme.

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    Ruth Villalonga-Planells

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. Despite concerted efforts to improve current therapies and develop novel clinical approaches, patient survival remains poor. As such, increasing attention has focused on developing new therapeutic strategies that specifically target the apoptotic pathway in order to improve treatment responses. Recently, nutlins, small-molecule antagonists of MDM2, have been developed to inhibit p53-MDM2 interaction and activate p53 signaling in cancer cells. Glioma cell lines and primary cultured glioblastoma cells were treated with nutlin-3a. Nutlin-3a induced p53-dependent G1- and G2-M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in glioma cell lines with normal TP53 status. In addition, nutlin-arrested glioma cells show morphological features of senescence and persistent induction of p21 protein. Furthermore, senescence induced by nutlin-3a might be depending on mTOR pathway activity. In wild-type TP53 primary cultured cells, exposure to nutlin-3a resulted in variable degrees of apoptosis as well as cellular features of senescence. Nutlin-3a-induced apoptosis and senescence were firmly dependent on the presence of functional p53, as revealed by the fact that glioblastoma cells with knockdown p53 with specific siRNA, or cells with mutated or functionally impaired p53 pathway, were completely insensitive to the drug. Finally, we also found that nutlin-3a increased response of glioma cells to radiation therapy. The results provide a basis for the rational use of MDM2 antagonists as a novel treatment option for glioblastoma patients.

  1. Metabolic Heterogeneity Evidenced by MRS among Patient-Derived Glioblastoma Multiforme Stem-Like Cells Accounts for Cell Clustering and Different Responses to Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sveva Grande

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Clustering of patient-derived glioma stem-like cells (GSCs through unsupervised analysis of metabolites detected by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS evidenced three subgroups, namely clusters 1a and 1b, with high intergroup similarity and neural fingerprints, and cluster 2, with a metabolism typical of commercial tumor lines. In addition, subclones generated by the same GSC line showed different metabolic phenotypes. Aerobic glycolysis prevailed in cluster 2 cells as demonstrated by higher lactate production compared to cluster 1 cells. Oligomycin, a mitochondrial ATPase inhibitor, induced high lactate extrusion only in cluster 1 cells, where it produced neutral lipid accumulation detected as mobile lipid signals by MRS and lipid droplets by confocal microscopy. These results indicate a relevant role of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation for energy production in GSCs. On the other hand, further metabolic differences, likely accounting for different therapy responsiveness observed after etomoxir treatment, suggest that caution must be used in considering patient treatment with mitochondria FAO blockers. Metabolomics and metabolic profiling may contribute to discover new diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers to be used for personalized therapies.

  2. Analysis of Electronic Densities and Integrated Doses in Multiform Glioblastomas Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron-Aznar, C.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Celis, M. A.; Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Integrated dose is the total energy delivered in a radiotherapy target. This physical parameter could be a predictor for complications such as brain edema and radionecrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy treatments for brain tumors. Integrated Dose depends on the tissue density and volume. Using CT patients images from the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery and BrainScan(c) software, this work presents the mean density of 21 multiform glioblastomas, comparative results for normal tissue and estimated integrated dose for each case. The relationship between integrated dose and the probability of complications is discussed

  3. Coexistence of meningioma and glioblastoma multiforme in a same patient: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, C.; Dumont, P.; Romero, P.C.; Lima, J.P.; Caldas, J.G.; Settanni, F.

    1991-01-01

    Tumoral collision has been defined as a coexistence of two or more central nervous system tumors histologically distinct, in a patient not harbouring a neuro-ectodermic disease (phakomatosis). Several theories exist for explaining this phenomenon but most of them assume that there is spacial proximity between the tumors and/or ionizing radiation effects. We report the case of coexistence of meningothelial meningioma and glioblastoma multiforme in a same patient, occurring in different hemispheres on different times. The tomographic aspects of the gliomatous lesion and the difficulty in differentiating by neuroimaging among high grade gliomas and recent hemorrhagic cerebral events are discussed. (author)

  4. Acquired MET expression confers resistance to EGFR inhibition in a mouse model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, H J; Acquaviva, J; Chi, D; Lessard, J; Zhu, H; Woolfenden, S; Bronson, R T; Pfannl, R; White, F; Housman, D E; Iyer, L; Whittaker, C A; Boskovitz, A; Raval, A; Charest, A

    2012-06-21

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumor for which there is no cure. Overexpression of wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and loss of the tumor suppressor genes Ink4a/Arf and PTEN are salient features of this deadly cancer. Surprisingly, targeted inhibition of EGFR has been clinically disappointing, demonstrating an innate ability for GBM to develop resistance. Efforts at modeling GBM in mice using wild-type EGFR have proven unsuccessful to date, hampering endeavors at understanding molecular mechanisms of therapeutic resistance. Here, we describe a unique genetically engineered mouse model of EGFR-driven gliomagenesis that uses a somatic conditional overexpression and chronic activation of wild-type EGFR in cooperation with deletions in the Ink4a/Arf and PTEN genes in adult brains. Using this model, we establish that chronic activation of wild-type EGFR with a ligand is necessary for generating tumors with histopathological and molecular characteristics of GBMs. We show that these GBMs are resistant to EGFR kinase inhibition and we define this resistance molecularly. Inhibition of EGFR kinase activity using tyrosine kinase inhibitors in GBM tumor cells generates a cytostatic response characterized by a cell cycle arrest, which is accompanied by a substantial change in global gene expression levels. We demonstrate that an important component of this pattern is the transcriptional activation of the MET receptor tyrosine kinase and that pharmacological inhibition of MET overcomes the resistance to EGFR inhibition in these cells. These findings provide important new insights into mechanisms of resistance to EGFR inhibition and suggest that inhibition of multiple targets will be necessary to provide therapeutic benefit for GBM patients.

  5. Temozolomide during radiotherapy of glioblastoma multiforme. Daily administration improves survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachbichler, Silke Birgit; Schupp, Gabi; Ballhausen, Hendrik; Niyazi, Maximilian; Belka, Claus [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Temozolomide-(TMZ)-based chemoradiotherapy defines the current gold standard for the treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Data regarding the influence of TMZ dose density during chemoradiotherapy are currently not available. We retrospectively compared outcomes in patients receiving no TMZ, TMZ during radiotherapy on radiotherapy days only, and TMZ constantly 7 days a week. From 2002-2012, a total of 432 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma received radiotherapy in our department: 118 patients had radiotherapy alone, 210 had chemoradiotherapy with TMZ (75 mg/m{sup 2}) daily (7/7), and 104 with TMZ only on radiotherapy days (5/7). Radiotherapy was applied to a total dose of 60 Gy. Median survival after radiotherapy alone was 9.1 months, compared to 12.6 months with 5/7-TMZ and to 15.7 months with 7/7-TMZ. The 1-year survival rates were 33, 52, and 64%, respectively. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significant improvement of TMZ-7/7 vs. 5/7 (p = 0.01 by the log-rank test), while 5/7-TMZ was still superior to no TMZ at all (p = 0.02). Multivariate Cox regression showed a significant influence of TMZ regimen (p = 0.009) on hazard rate (+58% between groups) even in the presence of confounding factors age, sex, resection status, and radiotherapy dose concept. Our results confirm the findings of the EORTC/NCIC trial. It seems that also a reduced TMZ scheme can at first prolong the survival of glioblastoma patients, but not as much as the daily administration. (orig.) [German] Eine Temozolomid-(TMZ-)basierte Radiochemotherapie ist der gegenwaertige Goldstandard in der Behandlung von neu diagnostizierten Glioblastomen. Daten bezueglich des Einflusses der TMZ-Dosisdichte waehrend der Radiochemotherapie sind derzeit nicht vorhanden. Wir haben retrospektiv die Ergebnisse von Patienten verglichen, die entweder kein TMZ, TMZ zur Strahlentherapie nur an Bestrahlungstagen oder TMZ konstant 7 Tage/Woche erhalten hatten. Von 2002-2012 bekamen insgesamt 432 Patienten mit

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging for target volume definition in glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berberat, Jatta; Remonda, Luca [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Neuro-radiology, Aarau (Switzerland); McNamara, Jane; Rogers, Susanne [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarau (Switzerland); Bodis, Stephan [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarau (Switzerland); University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an MR-based technique that may better detect the peritumoural region than MRI. Our aim was to explore the feasibility of using DTI for target volume delineation in glioblastoma patients. MR tensor tracts and maps of the isotropic (p) and anisotropic (q) components of water diffusion were coregistered with CT in 13 glioblastoma patients. An in-house image processing program was used to analyse water diffusion in each voxel of interest in the region of the tumour. Tumour infiltration was mapped according to validated criteria and contralateral normal brain was used as an internal control. A clinical target volume (CTV) was generated based on the T{sub 1}-weighted image obtained using contrast agent (T{sub 1Gd}), tractography and the infiltration map. This was compared to a conventional T{sub 2}-weighted CTV (T{sub 2}-w CTV). Definition of a diffusion-based CTV that included the adjacent white matter tracts proved highly feasible. A statistically significant difference was detected between the DTI-CTV and T{sub 2}-w CTV volumes (p < 0.005, t = 3.480). As the DTI-CTVs were smaller than the T{sub 2}-w CTVs (tumour plus peritumoural oedema), the pq maps were not simply detecting oedema. Compared to the clinical planning target volume (PTV), the DTI-PTV showed a trend towards volume reduction. These diffusion-based volumes were smaller than conventional volumes, yet still included sites of tumour recurrence. Extending the CTV along the abnormal tensor tracts in order to preserve coverage of the likely routes of dissemination, whilst sparing uninvolved brain, is a rational approach to individualising radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma patients. (orig.) [German] Die Diffusions-Tensor-Bildgebung (DTI) ist eine MR-Technik, die dank der Erfassung des peritumoralen Bereichs eine Verbesserung bezueglich MRI bringt. Unser Ziel war die Pruefung der Machbarkeit der Verwendung der DTI fuer die Zielvolumenabgrenzung fuer Patienten mit

  7. Invariant delineation of nuclear architecture in glioblastoma multiforme for clinical and molecular association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hang; Han, Ju; Borowsky, Alexander; Loss, Leandro; Gray, Joe W; Spellman, Paul T; Parvin, Bahram

    2013-04-01

    Automated analysis of whole mount tissue sections can provide insights into tumor subtypes and the underlying molecular basis of neoplasm. However, since tumor sections are collected from different laboratories, inherent technical and biological variations impede analysis for very large datasets such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Our objective is to characterize tumor histopathology, through the delineation of the nuclear regions, from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections. Such a representation can then be mined for intrinsic subtypes across a large dataset for prediction and molecular association. Furthermore, nuclear segmentation is formulated within a multi-reference graph framework with geodesic constraints, which enables computation of multidimensional representations, on a cell-by-cell basis, for functional enrichment and bioinformatics analysis. Here, we present a novel method, multi-reference graph cut (MRGC), for nuclear segmentation that overcomes technical variations associated with sample preparation by incorporating prior knowledge from manually annotated reference images and local image features. The proposed approach has been validated on manually annotated samples and then applied to a dataset of 377 Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) whole slide images from 146 patients. For the GBM cohort, multidimensional representation of the nuclear features and their organization have identified 1) statistically significant subtypes based on several morphometric indexes, 2) whether each subtype can be predictive or not, and 3) that the molecular correlates of predictive subtypes are consistent with the literature. Data and intermediaries for a number of tumor types (GBM, low grade glial, and kidney renal clear carcinoma) are available at: http://tcga.lbl.gov for correlation with TCGA molecular data. The website also provides an interface for panning and zooming of whole mount tissue sections with/without overlaid segmentation results for quality

  8. Liposomal n-butylidenephthalide protects the drug from oxidation and enhances its antitumor effects in glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin YL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Ling Lin,1,2,* Kai-Fu Chang,3,* Xiao-Fan Huang,3 Che-Lun Hung,4 Shyh-Chang Chen,5 Wan-Ru Chao,6,7 Kuang-Wen Liao,1,8 Nu-Man Tsai3,9 1College of Biological Science and Technology, 2Center for Bioinformatics Research, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 3School of Medical Laboratory and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, 4Department of Computer Science and Communication Engineering, Providence University, 5Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 6Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, 7Department of Pathology, Chung Shan Medical University and Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, 8Institute of Molecular Medicine and Bioengineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 9Clinical Laboratory, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The natural compound n-butylidenephthalide (BP can pass through the blood–brain barrier to inhibit the growth of glioblastoma multiforme tumors. However, BP has an unstable structure that reduces its antitumor activity and half-life in vivo.Objective: The aim of this study is to design a drug delivery system to encapsulate BP to enhance its efficacy by improving its protection and delivery.Methods: To protect its structural stability against protein-rich and peroxide solutions, BP was encapsulated into a lipo-PEG-PEI complex (LPPC. Then, the cytotoxicity of BP/LPPC following preincubation in protein-rich, acid/alkaline, and peroxide solutions was analyzed by MTT. Cell uptake of BP/LPPC was also measured by confocal microscopy. The therapeutic effects of BP/LPPC were analyzed in xenograft mice following intratumoral and intravenous injections.Results: When BP was encapsulated in LPPC, its cytotoxicity was maintained following preincubation in protein-rich, acid/alkaline, and peroxide solutions. The cytotoxic activity of encapsulated BP was higher than

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in 67 cases of glioblastoma multiform and occurrence of metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Nelson Fortes; Barbosa, Marcelo; Amaral, Lazaro L. Faria do; Mendonca, Renato Adam; Lima, Sergio Santos

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the main MRI characteristics of glioblastoma multiform (GBM), the most common CNS primary tumor, emphasizing its location and the occurrence of metastases. The MR imaging of 67 pathologically proven cases of glioblastoma multiform were retrospectively reviewed. The exams were realized in the period between 1995 and 2003, in one of three 1.5 Signa GE units (Milwaukee, WI). The ages of the patients ranged from 4 years to 86 years, mean 60 years, and the occurrence of the tumor was preponderant among men, with 39 cases (58%). The most common location was in the frontal lobes (47%) followed by the temporal lobes (18%) and the parietal lobes (16%). In 19% of the cases there were involvement of more than one site and long distance metastases were seen in 22% of the patients. According to the literature, the most common location of GBM was in the frontal lobe of older than 50 years old men. Metastases occurred in 22% of our cases. (author)

  10. A population-based study of glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paszat, Lawrence; Laperriere, Normand; Groome, Patti; Schulze, Karleen; Mackillop, William; Holowaty, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To describe (1) the use of surgery and radiotherapy (RT) in the treatment of patients with glioblastoma (GBM) in Ontario, (2) survival, and (3) proportion of survival time spent in the hospital after diagnosis. Methods and Materials: We performed a population-based cohort study of all Ontario Cancer Registry (OCR) cases of GBM diagnosed between 1982 and 1994. We linked OCR records, hospital files containing surgical procedure codes from the Canadian Institute for Health Information, and province-wide RT records. We studied the odds of treatment using multivariate logistic regression. We expressed the time spent in the hospital as the mean number of days per case, and as a proportion of the interval between diagnosis and death, or 24 months following diagnosis, whichever came first. We used the life-table method and Cox proportional hazards regression to describe survival. Results: The proportion of patients with GBM undergoing any surgery directed at the tumor varied with age (p<0.0001) and region of residence (p<0.0001). The proportion undergoing RT varied with age (p<0.0001), region of residence (p<0.0001), and year of diagnosis (p=0.01). RT dose ≥53.5 Gy varied with age (p<0.0001), region of residence (p<0.0001), and year of diagnosis (p=0.0002). Median survival was 11 months among patients receiving RT and 3 months among those not receiving RT. The percentage of survival time spent in the hospital was similar among those who received from 49.5 to <53.5 Gy, compared to ≥53.5 Gy. Overall survival and the adjusted relative risk of death varied with age and region of residence. Conclusion: We observed practice variation in the treatment of patients with GBM according to age, region of residence, and year of diagnosis. Survival did not increase during the study period. The variation in RT dose between those receiving from 49.5 to <53.5 Gy compared to ≥53.5 Gy was not paralleled by variation in survival between regions where one or the other of the

  11. Increased intracranial pressure in a case of spinal cervical glioblastoma multiforme: analysis of these two rare conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. de Castro-Costa

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a rare case of increased intracranial hypertension consequent to a spinal cervical glioblastoma multiforme in a young patient. They analyse the physiopathology of intracranial hypertension in spinal tumors and the rarity of such kind of tumor in this location, and its clinico-pathological aspects.

  12. Glioblastoma-Initiating Cells: Relationship with Neural Stem Cells and the Micro-Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Goffart, Nicolas; KROONEN, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO grade IV) is the most common and lethal subtype of primary brain tumor with a median overall survival of 15 months from the time of diagnosis. The presence in GBM of a cancer population displaying neural stem cell (NSC) properties as well as tumor-initiating abilities and resistance to current therapies suggests that these glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs) play a central role in tumor development and are closely related to NSCs. However, it is nowadays sti...

  13. SU-D-BRB-06: Treating Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) as a Chronic Disease: Implication of Temporal-Spatial Dose Fractionation Optimization Including Cancer Stem Cell Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, V; Nguyen, D; Pajonk, F; Kaprealian, T; Kupelian, P; Steinberg, M; Low, D; Sheng, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of improving GBM treatment outcome with temporal-spatial dose optimization of an ordinary differential equation (ODE) that models the differentiation and distinct radiosensitivity between cancer stem cells (CSC) and differentiated cancer cells (DCC). Methods: The ODE was formulated into a non-convex optimization problem with the objective to minimize remaining total cancer cells 500 days from the onset of radiotherapy when the total cancer cell number was 3.5×10{sup 7}, while maintaining normal tissue biological effective dose (BED) of 100Gy resulted from standard prescription of 2Gyx30. Assuming spatially separated CSC and DCC, optimization was also performed to explore the potential benefit from dose-painting the two compartments. Dose escalation to a sub-cell-population in the GTV was also examined assuming that a 2 cm margin around the GTV allows sufficient dose drop-off to 100Gy BED. The recurrence time was determined as the time at which the total cancer cell number regrows to 10{sup 9} cells. Results: The recurrence time with variable fractional doses administered once per week, bi-week and month for one year were found to be 615, 593 and 570 days, superior to the standard-prescription recurrence time of 418 days. The optimal dose-fraction size progression for both uniform and dose-painting to the tumor is low and relatively constant in the beginning and gradually increases to more aggressive fractions at end of the treatment course. Dose escalation to BED of 200Gy to the whole tumor alongside with protracted weekly treatment was found to further delay recurrence to 733 days. Dose-painting of 200 and 500Gy BED to CSC on a year-long weekly schedule further extended recurrence to 736 and 1076 days, respectively. Conclusion: GBM treatment outcome can possibly be improved with a chronic treatment approach. Further dose escalation to the entire tumor or CSC targeted killing is needed to achieve total tumor control. This work

  14. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy with or without carbogen and nicotinamide in inoperable biopsy-proven glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Jean-Marc; Noeel, Georges; Chiras, Jacques; Khe, H.-X.; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Baillet, Francois; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Background: Nicotinamide and carbogen have been shown to enhance the radiation effect in tumour models. Purpose: Prospective evaluation of the toxicity and efficacy of carbogen and nicotinamide with external beam radiotherapy in the management of inoperable glioblastoma. Patients and methods: From April 1995 to December 1997, 33 patients with inoperable biopsy-proven glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) were enrolled in a phase II trial, to undergo radiotherapy (59.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy/fraction), intra-arterial cerebral chemotherapy (ACNU 100 mg/m 2 , three cycles), carbogen breathing (15 l/min), and nicotinamide (85 mg/kg). This experimental group was compared to a control group of 38 patients with inoperable GBM treated with radiotherapy and three cycles of nitrosourea-based chemotherapy from January 1990 to March 1995, in our institution. Results: In the experimental group, carbogen breathing was well tolerated, but only 51.5% of patients completed daily nicotinamide over the 6.5-week treatment period. Nausea and vomiting were the most frequent side effects of nicotinamide. No significant difference in overall survival was observed among the two treatment groups: median survival times were 36.7 and 35.3 weeks for patients treated with carbogen and nicotinamide, and for those treated in the control group, respectively. Conclusion: The association of carbogen and nicotinamide with radiotherapy is feasible, but tolerable only in 51.5% of patients with GBM. Carbogen and nicotinamide did not appear to modify the evolution of glioblastoma

  15. Prognostic factors in glioblastoma multiforme. 10 years experience of a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulshof, M.C.C.M.; Schimmel, E.C.; Gonzalez, D.G.; Koot, R.W.; Bosch, D.A.; Dekker, F.

    2001-01-01

    Background: To analyze prognostic factors in patients with a glioblastoma multiforme treated in an academic institute over the last 10 years. Patients and method: From 1988 to 1998, 198 patients with pathologically confirmed glioblastoma multiforme were analyzed. Five radiation schedules were used mainly based on pretreatment selection criteria: 1. 60 Gy in 30 fractions followed by an interstitial iridium-192 (Ir-192) boost for selected patients with a good performance and a small circumscribed tumor, 2. 66 Gy in 33 fractions for good performance patients, 3. 40 Gy in eight fractions or 4. 28 Gy in four fractions for poor prognostic patients and 5. no irradiation. Results: Median survival was 16 months, 7 months, 5.6 months, 6.6 months and 1.8 months for the groups treated with Ir-192, 66 Gy, 40 Gy, 28 Gy and the group without treatment, respectively. No significant improvement in survival was encountered over the last 10 years. At multivariate analysis patients treated with a hypofractionated scheme showed a similar survival probability and duration of palliative effect compared to the conventionally fractionated group. The poor prognostic groups receiving radiotherapy had a highly significant better survival compared to the no-treatment group. Patients treated with an Ir-192 boost had a better median survival compared to a historical group matched on selection criteria but without boost treatment (16 vs 9.7 months, n.s.). However, survival at 2 years was similar. Analysis on pretreatment characteristics at multivariate analysis revealed age, neurological performance, addition of radiotherapy, total resection, tumor size post surgery and deterioration before start of radiotherapy (borderline) as significant prognostic factors for survival. Conclusion: Despite technical developments in surgery and radiotherapy over the last 10 years, survival of patients with a glioblastoma multiforme has not improved in our institution. The analysis of prognostic factors

  16. Saponin 1 Induces Apoptosis and Suppresses NF-κB-Mediated Survival Signaling in Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chi; Li, Bo; Wang, Yuangang; Gao, Zhenhui; Luo, Peng; Yin, Anan; Wang, Xiaoyang; Cheng, Guang; Fei, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Saponin 1 is a triterpeniod saponin extracted from Anemone taipaiensis, a traditional Chinese medicine against rheumatism and phlebitis. It has also been shown to exhibit significant anti-tumor activity against human leukemia (HL-60 cells) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep-G2 cells). Herein we investigated the effect of saponin 1 in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) U251MG and U87MG cells. Saponin 1 induced significant growth inhibition in both glioblastoma cell lines, with a 50% inhibitory concentration at 24 h of 7.4 µg/ml in U251MG cells and 8.6 µg/ml in U87MG cells, respectively. Nuclear fluorescent staining and electron microscopy showed that saponin 1 caused characteristic apoptotic morphological changes in the GBM cell lines. Saponin 1-induced apoptosis was also verified by DNA ladder electrophoresis and flow cytometry. Additionally, immunocytochemistry and western blotting analyses revealed a time-dependent decrease in the expression and nuclear location of NF-κB following saponin 1 treatment. Western blotting data indicated a significant decreased expression of inhibitors of apoptosis (IAP) family members,(e.g., survivin and XIAP) by saponin 1. Moreover, saponin 1 caused a decrease in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio and initiated apoptosis by activating caspase-9 and caspase-3 in the GBM cell lines. These findings indicate that saponin 1 inhibits cell growth of GBM cells at least partially by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting survival signaling mediated by NF-κB. In addition, in vivo study also demonstrated an obvious inhibition of saponin 1 treatment on the tumor growth of U251MG and U87MG cells-produced xenograft tumors in nude mice. Given the minimal toxicities of saponin 1 in non-neoplastic astrocytes, our results suggest that saponin 1 exhibits significant in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor efficacy and merits further investigation as a potential therapeutic agent for GBM. PMID:24278406

  17. Saponin 1 induces apoptosis and suppresses NF-κB-mediated survival signaling in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    Full Text Available Saponin 1 is a triterpeniod saponin extracted from Anemone taipaiensis, a traditional Chinese medicine against rheumatism and phlebitis. It has also been shown to exhibit significant anti-tumor activity against human leukemia (HL-60 cells and human hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep-G2 cells. Herein we investigated the effect of saponin 1 in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM U251MG and U87MG cells. Saponin 1 induced significant growth inhibition in both glioblastoma cell lines, with a 50% inhibitory concentration at 24 h of 7.4 µg/ml in U251MG cells and 8.6 µg/ml in U87MG cells, respectively. Nuclear fluorescent staining and electron microscopy showed that saponin 1 caused characteristic apoptotic morphological changes in the GBM cell lines. Saponin 1-induced apoptosis was also verified by DNA ladder electrophoresis and flow cytometry. Additionally, immunocytochemistry and western blotting analyses revealed a time-dependent decrease in the expression and nuclear location of NF-κB following saponin 1 treatment. Western blotting data indicated a significant decreased expression of inhibitors of apoptosis (IAP family members,(e.g., survivin and XIAP by saponin 1. Moreover, saponin 1 caused a decrease in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio and initiated apoptosis by activating caspase-9 and caspase-3 in the GBM cell lines. These findings indicate that saponin 1 inhibits cell growth of GBM cells at least partially by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting survival signaling mediated by NF-κB. In addition, in vivo study also demonstrated an obvious inhibition of saponin 1 treatment on the tumor growth of U251MG and U87MG cells-produced xenograft tumors in nude mice. Given the minimal toxicities of saponin 1 in non-neoplastic astrocytes, our results suggest that saponin 1 exhibits significant in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor efficacy and merits further investigation as a potential therapeutic agent for GBM.

  18. The future role of personalized medicine in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Jing Li1,2, Chunhui Di1,2, Austin K Mattox1,2, Linda Wu1,2, D Cory Adamson1,2,3,41Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center, Duke Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA; 2Department of Surgery (Neurosurgery, Duke Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA; 3Department of Neurobiology, Duke Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA; 4Neurosurgery Section, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USAAbstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM remains one of the most malignant primary central nervous system tumors. Personalized therapeutic approaches have not become standard of care for GBM, but science is fast approaching this goal. GBM’s heterogeneous genomic landscape and resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy make this tumor one of the most challenging to treat. Recent advances in genome-wide studies and genetic profiling show that there is unlikely to be a single genetic or cellular event that can be effectively targeted in all patients. Instead, future therapies will likely require personalization for each patient’s tumor genotype or proteomic profile. Over the past year, many investigations specifically focused simultaneously on strategies to target oncogenic pathways, angiogenesis, tumor immunology, epigenomic events, glioma stem cells (GSCs, and the highly migratory glioma cell population. Combination therapy targeting multiple pathways is becoming a fast growing area of research, and many studies put special attention on small molecule inhibitors. Because GBM is a highly vascular tumor, therapy that directs monoclonal antibodies or small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors toward angiogenic factors is also an area of focus for the development of new therapies. Passive, active, and adoptive immunotherapies have been explored by many studies recently, and epigenetic regulation of gene expression with microRNAs is also becoming an important area of study. GSCs can be useful targets to stop tumor recurrence and

  19. Enhanced tumor control of human Glioblastoma Multiforme xenografts with the concomitant use of radiotherapy and an attenuated herpes simplex-1 virus (ASTRO research fellowship)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Paul Y.; Sibley, Gregory S.; Advani, Sunil; Hallahan, Dennis; Hyland, John; Kufe, Donald W.; Chou, Joany; Roizman, Bernard; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma Multiforme remains one of the most incurable of human tumors. The current treatment outcomes are dismal. There are several recent reports which suggest that some human glioblastoma xenografts implanted in the brains of athymic mice may be potentially cured with the use of an attenuated herpes simplex-1 virus alone. We have chosen a replication competent, non-neurovirulent HSV-1 mutant, designated R3616 to determine whether there is an interactive cell killing and enhanced tumor control with radiotherapy in the treatment of a human glioblastoma xenograft. Materials and Methods: In vivo, 1 mm 3 pieces of U-87 human glioblastoma cell line xenografts were implanted into the right hind limb of athymic mice and grown to > 200 mm 3 . A total of 112 mice were then equally distributed within four treatment arms (see chart below) based upon tumor volume. Xenografts selected to receive virus as part of the therapy were inoculated with three injections of 2 x 10 7 plaque forming units (PFU) of R3616 virus given on day 1, 2, and 3 for a total dose of 6 x 10 7 PFU. R3616 is a non-neurovirulent HSV-1 mutant created by the deletion of the γ 34.5 gene. Local field irradiation was delivered on day 2 (20 Gy) and day 3 (25 Gy). The mice were then followed for 60 days during which time the xenografts were measured twice weekly. A clinically non-palpable tumor (< 10% original volume) was scored as a cure. In addition percent-fractional tumor volume (FTV) and mean tumor volume (MTV) were calculated for each group. Results: Conclusion: While our tumor control with R3616 alone is similar to that reported in the literature, we have seen significantly enhanced tumor control and cell killing with the addition of RT suggesting a synergistic interaction between an oncolytic virus and radiation in the treatment of human glioblastoma multiforme xenografts

  20. Inhibition of notch signaling in glioblastoma targets cancer stem cells via an endothelial cell intermediate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovinga, Koos E.; Shimizu, Fumiko; Wang, Rong; Panagiotakos, Georgia; van der Heijden, Maartje; Moayedpardazi, Hamideh; Correia, Ana Sofia; Soulet, Denis; Major, Tamara; Menon, Jayanthi; Tabar, Viviane

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly heterogeneous malignant tumor. Recent data suggests the presence of a hierarchical organization within the GBM cell population that involves cancer cells with stem-like behavior, capable of repopulating the tumor and contributing to its resistance to

  1. Optimizing cancer radiotheraphy with 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Dose escalation studies in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, D.; Gupta, J.P. [Dharmshila Cancer Hospital, New Delhi (India); Banerji, A.K. [Vidyasagar Inst. of Mental Health and Neurosciences, New Delhi (India); Dwarakanath, B.S.; Tripathi, R.P.; Mathew, T.L.; Ravindranath, T. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi (India); Jain, V. [Wright State University, Dayton, OH (United States). Kettering Medical Center

    2005-08-01

    Background and purpose: Higher rates of glucose utilization and glycolysis generally correlate with poor prognosis in several types of malignant tumors. Own earlier studies on model systems demonstrated that the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) could enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy in a dose-dependent manner by selectively sensitizing cancer cells while protecting normal cells. Phase I/II clinical trials indicated that the combination of 2-DG, at an oral dose of 200 mg/kg body weight (BW), with large fractions of {gamma}-radiation was well tolerated in cerebral glioma patients. Since higher 2-DG doses are expected to improve the therapeutic gain, present studies were undertaken to examine the tolerance and safety of escalating 2-DG dose during combined treatment (2-DG + radiotherapy) in glioblastoma multiforme patients. Patients and methods: Untreated patients with histologically proven glioblastoma multiforme (WHO criteria) were included in the study. Seven weekly fractions of {sup 60}C {gamma}-rays (5 Gy/fraction) were delivered to the tumor volume (presurgical CT/MRI evaluation) plus 3 cm margin. Escalating 2-DG doses (200-250-300 mg/kg BW) were administered orally 30 min before irradiation after overnight fasting. Acute toxicity and tolerance were studied by monitoring the vital parameters and side effects. Late radiation damage and treatment responses were studied radiologically and clinically in surviving patients. Results: Transient side effects similar to hypoglycemia were observed in most of the patients. Tolerance and patient compliance to the combined treatment were very good up to a 2-DG dose of 250 mg/kg BW. However, at the higher dose of 300 mg/kg BW, two out of six patients were very restless and could not complete treatment, though significant changes in the vital parameters were not observed even at this dose. No significant damage to the normal brain tissue was observed during follow-up in seven out of ten patients who

  2. Current status and future therapeutic perspectives of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) therapy: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Komal; Shagufta, Bibi Ibtesam; Abbas, Syed Qamar; Patel, Seema; Khan, Ishrat; Shah, Sayed Asmat Ali; Akhter, Najeeb; Hassan, Syed Shams Ul

    2017-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the deadliest form of heterogeneous brain cancer. It affects an enormous number of patients every year and the survival is approximately 8 to 15 months. GBM has driven by complex signaling pathways and considered as a most challenging to treat. Standard treatment of GBM includes surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and also the combined treatment. This review article described inter and intra- tumor heterogeneity of GMB. In addition, recent chemotherapeutic agents, with their mechanism of action have been defined. FDA-approved drugs also been focused over here and most importantly highlighting some natural and synthetic and novel anti- glioma agents, that are the main focus of researchers nowadays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Primary glioblastoma multiforme of medulla oblongata: Case report and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotai, Silky P.; Moon, Hong-Joo; Kim, Joo-Han; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kwon, Taek-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common glial tumor of the adult brain. However, the primary GBM of medulla oblongata is a rarity. To the best of our knowledge, only four cases of GBM of medulla oblongata have been reported so far in the literature, and this is the second report of conventional GBM of the medulla oblongata in adults. We describe a case of 51-year-old female, who presented with a heterogeneous mass with exophytic feature located in the caudal brain stem that was approached and a near total tumor removal was achieved by median suboccipital route. A literature review with emphasis on anatomical location, radiological and histopathological findings, extent of tumor resectibility, and outcome is included. PMID:22639691

  4. Role of 5-ALA in improving extent of tumour resection in patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas, Muhammad; Khan, Inamullah; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2017-10-01

    Goal of surgery for patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is gross total resection with no new neurological deficits. Surgical resection is often restricted due the difficulty in differentiating the tumour from surrounding normal brain using either naked eye, or standard intra-operative white light microscopy. GBM uptakes orally administered 5-ALA becomes fluorescent when viewed by a special light, and this property has been used to improve intra-operative tumour identification. This technique should therefore allow better extent of tumour resection. The hypothesis has been tested through several studies and even though most studies are of low quality, they strongly favour the use of 5- ALA in improving the extent of resection when compared to white light microscopy. A systematic review on the topic had a similar conclusion. Few studies have also hinted on a high false negative rate with the use of this technique..

  5. Comparing predictive models of glioblastoma multiforme built using multi-institutional and local data sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Kyle W; Hsu, William; Bui, Alex A T

    2012-01-01

    The growing amount of electronic data collected from patient care and clinical trials is motivating the creation of national repositories where multiple institutions share data about their patient cohorts. Such efforts aim to provide sufficient sample sizes for data mining and predictive modeling, ultimately improving treatment recommendations and patient outcome prediction. While these repositories offer the potential to improve our understanding of a disease, potential issues need to be addressed to ensure that multi-site data and resultant predictive models are useful to non-contributing institutions. In this paper we examine the challenges of utilizing National Cancer Institute datasets for modeling glioblastoma multiforme. We created several types of prognostic models and compared their results against models generated using data solely from our institution. While overall model performance between the data sources was similar, different variables were selected during model generation, suggesting that mapping data resources between models is not a straightforward issue.

  6. Metabolic management of glioblastoma multiforme using standard therapy together with a restricted ketogenic diet: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servadei Franco

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM has been difficult using standard therapy (radiation with temozolomide chemotherapy. The ketogenic diet is used commonly to treat refractory epilepsy in children and, when administered in restricted amounts, can also target energy metabolism in brain tumors. We report the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with progressive memory loss, chronic headaches, nausea, and a right hemisphere multi-centric tumor seen with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Following incomplete surgical resection, the patient was diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme expressing hypermethylation of the MGMT gene promoter. Methods Prior to initiation of the standard therapy, the patient conducted water-only therapeutic fasting and a restricted 4:1 (fat: carbohydrate + protein ketogenic diet that delivered about 600 kcal/day. The patient also received the restricted ketogenic diet concomitantly during the standard treatment period. The diet was supplemented with vitamins and minerals. Steroid medication (dexamethasone was removed during the course of the treatment. The patient was followed using MRI and positron emission tomography with fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG-PET. Results After two months treatment, the patient's body weight was reduced by about 20% and no discernable brain tumor tissue was detected using either FDG-PET or MRI imaging. Biomarker changes showed reduced levels of blood glucose and elevated levels of urinary ketones. MRI evidence of tumor recurrence was found 10 weeks after suspension of strict diet therapy. Conclusion This is the first report of confirmed GBM treated with standard therapy together with a restricted ketogenic diet. As rapid regression of GBM is rare in older patients following incomplete surgical resection and standard therapy alone, the response observed in this case could result in part from the action of the calorie restricted ketogenic diet. Further studies are needed

  7. FNAB cytology of extra-cranial metastasis of glioblastoma multiforme may resemble a lung primary: A diagnostic pitfall

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    Dincer HE

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As extra-cranial metastasis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is rare, it may create a diagnostic dilemma especially during interpretation of fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB cytology. Case presentation We present transbronchial FNAB findings in a 62-year-old smoker with lung mass clinically suspicious for a lung primary. The smears of transbronchial FNAB showed groups of cells with ill-defined cell margins and cytological features overlapping with poorly differentiated non-small cell carcinoma. The tumor cells demonstrated lack of immunoreactivity for cytokeratin, thyroid transcription factor-1, and usual neuroendocrine markers, synaptophysin and chromogranin in formalin-fixed cellblock sections. However, they were immunoreactive for the other neuroendocrine immunomarker, CD56, suggesting neural nature of the cells. Further scrutiny of clinical details revealed a history of GBM, 13 months status-post surgical excision with radiation therapy and systemic chemotherapy. The tumor recurred 7 months earlier and was debulked surgically and with intra-cranial chemotherapy. Additional evaluation of tumor cells for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP immunoreactivity with clinical details resulted in final interpretation of metastatic GBM. Conclusion Lack of clinical history and immunophenotyping may lead to a diagnostic pitfall with possible misinterpretation of metastatic GBM as poorly differentiated non-small cell carcinoma of lung in a smoker.

  8. Combined stereotactic biopsy and stepping-source interstitial irradiation of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehmer, Stefanie; Guthier, Christian V; Clausen, Sven; Schneider, Frank; Schulte, Dirk-Michael; Benker, Matthias; Bludau, Frederic; Glatting, Gerhard; Marx, Alexander; Schmiedek, Peter; Hesser, Jürgen; Wenz, Frederik; Giordano, Frank A

    2018-04-01

    Patients diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme receiving stereotactic biopsy only either due to tumor localization or impaired clinical status face a devastating prognosis with very short survival times. One strategy to provide an initial cytoreductive and palliative therapy at the time of the stereotactic biopsy is interstitial irradiation through the pre-defined trajectory of the biopsy channel. We designed a novel treatment planning system and evaluated the treatment potential of a fixed-source and a stepping-source algorithm for interstitial radiosurgery on non-spherical glioblastoma in direct adjacency to risk structures. Using both setups, we show that radiation doses delivered to 100% of the gross tumor volume shifts from sub-therapeutic (10-12 Gy) to sterilizing single doses (25-30 Gy) when using the stepping source algorithm due to improved sparing of organs-at-risk. Specifically, the maximum doses at the brain stem were 100% of the PTV dose when a fixed central source and 38% when a stepping-source algorithm was used. We also demonstrated precision of intracranial target points and stability of superficial and deep trajectories using both a phantom and a body donor study. Our setup now for the first time provides a basis for a clinical proof-of-concept trial and may widen palliation options for patients with limited life expectancy that should not undergo time-consuming therapies.

  9. Glioblastoma multiforme and papillary thyroid carcinoma - A rare combination of multiple primary malignancies

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    Swaroopa Pulivarthi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We are describing a 19-year-old white woman who presented with two synchronous primary cancers, namely glioblastoma multiforme and papillary thyroid cancer. The patient was admitted with dizziness, headache, and vomiting. CT head revealed acute intraparenchymal hematoma in the right cingulate gyrus and the splenium of the corpus callosum. Carotid and cerebral angiogram were unremarkable. MRI of the brain demonstrated a non-enhancing and non-hemorrhagic component of the lesion along the lateral margin of the hemorrhage just medial to the atrium of the right lateral ventricle that was suspicious for a tumor or metastasis. Brain biopsy confirmed it as glioblastoma mutiforme. CT chest was done to rule out primary cancer that revealed a 11 mm hypodense lesion in the left lobe of the thyroid and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy confirmed it as papillary thyroid carcinoma. We should evaluate for multiple primary malignancies in young patients who are found to have primary index cancer.

  10. Subcutaneous tissue metastasis from glioblastoma multiforme: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frade Porto, Natalia; Delgado Fernández, Juan; García Pallero, María de Los Ángeles; Penanes Cuesta, Juan Ramón; Pulido Rivas, Paloma; Gil Simoes, Ricardo

    2018-05-16

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary brain tumor, despite an aggressive clinical course, less than 2% of patients develop extraneural metastasis. We present a 72-year-old male diagnosed with a right temporal glioblastoma due to headache. He underwent total gross resection surgery and after that the patient was treated with adyuvant therapy. Five months after the patient returned with trigeminal neuralgia, and MRI showed an infratemporal cranial mass which infiltrates masticator space, the surrounding bone, the temporal muscle and superior cervical and parotid lymph nodes. The patient underwent a new surgery reaching partial resection of the temporal lesion. After that the patient continued suffering from disabling trigeminal neuralgia, that's why because of the bad clinical situation and the treatment failure we decided to restrict therapeutic efforts. The patient died 3 weeks after the diagnosis of extracranial metastasis. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Graphene Functionalized with Arginine Decreases the Development of Glioblastoma Multiforme Tumor in a Gene-Dependent Manner

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    Ewa Sawosz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies revealed that graphene had anticancer properties in experiments in vitro with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM cells and in tumors cultured in vivo. We hypothesized that the addition of arginine or proline to graphene solutions might counteract graphene agglomeration and increase the activity of graphene. Experiments were performed in vitro with GBM U87 cells and in vivo with GBM tumors cultured on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membranes. The measurements included cell morphology, mortality, viability, tumor morphology, histology, and gene expression. The cells and tumors were treated with reduced graphene oxide (rGO and rGO functionalized with arginine (rGO + Arg or proline (rGO + Pro. The results confirmed the anticancer effect of graphene on GBM cells and tumor tissue. After functionalization with amino acids, nanoparticles were distributed more specifically, and the flakes of graphene were less agglomerated. The molecule of rGO + Arg did not increase the expression of TP53 in comparison to rGO, but did not increase the expression of MDM2 or the MDM2/TP53 ratio in the tumor, suggesting that arginine may block MDM2 expression. The expression of NQO1, known to be a strong protector of p53 protein in tumor tissue, was greatly increased. The results indicate that the complex of rGO + Arg has potential in GBM therapy.

  12. Discovery of potent and selective cytotoxic activity of new quinazoline-ureas against TMZ-resistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkamhawy, Ahmed; Viswanath, Ambily Nath Indu; Pae, Ae Nim; Kim, Hyeon Young; Heo, Jin-Chul; Park, Woo-Kyu; Lee, Chong-Ock; Yang, Heekyoung; Kim, Kang Ho; Nam, Do-Hyun; Seol, Ho Jun; Cho, Heeyeong; Roh, Eun Joo

    2015-10-20

    Herein, we report new quinazoline-urea based compounds with potent cytotoxic activities against TMZ-resistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells. Low micromolar IC₅₀ values were exhibited over a panel of three primary GBM patient-derived cell cultures belonging to proneural (GBM-1), mesenchymal (GBM-2), and classical (GBM-3) subtypes. Eight compounds showed excellent selectivity indices for GBM cells comparing to a normal astrocyte cell line. In JC-1 assay, analogues 11, 12, 20, 22, and 24 exerted promising rates of mPTP opening induction towards proneural GBM subtype. Compounds 11, 20, and 24 bound to the translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) in submicromolar range using [(3)H] PK-11195 binding affinity assay. A homology model was built and docked models of 11, 12, 20, 22 and 24 were generated for describing their plausible binding modes in TSPO. In 3D clonogenic assay, compound 20 manifested potent tumoricidal effects on TMZ-resistant GBM cells even at submicromolar concentrations. In addition, CYP450 and hERG assays presented a safe toxicity profile of 20. Taken as a whole, this report presents compound 20 as a potent, selective and safe GBM cytotoxic agent which constitutes a promising direction against TMZ-resistant GBM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Graphene Functionalized with Arginine Decreases the Development of Glioblastoma Multiforme Tumor in a Gene-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Vadalasetty, Krishna Prasad; Grodzik, Marta; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Kurantowicz, Natalia; Strojny, Barbara; Hotowy, Anna; Lipińska, Ludwika; Jagiełło, Joanna; Chwalibog, André

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies revealed that graphene had anticancer properties in experiments in vitro with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells and in tumors cultured in vivo. We hypothesized that the addition of arginine or proline to graphene solutions might counteract graphene agglomeration and increase the activity of graphene. Experiments were performed in vitro with GBM U87 cells and in vivo with GBM tumors cultured on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membranes. The measurements included cell morphology, mortality, viability, tumor morphology, histology, and gene expression. The cells and tumors were treated with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and rGO functionalized with arginine (rGO + Arg) or proline (rGO + Pro). The results confirmed the anticancer effect of graphene on GBM cells and tumor tissue. After functionalization with amino acids, nanoparticles were distributed more specifically, and the flakes of graphene were less agglomerated. The molecule of rGO + Arg did not increase the expression of TP53 in comparison to rGO, but did not increase the expression of MDM2 or the MDM2/TP53 ratio in the tumor, suggesting that arginine may block MDM2 expression. The expression of NQO1, known to be a strong protector of p53 protein in tumor tissue, was greatly increased. The results indicate that the complex of rGO + Arg has potential in GBM therapy. PMID:26512645

  14. Prospective evaluation of angiogenic, hypoxic and EGFR-related biomarkers in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme treated with cetuximab, bevacizumab and irinotecan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Benedikte; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Broholm, Helle

    2010-01-01

    , hypoxia and mediators of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway were investigated. Tumor tissue was obtained from a previous phase II study, treating recurrent primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients with the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab in combination with bevacizumab and irinotecan...... of cetuximab. There is still an urgent need for one or more reliable and reproducible biomarkers able to predict the efficacy of anti-angiogenic therapy....

  15. Multifuntional Nanotherapeutics for the Combinatorial Drug and Gene Therapy in the Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourigan, Breanne

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a grade IV glioma, is the most common primary brain tumor, affecting about 3 out of 100,000 persons per year in the United States. GBM accounts for about 80% of primary malignant brain tumors, and is also the most aggressive of malignant brain tumors. With exhaustive treatment, survival only averages between 12 and 15 months, with a 2-year survival rate less than 25%. New therapeutic strategies are necessary to improve the outcomes of this disease. Chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ), a DNA alkylating agent, is used as a first-line of treatment for GBM. However, GBM tumors develop resistance to TMZ over time due to increased expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a gene responsible for DNA repair. We previously developed cationic, amphiphilic copolymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-g-polyethylenimine (PgP) and demonstrated its utility for nucleic acid delivery. Here, we examine the ability of PgP polyplexes to overcome TMZ resistance and improve therapeutic efficacy through combination drug and gene therapy for GBM treatment. In this study, we evaluated the ability of PgP to deliver siRNA targeting to MGMT (siMGMT), a gene responsible for drug resistance in GBM. Our results demonstrated that PgP effectively forms stable complex with siRNA and protects siRNAs from heparin competition assay, serum- and ribonuclease-mediated degradation, confirming the potential of the polyplex for in vivo delivery. Results from MTT assays showed that PgP/siRNA polyplexes exhibited minimal cytotoxicity compared to untreated cells when incubated with T98G human GBM cells. We also demonstrated that PgP/siMGMT polyplexes mediate knockdown of MGMT protein as well as a significant ˜56% and ˜68% knockdown of MGMT mRNA in T98G GBM cells compared to cells treated with PgP complexed with non-targeting siRNA (siNT) at a 60:1 and 80:1 nitrogen:phosphate (N:P) ratio, respectively. Further, co-incubation of PgP/siMGMT polyplexes with TMZ

  16. Prognostic factors in glioblastoma multiforme. 10 years experience of a single institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulshof, M C.C.M.; Schimmel, E C; Gonzalez, D G [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Koot, R W; Bosch, D A [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Dekker, F [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Epidemiology

    2001-06-01

    Background: To analyze prognostic factors in patients with a glioblastoma multiforme treated in an academic institute over the last 10 years. Patients and method: From 1988 to 1998, 198 patients with pathologically confirmed glioblastoma multiforme were analyzed. Five radiation schedules were used mainly based on pretreatment selection criteria: 1. 60 Gy in 30 fractions followed by an interstitial iridium-192 (Ir-192) boost for selected patients with a good performance and a small circumscribed tumor, 2. 66 Gy in 33 fractions for good performance patients, 3. 40 Gy in eight fractions or 4. 28 Gy in four fractions for poor prognostic patients and 5. no irradiation. Results: Median survival was 16 months, 7 months, 5.6 months, 6.6 months and 1.8 months for the groups treated with Ir-192, 66 Gy, 40 Gy, 28 Gy and the group without treatment, respectively. No significant improvement in survival was encountered over the last 10 years. At multivariate analysis patients treated with a hypofractionated scheme showed a similar survival probability and duration of palliative effect compared to the conventionally fractionated group. The poor prognostic groups receiving radiotherapy had a highly significant better survival compared to the no-treatment group. Patients treated with an Ir-192 boost had a better median survival compared to a historical group matched on selection criteria but without boost treatment (16 vs 9.7 months, n.s.). However, survival at 2 years was similar. Analysis on pretreatment characteristics at multivariate analysis revealed age, neurological performance, addition of radiotherapy, total resection, tumor size post surgery and deterioration before start of radiotherapy (borderline) as significant prognostic factors for survival. Conclusion: Despite technical developments in surgery and radiotherapy over the last 10 years, survival of patients with a glioblastoma multiforme has not improved in our institution. The analysis of prognostic factors

  17. Long-term Survival of Six Patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme: Case Series and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapour Omidvari

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The median overall survival in glioblastoma multiforme is usually less than one year. Long-term survival is rare and is seen in only 3%-6% of GBM patients. The present study reports the characteristics and treatment outcomes of six cases of glioblastoma multiforme with long-term survival. A literature review is also presented.Between 1990 and 2008, 217 glioblastoma multiforme patients have been treated at our center of which six cases (four males survived for three years or longer. The mean age of the six cases was 25.7 years. All patients received postoperative radiotherapy with a mean dose of 55 gray and four patients received nitrosourea-based chemotherapy.Patients' mean survival was 5.2 years. The results of this study and review of the literature have indicated that long-term (more than three years survival is exceptional and mainly observed in younger patients with good performance status and following complete surgical tumor resection.

  18. Difficult diagnosis of brainstem glioblastoma multiforme in a woman: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhan Shaheen E

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Brainstem gliomas are rare in adults. They most commonly occur in the pons and are most likely to be high-grade lesions. The diagnosis of a high-grade brainstem glioma is usually reached due to the presentation of rapidly progressing brainstem, cranial nerve and cerebellar symptoms. These symptoms do, however, overlap with a variety of other central nervous system disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is the radiographic modality of choice, but can still be misleading. Case presentation A 48-year-old Caucasian woman presented with headache and vomiting followed by cerebellar signs and confusion. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were suggestive of a demyelinating process, but the patient failed to respond to therapy. Her condition rapidly progressed and she died. At autopsy, a high-grade invasive pontine tumor was identified. Histological evaluation revealed glioblastoma multiforme. Conclusion While pontine gliomas are rare in adults, those that do occur tend to be high-grade and rapidly progressive. Progression of symptoms from non-specific findings of headache and vomiting to rapid neurological deterioration, as occurred in our patient, is common in glioblastoma multiforme. While radiographic findings are often suggestive of the underlying pathology, this case represents the possibility of glioblastoma multiforme presenting as a deceptively benign appearing lesion.

  19. In vivo bioluminescence imaging validation of a human biopsy-derived orthotopic mouse model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzabek, Monika A; Huszthy, Peter C; Skaftnesmo, Kai O; McCormack, Emmet; Dicker, Patrick; Prehn, Jochen H M; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Byrne, Annette T

    2013-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive brain malignancy, is characterized by extensive cellular proliferation, angiogenesis, and single-cell infiltration into the brain. We have previously shown that a xenograft model based on serial xenotransplantation of human biopsy spheroids in immunodeficient rodents maintains the genotype and phenotype of the original patient tumor. The present work further extends this model for optical assessment of tumor engraftment and growth using bioluminescence imaging (BLI). A method for successful lentiviral transduction of the firefly luciferase gene into multicellular spheroids was developed and implemented to generate optically active patient tumor cells. Luciferase-expressing spheroids were injected into the brains of immunodeficient mice. BLI photon counts and tumor volumes from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were correlated. Luciferase-expressing tumors recapitulated the histopathologic hallmarks of human GBMs and showed proliferation rates and microvessel density counts similar to those of wild-type xenografts. Moreover, we detected widespread invasion of luciferase-positive tumor cells in the mouse brains. Herein we describe a novel optically active model of GBM that closely mimics human pathology with respect to invasion, angiogenesis, and proliferation indices. The model may thus be routinely used for the assessment of novel anti-GBM therapeutic approaches implementing well-established and cost-effective optical imaging strategies.

  20. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging Validation of a Human Biopsy–Derived Orthotopic Mouse Model of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika A. Jarzabek

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most aggressive brain malignancy, is characterized by extensive cellular proliferation, angiogenesis, and single-cell infiltration into the brain. We have previously shown that a xenograft model based on serial xenotransplantation of human biopsy spheroids in immunodeficient rodents maintains the genotype and phenotype of the original patient tumor. The present work further extends this model for optical assessment of tumor engraftment and growth using bioluminescence imaging (BLI. A method for successful lentiviral transduction of the firefly luciferase gene into multicellular spheroids was developed and implemented to generate optically active patient tumor cells. Luciferase-expressing spheroids were injected into the brains of immunodeficient mice. BLI photon counts and tumor volumes from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were correlated. Luciferase-expressing tumors recapitulated the histopathologic hallmarks of human GBMs and showed proliferation rates and microvessel density counts similar to those of wild-type xenografts. Moreover, we detected widespread invasion of luciferase-positive tumor cells in the mouse brains. Herein we describe a novel optically active model of GBM that closely mimics human pathology with respect to invasion, angiogenesis, and proliferation indices. The model may thus be routinely used for the assessment of novel anti-GBM therapeutic approaches implementing well-established and cost-effective optical imaging strategies.

  1. Formulation and in vitro evaluation of 17-allyamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) loaded polymeric mixed micelles for glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Vipin; Hussain, Muhammad Delwar

    2013-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in human. 17-Allylamino-17-demethoxy geldanamycin (17-AAG) is an inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). The highly lipophilic nature and selective targeting of tumor cells makes 17-AAG a promising candidate for therapy of GBMs but poor water solubility, short biological half-life and hepatotoxicity limited its clinical use. Polymeric mixed micelles composed of Pluronic® P-123 and F-127 (2:1 (w/w)) containing 17-AAG were prepared and characterized. Cellular uptake and in vitro cytotoxicity of the prepared micelles were determined in U87MG human glioblastoma cells. The particle size of 17-AAG loaded Pluronic(®) P-123 and F-127 mixed micelles was 22.2 ± 0.1 nm; drug loading was about 4.0 ± 0.5% (w/w) with 88.2 ± 3.1% (w/w) encapsulation efficiency. About 90% of drug was released from the nanoparticles over 8 days. Cellular uptake studies showed intracellular uptake of mixed micelles. Cytotoxicity study showed 5-fold increase (P AAG-loaded mixed micelles to free 17-AAG. Due to their targeting ability, size, high drug loading and controlled release behavior, 17-AAG loaded Pluronic(®) P-123 and F-127 mixed micelles might be developed as a delivery system for GBM treatment. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of factor inhibiting HIF (FIH-1 in inhibiting HIF-1 transcriptional activity in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enfeng Wang

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM accounts for about 38% of primary brain tumors in the United States. GBM is characterized by extensive angiogenesis induced by vascular growth factors and cytokines. The transcription of these growth factors and cytokines is regulated by the Hypoxia-Inducible-Factor-1(HIF-1, which is a key regulator mediating the cellular response to hypoxia. It is known that Factor Inhibiting HIF-1, or FIH-1, is also involved in the cellular response to hypoxia and has the capability to physically interact with HIF-1 and block its transcriptional activity under normoxic conditions. Delineation of the regulatory role of FIH-1 will help us to better understand the molecular mechanism responsible for tumor growth and progression and may lead to the design of new therapies targeting cellular pathways in response to hypoxia. Previous studies have shown that the chromosomal region of 10q24 containing the FIH-1 gene is often deleted in GBM, suggesting a role for the FIH-1 in GBM tumorigenesis and progression. In the current study, we found that FIH-1 is able to inhibit HIF-mediated transcription of GLUT1 and VEGF-A, even under hypoxic conditions in human glioblastoma cells. FIH-1 has been found to be more potent in inhibiting HIF function than PTEN. This observation points to the possibility that deletion of 10q23-24 and loss or decreased expression of FIH-1 gene may lead to a constitutive activation of HIF-1 activity, an alteration of HIF-1 targets such as GLUT-1 and VEGF-A, and may contribute to the survival of cancer cells in hypoxia and the development of hypervascularization observed in GBM. Therefore FIH-1 can be potential therapeutic target for the treatment of GBM patients with poor prognosis.

  3. Stereotactic intracranial implantation and in vivo bioluminescent imaging of tumor xenografts in a mouse model system of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Brian C; Dorsey, Jay F; Benci, Joseph L; Joh, Daniel Y; Kao, Gary D

    2012-09-25

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a high-grade primary brain cancer with a median survival of only 14.6 months in humans despite standard tri-modality treatment consisting of surgical resection, post-operative radiation therapy and temozolomide chemotherapy. New therapeutic approaches are clearly needed to improve patient survival and quality of life. The development of more effective treatment strategies would be aided by animal models of GBM that recapitulate human disease yet allow serial imaging to monitor tumor growth and treatment response. In this paper, we describe our technique for the precise stereotactic implantation of bio-imageable GBM cancer cells into the brains of nude mice resulting in tumor xenografts that recapitulate key clinical features of GBM. This method yields tumors that are reproducible and are located in precise anatomic locations while allowing in vivo bioluminescent imaging to serially monitor intracranial xenograft growth and response to treatments. This method is also well-tolerated by the animals with low perioperative morbidity and mortality.

  4. 18F-Fluorothymidine-Pet Imaging of Glioblastoma Multiforme: Effects of Radiation Therapy on Radiotracer Uptake and Molecular Biomarker Patterns

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    Sanjay Chandrasekaran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. PET imaging is a useful clinical tool for studying tumor progression and treatment effects. Conventional 18F-FDG-PET imaging is of limited usefulness for imaging Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM due to high levels of glucose uptake by normal brain and the resultant signal-to-noise intensity. 18F-Fluorothymidine (FLT in contrast has shown promise for imaging GBM, as thymidine is taken up preferentially by proliferating cells. These studies were undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of 18F-FLT-PET in a GBM mouse model, especially after radiation therapy (RT, and its correlation with useful biomarkers, including proliferation and DNA damage. Methods. Nude/athymic mice with human GBM orthografts were assessed by microPET imaging with 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT. Patterns of tumor PET imaging were then compared to immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence for markers of proliferation (Ki-67, DNA damage and repair (γH2AX, hypoxia (HIF-1α, and angiogenesis (VEGF. Results. We confirmed that 18F-FLT-PET uptake is limited in healthy mice but enhanced in the intracranial tumors. Our data further demonstrate that 18F-FLT-PET imaging usefully reflects the inhibition of tumor by RT and correlates with changes in biomarker expression. Conclusions. 18F-FLT-PET imaging is a promising tumor imaging modality for GBM, including assessing RT effects and biologically relevant biomarkers.

  5. Patterns of failure for glioblastoma multiforme following limited-margin radiation and concurrent temozolomide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebhardt, Brian J; Dobelbower, Michael C; Ennis, William H; Bag, Asim K; Markert, James M; Fiveash, John B

    2014-01-01

    To analyze patterns of failure in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated with limited-margin radiation therapy and concurrent temozolomide. We hypothesize that patients treated with margins in accordance with Adult Brain Tumor Consortium guidelines (ABTC) will demonstrate patterns of failure consistent with previous series of patients treated with 2–3 cm margins. A retrospective review was performed of patients treated at the University of Alabama at Birmingham for GBM between 2000 and 2011. Ninety-five patients with biopsy-proven disease and documented disease progression after treatment were analyzed. The initial planning target volume includes the T1-enhancing tumor and surrounding edema plus a 1 cm margin. The boost planning target volume includes the T1-enhancing tumor plus a 1 cm margin. The tumors were classified as in-field, marginal, or distant if greater than 80%, 20-80%, or less than 20% of the recurrent volume fell within the 95% isodose line, respectively. The median progression-free survival from the time of diagnosis to documented failure was 8 months (range 3–46). Of the 95 documented recurrences, 77 patients (81%) had an in-field component of treatment failure, 6 (6%) had a marginal component, and 27 (28%) had a distant component. Sixty-three patients (66%) demonstrated in-field only recurrence. The low rate of marginal recurrence suggests that wider margins would have little impact on the pattern of failure, validating the use of limited margins in accordance ABTC guidelines

  6. The Radiologic Features of Cystic versus Noncystic Glioblastoma Multiforme as Significant Prognostic Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seung Joon; Hwang, Hee Young; Kim, Na Rae; Lee, Sheen Woo; Kim, Jeong Ho; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Hyung Sik

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the preoperative radiological characteristic and survival differences of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with and without cysts. Twenty-one GBMs were collected retrospectively; these tumors were pathologic confirmed as GBM. Based on the preoperative MR imaging, we compared the cystic GBMs with the noncystic GBMs according to the the tumor size, the tumor interface, the tumor wall thickness and peritumoral edema. Seven cases were classified as cystic GBMs and fourteen were noncystic GBMs. The cystic GBMs had a well-defined tumor interface, a less than 2 cm thickness of the tumor wall and less than 40 cm 3 thick peritumoral edema as compared to that of the noncystic GBMs. There was a statistically significant difference in age between the patients with cystic tumors and those with noncystic tumors. For the patients with cystic GBMs and noncystic GBMs, median survival time after surgery was 43.8 months and 12.5 months, respectively. The cystic GBMs had a well-defined tumor interface, a thin wall and minimal edema, as compared with that of the noncystic GBMs. The patients with cystic GBMs were significantly younger and they had more favorable survival outcomes than did the patients with noncystic GBMs

  7. Prolonged survival when temozolomide is added to accelerated radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme

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    Guckenberger, Matthias; Mayer, Mario; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Flentje, Michael [University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Buttmann, Mathias [University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Vince, Giles H. [University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    2011-09-15

    The goal of this study was to evaluate accelerated radiotherapy with and without temozolomide (TMZ) for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This retrospective analysis evaluated 86 patients with histologically proven GBM who were treated with accelerated radiotherapy of 1.8 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 54 Gy within 3 weeks. Median age was 62 years and median Karnofsky index was 90. A total of 41 patients received radiotherapy only from 2002-2005 and 45 patients were treated with TMZ concomitantly and after radiotherapy from 2005-2007. Median overall survival (OS) was 12.5 months and 2-year OS was 15.4%. Patient characteristics were well balanced between the two groups except for better performance status (p = 0.05) and higher frequency of retreatment for the first recurrence (p = 0.02) in the TMZ group. Age at diagnosis (HR 2.83) and treatment with TMZ (HR 0.60) were correlated with OS in the multivariate analysis: treatment with and without TMZ resulted in median OS of 16 months and 11.3 months, respectively. Hematological toxicity grade > II was observed in 2/45 patients and 5/37 patients during simultaneous radiochemotherapy and adjuvant TMZ. TMZ added to accelerated radiotherapy for GBM resulted in prolonged overall survival with low rates of severe hematological toxicity. (orig.)

  8. Prolonged survival when temozolomide is added to accelerated radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Mayer, Mario; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Flentje, Michael; Buttmann, Mathias; Vince, Giles H.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate accelerated radiotherapy with and without temozolomide (TMZ) for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This retrospective analysis evaluated 86 patients with histologically proven GBM who were treated with accelerated radiotherapy of 1.8 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 54 Gy within 3 weeks. Median age was 62 years and median Karnofsky index was 90. A total of 41 patients received radiotherapy only from 2002-2005 and 45 patients were treated with TMZ concomitantly and after radiotherapy from 2005-2007. Median overall survival (OS) was 12.5 months and 2-year OS was 15.4%. Patient characteristics were well balanced between the two groups except for better performance status (p = 0.05) and higher frequency of retreatment for the first recurrence (p = 0.02) in the TMZ group. Age at diagnosis (HR 2.83) and treatment with TMZ (HR 0.60) were correlated with OS in the multivariate analysis: treatment with and without TMZ resulted in median OS of 16 months and 11.3 months, respectively. Hematological toxicity grade > II was observed in 2/45 patients and 5/37 patients during simultaneous radiochemotherapy and adjuvant TMZ. TMZ added to accelerated radiotherapy for GBM resulted in prolonged overall survival with low rates of severe hematological toxicity. (orig.)

  9. Glioblastoma multiforme subterfuge as acute cerebral hemorrhage: A case report and literature review

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    Seidu A. Richard

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic related Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM are rare and characterizes with severe clinical scuffle. The etiology of this presentation although not well known is believed to be multifactorial. We present a case as well as review on the pathogenesis of evolution of the hematoma into ring enhancing features of GBM on imaging studies. We present a case of 28 years old man who suddenly went into coma for 9 hours preceded with seizures that latest for 10 minutes. He had no focal neurological signs. CT-Scans images indicated acute cerebral hemorrhage near the frontal horn of the left ventricle with brain edema about the hemorrhagic lesion and MRI done a week later revealed a cerebral ring enhancing lesion. The lesion was partially resected during surgery and immunohistochemical staining confirmed GBM (WHO, grade 4. The diagnosis of intratumoral hemorrhage in GBM was very challenging at the initial stages but with time the hematoma evolved into ring enhancing images typical of GBM. It’s not every intracranial hematoma that is of pure vascular origin.

  10. Phase II study of imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea in adults with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, David A; Egorin, Merrill J; Quinn, Jennifer A; Rich, Jeremy N; Rich, Jeremy N; Gururangan, Sridharan; Gururangan, Idharan; Vredenburgh, James J; Desjardins, Annick; Sathornsumetee, Sith; Provenzale, James M; Herndon, James E; Dowell, Jeannette M; Badruddoja, Michael A; McLendon, Roger E; Lagattuta, Theodore F; Kicielinski, Kimberly P; Dresemann, Gregor; Sampson, John H; Friedman, Allan H; Salvado, August J; Friedman, Henry S

    2005-12-20

    We performed a phase II study to evaluate the combination of imatinib mesylate, an adenosine triphosphate mimetic, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, plus hydroxyurea, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Patients with GBM at any recurrence received imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea (500 mg twice a day) orally on a continuous, daily schedule. The imatinib mesylate dose was 500 mg twice a day for patients on enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and 400 mg once a day for those not on EIAEDs. Assessments were performed every 28 days. The primary end point was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS). Thirty-three patients enrolled with progressive disease after prior radiotherapy and at least temozolomide-based chemotherapy. With a median follow-up of 58 weeks, 27% of patients were progression-free at 6 months, and the median PFS was 14.4 weeks. Three patients (9%) achieved radiographic response, and 14 (42%) achieved stable disease. Cox regression analysis identified concurrent EIAED use and no more than one prior progression as independent positive prognostic factors of PFS. The most common toxicities included grade 3 neutropenia (16%), thrombocytopenia (6%), and edema (6%). There were no grade 4 or 5 events. Concurrent EIAED use lowered imatinib mesylate exposure. Imatinib mesylate clearance was decreased at day 28 compared with day 1 in all patients, suggesting an effect of hydroxyurea. Imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea is well tolerated and associated with durable antitumor activity in some patients with recurrent GBM.

  11. A Pilot Safety Study of Lenalidomide and Radiotherapy for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drappatz, Jan; Wong, Eric T.; Schiff, David; Kesari, Santosh; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Doherty, Lisa; LaFrankie, Debra Conrad; Ramakrishna, Naren; Weiss, Stephanie; Smith, Sharon T.; Ciampa, Abigail; Zimmerman, Jennifer; Ostrowsky, Louis; David, Karly; Norden, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of lenalidomide, an analogue of thalidomide with enhanced immunomodulatory and antiangiogenic properties and a more favorable toxicity profile, in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) when given concurrently with radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Patients with newly diagnosed GBM received radiotherapy concurrently with lenalidomide given for 3 weeks followed by a 1-week rest period and continued lenalidomide until tumor progression or unacceptable toxicity. Dose escalation occurred in groups of 6. Determination of the MTD was based on toxicities during the first 12 weeks of therapy. The primary endpoint was toxicity. Results: Twenty-three patients were enrolled, of whom 20 were treated and evaluable for both toxicity and tumor response and 2 were evaluable for toxicity only. Common toxicities included venous thromboembolic disease, fatigue, and nausea. Dose-limiting toxicities were eosinophilic pneumonitis and transaminase elevations. The MTD for lenalidomide was determined to be 15 mg/m 2 /d. Conclusion: The recommended dose for lenalidomide with radiotherapy is 15 mg/m 2 /d for 3 weeks followed by a 1-week rest period. Venous thromboembolic complications occurred in 4 patients, and prophylactic anticoagulation should be considered

  12. Improved Outcomes with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Combined with Temozolomide for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

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    Noel J. Aherne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is optimally treated by maximal debulking followed by combined chemoradiation. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT is gaining widespread acceptance in other tumour sites, although evidence to support its use over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the treatment of gliomas is currently lacking. We examined the survival outcomes for patients with GBM treated with IMRT and Temozolomide. Methods and Materials. In all, 31 patients with GBM were treated with IMRT and 23 of these received chemoradiation with Temozolomide. We correlated survival outcomes with patient functional status, extent of surgery, radiation dose, and use of chemotherapy. Results. Median survival for all patients was 11.3 months, with a median survival of 7.2 months for patients receiving 40.05 Gray (Gy and a median survival of 17.4 months for patients receiving 60 Gy. Conclusions. We report one of the few series of IMRT in patients with GBM. In our group, median survival for those receiving 60 Gy with Temozolomide compared favourably to the combined therapy arm of the largest randomised trial of chemoradiation versus radiation to date (17.4 months versus 14.6 months. We propose that IMRT should be considered as an alternative to 3DCRT for patients with GBM.

  13. Improved outcomes with intensity modulated radiation therapy combined with temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aherne, Noel J; Benjamin, Linus C; Horsley, Patrick J; Silva, Thomaz; Wilcox, Shea; Amalaseelan, Julan; Dwyer, Patrick; Tahir, Abdul M R; Hill, Jacques; Last, Andrew; Hansen, Carmen; McLachlan, Craig S; Lee, Yvonne L; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is optimally treated by maximal debulking followed by combined chemoradiation. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is gaining widespread acceptance in other tumour sites, although evidence to support its use over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in the treatment of gliomas is currently lacking. We examined the survival outcomes for patients with GBM treated with IMRT and Temozolomide. Methods and Materials. In all, 31 patients with GBM were treated with IMRT and 23 of these received chemoradiation with Temozolomide. We correlated survival outcomes with patient functional status, extent of surgery, radiation dose, and use of chemotherapy. Results. Median survival for all patients was 11.3 months, with a median survival of 7.2 months for patients receiving 40.05 Gray (Gy) and a median survival of 17.4 months for patients receiving 60 Gy. Conclusions. We report one of the few series of IMRT in patients with GBM. In our group, median survival for those receiving 60 Gy with Temozolomide compared favourably to the combined therapy arm of the largest randomised trial of chemoradiation versus radiation to date (17.4 months versus 14.6 months). We propose that IMRT should be considered as an alternative to 3DCRT for patients with GBM.

  14. The development of glioblastoma multiforme reactive monoclonal antibodies and their use in drug targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaich, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to develop monoclonal antibodies reactive with the tumor glioblastoma multiforme and to use them to study and develop new treatment modalities for this disease. A tumor antigen enriched immunogen, prepared by immunoaffinity chromatography, was compared to a whole tumor homogenate immunogen with the difference in the yield of tumor reactive, normal brain unreactive monoclonal antibodies proving to be significant. Monoclonal antibody A7, reactive with tumor tissue but unreactive with normal tissue, was isotyped to be an IgG2a immunoglobulin and could be purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by using serum-free culture conditions and protein A sepharose chromatography. Monoclonal antibody A7 is noncytotoxic as measured by the 3 H-nicotinamide release assay and binds to a 138 kd membrane antigen which is not internalized. Localization studies using 14 C-labeled monoclonal antibody A7 and the U-87 MG nude mouse xenograft model resulted in a tumor:serum ratio of 1.25:1.0 as compared to 0.29:1.0 for the negative control. A monoclonal antibody A7-doxorubicin immunoconjugate proved to be more cytotoxic than free doxorubicin in vitro while lethality studies using Swiss mice demonstrated the lack of toxicity of the immunoconjugate as compared to free doxorubicin. In vivo chemotherapy studies using the U-87 MG nude mouse xenograft failed to demonstrate any immunoconjugate anti-tumor activity which may be attributable to the route of administration

  15. Semi-automated segmentation of a glioblastoma multiforme on brain MR images for radiotherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Daisuke; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Murakami, Ryuuji; Hirai, Toshinori

    2010-04-20

    We propose a computerized method for semi-automated segmentation of the gross tumor volume (GTV) of a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) on brain MR images for radiotherapy planning (RTP). Three-dimensional (3D) MR images of 28 cases with a GBM were used in this study. First, a sphere volume of interest (VOI) including the GBM was selected by clicking a part of the GBM region in the 3D image. Then, the sphere VOI was transformed to a two-dimensional (2D) image by use of a spiral-scanning technique. We employed active contour models (ACM) to delineate an optimal outline of the GBM in the transformed 2D image. After inverse transform of the optimal outline to the 3D space, a morphological filter was applied to smooth the shape of the 3D segmented region. For evaluation of our computerized method, we compared the computer output with manually segmented regions, which were obtained by a therapeutic radiologist using a manual tracking method. In evaluating our segmentation method, we employed the Jaccard similarity coefficient (JSC) and the true segmentation coefficient (TSC) in volumes between the computer output and the manually segmented region. The mean and standard deviation of JSC and TSC were 74.2+/-9.8% and 84.1+/-7.1%, respectively. Our segmentation method provided a relatively accurate outline for GBM and would be useful for radiotherapy planning.

  16. Quality of Radiomic Features in Glioblastoma Multiforme: Impact of Semi-Automated Tumor Segmentation Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myungeun; Woo, Boyeong; Kuo, Michael D; Jamshidi, Neema; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and quality of radiomic features in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) derived from tumor volumes obtained with semi-automated tumor segmentation software. MR images of 45 GBM patients (29 males, 16 females) were downloaded from The Cancer Imaging Archive, in which post-contrast T1-weighted imaging and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR sequences were used. Two raters independently segmented the tumors using two semi-automated segmentation tools (TumorPrism3D and 3D Slicer). Regions of interest corresponding to contrast-enhancing lesion, necrotic portions, and non-enhancing T2 high signal intensity component were segmented for each tumor. A total of 180 imaging features were extracted, and their quality was evaluated in terms of stability, normalized dynamic range (NDR), and redundancy, using intra-class correlation coefficients, cluster consensus, and Rand Statistic. Our study results showed that most of the radiomic features in GBM were highly stable. Over 90% of 180 features showed good stability (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] ≥ 0.8), whereas only 7 features were of poor stability (ICC NDR ≥1), while above 35% of the texture features showed poor NDR (software tools provided sufficiently reliable tumor segmentation and feature stability; thus helping to overcome the inherent inter-rater and intra-rater variability of user intervention. However, certain aspects of feature quality, including NDR and redundancy, need to be assessed for determination of representative signature features before further development of radiomics.

  17. 5-ALA Fluorescence Image Guided Resection of Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Meta-Analysis of the Literature

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    Samy Eljamel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is one of the most deadly cancers in humans. Despite recent advances in anti-cancer therapies, most patients with GBM die from local disease progression. Fluorescence image guided surgical resection (FIGR was recently advocated to enhance local control of GBM. This is meta-analyses of 5-aminolevulinic (5-ALA induced FIGR. Materials: Review of the literature produced 503 potential publications; only 20 of these fulfilled the inclusion criteria of this analysis, including a total of 565 patients treated with 5-ALA-FIGR reporting on its outcomes and 800 histological samples reporting 5-ALA-FIGR sensitivity and specificity. Results: The mean gross total resection (GTR rate was 75.4% (95% CI: 67.4–83.5, p < 0.001. The mean time to tumor progression (TTP was 8.1 months (95% CI: 4.7–12, p < 0.001. The mean overall survival gain reported was 6.2 months (95% CI: −1–13, p < 0.001. The specificity was 88.9% (95% CI: 83.9–93.9, p < 0.001 and the sensitivity was 82.6% (95% CI: 73.9–91.9, p < 0.001. Conclusion: 5-ALA-FIGR in GBM is highly sensitive and specific, and imparts significant benefits to patients in terms of improved GTR and TTP.

  18. Short course of radiation therapy in elderly patients with multiform glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idbaih, A.; Taillibert, S.; Simon, J.M.; Lopez, S.; Lang, P.; Toubiana, T.; Feuvret, L.; Mazeron, J.J.; Idbaih, A.; Taillibert, S.; Psimaras, D.; Delattre, J.Y.; Schneble, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The optimal schedule of irradiation in elderly patients suffering from glioblastoma multiform (G.B.M.) is unsettled. Materials and methods: This study reviewed the charts of 28 consecutive G.B.M. patients aged 70 years or more with a Karnofsky Performance Status (K.P.S.) greater than or equal to 70 who received a short course of radiotherapy (40 grays in 15 fractions over three weeks). Results: The median age at surgery was 74.6 years (range, 70.1 - 85.7). No patient received prior or concomitant chemotherapy. The median progression-free survival and overall survival were 21.6 weeks (95% CI, 17.0 - 39.9) and 50.6 weeks (95% CI, 26.3 - 62.0), respectively. Even within a narrow range (< 90 or = 90), K.P.S. remained a prognostic factor (p = 0.03). Tolerance appeared acceptable in terms of K.P.S. changes and corticosteroid use during radiation therapy. Conclusion: These results support the efficacy of short schedule radiotherapy for G.B.M. in elderly patients with a good K.P.S.. (authors)

  19. Hypofractionated High-Dose Irradiation with Positron Emission Tomography Data for the Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

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    Kazuhiro Miwa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research paper presents clinical outcomes of hypofractionated high-dose irradiation by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (Hypo-IMRT with 11C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET data for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. A total of 45 patients with GBM were treated with Hypo-IMRT after surgery. Gross tumor volume (GTV was defined as the area of enhanced lesion on MRI, including MET-PET avid region; clinical target volume (CTV was the area with 5 mm margin surrounding the GTV; planning target volume (PTV was the area with 15 mm margin surrounding the CTV, including MET-PET moderate region. Hypo-IMRT was performed in 8 fractions; planning the dose for GTV was escalated to 68 Gy and that for CTV was escalated to 56 Gy, while keeping the dose delivered to the PTV at 40 Gy. Concomitant and adjuvant TMZ chemotherapy was administered. At a median follow-up of 18.7 months, median overall survival (OS was 20.0 months, and median progression-free survival was 13.0 months. The 1- and 2-year OS rates were 71.2% and 26.3%, respectively. Adjuvant TMZ chemotherapy was significantly predictive of OS on multivariate analysis. Late toxicity included 7 cases of Grade 3-4 radiation necrosis. Hypo-IMRT with MET-PET data appeared to result in favorable survival outcomes for patients with GBM.

  20. Radiotherapy with concurrent or sequential temozolomide in elderly patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashem, Sameh A.; Salem, Ahmed; Al-Rashdan, Abdulla

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article was to evaluate therapeutic outcomes of elderly patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated by surgery followed by combined modality therapy and compare achievable outcomes to those of a younger age population. Seventy-eight adult patients with histologically confirmed grade IV astrocytoma were treated at King Hussein Cancer Center (Amman, Jordan) between September 2004 and December 2008. Records were retrospectively reviewed and included 55 males and 23 females between 19 and 78 years of age (median age 50 years). This case series included 20 patients aged 60 years or older. All patients underwent craniotomy followed radiotherapy and concurrent or sequential temozolomide. The follow-up ranged from 1 to 56 months (median 9.4 months). The median survival for the whole cohort was 13.8 months. The median survival for patients less than 60 years was 14.3 months and for patients 60 years or older was 12.3 months (P = 0.19). Among elderly patients, radical surgical resection (P = 0.002), concurrent delivery of chemoradiation (0.041) and radiotherapy dose ≥5400 cGy (P = 0.0001) conferred statistically significant improvements in overall survival. Management of GBM in elderly patients should include maximal surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and temozolomide whenever medically feasible. Outcomes comparable to those obtained in younger age groups can be expected. Our results indicate that concurrent chemoradiation is superior to sequential chemoradiation in these patients.

  1. Patterns of failure for glioblastoma multiforme following concurrent radiation and temozolomide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobelbower, Michael C.; Burnett, Omer L. III; Haytt, Mark D.; Fiveash, John B.; Nordal, Robert A.; Nabors, Louis B.; Markert, James M.

    2011-01-01

    To analyse patterns of failure in patients with glioblastoma multiforme treated with concurrent radiation and temozolomide. A retrospective review of patients treated with concurrent radiation and temozolomide was performed. Twenty patients treated at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, with biopsy-proven disease, documented disease progression after treatment, and adequate radiation dosimetry and imaging records were included in the study. Patients generally received 46 Gy to the primary tumour and surrounding oedema plus 1 cm, and 60 Gy to the enhancing tumour plus 1 cm. MRIs documenting failure after therapy were fused to the original treatment plans. Contours of post-treatment tumour volumes were generated from MRIs showing tumour failure and were overlaid onto the original isodose curves. The recurrent tumours were classified as in-field, marginal or regional. Recurrences were also evaluated for distant failure. Of the 20 documented failures, all patients had some component of failure at the primary site. Eighteen patients (90%) failed in-field, 2 patients (10%) had marginal failures, and no regional failures occurred. Four patients (20%) had a component of distant failure in which an independent satellite lesion was located completely outside of the 95% isodose curve. Radiation concurrent with temozolomide appears to be associated with a moderate risk of distant brain failure in addition to the high rate of local failure. The risk of distant failure was consistent with that observed with radiation alone, suggesting that temozolomide does not act to reduce distant brain failure but to improve local control.

  2. In silico studies on marine actinomycetes as potential inhibitors for Glioblastoma multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirubakaran, Palani; Kothapalli, Roopa; Singh, Kh Dhanachandra; Nagamani, Selvaraman; Arjunan, Subramanian; Muthusamy, Karthikeyan

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is considered to be the most common and often deadly disorder which affects the brain. It is caused by the over expression of proteins such as ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and EGFRvIII. These 3 proteins are considered to be the potential therapeutic targets for GBM. Among these, EphA2 is reported to be over-expressed in ˜90% of GBM. Herein we selected 35 compounds from marine actinomycetes, 5 in vitro and in vivo studied drug candidates and 4 commercially available drugs for GBM which were identified from literature and analysed by using comparative docking studies. Based on the glide scores and other in silico parameters available in Schrödinger, two selected marine actinomycetes compounds which include Tetracenomycin D and Chartreusin exhibited better binding energy among all the compounds studied in comparative docking. In this study we have demonstrated the inhibition of the 3 selected targets by the two bioactive compounds from marine actinomycetes through in-silico docking studies. Furthermore molecular dynamics simulation were also been performed to check the stability and the amino acids interacted with the 3 molecular targets (EphA2 receptor, EGFR, EGFRvIII) for GBM. Our results suggest that Tetracinomycin D and Chartreusin are the novel and potential inhibitor for the treatment of GBM. PMID:21584184

  3. Tumor-associated macrophages in glioblastoma multiforme-a suitable target for somatostatin receptor-based imaging and therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Lapa

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM have been shown to promote malignant growth and to correlate with poor prognosis. [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-NN',N″,N'″-tetraacetic acid]-d-Phe1,Tyr3-octreotate (DOTATATE labeled with Gallium-68 selectively binds to somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A which is specifically expressed and up-regulated in activated macrophages. On the other hand, the role of SSTR2A expression on the cell surface of glioma cells has not been fully elucidated yet. The aim of this study was to non-invasively assess SSTR2A expression of both glioma cells as well as macrophages in GBM.15 samples of patient-derived GBM were stained immunohistochemically for macrophage infiltration (CD68, proliferative activity (Ki67 as well as expression of SSTR2A. Anti-CD45 staining was performed to distinguish between resident microglia and tumor-infiltrating macrophages. In a subcohort, positron emission tomography (PET imaging using 68Ga-DOTATATE was performed and the semiquantitatively evaluated tracer uptake was compared to the results of immunohistochemistry.The amount of microglia/macrophages ranged from 50% in the tumor samples with the vast majority being resident microglial cells. A strong SSTR2A immunostaining was observed in endothelial cells of proliferating vessels, in neurons and neuropile. Only faint immunostaining was identified on isolated microglial and tumor cells. Somatostatin receptor imaging revealed areas of increased tracer accumulation in every patient. However, retention of the tracer did not correlate with immunohistochemical staining patterns.SSTR2A seems not to be overexpressed in GBM samples tested, neither on the cell surface of resident microglia or infiltrating macrophages, nor on the surface of tumor cells. These data suggest that somatostatin receptor directed imaging and treatment strategies are less promising in GBM.

  4. ATM and p53 combined analysis predicts survival in glioblastoma multiforme patients: A clinicopathologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Francesco Jacopo; Guadagno, Elia; Solari, Domenico; Borrelli, Giorgio; Pignatiello, Sara; Cappabianca, Paolo; Del Basso De Caro, Marialaura

    2018-06-01

    Glioblastoma is one of the most malignant cancers, with a distinguishing dismal prognosis: surgery followed by chemo- and radiotherapy represents the current standard of care, and chemo- and radioresistance underlie disease recurrence and short overall survival of patients suffering from this malignancy. ATM is a kinase activated by autophosphorylation upon DNA doublestrand breaks arising from errors during replication, byproducts of metabolism, chemotherapy or ionizing radiations; TP53 is one of the most popular tumor suppressor, with a preeminent role in DNA damage response and repair. To study the effects of the immunohistochemical expression of p-ATM and p53 in glioblastoma patients, 21 cases were retrospectively examined. In normal brain tissue, p-ATM was expressed only in neurons; conversely, in tumors cells, the protein showed a variable cytoplasmic expression (score: +,++,+++), with being completely undetectable in three cases. Statistical analysis revealed that high p-ATM score (++/+++) strongly correlated to shorter survival (P = 0.022). No difference in overall survival was registered between p53 normally expressed (NE) and overexpressed (OE) glioblastoma patients (P = 0.669). Survival analysis performed on the results from combined assessment of the two proteins showed that patients with NE p53 /low pATM score had longer overall survival than the NE p53/ high pATM score counterpart. Cox-regression analysis confirmed this finding (HR = 0.025; CI 95% = 0.002-0.284; P = 0.003). Our study outlined the immunohistochemical expression of p-ATM/p53 in glioblastomas and provided data on their possible prognostic/predictive of response role. A "non-oncogene addiction" to ATM for NEp53 glioblastoma could be postulated, strengthening the rationale for development of ATM inhibiting drugs. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Results of the Phase I Dose-Escalating Study of Motexafin Gadolinium With Standard Radiotherapy in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Judith M.; Seiferheld, Wendy; Alger, Jeffrey R.; Wu, Genevieve; Endicott, Thyra J.; Mehta, Minesh; Curran, Walter; Phan, See-Chun

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is a putative radiation enhancer initially evaluated in patients with brain metastases. This Phase I trial studied the safety and tolerability of a 2-6-week course (10-22 doses) of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 glioblastoma multiforme patients received one of seven MGd regimens starting at 10 doses of 4 mg/kg/d MGd and escalating to 22 doses of 5.3 mg/kg/d MGd (5 or 10 daily doses then three times per week). The National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program toxicity and stopping rules were applied. Results: The maximal tolerated dose was 5.0 mg/kg/d MGd (5 d/wk for 2 weeks, then three times per week) for 22 doses. The dose-limiting toxicity was reversible transaminase elevation. Adverse reactions included rash/pruritus (45%), chills/fever (30%), and self-limiting vesiculobullous rash of the thumb and fingers (42%). The median survival of 17.6 months prompted a case-matched analysis. In the case-matched analysis, the MGd patients had a median survival of 16.1 months (n = 31) compared with the matched Radiation Therapy Oncology Group database patients with a median survival of 11.8 months (hazard ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.94). Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme in this study was 5 mg/kg/d for 22 doses (daily for 2 weeks, then three times weekly). The baseline survival calculations suggest progression to Phase II trials is appropriate, with the addition of MGd to radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide

  6. Intraoperative MRI to guide the resection of primary supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme - a quantitative radiological analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Jens P.; Rubach, Matthias; Schulz, Thomas; Dietrich, Juergen; Zimmer, Claus; Kahn, Thomas [University of Leipzig, Diagnostic Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Trantakis, Christos; Winkler, Dirk; Renner, Christof [University of Leipzig, Department of Neurosurgery, Leipzig (Germany); Schober, Ralf; Geiger, Kathrin [University of Leipzig, Department of Neuropathology, Leipzig (Germany); Brosteanu, Oana [Coordination Centre for Clinical Trials, Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    primary glioblastoma multiforme under intraoperative MR guidance as demonstrated is a possibility to achieve a more complete removal of the tumor than with conventional techniques. In our small but homogeneous patient group we found an increase in the median survival time in patients with MRI for complete tumor resection, and the overall surgical morbidity was low. (orig.)

  7. Myelin structure is a key difference in the x-ray scattering signature between meningioma, schwannoma and glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falzon, G; Pearson, S; Murison, R; Hall, C; Siu, K; Round, A; Schueltke, E; Kaye, A H; Lewis, R

    2007-01-01

    Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns of benign and malignant brain tumour tissue were examined. Independent component analysis was used to find a feature set representing the images collected. A set of coefficients was then used to describe each image, which allowed the use of the statistical technique of flexible discriminant analysis to discover a hidden order in the data set. The key difference was found to be in the intensity and spectral content of the second and fourth order myelin scattering peaks. This has clearly demonstrated that significant differences in the structure of myelin exist in the highly malignant glioblastoma multiforme as opposed to the benign: meningioma and schwannoma

  8. Prospective evaluation of angiogenic, hypoxic and EGFR-related biomarkers in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme treated with cetuximab, bevacizumab and irinotecan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Benedikte; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Broholm, Helle

    2010-01-01

    , hypoxia and mediators of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway were investigated. Tumor tissue was obtained from a previous phase II study, treating recurrent primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients with the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab in combination with bevacizumab and irinotecan....... Of the 37 patients with available tumor tissue, 29 were evaluable for response. We concurrently performed immunohistochemical stainings on tumor tissue from 21 GBM patients treated with bevacizumab and irinotecan. We found a tendency of correlation between the hypoxia-related markers, indicating...

  9. Treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme with carmustine, cisplatin and etoposide followed by radiotherapy. A phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Kristjansen, P E; Wagner, A

    1999-01-01

    fractions. Twenty-nine patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), mean age 50 (27-66) and performance status (PS) 0-2 were included. Using the Macdonald criteria 33% had partial remission (PR), 41% stable disease (SD) and 26% progressive disease (PD) after chemotherapy. After additional...... (6.0-9.1) and median survival was 11.4 months (10.1-12.7). We conclude that this regimen is effective and feasible in patients with GBM. The short course pre-irradiatory chemotherapy may be less cumbersome than adjuvant chemotherapy and the regimen may be even more active in grade III gliomas....

  10. Transgenic nude mouse with green fluorescent protein expression-based human glioblastoma multiforme animal model with EGFR expression and invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Guo-Wei; Lan, Fo-Lin; Gao, Jian-Guo; Jiang, Cai-Mou; Zhang, Yi; Huang, Xiao-Hong; Ma, Yue-Hong; Shao, He-Dui; He, Xue-Yang; Chen, Jin-Long; Long, Jian-Wu; Xiao, Hui-Sheng; Guo, Zhi-Tong; Diao, Yi

    2012-08-01

    Previously, we developed an orthotopic xenograft model of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with high EGFR expression and invasiveness in Balb/c nu/nu nude mice. Now we also developed the same orthotopic xenograft model in transgenic nude mice with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression. The present orthotopic xenografts labeled by phycoerythrin fluorescing red showed high EGFR expression profile, and invasive behavior under a bright green-red dual-color fluorescence background. A striking advantage in the present human GBM model is that the change of tumor growth can be observed visually instead of sacrificing animals in our further antitumor therapy studies.

  11. Neoadjuvant bevacizumab and irinotecan versus bevacizumab and temozolomide followed by concomitant chemoradiotherapy in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofland, Kenneth F; Hansen, Steinbjørn; Sorensen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surgery followed by radiotherapy and concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide is standard therapy in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Bevacizumab combined with irinotecan produces impressive response rates in recurrent GBM. In a randomized phase II study, we investigated...... from febrile neutropenia whereas non-hematological toxicity was manageable. CONCLUSIONS: Only the Bev-Tem arm met the pre-specified level of activity of interest. Our results did not indicate any benefit from Bev-Iri in first-line therapy as opposed to Bev-Tem in terms of response and PFS....

  12. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma multiforme using the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capala, J.; Diaz, A.Z.; Chadha, M.

    1997-01-01

    The abstract describes evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for two groups of glioblastoma multiforme patients. From September 1994 to February 1996 15 patients have been treated. In September 1997 another 34 patients were examined. Authors determined a safe starting dose for BNCT using epithermal neutrons and BPA-F. They have also evaluated adverse effects of BNCT at this starting dose. Therapeutic effectiveness of this starting dose has been evaluated. No significant side effects from BPA-F infusion or BNCT treatment were observed in normal brains

  13. Prospective study evaluating the radiosensitizing effect of reduced doses of temozolomide in the treatment of Egyptian patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaber M

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available May Gaber, Hanan Selim, Tamer El-NahasDepartment of Clinical Oncology, Cairo University, Cairo, EgyptPurpose: In view of the documented toxicity of continuous daily radiosensitizer doses of temozolomide concomitant with radiation in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme, we aimed to compare it with a different schedule of abbreviated radiosensitizer dosing.Patients and methods: This was a randomized prospective study comparing toxicity and survival in 60 Egyptian patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Patients in arm I received temozolomide at a dose of 75 mg/m2 daily with radiotherapy for 42 days, starting 4 weeks after surgery and reaching to a total radiation dose of 60 Gy/30 Fractions/6 weeks, while patients in arm II received temozolomide at a dose of 75 mg/m2 concomitantly with the same radiotherapy schedule daily in the first and last weeks of the same radiotherapy program.Results: Common grade 1–2 adverse events were malaise in 28 patients (46.7%, followed by alopecia (40% and nausea (26.7%. Grade 3–4 convulsion and decreased level of consciousness was seen in only four patients who were all from arm I. The median progression-free survival (PFS for the entire study population was 10.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.3–14, and PFS at 12 months was 32%. The median PFS in arm I was 8.8 months (95% CI 5.9–11.7 and in arm II 11.5 months (95% CI 8.9–14.2, and PFS at 12 months for both arms was 32% and 30% respectively (P=0.571. The median overall survival (OS of the whole group of patients was 14.2 months (95% CI 13–15.5, and OS was 70% at 12 months and 25% at 18 months. The median OS for patients in arm I was 12.3 months (95% CI 7.7–16.9, whereas in arm II it was 14.3 months (95% CI 14–14.7 (P=0.83.Conclusion: Reduced radiosensitizer dosing of temozolomide concomitant with radiotherapy in glioblastoma multiforme exhibited comparable efficacy with a classic continuous daily schedule, though with better tolerability

  14. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma multiforme using the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capala, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Diaz, A.Z.; Chadha, M. [Univ. Hospital, State Univ. of New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31

    The abstract describes evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for two groups of glioblastoma multiforme patients. From September 1994 to February 1996 15 patients have been treated. In September 1997 another 34 patients were examined. Authors determined a safe starting dose for BNCT using epithermal neutrons and BPA-F. They have also evaluated adverse effects of BNCT at this starting dose. Therapeutic effectiveness of this starting dose has been evaluated. No significant side effects from BPA-F infusion or BNCT treatment were observed in normal brains.

  15. Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic Acid-Modified Lipid-Polymer Hybrid Nanoparticles for Docetaxel Delivery in Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kairong; Zhou, Jin; Zhang, Qianyu; Gao, Huile; Liu, Yayuan; Zong, Taili; He, Qin

    2015-03-01

    Hybrid nanoparticles consisting of lipids and the biodegradable polymer, poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), were developed for the targeted delivery of the anticancer drug, docetaxel. Transmission electron microscopic observations confirmed the presence of a lipid coating over the polymeric core. Using coumarin-6 as a fluorescent probe, the uptake efficacy of RGD conjugated lipid coated nanoparticles (RGD-L-P) by C6 cells was increased significantly, compared with that of lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (L-P; 2.5-fold higher) or PLGA-nanoparticles (PLGA-P; 1.76-fold higher). The superior tumor spheroid penetration of RGD-L-P indicated that RGD-L-P could target effectively and specifically to C6 cells overexpressing integrin α(v)β3. The anti-proliferative activity of docetaxel-loaded RGD-L-P against C6 cells was increased 2.69- and 4.13-fold compared with L-P and PLGA-P, respectively. Regarding biodistribution, the strongest brain-localized fluorescence signals were detected in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)-bearing rats treated with 1,10-Dioctadecyl-3,3,30,30-tetramethylindotricarb-ocyanine iodide (DiR)-loaded RGD-L-P, compared to rats treated with DiR-loaded L-P or PLGA-P. The median survival time of GBM-bearing rats treated with docetaxel-loaded RGD-L-P was 57 days, a fold increase of 1.43, 1.78, 3.35, and 3.56 compared with animals given L-P (P PLGA-P (P < 0.05), Taxotere (P < 0.01) and saline (P < 0.01), respectively. Collectively, these results support RGD-L-P as a promising drug delivery system for the specific targeting and the treatment of GBM.

  16. The prognostic significance of midline shift at presentation on survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamburg, Eugene S.; Regine, William F.; Patchell, Roy A.; Strottmann, James M.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Young, A. Byron

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: While patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who present with midline shift have a presumably worse prognosis, there is little literature evaluating the prognostic significance of this presentation in multivariate analysis in the context of other known prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: From March 1981 to September 1993, 219 patients underwent irradiation for intracranial glioma at our institution. One hundred fourteen patients with a diagnosis of a primary GBM were analyzed for the influence of the presence of midline shift at diagnosis on survival with respect to other known prognostic factors, including age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), and extent of surgery. Eighty-five patients (74%) presented with midline shift. Surgical treatment consisted of subtotal/total resection in 86 patients (75%). Among patients presenting with midline shift, 68 (80%) underwent subtotal/total resection before irradiation. Results: Multivariate analysis of the entire cohort of patients found none of the potential prognostic factors analyzed to significantly influence survival. The overall median survival was 6 months. However, when multivariate analysis was limited to patients with a KPS of ≥ 70, only the presence of midline shift and age were found to significantly influence survival. Patients with a KPS ≥ 70 and with midline shift present at diagnosis had a median survival of 8 months, as compared to 14 months for those not having midline shift at presentation (p = 0.04). Patients with a KPS ≥ 70 and age > 50 years had a median survival of 5 months as compared to 11 months for those ≤ 50 (p 0.02). Conclusion: In this series, where 80% of patients who presented with a midline shift underwent decompressive resection of GBM before irradiation, the presence of midline shift at diagnosis remained an independent prognostic factor influencing survival among good performance status patients. While the role of decompressive surgery in this setting is

  17. Phase I trial of verubulin (MPC-6827) plus carboplatin in patients with relapsed glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Kenneth F; Colman, Howard; Akerley, Wallace A; Glantz, Michael; Matsuoko, Yuko; Beelen, Andrew P; Yu, Margaret; De Groot, John F; Aiken, Robert D; Olson, Jeffrey J; Olsen, Jeffery J; Evans, Brent A; Jensen, Randy L

    2012-11-01

    Verubulin (MPC-6827) is a microtubule-destabilizing agent that achieves high concentrations in the brain. Verubulin disrupts newly formed blood vessels in xenografts. We determined the safety and tolerability of verubulin administered in combination with carboplatin in patients with relapsed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Three pre-selected doses of verubulin were tested: 2.1, 2.7, and 3.3 mg/m(2) in a standard "3+3" design. Verubulin was given every second week of a 6-week cycle in the 2.1 mg/m(2) cohort or weekly for 3 weeks of a 4-week cycle in subsequent cohorts. Carboplatin was administered intravenously at an area under the curve (AUC) dosage 4 every 2 weeks for the 2.1 mg/m(2) cohort or on day 1 of each 4-week cycle in subsequent cohorts. Nineteen patients with GBM in first or second relapse were enrolled. Four patients (21 %) experienced a grade 3 or greater verubulin- or carboplatin-related adverse event, including hypesthesia, cerebral ischemia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. The mean plasma half life of verubulin was 3.2 h (SD = 0.82). Two patients achieved at least a partial response by Macdonald criteria. One of these patients remains progression free and off treatment more than 24 months beyond his initiation of verubulin. Five patients had stable disease. Median progression-free survival (PFS) across all patients was 8 weeks, and the 6-month PFS rate was 21 %. The combination of verubulin at the previously determined single-agent maximum tolerated dose of 3.3 mg/m(2) with carboplatin in patients with recurrent/refractory GBM is safe and well tolerated. In this patient population with a highly vascularized tumor, no cerebral hemorrhage was observed.

  18. Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation for Glioblastoma Multiforme in the Era of Temozolomide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badiyan, Shahed N.; Markovina, Stephanie; Simpson, Joseph R.; Robinson, Clifford G.; DeWees, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Tran, David D.; Linette, Gerry [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Jalalizadeh, Rohan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Dacey, Ralph; Rich, Keith M.; Chicoine, Michael R.; Dowling, Joshua L.; Leuthardt, Eric C.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Kim, Albert H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Huang, Jiayi, E-mail: jhuang@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To review clinical outcomes of moderate dose escalation using high-dose radiation therapy (HDRT) in the setting of concurrent temozolomide (TMZ) in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), compared with standard-dose radiation therapy (SDRT). Methods and Materials: Adult patients aged <70 years with biopsy-proven GBM were treated with SDRT (60 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction) or with HDRT (>60 Gy) and TMZ from 2000 to 2012. Biological equivalent dose at 2-Gy fractions was calculated for the HDRT assuming an α/β ratio of 5.6 for GBM. Results: Eighty-one patients received SDRT, and 128 patients received HDRT with a median (range) biological equivalent dose at 2-Gy fractions of 64 Gy (61-76 Gy). Overall median follow-up time was 1.10 years, and for living patients it was 2.97 years. Actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates for patients that received HDRT versus SDRT were 12.4% versus 13.2% (P=.71), and 5.6% versus 4.1% (P=.54), respectively. Age (P=.001) and gross total/near-total resection (GTR/NTR) (P=.001) were significantly associated with PFS on multivariate analysis. Younger age (P<.0001), GTR/NTR (P<.0001), and Karnofsky performance status ≥80 (P=.001) were associated with improved OS. On subset analyses, HDRT failed to improve PFS or OS for those aged <50 years or those who had GTR/NTR. Conclusion: Moderate radiation therapy dose escalation above 60 Gy with concurrent TMZ does not seem to improve clinical outcomes for patients with GBM.

  19. 23Na-MRI of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme after intraoperative radiotherapy: technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haneder, Stefan; Buesing, Karen A.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Ong, Melissa M.; Giordano, Frank A.; Wenz, Frederik; Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R.; Brehmer, Stefanie; Schmiedek, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of an intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a patient with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who was followed up with a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method - 23 Na-MRI - in comparison to a standard contrast-enhanced 1 H-MRI and 18 F-FET-PET. A 56-year-old female patient with diagnosed GBM in July 2012 underwent tumor resection, radiochemotherapy, and three cycles of chemotherapy. After a relapse, 6 months after the initial diagnosis, an IORT was recommended which was performed in March 2013 using the INTRABEAM system (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Germany) with a 3-cm applicator and a surface dose of 20 Gy. Early post-operative contrast-enhanced and 1-month follow-up 1 H-MRI and a 18 F-FET-PET were performed. In addition, an IRB-approved 23 Na-MRI was performed on a 3.0-T MR scanner (MAGNETOM TimTrio, Siemens Healthcare, Germany). After re-surgery and IORT in March 2013, only a faint contrast enhancement but considerable surrounding edema was visible at the medio-posterior resection margins. In April 2013, new and progressive contrast enhancement, edema, 23 Na content, and increased uptake in the 18 F-FET-PET were visible, indicating tumor recurrence. Increased sodium content within the area of contrast enhancement was found in the 23 Na-MRI, but also exceeding this area, very similar to the increased uptake depicted in the 18 F-FET-PET. The clearly delineable zone of edema in both examinations exhibits a lower 23 Na content compared to areas with suspected proliferating tumor tissue. 23 Na-MRI provided similar information in the suspicious area compared to 18 F-FET-PET, exceeding conventional 1 H-MRI. Still, 23 Na-MRI remains an investigational technique, which is worth to be further evaluated. (orig.)

  20. Phase I/II Trial of Hyperfractionated Concomitant Boost Proton Radiotherapy for Supratentorial Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Masashi; Tsuboi, Koji; Igaki, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Takano, Shingo; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Yasutaka; Hashii, Haruko; Kanemoto, Ayae; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Sugahara, Shinji; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Matsumura, Akira; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of postoperative hyperfractionated concomitant boost proton radiotherapy with nimustine hydrochloride for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with histologically confirmed supratentorial GBM met the following criteria: (1) a Karnofsky performance status of ≥60; (2) the diameter of the enhanced area before radiotherapy was ≤40 cm; and (3) the enhanced area did not extend to the brain stem, hypothalamus, or thalamus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T 2 -weighted high area (clinical tumor volume 3 [CTV3]) was treated by x-ray radiotherapy in the morning (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). More than 6 hours later, 250 MeV proton beams were delivered to the enhanced area plus a 10-mm margin (CTV2) in the first half of the protocol (23.1 GyE in 14 fractions) and to the enhanced volume (CTV1) in the latter half (23.1 GyE in 14 fraction). The total dose to the CTV1 was 96.6 GyE. Nimustine hydrochloride (80 mg/m2) was administered during the first and fourth weeks. Results: Acute toxicity was mainly hematologic and was controllable. Late radiation necrosis and leukoencephalopathy were each seen in one patient. The overall survival rates after 1 and 2 years were 71.1% and 45.3%, respectively. The median survival period was 21.6 months. The 1- and 2-year progression-free survival rates were 45.0% and 15.5%, respectively. The median MRI change-free survival was 11.2 months. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated concomitant boost proton radiotherapy (96.6 GyE in 56 fractions) for GBM was tolerable and beneficial if the target size was well considered. Further studies are warranted to pursue the possibility of controlling border region recurrences.

  1. Differential Expression of Circular RNAs in Glioblastoma Multiforme and Its Correlation with Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junle Zhu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to explore the expression profiles of circular RNAs (circRNAs in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM in an attempt to identify potential core genes in the pathogenesis of this tumor. METHODS: Differentially expressed circRNAs were screened between tumor tissues from five GBM patients and five normal brain samples using Illumina Hiseq. Bioinformatics analysis was used to analyze their potential function. CircBRAF was further detected in different WHO grades glioma tissues and normal brain tissues. Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariate Cox's analysis were used to analyze the association between circBRAF expression level and prognosis of glioma patients. RESULTS: A total of 1411 differentially expressed circRNAs were identified in GBM patients including 206 upregulated circRNAs and 1205 downregulated circRNAs. Differential expression of circRNAs was closely associated with the biological process and molecular function. The downregulated circRNAs were mainly associated with ErbB and Neurotrophin signaling pathways. Moreover, the expression level of circBRAF in normal brain tissues was significantly higher than that in glioma tissues (P < .001. CircBRAF was significantly lower in glioma patients with high pathological grade (WHO III & IV than those with low grade (WHO I & II (P < .001. Cox analysis revealed that high circBRAF expression was an independent biomarker for predicting good progression-free survival and overall survival in glioma patients (HR = 0.413, 95% CI 0.201-0.849; HR = 0.299, 95% CI 0.135-0.661; respectively. CONCLUSION: The present study identified a profile of dysregulated circRNAs in GBM. Bioinformatics analysis showed that dysregulated circRNAs might be associated with tumorigenesis and development of GBM. In addition, circBRAF could severe as a biomarker for predicting pathological grade and prognosis in glioma patients.

  2. The addition of temozolomide does not change the pattern of progression glioblastoma multiforme post-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunjur, Ashray; Bressel, Mathias; Ryan, Gail

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the pattern of progressive disease (PD) for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients has changed with the introduction of the current standard of care protocol – postoperative conformal radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gray in 30 fractions with concurrent low-dose (75–100 mg/m 2 ) temozolomide, followed by six cycles of adjuvant high-dose (150–200 mg/m 2 ) temozolomide – as compared with radiotherapy alone. For GBM patients commencing combined modality treatment between October 2005 and August 2009, the MRI scan confirming progression (if any) was co-registered with the original planning CT scan, and progression site(s) marked. Coverage of the composite progression volume (PDvol) by the original 95% prescription isodose volume was obtained from dose-volume histogram (DVH) data, and assigned as ‘central’, ‘in field’, ‘marginal’ and ‘out of field’, corresponding to >95%, >80%, 20–80% and <20% coverage. Of 68 consecutive patients identified, 54 (79.4%) had documented PD. Of the 47 (87%) evaluable patients, 43 (91%) had in field progression with 36 (77%) of these being central. Of the remaining four cases, three (6%) had marginal progression, and only one patient (2%) had out of field progression. Median overall and progression-free survival were 11.6 and 6.6 months, respectively. The pattern of progression in our GBM patients does not appear to have been altered by the addition of temozolomide. The overwhelming majority of first PD occurred within the original radiotherapy planning target volume, as is the case in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. Major changes to radiotherapy volumes are not indicated, with alternative strategies required to improve outcomes.

  3. Quality of radiomic features in glioblastoma multiforme: Impact of semi-automated tumor segmentation software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Eun; Kim, Jong Hyo; Woo, Bo Yeong; Ko, Micheal D.; Jamshidi, Neema

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and quality of radiomic features in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) derived from tumor volumes obtained with semi-automated tumor segmentation software. MR images of 45 GBM patients (29 males, 16 females) were downloaded from The Cancer Imaging Archive, in which post-contrast T1-weighted imaging and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR sequences were used. Two raters independently segmented the tumors using two semi-automated segmentation tools (TumorPrism3D and 3D Slicer). Regions of interest corresponding to contrast-enhancing lesion, necrotic portions, and non-enhancing T2 high signal intensity component were segmented for each tumor. A total of 180 imaging features were extracted, and their quality was evaluated in terms of stability, normalized dynamic range (NDR), and redundancy, using intra-class correlation coefficients, cluster consensus, and Rand Statistic. Our study results showed that most of the radiomic features in GBM were highly stable. Over 90% of 180 features showed good stability (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] ≥ 0.8), whereas only 7 features were of poor stability (ICC NDR ≥1), while above 35% of the texture features showed poor NDR (< 1). Features were shown to cluster into only 5 groups, indicating that they were highly redundant. The use of semi-automated software tools provided sufficiently reliable tumor segmentation and feature stability; thus helping to overcome the inherent inter-rater and intra-rater variability of user intervention. However, certain aspects of feature quality, including NDR and redundancy, need to be assessed for determination of representative signature features before further development of radiomics

  4. Prognostic value of the Glasgow Prognostic Score for glioblastoma multiforme patients treated with radiotherapy and temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topkan, Erkan; Selek, Ugur; Ozdemir, Yurday; Yildirim, Berna A; Guler, Ozan C; Ciner, Fuat; Mertsoylu, Huseyin; Tufan, Kadir

    2018-04-25

    To evaluate the prognostic value of the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), the combination of C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin, in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and concurrent plus adjuvant temozolomide (GPS). Data of newly diagnosed GBM patients treated with partial brain RT and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were grouped into three according to the GPS criteria: GPS-0: CRP L and albumin > 35 g/L; GPS-1: CRP L and albumin L or CRP > 10 mg/L and albumin > 35 g/L; and GPS-2: CRP > 10 mg/L and albumin L. Primary end-point was the association between the GPS groups and the overall survival (OS) outcomes. A total of 142 patients were analyzed (median age: 58 years, 66.2% male). There were 64 (45.1%), 40 (28.2%), and 38 (26.7%) patients in GPS-0, GPS-1, and GPS-2 groups, respectively. At median 15.7 months follow-up, the respective median and 5-year OS rates for the whole cohort were 16.2 months (95% CI 12.7-19.7) and 9.5%. In multivariate analyses GPS grouping emerged independently associated with the median OS (P GPS grouping and the RTOG RPA classification were found to be strongly correlated in prognostic stratification of GBM patients (correlation coefficient: 0.42; P GPS appeared to be useful in prognostic stratification of GBM patients into three groups with significantly different survival durations resembling the RTOG RPA classification.

  5. SU-F-T-392: Superior Brainstem and Cochlea Sparing with VMAT for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briere, TM; McAleer, MF; Levy, LB; Yang, JN; Anderson, MD [Cancer Ctr., Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) can provide similar target coverage and normal tissue sparing as IMRT but with shorter treatment times. At our institution VMAT was adopted for the treatment glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) after a small number of test plans demonstrated its non-inferiority. In this study, we compare actual clinical treatment plans for a larger cohort of patients treated with either VMAT or IMRT. Methods: 90 GBM patients were included in this study, 45 treated with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. All planning target volumes (PTVs) were prescribed a dose of 50 Gy, with a simultaneous integrated boost to 60 Gy. Most IMRT plans used 5 non-coplanar beams, while most VMAT plans used 2 coplanar beams. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher’s exact test or the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney rank sum test. Included in the analysis were patient and treatment characteristics as well as the doses to the target volumes and organs at risk. Results: Treatment times for the VMAT plans were reduced by 5 minutes compared with IMRT. The PTV coverage was similar, with at least 95% covered for all plans, while the median boost PTV dose differed by 0.1 Gy between the IMRT and VMAT cohorts. The doses to the brain, optic chiasm, optic nerves and eyes were not significantly different. The mean dose to the brainstem, however, was 9.4 Gy less with VMAT (p<0.001). The dose to the ipsilateral and contralateral cochleae were respectively 19.7 and 9.5 Gy less (p<0.001). Conclusion: Comparison of clinical treatment plans for separate IMRT and VMAT cohorts demonstrates that VMAT can save substantial treatment time while providing similar target coverage and superior sparing of the brainstem and cochleae. To our knowledge this is the first study to demonstrate this benefit of VMAT in the management of GBM.

  6. Glioblastoma multiforme in Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Tevfik; Cikla, Ulas; Kirst, Alice; Baskaya, Mustafa K

    2015-04-17

    Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome (KTWS) is a rare syndrome in which patients usually present with cutaneous hemangiomas, venous varicosities, and bone and soft tissue hypertrophy of the affected limb. Intracranial lesions in patients with KTWS are extremely rare, and are generally reported as single cases in the literature. We describe a rare case, where a patient with KTWS was found with a hemorrhagic grade IV astrocytoma. Although central nervous system abnormalities such as intracranial aneurysms and cerebral and spinal cord cavernomas have been described in patients with KTWS, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an association between glioblastoma multiforme (grade IV astrocytoma) and KTWS in the English-language medical literature. A 61-year-old white Caucasian man with a history of KTWS presented with seizures. Left upper and lower extremity hypertrophy, left foot, leg and ear gigantism and left-sided abdominal capillary hemangiomas were noted in the physical examination. Cranial computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were obtained, showing a heterogeneous lesion in the cingulate gyrus, with peripheral and central areas of T1 hyperintensity and layering T2 hypointensity consistent with a hemorrhage. A right parasagittal frontal craniotomy was performed with an interhemispheric approach. We had difficulty controlling the bleeding with bipolar electrocautery during surgery and finally were able to stop the bleeding using surgicel and gelfoam. Postoperative cranial CT and MRI scans showed intraparenchymal hemorrhage centered within the medial right frontal lobe. There was no increase in hematoma size in consecutive CT scans. Co-occurrence of vascular abnormalities with KWTS should be taken into consideration to avoid perilous preoperative and postoperative complications.

  7. Quality of radiomic features in glioblastoma multiforme: Impact of semi-automated tumor segmentation software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myung Eun; Kim, Jong Hyo [Center for Medical-IT Convergence Technology Research, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Bo Yeong [Dept. of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Micheal D.; Jamshidi, Neema [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and quality of radiomic features in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) derived from tumor volumes obtained with semi-automated tumor segmentation software. MR images of 45 GBM patients (29 males, 16 females) were downloaded from The Cancer Imaging Archive, in which post-contrast T1-weighted imaging and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR sequences were used. Two raters independently segmented the tumors using two semi-automated segmentation tools (TumorPrism3D and 3D Slicer). Regions of interest corresponding to contrast-enhancing lesion, necrotic portions, and non-enhancing T2 high signal intensity component were segmented for each tumor. A total of 180 imaging features were extracted, and their quality was evaluated in terms of stability, normalized dynamic range (NDR), and redundancy, using intra-class correlation coefficients, cluster consensus, and Rand Statistic. Our study results showed that most of the radiomic features in GBM were highly stable. Over 90% of 180 features showed good stability (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] ≥ 0.8), whereas only 7 features were of poor stability (ICC < 0.5). Most first order statistics and morphometric features showed moderate-to-high NDR (4 > NDR ≥1), while above 35% of the texture features showed poor NDR (< 1). Features were shown to cluster into only 5 groups, indicating that they were highly redundant. The use of semi-automated software tools provided sufficiently reliable tumor segmentation and feature stability; thus helping to overcome the inherent inter-rater and intra-rater variability of user intervention. However, certain aspects of feature quality, including NDR and redundancy, need to be assessed for determination of representative signature features before further development of radiomics.

  8. Marital status, treatment, and survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme: a population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Susan M; Barker, Fred G

    2005-11-01

    Social factors influence cancer treatment choices, potentially affecting patient survival. In the current study, the authors studied the interrelations between marital status, treatment received, and survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GM), using population-based data. The data source was the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Public Use Database, 1988-2001, 2004 release, all registries. Multivariate logistic, ordinal, and Cox regression analyses adjusted for demographic and clinical variables were used. Of 10,987 patients with GM, 67% were married, 31% were unmarried, and 2% were of unknown marital status. Tumors were slightly larger at the time of diagnosis in unmarried patients (49% of unmarried patients had tumors larger than 45 mm vs. 45% of married patients; P = 0.004, multivariate analysis). Unmarried patients were less likely to undergo surgical resection (vs. biopsy; 75% of unmarried patients vs. 78% of married patients) and were less likely to receive postoperative radiation therapy (RT) (70% of unmarried patients vs. 79% of married patients). On multivariate analysis, the odds ratio (OR) for resection (vs. biopsy) in unmarried patients was 0.88 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.79-0.98; P = 0.02), and the OR for RT in unmarried patients was 0.69 (95% CI, 0.62-0.77; P Unmarried patients more often refused both surgical resection and RT. Unmarried patients who underwent surgical resection and RT were found to have a shorter survival than similarly treated married patients (hazard ratio for unmarried patients, 1.10; P = 0.003). Unmarried patients with GM presented with larger tumors, were less likely to undergo both surgical resection and postoperative RT, and had a shorter survival after diagnosis when compared with married patients, even after adjustment for treatment and other prognostic factors. (c) 2005 American Cancer Society.

  9. A Non-randomized Controlled Trial of EMDR on Affective Symptoms in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Szpringer

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a highly aggressive brain cancer and its survival after diagnosis is less than 2 years. Therefore, GBM patients are especially prone to co-occurring psychological conditions such as anxiety and depressive disorders. Furthermore, aggressive medical therapies affect patients’ lives, undermining their sense of meaning and coherence. The main aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR therapy on anxiety, depression and sense of coherence in patients with GBM. Thirty-seven GBM-diagnosed women were included in this trial and received standard medical care. Of those, 18 patients were treated during 4 months with 10–12 individual EMDR sessions (60–90 minutes each. Nineteen GBM patients were used as a non-randomized control group as they consented to psychological evaluations but not to a psychotherapeutic intervention. The groups were homogeneous in terms of gender, age, educational level and treatment, but not in anxiety and depressive levels at baseline. All patients were evaluated at baseline, after treatment (4 months and at follow-up (further 4 months by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-M and the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC-29. Caregivers in both groups were interviewed by the Patient Caregiver Questionnaire after 4 months follow-up. Statistical analyses were conducted using ANOVA statistics, correlation and regression analysis. Results showed a statistically significant decrease in the EMDR group in anxiety, depression and anger, when compared to the experimental group. EMDR therapy also had a positive impact upon the sense of coherence level in the experimental group, whereas in the control group this declined. Finally, the caregivers reported beneficial outcomes of the EMDR therapy with less anxiety- and anger-related behaviors in patients in the experimental group compared to the control group. This study is the first to show

  10. Live attenuated measles virus vaccine therapy for locally established malignant glioblastoma tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Shammari AM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed M Al-Shammari,1 Farah E Ismaeel,2 Shahlaa M Salih,2 Nahi Y Yaseen11Experimental Therapy Department, Iraqi Center for Cancer and Medical Genetic Researches, Mustansiriya University, 2Departments of Biotechnology, College of Science, Al-Nahrain University, Baghdad, IraqAbstract: Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in humans, with poor prognosis. A new glioblastoma cell line (ANGM5 was established from a cerebral glioblastoma multiforme in a 72-year-old Iraqi man who underwent surgery for an intracranial tumor. This study was carried out to evaluate the antitumor effect of live attenuated measles virus (MV Schwarz vaccine strain on glioblastoma multiforme tumor cell lines in vitro. Live attenuated MV Schwarz strain was propagated on Vero, human rhabdomyosarcoma, and human glioblastoma-multiform (ANGM5 cell lines. The infected confluent monolayer appeared to be covered with syncytia with granulation and vacuolation, as well as cell rounding, shrinkage, and large empty space with cell debris as a result of cell lysis and death. Cell lines infected with virus have the ability for hemadsorption to human red blood cells after 72 hours of infection, whereas no hemadsorption of uninfected cells is seen. Detection of MV hemagglutinin protein by monoclonal antibodies in infected cells of all cell lines by immunocytochemistry assay gave positive results (brown color in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Cell viability was measured after 72 hours of infection by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Results showed a significant cytotoxic effect for MV (P≤0.05 on growth of ANGM5 and rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines after 72 hours of infection. Induction of apoptosis by MV was assessed by measuring mitochondrial membrane potentials in tumor cells after 48, 72, and 120 hours of infection. Apoptotic cells were counted, and the mean percentage of dead cells was significantly higher after 48, 72

  11. Suppression of survivin expression in glioblastoma cells by the Ras inhibitor farnesylthiosalicylic acid promotes caspase-dependent apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Roy; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Rechavi, Gideon; Kloog, Yoel

    2006-09-01

    The Ras inhibitor farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS) has been shown to induce apoptosis in glioblastoma multiforme, but its mechanism of action was unknown. We show that FTS or dominant-negative Ras, by deregulating extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt signaling, decreases survivin gene transcripts in U87 glioblastoma multiforme, leading to disappearance of survivin protein and cell death. FTS affected both Ras-controlled regulators of survivin transcription and Ras-regulated survival signals. Thus, Ras inhibition by FTS resulted in release of the survivin "brake" on apoptosis and in activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway: dephosphorylation of Bad, activation of Bax, release of cytochrome c, and caspase activation. FTS-induced apoptosis of U87 cells was strongly attenuated by forced expression of survivin or by caspase inhibitors. These results show that resistance to apoptosis in glioblastoma multiforme can be abolished by a single Ras inhibitor, which targets both survivin, a critical inhibitor of apoptosis, and the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic machinery.

  12. The novel Hsp90 inhibitor NXD30001 induces tumor regression in a genetically engineered mouse model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haihao; Woolfenden, Steve; Bronson, Roderick T; Jaffer, Zahara M; Barluenga, Sofia; Winssinger, Nicolas; Rubenstein, Allan E; Chen, Ruihong; Charest, Al

    2010-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has an abysmal prognosis. We now know that the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway and the loss of function of the tumor suppressor genes p16Ink4a/p19ARF and PTEN play a crucial role in GBM pathogenesis: initiating the early stages of tumor development, sustaining tumor growth, promoting infiltration, and mediating resistance to therapy. We have recently shown that this genetic combination is sufficient to promote the development of GBM in adult mice. Therapeutic agents raised against single targets of the EGFR signaling pathway have proven rather inefficient in GBM therapy, showing the need for combinatorial therapeutic approaches. An effective strategy for concurrent disruption of multiple signaling pathways is via the inhibition of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). Hsp90 inhibition leads to the degradation of so-called client proteins, many of which are key effectors of GBM pathogenesis. NXD30001 is a novel second generation Hsp90 inhibitor that shows improved pharmacokinetic parameters. Here we show that NXD30001 is a potent inhibitor of GBM cell growth in vitro consistent with its capacity to inhibit several key targets and regulators of GBM biology. We also show the efficacy of NXD30001 in vivo in an EGFR-driven genetically engineered mouse model of GBM. Our findings establish that the Hsp90 inhibitor NXD30001 is a therapeutically multivalent molecule, whose actions strike GBM at the core of its drivers of tumorigenesis and represent a compelling rationale for its use in GBM treatment.

  13. An Update in the Use of Antibodies to Treat Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Y. Hernández-Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is a deadly brain disease and modest improvement in survival has been made. At initial diagnosis, treatment consists of maximum safe surgical resection, followed by temozolomide and chemoirradiation or adjuvant temozolomide alone. However, these treatments do not improve the prognosis and survival of patients. New treatment strategies are being sought according to the biology of tumors. The epidermal growth factor receptor has been considered as the hallmark in glioma tumors; thereby, some antibodies have been designed to bind to this receptor and block the downstream signaling pathways. Also, it is known that vascularization plays an important role in supplying new vessels to the tumor; therefore, new therapy has been guided to inhibit angiogenic growth factors in order to limit tumor growth. An innovative strategy in the treatment of glial tumors is the use of toxins produced by bacteria, which may be coupled to specific carrier-ligands and used for tumoral targeting. These carrier-ligands provide tumor-selective properties by the recognition of a cell-surface receptor on the tumor cells and promote their binding of the toxin-carrier complex prior to entry into the cell. Here, we reviewed some strategies to improve the management and treatment of glioblastoma and focused on the use of antibodies.

  14. {sup 23}Na-MRI of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme after intraoperative radiotherapy: technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haneder, Stefan; Buesing, Karen A.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Ong, Melissa M. [Heidelberg University, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Giordano, Frank A.; Wenz, Frederik [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg University, Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine, Mannheim (Germany); Brehmer, Stefanie; Schmiedek, Peter [Heidelberg University, Department of Neurosurgery, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    We report the first case of an intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a patient with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who was followed up with a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method - {sup 23}Na-MRI - in comparison to a standard contrast-enhanced {sup 1}H-MRI and {sup 18}F-FET-PET. A 56-year-old female patient with diagnosed GBM in July 2012 underwent tumor resection, radiochemotherapy, and three cycles of chemotherapy. After a relapse, 6 months after the initial diagnosis, an IORT was recommended which was performed in March 2013 using the INTRABEAM system (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Germany) with a 3-cm applicator and a surface dose of 20 Gy. Early post-operative contrast-enhanced and 1-month follow-up {sup 1}H-MRI and a {sup 18}F-FET-PET were performed. In addition, an IRB-approved {sup 23}Na-MRI was performed on a 3.0-T MR scanner (MAGNETOM TimTrio, Siemens Healthcare, Germany). After re-surgery and IORT in March 2013, only a faint contrast enhancement but considerable surrounding edema was visible at the medio-posterior resection margins. In April 2013, new and progressive contrast enhancement, edema, {sup 23}Na content, and increased uptake in the {sup 18}F-FET-PET were visible, indicating tumor recurrence. Increased sodium content within the area of contrast enhancement was found in the {sup 23}Na-MRI, but also exceeding this area, very similar to the increased uptake depicted in the {sup 18}F-FET-PET. The clearly delineable zone of edema in both examinations exhibits a lower {sup 23}Na content compared to areas with suspected proliferating tumor tissue. {sup 23}Na-MRI provided similar information in the suspicious area compared to {sup 18}F-FET-PET, exceeding conventional {sup 1}H-MRI. Still, {sup 23}Na-MRI remains an investigational technique, which is worth to be further evaluated. (orig.)

  15. Feasibility of extreme dose escalation for glioblastoma multiforme using 4π radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Dan; Rwigema, Jean-Claude M; Yu, Victoria Y; Kaprealian, Tania; Kupelian, Patrick; Selch, Michael; Lee, Percy; Low, Daniel A; Sheng, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) frequently recurs at the same location after radiotherapy. Further dose escalation using conventional methods is limited by normal tissue tolerance. 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy has recently emerged as a new potential method to deliver highly conformal radiation dose using the C-arm linacs. We aim to study the feasibility of very substantial GBM dose escalation while maintaining normal tissue tolerance using 4π. 11 GBM patients previously treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT/RapidArc) on the NovalisTx™ platform to a prescription dose of either 59.4 Gy or 60 Gy were included. All patients were replanned with 30 non-coplanar beams using a 4π radiotherapy platform, which inverse optimizes both beam angles and fluence maps. Four different prescriptions were used including original prescription dose and PTV (4πPTV PD ), 100 Gy to the PTV and GTV (4πPTV 100Gy ), 100 Gy to the GTV only while maintaining prescription dose to the rest of the PTV (4πGTV 100Gy ), and a 5 mm margin expansion plan (4πPTV PD+5mm ). OARs included in the study are the normal brain (brain – PTV), brainstem, chiasm, spinal cord, eyes, lenses, optical nerves, and cochleae. The 4π plans resulted in superior dose gradient indices, as indicated by >20% reduction in the R50, compared to the clinical plans. Among all of the 4π cases, when compared to the clinical plans, the maximum and mean doses were significantly reduced (p < 0.05) by a range of 47.01-98.82% and 51.87-99.47%, respectively, or unchanged (p > 0.05) for all of the non-brain OARs. Both the 4πPTV PD and 4π GTV 100GY plans reduced the mean normal brain mean doses. 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy substantially increases the dose gradient outside of the PTV and better spares critical organs. Dose escalation to 100 Gy to the GTV or additional margin expansion while meeting clinical critical organ dose constraints is feasible. 100 Gy to the PTV result in higher normal brain doses but may

  16. Parameter optimization for constructing competing endogenous RNA regulatory network in glioblastoma multiforme and other cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chen, Yidong; Chuang, Eric Y

    2015-01-01

    In addition to direct targeting and repressing mRNAs, recent studies reported that microRNAs (miRNAs) can bridge up an alternative layer of post-transcriptional gene regulatory networks. The competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) regulation depicts the scenario where pairs of genes (ceRNAs) sharing, fully or partially, common binding miRNAs (miRNA program) can establish coexpression through competition for a limited pool of the miRNA program. While the dynamics of ceRNA regulation among cellular conditions have been verified based on in silico and in vitro experiments, comprehensive investigation into the strength of ceRNA regulation in human datasets remains largely unexplored. Furthermore, pan-cancer analysis of ceRNA regulation, to our knowledge, has not been systematically investigated. In the present study we explored optimal conditions for ceRNA regulation, investigated functions governed by ceRNA regulation, and evaluated pan-cancer effects. We started by investigating how essential factors, such as the size of miRNA programs, the number of miRNA program binding sites, and expression levels of miRNA programs and ceRNAs affect the ceRNA regulation capacity in tumors derived from glioblastoma multiforme patients captured by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We demonstrated that increased numbers of common targeting miRNAs as well as the abundance of binding sites enhance ceRNA regulation and strengthen coexpression of ceRNA pairs. Also, our investigation revealed that the strength of ceRNA regulation is dependent on expression levels of both miRNA programs and ceRNAs. Through functional annotation analysis, our results indicated that ceRNA regulation is highly associated with essential cellular functions and diseases including cancer. Furthermore, the highly intertwined ceRNA regulatory relationship enables constitutive and effective intra-function regulation of genes in diverse types of cancer. Using gene and microRNA expression datasets from TCGA, we successfully

  17. A tumor-targeting p53 nanodelivery system limits chemoresistance to temozolomide prolonging survival in a mouse model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Soo; Rait, Antonina; Kim, Eric; Pirollo, Kathleen F; Chang, Esther H

    2015-02-01

    Development of temozolomide (TMZ) resistance contributes to the poor prognosis for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients. It was previously demonstrated that delivery of exogenous wild-type tumor suppressor gene p53 via a tumor-targeted nanocomplex (SGT-53) which crosses the blood-brain barrier could sensitize highly TMZ-resistant GBM tumors to TMZ. Here we assessed whether SGT-53 could inhibit development of TMZ resistance. SGT-53 significantly chemosensitized TMZ-sensitive human GBM cell lines (U87 and U251), in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, in an intracranial GBM tumor model, two cycles of concurrent treatment with systemically administered SGT-53 and TMZ inhibited tumor growth, increased apoptosis and most importantly, significantly prolonged median survival. In contrast TMZ alone had no significant effect on median survival compared to a single cycle of TMZ. These results suggest that combining SGT-53 with TMZ appears to limit development of TMZ resistance, prolonging its anti-tumor effect and could be a more effective therapy for GBM. Using human glioblastoma multiforma cell lines, this research team demonstrated that the delivery of exogenous wild-type tumor suppressor gene p53 via a tumor-targeted nanocomplex limited the development of temozolomide resistance and prolonged its anti-tumor effect, which may enable future human application of this or similar techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dae-Hee, E-mail: leedneo@gmail.com [Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kim, Dong-Wook [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of VA (United States); Jung, Chang-Hwa [Division of Metabolism and Functionality Research, Korea Food Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong J. [Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Park, Daeho, E-mail: daehopark@gist.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Most GBM cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. • Gingerol enhances the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins by ROS. • Gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through actions on the ROS–Bcl2 pathway.

  19. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Dong-Wook; Jung, Chang-Hwa; Lee, Yong J.; Park, Daeho

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Most GBM cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. • Gingerol enhances the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins by ROS. • Gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through actions on the ROS–Bcl2 pathway

  20. Impact of therapy on quality of life, neurocognitive function and their correlates in glioblastoma multiforme: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksson, Roger; Asklund, Thomas; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of quality of life (QoL) in patients with high-grade glioma is an important endpoint during treatment, particularly in those with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) given its dismal prognosis despite limited advances in standard therapy. It has proven difficult to identify new therapies...... that extend survival in patients with recurrent GBM, so one of the primary aims of new therapies is to reduce morbidity, restore or preserve neurologic functions, and the capacity to perform daily activities. Apart from temozolomide, cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents do not appear to significantly impact...... response or survival, but produce toxicity that is likely to negatively impact QoL. New biological agents, such as bevacizumab, can induce a clinically meaningful proportion of durable responses among patients with recurrent GBM with an acceptable safety profile. Emerging evidence suggests that bevacizumab...

  1. Maintenance of EGFR and EGFRvIII expressions in an in vivo and in vitro model of human glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Broholm, Helle; Villingshøj, Mette

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common, and most aggressive primary brain tumor among adults. A vast majority of the tumors express high levels of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as a consequence of gene amplification. Furthermore, gene amplification is often associated...... with mutation of EGFR, and the constitutive activated deletion variant EGFRvIII is the most common EGFR mutation found in GBM. Activated EGFR signaling, through overexpression and/or mutation, is involved in increased tumorigenic potential. As such, EGFR is an attractive target for GBM therapy. However......, clinical studies with EGFR inhibitors have shown inconsistent results, and as such, further knowledge regarding the role of EGFR and EGFRvIII in GBM is needed. For this, an appropriate in vivo/in vitro tumor model is required. Here, we report the establishment of an experimental GBM model in which...

  2. Boron neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma multiforme using the p- boronophenylalanine-fructose complex and epithermal neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.; Joel, D.D.; Liu, H.B.; Slatkin, D.N.; Wielopolski, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E. [Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Chadha, M. [Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1994-12-31

    The amino acid analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) is under investigation as a neutron capture agent for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme. A series of patients undergoing surgical removal of tumor received BPA orally as the free amino acid. Favorable tumor/blood boron concentration ratios were obtained but the absolute amount of boron in the tumor would have been insufficient for BNCT. BPA can be solubilized at neutral pH by complexation with fructose (BPA-F). Studies with rats suggest that intraperitoneal injection of BPA-F complex produces a much higher tumor boron concentration to rat intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma that were possible with oral BPA. Higher boron concentrations have allowed higher tumor radiation doses to be delivered while maintaining the dose to the normal brain vascular endothelium below the threshold of tolerance. The experience to date of the administration of BPA-F to one patient is provided in this report.

  3. Boron neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma multiforme using the p- boronophenylalanine-fructose complex and epithermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.; Joel, D.D.; Liu, H.B.; Slatkin, D.N.; Wielopolski, L.; Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E.; Chadha, M.

    1994-01-01

    The amino acid analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) is under investigation as a neutron capture agent for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme. A series of patients undergoing surgical removal of tumor received BPA orally as the free amino acid. Favorable tumor/blood boron concentration ratios were obtained but the absolute amount of boron in the tumor would have been insufficient for BNCT. BPA can be solubilized at neutral pH by complexation with fructose (BPA-F). Studies with rats suggest that intraperitoneal injection of BPA-F complex produces a much higher tumor boron concentration to rat intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma that were possible with oral BPA. Higher boron concentrations have allowed higher tumor radiation doses to be delivered while maintaining the dose to the normal brain vascular endothelium below the threshold of tolerance. The experience to date of the administration of BPA-F to one patient is provided in this report

  4. Bilateral posterior RION after concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, Stefanie; Prox-Vagedes, Vanessa; Elolf, Erck; Brueggemann, Ines; Gademann, Guenther; Galazky, Imke; Bartels, Claudius

    2010-01-01

    Radiation induced optic neuropathy (RION) is a rare but severe consequence of radiation therapy that is associated with adjuvant chemotherapy, specifically therapy with vincristine or nitrosoureas. However, there is very little evidence regarding the occurrence of RION after concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide. The case of a 63 year old woman with glioblastoma multiforme and concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide is described. Due to a slight depressive episode the patient also took hypericum perforatum. Five months after cessation of fractionated radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide (cumulative dose of 11040 mg) the patient developed bilateral amaurosis due to RION. Tumor regrowth was excluded by magnetic resonance imaging. After the application of gadolinium a pathognomonic contrast enhancement of both prechiasmatic optic nerves could be observed. In this patient, the occurrence of RION may have been the result of radiosensitization by temozolomide, which could have been strengthened by hypericin. Consequently, physicians should avoid a concomitant application of hypericum perforatum and radiochemotherapy

  5. The use of positron emission tomography in BNCT treatment planning for metastatic malignant melanoma and glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabalka, G.; Nichols, T.; Smith, G.; Miller, L.; Kahn, M.

    2000-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) evaluations of six glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and one metastatic melanoma (MM) patient have been carried out utilizing fluorine-18 labeled p-boronophenylalanine. Four of the GBM patients were imaged both prior to and post BNCT. In one GBM patient, biopsy derived boron distribution data compared favorably to the PET derived data. The PET data have been used as input to dosimetry calculations and the results vary from those obtained using current protocols. In addition, PET images of the thorax would indicate that the utility of PET for staging tumors for BNCT may extend beyond the brain. However, higher than anticipated levels of activity in the lungs (as also seen in salivary glands) indicate the more effective BNCT agents will be required. (author)

  6. 18F-Fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography may differentiate glioblastoma multiforme from less malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Kenji; Shiga, Tohru; Tamaki, Nagara; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Hattori, Naoya; Magota, Keiichi; Tanaka, Shinya; Kuge, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor and its prognosis is significantly poorer than those of less malignant gliomas. Pathologically, necrosis is one of the most important characteristics that differentiate GBM from lower grade gliomas; therefore, we hypothesized that 18 F fluoromisonidazole (FMISO), a radiotracer for hypoxia imaging, accumulates in GBM but not in lower grade gliomas. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of FMISO positron emission tomography (PET) for the differential diagnosis of GBM from lower grade gliomas. This prospective study included 23 patients with pathologically confirmed gliomas. All of the patients underwent FMISO PET and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET within a week. FMISO images were acquired 4 h after intravenous administration of 400 MBq of FMISO. Tracer uptake in the tumor was visually assessed. Lesion to normal tissue ratios and FMISO uptake volume were calculated. Of the 23 glioma patients, 14 were diagnosed as having GBM (grade IV glioma in the 2007 WHO classification), and the others were diagnosed as having non-GBM (5 grade III and 4 grade II). In visual assessment, all GBM patients showed FMISO uptake in the tumor greater than that in the surrounding brain tissues, whereas all the non-GBM patients showed FMISO uptake in the tumor equal to that in the surrounding brain tissues (p ≤ 0.001). One GBM patient was excluded from FDG PET study because of hyperglycemia. All GBM patients and three of the nine (33%) non-GBM patients showed FDG uptake greater than or equal to that in the gray matter. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing GBM were 100 and 100% for FMISO, and 100 and 66% for FDG, respectively. The lesion to cerebellum ratio of FMISO uptake was higher in GBM patients (2.74 ± 0.60, range 1.71-3.81) than in non-GBM patients (1.22 ± 0.06, range 1.09-1.29, p ≤ 0.001) with no overlap between the groups. The lesion to gray matter ratio of FDG was also higher in GBM

  7. {sup 18}F-Fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography may differentiate glioblastoma multiforme from less malignant gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Kenji; Shiga, Tohru; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Terasaka, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Houkin, Kiyohiro [Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Neurosurgery, Sapporo (Japan); Hattori, Naoya [Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Molecular Imaging, Sapporo (Japan); Magota, Keiichi [Hokkaido University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sapporo (Japan); Tanaka, Shinya [Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Cancer Pathology, Sapporo (Japan); Kuge, Yuji [Hokkaido University, Central Institute of Isotope Science, Sapporo (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor and its prognosis is significantly poorer than those of less malignant gliomas. Pathologically, necrosis is one of the most important characteristics that differentiate GBM from lower grade gliomas; therefore, we hypothesized that {sup 18}F fluoromisonidazole (FMISO), a radiotracer for hypoxia imaging, accumulates in GBM but not in lower grade gliomas. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of FMISO positron emission tomography (PET) for the differential diagnosis of GBM from lower grade gliomas. This prospective study included 23 patients with pathologically confirmed gliomas. All of the patients underwent FMISO PET and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET within a week. FMISO images were acquired 4 h after intravenous administration of 400 MBq of FMISO. Tracer uptake in the tumor was visually assessed. Lesion to normal tissue ratios and FMISO uptake volume were calculated. Of the 23 glioma patients, 14 were diagnosed as having GBM (grade IV glioma in the 2007 WHO classification), and the others were diagnosed as having non-GBM (5 grade III and 4 grade II). In visual assessment, all GBM patients showed FMISO uptake in the tumor greater than that in the surrounding brain tissues, whereas all the non-GBM patients showed FMISO uptake in the tumor equal to that in the surrounding brain tissues (p {<=} 0.001). One GBM patient was excluded from FDG PET study because of hyperglycemia. All GBM patients and three of the nine (33%) non-GBM patients showed FDG uptake greater than or equal to that in the gray matter. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing GBM were 100 and 100% for FMISO, and 100 and 66% for FDG, respectively. The lesion to cerebellum ratio of FMISO uptake was higher in GBM patients (2.74 {+-} 0.60, range 1.71-3.81) than in non-GBM patients (1.22 {+-} 0.06, range 1.09-1.29, p {<=} 0.001) with no overlap between the groups. The lesion to gray matter ratio of FDG was also

  8. Graphene nanoribbons as a drug delivery agent for lucanthone mediated therapy of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Surhland, Cassandra; Sanchez, Zina; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Suresh Kumar, M A; Lee, Stephen; Peña, Louis A; Waring, Michael; Sitharaman, Balaji; Naidu, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    We report use of PEG-DSPE coated oxidized graphene nanoribbons (O-GNR-PEG-DSPE) as agent for delivery of anti-tumor drug Lucanthone (Luc) into Glioblastoma Multiformae (GBM) cells targeting base excision repair enzyme APE-1 (Apurinic endonuclease-1). Lucanthone, an endonuclease inhibitor of APE-1, was loaded onto O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs using a simple non-covalent method. We found its uptake by GBM cell line U251 exceeding 67% and 60% in APE-1-overexpressing U251, post 24h. However, their uptake was ~38% and 29% by MCF-7 and rat glial progenitor cells (CG-4), respectively. TEM analysis of U251 showed large aggregates of O-GNR-PEG-DSPE in vesicles. Luc-O-GNR-PEG-DSPE was significantly toxic to U251 but showed little/no toxicity when exposed to MCF-7/CG-4 cells. This differential uptake effect can be exploited to use O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs as a vehicle for Luc delivery to GBM, while reducing nonspecific cytotoxicity to the surrounding healthy tissue. Cell death in U251 was necrotic, probably due to oxidative degradation of APE-1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The use of hypofractionated intensity-modulated irradiation in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme: preliminary results of a prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultanem, Khalil; Patrocinio, Horacio; Lambert, Christine; Corns, Robert; Leblanc, Richard; Parker, William; Shenouda, George; Souhami, Luis

    2004-01-01

    Despite major advances in treatment modalities, the prognosis of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains poor. Exploring hypofractionated regimens to replace the standard 6-week radiotherapy schedule is an attractive strategy as an attempt to prevent accelerated tumor cell repopulation. There is equally interest in dose escalation to the gross tumor volume where the majority of failures occur. We report our preliminary results using hypofractionated intensity-modulated accelerated radiotherapy regimen in the treatment of patients with GBM. Between July 1998 and December 2001, 25 patients with histologically proven diagnosis of GBM, Karnofsky performance status > or =60, and a postoperative tumor volume step-and-shoot technique), 60 Gy in 20 daily fractions of 3 Gy each were given to the GTV, whereas the planning target volume received a minimum of 40 Gy in 20 fractions of 2 Gy each at its periphery. Treatments were delivered over a 4-week period using 5 daily fractions per week. Dose was prescribed at the isocenter (ICRU point). Three beam angles were used in all of the cases. Treatments were well tolerated. Acute toxicity was limited to increased brain edema during radiotherapy in 2 patients who were on tapering doses of corticosteroids. This was corrected by increasing the steroid dose. At a median follow-up of 8.8 months, no late toxicity was observed. One patient experienced visual loss at 9 months after completion of treatment. MRI suggested nonspecific changes to the optic chiasm. On review of the treatment plan, the total dose to the optic chiasm was confirmed to be equal to or less than 40 Gy in 20 fractions. When Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis was used, 10 patients were class III-IV, and 15 patients were class V-VI. To date, 21 patients have had clinical and/or radiologic evidence of disease progression, and 16 patients have died. The median survival was 9.5 months (range: 2.8-22.9 months), the 1-year survival

  10. Phase II Radiation therapy oncology group trial of weekly paclitaxel and conventional external beam radiation therapy for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, Corey J.; Ruffer, James; Rhodes, Harker; Paulus, Rebecca; Murray, Kevin; Movsas, Benjamin; Curran, Walter

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) ± carmustine (BCNU) is the standard of care for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), but survival results remain poor. Preclinical studies indicate synergy between RT and paclitaxel (TAX) in astrocytoma cell lines. Phase I studies in GBM have demonstrated a maximum tolerated dose for TAX of 225 mg/m 2 /3 h/week x 6, during EBRT, with no exacerbation of typical RT-induced toxicities. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) therefore mounted a Phase II study to determine the feasibility and efficacy of conventional EBRT and concurrent weekly TAX at its MTD. Patients and Methods: Sixty-two patients with histologic diagnosis of GBM were enrolled from 8/16/96 through 3/21/97 in a multi-institutional Phase II trial of EBRT and TAX 225 mg/m 2 /3 h (1-3 h before EBRT), administered the first treatment day of each RT week. Total EBRT dose was 60 Gy (200 cGy/fraction), 5 days per week. A smaller treatment field, to include gross disease plus a margin only, was used after 46 Gy. Results: Sixty-one patients (98%) were evaluable. Median age was 55 years (range, 28-78). Seventy-four percent were ≥50 years. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Classes III, IV, V, VI included 10 (17%), 21 (34%), 25 (41%), and 5 (8%) patients, respectively. Gross total resection was performed in only 16%. There was no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia or thrombocytopenia. Hypersensitivity reactions precluding further use of TAX occurred in 4 patients. There were 2 instances of late neurotoxicity (4% Grade 3 or 4). Ninety-one percent of patients received treatment per protocol. Seventy-seven percent completed prescribed treatment (6 weeks). Of 35 patients with measurable disease, CR/PR was observed in 23%, MR in 17%, and SD in 43%. Seventeen percent demonstrated progression at first follow-up. Median potential follow-up time is 20 months. Median survival is 9.7 months, with median survivals for RPA classes III, IV, V, and VI of 16.3, 10

  11. What is the value of emission tomography studies in patients with a primary glioblastoma multiforme treated by 192Ir brachytherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koot, R.W.; Bosch, D.A.; Habraken, J.B.A.; Hulshof, M.C.C.M.; Paans, A.M.J.; Pruim, J.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the use of 201 thallium SPECT and L-[1- 11 C]-tyrosine PET in patients with a primary glioblastoma multiforme treated with 192 Ir brachytherapy after surgery and external beam radiation therapy. We hypothesised that the patients most likely to benefit from further surgery after deterioration would be those with radiation necrosis and would be recognised by a negative emission tomography scan. Twenty-one patients underwent 201 thallium SPECT performed before brachytherapy, and this was repeated in 19 patients when recurrence was suspected. Nine patients also underwent a PET scan at the same time. Nine patients underwent a second operation. SPECT and PET were highly concordant concerning the prediction of radionecrosis and/or tumor recurrence. Repeat surgery did not lead to a significant increase in survival. There was no significant association between the duration of survival and tumor-to-background ratio but the number studied was small. Both SPECT and PET showed highly active lesions, which were proved to be recurrent tumor by clinical and histological follow-up. Although PET and SPECT are both highly sensitive in detecting active tumor tissue, emission tomography was not clinically valuable in the investigation of patients with a primary glioblastoma treated with brachytherapy. (author)

  12. ω-3 and ω-6 Fatty Acids Modulate Conventional and Atypical Protein Kinase C Activities in a Brain Fatty Acid Binding Protein Dependent Manner in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa E. Elsherbiny

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a highly infiltrative brain cancer with a dismal prognosis. High levels of brain fatty acid binding protein (B-FABP are associated with increased migration/infiltration in GBM cells, with a high ratio of arachidonic acid (AA to docosahexaenoic acid (DHA driving B-FABP-mediated migration. Since several protein kinase Cs (PKCs are overexpressed in GBM and linked to migration, we explored a possible relationship between B-FABP and levels/activity of different PKCs, as a function of AA and DHA supplementation. We report that ectopic expression of B-FABP in U87 cells alters the levels of several PKCs, particularly PKCζ. Upon analysis of PKCζ RNA levels in a panel of GBM cell lines and patient-derived GBM neurospheres, we observed a trend towards moderate positive correlation (r = 0.624, p = 0.054 between B-FABP and PKCζ RNA levels. Analysis of PKC activity in U87 GBM cells revealed decreased typical PKC activity (23.4% in B-FABP-expressing cells compared with nonexpressing cells, with no difference in novel and atypical PKC activities. AA and DHA modulated both conventional and atypical PKC activities in a B-FABP-dependent manner, but had no effect on novel PKC activity. These results suggest that conventional and atypical PKCs are potential downstream effectors of B-FABP/fatty acid-mediated alterations in GBM growth properties.

  13. Initial care and outcome of glioblastoma multiforme patients in 2 diverse health care scenarios in Brazil: does public versus private health care matter?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Luiz Victor Maia; Pontes, Lucíola de Barros; Callegaro-Filho, Donato; Koch, Ludmila de Oliveira; Weltman, Eduardo; Victor, Elivane da Silva; Santos, Adrialdo José; Borges, Lia Raquel Rodrigues; Segreto, Roberto Araújo; Malheiros, Suzana Maria Fleury

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiological and survival features of patients with glioblastoma multiforme treated in 2 health care scenarios--public and private--in Brazil. We retrospectively analyzed clinical, treatment, and outcome characteristics of glioblastoma multiforme patients from 2003 to 2011 at 2 institutions. The median age of the 171 patients (117 public and 54 private) was 59.3 years (range, 18-84). The median survival for patients treated in private institutions was 17.4 months (95% confidence interval, 11.1-23.7) compared with 7.1 months (95% confidence interval, 3.8-10.4) for patients treated in public institutions (P public setting (median of 64 days for the public hospital and 31 days for the private institution; P = .003). The patients at the private hospital received radiotherapy concurrent with chemotherapy in 59.3% of cases; at the public hospital, only 21.4% (P Brazil is critical.

  14. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis brain abscess mimicking meningitis after surgery for glioblastoma multiforme: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani, L?a; Dubourg, Gr?gory; Graillon, Thomas; Honnorat, Estelle; Lepidi, Hubert; Drancourt, Michel; Seng, Piseth; Stein, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Salmonella brain abscess associated with brain tumor is rare. Only 11 cases have been reported to date. Here we report a case of brain abscess caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis mimicking post-surgical meningitis in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. Case presentation A 60-year-old Algerian woman was admitted through an emergency department for a 4-day history of headache, nausea and vomiting, and behavioral disorders. Surgery for cerebral tumor excision was per...

  15. Inhibition of GLO1 in Glioblastoma Multiforme Increases DNA-AGEs, Stimulates RAGE Expression, and Inhibits Brain Tumor Growth in Orthotopic Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Jandial

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers that exhibit the Warburg effect may elevate expression of glyoxylase 1 (GLO1 to detoxify the toxic glycolytic byproduct methylglyoxal (MG and inhibit the formation of pro-apoptotic advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs. Inhibition of GLO1 in cancers that up-regulate glycolysis has been proposed as a therapeutic targeting strategy, but this approach has not been evaluated for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most aggressive and difficult to treat malignancy of the brain. Elevated GLO1 expression in GBM was established in patient tumors and cell lines using bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches. GLO1 inhibition in GBM cell lines and in an orthotopic xenograft GBM mouse model was examined using both small molecule and short hairpin RNA (shRNA approaches. Inhibition of GLO1 with S-(p-bromobenzyl glutathione dicyclopentyl ester (p-BrBzGSH(Cp2 increased levels of the DNA-AGE N2-1-(carboxyethyl-2′-deoxyguanosine (CEdG, a surrogate biomarker for nuclear MG exposure; substantially elevated expression of the immunoglobulin-like receptor for AGEs (RAGE; and induced apoptosis in GBM cell lines. Targeting GLO1 with shRNA similarly increased CEdG levels and RAGE expression, and was cytotoxic to glioma cells. Mice bearing orthotopic GBM xenografts treated systemically with p-BrBzGSH(Cp2 exhibited tumor regression without significant off-target effects suggesting that GLO1 inhibition may have value in the therapeutic management of these drug-resistant tumors.

  16. Inhibition of GLO1 in Glioblastoma Multiforme Increases DNA-AGEs, Stimulates RAGE Expression, and Inhibits Brain Tumor Growth in Orthotopic Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandial, Rahul; Neman, Josh; Lim, Punnajit P; Tamae, Daniel; Kowolik, Claudia M; Wuenschell, Gerald E; Shuck, Sarah C; Ciminera, Alexandra K; De Jesus, Luis R; Ouyang, Ching; Chen, Mike Y; Termini, John

    2018-01-30

    Cancers that exhibit the Warburg effect may elevate expression of glyoxylase 1 (GLO1) to detoxify the toxic glycolytic byproduct methylglyoxal (MG) and inhibit the formation of pro-apoptotic advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). Inhibition of GLO1 in cancers that up-regulate glycolysis has been proposed as a therapeutic targeting strategy, but this approach has not been evaluated for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and difficult to treat malignancy of the brain. Elevated GLO1 expression in GBM was established in patient tumors and cell lines using bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches. GLO1 inhibition in GBM cell lines and in an orthotopic xenograft GBM mouse model was examined using both small molecule and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) approaches. Inhibition of GLO1 with S -( p -bromobenzyl) glutathione dicyclopentyl ester ( p- BrBzGSH(Cp)₂) increased levels of the DNA-AGE N ²-1-(carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (CEdG), a surrogate biomarker for nuclear MG exposure; substantially elevated expression of the immunoglobulin-like receptor for AGEs (RAGE); and induced apoptosis in GBM cell lines. Targeting GLO1 with shRNA similarly increased CEdG levels and RAGE expression, and was cytotoxic to glioma cells. Mice bearing orthotopic GBM xenografts treated systemically with p -BrBzGSH(Cp)₂ exhibited tumor regression without significant off-target effects suggesting that GLO1 inhibition may have value in the therapeutic management of these drug-resistant tumors.

  17. Correlação clínico-topográfica em glioblastomas multiformes nas síndromes motoras: significados fisiopatológicos Clinical topographic findings in glioblastoma multiforme and the relation with motor impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia G. Lucena

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available O glioblastoma multiforme (GBM é o tumor glial com maior grau de malignidade. Acomete principalmente os hemisférios cerebrais apresentando sintomas e sinais focais ou gerais, relacionados ao tamanho, localização e taxa de crescimento tumoral. OBJETIVO: Analisar a relação do déficit motor com a topografia do GBM. MÉTODO: Foram estudados 43 casos de GBM, referidos quanto à idade, sexo, localização e a síndrome motora. RESULTADOS: O tumor predominou em adultos (média de 55 anos, sexo masculino (55,82%, localização frontal (aproximadamente 40%. A hemiparesia prevaleceu como distúrbio motor, somente não ocorrendo em 2 casos de lesão frontal, 2 temporais, 1 parietal, 1 occipital e 1 fronto-temporal. CONCLUSÃO: Os achados clínico-topográficos favorecem os efeitos infiltrativos (lesões extensas como responsáveis pela síndrome motora em detrimento aos efeitos compressivos (lesões localizadas.Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the glial tumor with the highest grade of malignity. It mainly affects the cerebral hemispheres, presenting general or focal signs and symptoms, which depend on the size, the location of the lesion and rate of growth of the tumor. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the relationship between motor impairment and GBM topography. METHOD: We studied 43 cases of GBM, related to the age, gender, localization and motor impairment. RESULTS: The occurrence of the tumor was preponderant in adults (mean age 55 years old, men (55.82%, and frontal lobe (approximately 40%. The principal motor impairment was hemiparesis, with the exception of 2 cases in the frontal lobe, 2 temporal, 1 parietal, 1 occipital and 1 frontotemporal. CONCLUSION: The clinical-topographic findings lead to consider the infiltrative effects (broad lesions are responsible for the motor impairment rather than compressive effects (located lesions.

  18. Outcome in elderly patients undergoing definitive surgery and radiation therapy for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme at a tertiary care institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Dasarahally S.; Suh, John H.; Phan, Jennifer L.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Cohen, Bruce H.; Barnett, Gene H.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of definitive surgery and radiation in patients aged 70 years and older with supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: We selected elderly patients (≥ 70 years) who had primary treatment for glioblastoma multiforme at our tertiary care institution from 1977 through 1996. The study group (n = 102) included 58 patients treated with definitive radiation, 19 treated with palliative radiation, and 25 who received no radiation. To compare our results with published findings, we grouped our patients according to the applicable prognostic categories developed by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG): RTOG group IV (n = 6), V (n = 70), and VI (n = 26). Patients were retrospectively assigned to prognostic group IV, V, or VI based on age, performance status, extent of surgery, mental status, neurologic function, and radiation dose. Treatment included surgical resection and radiation (n 49), biopsy alone (n = 25), and biopsy followed by radiation (n = 28). Patients were also stratified according to whether they were optimally treated (gross total or subtotal resection with postoperative definitive radiation) or suboptimally treated (biopsy, biopsy + radiation, surgery alone, or surgery + palliative radiation). Patients were considered to have a favorable prognosis (n = 39) if they were optimally treated and had a Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) score of at least 70. Results: The median survival for patients according to RTOG groups IV, V, and VI was 9.2, 6.6, and 3.1 months, respectively (log-rank, p < 0.0004). The median overall survival was 5.3 months. The definitive radiation group (n = 58) had a median survival of 7.3 months compared to 4.5 months in the palliative radiation group (n = 19) and 1.2 months in the biopsy-alone group (p < 0.0001). Optimally treated patients had a median survival of 7.4 months compared to 2.4 months in those suboptimally treated (p < 0.0001). The favorable prognosis group had an

  19. Tubulin targets in the pathobiology and therapy of glioblastoma multiforme. I. class III beta-tubulin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katsetos, C.D.; Dráberová, Eduarda; Legido, A.; Dumontet, C.; Dráber, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 221, č. 3 (2009), s. 505-513 ISSN 0021-9541 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Beta-II-tubulin * glioblastoma Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.586, year: 2009

  20. Global diffusion tensor imaging derived metrics differentiate glioblastoma multiforme vs. normal brains by using discriminant analysis: introduction of a novel whole-brain approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Rios, Camilo; Cortez-Conradis, David; Favila, Rafael; Moreno-Jimenez, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    Histological behavior of glioblastoma multiforme suggests it would benefit more from a global rather than regional evaluation. A global (whole-brain) calculation of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) derived tensor metrics offers a valid method to detect the integrity of white matter structures without missing infiltrated brain areas not seen in conventional sequences. In this study we calculated a predictive model of brain infiltration in patients with glioblastoma using global tensor metrics. Retrospective, case and control study; 11 global DTI-derived tensor metrics were calculated in 27 patients with glioblastoma multiforme and 34 controls: mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, pure isotropic diffusion, pure anisotropic diffusion, the total magnitude of the diffusion tensor, linear tensor, planar tensor, spherical tensor, relative anisotropy, axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity. The multivariate discriminant analysis of these variables (including age) with a diagnostic test evaluation was performed. The simultaneous analysis of 732 measures from 12 continuous variables in 61 subjects revealed one discriminant model that significantly differentiated normal brains and brains with glioblastoma: Wilks' λ = 0.324, χ(2) (3) = 38.907, p tensor and linear tensor. These metrics might be clinically applied for diagnosis, follow-up, and the study of other neurological diseases.

  1. Phase I Trial of Gross Total Resection, Permanent Iodine-125 Brachytherapy, and Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Chang, Susan; Pouliot, Jean; Sneed, Penny K.; Prados, Michael D.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Malec, Mary K.; McDermott, Michael W.; Berger, Mitchell S.; Larson, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of gross total resection and permanent I-125 brachytherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: From April 1999 to May 2002, 21 patients with glioblastoma multiforme were enrolled on a Phase I protocol investigating planned gross total resection and immediate placement of permanent I-125 seeds, followed by postoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gy at 100 cGy b.i.d., 5 days per week. Median age and Karnofsky performance status were 50 years (range, 32-65 years) and 90 (range, 70-100), respectively. Toxicity was assessed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: Eighteen patients completed treatment according to protocol. The median preoperative tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging was 18.6 cm 3 (range, 4.4-41.2 cm 3 ). The median brachytherapy dose measured 5 mm radially outward from the resection cavity was 400 Gy (range, 200-600 Gy). Ten patients underwent 12 reoperations, with 11 of 12 reoperations demonstrating necrosis without evidence of tumor. Because of high toxicity, the study was terminated early. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 57 and 114 weeks, respectively, but not significantly improved compared with historical patients treated at University of California, San Francisco, with gross total resection and radiotherapy without brachytherapy. Conclusions: Treatment with gross total resection and permanent I-125 brachytherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy as performed in this study results in high toxicity and reoperation rates, without demonstrated improvement in survival

  2. Diagnostic challenges in primary brain stem glioblastoma multiform; a case report

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    Muhammad Taimur Malik, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Brainstem gliomas are rare form of primary brain tumors in adult and represent <2% of gliomas. Glioblastomas (GBM are much less common in pediatric patients; adult GBM vary in presentation and response to therapy, and generally have a very poor prognosis. GBM is less common in the brainstem, comprising <2% gliomas and there is therefore limited data available to provide a standard of care. Here we present a case report of a patient who presented with aggressive primary pontine GBM.

  3. Inhibition of Y-box binding protein-1 slows the growth of glioblastoma multiforme and sensitizes to temozolomide independent O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase.

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    Gao, Yuanyuan; Fotovati, Abbas; Lee, Cathy; Wang, Michelle; Cote, Gilbert; Guns, Emma; Toyota, Brian; Faury, Damien; Jabado, Nada; Dunn, Sandra E

    2009-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive type of brain tumor where 5 years. In adults, GBM is the most common type of brain tumor. It is rarer in children, where it constitutes approximately 15% of all brain tumors diagnosed. These tumors are often invasive, making surgical resection difficult. Further, they can be refractory to current therapies such as temozolomide. The current dogma is that temozolomide resistance rests on the expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) because it cleaves methylated DNA adducts formed by the drug. Our laboratory recently reported that another drug resistance gene known as the Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1) is highly expressed in primary GBM but not in normal brain tissues based on the evaluation of primary tumors. We therefore questioned whether GBM depend on YB-1 for growth and/or response to temozolomide. Herein, we report that YB-1 inhibition reduced tumor cell invasion and growth in monolayer as well as in soft agar. Moreover, blocking this protein ultimately delayed tumor onset in mice. Importantly, inhibiting YB-1 enhanced temozolomide sensitivity in a manner that was independent of MGMT in models of adult and pediatric GBM. In conclusion, inhibiting YB-1 may be a novel way to improve the treatment of GBM.

  4. Toroidal-spiral particles for codelivery of anti-VEGFR-2 antibody and irinotecan: a potential implant to hinder recurrence of glioblastoma multiforme.

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    Sharma, Vishal; Köllmer, Melanie; Szymusiak, Magdalena; Nitsche, Ludwig C; Gemeinhart, Richard A; Liu, Ying

    2014-03-10

    Heterogeneous toroidal-spiral particles (TSPs) were generated by polymer droplet sedimentation, interaction, and cross-linking. TSPs provide a platform for encapsulation and release of multiple compounds of different sizes and physicochemical properties. As a model system, we demonstrate the encapsulation and independently controlled release of an anti-VEGFR-2 antibody and irinotecan for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. The anti-VEGFR-2 antibody was released from the TS channels and its binding to HUVECs was confirmed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, suggesting active antibody encapsulation and release. Irinotecan, a small molecule drug, was released from the dense polymer matrix of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (MW ~ 700 g/mol; PEGDA 700). Released irinotecan inhibited the proliferation of U251 malignant glioma cells. Since the therapeutic compounds are released through different pathways, specifically diffusion through the polymer matrix versus TS channels, the release rate can be controlled independently through the design of the structure and material of particle components.

  5. DNM3, p65 and p53 from exosomes represent potential clinical diagnosis markers for glioblastoma multiforme

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    Yang, Jian-kai; Song, Jian; Huo, Hao-ran; Zhao, Yin-long; Zhang, Guang-yu; Zhao, Zong-mao; Sun, Guo-zhu; Jiao, Bao-hua

    2017-01-01

    Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive and deadly primary brain cancer that arises from astrocytes and classified as grade IV. Recently, exosomes have been reported as an essential mediator in diverse cancer carcinogenesis and metastasis. However, their role in GBM is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether blood exosomes can be potential clinical diagnostic markers for GBM. Methods: We used a xenograft orthotopic mouse model to detect the differentially expressed genes in the brain and blood exosomes of original/recurrent GBM. Results: We found that recurrent GBM had stronger growth capacity and lethality than original GBM in the mouse model. A gene microarray of original tumors and blood exosomes from GBM orthotopic xenografts results showed that DNM3, p65 and CD117 expressions increased, whereas PTEN and p53 expressions decreased in both original tumors and blood exosomes. In the recurrent GBM tumor model, DNM3 and p65 showed increased expressions, whereas ST14 and p53 showed decreased expressions in tumor and blood exosomes of the recurrent GBM mouse model. Conclusion: In summary, we found that DNM3, p65 and p53 had a similar trend in brain and blood exosomes both for original and recurrent GBM, and could serve as potential clinical diagnostic markers for GBM. PMID:29449895

  6. Bilateral posterior RION after concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme: a case report

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    Gademann Guenther

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation induced optic neuropathy (RION is a rare but severe consequence of radiation therapy that is associated with adjuvant chemotherapy, specifically therapy with vincristine or nitrosoureas. However, there is very little evidence regarding the occurrence of RION after concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide. Case Presentation The case of a 63 year old woman with glioblastoma multiforme and concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide is described. Due to a slight depressive episode the patient also took hypericum perforatum. Five months after cessation of fractionated radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide (cumulative dose of 11040 mg the patient developed bilateral amaurosis due to RION. Tumor regrowth was excluded by magnetic resonance imaging. After the application of gadolinium a pathognomonic contrast enhancement of both prechiasmatic optic nerves could be observed. Conclusions In this patient, the occurrence of RION may have been the result of radiosensitization by temozolomide, which could have been strengthened by hypericin. Consequently, physicians should avoid a concomitant application of hypericum perforatum and radiochemotherapy.

  7. Adoptive Cell Therapies for Glioblastoma

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    Kevin James Bielamowicz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common and most aggressive primary brain malignancy and, as it stands, is virtually incurable. With the current standard-of-care, maximum feasible surgical resection followed by radical radiotherapy and adjuvant temozolomide, survival rates are at a median of 14.6 months from diagnosis in molecularly unselected patients(1. Collectively, the current knowledge suggests that the continued tumor growth and survival is in part due to failure to mount an effective immune response. While this tolerance is subtended by the tumor being utterly self, it is to a great extent due to local and systemic immune compromise mediated by the tumor. Different cell modalities including lymphokine-activated killer (LAK cells, natural killer (NK cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL, and transgenic chimeric antigen receptor (CAR- or αβ T cell receptor (TCR grafted T cells are being explored to recover and or redirect the specificity of the cellular arm of the immune system towards the tumor complex. Promising phase I/II trials of such modalities have shown early indications of potential efficacy while maintaining a favorable toxicity profile. Efficacy will need to be formally tested in phase II/III clinical trials. Given the high morbidity and mortality of GBM, it is imperative to further investigate and possibly integrate such novel cell-based therapies into the current standards-of-care and herein we collectively assess and critique the state-of-the-knowledge pertaining to these efforts.

  8. Adoptive Cell Therapies for Glioblastoma

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    Bielamowicz, Kevin; Khawja, Shumaila; Ahmed, Nabil

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive primary brain malignancy and, as it stands, is virtually incurable. With the current standard of care, maximum feasible surgical resection followed by radical radiotherapy and adjuvant temozolomide, survival rates are at a median of 14.6 months from diagnosis in molecularly unselected patients (1). Collectively, the current knowledge suggests that the continued tumor growth and survival is in part due to failure to mount an effective immune response. While this tolerance is subtended by the tumor being utterly “self,” it is to a great extent due to local and systemic immune compromise mediated by the tumor. Different cell modalities including lymphokine-activated killer cells, natural killer cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and transgenic chimeric antigen receptor or αβ T cell receptor grafted T cells are being explored to recover and or redirect the specificity of the cellular arm of the immune system toward the tumor complex. Promising phase I/II trials of such modalities have shown early indications of potential efficacy while maintaining a favorable toxicity profile. Efficacy will need to be formally tested in phase II/III clinical trials. Given the high morbidity and mortality of GBM, it is imperative to further investigate and possibly integrate such novel cell-based therapies into the current standards-of-care and herein we collectively assess and critique the state-of-the-knowledge pertaining to these efforts. PMID:24273748

  9. Reassessing the Role of Intra-Arterial Drug Delivery for Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment

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    Jason A. Ellis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective treatment for glioblastoma (GBM will likely require targeted delivery of several specific pharmacological agents simultaneously. Intra-arterial (IA delivery is one technique for targeting the tumor site with multiple agents. Although IA chemotherapy for glioblastoma (GBM has been attempted since the 1950s, the predicted benefits remain unproven in clinical practice. This review focuses on innovative approaches to IA drug delivery in treating GBM. Guided by novel in vitro and in vivo optical measurements, newer pharmacokinetic models promise to better define the complex relationship between background cerebral blood flow and drug injection parameters. Advanced optical technologies and tracers, unique nanoparticles designs, new cellular targets, and rational drug formulations are continuously modifying the therapeutic landscape for GBM. Personalized treatment approaches are emerging; however, such tailored approaches will largely depend on effective drug delivery techniques and on the ability to simultaneously deliver multidrug regimens. These new paradigms for tumor-selective drug delivery herald dramatic improvements in the effectiveness of IA chemotherapy for GBM. Therefore, within this context of so-called “precision medicine,” the role of IA delivery for GBM is thoroughly reassessed.

  10. Invasive Glioblastoma Cells Acquire Stemness and Increased Akt Activation

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    Jennifer R. Molina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most frequent and most aggressive brain tumor in adults. The dismal prognosis is due to postsurgery recurrences arising from escaped invasive tumor cells. The signaling pathways activated in invasive cells are under investigation, and models are currently designed in search for therapeutic targets. We developed here an in vivo model of human invasive GBM in mouse brain from a GBM cell line with moderate tumorigenicity that allowed simultaneous primary tumor growth and dispersal of tumor cells in the brain parenchyma. This strategy allowed for the first time the isolation and characterization of matched sets of tumor mass (Core and invasive (Inv cells. Both cell populations, but more markedly Inv cells, acquired stem cell markers, neurosphere renewal ability, and resistance to rapamycin-induced apoptosis relative to parental cells. The comparative phenotypic analysis between Inv and Core cells showed significantly increased tumorigenicity in vivo and increased invasion with decreased proliferation in vitro for Inv cells. Examination of a large array of signaling pathways revealed extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk down-modulation and Akt activation in Inv cells and an opposite profile in Core cells. Akt activation correlated with the increased tumorigenicity, stemness, and invasiveness, whereas Erk activation correlated with the proliferation of the cells. These results underscore complementary roles of the Erk and Akt pathways for GBM proliferation and dispersal and raise important implications for a concurrent inhibitory therapy.

  11. Surprisal analysis of Glioblastoma Multiform (GBM) microRNA dynamics unveils tumor specific phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadran, Sohila; Remacle, Francoise; Levine, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Gliomablastoma multiform (GBM) is the most fatal form of all brain cancers in humans. Currently there are limited diagnostic tools for GBM detection. Here, we applied surprisal analysis, a theory grounded in thermodynamics, to unveil how biomolecule energetics, specifically a redistribution of free energy amongst microRNAs (miRNAs), results in a system deviating from a non-cancer state to the GBM cancer -specific phenotypic state. Utilizing global miRNA microarray expression data of normal and GBM patients tumors, surprisal analysis characterizes a miRNA system response capable of distinguishing GBM samples from normal tissue biopsy samples. We indicate that the miRNAs contributing to this system behavior is a disease phenotypic state specific to GBM and is therefore a unique GBM-specific thermodynamic signature. MiRNAs implicated in the regulation of stochastic signaling processes crucial in the hallmarks of human cancer, dominate this GBM-cancer phenotypic state. With this theory, we were able to distinguish with high fidelity GBM patients solely by monitoring the dynamics of miRNAs present in patients' biopsy samples. We anticipate that the GBM-specific thermodynamic signature will provide a critical translational tool in better characterizing cancer types and in the development of future therapeutics for GBM.

  12. Demonstration of brachytherapy boost dose-response relationships in glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneed, Penny K.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Larson, David A.; Prados, Michael D.; Malec, Mary K.; McDermott, Michael W.; Weaver, Keith A.; Phillips, Theodore L.; Wara, William M.; Gutin, Philip H.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate brachytherapy dose-response relationships in adults with glioblastoma undergoing temporary 125 I implant boost after external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Since June 1987, orthogonal radiographs using a fiducial marker box have been used to verify brain implant source positions and generate dose-volume histograms at the University of California, San Francisco. For adults who underwent brachytherapy boost for glioblastoma from June 1987 through December 1992, tumor volumes were reoutlined to ensure consistency and dose-volume histograms were recalculated. Univariate and multivariate analyses of various patient and treatment parameters were performed evaluating for influence of dose on freedom from local failure (FFLF) and actuarial survival. Results: Of 102 implant boosts, 5 were excluded because computer plans were unavailable. For the remaining 97 patients, analyses with adjustment for known prognostic factors (age, KPS, extent of initial surgical resection) and prognostic factors identified on univariate testing (adjuvant chemotherapy) showed that higher minimum brachytherapy tumor dose was strongly associated with improved FFLF (p = 0.001). A quadratic relationship was found between total biological effective dose and survival, with a trend toward optimal survival probability at 47 Gy minimum brachytherapy tumor dose (corresponding to about 65 Gy to 95% of the tumor volume); survival decreased with lower or higher doses. Two patients expired and one requires hospice care because of brain necrosis after brachytherapy doses > 63 Gy to 95% of the tumor volume with 60 Gy to > 18 cm 3 of normal brain. Conclusion: Although higher minimum brachytherapy tumor dose was strongly associated with better local control, a brachytherapy boost dose > 50-60 Gy may result in life-threatening necrosis. We recommend careful conformation of the prescription isodose line to the contrast enhancing tumor volume, delivery of a minimum brachytherapy

  13. Establishment, maintenance and in vitro and in vivo applications of primary human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) xenograft models for translational biology studies and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Brett L; Pokorny, Jenny L; Schroeder, Mark A; Sarkaria, Jann N

    2011-03-01

    Development of clinically relevant tumor model systems for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is important for advancement of basic and translational biology. One model that has gained wide acceptance in the neuro-oncology community is the primary xenograft model. This model entails the engraftment of patient tumor specimens into the flank of nude mice and subsequent serial passage of these tumors in the flank of mice. These tumors are then used to establish short-term explant cultures or intracranial xenografts. This unit describes detailed procedures for establishment, maintenance, and utilization of a primary GBM xenograft panel for the purpose of using them as tumor models for basic or translational studies.

  14. Ion channel expression patterns in glioblastoma stem cells with functional and therapeutic implications for malignancy.

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    Julia Pollak

    Full Text Available Ion channels and transporters have increasingly recognized roles in cancer progression through the regulation of cell proliferation, migration, and death. Glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs are a source of tumor formation and recurrence in glioblastoma multiforme, a highly aggressive brain cancer, suggesting that ion channel expression may be perturbed in this population. However, little is known about the expression and functional relevance of ion channels that may contribute to GSC malignancy. Using RNA sequencing, we assessed the enrichment of ion channels in GSC isolates and non-tumor neural cell types. We identified a unique set of GSC-enriched ion channels using differential expression analysis that is also associated with distinct gene mutation signatures. In support of potential clinical relevance, expression of selected GSC-enriched ion channels evaluated in human glioblastoma databases of The Cancer Genome Atlas and Ivy Glioblastoma Atlas Project correlated with patient survival times. Finally, genetic knockdown as well as pharmacological inhibition of individual or classes of GSC-enriched ion channels constrained growth of GSCs compared to normal neural stem cells. This first-in-kind global examination characterizes ion channels enriched in GSCs and explores their potential clinical relevance to glioblastoma molecular subtypes, gene mutations, survival outcomes, regional tumor expression, and experimental responses to loss-of-function. Together, the data support the potential biological and therapeutic impact of ion channels on GSC malignancy and provide strong rationale for further examination of their mechanistic and therapeutic importance.

  15. Ion channel expression patterns in glioblastoma stem cells with functional and therapeutic implications for malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Julia; Rai, Karan G; Funk, Cory C; Arora, Sonali; Lee, Eunjee; Zhu, Jun; Price, Nathan D; Paddison, Patrick J; Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Rostomily, Robert C

    2017-01-01

    Ion channels and transporters have increasingly recognized roles in cancer progression through the regulation of cell proliferation, migration, and death. Glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) are a source of tumor formation and recurrence in glioblastoma multiforme, a highly aggressive brain cancer, suggesting that ion channel expression may be perturbed in this population. However, little is known about the expression and functional relevance of ion channels that may contribute to GSC malignancy. Using RNA sequencing, we assessed the enrichment of ion channels in GSC isolates and non-tumor neural cell types. We identified a unique set of GSC-enriched ion channels using differential expression analysis that is also associated with distinct gene mutation signatures. In support of potential clinical relevance, expression of selected GSC-enriched ion channels evaluated in human glioblastoma databases of The Cancer Genome Atlas and Ivy Glioblastoma Atlas Project correlated with patient survival times. Finally, genetic knockdown as well as pharmacological inhibition of individual or classes of GSC-enriched ion channels constrained growth of GSCs compared to normal neural stem cells. This first-in-kind global examination characterizes ion channels enriched in GSCs and explores their potential clinical relevance to glioblastoma molecular subtypes, gene mutations, survival outcomes, regional tumor expression, and experimental responses to loss-of-function. Together, the data support the potential biological and therapeutic impact of ion channels on GSC malignancy and provide strong rationale for further examination of their mechanistic and therapeutic importance.

  16. Differentiation of solitary brain metastasis from glioblastoma multiforme: a predictive multiparametric approach using combined MR diffusion and perfusion

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    Bauer, Adam Herman; Moser, Franklin G.; Maya, Marcel [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Erly, William; Nael, Kambiz [University of Arizona Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Solitary brain metastasis (MET) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) can appear similar on conventional MRI. The purpose of this study was to identify magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion and diffusion-weighted biomarkers that can differentiate MET from GBM. In this retrospective study, patients were included if they met the following criteria: underwent resection of a solitary enhancing brain tumor and had preoperative 3.0 T MRI encompassing diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE), and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion. Using co-registered images, voxel-based fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), K{sup trans}, and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) values were obtained in the enhancing tumor and non-enhancing peritumoral T2 hyperintense region (NET2). Data were analyzed by logistic regression and analysis of variance. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the optimal parameter/s and threshold for predicting of GBM vs. MET. Twenty-three patients (14 M, age 32-78 years old) met our inclusion criteria. Pathology revealed 13 GBMs and 10 METs. In the enhancing tumor, rCBV, K{sup trans}, and FA were higher in GBM, whereas MD was lower, neither without statistical significance. In the NET2, rCBV was significantly higher (p = 0.05) in GBM, but MD was significantly lower (p < 0.01) in GBM. FA and K{sup trans} were higher in GBM, though not reaching significance. The best discriminative power was obtained in NET2 from a combination of rCBV, FA, and MD, resulting in an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.98. The combination of MR diffusion and perfusion matrices in NET2 can help differentiate GBM over solitary MET with diagnostic accuracy of 98 %. (orig.)

  17. Differentiation of solitary brain metastasis from glioblastoma multiforme: a predictive multiparametric approach using combined MR diffusion and perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Adam Herman; Moser, Franklin G.; Maya, Marcel; Erly, William; Nael, Kambiz

    2015-01-01

    Solitary brain metastasis (MET) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) can appear similar on conventional MRI. The purpose of this study was to identify magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion and diffusion-weighted biomarkers that can differentiate MET from GBM. In this retrospective study, patients were included if they met the following criteria: underwent resection of a solitary enhancing brain tumor and had preoperative 3.0 T MRI encompassing diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE), and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion. Using co-registered images, voxel-based fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), K trans , and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) values were obtained in the enhancing tumor and non-enhancing peritumoral T2 hyperintense region (NET2). Data were analyzed by logistic regression and analysis of variance. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the optimal parameter/s and threshold for predicting of GBM vs. MET. Twenty-three patients (14 M, age 32-78 years old) met our inclusion criteria. Pathology revealed 13 GBMs and 10 METs. In the enhancing tumor, rCBV, K trans , and FA were higher in GBM, whereas MD was lower, neither without statistical significance. In the NET2, rCBV was significantly higher (p = 0.05) in GBM, but MD was significantly lower (p < 0.01) in GBM. FA and K trans were higher in GBM, though not reaching significance. The best discriminative power was obtained in NET2 from a combination of rCBV, FA, and MD, resulting in an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.98. The combination of MR diffusion and perfusion matrices in NET2 can help differentiate GBM over solitary MET with diagnostic accuracy of 98 %. (orig.)

  18. Early post-treatment pseudo-progression amongst glioblastoma multiforme patients treated with radiotherapy and temozolomide: a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunjur, Ashray; Lau, Eddie; Taouk, Yamna; Ryan, Gail

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence and impact of early post-chemoradiation (cRT) 'pseudoprogression' (PsPD) amongst glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with the current standard of care – 60 Gy conformal radiotherapy with concurrent low-dose temozolomide, followed by six cycles of high-dose temozolomide (the 'Stupp protocol'). Clinical notes and radiology reports for GBM patients treated as per the Stupp protocol were reviewed. PsPD was defined as apparent radiological progression on the first post-cRT scan, with further imaging within 3 months being stable or improving, while true early progression (ePD) was confirmed by continued progression in the subsequent 3 months following the first post-cRT scan. Of the 68 patients evaluated, 14 (21%) and 27 (40%) experienced PsPD and ePD, respectively; 3/14 (21%) patients experiencing PsPD and 14/27(52%), ePD were symptomatic for progression on first post-cRT follow-up (P = 0.096 for difference). Median survival for patients with ePD, PsPD and neither were 10.4, 27.4 and 13.0 months, respectively (P = 0.003 for ePD vs. PsPD, P = 0.19 for neither vs. PsPD groups). These data confirm a significant incidence of PsPD in post-cRT GBM patients, associated with improved median survival compared with those with neither ePD nor PsPD (not statistically significant). It appears likely that PsPD actually represents tumour response, conflicting with the traditional notion that increase in lesion size on contrast-enhanced imaging represents disease progression. Early post-cRT imaging should thus be interpreted with caution. Accompanying clinical symptoms are more commonly associated with ePD, but do not reliably distinguish PsPD from ePD.

  19. A Phase I Dose Escalation Study of Hypofractionated IMRT Field-in-Field Boost for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

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    Monjazeb, Arta M., E-mail: arta.monjazeb@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [U.C. Davis School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ayala, Deandra; Jensen, Courtney [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Case, L. Douglas [Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Bourland, J. Daniel; Ellis, Thomas L. [Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Chan, Michael D. [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Tatter, Stephen B. [Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lesser, Glen J. [Hematology Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Shaw, Edward G. [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Objectives: To describe the results of a Phase I dose escalation trial for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) using a hypofractionated concurrent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost. Methods: Twenty-one patients were enrolled between April 1999 and August 2003. Radiotherapy consisted of daily fractions of 1.8 Gy with a concurrent boost of 0.7 Gy (total 2.5 Gy daily) to a total dose of 70, 75, or 80 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was not permitted. Seven patients were enrolled at each dose and dose limiting toxicities were defined as irreversible Grade 3 or any Grade 4-5 acute neurotoxicity attributable to radiotherapy. Results: All patients experienced Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicities. Acutely, 8 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 and 4 toxicities. Of these, only two reversible cases of otitis media were attributable to radiotherapy. No dose-limiting toxicities were encountered. Only 2 patients experienced Grade 3 delayed toxicity and there was no delayed Grade 4 toxicity. Eleven patients requiring repeat resection or biopsy were found to have viable tumor and radiation changes with no cases of radionecrosis alone. Median overall and progression-free survival for this cohort were 13.6 and 6.5 months, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 57% and 19%. At recurrence, 15 patients received chemotherapy, 9 underwent resection, and 5 received radiotherapy. Conclusions: Using a hypofractionated concurrent IMRT boost, we were able to safely treat patients to 80 Gy without any dose-limiting toxicity. Given that local failure still remains the predominant pattern for GBM patients, a trial of dose escalation with IMRT and temozolomide is warranted.

  20. A Phase I Dose Escalation Study of Hypofractionated IMRT Field-in-Field Boost for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monjazeb, Arta M.; Ayala, Deandra; Jensen, Courtney; Case, L. Douglas; Bourland, J. Daniel; Ellis, Thomas L.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Chan, Michael D.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Lesser, Glen J.; Shaw, Edward G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the results of a Phase I dose escalation trial for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) using a hypofractionated concurrent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost. Methods: Twenty-one patients were enrolled between April 1999 and August 2003. Radiotherapy consisted of daily fractions of 1.8 Gy with a concurrent boost of 0.7 Gy (total 2.5 Gy daily) to a total dose of 70, 75, or 80 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was not permitted. Seven patients were enrolled at each dose and dose limiting toxicities were defined as irreversible Grade 3 or any Grade 4–5 acute neurotoxicity attributable to radiotherapy. Results: All patients experienced Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicities. Acutely, 8 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 and 4 toxicities. Of these, only two reversible cases of otitis media were attributable to radiotherapy. No dose-limiting toxicities were encountered. Only 2 patients experienced Grade 3 delayed toxicity and there was no delayed Grade 4 toxicity. Eleven patients requiring repeat resection or biopsy were found to have viable tumor and radiation changes with no cases of radionecrosis alone. Median overall and progression-free survival for this cohort were 13.6 and 6.5 months, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 57% and 19%. At recurrence, 15 patients received chemotherapy, 9 underwent resection, and 5 received radiotherapy. Conclusions: Using a hypofractionated concurrent IMRT boost, we were able to safely treat patients to 80 Gy without any dose-limiting toxicity. Given that local failure still remains the predominant pattern for GBM patients, a trial of dose escalation with IMRT and temozolomide is warranted.

  1. Second-line chemotherapy with dacarbazine and fotemustine in nitrosourea-pretreated patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

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    Fazeny-Dörner, Barbara; Veitl, Mario; Wenzel, Catharina; Piribauer, Maria; Rössler, Karl; Dieckmann, Karin; Ungersböck, Karl; Marosi, Christine

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and toxicity of a combination of dacarbazine (D) and fotemustine (F) administered to a homogenous group of patients with recurrent or progressive glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Thirty-one patients with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scan evidence of recurrent or progressive GBM after first-line chemotherapy with nitrosoureas as well as radiation therapy were given a combination of D (200 mg/m2) and F (100 mg/m2). At 30 min after termination of D administration, F was given over 60 min. Treatment was performed in an outpatient setting every 21 days. A total of 140 cycles (range 1-12 cycles; median 4 cycles) was administered. One partial response (3%) lasting for 11 weeks was observed. Sixteen (52%) patients reached stable disease lasting between 7 and 94 weeks. Median survival from start of the D/F combination was 45 (range 10-150) weeks. Median time to progression was 17 (3-101) weeks for all patients. Major toxicity was myelosuppression resulting in exclusion from study in seven (23%) patients [due to thrombocytopenia common toxicity criteria (CTC) grade 2 persisting longer than 3 weeks in three patients, due to thrombocytopenia CTC grade >/=3 in three and due to leukopenia CTC grade 3 in one patient]. No other toxicity than alopecia occurred. We conclude that the D/F combination is a well-tolerated second-line regimen and can be administered in a complete outpatient setting. D/F shows efficacy even in nitrosourea-pretreated patients and justifies further investigation.

  2. Hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy with temozolomide chemotherapy may alter the patterns of failure in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Krishna; Chen, Changhu; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to report the patterns of failure in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated on a phase II trial of hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (hypo-IMRT) with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). Patients with newly diagnosed GBM post-resection received postoperative hypo-IMRT to 60Gy in 10 fractions. TMZ was given concurrently at 75mg/m 2 /day for 28 consecutive days and adjuvantly at 150–200mg/m 2 /day for 5 days every 28 days. Radiographic failure was defined as any new T1-enhancing lesion or biopsy-confirmed progressive enhancement at the primary site. MRIs obtained at the time of failure were fused to original hypo-IMRT plans. Central, in-field, marginal and distant failure were defined as ≥95%, 80% to 95%, any to 80% and 0% of the volume of a recurrence receiving 60Gy, respectively. Twenty-four patients were treated on the trial. Median follow-up was 14.8 months (range 2.7–34.2). Seventeen of 24 patients experienced radiographic failure: one central, five in-field, two marginal, eight distant and one both in-field and distant. Two of the eight distant failures presented with leptomeningeal disease. Two other patients died without evidence of radiographic recurrence. Five of 24 patients demonstrated asymptomatic, gradually progressive in-field T1 enhancement, suggestive of post-treatment changes, without clear evidence of failure; three of these patients received a biopsy/second resection, with 100% radiation necrosis found. The median overall survival of this group was 33.0 months. A 60-Gy hypo-IMRT treatment delivered in 6-Gy fractions with TMZ altered the patterns of failure in GBM, with more distant failures.

  3. The effect of combining recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha with local radiation on tumor control probability of a human glioblastoma multiforme xenograft in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Peigen; Allam, Ayman; Perez, Luis A.; Taghian, Alphonse; Freeman, Jill; Suit, Herman D.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the antitumor activity of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rHuTNF-α) on a human glioblastoma multiforme (U87) xenograft in nude mice, and to study the effect of combining rHuTNF-α with local radiation on the tumor control probability of this tumor model. Methods and Materials: U87 xenograft was transplanted SC into the right hindleg of NCr/Sed nude mice (7-8 weeks old, male). When tumors reached a volume of about 110 mm 3 , mice were randomly assigned to treatment: rHuTNF-α alone compared with normal saline control; or local radiation plus rHuTNF-α vs. local radiation plus normal saline. Parameters of growth delay, volume doubling time, percentage of necrosis, and cell loss factor were used to assess the antitumor effects of rHuTNF-α on this tumor. The TCD 50 (tumor control dose 50%) was used as an endpoint to determine the effect of combining rHuTNF-α with local radiation. Results: Tumor growth in mice treated with a dose of 150 μg/kg body weight rHuTNF-α, IP injection daily for 7 consecutive days, was delayed about 8 days compared to that in controls. Tumors in the treatment group had a significantly longer volume doubling time, and were smaller in volume and more necrotic than matched tumors in control group. rHuTNF-α also induced a 2.3 times increase of cell loss factor. The administration of the above-mentioned dose of rHuTNF-α starting 24 h after single doses of localized irradiation under hypoxic condition, resulted in a significant reduction in TCD 50 from the control value of 60.9 Gy to 50.5 Gy (p 50 value in the treatment vs. the control groups

  4. PACAP and VIP inhibit the invasiveness of glioblastoma cells exposed to hypoxia through the regulation of HIFs and EGFR expression

    OpenAIRE

    Grazia eMaugeri; Agata Grazia eD'Amico; Agata Grazia eD'Amico; Rita eReitano; Gaetano eMagro; Sebastiano eCavallaro; Salvatore eSalomone; Velia eD'Agata

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) through the binding of vasoactive intestinal peptide receptors (VIPRs), perform a wide variety of effects in human cancers, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This tumor is characterized by extensive areas of hypoxia, which triggers the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). HIFs not only mediate angiogenesis but also tumor cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, HIFs activation...

  5. Concurrent bevacizumab and temozolomide alter the patterns of failure in radiation treatment of glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, Lisa BE; Kadner, Robert; Vitaz, Todd W; Spalding, Aaron C

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the pattern of failure in glioblastoma multiforma (GBM) patients treated with concurrent radiation, bevacizumab (BEV), and temozolomide (TMZ). Previous studies demonstrated a predominantly in-field pattern of failure for GBM patients not treated with concurrent BEV. We reviewed the treatment of 23 patients with GBM who received 30 fractions of simultaneous integrated boost IMRT. PTV60 received 2 Gy daily to the tumor bed or residual tumor while PTV54 received 1.8 Gy daily to the surrounding edema. Concurrent TMZ (75 mg/m 2 ) daily and BEV (10 mg/kg every 2 weeks) were given during radiation therapy. One month after RT completion, adjuvant TMZ (150 mg/m 2 × 5 days) and BEV were delivered monthly until progression or 12 months total. With a median follow-up of 12 months, the median disease-free and overall survival were not reached. Four patients discontinued therapy due to toxicity for the following reasons: bone marrow suppression (2), craniotomy wound infection (1), and pulmonary embolus (1). Five patients had grade 2 or 3 hypertension managed by oral medications. Of the 12 patients with tumor recurrence, 7 suffered distant failure with either subependymal (5/12; 41%) or deep white matter (2/12; 17%) spread detected on T2 FLAIR sequences. Five of 12 patients (41%) with a recurrence demonstrated evidence of GAD enhancement. The patterns of failure did not correlate with extent of resection or number of adjuvant cycles. Treatment of GBM patients with concurrent radiation, BEV, and TMZ was well tolerated in the current study. The majority of patients experienced an out-of-field pattern of failure with radiation, BEV, and TMZ which has not been previously reported. Further investigation is warranted to determine whether BEV alters the underlying tumor biology to improve survival. These data may indicate that the currently used clinical target volume thought to represent microscopic disease for radiation may not be appropriate in combination with TMZ

  6. Immunohistochemically determined total epidermal growth factor receptor levels not of prognostic value in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme: Report from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarti, Arnab; Seiferheld, Wendy; Tu Xiaoyu; Wang Huijun; Zhang Huazhong; Ang, K. Kian; Hammond, Elizabeth; Curran, Walter; Mehta, Minesh

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) performed an analysis of patterns of immunohistochemically detected total epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein expression levels and their prognostic significance on archival tissue in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients from prior prospective RTOG clinical trials. Methods and materials: Patients in this study had been treated on previous RTOG GBM trials (RTOG 7401, 7918, 8302, 8409, 9006, 9305, 9602, and 9806). Tissue microarrays were prepared from 155 patients enrolled in these trials. These specimens were stained using a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for the extracellular binding domain of EGFR to detect total EGFR (including both wild-type phosphorylated and wild-type unphosphorylated isoforms with some cross-reactivity with EGFRvIII). The intensity of total EGFR protein expression was measured by computerized quantitative image analysis using the SAMBA 4000 Cell Image Analysis System. The parameters measured were the mean optical densities over the labeled areas and the staining index, which represents the proportion of stained area relative to the mean stain concentration. Both parameters were correlated with the clinical outcome. Results: No differences in either overall or progression-free survival could be demonstrated by the mean optical density class or mean optical density quartile or the staining index of total EGFR immunostaining among the representative RTOG GBM cases. Conclusion: Total EGFR protein expression levels, as measured immunohistochemically, do not appear to be of prognostic value in newly diagnosed GBM patients. Given the accumulating clinical evidence of the activity of anti-EGFR agents in GBM and the preclinical data suggesting the important role of downstream mediators as effectors of EGFR signaling, the RTOG is conducting additional investigations into the prognostic value of activation patterns of EGFR signaling, both at the level of the receptor

  7. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis brain abscess mimicking meningitis after surgery for glioblastoma multiforme: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, Léa; Dubourg, Grégory; Graillon, Thomas; Honnorat, Estelle; Lepidi, Hubert; Drancourt, Michel; Seng, Piseth; Stein, Andreas

    2016-07-07

    Salmonella brain abscess associated with brain tumor is rare. Only 11 cases have been reported to date. Here we report a case of brain abscess caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis mimicking post-surgical meningitis in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. A 60-year-old Algerian woman was admitted through an emergency department for a 4-day history of headache, nausea and vomiting, and behavioral disorders. Surgery for cerebral tumor excision was performed and histopathological analysis revealed glioblastoma multiforme. On the seventh day post-surgery, she presented a sudden neurological deterioration with a meningeal syndrome, confusion, and fever of 39.8°C. Her cerebrospinal fluid sample and blood cultures were positive for S. enterica Enteritidis. She was treated with ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. On the 17th day post-surgery, she presented a new neurological disorder and purulent discharge from the surgical wound. Brain computed tomography revealed a large cerebral abscess located at the operative site. Surgical drainage of the abscess was performed and microbial cultures of surgical deep samples were positive for the same S. enterica Enteritidis isolate. She recovered and was discharged 6 weeks after admission. In this case report, a brain abscess was initially diagnosed as Salmonella post-surgical meningitis before the imaging diagnosis of the brain abscess. The diagnosis of brain abscess should be considered in all cases of non-typhoidal Salmonella meningitis after surgery for brain tumor. Surgical brain abscess drainage followed by prolonged antibiotic treatment remains a major therapeutic option.

  8. What’s the clinical significance of adding diffusion and perfusion MRI in the differentiation of glioblastoma multiforme and solitary brain metastasis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr F. Mourad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the additional diagnostic value of diffusion and perfusion MRI in the differentiation of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM and solitary brain metastasis. Patients and methods: This retrospective study included 24 patients with histologically proven brain tumors who underwent conventional MRI with analysis of diffusion (DWI and perfusion (PWI MRI findings of each tumor. The Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC values were calculated in the minimum (ADC-MIN, mean (ADC-MEAN, and maximum (ADC-MAX in all the tumors and the peritumoral regions. The PWI data was expressed as maximum regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV of the tumors and peritumoral regions. Results: After adding diffusion and perfusion to conventional MRI findings, we found that the accuracy of differentiation between glioblastoma multiforme (GBM and solitary metastasis increased from 70% to 90%.There is a significant difference in DWI signal intensity between GBM and metastatic tumors (P < 0.05. The ADC values of GBM were lower than that of metastatic tumors. On perfusion MRI, the maximum rCBV of the peritumoral region (rCBVP of GBM was higher than that of brain metastases (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The addition of diffusion and perfusion to the MRI protocol increases the accuracy of differentiation between GBM and solitary brain metastasis and should be considered routinely. Keywords: Diffusion MRI, Perfusion MRI, GBM, Solitary brain metastases

  9. Long-sustaining response in a patient with non-resectable, distant recurrence of glioblastoma multiforme treated by interstitial photodynamic therapy using 5-ALA: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stummer, Walter; Beck, Tobias; Beyer, Wolfgang; Mehrkens, Jan Hendrik; Obermeier, Andreas; Etminan, Nima; Stepp, Herbert; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Baumgartner, Reinhold; Herms, Jochen; Kreth, Friedrich Wilhelm

    2008-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme continues to be a devastating disease despite modest improvements in survival achieved at present, and there is an urgent need for innovative treatment concepts. Five-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a drug which induces protoporphyrin IX accumulation in malignant gliomas and has been explored for fluorescence-guided resections of these tumors. ALA is also under investigation as a photosensitizer. We report a case of a patient with prior left frontal glioblastoma multiforme treated by surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, who developed a remote lesion in the left insula, which was refractory to secondary treatments. In a compassionate use setting she was treated by oral application of ALA (20 mg/kg bodyweight), and stereotactic phototherapy achieved by positioning four laser diffusors using 3-dimensional irradiation planning, and a 633 nm diode laser. The lesion disappeared 24 h after therapy. Circumferential contrast enhancement was observed at 72 h, which disappeared in the course of subsequent months. Edema resolved completely. The patient is still free of recurrence 56 months after treatment, demonstrating an impressive and long-lasting response to this novel mode of therapy.

  10. [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for targeting radiation dose escalation for patients with glioblastoma multiforme: Clinical outcomes and patterns of failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, James G.; Stelzer, Keith J.; Mankoff, David A.; Tralins, Kevin S.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Muzi, Mark; Silbergeld, Daniel L.; Rostomily, Robert C.; Scharnhorst, Jeffrey B.S.; Spence, Alexander M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging for brain tumors has been shown to identify areas of active disease. Radiation dose escalation in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme may lead to improved disease control. Based on these premises, we initiated a prospective study of FDG-PET for the treatment planning of radiation dose escalation for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Forty patients were enrolled. Patients were treated with standard conformal fractionated radiotherapy with volumes defined by MRI imaging. When patients reached a dose of 45-50.4 Gy, they underwent FDG-PET imaging for boost target delineation, for an additional 20 Gy (2 Gy per fraction) to a total dose of 79.4 Gy (n = 30). Results: The estimated 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) for the entire group was 70% and 17%, respectively, with a median overall survival of 70 weeks. The estimated 1-year and 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 18% and 3%, respectively, with a median of 24 weeks. No significant improvements in OS or PFS were observed for the study group in comparison to institutional historical controls. Conclusions: Radiation dose escalation to 79.4 Gy based on FDG-PET imaging demonstrated no improvement in OS or PFS. This study establishes the feasibility of integrating PET metabolic imaging into radiotherapy treatment planning

  11. Coordination of glioblastoma cell motility by PKCι

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldwin R Mitchell

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma is one of the deadliest forms of cancer, in part because of its highly invasive nature. The tumor suppressor PTEN is frequently mutated in glioblastoma and is known to contribute to the invasive phenotype. However the downstream events that promote invasion are not fully understood. PTEN loss leads to activation of the atypical protein kinase C, PKCι. We have previously shown that PKCι is required for glioblastoma cell invasion, primarily by enhancing cell motility. Here we have used time-lapse videomicroscopy to more precisely define the role of PKCι in glioblastoma. Results Glioblastoma cells in which PKCι was either depleted by shRNA or inhibited pharmacologically were unable to coordinate the formation of a single leading edge lamellipod. Instead, some cells generated multiple small, short-lived protrusions while others generated a diffuse leading edge that formed around the entire circumference of the cell. Confocal microscopy showed that this behavior was associated with altered behavior of the cytoskeletal protein Lgl, which is known to be inactivated by PKCι phosphorylation. Lgl in control cells localized to the lamellipod leading edge and did not associate with its binding partner non-muscle myosin II, consistent with it being in an inactive state. In PKCι-depleted cells, Lgl was concentrated at multiple sites at the periphery of the cell and remained in association with non-muscle myosin II. Videomicroscopy also identified a novel role for PKCι in the cell cycle. Cells in which PKCι was either depleted by shRNA or inhibited pharmacologically entered mitosis normally, but showed marked delays in completing mitosis. Conclusions PKCι promotes glioblastoma motility by coordinating the formation of a single leading edge lamellipod and has a role in remodeling the cytoskeleton at the lamellipod leading edge, promoting the dissociation of Lgl from non-muscle myosin II. In addition PKCι is required

  12. Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cells in Tumor Suppressor Mouse Models of Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara Llaguno, Sheila R; Xie, Xuanhua; Parada, Luis F

    2016-01-01

    The cellular origins and the mechanisms of progression, maintenance of tumorigenicity, and therapeutic resistance are central questions in the glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) field. Using tumor suppressor mouse models, our group recently reported two independent populations of adult GBM-initiating central nervous system progenitors. We found different functional and molecular subtypes depending on the tumor-initiating cell lineage, indicating that the cell of origin is a driver of GBM subtype diversity. Using an in vivo model, we also showed that GBM cancer stem cells (CSCs) or glioma stem cells (GSCs) contribute to resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and that genetic ablation of GSCs leads to a delay in tumor progression. These studies are consistent with the cell of origin and CSCs as critical regulators of the pathogenesis of GBM. © 2016 Alcantara Llaguno et al; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  13. The role of IDH1 mutated tumour cells in secondary glioblastomas: an evolutionary game theoretical view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basanta, David; Scott, Jacob G.; Rockne, Russ; Swanson, Kristin R.; Anderson, Alexander R. A.

    2011-02-01

    Recent advances in clinical medicine have elucidated two significantly different subtypes of glioblastoma which carry very different prognoses, both defined by mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH-1). The mechanistic consequences of this mutation have not yet been fully clarified, with conflicting opinions existing in the literature; however, IDH-1 mutation may be used as a surrogate marker to distinguish between primary and secondary glioblastoma multiforme (sGBM) from malignant progression of a lower grade glioma. We develop a mathematical model of IDH-1 mutated secondary glioblastoma using evolutionary game theory to investigate the interactions between four different phenotypic populations within the tumor: autonomous growth, invasive, glycolytic, and the hybrid invasive/glycolytic cells. Our model recapitulates glioblastoma behavior well and is able to reproduce two recent experimental findings, as well as make novel predictions concerning the rate of invasive growth as a function of vascularity, and fluctuations in the proportions of phenotypic populations that a glioblastoma will experience under different microenvironmental constraints.

  14. The role of IDH1 mutated tumour cells in secondary glioblastomas: an evolutionary game theoretical view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basanta, David; Scott, Jacob G; Anderson, Alexander R A; Rockne, Russ; Swanson, Kristin R

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in clinical medicine have elucidated two significantly different subtypes of glioblastoma which carry very different prognoses, both defined by mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH-1). The mechanistic consequences of this mutation have not yet been fully clarified, with conflicting opinions existing in the literature; however, IDH-1 mutation may be used as a surrogate marker to distinguish between primary and secondary glioblastoma multiforme (sGBM) from malignant progression of a lower grade glioma. We develop a mathematical model of IDH-1 mutated secondary glioblastoma using evolutionary game theory to investigate the interactions between four different phenotypic populations within the tumor: autonomous growth, invasive, glycolytic, and the hybrid invasive/glycolytic cells. Our model recapitulates glioblastoma behavior well and is able to reproduce two recent experimental findings, as well as make novel predictions concerning the rate of invasive growth as a function of vascularity, and fluctuations in the proportions of phenotypic populations that a glioblastoma will experience under different microenvironmental constraints

  15. Identification of novel candidate target genes in amplicons of Glioblastoma multiforme tumors detected by expression and CGH microarray profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Moneo Jose-Luis

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional cytogenetic and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH studies in brain malignancies have shown that glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is characterized by complex structural and numerical alterations. However, the limited resolution of these techniques has precluded the precise identification of detailed specific gene copy number alterations. Results We performed a genome-wide survey of gene copy number changes in 20 primary GBMs by CGH on cDNA microarrays. A novel amplicon at 4p15, and previously uncharacterized amplicons at 13q32-34 and 1q32 were detected and are analyzed here. These amplicons contained amplified genes not previously reported. Other amplified regions containg well-known oncogenes in GBMs were also detected at 7p12 (EGFR, 7q21 (CDK6, 4q12 (PDGFRA, and 12q13-15 (MDM2 and CDK4. In order to identify the putative target genes of the amplifications, and to determine the changes in gene expression levels associated with copy number change events, we carried out parallel gene expression profiling analyses using the same cDNA microarrays. We detected overexpression of the novel amplified genes SLA/LP and STIM2 (4p15, and TNFSF13B and COL4A2 (13q32-34. Some of the candidate target genes of amplification (EGFR, CDK6, MDM2, CDK4, and TNFSF13B were tested in an independent set of 111 primary GBMs by using FISH and immunohistological assays. The novel candidate 13q-amplification target TNFSF13B was amplified in 8% of the tumors, and showed protein expression in 20% of the GBMs. Conclusion This high-resolution analysis allowed us to propose novel candidate target genes such as STIM2 at 4p15, and TNFSF13B or COL4A2 at 13q32-34 that could potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of these tumors and which would require futher investigations. We showed that overexpression of the amplified genes could be attributable to gene dosage and speculate that deregulation of those genes could be important in the development

  16. SU-F-R-17: Advancing Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) Recurrence Detection with MRI Image Texture Feature Extraction and Machine Learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, V; Ruan, D; Nguyen, D; Kaprealian, T; Chin, R; Sheng, K [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To test the potential of early Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) recurrence detection utilizing image texture pattern analysis in serial MR images post primary treatment intervention. Methods: MR image-sets of six time points prior to the confirmed recurrence diagnosis of a GBM patient were included in this study, with each time point containing T1 pre-contrast, T1 post-contrast, T2-Flair, and T2-TSE images. Eight Gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) texture features including Contrast, Correlation, Dissimilarity, Energy, Entropy, Homogeneity, Sum-Average, and Variance were calculated from all images, resulting in a total of 32 features at each time point. A confirmed recurrent volume was contoured, along with an adjacent non-recurrent region-of-interest (ROI) and both volumes were propagated to all prior time points via deformable image registration. A support vector machine (SVM) with radial-basis-function kernels was trained on the latest time point prior to the confirmed recurrence to construct a model for recurrence classification. The SVM model was then applied to all prior time points and the volumes classified as recurrence were obtained. Results: An increase in classified volume was observed over time as expected. The size of classified recurrence maintained at a stable level of approximately 0.1 cm{sup 3} up to 272 days prior to confirmation. Noticeable volume increase to 0.44 cm{sup 3} was demonstrated at 96 days prior, followed by significant increase to 1.57 cm{sup 3} at 42 days prior. Visualization of the classified volume shows the merging of recurrence-susceptible region as the volume change became noticeable. Conclusion: Image texture pattern analysis in serial MR images appears to be sensitive to detecting the recurrent GBM a long time before the recurrence is confirmed by a radiologist. The early detection may improve the efficacy of targeted intervention including radiosurgery. More patient cases will be included to create a generalizable

  17. SU-F-R-42: Association of Radiomic and Metabolic Tumor Volumes in Radiation Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, C; Nagornaya, N; Parra, N; Kwon, D; Ishkanian, F; Markoe, A; Maudsley, A; Stoyanova, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: High-throughput extraction of imaging and metabolomic quantitative features from MRI and MR Spectroscopy Imaging (MRSI) of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) results in tens of variables per patient. In radiotherapy (RT) of GBM, the relevant metabolic tumor volumes (MTVs) are related to aberrant levels of N-acetyl Aspartate (NAA) and Choline (Cho). Corresponding Clinical Target Volumes (CTVs) for RT planning are based on Contrast Enhancing T1-weighted MRI (CE-T1w) and T2-weighted/Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) MRI. The objective is to build a framework for investigation of associations between imaging, CTV, and MTV features better understanding of the underlying information in the CTVs and dependencies between these volumes. Methods: Necrotic portions, enhancing lesion and edema were manually contoured on T1w/T2w images for 17 GBM patients. CTVs and MTVs for NAA (MTV NAA ) and Cho (MTV Cho ) were constructed. Tumors were scored categorically for ten semantic imaging traits by neuroradiologist. All features were investigated for redundancy. Two-way correlations between imaging and RT/MTV features were visualized as heat maps. Associations between MTV NAA , MTV Cho and imaging features were studied using Spearman correlation. Results: 39 imaging features were computed per patient. Half of the imaging traits were replaced with automatically extracted continuous variables. 21 features were extracted from MTVs/CTVs. There were a high number (43) of significant correlations of imaging with CTVs/MTV NAA while very few (10) significant correlations were with CTVs/MTV Cho . MTV NAA was found to be closely associated with MRI volumes, MTV Cho remains elusive for characterization with imaging. Conclusion: A framework for investigation of co-dependency between MRI and RT/metabolic features is established. A series of semantic imaging traits were replaced with automatically extracted continuous variables. The approach will allow for exploration of relationships

  18. SU-F-R-42: Association of Radiomic and Metabolic Tumor Volumes in Radiation Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, C; Nagornaya, N; Parra, N; Kwon, D; Ishkanian, F; Markoe, A; Maudsley, A; Stoyanova, R [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: High-throughput extraction of imaging and metabolomic quantitative features from MRI and MR Spectroscopy Imaging (MRSI) of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) results in tens of variables per patient. In radiotherapy (RT) of GBM, the relevant metabolic tumor volumes (MTVs) are related to aberrant levels of N-acetyl Aspartate (NAA) and Choline (Cho). Corresponding Clinical Target Volumes (CTVs) for RT planning are based on Contrast Enhancing T1-weighted MRI (CE-T1w) and T2-weighted/Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) MRI. The objective is to build a framework for investigation of associations between imaging, CTV, and MTV features better understanding of the underlying information in the CTVs and dependencies between these volumes. Methods: Necrotic portions, enhancing lesion and edema were manually contoured on T1w/T2w images for 17 GBM patients. CTVs and MTVs for NAA (MTV{sub NAA}) and Cho (MTV{sub Cho}) were constructed. Tumors were scored categorically for ten semantic imaging traits by neuroradiologist. All features were investigated for redundancy. Two-way correlations between imaging and RT/MTV features were visualized as heat maps. Associations between MTV{sub NAA}, MTV{sub Cho} and imaging features were studied using Spearman correlation. Results: 39 imaging features were computed per patient. Half of the imaging traits were replaced with automatically extracted continuous variables. 21 features were extracted from MTVs/CTVs. There were a high number (43) of significant correlations of imaging with CTVs/MTV{sub NAA} while very few (10) significant correlations were with CTVs/MTV{sub Cho}. MTV{sub NAA} was found to be closely associated with MRI volumes, MTV{sub Cho} remains elusive for characterization with imaging. Conclusion: A framework for investigation of co-dependency between MRI and RT/metabolic features is established. A series of semantic imaging traits were replaced with automatically extracted continuous variables. The approach will

  19. Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug DeliveryVehicle for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikanjam, Mina; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Shu,Xiao; Budinger, Thomas F.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2006-06-14

    This paper discribes a synthetic low density lipoprotein(LDL) made by complexing a 29 amino acid that consists of a lipid bindingdomain and the LDL receptor binding domain with a lipid microemulsion.The nano-LDL particles were intermdiate in size between LDL and HDL andbound to LDL receptors on GBM brain tumor cells. Synthetic nano-LDLuptake by GBM cells was LDL receptor specific and dependent on cellreceptor number. It is suggested that these synthetic particles can serveas a delivery vehicle for hydophobic anti-tumor drugs by targeting theLDL receptor.

  20. Intracerebral neurocysticercosis mimicking glioblastoma multiforme: a rare differential diagnosis in Central Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabel, M.; Weber, F.; Neuen-Jacob, E.; Vogt, C.

    2001-01-01

    A 47-year-old Greek man presented with a 4-week history of speech difficulties. CT and MRI revealed a low-density multilobulated cystic frontal mass with peripheral ring contrast enhancement adjacent to the sylvian fissure. Examination was normal. Blood tests revealed leucocytosis (16,000 cells/μl) and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (30/52). A malignant brain tumour was suspected and surgically removed. Histological examination disclosed intracerebral neurocysticercosis. (orig.)

  1. Natural killer (NK) cells inhibit systemic metastasis of glioblastoma cells and have therapeutic effects against glioblastomas in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se Jeong; Kang, Won Young; Yoon, Yeup; Jin, Ju Youn; Song, Hye Jin; Her, Jung Hyun; Kang, Sang Mi; Hwang, Yu Kyeong; Kang, Kyeong Jin; Joo, Kyeung Min; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2015-12-24

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is characterized by extensive local invasion, which is in contrast with extremely rare systemic metastasis of GBM. Molecular mechanisms inhibiting systemic metastasis of GBM would be a novel therapeutic candidate for GBM in the brain. Patient-derived GBM cells were primarily cultured from surgical samples of GBM patients and were inoculated into the brains of immune deficient BALB/c-nude or NOD-SCID IL2Rgamma(null) (NSG) mice. Human NK cells were isolated from peripheral blood mononucleated cells and expanded in vitro. Patient-derived GBM cells in the brains of NSG mice unexpectedly induced spontaneous lung metastasis although no metastasis was detected in BALB/c-nude mice. Based on the difference of the innate immunity between two mouse strains, NK cell activities of orthotopic GBM xenograft models based on BALB/c-nude mice were inhibited. NK cell inactivation induced spontaneous lung metastasis of GBM cells, which indicated that NK cells inhibit the systemic metastasis. In vitro cytotoxic activities of human NK cells against GBM cells indicated that cytotoxic activity of NK cells against GBM cells prevents systemic metastasis of GBM and that NK cells could be effective cell therapeutics against GBM. Accordingly, NK cells transplanted into orthotopic GBM xenograft models intravenously or intratumorally induced apoptosis of GBM cells in the brain and showed significant therapeutic effects. Our results suggest that innate NK immunity is responsible for rare systemic metastasis of GBM and that sufficient supplementation of NK cells could be a promising immunotherapeutic strategy for GBM in the brain.

  2. Development and in vitro testing of liposomal gadolinium-formulations for neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    For the improvement of current neutron capture therapy, several liposomal formulations of neutron capture agent gadolinium were developed and tested in a glioma cell model. Formulations were analyzed regarding physicochemical and biological parameters, such as size, zeta potential, uptake into cancer cells and performance under neutron irradiation. The neutron and photon dose derived from intracellular as well as extracellular Gd was calculated via Monte Carlo simulations and set in correlation with the reduction of cell survival after irradiation. To investigate the suitability of Gd as a radiosensitizer for photon radiation, cells were also irradiated with synchrotron radiation in addition to clinically used photons generated by linear accelerator. Irradiation with neutrons led to significantly lower survival for Gd-liposome-treated F98 and LN229 cells, compared to irradiated control cells and cells treated with non-liposomal Gd-DTPA. Correlation between Gd-content and -dose and respective cell survival displayed proportional relationship for most of the applied formulations. Photon irradiation experiments showed the proof-of-principle for the radiosensitizer approach, although the photon spectra currently used have to be optimized for higher efficiency of the radiosensitizer. In conclusion, the newly developed Gd-liposomes show great potential for the improvement of radiation treatment options for highly malignant glioblastoma.

  3. The effect of combining recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha with local radiation on tumor control probability of a human glioblastoma multiforme xenograft in nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Peigen; Allam, Ayman; Perez, Luis A; Taghian, Alphonse; Freeman, Jill; Suit, Herman D

    1995-04-30

    Purpose: To evaluate the antitumor activity of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rHuTNF-{alpha}) on a human glioblastoma multiforme (U87) xenograft in nude mice, and to study the effect of combining rHuTNF-{alpha} with local radiation on the tumor control probability of this tumor model. Methods and Materials: U87 xenograft was transplanted SC into the right hindleg of NCr/Sed nude mice (7-8 weeks old, male). When tumors reached a volume of about 110 mm{sup 3}, mice were randomly assigned to treatment: rHuTNF-{alpha} alone compared with normal saline control; or local radiation plus rHuTNF-{alpha} vs. local radiation plus normal saline. Parameters of growth delay, volume doubling time, percentage of necrosis, and cell loss factor were used to assess the antitumor effects of rHuTNF-{alpha} on this tumor. The TCD{sub 50} (tumor control dose 50%) was used as an endpoint to determine the effect of combining rHuTNF-{alpha} with local radiation. Results: Tumor growth in mice treated with a dose of 150 {mu}g/kg body weight rHuTNF-{alpha}, IP injection daily for 7 consecutive days, was delayed about 8 days compared to that in controls. Tumors in the treatment group had a significantly longer volume doubling time, and were smaller in volume and more necrotic than matched tumors in control group. rHuTNF-{alpha} also induced a 2.3 times increase of cell loss factor. The administration of the above-mentioned dose of rHuTNF-{alpha} starting 24 h after single doses of localized irradiation under hypoxic condition, resulted in a significant reduction in TCD{sub 50} from the control value of 60.9 Gy to 50.5 Gy (p < 0.01). Conclusion: rHuTNF-{alpha} exhibits an antitumor effect against U87 xenograft in nude mice, as evidenced by an increased delay in tumor growth as well as cell loss factor. Also, there was an augmentation of tumor curability when given in combination with radiotherapy, resulting in a significantly lower TCD{sub 50} value in the treatment vs. the

  4. Glioblastoma-Initiating Cells: Relationship with Neural Stem Cells and the Micro-Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goffart, Nicolas [Laboratory of Developmental Neurobiology, GIGA-Neurosciences Research Center, University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium); Kroonen, Jérôme [Human Genetics, CHU and University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium); The T& P Bohnenn Laboratory for Neuro-Oncology, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, UMC Utrecht, Utrecht 3556 (Netherlands); Rogister, Bernard, E-mail: Bernard.Register@ulg.ac.be [Laboratory of Developmental Neurobiology, GIGA-Neurosciences Research Center, University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium); Department of Neurology, CHU and University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium); GIGA-Development, Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium)

    2013-08-14

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO grade IV) is the most common and lethal subtype of primary brain tumor with a median overall survival of 15 months from the time of diagnosis. The presence in GBM of a cancer population displaying neural stem cell (NSC) properties as well as tumor-initiating abilities and resistance to current therapies suggests that these glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs) play a central role in tumor development and are closely related to NSCs. However, it is nowadays still unclear whether GICs derive from NSCs, neural progenitor cells or differentiated cells such as astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. On the other hand, NSCs are located in specific regions of the adult brain called neurogenic niches that have been shown to control critical stem cell properties, to nourish NSCs and to support their self-renewal. This “seed-and-soil” relationship has also been adapted to cancer stem cell research as GICs also require a specific micro-environment to maintain their “stem cell” properties. In this review, we will discuss the controversies surrounding the origin and the identification of GBM stem cells and highlight the micro-environment impact on their biology.

  5. Glioblastoma-Initiating Cells: Relationship with Neural Stem Cells and the Micro-Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goffart, Nicolas; Kroonen, Jérôme; Rogister, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO grade IV) is the most common and lethal subtype of primary brain tumor with a median overall survival of 15 months from the time of diagnosis. The presence in GBM of a cancer population displaying neural stem cell (NSC) properties as well as tumor-initiating abilities and resistance to current therapies suggests that these glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs) play a central role in tumor development and are closely related to NSCs. However, it is nowadays still unclear whether GICs derive from NSCs, neural progenitor cells or differentiated cells such as astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. On the other hand, NSCs are located in specific regions of the adult brain called neurogenic niches that have been shown to control critical stem cell properties, to nourish NSCs and to support their self-renewal. This “seed-and-soil” relationship has also been adapted to cancer stem cell research as GICs also require a specific micro-environment to maintain their “stem cell” properties. In this review, we will discuss the controversies surrounding the origin and the identification of GBM stem cells and highlight the micro-environment impact on their biology

  6. Glioblastoma-Initiating Cells: Relationship with Neural Stem Cells and the Micro-Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Goffart

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO grade IV is the most common and lethal subtype of primary brain tumor with a median overall survival of 15 months from the time of diagnosis. The presence in GBM of a cancer population displaying neural stem cell (NSC properties as well as tumor-initiating abilities and resistance to current therapies suggests that these glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs play a central role in tumor development and are closely related to NSCs. However, it is nowadays still unclear whether GICs derive from NSCs, neural progenitor cells or differentiated cells such as astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. On the other hand, NSCs are located in specific regions of the adult brain called neurogenic niches that have been shown to control critical stem cell properties, to nourish NSCs and to support their self-renewal. This “seed-and-soil” relationship has also been adapted to cancer stem cell research as GICs also require a specific micro-environment to maintain their “stem cell” properties. In this review, we will discuss the controversies surrounding the origin and the identification of GBM stem cells and highlight the micro-environment impact on their biology.

  7. MiR-196a exerts its oncogenic effect in glioblastoma multiforme by inhibition of IκBα both in vitro and in vivo

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Guang

    2014-01-23

    BackgroundRecent studies have revealed that miR-196a is upregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and that it correlates with the clinical outcome of patients with GBM. However, its potential regulatory mechanisms in GBM have never been reported.MethodsWe used quantitative real-time PCR to assess miR-196a expression levels in 132 GBM specimens in a single institution. Oncogenic capability of miR-196a was detected by apoptosis and proliferation assays in U87MG and T98G cells. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expression of IκBα in GBM tissues, and a luciferase reporter assay was carried out to confirm whether IκBα is a direct target of miR-196a. In vivo, xenograft tumors were examined for an antiglioma effect of miR-196a inhibitors.ResultsWe present for the first time evidence that miR-196a could directly interact with IκBα 3′-UTR to suppress IκBα expression and subsequently promote activation of NF-κB, consequently promoting proliferation of and suppressing apoptosis in GBM cells both in vitro and in vivo. Our study confirmed that miR-196a was upregulated in GBM specimens and that high levels of miR-196a were significantly correlated with poor outcome in a large cohort of GBM patients. Our data from human tumor xenografts in nude mice treated with miR-196 inhibitors demonstrated that inhibition of miR-196a could ameliorate tumor growth in vivo.ConclusionsMiR-196a exerts its oncogenic effect in GBM by inhibiting IκBα both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of GBM and indicate that miR-196a may predict clinical outcome of GBM patients and serve as a new therapeutic target for GBM. © 2014 © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Role of Intra-operative MRI (iMRI) in Improving Extent of Resection and Survival in Patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Inamullah; Waqas, Muhammad; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2017-07-01

    Multiple intraoperative aids have been introduced to improve the extent of resection (EOR) in Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) patients, avoiding any new neurological deficits. Intraoperative MRI (iMRI) has been debated for its utility and cost for nearly two decades in neurosurgical literature. Review of literature suggests improved EOR in GBM patients who underwent iMRI assisted surgical resections leading to higher overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS). iMRI provides real time intraoperative imaging with reasonable quality. Higher risk for new postoperative deficits with increased EOR is not reported in any study using iMRI. The level of evidence regarding prognostic benefits of iMRI is still of low quality..

  9. Quantitative Analyses of Synergistic Responses between Cannabidiol and DNA-Damaging Agents on the Proliferation and Viability of Glioblastoma and Neural Progenitor Cells in Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Liting; Ng, Lindsay; Ozawa, Tatsuya; Stella, Nephi

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the nonpsychotropic cannabis-derived compound, cannabidiol (CBD), has antineoplastic activity in multiple types of cancers, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). DNA-damaging agents remain the main standard of care treatment available for patients diagnosed with GBM. Here we studied the antiproliferative and cell-killing activity of CBD alone and in combination with DNA-damaging agents (temozolomide, carmustine, or cisplatin) in several human GBM cell lines and in mo...

  10. What is the value of emission tomography studies in patients with a primary glioblastoma multiforme treated by {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koot, R W; Bosch, D A [Academic Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Habraken, J B.A. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, M C.C.M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiotherapy, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Paans, A M.J.; Pruim, J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)], e-mail: r.w.koot@lumc.nl

    2008-07-01

    We studied the use of {sup 201}thallium SPECT and L-[1-{sup 11}C]-tyrosine PET in patients with a primary glioblastoma multiforme treated with {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy after surgery and external beam radiation therapy. We hypothesised that the patients most likely to benefit from further surgery after deterioration would be those with radiation necrosis and would be recognised by a negative emission tomography scan. Twenty-one patients underwent {sup 201}thallium SPECT performed before brachytherapy, and this was repeated in 19 patients when recurrence was suspected. Nine patients also underwent a PET scan at the same time. Nine patients underwent a second operation. SPECT and PET were highly concordant concerning the prediction of radionecrosis and/or tumor recurrence. Repeat surgery did not lead to a significant increase in survival. There was no significant association between the duration of survival and tumor-to-background ratio but the number studied was small. Both SPECT and PET showed highly active lesions, which were proved to be recurrent tumor by clinical and histological follow-up. Although PET and SPECT are both highly sensitive in detecting active tumor tissue, emission tomography was not clinically valuable in the investigation of patients with a primary glioblastoma treated with brachytherapy. (author)

  11. PCDH10 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echizen, Kanae; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Hayashi, Tomoatsu; Sabit, Hemragul; Furuta, Takuya; Nakai, Miyuki; Koyama-Nasu, Ryo; Nishimura, Yukiko; Taniue, Kenzui; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Hirano, Shinji; Terai, Kenta; Todo, Tomoki; Ino, Yasushi; Mukasa, Akitake; Takayanagi, Shunsaku; Ohtani, Ryohei; Saito, Nobuhito; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PCDH10 is required for the proliferation, survival and self-renewal of glioblastoma cells. • PCDH10 is required for glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • PCDH10 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. • PCDH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma. - Abstract: Protocadherin10 (PCDH10)/OL-protocadherin is a cadherin-related transmembrane protein that has multiple roles in the brain, including facilitating specific cell–cell connections, cell migration and axon guidance. It has recently been reported that PCDH10 functions as a tumor suppressor and that its overexpression inhibits proliferation or invasion of multiple tumor cells. However, the function of PCDH10 in glioblastoma cells has not been elucidated. In contrast to previous reports on other tumors, we show here that suppression of the expression of PCDH10 by RNA interference (RNAi) induces the growth arrest and apoptosis of glioblastoma cells in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that knockdown of PCDH10 inhibits the growth of glioblastoma cells xenografted into immunocompromised mice. These results suggest that PCDH10 is required for the proliferation and tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. We speculate that PCDH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma

  12. Bcl-w Enhances Mesenchymal Changes and Invasiveness of Glioblastoma Cells by Inducing Nuclear Accumulation of β-Catenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo Sang; Woo, Eun Young; Kwon, Junhye; Park, Myung-Jin; Lee, Jae-Seon; Han, Young-Hoon; Bae, In Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Bcl-w a pro-survival member of the Bcl-2 protein family, is expressed in a variety of cancer types, including gastric and colorectal adenocarcinomas, as well as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and lethal brain tumor type. Previously, we demonstrated that Bcl-w is upregulated in gastric cancer cells, particularly those displaying infiltrative morphology. These reports propose that Bcl-w is strongly associated with aggressive characteristic, such as invasive or mesenchymal phenotype of GBM. However, there is no information from studies of the role of Bcl-w in GBM. In the current study, we showed that Bcl-w is upregulated in human glioblastoma multiforme (WHO grade IV) tissues, compared with normal and glioma (WHO grade III) tissues. Bcl-w promotes the mesenchymal traits of glioblastoma cells by inducing vimentin expression via activation of transcription factors, β-catenin, Twist1 and Snail in glioblastoma U251 cells. Moreover, Bcl-w induces invasiveness by promoting MMP-2 and FAK activation via the PI3K-p-Akt-p-GSK3β-β-catenin pathway. We further confirmed that Bcl-w has the capacity to induce invasiveness in several human cancer cell lines. In particular, Bcl-w-stimulated β-catenin is translocated into the nucleus as a transcription factor and promotes the expression of target genes, such as mesenchymal markers or MMPs, thereby increasing mesenchymal traits and invasiveness. Our findings collectively indicate that Bcl-w functions as a positive regulator of invasiveness by inducing mesenchymal changes and that trigger their aggressiveness of glioblastoma cells. PMID:23826359

  13. Study of interaction of GNR with glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, Arti; Cardoso-Avila, P. E.; Sridharan, Sangita; Sahu, Aditi; Nair, Jyothi; Dongre, Harsh; Goda, Jayant S.; Sawant, Sharada; Dutt, Shilpee; Pichardo-Molina, J. L.; Murali Krishna, C.

    2018-01-01

    Radiation resistance is one of the major causes of recurrence and failure of radiotherapy. Different methods have been used to increase the efficacy of radiation therapy and at the same time restrict the radiation resistivity. From last few years nanoparticles have played a key role in the enhancement of radiosensitization. The densely packed nanoparticles can selectively scatter or absorb the high radiations, which allow better targeting of cellular components within the tumor hence resulting in increased radiation damage to the cancer cells. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the highly radioresistant brain cancer. Current treatment methods are surgical resection followed by concurrent chemo and radiation therapy. In this study we have used in-house engineered gold nano rodes (GNR) and analyzed their effect on U-87MG cell lines. MTT assay was employed to determine the cytotoxic concentration of the nanoparticles. Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze the effect of gold nanoparticles on glioma cells, which was followed by transmission electron microscopic examinations to visualize their cellular penetration. Our data shows that GNR were able to penetrate the cells and induce cytotoxicity at the concentration of 198 μM as determined by MTT assay at 24 post GNP treatment. Additionally, we show that Raman spectroscopy, could classify spectra between untreated and cells treated with nanoparticles. Taken together, this study shows GNR penetration and cytotoxicity in glioma cells thereby providing a rationale to use them in cancer therapeutics. Future studies will be carried out to study the biological activity of the formulation as a radiosensitizer in GBM.

  14. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals effects of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on invasion-promoting proteins secreted by glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangar, Vineet; Funk, Cory C; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Campbell, David S; Moritz, Robert L; Price, Nathan D

    2014-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is a highly invasive and aggressive brain tumor with an invariably poor prognosis. The overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a primary influencer of invasion and proliferation in tumor cells and the constitutively active EGFRvIII mutant, found in 30-65% of Glioblastoma multiforme, confers more aggressive invasion. To better understand how EGFR contributes to tumor aggressiveness, we investigated the effect of EGFR on the secreted levels of 65 rationally selected proteins involved in invasion. We employed selected reaction monitoring targeted mass spectrometry using stable isotope labeled internal peptide standards to quantity proteins in the secretome from five GBM (U87) isogenic cell lines in which EGFR, EGFRvIII, and/or PTEN were expressed. Our results show that cell lines with EGFR overexpression and constitutive EGFRvIII expression differ remarkably in the expression profiles for both secreted and intracellular signaling proteins, and alterations in EGFR signaling result in reproducible changes in concentrations of secreted proteins. Furthermore, the EGFRvIII-expressing mutant cell line secretes the majority of the selected invasion-promoting proteins at higher levels than other cell lines tested. Additionally, the intracellular and extracellular protein measurements indicate elevated oxidative stress in the EGFRvIII-expressing cell line. In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrate that EGFR signaling has a significant effect on the levels of secreted invasion-promoting proteins, likely contributing to the aggressiveness of Glioblastoma multiforme. Further characterization of these proteins may provide candidates for new therapeutic strategies and targets as well as biomarkers for this aggressive disease. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Characterization of radioresistant variant from U251 human glioblastoma cell line and the role of antioxdant enzymes in its radioresistancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyung Chahn; Park, In Chul; Park, Myung Jin; Woo, Sang Hyeok; Rhee, Chang Hum; Hong, Seok-II

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the radioresistant mechanism in glioblastoma multiforme(GBM), we isolated the radioresistant clone (RRC) from U251 human glioblastoma cell line by exposing to repeated fractions of 3 Gy γ-radiation for six months. RRC had higher radioresistance than the parent cell line as measured by clonogenic survival assay. FACS analysis showed that RRC had a delayed G2 arrest after radiation. Antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD, catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), were activated up to 5 folds in RRC after radiation. Erk 1/2 activation was higher in RRC than in the parent cell. Therefore, radioresistancy in RRC might be due to the delayed cell cycle, the coordinated high activation of antioxidant enzyme rather than a single enzyme alone,and higher activation of Erk 1/2

  16. The Effect of Z-Ligustilide on the Mobility of Human Glioblastoma T98G Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yin

    Full Text Available Z-ligustilide (LIG, an essential oil extract from Radix Angelica sinensis, has broad pharmaceutical applications in treating cardio-vascular diseases and ischemic brain injury. Recently, LIG has been connected to Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM because of its structural similarity to 3-n-alkyphthalide (NBP, which is specifically cytotoxic to GBM cells. Hence, we investigated LIG's effect on GBM T98G cells. The study shows that LIG can significantly reduce T98G cells' migration in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the attenuation of cellular mobility can be linked to the activity of the Rho GTPases (RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42, the three critical molecular switches governing cytoskeleton remodeling; thus, regulating cell migration. LIG significantly reduces the expression of RhoA and affects in a milder manner the expression of Cdc42 and Rac1.

  17. Glioblastoma progression is assisted by induction of immunosuppressive function of pericytes through interaction with tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdor, Rut; García-Bernal, David; Bueno, Carlos; Ródenas, Mónica; Moraleda, José M.; Macian, Fernando; Martínez, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    The establishment of immune tolerance during Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) progression, is characterized by high levels expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, which suppress the function of tumor assocciated myeloid cells, and the activation and expansion of tumor antigen specific T cells. However, the mechanisms underlying the failed anti-tumor immune response around the blood vessels during GBM, are poorly understood. The consequences of possible interactions between cancer cells and the perivascular compartment might affect the tumor growth. In this work we show for the first time that GBM cells induce immunomodulatory changes in pericytes in a cell interaction-dependent manner, acquiring an immunosuppresive function that possibly assists the evasion of the anti-tumor immune response and consequently participates in tumor growth promotion. Expression of high levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines was detected in vitro and in vivo in brain pericytes that interacted with GBM cells (GBC-PC). Furthermore, reduction of surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules and major histocompatibility complex molecules in GBC-PC correlated with a failure of antigen presentation to T cells and the acquisition of the ability to supress T cell responses. In vivo, orthotopic xenotransplant of human glioblastoma in an immunocompetent mouse model showed significant GBM cell proliferation and tumor growth after the establishment of interspecific immunotolerance that followed GMB interaction with pericytes. PMID:28978142

  18. First clinical results of a personalized immunotherapeutic vaccine against recurrent, incompletely resected, treatment-resistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors, based on combined allo- and auto-immune tumor reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schijns, Virgil E J C; Pretto, Chrystel; Devillers, Laurent; Pierre, Denis; Hofman, Florence M; Chen, Thomas C; Mespouille, Pascal; Hantos, Peter; Glorieux, Philippe; Bota, Daniela A; Stathopoulos, Apostolos

    2015-05-28

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients have a poor prognosis. After tumor recurrence statistics suggest an imminent death within 1-4.5 months. Supportive preclinical data, from a rat model, provided the rational for a prototype clinical vaccine preparation, named Gliovac (or ERC 1671) composed of autologous antigens, derived from the patient's surgically removed tumor tissue, which is administered together with allogeneic antigens from glioma tissue resected from other GBM patients. We now report the first results of the Gliovac treatment for treatment-resistant GBM patients. Nine (9) recurrent GBM patients, after standard of care treatment, including surgery radio- and chemotherapy temozolomide, and for US patients, also bevacizumab (Avastin™), were treated under a compassionate use/hospital exemption protocol. Gliovac was given intradermally, together with human GM-CSF (Leukine(®)), and preceded by a regimen of regulatory T cell-depleting, low-dose cyclophosphamide. Gliovac administration in patients that have failed standard of care therapies showed minimal toxicity and enhanced overall survival (OS). Six-month (26 weeks) survival for the nine Gliovac patients was 100% versus 33% in control group. At week 40, the published overall survival was 10% if recurrent, reoperated patients were not treated. In the Gliovac treated group, the survival at 40 weeks was 77%. Our data suggest that Gliovac has low toxicity and a promising efficacy. A phase II trial has recently been initiated in recurrent, bevacizumab naïve GBM patients (NCT01903330). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. CXCR4 expression varies significantly among different subtypes of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and its low expression or hypermethylation might predict favorable overall survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinlong; Shang, Feng; Zhu, Weidong; Lin, Qingtang

    2017-09-01

    CXCR4 is an oncogene in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) but the mechanism of its dysregulation and its prognostic value in GBM have not been fully understood. Bioinformatic analysis was performed by using R2 and the UCSC Xena browser based on data from GSE16011 in GEO datasets and in GBM cohort in TCGA database (TCGA-GBM). Kaplan Meier curves of overall survival (OS) were generated to assess the association between CXCR4 expression/methylation and OS in patients with GBM. GBM patients with high CXCR4 expression had significantly worse 5 and 10 yrs OS (p GBM subtypes, there was an inverse relationship between overall DNA methylation and CXCR4 expression. CXCR4 expression was significantly lower in CpG island methylation phenotype (CIMP) group than in non CIMP group. Log rank test results showed that patients with high CXCR4 methylation (first tertile) had significantly better 5 yrs OS (p = 0.038). CXCR4 expression is regulated by DNA methylation in GBM and its low expression or hypermethylation might indicate favorable OS in GBM patients.

  20. Reinduction of Bevacizumab in Combination with Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin in a Patient with Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme Who Progressed on Bevacizumab/Irinotecan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Almubarak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM carries a dismal prognosis despite the current standard of multimodality treatments. Recent studies showed promising results to a regimen consisting of a VEGF inhibitor, (bevacizumab and a topoisomerase I inhibitor (irinotecan [BI] in recurrent GBM. However, those patients with GBM who progress on BI will succumb to their disease generally in a very short period of time. We report a case of a 56-year-old male patient with GBM who declined surgical resection and received chemoradiation with temozolomide. This treatment was withheld secondary to significant thrombocytopenia. Subsequently, he achieved stable disease for 10 months with a regimen consisting of thalidomide and tamoxifen before progressing. This was followed by bevacizumab with irinotecan [BI], for which he had a significant partial response for 8 months with subsequent progression. Reinducing the patient with bevacizumab in combination with a pegylated liposomal doxorubicin [PLD] (a topoisomerase II inhibitor demonstrated antitumor activity with significant shrinkage of contrast enhancing mass and peritumoral edema.

  1. Long-Term Survival and Improved Quality of Life following Multiple Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgeries for Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik W. Larson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is in most cases complex and must be specifically tailored to the needs of the patient with the goals of extended survival and improved quality of life. Despite advancements in therapy, treatment outcomes remain almost universally poor. Salvage treatment options for the recurrence of the disease is an area of intense study. The following case highlights the utility of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery (GKRS as a salvage treatment. In this clinical situation, three sequential GKRS treatments led to prolonged survival (beyond four years after diagnosis and improved quality of life in a patient who was unable to receive further chemotherapy regimens and was unwilling to undergo further aggressive resection. To date, there have been few reports of three or more sequential GKRS treatment sessions utilized as salvage therapy for recurrent GBM in patients who can no longer tolerate chemotherapy. This report provides evidence that aggressive local treatment with GKRS at the time of recurrence may be appropriate, depending on a patient’s individual clinical situation, and can lead to prolonged survival and improved quality of life.

  2. Protein kinase D2 regulates migration and invasion of U87MG glioblastoma cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhart, Eva; Damm, Sabine; Wintersperger, Andrea [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria); DeVaney, Trevor [Institute of Biophysics, Medical University of Graz (Austria); Zimmer, Andreas [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Karl-Franzens University, Graz (Austria); Raynham, Tony; Ireson, Christopher [Cancer Research Technology Ltd, London (United Kingdom); Sattler, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.sattler@medunigraz.at [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria)

    2013-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor, which, despite combined modality treatment, reoccurs and is invariably fatal for affected patients. Recently, a member of the serine/threonine protein kinase D (PRKD) family, PRKD2, was shown to be a potent mediator of glioblastoma growth. Here we studied the role of PRKD2 in U87MG glioblastoma cell migration and invasion in response to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an activator of PRKD2 and a GBM mitogen. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that random cell migration was significantly diminished in response to PRKD2 silencing. The pharmacological PRKD family inhibitor CRT0066101 decreased chemotactic migration and invasion across uncoated or matrigel-coated Transwell inserts. Silencing of PRKD2 attenuated migration and invasion of U87MG cells even more effectively. In terms of downstream signaling, CRT0066101 prevented PRKD2 autophosphorylation and inhibited p44/42 MAPK and to a smaller extent p54/46 JNK and p38 MAPK activation. PRKD2 silencing impaired activation of p44/42 MAPK and p54/46 JNK, downregulated nuclear c-Jun protein levels and decreased c-Jun{sup S73} phosphorylation without affecting the NFκB pathway. Finally, qPCR array analyses revealed that silencing of PRKD2 downregulates mRNA levels of integrin alpha-2 and -4 (ITGA2 and -4), plasminogen activator urokinase (PLAU), plasminogen activator urokinase receptor (PLAUR), and matrix metallopeptidase 1 (MMP1). Findings of the present study identify PRKD2 as a potential target to interfere with glioblastoma cell migration and invasion, two major determinants contributing to recurrence of glioblastoma after multimodality treatment. Highlights: • Sphingosine-1-phosphate induces glioma cell migration and invasion. • Part of the effects is mediated by protein kinase D2 (PRKD2) activation. • Inactivation of PRKD2 attenuates glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • Both, RNAi and pharmacological inhibition of PRKD2 inhibits MAPK

  3. Protein kinase D2 regulates migration and invasion of U87MG glioblastoma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhart, Eva; Damm, Sabine; Wintersperger, Andrea; DeVaney, Trevor; Zimmer, Andreas; Raynham, Tony; Ireson, Christopher; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor, which, despite combined modality treatment, reoccurs and is invariably fatal for affected patients. Recently, a member of the serine/threonine protein kinase D (PRKD) family, PRKD2, was shown to be a potent mediator of glioblastoma growth. Here we studied the role of PRKD2 in U87MG glioblastoma cell migration and invasion in response to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an activator of PRKD2 and a GBM mitogen. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that random cell migration was significantly diminished in response to PRKD2 silencing. The pharmacological PRKD family inhibitor CRT0066101 decreased chemotactic migration and invasion across uncoated or matrigel-coated Transwell inserts. Silencing of PRKD2 attenuated migration and invasion of U87MG cells even more effectively. In terms of downstream signaling, CRT0066101 prevented PRKD2 autophosphorylation and inhibited p44/42 MAPK and to a smaller extent p54/46 JNK and p38 MAPK activation. PRKD2 silencing impaired activation of p44/42 MAPK and p54/46 JNK, downregulated nuclear c-Jun protein levels and decreased c-Jun S73 phosphorylation without affecting the NFκB pathway. Finally, qPCR array analyses revealed that silencing of PRKD2 downregulates mRNA levels of integrin alpha-2 and -4 (ITGA2 and -4), plasminogen activator urokinase (PLAU), plasminogen activator urokinase receptor (PLAUR), and matrix metallopeptidase 1 (MMP1). Findings of the present study identify PRKD2 as a potential target to interfere with glioblastoma cell migration and invasion, two major determinants contributing to recurrence of glioblastoma after multimodality treatment. Highlights: • Sphingosine-1-phosphate induces glioma cell migration and invasion. • Part of the effects is mediated by protein kinase D2 (PRKD2) activation. • Inactivation of PRKD2 attenuates glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • Both, RNAi and pharmacological inhibition of PRKD2 inhibits MAPK

  4. Glioblastoma formation from cell population depleted of Prominin1-expressing cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Nishide

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Prominin1 (Prom1, also known as CD133 in human has been widely used as a marker for cancer stem cells (CSCs, which self-renew and are tumorigenic, in malignant tumors including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. However, there is other evidence showing that Prom1-negative cancer cells also form tumors in vivo. Thus it remains controversial whether Prom1 is a bona fide marker for CSCs. To verify if Prom1-expressing cells are essential for tumorigenesis, we established a mouse line, whose Prom1-expressing cells can be eliminated conditionally by a Cre-inducible DTA gene on the Prom1 locus together with a tamoxifen-inducible CreER(TM, and generated glioma-initiating cells (GICs-LD by overexpressing both the SV40 Large T antigen and an oncogenic H-Ras(L61 in neural stem cells of the mouse line. We show here that the tamoxifen-treated GICs-LD (GICs-DTA form tumor-spheres in culture and transplantable GBM in vivo. Thus, our studies demonstrate that Prom1-expressing cells are dispensable for gliomagenesis in this mouse model.

  5. Suppression of Peroxiredoxin 4 in Glioblastoma Cells Increases Apoptosis and Reduces Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyong; Song, Jieun; Alcantara Llaguno, Sheila R.; Murnan, Eric; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Palanichamy, Kamalakannan; Yi, Ji-Yeun; Viapiano, Mariano Sebastian; Nakano, Ichiro; Yoon, Sung Ok; Wu, Hong; Parada, Luis F.; Kwon, Chang-Hyuk

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and aggressive primary brain malignancy, is incurable despite the best combination of current cancer therapies. For the development of more effective therapies, discovery of novel candidate tumor drivers is urgently needed. Here, we report that peroxiredoxin 4 (PRDX4) is a putative tumor driver. PRDX4 levels were highly increased in a majority of human GBMs as well as in a mouse model of GBM. Reducing PRDX4 expression significantly decreased GBM cell growth and radiation resistance in vitro with increased levels of ROS, DNA damage, and apoptosis. In a syngenic orthotopic transplantation model, Prdx4 knockdown limited GBM infiltration and significantly prolonged mouse survival. These data suggest that PRDX4 can be a novel target for GBM therapies in the future. PMID:22916164

  6. Suppression of peroxiredoxin 4 in glioblastoma cells increases apoptosis and reduces tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hyong Kim

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most common and aggressive primary brain malignancy, is incurable despite the best combination of current cancer therapies. For the development of more effective therapies, discovery of novel candidate tumor drivers is urgently needed. Here, we report that peroxiredoxin 4 (PRDX4 is a putative tumor driver. PRDX4 levels were highly increased in a majority of human GBMs as well as in a mouse model of GBM. Reducing PRDX4 expression significantly decreased GBM cell growth and radiation resistance in vitro with increased levels of ROS, DNA damage, and apoptosis. In a syngenic orthotopic transplantation model, Prdx4 knockdown limited GBM infiltration and significantly prolonged mouse survival. These data suggest that PRDX4 can be a novel target for GBM therapies in the future.

  7. Survival benefit of levetiracetam in patients treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide for glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Tackeun; Joo, Jin-Deok; Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, In Ah; Yun, Chang-Ho; Kim, Chae-Yong

    2015-09-01

    A chemosensitizing effect of levetiracetam (LEV) has been suggested because LEV inhibits O-6 methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). However, the survival benefit of LEV has not been clinically documented. The objective of this study was to assess the survival benefit of LEV compared with other antiepileptic drugs as a chemosensitizer to temozolomide for patients with glioblastoma. In total, 103 consecutive patients with primary glioblastoma who received concomitant chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide were retrospectively reviewed, and 58 patients (56%) received LEV during temozolomide chemotherapy for at least 3 months. A Cox regression survival analysis was performed to adjust for confounding factors, including age, extent of lesion, Karnofsky performance scale score, extent of removal, and MGMT promoter methylation status. The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for patients who received LEV in combination with temozolomide (PFS: median, 9.4 months; 95% confidence interval [CI], 7.5-11.3 months; OS: median, 25.7 months; 95% CI, 21.7-29.7 months) were significantly longer than those for patients who did not receive LEV (PFS: median, 6.7 months; 95% CI, 5.8-7.6 months; OS: median, 16.7 months; 95% CI, 12.1-21.3 months; P = .010 and P = .027, respectively). In multivariate analysis, the variables that were identified as significant prognostic factors for OS were preoperative Karnofsky performance scale score (hazard ratio [HR], 0.37; P = .016), MGMT promoter methylation (HR, 0.30; P = .002), and receipt of LEV (HR, 0.31; P benefit in patients with glioblastoma who receive temozolomide-based chemotherapy. A prospective randomized study may be indicated. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  8. Extracts of Artocarpus communis Induce Mitochondria-Associated Apoptosis via Pro-oxidative Activity in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang-Wen Lee

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is an extremely aggressive and devastating malignant tumor in the central nervous system. Its incidence is increasing and the prognosis is poor. Artocarpin is a natural prenylated flavonoid with various anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor properties. Studies have shown that artocarpin is associated with cell death of primary glioblastoma cells. However, the in vivo effects and the cellular and molecular mechanisms modulating the anticancer activities of artocarpin remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that treating the glioblastoma cell lines U87 and U118 cells with artocarpin induced apoptosis. Artocarpin-induced apoptosis is associated with caspase activation and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP cleavage and is mediated by the mitochondrial pathway. This is associated with mitochondrial depolarization, mitochondrial-derived reactive oxidative species (ROS production, cytochrome c release, Bad and Bax upregulations, and Bcl-2 downregulation. Artocarpin induced NADPH oxidase/ROS generation plays an important role in the mitochondrial pathway activation. Furthermore, we found artocarpin-induced ROS production in mitochondria is associated with Akt- and ERK1/2 activation. After treatment with artocarpin, ROS causes PI3K/Akt/ERK1/2-induced cell death of these tumor cells. These observations were further verified by the results from the implantation of both U87 and U118 cells into in vivo mouse. In conclusion, our findings suggest that artocarpin induces mitochondria-associated apoptosis of glioma cells, suggesting that artocarpine can be a potential chemotherapeutic agent for future GBM treatment.

  9. Target-specific delivery of doxorubicin to human glioblastoma cell ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abdullah Tahir Bayraç

    2018-01-29

    Jan 29, 2018 ... was previously selected for specific recognition of glioblastoma and represented many advantageous ... antigens, receptors or any 3-D structure on the target cells ..... both PSMA (?) and PSMA (-) prostate cancers.

  10. Dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy and irradiation of subventricular zones in relation to tumor control outcomes of patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusumawidjaja G

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Grace Kusumawidjaja,1 Patricia Zhun Hong Gan,1 Whee Sze Ong,2 Achiraya Teyateeti,3 Pittaya Dankulchai,3 Daniel Yat Harn Tan,1 Eu Tiong Chua,1 Kevin Lee Min Chua,1 Chee Kian Tham,4 Fuh Yong Wong,1 Melvin Lee Kiang Chua1,5 1Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre, Singapore; 2Division of Clinical Trials and Epidemiological Sciences, National Cancer Centre, Singapore; 3Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Thailand; 4Division of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Centre, Singapore; 5Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive primary brain tumor with high relapse rate. In this study, we aimed to determine if dose-escalated (DE radiotherapy improved tumor control and survival in GBM patients. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of 49 and 23 newly-diagnosed histology-proven GBM patients, treated with DE radiotherapy delivered in 70 Gy (2.33 Gy per fraction and conventional doses (60 Gy, respectively, between 2007 and 2013. Clinical target volumes for 70 and 60 Gy were defined by 0.5 and 2.0 cm expansion of magnetic resonance imaging T1-gadolinium-enhanced tumor/surgical cavity, respectively. Bilateral subventricular zones (SVZ were contoured on a co-registered pre-treatment magnetic resonance imaging and planning computed tomography dataset as a 5 mm wide structure along the lateral margins of the lateral ventricles. Survival outcomes of both cohorts were compared using log-rank test. Radiation dose to SVZ in the DE cohort was evaluated. Results: Median follow-up was 13.6 and 15.1 months for the DE- and conventionally-treated cohorts, respectively. Median overall survival (OS of patients who received DE radiotherapy was 15.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI] =11.0–18.6, while median OS of the latter cohort was 18.4 months (95% CI =12.5–31.4, P=0.253. Univariate analyses of

  11. Association of the CC genotype of the regulatory BCL2 promoter polymorphism (-938C>A) with better 2-year survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hindy, Nicolai; Bachmann, Hagen S; Lambertz, Nicole; Adamzik, Michael; Nückel, Holger; Worm, Karl; Zhu, Yuan; Sure, Ulrich; Siffert, Winfried; Sandalcioglu, I Erol

    2011-06-01

    Bcl-2 plays a key role in the downregulation of apoptosis and proliferation and leads to increased chemoresistance in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The authors investigated the role of a common regulatory single-nucleotide polymorphism (-938C>A), which is located in the inhibitory P2 promoter of BCL2. Data from 160 patients suffering from GBM were retrospectively evaluated. Study inclusion criteria consisted of available DNA and, in patients still alive, a follow-up of at least 24 months. Results were analyzed with respect to the basic clinical data, type of surgical intervention (gross-total resection [GTR] versus stereotactic biopsy [SB]), adjuvant therapy, MGMT promoter methylation, and survival at the 2-year follow-up. At the 2-year follow-up, 127 (79.4%) of the 160 patients had died. Kaplan-Meier curves revealed a significantly higher rate of survival for homo- and heterozygous C-allele carriers (p = 0.031). In the GTR group, the survival rate was 47.1% for homozygous C-allele carriers, 32.0% for heterozygous C-allele carriers, and only 21.4% for homozygous A-allele carriers (p = 0.024). The SB group showed no genotype-dependent differences. Multivariable Cox regression revealed that the BCL2 (-938AA) genotype was an independent negative prognostic factor for 2-year survival in the GTR group according to the BCL2 (-938CC) genotype reference group (hazard ratio 2.50, 95% CI 1.14-5.48, p = 0.022). These results suggested that the (-938C>A) polymorphism is a survival prognosticator as well as a marker for a high-risk group among patients with GBM who underwent GTR.

  12. Postoperative treatment of glioblastoma multiforme with radiation therapy plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide : A mono-institutional experience of 215 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Julka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the clinical results and prognostic factors of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM treated by postoperative radiation therapy (PORT and concomitant temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide. Methods: From 2005 to 2008, 215 patients (median age 48 years with GBM were treated with PORT plus temozolomide chemotherapy. Radiation therapy (RT was employed with a dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks by conventional fractionation with concomitant temozolomide (75 mg/m 2 /day. Adjuvant therapy consisted of 6 cycles of temozolomide (150 mg/m 2 for 5 days, 28 days cycle. The primary end point of the study was overall survival (OS, and the secondary end points were progression free survival (PFS and toxicity. OS was determined with respect to different variables to study the prognostic significance. Results: Median follow up was 11 months (range 2-50 months. Median OS and PFS were 13 months and 11 months respectively. The 1-year and 2-year OS was 44% and 18% respectively. There was no statistical significant impact of age, sex, KP score, anatomical location and extent of surgery. Presentation without seizures (on univariate analysis and 6 cycles of adjuvant temozolomide therapy (on univariate as well as multivariate analysis were found significant prognostic factors. Sixteen patients developed grade III-IV neutropenia/thrombocytopenia during the course of RT. Conclusion: Our results authenticate the role of concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy in combination with PORT for the management of GBM patients. We strongly recommend complete 6 cycle of adjuvant temozolomide since it significantly improved the survival in our study.

  13. Phase I trial of erlotinib with radiation therapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme: Results of North Central Cancer Treatment Group protocol N0177

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Sunil; Brown, Paul D.; Ballman, Karla V.; Fiveash, John B.; Uhm, Joon H.; Giannini, Caterina; Jaeckle, Kurt A.; Geoffroy, Francois J.; Nabors, L. Burt; Buckner, Jan C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of erlotinib plus radiation therapy (RT) in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in a multicenter phase I trial. Methods and Materials: Patients were stratified on the basis of the use of enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants (EIACs). After resection or biopsy, patients were treated with erlotinib for 1 week before concurrent erlotinib and 6 weeks (60 Gy) of RT and maintained on erlotinib until progression. The erlotinib dose was escalated in cohorts of 3 starting at 100 mg/day. Results: Twenty patients were enrolled and 19 were evaluable for the MTD and efficacy endpoints. Of these patients, 14 were males and 5 were females, with a median age of 54 years. Seven had undergone biopsy only, 5 had subtotal resections, and 7 had gross total resections. The highest dose level was 150 mg/day erlotinib for patients not on EIACs (Group 1) and 200 mg/day for patients on EIACs (Group 2). MTD was not reached in either group. In Group 1 at 100 mg (n = 6) and at 150 mg (n = 4), only 1 dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) occurred (stomatitis at 100 mg). No DLTs have occurred in Group 2 at 100 mg (n = 3), 150 mg (n = 3), and 200 mg (n = 3). With a median follow-up of 52 weeks, progression was documented in 16 patients and 13 deaths occurred. Median time to progression was 26 weeks, and median survival was 55 weeks. Conclusion: Toxicity is acceptable at the current doses of erlotinib plus RT. The study was modified to include concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide, and accrual is in progress

  14. Cell cycle and aging, morphogenesis, and response to stimuli genes are individualized biomarkers of glioblastoma progression and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Southey Bruce R

    2011-06-01

    . Biological processes associated glioblastoma survival included morphogenesis, cell cycle, aging, response to stimuli, and programmed cell death. Conclusions Known biomarkers of glioblastoma survival were confirmed, and new general and clinical-dependent gene profiles were uncovered. The comparison of biomarkers across glioblastoma phases and functional analyses offered insights into the role of genes. These findings support the development of more accurate and personalized prognostic tools and gene-based therapies that improve the survival and quality of life of individuals afflicted by glioblastoma multiforme.

  15. Enhancing tumor apparent diffusion coefficient histogram skewness stratifies the postoperative survival in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme patients undergoing salvage surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolal, Amir; Juratli, Tareq A; Linn, Jennifer; Podlesek, Dino; Sitoci Ficici, Kerim Hakan; Kitzler, Hagen H; Schackert, Gabriele; Sobottka, Stephan B; Rieger, Bernhard; Krex, Dietmar

    2016-05-01

    Objective To determine the value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram parameters for the prediction of individual survival in patients undergoing surgery for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) in a retrospective cohort study. Methods Thirty-one patients who underwent surgery for first recurrence of a known GBM between 2008 and 2012 were included. The following parameters were collected: age, sex, enhancing tumor size, mean ADC, median ADC, ADC skewness, ADC kurtosis and fifth percentile of the ADC histogram, initial progression free survival (PFS), extent of second resection and further adjuvant treatment. The association of these parameters with survival and PFS after second surgery was analyzed using log-rank test and Cox regression. Results Using log-rank test, ADC histogram skewness of the enhancing tumor was significantly associated with both survival (p = 0.001) and PFS after second surgery (p = 0.005). Further parameters associated with prolonged survival after second surgery were: gross total resection at second surgery (p = 0.026), tumor size (0.040) and third surgery (p = 0.003). In the multivariate Cox analysis, ADC histogram skewness was shown to be an independent prognostic factor for survival after second surgery. Conclusion ADC histogram skewness of the enhancing lesion, enhancing lesion size, third surgery, as well as gross total resection have been shown to be associated with survival following the second surgery. ADC histogram skewness was an independent prognostic factor for survival in the multivariate analysis.

  16. Glioblastoma cells labeled by robust Raman tags for enhancing imaging contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Ching; Chang, Yung-Ching; Wu, Yi-Syuan; Sun, Wei-Lun; Liu, Chan-Chuan; Sze, Chun-I; Chen, Shiuan-Yeh

    2018-05-01

    Complete removal of a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a highly malignant brain tumor, is challenging due to its infiltrative characteristics. Therefore, utilizing imaging agents such as fluorophores to increase the contrast between GBM and normal cells can help neurosurgeons to locate residual cancer cells during image guided surgery. In this work, Raman tag based labeling and imaging for GBM cells in vitro is described and evaluated. The cell membrane of a GBM adsorbs a substantial amount of functionalized Raman tags through overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and "broadcasts" stronger pre-defined Raman signals than normal cells. The average ratio between Raman signals from a GBM cell and autofluorescence from a normal cell can be up to 15. In addition, the intensity of these images is stable under laser illuminations without suffering from the severe photo-bleaching that usually occurs in fluorescent imaging. Our results show that labeling and imaging GBM cells via robust Raman tags is a viable alternative method to distinguish them from normal cells. This Raman tag based method can be used solely or integrated into an existing fluorescence system to improve the identification of infiltrative glial tumor cells around the boundary, which will further reduce GBM recurrence. In addition, it can also be applied/extended to other types of cancer to improve the effectiveness of image guided surgery.

  17. Diagnostic examination performance by using microvascular leakage, cerebral blood volume, and blood flow derived from 3-T dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging in the differentiation of glioblastoma multiforme and brain metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, Andres; Nakstad, Per H.; Orheim, Tone E.D.; Graff, Bjoern A.; Josefsen, Roger; Kumar, Theresa

    2011-01-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has limited capacity to differentiate between glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and metastasis. The purposes of this study were: (1) to compare microvascular leakage (MVL), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and blood flow (CBF) in the distinction of metastasis from GBM using dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DSC-MRI), and (2) to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of perfusion and permeability MR imaging. A prospective study of 61 patients (40 GBMs and 21 metastases) was performed at 3 T using DSC-MRI. Normalized rCBV and rCBF from tumoral (rCBVt, rCBFt), peri-enhancing region (rCBVe, rCBFe), and by dividing the value in the tumor by the value in the peri-enhancing region (rCBVt/e, rCBFt/e), as well as MVL were calculated. Hemodynamic and histopathologic variables were analyzed statistically and Spearman/Pearson correlations. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed for each of the variables. The rCBVe, rCBFe, and MVL were significantly greater in GBMs compared with those of metastases. The optimal cutoff value for differentiating GBM from metastasis was 0.80 which implies a sensitivity of 95%, a specificity of 92%, a positive predictive value of 86%, and a negative predictive value of 97% for rCBVe ratio. We found a modest correlation between rCBVt and rCBFt ratios. MVL measurements in GBMs are significantly higher than those in metastases. Statistically, both rCBVe, rCBVt/e and rCBFe, rCBFt/e were useful in differentiating between GBMs and metastases, supporting the hypothesis that perfusion MR imaging can detect infiltration of tumor cells in the peri-enhancing region. (orig.)

  18. Diagnostic examination performance by using microvascular leakage, cerebral blood volume, and blood flow derived from 3-T dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging in the differentiation of glioblastoma multiforme and brain metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Server, Andres; Nakstad, Per H. [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Orheim, Tone E.D. [Oslo University Hospital, Interventional Centre, Oslo (Norway); Graff, Bjoern A. [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Josefsen, Roger [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Department of Neurosurgery, Oslo (Norway); Kumar, Theresa [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Department of Pathology, Oslo (Norway)

    2011-05-15

    Conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has limited capacity to differentiate between glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and metastasis. The purposes of this study were: (1) to compare microvascular leakage (MVL), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and blood flow (CBF) in the distinction of metastasis from GBM using dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DSC-MRI), and (2) to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of perfusion and permeability MR imaging. A prospective study of 61 patients (40 GBMs and 21 metastases) was performed at 3 T using DSC-MRI. Normalized rCBV and rCBF from tumoral (rCBVt, rCBFt), peri-enhancing region (rCBVe, rCBFe), and by dividing the value in the tumor by the value in the peri-enhancing region (rCBVt/e, rCBFt/e), as well as MVL were calculated. Hemodynamic and histopathologic variables were analyzed statistically and Spearman/Pearson correlations. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed for each of the variables. The rCBVe, rCBFe, and MVL were significantly greater in GBMs compared with those of metastases. The optimal cutoff value for differentiating GBM from metastasis was 0.80 which implies a sensitivity of 95%, a specificity of 92%, a positive predictive value of 86%, and a negative predictive value of 97% for rCBVe ratio. We found a modest correlation between rCBVt and rCBFt ratios. MVL measurements in GBMs are significantly higher than those in metastases. Statistically, both rCBVe, rCBVt/e and rCBFe, rCBFt/e were useful in differentiating between GBMs and metastases, supporting the hypothesis that perfusion MR imaging can detect infiltration of tumor cells in the peri-enhancing region. (orig.)

  19. Benzyl isothiocyanate alters the gene expression with cell cycle regulation and cell death in human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Nou-Ying; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Yu, Chien-Chih; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Hsia, Te-Chun; Wu, King-Chuen; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Lu, Kung-Wen; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant devastating brain tumor in adults. Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is one of the isothiocyanates that have been shown to induce human cancer cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Herein, the effect of BITC on cell viability and apoptotic cell death and the genetic levels of human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells in vitro were investigated. We found that BITC induced cell morphological changes, decreased cell viability and the induction of cell apoptosis in GBM 8401 cells was time-dependent. cDNA microarray was used to examine the effects of BITC on GBM 8401 cells and we found that numerous genes associated with cell death and cell cycle regulation in GBM 8401 cells were altered after BITC treatment. The results show that expression of 317 genes was upregulated, and two genes were associated with DNA damage, the DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3 (DDIT3) was increased 3.66-fold and the growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible α (GADD45A) was increased 2.34-fold. We also found that expression of 182 genes was downregulated and two genes were associated with receptor for cell responses to stimuli, the EGF containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) was inhibited 2.01-fold and the TNF receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1) was inhibited 2.08-fold. BITC inhibited seven mitochondria ribosomal genes, the mitochondrial ribosomal protein; tumor protein D52 (MRPS28) was inhibited 2.06-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S2 (MRPS2) decreased 2.07-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein L23 (MRPL23) decreased 2.08-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S2 (MRPS2) decreased 2.07-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S12 (MRPS12) decreased 2.08-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein L12 (MRPL12) decreased 2.25-fold and the mitochondria ribosomal protein S34 (MRPS34) was decreased 2.30-fold in GBM 8401 cells. These changes of gene expression can provide the effects of BITC on the genetic level and are

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell-like properties of CD133+ glioblastoma initiating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavon, Lorena Favaro; Sibov, Tatiana Tais; de Oliveira, Daniela Mara; Marti, Luciana C.; Cabral, Francisco Romero; de Souza, Jean Gabriel; Boufleur, Pamela; Malheiros, Suzana M.F.; de Paiva Neto, Manuel A.; da Cruz, Edgard Ferreira; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana Marisa; Cavalheiro, Sérgio

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is composed of dividing tumor cells, stromal cells and tumor initiating CD133+ cells. Recent reports have discussed the origin of the glioblastoma CD133+ cells and their function in the tumor microenvironment. The present work sought to investigate the multipotent and mesenchymal properties of primary highly purified human CD133+ glioblastoma-initiating cells. To accomplish this aim, we used the following approaches: i) generation of tumor subspheres of CD133+ selected cells from primary cell cultures of glioblastoma; ii) analysis of the expression of pluripotency stem cell markers and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers in the CD133+ glioblastoma-initiating cells; iii) side-by-side ultrastructural characterization of the CD133+ glioblastoma cells, MSC and CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells isolated from human umbilical cord blood (UCB); iv) assessment of adipogenic differentiation of CD133+ glioblastoma cells to test their MSC-like in vitro differentiation ability; and v) use of an orthotopic glioblastoma xenograft model in the absence of immune suppression. We found that the CD133+ glioblastoma cells expressed both the pluripotency stem cell markers (Nanog, Mush-1 and SSEA-3) and MSC markers. In addition, the CD133+ cells were able to differentiate into adipocyte-like cells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the CD133+ glioblastoma-initiating cells had ultrastructural features similar to those of undifferentiated MSCs. In addition, when administered in vivo to non-immunocompromised animals, the CD133+ cells were also able to mimic the phenotype of the original patient's tumor. In summary, we showed that the CD133+ glioblastoma cells express molecular signatures of MSCs, neural stem cells and pluripotent stem cells, thus possibly enabling differentiation into both neural and mesodermal cell types. PMID:27244897

  1. Global DNA methylation synergistically regulates the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Johnson, Jacqueline; St John, Justin C

    2018-05-02

    Replication of mitochondrial DNA is strictly regulated during differentiation and development allowing each cell type to acquire its required mtDNA copy number to meet its specific needs for energy. Undifferentiated cells establish the mtDNA set point, which provides low numbers of mtDNA copy but sufficient template for replication once cells commit to specific lineages. However, cancer cells, such as those from the human glioblastoma multiforme cell line, HSR-GBM1, cannot complete differentiation as they fail to enforce the mtDNA set point and are trapped in a 'pseudo-differentiated' state. Global DNA methylation is likely to be a major contributing factor, as DNA demethylation treatments promote differentiation of HSR-GBM1 cells. To determine the relationship between DNA methylation and mtDNA copy number in cancer cells, we applied whole genome MeDIP-Seq and RNA-Seq to HSR-GBM1 cells and following their treatment with the DNA demethylation agents 5-azacytidine and vitamin C. We identified key methylated regions modulated by the DNA demethylation agents that also induced synchronous changes to mtDNA copy number and nuclear gene expression. Our findings highlight the control exerted by DNA methylation on the expression of key genes, the regulation of mtDNA copy number and establishment of the mtDNA set point, which collectively contribute to tumorigenesis.

  2. Differentiating primary CNS lymphoma from glioblastoma multiforme: assessment using arterial spin labeling, diffusion-weighted imaging, and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Koji; Yoshiura, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Togao, Osamu; Abe, Koichiro; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Maruoka, Yasuhiro; Honda, Hiroshi [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshimoto, Koji; Mizoguchi, Masahiro [Kyushu University, Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Iwaki, Toru [Kyushu University, Department of Neuropathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    Our purpose was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in differentiating primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSLs) from glioblastoma multiformes (GBMs). Fifty-six patients including 19 with PCNSL and 37 with GBM were retrospectively studied. From the ASL data, an absolute tumor blood flow (aTBF) and a relative tumor blood flow (rTBF) were obtained within the enhancing portion of each tumor. In addition, the minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCmin) and the maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) were obtained from DWI and FDG-PET data, respectively. Each of the four parameters was compared between PCNSLs and GBMs using Kruskal-Wallis test. The performance in discriminating between PCNSLs and GBMs was evaluated using the receiver-operating characteristics analysis. Area-under-the-curve (AUC) values were compared among the four parameters using a nonparametric method. The aTBF, rTBF, and ADCmin were significantly higher in GBMs (mean aTBF {+-} SD = 91.6 {+-} 56.0 mL/100 g/min, mean rTBF {+-} SD = 2.61 {+-} 1.61, mean ADCmin {+-} SD = 0.78 {+-} 0.19 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) than in PCNSLs (mean aTBF {+-} SD = 37.3 {+-} 10.5 mL/100 g/min, mean rTBF {+-} SD = 1.24 {+-} 0.37, mean ADCmin {+-} SD = 0.61 {+-} 0.13 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) (p < 0.005, respectively). In addition, SUVmax was significantly lower in GBMs (mean {+-} SD = 13.1 {+-} 6.34) than in PCNSLs (mean {+-} SD = 22.5 {+-} 7.83) (p < 0.005). The AUC for aTBF (0.888) was higher than those for rTBF (0.810), ADCmin (0.768), and SUVmax (0.848), although their difference was not statistically significant. ASL perfusion imaging is useful for differentiating PCNSLs from GBMs as well as DWI and FDG-PET. (orig.)

  3. Phase 1/2 Trials of Temozolomide, Motexafin Gadolinium, and 60-Gy Fractionated Radiation for Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Glioblastoma Multiforme: Final Results of RTOG 0513

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brachman, David G., E-mail: david.brachman@dignityhealth.org [Arizona Oncology Services Foundation, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Pugh, Stephanie L. [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ashby, Lynn S. [Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Thomas, Theresa A. [Arizona Oncology Services Foundation, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Dunbar, Erin M. [University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Narayan, Samir [St. Joseph Mercy Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Robins, H. Ian [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bovi, Joseph A. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Rockhill, Jason K. [University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Won, Minhee [Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Curran, Walter P. [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of phase 1 was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) given concurrently with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT) in patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Phase 2 determined whether this combination improved overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in GBM recursive partitioning analysis class III to V patients compared to therapies for recently published historical controls. Methods and Materials: Dose escalation in phase 1 progressed through 3 cohorts until 2 of 6 patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity or a dose of 5 mg/kg was reached. Once MTD was established, a 1-sided 1-sample log-rank test at significance level of .1 had 85% power to detect a median survival difference (13.69 vs 18.48 months) with 60 deaths over a 12-month accrual period and an additional 18 months of follow-up. OS and PFS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: In phase 1, 24 patients were enrolled. The MTD established was 5 mg/kg, given intravenously 5 days a week for the first 10 RT fractions, then 3 times a week for the duration of RT. The 7 patients enrolled in the third dose level and the 94 enrolled in phase 2 received this dose. Of these 101 patients, 87 were eligible and evaluable. Median survival time was 15.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.9-17.6 months), not significantly different from that of the historical control (P=.36). Median PFS was 7.6 months (95% CI: 5.7-9.6 months). One patient (1%) experienced a grade 5 adverse event possibly related to therapy during the concurrent phase, and none experience toxicity during adjuvant TMZ therapy. Conclusions: Treatment was well tolerated, but median OS did not reach improvement specified by protocol compared to historical control, indicating that the combination of standard RT with TMZ and MGd did not achieve a significant survival advantage.

  4. The effects of antiepileptic drugs on the growth of glioblastoma cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ching-Yi; Lai, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Angela; Chan, She-Hung; Hsiao, Ling-Ping; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effects of antiepileptic drug compounds on glioblastoma cellular growth, we exposed glioblastoma cell lines to select antiepileptic drugs. The effects of selected antiepileptic drugs on glioblastoma cells were measured by MTT assay. For compounds showing significant inhibition, cell cycle analysis was performed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS. The antiepileptic compounds selected for screening included carbamazepine, ethosuximide, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levet...

  5. Saponin B, a novel cytostatic compound purified from Anemone taipaiensis, induces apoptosis in a human glioblastoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuangang; Tang, Haifeng; Zhang, Yun; Li, Juan; Li, Bo; Gao, Zhenhui; Wang, Xiaoyang; Cheng, Guang; Fei, Zhou

    2013-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most common malignant brain tumors. Saponin B, a novel compound isolated from the medicinal plant, Anemone taipaiensis, has been found to have a strong time- and dose-dependent cytostatic effect on human glioma cells and to suppress the growth of U87MG GBM cells. In this study, we investigated whether saponin B induces the apoptosis of glioblastoma cells and examined the underlying mechanism(s) of action of saponin B. Saponin B significantly suppressed U87MG cell proliferation. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA in the U87MG cells confirmed that saponin B blocked the cell cycle at the S phase. Furthermore, treatment of the U87MG cells with saponin B induced chromatin condensation and led to the formation of apoptotic bodies, as observed under a fluorescence microscope, and Annexin V/PI assay further suggested that phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization was apparent at higher drug concentrations. Treatment with saponin B activated the receptor-mediated pathway of apoptosis, as western blot analysis revealed the activation of Fas-l. Saponin B increased the Bax and caspase-3 ratio and decreased the protein expression of Bcl-2. The results from the present study demonstrate that the novel compound, saponin B, effectively induces the apoptosis of GBM cells and inhibits glioma cell growth and survival. Therefore, saponin B may be a potential candidate for the development of novel cancer therapeutics with antitumor activity against gliomas.

  6. Periarteriolar Glioblastoma Stem Cell Niches Express Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hira, Vashendriya V. V.; Wormer, Jill R.; Kakar, Hala; Breznik, Barbara; van der Swaan, Britt; Hulsbos, Renske; Tigchelaar, Wikky; Tonar, Zbynek; Khurshed, Mohammed; Molenaar, Remco J.; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2018-01-01

    In glioblastoma, a fraction of malignant cells consists of therapy-resistant glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) residing in protective niches that recapitulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niches in bone marrow. We have previously shown that HSC niche proteins stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α),

  7. HMGA1 silencing reduces stemness and temozolomide resistance in glioblastoma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colamaio, Marianna; Tosti, Nadia; Puca, Francesca; Mari, Alessia; Gattordo, Rosaria; Kuzay, Yalçın; Federico, Antonella; Pepe, Anna; Sarnataro, Daniela; Ragozzino, Elvira; Raia, Maddalena; Hirata, Hidenari; Gemei, Marica; Mimori, Koshi; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Battista, Sabrina; Fusco, Alfredo

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) develops from a small subpopulation of stem-like cells, which are endowed with the ability to self-renew, proliferate and give rise to progeny of multiple neuroepithelial lineages. These cells are resistant to conventional chemo- and radiotherapy and are hence also responsible for tumor recurrence. HMGA1 overexpression has been shown to correlate with proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis of GBMs and to affect self-renewal of cancer stem cells from colon cancer. The role of HMGA1 in GBM tumor stem cells is not completely understood. We have investigated the role of HMGA1 in brain tumor stem cell (BTSC) self-renewal, stemness and resistance to temozolomide by shRNA- mediated HMGA1 silencing. We first report that HMGA1 is overexpressed in a subset of BTSC lines from human GBMs. Then, we show that HMGA1 knockdown reduces self-renewal, sphere forming efficiency and stemness, and sensitizes BTSCs to temozolomide. Interestingly, HMGA1 silencing also leads to reduced tumor initiation ability in vivo. These results demonstrate a pivotal role of HMGA1 in cancer stem cell gliomagenesis and endorse HMGA1 as a suitable target for CSC-specific GBM therapy.

  8. REST controls self-renewal and tumorigenic competence of human glioblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Conti

    Full Text Available The Repressor Element 1 Silencing Transcription factor (REST/NRSF is a master repressor of neuronal programs in non-neuronal lineages shown to function as a central regulator of developmental programs and stem cell physiology. Aberrant REST function has been associated with a number of pathological conditions. In cancer biology, REST has been shown to play a tumor suppressor activity in epithelial cancers but an oncogenic role in brain childhood malignancies such as neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. Here we examined REST expression in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM specimens and its role in GBM cells carrying self-renewal and tumorigenic competence. We found REST to be expressed in GBM specimens, its presence being particularly enriched in tumor cells in the perivascular compartment. Significantly, REST is highly expressed in self-renewing tumorigenic-competent GBM cells and its knock down strongly reduces their self-renewal in vitro and tumor-initiating capacity in vivo and affects levels of miR-124 and its downstream targets. These results indicate that REST contributes to GBM maintenance by affecting its self-renewing and tumorigenic cellular component and that, hence, a better understanding of these circuitries in these cells might lead to new exploitable therapeutic targets.

  9. Genome-wide RNAi screening identifies genes inhibiting the migration of glioblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Yang

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM cells are highly invasive, infiltrating into the surrounding normal brain tissue, making it impossible to completely eradicate GBM tumors by surgery or radiation. Increasing evidence also shows that these migratory cells are highly resistant to cytotoxic reagents, but decreasing their migratory capability can re-sensitize them to chemotherapy. These evidences suggest that the migratory cell population may serve as a better therapeutic target for more effective treatment of GBM. In order to understand the regulatory mechanism underlying the motile phenotype, we carried out a genome-wide RNAi screen for genes inhibiting the migration of GBM cells. The screening identified a total of twenty-five primary hits; seven of them were confirmed by secondary screening. Further study showed that three of the genes, FLNA, KHSRP and HCFC1, also functioned in vivo, and knocking them down caused multifocal tumor in a mouse model. Interestingly, two genes, KHSRP and HCFC1, were also found to be correlated with the clinical outcome of GBM patients. These two genes have not been previously associated with cell migration.

  10. Multifaceted role of galectin-3 on human glioblastoma cell motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debray, Charles; Vereecken, Pierre; Belot, Nathalie; Teillard, Peggy; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pochet, Roland

    2004-01-01

    Astrocytic tumors' aggressiveness results from an imbalance between cell proliferation and cell death favoring growth, but also from the propensity of tumor cells to detach from the primary tumor site, migrate, and invade the surrounding parenchyma. Astrocytic tumor progression is known to be associated with an increased expression of galectin-3. We investigated in cell culture how galectin-3 expression affects astrocytoma cell motility. Galectin-3 deficient cells were obtained by stable transfection of the U373 glioblastoma cell line with a specific expression antisense plasmid. Cultured galectin-3 deficient glioblastoma cells showed increased motility potential on laminin and modifications in the cytoskeleton reorganization. In addition, c-DNA microarrays and quantitative immunofluorescence analysis showed that galectin-3 deficient U373 cells have an increased expression of integrins-α6 and -β1, proteins known to be implicated in the regulation of cell adhesion

  11. EGFR and EGFRvIII Promote Angiogenesis and Cell Invasion in Glioblastoma: Combination Therapies for an Effective Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Keller

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and the mutant EGFRvIII are major focal points in current concepts of targeted cancer therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most malignant primary brain tumor. The receptors participate in the key processes of tumor cell invasion and tumor-related angiogenesis and their upregulation correlates with the poor prognosis of glioma patients. Glioma cell invasion and increased angiogenesis share mechanisms of the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM through upregulation of ECM-degrading proteases as well as the activation of aberrant signaling pathways. This review describes the role of EGFR and EGFRvIII in those mechanisms which might offer new combined therapeutic approaches targeting EGFR or EGFRvIII together with drug treatments against proteases of the ECM or downstream signaling to increase the inhibitory effects of mono-therapies.

  12. Single-Cell RNA Sequencing of Glioblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Rajeev; Dolgalev, Igor; Bayin, N Sumru; Heguy, Adriana; Tsirigos, Aris; Placantonakis, Dimitris G

    2018-01-01

    Single-cell RNA sequencing (sc-RNASeq) is a recently developed technique used to evaluate the transcriptome of individual cells. As opposed to conventional RNASeq in which entire populations are sequenced in bulk, sc-RNASeq can be beneficial when trying to better understand gene expression patterns in markedly heterogeneous populations of cells or when trying to identify transcriptional signatures of rare cells that may be underrepresented when using conventional bulk RNASeq. In this method, we describe the generation and analysis of cDNA libraries from single patient-derived glioblastoma cells using the C1 Fluidigm system. The protocol details the use of the C1 integrated fluidics circuit (IFC) for capturing, imaging and lysing cells; performing reverse transcription; and generating cDNA libraries that are ready for sequencing and analysis.

  13. Local delivery of cannabinoid-loaded microparticles inhibits tumor growth in a murine xenograft model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Hernán Pérez de la Ossa

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana and their derivatives, are currently investigated due to their potential therapeutic application for the management of many different diseases, including cancer. Specifically, Δ(9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and Cannabidiol (CBD - the two major ingredients of marijuana - have been shown to inhibit tumor growth in a number of animal models of cancer, including glioma. Although there are several pharmaceutical preparations that permit the oral administration of THC or its analogue nabilone or the oromucosal delivery of a THC- and CBD-enriched cannabis extract, the systemic administration of cannabinoids has several limitations in part derived from the high lipophilicity exhibited by these compounds. In this work we analyzed CBD- and THC-loaded poly-ε-caprolactone microparticles as an alternative delivery system for long-term cannabinoid administration in a murine xenograft model of glioma. In vitro characterization of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles showed that this method of microencapsulation facilitates a sustained release of the two cannabinoids for several days. Local administration of THC-, CBD- or a mixture (1:1 w:w of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles every 5 days to mice bearing glioma xenografts reduced tumour growth with the same efficacy than a daily local administration of the equivalent amount of those cannabinoids in solution. Moreover, treatment with cannabinoid-loaded microparticles enhanced apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and angiogenesis in these tumours. Our findings support that THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles could be used as an alternative method of cannabinoid delivery in anticancer therapies.

  14. Glioblastoma stem-like cells give rise to tumour endothelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Rong; Chadalavada, Kalyani; Wilshire, Jennifer; Kowalik, Urszula; Hovinga, Koos E.; Geber, Adam; Fligelman, Boris; Leversha, Margaret; Brennan, Cameron; Tabar, Viviane

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is among the most aggressive of human cancers. A key feature of GBMs is the extensive network of abnormal vasculature characterized by glomeruloid structures and endothelial hyperplasia. Yet the mechanisms of angiogenesis and the origin of tumour endothelial cells remain poorly

  15. Phase I/IIa study of intratumoral/intracerebral or intravenous/intracerebral administration of Parvovirus H-1 (ParvOryx) in patients with progressive primary or recurrent glioblastoma multiforme: ParvOryx01 protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geletneky, Karsten; Hajda, Jacek; Huesing, Johannes; Rommelaere, Jean; Schlehofer, Joerg R; Leuchs, Barbara; Dahm, Michael; Krebs, Ottheinz; Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus von; Huber, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of patients with malignant brain tumors remains a major oncological problem. The median survival of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most malignant type, is only 15 months after initial diagnosis and even less after tumor recurrence. Improvements of standard treatment including surgery and radio-chemotherapy have not lead to major improvements. Therefore, alternative therapeutics such as oncolytic viruses that specifically target and destroy cancer cells are under investigation. Preclinical data of oncolytic parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV) infection of glioma cells demonstrated strong cytotoxic and oncosuppressing effects, leading to a phase I/IIa trial of H-1PV in patients with recurrent GBM (ParvOryx01). ParvOryx01 is the first trial with a replication competent oncolytic virus in Germany. ParvOryx01 is an open, non-controlled, two groups, intra-group dose escalation, single center, phase I/IIa trial. 18 patients with recurrent GBM will be treated in 2 groups of 9 patients each. Treatment group 1 will first receive H-1PV by intratumoral injection and second by administration into the walls of the tumor cavity during tumor resection. In treatment group 2 the virus will initially be injected intravenously and afterwards, identical to group 1, into the surrounding brain tissue during tumor removal. Main eligibility criteria are: age of 18 years, unifocal recurrent GBM, amenable to complete or subtotal resection. Dose escalation will be based on the Continual Reassessment Method. The primary objective of the trial is local and systemic safety and tolerability and to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Secondary objectives are proof of concept (PoC) and Progression-free Survival (PFS) up to 6 months. This is the first trial with H-1PV in patients with recurrent GBM. The risks for the participants appear well predictable and justified. Furthermore, ParvOryx01 will be the first assessment of combined intratumoral and intravenous application

  16. Up-regulation of cholesterol associated genes as novel resistance mechanism in glioblastoma cells in response to archazolid B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamm, Rebecca; Zeino, Maen [Institute of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Frewert, Simon [Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research and Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Saarland University, Saarbrücken (Germany); Efferth, Thomas, E-mail: efferth@uni-mainz.de [Institute of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and aggressive lethal brain tumor, represents a great challenge. Despite decades of research, the survival prognosis of GBM patients is unfavorable and more effective therapeutics are sorely required. Archazolid B, a potent vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPase inhibitor influencing cellular pH values, is a promising new compound exerting cytotoxicity in the nanomolar range on wild-type U87MG glioblastoma cells and U87MG.∆EGFR cells transfected with a mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene. Gene expression profiling using microarray technology showed that archazolid B caused drastic disturbances in cholesterol homeostasis. Cholesterol, a main component of cellular membranes, is known to be essential for GBM growth and cells bearing EGFRvIII mutation are highly dependent on exogenous cholesterol. Archazolid B caused excessive accumulation of free cholesterol within intracellular compartments thus depleting cellular cholesterol and leading to up-regulation of SREBP targeted genes, including LDLR and HMGCR, the key enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis. This cholesterol response is considered to be a novel resistance mechanism induced by archazolid B. We surmise that re-elevation of cholesterol levels in archazolid B treated cells may be mediated by newly synthesized cholesterol, since the drug leads to endosomal/lysosomal malfunction and cholesterol accumulation.

  17. PACAP and VIP inhibit the invasiveness of glioblastoma cells exposed to hypoxia through the regulation of HIFs and EGFR expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia eMaugeri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP through the binding of vasoactive intestinal peptide receptors (VIPRs, perform a wide variety of effects in human cancers, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. This tumor is characterized by extensive areas of hypoxia, which triggers the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs. HIFs not only mediate angiogenesis but also tumor cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, HIFs activation is linked to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR overexpression. Previous studies have shown that VIP interferes with the invasive nature of gliomas by regulating cell migration. However, the role of VIP family members in GBM infiltration under low oxygen tension has not been clarified yet. Therefore, in the present study we have investigated, for the first time, the molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-invasive effect of PACAP or VIP in U87MG glioblastoma cells exposed to hypoxia induced by treatment with desferrioxamine (DFX. The results suggest that either PACAP or VIP exert an anti-infiltrative effect under low oxygen tension by modulating HIFs and EGFR expression, key elements involved in cell migration and angiogenesis. These peptides act through the inhibition of PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways, which are known to have a crucial role in HIFs regulation. In conclusion, the modulation of hypoxic event and the anti-invasive effect exerted by some VIP family members might open new insights in the therapeutic approach to GBM.

  18. Up-regulation of cholesterol associated genes as novel resistance mechanism in glioblastoma cells in response to archazolid B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, Rebecca; Zeino, Maen; Frewert, Simon; Efferth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and aggressive lethal brain tumor, represents a great challenge. Despite decades of research, the survival prognosis of GBM patients is unfavorable and more effective therapeutics are sorely required. Archazolid B, a potent vacuolar H + -ATPase inhibitor influencing cellular pH values, is a promising new compound exerting cytotoxicity in the nanomolar range on wild-type U87MG glioblastoma cells and U87MG.∆EGFR cells transfected with a mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene. Gene expression profiling using microarray technology showed that archazolid B caused drastic disturbances in cholesterol homeostasis. Cholesterol, a main component of cellular membranes, is known to be essential for GBM growth and cells bearing EGFRvIII mutation are highly dependent on exogenous cholesterol. Archazolid B caused excessive accumulation of free cholesterol within intracellular compartments thus depleting cellular cholesterol and leading to up-regulation of SREBP targeted genes, including LDLR and HMGCR, the key enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis. This cholesterol response is considered to be a novel resistance mechanism induced by archazolid B. We surmise that re-elevation of cholesterol levels in archazolid B treated cells may be mediated by newly synthesized cholesterol, since the drug leads to endosomal/lysosomal malfunction and cholesterol accumulation

  19. Genome-wide methylation profiling identifies an essential role of reactive oxygen species in pediatric glioblastoma multiforme and validates a methylome specific for H3 histone family 3A with absence of G-CIMP/isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Prerana; Pia Patric, Irene Rosita; Shukla, Sudhanshu; Pathak, Pankaj; Pal, Jagriti; Sharma, Vikas; Thinagararanjan, Sivaarumugam; Santosh, Vani; Suri, Vaishali; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Arivazhagan, Arimappamagan; Suri, Ashish; Gupta, Deepak; Somasundaram, Kumaravel; Sarkar, Chitra

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is rare, and there is a single study, a seminal discovery showing association of histone H3.3 and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1 mutation with a DNA methylation signature. The present study aims to validate these findings in an independent cohort of pediatric GBM, compare it with adult GBM, and evaluate the involvement of important functionally altered pathways. Genome-wide methylation profiling of 21 pediatric GBM cases was done and compared with adult GBM data (GSE22867). We performed gene mutation analysis of IDH1 and H3 histone family 3A (H3F3A), status evaluation of glioma cytosine-phosphate-guanine island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP), and Gene Ontology analysis. Experimental evaluation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) association was also done. Distinct differences were noted between methylomes of pediatric and adult GBM. Pediatric GBM was characterized by 94 hypermethylated and 1206 hypomethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) islands, with 3 distinct clusters, having a trend to prognostic correlation. Interestingly, none of the pediatric GBM cases showed G-CIMP/IDH1 mutation. Gene Ontology analysis identified ROS association in pediatric GBM, which was experimentally validated. H3F3A mutants (36.4%; all K27M) harbored distinct methylomes and showed enrichment of processes related to neuronal development, differentiation, and cell-fate commitment. Our study confirms that pediatric GBM has a distinct methylome compared with that of adults. Presence of distinct clusters and an H3F3A mutation-specific methylome indicate existence of epigenetic subgroups within pediatric GBM. Absence of IDH1/G-CIMP status further indicates that findings in adult GBM cannot be simply extrapolated to pediatric GBM and that there is a strong need for identification of separate prognostic markers. A possible role of ROS in pediatric GBM pathogenesis is demonstrated for the first time and needs further evaluation. © The Author(s) 2014

  20. Subcellular SIMS imaging of gadolinium isotopes in human glioblastoma cells treated with a gadolinium containing MRI agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Duane R.; Lorey, Daniel R.; Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-01

    Neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary radiotherapeutic modality for the treatment of brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme. Recently, neutron capture therapy with gadolinium-157 has gained attention, and techniques for studying the subcellular distribution of gadolinium-157 are needed. In this preliminary study, we have been able to image the subcellular distribution of gadolinium-157, as well as the other six naturally abundant isotopes of gadolinium, with SIMS ion microscopy. T98G human glioblastoma cells were treated for 24 h with 25 mg/ml of the metal ion complex diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid Gd(III) dihydrogen salt hydrate (Gd-DTPA). Gd-DTPA is a contrast enhancing agent used for MRI of brain tumors, blood-brain barrier impairment, diseases of the central nervous system, etc. A highly heterogeneous subcellular distribution was observed for gadolinium-157. The nuclei in each cell were distinctly lower in gadolinium-157 than in the cytoplasm. Even within the cytoplasm the gadolinium-157 was heterogeneously distributed. The other six naturally abundant isotopes of gadolinium were imaged from the same cells and exhibited a subcellular distribution consistent with that observed for gadolinium-157. These observations indicate that SIMS ion microscopy may be a viable approach for subcellular studies of gadolinium containing neutron capture therapy drugs and may even play a major role in the development and validation of new gadolinium contrast enhancing agents for diagnostic MRI applications.

  1. Adult, embryonic and fetal hemoglobin are expressed in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emara, Marwan; Turner, A Robert; Allalunis-Turner, Joan

    2014-02-01

    Hemoglobin is a hemoprotein, produced mainly in erythrocytes circulating in the blood. However, non-erythroid hemoglobins have been previously reported in other cell types including human and rodent neurons of embryonic and adult brain, but not astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive tumor among gliomas. However, despite extensive basic and clinical research studies on GBM cells, little is known about glial defence mechanisms that allow these cells to survive and resist various types of treatment. We have shown previously that the newest members of vertebrate globin family, neuroglobin (Ngb) and cytoglobin (Cygb), are expressed in human GBM cells. In this study, we sought to determine whether hemoglobin is also expressed in GBM cells. Conventional RT-PCR, DNA sequencing, western blot analysis, mass spectrometry and fluorescence microscopy were used to investigate globin expression in GBM cell lines (M006x, M059J, M059K, M010b, U87R and U87T) that have unique characteristics in terms of tumor invasion and response to radiotherapy and hypoxia. The data showed that α, β, γ, δ, ζ and ε globins are expressed in all tested GBM cell lines. To our knowledge, we are the first to report expression of fetal, embryonic and adult hemoglobin in GBM cells under normal physiological conditions that may suggest an undefined function of those expressed hemoglobins. Together with our previous reports on globins (Ngb and Cygb) expression in GBM cells, the expression of different hemoglobins may constitute a part of series of active defence mechanisms supporting these cells to resist various types of treatments including chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  2. Cytotoxic and Apoptogenic Effects of Cyanidin-3-Glucoside on the Glioblastoma Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Masoumeh Mansoubi; Karimi, Aliasghar; Behroozaghdam, Mitra; Javidi, Mohammad Amin; Ghiasvand, Saeedeh; Bereimipour, Ahmad; Aryan, Hoda; Nassiri, Farbod; Jangholi, Ehsan

    2017-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most prevalent and aggressive primary cerebral tumor. The median survival time is 15 months despite maximum treatment because the tumor is resistant to most therapeutic modalities. Several studies have indicated chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activity of cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G) as an anthocyanin component. We aimed to illustrate the cytotoxic and apoptogenic effects of C3G in the U87 cell line (human GBM cell line). Cytotoxic activity was evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide tetrazolium assay after treatment with C3G at different concentrations in the U87 cell line. Cisplatin was used as a positive control for 24 and 48 hours. The percentage of apoptotic cells was determined using an Annexin V/propidium iodide assay, and the expression of bax, bcl2, and p53 genes was assessed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Treatment of U87 cells with 40 μg/mL of C3G resulted in 32% apoptotic cells after 24 hours. To further confirm that C3G treatment induced apoptosis in U87 cells, RNA expression of bax, bcl2, and p53 genes was investigated after treatment. Real-time polymerase chain reaction indicated that the expression of bax and p53 increased, whereas the expression of bcl2 decreased. C3G had an apoptogenic effect in the GBM cell line. New information regarding the therapeutic effects of C3G in GBM could ultimately lead to the production of new drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Modelling glioblastoma tumour-host cell interactions using adult brain organotypic slice co-culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angeles Marques-Torrejon

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is an aggressive incurable brain cancer. The cells that fuel the growth of tumours resemble neural stem cells found in the developing and adult mammalian forebrain. These are referred to as glioma stem cells (GSCs. Similar to neural stem cells, GSCs exhibit a variety of phenotypic states: dormant, quiescent, proliferative and differentiating. How environmental cues within the brain influence these distinct states is not well understood. Laboratory models of GBM can be generated using either genetically engineered mouse models, or via intracranial transplantation of cultured tumour initiating cells (mouse or human. Unfortunately, these approaches are expensive, time-consuming, low-throughput and ill-suited for monitoring live cell behaviours. Here, we explored whole adult brain coronal organotypic slices as an alternative model. Mouse adult brain slices remain viable in a serum-free basal medium for several weeks. GSCs can be easily microinjected into specific anatomical sites ex vivo, and we demonstrate distinct responses of engrafted GSCs to diverse microenvironments in the brain tissue. Within the subependymal zone – one of the adult neural stem cell niches – injected tumour cells could effectively engraft and respond to endothelial niche signals. Tumour-transplanted slices were treated with the antimitotic drug temozolomide as proof of principle of the utility in modelling responses to existing treatments. Engraftment of mouse or human GSCs onto whole brain coronal organotypic brain slices therefore provides a simplified, yet flexible, experimental model. This will help to increase the precision and throughput of modelling GSC-host brain interactions and complements ongoing in vivo studies. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper.

  4. Fenofibrate induces ketone body production in melanoma and glioblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja M Grabacka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ketone bodies (beta-hydroxybutyrate, bHB, acetoacetate are mainly produced in the liver during prolonged fasting or starvation. bHB is a very efficient energy substrate for sustaining ATP production in peripheral tissues; importantly its consumption is preferred over glucose. However, the majority of malignant cells, particularly cancer cells of neuroectodermal origin such as glioblastoma, are not able to use ketone bodies as a source of energy. Here, we report a novel observation that fenofibrate, a synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa agonist, induces bHB production in melanoma and glioblastoma cells, as well as in neurospheres composed of nontransformed cells. Unexpectedly, this effect is not dependent on PPARa activity or its expression level. The fenofibrate-induced ketogenesis is accompanied by growth arrest and down-regulation of transketolase, but the NADP/NADPH and GSH/GSSG ratios remain unaffected. Our results reveal a new, intriguing aspect of cancer cell biology and highlight the benefits of fenofibrate as a supplement to both canonical and dietary (ketogenic therapeutic approaches against glioblastoma.

  5. CAR T-Cell Therapies in Glioblastoma: A First Look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Denis; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves; Stupp, Roger; Linette, Gerald P; Posey, Avery D; June, Carl H

    2018-02-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The current standard of care for newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients includes surgery to the extent, temozolomide combined with radiotherapy, and alternating electric fields therapy. After recurrence, there is no standard therapy and survival is less than 9 months. Recurrent glioblastoma offers a unique opportunity to investigate new treatment approaches in a malignancy known for remarkable genetic heterogeneity, an immunosuppressive microenvironment, and a partially permissive anatomic blood-brain barrier. Results from three first-in-man chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell trials targeting IL13Rα2, Her2/CMV, and EGFRvIII have recently been reported. Each one of these trials addresses important questions, such as T-cell trafficking to CNS, engraftment and persistence, tumor microenvironment remodeling, and monitoring of glioma response to CAR T cells. Objective radiologic responses have been reported. Here, we discuss and summarize the results of these trials and suggest opportunities for the field. Clin Cancer Res; 24(3); 535-40. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Precursor States of Brain Tumor Initiating Cell Lines Are Predictive of Survival in Xenografts and Associated with Glioblastoma Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cusulin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, brain-tumor-initiating cells (BTICs with cancer stem cell characteristics have been identified and proposed as primordial cells responsible for disease initiation, recurrence, and therapeutic resistance. However, the extent to which individual, patient-derived BTIC lines reflect the heterogeneity of GBM remains poorly understood. Here we applied a stem cell biology approach and compared self-renewal, marker expression, label retention, and asymmetric cell division in 20 BTIC lines. Through cluster analysis, we identified two subgroups of BTIC lines with distinct precursor states, stem- or progenitor-like, predictive of survival after xenograft. Moreover, stem and progenitor transcriptomic signatures were identified, which showed a strong association with the proneural and mesenchymal subtypes, respectively, in the TCGA cohort. This study proposes a different framework for the study and use of BTIC lines and provides precursor biology insights into GBM.

  7. Deregulation of a STAT3-IL8 Signaling Pathway Promotes Human Glioblastoma Cell Proliferation and Invasiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Iglesia, Núria; Konopka, Genevieve; Lim, Kah Leong; Nutt, Catherine L.; Bromberg, Jacqueline F.; Frank, David A.; Mischel, Paul S.; Louis, David N.; Bonni, Azad

    2009-01-01

    Inactivation of the tumor suppressor PTEN is recognized as a major event in the pathogenesis of the brain tumor glioblastoma. However, the mechanisms by which PTEN loss specifically impacts the malignant behavior of glioblastoma cells including their proliferation and propensity for invasiveness remain poorly understood. Genetic studies suggest that the transcription factor STAT3 harbors a PTEN-regulated tumor suppressive function in mouse astrocytes. Here, we report that STAT3 plays a critical tumor suppressive role in PTEN-deficient human glioblastoma cells. Endogenous STAT3 signaling is specifically inhibited in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma cells. Strikingly, reactivation of STAT3 in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma cells inhibits their proliferation, invasiveness, and ability to spread on myelin. We also identify the chemokine IL8 as a novel target gene of STAT3 in human glioblastoma cells. Activated STAT3 occupies the endogenous IL8 promoter and directly represses IL8 transcription. Consistent with these results, IL8 is upregulated in PTEN-deficient human glioblastoma tumors. Importantly, IL8 repression mediates STAT3-inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation, invasiveness, and spreading on myelin. Collectively, our findings uncover a novel link between STAT3 and IL8 whose deregulation plays a key role in the malignant behavior of PTEN-deficient glioblastoma cells. These studies suggest that STAT3 activation or IL8 inhibition may have potential in patient-tailored treatment of PTEN-deficient brain tumors. PMID:18524891

  8. A phase I/II trial of hydroxychloroquine in conjunction with radiation therapy and concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Myrna R; Ye, Xiaobu; Supko, Jeffrey G; Desideri, Serena; Grossman, Stuart A; Brem, Steven; Mikkelson, Tom; Wang, Daniel; Chang, Yunyoung C; Hu, Janice; McAfee, Quentin; Fisher, Joy; Troxel, Andrea B; Piao, Shengfu; Heitjan, Daniel F; Tan, Kay-See; Pontiggia, Laura; O'Dwyer, Peter J; Davis, Lisa E; Amaravadi, Ravi K

    2014-08-01

    Preclinical studies indicate autophagy inhibition with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) can augment the efficacy of DNA-damaging therapy. The primary objective of this trial was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and efficacy of HCQ in combination with radiation therapy (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ) for newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GB). A 3 + 3 phase I trial design followed by a noncomparative phase II study was conducted in GB patients after initial resection. Patients received HCQ (200 to 800 mg oral daily) with RT and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Quantitative electron microscopy and immunoblotting were used to assess changes in autophagic vacuoles (AVs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Population pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling enabled PK-pharmacodynamic correlations. Sixteen phase I subjects were evaluable for dose-limiting toxicities. At 800 mg HCQ/d, 3/3 subjects experienced Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, 1 with sepsis. HCQ 600 mg/d was found to be the MTD in this combination. The phase II cohort (n = 76) had a median survival of 15.6 mos with survival rates at 12, 18, and 24 mo of 70%, 36%, and 25%. PK analysis indicated dose-proportional exposure for HCQ. Significant therapy-associated increases in AV and LC3-II were observed in PBMC and correlated with higher HCQ exposure. These data establish that autophagy inhibition is achievable with HCQ, but dose-limiting toxicity prevented escalation to higher doses of HCQ. At HCQ 600 mg/d, autophagy inhibition was not consistently achieved in patients treated with this regimen, and no significant improvement in overall survival was observed. Therefore, a definitive test of the role of autophagy inhibition in the adjuvant setting for glioma patients awaits the development of lower-toxicity compounds that can achieve more consistent inhibition of autophagy than HCQ.

  9. Autotaxin inhibition with PF8380 enhances the radiosensitivity of human and murine glioblastoma cell lines

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    Sandeep R Bhave

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is an aggressive primary brain tumor that is radio-resistant and recurs despite aggressive surgery, chemo and radiotherapy. Autotaxin (ATX is over expressed in various cancers including GBM and is implicated in tumor progression, invasion, and angiogenesis. Using the ATX specific inhibitor, PF-8380, we studied ATX as a potential target to enhance radiosensitivity in GBM.Methods and Materials: Mouse GL-261 and Human U87MG cells were used as GBM cell models. Clonogenic survival assays and tumor transwell invasion assays were performed using PF-8380 to evaluate role of ATX in survival and invasion. Radiation dependent activation of Akt was analyzed by immunoblotting. Tumor induced angiogenesis was studied using the dorsal skin-fold model in Gl-261. Heterotopic mouse GL-261 tumors were used to evaluate the efficacy of PF-8380 as a radiosensitizer.Results: Pretreatment of GL-261 and U87-MG cells with 1µM PF-8380 followed by 4Gy irradiation resulted in decreased clonogenic survival, decreased migration (33% in GL-261;P = 0.002 and 17.9% in U87; P = 0.012 decreased invasion (35.6% in GL-261; P = 0.0037 and 31.8% in U87; P = 0.002, and attenuated radiation induced Akt phosphorylation. In the tumor window model inhibition of ATX abrogated radiation-induced tumor neovascularization (65%; P=0.011. In a heterotopic mouse GL-261 tumors untreated mice took 11.2 days to reach a tumor volume of 7000 mm3 , however combination of PF-8380 (10mg/kg with irradiation (5 fractions of 2Gy took more than 32 days to reach a tumor volume of 7000 mm3 .Conclusion: Inhibition of ATX by PF8380 led to decreased invasion and enhanced radiosensitization of glioma cells. Radiation induced activation of Akt was abrogated by inhibition of ATX. Furthermore, inhibition of ATX led to diminished tumor vascularity and delayed tumor growth. These results suggest that inhibition of ATX may ameliorate glioblastoma response to radiotherapy.

  10. Long-Term Survival after Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in a Case of Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumma, Sudheer R.; Elaimy, Ameer L.; Daines, Nathan; Mackay, Alexander R.; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Fairbanks, Robert K.; Demakas, John J.; Cooke, Barton S.; Lee, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    The management of recurrent glioblastoma is highly challenging, and treatment outcomes remain uniformly poor. Glioblastoma is a highly infiltrative tumor, and complete surgical resection of all microscopic extensions cannot be achieved at the time of initial diagnosis, and hence local recurrence is observed in most patients. Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used to treat these tumor recurrences for select cases and has been successful in prolonging the median survival by 8–12 months on average for select cases. We present the unique case of a 63-year-old male with multiple sequential recurrences of glioblastoma after initial standard treatment with surgery followed by concomitant external beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy (temozolomide). The patient was followed clinically as well as with surveillance MRI scans at every 2-3-month intervals. The patient underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery three times for 3 separate tumor recurrences, and the patient survived for seven years following the initial diagnosis with this aggressive treatment. The median survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma is usually 8–12 months after recurrence, and this unique case illustrates that aggressive local therapy can lead to long-term survivors in select situations. We advocate that each patient treatment at the time of recurrence should be tailored to each clinical situation and desire for quality of life and improved longevity. PMID:22548078

  11. A very rare case report of long-term survival: A patient operated on in 1994 of glioblastoma multiforme and currently in perfect health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Caruso

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The fact that there are extremely rare cases of long-term survival and even zero recurrence of the glioblastoma should serve as a stimulus to continue the research effort and not give up the fight against this tumor on a day-to-day basis.

  12. Adhesion signaling promotes protease‑driven polyploidization of glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercapide, Javier; Lorico, Aurelio

    2014-11-01

    An increase in ploidy (polyploidization) causes genomic instability in cancer. However, the determinants for the increased DNA content of cancer cells have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated whether adhesion induces polyploidization in human U87MG glioblastoma cells. For this purpose, we employed expression vectors that reported transcriptional activation by signaling networks implicated in cancer. Signaling activation induced by intercellular integrin binding elicited both extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) and Notch target transcription. Upon the prolonged activation of both ERK and Notch target transcription induced by integrin binding to adhesion protein, cell cultures accumulated polyploid cells, as determined by cell DNA content distribution analysis and the quantification of polynucleated cells. This linked the transcriptional activation induced by integrin adhesion to the increased frequency of polyploidization. Accordingly, the inhibition of signaling decreased the extent of polyploidization mediated by protease‑driven intracellular invasion. Therefore, the findings of this study indicate that integrin adhesion induces polyploidization through the stimulation of glioblastoma cell invasiveness.

  13. Investigating Ceria Nanocrystals Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells and its Related Effects: An Electron Microscopy Study

    KAUST Repository

    Aloufi, Bader

    2017-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles have been utilized widely nowadays in cancer research. It has been suggested by many studies that these nanoparticles are capable of having dual antioxidant behavior in healthy and cancer microenvironment; where

  14. In vitro evaluation of the effects of graphene platelets on glioblastoma multiforme cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaworski, Slawomir; Sawosz, Ewa; Grodzik, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Graphene is a single atom-thick material with exciting potential. It can be used in many fields, from electronics to biomedicine. However, little is known about its toxicity and biocompatibility. Herein, we report a study on the toxicity of graphene platelets (GPs) by examining the influence of G...

  15. A Retrospective Comparative Study of Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy followed by Adjuvant Temozolomide Versus Radiotherapy Alone In Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme - An Experience at Radium Institute, Patna Medical College and Hospital, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S; Pandit, P N; Kishor, K

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (WHO grade IV glioma) still remains a dreadful diagnosis in oncology with the median survival ranging between 12 to 17 months, despite the recent advances in its management. It is the most common malignant primary tumour in adults(13). The standard of care is Maximal Safe Resection followed by Concomitant ChemoRadiotherapy. During the period 2006 to 2010 at Radium Institute, Patna Medical College and Hospital (PMCH) in India, a study was conducted on 37 newly diagnosed GBM cases in which the control-arm (c-arm) received Conventional Radiotherapy (60Gy/30#) only whereas the study arm (s-arm) received Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy followed by Adjuvant Temozolomide. The median survival was 15.4 months in the s-arm as compared to 12.4 months in the c-arm. The OS showed a significant improvement with p-value of 0.05 and PFS also showed a benefit with a p-value of 0.005. The results were encouraging with improvement in OS as well as PFS in the s-arm and were at par with the other similar studies conducted in different parts of the world.

  16. Stem Cell Niches in Glioblastoma: A Neuropathological View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Schiffer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM stem cells (GSCs, responsible for tumor growth, recurrence, and resistance to therapies, are considered the real therapeutic target, if they had no molecular mechanisms of resistance, in comparison with the mass of more differentiated cells which are insensitive to therapies just because of being differentiated and nonproliferating. GSCs occur in tumor niches where both stemness status and angiogenesis are conditioned by the microenvironment. In both perivascular and perinecrotic niches, hypoxia plays a fundamental role. Fifteen glioblastomas have been studied by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence for stemness and differentiation antigens. It has been found that circumscribed necroses develop inside hyperproliferating areas that are characterized by high expression of stemness antigens. Necrosis developed inside them because of the imbalance between the proliferation of tumor cells and endothelial cells; it reduces the number of GSCs to a thin ring around the former hyperproliferating area. The perinecrotic GSCs are nothing else that the survivors remnants of those populating hyperproliferating areas. In the tumor, GSCs coincide with malignant areas so that the need to detect where they are located is not so urgent.

  17. Gaussian graphical modeling reveals specific lipid correlations in glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Nikola S.; Krumsiek, Jan; Theis, Fabian J.; Böhm, Christian; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2011-06-01

    Advances in high-throughput measurements of biological specimens necessitate the development of biologically driven computational techniques. To understand the molecular level of many human diseases, such as cancer, lipid quantifications have been shown to offer an excellent opportunity to reveal disease-specific regulations. The data analysis of the cell lipidome, however, remains a challenging task and cannot be accomplished solely based on intuitive reasoning. We have developed a method to identify a lipid correlation network which is entirely disease-specific. A powerful method to correlate experimentally measured lipid levels across the various samples is a Gaussian Graphical Model (GGM), which is based on partial correlation coefficients. In contrast to regular Pearson correlations, partial correlations aim to identify only direct correlations while eliminating indirect associations. Conventional GGM calculations on the entire dataset can, however, not provide information on whether a correlation is truly disease-specific with respect to the disease samples and not a correlation of control samples. Thus, we implemented a novel differential GGM approach unraveling only the disease-specific correlations, and applied it to the lipidome of immortal Glioblastoma tumor cells. A large set of lipid species were measured by mass spectrometry in order to evaluate lipid remodeling as a result to a combination of perturbation of cells inducing programmed cell death, while the other perturbations served solely as biological controls. With the differential GGM, we were able to reveal Glioblastoma-specific lipid correlations to advance biomedical research on novel gene therapies.

  18. Preferential Iron Trafficking Characterizes Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schonberg, David L; Miller, Tyler E; Wu, Qiulian

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastomas display hierarchies with self-renewing cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). RNA sequencing and enhancer mapping revealed regulatory programs unique to CSCs causing upregulation of the iron transporter transferrin, the top differentially expressed gene compared with tissue......, to propagate and form tumors in vivo. Depleting ferritin disrupted CSC mitotic progression, through the STAT3-FoxM1 regulatory axis, revealing an iron-regulated CSC pathway. Iron is a unique, primordial metal fundamental for earliest life forms, on which CSCs have an epigenetically programmed, targetable...

  19. The response of human glioblastoma in culture to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Koji; Aramaki, Ryoji; Takagi, Tosuke

    1980-01-01

    Cells from two human glioblastoma multiforme and one mouse glioma were grown in tissue cultures and their X-ray survival curve parameters were determined under oxygenated and hypoxic conditions. These were compared with the survival parameters for mouse fibroblasts (L5) and established cell lines from human carcinoma coli (HeLa S3) irradiated under identical conditions. There was no significant difference in response among the cell lines used. Repair of potentially lethal damage for human glioblastoma and HeLa S3 was assessed by the increase in survival which occurred as the cells were held in density inhibited stationary phase. The magnitude of repair of potentially lethal damage (slope modifying factors) for the glioblastoma and HeLa were 1.9 and 1.1, respectively. (author)

  20. Hypofractionated radiation induces a decrease in cell proliferation but no histological damage to organotypic multicellular spheroids of human glioblastomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaijk, P.; Troost, D.; Sminia, P.; Hulshof, M. C.; van der Kracht, A. H.; Leenstra, S.; Bosch, D. A.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of radiation on glioblastoma, using an organotypic multicellular spheroid (OMS) model. Most glioblastoma cell lines are, in contrast to glioblastomas in vivo, relatively radiosensitive. This limits the value of using cell lines for studying the

  1. Dual-targeting immunoliposomes using angiopep-2 and CD133 antibody for glioblastoma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Seok; Shin, Dae Hwan; Kim, Jin-Seok

    2018-01-10

    Glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs), which are identified as subpopulation of CD133 + /ALDH1 + , are known to show resistance to the most of chemotherapy and radiation therapy, leading to the recurrence of tumor in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients. Also, delivery of temozolomide (TMZ), a mainline treatment of GBM, to the GBM site is hampered by various barriers including the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A dual-targeting immunoliposome encapsulating TMZ (Dual-LP-TMZ) was developed by using angiopep-2 (An2) and anti-CD133 monoclonal antibody (CD133 mAb) for BBB transcytosis and specific delivery to GSCs, respectively. The size, zeta potential and drug encapsulation efficiency of Dual-LP-TMZ were 203.4nm in diameter, -1.6mV and 99.2%, respectively. The in vitro cytotoxicity of Dual-LP-TMZ against U87MG GSCs was increased by 425- and 181-folds when compared with that of free TMZ and non-targeted TMZ liposome (LP-TMZ) (10.3μM vs. 4380μM and 1869μM in IC 50 , respectively). Apoptosis and anti-migration ability of Dual-LP-TMZ in U87MG GSCs were also significantly enhanced comparing with those of free TMZ or LP-TMZ. In vivo study clearly showed a significant reduction in tumor size after intravenous administrations of Dual-LP-TMZ to the orthotopically-implanted brain tumor mice when compared with free TMZ or LP-TMZ. Increased life span (ILS) and median survival time (MST) of tumor-bearing mice were also increased when treated with Dual-LP-TMZ (211.2% in ILS and 49.2days in MST) than with free TMZ (0% in ILS and 23.3day in MST). These data indicate that conjugation of both An2 peptide and CD133 mAb to TMZ-encapsulating liposome is very effective in delivering the TMZ to GSCs via BBB, suggesting a potential use of Dual-LP-TMZ as a therapeutic modality for GBM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. VEGF promotes tumorigenesis and angiogenesis of human glioblastoma stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Naoki; Soeda, Akio; Inagaki, Akihito; Onodera, Masafumi; Maruyama, Hidekazu; Hara, Akira; Kunisada, Takahiro; Mori, Hideki; Iwama, Toru

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in malignant brain tumors, and these CSCs may play a pivotal role in tumor initiation, growth, and recurrence. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promotes the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and the neurogenesis of neural stem cells. Using CSCs derived from human glioblastomas and a retrovirus expressing VEGF, we examined the effects of VEGF on the properties of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. Although VEGF did not affect the property of CSCs in vitro, the injection of mouse brains with VEGF-expressing CSCs led to the massive expansion of vascular-rich GBM, tumor-associated hemorrhage, and high morbidity, suggesting that VEGF promoted tumorigenesis via angiogenesis. These results revealed that VEGF induced the proliferation of VEC in the vascular-rich tumor environment, the so-called stem cell niche

  3. Mast cell accumulation in glioblastoma with a potential role for stem cell factor and chemokine CXCL12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Põlajeva

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common and malignant form of glioma with high mortality and no cure. Many human cancers maintain a complex inflammatory program triggering rapid recruitment of inflammatory cells, including mast cells (MCs, to the tumor site. However, the potential contribution of MCs in glioma has not been addressed previously. Here we report for the first time that MCs infiltrate KRas+Akt-induced gliomas, using the RCAS/TV-a system, where KRas and Akt are transduced by RCAS into the brains of neonatal Gtv-a- or Ntv-a transgenic mice lacking Ink4a or Arf. The most abundant MC infiltration was observed in high-grade gliomas of Arf-/- mice. MC accumulation could be localized to the vicinity of glioma-associated vessels but also within the tumor mass. Importantly, proliferating MCs were detected, suggesting that the MC accumulation was caused by local expansion of the MC population. In line with these findings, strong expression of stem cell factor (SCF, i.e. the main MC growth factor, was detected, in particular around tumor blood vessels. Further, glioma cells expressed the MC chemotaxin CXCL12 and MCs expressed the corresponding receptor, i.e. CXCR4, suggesting that MCs could be attracted to the tumor through the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis. Supporting a role for MCs in glioma, strong MC infiltration was detected in human glioma, where GBMs contained significantly higher MC numbers than grade II tumors did. Moreover, human GBMs were positive for CXCL12 and the infiltrating MCs were positive for CXCR4. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence for a role for MCs in glioma.

  4. Ruta graveolens L. induces death of glioblastoma cells and neural progenitors, but not of neurons, via ERK 1/2 and AKT activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Gentile

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme is a highly aggressive brain tumor whose prognosis is very poor. Due to early invasion of brain parenchyma, its complete surgical removal is nearly impossible, and even after aggressive combined treatment (association of surgery and chemo- and radio-therapy five-year survival is only about 10%. Natural products are sources of novel compounds endowed with therapeutic properties in many human diseases, including cancer. Here, we report that the water extract of Ruta graveolens L., commonly known as rue, induces death in different glioblastoma cell lines (U87MG, C6 and U138 widely used to test novel drugs in preclinical studies. Ruta graveolens' effect was mediated by ERK1/2 and AKT activation, and the inhibition of these pathways, via PD98058 and wortmannin, reverted its antiproliferative activity. Rue extract also affects survival of neural precursor cells (A1 obtained from embryonic mouse CNS. As in the case of glioma cells, rue stimulates the activation of ERK1/2 and AKT in A1 cells, whereas their blockade by pharmacological inhibitors prevents cell death. Interestingly, upon induction of differentiation and cell cycle exit, A1 cells become resistant to rue's noxious effects but not to those of temozolomide and cisplatin, two alkylating agents widely used in glioblastoma therapy. Finally, rutin, a major component of the Ruta graveolens water extract, failed to cause cell death, suggesting that rutin by itself is not responsible for the observed effects. In conclusion, we report that rue extracts induce glioma cell death, discriminating between proliferating/undifferentiated and non-proliferating/differentiated neurons. Thus, it can be a promising tool to isolate novel drugs and also to discover targets for therapeutic intervention.

  5. PI3K and Bcl-2 inhibition primes glioblastoma cells to apoptosis through downregulation of Mcl-1 and Phospho-BAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Fresia; Macleod, David; Shu, Chang; Crary, John F; Canoll, Peter D; Ross, Alonzo H; Siegelin, Markus D

    2014-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant human brain neoplasm with limited therapeutic options. GBMs display a deregulated apoptotic pathway with high levels of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family of proteins and overt activity of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. Therefore, combined interference of the PI3K pathway and the Bcl-2 family of proteins is a reasonable therapeutic strategy. ABT-263 (Navitoclax), an orally available small-molecule Bcl-2 inhibitor, and GDC-0941, a PI3K inhibitor, were used to treat established glioblastoma and glioblastoma neurosphere cells, alone or in combination. Although GDC-0941 alone had a modest effect on cell viability, treatment with ABT-263 displayed a marked reduction of cell viability and induction of apoptotic cell death. Moreover, combinatorial therapy using ABT-263 and GDC-0941 showed an enhanced effect, with a further decrease in cellular viability. Furthermore, combination treatment abrogated the ability of stem cell-like glioma cells to form neurospheres. ABT-263 and GDC-0941, in combination, resulted in a consistent and significant increase of Annexin V positive cells and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential compared with either monotherapy. The combination treatment led to enhanced cleavage of both initiator and effector caspases. Mechanistically, GDC-0941 depleted pAKT (Serine 473) levels and suppressed Mcl-1 protein levels, lowering the threshold for the cytotoxic actions of ABT-263. GDC-0941 decreased Mcl-1 in a posttranslational manner and significantly decreased the half-life of Mcl-1 protein. Ectopic expression of human Mcl-1 mitigated apoptotic cell death induced by the drug combination. Furthermore, GDC-0941 modulated the phosphorylation status of BAD, thereby further enhancing ABT-263-mediated cell death. Combination therapy with ABT-263 and GDC-0941 has novel therapeutic potential by specifically targeting aberrantly active, deregulated pathways in GBM, overcoming

  6. Modeling microenvironmental regulation of glioblastoma stem cells: a biomaterials perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, John M.; Sirianni, Rachael W.

    2018-02-01

    Following diagnosis of a glioblastoma (GBM) brain tumor, surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiation together yield a median patient survival of only 15 months. Importantly, standard treatments fail to address the dynamic regulation of the brain tumor microenvironment that actively supports tumor progression and treatment resistance. It is becoming increasingly recognized that specialized niches within the tumor microenvironment maintain a population of highly malignant glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs). GSCs are resistant to traditional chemotherapy and radiation therapy, suggesting that they may be responsible for the near universal rates of tumor recurrence and associated morbidity in GBM. Thus, disrupting microenvironmental support for GSCs could be critical to developing more effective GBM therapies. Three-dimensional (3D) culture models of the tumor microenvironment are powerful tools for identifying key biochemical and biophysical inputs that impact malignant behaviors. Such systems have been used effectively to identify conditions that regulate GSC proliferation, invasion, stem-specific phenotypes, and treatment resistance. Considering the significant role that GSC microenvironments play in regulating this tumorigenic sub-population, these models may be essential for uncovering mechanisms that limit GSCs malignancy.

  7. Olea europaea leaf extract and bevacizumab synergistically exhibit beneficial efficacy upon human glioblastoma cancer stem cells through reducing angiogenesis and invasion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezcan, Gulcin; Taskapilioglu, Mevlut Ozgur; Tunca, Berrin; Bekar, Ahmet; Demirci, Hilal; Kocaeli, Hasan; Aksoy, Secil Ak; Egeli, Unal; Cecener, Gulsah; Tolunay, Sahsine

    2017-06-01

    Patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) that are cancer stem-cell-positive (GSC [+]) essentially cannot benefit from anti-angiogenic or anti-invasive therapy. In the present study, the potential anti-angiogenic and anti-invasive effects of Olea europaea (olive) leaf extract (OLE) were tested using GSC (+) tumours. OLE (2mg/mL) caused a significant reduction in tumour weight, vascularisation, invasiveness and migration (p=0.0001, p<0.001, p=0.004; respectively) that was associated with reducing the expression of VEGFA, MMP-2 and MMP-9. This effect was synergistically increased in combination with bevacizumab. Therefore, our current findings may contribute to research on drugs that inhibit the invasiveness of GBM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Tumor and Endothelial Cell Hybrids Participate in Glioblastoma Vasculature

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    Soufiane El Hallani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recently antiangiogenic therapy with bevacizumab has shown a high but transient efficacy in glioblastoma (GBM. Indeed, GBM is one of the most angiogenic human tumors and endothelial proliferation is a hallmark of the disease. We therefore hypothesized that tumor cells may participate in endothelial proliferation of GBM. Materials and Methods. We used EGFR FISH Probe to detect EGFR amplification and anti-CD31, CD105, VE-cadherin, and vWF to identify endothelial cells. Endothelial and GBM cells were grown separately, labeled with GFP and DsRed lentiviruses, and then cocultured with or without contact. Results. In a subset of GBM tissues, we found that several tumor endothelial cells carry EGFR amplification, characteristic of GBM tumor cells. This observation was reproduced in vitro: when tumor stem cells derived from GBM were grown in the presence of human endothelial cells, a fraction of them acquired endothelial markers (CD31, CD105, VE-cadherin, and vWF. By transduction with GFP and DsRed expressing lentiviral vectors, we demonstrate that this phenomenon is due to cell fusion and not transdifferentiation. Conclusion. A fraction of GBM stem cells thus has the capacity to fuse with endothelial cells and the resulting hybrids may participate in tumor microvascular proliferation and in treatment resistance.

  9. A clinical review of treatment outcomes in glioblastoma multiforme - the validation in a non-trial population of the results of a randomised Phase III clinical trial: has a more radical approach improved survival?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rock, K

    2012-01-03

    Objective: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) accounts for up to 60% of all malignant primary brain tumours in adults, occurring in 2-3 cases per 100 000 in Europe and North America. In 2005, a Phase III clinical trial demonstrated a significant improvement in survival over 2, and subsequently, 5 years with the addition of concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) to radical radiotherapy (RT) (Stupp R, Hegi M, van den Bent M, et al. Effects of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide versus radiotherapy alone on survival in glioblastoma in a randomised phase III study: 5-year analysis of the EORTC-NCIC trial. Lancet Oncol 2009:10:459-66). The aim of this study was to investigate if the demonstrated improved survival in the literature translated to clinical practice.Methods: This was a retrospective study including all patients with histologically proven GBM diagnosed from 1999 to 2008 and treated with adjuvant RT at our institution. A total of 273 patients were identified. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS v18.Results: The median survival for the whole group (n = 273) over the 10-year period was 7.6 months (95% confidence interval 6.7-8.4 months). Overall, the cumulative probability of survival at 1 and 2 years was 31.5 and 9.4%, respectively. In total, 146 patients received radical RT. 103 patients were treated with radical RT and TMZ and 43 patients received radical RT alone. The median survival for patients receiving radical RT with TMZ was 13.4 months (95% CI 10.9-15.8 months) vs 8.8 months for radical RT alone (95% CI 6.9 - 10.7 months, p = 0.006). 2-year survival figures were 21.2 vs 4.7%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, independent predictors of survival included KPS, RT dose, TMZ and extent of surgery. The strongest predictors of poorer outcome based on the hazard ratio were palliative RT, followed by not receiving TMZ chemotherapy, then KPS <90 and a biopsy only surgical approach.Conclusion: This paper demonstrates

  10. A clinical review of treatment outcomes in glioblastoma multiforme - the validation in a non-trial population of the results of a randomised Phase III clinical trial: has a more radical approach improved survival?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Objective: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) accounts for up to 60% of all malignant primary brain tumours in adults, occurring in 2-3 cases per 100 000 in Europe and North America. In 2005, a Phase III clinical trial demonstrated a significant improvement in survival over 2, and subsequently, 5 years with the addition of concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) to radical radiotherapy (RT) (Stupp R, Hegi M, van den Bent M, et al. Effects of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide versus radiotherapy alone on survival in glioblastoma in a randomised phase III study: 5-year analysis of the EORTC-NCIC trial. Lancet Oncol 2009:10:459-66). The aim of this study was to investigate if the demonstrated improved survival in the literature translated to clinical practice.Methods: This was a retrospective study including all patients with histologically proven GBM diagnosed from 1999 to 2008 and treated with adjuvant RT at our institution. A total of 273 patients were identified. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS v18.Results: The median survival for the whole group (n = 273) over the 10-year period was 7.6 months (95% confidence interval 6.7-8.4 months). Overall, the cumulative probability of survival at 1 and 2 years was 31.5 and 9.4%, respectively. In total, 146 patients received radical RT. 103 patients were treated with radical RT and TMZ and 43 patients received radical RT alone. The median survival for patients receiving radical RT with TMZ was 13.4 months (95% CI 10.9-15.8 months) vs 8.8 months for radical RT alone (95% CI 6.9 - 10.7 months, p = 0.006). 2-year survival figures were 21.2 vs 4.7%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, independent predictors of survival included KPS, RT dose, TMZ and extent of surgery. The strongest predictors of poorer outcome based on the hazard ratio were palliative RT, followed by not receiving TMZ chemotherapy, then KPS <90 and a biopsy only surgical approach.Conclusion: This paper demonstrates improved

  11. Clinical variables serve as prognostic factors in a model for survival from glioblastoma multiforme: an observational study of a cohort of consecutive non-selected patients from a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaelsen, Signe Regner; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Grunnet, Kirsten; Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Broholm, Helle; Kosteljanetz, Michael; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2013-01-01

    Although implementation of temozolomide (TMZ) as a part of primary therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has resulted in improved patient survival, the disease is still incurable. Previous studies have correlated various parameters to survival, although no single parameter has yet been identified. More studies and new approaches to identify the best and worst performing patients are therefore in great demand. This study examined 225 consecutive, non-selected GBM patients with performance status (PS) 0–2 receiving postoperative radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant TMZ as primary therapy. At relapse, patients with PS 0–2 were mostly treated by reoperation and/or combination with bevacizumab/irinotecan (BEV/IRI), while a few received TMZ therapy if the recurrence-free period was >6 months. Median overall survival and time to progression were 14.3 and 8.0 months, respectively. Second-line therapy indicated that reoperation and/or BEV/IRI increased patient survival compared with untreated patients and that BEV/IRI was more effective than reoperation alone. Patient age, ECOG PS, and use of corticosteroid therapy were significantly correlated with patient survival and disease progression on univariate analysis, whereas p53, epidermal growth factor receptor, and O 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase expression (all detected by immunohistochemistry), tumor size or multifocality, and extent of primary operation were not. A model based on age, ECOG PS, and corticosteroids use was able to predict survival probability for an individual patient. The survival of RT/TMZ-treated GBM patients can be predicted based on patient age, ECOG PS, and corticosteroid therapy status

  12. Cell surface area and membrane folding in glioblastoma cell lines differing in PTEN and p53 status.

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    Simon Memmel

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is characterized by rapid growth, invasion and resistance to chemo-/radiotherapy. The complex cell surface morphology with abundant membrane folds, microvilli, filopodia and other membrane extensions is believed to contribute to the highly invasive behavior and therapy resistance of GBM cells. The present study addresses the mechanisms leading to the excessive cell membrane area in five GBM lines differing in mutational status for PTEN and p53. In addition to scanning electron microscopy (SEM, the membrane area and folding were quantified by dielectric measurements of membrane capacitance using the single-cell electrorotation (ROT technique. The osmotic stability and volume regulation of GBM cells were analyzed by video microscopy. The expression of PTEN, p53, mTOR and several other marker proteins involved in cell growth and membrane synthesis were examined by Western blotting. The combined SEM, ROT and osmotic data provided independent lines of evidence for a large variability in membrane area and folding among tested GBM lines. Thus, DK-MG cells (wild type p53 and wild type PTEN exhibited the lowest degree of membrane folding, probed by the area-specific capacitance C m = 1.9 µF/cm(2. In contrast, cell lines carrying mutations in both p53 and PTEN (U373-MG and SNB19 showed the highest C m values of 3.7-4.0 µF/cm(2, which corroborate well with their heavily villated cell surface revealed by SEM. Since PTEN and p53 are well-known inhibitors of mTOR, the increased membrane area/folding in mutant GBM lines may be related to the enhanced protein and lipid synthesis due to a deregulation of the mTOR-dependent downstream signaling pathway. Given that membrane folds and extensions are implicated in tumor cell motility and metastasis, the dielectric approach presented here provides a rapid and simple tool for screening the biophysical cell properties in studies on targeting chemo- or radiotherapeutically the

  13. Synemin promotes AKT-dependent glioblastoma cell proliferation by antagonizing PP2A

    OpenAIRE

    Pitre, Aaron; Davis, Nathan; Paul, Madhumita; Orr, A Wayne; Skalli, Omar

    2012-01-01

    The intermediate filament protein synemin is present in astrocyte progenitors and glioblastoma cells but not in mature astrocytes. Here we demonstrate a role for synemin in enhancing glioblastoma cell proliferation and clonogenic survival, as synemin RNA interference decreased both behaviors by inducing G1 arrest along with Rb hypophosphorylation and increased protein levels of the G1/S inhibitors p21Cip1 and p27Kip1. Akt involvement was demonstrated by decreased phosphorylation of its substr...

  14. Radiomic features from the peritumoral brain parenchyma on treatment-naive multi-parametric MR imaging predict long versus short-term survival in glioblastoma multiforme: Preliminary findings

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    Prasanna, Prateek; Patel, Jay; Madabhushi, Anant; Tiwari, Pallavi [Case Western Reserve University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cleveland, OH (United States); Partovi, Sasan [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Despite 90 % of glioblastoma (GBM) recurrences occurring in the peritumoral brain zone (PBZ), its contribution in patient survival is poorly understood. The current study leverages computerized texture (i.e. radiomic) analysis to evaluate the efficacy of PBZ features from pre-operative MRI in predicting long- (>18 months) versus short-term (<7 months) survival in GBM. Sixty-five patient examinations (29 short-term, 36 long-term) with gadolinium-contrast T{sub 1w}, FLAIR and T{sub 2w} sequences from the Cancer Imaging Archive were employed. An expert manually segmented each study as: enhancing lesion, PBZ and tumour necrosis. 402 radiomic features (capturing co-occurrence, grey-level dependence and directional gradients) were obtained for each region. Evaluation was performed using threefold cross-validation, such that a subset of studies was used to select the most predictive features, and the remaining subset was used to evaluate their efficacy in predicting survival. A subset of ten radiomic 'peritumoral' MRI features, suggestive of intensity heterogeneity and textural patterns, was found to be predictive of survival (p = 1.47 x 10{sup -5}) as compared to features from enhancing tumour, necrotic regions and known clinical factors. Our preliminary analysis suggests that radiomic features from the PBZ on routine pre-operative MRI may be predictive of long- versus short-term survival in GBM. (orig.)

  15. The Anti-Warburg Effect Elicited by the cAMP-PGC1α Pathway Drives Differentiation of Glioblastoma Cells into Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Xing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is among the most aggressive of human cancers. Although differentiation therapy has been proposed as a potential approach to treat GBM, the mechanisms of induced differentiation remain poorly defined. Here, we established an induced differentiation model of GBM using cAMP activators that specifically directed GBM differentiation into astroglia. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses revealed that oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial biogenesis are involved in induced differentiation of GBM. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dbcAMP reverses the Warburg effect, as evidenced by increased oxygen consumption and reduced lactate production. Mitochondrial biogenesis induced by activation of the CREB-PGC1α pathway triggers metabolic shift and differentiation. Blocking mitochondrial biogenesis using mdivi1 or by silencing PGC1α abrogates differentiation; conversely, overexpression of PGC1α elicits differentiation. In GBM xenograft models and patient-derived GBM samples, cAMP activators also induce tumor growth inhibition and differentiation. Our data show that mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolic switch to oxidative phosphorylation drive the differentiation of tumor cells. : Xing et al. show that the metabolic shift from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation drives differentiation of GBM cells into astrocytes by cAMP activation. Mechanistically, the cAMP-CREB-PGC1α signal mediates mitochondrial biogenesis, which leads to metabolic reprogramming, induced differentiation, and tumor growth inhibition. Keywords: glioblastoma, induced differentiation, Warburg effect, metabolic reprogramming, oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis, mitochondrial biogenesis, cyclic adenosine monophosphate, cAMP, PPARγ coactivator-1α, PGC1α

  16. Resveratrol Inhibits the Invasion of Glioblastoma-Initiating Cells via Down-Regulation of the PI3K/Akt/NF-κB Signaling Pathway

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    Yuming Jiao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasion and metastasis of glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs are thought to be responsible for the progression and recurrence of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. A safe drug that can be applied during the rest period of temozolomide (TMZ maintenance cycles would greatly improve the prognosis of GBM patients by inhibiting GIC invasion. Resveratrol (RES is a natural compound that exhibits anti-invasion properties in multiple tumor cell lines. The current study aimed to evaluate whether RES can inhibit GIC invasion in vitro and in vivo. GICs were identified using CD133 and Nestin immunofluorescence staining and tumorigenesis in non-obese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID mice. Invasive behaviors, including the adhesion, invasion and migration of GICs, were determined by tumor invasive assays in vitro and in vivo. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs was measured by the gelatin zymography assay. Western blotting analysis and immunofluorescence staining were used to determine the expression of signaling effectors in GICs. We demonstrated that RES suppressed the adhesion, invasion and migration of GICs in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we proved that RES inhibited the invasion of GICs via the inhibition of PI3K/Akt/NF-κB signal transduction and the subsequent suppression of MMP-2 expression.

  17. Sprouty2 enhances the tumorigenic potential of glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Whi; Wollmann, Guido; Urbiola, Carles; Fogli, Barbara; Florio, Tullio; Geley, Stephan; Klimaschewski, Lars

    2018-02-23

    Sprouty2 (SPRY2), a feedback regulator of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, has been shown to be associated with drug resistance and cell proliferation in glioblastoma (GBM), but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly defined. SPRY2 expression and survival patterns of patients with gliomas were analyzed using publicly available databases. Effects of RNA interference targeting SPRY2 on cellular proliferation in established GBM or patient-derived GBM stemlike cells were examined. Loss- or gain-of-function of SPRY2 to regulate the tumorigenic capacity was assessed in both intracranial and subcutaneous xenografts. SPRY2 was found to be upregulated in GBM, which correlated with reduced survival in GBM patients. SPRY2 knockdown significantly impaired proliferation of GBM cells but not of normal astrocytes. Silencing of SPRY2 increased epidermal growth factor-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt activation causing premature onset of DNA replication, increased DNA damage, and impaired proliferation, suggesting that SPRY2 suppresses DNA replication stress. Abrogating SPRY2 function strongly inhibited intracranial tumor growth and led to significantly prolonged survival of U87 xenograft-bearing mice. In contrast, SPRY2 overexpression promoted tumor propagation of low-tumorigenic U251 cells. The present study highlights an antitumoral effect of SPRY2 inhibition that is based on excessive activation of ERK signaling and DNA damage response, resulting in reduced cell proliferation and increased cytotoxicity, proposing SPRY2 as a promising pharmacological target in GBM patients.

  18. Bee venom induces apoptosis and suppresses matrix metaloprotease-2 expression in human glioblastoma cells

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    Mohsen Sisakht

    Full Text Available Abstract Glioblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor representing with poor prognosis, therapy resistance and high metastasis rate. Increased expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2, a member of matrix metalloproteinase family proteins, has been reported in many cancers including glioblastoma. Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression has resulted in reduced aggression of glioblastoma tumors in several reports. In the present study, we evaluated effect of bee venom on expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 as well as potential toxicity and apoptogenic properties of bee venom on glioblastoma cells. Human A172 glioblastoma cells were treated with increasing concentrations of bee venom. Then, cell viability, apoptosis, matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity were measured using MMT assay, propidium iodide staining, real time-PCR, and zymography, respectively. The IC50 value of bee venom was 28.5 µg/ml in which it leads to decrease of cell viability and induction of apoptosis. Incubation with bee venom also decreased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in this cell line (p < 0.05. In zymography, there was a reverse correlation between bee venom concentration and total matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity. Induction of apoptosis as well as inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity and expression can be suggested as molecular mechanisms involved in cytotoxic and antimetastatic effects of bee venom against glioblastoma cells.

  19. Nuclear receptor TLX inhibits TGF-β signaling in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Erik; Zhai, Qiwei; Zeng, Zhao-Jun; Yoshida, Takeshi; Funa, Keiko

    2016-05-01

    TLX (also called NR2E1) is an orphan nuclear receptor that maintains stemness of neuronal stem cells. TLX is highly expressed in the most malignant form of glioma, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and is important for the proliferation and maintenance of the stem/progenitor cells of the tumor. Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) is a cytokine regulating many different cellular processes such as differentiation, migration, adhesion, cell death and proliferation. TGF-β has an important function in cancer where it can work as either a tumor suppressor or oncogene, depending on the cancer type and stage of tumor development. Since glioblastoma often have dysfunctional TGF-β signaling we wanted to find out if there is any interaction between TLX and TGF-β in glioblastoma cells. We demonstrate that knockdown of TLX enhances the canonical TGF-β signaling response in glioblastoma cell lines. TLX physically interacts with and stabilizes Smurf1, which can ubiquitinate and target TGF-β receptor II for degradation, whereas knockdown of TLX leads to stabilization of TGF-β receptor II, increased nuclear translocation of Smad2/3 and enhanced expression of TGF-β target genes. The interaction between TLX and TGF-β may play an important role in the regulation of proliferation and tumor-initiating properties of glioblastoma cells. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Quantitative Analyses of Synergistic Responses between Cannabidiol and DNA-Damaging Agents on the Proliferation and Viability of Glioblastoma and Neural Progenitor Cells in Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Liting; Ng, Lindsay; Ozawa, Tatsuya; Stella, Nephi

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the nonpsychotropic cannabis-derived compound, cannabidiol (CBD), has antineoplastic activity in multiple types of cancers, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). DNA-damaging agents remain the main standard of care treatment available for patients diagnosed with GBM. Here we studied the antiproliferative and cell-killing activity of CBD alone and in combination with DNA-damaging agents (temozolomide, carmustine, or cisplatin) in several human GBM cell lines and in mouse primary GBM cells in cultures. This activity was also studied in mouse neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in culture to assess for potential central nervous system toxicity. We found that CBD induced a dose-dependent reduction of both proliferation and viability of all cells with similar potencies, suggesting no preferential activity for cancer cells. Hill plot analysis indicates an allosteric mechanism of action triggered by CBD in all cells. Cotreatment regimens combining CBD and DNA-damaging agents produced synergistic antiproliferating and cell-killing responses over a limited range of concentrations in all human GBM cell lines and mouse GBM cells as well as in mouse NPCs. Remarkably, antagonistic responses occurred at low concentrations in select human GBM cell lines and in mouse GBM cells. Our study suggests limited synergistic activity when combining CBD and DNA-damaging agents in treating GBM cells, along with little to no therapeutic window when considering NPCs. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  1. A high-content small molecule screen identifies sensitivity of glioblastoma stem cells to inhibition of polo-like kinase 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Danovi

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary brain cancer in adults and there are few effective treatments. GBMs contain cells with molecular and cellular characteristics of neural stem cells that drive tumour growth. Here we compare responses of human glioblastoma-derived neural stem (GNS cells and genetically normal neural stem (NS cells to a panel of 160 small molecule kinase inhibitors. We used live-cell imaging and high content image analysis tools and identified JNJ-10198409 (J101 as an agent that induces mitotic arrest at prometaphase in GNS cells but not NS cells. Antibody microarrays and kinase profiling suggested that J101 responses are triggered by suppression of the active phosphorylated form of polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1 (phospho T210, with resultant spindle defects and arrest at prometaphase. We found that potent and specific Plk1 inhibitors already in clinical development (BI 2536, BI 6727 and GSK 461364 phenocopied J101 and were selective against GNS cells. Using a porcine brain endothelial cell blood-brain barrier model we also observed that these compounds exhibited greater blood-brain barrier permeability in vitro than J101. Our analysis of mouse mutant NS cells (INK4a/ARF(-/-, or p53(-/-, as well as the acute genetic deletion of p53 from a conditional p53 floxed NS cell line, suggests that the sensitivity of GNS cells to BI 2536 or J101 may be explained by the lack of a p53-mediated compensatory pathway. Together these data indicate that GBM stem cells are acutely susceptible to proliferative disruption by Plk1 inhibitors and that such agents may have immediate therapeutic value.

  2. Glioblastoma Stem-Like Cells—Biology and Therapeutic Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gürsel, Demirkan B.; Shin, Benjamin J.; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Kesavabhotla, Kartik; Schlaff, Cody D.; Boockvar, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer stem-cell hypothesis proposes that malignant tumors are likely to encompass a cellular hierarchy that parallels normal tissue and may be responsible for the maintenance and recurrence of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in patients. The purpose of this manuscript is to review methods for optimizing the derivation and culturing of stem-like cells also known as tumor stem cells (TSCs) from patient-derived GBM tissue samples. The hallmarks of TSCs are that they must be able to self-renew and retain tumorigenicity. The isolation, optimization and derivation of TSCs as outlined in this review, will be important in understanding biology and therapeutic applications related to these cells

  3. The antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of apigenin on glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, Trevor A; Santee, Brittany N; Williams, Lauren P; Kunze, Rachel A; Heinze, Chelsae E; Huseman, Eric D; Gryka, Rebecca J; Simpson, Denise S; Amos, Samson

    2017-07-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is highly proliferative, infiltrative, malignant and the most deadly form of brain tumour. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed, amplified and mutated in GBM and has been shown to play key and important roles in the proliferation, growth and survival of this tumour. The goal of our study was to investigate the antiproliferative, apoptotic and molecular effects of apigenin in GBM. Proliferation and viability tests were carried out using the trypan blue exclusion, MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. Flow cytometry was used to examine the effects of apigenin on the cell cycle check-points. In addition, we determined the effects of apigenin on EGFR-mediated signalling pathways by Western blot analyses. Our results showed that apigenin reduced cell viability and proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner while increasing cytotoxicity in GBM cells. Treatment with apigenin-induced is poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage and caused cell cycle arrest at the G2M checkpoint. Furthermore, our data revealed that apigenin inhibited EGFR-mediated phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), AKT and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathways and attenuated the expression of Bcl-xL. Our results demonstrated that apigenin has potent inhibitory effects on pathways involved in GBM proliferation and survival and could potentially be used as a therapeutic agent for GBM. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  4. Strategies of temozolomide in future glioblastoma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee CY

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chooi Yeng Lee School of Pharmacy, Monash University Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM may be one of the most challenging brain tumors to treat, as patients generally do not live more than 2 years. This review aimed to give a timely review of potential future treatments for GBM by looking at the latest strategies, involving mainly the use of temozolomide (TMZ. Although these studies were carried out either in vitro or in rodents, the findings collectively suggested that we are moving toward developing a more efficacious therapy for GBM patients. Nanoparticles preparation was, by far, the most extensively studied strategy for targeted brain delivery. Therefore, the first section of this review presents a treatment strategy using TMZ-loaded nanocarriers, which encompassed nanoparticles, nanoliposomes, and nanosponges. Besides nanocarriers, new complexes that were formed between TMZ and another chemical agent or molecule have shown increased cytotoxicity and antitumor activity. Another approach was by reducing GBM cell resistance to TMZ, and this was achieved either through the suppression of metabolic change occurring in the cells, inhibition of the DNA repair protein, or up-regulation of the protein that mediates autophagy. Finally, the review collates a list of substances that have demonstrated the ability to suppress tumor cell growth. Keywords: cellular resistance, glioblastoma multiforme, nanoparticles, targeted delivery, temozolomide

  5. The Human Glioblastoma Cell Culture Resource: Validated Cell Models Representing All Molecular Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Xie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most frequent and malignant form of primary brain tumor. GBM is essentially incurable and its resistance to therapy is attributed to a subpopulation of cells called glioma stem cells (GSCs. To meet the present shortage of relevant GBM cell (GC lines we developed a library of annotated and validated cell lines derived from surgical samples of GBM patients, maintained under conditions to preserve GSC characteristics. This collection, which we call the Human Glioblastoma Cell Culture (HGCC resource, consists of a biobank of 48 GC lines and an associated database containing high-resolution molecular data. We demonstrate that the HGCC lines are tumorigenic, harbor genomic lesions characteristic of GBMs, and represent all four transcriptional subtypes. The HGCC panel provides an open resource for in vitro and in vivo modeling of a large part of GBM diversity useful to both basic and translational GBM research.

  6. Phase II Trial of Radiosurgery to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy–Defined High-Risk Tumor Volumes in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein, Douglas B.; Wessels, Barry; Bangert, Barbara; Fu, Pingfu; Nelson, A. Dennis; Cohen, Mark; Sagar, Stephen; Lewin, Jonathan; Sloan, Andrew; Zheng Yiran; Williams, Jordonna; Colussi, Valdir; Vinkler, Robert; Maciunas, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost to areas of high risk determined by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) functional imaging in addition to standard radiotherapy for patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients in this prospective Phase II trial underwent surgical resection or biopsy for a GBM followed by SRS directed toward areas of MRS-determined high biological activity within 2 cm of the postoperative enhancing surgical bed. The MRS regions were determined by identifying those voxels within the postoperative T2 magnetic resonance imaging volume that contained an elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate ratio in excess of 2:1. These voxels were marked, digitally fused with the SRS planning magnetic resonance image, targeted with an 8-mm isocenter per voxel, and treated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group SRS dose guidelines. All patients then received conformal radiotherapy to a total dose of 60 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Results: The median survival for the entire cohort was 15.8 months. With 75% of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 3 patients still alive 18 months after treatment, the median survival for RPA Class 3 has not yet been reached. The median survivals for RPA Class 4, 5, and 6 patients were 18.7, 12.5, and 3.9 months, respectively, compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiotherapy-alone historical control survivals of 11.1, 8.9, and 4.6 months. For the 16 of 35 patients who received concurrent temozolomide in addition to protocol radiotherapeutic treatment, the median survival was 20.8 months, compared with European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer historical controls of 14.6 months using radiotherapy and temozolomide. Grade 3/4 toxicities possibly attributable to treatment were 11%. Conclusions: This represents the first prospective trial using selective MRS-targeted functional SRS

  7. Glioblastoma: Molecular Pathways, Stem Cells and Therapeutic Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhanwar-Uniyal, Meena; Labagnara, Michael; Friedman, Marissa; Kwasnicki, Amanda; Murali, Raj

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), a WHO-defined Grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common and aggressive CNS malignancy. Despite current treatment modalities, the survival time remains dismal. The main cause of mortality in patients with this disease is reoccurrence of the malignancy, which is attributed to treatment-resistant cancer stem cells within and surrounding the primary tumor. Inclusion of novel therapies, such as immuno- and DNA-based therapy, may provide better means of treating GBM. Furthermore, manipulation of recently discovered non-coding microRNAs, some of which regulate tumor growth through the development and maintenance of GBM stem cells, could provide new prospective therapies. Studies conducted by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) also demonstrate the role of molecular pathways, specifically the activated PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, in GBM tumorigenesis. Inhibition of the aforementioned pathway may provide a more direct and targeted method to GBM treatment. The combination of these treatment modalities may provide an innovative therapeutic approach for the management of GBM

  8. Glioblastoma: Molecular Pathways, Stem Cells and Therapeutic Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhanwar-Uniyal, Meena, E-mail: meena_jhanwar@nymc.edu; Labagnara, Michael; Friedman, Marissa; Kwasnicki, Amanda; Murali, Raj [Department of Neurosurgery, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY 10595 (United States)

    2015-03-25

    Glioblastoma (GBM), a WHO-defined Grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common and aggressive CNS malignancy. Despite current treatment modalities, the survival time remains dismal. The main cause of mortality in patients with this disease is reoccurrence of the malignancy, which is attributed to treatment-resistant cancer stem cells within and surrounding the primary tumor. Inclusion of novel therapies, such as immuno- and DNA-based therapy, may provide better means of treating GBM. Furthermore, manipulation of recently discovered non-coding microRNAs, some of which regulate tumor growth through the development and maintenance of GBM stem cells, could provide new prospective therapies. Studies conducted by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) also demonstrate the role of molecular pathways, specifically the activated PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, in GBM tumorigenesis. Inhibition of the aforementioned pathway may provide a more direct and targeted method to GBM treatment. The combination of these treatment modalities may provide an innovative therapeutic approach for the management of GBM.

  9. CAR T Cell Therapy for Glioblastoma: Recent Clinical Advances and Future Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Stephen J; Desai, Arati S; Linette, Gerald P; June, Carl H; O'Rourke, Donald M

    2018-03-02

    In patients with certain hematologic malignancies, the use of autologous T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has led to unprecedented clinical responses. Although progress in solid tumors has been elusive, recent clinical studies have demonstrated the feasibility and safety of CAR T cell therapy for glioblastoma. In addition, despite formidable barriers to T cell localization and effector function in glioblastoma, signs of efficacy have been observed in select patients. In this review, we begin with a discussion of established obstacles to systemic therapy in glioblastoma and how these may be overcome by CAR T cells. We continue with a summary of previously published CAR T cell trials in GBM, and end by outlining the key therapeutic challenges associated with the use of CAR T cells in this disease.

  10. Changes in chromatin state reveal ARNT2 at a node of a tumorigenic transcription factor signature driving glioblastoma cell aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogeas, Alexandra; Morvan-Dubois, Ghislaine; El-Habr, Elias A; Lejeune, François-Xavier; Defrance, Matthieu; Narayanan, Ashwin; Kuranda, Klaudia; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Sayd, Salwa; Delaunay, Virgile; Dubois, Luiz G; Parrinello, Hugues; Rialle, Stéphanie; Fabrega, Sylvie; Idbaih, Ahmed; Haiech, Jacques; Bièche, Ivan; Virolle, Thierry; Goodhardt, Michele; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Junier, Marie-Pierre

    2018-02-01

    Although a growing body of evidence indicates that phenotypic plasticity exhibited by glioblastoma cells plays a central role in tumor development and post-therapy recurrence, the master drivers of their aggressiveness remain elusive. Here we mapped the changes in active (H3K4me3) and repressive (H3K27me3) histone modifications accompanying the repression of glioblastoma stem-like cells tumorigenicity. Genes with changing histone marks delineated a network of transcription factors related to cancerous behavior, stem state, and neural development, highlighting a previously unsuspected association between repression of ARNT2 and loss of cell tumorigenicity. Immunohistochemistry confirmed ARNT2 expression in cell sub-populations within proliferative zones of patients' glioblastoma. Decreased ARNT2 expression was consistently observed in non-tumorigenic glioblastoma cells, compared to tumorigenic cells. Moreover, ARNT2 expression correlated with a tumorigenic molecular signature at both the tissue level within the tumor core and at the single cell level in the patients' tumors. We found that ARNT2 knockdown decreased the expression of SOX9, POU3F2 and OLIG2, transcription factors implicated in glioblastoma cell tumorigenicity, and repressed glioblastoma stem-like cell tumorigenic properties in vivo. Our results reveal ARNT2 as a pivotal component of the glioblastoma cell tumorigenic signature, located at a node of a transcription factor network controlling glioblastoma cell aggressiveness.

  11. N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl) retinamide potentiated paclitaxel for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in glioblastoma C6 and RG2 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Janardhanan, Rajiv; Butler, Jonathan T.; Banik, Naren L.; Ray, Swapan K.

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma grows aggressively due to its ability to maintain abnormally high potentials for cell proliferation. The present study examines the synergistic actions of N-(4-hdroxyphenyl) retinamide (4-HPR) and paclitaxel (PTX) to control the growth of rat glioblastoma C6 and RG2 cell lines. 4-HPR induced astrocytic differentiation was accompanied by increased expression of the tight junction protein e-cadherin and sustained down regulation of Id2 (member of inhibitor of differentiation family...

  12. Activity of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 4 Suppresses Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis With Inhibition of Gli-1 in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most lethal glioma variant in the adult brain and among the deadliest of human cancers. Increasing evidence has shown that metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 (mGluR4 expression may play roles in regulating the growth of neural stem cells as well as several cancer cell lines. Here, we investigated the effects of mGluR4 on the growth and apoptosis of the LN229 GBM cell line. Involvement of Gli-1, one of the key transcription factors in the sonic Hedgehog (SHH signaling pathway, was further explored. In this study, mGluR4 was activated using selective agonist VU0155041; and gene-targeted siRNAs were used to generate loss of function of mGluR4 and Gli-1 in LN229 cells. The results demonstrated that LN229 cells expressed mGluR4 and the agonist VU0155041 decreased cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Activation of mGluR4 inhibited cyclin D1 expression, activated pro-caspase-8/9/3, and disrupted the balance of Bcl-2/Bax expression, which indicated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of LN229 cells, respectively. Furthermore, Gli-1 expression was reduced by mGluR4 activation in LN229 cells, and downregulation of Gli-1 expression by gene-targeted siRNA resulted in both inhibition of cell proliferation and promotion of apoptosis. Moreover, VU0155041 treatment substantially blocked SHH-induced cyclin D1 expression and cell proliferation, while increasing TUNEL-positive cells and the activation of apoptosis-related proteins. We concluded that activation of mGluR4 expressed in LN229 cells could inhibit GBM cell growth by decreasing cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis. Further suppression of intracellular Gli-1 expression might be involved in the action of mGluR4 on cancer cells. Our study suggested a novel role of mGluR4, which might serve as a potential drug target for control of GBM cell growth.

  13. Angiogenic Gene Signature Derived from Subtype Specific Cell Models Segregate Proneural and Mesenchymal Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Sharma

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Intertumoral molecular heterogeneity in glioblastoma identifies four major subtypes based on expression of molecular markers. Among them, the two clinically interrelated subtypes, proneural and mesenchymal, are the most aggressive with proneural liable for conversion to mesenchymal upon therapy. Using two patient-derived novel primary cell culture models (MTA10 and KW10, we developed a minimal but unique four-gene signature comprising genes vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A, vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGF-B and angiopoietin 1 (ANG1, angiopoietin 2 (ANG2 that effectively segregated the proneural (MTA10 and mesenchymal (KW10 glioblastoma subtypes. The cell culture preclassified as mesenchymal showed elevated expression of genes VEGF-A, VEGF-B and ANG1, ANG2 as compared to the other cell culture model that mimicked the proneural subtype. The differentially expressed genes in these two cell culture models were confirmed by us using TCGA and Verhaak databases and we refer to it as a minimal multigene signature (MMS. We validated this MMS on human glioblastoma tissue sections with the use of immunohistochemistry on preclassified (YKL-40 high or mesenchymal glioblastoma and OLIG2 high or proneural glioblastoma tumor samples (n = 30. MMS segregated mesenchymal and proneural subtypes with 83% efficiency using a simple histopathology scoring approach (p = 0.008 for ANG2 and p = 0.01 for ANG1. Furthermore, MMS expression negatively correlated with patient survival. Importantly, MMS staining demonstrated spatiotemporal heterogeneity within each subclass, adding further complexity to subtype identification in glioblastoma. In conclusion, we report a novel and simple sequencing-independent histopathology-based biomarker signature comprising genes VEGF-A, VEGF-B and ANG1, ANG2 for subtyping of proneural and mesenchymal glioblastoma.

  14. Nanoparticles for hyperthermic therapy: synthesis strategies and applications in glioblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verma, Jyoti; Lal, Sumit; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in humans. Current GBM treatment includes surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, sometimes supplemented with novel therapies. Despite recent advances, survival of GBM patients remains poor.

  15. Over-expression of CHAF1A promotes cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance in glioblastoma cells via AKT/FOXO3a/Bim pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Honghai; Du, Bin; Jiang, Huili; Gao, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Chromatinassembly factor 1 subunit A (CHAF1A) has been reported to be involved in several human diseases including cancer. However, the biological and clinical significance of CHAF1A in glioblastoma progression remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that up-regulation of CHAF1A happens frequently in glioblastoma tissues and is associated with glioblastoma prognosis. Knockout of CHAF1A by CRISPR/CAS9 technology induce G1 phase arrest and apoptosis in glioblastoma cell U251 and U87. In addition, inhibition of CHAF1A influenced the signal transduction of the AKT/FOXO3a/Bim axis, which is required for glioblastoma cell proliferation. Taken together, these results show that CHAF1A contributes to the proliferation of glioblastoma cells and may be developed as a de novo drug target and prognosis biomarker of glioblastoma.

  16. Over-expression of CHAF1A promotes cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance in glioblastoma cells via AKT/FOXO3a/Bim pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Honghai; Du, Bin [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250013 (China); Jiang, Huili [Friendship Nephrology and Blood Purification Center, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250013 (China); Gao, Jun, E-mail: gaoj1666@126.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250013 (China)

    2016-01-22

    Chromatinassembly factor 1 subunit A (CHAF1A) has been reported to be involved in several human diseases including cancer. However, the biological and clinical significance of CHAF1A in glioblastoma progression remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that up-regulation of CHAF1A happens frequently in glioblastoma tissues and is associated with glioblastoma prognosis. Knockout of CHAF1A by CRISPR/CAS9 technology induce G1 phase arrest and apoptosis in glioblastoma cell U251 and U87. In addition, inhibition of CHAF1A influenced the signal transduction of the AKT/FOXO3a/Bim axis, which is required for glioblastoma cell proliferation. Taken together, these results show that CHAF1A contributes to the proliferation of glioblastoma cells and may be developed as a de novo drug target and prognosis biomarker of glioblastoma.

  17. Saponin 6 derived from Anemone taipaiensis induces U87 human malignant glioblastoma cell apoptosis via regulation of Fas and Bcl‑2 family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chen-Chen; Tang, Hai-Feng; Hu, Yi-Yang; Zhang, Yun; Zheng, Min-Hua; Qin, Hong-Yan; Li, San-Zhong; Wang, Xiao-Yang; Fei, Zhou; Cheng, Guang

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive type of brain tumor, and is associated with a poor prognosis. Saponin 6, derived from Anemone taipaiensis, exerts potent cytotoxic effects against the human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cell line and the human promyelocytic leukemia HL‑60 cell line; however, the effects of saponin 6 on glioblastoma remain unknown. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of saponin 6 on human U87 malignant glioblastoma (U87 MG) cells. The current study revealed that saponin 6 induced U87 MG cell death in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner, with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 2.83 µM after treatment for 48 h. However, saponin 6 was needed to be used at a lesser potency in HT‑22 cells, with an IC50 value of 6.24 µM. Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry using Annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining. DNA fragmentation and alterations in nuclear morphology were examined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The present study demonstrated that treatment with saponin 6 induced cell apoptosis in U87 MG cells, and resulted in DNA fragmentation and nuclear morphological alterations typical of apoptosis. In addition, flow cytometric analysis revealed that saponin 6 was able to induce cell cycle arrest. The present study also demonstrated that saponin 6‑induced apoptosis of U87 MG cells was attributed to increases in the protein expression levels of Fas, Fas ligand, and cleaved caspase‑3, ‑8 and ‑9, and decreases in the levels of B‑cell lymphoma 2. The current study indicated that saponin 6 may exhibit selective cytotoxicity toward U87 MG cells by activating apoptosis via the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Therefore, saponin 6 derived from A. taipaiensis may possess therapeutic potential for the treatment of GBM.

  18. Hypofractionated radiation induces a decrease in cell proliferation but no histological damage to organotypic multicellular spheroids of human glioblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaaijk, P.; Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam; Troost, D.; Leenstra, S.; Bosch, D.A.; Sminia, P.; Hulshof, M.C.C.M..; Kracht, A.H.W. van der

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of radiation on glioblastoma, using an organotypic multicellular spheroid (OMS) model. Most glioblastoma cell lines are, in contrast to glioblastomas in vivo, relatively radiosensitive. This limits the value of using cell lines for studying the radiation effect of glioblastomas. The advantage of OMS is maintenance of the characteristics of the original tumour, which is lost in conventional cell cultures. OMS prepared from four glioblastomas were treated with hypofractionated radiation with a radiobiologically equivalent dose to standard radiation treatment for glioblastomas patients. After treatment, the histology as well as the cell proliferation of the OMS was examined. After radiation, a significant decrease in cell proliferation was found, although no histological damage to the OMS was observed. The modest effects of radiation on the OMS are in agreement with the limited therapeutic value of radiotherapy for glioblastoma patients. Therefore, OMS seems to be a good alternative for cell lines to study the radiobiological effect on glioblastomas. (author)

  19. Hypofractionated radiation induces a decrease in cell proliferation but no histological damage to organotypic multicellular spheroids of human glioblastomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaaijk, P [Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of (Neuro) Pathology; [Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Troost, D [Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of (Neuro) Pathology; Leenstra, S; Bosch, D A [Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Sminia, P; Hulshof, M C.C.M.; Kracht, A.H.W. van der [Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of (Experimental) Radiotherapy

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of radiation on glioblastoma, using an organotypic multicellular spheroid (OMS) model. Most glioblastoma cell lines are, in contrast to glioblastomas in vivo, relatively radiosensitive. This limits the value of using cell lines for studying the radiation effect of glioblastomas. The advantage of OMS is maintenance of the characteristics of the original tumour, which is lost in conventional cell cultures. OMS prepared from four glioblastomas were treated with hypofractionated radiation with a radiobiologically equivalent dose to standard radiation treatment for glioblastomas patients. After treatment, the histology as well as the cell proliferation of the OMS was examined. After radiation, a significant decrease in cell proliferation was found, although no histological damage to the OMS was observed. The modest effects of radiation on the OMS are in agreement with the limited therapeutic value of radiotherapy for glioblastoma patients. Therefore, OMS seems to be a good alternative for cell lines to study the radiobiological effect on glioblastomas. (author).

  20. Bioactive form of resveratrol in glioblastoma cells and its safety for normal brain cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hong Shu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBackground: Resveratrol, a plant polyphenol existing in grapes and many other natural foods, possesses a wide range of biological activities including cancer prevention. It has been recognized that resveratrol is intracellularly biotransformed to different metabolites, but no direct evidence has been available to ascertain its bioactive form because of the difficulty to maintain resveratrol unmetabolized in vivo or in vitro. It would be therefore worthwhile to elucidate the potential therapeutic implications of resveratrol metabolism using a reliable resveratrol-sensitive cancer cells.Objective: To identify the real biological form of trans-resveratrol and to evaluate the safety of the effective anticancer dose of resveratrol for the normal brain cells.Methods: The samples were prepared from the condition media and cell lysates of human glioblastoma U251 cells, and were purified by solid phase extraction (SPE. The samples were subjected to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS analysis. According to the metabolite(s, trans-resveratrol was biotransformed in vitro by the method described elsewhere, and the resulting solution was used to treat U251 cells. Meanwhile, the responses of U251 and primarily cultured rat normal brain cells (glial cells and neurons to 100μM trans-resveratrol were evaluated by multiple experimental methods.Results: The results revealed that resveratrol monosulfate was the major metabolite in U251 cells. About half fraction of resveratrol monosulfate was prepared in vitro and this trans-resveratrol and resveratrol monosulfate mixture showed little inhibitory effect on U251 cells. It is also found that rat primary brain cells (PBCs not only resist 100μM but also tolerate as high as 200μM resveratrol treatment.Conclusions: Our study thus demonstrated that trans-resveratrol was the bioactive form in glioblastoma cells and, therefore, the biotransforming

  1. The Use of Longitudinal 18F-FET MicroPET Imaging to Evaluate Response to Irinotecan in Orthotopic Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Mette K; Kristoffersen, Karina; Michaelsen, Signe R

    2014-01-01

    was compared. METHODS: Human GBM cells were injected orthotopically in nude mice and 18F-FET uptake was followed by weekly MicroPET/CT. When tumor take was observed, mice were treated with CPT-11 or saline weekly. After two weeks of treatment the brain tumors were isolated and quantitative polymerase chain......OBJECTIVES: Brain tumor imaging is challenging. Although 18F-FET PET is widely used in the clinic, the value of 18F-FET MicroPET to evaluate brain tumors in xenograft has not been assessed to date. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate the performance of in vivo 18F-FET Micro......, a 1.6 fold higher expression of LAT1 and a 23 fold higher expression of LAT2 were observed in patient specimens compared to xenografts. CONCLUSIONS: 18F-FET MicroPET can be used to detect a treatment response to CPT-11 in GBM xenografts. The strong negative correlation between SUV max T/B ratio...

  2. Glioblastoma Inhibition by Cell Surface Immunoglobulin Protein EWI-2, In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana V. Kolesnikova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available EWI-2, a cell surface IgSF protein, is highly expressed in normal human brain but is considerably diminished in glioblastoma tumors and cell lines. Moreover, loss of EWI-2 expression correlated with a shorter survival time in human glioma patients, suggesting that EWI-2 might be a natural inhibitor of glioblastoma. In support of this idea, EWI-2 expression significantly impaired both ectopic and orthotopic tumor growth in nude mice in vivo. In vitro assays provided clues regarding EWI-2 functions. Expression of EWI-2 in T98G and/or U87-MG malignant glioblastoma cell lines failed to alter two-dimensional cell proliferation but inhibited glioblastoma colony formation in soft agar and caused diminished cell motility and invasion. At the biochemical level, EWI-2 markedly affects the organization of four molecules (tetraspanin proteins CD9 and CD81 and matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MT1-MMP, which play key roles in the biology of astrocytes and gliomas. EWI-2 causes CD9 and CD81 to become more associated with each other, whereas CD81 and other tetraspanins become less associated with MMP-2 and MT1-MMP. We propose that EWI-2 inhibition of glioblastoma growth in vivo is at least partly explained by the capability of EWI-2 to inhibit growth and/or invasion in vitro. Underlying these functional effects, EWI-2 causes a substantial molecular reorganization of multiple molecules (CD81, CD9, MMP-2, and MT1-MMP known to affect proliferation and/or invasion of astrocytes and/or glioblastomas.

  3. [2,4-(13)C]β-hydroxybutyrate metabolism in astrocytes and C6 glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloqayli, Haytham; Melø, Torun M; Haukvik, Anne; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2011-08-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if the ketogenic diet could be useful for glioblastoma patients. The hypothesis tested was whether glioblastoma cells can metabolize ketone bodies. Cerebellar astrocytes and C6 glioblastoma cells were incubated in glutamine and serum free medium containing [2,4-(13)C]β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) with and without glucose. Furthermore, C6 cells were incubated with [1-(13)C]glucose in the presence and absence of BHB. Cell extracts were analyzed by mass spectrometry and media by (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy and HPLC. Using [2,4-(13)C]BHB and [1-(13)C]glucose it could be shown that C6 cells, in analogy to astrocytes, had efficient mitochondrial activity, evidenced by (13)C labeling of glutamate, glutamine and aspartate. However, in the presence of glucose, astrocytes were able to produce and release glutamine, whereas this was not accomplished by the C6 cells, suggesting lack of anaplerosis in the latter. We hypothesize that glioblastoma cells kill neurons by not supplying the necessary glutamine, and by releasing glutamate.

  4. Nuclear receptor TLX inhibits TGF-β signaling in glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Erik; Zhai, Qiwei [Sahlgrenska Cancer Center at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 425, SE 405 30 Gothenburg (Sweden); Zeng, Zhao-jun [Sahlgrenska Cancer Center at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 425, SE 405 30 Gothenburg (Sweden); Molecular Biology Research Center, School of Life Sciences, Central South University, 110, Xiangya Road, Changsha, Hunan 410078 (China); Yoshida, Takeshi [Sahlgrenska Cancer Center at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 425, SE 405 30 Gothenburg (Sweden); Funa, Keiko, E-mail: keiko.funa@gu.se [Sahlgrenska Cancer Center at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 425, SE 405 30 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-05-01

    TLX (also called NR2E1) is an orphan nuclear receptor that maintains stemness of neuronal stem cells. TLX is highly expressed in the most malignant form of glioma, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and is important for the proliferation and maintenance of the stem/progenitor cells of the tumor. Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) is a cytokine regulating many different cellular processes such as differentiation, migration, adhesion, cell death and proliferation. TGF-β has an important function in cancer where it can work as either a tumor suppressor or oncogene, depending on the cancer type and stage of tumor development. Since glioblastoma often have dysfunctional TGF-β signaling we wanted to find out if there is any interaction between TLX and TGF-β in glioblastoma cells. We demonstrate that knockdown of TLX enhances the canonical TGF-β signaling response in glioblastoma cell lines. TLX physically interacts with and stabilizes Smurf1, which can ubiquitinate and target TGF-β receptor II for degradation, whereas knockdown of TLX leads to stabilization of TGF-β receptor II, increased nuclear translocation of Smad2/3 and enhanced expression of TGF-β target genes. The interaction between TLX and TGF-β may play an important role in the regulation of proliferation and tumor-initiating properties of glioblastoma cells. - Highlights: • TLX knockdown enhances TGF-β dependent Smad signaling in glioblastoma cells • TLX knockdown increases the protein level of TGF-β receptor II. • TLX stabilizes and retains Smurf1 in the cytoplasm. • TLX enhances Smurf1-dependent ubiquitination and degradation of TGF-β receptor II.

  5. Nuclear receptor TLX inhibits TGF-β signaling in glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Erik; Zhai, Qiwei; Zeng, Zhao-jun; Yoshida, Takeshi; Funa, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    TLX (also called NR2E1) is an orphan nuclear receptor that maintains stemness of neuronal stem cells. TLX is highly expressed in the most malignant form of glioma, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and is important for the proliferation and maintenance of the stem/progenitor cells of the tumor. Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) is a cytokine regulating many different cellular processes such as differentiation, migration, adhesion, cell death and proliferation. TGF-β has an important function in cancer where it can work as either a tumor suppressor or oncogene, depending on the cancer type and stage of tumor development. Since glioblastoma often have dysfunctional TGF-β signaling we wanted to find out if there is any interaction between TLX and TGF-β in glioblastoma cells. We demonstrate that knockdown of TLX enhances the canonical TGF-β signaling response in glioblastoma cell lines. TLX physically interacts with and stabilizes Smurf1, which can ubiquitinate and target TGF-β receptor II for degradation, whereas knockdown of TLX leads to stabilization of TGF-β receptor II, increased nuclear translocation of Smad2/3 and enhanced expression of TGF-β target genes. The interaction between TLX and TGF-β may play an important role in the regulation of proliferation and tumor-initiating properties of glioblastoma cells. - Highlights: • TLX knockdown enhances TGF-β dependent Smad signaling in glioblastoma cells • TLX knockdown increases the protein level of TGF-β receptor II. • TLX stabilizes and retains Smurf1 in the cytoplasm. • TLX enhances Smurf1-dependent ubiquitination and degradation of TGF-β receptor II.

  6. N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl) retinamide potentiated paclitaxel for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in glioblastoma C6 and RG2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhanan, Rajiv; Butler, Jonathan T.; Banik, Naren L.; Ray, Swapan K.

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma grows aggressively due to its ability to maintain abnormally high potentials for cell proliferation. The present study examines the synergistic actions of N-(4-hdroxyphenyl) retinamide (4-HPR) and paclitaxel (PTX) to control the growth of rat glioblastoma C6 and RG2 cell lines. 4-HPR induced astrocytic differentiation was accompanied by increased expression of the tight junction protein e-cadherin and sustained down regulation of Id2 (member of inhibitor of differentiation family), catalytic subunit of rat telomerase reverse transcriptase (rTERT), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Flow cytometric analysis showed that the microtubule stabilizer PTX caused cell cycle deregulation due to G2/M arrest. This in turn could alter the fate of kinetochore-spindletube dynamics thereby halting cell cycle progression. An interesting observation was induction of G1/S arrest by combination of 4-HPR and PTX, altering the G2/M arrest induced by PTX alone. This was further ratified by the upregulation of tumor suppressor protein retinoblastoma, which repressed the expression of the key signaling moieties to induce G1/S arrest. Collectively, combination of 4-HPR and PTX diminished the survival factors (e.g., rTERT, PCNA, and Bcl-2) to make glioblastoma cells highly prone to apoptosis with activation of cysteine proteases (e.g., calpain, cathepsins, caspase-8, caspase-3) in two glioblastoma cell lines. Hence, combination 4-HPR and PTX can be considered as an effective therapeutic strategy for controlling the growth of heterogeneous glioblastoma cell populations. PMID:19285047

  7. Heterogenic expression of stem cell markers in patient-derived glioblastoma spheroid cultures exposed to long-term hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Tine; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Petterson, Stine Asferg

    2018-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the time profile of hypoxia and stem cell markers in glioblastoma spheroids of known molecular subtype. MATERIALS & METHODS: Patient-derived glioblastoma spheroids were cultured up to 7 days in either 2% or 21% oxygen. Levels of proliferation (Ki-67), hypoxia (HIF-1α, CA9...

  8. Downregulation of mitochondrial UQCRB inhibits cancer stem cell-like properties in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Narae; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Jung, Hye Jin

    2018-01-01

    Glioblastoma stem cell targeted therapies have become a powerful strategy for the treatment of this deadliest brain tumor. We demonstrate for the first time that downregulation of mitochondrial ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase binding protein (UQCRB) inhibits the cancer stem cell-like properties in human glioblastoma cells. The synthetic small molecules targeting UQCRB significantly suppressed not only the self-renewal capacity such as growth and neurosphere formation, but also the metastatic potential such as migration and invasion of glioblastoma stem‑like cells (GSCs) derived from U87MG and U373MG at subtoxic concentrations. Notably, the UQCRB inhibitors repressed c‑Met-mediated downstream signal transduction and hypoxia‑inducible factor‑1α (HIF‑1α) activation, thereby reducing the expression levels of GSC markers including CD133, Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2 in the GSCs. Furthermore, the UQCRB inhibitors decreased mitochondrial ROS generation and mitochondrial membrane potential in the GSCs, indicating that they regulate the mitochondrial function in GSCs. Indeed, the knockdown of UQCRB gene by UQCRB siRNA significantly inhibited the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes as well as the expression of stemness markers by blocking mitochondrial ROS/HIF‑1α/c‑Met pathway in U87MG GSCs. These findings suggest that UQCRB and its inhibitors could be a new therapeutic target and lead compounds for eliminating cancer stem cells in glioblastoma.

  9. Protective Effect of Gwakhyangjeonggisan Herbal Acupuncture Solution in Glioblastoma Cells: Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Seok Lee

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Neurological disorders have been one of main therapeutic targets of acupuncture. The present study investigated the protective effects of Gwakhyangjeonggisan herbal acupuncture solution (GHAS. Methods : We performed 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay in glioblastoma cells, and did microarray analysis with cells exposed to reactive oxigen species (ROS of hydrogen peroxide by 8.0 k Human cDNA, with cut-off level of 2-fold changes in gene expression. Results : MTT assay showed protective effect of GHAS on the glioblastoma cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide. When glioblastoma cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, 24 genes were downregulated. When the cells were pretreated with GHAS before exposure to hydrogen peroxide, 46 genes were downregulated. Many of the genes downregulated by hydrogen peroxide stimulation were decreased in the amount of downregulation or reversed to upregulation. Conclusions : The gene expression changes observed in the present study are supposed to be related to the protective molecular mechanism of GHAS in the glioblastoma cells exposed to ROS stress.

  10. Glioblastoma-infiltrated innate immune cells resemble M0 macrophage phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Wei, Jun; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Healy, Luke M.; Maiti, Sourindra N.; Wang, Qianghu; Elakkad, Ahmed; Liebelt, Brandon D.; Yaghi, Nasser K.; Ezhilarasan, Ravesanker; Huang, Neal; Weinberg, Jeffrey S.; Prabhu, Sujit S.; Rao, Ganesh; Sawaya, Raymond; Langford, Lauren A.; Bruner, Janet M.; Fuller, Gregory N.; Bar-Or, Amit; Li, Wei; Colen, Rivka R.; Curran, Michael A.; Bhat, Krishna P.; Antel, Jack P.; Cooper, Laurence J.; Sulman, Erik P.; Heimberger, Amy B.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastomas are highly infiltrated by diverse immune cells, including microglia, macrophages, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Understanding the mechanisms by which glioblastoma-associated myeloid cells (GAMs) undergo metamorphosis into tumor-supportive cells, characterizing the heterogeneity of immune cell phenotypes within glioblastoma subtypes, and discovering new targets can help the design of new efficient immunotherapies. In this study, we performed a comprehensive battery of immune phenotyping, whole-genome microarray analysis, and microRNA expression profiling of GAMs with matched blood monocytes, healthy donor monocytes, normal brain microglia, nonpolarized M0 macrophages, and polarized M1, M2a, M2c macrophages. Glioblastoma patients had an elevated number of monocytes relative to healthy donors. Among CD11b+ cells, microglia and MDSCs constituted a higher percentage of GAMs than did macrophages. GAM profiling using flow cytometry studies revealed a continuum between the M1- and M2-like phenotype. Contrary to current dogma, GAMs exhibited distinct immunological functions, with the former aligned close to nonpolarized M0 macrophages. PMID:26973881

  11. New perspective for GdNCT. Gd-DTPA reaches the nucleus of glioblastoma cells in culture and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasio, G. de; Gilbert, B.; Frazer, B.H.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the prospects of gadolinium as a neutron capture therapy agent by combining three independent techniques to study the uptake of Gd-DTPA in vitro, in cultured glioblastoma cells, and in vivo, in the glioblastoma tissue sections after injection of Gd-DTPA and tumor extraction. We show that gadolinium not only penetrates the plasma membrane of glioblastoma cells grown in culture, but we also observe a statistically significant higher concentration of Gd in the nucleus relative to the cytoplasm. For the in vivo experiments, Gd-DTPA was administered to 6 glioblastoma patients before neurosurgery. The extracted bioptic tissue was then analyzed with spectromictroscopy, showing Gd localized in the nuclei of glioblastoma cells in 5 patients out of the 6 analyzed. (author)

  12. Intraoperative radiation therapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsutani, Masao; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Tadayoshi

    1986-01-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IOR) is quite applicable for radioresistant malignant gliomas, because of precise demarcations of the treatment volume under direct vision, minimum damage to surrounding normal tissues, and a high target absorbed dose of 1500 to 2000 rad. Fifteen patients with glioblatoma were treated with IOR, and the 2-year survival rate was 61.1 %. The result apparently indicate that areas adjacent to the margin of almost complete removal should be irradated with a sufficient dose to sterilize the remaining malignant remnants, and IOR is one of the logical treatment modalities for local control of malignant gliomas. (author)

  13. Irinotecan and bevacizumab in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Hasselbalch, Benedikte; Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése

    2011-01-01

    treatment with BVZ and irinotecan provides impressive response rates (RR), it is still uncertain if this treatment translates into improved clinical benefit in GBM patients. AREAS COVERED: This review discusses the clinical efficacy, safety and difficulties regarding response evaluation when treating...... with BVZ and CPT-11 in recurrent GBM. Particular attention is placed on the literature and a discussion on whether treatment with BVZ and CPT-11 improves clinical outcome. Antiangiogenic treatment has led to difficulties when evaluating objective response by the conventional MacDonald criteria....... In the present paper the authors discuss selected key aspects of this treatment modality. A literature search was performed using PubMed in February 2011. EXPERT OPINION: BVZ + irinotecan leads to high RR and to an increased 6-month progression-free survival. However, no improvement in median overall survival...

  14. PICTORIAL REVIEW Glioblastoma multiforme has many faces

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    demonstrated a left frontal mass with surrounding oedema and pressure effects including midline shift. ... Subsequent radiotherapy localised to the lesion and base of the brain was completed. ... frontal horn of the right lateral ventricle. Areas of ...

  15. Three-dimensional Invasion of Human Glioblastoma Cells Remains Unchanged by X-ray and Carbon Ion Irradiation In Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eke, Iris; Storch, Katja; Kaestner, Ina; Vehlow, Anne [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany); Faethe, Christina; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang [Institute of Physiology and Pathophysiology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Taucher-Scholz, Gisela [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt (Germany); Temme, Achim; Schackert, Gabriele [Section of Experimental Neurosurgery/Tumor Immunology, Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany); Cordes, Nils, E-mail: Nils.Cordes@Oncoray.de [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Cell invasion represents one of the major determinants that treatment has failed for patients suffering from glioblastoma. Contrary findings have been reported for cell migration upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Here, the migration and invasion capability of glioblastoma cells on and in collagen type I were evaluated upon irradiation with X-rays or carbon ions. Methods and Materials: Migration on and invasion in collagen type I were evaluated in four established human glioblastoma cell lines exposed to either X-rays or carbon ions. Furthermore, clonogenic radiation survival, proliferation (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine positivity), DNA double-strand breaks ({gamma}H2AX/53BP1-positive foci), and expression of invasion-relevant proteins (eg, {beta}1 integrin, FAK, MMP2, and MMP9) were explored. Migration and invasion assays for primary glioblastoma cells also were carried out with X-ray irradiation. Results: Neither X-ray nor carbon ion irradiation affected glioblastoma cell migration and invasion, a finding similarly observed in primary glioblastoma cells. Intriguingly, irradiated cells migrated unhampered, despite DNA double-strand breaks and reduced proliferation. Clonogenic radiation survival was increased when cells had contact with extracellular matrix. Specific inhibition of the {beta}1 integrin or proliferation-associated signaling molecules revealed a critical function of JNK, PI3K, and p38 MAPK in glioblastoma cell invasion. Conclusions: These findings indicate that X-rays and carbon ion irradiation effectively reduce proliferation and clonogenic survival without modifying the migration and invasion ability of glioblastoma cells in a collagen type I environment. Addition of targeted agents against members of the MAPK and PI3K signaling axis to conventional chemoradiation therapy seems potentially useful to optimize glioblastoma therapy.

  16. The radiosensitizing effect of a N(4)-tolyl-2-acetylpyridine derived thiosemicarbazone and its metallic complex against a glioblastoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilas Boas, Fabricio A.S.; Hudson, Luiza O.; Santos, Raquel G. dos; Mendes, Isolda C.; Beraldo, Heloisa O.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most prevalent and difficult diseases to be treated. Despite the efforts at improving diagnose and treatment, the success is still very limited. One of the factors implicated in such limitation is the inherent radioresistance of most tumors, specially the cerebral ones. They are poorly vascularized due to the rapid growth of cells and disorganized angiogenesis that leads to hypoxic tissue that increases radioresistance. Also another issue is the side effects of exposition to high levels of radiation and chemicals. Combined approaches using both chemo and radiotherapy are one of the most effective strategies applied to maximize the results and decrease the side effects of the treatment to the patient. One of the drugs that are commonly used is cisplatin that has some, yet limited result. Given this context, our group has been testing several synthetic compounds of the thiosemicarbazone class. These chemicals have broad pharmacologic profile including antitumoral effect. We have shown in previous works the effective reduction of cell viability and proliferation using very low concentrations of thiosemicarbazones both in free form and complexed with metals like copper. In this work we present another application of this compound that can also be used as a radiosensitization agent in glioblastoma multiform cell line RT-2 present that the combined approach increases de effect of gamma radiation. Also, that the coordination to copper apparently does not increase this activity. (author)

  17. Single-Cell RNA-Seq Analysis of Infiltrating Neoplastic Cells at the Migrating Front of Human Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros Darmanis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common primary brain cancer in adults and is notoriously difficult to treat because of its diffuse nature. We performed single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-seq on 3,589 cells in a cohort of four patients. We obtained cells from the tumor core as well as surrounding peripheral tissue. Our analysis revealed cellular variation in the tumor’s genome and transcriptome. We were also able to identify infiltrating neoplastic cells in regions peripheral to the core lesions. Despite the existence of significant heterogeneity among neoplastic cells, we found that infiltrating GBM cells share a consistent gene signature between patients, suggesting a common mechanism of infiltration. Additionally, in investigating the immunological response to the tumors, we found transcriptionally distinct myeloid cell populations residing in the tumor core and the surrounding peritumoral space. Our data provide a detailed dissection of GBM cell types, revealing an abundance of information about tumor formation and migration. : Darmanis et al. perform single-cell transcriptomic analyses of neoplastic and stromal cells within and proximal to primary glioblastomas. The authors describe a population of neoplastic-infiltrating glioblastoma cells as well as a putative role of tumor-infiltrating immune cells in supporting tumor growth. Keywords: single cell, RNA-seq, glioma, glioblastoma, GBM, brain, heterogeneity, infiltrating, diffuse, checkpoint

  18. Evaluation of photodynamic treatment efficiency on glioblastoma cells received from malignant lesions: initial studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Ekaterina; Kyurkchiev, Dobroslav; Tumangelova-Yuzeir, Kalina; Angelov, Ivan; Genova-Hristova, Tsanislava; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, Oxana; Minkin, Krassimir

    2018-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy is well-established and extensively used method in treatment of different cancer types. This research reveals its potential in the treatment of cultivated human glioblastoma cells with adherent morphology. As the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of the drugs is a significant problem that could not be solved easily for large biomolecules, we search for an appropriate low-molecular weight photosensitizer that could be applied for photodynamic treatment of glioblastoma cells. We used delta-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), which could pass BBB and plays the role of precursor of a protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) - photosensitizer, that is accumulated selectively in the tumour cells and could be a proper tool in PDT of glioblastoma. However, differences from patient to patient and between the cell activities could also lead to different effectiveness of the PDT treatment of the tumour areas. Therefore in our study we investigated not only the effect of using different fluence rates and light doses, but aims to establish more efficient values for further clinical applications for each sub-type of the GBM lesions. For the needs of PDT application an illumination device was developed in Laboratory of Biophotonics, BAS based on light-emitting diode (LED) matrix light sources for therapeutic application emitting at 635 nm. The device is optimized for PDT in combination with aminolevulinic acid/protoporphyrin IX applied as a photosensitizer drug. By the means of FACSCalibur flow cytometer (Becton Dickinson, USA) and Cell Quest Software was made evaluation of PDT effect on used human glioblastoma cells. Treatment of glioblastoma tumours continues to be a very serious issue and there is growing need in development of new concepts, methods and cancer-fighting strategies. PDT may contribute in accomplishing better results in cancer treatment and can be applied as well in combination with other techniques.

  19. Proliferative and Invasive Effects of Progesterone-Induced Blocking Factor in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Gutiérrez-Rodríguez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF is a progesterone (P4 regulated protein expressed in different types of high proliferative cells including astrocytomas, the most frequent and aggressive brain tumors. It has been shown that PIBF increases the number of human astrocytoma cells. In this work, we evaluated PIBF regulation by P4 and the effects of PIBF on proliferation, migration, and invasion of U87 and U251 cells, both derived from human glioblastomas. PIBF mRNA expression was upregulated by P4 (10 nM from 12 to 24 h. Glioblastoma cells expressed two PIBF isoforms, 90 and 57 kDa. The content of the shorter isoform was increased by P4 at 24 h, while progesterone receptor antagonist RU486 (10 μM blocked this effect. PIBF (100 ng/mL increased the number of U87 cells on days 4 and 5 of treatment and induced cell proliferation on day 4. Wound-healing assays showed that PIBF increased the migration of U87 (12–48 h and U251 (24 and 48 h cells. Transwell invasion assays showed that PIBF augmented the number of invasive cells in both cell lines at 24 h. These data suggest that PIBF promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of human glioblastoma cells.

  20. Cytomegalovirus infection induces a stem cell phenotype in human primary glioblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fornara, O; Bartek, J; Rahbar, A

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is associated with poor prognosis despite aggressive surgical resection, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Unfortunately, this standard therapy does not target glioma cancer stem cells (GCSCs), a subpopulation of GBM cells that can give rise to recurrent tumors. GBMs express...... human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) proteins, and previously we found that the level of expression of HCMV immediate-early (IE) protein in GBMs is a prognostic factor for poor patient survival. In this study, we investigated the relation between HCMV infection of GBM cells and the presence of GCSCs. Primary...... GBMs were characterized by their expression of HCMV-IE and GCSCs marker CD133 and by patient survival. The extent to which HCMV infection of primary GBM cells induced a GCSC phenotype was evaluated in vitro. In primary GBMs, a large fraction of CD133-positive cells expressed HCMV-IE, and higher co...

  1. Establishment and Characterization of a Tumor Stem Cell-Based Glioblastoma Invasion Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stine Skov; Meyer, Morten; Petterson, Stine Asferg

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Glioblastoma is the most frequent and malignant brain tumor. Recurrence is inevitable and most likely connected to tumor invasion and presence of therapy resistant stem-like tumor cells. The aim was therefore to establish and characterize a three-dimensional in vivo-like in vitro model taking...... invasion and tumor stemness into account. METHODS: Glioblastoma stem cell-like containing spheroid (GSS) cultures derived from three different patients were established and characterized. The spheroids were implanted in vitro into rat brain slice cultures grown in stem cell medium and in vivo into brains...... of immuno-compromised mice. Invasion was followed in the slice cultures by confocal time-lapse microscopy. Using immunohistochemistry, we compared tumor cell invasion as well as expression of proliferation and stem cell markers between the models. RESULTS: We observed a pronounced invasion into brain slice...

  2. CCL5, CCR1 and CCR5 in murine glioblastoma: immune cell infiltration and survival rates are not dependent on individual expression of either CCR1 or CCR5

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Kien; Luo, Defang; Liu, Che; Harrison, Jeffrey K.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant brain tumor. Microglia/macrophages are found within human GBM where they likely promote tumor progression. We report that CCL5, CCR1, and CCR5 are expressed in glioblastoma. Individual deletion of CCR1 or CCR5 had little to no effect on survival of tumor bearing mice, or numbers of glioblastoma-infiltrated microglia/macrophages or lymphocytes. CCL5 promoted in vitro migration of wild type, CCR1- or CCR5-deficient microglia/macrophages that w...

  3. miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation by suppressing CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xuesong; Gong, Xuhai; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Jinghui; Sun, Jiahang; Guo, Mian

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma development is often associated with alteration in the activity and expression of cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent kinases (CKDs) and cyclins, resulting in aberrant cell proliferation. Recent studies have highlighted the pivotal roles of miRNAs in controlling the development and growth of glioblastoma. Here, we provide evidence for a function of miR-340 in the inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation. We found that miR-340 is downregulated in human glioblastoma tissue samples and several established glioblastoma cell lines. Proliferation and neurosphere formation assays revealed that miR-340 plays an oncosuppressive role in glioblastoma, and that its ectopic expression causes significant defect in glioblastoma cell growth. Further, using bioinformatics, luciferase assay and western blot, we found that miR-340 specifically targets the 3′UTRs of CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2, leading to the arrest of glioblastoma cells in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Confirming these results, we found that re-introducing CDK6, cyclin-D1 or cyclin-D2 expression partially, but significantly, rescues cells from the suppression of cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest mediated by miR-340. Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-340 plays a tumor-suppressive role in glioblastoma and may be useful as a diagnostic biomarker and/or a therapeutic avenue for glioblastoma. - Highlights: • miR-340 is downregulated in glioblastoma samples and cell lines. • miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation. • miR-340 directly targets CDK6, cyclin-D1, and cyclin-D2. • miR-340 regulates glioblastoma cell proliferation via CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2

  4. miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation by suppressing CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xuesong; Gong, Xuhai [Department of Neurology, Daqing Oilfield General Hospital, Daqing, Heilongjiang 163001 (China); Chen, Jing [Department of Neurology, Daqing Longnan Hospital, Daqing, Heilongjiang, 163001 China (China); Zhang, Jinghui [Department of Cardiology, The Fourth Hospital of Harbin City, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150026 (China); Sun, Jiahang [Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150086 (China); Guo, Mian, E-mail: guomian_hyd@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150086 (China)

    2015-05-08

    Glioblastoma development is often associated with alteration in the activity and expression of cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent kinases (CKDs) and cyclins, resulting in aberrant cell proliferation. Recent studies have highlighted the pivotal roles of miRNAs in controlling the development and growth of glioblastoma. Here, we provide evidence for a function of miR-340 in the inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation. We found that miR-340 is downregulated in human glioblastoma tissue samples and several established glioblastoma cell lines. Proliferation and neurosphere formation assays revealed that miR-340 plays an oncosuppressive role in glioblastoma, and that its ectopic expression causes significant defect in glioblastoma cell growth. Further, using bioinformatics, luciferase assay and western blot, we found that miR-340 specifically targets the 3′UTRs of CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2, leading to the arrest of glioblastoma cells in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Confirming these results, we found that re-introducing CDK6, cyclin-D1 or cyclin-D2 expression partially, but significantly, rescues cells from the suppression of cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest mediated by miR-340. Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-340 plays a tumor-suppressive role in glioblastoma and may be useful as a diagnostic biomarker and/or a therapeutic avenue for glioblastoma. - Highlights: • miR-340 is downregulated in glioblastoma samples and cell lines. • miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation. • miR-340 directly targets CDK6, cyclin-D1, and cyclin-D2. • miR-340 regulates glioblastoma cell proliferation via CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2.

  5. Repopulation capacity during fractionated irradiation of squamous cell carcinomas and glioblastomas in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, Wilfried; Gioioso, Danielle; Taghian, Alphonse; Stuschke, Martin; Suit, Herman D

    1997-10-01

    Purpose: Determination of clonogenic cell proliferation of three highly malignant squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and two glioblastoma cell lines during a 20-day course of fractionated irradiation under in vitro conditions. Methods and Materials: Tumor cells in exponential growth phase were plated in 24-well plastic flasks and irradiated 24 h after plating with 250 kV x-rays at room temperature. Six fractions with single doses between 0.6 and 9 Gy were administered in 1.67, 5, 10, 15, and 20 days. Colony growth was monitored for at least 60 days after completion of irradiation. Wells with confluent colonies were considered as 'recurrences' and wells without colonies as 'controlled'. The dose required to control 50% of irradiated wells (WCD{sub 50}) was estimated by a logistic regression for the different overall treatment times. The effective doubling time of clonogenic cells (T{sub eff}) was determined by a direct fit using the maximum likelihood method. Results: The increase of WCD{sub 50} within 18.3 days was highly significant for all tumor cell lines accounting for 7.9 and 12.0 Gy in the two glioblastoma cell lines and for 12.7, 14.0, and 21.7 Gy in the three SCC cell lines. The corresponding T{sub eff}s were 4.4 and 2.0 days for glioblastoma cell lines and 2.4, 4.2, and 1.8 days for SCC cell lines. Population doubling times (PDT) of untreated tumor cells ranged from 1.0 to 1.9 days, showing no correlation with T{sub eff}s. T{sub eff} was significantly longer than PDT in three of five tumor cell lines. No significant differences were observed comparing glioblastomas and SCC. Increase of WCD{sub 50} with time did not correlate with T{sub eff} but with T{sub eff}* InSF2 (surviving fraction at 2 Gy). Conclusion: The intrinsic ability of SCC and glioblastoma cells to repopulate during fractionated irradiation could be demonstrated. Repopulation induced dose loss per day depends on T{sub eff} and intrinsic radiation sensitivity. Proliferation during treatment was

  6. Second Generation Amphiphilic Poly-Lysine Dendrons Inhibit Glioblastoma Cell Proliferation without Toxicity for Neurons or Astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Janiszewska

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas are the most common malignant primary brain tumours in adults and one of the most aggressive and difficult-to-treat cancers. No effective treatment exits actually for this tumour and new therapeutic approaches are needed for this disease. One possible innovative approach involves the nanoparticle-mediated specific delivery of drugs and/or genetic material to glioblastoma cells where they can provide therapeutic benefits. In the present work, we have synthesised and characterised several second generation amphiphilic polylysine dendrons to be used as siRNA carriers. We have found that, in addition to their siRNA binding properties, these new compounds inhibit the proliferation of two glioblastoma cell lines while being nontoxic for non-tumoural central nervous system cells like neurons and glia, cell types that share the anatomical space with glioblastoma cells during the course of the disease. The selective toxicity of these nanoparticles to glioblastoma cells, as compared to neurons and glial cells, involves mitochondrial depolarisation and reactive oxygen species production. This selective toxicity, together with the ability to complex and release siRNA, suggests that these new polylysine dendrons might offer a scaffold in the development of future nanoparticles designed to restrict the proliferation of glioblastoma cells.

  7. Polysialic Acid Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (PSA-NCAM) is an adverse prognosis factor in glioblastoma, and regulates olig2 expression in glioma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoureux, Marie-Claude; Coulibaly, Béma; Chinot, Olivier; Loundou, Anderson; Metellus, Philippe; Rougon, Geneviève; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive and frequent brain tumor, albeit without cure. Although patient survival is limited to one year on average, significant variability in outcome is observed. The assessment of biomarkers is needed to gain better knowledge of this type of tumor, help prognosis, design and evaluate therapies. The neurodevelopmental polysialic acid neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) protein is overexpressed in various cancers. Here, we studied its expression in GBM and evaluated its prognosis value for overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS). We set up a specific and sensitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test for PSA-NCAM quantification, which correlated well with PSA-NCAM semi quantitative analysis by immunohistochemistry, and thus provides an accurate quantitative measurement of PSA-NCAM content for the 56 GBM biopsies analyzed. For statistics, the Spearman correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the consistency between the immunohistochemistry and ELISA data. Patients' survival was estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier method, and curves were compared using the log-rank test. On multivariate analysis, the effect of potential risk factors on the DFS and OS were evaluated using the cox regression proportional hazard models. The threshold for statistical significance was p = 0.05. We showed that PSA-NCAM was expressed by approximately two thirds of the GBM at variable levels. On univariate analysis, PSA-NCAM content was an adverse prognosis factor for both OS (p = 0.04) and DFS (p = 0.0017). On multivariate analysis, PSA-NCAM expression was an independent negative predictor of OS (p = 0.046) and DFS (p = 0.007). Furthermore, in glioma cell lines, PSA-NCAM level expression was correlated to the one of olig2, a transcription factor required for gliomagenesis. PSA-NCAM represents a valuable biomarker for the prognosis of GBM patients

  8. Phenylbutyrate Sensitizes Human Glioblastoma Cells Lacking Wild-Type P53 Function to Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Carlos A.; Feng, Felix Y.; Herman, Joseph M.; Nyati, Mukesh K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ljungman, Mats

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors induce growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in cancer cells. Phenylbutyrate (PB) is a HDAC inhibitor used clinically for treatment of urea cycle disorders. Because of its low cytotoxicity, cerebrospinal fluid penetration, and high oral bioavailability, we investigated PB as a potential radiation sensitizer in human glioblastoma cell lines. Methods and Materials: Four glioblastoma cell lines were selected for this study. Phenylbutyrate was used at a concentration of 2 mM, which is achievable in humans. Western blots were used to assess levels of acetylated histone H3 in tumor cells after treatment with PB. Flow cytometry was used for cell cycle analysis. Clonogenic assays were performed to assess the effect of PB on radiation sensitivity. We used shRNA against p53 to study the role of p53 in radiosensitization. Results: Treatment with PB alone resulted in hyperacetylation of histones, confirmed by Western blot analysis. The PB alone resulted in cytostatic effects in three cell lines. There was no evidence of G 1 arrest, increase in sub-G 1 fraction or p21 protein induction. Clonogenic assays showed radiosensitization in two lines harboring p53 mutations, with enhancement ratios (± SE) of 1.5 (± 0.2) and 1.3 (± 0.1), respectively. There was no radiopotentiating effect in two cell lines with wild-type p53, but knockdown of wild-type p53 resulted in radiosensitization by PB. Conclusions: Phenylbutyrate can produce p21-independent cytostasis, and enhances radiation sensitivity in p53 mutant human glioblastoma cells in vitro. This suggests the potential application of combined PB and radiotherapy in glioblastoma harboring mutant p53

  9. Circulating endothelial cells and procoagulant microparticles in patients with glioblastoma: prognostic value.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaspar Reynés

    Full Text Available AIM: Circulating endothelial cells and microparticles are prognostic factors in cancer. However, their prognostic and predictive value in patients with glioblastoma is unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential prognostic value of circulating endothelial cells and microparticles in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma treated with standard radiotherapy and concomitant temozolomide. In addition, we have analyzed the methylation status of the MGMT promoter. METHODS: Peripheral blood samples were obtained before and at the end of the concomitant treatment. Blood samples from healthy volunteers were also obtained as controls. Endothelial cells were measured by an immunomagnetic technique and immunofluorescence microscopy. Microparticles were quantified by flow cytometry. Microparticle-mediated procoagulant activity was measured by endogen thrombin generation and by phospholipid-dependent clotting time. Methylation status of MGMT promoter was determined by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. RESULTS: Pretreatment levels of circulating endothelial cells and microparticles were higher in patients than in controls (p<0.001. After treatment, levels of microparticles and thrombin generation decreased, and phospholipid-dependent clotting time increased significantly. A high pretreatment endothelial cell count, corresponding to the 99(th percentile in controls, was associated with poor overall survival. MGMT promoter methylation was present in 27% of tumor samples and was associated to a higher overall survival (66 weeks vs 30 weeks, p<0.004. CONCLUSION: Levels of circulating endothelial cells may have prognostic value in patients with glioblastoma.

  10. The Long Non-coding RNA HIF1A-AS2 Facilitates the Maintenance of Mesenchymal Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells in Hypoxic Niches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Mineo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs have an undefined role in the pathobiology of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. These tumors are genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous with transcriptome subtype-specific GBM stem-like cells (GSCs that adapt to the brain tumor microenvironment, including hypoxic niches. We identified hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha-antisense RNA 2 (HIF1A-AS2 as a subtype-specific hypoxia-inducible lncRNA, upregulated in mesenchymal GSCs. Its deregulation affects GSC growth, self-renewal, and hypoxia-dependent molecular reprogramming. Among the HIF1A-AS2 interactome, IGF2BP2 and DHX9 were identified as direct partners. This association was needed for maintenance of expression of their target gene, HMGA1. Downregulation of HIF1A-AS2 led to delayed growth of mesenchymal GSC tumors, survival benefits, and impaired expression of HMGA1 in vivo. Our data demonstrate that HIF1A-AS2 contributes to GSCs’ speciation and adaptation to hypoxia within the tumor microenvironment, acting directly through its interactome and targets and indirectly by modulating responses to hypoxic stress depending on the subtype-specific genetic context.

  11. Orthotopic glioblastoma stem-like cell xenograft model in mice to evaluate intra-arterial delivery of bevacizumab: from bedside to bench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Hofstetter, Christoph P; Santillan, Alejandro; Shin, Benjamin J; Foley, Conor P; Ballon, Douglas J; Pierre Gobin, Y; Boockvar, John A

    2012-11-01

    Bevacizumab (BV), a humanized monocolonal antibody directed against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), is a standard intravenous (IV) treatment for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), that has been introduced recently as an intra-arterial (IA) treatment modality in humans. Since preclinical models have not been reported, we sought to develop a tumor stem cell (TSC) xenograft model to investigate IA BV delivery in vivo. Firefly luciferase transduced patient TSC were injected into the cortex of 35 nude mice. Tumor growth was monitored weekly using bioluminescence imaging. Mice were treated with either intraperitoneal (IP) or IA BV, with or without blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD), or with IP saline injection (controls). Tumor tissue was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and western blot techniques. Tumor formation occurred in 31 of 35 (89%) mice with a significant signal increase over time (p=0.018). Post mortem histology revealed an infiltrative growth of TSC xenografts in a similar pattern compared to the primary human GBM. Tumor tissue analyzed at 24 hours after treatment revealed that IA BV treatment with BBBD led to a significantly higher intratumoral BV concentration compared to IA BV alone, IP BV or controls (pmouse model that allows us to study IA chemotherapy. However, further studies are needed to analyze the treatment effects after IA BV to assess tumor progression and overall animal survival. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. MiR-18a regulates the proliferation, migration and invasion of human glioblastoma cell by targeting neogenin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yichen, E-mail: jeff200064017@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Wang, Ping, E-mail: pingwang8000@163.com [Department of Neurobiology, College of Basic Medicine, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Institute of Pathology and Pathophysiology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Zhao, Wei, E-mail: 15669746@qq.com [Department of Neurobiology, College of Basic Medicine, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Institute of Pathology and Pathophysiology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Yao, Yilong, E-mail: yaoyilong_322@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liu, Xiaobai, E-mail: paganizonda1991@qq.com [The 96th Class, 7-year Program, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110001 (China); Ma, Jun, E-mail: majun_724@163.com [Department of Neurobiology, College of Basic Medicine, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Institute of Pathology and Pathophysiology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Xue, Yixue, E-mail: xueyixue888@163.com [Department of Neurobiology, College of Basic Medicine, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Institute of Pathology and Pathophysiology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Liu, Yunhui, E-mail: liuyh@sj-hospital.org [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2014-05-15

    MiR-17-92 cluster has recently been reported as an oncogene in some tumors. However, the association of miR-18a, an important member of this cluster, with glioblastoma remains unknown. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the expression of miR-18a in glioblastoma and its role in biological behavior of U87 and U251 human glioblastoma cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that miR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines compared with that in human brain tissues and primary normal human astrocytes, and the expression levels were increased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a by dual-luciferase reporter assays. RT-PCR and western blot results showed that its expression levels were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Inhibition of miR-18a expression was established by transfecting exogenous miR-18a inhibitor into U87 and U251 cells, and its effects on the biological behavior of glioblastoma cells were studied using CCK-8 assay, transwell assay and flow cytometry. Inhibition of miR-18a expression in U87 and U251 cells significantly up-regulated neogenin, and dramatically suppressed the abilities of cell proliferation, migration and invasion, induced cell cycle arrest and promoted cellular apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that miR-18a may regulate biological behavior of human glioblastoma cells by targeting neogenin, and miR-18a can serve as a potential target in the treatment of glioblastoma. - Highlights: • MiR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines. • Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a. • Neogenin expressions were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. • Inhibition of miR-18a suppressed biological behavior of glioma cells by up-regulating neogenin.

  13. MiR-18a regulates the proliferation, migration and invasion of human glioblastoma cell by targeting neogenin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yichen; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Wei; Yao, Yilong; Liu, Xiaobai; Ma, Jun; Xue, Yixue; Liu, Yunhui

    2014-01-01

    MiR-17-92 cluster has recently been reported as an oncogene in some tumors. However, the association of miR-18a, an important member of this cluster, with glioblastoma remains unknown. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the expression of miR-18a in glioblastoma and its role in biological behavior of U87 and U251 human glioblastoma cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that miR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines compared with that in human brain tissues and primary normal human astrocytes, and the expression levels were increased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a by dual-luciferase reporter assays. RT-PCR and western blot results showed that its expression levels were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Inhibition of miR-18a expression was established by transfecting exogenous miR-18a inhibitor into U87 and U251 cells, and its effects on the biological behavior of glioblastoma cells were studied using CCK-8 assay, transwell assay and flow cytometry. Inhibition of miR-18a expression in U87 and U251 cells significantly up-regulated neogenin, and dramatically suppressed the abilities of cell proliferation, migration and invasion, induced cell cycle arrest and promoted cellular apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that miR-18a may regulate biological behavior of human glioblastoma cells by targeting neogenin, and miR-18a can serve as a potential target in the treatment of glioblastoma. - Highlights: • MiR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines. • Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a. • Neogenin expressions were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. • Inhibition of miR-18a suppressed biological behavior of glioma cells by up-regulating neogenin

  14. Primary ciliogenesis defects are associated with human astrocytoma/glioblastoma cells

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    Rattner Jerome B

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary cilia are non-motile sensory cytoplasmic organelles that have been implicated in signal transduction, cell to cell communication, left and right pattern embryonic development, sensation of fluid flow, regulation of calcium levels, mechanosensation, growth factor signaling and cell cycle progression. Defects in the formation and/or function of these structures underlie a variety of human diseases such as Alström, Bardet-Biedl, Joubert, Meckel-Gruber and oral-facial-digital type 1 syndromes. The expression and function of primary cilia in cancer cells has now become a focus of attention but has not been studied in astrocytomas/glioblastomas. To begin to address this issue, we compared the structure and expression of primary cilia in a normal human astrocyte cell line with five human astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines. Methods Cultured normal human astrocytes and five human astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines were examined for primary cilia expression and structure using indirect immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Monospecific antibodies were used to detect primary cilia and map the relationship between the primary cilia region and sites of endocytosis. Results We show that expression of primary cilia in normal astrocytes is cell cycle related and the primary cilium extends through the cell within a unique structure which we show to be a site of endocytosis. Importantly, we document that in each of the five astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines fully formed primary cilia are either expressed at a very low level, are completely absent or have aberrant forms, due to incomplete ciliogenesis. Conclusions The recent discovery of the importance of primary cilia in a variety of cell functions raises the possibility that this structure may have a role in a variety of cancers. Our finding that the formation of the primary cilium is disrupted in cells derived from astrocytoma/glioblastoma tumors provides the first

  15. A radial glia gene marker, fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7, is involved in proliferation and invasion of glioblastoma cells.

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    Antonella De Rosa

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is among the most deadly cancers. A number of studies suggest that a fraction of tumor cells with stem cell features (Glioma Stem-like Cells, GSC might be responsible for GBM recurrence and aggressiveness. GSC similarly to normal neural stem cells, can form neurospheres (NS in vitro, and seem to mirror the genetic features of the original tumor better than glioma cells growing adherently in the presence of serum. Using cDNA microarray analysis we identified a number of relevant genes for glioma biology that are differentially expressed in adherent cells and neurospheres derived from the same tumor. Fatty acid-binding protein 7 (FABP7 was identified as one of the most highly expressed genes in NS compared to their adherent counterpart. We found that down-regulation of FABP7 expression in NS by small interfering RNAs significantly reduced cell proliferation and migration. We also evaluated the potential involvement of FABP7 in response to radiotherapy, as this treatment may cause increased tumor infiltration. Migration of irradiated NS was associated to increased expression of FABP7. In agreement with this, in vivo reduced tumorigenicity of GBM cells with down-regulated expression of FABP7 was associated to decreased expression of the migration marker doublecortin. Notably, we observed that PPAR antagonists affect FABP7 expression and decrease the migration capability of NS after irradiation. As a whole, the data emphasize the role of FABP7 expression in GBM migration and provide translational hints on the timing of treatment with anti-FABP7 agents like PPAR antagonists during GBM evolution.

  16. HAX-1 Protects Glioblastoma Cells from Apoptosis through the Akt1 Pathway

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    Xin Deng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most common malignant tumor in central nervous system (CNS, and it is still insurmountable and has a poor prognosis. The proliferation and survival mechanism of glioma cells needs to be explored further for the development of glioma treatment. Hematopoietic-substrate-1 associated protein X-1 (HAX-1 has been reported as an anti-apoptosis protein that plays an important role in several malignant tumors. However, the effect and mechanism of HAX-1 in glioblastomas remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of HAX-1 in glioblastoma cells and