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Sample records for glibenclamide glimepiride glipizide

  1. Clinical Trial Of Glimepiride Compared With Glibenclamide For ...

    Objective: The study was undertaken to compare the efficacy and safety of Glimepiride against Glibenclamide in the management of patients with type 2 DM in Jos, Nigeria. Study design: An open, randomised controlled trial. Setting: Diabetes Clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria. Subjects: Seventy four ...

  2. Theoretical and experimental studies on the internal mobility of two sulfonylurea agents: glibenclamide and glimepiride

    Wlodarczyk, P; Paluch, M; Wojnarowska, Z; Hawelek, L; Kaminski, K [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, ulica Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Pilch, J, E-mail: pwlodarc@us.edu.pl [Department of Biological Sciences, Academy of Physical Education, ulica Raciborska 1, 40-074 Katowice (Poland)

    2011-10-26

    Molecular dynamics of glibenclamide and glimepiride in their glassy state were studied by means of broadband dielectric spectroscopy. In both compounds we found a {gamma}-relaxation process, with nearly the same value of activation energy. Further, we were able to identify the origin of {gamma} relaxation by performing calculations within the framework of density functional theory. It was found that rotation of the chain end included cyclohexyl and neighboring carbonyl group is related to the observed mode in dielectric spectra. The calculated activation energy was only a few kJ per mole lower than the energies obtained from experiment. It is demonstrated that this fast {gamma} process is insensitive to pressure. Finally, another secondary mode in glibenclamide, predicted by computations, was confirmed from dielectric measurements at elevated pressure. Our calculations indicate that this mode should be pressure-sensitive. (paper)

  3. Glimepiride

    Glimepiride comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once a day with breakfast or the first main meal of the ... medications to treat high blood sugar or diabetes; isoniazid (INH); MAO inhibitors such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine ( ...

  4. Optimization of therapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus with the oral hypoglycemic agent glimepiride

    Tatiana Ivanovna Romantsova

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is believed to develop as a result of lowered insulin secretion and insulin resistance leading to hyperglycemia. Sulfonylureas stimulateinsulin secretion and thereby decrease blood glucose level which accounts for their wide application in the treatment of diabetes. However, manyagents of this class produce side effects (increased body mass, hypoglycemia, resistance to therapy, etc. attributable to excess stimulation of insulinsecretion. Glimepiride is as efficient as traditionally used sulfonylureas but causes a smaller rise in insulin secretion. Sulfonylurea receptors showlower affinity for glimepiride than for glibenclamide. Formation and dissociation of glimepiride-receptor complexes occur faster than those of glibenclamide-receptor complexes. In addition, therapeutic effect of glimepiride was shown to be associated with improved insulin sensitivity. It is concludedthat glimepiride is an efficacious agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  5. Glipizide Pharmacokinetics in Healthy and Diabetic Volunteers

    Erah

    Purpose: Disease state may contribute to alteration in drug pharmacokinetics. The purpose of .... dependency or drug abuse, known allergy to ... HPLC analysis of glipizide ... months when stored at 4 0C, protected from .... plasma and urine.

  6. Glipizide

    ... manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye ...

  7. The biological fate of glipizide (II)

    Sugihara, Juko; Sato, Yoshishige

    1975-01-01

    The isolation and characteristics of metabolites excreted in rat urine and other small animals were studied following oral administration of 14 C-glipizide. Five metabolites and a small amount of the unchanged compound were isolated from the urine and their structures were elucidated by thin-layer chromatography and by various spectroscopic analyses. 3-cis-, 4-trans-hydroxycyclohexyl derivatives, decyclohexyl derivative, hydroxymethyl derivative and hydroxyethyl derivative were identified or suggested. The relative amount of each metabolite excreted differed markedly according to the species of animals used. In the rat and the mouse, major metabolites were 4-trans-, 3-cis-hydroxycyclohexyl derivatives and decyclohexyl derivative; in the guinea-pig 4-trans-, 3-cis-hydroxycyclohexyl derivatives and hydroxymethyl derivative; and in the rabbit hydroxymethyl derivative. In the dog, the cat and the monkeys N-(4-carboxymethyl-benzenesulfonyl)-N'-cyclohexyl-urea was suggested to be a major metabolite. (auth.)

  8. Dissolution test for glibenclamide tablets

    Elisabeth Aparecida dos Santos Gianotto

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to develop and validate a dissolution test for glibenclamide tablets. Optimal conditions to carry out the dissolution test are 500 mL of phosphate buffer at pH 8.0, paddles at 75 rpm stirring speed, time test set to 60 min and using equipment with six vessels. The derivative UV spectrophotometric method for determination of glibenclamide released was developed, validated and compared with the HPLC method. The UVDS method presents linearity (r² = 0.9999 in the concentration range of 5-14 µg/mL. Precision and recoveries were 0.42% and 100.25%, respectively. The method was applied to three products commercially available on the Brazilian market.

  9. Compound list: glibenclamide [Open TG-GATEs

    Full Text Available glibenclamide GBC 00042 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/glibenclam...ide.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/glibenclam..._vivo/Liver/Single/glibenclamide.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bioscienc...edbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/glibenclamide.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  10. The biological fate of glipizide (II). The metabolism of glipizide in animals

    Sugihara, J; Sato, Y [Tanabe Seiyaku Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1975-03-01

    The isolation and characteristics of metabolites excreted in rat urine and other small animals were studied following oral administration of /sup 14/C-glipizide. Five metabolites and a small amount of the unchanged compound were isolated from the urine and their structures were elucidated by thin-layer chromatography and by various spectroscopic analyses. 3-cis-, 4-trans-hydroxycyclohexyl derivatives, decyclohexyl derivative, hydroxymethyl derivative and hydroxyethyl derivative were identified or suggested. The relative amount of each metabolite excreted differed markedly according to the species of animals used. In the rat and the mouse, major metabolites were 4-trans-, 3-cis-hydroxycyclohexyl derivatives and decyclohexyl derivative; in the guinea-pig 4-trans-, 3-cis-hydroxycyclohexyl derivatives and hydroxymethyl derivative; and in the rabbit hydroxymethyl derivative. In the dog, the cat and the monkeys N-(4-carboxymethyl-benzenesulfonyl)-N'-cyclohexyl-urea was suggested to be a major metabolite.

  11. Probable hypoglycemic adverse drug reaction associated with prickly pear cactus, glipizide, and metformin in a patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Sobieraj, Diana M; Freyer, Craig W

    2010-01-01

    To report a case of an adverse drug reaction (ADR) in a patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus taking prickly pear cactus (PPC), glipizide, and metformin. A 58-year-old Mexican male with type 2 diabetes mellitus being treated with metformin 1000 mg twice daily and extended-release glipizide 10 mg daily was referred to the pharmacist for medication education. He denied taking herbal supplements or experiencing hypoglycemia. Two hemoglobin A(1c) values (6.8% and 6.7%) obtained over the past year demonstrated glycemic control, which was supported by his reported fasting blood glucose readings of 113-132 mg/dL. One month later, the patient reported 4 hypoglycemic events with blood glucose readings of 49-68 mg/dL, which resulted in discontinuation of glipizide. One month later, the patient denied any further hypoglycemia. During medication reconciliation he reported consuming crude PPC pads daily for 2 months for glucose control. Literature suggests that PPC has an effect on lowering blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, although few identified data describe ADRs from combining PPC with other agents used in treating type 2 diabetes mellitus. A literature search of MEDLINE (through December 2009) using the search terms diabetes mellitus, prickly pear cactus, nopal, opuntia, metformin, glipizide, glyburide, glimepiride, and sulfonylurea revealed no case reports of the described ADR. One case report describing the blood glucose-lowering effect of PPC in a patient concurrently taking oral antihyperglycemics documented an episode of hypoglycemia, although the Naranjo probability scale was not applied. One patient survey discovered the most common drug-herbal interaction in the given population to be between PPC and antihyperglycemic agents, resulting in hypoglycemia. In our case, use of the Naranjo probability scale suggests the ADR to be probable. The mechanism may be due to the additive glucose lowering of the 3 agents consumed concurrently by the

  12. Development of natural gum based fast disintegrating tablets of glipizide

    Antesh Kumar Jha; Dipak Chetia

    2012-01-01

    Dysphagia and risk of choking are leading causes of patient non-compliance in the self-administration of conventional tablets. To overcome these limitations of conventional tablets fast-disintegrating tablets were developed, using natural gums. Natural gums were evaluated for bulk swelling capacity. Powder mix containing natural gums and glipizide was evaluated for water sorption, swelling index and capillary action. For faster onset and immediate hypoglycemic action, the fast disintegrating ...

  13. Research Article Preparation and Evaluation of Glibenclamide ...

    The effect of stirring speed (250, 1000, 1500 and 2500 rpm) and drug: polymer ratio ... encapsulation efficiency and drug release was also studied. Results: Stable NPs ... Conclusion: Controlled release biodegradable glibenclamide NPs can be efficiently prepared by ... drug delivery, improved bioavailability, stability, and.

  14. Stabilized amorphous glibenclamide nanoparticles by high-gravity technique

    Yu Lei; Li Caixia; Le Yuan; Chen Jianfeng; Zou Haikui

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: · Amorphous glibenclamide nanoparticles of 220 nm are obtained using the high-gravity technique. · The dissolution rate of these nanoparticles achieves 85% in 5 min, while those of the raw glibenclamide and the commercial glibenclamide tablet only reach 35% and 55% respectively during the same period. · The morphology, particle size, crystalline form and dissolution rate of these nanoparticles almost remain constant after keeping more than 70 days. - Abstract: The stable amorphous glibenclamide nanoparticles was obtained via anti-solvent precipitation using the high-gravity technique in this study. The effects of operating variables on the particle size were investigated. The properties of glibenclamide nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dissolution test. The prepared glibenclamide nanoparticles had a mean size of 220 nm within a narrow distribution. The dissolution rate of glibenclamide nanoparticles was obviously faster than that of the raw glibenclamide or the commercial glibenclamide tablet. It achieved 85% in 5 min, while those of the raw glibenclamide and the commercial glibenclamide tablet achieved 35% and 55% respectively during the same period. The physical stability of the nanoparticles was tested after storing for more than 70 days at room conditions. Their morphology, particle size, crystalline form and dissolution rate almost remained constant during storage.

  15. Formulation and evaluation of glipizide floating-bioadhesive tablets

    Jayvadan K. Patel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was formulation and in vitro evaluation of floating-bioadhesive tablets to lengthen the stay of glipizide in its absorption area. Effervescent tablets were made using chitosan (CH, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC, carbopolP934 (CP, polymethacrylic acid (PMA, citric acid, and sodium bicarbonate. Tablets with 5% effervescent base had longer lag time than 10%. The type of polymer had no significant effect on the floating lag time. All tablets floated atop the medium for 23-24 hr. Increasing carbopolP934 caused higher bioadhesion than chitosan (p < 0.05. All formulations showed a Higuchi, non-Fickian release mechanism. Tablets with 10% effervescent base, 80% CH/20% HPMC, or 80% CP/20% PMA seemed desirable.

  16. In vitro and in vivo studies on the complexes of glipizide with water-soluble β-cyclodextrin-epichlorohydrin polymers.

    Nie, Shufang; Zhang, Shu; Pan, Weisan; Liu, Yanli

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of a newly modified cyclodextrin derivative, water-soluble β-cyclodextrin-epichlorohydrin polymer (β-CDP), as an effective drug carrier to enhance the dissolution rate and oral bioavailability of glipizide as a poorly water-soluble model drug. Inclusion complexes of glipizide with β-CDP were prepared by the co-evaporation method and characterized by phase solubility, dissolution, and differential scanning calorimetry. The solubility curve was classified as type A(L), which indicated the formation of 1:1 complex between glipizide and β-CDP. β-CDP had better properties of increasing the aqueous solubility of glipizide compared with HP-β-CD. The dissolution rate of drug from the β-CDP complexes was significantly greater than that of the corresponding physical mixtures indicating that the formation of amorphous complex increased the solubility of glipizide. Moreover, the increment in drug dissolution rate from the glipizide/β-CDP systems was higher than that from the corresponding ones with HP-β-CD, which indicated that β-CDP could provide greater capability of solubilization for poorly soluble drugs. Furthermore, in vivo study revealed that the bioavailability of glipizide was significantly improved by glipizide /β-CDP inclusion complex after oral administration to beagle dogs.

  17. Comparison between repaglinide and glipizide in Type 2 diabetes mellitus: a 1-year multicentre study

    Madsbad, Sten; Kilhovd, B; Lager, I

    2001-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the long-term effectiveness and safety of repaglinide, a novel prandial glucose regulator, in comparison with glipizide in the treatment of patients with Type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Diet or tablet-treated patients with Type 2 diabetes (n = 256; age 40-75 years, body mass index (BMI...... with Type 2 diabetes, and is better than glipizide in controlling HbA1c and FBG levels, overall, and in OHA-naive patients.......) 20-35 kg/m2, HbA1c 4.2-12.8%), without signs of severe microvascular or macrovascular complications, were included in this double-blind, multicentre, parallel-group comparative trial. Patients were randomized at a 2:1 ratio to repaglinide, 1-4 mg at mealtimes, or glipizide, 5-15 mg daily. RESULTS...

  18. The biopharmaceutics of successful controlled release drug product: Segmental-dependent permeability of glipizide vs. metoprolol throughout the intestinal tract.

    Zur, Moran; Cohen, Noa; Agbaria, Riad; Dahan, Arik

    2015-07-15

    The purpose of this work was to study the challenges and prospects of regional-dependent absorption in a controlled-release scenario, through the oral biopharmaceutics of the sulfonylurea antidiabetic drug glipizide. The BCS solubility class of glipizide was determined, and its physicochemical properties and intestinal permeability were thoroughly investigated, both in-vitro (PAMPA and Caco-2) and in-vivo in rats. Metoprolol was used as the low/high permeability class boundary marker. Glipizide was found to be a low-solubility compound. All intestinal permeability experimental methods revealed similar trend; a mirror image small intestinal permeability with opposite regional/pH-dependency was obtained, a downward trend for glipizide, and an upward trend for metoprolol. Yet the lowest permeability of glipizide (terminal Ileum) was comparable to the lowest permeability of metoprolol (proximal jejunum). At the colon, similar permeability was evident for glipizide and metoprolol, that was higher than metoprolol's jejunal permeability. We present an analysis that identifies metoprolol's jejunal permeability as the low/high permeability class benchmark anywhere throughout the intestinal tract; we show that the permeability of both glipizide and metoprolol matches/exceeds this threshold throughout the entire intestinal tract, accounting for their success as controlled-release dosage form. This represents a key biopharmaceutical characteristic for a successful controlled-release dosage form. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Glibenclamide reduces secondary brain damage after experimental traumatic brain injury.

    Zweckberger, K; Hackenberg, K; Jung, C S; Hertle, D N; Kiening, K L; Unterberg, A W; Sakowitz, O W

    2014-07-11

    Following traumatic brain injury (TBI) SUR1-regulated NCCa-ATP (SUR1/TRPM4) channels are transcriptionally up-regulated in ischemic astrocytes, neurons, and capillaries. ATP depletion results in depolarization and opening of the channel leading to cytotoxic edema. Glibenclamide is an inhibitor of SUR-1 and, thus, might prevent cytotoxic edema and secondary brain damage following TBI. Anesthetized adult Sprague-Dawley rats underwent parietal craniotomy and were subjected to controlled cortical impact injury (CCI). Glibenclamide was administered as a bolus injection 15min after CCI injury and continuously via osmotic pumps throughout 7days. In an acute trial (180min) mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, intracranial pressure, encephalographic activity, and cerebral metabolism were monitored. Brain water content was assessed gravimetrically 24h after CCI injury and contusion volumes were measured by MRI scanning technique at 8h, 24h, 72h, and 7d post injury. Throughout the entire time of observation neurological function was quantified using the "beam-walking" test. Glibenclamide-treated animals showed a significant reduction in the development of brain tissue water content(80.47%±0.37% (glibenclamide) vs. 80.83%±0.44% (control); pbeam-walking test throughout 7days. In accordance to these results and the available literature, glibenclamide seems to have promising potency in the treatment of TBI. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Glibenclamide for the Treatment of Acute CNS Injury

    J. Marc Simard

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available First introduced into clinical practice in 1969, glibenclamide (US adopted name, glyburide is known best for its use in the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2, where it is used to promote the release of insulin by blocking pancreatic KATP [sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1-Kir6.2] channels. During the last decade, glibenclamide has received renewed attention due to its pleiotropic protective effects in acute CNS injury. Acting via inhibition of the recently characterized Sur1-Trpm4 channel (formerly, the Sur1-regulated NCCa-ATP channel and, in some cases, via brain KATP channels, glibenclamide has been shown to be beneficial in several clinically relevant rodent models of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, neonatal encephalopathy of prematurity, and metastatic brain tumor. Glibenclamide acts on microvessels to reduce edema formation and secondary hemorrhage, it inhibits necrotic cell death, it exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects and it promotes neurogenesis—all via inhibition of Sur1. Two clinical trials, one in TBI and one in stroke, currently are underway. These recent findings, which implicate Sur1 in a number of acute pathological conditions involving the CNS, present new opportunities to use glibenclamide, a well-known, safe pharmaceutical agent, for medical conditions that heretofore had few or no treatment options.

  1. Glibenclamide for the Treatment of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Nicholas Caffes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are associated with severe functional disability and high mortality. Except for recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, therapies targeting the underlying pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS ischemia and hemorrhage are strikingly lacking. Sur1-regulated channels play essential roles in necrotic cell death and cerebral edema following ischemic insults, and in neuroinflammation after hemorrhagic injuries. Inhibiting endothelial, neuronal, astrocytic and oligodendroglial sulfonylurea receptor 1–transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (Sur1–Trpm4 channels and, in some cases, microglial KATP (Sur1–Kir6.2 channels, with glibenclamide is protective in a variety of contexts. Robust preclinical studies have shown that glibenclamide and other sulfonylurea agents reduce infarct volumes, edema and hemorrhagic conversion, and improve outcomes in rodent models of ischemic stroke. Retrospective studies suggest that diabetic patients on sulfonylurea drugs at stroke presentation fare better if they continue on drug. Additional laboratory investigations have implicated Sur1 in the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic CNS insults. In clinically relevant models of subarachnoid hemorrhage, glibenclamide reduces adverse neuroinflammatory and behavioral outcomes. Here, we provide an overview of the preclinical studies of glibenclamide therapy for CNS ischemia and hemorrhage, discuss the available data from clinical investigations, and conclude with promising preclinical results that suggest glibenclamide may be an effective therapeutic option for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

  2. Glibenclamide for the treatment of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

    Caffes, Nicholas; Kurland, David B; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-03-04

    Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are associated with severe functional disability and high mortality. Except for recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, therapies targeting the underlying pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS) ischemia and hemorrhage are strikingly lacking. Sur1-regulated channels play essential roles in necrotic cell death and cerebral edema following ischemic insults, and in neuroinflammation after hemorrhagic injuries. Inhibiting endothelial, neuronal, astrocytic and oligodendroglial sulfonylurea receptor 1-transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (Sur1-Trpm4) channels and, in some cases, microglial KATP (Sur1-Kir6.2) channels, with glibenclamide is protective in a variety of contexts. Robust preclinical studies have shown that glibenclamide and other sulfonylurea agents reduce infarct volumes, edema and hemorrhagic conversion, and improve outcomes in rodent models of ischemic stroke. Retrospective studies suggest that diabetic patients on sulfonylurea drugs at stroke presentation fare better if they continue on drug. Additional laboratory investigations have implicated Sur1 in the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic CNS insults. In clinically relevant models of subarachnoid hemorrhage, glibenclamide reduces adverse neuroinflammatory and behavioral outcomes. Here, we provide an overview of the preclinical studies of glibenclamide therapy for CNS ischemia and hemorrhage, discuss the available data from clinical investigations, and conclude with promising preclinical results that suggest glibenclamide may be an effective therapeutic option for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

  3. The radioimmunological determination of glibenclamide and its metabolites in serum

    Glogner, P.; Heni, N.; Nissen, L.

    1977-01-01

    This report describes a sensitive and specific radio-immunological method for determining serum levels of the 1-(p-[2- (5-chloro-2-methoxybenzamido) -ethyl]-benzenesulfonyl) -3-cyclohexylurea (clibenclamide) and its metabolites. The antigen was prepared by coupling a metabolite to bovine serum albumin. Antibodies could be demonstrated in serum after immunisation of rabbits. The separation of free and antibody-bound glibenclamide was achieved by a dextran-charcoal suspension. Presence of serum did not influence the binding characteristics. The limit of detection was 20 ng/ml. The affinity of the metabolites differed only slightly from that of glibenclamide. The presence of related drugs from the sulfonylurea series such as tolbutamide, glibornuride and the sulfonamide sulfamethoxazol did not affect the determination. Only closely related substances showed a variable degree of affinity towards antibodies. As an example of the possible application of this method, the serum concentration of glibenclamide was determined over a period of 8 h after single i.v. injection to a volunteer. The data are in close accordance with the results of authors using radioactive glibenclamide. (orig.) [de

  4. Glimepiride attenuates Aβ production via suppressing BACE1 activity in cortical neurons.

    Liu, Feiyang; Wang, Yijin; Yan, Ming; Zhang, Luyong; Pang, Tao; Liao, Hong

    2013-12-17

    Numerous lines of evidence suggest a strong link between diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Impaired insulin signaling and insulin resistance occur not only in diabetes but also in the brain of AD. Recent evidence has indicated that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists thiazolidinediones (TZDs) can decrease β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) deposition, which is the core component of senile plaques in AD, but the underlying mechanisms still remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether glimepiride with PPARγ-stimulating activity, an oral anti-diabetic drug, has similar effects on Aβ production in primary cortical neurons. We demonstrated that glimepiride decreased extracellular Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels. The effect of glimepiride on reduction of Aβ40 generation was mediated by downregulation of β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) mRNA and protein expression, and by suppression of BACE1 activity. In addition, we found that high glucose condition enhanced Aβ40 production and glimepiride significantly decreased high glucose-induced Aβ40 production. Finally, a specific PPARγ antagonist GW9662 reversed glimepiride inhibitory effect on Aβ40 generation, suggesting a PPARγ-dependent mechanism may be involved. Our data indicated that glimepiride may serve as a promising drug for the treatment of AD associated with diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Design, optimization and evaluation of glipizide solid self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery for enhanced solubility and dissolution.

    Dash, Rajendra Narayan; Mohammed, Habibuddin; Humaira, Touseef; Ramesh, Devi

    2015-10-01

    A solid self-nanoemulsifying drug-delivery system (solid SNEDDS) has been explored to improve the solubility and dissolution profile of glipizide. SNEDDS preconcentrate was systematically optimized using a circumscribed central composite design by varying Captex 355 (Oil), Solutol HS15 (Surfactant) and Imwitor 988 (Co-surfactant). The optimized SNEDDS preconcentrate consisted of Captex 355 (30% w/w), Solutol HS15 (45% w/w) and Imwitor 988 (25% w/w). The saturation solubility (SS) of glipizide in optimized SNEDDS preconcentrate was found to be 45.12 ± 1.36 mg/ml, indicating an improvement (1367 times) of glipizide solubility as compared to its aqueous solubility (0.033 ± 0.0021 mg/ml). At 90% SS, glipizide was loaded to the optimized SNEDDS. In-vitro dilution of liquid SNEDDS resulted in a nanoemulsion with a mean droplet size of 29.4 nm. TEM studies of diluted liquid SNEDDS confirmed the uniform shape and size of the globules. The liquid SNEDDS was adsorbed onto calcium carbonate and talc to form solid SNEDDS. PXRD, DSC, and SEM results indicated that, the presence of glipizide as an amorphous and as a molecular dispersion state within solid SNEDDS. Glipizide dissolution improved significantly (p < 0.001) from the solid SNEDDS (∼100% in 15 min) as compared to the pure drug (18.37%) and commercial product (65.82) respectively.

  6. Meal fat storage in subcutaneous adipose tissue: comparison of pioglitazone and glipizide treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    Basu, Ananda; Basu, Rita; Pattan, Vishwanath; Rizza, Robert A; Jensen, Michael D

    2010-10-01

    Treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) with pioglitazone changes abdominal fat in the opposite direction as treatment with glipizide. To determine whether these two medications affect adipose tissue meal fatty acid storage differently we studied 19 T2DM treated with either pioglitazone (n = 8) or glipizide (n = 11) and 11 non-DM control subjects matched for age, BMI, abdominal and leg fat. A breakfast mixed meal containing [1-(14)C]triolein was given and abdominal and femoral subcutaneous (sc) adipose tissue biopsies were collected 6 and 24 h later to measure meal fatty acid storage. The portion of meal fatty acids stored in upper body sc and lower body sc adipose tissue did not differ between non-DM and T2DM subjects either at 6 or 24 h. Likewise, meal fatty acid storage did not differ between the T2DM participants treated with pioglitazone or glipizide. We conclude that meal fatty acid storage in upper body and lower body sc adipose tissue is not abnormal in T2DM patients treated with pioglitazone or glipizide.

  7. Formulation and Evaluation of New Glimepiride Sublingual Tablets

    Wafa Al-Madhagi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucosal delivery of drugs promotes rapid absorption and high bioavailability, with a subsequent immediate onset of pharmacological effect. However, many oral mucosal deliveries are compromised by the possibility of the patient swallowing the active substance before it has been released and absorbed locally into the systemic circulation. The aim of this research was to introduce a new glimepiride formula for sublingual administration and rapid drug absorption that can be used in an emergency. The new sublingual formulation was prepared after five trials to prepare the suitable formulation. Two accepted formulations of the new sublingual product were prepared, but one of them with disintegration time of 1.45 min and searching for preferred formulation, the binder, is changed with Flulac and starch slurry to prepare formula with disintegration time of 21 seconds that supports the aim of research to be used in an emergency. The five formulations were done, after adjusting to the binder as Flulac and aerosil with disintegration time of 21 seconds and accepted hardness as well as the weight variation. The assay of a new product (subglimepiride is 103% which is a promising result, confirming that the formula succeeded. The new product (subglimepiride is accepted in most quality control tests and it is ready for marketing.

  8. A simple and convenient method for the simultaneous in vitro study of metformin and glimepiride tablets.

    Ahmed, Rehan

    2014-11-01

    A simple and convenient method was developed for the simultaneous determination of metformin HCl and glimepiride in tablet dosage form of different pharmaceuticals companies. This method was validated and proved to be applicable for assay determination in intermediate and finished staged. More over a single medium dissolution of metformin HCl and glimepiride was established and the media was evaluated for comparative studies for different formulations. Reverse phase HPLC equipped with UV detector was used for the determination of metformin HCl and glimepiride. A mixture of acetonitrile and ammonium acetate buffer 0.05M pH 3.0 was used as mobile phase at flow rate of 1.0ml/min. Promocil C18 5µ 100Aº 4.6 x 100mm C18 silica column was used and detection was carried out at 270nm. Method was found to be linear over the range of 4ppm to 16ppm for glimepiride and 170ppm to 680ppm for metformin HCl. Regression co-efficient were found to be 0.9949 and 0.9864 for glimepiride and metformin HCl respectively. Dissolution was performed in 500ml 0.2% sodium lauryl sulfate at 37°C for 45min using paddle apparatus. Dissolution of glimepiride was found to be 98.60% and 101.08% in Orinase Met1 tablet and Amaryl M tablet respectively whereas metformin was found 99.41% and 98.59% in Orinase Met 1 tablet and Amaryl M tablet. RSD for all the dissolutions was less than 2.0% after completion.

  9. A rapid hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic determination of glimepiride in pharmaceutical formulations

    Si Zhou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Glimepiride is one of the most widely prescribed antidiabetic drugs and contains both hydrophobic and hydrophilic functional groups in its molecules, and thus could be analyzed by either reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC or hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC. In the literature, however, only reversed-phase HPLC has been reported. In this study, a simple, rapid and accurate hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic method was developed for the determination of glimepiride in pharmaceutical formulations. The analytical method comprised a fast ultrasound-assisted extraction with acetonitrile as a solvent followed by HILIC separation and quantification using a Waters Spherisorb S5NH2 hydrophilic column with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and aqueous acetate buffer (5.0 mM. The retention time of glimepiride increased slightly with decrease of mobile phase pH value from 6.8 to 5.8 and of acetonitrile content from 60% to 40%, indicating that both hydrophilic, ionic, and hydrophobic interactions were involved in the HILIC retention and elution mechanisms. Quantitation was carried out with a mobile phase of 40% acetonitrile and 60% aqueous acetate buffer (5.0 mM at pH 6.3, by relating the peak area of glimepiride to that of the internal standard, with a detection limit of 15.0 μg/L. UV light absorption responses at 228 nm were linear over a wide concentration range from 50.0 μg/L to 6.00 mg/L. The recoveries of the standard added to pharmaceutical tablet samples were 99.4–103.0% for glimepiride, and the relative standard deviation for the analyte was less than 1.0%. This method has been successfully applied to determine the glimepiride contents in pharmaceutical formulations.

  10. Comparison of Vildagliptin-Metformin and Glimepiride-Metformin Treatments in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Hyun Jeong Jeon

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe present study investigated the efficacy and safety of vildagliptin-metformin treatment compared to those of glimepiride-metformin treatment for type 2 diabetes.MethodsIn a randomized, open-label, comparative study, 106 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled. The primary endpoint was a reduction in HbA1c from baseline and secondary endpoints included fasting plasma glucose (FPG or 2-hour postprandial glucose (2h-PPG reduction from baseline, as well as HbA1c responder rate and HbA1c reduction according to baseline HbA1c category.ResultsComparable HbA1c reduction was observed with a mean±standard deviation change from baseline to the 32-week endpoint of -0.94±1.15% in the vildagliptin group and -1.00±1.32% in the glimepiride group. A similar reduction in 2h-PPG (vildagliptin group 3.53±4.11 mmol/L vs. the glimepiride group 3.72±4.17 mmol/L was demonstrated, and the decrements in FPG (vildagliptin group 1.54±2.41 mmol/L vs. glimepiride group 2.16±2.51 mmol/L were not different between groups. The proportion of patients who achieved an HbA1c less than 7% at week 32 was 50.1% in the vildagliptin group and 56.0% in the glimepiride group. An average body weight gain of 2.53±1.21 kg in the glimepiride group was observed in contrast with the 0.23±0.69 kg weight gain noted in the vildagliptin group. A 10-fold lower incidence of hypoglycemia was demonstrated in the vildagliptin group, in addition to an absence of severe hypoglycemia.ConclusionVildagliptin-metformin treatment provided blood glucose control efficacy comparable to that of glimepiride-metformin treatment and resulted in better adverse event profiles with lower risks of hypoglycemia and weight gain.

  11. Mechanistic analysis of Zein nanoparticles/PLGA triblock in situ forming implants for glimepiride

    Ahmed OAA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Osama Abdelhakim Aly Ahmed,1,2 Ahmed Samir Zidan,1,3 Maan Khayat4 1Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Minia University, Minia, Egypt; 3Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt; 4Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Objectives: The study aims at applying pharmaceutical nanotechnology and D-optimal fractional factorial design to screen and optimize the high-risk variables affecting the performance of a complex drug delivery system consisting of glimepiride–Zein nanoparticles and inclusion of the optimized formula with thermoresponsive triblock copolymers in in situ gel. Methods: Sixteen nanoparticle formulations were prepared by liquid–liquid phase separation method according to the D-optimal fractional factorial design encompassing five variables at two levels. The responses investigated were glimepiride entrapment capacity (EC, particle size and size distribution, zeta potential, and in vitro drug release from the prepared nanoparticles. Furthermore, the feasibility of embedding the optimized Zein-based glimepiride nanoparticles within thermoresponsive triblock copolymers poly(lactide-co-glycolide-block-poly(ethylene glycol-block-poly(lactide-co-glycolide in in situ gel was evaluated for controlling glimepiride release rate. Results: Through the systematic optimization phase, improvement of glimepiride EC of 33.6%, nanoparticle size of 120.9 nm with a skewness value of 0.2, zeta potential of 11.1 mV, and sustained release features of 3.3% and 17.3% drug released after 2 and 24 hours, respectively, were obtained. These desirability functions were obtained at Zein and glimepiride loadings of 50 and 75 mg, respectively, utilizing

  12. Treatment satisfaction in type 2 diabetes patients taking empagliflozin compared with patients taking glimepiride.

    Chirila, Costel; Zheng, Qingyao; Davenport, Eric; Kaschinski, Dagmar; Pfarr, Egon; Hach, Thomas; Palencia, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    This exploratory analysis assessed and compared patients' treatment satisfaction with empagliflozin plus metformin versus glimepiride plus metformin, using data obtained from the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire, status version (DTSQs) collected in a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy clinical trial. Observed values for DTSQs scale score and each of its eight items were summarized by visit and treatment arm. Changes from baseline in these scores were analyzed using linear mixed models for repeated measures. The baseline scale score and item scores were comparable between empagliflozin plus metformin (n = 765) and glimepiride plus metformin (n = 780). Compared with baseline, patients reported significant treatment satisfaction increases and significant decreases in perceived hyperglycemia with both treatments at all visits. Also, compared with baseline, a significant increase in perceived frequency of hypoglycemia was observed in the glimepiride treatment group at all visits. No statistically significant treatment difference was observed in DTSQs scale score and its items at week 104. The difference between the treatment groups was significant and in favor of empagliflozin from week 28 onward for perceived frequency of hyperglycemia (P ≤ 0.006) and perceived frequency of hypoglycemia (P ≤ 0.011). Despite positive trends in favor of empagliflozin, there was no significant difference in DTSQs scale score between empagliflozin and glimepiride at 104 weeks. However, when compared with glimepiride, empagliflozin demonstrated significantly lower perceived frequency of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia at all visits from week 28 onward. This finding is consistent with the clinical results reported for the EMPA-REG H2H-SU trial.

  13. Effects of glibenclamide on memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats

    MH. Esmaeili

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glucose increases memory in rats, and inhibit memory impairments produced by morphine. One mechanism by which glucose might act on memory via regulating the ATP-sensitive potassium channel. Objective: The aim of present study was to investigate the effects of glibenclamide on memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats. Methods: This experimental study has been conducted in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences (2016. Forty male Wistar rats were divided into: Control, DMSO and glibenclamide groups (n=8. All rats were trained in a passive avoidance task (50 Hz, 1 mA, 3 s. DMSO (0.2 ml or glibenclamide (1, 2, 5 mg/kg, i.p. were injected for 10 days before training. Retention test was done 48 h later. Memory retention of each animal was measured as latency takes to enter the dark chamber. Findings: The time spent in the light chamber area before entering to the dark area and total time spent in the light chamber in the glibenclamide groups were less than control group. These times in the glibenclamide (5 mg/kg group was significantly lower than control group (P<0.05, conversely total time spent in the dark chamber in the glibenclamide groups were higher than control group. Conclusion: Glibenclamide, as an ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker, may reduce memory retention by increasing insulin levels and, consequently, reducing blood glucose levels.

  14. Comparison of vildagliptin and glimepiride: effects on glycaemic control, fat tolerance and inflammatory markers in people with type 2 diabetes.

    Derosa, G; Bonaventura, A; Bianchi, L; Romano, D; Fogari, E; D'Angelo, A; Maffioli, P

    2014-12-01

    To compare the effects of vildagliptin with those of glimepiride on glycaemic control, fat tolerance and inflammatory markers in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus receiving metformin treatment. A total of 167 participants were randomized to vildagliptin 50 mg twice a day or glimepiride 2 mg three times a day, for 6 months. We evaluated the following variables: BMI; glycaemic control; fasting plasma insulin; homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index; fasting plasma proinsulin; glucagon; lipid profile; adiponectin; high-sensitivity C-reactive protein; interleukin-6; and tumour necrosis factor-α. A euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp procedure and an oral fat load test were also performed. Despite a similar decrease in HbA1c levels (P = 0.009, and P = 0.008, respectively), body weight increased with glimepiride (P = 0.048 vs baseline) and decreased with vildagliptin (P = 0.041 vs baseline and vs glimepiride). Fasting plasma insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index were significantly lower with vildagliptin compared with glimepiride (P = 0.035 and 0.047). M value, an index of insulin sensitivity, increased with vildagliptin, both compared with baseline and with glimepiride (P = 0.028 and 0.039, respectively). Vildagliptin improved all post-oral fat load peaks of lipid profile compared with glimepiride. Adiponectin levels were higher (P = 0.035) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels were lower (P = 0.038) with vildagliptin vs glimepiride. During the oral fat load test, interleukin-6, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and tumour necrosis factor-α peaks were lower and adiponectin peak was higher in the vildagliptin group than in the glimepiride group. There was a higher dropout rate as a result of hypoglycaemia in the glimepiride group than in the vildagliptin group. Vildagliptin was more effective than glimepiride in reducing post-oral fat load peaks of lipid-trafficking adipocytokines and

  15. Glibenclamide Mimics Metabolic Effects of Metformin in H9c2 Cells.

    Salani, Barbara; Ravera, Silvia; Fabbi, Patrizia; Garibaldi, Silvano; Passalacqua, Mario; Brunelli, Claudio; Maggi, Davide; Cordera, Renzo; Ameri, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Sulfonylureas, such as glibenclamide, are antidiabetic drugs that stimulate beta-cell insulin secretion by binding to the sulfonylureas receptors (SURs) of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide may be also cardiotoxic, this effect being ascribed to interference with the protective function of cardiac KATP channels for which glibenclamide has high affinity. Prompted by recent evidence that glibenclamide impairs energy metabolism of renal cells, we investigated whether this drug also affects the metabolism of cardiac cells. The cardiomyoblast cell line H9c2 was treated for 24 h with glibenclamide or metformin, a known inhibitor of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Cell viability was evaluated by sulforodhamine B assay. ATP and AMP were measured according to the enzyme coupling method and oxygen consumption by using an amperometric electrode, while Fo-F1 ATP synthase activity assay was evaluated by chemiluminescent method. Protein expression was measured by western blot. Glibenclamide deregulated energy balance of H9c2 cardiomyoblasts in a way similar to that of metformin. It inhibited mitochondrial complexes I, II and III with ensuing impairment of oxygen consumption and ATP synthase activity, ATP depletion and increased AMPK phosphorylation. Furthermore, glibenclamide disrupted mitochondrial subcellular organization. The perturbation of mitochondrial energy balance was associated with enhanced anaerobic glycolysis, with increased activity of phosphofructo kinase, pyruvate kinase and lactic dehydrogenase. Interestingly, some additive effects of glibenclamide and metformin were observed. Glibenclamide deeply alters cell metabolism in cardiac cells by impairing mitochondrial organization and function. This may further explain the risk of cardiovascular events associated with the use of this drug, alone or in combination with metformin. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Vildagliptin compared to glimepiride on post-prandial lipemia and on insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Bonaventura, Aldo; Bianchi, Lucio; Romano, Davide; Fogari, Elena; D'Angelo, Angela; Maffioli, Pamela

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the effects of vildagliptin compared to glimepiride on glycemic control, insulin resistance and post-prandial lipemia. 167 type 2 diabetic patients, not adequately controlled by metformin, were randomized to vildagliptin 50 mg twice a day or glimepiride 2 mg three times a day for 6 months, in a double blind, randomized clinical trial. We evaluated: body mass index (BMI), glycemic control, fasting plasma insulin (FPI), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), fasting plasma proinsulin (FPPr), glucagon, lipid profile, resistin, retinol binding protein-4 (RBP-4), visfatin and vaspin. Furthermore, at the randomization and at the end of the study all patients underwent an euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp to evaluate M value and an oral fat load. Despite a similar decrease of glycated hemoglobin, there were an increase of body weight with glimepiride + metformin and a decrease with vildagliptin + metformin. Fasting plasma insulin increased with glimepiride + metformin, while it did not change with vildagliptin + metformin. Vildagliptin + metformin improved lipid profile. Regarding insulin sensitivity, vildagliptin + metformin increased M value. Resistin, RBP-4, vaspin and visfatin were decreased by vildagliptin + metformin, but in group to group comparison, only vaspin reduction resulted statistically significant. Vildagliptin + metformin reduced post-prandial lipemia and insulinemia compared to glimepiride + metformin. Vildagliptin, in addition to metformin, was more effective than glimepiride + metformin in reducing insulin resistance and post-prandial lipemia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Unravelling the relationship between degree of disorder and the dissolution behavior of milled glibenclamide

    Mah, Pei T; Laaksonen, Timo; Rades, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Milling is an attractive method to prepare amorphous formulations as it does not require the use of solvents and is suitable for thermolabile drugs. One of the key critical quality attributes of milled amorphous formulations is their dissolution behavior. However, there are limited studies...... that have investigated the relationship between degree of disorder induced by milling and dissolution behavior. The main aim of this study was to identify the analytical technique used to characterize degree of disorder that correlates best with the recrystallization behavior during dissolution of milled...... glibenclamide samples. Solid state and surface changes during dissolution of milled glibenclamide samples were monitored in order to elucidate the processes that influence the dissolution behavior of milled glibenclamide samples. Glibenclamide was ball milled for different durations and analyzed using X...

  18. Supramolecular structure of glibenclamide and β-cyclodextrins complexes.

    Lucio, David; Irache, Juan Manuel; Font, María; Martínez-Ohárriz, María Cristina

    2017-09-15

    Glibenclamide is an antidiabetic drug showing low bioavailability as consequence of its low solubility. To solve this drawback, the interaction with cyclodextrins has been proposed. The formation of GB-βCDs inclusion complexes was carried out using different methods, βCD derivatives and drug-to-cyclodextrin ratios. The structures of the corresponding complexes have been studied by molecular modelling, X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis. The dissolution behavior of inclusion complexes has been compared to that of pure GB. Dimeric inclusion complexes were obtained with different CD disposals, head-to-head for βCD and head-to-tail for HPβCD and RMβCD. Amorphous inclusion complexes were obtained by employing methods of freeze-drying or coevaporation in ammonia-water. However, crystalline structures were formed by kneading and coevaporation in ethanol/water in the case of GB-βCD complexes. The arrangement of these structures depended on the GB:βCD ratio, yielding cage type structures for 1:3 and 1:5 ratios and channel-type structures for higher GB contents. The amount of GB released and its dissolution rate was considerably increased by the use of amorphous inclusion complexes; whereas, slower GB release rates were found from crystalline inclusion complexes formed by kneading or coevaporation in ethanol/water. In addition, it was found that the porous structure strongly conditioned the GB dissolution rate from crystalline products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of superporous hydrogel particles as a superdisintegrant in fast disintegrating tablet of Glipizide

    Hitesh V Chavda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Superporous hydrogel (SPH swells very rapidly in a shorter period of time to an equilibrium size and contains highly porous structure. The literature survey reflects the preparation of SPHs and its composite, but its application as an excipient in a drug delivery system is not well focused. Aim: Efforts were made to develop fast disintegrating tablets of Glipizide using superporous hydrogel particles (SPHPs as a wicking agent, which act as a superdisintegrant to decrease disintegration time. Materials and Methods: The SPH of poly (acrylamide-co-acrylic acid was prepared by solution polymerization and characterized. Prepared tablets were evaluated for concerned parameters. Formulation optimization was carried out using 3 2 full factorial design and analysis of variance. Results: Scanning electron microscopy pictures clearly confirmed the superporous structure of hydrogel. Batch F 4 containing 4% w/w of SPH of poly (acrylamide-co-acrylic acid as a superdisintegrant showed extremely fast wicking effect and lesser disintegration time compared with other potential superdisintegrants. Drug release was good compared with conventional immediate release marketed product. Conclusion: It can be concluded that SPHPs can be used as a potential superdisintegrant in tablet formulation.

  20. Design and statistical optimization of glipizide loaded lipospheres using response surface methodology.

    Shivakumar, Hagalavadi Nanjappa; Patel, Pragnesh Bharat; Desai, Bapusaheb Gangadhar; Ashok, Purnima; Arulmozhi, Sinnathambi

    2007-09-01

    A 32 factorial design was employed to produce glipizide lipospheres by the emulsification phase separation technique using paraffin wax and stearic acid as retardants. The effect of critical formulation variables, namely levels of paraffin wax (X1) and proportion of stearic acid in the wax (X2) on geometric mean diameter (dg), percent encapsulation efficiency (% EE), release at the end of 12 h (rel12) and time taken for 50% of drug release (t50), were evaluated using the F-test. Mathematical models containing only the significant terms were generated for each response parameter using the multiple linear regression analysis (MLRA) and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Both formulation variables studied exerted a significant influence (p optimization using the desirability approach was employed to develop an optimized formulation by setting constraints on the dependent and independent variables. The experimental values of dg, % EE, rel12 and t50 values for the optimized formulation were found to be 57.54 +/- 1.38 mum, 86.28 +/- 1.32%, 77.23 +/- 2.78% and 5.60 +/- 0.32 h, respectively, which were in close agreement with those predicted by the mathematical models. The drug release from lipospheres followed first-order kinetics and was characterized by the Higuchi diffusion model. The optimized liposphere formulation developed was found to produce sustained anti-diabetic activity following oral administration in rats.

  1. Assessment of in vivo and in vitro genotoxicity of glibenclamide in eukaryotic cells.

    Juliane Rocha de Sant'Anna

    Full Text Available Glibenclamide is an oral hypoglycemic drug commonly prescribed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, whose anti-tumor activity has been recently described in several human cancer cells. The mutagenic potential of such an antidiabetic drug and its recombinogenic activity in eukaryotic cells were evaluated, the latter for the first time. The mutagenic potential of glibenclamide in therapeutically plasma (0.6 μM and higher concentrations (10 μM, 100 μM, 240 μM and 480 μM was assessed by the in vitro mammalian cell micronucleus test in human lymphocytes. Since the loss of heterozygosity arising from allelic recombination is an important biologically significant consequence of oxidative damage, the glibenclamide recombinogenic activity at 1 μM, 10 μM and 100 μM concentrations was evaluated by the in vivo homozygotization assay. Glibenclamide failed to alter the frequency of micronuclei between 0.6 μM and 480 μM concentrations and the cytokinesis block proliferation index between 0.6 μM and 240 μM concentrations. On the other hand, glibenclamide changed the cell-proliferation kinetics when used at 480 μM. In the homozygotization assay, the homozygotization indices for the analyzed markers were lower than 2.0 and demonstrated the lack of recombinogenic activity of glibenclamide. Data in the current study demonstrate that glibenclamide, in current experimental conditions, is devoid of significant genotoxic effects. This fact encourages further investigations on the use of this antidiabetic agent as a chemotherapeutic drug.

  2. Anthelminthic activity of glibenclamide on secondary cystic echinococcosis in mice.

    Julia A Loos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE is a worldwide parasitic zoonosis caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. Current chemotherapy against this disease is based on the administration of benzimidazoles (BZMs. However, BZM treatment has a low cure rate and causes several side effects. Therefore, new treatment options are needed. The antidiabetic drug glibenclamide (Glb is a second-generation sulfonylurea receptor inhibitor that has been shown to be active against protozoan parasites. Hence, we assessed the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological effects of Glb against the larval stage of E. granulosus. The in vitro activity was concentration dependent on both protoscoleces and metacestodes. Moreover, Glb combined with the minimum effective concentration of albendazole sulfoxide (ABZSO was demonstrated to have a greater effect on metacestodes in comparison with each drug alone. Likewise, there was a reduction in the cyst weight after oral administration of Glb to infected mice (5 mg/kg of body weight administered daily for a period of 8 weeks. However, in contrast to in vitro assays, no differences in effectiveness were found between Glb + albendazole (ABZ combined treatment and Glb monotherapy. Our results also revealed mitochondrial membrane depolarization and an increase in intracellular Ca2+ levels in Glb-treated protoscoleces. In addition, the intracystic drug accumulation and our bioinformatic analysis using the available E. granulosus genome suggest the presence of genes encoding sulfonylurea transporters in the parasite. Our data clearly demonstrated an anti-echinococcal effect of Glb on E. granulosus larval stage. Further studies are needed in order to thoroughly investigate the mechanism involved in the therapeutic response of the parasite to this sulfonylurea.

  3. Appropriate timing of glimepiride administration in patients with type 2 diabetes millitus: a study in Mediterranean countries.

    Gomis, R; Raptis, S A; Ravella, R

    2000-08-01

    Sulfonylureas are used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus when diet and exercise fail. Glimepiride, a new sulfonylurea, can be administered in one daily dose, thanks to its pharmacokinetic properties. We attempted to establish the optimal time of day for the administration of Glimepiride in a group of patients from the Mediterranean area by clinical trial. No relationship was found between the time of administration and fasting blood glucose values, or HbA1c, or the frequency or severity of hypoglycemic episodes.

  4. Amino acids as co-amorphous excipients for simvastatin and glibenclamide

    Laitinen, Riikka; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger

    2014-01-01

    to a few drugs and amino acids. To facilitate the rational selection of amino acids, the practical importance of the amino acid coming from the biological target site of the drug (and associated intermolecular interactions) needs to be established. In the present study, the formation of co......-amorphous systems using cryomilling and combinations of two poorly water-soluble drugs (simvastatin and glibenclamide) with the amino acids aspartic acid, lysine, serine, and threonine was investigated. Solid-state characterization with X-ray powder diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier...... in the mixtures. Interestingly, a favorable effect by the excipients on the tautomerism of amorphous glibenclamide in the co-amorphous blends was seen, as the formation of the thermodynamically less stable imidic acid tautomer of glibenclamide was suppressed compared to that of the pure amorphous drug...

  5. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of diclofenac in the presence and absence of glibenclamide in the rat.

    León-Reyes, María R; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Ortiz, Mario I

    2008-01-01

    There are evidences that glibenclamide, a sulfonylurea antidiabetic agent, reduces the analgesic action of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids and neuromodulators in animal models. The purpose of this work was to examine in the rat if such interaction involves pharmacokinetic mechanisms or is solely limited to the pharmacodynamic level. All studies were carried out in female Wistar rats. Analgesia was assessed using the formalin test. Fifty microliters of diluted formalin was injected subcutaneously into the dorsal surface of the right hind paw. Nociceptive behavior was quantified as the number of flinches of the injected paw during 60 min after injection and a reduction in formalin-induced flinching was interpreted as an analgesic response. Rats were treated with oral diclofenac (3-18 mg/kg) in presence and the absence of oral glibenclamide (1-30 mg/kg). To evaluate the possibility of a pharmacokinetic interaction, the oral bioavailability of diclofenac (18 mg/kg) was studied in presence and the absence of glibenclamide (10 mg/kg). Oral administration of diclofenac produced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in the formalin test. Coadministration of glibenclamide significantly reduced diclofenac-induced antinociception. Notwithstanding, the interaction does no appear to involve pharmacokinetic mechanisms, as oral glibenclamide failed to produce any significant alteration in oral diclofenac bioavailability. Concomitant systemic administration of glibenclamide and diclofenac results in a reduction of the analgesic effect of the NSAID in the formalin test in the rat. This interaction, however, appears due solely to a pharmacodynamic mechanisms as diclofenac pharmacokinetics are not altered.

  6. Quantification of glibenclamide in cleaning samples of pharmaceutical equipment through high performance liquid chromatography

    Baeza Fonte, Alen Nils; Diaz Aguila, Elsa Eneida; Martinez Alfonso; Nancy

    2012-01-01

    to submit a selective analytical method for quantization of glibenclamide in cleaning samples of pharmaceutical equipment using high performance liquid chromatography. The mobile phase consisted of an equal mixing of acetonitrile/phosphate buffer KH 2 PO 4 ; with 0.037 mol/L concentration pH 5.25 and flow of 1.5 mL/min, in a Nucleosil 100 C8 column. Glibenclamide was injected with progesterone as internal standard and using an UV detector= 230 nm

  7. Improved oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble glimepiride by utilizing microemulsion technique

    Li HY

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Haiying Li,1 Tingting Pan,1 Ying Cui,1 Xiaxia Li,1 Jiefang Gao,1 Wenzhi Yang,1 Shigang Shen2 1Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Quality Control of Hebei Province, College of Pharmacy, 2Key Laboratory of Analytical Science and Technology of Hebei Province, College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Hebei University, Baoding, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The objective of this work was to prepare an oil/water glimepiride (GM microemulsion (ME for oral administration to improve its solubility and enhance its bioavailability. Based on a solubility study, pseudoternary phase diagrams, and Box–Behnken design, the oil/water GMME formulation was optimized and prepared. GMME was characterized by dynamic laser light scattering, zeta potential, transmission electron microscopy, and viscosity. The in vitro drug release, storage stability, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of GMME were investigated. The optimized GMME was composed of Capryol 90 (oil, ­Cremophor RH40 (surfactant, and Transcutol (cosurfactant, and increased GM solubility up to 544.6±4.91 µg/mL. The GMME was spherical in shape. The particle size and its polydispersity index were 38.9±17.46 nm and 0.266±0.057, respectively. Meanwhile, the GMME was physicochemically stable at 4°C for at least 3 months. The short-term efficacy in diabetic mice provided the proof that blood glucose had a consistent and significant reduction at a dose of 375 µg/kg whether via IP injection or IG administration of GMME. Compared with the glimepiride suspensions or glimepiride-meglumine complex solution, the pharmacokinetics of GMME in Wistar rats via IG administration exhibited higher plasma drug concentration, larger area under the curve, and more enhanced oral bioavailability. There was a good correlation of GMME between the in vitro release values and the in vivo oral absorption. ME could be an effective oral drug delivery system to improve bioavailability of GM. Keywords: glimepiride

  8. Evaluation of fixed dose combination of glimepiride and metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes. Results of Russian observational study

    Natalya Vladislavovna Zaytseva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the efficacy and safety of combined glimepiride and metformin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Materials and methods. A multi-centre, open-label, prospective, observational study was conducted. A total of 1200 patients with T2DM inadequately controlled with metformin, glimepiride or combination of metformin + glimepiride were enrolled. Change in serum glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, and postprandial blood glucose (PPG levels; weight; waist circumference and hypoglycemic episodes were evaluated. Results. Baseline HbA1c levels (8.24% ? 0.42% were significantly reduced after 12 weeks of treatment (7.48% ? 0.48% and at the end of the study. (6.88% ? 0.56%. Target HbA1c levels (?7% were achieved in 65.1% of patients at the final visit at 24 weeks. FPG and PPG levels decreased by 1.45 ? 1.14 mmol/l and 2.17 ? 1.27 mmol/l respectively (p < 0.001. No severe hypoglycemic events were reported. Body mass index reduced by 0.85 ? 1.28 kg/m2 (p < 0.001. Conclusion. . Combined glimepiride and metformin therapy significantly improved long-term glycemic control in patients with T2DM during the period of 24 weeks. without additional risk of hypoglycemic events or weight gain.

  9. Vildagliptin reduces plasma stromal cell-derived factor-1α in patients with type 2 diabetes compared with glimepiride.

    Park, Kyeong Seon; Kwak, SooHeon; Cho, Young Min; Park, Kyong Soo; Jang, Hak C; Kim, Seong Yeon; Jung, Hye Seung

    2017-03-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors might have pleiotropic protective effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD), in contrast to sulfonylureas. Therefore, we compared various CVD risk factors between vildagliptin and glimepiride. We carried out a randomized, prospective and crossover trial. A total of 16 patients with type 2 diabetes whose glycated hemoglobin was >7% were randomized to add vildagliptin or glimepiride. After 12-week treatment, each drug was replaced with the other for another 12 weeks. Before and after each treatment, glucose homeostasis and CVD risk factors were assessed, and the continuous glucose monitoring system was applied to calculate glycemic variability. The mean age of the participants was 60 years, 31% were men, body mass index 25.5 kg/m 2 and HbA1c 8.41%. Both vildagliptin and glimepiride significantly decreased glycated hemoglobin and glycemic variability indices. Despite the improved glucose homeostasis, favorable change of CVD markers was not prominent in both the arms, along with significant weight gain. Only plasma stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α decreased by 30% in the vildagliptin arm. According to regression analyses, the reduction of SDF-1α was independently associated with vildagliptin usage and serum interleukin-6 changes, but white blood cells were not related with the SDF-1α changes. Compared with glimepiride, vildagliptin arrestingly decreased plasma SDF-1α, and its clinical implications should be further investigated. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Evaluation of fixed dose combination of glimepiride and metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes. Results of Russian observational study

    Natalya Vladislavovna Zaytseva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim.To investigate the efficacy and safety of combined glimepiride and metformin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.Materials and methods.A multi-centre, open-label, prospective, observational study was conducted. A total of 1200 patients with T2DM inadequately controlled with metformin, glimepiride or combination of metformin + glimepiride were enrolled. Change in serum glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, and postprandial blood glucose (PPG levels; weight; waist circumference and hypoglycemic episodes were evaluated.Results.Baseline HbA1c levels (8.24% ± 0.42% were significantly reduced after 12 weeks of treatment (7.48% ± 0.48% and at the end of the study(6.88% ± 0.56%. Target HbA1c levels (≤7% were achieved in 65.1% of patients at the final visit at 24 weeks. FPG and PPG levels decreased by 1.45 ± 1.14 mmol/l and 2.17 ± 1.27 mmol/l respectively (p < 0.001. No severe hypoglycemic events were reported. Body mass index reduced by 0.85 ± 1.28 kg/m2 (p < 0.001.Conclusion. Combined glimepiride and metformin therapy significantly improved long-term glycemic control in patients with T2DM during the period of 24 weeks without additional risk of hypoglycemic events or weight gain.

  11. Design and baseline characteristics of the CARdiovascular Outcome Trial of LINAgliptin Versus Glimepiride in Type 2 Diabetes (CAROLINA (R))

    Marx, Nikolaus; Rosenstock, Julio; Kahn, Steven E.; Zinman, Bernard; Kastelein, John J.; Lachin, John M.; Espeland, Mark A.; Bluhmki, Erich; Mattheus, Michaela; Ryckaert, Bart; Patel, Sanjay; Johansen, Odd Erik; Woerle, Hans-Juergen

    2015-01-01

    CARdiovascular Outcome Trial of LINAgliptin Versus Glimepiride in Type 2 Diabetes (NCT01243424) is an ongoing, randomized trial in subjects with early type 2 diabetes and increased cardiovascular risk or established complications that will determine the long-term cardiovascular impact of linagliptin

  12. A review of pioglitazone HCL and glimepiride in the treatment of type 2 diabetes

    Mozhgan Dorkhan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Mozhgan Dorkhan, Anders FridDepartment of Clinical Sciences, Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, SwedenAbstract: Type 2 diabetes (T2D is a progressive disorder with a consistent and steady increase in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c over time associated with enhanced risk of micro- and macrovascular complications and a substantial reduction in life expectancy. There are three major pathophysiologic abnormalities associated with T2D: impaired insulin secretion, excessive hepatic glucose output, and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissue. These defects have been treated in clinical praxis by use of oral insulin secretagogues (sulfonylureas/glinides or insulin, biguanides, and thiazolidinediones (TZDs respectively. Pioglitazone HCL is an insulin sensitizer in the TZD family and glimepiride is an insulin secretagogue in the SU family. This article reviews mechanisms of action and clinical data behind the use of these two commonly used oral hypoglycemic agents with documented efficacy and good safety profile of once-daily administration, alone or in combination with insulin or metformin, in the management of T2D in terms of glycemic and non-glycemic effects, tolerability and side effects, and impact on vascular health.Keywords: pioglitazone, glimepiride, type 2 diabetes, thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas

  13. Effect of glibenclamide on insulin release at moderate and high blood glucose levels in normal man

    Ligtenberg, JJM; Venker, CE; Sluiter, WJ; VanHaeften, TW

    Insulin release occurs in two phases; sulphonylurea derivatives may have different potencies in stimulating first-and second-phase insulin release. We studied the effect of glibenclamide on insulin secretion at submaximally and maximally stimulating blood glucose levels with a primed hyperglycaemic

  14. Systemic Administration of Glibenclamide Fails to Achieve Therapeutic Levels in the Brain and Cerebrospinal Fluid of Rodents.

    Carolina Lahmann

    Full Text Available Activating mutations in the Kir6.2 (KCNJ11 subunit of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel cause neonatal diabetes (ND. Patients with severe mutations also suffer from neurological complications. Glibenclamide blocks the open KATP channels and is the treatment of choice for ND. However, although glibenclamide successfully restores normoglycaemia, it has a far more limited effect on the neurological problems. To assess the extent to which glibenclamide crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB in vivo, we quantified glibenclamide concentrations in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, and brain tissue of rats, control mice, and mice expressing a human neonatal diabetes mutation (Kir6.2-V59M selectively in neurones (nV59M mice. As only small sample volumes can be obtained from rodents, we developed a highly sensitive method of analysis, using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry acquisition with pseudo-selected reaction monitoring, achieving a quantification limit of 10ng/ml (20nM glibenclamide in a 30μl sample. Glibenclamide was not detectable in the CSF or brain of rats after implantation with subcutaneous glibenclamide pellets, despite high plasma concentrations. Further, one hour after a suprapharmacological glibenclamide dose was administered directly into the lateral ventricle of the brain, the plasma concentration was twice that of the CSF. This suggests the drug is rapidly exported from the CSF. Elacridar, an inhibitor of P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein (major multidrug resistance transporters at the BBB, did not affect glibenclamide levels in CSF and brain tissue. We also identified a reduced sensitivity to volatile anaesthetics in nV59M mice and showed this was not reversed by systemic delivery of glibenclamide. Our results therefore suggest that little glibenclamide reaches the central nervous system when given systemically, that glibenclamide is rapidly removed across the BBB when given intracranioventricularly

  15. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of glibenclamide in poorly controlled South African type 2 diabetic subjects

    Rambiritch V

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Virendra Rambiritch,1 Poobalan Naidoo,2 Breminand Maharaj,1 Goonaseelan Pillai3 1University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 2Department of Internal Medicine, RK Khan Regional Hospital, Chatsworth, South Africa; 3Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the pharmacokinetics (PK of glibenclamide in poorly controlled South African type 2 diabetic subjects using noncompartmental and model-based methods. Methods: A total of 24 subjects with type 2 diabetes were administered increasing doses (0 mg/d, 2.5 mg/d, 5 mg/d, 10 mg/d, and 20 mg/d of glibenclamide daily at 2-week intervals. Plasma glibenclamide, glucose, and insulin determinations were performed. Blood sampling times were 0 minute, 30 minutes, 60 minutes, 90 minutes, and 120 minutes (post breakfast sampling and 240 minutes, 270 minutes, 300 minutes, 330 minutes, 360 minutes, and 420 minutes (post lunch sampling on days 14, 28, 42, 56, and 70 for doses of 0 mg, 2.5 mg, 5.0 mg, 10 mg, and 20 mg, respectively. Blood sampling was performed after the steady state was reached.  A total of 24 individuals in the data set contributed to a total of 841 observation records. The PK was analyzed using noncompartmental analysis methods, which were implemented in WinNonLin®, and population PK analysis using NONMEM®. Glibenclamide concentration data were log transformed prior to fitting. Results: A two-compartmental disposition model was selected after evaluating one-, two-, and three-compartmental models to describe the time course of glibenclamide plasma concentration data. The one-compartment model adequately described the data; however, the two-compartment model provided a better fit. The three-compartment model failed to achieve successful convergence. A more complex model, to account for enterohepatic recirculation that was observed in the data, was unsuccessful. Conclusion: In South African diabetic subjects, glibenclamide demonstrates linear PK and was best

  16. Comparative evaluation of safety and efficacy of glimepiride and sitagliptin in combination with metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: Indian multicentric randomized trial - START Study

    T V Devarajan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Modern sulfonylureas like glimepiride offer effective glycemic control with extrapancreatic benefits and good tolerability. The objective of the present study was to evaluate and compare safety and efficacy of glimepiride and sitagliptin in combination with metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Methods: In this open-label, randomized, comparative, multicenter study, a total of 305 T2DM patients who were either drug naïve or uncontrolled on metformin were randomized to glimepiride 1 or 2 mg/sustained-release metformin 1000 mg once daily (glimepiride group, n = 202 or sitagliptin 50 mg/metformin 500 mg twice daily (sitagliptin group, n = 103 for 12 weeks. Primary endpoint was change in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c. Secondary endpoints were change in fasting plasma glucose (FPG, postprandial plasma glucose (PPG, body mass index (BMI and to assess overall safety profile. Results: At 12 weeks, there was a statistically significant difference in the mean HbA1c reduction in glimepiride group (0.42% as compared to sitagliptin group (0.30% (P = 0.001. Mean reduction in FPG and PPG was also statistically significant in the glimepiride group as compared to the sitagliptin group (P = 0.008. There was no significant difference in terms of change in BMI (0.07 ± 0.39 kg/m2 vs. 0.08 ± 0.31 kg/m2 in glimepiride and sitagliptin groups, respectively, (P = 0.644 between both the groups. The incidences of hypoglycemic events were also comparable among both the groups. Conclusion: In T2DM patients, glimepiride/metformin combination exhibited significant reduction in glycemic parameters as compared to sitagliptin/metformin combination. Moreover, there was no significant difference between both the groups in terms of change in BMI and incidence of hypoglycemia.

  17. The efficacy and safety of adding either vildagliptin or glimepiride to ongoing metformin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Kim, Gyuri; Oh, Sewon; Jin, Sang-Man; Hur, Kyu Yeon; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Lee, Moon-Kyu

    2017-08-01

    To compare the effects of either vildagliptin or glimepiride on glycemic variability, oxidative stress, and endothelial parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) inadequately controlled with metformin alone. In this randomized, open-label, parallel study, 34 patients with T2DM being treated with metformin having an HbA1c of 7.0-10.0% were allocated into either the vildagliptin or glimepiride group. A mixed-meal tolerance test and 72-hour continuous glucose monitoring were conducted, and urinary 8-iso-prostaglandinF 2α (PGF 2α ) and endothelial-dependent flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) were evaluated at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment. Similar significant improvements in HbA1c level were shown in both vildagliptin (-0.8%) and glimepiride (-0.9%) groups after treatment (Psvildagliptin (P = 0.044 and P = 0.031, respectively) but not by glimepiride. Glimepiride was significantly associated with a higher incidence of hypoglycemia than vildagliptin (P = 0.005). There were no significant differences in urinary 8-iso-PGF 2α or FMD between the two groups. Vildagliptin effectively improved glucose level with a significantly greater reduction in glycemic variability and hypoglycemia than glimepiride in patients with T2DM ongoing metformin therapy. The two drugs showed no significant differences in urinary 8-iso-PGF 2α and FMD. NCT01404676.

  18. The study to understand the genetics of the acute response to metformin and glipizide in humans (SUGAR-MGH: design of a pharmacogenetic resource for type 2 diabetes.

    Geoffrey A Walford

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies have uncovered a large number of genetic variants associated with type 2 diabetes or related phenotypes. In many cases the causal gene or polymorphism has not been identified, and its impact on response to anti-hyperglycemic medications is unknown. The Study to Understand the Genetics of the Acute Response to Metformin and Glipizide in Humans (SUGAR-MGH, NCT01762046 is a novel resource of genetic and biochemical data following glipizide and metformin administration. We describe recruitment, enrollment, and phenotyping procedures and preliminary results for the first 668 of our planned 1,000 participants enriched for individuals at risk of requiring anti-diabetic therapy in the future.All individuals are challenged with 5 mg glipizide × 1; twice daily 500 mg metformin × 2 days; and 75-g oral glucose tolerance test following metformin. Genetic variants associated with glycemic traits and blood glucose, insulin, and other hormones at baseline and following each intervention are measured.Approximately 50% of the cohort is female and 30% belong to an ethnic minority group. Following glipizide administration, peak insulin occurred at 60 minutes and trough glucose at 120 minutes. Thirty percent of participants experienced non-severe symptomatic hypoglycemia and required rescue with oral glucose. Following metformin administration, fasting glucose and insulin were reduced. Common genetic variants were associated with fasting glucose levels.SUGAR-MGH represents a viable pharmacogenetic resource which, when completed, will serve to characterize genetic influences on pharmacological perturbations, and help establish the functional relevance of newly discovered genetic loci to therapy of type 2 diabetes.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01762046.

  19. Metformin, but not glimepiride, improves carotid artery diameter and blood flow in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Helena Atroch Machado

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of glimepiride and metformin on vascular reactivity, hemostatic factors and glucose and lipid profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: A prospective study was performed in 16 uncontrolled patients with diabetes previously treated with dietary intervention. The participants were randomized into metformin or glimepiride therapy groups. After four months, the patients were crossed over with no washout period to the alternative treatment for an additional four-month period on similar dosage schedules. The following variables were assessed before and after four months of each treatment: 1 fasting glycemia, insulin, catecholamines, lipid profiles and HbA1 levels; 2 t-PA and PAI-1 (antigen and activity, platelet aggregation and fibrinogen and plasminogen levels; and 3 the flow indices of the carotid and brachial arteries. In addition, at the end of each period, a 12-hour metabolic profile was obtained after fasting and every 2 hours thereafter. RESULTS: Both therapies resulted in similar decreases in fasting glucose, triglyceride and norepinephrine levels, and they increased the fibrinolytic factor plasminogen but decreased t-PA activity. Metformin caused lower insulin and pro-insulin levels and higher glucagon levels and increased systolic carotid diameter and blood flow. Neither metformin nor glimepiride affected endothelial-dependent or endothelial-independent vasodilation of the brachial artery. CONCLUSIONS: Glimepiride and metformin were effective in improving glucose and lipid profiles and norepinephrine levels. Metformin afforded more protection against macrovascular diabetes complications, increased systolic carotid artery diameter and total and systolic blood flow, and decreased insulin levels. As both therapies increased plasminogen levels but reduced t-PA activity, a coagulation process was likely still ongoing.

  20. Glimepiride versus pioglitazone combination therapy in subjects with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on metformin monotherapy: results of a randomized clinical trial.

    Umpierrez, Guillermo; Issa, Maher; Vlajnic, Aleksandra

    2006-04-01

    To compare the effect of add-on glimepiride or pioglitazone in subjects with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on metformin monotherapy. Multicenter, randomized, parallel-group, open-label, forcedtitration study involving 203 adults with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (A1C 7.5-10%) on metformin monotherapy. Subjects were randomized to receive glimepiride or pioglitazone, titrated to the maximum dose for 26 weeks. Subjects were evaluated for A1C changes, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), insulin, C-peptide, and lipid levels. Safety outcomes and diabetes-related healthcare resource utilization were also evaluated. Both treatment groups achieved similar and significant mean decreases from baseline to endpoint (week 26) in A1C (p = 0.0001) and FPG (p use of fasting C-peptide concentration > or = 0.27 nmol/L in the inclusion criteria was a potential limitation as it may have included those patients with an improved probability for glimepiride or pioglitazone response. In addition, a larger patient population would have provided a greater degree of data applicability. In patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on metformin monotherapy, add-on glimepiride or pioglitazone results in similar overall improvements in glycemic control. Compared with pioglitazone, glimepiride is associated with faster glycemic control, lower total and LDL cholesterol levels and reduced short-term healthcare costs.

  1. A review of pioglitazone HCL and glimepiride in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    Dorkhan, Mozhgan; Frid, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a progressive disorder with a consistent and steady increase in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) over time associated with enhanced risk of micro- and macrovascular complications and a substantial reduction in life expectancy. There are three major pathophysiologic abnormalities associated with T2D: impaired insulin secretion, excessive hepatic glucose output, and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissue. These defects have been treated in clinical praxis by use of oral insulin secretagogues (sulfonylureas/ glinides) or insulin, biguanides, and thiazolidinediones (TZDs) respectively. Pioglitazone HCL is an insulin sensitizer in the TZD family and glimepiride is an insulin secretagogue in the SU family. This article reviews mechanisms of action and clinical data behind the use of these two commonly used oral hypoglycemic agents with documented efficacy and good safety profile of once-daily administration, alone or in combination with insulin or metformin, in the management of T2D in terms of glycemic and non-glycemic effects, tolerability and side effects, and impact on vascular health.

  2. Determination of glibenclamide, metformin hydrochloride and rosiglitazone maleate by reversed phase liquid chromatographic technique in tablet dosage form

    Havele Shweta S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, precise and accurate high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method was developed for the simultaneous estimation of metformin hydrochloride, rosiglitazone maleate, glibenclamide present in multicomponent dosage forms. Chromatography was performed on a 25 cm × 4.6 mm i.d., 5-μm particle, C18 column with 78:22 (v/v methanol: 20 mM potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer as mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min and UV detection at 238 nm for metformin hydrochloride, rosiglitazone maleate, and glibenclamide. The total elution time was shorter than 9 min. This method was found to be precise and reproducible. This proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of metformin hydrochloride, rosiglitazone maleate, glibenclamide as a bulk drug and in pharmaceutical formulation without any interference from the excipients.

  3. Pharmacokinetic interactions between glimepiride and rosuvastatin in healthy Korean subjects: does the SLCO1B1 or CYP2C9 genetic polymorphism affect these drug interactions?

    Kim CO

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Choon Ok Kim,1 Eun Sil Oh,2 Hohyun Kim,3 Min Soo Park1,4 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Medicine and Regulatory Sciences, College of Medicine and Pharmacy, Yonsei University, Incheon, 3Korea Medicine Research Institute, Inc., Seongnam, 4Department of Pediatrics, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Abstract: To improve cardiovascular outcomes, dyslipidemia in patients with diabetes needs to be treated. Thus, these patients are likely to take glimepiride and rosuvastatin concomitantly. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the pharmacokinetic (PK interactions between these two drugs in healthy males and to explore the effect of SLCO1B1 and CYP2C9 polymorphisms on their interactions in two randomized, open-label crossover studies. Glimepiride was studied in part 1 and rosuvastatin in part 2. Twenty-four participants were randomly assigned to each part. All subjects (n=24 completed part 1, and 22 subjects completed part 2. A total of 38 subjects among the participants of the PK interaction studies were enrolled in the genotype study to analyze their SLCO1B1 and CYP2C9 polymorphisms retrospectively (n=22 in part 1, n=16 in part 2. Comparison of the PK and safety of each drug alone with those of the drugs in combination showed that both glimepiride and rosuvastatin did not interact with each other and had tolerable safety profiles in all subjects. However, with regard to glimepiride PK, the SLCO1B1 521TC group had a significantly higher maximum plasma concentration (Cmax,ss and area under the plasma concentration–time curve during the dose interval at steady state (AUCt,ss for glimepiride in combination with rosuvastatin than those for glimepiride alone. However, other significant effects of the SLCO1B1 or CYP2C9 polymorphism on the interaction between the two drugs were not observed. In conclusion, there were no significant PK

  4. In situ controlled crystallization as a tool to improve the dissolution of Glibenclamide.

    Elkordy, Amal Ali; Jatto, Ayobami; Essa, Ebtessam

    2012-05-30

    For pharmaceutical purpose, micro-sized drugs are needed for many delivery systems, such as pulmonary and oral drug delivery systems. Many strategies have been employed to reduce the particle size of poorly water soluble drugs. Microcrystals could be produced by controlled association of drug in order to obtain naturally grown particles. The aim of this work was to increase the aqueous solubility and dissolution of Glibenclamide. The in situ controlled crystallization process was conducted in the presence of the non-ionic surfactants, Cremophor RH40 and Solutol HS-15 (0.75 and 1.5%, w/v), as protective stabilizing agents against agglomeration. In addition, these surfactants inhibit P-glycoprotein that reduces intestinal absorption of Glibenclamide by efflux transportation. Crystal shape was changed and particle size was reduced by about 15-folds, compared to control untreated drug. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) results indicated no interaction between the drug and the stabilizer. Microcrystals showed marked increase in the drug dissolution, Solutol HS-15 at 1.5% (w/v) concentration showing the highest dissolution efficiency. It could be concluded that in situ controlled crystallization using surfactants are promising method to improve dissolution of Glibeclamide as a model poorly water soluble drug. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibition of isolated human myometrium contractility by minoxidil and reversal by glibenclamide.

    Prabhakaran, S S; Dhanasekar, K R; Thomas, E; Jose, R; Peedicayil, J; Samuel, P

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated the ability of the antihypertensive drug minoxidil to inhibit potassium chloride (KCl)-induced contractility of the isolated human myometrium. Twelve strips of myometrium obtained from 12 patients who underwent hysterectomy were triggered to contract with 55 mM KCl before and after incubation with 3 concentrations (1, 3 and 10 microM) of minoxidil. The percent inhibition by minoxidil on the extent of contraction, and the area under the contractile curve of KCl-induced contraction of the myometrial strips was determined. Furthermore, the effect of 10 microM glibenclamide on the inhibition generated by 3 microM minoxidil on KCl-induced contractility was studied. It was found that minoxidil produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of KCl-induced contractility of the myometrium and that glibenclamide reversed this inhibitory effect. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of minoxidil on isolated human myometrium contractility may prove useful in clinical conditions requiring relaxation of the myometrium. 2010 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  6. A validated high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of glibenclamide in human plasma and its application to pharmacokinetic studies.

    Niopas, Ioannis; Daftsios, Athanasios C

    2002-05-15

    Glibenclamide is a potent second generation oral sulfonylurea antidiabetic agent widely used for the treatment of type II diabetes melitus. A rapid, sensitive, precise, accurate and specific HPLC assay for the determination of glibenclamide in human plasma was developed and validated. After addition of flufenamic acid as internal standard, the analytes were isolated from human plasma by liquid-liquid extraction. The method was linear in the 10-400 ng/ml concentration range (r > 0.999). Recovery for glibenclamide was greater than 91.5% and for internal standard was 93.5%. Within-day and between-day precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD%), ranged from 1.4 to 5.9% and 5.8 to 6.6%, respectively. Assay accuracy was better than 93.4%. The assay was used to estimate the pharmacokinetics of glibenclamide after oral administration of a 5 mg tablet of glibenclamide to 18 healthy volunteers.

  7. Clinical pharmacokinetic study for the effect of glimepiride matrix tablets developed by quality by design concept.

    Ahmed, Tarek A; Suhail, Mohammad A A; Hosny, Khaled M; Abd-Allah, Fathy I

    2018-01-01

    Implementation of a new pharmaceutical technique to improve aqueous solubility and thus dissolution, enhancement of drug permeation, and finally formulation of a controlled release tablet loaded with glimepiride (GLMP). Improve GLMP bioavailability and pharmacokinetics in type II diabetic patients. Different polymers were used to enhance aqueous GLMP solubility of which a saturated polymeric drug solution was prepared and physically adsorbed onto silica. An experimental design was employed to optimize the formulation parameters affecting the preparation of GLMP matrix tablets. A compatibility study was conducted to study components interactions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was performed before and after the tablets were placed in the dissolution medium. An in vivo study in human volunteers was performed with the optimized GLMP tablets, which were compared to pure and marketed drug products. Enhancement of GLMP aqueous solubility, using the polymeric drug solution technique, by more than 6-7 times when compared with the binary system. All the studied formulation factors significantly affected the studied variables. No significant interaction was detected among components. SEM illustrated the surface and inner tablet structure, and confirmed the drug release which was attributed to diffusion mechanism. The volunteer group administered the optimized GLMP tablet exhibited higher drug plasma concentration (147.4 ng/mL), longer time to reach maximum plasma concentration (4 h) and longer t 1/2 (7.236 h) compared to other groups. Matrix tablet loaded with a physically modified drug form could represent a key solution for drugs with inconsistent dissolution and absorption profiles.

  8. Improvement of dissolution and hypoglycemic efficacy of glimepiride by different carriers.

    Mohamed, Elham A; Meshali, Mahasen M; Foda, Abdel Monem M; Borg, Thanaa M

    2012-09-01

    Effects of tromethamine (Tris), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-K25), and low molecular weight chitosan (LM-CH) on dissolution and therapeutic efficacy of glimepiride (Gmp) were investigated using physical mixtures (PMs), coground mixtures, coprecipitates (Coppts) or kneaded mixtures (KMs), and compared with drug alone. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning colorimetry, and X-ray diffractometry were performed to identify any physicochemical interaction with Gmp. Surface morphology was examined via scanning electron microscopy. The results of Gmp in vitro dissolution revealed that it was greatly enhanced by Coppt with Tris or PVP-K25 and KM with LM-CH at a drug to carrier ratio of 1:8. Gmp amorphization by PVP-K25 and LM-CH was a major factor in increasing Gmp dissolution. Being basic, Tris might increase the pH of the microdiffusion layer around Gmp particles improving its dissolution. Formation of water-soluble complexes suggested by solubility study may also explain the enhanced dissolution. Capsules were prepared from Coppts and KM 1:8 drug to carrier binary systems and also with Tris PMs. In vivo, the hypoglycemic efficacy of Gmp capsules in rabbits increased by 1.63-, 1.50-, and 1.46-fold for 1:8 Coppts with Tris or PVP-K25 and KM with LM-CH respectively, compared with Gmp alone. Surprisingly, the response to Tris PM 1:20 capsules was 1.52-fold revealing statistically insignificant difference to that of Tris Coppt 1:8 (1.63 fold). As a conclusion, dissolution enhancement and hypoglycemic potentiation by 1:20 PM of Gmp/Tris, being simple and easy to prepare, may enable development of a reduced-dose and fast-release oral dosage form of Gmp.

  9. Application of the combinative particle size reduction technology H 42 to produce fast dissolving glibenclamide tablets.

    Salazar, Jaime; Müller, Rainer H; Möschwitzer, Jan P

    2013-07-16

    Standard particle size reduction techniques such as high pressure homogenization or wet bead milling are frequently used in the production of nanosuspensions. The need for micronized starting material and long process times are their evident disadvantages. Combinative particle size reduction technologies have been developed to overcome the drawbacks of the standard techniques. The H 42 combinative technology consists of a drug pre-treatment by means of spray-drying followed by standard high pressure homogenization. In the present paper, spray-drying process parameters influencing the diminution effectiveness, such as drug and surfactant concentration, were systematically analyzed. Subsequently, the untreated and pre-treated drug powders were homogenized for 20 cycles at 1500 bar. For untreated, micronized glibenclamide, the particle size analysis revealed a mean particle size of 772 nm and volume-based size distribution values of 2.686 μm (d50%) and 14.423 μm (d90%). The use of pre-treated material (10:1 glibenclamide/docusate sodium salt ratio spray-dried as ethanolic solution) resulted in a mean particle size of 236 nm and volume-based size distribution values of 0.131 μm (d50%) and 0.285 μm (d90%). These results were markedly improved compared to the standard process. The nanosuspensions were further transferred into tablet formulations. Wet granulation, freeze-drying and spray-drying were investigated as downstream methods to produce dry intermediates. Regarding the dissolution rate, the rank order of the downstream processes was as follows: Spray-drying>freeze-drying>wet granulation. The best drug release (90% within 10 min) was obtained for tablets produced with spray-dried nanosuspension containing 2% mannitol as matrix former. In comparison, the tablets processed with micronized glibenclamide showed a drug release of only 26% after 10 min. The H 42 combinative technology could be successfully applied in the production of small drug nanocrystals. A

  10. High affinity [3H]glibenclamide binding sites in rat neuronal and cardiac tissue: Localization and developmental characteristics

    Miller, J.A.; Velayo, N.L.; Dage, R.C.; Rampe, D.

    1991-01-01

    We examined the binding of the antidiabetic sulfonylurea [3H] glibenclamide to rat brain and heart membranes. High affinity binding was observed in adult rat forebrain (Kd = 137.3 pM, maximal binding site density = 91.8 fmol/mg of protein) and ventricle (Kd = 77.1 pM, maximal binding site density = 65.1 fmol/mg of protein). Binding site density increased approximately 250% in forebrain membranes during postnatal development but was constant in ventricular membranes. Quantitative autoradiography was used to examine the regional distribution of [3H] glibenclamide binding sites in sections from rat brain, spinal cord and heart. The greatest density of binding in adult brain was found in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus, whereas the other areas displayed heterogenous binding. In agreement with the membrane binding studies, 1-day-old rat brain had significantly fewer [3H]glibenclamide binding sites than adult brain. Additionally, the pattern of distribution of these sites was qualitatively different from that of the adult. In adult rat spinal cord, moderate binding densities were observed in spinal cord gray and displayed a rostral to caudal gradient. In adult rat heart, moderate binding densities were observed and the sites were distributed homogeneously. In conclusion, significant development of [3H]glibenclamide binding sites was seen in the brain but not the heart during postnatal maturation. Furthermore, a heterogeneous distribution of binding sites was observed in both the brain and spinal cord of adult rats

  11. Comparative effects of mature coconut water (Cocos nucifera and glibenclamide on some biochemical parameters in alloxan induced diabetic rats

    P. P. Preetha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, comparative effects of mature coconut water (Cocos nucifera L., Arecaceae and glibenclamide in alloxan induced diabetic rats were evaluated. Diabetes mellitus was induced in Sprague-Dawly rats using alloxan monohydrate (150 mg kg-1 body weight. Treatment with lyophilized form of mature coconut water and glibenclamide in diabetic rats reduced the blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin along with improvement in plasma insulin level. Elevated levels of liver function enzymes markers like alkaline phosphatase, serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase and serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase in diabetic rats were significantly reduced on treatment with mature coconut water. In addition to this, diabetic rats showed altered levels of blood urea, serum creatinine, albumin, albumin/globulin ratio which were significantly improved by treatment with mature coconut water and glibenclamide. Activities of nitric oxide synthase in liver and plasma L-arginine were reduced significantly in alloxan induced diabetic rats while treatment with mature coconut water reversed these changes. The overall results show that mature coconut water has significant beneficial effects in diabetic rats and its effects were comparable to that of glibenclamide, a well known antidiabetic drug.

  12. Liquigroud technique: a new concept for enhancing dissolution rate of glibenclamide by combination of liquisolid and co-grinding technologies.

    Azharshekoufeh, Leila; Shokri, Javad; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Javadzadeh, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The potential of combining liquisolid and co-grinding technologies (liquiground technique) was investigated to improve the dissolution rate of a water-insoluble agent (glibenclamide) with formulation-dependent bioavailability. Methods: To this end, different formulations of liquisolid tablets with a wide variety of non-volatile solvents contained varied ratios of drug: solvent and dissimilar carriers were prepared, and then their release profiles were evaluated. Furthermore, the effect of size reduction by ball milling on the dissolution behavior of glibenclamide from liquisolid tablets was investigated. Any interaction between the drug and the excipient or crystallinity changes during formulation procedure was also examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results: The present study revealed that classic liquisolid technique did not significantly affect the drug dissolution profile as compared to the conventional tablets. Size reduction obtained by co-grinding of liquid medication was more effective than the implementation of liquisolid technique in enhancing the dissolution rate of glibenclamide. The XRD and DSC data displayed no formation of complex or any crystallinity changes in both formulations. Conclusion: An enhanced dissolution rate of glibenclamide is achievable through the combination of liquisolid and co-grinding technologies.

  13. Antioxidant Protective Effect of Glibenclamide and Metformin in Combination with Honey in Pancreas of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Omotayo Owomofoyon Erejuwa

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia exerts toxic effects on the pancreatic β-cells. This study investigated the hypothesis that the common antidiabetic drugs glibenclamide and metformin, in combination with tualang honey, offer additional protection for the pancreas of streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats against oxidative stress and damage. Diabetes was induced in male Sprague Dawley rats by a single dose of STZ (60 mg/kg; ip. Diabetic rats had significantly elevated levels of lipid peroxidation (TBARS, up-regulated activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx while catalase (CAT activity was significantly reduced. Glibenclamide and metformin produced no significant effects on TBARS and antioxidant enzymes except GPx in diabetic rats. In contrast, the combination of glibenclamide, metformin and honey significantly up-regulated CAT activity and down-regulated GPx activity while TBARS levels were significantly reduced. These findings suggest that tualang honey potentiates the effect of glibenclamide and metformin to protect diabetic rat pancreas against oxidative stress and damage.

  14. Differential effects of vildagliptin and glimepiride on glucose fluctuations in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus assessed using continuous glucose monitoring.

    He, Y L; Foteinos, G; Neelakantham, S; Mattapalli, D; Kulmatycki, K; Forst, T; Taylor, A

    2013-12-01

    To assess whether there is a difference in the effects of vildagliptin and glimepiride on glucose fluctuation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). This was an open-label, randomized cross-over study conducted in T2DM patients. A total of 24 patients (age: 58.3 ± 5.56 years, baseline HbA1c: 7.6 ± 0.50%) who were on stable metformin monotherapy (500-3000 mg) were enrolled, and all completed the study. Each patient received two 5-day treatments (vildagliptin 50 mg b.i.d. or glimepiride 2 mg q.d.) in a cross-over manner. Various biomarkers and blood glucose concentrations were measured following breakfast. The 24-h glucose profiles were also measured using the CGM device at baseline and after 5 days of treatment, and fluctuations in glucose levels were estimated from CGM data. Both vildagliptin and glimepiride reduced postprandial glucose levels, based on both CGM data (15% vs. 16%) and measured plasma glucose (13% vs.17%). Vildagliptin showed lower glucose fluctuations than glimepiride as measured by mean amplitude of glycaemic excursions (MAGE, p = 0.1076), standard deviation (s.d., p = 0.1346) of blood glucose rate of change, but did not reach statistical significance attributed to the small sample size. MAGE was reduced by ∼20% with vildagliptin versus glimepiride. Vildagliptin led to statistically significant lowering of the rate of change in the median curve (RCMC) and interquartile range (IQR) of glucose. Treatment with vildagliptin significantly increased the levels of active glucagon-like peptide-1 by 2.36-fold (p ≤ 0.0001) and suppressed glucagon by 8% (p = 0.01), whereas glimepiride significantly increased the levels of insulin and C-peptide by 21% (p = 0.012) and 12% (p = 0.003), respectively. Vildagliptin treatment was associated with less fluctuation of glucose levels than glimepiride treatment as assessed by 24-h CGM device, suggesting vildagliptin may

  15. Serum uric acid concentration in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus during diet or glibenclamide therapy

    Mahmood, I.H.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate serum uric acid concentration in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This is a case control study conducted in Al-Wafa Diabetic Center in Mosul over a period of one year starting from January 1, 2005 to January 1, 2006. Serum glucose concentration and uric acid concentration were measured in both control and patient's groups (group 1 patients on diet therapy, group 2 patients on glibenclamide therapy and group 3 involve naturopathic patients). Serum glucose concentration was high in the diabetic groups as compared with the control group (P 0.2) except in group-3 (P<0.05). A negative correlation was reported between hyperglycemia and uric acid concentration of the different groups. Serum uric acid concentration is slightly reduced in type 2 diabetic patients particularly in the complicated patients with peripheral neuropathy and this may be due to the oxidative stress that decreases the antioxidant capacity of the body involving uric acid. (author)

  16. Comparison of the Efficacy of Glimepiride, Metformin, and Rosiglitazone Monotherapy in Korean Drug-Naïve Type 2 Diabetic Patients: The Practical Evidence of Antidiabetic Monotherapy Study

    Kun Ho Yoon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAlthough many anti-diabetic drugs have been used to control hyperglycemia for decades, the efficacy of commonly-used oral glucose-lowering agents in Korean type 2 diabetic patients has yet to be clearly demonstrated.MethodsWe evaluated the efficacy of glimepiride, metformin, and rosiglitazone as initial treatment for drug-naïve type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in a 48-week, double-blind, randomized controlled study that included 349 Korean patients. Our primary goal was to determine the change in HbA1c levels from baseline to end point. Our secondary goal was to evaluate changes in fasting plasma glucose (FPG levels, body weight, frequency of adverse events, and the proportion of participants achieving target HbA1c levels.ResultsHbA1c levels decreased from 7.8% to 6.9% in the glimepiride group (P<0.001, from 7.9% to 7.0% in the metformin group (P<0.001, and from 7.8% to 7.0% (P<0.001 in the rosiglitazone group. Glimepiride and rosiglitazone significantly increased body weight and metformin reduced body weight during the study period. Symptomatic hypoglycemia was more frequent in the glimepiride group and diarrhea was more frequent in the metformin group.ConclusionThe efficacy of glimepiride, metformin, and rosiglitazone as antidiabetic monotherapies in drug-naïve Korean type 2 diabetic patients was similar in the three groups, with no statistical difference. This study is the first randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of commonly-used oral hypoglycemic agents in Korean type 2 diabetic patients. An additional subgroup analysis is recommended to obtain more detailed information.

  17. Comparison between the therapeutic effect of metformin, glimepiride and their combination as an add-on treatment to insulin glargine in uncontrolled patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Cheol-Young Park

    Full Text Available To compare the commonly prescribed oral anti-diabetic drug (OAD combinations to use as an add-on therapy with insulin glargine in patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes despite submaximal doses of OADs.People with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes (n = 99 were randomly assigned on a 1∶1∶1 basis to receive insulin glargin, with fixed doses of glimepiride, metformin, and glimepiride plus metformin. Outcomes assessed included HbA1c, the changes in fasting glucose levels, body weight, serum lipids values, insulin dose and symptomatic hypoglycemia.After 24 weeks, HbA1C levels improved from (mean ± SD 8.5±0.9% to 7.7±0.8% (69.0±10.0 mmol/mol to 60.8±8.6 mmol/mol with insulin glargine plus metformin, from 8.4±1.0% to 7.7±1.3% (68.8±10.6 mmol/mol to 61.1±14.4 mmol/mol with insulin glargine plus glimepiride and from 8.7±0.9% to 7.3±0.6% (71.7±9.8 mmol/mol to 56.2±6.7 mmol/mol with insulin glargine plus glimepirde plus metformin. The decrease in HbA1c was more pronounced with insulin glargine plus glimepiride plus metformin than with insulin glargine plus metformin (0.49% [CI, 0.16% to 0.82%]; P = 0.005 (5.10 mmol/mol [CI, 1.64 to 8.61]; P = 0.005 and insulin glargine plus glimepiride (0.59% [CI, 0.13% to 1.05%]; P = 0.012 (5.87 mmol/mol [CI, 1.10 to 10.64]; P = 0.012 (overall P = 0.02. Weight gain and the risk of hypoglycemia of any type did not significantly differ among the treatment groups.The combination therapy of metformin and glimepiride plus glargine insulin resulted in a significant improvement in overall glycemic control as compared with the other combinations.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00708578. The approval number of Kangbuk Samsung hospital's institutional review board (IRB: C0825.

  18. Optimization of glibenclamide tablet composition through the combined use of differential scanning calorimetry and D-optimal mixture experimental design.

    Mura, P; Furlanetto, S; Cirri, M; Maestrelli, F; Marras, A M; Pinzauti, S

    2005-02-07

    A systematic analysis of the influence of different proportions of excipients on the stability of a solid dosage form was carried out. In particular, a d-optimal mixture experimental design was applied for the evaluation of glibenclamide compatibility in tablet formulations, consisting of four classic excipients (natrosol as binding agent, stearic acid as lubricant, sorbitol as diluent and cross-linked polyvinylpyrrolidone as disintegrant). The goal was to find the mixture component proportions which correspond to the optimal drug melting parameters, i.e. its maximum stability, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to quickly obtain information about possible interactions among the formulation components. The absolute value of the difference between the melting peak temperature of pure drug endotherm and that in each analysed mixture and the absolute value of the difference between the enthalpy of the pure glibenclamide melting peak and that of its melting peak in the different analyzed mixtures, were chosen as indexes of the drug-excipient interaction degree.

  19. Transdermal glimepiride delivery system based on optimized ethosomal nano-vesicles: Preparation, characterization, in vitro, ex vivo and clinical evaluation.

    Ahmed, Tarek A; El-Say, Khalid M; Aljaeid, Bader M; Fahmy, Usama A; Abd-Allah, Fathy I

    2016-03-16

    This work aimed to develop an optimized ethosomal formulation of glimepiride then loading into transdermal films to offer lower drug side effect, extended release behavior and avoid first pass effect. Four formulation factors were optimized for their effects on vesicle size (Y1), entrapment efficiency (Y2) and vesicle flexibility (Y3). Optimum desirability was identified and, an optimized formulation was prepared, characterized and loaded into transdermal films. Ex-vivo permeation study for the prepared films was conducted and, the permeation parameters and drug permeation mechanism were identified. Penetration through rat skin was studied using confocal laser microscope. In-vivo study was performed following transdermal application on human volunteers. The percent of alcohol was significantly affecting all the studied responses while the other factors and their interaction effects were varied on their effects on each response. The optimized ethosomal formulation showed observed values for Y1, Y2 and Y3 of 61 nm, 97.12% and 54.03, respectively. Ex-vivo permeation of films loaded with optimized ethosomal formulation was superior to that of the corresponding pure drug transdermal films and this finding was also confirmed after confocal laser microscope study. Permeation of glimepiride from the prepared films was in favor of Higushi-diffusion model and exhibited non-Fickian or anomalous release mechanism. In-vivo study revealed extended drug release behavior and lower maximum drug plasma level from transdermal films loaded with drug ethosomal formulation. So, the ethosomal formulation could be considered a suitable drug delivery system especially when loaded into transdermal vehicle with possible reduction in side effects and controlling the drug release. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Duration Effect of Acacia Nilotica Leaves Extract and Glibenclamide as Hypolipidaemic and Hypoglycaemic Activity in Alloxan Induced Diabetic Rats

    Asad, M.; Shah, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the duration and effects of aqueous methanol Acacia-nilotica leaves extract and glibenclamide as hypoglycaemic and hypolipidaemic activity in diabetic rats. Methods: The experimental study was conducted at Shifa International Hospital in collaboration with National Institute of Health, Islamabad, from September 2010 to August 2011.Male Sprague Dawley albino rats were taken and divided into 8 equal groups. Groups I and II were the normal and diabetic control rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced in group II to VIII by administering 110 mg/kg body weight alloxan and at day 4, fasting blood glucose level of >200 mg/dl confirmed diabetes. Acacia-nilotica leaves extract was given to group III, IV and V and glibenclamide to group VI to VIII for a period of 1-3 weeks. Blood samples were analysed for lipid profile using enzymatic calorimetric method and serum insulin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on days 0, 7, 14, and 21. Results: There were 64 rats in the study, with 8(12.5 percent) in each group. Statistically significant decreases in fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride, phospholipids, low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein and an increase in high density lipoprotein and serum insulin levels were observed in diabetic rats compared to diabetic controls after 2 weeks of treatment with plant extract and glibenclamide (p<0.05 each).When plant extract and drug treated diabetic rats were compared, a significant difference in the levels of blood glucose, insulin, total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were noted after 2 and 3 weeks of treatment. Conclusion: Acacia-nilotica leaves extract resulted in hypoglycaemic and hypolipidaemic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats similar to glibenclamide. (author)

  1. Comparison of neonatal outcomes in women with gestational diabetes with moderate hyperglycaemia on metformin or glibenclamide--a randomised controlled trial.

    George, Anne; Mathews, Jiji E; Sam, Dibu; Beck, Manisha; Benjamin, Santosh J; Abraham, Anuja; Antonisamy, Balevendra; Jana, Atanu K; Thomas, Nihal

    2015-02-01

    Two oral hypoglycaemic agents, metformin and glibenclamide, have been compared with insulin in separate large randomised controlled trials and have been found to be as effective as insulin in gestational diabetes. However, very few trials have compared metformin with glibenclamide. Of 159 South Indian women with fasting glucose ≥5.5 mmol/l and ≤7.2 mmol/l and/or 2-h post-prandial value ≥6.7 mmol/l and ≤13.9 mmol/l after medical nutritional therapy consented to be randomised to receive either glibenclamide or metformin. 80 women received glibenclamide and 79 received metformin. Neonatal outcomes were assessed by neonatologists who were unaware that the mother was part of a study and were recorded by assessors blinded to the medication the mother was given. The primary outcome was a composite of neonatal outcomes namely macrosomia, hypoglycaemia, need for phototherapy, respiratory distress, stillbirth or neonatal death and birth trauma. Secondary outcomes were birthweight, maternal glycaemic control, pregnancy induced hypertension, preterm birth, need for induction of labour, mode of delivery and complications of delivery. Baseline characteristics were similar but for the higher fasting triglyceride levels in women on metformin. The primary outcome was seen in 35% of the glibenclamide group and 18.9% of the metformin group [95% CI 16.1 (2.5, 29.7); P = 0.02]. The difference in outcome related to a higher rate of neonatal hypoglycaemia in the glibenclamide group (12.5%) versus none in the metformin group [95% CI 12.5(5.3, 19.7); P = 0.001]. Secondary outcomes in both groups were similar. In a south Indian population with gestational diabetes, metformin was associated with better neonatal outcomes than glibenclamide. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  2. Changes in the pharmacokinetics of glibenclamide in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus

    Yuqing Li

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of glibenclamide (Gli administrated orally and intravenously to normal and diabetic rats. The AUC(0–720 min of orally administered Gli in diabetic rats (321.24 mg min/L was greater than that (57.752 mg min/L in normal rats. CL (0.019 L/min/kg was significantly slower than that (0.092 L/min/kg of normal rats. The AUC(0–480min of intravenous Gli in diabetic rats (1528.280 mg min/L also was significantly greater than that (509.523 mg min/L in normal rats, and CL was decreased approximately 3-fold. No significant difference in intestinal absorption of Gli was observed between normal and diabetic rats as determined by in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion. The clearance of Diclofenac (a substrate of CYP2C9 was determined to evaluate changes in hepatic drug-metabolizing enzyme activity in rats. The CL in diabetic rats was significantly lower (42.43% decrease than that in normal rats. Hepatic protein expression of CYP2C9 was measured using Western blot analysis; compared with normal rats, the hepatic protein expression of CYP2A9 was decreased in diabetic rats. Therefore, the slower clearance of Gli in diabetic rats can be attributed primarily to the lower expression of hepatic CYP2C9.

  3. Preparation and pharmaceutical evaluation of glibenclamide slow release mucoadhesive buccal film

    Bahri-Najafi, R.; Tavakoli, N.; Senemar, M.; Peikanpour, M.

    2014-01-01

    Buccal mucoadhesive systems among novel drug delivery systems have attracted great attention in recent years due to their ability to adhere and remain on the oral mucosa and to release their drug content gradually. Buccal mucoadhesive films can improve the drug therapeutic effect by enhancement of drug absorption through oral mucosa increasing the drug bioavailability via reducing the hepatic first pass effect. The aim of the current study was to formulate the drug as buccal bioadhesive film, which releases the drug at sufficient concentration with a sustain manner reducing the frequency of the dosage form administration. One of the advantagees of this formulation is better patient compliances due to the ease of administration with no water to swallow the product. The mucoadhesive films of glibenclamide were prepared using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) K4M, K15M and Eudragit RL100 polymers and propylene glycol as plasticizer and co-solvent. Films were prepared using solvent casting method, and were evaluated with regard to drug content, thickness, weight variations, swelling index, tensile strength, ex vivo adhesion force and percentage of in vitro drug release. Films with high concentrations of HPMC K4M and K15M did not have favorable appearance and uniformity. The formulations prepared from Eudragit were transparent, uniform, flexible, and without bubble. The highest and the lowest percentages of swelling were observed for the films containing HPMC K15M and Eudragit RL100, respectively. Films made of HPMC K15M had adhesion force higher than those containing Eudragit RL100. Formulations with Eudragit RL100 showed the highest mean dissolution time (MDT). Drug release kinetics of all formulations followed Higuchi's model and the mechanism of diffusion was considered non-Fickian type. It was concluded that formulations containing Eudragit RL100 were more favorable than others with regard to uniformity, flexibility, rate and percentage of drug release. PMID

  4. Preparation of glibenclamide nanocrystals by a simple laboratory scale ultra cryo-milling

    Martena, Valentina; Censi, Roberta [University of Camerino, School of Pharmacy (Italy); Hoti, Ela; Malaj, Ledjan [University of Tirana, Department of Pharmacy (Albania); Martino, Piera Di, E-mail: piera.dimartino@unicam.it [University of Camerino, School of Pharmacy (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the ability to reduce the particle size of glibenclamide (GBC) to the nanometric scale through a very simple and well-known laboratory scale method, the laboratory scale ultra cryo-milling. The effect of milling on GBC crystalline properties and dissolution behaviour was deliberately evaluated in the absence of any surfactants as stabilizers. The milling procedure consisted in adding particles to liquid nitrogen and milling them by hand in a mortar with a pestle for different time intervals (15, 30, 40 min). For comparison, the same milling procedure was also applied without liquid nitrogen. The particle size reduction was evaluated for the coarsest samples (>3 {mu}m) by measuring the particle Ferret's diameter through scanning electron microscopy, while for the smallest one (<3 {mu}m) by dynamic light scattering. A time grinding of 40 min in the presence of liquid nitrogen was revealed highly efficacious to obtain particles of nanodimensions, with a geometric mean particle size of 0.55 {+-} 0.23 {mu}m and more than the 80 % of particles lower than 1,000 nm. Interestingly, non-agglomerated particles were obtained. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffractometry allowed to assess that under mechanical treatment no polymorphic transitions were observed, while a decrease in crystallinity degree occurred depending on the milling procedure (presence or absence of liquid nitrogen) and the milling time (crystallinity decreases at increasing milling time from 15 to 40 min). A comparison of the intrinsic dissolution rate and the dissolution from particles revealed an interesting improvement of particle dissolution particularly for particles milled in the presence of liquid nitrogen due to an increase in particle surface area and concentration gradient, according to the Noyes-Whitney equation.

  5. Enhanced oral bioavailability and sustained delivery of glimepiride via niosomal encapsulation: in-vitro characterization and in-vivo evaluation.

    Mohsen, Amira Mohamed; AbouSamra, Mona Mahmoud; ElShebiney, Shaimaa Ahmed

    2017-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potency of niosomes, for glimepiride (GLM) encapsulation, aiming at enhancing its oral bioavailability and hypoglycemic efficacy. Niosomes containing nonionic surfactants (NIS) were prepared by thin film hydration technique and characterized. In-vitro release study was performed using a dialysis technique. In-vivo pharmacodynamic studies, as well as pharmacokinetic evaluation were performed on alloxan-induced diabetic rats. GLM niosomes exhibited high-entrapment efficiency percentages (E.E. %) up to 98.70% and a particle size diameter ranging from 186.8 ± 18.69 to 797.7 ± 12.45 nm, with negatively charged zeta potential (ZP). Different GLM niosomal formulation showed retarded in vitro release, compared to free drug. In-vivo studies revealed the superiority of GLM niosomes in lowering blood glucose level (BGL) and in maintaining a therapeutic level of GLM for a longer period of time, as compared to free drug and market product. There was no significant difference between mean plasma AUC 0-48 hr of GLM-loaded niosomes and that of market product. GLM-loaded niosomes exhibited seven-fold enhancement in relative bioavailability in comparison with free drug. These findings reinforce the potential use of niosomes for enhancing the oral bioavailability and prolonged delivery of GLM via oral administration.

  6. The Impact of Amorphisation and Spheronization Techniques on the Improved in Vitro & in Vivo Performance of Glimepiride Tablets

    Rana Refaat Makar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Triple solid dispersion adsorbates (TSDads and spherical agglomerates (SA present new techniques that extensively enhance dissolution of poorly soluble drugs. The aim of the present study is to hasten the onset of hypoglycemic effect of glimepiride through enhancing its rate of release from tablet formulation prepared from either technique. Methods: Drug release from TSDads or SA tablets with different added excipients was explored. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and effect of compression on dissolution were illustrated. Pharmacodynamic evaluation was performed on optimized tablets. Results: TSDads & SA tablets with Cross Povidone showed least disintegration times of 1.48 and 0.5 min. respectively. Kinetics of drug release recorded least half-lives (54.13 and 59.83min for both techniques respectively. Cross section in tablets displayed an organized interconnected matrix under SEM, accounting for the rapid access of dissolution media to the tablet core. Components of tablets filled into capsules showed a similar release profile to that of tablets after compression as indicated by similarity factor. The onset time of maximum reduction in blood glucose in male albino rabbits was hastened to 2h instead of 3h for commercial tablets. Conclusion: After optimization of tablet excipients that interacted differently with respect to their effect on drug release, we could conclude that both amorphisation and spheronization were equally successful in promoting in vitro dissolution enhancement as well as providing a more rapid onset time for drug action in vivo.

  7. Metformin Ameliorates Dysfunctional Traits of Glibenclamide- and Glucose-Induced Insulin Secretion by Suppression of Imposed Overactivity of the Islet Nitric Oxide Synthase-NO System.

    Ingmar Lundquist

    Full Text Available Metformin lowers diabetic blood glucose primarily by reducing hepatic gluconeogenesis and increasing peripheral glucose uptake. However, possible effects by metformin on beta-cell function are incompletely understood. We speculated that metformin might positively influence insulin secretion through impacting the beta-cell nitric oxide synthase (NOS-NO system, a negative modulator of glucose-stimulated insulin release. In short-time incubations with isolated murine islets either glibenclamide or high glucose augmented insulin release associated with increased NO production from both neural and inducible NOS. Metformin addition suppressed the augmented NO generation coinciding with amplified insulin release. Islet culturing with glibenclamide or high glucose revealed pronounced fluorescence of inducible NOS in the beta-cells being abolished by metformin co-culturing. These findings were reflected in medium nitrite-nitrate levels. A glucose challenge following islet culturing with glibenclamide or high glucose revealed markedly impaired insulin response. Metformin co-culturing restored this response. Culturing murine islets and human islets from controls and type 2 diabetics with high glucose or high glucose + glibenclamide induced a pronounced decrease of cell viability being remarkably restored by metformin co-culturing. We show here, that imposed overactivity of the beta-cell NOS-NO system by glibenclamide or high glucose leads to insulin secretory dysfunction and reduced cell viability and also, importantly, that these effects are relieved by metformin inhibiting beta-cell NO overproduction from both neural and inducible NOS thus ameliorating a concealed negative influence by NO induced by sulfonylurea treatment and/or high glucose levels. This double-edged effect of glibenclamide on the beta-cellsuggests sulfonylurea monotherapy in type 2 diabetes being avoided.

  8. Effects of the hypoglycaemic drugs repaglinide and glibenclamide on ATP-sensitive potassium-channels and cytosolic calcium levels in beta TC3 cells and rat pancreatic beta cells

    Gromada, J; Dissing, S; Kofod, Hans

    1995-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the action of the hypoglycaemic drugs repaglinide and glibenclamide in cultured newborn rat islet cells and mouse beta TC3 cells. In cell-attached membrane patches of newborn rat islet cells repaglinide (10 nmol/l) and glibenclamide (20 nmol/l) decrease the open pro...

  9. Simultaneous determination of atorvastatin, metformin and glimepiride in human plasma by LC–MS/MS and its application to a human pharmacokinetic study

    Srinivasa Rao Polagani

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple, rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC–MS/MS assay method has been developed and fully validated for the simultaneous quantification of atorvastatin, metformin and glimepiride in human plasma. Carbamazepine was used as internal standard (IS. The analytes were extracted from 200 μL aliquots of human plasma via protein precipitation using acetonitrile. The reconstituted samples were chromatographed on a Alltima HP C18 column by using a 60:40 (v/v mixture of acetonitrile and 10 mM ammonium acetate (pH 3.0 as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.1 mL/min. The calibration curves obtained were linear (r2≥0.99 over the concentration range of 0.50–150.03 ng/mL for atorvastatin, 12.14–1207.50 ng/mL for metformin and 4.98–494.29 ng/mL for glimepiride. The API-4000 LC–MS/MS in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM mode was used for detection. The results of the intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy studies were well within the acceptable limits. All the analytes were found to be stable in a battery of stability studies. The method is precise and sensitive enough for its intended purpose. A run time of 2.5 min for each sample made it possible to analyze more than 300 plasma samples per day. The developed assay method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study in human male volunteers. Keywords: Atorvastatin, Metformin, Glimepiride, LC–MS/MS, Human plasma, Pharmacokinetics

  10. Neuro, cardio, and reno protective activities of rosuvastatin in streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetic rats undergoing treatment with metformin and glimepiride

    Shailaja Rondi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is associated with complications like neuropathy, nephropathy, cardiomyopathy, and retinopathy due to increased oxidative stress and serum lipids. In the present study, rosuvastatin, a HMG-CoA inhibitor, was investigated for its protective effect in neuropathy, nephropathy, and cardiomyopathy based on the lipid-lowering property along with its pleiotropic effects such as improved blood flow to the organ and antioxidant defense. Type 2 diabetes was induced in Wistar rats by single i.p. administration of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg. These diabetic rats were treated with daily doses of rosuvastatin (10 mg/kg alone, metformin (120 mg/kg and glimepiride (1 mg/kg and rosuvastatin in combination with metformin (120 mg/kg and glimepiride (1 mg/kg for a period of 6 weeks. The biochemical parameters involved in neuropathy, renopathy, and cardiopathy were estimated. Treatment resulted in significant (P < 0.05 decrease in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS and increase in levels of glutathione peroxidise and catalase in brain and kidney homogenates. Significant (P < 0.05 increase in high-density lipoproteins and decrease in creatinine kinase, triglycerides, total serum cholesterol represents the cardioprotective action, whereas significant (P < 0.05 increase in the latency in the hotplate model shows the neuroprotective activity, and significant (P < 0.05 decrease in blood urea nitrogen, creatinine levels and increase in serum total protein levels suggested the renoprotective actions. The unique properties of rosuvastatin such as antioxidant defense and lipid-lowering nature might have resulted in cardio, neuro, and renoprotective activity in type 2 diabetic rats treated with metformin and glimepiride.

  11. The dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor vildagliptin does not accentuate glibenclamide-induced hypoglycemia but reduces glucose-induced glucagon-like peptide 1 and gastric inhibitory polypeptide secretion

    El-Ouaghlidi, Andrea; Rehring, Erika; Holst, Jens Juul

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 by vildagliptin enhances the concentrations of the active form of the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP). The present study asked whether vildagliptin accentuates glibenclamide-induced hy...

  12. PRENATAL DIAGNOSIS OF ROBERT/SC SYNDROME IN A DIABETIC MOTHER WITH A HISTORY OF MEBENDAZOLE AND GLIBENCLAMIDE INTAKE

    M. Pourissa

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The Robert/SC (pseudothalidomide syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, associated with phocomelia and craniofacial abnormalities. An anomalous fetus with lower limb phocomelia and micromelia, lumbar myeloschisis, upper limb and ribs defects and craniofacial abnormalities is reported whose diabetic mother took mebendazole and glibenclamide in early pregnancy. Ultrasonographic findings of syndromes with phocomelia are discussed as well as Robert/SC syndrome which is the most probable diagnosis. Robert/SC phocomelia syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive condition characterized by severe pre and postnatal growth deficiency, symmetric limb reductions of variable severity and craniofacial anomalies including hypertelorism, hypoplastic nasal alae, cleft lip and palate. About half of the reported cases presented chromosomal abnormalities. We think that findings in our case are consistent with Robert/SC syndrome with additional abnormalities.

  13. Effects of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Patients on Treatment With Glibenclamide and Metformin on Carvedilol Enantiomers Metabolism.

    Nardotto, Glauco H B; Coelho, Eduardo B; Paiva, Carlos E; Lanchote, Vera L

    2017-06-01

    Carvedilol is available in clinical practice as a racemate in which (S)-(-)-carvedilol is a β- and α 1 -adrenergic antagonist and (R)-(+)-carvedilol is only an α 1 -adrenergic antagonist. Carvedilol is mainly metabolized by glucuronidation, by CYP2D6 to hydroxyphenylcarvedilol (OHC), and by CYP2C9 to O-desmethylcarvedilol (DMC). This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics of carvedilol enantiomers and their metabolites OHC and DMC in healthy volunteers (n = 13) and in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with good glycemic control (n = 13). The healthy subjects were enrolled to receive either a 25-mg oral single dose of carvedilol alone (no DDI) or carvedilol simultaneously with 5 mg glibenclamide and 500 mg metformin (DDI), whereas type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who were on long-term treatment with glibenclamide (5 mg/8 h) and metformin (500 mg/8 h) were enrolled to receive only a single oral dose of 25 mg carvedilol. The plasma concentrations of the (R)-(+)-carvedilol, (R)-(+)-DMC, and (R)-(+)-OHC were higher than those of (S)-(-)-carvedilol, (S)-(-)-DMC, and (S)-(-)-OHC in all investigated groups. The pharmacokinetics of the carvedilol enantiomers did not differ between the groups. However, the AUC values of the DMC enantiomers were lower in the type 2 diabetes mellitus patients than in the healthy volunteers (DDI and no DDI) [(R)-(+), 6.9, 10.4, 11.9 ng·h/mL; and (S)-(-), 2.4, 4.3, 4.0 ng·h/mL, respectively]. In contrast, the AUC values of the OHC enantiomers were higher in the type 2 diabetes mellitus patients [(R)-(+), 13.9, 6.6, 4.9 ng·h/mL; and (S)-(-), 7.2, 1.5, 1.5 ng·h/mL], which explains the fact that the carvedilol pharmacokinetics was unchanged. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  14. Caracterização do fármaco hipoglicemiante glibenclamida Characterization of the hypoglycemic drug glibenclamide

    Christiane Gino Colu Nery

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A glibenclamida (GLIB é um fármaco de segunda geração, administrado por via oral na forma de comprimidos, utilizado para o tratamento de Diabetes mellitus. GLIB possui baixa solubilidade aquosa, o que pode levar a uma baixa liberação a partir de formas farmacêuticas sólidas no teste de dissolução e, portanto, a variabilidades no tratamento. Neste estudo, avaliam-se as características da matéria-prima GLIB, que podem influenciar o perfil de dissolução, e conseqüentemente, a biodisponibilidade, por meio de técnicas tais como, adsorção de nitrogênio, difração de raio laser, análise térmica, espectroscopia por IV/UV e difração de raios X.Glibenclamide (GLIB or glyburide, a second-generation hypoglycemic agent is orally used in the form of tablets for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Bulk GLIB has a low aqueous solubility and it may yield low drug release in the dissolution test, causing variabilility in the treatment. This work evaluates the bulk GLIB features, which may influence drug release profile, hence, bioavailability, by means of techniques such as nitrogen sorption analysis, laser diffraction, thermal analysis, IV/UV spectroscopy and X-ray analysis.

  15. Evaluation of Trigonella foenum-graecum extract in combination with swimming exercise compared to glibenclamide consumption on type 2 Diabetic rodents

    Sajad Arshadi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/objective: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of fenugreek seed extract in combination with swimming exercise compared to glibenclamide consumption on type 2 diabetic rats. Design: The acute toxicity test was carried out to choose the safe doses and identify the toxicity effects of the fenugreek seed extract. To investigate the hypoglycemic effect of the extract and its effect in combination with swimming training, 80 Wistar Kyoto male streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were divided randomly into eight groups: diabetic control (C; fenugreek seed extract 0.8 g/kg (F1; fenugreek extract 1.6 g/kg (F2; swimming training (S; swimming training plus fenugreek extract 0.8 g/kg (SF1; swimming training plus fenugreek extract 1.6 g/kg (SF2; glibenclamide (G and swimming training plus glibenclamide (SG. The rats were orally administrated with the treatments once a day with the respective treatment, and the training groups were subjected to swimming training every day for 60 min. Fasting blood samples were collected to measure fasting blood glucose, lipid profile, adiponectin, leptin, and insulin concentrations. Results: The results obtained from acute toxicity study showed no toxicity effect of fenugreek seed extract on the tested dose. Biochemical analysis showed significant improvements in all of the groups compared to the control group (p<0.05. Plasma insulin concentration and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR was significantly reduced in treated groups compared with the diabetic control group. Plasma leptin were significantly decreased in treated groups compared with the control group; while adiponectin had markedly increased (p<0.05. Conclusion: The findings suggest that fenugreek seed consuming, alongside swimming exercise, has a strong therapeutic effect on the improvement of diabetic parameters.

  16. Effects on Subclinical Heart Failure in Type 2 Diabetic Subjects on Liraglutide Treatment vs. Glimepiride Both in Combination with Metformin: A Randomized Open Parallel-Group Study.

    Nyström, Thomas; Padro Santos, Irene; Hedberg, Fredric; Wardell, Johan; Witt, Nils; Cao, Yang; Bojö, Leif; Nilsson, Bo; Jendle, Johan

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of liraglutide treatment on heart function in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients with subclinical heart failure. Randomized open parallel-group trial. 62 T2D patients (45 male) with subclinical heart failure were randomized to either once daily liraglutide 1.8 mg, or glimepiride 4 mg, both add on to metformin 1 g twice a day. Mitral annular systolic (s') and early diastolic (e') velocities were measured at rest and during bicycle ergometer exercise, using tissue Doppler echocardiography. The primary endpoint was 18-week treatment changes in longitudinal functional reserve index (LFRI diastolic/systolic ). Clinical characteristics between groups (liraglutide = 33 vs. glimepiride = 29) were well matched. At baseline left ventricle ejection fraction (53.7 vs. 53.6%) and global longitudinal strain (-15.3 vs. -16.5%) did not differ between groups. There were no significant differences in mitral flow velocities between groups. For the primary endpoint, there was no treatment change [95% confidence interval] for: LFRI diastolic (-0.18 vs. -0.53 [-0.28, 2.59; p  = 0.19]), or LFRI systolic (-0.10 vs. -0.18 [-1.0, 1.7; p  = 0.54]); for the secondary endpoints, there was a significant treatment change in respect of body weight (-3.7 vs. -0.2 kg [-5.5, -1.4; p  = 0.001]), waist circumference (-3.1 vs. -0.8 cm [-4.2, -0.4; p  = 0.019]), and heart rate (HR) (6.3 vs. -2.3 bpm [-3.0, 14.2; p  = 0.003]), with no such treatment change in hemoglobin A1c levels (-11.0 vs. -9.2 mmol/mol [-7.0, 2.6; p  = 0.37]), between groups. 18-week treatment of liraglutide compared with glimepiride did not improve LFRI diastolic/systolic , but however increased HR. There was a significant treatment change in body weight reduction in favor for liraglutide treatment.

  17. Effect of Gymnema sylvestre on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of 0.5mg & 0.6mg Glibenclamide in diabetic rats

    Shravan Kumar Dholi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Traditional medicines derived from medicinal plants are used by about 60 per cent world population. Diabetes is an important human ailment officiating many from various walk of life in different countries including India. It providing to a major health problem, especially in the rural and subrural  areas.  Gymnema sylvestre R.Br. (Asclepiadaceae is a herb distributed throughout the world. The leaves of the plant are widely used for the treatment of diabetes and as diuretic in India proprietary medicine. Gymnema sylvestre an Ayurvedic herb, came to be known as “destroyer of sugar” because, in ancient times, Ayurvedia physicians observed that chewing a few  leaves of G. sylvestre suppressed the taste of sugar. It is used totally all over India for controlling blood sugar. This study was to determine effect of Gymnema sylvestre on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of Glibenclamide in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Results have indicated the negative effect of Gymnema Sylvestre on pharmacokinetics but positive effect on pharmacodynamics of Glibenclamide.

  18. Design of modified xanthan mini-matrices for monitoring oral discharge of highly soluble Soluplus{sup ®}–glibenclamide dispersion

    Bakshi, Paromita; Sadhukhan, Sayantan; Maiti, Sabyasachi, E-mail: sabya245@rediffmail.com

    2015-09-01

    In this work, Soluplus{sup ®} was used as a hydrophilic carrier for the preparation of solid dispersion (SD) of a model BCS class II drug, glibenclamide by applying hot melting process and microwave irradiation in combination. Increasing the concentration of carrier relative to drug significantly increased the drug solubility, which corresponded to a maximum 75 fold increase at a drug:carrier ratio of 1:7. Scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and x-ray diffraction analyses confirmed complete amorphization of the drug in SD. In animal study, about two fold reductions in hyperglycemic level were achieved by SD compared to pure drug. SD-loaded O-carboxymethyl xanthan mini-matrices controlled the release of drug into gastro-luminal fluid over longer duration. The drug release corroborated with pH-dependent swelling behavior of the matrices and approximated anomalous diffusion mechanism. This study proved the potential of Soluplus{sup ®}-based dispersion in improving the clinical performance of the drug, especially when embedded in modified xanthan mini-matrices. - Highlights: • Microwave-induced solid dispersion of glibenclamide was prepared using Soluplus®. • Solubility of drug corresponded to 75 fold increase at a drug:Soluplus® ratio of 1:7. • Thermal and x-ray analyses suggested amorphization of drug in solid dispersion. • About two fold reductions in hyperglycemic level were achieved by solid dispersion. • Modified xanthan gum showed potential in controlling anomalous transport of drug.

  19. An open, randomized, parallel-group study to compare the efficacy and safety profile of inhaled human insulin (Exubera) with glibenclamide as adjunctive therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes poorly controlled on metformin

    Barnett, AH; Dreyer, M; Lange, Peter

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy and safety profile of adding inhaled human insulin (INH) (Exubera) or glibenclamide to metformin monotherapy in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted an open-label, parallel, 24-week multicenter trial. Patients...... associated clinical manifestations. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with type 2 diabetes poorly controlled on metformin, adding INH or glibenclamide was similarly effective in improving glycemic control, and both were well tolerated. A predefined subgroup with very high A1C (>9.5%) was more effectively treated...

  20. Multi-objective optimization strategy based on desirability functions used for electrophoratic separation and quantification of rosiglitazone and glimepiride in plasma and formulations.

    Hefnawy, Mohamed M; Sultan, Maha A; Al-Johar, Haya I; Kassem, Mohamed G; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2012-01-01

    Multiple response simultaneous optimization employing Derringer's desirability function was used for the development of a capillary electrophoresis method for the simultaneous determination of rosiglitazone (RSG) and glimepiride (GLM) in plasma and formulations. Twenty experiments, taking the two resolutions, the analysis time, and the capillary current as the responses with three important factors--buffer morality, volte and column temperature--were used to design mathematical models. The experimental responses were fitted into a second order polynomial and the six responses were simultaneously optimized to predict the optimum conditions for the effective separation of the studied compounds. The separation was carried out by using capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with a silica capillary column and diode array detector at 210 nm. The optimum assay conditions were 52 mmol l⁻¹ phosphate buffer, pH 7, and voltage of 22 kV at 29 °C. The method showed good agreement between the experimental data and predictive value throughout the studied parameter space. The assay limit of detection was 0.02 µg ml⁻¹ and the effective working range at relative standard deviation (RSD) of ≤ 5% was 0.05-16 µg ml⁻¹ (r = 0.999) for both drugs. Analytical recoveries of the studied drugs from spiked plasma were 97.2-101.9 ± 0.31-3.0%. The precision of the assay was satisfactory; RSD was 1.07 and 1.14 for intra- and inter-assay precision, respectively. The proposed method has a great value in routine analysis of RSG and GLM for its therapeutic monitoring and pharmacokinetic studies. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Vildagliptin, but not glibenclamide, increases circulating endothelial progenitor cell number: a 12-month randomized controlled trial in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Dei Cas, Alessandra; Spigoni, Valentina; Cito, Monia; Aldigeri, Raffaella; Ridolfi, Valentina; Marchesi, Elisabetta; Marina, Michela; Derlindati, Eleonora; Aloe, Rosalia; Bonadonna, Riccardo C; Zavaroni, Ivana

    2017-02-23

    Fewer circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and increased plasma (C-term) stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α), a substrate of DPP-4, are biomarkers, and perhaps mediators, of cardiovascular risk and mortality. Short-term/acute treatment with DPP-4 inhibitors improve EPC bioavailability; however, long-term effects of DPP-4i on EPCs bioavailability/plasma (C-term) SDF-1α are unknown. Randomized (2:1) open-label trial to compare the effects of vildagliptin (V) (100 mg/day) vs glibenclamide (G) (2.5 mg bid to a maximal dose of 5 mg bid) on circulating EPC levels at 4 and 12 months of treatment in 64 patients with type 2 diabetes in metformin failure. At baseline, and after 4 and 12 months, main clinical/biohumoral parameters, inflammatory biomarkers, concomitant therapies, EPC number (CD34 + /CD133 + /KDR + /10 6 cytometric events) and plasma (C-term) SDF-1α (R&D system) were assessed. Baseline characteristics were comparable in the two groups. V and G similarly and significantly (p < 0.0001) improved glucose control. At 12 months, V significantly increased EPC number (p < 0.05) and significantly reduced (C-term) SDF-1α plasma levels (p < 0.01) compared to G, with no differences in inflammatory biomarkers. V exerts a long-term favorable effect on EPC and (C-term) SDF-1α levels at glucose equipoise, thereby implying a putative beneficial effect on vascular integrity. Trial registration Clinical Trials number: NCT01822548; name: Effect of Vildagliptin vs. Glibenclamide on Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cell Number Type 2 Diabetes. Registered 28 March, 2013.

  2. Hypoglycaemia when adding sulphonylurea to metformin

    Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Christensen, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: The risk of hypoglycaemia may differ among sulphonylureas (SUs), but evidence from head-to-head comparisons is sparse. Performing a network meta-analysis to use indirect evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs), we compared the relative risk of hypoglycaemia with newer generation SUs...... when added to metformin. METHODS: A systematic review identified RCTs lasting 12-52 weeks and evaluating SUs added to inadequate metformin monotherapy (≥1000 mg/day) in type 2 diabetes. Adding RCTs investigating the active comparators from the identified SU trials, we established a coherent network...... of hypoglycaemia was lowest with gliclazide compared to glipizide (OR 0.22, CrI: 0.05 to 0.96), glimepiride (OR 0.40, CrI: 0.13 to 1.27), and glibenclamide (OR 0.21, CrI: 0.03 to 1.48). A major limitation is varying definitions of hypoglycaemia across studies. CONCLUSIONS: When added to metformin, gliclazide...

  3. Use of medicinal plants among Ethiopian patients with diabetes: A ...

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    Glibenclamide + metformin. 22. Glimepiride + metformin. 1. Glibenclamide. 1. Insulin. 14. Insulin plus metformin. 1. The findings revealed that a little less than half of the study participants claimed to have used or briefly tried out medicinal plants for their diabetes, with all using it on a self-care basis except for one participant ...

  4. New metastable form of glibenclamide prepared by redispersion from ternary solid dispersions containing polyvinylpyrrolidone-K30 and sodium lauryl sulfate.

    Thongnopkoon, Thanu; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit

    2016-01-01

    Modification of polymorphic forms of poorly water-soluble drugs is one way to achieve the desirable properties. In this study, glibenclamide (GBM) particles with different polymorphic forms, including a new metastable form, were obtained from redispersion of ternary solid dispersion systems. The ternary solid dispersion systems, consisting of GBM, polyvinylpyrrolidone-K30 (PVP-K30) and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), were prepared by solvent evaporation method and subsequently redispersed in deionized water. The precipitated drug particles were then collected at a given time period. The drug particles with different polymorphic forms could be achieved depending on the polymer/surfactant ratio. Amorphous drug nanoparticles could be obtained by using a high polymer/surfactant ratio, whereas two different crystalline forms were obtained from the systems containing low polymer/surfactant ratios. Interestingly, a new metastable form IV of GBM with improved dissolution behavior could be obtained from the system of GBM:PVP-K30:SLS with the weight ratio of 2:2:4. This new polymorphic form IV of GBM was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD) and solid state 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The molecular arrangement of the new polymorphic form IV of GBM was proposed. The GBM particles with polymorphic form IV also showed an improved dissolution behavior. In addition, it was found that the formation of the new polymorphic form IV of GBM by this process was reproducible.

  5. Glipizide Pharmacokinetics in Healthy and Diabetic Volunteers

    Erah

    Purpose: Disease state may contribute to alteration in drug pharmacokinetics. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) on the ... assayed using a sensitive and validated reverse phase high performance liquid ..... factors may contribute to these variations. [17].

  6. Increase in overall mortality risk in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving different oral diabetes drugs

    E A Pigarova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Реферат по статье: Pantalone KM, Kattan MW, Yu C, Wells BJ, Arrigain S, Jain A, Atreja A, Zimmerman RS. Increase in overall mortality risk in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving glipizide, glyburide or glimepiride monotherapy versus metformin: a retrospective analysis. Diabetes Obes Metab. 2012 Sep;14(9:803-809.

  7. DaonilÒ y glibenclamida 5 mg de producción nacional: liberación in vitro Daonil ® and glibenclamide 5 mg of national production: release in vitro

    Diana Pereda Rodríguez

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Dentro del proceso global de la liberación de un fármaco, la disolución es el paso más importante pues está íntimamente relacionado con los procesos de absorción, determinantes en la biodisponibilidad de un medicamento administrado por vía oral. En el presente trabajo se realizaron los perfiles de disolución de 2 lotes de DaonilÒ (Hoechst Farma SA, Barcelona, medicamento líder del principio activo glibenclamida (DCI, y de 3 lotes de glibenclamida 5 mg de producción nacional. Los datos de porcentaje de principio activo liberado contra tiempo se sometieron a un estudio de ajuste a 4 modelos comunes a perfiles de disolución mediante el programa CurveExpert y se realizó la comparación estadística de los perfiles de disolución con la utilización de un método independiente de modelo matemático (f2: factor de similitud. Los lotes estudiados no cumplen con los criterios de la Food and Drug Administration (FDA para los estudios de equivalencia in vitro y muestran diferencias significativas (p 0,05 sus perfiles de disolución.Dissolution is the most important step in the global release process of a drug, since it is closely related to the absorption processes, which are determinant in the bioavailability of a drug administered by oral route. The dissolution profiles of two batches of Daonil® (Hoechst Farma SA Barcelona, a leading drug of the glibenclamide active principle (DCI, and of 3 batches of glibenclamide 5 mg of national production were studied. The percentage data of the active principle released against time were subjected to a study of adjustment of 4 models to common dissolution profiles by the CurveExpert program, and the statistical comparison of dissolution profiles was made by using a mathematical independent model (f2: similarity factor. All the batches studied do not fulfill the criteria of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the in vitro equivalence studies and showed significant differences in their

  8. Teste de dissolução para avaliação de liberação de glibenclamida em comprimidos Glibenclamide dissolution test for drug release evaluation in tablets

    Christiane Gino Colu Nery

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A glibenclamida (GLIB ou gliburida, é um hipoglicemiante oral de segunda geração, da classe das sulfoniluréias, usado sob a forma de comprimidos para tratamento do diabetes mellitus. Variações no tratamento podem ocorrer, devido à baixa solubilidade do fármaco em comprimidos. A comparação de várias formulações de comprimidos piloto com comprimidos do medicamento referência (Daonil®, glibenclamida 5 mg comprimidos, Aventis Pharma Ltda. foi avaliada por meio do desenvolvimento de um teste de dissolução sem adição de solventes orgânicos ou tensoativos no meio, que mostrou ser discriminativo para as diferentes formulações farmacêuticas propostas. A quantificação de GLIB foi realizada por meio de cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência em fase reversa (CLAE-FR, método previamente validado. A partir de vários ensaios de perfil de dissolução testados comparativamente àquele de comprimidos do medicamento referência, verificou-se o potencial de determinada formulação proposta (f1 4,04 and f2 69,35 como candidata a medicamento genérico no mercado brasileiro.Glibenclamide (GLIB or glyburide, a second-generation hypoglycemic agent is used per oral as tablets for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Much variabilility in the treatment may occur because of the low drug aqueous solubility in tablets dosage forms. This work reports the comparison of several pilot formulation batches with the commercial reference drug dosage form (Daonil®, glibenclamide 5 mg per tablet, Aventis Pharma Ltda.. A feasible dissolution test, developed with no use of organic solvents or surfactants in the medium, showed to be discriminative regarding to different formulations tested. GLIB quantitation was performed by a previously validated reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC. Among several dissolution profiles compared with that of a commercial reference, a potential for a generic candidate was evident (f1 4.04 and f2 69

  9. Author Details

    Agaba, E I. Vol 5, No 1 (2007) - Articles Evaluation of Nutritional Status and Hydration in Patients on Chronic Hemodialysis by Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis Abstract · Vol 5, No 1 (2007) - Articles Clinical Trial Of Glimepiride Compared With Glibenclamide For Efficacy And Safety In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In Jos, Nigeria

  10. Browse Title Index

    Items 51 - 100 of 297 ... Vol 1, No 4 (2003), Clinical Risk factors for deep vein thrombosis in Maiduguri - Nigeria, Abstract. SG Ahmed, A Tahir, AW Hassan, O Kyari, UA Ibrahim. Vol 5, No 1 (2007), Clinical Trial Of Glimepiride Compared With Glibenclamide For Efficacy And Safety In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In Jos, Nigeria ...

  11. Half-Life of Sulfonylureas in HNF1A and HNF4A Human MODY Patients is not Prolonged as Suggested by the Mouse Hnf1a(-/-) Model.

    Urbanova, Jana; Andel, Michal; Potockova, Jana; Klima, Josef; Macek, Jan; Ptacek, Pavel; Mat'oska, Vaclav; Kumstyrova, Tereza; Heneberg, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Sulfonylurea derivatives are widely used for clinical treatment of human subjects with Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY) caused by mutations in HNF-1α or HNF-4α despite the mechanism leading to their hypersensitivity is incompletely understood. In Hnf1a(-/-) mice, serum concentrations and half-life of sulfonylurea derivatives are strongly increased. We thus hypothesized that reduced sulfonylurea derivatives clearance stands behind their therapeutic potential in human HNF1A/HNF4A MODY subjects. Single doses of 3 mg glipizide and 5 mg glibenclamide/glyburide were administered sequentially to seven HNF1A/HNF4A MODY subjects and six control individuals matched for their age, BMI and CYP2C9 genotype. Pharmacokinetic (plasma concentration levels, Cmax, tmax, t1/2, AUC) and pharmacodynamic parameters (glycemia, C-peptide and insulin plasma levels) were followed for 24 hours after drug administration. We provide the first evidence on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of sulfonylurea derivatives in human MODY subjects. The half-life of glipizide did not change, and reached 3.8±0.7 and 3.7±1.8 h in the MODY and control subjects, respectively. The half-life of glibenclamide was increased only in some MODY subjects (t1/2 9.5±6.7 and 5.0±1.4 h, respectively). Importantly, the intra- individual responses of MODY (but control) subjects to glipizide and glibenclamide treatment were highly correlated. With regards to pharmacodynamics, we observed a differential response of control but not MODY subjects to the doses of glipizide and glibenclamide applied. We rejected the hypothesis that all human MODY-associated mutations in HNF1A / HNF4A induce changes in the pharmacokinetics of sulfonylureas in humans analogically to the Hnf1a(-/-) mouse model.

  12. Metformin and phenformin block the peripheral antinociception induced by diclofenac and indomethacin on the formalin test.

    Ortiz, Mario I

    2012-01-02

    Recent evidence has shown that systemic administration of sulfonylureas and biguanides block the diclofenac-induced antinociception, but not the effect produced by indomethacin. However, there are no reports about the peripheral interaction between analgesics and the biguanides metformin and phenformin. Therefore, this work was undertaken to determine whether glibenclamide and glipizide and the biguanides metformin and phenformin have any effect on the peripheral antinociception induced by diclofenac and indomethacin. Diclofenac and indomethacin were administered locally in the formalin-injured rat paw, and the antinociceptive effect was evaluated using the 1% formalin test. To determine whether peripheral antinociception induced by diclofenac or indomethacin was mediated by either the ATP-sensitive K(+) channels or biguanides-induced mechanisms, the effect of pretreatment with the appropriates vehicles or glibenclamide, glipizide, metformin and phenformin on the antinociceptive effect induced by local peripheral diclofenac and indomethacin was assessed. Local peripheral injections of diclofenac (50-200 μg/paw) and indomethacin (200-800 μg/paw) produced a dose-dependent antinociception during the second phase of the test. Local pretreatment with glibenclamide, glipizide, metformin and phenformin blocked the diclofenac-induced antinociception. On the other hand, the pretreatment with glibenclamide and glipizide did not prevent the local antinociception produced by indomethacin. Nonetheless, metformin and phenformin reversed the local antinociception induced by indomethacin. Data suggest that diclofenac could activate the K(+) channels and biguanides-dependent mechanisms to produce its peripheral antinociceptive effects in the formalin test. Likewise, a biguanides-dependent mechanism could be activated by indomethacin consecutively to generate its peripheral antinociceptive effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cuantificación de glibenclamida en muestras de limpieza de equipos farmacéuticos mediante cromatografía líquida de alta resolución Quantification of glibenclamide in cleaning samples of pharmaceutical equipment through high performance liquid chromatography

    Alen Nils Baeza Fonte

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: proponer un procedimiento analítico selectivo para la cuantificación de glibenclamida en muestras de limpieza de equipos farmacéuticos mediante cromatografía líquida de alta resolución. Métodos: la fase móvil consistió en una mezcla equivalente de volúmenes de acetonitrilo y solución amortiguadora KH2PO4 de concentración 0,037 mol/L a pH 5,25 y flujo 1,5 mL/min, en una columna Nucleosil 100 C8. La glibenclamida se inyectó con progesterona como estándar interno y empleando detector UV a una l= 230 nm. Resultados: el método resultó lineal en el intervalo de concentraciones de 0,4-150 mg/mL, teniendo como límites de detección y cuantificación 10 y 40 ng/mL respectivamente y siendo específico al analito en presencia del placebo, sus productos de degradación y a otros ingredientes farmacéuticamente activos. Se consideraron potenciales de interferencias para el método propuesto: captopril, clortalidona, dexametasona, digoxina, 8-cloroteofilina, difenhidramina HCl, fenobarbital, haloperidol, hidroclorotiazida, ácido fumárico, ketotifeno, metoclopramida HCl, piridoxina HCl, piroxicam, prednisona y nifedipino. Se identificaron: ibuprofeno, indometacina, trifluoperazina HCl, tioridazina HCl e imipramina HCl, como interferentes del procedimiento en concentraciones cercanas a 10 mg/mL. Conclusiones: el método desarrollado es sensible, rápido y especialmente selectivo para la evaluación de residuales del principio activo glibenclamida en equipos de producción de tabletas, empleando un muestreo por hisopado, y pudiera utilizarse potencialmente cuando exista sospecha de contaminación cruzada de glibenclamida con otros fármacos de los aquí descritos.Objective: to submit a selective analytical method for quantization of glibenclamide in cleaning samples of pharmaceutical equipment using high performance liquid chromatography. Methods: the mobile phase consisted of an equal mixing of acetonitrile/phosphate buffer KH2PO4

  14. Genotoxic evaluation of two oral antidiabetic agents in the Drosophila wing spot test.

    Gürbüzel, Mehmet; Çapoğlu, Ilyas; Kızılet, Halit; Halıcı, Zekai; Özçiçek, Fatih; Demirtaş, Levent

    2014-05-01

    In this study, two sulfonylureas--glimepiride and glipizide--commonly used in type 2 diabetes mellitus were investigated for genotoxicity in the Drosophila wing spot test. For this purpose, three-day-old transheterozygous larvae were treated with three mutagenic compounds, and the results obtained were compared with the control group. Mutational or recombinogenic changes were recorded in two recessive genes--multiple wing hairs (mwh) and flare (flr (3)). Two recessive markers were located on the left arm of chromosome 3, mwh in map position 0.3, and flare-3 (flr3) at 38.8, while the centromere was located in position 47.7. Wing spot tests are targeted on the loss of heterozygosity, which may be grounded in different genetic mechanisms such as mutation, mitotic recombination, deletion, half-translocation, chromosome loss, or nondisjunction. Genetic changes formatting in somatic cells of the imaginal discs cause nascence different mutant cloning in different body parts of adult flies. Our in vivo experiments demonstrated that glimepiride and glipizide show the genotoxicity, which is especially dependent on homologous somatic recombination.

  15. Ruzu ® herbal bitters and glibenclamide tablets: Dissolution and in ...

    Background: The concomitant intake of poly-herbal medicines with orthodox drugs raises huge concerns about herb-drug interactions and patient safety, especially as the pharmacokinetic properties of these herbal medicines are not known. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the effect of Ruzu® herbal bitters on the ...

  16. [Fatal iatrogenically-induced hyperglycemia following accidental glibenclamide ingestion].

    Lemke, R

    1990-01-01

    A 2 9/12 years old girl had swallowed 8 to 9 tablets Euglucon N. By concatenation of unfortunatable facts the infant died of hyperglycaemia. The findings from this case should contribute to differentiate also in medical textbooks therapeutic recommendations.

  17. NEW IN THE TREATMENT OF TYPE 2 DIABETES

    V. G. Kadzharyan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a major medical and social problem almost in all countries of the world. Currently, there are more and more various pharmacological agents that make management of the glycaemia in patients with type 2 diabetes extremely difficult. Therefore, when the physician is faced with the choice of glucose-lowering therapy, he should be clearly aware of all the options in contemporary treatment. 11 groups of hypoglycemic agents are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes The biguanides. According to modern concepts, biguanides inhibit the oxidation of glucose by stimulating anaerobic glycolysis. Both in the consensus of ADA / EASD, and in the IDF recommendations metformin may be the drug of the choice for hypoglycemic therapy of diabetes type 2. Sulfonylurea derivatives: glibenclamide, glimepiride, gliquidone, Glipizide. They belong to a group of secretagogues, as their action is based on the ability to stimulate the secretion of insulin by ß-cells of the pancreas. Prandial glucose regulators. Meglitinides (repaglinide and nateglinide stimulate insulin secretion by ß-cells. Due to the rapid normalization of stimulated insulin level after taking the drugs the risk of hypoglycaemia between meals is minimized. Insulin sensitayzers. Thiazolidinediones (rosiglitazone, pioglitazone reduce insulin resistance of peripheral tissues by binding to receptors, activating peroxisome proliferation (PPARg in the nuclear membrane. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (acarbose, miglitol, voglibose competitively inhibits intestinal enzymes (α-glucosidase. It consequently slows carbohydrate absorption from foods and supply of glucose into the blood. Incretin mimetics. Analogues of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 stimulate the biosynthesis and secretion of insulin, regulate food consumption, support ß-cells in a healthy state, suppress glucagon secretion, depending on the glucose levels, affect the rate of gastric emptying, stimulat proliferation of

  18. Screening of pharmacologic adulterant classes in herbal formulations using voltammetry of microparticles.

    Doménech-Carbó, Antonio; Martini, Mariele; de Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Viana, Carine; Doménech-Carbó, María Teresa; Silva, Miguel

    2013-02-23

    A solid state electrochemical method for screening different families of adulterant chemicals illegally added to commercial phytotherapuetic formulations is described. The proposed method, based on the voltammetry of microparticles approach, permits a fast and sensitive way to distinguish between anorexics (amfepramone, fenproporex, sibutramine), benzozodiazepinic anxiolytics (clonazepam, flurazepam, alprazolam, midazolam, medazepam, chlordiazepoxide, diazepam), antidepressants (bupropione, fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine), diuretics (hydrochlorothiazide, furosemide, chlortalidone, amiloride, spironolactone), and hypoglycemics (glimepiride, chlorpropamide, glibenclamide) based on characteristic voltammetric signals recorded on solid micro- or nanosamples attached to graphite electrodes immersed into aqueous electrolytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Metformin in combination with various insulin secretagogues in type 2 diabetes and associated risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality

    Mogensen, Ulrik Madvig; Andersson, Charlotte; Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup

    2015-01-01

    with pharmacologically different ISs. METHODS: Using nationwide administrative Danish registries, we followed all individuals without prior stroke or myocardial infarction who initiated metformin and an IS from 1997 through 2009. Rate ratios (RR) of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, and a composite...... of myocardial infarction, stroke, or cardiovascular death were compared between user groups using time-dependent multivariable Poisson regression models. The most common combination, glimepiride+metformin, was used as reference. RESULTS: A total of 56,827 patients were included, 56% male, the mean age was 61...... and cardiovascular risk. Whether glipizide is associated with increased risk compared with other ISs when used in combinations with metformin warrants further study....

  20. Safety and Clinical Efficiency of Using Combined Preparation of Metformin Extended-Release and Glimepiride

    V.I. Pankiv

    2013-04-01

    Conclusions. Administration of a combined anti-diabetic therapy with Duglimax for 24 weeks results in a significant reduction in HbA1c and the achievement of the targets of carbohydrate metabolism in patients with DM type 2. On the background of normalization of carbohydrate metabolism using combination therapy helps moderate decrease in body weight and WC value, to reduce serum LDL. Good tolerability and high degree of safety of Duglimax throughout the observation period were noted.

  1. Simultaneous Quantification of Antidiabetic Agents in Human Plasma by a UPLC-QToF-MS Method.

    Mariana Millan Fachi

    Full Text Available An ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantification of chlorpropamide, glibenclamide, gliclazide, glimepiride, metformin, nateglinide, pioglitazone, rosiglitazone, and vildagliptin in human plasma was developed and validated, using isoniazid and sulfaquinoxaline as internal standards. Following plasma protein precipitation using acetonitrile with 1% formic acid, chromatographic separation was performed on a cyano column using gradient elution with water and acetonitrile, both containing 0.1% formic acid. Detection was performed in a quadrupole time-of-flight analyzer, using electrospray ionization operated in the positive mode. Data from validation studies demonstrated that the new method is highly sensitive, selective, precise (RSD 0.99, free of matrix and has no residual effects. The developed method was successfully applied to volunteers' plasma samples. Hence, this method was demonstrated to be appropriate for clinical monitoring of antidiabetic agents.

  2. Evaluation of herb-drug interaction of a polyherbal Ayurvedic formulation through high throughput cytochrome P450 enzyme inhibition assay.

    Pandit, Subrata; Kanjilal, Satyajyoti; Awasthi, Anshumali; Chaudhary, Anika; Banerjee, Dipankar; Bhatt, B N; Narwaria, Avinash; Singh, Rahul; Dutta, Kakoli; Jaggi, Manu; Singh, Anu T; Sharma, Neena; Katiyar, Chandra Kant

    2017-02-02

    Arishtas are Ayurvedic formulation made with decoction of herbs. Arjunarishta formulation is being used in Ayurveda for cardio-protective activity. Ashwagandharishta formulation possesses antioxidant, anti-atherosclerotic and anti-stress properties. Ridayarishta, a novel empirical formulation was prepared using combination of selected ingredients from these two formulations to support healthy heart functions and to reduce stress. Aim of the Study was to investigate herb-drug interaction (HDI) of Ridayarishta formulation through human hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme inhibition assay. Ridayarishta formulation was phyto-chemically standardized against arjunolic acid, arjunetin, berberine, piperine, resveratrol and withaferin-A using high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) analysis. The formulation was standardized with respect to ethanol by gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. HDI was evaluated with Ridayarishta formulation and amlodipine besilate, atenolol, atorvastatin, metformin, glipizide glimepiride cocktail using high throughput CYP450 enzyme inhibition assay; against CYP1A2, 2C19, 2D6 and 3A4 isozymes. Contents of arjunolic acid, arjunetin, berberine, piperine, resveratrol and withaferin-A in Ridayarishta formulation were found to be 1.76±0.12, 1.51±0.09, 1.85±0.05, 3.2±0.12, 1.21±0.08, and 2.16±0.09ppm, respectively. Quantity of ethanol in Ridayarishta was found to be 7.95±0.023% (V/V). Ridayarishta showed significantly higher (Pdrugs showed significantly (P<0.001and P<0.01) less or negligible HDI. Ridayarishta formulation alone and cocktail with amlodipine besilate, atenolol, atorvastatin, metformin, glipizide, glimepiride had negligible or insignificant effect on CYP450 inhibition. It may be concluded that consumption of Ridayarishta along with selective cardio protective, antihypertensive and anti-diabetic conventional medicine is safe with negligible or without any significant CYP450 (CYP1A2, 2C19, 2D6 and 3A4) inhibition mediated

  3. Quantitative Evaluation of Compliance with Recommendation for Sulfonylurea Dose Co-Administered with DPP-4 Inhibitors in Japan

    Motonobu Sakaguchi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available After the launch of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4, a new oral hypoglycemic drug (OHD, in December 2009, severe hypoglycemia cases were reported in Japan. Although the definite cause was unknown, co-administration with sulfonylureas (SU was suspected as one of the potential risk factors. The Japan Association for Diabetes Education and Care (JADEC released a recommendation in April 2010 to lower the dose of three major SUs (glimepiride, glibenclamide, and gliclazide when adding a DPP-4 inhibitor. To evaluate the effectiveness of this risk minimization action along with labeling changes, dispensing records for 114,263 patients prescribed OHDs between December 2008 and December 2010 were identified in the Nihon-Chouzai pharmacy claims database. The adherence to the recommended dosing of SU co-prescribed with DPP-4 inhibitors increased from 46.3% before to 63.8% after the JADEC recommendation (p < 0.01 by time-series analysis, while no change was found in those for SU monotherapy and SU with other OHD co-prescriptions. The adherence was significantly worse for those receiving a glibenclamide prescription. The JADEC recommendation, along with labeling changes, appeared to have a favorable effect on the risk minimization action in Japan. In these instances, a pharmacy claims database can be a useful tool to evaluate risk minimization actions.

  4. Effect of sulfonylureas administered centrally on the blood glucose level in immobilization stress model.

    Sharma, Naveen; Sim, Yun-Beom; Park, Soo-Hyun; Lim, Su-Min; Kim, Sung-Su; Jung, Jun-Sub; Hong, Jae-Seung; Suh, Hong-Won

    2015-05-01

    Sulfonylureas are widely used as an antidiabetic drug. In the present study, the effects of sulfonylurea administered supraspinally on immobilization stress-induced blood glucose level were studied in ICR mice. Mice were once enforced into immobilization stress for 30 min and returned to the cage. The blood glucose level was measured 30, 60, and 120 min after immobilization stress initiation. We found that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection with 30 µg of glyburide, glipizide, glimepiride or tolazamide attenuated the increased blood glucose level induced by immobilization stress. Immobilization stress causes an elevation of the blood corticosterone and insulin levels. Sulfonylureas pretreated i.c.v. caused a further elevation of the blood corticosterone level when mice were forced into the stress. In addition, sulfonylureas pretreated i.c.v. alone caused an elevation of the plasma insulin level. Furthermore, immobilization stress-induced insulin level was reduced by i.c.v. pretreated sulfonylureas. Our results suggest that lowering effect of sulfonylureas administered supraspinally against immobilization stress-induced increase of the blood glucose level appears to be primarily mediated via elevation of the plasma insulin level.

  5. Improving the Efficiency and Efficacy of Glibenclamide in Limiting Progressive Hemorrhagic Necrosis Following Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    2014-12-01

    signatures of each animal could be used to predict the relative efficacy Glib therapy . Through research funded by the Department of Defense, we have tested...Care and Use Committee. In accor- dance with “good laboratory practice”, different investigators blinded to injury-group conducted behavioral tests and...the in- jured spinal cord. Implications for neuroprotective therapy . Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 890, 366–384. Ichihara, K., Taguchi, T., Shimada, Y

  6. Improving the Efficiency and Efficacy of Glibenclamide in Limiting Progressive Hemorrhagic Necrosis Following Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    2015-02-01

    microvasculature in the canine spinal cord. Anat. Rec. 200, 102–113.Kilbourne, M., Kuehn, R., Tosun, C., Caridi, J., Keledjian, K., Bochicchio, G...acquisition gradient echo (MP- RAGE ) images were acquired in the axial plane with adequate coverage of the injury using 64 slices over a field of view

  7. [Dapagliflozin, the first SGLT-2 inhibitor in the treatment of type 2 diabetes].

    Albarrán, Olga González; Ampudia-Blasco, F Javier

    2013-09-01

    Dapagliflozin is the first novel sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. By inhibiting SGLT2, dapagliflozin blocks reabsorption of filtered glucose in the kidney, increasing urinary glucose excretion and reducing blood glucose levels. Its mechanism of action is independent of pancreatic β cell function and modulation of insulin sensitivity. The results of phase III clinical trials showed that dapagliflozin, at a dose of 5 or 10mg/day for 24 weeks as monotherapy in previously untreated patients, or as add-on combination therapy with metformin, glimepiride, pioglitazone or insulin-based therapy, significantly reduced both HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose levels compared with placebo. In addition, dapagliflozin was noninferior to glipizide, in terms of glycemic control after 52 weeks, when used as add-on therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with metformin. In most clinical trials, dapagliflozin reduced body weight. The combination of both effects (improved glycemic control and weight loss) is achieved to a greater extent in treatments that include dapaglifozin. Longer-term extension studies indicated that the efficacy of dapagliflozin on the glycemic control and weight reducción is maintained for up to 2 and 4 years. Dapagliflozin was well tolerated. Genital infections and urinary tract infections were more frequent in patients who received dapagliflozin than in placebo recipients. Hypoglycemic episodes were scarce with dapagliflozin. In conclusion, dapagliflozin is a novel option for the management of type 2 diabetes, particularly when used as add-on therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Ten-Year Trends in the Morbidity of Diabetes Mellitus and Antidiabetic Drug Utilization in Croatia: A Study Based on Routinely Collected Data.

    Pavlov, Renata; Topličan, Ivančica; Vrcić Keglević, Mladenka

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate trends of diabetes mellitus (DM) morbidity and antidiabetic drug utilization in Croatian primary health care (PHC) from 2005 to 2014. Method. Routinely collected morbidity data from all PHC units, presented in Croatian health-statistics yearbooks, were retrieved. Data on drug utilization were retrieved from the Annual Reports of the Croatian Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices (ATC/DDD, antidiabetic, A10). Results. Total morbidity increased by 33.3% and DM increased by 65.6%, mostly in patients over age 65 (from 50% to 57%). Estimated DM prevalence in adults increased from 3.9% to 6.4%. Increased morbidity was followed by an even higher increase in drug utilization (120%). Metformin was first, with a constant increase (from 18% to 39%), followed by glimepiride, while glibenclamide use decreased. Total utilization of insulin increased even more, mostly for aspart (600%) and newly introduced glargine and detemir, while human insulin usage sharply decreased. Spending also increased, mostly for aspart (from 21% to 61% of total). Conclusions. Increased DM is followed by a higher increase in antidiabetic drug utilization; this trend will continue in the future. In Croatian PHC, metformin has primacy along with insulin analogues.

  9. Rapid identification of illegal synthetic adulterants in herbal anti-diabetic medicines using near infrared spectroscopy

    Feng, Yanchun; Lei, Deqing; Hu, Changqin

    We created a rapid detection procedure for identifying herbal medicines illegally adulterated with synthetic drugs using near infrared spectroscopy. This procedure includes a reverse correlation coefficient method (RCCM) and comparison of characteristic peaks. Moreover, we made improvements to the RCCM based on new strategies for threshold settings. Any tested herbal medicine must meet two criteria to be identified with our procedure as adulterated. First, the correlation coefficient between the tested sample and the reference must be greater than the RCCM threshold. Next, the NIR spectrum of the tested sample must contain the same characteristic peaks as the reference. In this study, four pure synthetic anti-diabetic drugs (i.e., metformin, gliclazide, glibenclamide and glimepiride), 174 batches of laboratory samples and 127 batches of herbal anti-diabetic medicines were used to construct and validate the procedure. The accuracy of this procedure was greater than 80%. Our data suggest that this protocol is a rapid screening tool to identify synthetic drug adulterants in herbal medicines on the market.

  10. Role of oral hypoglycemic agents in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus during Ramadan

    Mir Iftikhar Bashir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is obligatory for all adult Muslims to observe fast during the holy month of Ramadan, but sick individuals including those with diabetes mellitus are exempted from the duty of fasting. Specific medical advice must be provided to individual patients concerning the potential risks they must accept if they decide to fast. Any alteration in medications deemed necessary to provide an effective and safe antidiabetic regimen should be instituted well before the start of Ramadan. Diet-controlled patients and those well controlled on insulin sensitizers have low risk of hypoglycemia and may safely fast with some modification in the timing of the doses. Newer generation sulfonylureas (gliclazide MR and glimepiride have reasonable safety profile during Ramadan fasting and are economical options for a large number of diabetics worldwide, especially in the developing countries; older, long acting sulfonylureas like glibenclamide and chlorpropamide should be avoided during fasting. Oral DPP-IV inhibitors are important substitutes to sulfonylureas for patients with diabetes mellitus during fasting owing to their glucose-dependent mechanism of action, efficacy, and tolerability. This group of drugs causes a moderate A1c reduction, are weight neutral, and have a very low risk of hypoglycemia. Short-acting insulin secretagogues are an option in the subset of fasting diabetic patients who have predominantly post-prandial hyperglycemia.

  11. Role of oral hypoglycemic agents in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus during Ramadan

    Bashir, Mir Iftikhar; Pathan, Md Faruque; Raza, Syed Abbas; Ahmad, Jamal; Khan, A. K. Azad; Ishtiaq, Osama; Sahay, Rakesh K.; Sheikh, Aisha; Zargar, Abdul Hamid

    2012-01-01

    It is obligatory for all adult Muslims to observe fast during the holy month of Ramadan, but sick individuals including those with diabetes mellitus are exempted from the duty of fasting. Specific medical advice must be provided to individual patients concerning the potential risks they must accept if they decide to fast. Any alteration in medications deemed necessary to provide an effective and safe antidiabetic regimen should be instituted well before the start of Ramadan. Diet-controlled patients and those well controlled on insulin sensitizers have low risk of hypoglycemia and may safely fast with some modification in the timing of the doses. Newer generation sulfonylureas (gliclazide MR and glimepiride) have reasonable safety profile during Ramadan fasting and are economical options for a large number of diabetics worldwide, especially in the developing countries; older, long acting sulfonylureas like glibenclamide and chlorpropamide should be avoided during fasting. Oral DPP-IV inhibitors are important substitutes to sulfonylureas for patients with diabetes mellitus during fasting owing to their glucose-dependent mechanism of action, efficacy, and tolerability. This group of drugs causes a moderate A1c reduction, are weight neutral, and have a very low risk of hypoglycemia. Short-acting insulin secretagogues are an option in the subset of fasting diabetic patients who have predominantly post-prandial hyperglycemia. PMID:22837904

  12. Cost-effectiveness of saxagliptin vs glimepiride as a second-line therapy added to metformin in Type 2 diabetes in China.

    Gu, Shuyan; Deng, Jing; Shi, Lizheng; Mu, Yiming; Dong, Hengjin

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to estimate the long-term cost-effectiveness of saxagliptin + metformin (SAXA + MET) vs glimepiride + metformin (GLI + MET) in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) inadequately controlled with MET in China. The Cardiff Model was used to simulate disease progression and estimate the long-term effect of treatments on patients. Systematic literature reviews and hospital surveys were conducted to obtain patients profiles, clinical data, and costs. Health insurance costs (2014¥) were estimated over a 40-year period. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. SAXA + MET had lower predicted incidences of cardiovascular and hypoglycemia events and a decreased total cost compared with GLI + MET (¥241,072,807 vs ¥285,455,177). There were increased numbers of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs; 1.01/patient) and life-years (Lys; 0.03/patient) gained with SAXA + MET compared with GLI + MET, and the incremental cost of SAXA + MET vs GLI + MET (-¥44,382) resulted in -¥43,883/QALY and -¥1,710,926/LY gained with SAXA + MET. Sensitivity analyses confirmed that the results were robust. In patients with T2DM in China, SAXA + MET was more cost-effective and was well tolerated with fewer adverse effects (AEs) compared with GLI + MET. As a second-line therapy for T2DM, SAXA may address some of the unmet medical needs attributable to AEs in the treatment of T2DM.

  13. Rationale and design of the CAROLINA® - cognition substudy: A randomised controlled trial on cognitive outcomes of linagliptin versus glimepiride in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    G.J. Biessels (Geert Jan); Janssen, J. (Jolien); E. van den Berg (Esther); Zinman, B. (Bernard); Espeland, M.A. (Mark A.); Mattheus, M. (Michaela); Johansen, O.E. (Odd Erik)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with cognitive dysfunction and an increased risk of dementia. Linagliptin is a glucose-lowering agent of the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) inhibitor class that is of particular interest for the prevention of accelerated cognitive

  14. Comparison of the long-term effects of LIiraglutide and Glimepiride monotherapy on bone mineral density in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Gilbert, Matthew P; Marre, Michel; Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of fragility fractures; the cause is unclear, but is likely multifactorial. Some diabetes treatments induce bone loss, accentuating underlying skeletal fragility and increasing fracture risk. This subgroup analysis aimed to compare...... diabetes. A 52-week, open-label extension followed, in which participants remained on randomized therapy. A subgroup of participants underwent BMD measurement by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry at baseline, 52, and 104 weeks. The main outcome measure was change from baseline in total body BMD at 52...... did not negatively affect total BMD in a 2-year prospective study, suggesting it may not exacerbate the consequences of bone fragility....

  15. Effects of short-term therapy with glibenclamide and repaglinide on incretin hormones and oxidative damage associated with postprandial hyperglycaemia in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Stephens, J W; Bodvarsdottir, T B; Wareham, K

    2011-01-01

    glucose load at baseline and after eight weeks of treatment. The areas under the curve were analysed at 45, 60 and 120 min (AUC45, AUC60, AUC120). Results: Significant improvements in glucose were observed with repaglinide (HBA1c: 1.5%, fasting glucose: 2.8 mmol/L, 2-h glucose: 3.7 mmol/L, AUC120: 18...

  16. Coadjuvant hypoglycemiant effect of Annona muricata L (guanabana) leaves ethanolic extract in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus receiving glibenclamide treatment

    Arroyo, Jorge; Martínez, Jaime; Ronceros, Gerardo; Palomino, Robert; Villarreal, Aníbal; Bonilla, Pablo; Palomino, Christian; Quino, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    Objetivo: Determinar la eficacia y seguridad de cápsulas de extracto etanólico de hojas de Annona muricata L (guanábana) más glibenclamida para un mejor control de los niveles glicemia comparado con la administración de glibenclamida sola, en pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2. Diseño: Estudio clínico, aleatorio, grupo paralelo, doble ciego. Lugar: Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital I EsSalud, ciudad de Tingo María, Departamento de Huánuco. Pacientes: Pacientes con diagnóstico de diab...

  17. Quercetin, ascorbic acid, caffeine and ellagic acid are more efficient than rosiglitazone, metformin and glimepiride in interfering with pathways leading to the development of neurological complications associated with diabetes: A comparative in-vitro study

    Vineet Mehta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathy is the least understood and most devastating complication associated with diabetes. Diabetic neuropathy develops in patients despite of regular therapy, indicating that marketed drugs has minimal effect on pathways leading to the development and progression of these complications. Present study was aimed to evaluate natural compounds for their ability to interfere with pathways leading to the development of diabetes mediated neurological complications and compare their efficacy with marketed anti-diabetic drugs. Anti-diabetic potential of ascorbic acid, gallic acid, quercetin, ellagic acid, cinnamic acid, caffeine and piperine was predicted by evaluating in-silico interaction energy (kcal/mol of these compounds with insulin receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-γ and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 proteins. Ascorbic acid, gallic acid, quercetin and ellagic acid showed excellent in-vitro antioxidant activity in DPPH radical scavenging and inhibition of lipid peroxidation assay, which was 1.5–3 folds better than the marketed drugs. Quercetin, gallic acid, cinnamic acid, piperine and caffeine efficiently prevented H2O2 induced genotoxicity, which commercial drugs failed to prevent. Further, quercetin, ellagic acid, caffeine and ascorbic acid were 3–4.7 folds better than marketed drugs in inhibiting α-amylase activity. Herbal molecules and rosiglitazone showed comparable results for glucose uptake, which may be attributed to enhanced GLUT4 translocation into primary neuronal culture under hyperglycemic conditions. In conclusion, currently available marketed anti-diabetic drugs have minimal effect on the pathways leading to diabetic neuropathy and supplementing diabetic therapeutics with quercetin, ascorbic acid, caffeine and ellagic acid may be better suited to counter diabetic neuropathy through inhibiting oxidative stress, genotoxicity and improving neuronal glucose utilization.

  18. Clinical Investigation of Treatment Failure in Type 2 Diabetic ...

    HP

    contributory factors in treatment failure in type 2 diabetic patients taking metformin and glibenclamide in a tertiary ... that took metformin and glibenclamide for a minimum of 1 year were examined. Patients ..... obesity in adults and children.

  19. Impact of carriers in oral absorption

    Gram, Luise Kvisgaard; Rist, Gerda Marie; Lennernäs, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Carriers may mediate the permeation across enterocytes for drug substances being organic anions. Carrier mediated permeation for the organic anions estrone-3-sulfate (ES) and glipizide across Caco-2 cells were investigated kinetically, and interactions on involved carriers evaluated. Initial...

  20. Meglitinide analogues in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Landgraf, R

    2000-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex heterogenous metabolic disorder in which peripheral insulin resistance and impaired insulin release are the main pathogenetic factors. The rapid response of the pancreatic beta-cells to glucose is already markedly disturbed in the early stages of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The consequence is often postprandial hyperglycaemia, which seems to be extremely important in the development of secondary complications, especially macrovascular disease. Therefore one of the main aims of treatment is to minimise blood glucose oscillations and attain near-normal glycosylated haemoglobin levels. Meglitinide analogues belong to a new family of insulin secretagogues which stimulate insulin release by inhibiting ATP-sensitive potassium channels of the beta-cell membrane via binding to a receptor distinct from that of sulphonylureas (SUR1/KIR 6.2). The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of repaglinide, the first drug of these new antihyperglycaemic agents on the market, and of nateglinide, which will be available soon, differ markedly from the currently used sulphonylureas [mainly glibenclamide (glyburide) and glimepiride]. Repaglinide and nateglinide are absorbed rapidly, stimulate insulin release within a few minutes, are rapidly metabolised in the liver and are mainly excreted in the bile. Therefore, following preprandial administration of these drugs, insulin is more readily available during and just after the meal. This leads to a significant reduction in postprandial hyperglycaemia without the danger of hypoglycaemia between meals. The short action of these compounds and biliary elimination makes repaglinide and nateglinide especially suitable for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who would like to have a more flexible lifestyle, need more flexibility because of unplanned eating behaviour (e.g. geriatric patients) or in whom one of the other first-line antidiabetic drugs, i.e. metformin, is strictly contraindicated (e

  1. Enhancement of In Vitro Skin Transport and In Vivo Hypoglycemic ...

    ... (PVP) for the enhancement of the transdermal delivery of glimepiride (GMD). Methods: Matrix-type transdermal patches containing GMD, drug coprecipitate ... evaluation of the formulations was conducted using automated diffusion system.

  2. Raspberry Ketone

    ... a pounding heart beat (palpitations). Special precautions & warnings: Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable ... glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (Diabeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, metformin (Glumetza, Fortamet, Glucophage, Riomet), pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), ...

  3. Design Optimization and Evaluation of Gastric Floating Matrix Tablet ...

    HP

    Abstract. Purpose: To formulate an optimized gastric floating drug delivery system (GFDDS) containing glipizide ... Index Medicus, JournalSeek, Journal Citation Reports/Science Edition, Directory of Open Access Journals ... Sodium bicarbonate by geometric mixing then .... order polynomial equation (Eq 4) with added.

  4. Improvement in C-reactive protein and advanced glycosylation end-products in poorly controlled diabetics is independent of glucose control.

    Md Isa, S H; Najihah, I; Nazaimoon, W M Wan; Kamarudin, N A; Umar, N A; Mat, N H; Khalid, B A K

    2006-04-01

    We studied the efficacy of four different treatment regimens (sulphonylurea and metformin+/-acarbose versus glimepiride and rosiglitazone versus glimepiride and bedtime NPH insulin versus multiple actrapid and NPH insulin injections) in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes subjects on hs-CRP, VCAM-1 and AGE at 4, 8 and 12 weeks of treatment. Multiple insulin injections rapidly improved HbA(1c) by 0.6+/-0.9% (pimprovement in blood glucose. AGE improved in all groups irrespective of type of treatment, glycaemic control and CRP levels. Our data indicate rapid glycaemic control alone does not necessarily result in improvement in markers of inflammation in type 2 diabetes patients.

  5. Synthesis of substituted gamma-lactams through petasis-type addition of boronic acids to N-acyliminium lons

    Wu, Peng; Clausen, Mads Hartvig; Nielsen, Thomas Eiland

    2014-01-01

    Substituted g -lactams are important heterocyclic motifs found in various biologically active compounds and marketed drugs, such as glimepiride, doxapram, and levetiracetam. Among available m ethods for the synthesis of substituted g -lactams, the addition of nucleophiles to N -acyliminium ions...

  6. Anti Diabetic Drug Utilization by Elderly Patients in a Tertiary ...

    This study is intended to determine the pattern and rational use of drugs in the elderly diabetic patients in a tertiary health care facility in Western Nigeria. ... Metformin was the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic medication for the patients followed by glimepiride (52.8%) (highest within age 50-59 years) and then ...

  7. Browse Title Index

    Items 1 - 50 of 122 ... ... of Transdermal Delivery of Glibenclamide Using Iontophoresis, Abstract PDF ... Vol 1, No 3 (2008), Advances in iontophoresis for drug delivery .... (Ob Gene Product) in Reproductive System with Special Reference to ...

  8. Effect of Methanolic extract of Musa sapientum leaves on ...

    . Hyperglycaemia particularly has been reported to inhibit gastrointestinal transit time while glibenclamide, a sulphonylurea and insulin, both increased transit time. Musa sapientum has also been reported as an antidiabetic agent but there is ...

  9. JMBR vol 7.cdr

    Tope

    1. Department of Physiology, College of Medical Sciences,. University of Benin, P.M.B. 1156, Benin ... were on insulin, metformin or glibenclamide treatment and 25 non-diabetic subjects matched by ..... in type 1 Insulin dependent diabetes.

  10. Evaluation of toxic effects of metformin hydrochloride and ...

    olayemitoyin

    Drug Metabolism and Toxicology Research Laboratories, Department of ... This study was designed to investigate the toxic effect of MET and GB in the Liver, kidney and testis of rats. Twenty one ..... glibenclamide on male reproductive system,.

  11. Browse Title Index

    2005), Pests and diseases of African yam bean, ... study: effect of sertraline on the hypoglucemic action of glibenclamide in rats, Abstract ... Vol 7, No 1 (2009), Preformulation compatibility screening of dika fat-drug mixtures ...

  12. Clinical Investigation of Treatment Failure in Type 2 Diabetic ...

    Clinical Investigation of Treatment Failure in Type 2 Diabetic Patients ... Purpose: To examine body mass index (BMI), occupation, sex, age, and ... development of secondary failure in type 2 diabetics receiving metformin and glibenclamide.

  13. Effect of Ethanol Leaf Extract of Newboulda Laevis on Blood ...

    Erah

    ethanol extract Newbouldia laevis and the fifth group received a reference standard, glibenclamide (5 mg/kg). Treatment ... presence of saponins, tannins, alkaloids and flavonoids. Conclusion: ..... City for his technical assistance in the course.

  14. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research - Vol 13, No 9 (2014)

    ... Methanol Extracts of Wild Plants of Southern Sonora, Mexico · EMAIL FREE FULL ... 2 Diabetic Patients Treated with Metformin and Glibenclamide at a Hospital in ... Alternative Medicines for HIV/AIDS in Resource-Poor Settings: Insight from ...

  15. Evaluation of the long-term cost-effectiveness of liraglutide therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes in France.

    Roussel, Ronan; Martinez, Luc; Vandebrouck, Tom; Douik, Habiba; Emiel, Patrick; Guery, Matthieu; Hunt, Barnaby; Valentine, William J

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare the projected long-term clinical and cost implications associated with liraglutide, sitagliptin and glimepiride in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus failing to achieve glycemic control on metformin monotherapy in France. Clinical input data for the modeling analysis were taken from two randomized, controlled trials (LIRA-DPP4 and LEAD-2). Long-term (patient lifetime) projections of clinical outcomes and direct costs (2013 Euros; €) were made using a validated computer simulation model of type 2 diabetes. Costs were taken from published France-specific sources. Future costs and clinical benefits were discounted at 3% annually. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Liraglutide was associated with an increase in quality-adjusted life expectancy of 0.25 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and an increase in mean direct healthcare costs of €2558 per patient compared with sitagliptin. In the comparison with glimepiride, liraglutide was associated with an increase in quality-adjusted life expectancy of 0.23 QALYs and an increase in direct costs of €4695. Based on these estimates, liraglutide was associated with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of €10,275 per QALY gained vs sitagliptin and €20,709 per QALY gained vs glimepiride in France. Calculated ICERs for both comparisons fell below the commonly quoted willingness-to-pay threshold of €30,000 per QALY gained. Therefore, liraglutide is likely to be cost-effective vs sitagliptin and glimepiride from a healthcare payer perspective in France.

  16. Modification of the mitochondrial sulfonylurea receptor by thiol reagents.

    Szewczyk, A; Wójcik, G; Lobanov, N A; Nalecz, M J

    1999-08-19

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects exerted by thiol-modifying reagents on themitochondrial sulfonylurea receptor. The thiol-oxidizing agents (timerosal and 5, 5'-dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)) were found to produce a large inhibition (70% to 80%) of specific binding of [(3)H]glibenclamide to the beef heart mitochondrial membrane. Similar effects were observed with membrane permeable (N-ethylmaleimide) and non-permeable (mersalyl) thiol modifying agents. Glibenclamide binding was also decreased by oxidizing agents (hydrogen peroxide) but not by reducing agents (reduced gluthatione, dithiothreitol and the 2,3-dihydroxy-1,4-dithiolbutane). The results suggest that intact thiol groups, facing the mitochondrial matrix, are essential for glibenclamide binding to the mitochondrial sulfonylurea receptor. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. Antidiabetic Evaluation of Momordica charantia L Fruit Extracts

    Tahira, S; Hussain, F

    2014-01-01

    To investigate hypoglycaemic, hypolipidaemic and pancreatic beta cell regeneration activities of Momordica charantia L fruits (MC). Alloxan-induced diabetic rabbits were treated with methanolic and ethanolic MC extract. Effects of plant extracts and the drug glibenclamide on serum glucose, lipid profile and pancreatic beta cell were determined after two weeks of treatment. Serum glucose and lipid profiles were assayed by kit methods. Pancreatic tissue histopathology was performed to study pancreatic beta cell regeneration. Momordica charantia extracts produced significant hypoglycaemic effects (p Momordica charantia supplementations were unable to normalize glucose and lipid profiles. Glibenclamide, a standard drug, not only lowered hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia but also restored the normal levels. Regeneration of pancreatic beta cells by MC extracts was minimal, with fractional improvement produced by glibenclamide. The most significant finding of the present study was a 28% reduction in hyperglycaemia by MC ethanol extracts. To determine reliable antidiabetic potentials of MC, identification of the relevant antidiabetic components and underlying mechanisms is warranted. PMID:25429471

  18. Effect of aluminum chloride on blood glucose level and lipid profile in normal, diabetic and treated diabetic rats.

    Konda, Venugopala Rao; Eerike, Madhavi; Chary, R Prasanth; Arunachalam, Ruckmani; Yeddula, Venkata Ramana; Meti, Vinayak; Devi, T Sobita

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to assess evaluate the effects of aluminum chloride (AlCl 3 ) on blood glucose and lipid levels in normal, diabetic, and glibenclamide-treated diabetic rats. Forty-two male Wistar rats were divided into seven groups of six each. Group I was normal control, Groups II and III were given AlCl 3 50 and 100 mg/kg, and Group IV to VII were administered with streptozotocin (STZ) (60 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. Group IV was diabetic control, Group V in addition was given AlCl 3 50 mg/kg, Group VI glibenclamide (10 mg/kg), and Group VII glibenclamide and AlCl 3 (50 mg/kg) per-oral daily for 28 days. Blood glucose and lipid levels were estimated at base line, after diabetes was set in and on the last day of study. Histopathological changes in pancreas, liver, and kidney were studied. No significant change was observed in blood glucose and lipid levels in Group I. Group II and III showed a dose-dependent significant increase in blood glucose was observed. Group V had a reduction in blood glucose but not to the nondiabetic level. Group VI had significant reduction in blood sugar. In Group VII, treated with glibenclamide and AlCl 3 , there was no significant change in blood glucose reduction compared to Group VI. Lipid levels were reduced in groups treated with AlCl 3 and glibenclamide and not in other groups. Gross tissue damage was seen in pancreas in STZ group and in liver and kidney in AlCl 3 groups. AlCl 3 administration in Wistar rats caused in significant hyperglycemia in normal rats, hypoglycemia in diabetic rats, and did not influenced hypoglycemic effect of glibenclamide and in addition, resulted in reduction in lipid levels.

  19. Canagliflozin improves risk factors of metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome

    Davies MJ

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Davies,1 Katherine W Merton,1 Ujjwala Vijapurkar,2 Dainius A Balis,2 Mehul Desai2 1Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Titusville, NJ, USA; 2Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Raritan, NJ, USA Objective: Metabolic syndrome refers to a collection of risk factors associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, improves glycemic control and reduces body weight and blood pressure (BP in a broad range of patients with T2DM. This post hoc analysis assessed the effects of canagliflozin on the components of metabolic syndrome in patients with T2DM and metabolic syndrome.Methods: This analysis was based on data from 2 head-to-head studies of canagliflozin in patients with T2DM on background metformin versus glimepiride (study 1 and background metformin plus sulfonylurea versus sitagliptin 100 mg (study 2. Changes from baseline in glycemic efficacy, anthropometric measures, BP, and lipids were evaluated with canagliflozin versus glimepiride and sitagliptin at week 52 in patients who met ≥2 of the criteria for metabolic syndrome (in addition to T2DM: triglycerides ≥1.7 mmol/L; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C <1.0 mmol/L (men or <1.3 mmol/L (women; waist circumference ≥102 cm (non-Asian men, ≥88 cm (non-Asian women, >90 cm (Asian men, or >80 cm (Asian women; diagnosis of hypertension or meeting BP-related criteria (systolic BP ≥130 mmHg or diastolic BP ≥85 mmHg. Safety was assessed based on adverse event reports.Results: In study 1, canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg provided similar and greater HbA1c reductions versus glimepiride, respectively. In study 2, canagliflozin 300 mg provided greater HbA1c lowering versus sitagliptin 100 mg. Canagliflozin also reduced fasting plasma glucose, body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, BP, and triglycerides, and increased HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol versus

  20. Effects of canagliflozin on body weight and body composition in patients with type 2 diabetes over 104 weeks.

    Blonde, Lawrence; Stenlöf, Kaj; Fung, Albert; Xie, John; Canovatchel, William; Meininger, Gary

    2016-05-01

    Canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, has been associated with weight loss in a broad range of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This analysis further evaluated changes in body weight and composition with canagliflozin in two 104-week, Phase 3 studies. In Study 1, patients aged 18-80 years (N = 1,450) received canagliflozin 100 or 300 mg or glimepiride as add-on to metformin for a 52-week core treatment period, followed by a 52-week extension period. In Study 2, patients aged 55-80 years (N = 714) received canagliflozin 100 or 300 mg or placebo added to stable background antihyperglycemic agents for a 26-week core treatment period, followed by a 78-week extension period. Percent change from baseline in body weight; proportion of patients with any weight loss, ≥5% weight loss, and ≥10% weight loss; change in body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference; change in body weight across weight-loss quartiles; and changes in body composition were evaluated in both studies. Canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg provided sustained weight loss versus either glimepiride or placebo over 104 weeks. More patients experienced any weight loss and ≥5% weight loss with canagliflozin versus comparator. Across the 3 highest weight-loss quartiles, canagliflozin provided greater weight loss versus glimepiride or placebo. BMI and waist circumference reductions were observed with canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg versus either glimepiride or placebo over 104 weeks; more patients had BMI or waist circumference reductions with canagliflozin versus comparator. Body composition analysis indicated that the majority of weight loss was due to loss of fat mass. Canagliflozin was generally well tolerated, with increased incidence of adverse events related to the SGLT2 inhibition mechanism. Canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg provided sustained reductions in body weight, BMI, and waist circumference in a greater proportion of patients with T2DM versus

  1. Chemical imaging and solid state analysis at compact surfaces using UV imaging

    Wu, Jian X.; Rehder, Sönke; van den Berg, Frans

    2014-01-01

    and excipients in a non-invasive way, as well as mapping the glibenclamide solid state form. An exploratory data analysis supported the critical evaluation of the mapping results and the selection of model parameters for the chemical mapping. The present study demonstrated that the multi-wavelength UV imaging......Fast non-destructive multi-wavelength UV imaging together with multivariate image analysis was utilized to visualize distribution of chemical components and their solid state form at compact surfaces. Amorphous and crystalline solid forms of the antidiabetic compound glibenclamide...

  2. In vitro characterization of a novel polymeric system for preparation of amorphous solid drug dispersions.

    Mahmoudi, Zahra N; Upadhye, Sampada B; Ferrizzi, David; Rajabi-Siahboomi, Ali R

    2014-07-01

    Preparation of amorphous solid dispersions using polymers is a commonly used formulation strategy for enhancing the solubility of poorly water-soluble drugs. However, often a single polymer may not bring about a significant enhancement in solubility or amorphous stability of a poorly water-soluble drug. This study describes application of a unique and novel binary polymeric blend in preparation of solid dispersions. The objective of this study was to investigate amorphous solid dispersions of glipizide, a BCS class II model drug, in a binary polymeric system of polyvinyl acetate phthalate (PVAP) and hypromellose (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, HPMC). The solid dispersions were prepared using two different solvent methods: rotary evaporation (rotavap) and fluid bed drug layering on sugar spheres. The performance and physical stability of the dispersions were evaluated with non-sink dissolution testing, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and modulated differential scanning calorimetry (mDSC). PXRD analysis demonstrated an amorphous state for glipizide, and mDSC showed no evidence of phase separation. Non-sink dissolution testing in pH 7.5 phosphate buffer indicated more than twofold increase in apparent solubility of the drug with PVAP-HPMC system. The glipizide solid dispersions demonstrated a high glass transition temperature (Tg) and acceptable chemical and physical stability during the stability period irrespective of the manufacturing process. In conclusion, the polymeric blend of PVAP-HPMC offers a unique formulation approach for developing amorphous solid dispersions with the flexibility towards the use of these polymers in different ratios and combined quantities depending on drug properties.

  3. Assessment on the Prevention of Progression by Rosiglitazone on Atherosclerosis in diabetes patients with Cardiovascular History (APPROACH): study design and baseline characteristics.

    Ratner, Robert E; Cannon, Christopher P; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Nesto, Richard W; Serruys, Patrick W; Van Es, Gerrit-Anne; Kolatkar, Nikheel S; Kravitz, Barbara G; Zalewski, Andrew; Fitzgerald, Peter J

    2008-12-01

    Rosiglitazone, a thiazolidinedione, has effects on insulin sensitivity and cardiovascular risk factors that may favorably impact the progression of coronary atherosclerosis. APPROACH is a double-blind randomized clinical trial comparing the effects of the insulin sensitizer rosiglitazone with the insulin secretagogue glipizide on the progression of coronary atherosclerosis. Patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease undergoing clinically indicated coronary angiography or percutaneous coronary intervention are randomized to receive rosiglitazone or glipizide for 18 months using a titration algorithm designed to provide comparable glycemic control between treatment groups. The primary end point is change in percent atheroma volume from baseline to study completion in a nonintervened coronary artery, as measured by intravascular ultrasound. Cardiovascular events are adjudicated by an end point committee. A total of 672 patients were randomized. The mean age was 61 years, hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) 7.2%, body mass index 29.5 kg/m(2), and median duration of diabetes 4.8 years. At baseline, approximately half of the participants were receiving oral antidiabetic monotherapy (53.9%) with 27.5% receiving dual combination therapy and 17.9% treated with diet and exercise alone. Approximately two thirds of the participants (68%) had dyslipidemia, 79.9% hypertension, and 24% prior myocardial infarction. APPROACH has fully enrolled a high-risk patient population and will compare the glucose-independent effects of rosiglitazone and glipizide on the progression of coronary atherosclerosis, as well as provide additional data on the cardiovascular safety of rosiglitazone in patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease.

  4. Interactions between organic anions on multiple transporters in Caco-2 cells

    Grandvuinet, Anne Sophie; Steffansen, Bente

    2011-01-01

    Caco-2 cell line may be used as an overall model to predict interactions on multiple membrane transporters in the intestine. Taurocholic acid (TCA) and estrone-3-sulfate (E1S) were used as model substrates. Possible inhibitors studied were TCA, E1S, taurolithocholic acid, fluvastatin, and glipizide......-dependent bile acid transporter and the organic solute transporter α/β, and to less extent by the organic anion transporting polypeptide 2B1. However, interactions on efflux transporters were not detected, although they were expected from the literature on the investigated compounds. Biosimulation methods may...

  5. The effect of rutin on lipid profile and liver function enzymes on ...

    pc

    2017-06-01

    Jun 1, 2017 ... However, there was a significant (p<0.05) inc compared to diabetic control. Furthermore, serum liver .... orange, grapefruit, lemon and lime) and apple; berries such as mulberry, ash tree fruits and ... Glibenclamide and alloxan were purchased from. Sigma chemical Company St. Louis U.S.A. Rutin was.

  6. Anti-hyperglycaemic Activity of Tribulus terrestris L Aerial Part ...

    Faculty of Pharmacy, 3Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine and ... FBG were significantly (p < 0.05) lowered at 2 and 3 h in both glibenclamide (45.5 and 56.9 ..... scientifically evaluated for Type 2 DM treatment.

  7. Hypoglycaemic Activity of Acalypha fruticosa Forssk Extracts in ...

    glucose level in STZ-Nicotinamide induced diabetic rats when compared to standard glibenclamide [21]. Therefore, the present study was aimed to investigate the potential hypoglycaemic activity of different polarity fractions obtained by extracting the aerial part of. Acalypha fruticosa as well as its acute toxicity. To the best of ...

  8. Antiglycation and Hypolipidemic Effects of Polyphenols from ...

    HP

    diabetes as well as its complications, and its effect is comparable to that of the standard drug, glibenclamide. Keywords: Zingiber officinale ... nausea It is also used to treat a variety of human ailments such as rheumatism, asthma, stroke, .... through the stimulation of a regeneration process of the remaining β-cells [16].

  9. Effect of phosphodiesterase inhibitors on human arteries in vitro

    Vroom, M. B.; Pfaffendorf, M.; van Wezel, H. B.; van Zwieten, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated if the relaxant effects of phosphodiesterase (PDE) III inhibitors on human vessels could be inhibited by a nitric oxide synthase blocker, L-NAME, or by a blocker of ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP), glibenclamide. The experiments were performed using an

  10. Comparative antioxidant and hypoglycaemic effects of aqueous ...

    Diabetes was induced intraperitoneally using 50 mg/kg streptozotocin, while diabetic rats were treated in 12 h cycles for four weeks with 100 mg/kg of the extract and glibenclamide (2.5 mg/kg). Nondiabetic control rats received distilled water. The levels of fasting blood sugar (FBS), thiobarbituric acid reactive substance ...

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    The presence of VRAC and VDAC antagonists–tamoxifen, glibenclamide, fluoxetine and verapamil, and 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulphonic acid (DIDS), respectively–inhibited this enhanced activity brought about by either hypotonic stress or homocysteine. The blockers do not affect the ferricyanide reductase ...

  12. Hypoglycaemic activity of Telfairia occidentalis in rats | Eseyin ...

    ... of Telfairia occidentalis possess hypoglycemic activity in normoglycemic and alloxan-induced diabetic rats and this could be beneficial in the ethnotherapy of diabetes mellitus. Key words: Telfairia occidentalis; Glibenclamide; Hypoglycaemic activity; Alloxan-induced diabetes. Journal of Pharmacy and Bioresources Vol.

  13. Formulation of Fast-Release Gastroretentive Solid Dispersion of ...

    Methods: Hot melt granulation technique was adopted to prepare solid dispersions (SDs) of glibenclamide in .... ml of 0.1M HCl (pH 1.2), stirred at 20 rpm in a water bath (25 ± 0.3 .... cm-1; and SO2 stretching vibration at 1340.43 and 1159.14 ...

  14. Author Details

    Eckerts, HG. Vol 76, No 8 (1989) - Articles Bio-availability of three formulations of glibenclamide. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 0256-95749. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL ...

  15. RJHS Vol 4(4).cdr

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    However, evidence now exist supporting satisfactory outcome with the use of oral medications like sulphonylurea such as glibenclamide (glyburide) and metformin (3). Complications of untreated GDM includes pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, cesarean section in the mother and macrosomia, birth trauma, neonatal hypoglycemia, ...

  16. Download this PDF file

    User

    cigarette smoking. The heart failure responded satisfactorily to anti-heart failure medications including loop diuresis, angiotensin converting enzyme and aldosterone inhibition, and low dose beta blockade with carvidilol. Blood sugar was adequately controlled using metformin and glibenclamide. Blood pressure control was ...

  17. Hypoxia sensing in the fetal chicken femoral artery is mediated by the mitochondrial electron transport chain

    Zoer, Bea; Cogolludo, Angel L; Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    ) (polyethylene glycol-catalase) or by NADPH-oxidase inhibition (apocynin). Also, the K(+) channel inhibitors tetraethylammonium (nonselective), diphenyl phosphine oxide-1 (voltage-gated K(+) channel 1.5), glibenclamide (ATP-sensitive K(+) channel), iberiotoxin (large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel...

  18. Pharmacodynamic drug interaction study: effect of sertraline on the ...

    The effect of sertraline on glibenclamide control of blood sugar level was determined in normoglycemic and alloxanised rats. Sertraline enhance the hypoglycaemic action in a non-dose dependent fashion in the normoglycaemic and alloxanised rats. Sertraline (40mg/Kg body weight) was more effective in the enhancement ...

  19. Antidiabetic and Synergistic Effects of Anthocyanin Fraction from Berberis integerrima Fruit on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Model

    Zahra Sabahi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a complex endocrine disorder. There is a serious attempt to identify antidiabetic compounds from natural sources to use with other drugs for reduction of diabetes complications. Present study is based on the investigation of antihyperglycemic effect of anthocyanin fraction of Berberis integerrima Bunge (AFBI fruits on some physiological parameters (glucose level, glycogen content, and body weight in normal and streptozotocin-induced (STZ-induced diabetic rats and evaluation of synergic effect of this fraction with metformin and glibenclamide. Male Sprague dawley rats were divided into nine groups: healthy control group, diabetic control group, diabetic groups treated with anthocyanin fraction (200, 400 and 1000 mg/kg, respectively; diabetic groups treated with glibenclamide and metformin separately, diabetic groups treated with glibenclamide + anthocyanin fraction (1000 mg/kg, metformin + anthocyanin fraction (1000 mg/kg. Treatment of diabetic rats with AFBI (400, 1000mg/kg significantly decreased blood glucose as compared with control. Moreover, AFBI (400, 1000mg/kg significantly increased liver glycogen and body weight compared to control. Nevertheless, there were no synergistic effects between anthocyanin fraction and metformin or glibenclamide on blood glucose, liver glycogen, and body weight. The results of this study indicate that AFBI possesses hypoglycemic effects and may be considered for evaluation in future diabetes clinical studies.

  20. Diabetes

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2015-01-01

    For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women...... with gestational diabetes mellitus is highly relevant....

  1. an alternative therapy for gestational diabetes mellitus

    Toxic effects of glibenclamide in fetuses of normoglycemic rats: an alternative therapy for gestational diabetes mellitus. ... However, GLIB animals presented a light brownish precipitate into the center-lobular veins and in the liver parenchyma among the hepatocytes. These results indicated a possible passage of the drug ...

  2. Protective effect of Na(+)/Ca (2+) exchange blocker KB-R7943 on myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in hypercholesterolemic rats.

    Lv, Yan; Ren, Yongkui; Sun, Lufan; Wang, Shaojun; Wei, Minjie; Jia, Dalin

    2013-06-01

    Reverse-mode activation of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) during reperfusion following ischemia contributes to Ca(2+) overload and cardiomyocyte injury. KB-R7943, a selective reverse-mode NCX inhibitor, reduces lethal reperfusion injury under non-ischemic conditions. However, the effectiveness of this compound under ischemic conditions is unclear. In the present study, we studied the effects of KB-R7943 in an animal model of hyperlipidemia. We further assessed whether the K ATP (+) channels are involved in potential protective mechanisms of KB-R7943. Twelve rats were fed normal chow, while 48 animals were fed a high cholesterol diet. The hearts from the control and hypercholesterolemic rats were subjected to 25 min of global ischemia followed by a 120-min reperfusion. Before this, hearts from hypercholesterolemic rats either received no intervention (cholesterol control group) or were pre-treated with 1 μM KB-R7943 and 0.3 μM of K ATP (+) blocker glibenclamide or glibenclamide alone. The infarction sizes (triphenyltetrazolium assay) were 35 ± 5.0 % in the control group, 46 ± 8.7 % in the cholesterol control group (p KB-R7943 group (p KB-R7943 and glibenclamide group, and 47 ± 8.5 % in the glibenclamide group (p KB-R7943 attenuated the magnitude of cell apoptosis (p KB-R7943 reduces the infarction size and apoptosis in hyperlipidemic animals through the activation of K ATP (+) channels.

  3. ppt level detection of samarium(III) with a coated graphite sensor based on an antibiotic.

    Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Rezapour, Morteza; Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza; Haghgoo, Soheila

    2004-07-01

    N-[2-[4-[[[(Cyclohexylamino)carbonyl]amino]sulfonyl]phenyl]ethyl]-5-methyl pyrazine carboxamide (glipizid) was explored as an electro-active material for preparing a polymeric membrane-based sensor selective to samarium ions. The membrane incorporated 30% poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), 53% benzyl acetate (BA), 11% glipizid and 6% sodium tetraphenyl borate. When coated on the surface of a graphite electrode, it exhibits Nernstian responses in the concentration range of 1.0 x 10(-5) to 1.0 x 10(-10) M, with a detection limit of 8.0 x 10(-11)M samarium. The electrode shows high selectivity towards samarium over several cations (alkali, alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal ions), and specially lanthanide ions. The proposed sensor has a very short response time (pH range for at least ten weeks. It was used as an indicator electrode in potentiometric titration of Sm(III) ions with an EDTA solution, and for determination of samarium in binary and ternary mixtures.

  4. 3D printing of tablets containing multiple drugs with defined release profiles.

    Khaled, Shaban A; Burley, Jonathan C; Alexander, Morgan R; Yang, Jing; Roberts, Clive J

    2015-10-30

    We have employed three-dimensional (3D) extrusion-based printing as a medicine manufacturing technique for the production of multi-active tablets with well-defined and separate controlled release profiles for three different drugs. This 'polypill' made by a 3D additive manufacture technique demonstrates that complex medication regimes can be combined in a single tablet and that it is viable to formulate and 'dial up' this single tablet for the particular needs of an individual. The tablets used to illustrate this concept incorporate an osmotic pump with the drug captopril and sustained release compartments with the drugs nifedipine and glipizide. This combination of medicines could potentially be used to treat diabetics suffering from hypertension. The room temperature extrusion process used to print the formulations used excipients commonly employed in the pharmaceutical industry. Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) were used to assess drug-excipient interaction. The printed formulations were evaluated for drug release using USP dissolution testing. We found that the captopril portion showed the intended zero order drug release of an osmotic pump and noted that the nifedipine and glipizide portions showed either first order release or Korsmeyer-Peppas release kinetics dependent upon the active/excipient ratio used. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Exenatide Is an Effective Antihyperglycaemic Agent in a Mouse Model of Wolfram Syndrome 1.

    Sedman, Tuuli; Rünkorg, Kertu; Krass, Maarja; Luuk, Hendrik; Plaas, Mario; Vasar, Eero; Volke, Vallo

    2016-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome 1 is a very rare monogenic disease resulting in a complex of disorders including diabetes mellitus. Up to now, insulin has been used to treat these patients. Some of the monogenic forms of diabetes respond preferentially to sulphonylurea preparations. The aim of the current study was to elucidate whether exenatide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, and glipizide, a sulphonylurea, are effective in a mouse model of Wolfram syndrome 1. Wolframin-deficient mice were used to test the effect of insulin secretagogues. Wolframin-deficient mice had nearly normal fasting glucose levels but developed hyperglycaemia after glucose challenge. Exenatide in a dose of 10 μg/kg lowered the blood glucose level in both wild-type and wolframin-deficient mice when administered during a nonfasted state and during the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Glipizide (0.6 or 2 mg/kg) was not able to reduce the glucose level in wolframin-deficient animals. In contrast to other groups, wolframin-deficient mice had a lower insulin-to-glucose ratio during the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test, indicating impaired insulin secretion. Exenatide increased the insulin-to-glucose ratio irrespective of genotype, demonstrating the ability to correct the impaired insulin secretion caused by wolframin deficiency. We conclude that GLP-1 agonists may have potential in the treatment of Wolfram syndrome-related diabetes.

  6. Exenatide Is an Effective Antihyperglycaemic Agent in a Mouse Model of Wolfram Syndrome 1

    Tuuli Sedman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wolfram syndrome 1 is a very rare monogenic disease resulting in a complex of disorders including diabetes mellitus. Up to now, insulin has been used to treat these patients. Some of the monogenic forms of diabetes respond preferentially to sulphonylurea preparations. The aim of the current study was to elucidate whether exenatide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, and glipizide, a sulphonylurea, are effective in a mouse model of Wolfram syndrome 1. Wolframin-deficient mice were used to test the effect of insulin secretagogues. Wolframin-deficient mice had nearly normal fasting glucose levels but developed hyperglycaemia after glucose challenge. Exenatide in a dose of 10 μg/kg lowered the blood glucose level in both wild-type and wolframin-deficient mice when administered during a nonfasted state and during the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Glipizide (0.6 or 2 mg/kg was not able to reduce the glucose level in wolframin-deficient animals. In contrast to other groups, wolframin-deficient mice had a lower insulin-to-glucose ratio during the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test, indicating impaired insulin secretion. Exenatide increased the insulin-to-glucose ratio irrespective of genotype, demonstrating the ability to correct the impaired insulin secretion caused by wolframin deficiency. We conclude that GLP-1 agonists may have potential in the treatment of Wolfram syndrome-related diabetes.

  7. Antidiabetic effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Carthamus tinctorius L. in alloxan-induced diabetic rats

    Sedigheh Asgary

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carthamus tinctorius L. (Compositae has been used in Iranian traditional medicine for treatment of diabetes. In this study, anti-diabetic effect of its hydroalcoholic extract was compared with that of glibenclamide. Methods: Male white Wistar rats were randomly allocated into four groups of six each: nondiabetic control; diabetic control; diabetic treated with hydroalcoholic extract of Carthamus tinctorius (200 mg kg -1 BW; diabetic rats treated with glibenclamide (0.6 mg kg -1 BW. Alloxan was administered (120 mg kg -1 BW, intraperitoneally to induce diabetes. Fasting blood samples were collected three times, before injection of alloxan, two weeks and six weeks after injection of alloxan and fasting blood sugar (FBS, Hb A1C, insulin, cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, VLDL-C, triglyceride, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST were measured each time. Results: FBS, triglyceride, cholesterol, LDL-C and VLDL-C had a meaningful decrease in diabetic rats treated with Carthamus tinctorius and diabetic rats treated with glibenclamide as compared with diabetic rats with no treatment. Insulin level increased significantly in diabetic groups received treatment (glibenclamide or Carthamus tinctorius L in comparison with diabetic group with no treatment. The histological study revealed size of islets of Langerhans enlarged significantly consequentially as compared with diabetic rats with no treatment. The extract appeared non toxic as evidenced by normal levels of AST, ALP and ALT. Effects of administrating glibenclamide or extract of Carthamus tinctorius L on all biochemical parameters discussed above showed no difference and both tend to bring the values to near normal. Conclusion: These results suggested that the hydroalcoholic extract of Carthamus tinctorius possesses beneficial effect on treatment of diabetes.

  8. Fixed-dose combinations in type 2 diabetes – role of the canagliflozin metformin combination

    Fleming JW

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Joshua W Fleming, Laurie W Fleming, Courtney S Davis Department of Pharmacy Practice, The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, Jackson, MS, USA Abstract: Canagliflozin–metformin is one of the newest combination therapies available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Canagliflozin is an inhibitor of the sodium–glucose co-transporter 2 which causes an increase in the urinary excretion of glucose. In the present article, we review the safety and efficacy of canagliflozin and metformin from data obtained from Phase III metformin add-on therapy clinical trials as there are no studies to date that specifically evaluate the combination of metformin and canagliflozin. Trials included in this review were dual-therapy trials of subjects who were already taking background metformin and were assigned to receive canagliflozin, glimepiride, or sitagliptin. The addition of canagliflozin to metformin resulted in a decrease in HbA1c of 0.73%–0.93%. Canagliflozin 100 mg was considered to be non-inferior to glimepiride and sitagliptin 100 mg with the canagliflozin 300 mg dose being statistically superior to sitagliptin and glimepiride. Other advantages of the use of canagliflozin are reduction in weight (3.3–4.0 kg and systolic blood pressure (3.3–4.7 mmHg. The primary disadvantages are potential genital mycotic infections, hypotension, and gastrointestinal side effects from metformin. All things considered, this combination appears to be safe and effective in clinical trials and represents a promising option for the treatment of T2DM. Keywords: type 2 diabetes, fixed-dose combination (FDC, canagliflozin metformin 

  9. Voglibose in Combination of Three Hypoglycemic Agents in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    V.I. Pankivn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study — clinical and metabolic rationale for the selection of the third hypoglycemic agent to enhance the effectiveness of treatment in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM type 2, assessment of the impact of the therapy intensification due to the addition of voglibose on carbohydrate metabolism parameters, which have not reached target levels during the combination therapy with metformin and glimepiride. Materials and methods. We observed 45 patients with DM type 2, who have not reached the targets of carbohydrate metabolism under the influence of previous treatments (metformin and glimepiride. After the initial clinical examination, patients were divided into two groups. In the first group (n = 30, wе added to the treatment the drug voglibose (Voxid, production of Kusum Pharm Ltd, Ukraine 0.2 mg before breakfast, lunch and dinner for 12 weeks. Results. After 12 weeks of treatment, the level of glycated hemoglobin (НbА1с in the first group decreased by 1.5 [1.1; 1.9] % (p  0.05. 80 % of patients achieved target levels of glycemia. The first group of patients showed a significant increase in HOMA-β index by 24.9 %, as well as a reduction of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR by 31.5 %. After 12 weeks of therapy, there was a statistically significant decrease in body weight by 2.1 kg in the first group of patients and no response in patients of the second group. Safety has been proveв in terms of the functional state of the liver and kidneys in this therapy. Conclusions. Adding voglibose for intensification of therapy in patients with type 2 DM, who had previously received metformin and glimepiride, has led to a significant improvement in carbohydrate metabolism (decrease in HbA1c by 1.5 %. Better control of carbohydrate metabolism during the combination therapy with metformin, glimepiride, and voglibose is accompanied by an increase of functional activity of pancreatic β-cells, a decrease in insulin resistance in the

  10. Effect of Scoparia dulcis extract on insulin receptors in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats: studies on insulin binding to erythrocytes.

    Pari, Leelavinothan; Latha, Muniappan; Rao, Chippada Appa

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the insulin-receptor-binding effect of Scoparia dulcis plant extract in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced male Wistar rats, using circulating erythrocytes (ER) as a model system. An aqueous extract of S dulcis plant (SPEt) (200 mg/kg body weight) was administered orally. We measured blood levels of glucose and plasma insulin and the binding of insulin to cell-membrane ER receptors. Glibenclamide was used as standard reference drug. The mean specific binding of insulin to ER was significantly lower in diabetic control rats (DC) (55.0 +/- 2.8%) than in SPEt-treated (70.0 +/- 3.5%)- and glibenclamide-treated (65.0 +/- 3.3%) diabetic rats, resulting in a significant decrease in plasma insulin. Scatchard plot analysis demonstrated that the decrease in insulin binding was accounted for by a lower number of insulin receptor sites per cell in DC rats when compared with SPEt- and glibenclamide-treated rats. High-affinity (Kd1), low-affinity (Kd2), and kinetic analysis revealed an increase in the average receptor affinity in ER from SPEt and glibenclamide treated diabetic rats having 2.5 +/- 0.15 x 10(10) M(-1) (Kd1); 17.0 +/- 1.0 x 10(-8) M(-1) (Kd2), and 2.0 +/- 0.1 x 10(-10) M(-1) (Kd1); 12.3 +/- 0.9 x 10(-8) M(-1) (Kd2) compared with 1.0 +/- 0.08 x 10(-10) M(-1) (Kd1); 2.7 +/- 0.25 x 10(-8) M(-1) (Kd2) in DC rats. The results suggest an acute alteration in the number of insulin receptors on ER membranes in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Treatment with SPEt and glibenclamide significantly improved specific insulin binding, with receptor number and affinity binding (p < 0.001) reaching almost normal non-diabetic levels. The data presented here show that SPEt and glibenclamide increase total ER membrane insulin binding sites with a concomitant significant increase in plasma insulin.

  11. Diabetes mellitus in the young: Gliptins or sulfonylurea after metformin?

    J Muthukrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diagnosis and initial management of diabetes mellitus (DM in the young are clinical dilemma. Gliptins may be a safer and more effective option than sulfonylureas. Few Indian studies have addressed this issue of clinical relevance. Aim: To compare the use of sitagliptin and glimepiride as early add-on drugs along with metformin in young patients with DM to achieve optimum glycemic targets. Methods: This was a prospective, open-label, cohort study set in a tertiary care hospital in North India. Newly diagnosed patients of DM ≤35 year of age were initially treated to pre-defined glycemic goals (Fasting plasma glucose (FPG 70-130, post prandial glucose (PPG 180, PPG > 250 mg/dl with/without catabolic symptoms/ketosis were withdrawn. Results: Sitagliptin with metfromin and metfromin alone group fared better than the glimepiride group for glycemic control, lesser treatment failures, and less weight gain. Conclusion : In this limited study, we found that sitagliptin is a safer and more effective option in young, newly diagnosed patients with DM. Findings of this study are relevant for clinical practice in Indian setting.

  12. Step-by-step Individual Intensification of Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. What is Further Choice after Metformin? (Literature Review

    І.V. Pankiv

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metformin — first-line drug for the treatment of diabetes mellitus (DM type 2, the use of which reduces the progression of carbohydrate metabolism disorders and helps to reduce mortality rates. The progressive course of DM type 2 leads to the fact that patients, in which initial therapy contained only metformin, ultimately required step-by-step addition of other glucose-lowering drugs to achieve and maintain glycemic control. This literature review examines different approaches to step-by-step individual intensification of therapy for DM type 2. The most popular and most studied combination aimed at both defects determining the development of metabolic disorders in DM type 2 (relative insulin deficiency and insulin resistance is a combination of metformin with sulfonylurea agents. Glimepiride has a unique combination of insulin secretagogue («careful» stimulation and insulin sensitizing properties at neutral effect on body weight and lower the risk of hypoglycemia. Therefore, glimepiride today is regarded as the best choice in patients with DM type 2 in the presence of cardiovascular risk compared with other sulfonylurea drugs.

  13. Effect of sitagliptin on blood glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who are treatment naive or poorly responsive to existing antidiabetic drugs: the JAMP study.

    Sakura, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Naotake; Sasamoto, Kazuo; Ohashi, Hiroshi; Hasumi, Sumiko; Ujihara, Noriko; Kasahara, Tadasu; Tomonaga, Osamu; Nunome, Hideo; Honda, Masashi; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the ameliorating effect of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, on blood glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were previously untreated with or who have a poor responsive to existing antidiabetic drugs. Sitagliptin (50 mg/day) was added on to the pre-existing therapy for type 2 diabetes and changes in the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level after 3 months of treatment were compared with the baseline and performed exploratory analysis. HbA1c levels were significantly decreased after 1 month of treatment compared to baseline, with a mean change in HbA1c level from baseline of -0.73% (range, -0.80 to -0.67) in the entire study population at 3 months. Patients who received a medium dose of glimepiride showed the least improvement in HbA1c levels. The percentage of patients who achieved an HbA1c level of blood glucose level of type 2 diabetes mellitus who were previously untreated with, or poorly responsive to, existing antidiabetic drugs. Thus, sitagliptin is expected to be useful in this patient group. However, the additional administration of sitagliptin in patients treated with medium-dose glimepiride only slightly improved blood glucose control when corrected for baseline HbA1c level.

  14. Anti-hyperglycemic effect and glucose tolerance of guajava (Psidium guajava L.) leaf ethanol extract in diabetic rats

    Yanis Musdja, Muhammad; Mahendra, Feizar; Musir, Ahmad

    2017-12-01

    Traditionally guava (Psidium guajava L) leaf is used for treatment of various ailments like diarrhea, wounds, rheumatism, anti-allergy, ant-spasmodic, etc, as folk medicine. The aim of this research is to know the effect of hypoglycemia and glucose tolerance of ethanol extract of guava leaf against male white rat. The guajava leaf was obtained from Balitro Bogor. Preparation of guajava leaf extract was done by cold maceration extraction technique using ethanol 70%. Male albino rats were made into diabetics using the alloxan method. Rats were divided into 6 groups, as a comparative drug for anti-hyperglycemic used glibenclamid and as a comparative drug for glucose tolerance used acarbose. The result of blood glucometer test showed that ethanol extract 70% of guajava leaf had effect as anti-hyperglycemic and glucose tolerance with no significant difference with glibenclamid drug as anti-hyperglycemic and acarbose as glucose tolerance drug.

  15. Efficiency and safety of transfer of type 2 diabetes patients inadequately controlled on metformin alone to combined therapy with metformin and diabeton MB

    Alexander Sergeevich Ametov

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate efficiency and tolerability of diabeton MB/metformin combination in patients failing to achieve optimal glycemic control when onmetformin monotherapy and prove advantages of this combination over combined low-dose therapy with glibenclamide and metformin. Materials and methods. The study included 464 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who poorly responded to metformin monotherapy. It was supplementedby diabeton MB. Efficiency and tolerability of combined treatment was evaluated from dynamics of glycemia and frequency of side-effects.40 patients were included in detailed comparative assessment (laboratory and instrumental, CGMS of this monotherapy and fixed low-dose combinationof glibenclamide with metformin. Results. Results of comparison show that diabeton MB/metformin combination ensured most optimal glycemic control with a minimal risk of side effects. Conclusion. Diabeton MB/metformin combination is convenient, efficient and safe.

  16. Regulation of ATP-sensitive K+ channels in insulinoma cells: Activation by somatostatin and protein kinase C and the role of cAMP

    De Weille, J.R.; Schmid-Antomarchi, H.; Fosset, M.; Lazdunski, M.

    1989-01-01

    The actions of somatostatin and of the phorbol ester 4β-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) were studied in rat insulinoma (RINm5F) cells by electrophysiological and 86 Rb + flux techniques. Both PMA and somatostatin hyperpolarize insulinoma cells by activating ATP-sensitive K + channels. The presence of intracellular GTP is required for the somatostatin effects. PMA- and somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization and channel activity are inhibited by the sulfonylurea glibenclamide. Glibenclamide-sensitive 86 Rb + efflux from insulinoma cells is stimulated by somatostatin in a dose-dependent manner (half maximal effect at 0.7 nM) and abolished by pertussis toxin pretreatment. Mutual roles of a GTP-binding protein, of protein kinase C, and of cAMP in the regulation of ATP-sensitive K + channels are discussed

  17. Effect of Extracts of Khat ( Catha edulis F.) on Glucose Handling in ...

    Blood was then taken from the tail vein at 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h to determine blood glucose level using commercial one touch glucometer. The flavonoid fraction at 200 and 400 mg/kg (p < 0.001) as well as the alkaloid fraction (p < 0.05) and glibenclamide (p < 0.05) produced a significant reduction in blood glucose level in ...

  18. Study of Hypoglycemic Activity of Aqueous Extract of Leucas indica Linn. Aerial Parts on Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    Mahananda Sarkar; Prova Biswas; Amalesh Samanta

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the hypoglycemic activity of the aqueous extract of Leucas indica Linn. on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. The extract showed a significant dose depended (200 and 400 mg/kg b.w, orally) reduction in fasting blood glucose level, comparing with reference drug, glibenclamide (0.5 mg/kg b.w, orally). In addition, the changes in body weight, analysis of serum biochemical parameters like lipid profile, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, glutamate p...

  19. Evaluation of the Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease and Rates of Oral Antidiabetic Prescribing in Accordance with Guidelines and Manufacturer Recommendations in Type 2 Diabetic Patients within a Long-Term Care Setting

    Ning Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study assessed the prevalence of moderate to severe chronic kidney disease (CKD among nursing home (NH residents with type 2 diabetes. The pattern of oral antidiabetic drug (OAD use and their concordance with the National Kidney Foundation (NKF guideline and prescribing information (PI was also assessed. About half (47% of diabetic residents had moderate to severe CKD. A little over a quarter of the 186 residents using OADs received at least one NKF-discordant OAD prescription. Metformin was the most commonly misused OAD. PI nonconcordance was observed in 58.6% of residents and was highest in glipizide and metformin users. With the high prevalence of moderate to severe CKD in NH residents with diabetes, physicians should consider residents’ renal function when choosing treatment plans and review treatments regularly to check compliance with the NKF guidelines or PIs.

  20. TREATMENT OF DIABETES MELLITUS IN A GOLDEN LION TAMARIN (LEONTOPITHECUS ROSALIA) WITH THE GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDE-1 MIMETIC EXENATIDE.

    Johnson, James G; Langan, Jennifer N; Gilor, Chen

    2016-09-01

    An 8-yr-old male golden lion tamarin ( Leontopithecus rosalia ) was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus based on hyperglycemia and persistent glycosuria. Initial treatment consisted of the oral antihyperglycemic medications glipizide and metformin that resulted in decreased blood glucose concentrations; however, marked glycosuria persisted. Insufficient improvement on oral antihyperglycemic therapy and poor feasibility of daily subcutaneous insulin therapy led to an investigation into an alternative therapy with extended-release exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetic, at a dosage of 0.13 mg/kg subcutaneously once per month. Following treatment with exenatide, the persistent glycosuria resolved, the animal maintained normal blood glucose concentrations, and had lower serum fructosamine concentrations compared to pretreatment levels. Based on these findings, extended-release exenatide could be considered as a therapeutic option in nonhuman primates with diabetes mellitus that do not respond to oral antihyperglycemics and in which daily subcutaneous insulin is not feasible.

  1. Reduction in renal blood flow following administration of norepinephrine and phenylephrine in septic rats treated with Kir6.1 ATP-sensitive and KCa1.1 calcium-activated K+ channel blockers.

    da Rosa Maggi Sant'Helena, Bruna; Guarido, Karla L; de Souza, Priscila; Crestani, Sandra; da Silva-Santos, J Eduardo

    2015-10-15

    We evaluated the effects of K+ channel blockers in the vascular reactivity of in vitro perfused kidneys, as well as on the influence of vasoactive agents in the renal blood flow of rats subjected to the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis. Both norepinephrine and phenylephrine had the ability to increase the vascular perfusion pressure reduced in kidneys of rats subjected to CLP at 18 h and 36 h before the experiments. The non-selective K+ channel blocker tetraethylammonium, but not the Kir6.1 blocker glibenclamide, normalized the effects of phenylephrine in kidneys from the CLP 18 h group. Systemic administration of tetraethylammonium, glibenclamide, or the KCa1.1 blocker iberiotoxin, did not change the renal blood flow in control or septic rats. Norepinephrine or phenylephrine also had no influence on the renal blood flow of septic animals, but its injection in rats from the CLP 18 h group previously treated with either glibenclamide or iberiotoxin resulted in an exacerbated reduction in the renal blood flow. These results suggest an abnormal functionality of K+ channels in the renal vascular bed in sepsis, and that the blockage of different subtypes of K+ channels may be deleterious for blood perfusion in kidneys, mainly when associated with vasoactive drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Anti-Glycemic and Anti-Hepatotoxic Effects of Mangosteen Vinegar Rind from Garcinia mangostana Against HFD/STZ-Induced Type II Diabetes in Mice

    Karim Naymul

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on anti-glycemic and anti-hepatotoxic effects of mangosteen vinegar rind (MVR on five weeks high-fat diet (HFD / single dose streptozotocin (STZ 30 mg/kg BW induced male ICR diabetic mice. Mice were randomly divided into five groups (n=6, normal control, diabetic control, and diabetic groups treated with MVR 100, 200 mg/kg BW and glibenclamide 60 mg/kg BW for one week. After the treatment, lipid profile, glycogen and bilirubin contents, oxidative damage (malondialdehyde, MDA, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT activities, antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT were measured in plasma and/or liver tissues. MVR and glibenclamide treatment to HFD/STZ-induced diabetic mice significantly reduced their plasma glucose, plasma lipid profile, and hepatic lipid profile (P<0.05. Increased hepatic glycogen content indicates improvement of insulin sensitivity. Moreover, oxidative damage markers were ameliorated in MVR- and glibenclamide-treated groups compared to the diabetic control group. MVR with phenolic compounds content of 75 mg GAE/g dry weight and antioxidant potential of 303 mmol/L Trolox/g dry weight acted as a hepatoprotective agent against oxidative damage.

  3. Molecular mechanism of α-tocopheryl-phosphate transport across the cell membrane

    Negis, Yesim; Meydani, Mohsen; Zingg, Jean-Marc; Azzi, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    α-Tocopheryl-phosphate (α-TP) is synthesized and hydrolyzed in animal cells and tissues where it modulates several functions. α-TP is more potent than α-T in inhibiting cell proliferation, down-regulating CD36 transcription, inhibiting atherosclerotic plaque formation. Administration of α-TP to cells or animals requires its transfer through membranes, via a transporter. We show here that α-TP is passing the plasma membrane via a system that is inhibited by glibenclamide and probenecid, inhibitors of a number of transporters. Glibenclamide and probenecid prevent dose-dependently α-TP inhibition of cell proliferation. The two inhibitors act on ATP binding cassette (ABC) and organic anion transporters (OAT). Since ABC transporters function to export solutes and α-TP is transported into cells, it may be concluded that α-TP transport may occur via an OAT family member. Due to the protection by glibenclamide and probenecid on the α-TP induced cell growth inhibition it appears that α-TP acts after its uptake inside cells

  4. Efek Antidiabetes Kombinasi Ekstrak Bawang Putih (Allium sativum Linn. dan Rimpang Kunyit (Curcumma domestica Val. dengan Pembanding Glibenklamid pada Penderita Diabetes Melitus Tipe 2

    Ame Suciati Setiawan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The combination of garlic (Allium sativum Linn. and curcumin extract (Curcumma domestica Val. can be used as an antidiabetic oral to type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM patients and the clinical trial showed that the extract can decrease blood glucose at a dose 2.4 g/day. This clinical trial was conducted to know the antidiabetic effect of the combination of garlic and curcumin extract compared with antidiabetic oral, glibenclamide. The subjects were >35 years of age with type 2 DM who came to internal and endocrine clinic RSUP. Hasan Sadikin Bandung and has been treated with medical nutrition therapy for 2 weeks period November 2007–December 2008. The research design was parallel, randomized and double blind. The combination of garlic and curcumin extract decreased mean value of fasting blood glucose 9.25 mg/dL, 2h PP blood glucose 22.25 mg/dL, HbA1c 1,30% and insulin 12.57 mg/ dL compared with baseline whereas glibenclamide decreased the mean value of fasting blood glucose 72.37 mg/dL, 2h PP 114,25 mg/dL, HbA1c 4.12% and increased insulin 3.34 mg/dL. In conclusion, the extract combination has antidiabetic effect eventhough the effect was not as high as glibenclamide

  5. Antihyperlipidemic and antiperoxidative effect of Diasulin, a polyherbal formulation in alloxan induced hyperglycemic rats

    Pari Leelavinothan

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was undertaken to investigation the effect of Diasulin, a poly herbal drug composed of ethanolic extract of ten medicinal plants on blood glucose, plasma insulin, tissue lipid profile, and lipidperoxidation in alloxan induced diabetes. Methods Ethanolic extract of Diasulin a, poly herbal drug was administered orally (200 mg/kg body weight for 30 days. The different doses of Diasulin on blood glucose and plasma insulin in diabetic rats were studied and the levels of lipid peroxides [TBARS, and Hydroperoxide] and tissue lipids [cholesterol, triglyceride, phospholipides and free fatty acids] were also estimated in alloxan induced diabetic rats. The effects were compared with glibenclamide. Result Treatment with Diasulin and glibenclamide resulted in a significant reduction of blood glucose and increase in plasma insulin. Diasulin also resulted in a significant decrease in tissue lipids and lipid peroxide formation. The effect produced by Diasulin was comparable with that of glibenclamide. Conclusion The decreased lipid peroxides and tissue lipids clearly showed the antihyperlipidemic and antiperoxidative effect of Diasulin apart from its antidiabetic effect.

  6. Antidiabetic activity of medium-polar extract from the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana Bert. (Bertoni on alloxan-induced diabetic rats

    Himanshu Misra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the medicative effects of medium-polar (benzene:acetone, 1:1, v/v extract of leaves from Stevia rebaudiana (family Asteraceae on alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced in adult albino Wistar rats by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of alloxan (180 mg/kg. Medium-polar extract was administered orally at daily dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg body wt. basis for 10 days. The control group received normal saline (0.9% for the same duration. Glibenclamide was used as positive control reference drug against Stevia extract. Results: Medium-polar leaf extract of S. rebaudiana (200 and 400 mg/kg produced a delayed but significant (P < 0.01 decrease in the blood glucose level, without producing condition of hypoglycemia after treatment, together with lesser loss in the body weight as compared with standard positive control drug glibenclamide. Conclusions: Treatment of diabetes with sulfonylurea drugs (glibenclamide causes hypoglycemia followed by greater reduction in body weight, which are the most worrisome effects of these drugs. Stevia extract was found to antagonize the necrotic action of alloxan and thus had a re-vitalizing effect on β-cells of pancreas.

  7. Antidiabetic effect of Chloroxylon swietenia bark extracts on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    B. Jayaprasad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes has been increasing at an alarming rate around the world, and experts have relied on remedies from the utilization of ancient drugs that are essentially derived from plants. The present study aimed to evaluate the antidiabetic potential of Chloroxylon swietenia bark extracts on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in male albino Wistar rats by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ (50 mg/kg b.w.. The diabetic rats were administered orally with C. swietenia bark (CSB methanolic (CSBMEt and aqueous (CSBAEt (250 mg/kg b.w. extracts and glibenclamide (600 µg/kg b.w. by intragastric intubation for 45 days. The result showed a heavy loss in weight, increase in blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin level, and decline in plasma insulin and total hemoglobin content. Furthermore, glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bis phosphatase were found to be increased whereas hexokinase and glycogen contents were decreased in STZ induced diabetic rats. CSBAEt, CSBMEt and glibenclamide treated diabetic rats showed moderate reduction in blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels; in addition, plasma insulin and hemoglobin levels were elevated. The altered activities of carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes and liver glycogen were improved remarkably. CSBMEt results were comparable to the standard drug glibenclamide. The present findings support the usage of the plant extracts for the traditional treatment of diabetes.

  8. Sulphonylurea drugs reduce hypoxic damage in the isolated perfused rat kidney.

    Engbersen, R; Moons, M M; Wouterse, A C; Dijkman, H B; Kramers, C; Smits, P; Russel, F G

    2000-08-01

    Sulphonylurea drugs have been shown to protect against hypoxic damage in isolated proximal tubules of the kidney. In the present study we investigated whether these drugs can protect against hypoxic damage in a whole kidney preparation. Tolbutamide (200 microM) and glibenclamide (10 microM) were applied to the isolated perfused rat kidney prior to changing the gassing from oxygen to nitrogen for 30 min. Hypoxic perfusions resulted in an increased fractional excretion of glucose (FE % glucose 14.3+/-1.5 for hypoxic perfusions vs 4.9+/-1.6 for normoxic perfusions, mean +/- s.e. mean, P<0.05), which could be completely restored by 200 microM tolbutamide (5.7+/-0.4 for tolbutamide vs 14.3+/-1.5 for untreated hypoxic kidneys, P<0.01). Furthermore, tolbutamide reduced the total amount of LDH excreted in the urine (220+/-100 mU for tolbutamide vs. 1220+/-160 mU for untreated hypoxic kidneys, P<0.01). Comparable results were obtained with glibenclamide (10 microM). In agreement with the effect on functional parameters, ultrastructural analysis of proximal tubules showed increased brush border preservation in tolbutamide treated kidneys compared to untreated hypoxic kidneys. We conclude that glibenclamide and tolbutamide are both able to reduce hypoxic damage to proximal tubules in the isolated perfused rat kidney when applied in the appropriate concentrations.

  9. A family with a novel termination mutation in hepatic nuclear factor 1α in maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 3 which is unresponsive to sulphonylurea therapy.

    Demol, S; Lebenthal, Y; Bar-Meisels, M; Phillip, M; Gat-Yablonski, G; Gozlan, Y

    2014-01-01

    Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a monogenic form of diabetes mellitus. To identify the genetic basis in a family with 3 generations of diabetes and to assess the concordance between the genotype and phenotype. A molecular analysis was performed on genomic DNA using polymerase chain reaction, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and sequencing. A mixed-meal tolerance test (MMTT) was performed with/without glibenclamide. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed on all family members with diabetes due to the location of the mutation. A novel c.618G>A, p.W206X termination mutation was identified in the hepatic nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) gene. The mutation was identified in the proband and 8 of the 14 family members tested. An MMTT stimulus (±2.5 and 5 mg glibenclamide) produced a similar glucose profile and C-peptide graph in both the obese proband and her nonobese mother, showing no effect of the glibenclamide. No evidence of liver adenomas was found in the abdominal ultrasonography. We described a novel c.618G>A, p.W206X mutation in HNF1α associated with MODY 3 but not with hepatocellular adenoma. In contradistinction to most MODY 3 mutations, treatment with sulphonylurea was found to be a clinically ineffective alternative to insulin therapy.

  10. A Semi-Supervised Approach for Refining Transcriptional Signatures of Drug Response and Repositioning Predictions.

    Francesco Iorio

    Full Text Available We present a novel strategy to identify drug-repositioning opportunities. The starting point of our method is the generation of a signature summarising the consensual transcriptional response of multiple human cell lines to a compound of interest (namely the seed compound. This signature can be derived from data in existing databases, such as the connectivity-map, and it is used at first instance to query a network interlinking all the connectivity-map compounds, based on the similarity of their transcriptional responses. This provides a drug neighbourhood, composed of compounds predicted to share some effects with the seed one. The original signature is then refined by systematically reducing its overlap with the transcriptional responses induced by drugs in this neighbourhood that are known to share a secondary effect with the seed compound. Finally, the drug network is queried again with the resulting refined signatures and the whole process is carried on for a number of iterations. Drugs in the final refined neighbourhood are then predicted to exert the principal mode of action of the seed compound. We illustrate our approach using paclitaxel (a microtubule stabilising agent as seed compound. Our method predicts that glipizide and splitomicin perturb microtubule function in human cells: a result that could not be obtained through standard signature matching methods. In agreement, we find that glipizide and splitomicin reduce interphase microtubule growth rates and transiently increase the percentage of mitotic cells-consistent with our prediction. Finally, we validated the refined signatures of paclitaxel response by mining a large drug screening dataset, showing that human cancer cell lines whose basal transcriptional profile is anti-correlated to them are significantly more sensitive to paclitaxel and docetaxel.

  11. Evaluation of antidiabetic, hypolipedimic and antioxidant activity of hydroalcoholic extract of leaves and fruit peel of Punica granatum in male Wistar albino rats.

    Salwe, Kartik J; Sachdev, Devender O; Bahurupi, Yogesh; Kumarappan, Manimekalai

    2015-01-01

    We investigated anti-diabetic, hypolipedimic and antioxidant activity of hydroalcoholic extract from leaves and fruit peel of Punica granatum. Streptozotocin induced diabetic Wister rats were used in this study consisting of seven groups of six animals each. Groups (1) normal control, (2) diabetic control, (3) leaves extract 100 mg/kg b.w. of P. granatum, (4) leaves extract 200 mg/kg b.w. of P. granatum, (5) fruit peel extract 100 mg/kg b.w. of P. granatum, (6) peel extract 200 mg/kg b.w. of P. granatum and (7) glibenclamide respectively. Fasting blood sugar was recorded on 1(st), 7(th), 14(th), 21(st) and 28(th) day. At the end of the experiment Lipid profile and levels of antioxidants were determined. Safety profile of both extracts was evaluated using acute and chronic toxicity studies. Higher dose of fruit peel extract of P. granatum (PEPG) and glibenclamide significantly lowered blood glucose level from 7(th) day onwards however glibenclamide was found to be more effective. Leaves extract at higher dose and fruit extract at lower dose also significantly lowered blood glucose level from 14(th) day onwards. Leaves extract at lower dose also significantly lowered blood glucose level from 21(st) day onwards. Glibenclamide and higher dose of fruit PEPG extract significantly reduced the total cholesterol, triglyceride levels and significantly increased the high density lipoprotein cholesterol level. Glibenclamide followed by higher dose was found more effective in reducing plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and increasing levels of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and catalase). No toxicity was observed even when both extracts were administered at 10 times of higher dose used in this study and no significant changes were seen when it were used chronically. Leaves and fruit PEPG possesses significant anti-diabetic, hypolipedimic and antioxidant properties. This study supports the traditional use of P. granatum in diabetes. Fruit peel which is

  12. A case of hypoglycemic hemiparesis and literature review.

    Yoshino, Tetsuhiro; Meguro, Shu; Soeda, Yukie; Itoh, Arata; Kawai, Toshihide; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    An 89-year-old man with diabetes treated with metformin 500 mg/day and glimepiride 4 mg/day was hospitalized because of hypoglycemic right hemiparesis and dysarthria (casual glucose value 1.8 mmol/L), which resolved quickly following administration of 40 mL of 40% dextrose. Hemiparesis is a rare symptom (4.2%) of hypoglycemia. There are about 200 case reports of hypoglycemic hemiparesis. The average glucose level at which hemiparesis developed was 1.8 mmol/L. Right-sided hemiparesis predominated (R 66%; L 34%). On imaging studies, abnormal findings were frequently observed in the internal capsule or splenium of the corpus callosum. The mechanism of hemiparesis is not fully understood. The existence of cases in which hypoglycemia cannot be distinguished from stroke on imaging studies suggests the importance of measurement of the blood glucose level when the symptoms of stroke are first recognized.

  13. Hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetes patients treated with insulin: the advantages of continuous glucose monitoring

    Vadim Valer'evich Klimontov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims.  To determine the incidence and risk factors for hypoglycemia in elderly insulin-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients by means of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM. Materials and Methods.  We observed seventy-six hospitalized patients with T2DM, aged 65 to 79 years. Treatment with basal insulin (n=36, premixed insulin (n=12 or basal-bolus insulin regimen (n=28 was followed by metformin (n=44, glimepiride (n=14 and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (n=14. 2-days CGM with retrospective data analysis was performed in all patients. During CGM, three fasting and three 2-h postprandial finger-prick glucose values were obtained daily with portable glucose meter. Results.  Hypoglycemia (identified as blood glucose

  14. Are patients reliable when self-reporting medication use? Validation of structured drug interviews and home visits by drug analysis and prescription data in acutely hospitalized patients

    Glintborg, Bente; Hillestrøm, Peter René; Olsen, Lenette Holm

    2007-01-01

    were compared to the patients' self-reported medication history. Information on prescribed drugs dispensed from any Danish pharmacy was collected from nationwide real-time pharmacy records. The authors performed home visits in a subgroup of 115 patients 4 weeks after their discharge. Stored drugs were......The medication history among hospitalized patients often relies on patients' self-reports due to insufficient communication between health care professionals. The aim of the present study was to estimate the reliability of patients' self-reported medication use. Five hundred patients admitted...... to an acute medical department at a Danish university hospital were interviewed on the day of admission about their recent medication use. Blood samples drawn immediately after admission were screened for contents of 5 drugs (digoxin, bendroflumethiazide, amlodipine, simvastatin, glimepiride), and the results...

  15. Consensus recommendations on sulfonylurea and sulfonylurea combinations in the management of Type 2 diabetes mellitus – International Task Force

    Sanjay Kalra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available For decades, sulfonylureas (SUs have been important drugs in the antidiabetic therapeutic armamentarium. They have been used as monotherapy as well as combination therapy. Focus on newer drugs and concerns about the risk of severe hypoglycemia and weight gain with some SUs have led to discussion on their safety and utility. It has to be borne in mind that the adverse events associated with SUs should not be ascribed to the whole class, as many modern SUs, such as glimepiride and gliclazide modified release, are associated with better safety profiles. Furthermore, individualization of treatment, using SUs in combination with other drugs, backed with careful monitoring and patient education, ensures maximum benefits with minimal side effects. The current guidelines, developed by experts from Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, promote the safe and smart use of SUs in combination with other glucose-lowering drugs.

  16. Are patients reliable when self-reporting medication use? Validation of structured drug interviews and home visits by drug analysis and prescription data in acutely hospitalized patients

    Glintborg, Bente; Hillestrøm, Peter René; Olsen, Lenette Holm

    2007-01-01

    inspected, and patients were interviewed about their drug use. Additional blood samples were drawn for drug analysis. The median age of included patients was 72 years, and 298 patients (60%) were women. Patients reported use of 3 (median) prescription-only medications (range, 0-14) during the structured...... interview. The congruence between self-report and drug analysis was high for all 5 drugs measured (all kappa >0.8). However, 9 patients (2%) reported use of drugs that were not detected in their blood samples. In 29 patients (6%), the blood samples contained drugs not reported during the structured...... to an acute medical department at a Danish university hospital were interviewed on the day of admission about their recent medication use. Blood samples drawn immediately after admission were screened for contents of 5 drugs (digoxin, bendroflumethiazide, amlodipine, simvastatin, glimepiride), and the results...

  17. Application of a Fast Separation Method for Anti-diabetics in Pharmaceuticals Using Monolithic Column: Comparative Study With Silica Based C-18 Particle Packed Column.

    Hemdan, A; Abdel-Aziz, Omar

    2018-04-01

    Run time is a predominant factor in HPLC for quality control laboratories especially if there is large number of samples have to be analyzed. Working at high flow rates cannot be attained with silica based particle packed column due to elevated backpressure issues. The use of monolithic column as an alternative to traditional C-18 column was tested for fast separation of pharmaceuticals, where the results were very competitive. The performance comparison of both columns was tested for separation of anti-diabetic combination containing Metformin, Pioglitazone and Glimepiride using Gliclazide as an internal standard. Working at high flow rates with less significant backpressure was obtained with the monolithic column where the run time was reduced from 6 min in traditional column to only 1 min in monolithic column with accepted resolution. The structure of the monolith contains many pores which can adapt the high flow rate of the mobile phase. Moreover, peak symmetry and equilibration time were more efficient with monolithic column.

  18. Mortality and cardiovascular risk associated with different insulin secretagogues compared with metformin in type 2 diabetes, with or without a previous myocardial infarction: a nationwide study

    Schramm, Tina Ken; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Vaag, Allan

    2011-01-01

    Aims The impact of insulin secretagogues (ISs) on long-term major clinical outcomes in type 2 diabetes remains unclear. We examined mortality and cardiovascular risk associated with all available ISs compared with metformin in a nationwide study. Methods and results All Danish residents >20 years......, initiating single-agent ISs or metformin between 1997 and 2006 were followed for up to 9 years (median 3.3 years) by individual-level linkage of nationwide registers. All-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and the composite of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and cardiovascular mortality...... associated with individual ISs were investigated in patients with or without previous MI by multivariable Cox proportional-hazard analyses including propensity analyses. A total of 107 806 subjects were included, of whom 9607 had previous MI. Compared with metformin, glimepiride (hazard ratios and 95...

  19. Efficacy and safety of vildagliptin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled with dual combination of metformin and sulphonylurea.

    Lukashevich, V; Del Prato, S; Araga, M; Kothny, W

    2014-05-01

    The broadly used combination of metformin and sulphonylurea (SU) often fails to bring patients to glycaemic goal. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of vildagliptin as add-on therapy to metformin plus glimepiride combination in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who had inadequate glycaemic control. A multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled study randomized patients to receive treatment with vildagliptin 50 mg bid (n = 158) or placebo (n = 160) for 24 weeks. After 24 weeks, the adjusted mean change in haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was -1.01% with vildagliptin (baseline 8.75%) and -0.25% with placebo (baseline 8.80%), with a between-treatment difference of -0.76% (p vildagliptin achieved the HbA1c target vildagliptin and placebo was -1.13 mmol/l (p vildagliptin reduced HbA1c by 0.74% from baseline 7.82% (between-treatment difference: -0.97%; p Vildagliptin was well tolerated with low incidence of hypoglycaemia, slightly higher than with placebo (5.1% vs. 1.9%) and no clinically relevant weight gain. Vildagliptin significantly improved glycaemic control in patients with T2DM inadequately controlled with metformin plus glimepiride combination. The addition of vildagliptin was well tolerated with low risk of hypoglycaemia and weight gain. This makes vildagliptin an attractive treatment option for patients failing on metformin plus SU particularly in patients with baseline HbA1c ≤8%. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Vildagliptin added to sulfonylurea improves glycemic control without hypoglycemia and weight gain in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Yang, Wenying; Xing, Xiaoping; Lv, Xiaofeng; Li, Yiming; Ma, Jianhua; Yuan, Guoyue; Sun, Feifei; Wang, Wei; Woloschak, Michael; Lukashevich, Valentina; Kozlovski, Plamen; Kothny, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy and safety of vildagliptin as add-on to sulfonylurea therapy in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) inadequately controlled on sulfonylurea monotherapy. The 24-week randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study compared vildagliptin 50 mg, q.d., with placebo as add-on to glimepiride in T2DM patients who were inadequately controlled (HbA1c 7.5%-11.0% [58-97 mmol/mol]) on a stable dose of sulfonylurea for ≥12 weeks before study entry. In all, 279 patients were randomized to receive either vildagliptin (n = 143) or placebo (n = 136). At baseline, overall mean age was 58.5 years, body weight 68.1 kg, duration of diabetes 6.9 years and daily glimepiride dose 3.3 mg. After 24 weeks, the adjusted mean change (AMΔ) in HbA1c was -0.7% (-8 mmol/mol; baseline 8.6%, 70 mmol/mol) in the vildagliptin group and -0.2% (-2 mmol/mol; baseline 8.7%, 72 mmol/mol) in the placebo group, with a treatment difference of -0.5% (-5 mmol/mol; P vildagliptin and placebo groups reported low and comparable incidences of adverse events (14.0% vs. 17.8%) and serious adverse events (0.7% in each group). Vildagliptin 50 mg, q.d., added to sulfonylurea monotherapy is effective in Chinese patients with T2DM, without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia and weight gain. © 2014 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of add-on treatments to metformin in a Swedish setting: liraglutide vs sulphonylurea or sitagplitin.

    Steen Carlsson, Katarina; Persson, Ulf

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate long-run cost-effectiveness in a Swedish setting for liraglutide compared with sulphonylureas (glimepiride) or sitagliptin, all as add-on to metformin for patients with type 2 diabetes insufficiently controlled with metformin in monotherapy. The IHE Cohort Model of Type 2 Diabetes was used to evaluate clinical and economic outcomes from a societal perspective. Model input data were obtained from two clinical trials, the Swedish National Diabetes Register and the literature. Cost data reflected year 2013 price level. The robustness of results was checked with one-way-sensitivity analysis and probability sensitivity analysis. The cost per QALY gained for liraglutide (1.2 mg) compared to SU (glimepiride 4 mg), both as add-on to metformin, ranged from SEK 226,000 to SEK 255,000 in analyzed patient cohorts. The cost per QALY for liraglutide (1.2 mg) vs sitagliptin (100 mg) as second-line treatment was lower, ranging from SEK 149,000 to SEK 161,000. Costs of preventive treatment were driving costs, but there was also a cost offset from reduced costs of complications of ∼ 20%. Notable cost differences were found for nephropathy, stroke, and heart failure. The predicted life expectancy with liraglutide increased the cost of net consumption for liraglutide. The analysis was an ex-ante analysis using model input data from clinical trials which may not reflect effectiveness in real-world clinical practice in broader patient populations. This limitation was explored in the sensitivity analysis. The lack of specific data on loss of production due to diabetes complications implied that these costs may be under-estimated. Treatment strategies with liraglutide 1.2 mg improved the expected quality-of-life and increased costs when compared to SU and to sitagliptin for second-line add-on treatments. The cost per QALY for liraglutide was in the range considered medium by Swedish authorities.

  2. The effect of nitrazepam on depression and curiosity in behavioral tests in mice: The role of potassium channels.

    Nikoui, Vahid; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Azhand, Pardis; Zolfaghari, Samira; Amiri, Shayan; Foroohandeh, Mehrdad; Motevalian, Manijeh; Sharifi, Ali Mohammad; Bakhtiarian, Azam

    2016-11-15

    Evidence show that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors are involved in depression, so the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nitrazepam as agonist of GABA A receptors on depression and curiosity in male mice and the role of potassium channel in antidepressant-like response. For this purpose, we studied the antidepressant-like properties of fluoxetine, nitrazepam, glibenclamide, and cromakalim by both forced swimming test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST). Animals were injected by various doses of nitrazepam (0.05, 0.1, and 0.5mg/kg). Nitrazepam at dose of 0.5mg/kg significantly decreased the immobility time compared to control group in both FST and TST. Fluoxetine also showed such a response. Co-administration of nitrazepam (0.05mg/kg) with glibenclamide in TST (1mg/kg) and in FST (0.3, 1mg/kg) also showed antidepressant-like response. Beside, cromakalim (0.1mg/kg) could reverse the antidepressant-like effect of nitrazepam (0.5mg/kg) in both FST and TST, while cromakalim and glibenclamide alone could not change the immobility time compared to control group (P>0.05). The hole-board test revealed that nitrazepam at doses of 0.5 and 0.1mg/kg could increase the activity of the animal's head-dipping and boost the curiosity and exploration behavior of mice. The results of this study revealed that nitrazepam may possess antidepressant-like properties and this effect is dependent to potassium channels in both FST and TST. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of Biological Effects of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Hibiscus Rosa Sinensis Flowers on Alloxan Induced Diabetes in Rats.

    Pethe, Mohan; Yelwatkar, Samir; Manchalwar, Smita; Gujar, Vijay

    2017-08-01

    Aim and Objective The current study sought to investigate antidiabetic, hypolipidimic, antioxidant and histopathological effects of floral extract of Hibiscus rosa sinensis in Alloxan induced Diabetes in rats. Materials and Methods Study was conducted on 6 groups with 6 wistar rats in each group for the period of 4 weeks. Group I: served as normal control (NC), rats administered with gum acacia 1 ml daily, group II: consider as diabetic control (DC) treated with alloxon 150 mg/kg body wt. Whereas Hibiscus rosa-sinensis flower extract was given orally in group III (DE1), group IV (DE2), group V (DE3) at doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight dissolved in distilled water respectively. Group VI (DG) was given glibenclamide (5 mg/kg) as a standard drug and results were compared in reference to it. Results The results indicate that the test compound HEFHR (Hydroalcoholic extract of flower Hibiscus rosa-sinensis) has significant and sustained oral antidiabetic activity, comparable with the hypoglycemic effect of Glibenclamide and Sulphonylurea. Flower extract of HRS was more efficacious in lipid lowering effect and in antioxidative activity than glibenclamide. After 28 day treatment with flower extract, size of islets was significantly increased and necrosis and atrophy of islets were significantly improved; also increase in number and diameter of cell islets appeared to be regular as compared to the diabetic group. Conclusion HEFHR possesses significant antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and antioxidant properties as well as regeneration of beta cells in rats. Further evaluation of HEFHR is in progress. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. AKTIVITAS GLUTATION PEROKSIDASE DAN KADAR GULA DARAH TIKUS DIABETES YANG DIBERI EKSTRAK DAUN KAPULAGA (Amomum cardamomum

    Hafsah Riyanti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress in a patient with diabetes known to decrease the activity of GSH-PX and increase the level of blood glucose. Glibenclamide is commonly used by patients with diabetes to lower the blood glucose. However, the long-term use of glibenclamide may induce the damage of pancreatic β-cells. The extract containing flavonoids and vitamin C of cardamoms leaf can reduce free radicals. The effect of cardamoms leaf extract on the enzymes activity and the level of blood glucose in diabetic rats is yet unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of cardamoms leaf extract administration in the GSH-PX activities and the level of blood glucose of diabetic rats. The method used in this study was experimental with completely randomized design (CRD. There were three groups with five replicates for each. The first group, diabetic rats as control group were given no treatment; the second group, diabetic rats were given cardamoms leaf extract at the dose of 100 mg/kg of body weight; the third group, the diabetic rat were given glibenclamide at the dose of 2 mg/kg of body weight. Blood samples were taken three times at 0, 7, and 14 days after each treatment. Parameters measured were GSH-PX activity and the level of blood glucose. The data were analyzed using ANOVA F-test with a confidence level of 95%. The result of this study showed that the cardamoms leaf extract treatment decreased the activity of GSH-PX activity and decreased the level of blood glucose at a significant level (p < 0.05 from 278.8 to 101.4 mg/dl.

  5. An NBD derivative of the selective rat toxicant norbormide as a new probe for living cell imaging.

    Claudio D'amore

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Norbormide (NRB is a unique compound that acts directly on rat vascular myocytes to trigger a contractile process, through an as yet unknown mechanism, which results in the selective contraction of rat peripheral arteries. To gain insight into the mechanisms involved in NRB rat-selective activity, we investigated the subcellular distribution of NRB-AF12, a nitrobenzodiazole (NBD-derivative of NRB, in living NRB-sensitive and NRB-insensitive cells. In both cell types, NRB-AF12 localised to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, Golgi apparatus, mitochondria, lysosomes and endosomes; however, in NRB-sensitive cells, the fluorescence also extended to the plasma membrane. NRB-AF12 was rapidly internalised into the cells, could easily be washed out and then reloaded back into the same cells, all with a high degree of reproducibility. Cells exposed for 24 h to NRB-AF12 did not show apparent signs of toxicity, even at concentrations of the dye (10 µM much higher than those required for fluorescence labelling (500 ηM. The distribution pattern of NRB-AF12 fluorescence was near identical to that of ER-Tracker® (Er-Tr, a fluorescent derivative of glibenclamide, a known KATP channel blocker. Displacement tests did not demonstrate, but at the same time did not rule out the possibility of a common target for ER-Tr, NRB-AF12, NRB and glibenclamide. On the basis of these results we hypothesize a common target site for NRB-AF12 and ER-Tr, and a similar target profile for norbormide and glibenclamide, and propose NRB-AF12 as an alternative fluorescence probe to ER-Tracker. Furthermore, NRB-based fluorescence derivatives could be designed to selectively label single cellular structures.

  6. Antidiabetic and Antihyperlipidemic Activity of Cucurbita maxima Duchense (Pumpkin) Seeds on Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    Ashish K. Sharma; Ashok Sharma

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic effect of petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and alcohol extract of seeds of Cucurbita maxima for its purported use in diabetes. The antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic activity of different extracts of Cucurbita maxima seeds was evaluated in wistar albino rats against streptozotocin (50 mg/kg i.p.) at dose of 200 mg/kg p.o. for 21 days. Glibenclamide (500µg/kg) was used as reference drug. Fasting blood g...

  7. Chronic antidiabetic sulfonylureas in vivo: reversible effects on mouse pancreatic beta-cells.

    Maria Sara Remedi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cell ATP-sensitive potassium (K ATP channels are critical links between nutrient metabolism and insulin secretion. In humans, reduced or absent beta-cell K ATP channel activity resulting from loss-of-function K ATP mutations induces insulin hypersecretion. Mice with reduced K ATP channel activity also demonstrate hyperinsulinism, but mice with complete loss of K ATP channels (K ATP knockout mice show an unexpected insulin undersecretory phenotype. Therefore we have proposed an "inverse U" hypothesis to explain the response to enhanced excitability, in which excessive hyperexcitability drives beta-cells to insulin secretory failure without cell death. Many patients with type 2 diabetes treated with antidiabetic sulfonylureas (which inhibit K ATP activity and thereby enhance insulin secretion show long-term insulin secretory failure, which we further suggest might reflect a similar progression.To test the above hypotheses, and to mechanistically investigate the consequences of prolonged hyperexcitability in vivo, we used a novel approach of implanting mice with slow-release sulfonylurea (glibenclamide pellets, to chronically inhibit beta-cell K ATP channels. Glibenclamide-implanted wild-type mice became progressively and consistently diabetic, with significantly (p < 0.05 reduced insulin secretion in response to glucose. After 1 wk of treatment, these mice were as glucose intolerant as adult K ATP knockout mice, and reduction of secretory capacity in freshly isolated islets from implanted animals was as significant (p < 0.05 as those from K ATP knockout animals. However, secretory capacity was fully restored in islets from sulfonylurea-treated mice within hours of drug washout and in vivo within 1 mo after glibenclamide treatment was terminated. Pancreatic immunostaining showed normal islet size and alpha-/beta-cell distribution within the islet, and TUNEL staining showed no evidence of apoptosis.These results demonstrate that

  8. The hydrogen sulfide donor, Lawesson's reagent, prevents alendronate-induced gastric damage in rats

    Nicolau, L.A.D. [Núcleo de Pesquisa em Produtos Naturais, Departamento de Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Piauí, Teresina, PI (Brazil); Silva, R.O.; Damasceno, S.R.B.; Carvalho, N.S.; Costa, N.R.D. [Laboratório de Fisiofarmacologia Experimental, Centro de Pesquisa em Biodiversidade e Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal do Piauí, Parnaíba, PI (Brazil); Aragão, K.S. [Laboratório de Farmacologia da Inflamação e do Câncer, Departamento de Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Barbosa, A.L.R. [Núcleo de Pesquisa em Produtos Naturais, Departamento de Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Piauí, Teresina, PI (Brazil); Laboratório de Fisiofarmacologia Experimental, Centro de Pesquisa em Biodiversidade e Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal do Piauí, Parnaíba, PI (Brazil); Soares, P.M.G.; Souza, M.H.L.P. [Laboratório de Farmacologia da Inflamação e do Câncer, Departamento de Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Medeiros, J.V.R. [Núcleo de Pesquisa em Produtos Naturais, Departamento de Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Piauí, Teresina, PI (Brazil); Laboratório de Fisiofarmacologia Experimental, Centro de Pesquisa em Biodiversidade e Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal do Piauí, Parnaíba, PI (Brazil)

    2013-08-16

    Our objective was to investigate the protective effect of Lawesson's reagent, an H{sub 2}S donor, against alendronate (ALD)-induced gastric damage in rats. Rats were pretreated with saline or Lawesson's reagent (3, 9, or 27 µmol/kg, po) once daily for 4 days. After 30 min, gastric damage was induced by ALD (30 mg/kg) administration by gavage. On the last day of treatment, the animals were killed 4 h after ALD administration. Gastric lesions were measured using a computer planimetry program, and gastric corpus pieces were assayed for malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), proinflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β], and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Other groups were pretreated with glibenclamide (5 mg/kg, ip) or with glibenclamide (5 mg/kg, ip)+diazoxide (3 mg/kg, ip). After 1 h, 27 µmol/kg Lawesson's reagent was administered. After 30 min, 30 mg/kg ALD was administered. ALD caused gastric damage (63.35±9.8 mm{sup 2}); increased levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and MDA (2311±302.3 pg/mL, 901.9±106.2 pg/mL, 121.1±4.3 nmol/g, respectively); increased MPO activity (26.1±3.8 U/mg); and reduced GSH levels (180.3±21.9 µg/g). ALD also increased cystathionine-γ-lyase immunoreactivity in the gastric mucosa. Pretreatment with Lawesson's reagent (27 µmol/kg) attenuated ALD-mediated gastric damage (15.77±5.3 mm{sup 2}); reduced TNF-α, IL-1β, and MDA formation (1502±150.2 pg/mL, 632.3±43.4 pg/mL, 78.4±7.6 nmol/g, respectively); lowered MPO activity (11.7±2.8 U/mg); and increased the level of GSH in the gastric tissue (397.9±40.2 µg/g). Glibenclamide alone reversed the gastric protective effect of Lawesson's reagent. However, glibenclamide plus diazoxide did not alter the effects of Lawesson's reagent. Our results suggest that Lawesson's reagent plays a protective role against ALD-induced gastric damage through mechanisms that depend at least in part on activation of ATP-sensitive potassium (K

  9. Glycemic excursions are positively associated with HbA1c reduction from baseline after treatment with acarbose in patients with type 2 diabetes on metformin monotherapy.

    Wang, Jun-Sing; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lin, Shi-Dou; Su, Shih-Li; Tu, Shih-Te; Tseng, Yao-Hsien; Lin, Shih-Yi; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the association between glycemic excursions before treatment and HbA1c reduction after treatment intensification with acarbose or glibenclamide in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Patients receiving single or dual oral antidiabetic drug treatment with an HbA1c of 7.0-11.0 % (53-97 mmol/mol) were switched to metformin monotherapy (500 mg, t.i.d.) for 8 weeks, followed by randomization to either acarbose (100 mg, t.i.d.) or glibenclamide (5 mg, t.i.d.) as add-on treatment for 16 weeks. Glycemic excursions were assessed as mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE) with 72-h ambulatory continuous glucose monitoring. Treatment efficacy was evaluated as relative HbA1c reduction (%), calculated as (baseline HbA1c - post-treatment HbA1c)/baseline HbA1c × 100. Fifty patients (mean [±SD] age 53.5 ± 8.2 years, 48 % men, mean baseline HbA1c 8.4 ± 1.2 %) were analyzed. Baseline MAGE was positively correlated with relative HbA1c reduction from baseline in patients treated with acarbose (r = 0.421, P = 0.029) but not glibenclamide (r = 0.052, P = 0.813). Linear regression analysis revealed that the association between baseline MAGE and relative HbA1c reduction from baseline (β = 0.125, P = 0.029) in patients treated with acarbose remained significant after adjustment for several confounders (P HbA1c reduction from baseline after treatment with acarbose, but not glibenclamide. These findings highlight the importance of glycemic excursions in individualized treatment for patients with T2D. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine (SJTU), Chinese Society of Endocrinology and Chinese Endocrinologist Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Effect of Fenugreek seed Extract (Trigonella Foenum-graecum on testicular tissue in the embryos of Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    M beyzaei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Diabetes mellitus is associated with some of the metabolic dysfunctions represented with chronic hyperglycemia.  This disease can disrupt the function of testicular tissue and decline male sexual ability. Some of the medicinal herbs such as fenugreeks have protective effects on tissues via hypoglycemic and anti-oxidative properties. In the present paper,  the effects of fenugreek seed extract was evaluated on testicular tissue of 20 day-old embryos from diabetic rats. Methods: In the present experimental study, sixty normal female rats were divided into three normal groups: non-diabetic control, glibenclamide and fenugreek groups and three diabetic groups: diabetic control, glibenclamide treatment and fenugreek treatment groups. Single injection of streptozotocin was used for induction of diabetes in these female rats. After detection of pregnancy, 1000 mg/kg fenugreek seed extract was fed to non-diabetic and diabetic fenugreek groups and 5 mg/kg glibenclamide was fed to non-diabetic and diabetic glibenclamide groups. Non-diabetic and diabetic control group was fed with distilled water as the same volume as the fenugreek extract. After 20 days, their embryos were pulled out and fixed at 10% formalin. After tissue processing, five micron sections were stained with Hematoxylin- eosin and evaluated for morphometric changes of testicular tissue. Data were evaluated with One-Way ANOVA test and Duncan post-hoc test. Results: The mean diameter of seminiferous tubules and testis capsule thickness indicated no significant differences between fenugreek treatment and diabetic control groups (P> 0.05. Mean body weight of male embryos was significantly lower in fenugreek treatment group in comparison with the diabetic control group (P&le 0.05. The leydig, sertoli and spermatogonial cells number was significantly higher in fenugreek treatment group in compression with diabetic control group                      (P

  11. The hydrogen sulfide donor, Lawesson's reagent, prevents alendronate-induced gastric damage in rats

    Nicolau, L.A.D.; Silva, R.O.; Damasceno, S.R.B.; Carvalho, N.S.; Costa, N.R.D.; Aragão, K.S.; Barbosa, A.L.R.; Soares, P.M.G.; Souza, M.H.L.P.; Medeiros, J.V.R.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate the protective effect of Lawesson's reagent, an H 2 S donor, against alendronate (ALD)-induced gastric damage in rats. Rats were pretreated with saline or Lawesson's reagent (3, 9, or 27 µmol/kg, po) once daily for 4 days. After 30 min, gastric damage was induced by ALD (30 mg/kg) administration by gavage. On the last day of treatment, the animals were killed 4 h after ALD administration. Gastric lesions were measured using a computer planimetry program, and gastric corpus pieces were assayed for malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), proinflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β], and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Other groups were pretreated with glibenclamide (5 mg/kg, ip) or with glibenclamide (5 mg/kg, ip)+diazoxide (3 mg/kg, ip). After 1 h, 27 µmol/kg Lawesson's reagent was administered. After 30 min, 30 mg/kg ALD was administered. ALD caused gastric damage (63.35±9.8 mm 2 ); increased levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and MDA (2311±302.3 pg/mL, 901.9±106.2 pg/mL, 121.1±4.3 nmol/g, respectively); increased MPO activity (26.1±3.8 U/mg); and reduced GSH levels (180.3±21.9 µg/g). ALD also increased cystathionine-γ-lyase immunoreactivity in the gastric mucosa. Pretreatment with Lawesson's reagent (27 µmol/kg) attenuated ALD-mediated gastric damage (15.77±5.3 mm 2 ); reduced TNF-α, IL-1β, and MDA formation (1502±150.2 pg/mL, 632.3±43.4 pg/mL, 78.4±7.6 nmol/g, respectively); lowered MPO activity (11.7±2.8 U/mg); and increased the level of GSH in the gastric tissue (397.9±40.2 µg/g). Glibenclamide alone reversed the gastric protective effect of Lawesson's reagent. However, glibenclamide plus diazoxide did not alter the effects of Lawesson's reagent. Our results suggest that Lawesson's reagent plays a protective role against ALD-induced gastric damage through mechanisms that depend at least in part on activation of ATP-sensitive potassium (K ATP ) channels

  12. Effect of Curcumin on Blood Glucose Level and Some Neurobehavioral Responses in Alloxan-induced Diabetic Swiss Albino Mice

    U. A. Garkuwa; A. W. Alhassan; Y. Tanko

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of curcumin on blood glucose level and neurobehavioral response in Alloxan-induced diabetic Swiss Albino mice. The animals were divided into five (5) groups of four each (n=4). Group I served as control and received distilled water, group II, III, IV and V were diabetic and received olive oil 1 ml/kg, glibenclamide 1 mg/kg, curcumin 50 mg/kg and curcumin 100 mg/kg respectively. Diabetes was induced using Alloxan (150 mg/kg). All administrations...

  13. Antidiabetic Activity Test of Ethanolic Seri Leave’s (Muntingia Calabura L.) Extract in Male Rats Induced by Alloxan

    Herlina Herlina; Annisa Amriani; Indah Solihah; Rizky Sintya

    2018-01-01

    Antidiabetic activity test of ethanol extract of seri leave (Muntingia calabura L.) rats induced by alloxan has been done. Male wistar albino rats are used as animal models which divided into 6 groups, normal group (aquadest), negative control group (Na CMC 0,5%), positive control group (glibenclamide 0,43 mg/200 gBB), and 1, 2, and 3 treatment groups (ethanol extract of seri leave 65, 130, dan 260 mg/kgBB). Rats blood glucose level after induced intraperitoneally by alloxan 130 mg/kgBB can b...

  14. Involvement of ATP-sensitive potassium channels and the opioid system in the anticonvulsive effect of zolpidem in mice.

    Sheikhi, Mehdi; Shirzadian, Armin; Dehdashtian, Amir; Amiri, Shayan; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-09-01

    Zolpidem is a hypnotic medication that mainly exerts its function through activating γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors. There is some evidence that zolpidem may have anticonvulsive effects. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect have not been elucidated yet. In the present study, we used the pentylentetrazole (PTZ)-induced generalized seizure model in mice to investigate whether zolpidem can affect seizure threshold. We also further evaluated the roles of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels as well as μ-opioid receptors in the effects of zolpidem on seizure threshold. Our data showed that zolpidem in a dose-dependent manner increased the PTZ-induced seizure threshold. The noneffective (i.e., did not significantly alter the PTZ-induced seizure threshold by itself) doses of KATP channel blocker (glibenclamide) and nonselective opioid receptor antagonist (naloxone) were able to inhibit the anticonvulsive effect of zolpidem. Additionally, noneffective doses of either KATP channel opener (cromakalim) or nonselective μ-opioid receptor agonist (morphine) in combination with a noneffective dose of zolpidem exerted a significant anticonvulsive effect on PTZ-induced seizures in mice. A combination of noneffective doses of naloxone and glibenclamide, which separately did not affect zolpidem effect on seizure threshold, inhibited the anticonvulsive effects of zolpidem. These results suggest a role for KATP channels and the opioid system, alone or in combination, in the anticonvulsive effects of zolpidem. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF HYPOGLYCEMIC EFFECTS OF TWO DIFFERENT PARTS OF BAUHUNIA PURPUREA LINN. PLANT IN STZ-INDUCED DIABETIC ALBINO WISTAR RATS

    A. K. Brahmachari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work was undertaken to study the comparative phytochemical profiles and hypoglycemic effects of Bauhinia purpurea Linn. Barks (BPBE and leaves ethanolic extracts (BPLE in albino wistar rats to validate their ethno medical use in hyperglycemia as well as to explore the better option. Phytochemicals in ethanolic extracts were analyzed by standard natural product chemistry methods. Diabetes was developed in rats by single intraperitoneal injection of Streptozotocin @ 60mg/ Kg bw. Diabetic albino wister rats (n=3 of either sex (150-200gm bw were orally fed with the extracts once daily for 4 weeks. Glibenclamide @ 0.5mg/Kg bw was used as a positive control for comparison. Fasting blood glucose level at 0, 14th and 28th day and hemoglobin and glycosylated hemoglobin on 28th day of experiment were analyzed. Our results show that the extracts contain alkaloids, flavonoids, glycosides, terpenoids, tannins and phenolics. Rats treated with plant extracts show better glucose modulation, decreased hemoglobin glycosylation and improved hemoglobin concentration as compared to diabetic control. The hypoglycemic effect of only BPBE at 420 mgkg-1 on 14th and 28th day is comparable to that of standard drug glibenclamide (P>0.01. The bark extract has been observed to be more potent hypoglycemic agent than leave extract.

  16. [Role of ATP-sensitive potassium channel activators in liver mitochondrial function in rats with different resistance to hypoxia].

    Tkachenko, H M; Kurhaliuk, N M; Vovkanych, L S

    2003-01-01

    Effects of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels opener pinacidil (0.06 mg/kg) and inhibitor glibenclamide (1 mg/kg) in rats with different resistance to hypoxia on indices of ADP-stimulation of mitochondrial respiration by Chance, calcium capacity and processes of lipid peroxidation in liver has been investigated. We used next substrates of oxidation: 0.35 mM succinate, 1 mM alpha-ketoglutarate. Additional analyses contain the next inhibitors: mitochondrial fermentative complex I-10 mkM rotenone, succinate dehydrogenase 2 mM malonic acid. It was shown that effects of pinacidil induced the increasing of oxidative phosporylation efficacy and ATP synthesis together with lowering of calcium capacity in rats with low resistance to hypoxia. Effects of pinacidil were leveled by glibenclamide. These changes are connected with the increasing of respiratory rate, calcium overload and intensification of lipid peroxidation processes. A conclusion was made about protective effect of pinacidil on mitochondrial functioning by economization of oxygen-dependent processes, adaptive potentialities of organisms with low resistance to hypoxia being increased.

  17. Production of drug nanosuspensions: effect of drug physical properties on nanosizing efficiency.

    Liu, Tao; Müller, Rainer H; Möschwitzer, Jan P

    2018-02-01

    Drug nanosuspension is one of the established methods to improve the bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. Drug physical properties aspect (morphology, solid state, starting size et al) is a critical parameter determining the production efficiency. Some drug modification approaches such as spray-drying were proved to improve the millability of drug powders. However, the mechanism behind those improved performances is unclear. This study is to systematically investigate the influence of those physical properties. Five different APIs (active pharmaceutical ingredients) with different millabilities, i.e. resveratrol, hesperetin, glibenclamide, rutin, and quercetin, were processed by standard high pressure homogenization (HPH), wet bead milling (WBM), and a combinative method of spray-drying and HPH. Smaller starting sizes of certain APIs could accelerate the particle size reduction velocity during both HPH and WBM processes. Spherical particles were observed for almost all spray-dried powders (except spray-dried hesperetin) after spray-drying. The crystallinity of some spray-dried samples such as rutin and glibenclamide became much lower than their corresponding unmodified powders. Almost all spray-dried drug powders after HPH processes could lead to smaller nanocrystal particle size than unmodified APIs. The modified microstructure instead of solid state after spray-drying explained the potential reason for improved nanosizing efficiency. In addition, the contribution of starting size on the production efficiency was also critical according to both HPH and WBM results.

  18. Successful treatment of young infants presenting neonatal diabetes mellitus with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion before genetic diagnosis.

    Rabbone, Ivana; Barbetti, Fabrizio; Marigliano, Marco; Bonfanti, Riccardo; Piccinno, Elvira; Ortolani, Federica; Ignaccolo, Giovanna; Maffeis, Claudio; Confetto, Santino; Cerutti, Franco; Zanfardino, Angela; Iafusco, Dario

    2016-08-01

    Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is defined as hyperglycemia and impaired insulin secretion with onset within 6 months of birth. While rare, NDM presents complex challenges regarding the management of glycemic control. The availability of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pumps (CSII) in combination with continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGM) provides an opportunity to monitor glucose levels more closely and deliver insulin more safely. We report four cases of young infants with NDM successfully treated with CSII and CGM. Moreover, in two cases with Kir 6.2 mutation, we describe the use of CSII in switching therapy from insulin to sulfonylurea treatment. Insulin pump requirement for the 4 neonatal diabetes cases was the same regardless of disease pathogenesis and c-peptide levels. No dilution of insulin was needed. The use of an integrated CGM system helped in a more precise control of BG levels with the possibility of several modifications of insulin basal rates. Moreover, as showed in the first two case-reports, when the treatment was switched from insulin to glibenclamide, according to identification of Kir 6.2 mutation and diagnosis of NPDM, the CSII therapy demonstrated to be helpful in allowing gradual insulin suspension and progressive introduction of sulfonylurea. During the neonatal period, the use of CSII therapy is safe, more physiological, accurate and easier for the insulin administration management. Furthermore, CSII therapy is safe during the switch of therapy from insulin to glibenclamide for infants with permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus.

  19. Inhibition of Advanced Glycation End-Product Formation by Origanum majorana L. In Vitro and in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Rosa Martha Perez Gutierrez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of AGE inhibitors is considered to have therapeutic potential in patients with diabetes diseases. The aim of the present study was investigate the effect of methanolic extract of the leaves of Origanum majorana (OM used as spice in many countries on AGEs formation. In vitro studies indicated a significant inhibitory effects on the formation of AGEs. Their antiglycation activities were not only brought about by their antioxidant activities but also related to their trapping abilities of reactive carbonyl species such as methylglyoxal, an intermediate reactive carbonyl of AGE formation. The results demonstrate that OM have significant effects on in vitro AGE formation, and the glycation inhibitory activity was more effectively than those obtained using as standard antiglycation agent aminoguanidine. OM is a potent agent for protecting LDL against oxidation and glycation. Treatment of streptozotocin-diabetic mice with OM and glibenclamide for 28 days had beneficial effects on renal metabolic abnormalities including glucose level and AGEs formation. Diabetic mice showed increase in tail tendon collagen, glycated collagen linked fluorescence and reduction in pepsin digestion. Treatment with OM improved these parameters when compared to diabetic control and glibenclamide.

  20. Clinical significance of the radioimmunological determination of C-peptide

    Dudczak, R.; Waldhaeusl, W.

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of metabolic control to insulinogenic reserve in insulin-dependent diabetics. Thus, the secretory reserve of the pancreatic beta cell was estimated in insulin-dependent diabetics by measuring changes in peripheral serum immunoreactive C-peptide (IRCP) concentrations in response to intravenous arginine (n = 19; 0.5 g/kg,t = 30 min) or glibenclamide-glucose (n = 6; 2 mg HB 419 - 0.33 g/kg intravenously). In the majority of ''stable'' diabetics a small secretory reserve of the beta cell was demonstrated, but both the absolute and relative increase in IRCP was reduced after intravenous arginine or glibenclamide-glucose in comparison with normal controls. In ''unstable'' diabetics a decreased basal concentration of IRCP, significantly smaller than that seen in ''stable'' diabetics (p < 0.01), was accompanied by a complete lack of IRCP release on intravenous arginine administration. Thus, we conclude that the radioimmunological determination of IRCP is of clinical interest in assessing the residual secretory capacity of the beta cell in insulin-dependent diabetics. In revealing a lack of insulin this diagnostic tool seems to detect a group of potentially ''unstable'' diabetics in need of strict observation, which would minimize the risks of bad metabolic control. (author)

  1. Antidiabetic Activity of Aqueous Leaves Extract of Sesbania sesban (L) Merr. in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    Pandhare, Ramdas B.; Sangameswaran, B.; Mohite, Popat B.; Khanage, Shantaram G.

    2011-01-01

    The aqueous leaves extract of Sesbania sesban (L) Merr. (Family: Fabaceae) was evaluated for its antidiabetic potential on normal and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. In the chronic model, the aqueous extract was administered to normal and STZ- induced diabetic rats at the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) p.o. per day for 30 days. The fasting Blood Glucose Levels (BGL), serum insulin level and biochemical data such as glycosylated hemoglobin, Total Cholesterol (TC), Triglycerides (TG), High Density Lipoproteins (HDL) and Low Density Lipoproteins (LDL) were evaluated and all were compared to that of the known anti-diabetic drug glibenclamide (0.25 mg/kg b.w.). The statistical data indicated significant increase in the body weight, liver glycogen, serum insulin and HDL levels and decrease in blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, total cholesterol and serum triglycerides when compared with glibenclamide. Thus the aqueous leaves extract of Sesbania sesban had beneficial effects in reducing the elevated blood glucose level and lipid profile of STZ-induced diabetic rats. PMID:23407749

  2. Protective role of Scoparia dulcis plant extract on brain antioxidant status and lipidperoxidation in STZ diabetic male Wistar rats

    Latha Muniappan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis on the occurrence of oxidative stress in the brain of rats during diabetes by measuring the extent of oxidative damage as well as the status of the antioxidant defense system. Methods Aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis plant was administered orally (200 mg/kg body weight and the effect of extract on blood glucose, plasma insulin and the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, hydroperoxides, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione-S-transferase (GST and reduced glutathione (GSH were estimated in streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats. Glibenclamide was used as standard reference drug. Results A significant increase in the activities of plasma insulin, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase and reduced glutathione was observed in brain on treatment with 200 mg/kg body weight of Scoparia dulcis plant extract (SPEt and glibenclamide for 6 weeks. Both the treated groups showed significant decrease in TBARS and hydroperoxides formation in brain, suggesting its role in protection against lipidperoxidation induced membrane damage. Conclusions Since the study of induction of the antioxidant enzymes is considered to be a reliable marker for evaluating the antiperoxidative efficacy of the medicinal plant, these findings suggest a possible antiperoxidative role for Scoparia dulcis plant extract. Hence, in addition to antidiabetic effect, Scoparia dulcis possess antioxidant potential that may be used for therapeutic purposes.

  3. Effect of an aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis on blood glucose, plasma insulin and some polyol pathway enzymes in experimental rat diabetes

    M. Latha

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of an aqueous extract of the plant Scoparia dulcis (200 mg/kg on the polyol pathway and lipid peroxidation were examined in the liver of streptozotocin adult diabetic male albino Wistar rats. The diabetic control rats (N = 6 presented a significant increase in blood glucose, sorbitol dehydrogenase, glycosylated hemoglobin and lipid peroxidation markers such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS and hydroperoxides, and a significant decrease in plasma insulin and antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione-S-transferase (GST and reduced glutathione (GSH compared to normal rats (N = 6. Scoparia dulcis plant extract (SPEt, 200 mg kg-1 day-1 and glibenclamide (600 µg kg-1 day-1, a reference drug, were administered by gavage for 6 weeks to diabetic rats (N = 6 for each group and significantly reduced blood glucose, sorbitol dehydrogenase, glycosylated hemoglobin, TBARS, and hydroperoxides, and significantly increased plasma insulin, GPx, GST and GSH activities in liver. The effect of the SPEt was compared with that of glibenclamide. The effect of the extract may have been due to the decreased influx of glucose into the polyol pathway leading to increased activities of antioxidant enzymes and plasma insulin and decreased activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase. These results indicate that the SPEt was effective in attenuating hyperglycemia in rats and their susceptibility to oxygen free radicals.

  4. EFEK ANTIDIABETES EKSTRAK AIR KULIT BUAH PISANG AMBON (Musa paradisiaca L. TERHADAP MENCIT (Mus musculus MODEL HIPERGLIKEMIA

    Sri Indrawati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pisang Ambon (Musa paradisiaca L. is one type of bananas usually consumed by Indonesian people. Besides its flesh which has high nutrition, its peels also has antioxidant activity. Antioxidants has the ability to reduce oxidative damage in people’s body with diabetes mellitus. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the antioxidant activity of the aqueous  extract of Pisang Ambon peels and to determine it’s effective dose as an antidiabetic agent in hyperglycemic mice. This study used male mice which all have been intravenously induced with alloxan at a dose of 50 mg/kgBW. They were then divided into five groups. The first two groups got Na CMC 0.5% (negative control and glibenclamide 0.65 mg/kgBW (positive control, while the other three got  the aqueous  extract of Pisang Ambon peels successively at doses of 400, 800, and 1200 mg/kgBW. The data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA (Analysis of Variance at 95% confidence interval with parameter of blood glucose levels difference between before and after treatment. The results showed that the aqueous extract of Pisang Ambon peels had antidiabetic activity at an effective dose of 400 mg/kgBW in hyperglycemic mice which was comparable to glibenclamide

  5. Effect of an aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis on blood glucose, plasma insulin and some polyol pathway enzymes in experimental rat diabetes.

    Latha, M; Pari, L

    2004-04-01

    The effects of an aqueous extract of the plant Scoparia dulcis (200 mg/kg) on the polyol pathway and lipid peroxidation were examined in the liver of streptozotocin adult diabetic male albino Wistar rats. The diabetic control rats (N = 6) presented a significant increase in blood glucose, sorbitol dehydrogenase, glycosylated hemoglobin and lipid peroxidation markers such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and hydroperoxides, and a significant decrease in plasma insulin and antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and reduced glutathione (GSH) compared to normal rats (N = 6). Scoparia dulcis plant extract (SPEt, 200 mg kg-1 day-1) and glibenclamide (600 microg kg-1 day-1), a reference drug, were administered by gavage for 6 weeks to diabetic rats (N = 6 for each group) and significantly reduced blood glucose, sorbitol dehydrogenase, glycosylated hemoglobin, TBARS, and hydroperoxides, and significantly increased plasma insulin, GPx, GST and GSH activities in liver. The effect of the SPEt was compared with that of glibenclamide. The effect of the extract may have been due to the decreased influx of glucose into the polyol pathway leading to increased activities of antioxidant enzymes and plasma insulin and decreased activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase. These results indicate that the SPEt was effective in attenuating hyperglycemia in rats and their susceptibility to oxygen free radicals.

  6. Protective role of Scoparia dulcis plant extract on brain antioxidant status and lipidperoxidation in STZ diabetic male Wistar rats.

    Pari, Leelavinothan; Latha, Muniappan

    2004-11-02

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis on the occurrence of oxidative stress in the brain of rats during diabetes by measuring the extent of oxidative damage as well as the status of the antioxidant defense system. Aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis plant was administered orally (200 mg/kg body weight) and the effect of extract on blood glucose, plasma insulin and the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), hydroperoxides, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were estimated in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. Glibenclamide was used as standard reference drug. A significant increase in the activities of plasma insulin, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase and reduced glutathione was observed in brain on treatment with 200 mg/kg body weight of Scoparia dulcis plant extract (SPEt) and glibenclamide for 6 weeks. Both the treated groups showed significant decrease in TBARS and hydroperoxides formation in brain, suggesting its role in protection against lipidperoxidation induced membrane damage. Since the study of induction of the antioxidant enzymes is considered to be a reliable marker for evaluating the antiperoxidative efficacy of the medicinal plant, these findings suggest a possible antiperoxidative role for Scoparia dulcis plant extract. Hence, in addition to antidiabetic effect, Scoparia dulcis possess antioxidant potential that may be used for therapeutic purposes.

  7. Effect of Potassium Channel Modulators on Morphine Withdrawal in Mice

    Vikas Seth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of potassium channel openers and blockers on morphine withdrawal syndrome. Mice were rendered dependent on morphine by subcutaneous injection of morphine; four hours later, withdrawal was induced by using an opioid antagonist, naloxone. Mice were observed for 30 minutes for the withdrawal signs ie, the characteristic jumping, hyperactivity, urination and diarrhea. ATP-dependent potassium (K + ATP channel modulators were injected intraperitoneally (i.p. 30 minutes before the naloxone. It was found that a K + ATP channel opener, minoxidil (12.5–50 mg/kg i.p., suppressed the morphine withdrawal significantly. On the other hand, the K + ATP channel blocker glibenclamide (12.5–50 mg/kg i.p. caused a significant facilitation of the withdrawal. Glibenclamide was also found to abolish the minoxidil's inhibitory effect on morphine withdrawal. The study concludes that K + ATP channels play an important role in the genesis of morphine withdrawal and K + ATP channel openers could be useful in the management of opioid withdrawal. As morphine opens K + ATP channels in neurons, the channel openers possibly act by mimicking the effects of morphine on neuronal K + currents.

  8. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  9. Influence of kaempferol, a flavonoid compound, on membrane-bound ATPases in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Al-Numair, Khalid S; Veeramani, Chinnadurai; Alsaif, Mohammed A; Chandramohan, Govindasamy

    2015-01-01

    Kaempferol is a flavonoid found in many edible plants (e.g. tea, cabbage, beans, tomato, strawberries, and grapes) and in plants or botanical products commonly used in traditional medicine. Numerous preclinical studies have shown that kaempferol have a wide range of pharmacological activities, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, cardioprotective, neuroprotective, and antidiabetic activities. The present study investigates the effect of kaempferol on membrane-bound ATPases in erythrocytes and in liver, kidney, and heart of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced into adult male albino rats of the Wistar strain, by intraperitoneal administration of STZ (40 mg/kg body weight (BW)). Kaempferol (100 mg/kg BW) or glibenclamide (600 µg/kg BW) was administered orally once daily for 45 d to normal and STZ-induced diabetic rats. The effects of kaempferol on membrane-bound ATPases (total ATPase, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase, and Mg(2+)-ATPase) activity in erythrocytes and in liver, kidney, and heart were determined. In our study, diabetic rats had significantly (p kaempferol (100 mg/kg BW) or glibenclamide (600 µg/kg BW) for a period of 45 d resulted in significant (p kaempferol has the potential to restore deranged activity of membrane-bound ATPases in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Further detailed investigation is necessary to discover kaempferol's action mechanism.

  10. Effect of Carthamus tinctorius (Safflower) on fasting blood glucose and insulin levels in alloxan induced diabetic rabbits.

    Qazi, Nasreen; Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Rizwani, Ghazala H; Feroz, Zeeshan

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major threat to present and future generations. The role of herbal medication has emerged as a safe alternative to currently available medication due to its decreased potential to produce side effects, hence effect of Carthamus tinctorius was observed on fasting blood glucose and insulin levels in alloxan induced diabetic rabbits. Thirty five healthy male rabbits were divided into 5 groups with 7 rabbits in each (Normal control, diabetic control, diabetic treated with glibenclamide, diabetic treated with Carthamus tinctorius extract at doses of 200 and 300mg/kg of body weight). Drug and extract were given orally for 30 days and the values for blood glucose levels were observed after 15(th) and 30(th) day of treatment by using standard reagent kits provided by Human Germany. While insulin levels were checked at the end of the study by using Architect i1000 by Abbott Diagnostics USA. Animals were also observed for any gross toxicity during the study. Results revealed that Carthamus tinctorius has significant hypoglycemic effect at 200mg/kg and 300mg/kg doses as compared to diabetic control group. Insulin levels were significantly increased in Glibenclamide treated as well as Carthamus tinctorius treated groups as compared to diabetic control.

  11. Efficacy of combination herbal product (Curcuma longa and Eugenia jambolana) used for diabetes mellitus.

    Rao, Sadia Saleem; Najam, Rahila

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the efficacy of a combination herbal product that is traditionally used for managing diabetes mellitus. Herbal drug contains Curcuma longa and Eugenia jambolanain the ratio of 1:1. It was orally administered at the dose of 1082 mg/70 kg twice a day for a period of 6 weeks to alloxan induced diabetic rats and compared with glibenclamide (standard). The effects of drug were observed at intervals, with respect to random and fasting glucose levels. HbA1C was also monitored after the drug treatment to monitor the overall diabetic effect. Results revealed that the combination of two herbs significantly reduced fasting and random glucose levels with HbA1C of less than 6% (p<0.001) in comparison to diabetic control. The control of fasting blood glucose levels by herbal combination is similar to the standard drug, glibenclamide (p<0.05). Random glucose levels by herbal combination is better than standard drug after one week and six weeks of treatment (p<0.01 and p<0.001 respectively) and similar after third week of treatment (p<0.05). Also, herbal drug combination showed HbA1C closer to the standard drug. It shows that this herbal combination can be of potential benefit in managing diabetes mellitus in future.

  12. Dissolution properties of co-amorphous drug-amino acid formulations in buffer and biorelevant media.

    Heikkinen, A T; DeClerck, L; Löbmann, K; Grohganz, H; Rades, T; Laitinen, R

    2015-07-01

    Co-amorphous formulations, particularly binary drug-amino acid mixtures, have been shown to provide enhanced dissolution for poorly-soluble drugs and improved physical stability of the amorphous state. However, to date the dissolution properties (mainly intrinsic dissolution rate) of the co-amorphous formulations have been tested only in buffers and their supersaturation ability remain unexplored. Consequently, dissolution studies in simulated intestinal fluids need to be conducted in order to better evaluate the potential of these systems in increasing the oral bioavailability of biopharmaceutics classification system class II drugs. In this study, solubility and dissolution properties of the co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine, gibenclamide-serine, glibenclamide-threonine and glibenclamide-serine-threonine were studied in phosphate buffer pH 7.2 and biorelevant media (fasted and fed state simulated intestinal fluids (FaSSIF and FeSSIF, respectively)). The co-amorphous formulations were found to provide a long-lasting supersaturation and improve the dissolution of the drugs compared to the crystalline and amorphous drugs alone in buffer. Similar improvement, but in lesser extent, was observed in biorelevant media suggesting that a dissolution advantage observed in aqueous buffers may overestimate the advantage in vivo. However, the results show that, in addition to stability advantage shown earlier, co-amorphous drug-amino acid formulations provide dissolution advantage over crystalline drugs in both aqueous and biorelevant conditions.

  13. Clinical significance of the radioimmunological determination of C-peptide

    Dudczak, R; Waldhaeusl, W [Vienna Univ. (Austria). 1. Medizinische Klinik

    1979-10-12

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of metabolic control to insulinogenic reserve in insulin-dependent diabetics. Thus, the secretory reserve of the pancreatic beta cell was estimated in insulin-dependent diabetics by measuring changes in peripheral serum immunoreactive C-peptide (IRCP) concentrations in response to intravenous arginine (n = 19; 0.5 g/kg,t = 30 min) or glibenclamide-glucose (n = 6; 2 mg HB 419 - 0.33 g/kg intravenously). In the majority of stable diabetics a small secretory reserve of the beta cell was demonstrated, but both the absolute and relative increase in IRCP was reduced after intravenous arginine or glibenclamide-glucose in comparison with normal controls. In unstable diabetics a decreased basal concentration of IRCP, significantly smaller than that seen in stable diabetics (p < 0.01), was accompanied by a complete lack of IRCP release on intravenous arginine administration. Thus, we conclude that the radioimmunological determination of IRCP is of clinical interest in assessing the residual secretory capacity of the beta cell in insulin-dependent diabetics. In revealing a lack of insulin this diagnostic tool seems to detect a group of potentially unstable diabetics in need of strict observation, which would minimize the risks of bad metabolic control.

  14. Investigation of the Blood Glucose Lowering Potential of the Jamaican Momordica charantia (Cerasee) Fruit in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Burnett, A; McKoy, M-L; Singh, P

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Momordica charantia (MC) fruit has been documented to possess antidiabetic properties. However, these studies were not without controversy surrounding the blood glucose-lowering ability and the mechanism of action in diabetes therapy. In an effort to evaluate such claims in the Jamaican MC species known as cerasee, aqueous extracts of the unripe fruit were studied in normal and diabetic rats. Normal male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into groups (n = 6) orally administered distilled water, 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution, the aqueous extract (400 mg/kg body weight) and glibenclamide (15 mg/kg body weight), respectively prior to assessment of fasting blood glucose (FBG) concentration. The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was conducted in normoglycaemic rats orally administered distilled water, 10% DMSO solution, glibenclamide (15 mg/kg body weight) or aqueous extracts of the fruit (200 and 400 mg/kg body weight). Blood glucose concentration was also monitored in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats administered the aqueous extract (250 mg/kg body weight) or water vehicle after an overnight fast. The aqueous extracts showed no hypoglycaemic or antidiabetic activity. However, the administration of the aqueous extracts (200 and 400 mg/kg body weight) resulted in significant improvement in glucose tolerance of glucose-primed normoglycaemic rats during the OGTT. These data suggest that the glucose-lowering mechanism of the Jamaican MC fruit species likely involves altered glucose absorption across the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26624580

  15. Effect of mitochondrial potassium channel on the renal protection mediated by sodium thiosulfate against ethylene glycol induced nephrolithiasis in rat model

    N. Baldev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Sodium thiosulfate (STS is clinically reported to be a promising drug in preventing nephrolithiasis. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of mitochondrial KATP channel in the renal protection mediated by STS. Materials and Methods: Nephrolithiasis was induced in Wistar rats by administrating 0.4% ethylene glycol (EG along with 1% ammonium chloride for one week in drinking water followed by only 0.75% EG for two weeks. Treatment groups received STS, mitochondrial KATP channel opener and closer exclusively or in combination with STS for two weeks. Results: Animals treated with STS showed normal renal tissue architecture, supported by near normal serum creatinine, urea and ALP activity. Diazoxide (mitochondria KATP channel opening treatment to the animal also showed normal renal tissue histology and improved serum chemistry. However, an opposite result was shown by glibenclamide (mitochondria KATP channel closer treated rats. STS administered along with diazoxide negated the renal protection rendered by diazoxide alone, while it imparted protection to the glibenclamide treated rats, formulating a mitochondria modulated STS action. Conclusion: The present study confirmed that STS render renal protection not only through chelation and antioxidant effect but also by modulating the mitochondrial KATP channel for preventing urolithiasis.

  16. Factors associated with clinical remission in cats with diabetes mellitus

    Yu-Hsin Lien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common endocrine disease in cats. The aim of this study was to investigate factors that are associated with clinical remission in diabetic cats, and those that might influence survival time. Medical records of 29 cats with diabetes mellitus were evaluated retrospectively. Data collected from each record included breed, age, and sex, types of diet before and after admission, degree of weight loss, duration of clinical signs before admission, elevation of alanine aminotransferase activity and ketonuria at the time of admission, concurrent pancreatitis or renal failure, glipizide administration, insulin supplement, and survival time. The diet after establishing diagnosis (restriction to non-carbohydrate canned food was the only factor that was significantly associated with achieving clinical remission (P P = 0.004 with clinical remission status and the type of diet after admission (P = 0.04 and negatively associated with the presence of chronic renal failure (P = 0.04. This was the first report of feline diabetes mellitus from Taiwan.

  17. Cardiovascular Protective Effect of Metformin and Telmisartan: Reduction of PARP1 Activity via the AMPK-PARP1 Cascade.

    Fenqing Shang

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia and hypertension impair endothelial function in part through oxidative stress-activated poly (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1. Biguanides and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs such as metformin and telmisartan have a vascular protective effect. We used cultured vascular endothelial cells (ECs, diabetic and hypertensive rodent models, and AMPKα2-knockout mice to investigate whether metformin and telmisartan have a beneficial effect on the endothelium via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylation of PARP1 and thus inhibition of PARP1 activity. The results showed that metformin and telmisartan, but not glipizide and metoprolol, activated AMPK, which phosphorylated PARP1 Ser-177 in cultured ECs and the vascular wall of rodent models. Experiments using phosphorylated/de-phosphorylated PARP1 mutants show that AMPK phosphorylation of PARP1 leads to decreased PARP1 activity and attenuated protein poly(ADP-ribosylation (PARylation, but increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS activity and silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1 expression. Taken together, the data presented here suggest biguanides and ARBs have a beneficial effect on the vasculature by the cascade of AMPK phosphorylation of PARP1 to inhibit PARP1 activity and protein PARylation in ECs, thereby mitigating endothelial dysfunction.

  18. Evaluation of antioxidative and antidiabetic activity of bark of holarrhena pubescens wall.

    Bhusal, Anup; Jamarkattel, Nirmala; Shrestha, Aasmin; Lamsal, Nisha Kiran; Shakya, Sangam; Rajbhandari, Sneha

    2014-09-01

    The objectives of the study are to screen out various phytochemicals and to evaluate the antioxidant and antidiabetic potential of the stem bark of Holarrhena pubescens Wall (Holarrhena antidysenterica). The antioxidant activity was determined by the DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging activity where ascorbic acid was taken as positive control. The antioxidant property was later exploited and the methanolic extract of plant was tested for antihyperglycemic activity in glucose overloaded hyperglycemic mice. The extract was tested for its hypoglycemic activity at two-dose levels, 250 and 500 mg/kg respectively where Glipizide 5 mg/kg was taken as standard reference drug. All results are presented as mean ± SD (Standard Deviation). Significant differences between experimental groups were determined by Student's t-test. The methanolic and water extract showed strong antioxidant activity with inhibition of more than 90% DPPH free radicals at the concentration of 100μg/mL. The hypoglycemic activity of methanolic extract on glucose tolerance test were significant (p flavonoides, phenolic compounds suggested that they may be partially responsible for antioxidant and antidiabetic activity.

  19. Anti hyperglycaemic study of natural inhibitors for Insulin receptor.

    Chatterjee, Subhojyoti; Narasimhaiah, Akshaya Lakshmi; Kundu, Sanjay; Anand, Santosh

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder associated with either improper functioning of the beta-cells or wherein cells fail to use insulin properly. Insulin, the principal hormone regulates uptake of glucose from the blood into most of the cells except central nervous system. Therefore, deficiency of insulin or the insensitivity of its receptors plays a key role in all forms of diabetes. In the present work, attempt has been made to find out plant sources which show anti hyperglycaemic activity (AhG) (i.e. compounds that bring down the blood glucose level in the body). Ayurvedic plants showing AhG activity formed the basis of our study by using the platform of Computer Aided Drug Designing (CADD). Among 600 plants showing AhG activity, 500 compounds were selected and screened, out of which 243 compounds showed drug likeness property that can be used as therapeutic ligand/drug. Initial screening of such compounds was done based on their drug likeness or biochemical properties. Dynamic interaction of these molecules was captured through Protein-Ligand study. It also gave an insight of the binding pockets involved. Bench marking of all the parameters were done using the diabetic inhibitor drug, Glipizide. Pharmacokinetic studies of the compounds such as Aloins, Capparisine, Funiculosin and Rhein exhibited less toxicity on various levels of the body. As a conclusion these ligands can lay a foundation for a better anti-diabetic therapy. AhG - Anti hyperglycaemic, CADD - Computer Aided Drug Designing.

  20. Metformin-associated respiratory alkalosis.

    Bryant, Sean M; Cumpston, Kirk; Lipsky, Martin S; Patel, Nirali; Leikin, Jerrold B

    2004-01-01

    We present an 84-year-old man with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, glaucoma, and bladder cancer who presented to the emergency department after the police found him disoriented and confused. Metformin therapy began 3 days before, and he denied any overdose or suicidal ideation. Other daily medications included glipizide, fluticasone, prednisone, aspirin, furosemide, insulin, and potassium supplements. In the emergency department, his vital signs were significant for hypertension (168/90), tachycardia (120 bpm), and Kussmaul respirations at 24 breaths per minute. Oxygen saturation was 99% on room air, and a fingerstick glucose was 307 mg/dL. He was disoriented to time and answered questions slowly. Metformin was discontinued, and by day 3, the patient's vital signs and laboratory test results normalized. He has been asymptomatic at subsequent follow-up visits. Metformin-associated lactic acidosis is a well-known phenomenon. Respiratory alkalosis may be an early adverse event induced by metformin prior to the development of lactic acidosis.

  1. Preventing the progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults at high risk: a systematic review and network meta-analysis of lifestyle, pharmacological and surgical interventions.

    Stevens, John W; Khunti, Kamlesh; Harvey, Rebecca; Johnson, Maxine; Preston, Louise; Woods, Helen Buckley; Davies, Melanie; Goyder, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Individuals with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) have an increased risk of progression to Type 2 diabetes mellitus. The objective of this review was to quantify the effectiveness of lifestyle, pharmacological and surgical interventions in reducing the progression to Type 2 diabetes mellitus in people with IFG or IGT. A systematic review was carried out. A network meta-analysis (NMA) of log-hazard ratios was performed. Results are presented as hazard ratios and the probabilities of treatment rankings. 30 studies were included in the NMA. There was a reduced hazard of progression to Type 2 diabetes mellitus associated with all interventions versus standard lifestyle advice; glipizide, diet plus pioglitazone, diet plus exercise plus metformin plus rosiglitazone, diet plus exercise plus orlistat, diet plus exercise plus pedometer, rosiglitazone, orlistat and diet plus exercise plus voglibose produced the greatest effects. Lifestyle and some pharmacological interventions are beneficial in reducing the risk of progression to Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lifestyle interventions require significant behaviour changes that may be achieved through incentives such as the use of pedometers. Adverse events and cost of pharmacological interventions should be taken into account when considering potential risks and benefits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Saponins from the traditional medicinal plant Momordica charantia stimulate insulin secretion in vitro

    Keller, Amy C.; Ma, Jun; Kavalier, Adam; He, Kan; Brillantes, Anne-Marie B.; Kennelly, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    The antidiabetic activity of Momordica charantia (L.), Cucurbitaceae, a widely-used treatment for diabetes in a number of traditional medicine systems, was investigated in vitro. Antidiabetic activity has been reported for certain saponins isolated from M. charantia. In this study insulin secretion was measured in MIN6 β-cells incubated with an ethanol extract, saponin-rich fraction, and five purified saponins and cucurbitane triterpenoids from M. charantia, 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23(E)-dien-19-al (1), momordicine I (2), momordicine II (3), 3-hydroxycucurbita-5,24-dien-19-al-7,23-di-O-β-glucopyranoside (4), and kuguaglycoside G (5). Treatments were compared to incubation with high glucose (27 mM) and the insulin secretagogue, glipizide (50 μM). At 125 μg/ml, an LC-ToF-MS characterized saponin-rich fraction stimulated insulin secretion significantly more than the DMSO vehicle, p=0.02. At concentrations 10 and 25 μg/ml, compounds 3 and 5 also significantly stimulated insulin secretion as compared to the vehicle, p≤0.007, and p= 0.002, respectively. This is the first report of a saponin-rich fraction, and isolated compounds from M. charantia, stimulating insulin secretion in an in vitro, static incubation assay. PMID:22133295

  3. Type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome - adipokine levels and effect of drugs.

    Farooq, Rabia; Amin, Shajrul; Hayat Bhat, M; Malik, Rawoof; Wani, Hilal Ahmad; Majid, Sabhiya

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a consequence of complex interactions among multiple genetic variants and environmental risk factors. This complex disorder is also characterized by changes in various adipokines. In this study, our objective was to estimate the levels of adiponectin, leptin, and resistin (ALR) in T2DM patients, besides studying the effect of various drugs on their levels. Study participants included 400 diabetic and 300 normal patients from the Department of Endocrinology and Department of Biochemistry, Govt Medical College Srinagar. Subjects were categorized under various groups, i.e., Group 1 (metformin treated) and Group 2 (glimepiride treated), and cases were also categorized as obese with T2DM (Group A), obese without T2DM (Group B), and T2DM only (Group C). The serum ALR levels were estimated by ELISA (Alere), and biochemical parameters were also evaluated before and after treatment. Adiponectin levels were found to be significantly lower in T2DM cases as compared to controls (12 ± 5.5 versus 22.5 ± 7.9 μg/ml), while leptin and resistin levels were found to be significantly higher than controls (14.3 ± 7.4 versus 7.36 ± 3.73 ng/ml) (13.4 ± 1.56 versus 7.236 ± 2.129 pg/ml). Taking the effect of drugs into consideration, the effect on adiponectin and resistin levels was found to be highly significant in Group 2 before and after treatment (11 ± 5 versus 19.2 ± 4.5 μg/ml) (13.6 ± 2.5 versus 7.3 ± 2.9 pg/ml), while more effect was observed in leptin among Group 1 (metformin)-treated cases (27 ± 15 ng/ml versus 15 ± 15 ng/ml). Further the adiponectin levels were found to be significantly lower in Group B, while leptin and resistin levels were found to be significantly higher among obese cases when compared to T2DM cases only. Glimepiride also shows more effect on FBG, HbA1c% levels, while metformin shows more effect on Lipid profile levels. From the study, it can be

  4. Cost effectiveness of liraglutide in type II diabetes: a systematic review.

    Zueger, Patrick M; Schultz, Neil M; Lee, Todd A

    2014-11-01

    As novel treatments for type II diabetes enter the market, there is a need to assess their long-term clinical and economic outcomes against currently available treatment alternatives. Objective compilation and evaluation of current pharmacoeconomic evidence can assist payers and decision makers in determining the appropriate place in therapy of a new medication. Our objective was to review the existing pharmacoeconomic literature evaluating the cost effectiveness and overall costs of treatment associated with liraglutide in type II diabetes. Medical literature indexed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and EconLit through 1 June 2014 was searched. Full-text, English-language cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, and other cost analyses in type II diabetes that compared liraglutide to one or more anti-diabetic agents were included. Initial screening was based on relevance of titles and abstracts followed by examination of the study methods of each remaining manuscript. Studies conducting original pharmacoeconomic analyses were chosen for inclusion. Articles meeting the inclusion criteria were retrieved, and information on the study design and results was abstracted. Abstracted data elements were chosen and assessed based on the authors' experience as well as criteria set forth by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) Health Economic Evaluation Publication Guidelines Task Force. Additionally, reported incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) and selected sensitivity analysis results were converted to $US, year 2012 values, in order to facilitate comparison across studies. A total of six cost studies and seven cost-utility studies were identified for inclusion. Across cost studies, liraglutide treatment resulted in costs ranging from a loss of $US2,730 (liraglutide 1.8 mg vs. sitagliptin; pharmacy costs only) over a 1-year time horizon to a savings of $US9,367 (liraglutide 1.8 mg vs. glimepiride; diabetes

  5. Limitations of the HOMA-B score for assessment of beta-cell functionality in interventional trials-results from the PIOglim study.

    Pfützner, Andreas; Derwahl, Michael; Jacob, Stephan; Hohberg, Cloth; Blümner, Ernst; Lehmann, Ute; Fuchs, Winfried; Forst, Thomas

    2010-08-01

    Drugs with unspecific stimulating effects on beta-cell secretion increase the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-B score, indicating improved beta-cell "function." We investigated whether the beta-cell protection provided by adding pioglitazone (PIO) to glimepiride (GLIM) in comparison to up-titrating the GLIM dose alone is reflected by appropriate changes in several measures of beta-cell function, including HOMA-B score. This double-blind, parallel prospective 6-month study was performed with 82 patients (47 men, 35 women; age, 61 +/- 9 years; duration of disease, 5.3 +/- 4.4 years; body mass index, 32.6 +/- 6.0 kg/m(2); hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c], 7.3 +/- 0.7%) with GLIM monotherapy (1-3 mg). They were randomized to receive a GLIM + PIO combination with up-titration (2 mg + 30 mg/4 mg + 30 mg/4 mg + 4 mg) or to remain on GLIM (up-titration 4/5/6 mg). Observation parameters determined at baseline and end point included HOMA-B, HOMA-IR, HbA1c, glucose, insulin, and intact proinsulin. There was a slight increase in the HOMA-B score in the GLIM group but not in the GLIM + PIO arm (baseline/end point: for GLIM, 71 +/- 48/88 +/- 64; for PIO + GLIM, 74 +/- 56/69 +/- 52). Improvements in the other observation parameters were predominantly detected in the PIO + GLIM group (HbA1c, 7.20 +/- 0.61%/6.36 +/- 0.90%; HOMA-IR, 7.0 +/- 4.5/4.1 +/- 2.1; intact proinsulin, 12.4 +/- 10.3/7.6 +/- 4.8 pmol/L [all P HOMA-IR, 7.4 +/- 4.5/7.5 +/- 4.3 [not significant]; intact proinsulin, 17.3 +/- 21.6/16.3 +/- 15.5 pmol/L [not significant]). The PIO + GLIM combination led to overall improvement of laboratory biomarkers for beta-cell function, except for HOMA-B. Glimepiride up-titration had no such effects but increased the HOMA-B score. HOMA-B seems to provide misleading results when used as a diagnostic tool in patients treated with sulfonylurea drugs. A corrective term for consideration of proinsulin in the HOMA-B equation may address this limitation.

  6. Resultados preliminares do uso de anti-hiperglicemiantes orais no diabete melito gestacional Preliminary results of the use of oral hypoglycemic drugs on gestational diabetes mellitus

    Jean Carl Silva

    2005-08-01

    effectiveness of glibenclamide and acarbose with that of insulin for the treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM, in regard to maternal glucose levels, newborn (NB weight and neonatal hypoglycemia. METHODS: an open, randomized prospective study was carried out. Fifty-seven patients diagnosed with GDM were included. These patients required dietary control and additional therapy. Pregnant women were randomly alloted to one of three groups with different therapies: a control group making use of insulin therapy, a study group making use of glibenclamide and a study group making use of acarbose. The study took seven months (from October 1st 2003 to May 1st 2004. Assessed outcomes were maternal glucose levels in the prenatal period, the need for replacing therapy to achieve glucose level control, NB weight and neonatal hypoglycemia. Statistical analysis was determined by ANOVA with the level of significance set at 5%. RESULTS: maternal characteristics were similar in all the three groups. Glucose level control was not obtained in three of the patients who used glibenclamide (15% and in seven (38.8% of the patients who used acarbose. Regarding fasting and postprandial glucose level rates and average NB weight no difference between the three groups was observed. No statistical difference was found for fasting or postprandial glucose levels and average NB weight in any of the three groups. The rate of large for gestational age fetuses was 5.2, 31.5 and 11.1% for the groups treated with insulin, glibenclamide and acarbose, respectively. Neonatal hypoglycemia was observed in six NB. Four of these were from the glibenclamide group (21.0%. CONCLUSIONS: glibenclamide was more effective for glucose level control than acarbose but neither were more efficient than insulin. NB children whose mothers had been alloted to the glibenclamide group showed a higher rate of macrosomia and neonatal hypoglycemia when compared to those newborns whose mothers were subjected to other therapies.

  7. Comparative study of hypoglycemic and antibacterial activity of organic extracts of four Bangladeshi plants

    Mohammad Shah Hafez Kabir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine hypoglycemic and antibacterial activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria of organic extracts of four Bangladeshi plants. Methods: An in vivo hypoglycemic effect on mice model was used to check the hypoglycemic effect of four Bangladeshi herbal organic extracts viz., roots of Curculigo recurvata W. T. Aiton (Satipata (C. recurvata, leaf of Amorphophallus bulbifer Roxb. (Olkachu (A. bulbifer, whole plant of Thunbergia grandiflora Roxb. (Nillata (T. grandiflora and leaf of Steudnera colocasiifolia K. Koch (Yunnan (S. colocasiifolia using glibenclamide as a positive control and water as a negative control. They were also tested for antibacterial activity on three Grampositive and four Gram-negative bacteria by disk diffusion method. C. recurvata, A. bulbifer and T. grandiflora were extracted with methanol and S. colocasiifolia was extracted with ethanol. Results: Among all the plant extract, only ethanol extract of S. colocasiifolia leaves at 800 mg/ kg dose significantly (P < 0.01 reduced fasting glucose level in normal mice as compared to standard drug glibenclamide (5 mg/kg. Ethanol extract of S. colocasiifolia leaves at 800 mg/ kg dose decreased 20.28% of blood glucose level after 2 h of administration in normal mice, where glibenclamide decreased 39.63%. Methanol extract of T. grandiflra didn’t show any zone of inhibition against the tested bacteria, but other three extracts showed a wide range of zone of inhibition. However, none of the extract showed antibacterial activity against all the tested bacteria. Methanol extract of C. recurvata showed maximum zone of inhibition against Bacillus cereus [(10.50 ± 0.50 mm], Salmonella typhi [(16.20 ± 1.26 mm], Escherichia coli [(13.00 ± 1.00 mm] and ethanol extract of S. colocasiifolia showed maximum zone of inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus [(11.20 ± 1.26 (mm], Bacillus subtilis [(12.00 ± 0.50 (mm], Salmonella paratyphi [(10.80 ± 0.29 (mm

  8. Absorbance detector for high performance liquid chromatography based on a deep-UV light-emitting diode at 235nm.

    da Silveira Petruci, João Flavio; Liebetanz, Michael G; Cardoso, Arnaldo Alves; Hauser, Peter C

    2017-08-25

    In this communication, we describe a flow-through optical absorption detector for HPLC using for the first time a deep-UV light-emitting diode with an emission band at 235nm as light source. The detector is also comprised of a UV-sensitive photodiode positioned to enable measurement of radiation through a flow-through cuvette with round aperture of 1mm diameter and optical path length of 10mm, and a second one positioned as reference photodiode; a beam splitter and a power supply. The absorbance was measured and related to the analyte concentration by emulating the Lambert-Beer law with a log-ratio amplifier circuitry. This detector showed noise levels of 0.30mAU, which is comparable with our previous LED-based detectors employing LEDs at 280 and 255nm. The detector was coupled to a HPLC system and successfully evaluated for the determination of the anti-diabetic drugs pioglitazone and glimepiride in an isocratic separation and the benzodiazepines flurazepam, oxazepam and clobazam in a gradient elution. Good linearities (r>0.99), a precision better than 0.85% and limits of detection at sub-ppm levels were achieved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. BIJI MAHONI (SWIETENIA MAHAGONI MENURUNKAN GLUKOSA DARAH PADA DIABETES MELITUS TIPE II

    ani astuti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Kontrol glukosa darah dapat dilakukan dengan terapi farmakologi dan tanaman berkhasiat obat atau herbal. Obat herbal yang mempunyai efek hipoglikemik salah satunya adalah biji mahoni yang berfungsi sebagai astrigen menghambat asupan glukosa dan laju peningkatan glukosa darah. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh biji mahoni terhadap kadar glukosa darah pada penderita diabetes melitus tipe II, dengan desain penelitian adalah quasi eksperimental ‘’Pre and Post-Test Control Group Design’’, pada desain ini responden penelitian dibagi menjadi dua kelompok. 34 responden kelompok intervensi, dan 34 responden kelompok kontrol sebagai pembanding. Pengumpulan data dilakukan dengan pemeriksaan kadar glukosa darah pre dan post perlakuan, lembar observasi dan hasil penelitian dianalisis secara univariat dan bivariat dengan menggunakan uji Wilcoxon. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan sebanyak (100% responden sebelum dilakukan intervensi dan pemberian glibenklamide dengan kadar glukosa darah > 200 mg/dl. Sebanyak (85,3% responden sesudah intervensi dengan nilai kadar glukosa darah 90-199 mg/dl. Dari analisis bivariat terdapat pengaruh biji mahoni terhadap kadar glukosa darah dengan nilai p- value = 0,000 (p<0,05. Biji mahoni lebih berpotensi menurunkan kadar glukosa darah dibandingkan dengan glimepiride dengan beda rerata median 17,5 mg/dl.  Kata Kunci: Biji Mahoni, Glukosa Darah, Diabetes Melitus Tipe II  

  10. Comparative assessment of the treatment of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Kokic, S.; Radman, M.; Capkum, V.; Dovzak-Kokic, D.; Tesanovic, S.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the study was to estimate the most successful way of treating patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A total of 87 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were selected for a three-month study. The patients were divided into three groups comprising 29 patients in each group, based upon the treatment regimen. Group 1 (BMI 32.3+-3.6 kg/m2) was treated with glimepiride and metformin; group 2 (BMI 27.9+-3.9) was treated with daily doses of insulin mixture 30/70 and bed-time NPH insulin; and group 3 (BMI 30.02+-4.8) was treated with a combination of three daily doses of lispo and metformin.The groups did not differ significantly in terms of sex and age. Initially, there were significant statistical differences in HbA1c (P=0.035) between the three groups (9, 21%+-1.72%; 9.21%+-1.54%; and 10, 0%+-1.73% respectively). After three months there were no statistically differences in HbA1c (P=0.66) between the groups (8.52+-1.7%; 8.03%+-1.05%; and 8.0%+-0.63%, respectively. Decreases in HbA1c were significant in all groups, but most pronounced in patients treated with lispro and metaformin (17% on average). The study results suggest the need for establishing guidelines on how to treat type 2 diabetics. (author)

  11. Major Pathophysiology in Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes: Decreased Insulin in Lean and Insulin Resistance in Obese.

    Kabadi, Udaya M

    2017-06-01

    Lowering of body mass index (BMI) to ≥25 kg/m 2 as obesity by ADA suggests insulin resistance as a major mechanism of impaired glucose metabolism (IGM) in Asians. However, glimepiride, an insulin secretagogue, delayed onset of type 2 diabetes (DM2) from prediabetes (PreDM), indicating decreased insulin secretion (IS) as a major factor in lean (L; BMI DM2. Seventy-five men and 45 women ages 36 to 75 years were divided into six groups: LN, LPreDM, LDM2, ObN, ObPreDM, and ObDM2. Determination of IS by insulinogenic indices (I/G) at fasting (FI/FG), first phase (∆I/∆G), and cumulative responses over 2 hours of OGTT (CRI/CRG), and IR by FIXFG, ∆IX∆G, and CRIXCRG. Changes in IS and IR for PreDM and DM2 were calculated as % fall and % rise, respectively, from levels in N. All indices of IS and IR were lower ( P DM2 ( P < 0.05) in both groups. However, the declines in IS were greater ( P < 0.05) than rises in IR in LPreDM and LDM2. Whereas, the rises in IR were higher ( P < 0.05) than declines in IS in ObPreDM and ObDM2. In L, major mechanism of IGM is declining IS and not rising IR documented among Ob.

  12. Nigella sativa Relieves the Altered Insulin Receptor Signaling in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Fed with a High-Fat Diet.

    Balbaa, Mahmoud; El-Zeftawy, Marwa; Ghareeb, Doaa; Taha, Nabil; Mandour, Abdel Wahab

    2016-01-01

    The black cumin (Nigella sativa) "NS" or the black seeds have many pharmacological activities such as antioxidant, anticarcinogenic, antihypertensive, and antidiabetic properties. In this work, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats fed with a high-fat diet were treated daily with NS oil (NSO) in order to study the effect on the blood glucose, lipid profile, oxidative stress parameters, and the gene expression of some insulin receptor-induced signaling molecules. This treatment was combined also with some drugs (metformin and glimepiride) and the insulin receptor inhibitor I-OMe-AG538. The administration of NSO significantly induced the gene expression of insulin receptor compared to rats that did not receive NSO. Also, it upregulated the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 and phosphoinositide-3 kinase, whereas the expression of ADAM-17 was downregulated. The expression of ADAM-17 is corroborated by the analysis of TIMP-3 content. In addition, the NSO significantly reduced blood glucose level, components of the lipid profile, oxidative stress parameters, serum insulin/insulin receptor ratio, and the tumor necrosis factor-α, confirming that NSO has an antidiabetic activity. Thus, the daily NSO treatment in our rat model indicates that NSO has a potential in the management of diabetes as well as improvement of insulin-induced signaling.

  13. Nigella sativa Relieves the Altered Insulin Receptor Signaling in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Fed with a High-Fat Diet

    Mahmoud Balbaa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The black cumin (Nigella sativa “NS” or the black seeds have many pharmacological activities such as antioxidant, anticarcinogenic, antihypertensive, and antidiabetic properties. In this work, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats fed with a high-fat diet were treated daily with NS oil (NSO in order to study the effect on the blood glucose, lipid profile, oxidative stress parameters, and the gene expression of some insulin receptor-induced signaling molecules. This treatment was combined also with some drugs (metformin and glimepiride and the insulin receptor inhibitor I-OMe-AG538. The administration of NSO significantly induced the gene expression of insulin receptor compared to rats that did not receive NSO. Also, it upregulated the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 and phosphoinositide-3 kinase, whereas the expression of ADAM-17 was downregulated. The expression of ADAM-17 is corroborated by the analysis of TIMP-3 content. In addition, the NSO significantly reduced blood glucose level, components of the lipid profile, oxidative stress parameters, serum insulin/insulin receptor ratio, and the tumor necrosis factor-α, confirming that NSO has an antidiabetic activity. Thus, the daily NSO treatment in our rat model indicates that NSO has a potential in the management of diabetes as well as improvement of insulin-induced signaling.

  14. Place of sulfonylureas in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in South Asia: A consensus statement

    Sanjay Kalra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since their introduction in clinical practice in the 1950′s, Sulfonylureas (SUs have remained the main-stay of pharmacotherapy in the management of type 2 diabetes. Despite their well-established benefits, their place in therapy is inappropriately being overshadowed by newer therapies. Many of the clinical issues associated with the use of SUs are agent-specific, and do not pertain to the class as such. Modern SUs (glimepiride, gliclazide MR are backed by a large body of evidence, experience, and most importantly, outcome data, which supports their role in managing patients with diabetes. Person-centred care, i.e., careful choice of SU, appropriate dosage, timing of administration, and adequate patient counseling, will ensure that deserving patients are not deprived of the advantages of this well-established class of anti-diabetic agents. Considering their efficacy, safety, pleiotropic benefits, and low cost of therapy, SUs should be considered as recommended therapy for the treatment of diabetes in South Asia. This initiative by SAFES aims to encourage rational, safe and smart prescription of SUs, and includes appropriate medication counseling.

  15. Cardiovascular safety of liraglutide assessed in a patient-level pooled analysis of phase 2: 3 liraglutide clinical development studies.

    Marso, Steven P; Lindsey, Jason B; Stolker, Joshua M; House, John A; Martinez Ravn, Gabriela; Kennedy, Kevin F; Jensen, Troels M; Buse, John B

    2011-07-01

    We assessed the cardiovascular safety of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, using existing clinical data. Patient-level results from all completed phase 2 and 3 studies from the liraglutide clinical development programme were pooled to determine rates of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE): cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke. MACE were identified by querying the study database using Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) terms combined with serious adverse events recorded by study investigators. Broad, narrow, and custom groups of MedDRA queries were used. Candidate events from each query were independently adjudicated post hoc. In 15 studies (6638 patients; 4257 liraglutide treated), there were 114 patients with MACE identified using the broad MedDRA query. Of these, 44 were classified as serious adverse events and 39 were adjudicated as MACE. The incidence ratio for adjudicated broad/serious MACE associated with liraglutide was 0.73 (95% CI 0.38-1.41) versus all comparator drugs (metformin, glimepiride, rosiglitazone, insulin glargine, placebo), within cardiovascular safety limits defined by the United States Food & Drug Administration for diabetes therapies under current investigation.

  16. Ameliorative Activity of Ethanol Extract of Artocarpus heterophyllus Stem Bark on Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    Ajiboye, Basiru O; Ojo, Oluwafemi A; Adeyonu, Oluwatosin; Imiere, Oluwatosin D; Fadaka, Adewale O; Osukoya, Adetutu O

    2017-10-01

    This study sought to investigate the ameliorative effects of ethanol extract Artocarpus heterophyllus (EAH) in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. The rats were divided into 6 groups, with groups 1 and 2 serving as nondiabetic and diabetic control, respectively; group 3 serving as diabetic rats treated with 5 mg/kg glibenclamide; and groups 4 to 6 were diabetic rats treated with 50, 100, and 150 mg/kg of EAH, respectively. Assays determined were serum insulin, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant enzyme activities. EAH stem bark reduced fasting blood glucose and lipid peroxidation levels and increased serum insulin levels and activities of antioxidant enzymes. Data obtained demonstrated the ability of EAH stem bark to ameliorate pancreatic β-cell dysfunction in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

  17. ATP secretion from nerve trunks and Schwann cells mediated by glutamate.

    Liu, Guo Jun; Bennett, Max R

    2003-11-14

    ATP release from rat sciatic nerves and from cultured Schwann cells isolated from the nerves was investigated using an online bioluminescence technique. ATP was released in relatively large amounts from rat sciatic nerve trunks during electrical stimulation. This release was blocked by the sodium channel inhibitor tetrodotoxin and the non-NMDA glutamate receptor blocker 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). Schwann cells isolated from the nerve trunks did not release ATP when electrically stimulated but did in response to glutamate in a concentration-dependent manner. Glutamate-stimulated ATP release was inhibited by specific non-competitive AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI 52466 and competitive non-NMDA receptor antagonist CNQX. Glutamate-stimulated ATP release was decreased by inhibition of anion transporter inhibitors by furosemide, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator by glibenclamide and exocytosis by botulinum toxin A, indicating that anion transporters and exocytosis provide the main secretion mechanisms for ATP release from the Schwann cells.

  18. The metabolic impact of β-hydroxybutyrate on neurotransmission: Reduced glycolysis mediates changes in calcium responses and KATP channel receptor sensitivity

    Lund, Trine Meldgaard; Ploug, K.B.; Iversen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    -hydroxybutyrate might change neuronal function as there is a known coupling between metabolism and neurotransmission. The purpose of this study was to shed light on the effects of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate on glycolysis and neurotransmission in cultured murine glutamatergic neurons. Previous studies have shown...... an effect of β-hydroxybutyrate on glucose metabolism, and the present study further specified this by showing attenuation of glycolysis when β-hydroxybutyrate was present in these neurons. In addition, the NMDA receptor-induced calcium responses in the neurons were diminished in the presence of β...... to a combination of glucose and R-β-hydroxybutyrate in cultured neurons. Using the latter combination, glycolysis was diminished, NMDA receptor-induced calcium responses were lower, and the KATP channel blocker glibenclamide caused a higher transmitter release....

  19. KATP channels are not essential for pressure-dependent control of renin secretion

    Jensen, B L; Gambaryan, S; Scholz, H

    1998-01-01

    (IPRK). Cromakalim (0.1-10 muM) stimulated basal renin secretion up to threefold and caused vasorelaxation in the IPRK. Both effects of cromakalim were attenuated by glibenclamide. Cromakalim stimulated renin secretion from isolated juxtaglomerular (JG) cells and from microdissected afferent arterioles......This study aimed to investigate the functional role of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels in the control of renin secretion by renal perfusion pressure. We studied the effect of openers and blockers of KATP-channels on basal- and low-pressure-induced renin secretion from isolated perfused rat kidneys......, all of which suggests that KATP channel openers stimulate renin secretion at the level of JG cells. A decrease in the perfusion pressure from 13.3 to 9.33 kPa (100 mmHg to 70 mmHg) increased renin secretion twofold, and cromakalim further increased renin secretion. At 5.33 kPa (40 mmHg) renin...

  20. Antidiabetic activity of medium-polar extract from the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana Bert. (Bertoni) on alloxan-induced diabetic rats

    Misra, Himanshu; Soni, Manish; Silawat, Narendra; Mehta, Darshana; Mehta, B. K.; Jain, D. C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the medicative effects of medium-polar (benzene:acetone, 1:1, v/v) extract of leaves from Stevia rebaudiana (family Asteraceae) on alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced in adult albino Wistar rats by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of alloxan (180 mg/kg). Medium-polar extract was administered orally at daily dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg body wt. basis for 10 days. The control group received normal saline (0.9%) for the same duration. Glibenclamide was used as positive control reference drug against Stevia extract. Results: Medium-polar leaf extract of S. rebaudiana (200 and 400 mg/kg) produced a delayed but significant (P Stevia extract was found to antagonize the necrotic action of alloxan and thus had a re-vitalizing effect on β-cells of pancreas. PMID:21687353

  1. Cholesterol crystals enhance TLR2-and TLR4-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine responses of monocytes to the proatherogenic oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Køllgaard, Tania Maria Simonsen; Enevold, Christian; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    , including Porphyromonas gingivalis, have been found in atherosclerotic plaques in humans and mice. We aimed to determine whether cholesterol crystals (CHCs) and oral bacteria synergize in the stimulation of human monocytes. Incubation of human monocytes with CHCs induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β......β secretion induced by P. gingivalis LPS and IL-1β secretion induced by whole P. gingivalis bacteria. This enhancement was abrogated by the NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitors Z-YVAD-FMK and glibenclamide. CHCs had no effect on cytokine production induced by P. gingivalis gingipains. Taken together, our...... findings support that CHCs, via stimulation of NLRP3 inflammasomes, act in synergy with the periodontal pathogen P. gingivalis to promote monocyte secretion of pro-atherogenic cytokines....

  2. Antidiabetic effect of Scoparia dulcis: effect on lipid peroxidation in streptozotocin diabetes.

    Pari, L; Latha, M

    2005-03-01

    Oxidative damage has been suggested to be a contributory factor in the development and complications of diabetes. The antioxidant effect of an aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis, an indigenous plant used in Ayurvedic medicine in India was studied in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Oral administration of Scoparia dulcis plant extract (SPEt) (200 mg/kg body weight) for 3 weeks resulted in a significant reduction in blood glucose and an increase in plasma insulin. The aqueous extract also resulted in decreased free radical formation in tissues (liver and kidney) studied. The decrease in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and hydroperoxides (HPX) and increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), reduced glutathione (GSH) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) clearly show the antioxidant properties of SPEt in addition to its antidiabetic effect. The effect of SPEt at 200 mg/kg body weight was better than glibenclamide, a reference drug.

  3. Effect of scoparia dulcis (Sweet Broomweed) plant extract on plasma antioxidants in streptozotocin-induced experimental diabetes in male albino Wistar rats.

    Pari, L; Latha, M

    2004-07-01

    Clinical research has confirmed the efficacy of several plants in the modulation of oxidative stress associated with diabetes mellitus. Scoparia dulcis plant extract is tried for prevention and treatment of diabetes mellitus induced experimentally by streptozotocin injection. A single dose of streptozotocin (45 mg/kg body weight) produced decrease in insulin, hyperglycemia, increased lipid peroxidation (Thiobarbituric reactive substances and lipid hydroperoxides) and decreased antioxidant levels (vitamin C, vitamin E, reduced glutathione, ceruloplasmin). Oral administration of an aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis plant (200 mg/kg body weight) for 6 weeks to diabetic rats significantly increased the plasma insulin and plasma antioxidants and significantly decreased lipid peroxidation. The effect of Scoparia dulcis plant extract at 200 mg/kg body weight was better than that of glibenclamide, a reference drug.

  4. Hypoglycaemic activity of Scopariadulcis L. extract in alloxan induced hyperglycaemic rats.

    Pari, L; Venkateswaran, S

    2002-11-01

    Scoparia dulcis L. commonly known as 'Sweet Broomweed' is widely used in Indian folk medicine for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Oral administration of 0.15, 0.30 and 0.45 g/kg body weight of the aqueous extract of the Scoparia dulcis leaves (SLEt) for 45 days resulted in a significant reduction in blood glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin and an increase in total haemoglobin but in the case of 0.45 g/kg body weight the effect was highly significant. The aqueous extract also prevented a decrease in the body weight. An oral glucose tolerance test was also performed in experimental diabetic rats, in which there was a significant improvement in glucose tolerance in animals treated with SLEt and the effect was comparable to that of glibenclamide. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The effect of control of diabetes mellitus on plasma T4, T3, rT3 levels and half muscle relaxation period

    Ismail, A.A.; Hafiez, A.A.; Sayed, S.N.; Abbas, E.Z.; Halawa, F.A.; Youssef, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    25 diabetics of the maturity onset type who showed no clinical evidence of either peripheral neruropathy or diabetic amyotrophy were selected for this study. All patients were subjected to the following investigations: estimation of half muscle relaxation period of the quadriceps muscle knee-jerk, measurement of plasma levels of thyroxine (T 4 ), triiodothyronine (T 3 ) and reverse triiodothronine (rT 3 ), determination of fasting and two hours postprandial blood sugar levels. The quadriceps muscle relaxation period in uncontrolled diabetics was significantly longer than in normals. Control of diabetes by glibenclamide or gliclazide did not cause a significant change in muscle relaxation period. There was also no significant difference between the effects of the two drugs. (author)

  6. Long-term tolerability of inhaled human insulin (Exubera) in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes

    Barnett, A H; Lange, P; Dreyer, M

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Inhaled human insulin (Exubera; EXU) has shown encouraging tolerability in short-term trials. We evaluated the safety profile of EXU after long-term exposure. DESIGN: In two, open-label, 2-year studies patients poorly controlled on a sulphonylurea were randomised to adjunctive EXU...... or metformin (study 1) and patients poorly controlled on metformin were randomised to adjunctive EXU or the sulphonylurea, glibenclamide (study 2). PATIENTS: The studies included 446 (study 1) and 476 (study 2) patients with type 2 diabetes, no clinically significant respiratory disease and glycosylated....... There was no discernable effect of long-term EXU therapy on pulmonary gas exchange. Insulin antibody binding reached a plateau at 6 months and did not correlate with HbA(1c) or lung function changes. Glycaemic control was maintained over 2 years. CONCLUSIONS: Exubera was well tolerated during long-term use. Pulmonary...

  7. Long-term tolerability of inhaled human insulin (Exubera) in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes

    Barnett, A H; Lange, P; Dreyer, M

    2007-01-01

    or metformin (study 1) and patients poorly controlled on metformin were randomised to adjunctive EXU or the sulphonylurea, glibenclamide (study 2). PATIENTS: The studies included 446 (study 1) and 476 (study 2) patients with type 2 diabetes, no clinically significant respiratory disease and glycosylated....... There was no discernable effect of long-term EXU therapy on pulmonary gas exchange. Insulin antibody binding reached a plateau at 6 months and did not correlate with HbA(1c) or lung function changes. Glycaemic control was maintained over 2 years. CONCLUSIONS: Exubera was well tolerated during long-term use. Pulmonary...... function changes compared with comparator groups were small, non-progressive and reversed upon treatment discontinuation. Importantly, rates of lung function change were indistinguishable between EXU and comparator after 6 months of therapy. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Oct...

  8. Antihyperglycemic and histological effects on the pancreas of the aqueous leaves extract of Annona squamosa L. in normal and diabetic rats

    Pornrut Rabintossaporn

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of our present study were to investigate the antihyperglycemic effect of aqueous leaves extract ofAnnona squamosa L. at different doses and histology of the pancreas in normal and diabetic rats after receiving the extract. The study of antihyperglycemic activities was undertaken by oral administration of vehicle, glibenclamide (3 mg/kg and water leaves extract of Annona squamosa L (125, 250 and 500 mg/kg for 12 days. Fasting blood glucose levels were recorded on the fifth and twelfth days of administration and the third day after stopping administration. The results showed that diabetic rats receiving the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg leaves extract had statistically significant (pAnnona squamosa L. has an antihyperglycemic effect and is able toimprove the histological appearance of diabetic rat pancreas.

  9. Medication usage in Majuro, Marshall Islands.

    Harding, Andrew

    2005-03-01

    To conduct a drug utilisation study to determine the top 50 drugs by prescription count, top 50 drugs by cost to government and the top 30 drugs by consumption for Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands for the year 2003. Data was collected from the Majuro Hospital computer dispensing system. All outpatient prescriptions dispensed in the year 2003 were included. The defined daily dose (DDD) methodology was employed. Drug consumption was presented as DDD/1000 population/day. The top 5 drugs by consumption in Majuro for 2003 were glibenclamide (glyburide), enalapril, ferrous sulphate, amoxycillin and ascorbic acid. Values for the DDD/1000 population/day were on average lower than many other countries. This is the first local study of medication usage in the Marshall Islands. It provided some useful baseline data.

  10. Effect of Luffa aegyptiaca (seeds) and Carissa edulis (leaves) extracts on blood glucose level of normal and streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    El-Fiky, F K; Abou-Karam, M A; Afify, E A

    1996-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of oral administration of the ethanolic extracts of Luffa aegyptiaca (seeds) and Carissa edulis (leaves) on blood glucose levels both in normal and streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats. Treatment with both extracts significantly reduced the blood glucose level in STZ diabetic rats during the first three hours of treatment. L. aegyptiaca extract decreased blood glucose level with a potency similar to that of the biguanide, metformin. The total glycaemic areas were 589.61 +/- 45.62 mg/dl/3 h and 660.38 +/- 64.44 mg/dl/3 h for L. aegyptiaca and metformin, respectively, vs. 816.73 +/- 43.21 mg/dl/3 h for the control (P < 0.05). On the other hand, in normal rats, both treatments produced insignificant changes in blood glucose levels compared to glibenclamide treatment.

  11. THE PARTICIPATION OF THE NITRERGIC PATHWAY IN INCREASED RATE OF TRANSITORY RELAXATION OF LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER INDUCED BY RECTAL DISTENSION IN DOGS

    Michel Santos PALHETA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context The rectal distension in dogs increases the rate of transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation considered the main factor causing gastroesophageal reflux. Objectives The aim of this study was evaluate the participation of the nitrergic pathway in the increased transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation rate induced by rectal distension in anesthetized dogs. Methods Male mongrel dogs (n = 21, weighing 10-15 kg, were fasted for 12 hours, with water ad libitum. Thereafter, they were anesthetized (ketamine 10 mg.Kg-1 + xylazine 20 mg.Kg-1, so as to carry out the esophageal motility evaluation protocol during 120 min. After a 30-minute basal period, the animals were randomly intravenous treated whith: saline solution 0.15M (1ml.Kg-1, L-NAME (3 mg.Kg-1, L-NAME (3 mg.Kg-1 + L-Arginine (200 mg.Kg-1, glibenclamide (1 mg.Kg-1 or methylene blue (3 mg.Kg-1. Forty-five min after these pre-treatments, the rectum was distended (rectal distension, 5 mL.Kg-1 or not (control with a latex balloon, with changes in the esophageal motility recorded over 45 min. Data were analyzed using ANOVA followed by Student Newman-Keuls test. Results In comparison to the respective control group, rectal distension induces an increase in transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Pre-treatment with L-NAME or methylene blue prevents (P<0.05 this phenomenon, which is reversible by L-Arginine plus L-NAME. However, pretreating with glibenclamide failed to abolish this process. Conclusions Therefore, these experiments suggested, that rectal distension increases transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in dogs via through nitrergic pathways.

  12. H2S-induced HCO3- secretion in the rat stomach--involvement of nitric oxide, prostaglandins, and capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons.

    Takeuchi, Koji; Ise, Fumitaka; Takahashi, Kento; Aihara, Eitaro; Hayashi, Shusaku

    2015-04-30

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to be an important gaseous mediator that affects various functions under physiological and pathological conditions. We examined the effects of NaHS, a H2S donor, on HCO3(-) secretion in rat stomachs and investigated the mechanism involved in this response. Under urethane anesthesia, rat stomachs were mounted on an ex vivo chamber and perfused with saline. Acid secretion had been inhibited by omeprazole. The secretion of HCO3(-) was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method and by the addition of 10 mM HCl. NaHS (0.5-10 mM) was perfused in the stomach for 5 min. Indomethacin or L-NAME was administered s.c. before NaHS treatment, while glibenclamide (a KATP channel blocker), ONO-8711 (an EP1 antagonist), or propargylglycine (a cystathionine γ-lyase inhibitor) was given i.p. before. The mucosal perfusion of NaHS dose-dependently increased the secretion of HCO3(-), and this effect was significantly attenuated by indomethacin, L-NAME, and sensory deafferentation, but not by glibenclamide or ONO-8711. The luminal output of nitric oxide, but not the mucosal production of prostaglandin E2, was increased by the perfusion of NaHS. Mucosal acidification stimulated HCO3(-) secretion, and this response was inhibited by sensory deafferentation, indomethacin, L-NAME, and ONO-8711, but not by propargylglycine. These results suggested that H2S increased HCO3(-) secretion in the stomach, and this effect was mediated by capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons and dependent on nitric oxide and prostaglandins, but not ATP-sensitive K(+) channels. Further study is needed to define the role of endogenous H2S in the mechanism underlying acid-induced gastric HCO3(-) secretion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of the NO/K ATP pathway in the protective effect of a sulfated-polysaccharide fraction from the algae Hypnea musciformis against ethanol-induced gastric damage in mice

    Samara R. B. Damasceno

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Seaweeds are the most abundant source of polysaccharides such as alginates and agar, as well as carrageenans. This study aimed to investigate the gastroprotective activity and the mechanism underlying this activity of a sulfated-polysaccharide fraction extracted from the algae Hypnea musciformis (Wulfen J.V. Lamour. (Gigartinales-Rhodophyta. Mice were treated with sulfated-polysaccharide fraction (3, 10, 30, and 90 mg/kg, p.o. and, after 30 min, they were administered 50% ethanol (0.5 mL/25 g, p.o.. After 1 h, gastric damage was measured using a planimeter. In addition, samples of the stomach tissue were obtained for histopathological examination and for assays to determine the glutathione and malondialdehyde levels. Other groups of mice were pretreated with N G-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10 mg/kg, i.p., aminoguanidine (100 mg/kg, i.p., or glibenclamide (10 mg/kg, i.p.. After 30 min to the aminoguanidine group and 1 h to the other groups, sulfated-polysaccharide fraction (30 mg/kg, p.o. was administered and gastric damage was induced as described above. Sulfated-polysaccharide fraction prevented ethanol-induced gastric injury in a dose-dependent manner. However, treatment with L-NAME or glibenclamide reversed this gastroprotective effect. Administration of aminoguanidine did not influence the effect of sulfated-polysaccharide fraction. Our results suggest that sulfated-polysaccharide fraction exerts a protective effect against ethanol-induced gastric damage via activation of the NO/K ATP pathway.

  14. Comparative hypoglycemic potentials and phytochemical profiles of 12 common leafy culinary vegetables consumed in Nsukka, Southeastern Nigeria.

    Aba, Patrick Emeka; Udechukwu, Ifeanyi Ronald

    2018-04-11

    Metabolic disease like diabetes mellitus is on the increase in developing countries due to lack of access to orthodox medicine owing to its high cost. Health benefits of culinary vegetables cannot be overemphasized. This study therefore aims to profile the hypoglycaemic potentials of 12 common leafy vegetables consumed in Nsukka, Southeastern Nigeria and advise diabetic patients accordingly. A total of 75 albino Wistar rats assigned to 15 groups of five rats per group were used for the study. Diabetes was induced in groups 1-14 rats by intraperitoneal injection of alloxan monohydrate (160 mg/kg), and rats in group 15 were not made diabetic. Groups 1-12 rats were treated with aqueous extracts of the vegetables (200 mg/kg), and group 13 rats received glibenclamide at 2 mg/kg and served as standard control. Rats in groups 14 and 15 received distilled water (10 mL/kg) to serve as negative and normal controls, respectively. The fasting blood glucose (FBG) values of the rats were determined 3, 6 and 24 h post-treatment. Phytochemical studies on the vegetables were also carried out. Results revealed that the hypoglycaemic activities of Gongronema latifolium, Pterocarpus santalinoides, Ocimum gratissimum, Pterocarpus mildbraedii and Vernonia amygdalina were comparable (p>0.05) to that obtained for glibenclamide (standard anti-diabetic drug) while Gnetum africanum and Piper guineense did not show significant hypoglycaemic activities. Phytochemicals such as flavonoids, alkaloids, tannins, saponins, glycosides, and terpenes were present in the vegetables. It was concluded that the vegetables possess hypoglycaemic activities at different capacities with G. latifolium being the most potent.

  15. The metabolic impact of β-hydroxybutyrate on neurotransmission: Reduced glycolysis mediates changes in calcium responses and KATP channel receptor sensitivity.

    Lund, Trine M; Ploug, Kenneth B; Iversen, Anne; Jensen, Anders A; Jansen-Olesen, Inger

    2015-03-01

    Glucose is the main energy substrate for neurons, and ketone bodies are known to be alternative substrates. However, the capacity of ketone bodies to support different neuronal functions is still unknown. Thus, a change in energy substrate from glucose alone to a combination of glucose and β-hydroxybutyrate might change neuronal function as there is a known coupling between metabolism and neurotransmission. The purpose of this study was to shed light on the effects of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate on glycolysis and neurotransmission in cultured murine glutamatergic neurons. Previous studies have shown an effect of β-hydroxybutyrate on glucose metabolism, and the present study further specified this by showing attenuation of glycolysis when β-hydroxybutyrate was present in these neurons. In addition, the NMDA receptor-induced calcium responses in the neurons were diminished in the presence of β-hydroxybutyrate, whereas a direct effect of the ketone body on transmitter release was absent. However, the presence of β-hydroxybutyrate augmented transmitter release induced by the KATP channel blocker glibenclamide, thus giving an indirect indication of the involvement of KATP channels in the effects of ketone bodies on transmitter release. Energy metabolism and neurotransmission are linked and involve ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP ) channels. However, it is still unclear how and to what degree available energy substrate affects this link. We investigated the effect of changing energy substrate from only glucose to a combination of glucose and R-β-hydroxybutyrate in cultured neurons. Using the latter combination, glycolysis was diminished, NMDA receptor-induced calcium responses were lower, and the KATP channel blocker glibenclamide caused a higher transmitter release. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. Decreased insulin secretion in pregnant rats fed a low protein diet.

    Gao, Haijun; Ho, Eric; Balakrishnan, Meena; Yechoor, Vijay; Yallampalli, Chandra

    2017-10-01

    Low protein (LP) diet during pregnancy leads to reduced plasma insulin levels in rodents, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Glucose is the primary insulin secretagogue, and enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in beta cells contributes to compensation for insulin resistance and maintenance of glucose homeostasis during pregnancy. In this study, we hypothesized that plasma insulin levels in pregnant rats fed LP diet are reduced due to disrupted GSIS of pancreatic islets. We first confirmed reduced plasma insulin levels, then investigated in vivo insulin secretion by glucose tolerance test and ex vivo GSIS of pancreatic islets in the presence of glucose at different doses, and KCl, glibenclamide, and L-arginine. Main findings include (1) plasma insulin levels were unaltered on day 10, but significantly reduced on days 14-22 of pregnancy in rats fed LP diet compared to those of control (CT) rats; (2) insulin sensitivity was unchanged, but glucose intolerance was more severe in pregnant rats fed LP diet; (3) GSIS in pancreatic islets was lower in LP rats compared to CT rats in the presence of glucose, KCl, and glibenclamide, and the response to L-arginine was abolished in LP rats; and (4) the total insulin content in pancreatic islets and expression of Ins2 were reduced in LP rats, but expression of Gcg was unaltered. These studies demonstrate that decreased GSIS in beta cells of LP rats contributes to reduced plasma insulin levels, which may lead to placental and fetal growth restriction and programs hypertension and other metabolic diseases in offspring. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for the Study of Reproduction. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Ropivacaine-Induced Contraction Is Attenuated by Both Endothelial Nitric Oxide and Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channels in Isolated Rat Aortae

    Seong-Ho Ok

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated endothelium-derived vasodilators and potassium channels involved in the modulation of ropivacaine-induced contraction. In endothelium-intact rat aortae, ropivacaine concentration-response curves were generated in the presence or absence of the following inhibitors: the nonspecific nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, the neuronal NOS inhibitor Nω-propyl-L-arginine hydrochloride, the inducible NOS inhibitor 1400W dihydrochloride, the nitric oxide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase (GC inhibitor ODQ, the NOS and GC inhibitor methylene blue, the phosphoinositide-3 kinase inhibitor wortmannin, the cytochrome p450 epoxygenase inhibitor fluconazole, the voltage-dependent potassium channel inhibitor 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, the calcium-activated potassium channel inhibitor tetraethylammonium (TEA, the inward-rectifying potassium channel inhibitor barium chloride, and the ATP-sensitive potassium channel inhibitor glibenclamide. The effect of ropivacaine on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS phosphorylation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells was examined by western blotting. Ropivacaine-induced contraction was weaker in endothelium-intact aortae than in endothelium-denuded aortae. L-NAME, ODQ, and methylene blue enhanced ropivacaine-induced contraction, whereas wortmannin, Nω-propyl-L-arginine hydrochloride, 1400W dihydrochloride, and fluconazole had no effect. 4-AP and TEA enhanced ropivacaine-induced contraction; however, barium chloride and glibenclamide had no effect. eNOS phosphorylation was induced by ropivacaine. These results suggest that ropivacaine-induced contraction is attenuated primarily by both endothelial nitric oxide and voltage-dependent potassium channels.

  18. GC-MS analysis and screening of antidiabetic, antioxidant and hypolipidemic potential of Cinnamomum tamala oil in streptozotocin induced diabetes mellitus in rats

    Kumar Suresh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim of the study This study was made to investigate the antidiabetic, antioxidant and hypolipidemic potential of Cinnamomum tamala, (Buch.-Ham. Nees & Eberm (Tejpat oil (CTO in streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetes in rats along with evaluation of chemical constituents. Materials and methods The GC-MS (Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis of the oil showed 31 constituents of which cinnamaldehyde was found the major component (44.898%. CTO and cinnamaldehyde was orally administered to diabetic rats to study its effect in both acute and chronic antihyperglycemic models. The body weight, oral glucose tolerance test and biochemical parameters viz. glucose level, insulin level, liver glycogen content, glycosylated hemoglobin, total plasma cholesterol, triglyceride and antioxidant parameters were estimated for all treated groups and compared against diabetic control group. Results CTO (100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg, cinnamaldehyde (20 mg/kg and glibenclamide (0.6 mg/kg in respective groups of diabetic animals administered for 28 days reduced the blood glucose level in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. There was significant increase in body weight, liver glycogen content, plasma insulin level and decrease in the blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin and total plasma cholesterol in test groups as compared to control group. The results of CTO and cinnamaldehyde were found comparable with standard drug glibenclamide. In vitro antioxidant studies on CTO using various models showed significant antioxidant activity. In vivo antioxidant studies on STZ induced diabetic rats revealed decreased malondialdehyde (MDA and increased reduced glutathione (GSH. Conclusion Thus the investigation results that CTO has significant antidiabetic, antioxidant and hypolipidemic activity.

  19. Possible role of opioids and KATP channels in neuroprotective effect of postconditioning in mice.

    Pateliya, Bharat Bhai; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2008-09-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the possible role of opioids and K(ATP) channels in ischemic postconditioning-induced reversal of global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) induced neuronal injury. Mice were subjected to global ischemia by bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 10 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h, to produce neuronal injury. Ischemic postconditioning was induced by three episodes of carotid artery occlusion and reperfusion of 10 s each, immediately after global ischemia. Morphine postconditioning was induced by administration of morphine (5 mg/kg i.v.), 5 min prior to reperfusion. Naloxone (5 mg/kg i.v.), opioid receptor antagonist, and glibenclamide (5 mg/kg i.v.), K(ATP) channel blocker were administered 10 min before global ischemia. Extent of cerebral injury was assessed by measuring cerebral infarct size using triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. Short-term memory was evaluated using the elevated plus maze test, while degree of motor incoordination was evaluated using inclined beam-walking, rota-rod and lateral push tests. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion followed by reperfusion resulted in significant increase in infarct size, impairment in short-term memory and motor co-ordination. Ischemic/morphine postconditioning significantly attenuated I/R induced neuronal injury and behavioural alterations. Pretreatments with naloxone and glibenclamide attenuated the neuroprotective effects of ischemic/morphine postconditioning. It may be concluded that ischemic/morphine postconditioning protects I/R induced cerebral injury via activating opioid receptor and K(ATP) channel opening.

  20. Antioxidant activity of citrullus colocynthis pulp extract in the RBC's of alloxan-induced diabetic rats

    Dallak, M.; Jaliah, B.I.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory showed that Citrullus colocynthis pulp seedless extract have antihyperglycemic and insulinotropic effects in alloxan induced diabetes. Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in the mechanism of damage of red blood cells and anaemia in diabetic patients. So the current study was carried out to investigate the protective role of citrullus colocynthis against oxidative stress in the RBC's of alloxan induced diabetic rats. Methods: Rats were divided into four groups each of ten rats, the first group was normal non diabetic rats given normal saline orally and was named control group, the second group was diabetic rats given normal saline orally and were named normal saline treated-diabetic rats, the third and fourth group were diabetic rats treated with the pulp extract or glibenclamide (a positive control) orally. Evaluations were made for haematological parameters in the blood and for lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress enzymes activities in the RBC's of all experimental rats. Results: The diabetic rats had a significant decrease (p<0.05) in total erythrocytes count and Packed Cell Volume (PCV) and a normal Haemoglobin (Hb) value in the blood. They also showed decreased levels of Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) and decreased activities of Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and Catalase (CAT) in the RBC's hemolysate. On other hand, oral administration of citrullus colocynthis or glibenclamide alleviated these altered parameters in the treated rats, they resulted in a significant increase (p<0.05) in the in total erythrocytes count and PCV (Haematocrit) values in the blood and caused a significant decreased levels of TBARS and increased activities of SOD and CAT in the RBC's of those diabetic treated rats when compared to diabetic rats given normal saline. The effect was more profound in citrullus colocynthis treated diabetic rats. Conclusion: Citrullus colocynthis pulp extract possesses a potent antioxidant property

  1. Hypoglycemic and beta cell protective effects of andrographolide analogue for diabetes treatment

    Larrick James W

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While all anti-diabetic agents can decrease blood glucose level directly or indirectly, few are able to protect and preserve both pancreatic beta cell mass and their insulin-secreting functions. Thus, there is an urgent need to find an agent or combination of agents that can lower blood glucose and preserve pancreatic beta cells at the same time. Herein, we report a dual-functional andrographolide-lipoic acid conjugate (AL-1. The anti-diabetic and beta cell protective activities of this novel andrographolide-lipoic acid conjugate were investigated. Methods In alloxan-treated mice (a model of type 1 diabetes, drugs were administered orally once daily for 6 days post-alloxan treatment. Fasting blood glucose and serum insulin were determined. Pathologic and immunohistochemical analysis of pancreatic islets were performed. Translocation of glucose transporter subtype 4 in soleus muscle was detected by western blot. In RIN-m cells in vitro, the effect of AL-1 on H2O2-induced damage and reactive oxidative species production stimulated by high glucose and glibenclamide were measured. Inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB activation induced by IL-1β and IFN-γ was investigated. Results In alloxan-induced diabetic mouse model, AL-1 lowered blood glucose, increased insulin and prevented loss of beta cells and their dysfunction, stimulated glucose transport protein subtype 4 (GLUT4 membrane translocation in soleus muscles. Pretreatment of RIN-m cells with AL-1 prevented H2O2-induced cellular damage, quenched glucose and glibenclamide-stimulated reactive oxidative species production, and inhibited cytokine-stimulated NF-κB activation. Conclusion We have demonstrated that AL-1 had both hypoglycemic and beta cell protective effects which translated into antioxidant and NF-κB inhibitory activity. AL-1 is a potential new anti-diabetic agent.

  2. Bioassay-Guided Antidiabetic Study of Phaleria macrocarpa Fruit Extract

    Mohd Z. Asmawi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available An earlier anti-hyperglycemic study with serial crude extracts of Phaleria macrocarpa (PM fruit indicated methanol extract (ME as the most effective. In the present investigation, the methanol extract was further fractionated to obtain chloroform (CF, ethyl acetate (EAF, n-butanol (NBF and aqueous (AF fractions, which were tested for antidiabetic activity. The NBF reduced blood glucose (p < 0.05 15 min after administration, in an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT similar to metformin. Moreover, it lowered blood glucose in diabetic rats by 66.67% (p < 0.05, similar to metformin (51.11%, glibenclamide (66.67% and insulin (71.43% after a 12-day treatment, hence considered to be the most active fraction. Further fractionation of NBF yielded sub-fractions I (SFI and II (SFII, and only SFI lowered blood glucose (p < 0.05, in IPGTT similar to glibenclamide. The ME, NBF, and SFI correspondingly lowered plasma insulin (p < 0.05 and dose-dependently inhibited glucose transport across isolated rat jejunum implying an extra-pancreatic mechanism. Phytochemical screening showed the presence of flavonoids, terpenes and tannins, in ME, NBF and SFI, and LC-MS analyses revealed 9.52%, 33.30% and 22.50% mangiferin respectively. PM fruit possesses anti-hyperglycemic effect, exerted probably through extra-pancreatic action. Magniferin, contained therein may be responsible for this reported activity.

  3. Antihyperglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of α, β-amyrin, a triterpenoid mixture from Protium heptaphyllum in mice

    Santos Flávia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pentacyclic triterpenes in general exert beneficial effects in metabolic disorders. This study investigated the effects of α, β-amyrin, a pentacyclic triterpene mixture from the resin of Protium heptaphyllum on blood sugar level and lipid profile in normal and streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic mice, and in mice fed on a high-fat diet (HFD. Findings Mice treated with α, β-amyrin (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg, p.o. or glibenclamide (10 mg/kg, p.o. had significantly reduced STZ-induced increases in blood glucose (BG, total cholesterol (TC and serum triglycerides (TGs. Unlike glibenclamide that showed significant reductions in BG, TC and TGs in normoglycemic mice, α, β-amyrin did not lower normal blood sugar levels but at 100 mg/kg, manifested a hypolipidemic effect. Also, α, β-amyrin effectively reduced the elevated plasma glucose levels during the oral glucose tolerance test. Moreover, the plasma insulin level and histopathological analysis of pancreas revealed the beneficial effect of α, β-amyrin in the preservation of beta cell integrity. In mice treated orally with α, β-amyrin (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg or fenofibrate (200 mg/kg, the HFD-associated rise in serum TC and TGs were significantly less. The hypocholesterolemic effect of α, β-amyrin appeared more prominent at 100 mg/kg with significant decreases in VLDL and LDL cholesterol and an elevation of HDL cholesterol. Besides, the atherogenic index was significantly reduced by α, β-amyrin. Conclusions These findings reflect the potential antihyperglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of α, β-amyrin mixture and suggest that it could be a lead compound for drug development effective in diabetes and atherosclerosis.

  4. EFFECTIVITY OF EXTRACT RED BETEL LEAF (Piper crocatum WITH WEIGHT INCREASE OF MALE WHITE MICE (Rattus novergicus IN CONDUTION DIABETES WHICH INDUCE ALLOXAN

    I Nengah Kerta Besung

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this research is to learn the level of effectiveness of ethanol extract from red betel leaf (Piper crocatum within increase weight of male white mouse in condition for diabetes mellitus. 20 male white mice (Rattus novergicus in 3 mounth with weight between 190-250 gram which adapted during 2 weeks. It classified to be 5 groups random, each group consisty by 4 mice. The first treatment as a negative control (healty mouse whitout giving treatment. The second treatment as alloxan positive control, the third treatment alloxan added by 2% suspension of ethaol extract from red betel leaf (dose 100 mg/kg bb per oral. The fifth treatment is alloxan added by 0.02% suspension glibenclamide (dose 1 ml/kg bb per oral. Giving extract betel leaf is done by oral with used sonde. Giving treatment at treatment III, IV and V is done everyday start from day 3 until the end of the day (21 day. The weight of mouse is measure at day 7, 14 and day 21 used analytical balanced. The result of this research show up that giving 2% ethanol extract from red betel leaf (Piper crocatum with dose (50 mg/kg bb, dose (100 mg/kg bb and glibenclamide 0,02% ( 1 ml/kg bb with significant can increase weight (P<0,05 of white mice which induce alloxan. Result of this research could be conclude that ethanol extract of red betel leaf (Piper crocatum can used for increase the weight.

  5. In vitro vascular effects produced by crude aqueous extract of green marine algae, Cladophora patentiramea (Mont.) Kützing, in aorta from normotensive rats.

    Lim, Yee-Ling; Mok, Shiueh-Lian

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the antihypertensive activity of aqueous extracts obtained from Malaysian coastal seaweeds and to determine the pharmacological mechanisms of the extracts on rat aorta in vitro. The antihypertensive activity of 11 species of seaweeds (5 brown, 1 red and 5 green algae) were tested by cumulative addition of the extracts to phenylephrine (PE)-precontracted Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) aortic rings in in vitro isometric contraction studies. Mechanisms for vasorelaxant effect were investigated in the presence of various antagonists. Of the 11 species tested, 2 showed a vasorelaxant effect. Further investigation of the mechanisms of action of the aqueous extract of green alga, Cladophora patentiramea (AECP),showed that the vascular relaxant effect was endothelium- and concentration-dependent. A maximum relaxation of 45.8 +/- 4.6% (n = 8, p < 0.001) was obtained at 0.1 mg/ml of extract, after which the response was found to reduce in a concentration-dependent manner to 15.7 +/- 4.9% (n = 8, p < 0.001) at the highest extract concentration tested. Pretreatment of endothelium-intact aortic rings with Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 30 microM), (1)H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 10 microM) and methylene blue (100 microM) resulted in a complete blockade of AECP-induced vasorelaxation. However, the relaxant effects of the extract were not blocked by atropine (1 microM), indomethacin (10 microM) and glibenclamide (10 microM), although the maximum relaxant responses were enhanced in the presence of glibenclamide. Our data showed that the in vitro vascular relaxant effect of AECPwas mediated through endothelium-dependent nitric oxide-cGMP pathway, and was not associated with the release of vasodilator prostaglandins, activation of muscarinic receptors, or ATP-sensitive potassium channels opening. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Experience of malignancies with oral glucose-lowering drugs in the randomised controlled ADOPT (A Diabetes Outcome Progression Trial) and RECORD (Rosiglitazone Evaluated for Cardiovascular Outcomes and Regulation of Glycaemia in Diabetes) clinical trials.

    Home, P D; Kahn, S E; Jones, N P; Noronha, D; Beck-Nielsen, H; Viberti, G

    2010-09-01

    Observational and mechanistic studies have suggested a possible relationship between treatment with metformin and decreased incidence of cancer in participants with type 2 diabetes. We extracted data for malignancies from the ADOPT (A Diabetes Outcome Progression Trial) and RECORD (Rosiglitazone Evaluated for Cardiovascular Outcomes and Regulation of Glycaemia in Diabetes) randomised controlled clinical trials, in which the efficacy and/or safety of metformin was assessed in comparison with sulfonylureas and rosiglitazone. Neoplasm occurrences were collected as adverse events in these studies. We reviewed and re-analysed the individual participant data in both studies for serious adverse events, malignancies reported as adverse events and related neoplasms of special interest. In ADOPT, 50 participants (3.4%) on metformin and 55 (3.8%) on each of rosiglitazone and glibenclamide (known as glyburide in the USA and Canada) developed serious adverse event malignancies (excluding non-melanoma skin cancers). This corresponds to 1.03, 1.12 and 1.31 per 100 person-years, giving hazard ratios for metformin of 0.92 (95% CI 0.63-1.35) vs rosiglitazone and 0.78 (0.53-1.14) vs glibenclamide. In RECORD, on a background of sulfonylurea, 69 (6.1%) participants developed malignant neoplasms in the metformin group, compared with 56 (5.1%) in the rosiglitazone group (HR 1.22 [0.86-1.74]). On a background of metformin, 74 (6.7%) participants in the sulfonylurea group developed malignant neoplasms, compared with 57 (5.1%) in the rosiglitazone group (HR 1.33 [0.94-1.88]). The malignancy rates in these two randomised controlled clinical trials do not support a view that metformin offers any particular protection against malignancy compared with rosiglitazone. However, they do not refute the possibility of a difference compared with sulfonylureas.

  7. Urtica Dioica Distillate Regenerates Pancreatic Beta Cells in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Gohari, Ali; Noorafshan, Ali; Akmali, Masoumeh; Zamani-Garmsiri, Fahimeh; Seghatoleslam, Atefeh

    2018-01-01

    Background Urtica dioica is known as an anti-hyperglycemic plant. Urtica dioica distillate (UD) is a traditional Iranian drink, locally known as “aragh gazaneh”. In spite of its widespread consumption in Iran, according to traditional Iranian medicine, there is no scientific report on the usefulness of UD for diabetic patients. This survey was designed to evaluate its protective effects for the recovery from diabetes by determining the serum insulin, blood glucose, volume of pancreatic islets, and the number and volume of β-cells in diabetic rats. Methods A total of 48 Sprague-Dawley male rats (200-250 g) were randomly distributed into 6 groups (n=8), including non-diabetic plus distilled water (DW), non-diabetic plus UD, diabetic plus DW, diabetic plus UD, diabetic plus insulin, and diabetic plus glibenclamide. DW, UD, and glibenclamide were administered via intragastric gavage and insulin was injected subcutaneously. After four weeks of experiments, blood samples were collected for serum insulin and blood glucose assay. Pancreas was also evaluated using stereological method. The SPSS software was used for statistical analysis. Kruskal-Wallis, repeated measurements, and Mann-Whitney U test were applied for comparisons between the groups. Results The treatment of diabetic rats with UD reduced the blood glucose dramatically (P<0.001) and increased serum insulin levels significantly (P=0.03) in comparison to the diabetic plus DW rats. Treatment with UD did not affect the mean β-cell volumes in the diabetic rats when compared to the diabetic plus DW rats, but the islet volumes and β-cell numbers were significantly recovered. Conclusion UD treatment in diabetic rats improves hyperglycemia by partially restoring plasma insulin levels. The data suggest that UD prevents islet atrophy and/or regenerate pancreatic β-cells. PMID:29749986

  8. Antinociceptive activity of Astragalus gummifer gum (gum tragacanth) through the adrenergic system: A in vivo study in mice.

    Bagheri, Seyyed Majid; Keyhani, Leila; Heydari, Mehrangiz; Dashti-R, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    In Iranian traditional medicine, gum obtained from Astragalus gummifer and some other species of Astragalus was used as analgesic agent. In this study, we investigated the antinociceptive effect of several concentrations (125, 250, and 500 μg/kg body weight) of Astragalus gummifer gum (AGG) on thermal and acetic acid induced pain in mice. AGG was dissolved in distillated water and injected i.p to male mice 15 minute before the onset of experiment. Writhing and hot-plate tests were applied to study the analgesic effect of AGG and compared with that of diclofenac sodium (30 mg/kg, i.p.) or morphine (8 mg/kg, i.p). To investigate the mechanisms involved in antinociception, yohimbine, naloxone, glibenclamide, and theophylline were used in writhing test. These drugs were injected intraperitoneally 15 min before the administration of AGG. The number of writhes were counted in 30 minutes and analyzed. AGG exhibited a significant antinociceptive effect and the most effective dose of AGG was 500 μg/kg. The most maximum possible effect (%MPE) was observed (117.4%) 15 min after drug administration. The %inhibition of acetic acid-induced writhing in AGG 125, 250 and 500 was 47%, 50% and 54% vs %15 of control and 66.3% of diclofenac sodium group. The antinociceptive effect induced by this gum in the writhing test was reversed by the systemic administration of yohimbine (α2-adrenergic antagonist), but naloxone, glibenclamide, and theophylline did not reverse this effect. The findings of this study indicated that AGG induced its antinociceptive through the adrenergic system.

  9. Antinociceptive activity of Astragalus gummifer gum (gum tragacanth through the adrenergic system: A in vivo study in mice

    Seyyed Majid Bagheri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Iranian traditional medicine, gum obtained from Astragalus gummifer and some other species of Astragalus was used as analgesic agent. Objective: In this study, we investigated the antinociceptive effect of several concentrations (125, 250, and 500 μg/kg body weight of Astragalus gummifer gum (AGG on thermal and acetic acid induced pain in mice. Materials and Methods: AGG was dissolved in distillated water and injected i.p to male mice 15 minute before the onset of experiment. Writhing and hot-plate tests were applied to study the analgesic effect of AGG and compared with that of diclofenac sodium (30 mg/kg, i.p. or morphine (8 mg/kg, i.p. To investigate the mechanisms involved in antinociception, yohimbine, naloxone, glibenclamide, and theophylline were used in writhing test. These drugs were injected intraperitoneally 15 min before the administration of AGG. The number of writhes were counted in 30 minutes and analyzed. Results: AGG exhibited a significant antinociceptive effect and the most effective dose of AGG was 500 μg/kg. The most maximum possible effect (%MPE was observed (117.4% 15 min after drug administration. The %inhibition of acetic acid-induced writhing in AGG 125, 250 and 500 was 47%, 50% and 54% vs %15 of control and 66.3% of diclofenac sodium group. The antinociceptive effect induced by this gum in the writhing test was reversed by the systemic administration of yohimbine (α2 -adrenergic antagonist, but naloxone, glibenclamide, and theophylline did not reverse this effect. Conclusions: The findings of this study indicated that AGG induced its antinociceptive through the adrenergic system.

  10. Antidiabetic Activity Test of Ethanolic Seri Leave’s (Muntingia Calabura L. Extract in Male Rats Induced by Alloxan

    Herlina Herlina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Antidiabetic activity test of ethanol extract of seri leave (Muntingia calabura L. rats induced by alloxan has been done. Male wistar albino rats are used as animal models which divided into 6 groups, normal group (aquadest, negative control group (Na CMC 0,5%, positive control group (glibenclamide 0,43 mg/200 gBB, and 1, 2, and 3 treatment groups (ethanol extract of seri leave 65, 130, dan 260 mg/kgBB. Rats blood glucose level after induced intraperitoneally by alloxan 130 mg/kgBB can be stated as diabetes when >200 mg/dL. Preprandial blood glucose levels are measured using DTN-410-K photometer, on day 0, 5, 10, and 15. The average result of AUC0-15 and percentage of decreasing blood glucose level for positive control group are 2732,5 and 37,43%, and 3 treatment groups (65 mg/kgBB, 130 mg/kgBB, and 260 mg/kgBB 3105 and 28,90%; 2962,5 and 32,16%; 2810 and 35,66%. This point indicated that the ethanol extract of seri leave has an antidiabetic activity and there is no significant difference compared with glibenclamide (p<0,05. Percentage of blood glucose decrease level the third treatment group there is no significant difference compare with positive control group. According to the relation between percentage of blood glucose decrease level with dose, value of ED50 of ethanol extract of seri leave is 692,424 mg/kgBB.

  11. Hypoglycaemic and Hypolipidaemic Effects of Withania somnifera Root and Leaf Extracts on Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Andy Ganapathi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera is an important medicinal plant, which is used in traditional medicine to cure many diseases.Flavonoids were determined in the extracts of W. somnifera root (WSREt and leaf (WSLEt. The amounts of total flavonoids found in WSREt and WSLEt were 530 and 520 mg/100 g dry weight (DW, respectively. Hypoglycaemic and hypolipidaemic effects of WSREt and WSLEt were also investigated in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. WSREt and WSLEt and the standard drug glibenclamide were orally administered daily to diabetic rats for eight weeks. After the treatment period, urine sugar, blood glucose, haemoglobin (Hb, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1C, liver glycogen, serum and tissues lipids, serum and tissues proteins, liver glucose-6-phosphatase (G6P and serum enzymes like aspartate transaminase (AST, alanine transaminase (ALT, acid phosphatase (ACP and alkaline phosphatase (ALP levels were determined. The levels of urine sugar, blood glucose, HbA1C, G6P, AST, ALT, ACP, ALP, serum lipids except high density lipoprotein-bound cholesterol (HDL-c and tissues like liver, kidney and heart lipids were significantly (p < 0.05 increased, however Hb, total protein, albumin, albumin:globulin (A:G ratio, tissues protein and glycogen were significantly (p < 0.05 decreased in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Treatment of the diabetic rats with WSREt, WSLEt and glibenclamide restored the changes of the above parameters to their normal level after eight weeks of treatment, indicating that WSREt and WSLEt possess hypoglycaemic and hypolipidaemic activities in alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus (DM rats.

  12. Bauhinia variegata (Caesalpiniaceae) leaf extract: An effective treatment option in type I and type II diabetes.

    Kulkarni, Yogesh A; Garud, Mayuresh S

    2016-10-01

    Among various metabolic disorders, diabetes mellitus is one of the most common disorder. Present study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of aqueous extract of Bauhinia variegata leaves (AE) in animal models of type I and type II diabetes. Type I diabetes was induced by streptozotocin at the dose of 55mg/kg (i.p.) in male Sprague Dawley rats while type II diabetes was induced by high fat diet and streptozotocin at the dose of 35mg/kg (i.p.). Diabetic animals were treated with AE at the dose of 250, 500 and 1000mg/kg. Glipizide (5mg/kg) was used as standard treatment drug. Treatment was given for 28days. Parameters evaluated were body weight, plasma glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, total proteins, albumin, creatinine and bun urea nitrogen. In type II diabetes, high density lipoprotein levels in plasma and plasma insulin level were also evaluated. Histopathological study of pancreases were carried out in type I study. AE showed significant decrease in plasma glucose significantly. AE was also found to decrease cholesterol, triglyceride, creatinine and blood urea nitrogen level in both types of diabetes. AE did not show any significant effect on plasma levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase. AE was found to increase the albumin and total protein levels. Histopathological study showed that AE decreases the necrotic changes in the pancreatic tissue. Aqueous extract of B. variegata leaves was found effective in treatment of both type I and type II diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Evidence based study of antidiabetic potential of C. maxima seeds - In vivo.

    Kushawaha, Devesh Kumar; Yadav, Manjulika; Chatterji, Sanjukta; Srivastava, Amrita Kumari; Watal, Geeta

    2017-10-01

    In vitro antidiabetic efficacy of Cucurbita maxima seed extract (CMSE) has already been studied in our previous findings. Thus, in order to validate these findings in biological system, in vivo antidiabetic activity of aqueous extract was investigated in normal as well as diabetic experimental models. Variable doses of extract were administered orally to normal and STZ induced mild diabetic rats during fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glucose tolerance test (GTT) studies. In order to determine the extract's antidiabetic potential long-term FBG and post prandial glucose (PPG) studies were also carried out. Most effective dose of 200 mg kg -1 of CMSE decreases the blood glucose level (BGL) in normal rats by 29.02% at 6 h during FBG studies and 23.23% at 3 h during GTT. However, the maximum reduction observed in BGL of mild diabetic rats during GTT the same interval of time was 26.15%. Moreover, in case of severely diabetic rats a significant reduction of 39.33% was observed in FBG levels whereas, in case of positive control, rats treated with 2.5 mg kg -1 of glipizide, a fall of 42.9% in FBG levels was observed after 28 days. Results of PPG level also showed a fall of 33.20% in severely diabetic rats as compared to the positive control showing a fall of 44.2% at the end of the 28 days. Thus, the present study validate the hypoglycemic and antidiabetic effect of CMSE and hence this extract could be explored further for developing as a novel antidiabetic agent.

  14. Hypoglycemia Secondary to Sulfonylurea Ingestion in a Patient with End Stage Renal Disease: Results from a 72-Hour Fast

    Alice Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin, proinsulin, and C-peptide levels increase with sulfonylurea exposure but the acuity of increase has not been described in dialysis patients. We present a case of a dialysis patient who presented with hypoglycemia and was found to have accidental sulfonylurea ingestion. This is a 73-year-old man with ESRD on peritoneal dialysis, without history of diabetes, who presented with hypoglycemia. Past medical history includes multiple myeloma, congestive heart failure, and hypertension. At initial presentation, his blood glucose was 47 mg/dL, with concomitant elevations in the following: C-peptide 30.5 (nl: 0.8–3.5 ng/mL, insulin 76 (nl: 3–19 μIU/mL, and proinsulin 83.3 (nl: ≤8.0 pmol/L. During the 72-hour fast, which he completed without hypoglycemia, insulin declined to be within normal limits (to 12 μIU/mL; proinsulin (to 12.1 pmol/L and C-peptide (to 7.2 ng/mL levels decreased but remained elevated. The sulfonylurea screen ultimately returned positive for glipizide, clinching the diagnosis. This is the first reported case which characterizes the chronic elevation of proinsulin in a patient with ESRD, as well as its dramatic increase after a presumed solitary exposure to sulfonylurea. The 72-hour fast conducted gives insight into the clearance of insulin, proinsulin, and C-peptide after sulfonylurea ingestion in ESRD.

  15. Sitagliptin/Simvastatin: a first combination tablet to treat type 2 diabetes and hypercholesterolemia – a review of its characteristics

    Ramadan, Wijdan H; Kabbara, Wissam K

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to review the current literature and information on the combination product Juvisync™ (sitagliptin + simvastatin), which was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in October 2011. Methods PubMed (2001–2014) was searched for primary and review articles on sitagliptin, simvastatin, or the combination product. Drug manufacturing data and product labeling were also used. Studies of simvastatin, sitagliptin, or the combination were screened and analyzed to include relevant and recent papers. Selected English language trials were limited to those with human subjects and included both safety and efficacy outcomes. Results When compared with glipizide as add-on therapy to metformin, sitagliptin was noninferior but had lower rates of hypoglycemia and weight gain. In addition, when compared with insulin glargine, sitagliptin was less effective in decreasing glycosylated hemoglobin, but was associated with significantly lower rates of hypoglycemia. Further, trials have shown a beneficial effect of using statins in patients with diabetes mellitus with regard to decreasing cardiovascular risk, regardless of baseline lipid levels or the presence of a cardiac disease. Both medications have also demonstrated an acceptable side effect profile. However, caution is needed when coadministering with any drug that may increase simvastatin levels to reduce the risk of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Conclusion Juvisync should be used in patients requiring both sitagliptin and simvastatin. Both agents have shown good efficacy and acceptable safety profiles. Sitagliptin is a good option for diabetic patients to improve glycemic control with a lower risk of hypoglycemia and weight gain. PMID:25709467

  16. Association of endothelial progenitor cells and peptic ulcer treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Nie, Zhihong; Xu, Limin; Li, Chuanyuan; Tian, Tao; Xie, Pingping; Chen, Xia; Li, Bojing

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the association between endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and peptic ulcers in patients with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), in association with the efficiency of peptic ulcer treatment. The study recruited healthy subjects and peptic ulcer patients with or without T2DM. All the ulcer patients, including those with and without T2DM, were administered omeprazole for 8 weeks. Peptic ulcer patients with T2DM were additionally treated with glipizide and novolin. Blood samples were then obtained from the three groups following ulcer treatment. CD133 + cells were isolated from the blood samples using magnetic bead selection, and cultured in complete medium 199. Morphological and quantity changes in EPCs were observed by light and fluorescence microscopy. In addition, flow cytometric analysis was used to quantify the number of vascular endothelial cells. The treatment was partially effective in 7 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients without T2DM and 12 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients with T2DM. However, this treatment was ineffective in 20 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients with T2DM. Notably, 25 peptic ulcer patients without T2DM were defined as completely recovered following treatment. In addition, the number of circulating EPCs as well as their colony forming ability was significantly reduced (Ppeptic ulcer patients with T2DM following ulcer treatment, compared with the other groups. Circulating EPC counts were significantly increased in peptic ulcer patients without T2DM, as compared with the healthy controls. With regards to colony formation, peptic ulcer patients without T2DM did not exhibit improved colony formation ability. In conclusion, the number of circulating EPCs and their colony-forming ability was significantly reduced in peptic ulcer patients with T2DM following ulcer treatment when compared with the other groups. This suggests that the poor curative effect of peptic ulcer treatment in these patients is

  17. A model of type 2 diabetes in the guinea pig using sequential diet-induced glucose intolerance and streptozotocin treatment

    Ackart, David F.; Richardson, Michael A.; DiLisio, James E.; Pulford, Bruce; Basaraba, Randall J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type 2 diabetes is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among noncommunicable diseases, and additional animal models that more closely replicate the pathogenesis of human type 2 diabetes are needed. The goal of this study was to develop a model of type 2 diabetes in guinea pigs, in which diet-induced glucose intolerance precedes β-cell cytotoxicity, two processes that are crucial to the development of human type 2 diabetes. Guinea pigs developed impaired glucose tolerance after 8 weeks of feeding on a high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet, as determined by oral glucose challenge. Diet-induced glucose intolerance was accompanied by β-cell hyperplasia, compensatory hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia with hepatocellular steatosis. Streptozotocin (STZ) treatment alone was ineffective at inducing diabetic hyperglycemia in guinea pigs, which failed to develop sustained glucose intolerance or fasting hyperglycemia and returned to euglycemia within 21 days after treatment. However, when high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet-fed guinea pigs were treated with STZ, glucose intolerance and fasting hyperglycemia persisted beyond 21 days post-STZ treatment. Guinea pigs with diet-induced glucose intolerance subsequently treated with STZ demonstrated an insulin-secretory capacity consistent with insulin-independent diabetes. This insulin-independent state was confirmed by response to oral antihyperglycemic drugs, metformin and glipizide, which resolved glucose intolerance and extended survival compared with guinea pigs with uncontrolled diabetes. In this study, we have developed a model of sequential glucose intolerance and β-cell loss, through high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet and extensive optimization of STZ treatment in the guinea pig, which closely resembles human type 2 diabetes. This model will prove useful in the study of insulin-independent diabetes pathogenesis with or without comorbidities, where the guinea pig serves as a relevant model species. PMID:28093504

  18. Comparative effectiveness of sulfonylurea and metformin monotherapy on cardiovascular events in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a cohort study.

    Roumie, Christianne L; Hung, Adriana M; Greevy, Robert A; Grijalva, Carlos G; Liu, Xulei; Murff, Harvey J; Elasy, Tom A; Griffin, Marie R

    2012-11-06

    The effects of sulfonylureas and metformin on outcomes of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in type 2 diabetes are not well-characterized. To compare the effects of sulfonylureas and metformin on CVD outcomes (acute myocardial infarction and stroke) or death. Retrospective cohort study. National Veterans Health Administration databases linked to Medicare files. Veterans who initiated metformin or sulfonylurea therapy for diabetes. Patients with chronic kidney disease or serious medical illness were excluded. Composite outcome of hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction or stroke, or death, adjusted for baseline demographic characteristics; medications; cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c, and serum creatinine levels; blood pressure; body mass index; health care utilization; and comorbid conditions. Among 253 690 patients initiating treatment (98 665 with sulfonylurea therapy and 155 025 with metformin therapy), crude rates of the composite outcome were 18.2 per 1000 person-years in sulfonylurea users and 10.4 per 1000 person-years in metformin users (adjusted incidence rate difference, 2.2 [95% CI, 1.4 to 3.0] more CVD events with sulfonylureas per 1000 person-years; adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.21 [CI, 1.13 to 1.30]). Results were consistent for both glyburide (aHR, 1.26 [CI, 1.16 to 1.37]) and glipizide (aHR, 1.15 [CI, 1.06 to 1.26]) in subgroups by CVD history, age, body mass index, and albuminuria; in a propensity score-matched cohort analysis; and in sensitivity analyses. Most of the veterans in the study population were white men; data on women and minority groups were limited but reflective of the Veterans Health Administration population. Use of sulfonylureas compared with metformin for initial treatment of diabetes was associated with an increased hazard of CVD events or death. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

  19. Quantitative autoradiography of the binding sites for [125I] iodoglyburide, a novel high-affinity ligand for ATP-sensitive potassium channels in rat brain

    Gehlert, D.R.; Gackenheimer, S.L.; Mais, D.E.; Robertson, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a high specific activity ligand for localization of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the brain. When brain sections were incubated with [ 125 I]iodoglyburide (N-[2-[[[(cyclohexylamino)carbonyl]amino]sulfonyl]ethyl]-5- 125 I-2- methoxybenzamide), the ligand bound to a single site with a KD of 495 pM and a maximum binding site density of 176 fmol/mg of tissue. Glyburide was the most potent inhibitor of specific [ 125 I]iodoglyburide binding to rat forebrain sections whereas iodoglyburide and glipizide were slightly less potent. The binding was also sensitive to ATP which completely inhibited binding at concentrations of 10 mM. Autoradiographic localization of [ 125 I]iodoglyburide binding indicated a broad distribution of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel in the brain. The highest levels of binding were seen in the globus pallidus and ventral pallidum followed by the septohippocampal nucleus, anterior pituitary, the CA2 and CA3 region of the hippocampus, ventral pallidum, the molecular layer of the cerebellum and substantia nigra zona reticulata. The hilus and dorsal subiculum of the hippocampus, molecular layer of the dentate gyrus, cerebral cortex, lateral olfactory tract nucleus, olfactory tubercle and the zona incerta contained relatively high levels of binding. A lower level of binding (approximately 3- to 4-fold) was found throughout the remainder of the brain. These results indicate that the ATP-sensitive potassium channel has a broad presence in the rat brain and that a few select brain regions are enriched in this subtype of neuronal potassium channels

  20. Chiral recognition of pinacidil and its 3-pyridyl isomer by canine cardiac and smooth muscle: Antagonism by sulfonylureas

    Steinberg, M.I.; Wiest, S.A.; Zimmerman, K.M.; Ertel, P.J.; Bemis, K.G.; Robertson, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Pinacidil, a potassium channel opener (PCO), relaxes vascular smooth muscle by increasing potassium ion membrane conductance, thereby causing membrane hyperpolarization. PCOs also act on cardiac muscle to decrease action potential duration (APD) selectively. To examine the enantiomeric selectivity of pinacidil, the stereoisomers of pinacidil (a 4-pyridylcyanoguanidine) and its 3-pyridyl isomer (LY222675) were synthesized and studied in canine Purkinje fibers and cephalic veins. The (-)-enantiomers of both pinacidil and LY222675 were more potent in relaxing phenylephrine-contracted cephalic veins and decreasing APD than were their corresponding (+)-enantiomers. The EC50 values for (-)-pinacidil and (-)-LY222675 in relaxing cephalic veins were 0.44 and 0.09 microM, respectively. In decreasing APD, the EC50 values were 3.2 microM for (-)-pinacidil and 0.43 microM for (-)-LY222675. The eudismic ratio was greater for the 3-pyridyl isomer than for pinacidil in both cardiac (71 vs. 22) and vascular (53 vs. 17) tissues. (-)-LY222675 and (-)-pinacidil (0.1-30 microM) also increased 86Rb efflux from cephalic veins to a greater extent than did their respective optical antipodes. The antidiabetic sulfonylurea, glyburide (1-30 microM), shifted the vascular concentration-response curve of (-)-pinacidil to the right by a similar extent at each inhibitor concentration. Glipizide also antagonized the response to (-)-pinacidil, but was about 1/10 as potent with a maximal shift occurring at 10 and 30 microM. Glyburide antagonized the vascular relaxant effects of 0.3 microM (-)-LY222675 (EC50, 2.3 microM) and reversed the decrease in APD caused by 3 microM (-)-LY222675 (EC50, 1.9 microM). Nitroprusside did not alter 86Rb efflux, and vascular relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside was unaffected by sulfonylureas

  1. A model of type 2 diabetes in the guinea pig using sequential diet-induced glucose intolerance and streptozotocin treatment.

    Podell, Brendan K; Ackart, David F; Richardson, Michael A; DiLisio, James E; Pulford, Bruce; Basaraba, Randall J

    2017-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among noncommunicable diseases, and additional animal models that more closely replicate the pathogenesis of human type 2 diabetes are needed. The goal of this study was to develop a model of type 2 diabetes in guinea pigs, in which diet-induced glucose intolerance precedes β-cell cytotoxicity, two processes that are crucial to the development of human type 2 diabetes. Guinea pigs developed impaired glucose tolerance after 8 weeks of feeding on a high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet, as determined by oral glucose challenge. Diet-induced glucose intolerance was accompanied by β-cell hyperplasia, compensatory hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia with hepatocellular steatosis. Streptozotocin (STZ) treatment alone was ineffective at inducing diabetic hyperglycemia in guinea pigs, which failed to develop sustained glucose intolerance or fasting hyperglycemia and returned to euglycemia within 21 days after treatment. However, when high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet-fed guinea pigs were treated with STZ, glucose intolerance and fasting hyperglycemia persisted beyond 21 days post-STZ treatment. Guinea pigs with diet-induced glucose intolerance subsequently treated with STZ demonstrated an insulin-secretory capacity consistent with insulin-independent diabetes. This insulin-independent state was confirmed by response to oral antihyperglycemic drugs, metformin and glipizide, which resolved glucose intolerance and extended survival compared with guinea pigs with uncontrolled diabetes. In this study, we have developed a model of sequential glucose intolerance and β-cell loss, through high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet and extensive optimization of STZ treatment in the guinea pig, which closely resembles human type 2 diabetes. This model will prove useful in the study of insulin-independent diabetes pathogenesis with or without comorbidities, where the guinea pig serves as a relevant model species. © 2017. Published by

  2. Rapid increase in the use of oral antidiabetic drugs in the United States, 1990-2001.

    Wysowski, Diane K; Armstrong, George; Governale, Laura

    2003-06-01

    To describe the use of oral antidiabetic drugs for management of type 2 diabetes in the U.S. from 1990 through 2001. Data on oral antidiabetic drugs were derived from two pharmaceutical marketing databases from IMS Health, the National Prescription Audit Plus and the National Disease and Therapeutic Index. In 1990, 23.4 million outpatient prescriptions of oral antidiabetic agents were dispensed. By 2001, this number had increased 3.9-fold, to 91.8 million prescriptions. Glipizide and glyburide, two sulfonylurea medications, accounted for approximately 77% of prescriptions of oral antidiabetic drugs in 1990 and 35.5% of prescriptions in 2001. By 2001, the biguanide metformin (approved in 1995) had captured approximately 33% of prescriptions, and the thiazolidinedione insulin sensitizers (rosiglitazone and pioglitazone marketed beginning in 1999) accounted for approximately 17% of market share. Compared with patients treated in 1990, those in 2001 were proportionately younger and they more often used oral antidiabetic drugs and insulin in combination. Internists and general and family practitioners were the primary prescribers of this class of drugs. Consistent with the reported increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, the number of dispensed outpatient prescriptions of oral antidiabetic drugs increased rapidly between 1990 and 2001. This period was marked by an increase in the treatment of younger people and the use of oral antidiabetic drugs in combination. With the approval in the last decade of several new types of oral antidiabetic medications with different mechanisms of action, options for management of type 2 diabetes have expanded.

  3. Sitagliptin/Simvastatin: a first combination tablet to treat type 2 diabetes and hypercholesterolemia – a review of its characteristics

    Ramadan WH

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Wijdan H Ramadan, Wissam K Kabbara Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, Lebanese American University, Byblos, Lebanon Background: The purpose of this study was to review the current literature and information on the combination product Juvisync™ (sitagliptin + simvastatin, which was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in October 2011. Methods: PubMed (2001–2014 was searched for primary and review articles on sitagliptin, simvastatin, or the combination product. Drug manufacturing data and product labeling were also used. Studies of simvastatin, sitagliptin, or the combination were screened and analyzed to include relevant and recent papers. Selected English language trials were limited to those with human subjects and included both safety and efficacy outcomes. Results: When compared with glipizide as add-on therapy to metformin, sitagliptin was noninferior but had lower rates of hypoglycemia and weight gain. In addition, when compared with insulin glargine, sitagliptin was less effective in decreasing glycosylated hemoglobin, but was associated with significantly lower rates of hypoglycemia. Further, trials have shown a beneficial effect of using statins in patients with diabetes mellitus with regard to decreasing cardiovascular risk, regardless of baseline lipid levels or the presence of a cardiac disease. Both medications have also demonstrated an acceptable side effect profile. However, caution is needed when coadministering with any drug that may increase simvastatin levels to reduce the risk of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Conclusion: Juvisync should be used in patients requiring both sitagliptin and simvastatin. Both agents have shown good efficacy and acceptable safety profiles. Sitagliptin is a good option for diabetic patients to improve glycemic control with a lower risk of hypoglycemia and weight gain. Keywords: simvastatin, sitagliptin, Juvisync™, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia

  4. ACh-evoked membrane hyperpolarization in smooth muscle cells of rat vas deferens in vitro: Involvement of K+ channels and NO%一氧化氮和K+通道参与乙酰胆碱引起的大鼠离体输精管平滑肌细胞超极化

    范平; 李丽; 刘政江; 司军强; 张志琴; 赵磊; 马克涛

    2007-01-01

    To explore the underlying mechanism of acetylcholine (Ach)-evoked membrane hyperpolarizing response in isolated rat vas deferens smooth muscle cells (SMCs), intracellular microelectrode recording technique and intracellular microelectrophoresis fluorescent staining technique were used to study Ach-evoked membrane hyperpolarizing response in SMCs freshly isolated from Wistar rat vas deferens. By using microelectrodes containing fluorescent dye 0.1% propidium iodide (PI), 37 and 17 cells were identified as SMCs in outer longitudinal and inner circular muscular layers, respectively. The resting membrane potentials of SMCs were (–53.56±3.88) mV and (–51.62±4.27) mV, respectively. The membrane input resistances were (2 245.60±372.50) MΩ and (2 101.50±513.50) MΩ , respectively. Ach evoked membrane hyperpolarizing response in a concentration-dependent manner with an of 36 μmol/L. This action of Ach was abolished by both a non-sepcific muscarinic (M) receptor antagonist atropine (1 μmol/L) and a selective M 3 receptor antagonist diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine-methiodide (DAMP, 100 nmol/L). Ach-evoked membrane hyperpolarization was also abolished by a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 300 μmol/L) and suppressed by an ATP-sensitive potassium (K ATP ) channel blocker glipizide (5 μmol/L) and an inward rectifier potassium (K ir ) channel inhibitor bariumion (50 μmol/L). A combination of glipizide and bariumion abolished Ach-evoked membrane hyperpolarizing response. The results suggest that Ach-evoked membrane hyperpolarization in rat vas deferens SMCs is mediated by M 3 receptor followed with activation of K ATP channels, K ir channels, and NO release.%本文旨在探讨大鼠新鲜离体输精管平滑肌细胞中乙酰胆碱(acetylcholine,Ach)引起超极化反应的机制,采用细胞内微电极记录技术和细胞内荧光标记技术研究Ach对大鼠输精管不同走行方向平滑肌细

  5. Role of wetland organic matters as photosensitizer for degradation of micropollutants and metabolites

    Lee, Eunkyung; Shon, Ho Kyong; Cho, Jaeweon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Photodegradation of PPCPs was investigated in various NOM enriched solutions. • Direct and indirect photolysis experiments were conducted upon UV irradiation. • PPCPs showed different levels of photodegradation rates depending on their photoreactivity. • Allochthonous NOM inhibited the photolysis of target PPCPs. • Wetland NOM enhanced photodegradation of some conservative PPCPs. - Abstract: Overall photodegradation of pharmaceuticals, personal care products (PPCPs) and pharmaceutical metabolites were investigated in order to evaluate their photochemical fate in aquatic environments in various natural organic matter (NOM) enriched solutions. Tested PPCPs exhibited different rates of loss during direct and indirect photolysis. Here, only ultraviolet (UV) light source was used for direct photolysis and UV together with 3 DOM * for indirect photolysis. Diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole were susceptible to photodegradation, whereas carbamazepine, caffeine, paraxanthine and tri(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) showed low levels of photodegradation rate, reflecting their conservative photoreactivity. During indirect photodegradation, in contrast to the hydrophilic autochthonous NOM, allochthonous NOM with relatively high molecular weight (MW), specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) and hydrophobicity (e.g., Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA)) revealed to significantly inhibit the photolysis of target micropollutants. The presence of Typha wetland NOM enhanced the indirect photolysis of well-known conservative micopollutants (carbamazepine and paraxanthine). And atenolol, carbamazepine, glimepiride, and N-acetyl-sulfamethoxazole were found to be sensitive to the triplet excited state of dissolved organic matter ( 3 DOM * ) with Typha wetland NOM under deoxygenated condition. This suggests that photolysis in constructed wetlands connected to the wastewater treatment plant can enhance the degradation of some anthropogenic micropollutants by the

  6. Non-severe Hypoglycemia Risk Difference between Sulfonylurea and Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter-2 Inhibitors (SGLT2-I) as an Add-On to Metformin in Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Farahani, Pendar

    2017-05-23

    Non-severe hypoglycemia reduces well-being, lowers quality of life, reduces productivity and increases treatment costs. The non-severe hypoglycemia rate, attributable to sulfonylurea (SU) utilization compared with newer classes such as SGLT2-I, could be of clinical significance. To explore the non-severe hypoglycemia risk difference (RD) for SU use compared with SGLT2-I in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) as an add on to metformin. A search was conducted for RCTs of SGLT2-I. PubMed database were utilized for this search. The search was limited to RCTs reported in English language for canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin. SU dose comparison was utilized to convert the dose of SUs to glimepiride equivalent doses. Totally, 118 RCTs were reviewed; 6 articles had an arm for a SU as add on to metformin. Six articles belong to 3 RCTs, which reported results for 52 weeks and 104 weeks. Average non-severe hypoglycemia rate for SU arm was 30% (5.5%) [Mean (SD)] for 52 weeks and 35.6% (6.1%) for 104 weeks. RD for non-severe hypoglycemia events for SU compared to SGLT2-I was 26.7% (4.9%) for 52 weeks (p-value less than 0.001) and 30.6% (5.5%) for 104 weeks (p-value less than 0.001). There was a significant correlation between dose of SU and hypoglycemia rate (Pearson correlation 0.995; R-square 99%). This study illustrated that a large proportion of patients who had exposure to SU in RCTs of SGLT2-I experienced non-severe hypoglycemia compared to SGLT2-I. There was a close relation between SU dose and increased probability of non-severe hypoglycemia events. © 2017 Journal of Population Therapeutics and Clinical Pharmacology. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy of vildagliptin versus sulfonylureas as add-on therapy to metformin: comparison of results from randomised controlled and observational studies.

    Ahrén, Bo; Mathieu, Chantal; Bader, Giovanni; Schweizer, Anja; Foley, James E

    2014-07-01

    Randomised control trials (RCTs) do not always reflect real-life outcomes for glucose-lowering drugs. In this work we compared RCT and real-life data on the efficacy of the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-4) inhibitor vildagliptin or sulfonylureas when added to metformin. Data were pooled from five RCTs examining vildagliptin (n = 2,788) and sulfonylureas (glimepiride [n = 1,259] or gliclazide [n = 433]), added to metformin. For real-life conditions, data were extracted from an observational study examining vildagliptin (n = 7,002) or sulfonylureas (n = 3,702), added to metformin monotherapy. Linear regression analyses were performed between the baseline HbA1c and the change in HbA1c (Δ HbA1c) after 24 weeks. Baseline HbA1c correlated to Δ HbA1c (r (2) = 0.36, slope = -0.54 [95% CI -0.55, -0.53; p vildagliptin, the slope was virtually identical in the observational study and the RCTs (interaction coefficient = 0.024, p = 0.175). For any given baseline HbA1c, Δ HbA1c with sulfonylureas was smaller in real life than in RCTs, whereas Δ HbA1c with vildagliptin was the same. When comparing RCT to real-life data, the decrease in HbA1c from baseline with sulfonylurea treatment is smaller in real life than in RCTs, whereas the reduction with vildagliptin is essentially the same, suggesting that the full power of treatment is retained in real life for vildagliptin but not for sulfonylureas, possibly due to fear of hypoglycaemia.

  8. Dual therapy of vildagliptin and telmisartan on diabetic nephropathy in experimentally induced type 2 diabetes mellitus rats.

    Sharma, Ashish Kumar; Kanawat, Devendra Singh; Mishra, Akanksha; Dhakad, Prashant Kumar; Sharma, Prashant; Srivastava, Varnika; Joshi, Sneha; Joshi, Megha; Raikwar, Sachin Kumar; Kurmi, Muneem Kumar; Srinivasan, Bharthu Parthsarthi

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate the combination of telmisartan with vildagliptin therapy versus monotherapy of vildagliptin and telmisartan on diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus rats. In adult rats streptozotocin (65 mg/kg) and nicotinamide (110 mg/kg) were injected intraperitoneally to produce diabetic nephropathy. Rats of either sex allotted to the following groups: (i) triple therapy: metformin (120 mg/kg, o.d.) + pioglitazone (1.25 mg/kg, o.d.) + glimepiride (0.7 mg/kg, o.d.); (ii) dual therapy: vildagliptin (8.76 mg/kg, o.d.) + telmisartan (6.48 mg/kg, o.d.); (iii) vildagliptin (8.76 mg/kg, o.d.); and (iv) telmisartan (6.48 mg/kg, o.d.); therapy was carried out for 35 days orally. Weekly at days 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35, blood pressure, blood glucose level, body weight, blood serum creatinine level, protein albumin level in urine, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were estimated. Renal structural changes were observed. Blood pressure, blood glucose level, blood serum creatinine level, protein albumin level in urine, BUN and renal deterioration increased significantly in diabetic rats compared with normal control rats. The vildagliptin + telmisartan treatment group showed no weight gain and controlled blood pressure, renovascular structural and biochemical parameters in diabetic neuropathy rats. The addition of telmisartan to vildagliptin demonstrated the best control over blood pressure, glycemia and diabetic nephropathy markers, renal structural changes and improvement of renal function as opposed to monotherapy with either drug, possibly because of the dual inhibitory effect on the renin-angiotensin system. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Profile of diseases prevalent in a tribal locality in Jharkhand, India: A family medicine practitioner′s perspective

    Sumit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    , ramipril, hydrochlorothiazide, atenolol, salbutamol, etophyline, metformin, glimepiride, fluoxetine, flavoxate, tamsulosin, iron-folic acid, etc. The fact that three or more drugs are given in most of the prescriptions, can be justified due to multiple morbidity and the severity of disease than to irresponsible prescribing.

  10. Effect of Vitamin E and omega 3 fatty acids in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    Dass, Ashwitha Shruti; Narayana, Sarala; Venkatarathnamma, P N

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and its complications have been implicated in hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. Antioxidants can improve glycemic control, lipid profile, and cognitive functions. We assessed the effect of Vitamin E and omega 3 fatty acids (OFA) on the above parameters. One hundred patients with type 2 DM receiving metformin 500 mg and glimepiride 1 mg were randomized to receive add-on therapy of Vitamin E 400 mg or OFA once daily for 12 weeks and the third group served as control. Fasting blood sugar (FBS), postprandial blood sugar (PPBS), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR), lipid profile, and mini-mental state examination were done at baseline and 12 weeks. Eighty-seven patients completed the study. A significant reduction in FBS, PPBS, and HbA1c was observed in all the three groups at 12 weeks. There was significant reduction in total cholesterol and triglycerides (TG) in patients receiving either of the antioxidants and also significant reduction in low-density lipoprotein in patients receiving OFA at 12 weeks compared to baseline. BMI and WHR were significantly increased in control group. Intergroup analysis showed that in patients receiving Vitamin E and OFA, the reduction of FBS, PPBS, and HbA1c were similar. The patients receiving OFA had significant reduction in TG compared to control. There was no significant effect on cognitive function. Vitamin E and OFA had beneficial effects on lipid profile and anthropometric measurements; however, the glycemic control was similar to the patients in control group.

  11. Sialic Acid on the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Regulates PrP-mediated Cell Signaling and Prion Formation.

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; Williams, Alun

    2016-01-01

    The prion diseases occur following the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into disease-related isoforms (PrP(Sc)). In this study, the role of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor attached to PrP(C) in prion formation was examined using a cell painting technique. PrP(Sc) formation in two prion-infected neuronal cell lines (ScGT1 and ScN2a cells) and in scrapie-infected primary cortical neurons was increased following the introduction of PrP(C). In contrast, PrP(C) containing a GPI anchor from which the sialic acid had been removed (desialylated PrP(C)) was not converted to PrP(Sc). Furthermore, the presence of desialylated PrP(C) inhibited the production of PrP(Sc) within prion-infected cortical neurons and ScGT1 and ScN2a cells. The membrane rafts surrounding desialylated PrP(C) contained greater amounts of sialylated gangliosides and cholesterol than membrane rafts surrounding PrP(C). Desialylated PrP(C) was less sensitive to cholesterol depletion than PrP(C) and was not released from cells by treatment with glimepiride. The presence of desialylated PrP(C) in neurons caused the dissociation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 from PrP-containing membrane rafts and reduced the activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2. These findings show that the sialic acid moiety of the GPI attached to PrP(C) modifies local membrane microenvironments that are important in PrP-mediated cell signaling and PrP(Sc) formation. These results suggest that pharmacological modification of GPI glycosylation might constitute a novel therapeutic approach to prion diseases. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Evaluation of Antidiabetic Prescriptions from Medical Reimbursement Applications at Banaras Hindu University Health Care Facility

    Dev Priya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes is on rapid increase in third world countries undergoing rapid transition in terms of development particularly in India, which is often being referred as Diabetic capital. It is a disease more prevalent at latter part of life of human beings when finances dwindle and social care gets neglected. The medication continues till the whole life on a regular basis. In present study, the objective has been to provide pharmacoeconomic medication to the diabetic pensioners in the backdrop as mentioned in above background.Methods: The data was collected at the medical reimbursement section of pensioners of the University. The data was examined to answer issues of therapeutic decisions in the light of the pharmacoeconomic considerations. In this paper essentially data on choice of prescriptions with the angle of pharmacoeconomic prudence were included. The dichotomy of specialist versus non specialist prescribers at the tertiary center (i.e. medical college hospital was compared. Effort was made to define merit of the prescription based on comprehensive considerations of patient profile, disease profile and therapeutic choice.Results: Total 72 prescriptions were analyzed for the study in which 475 drugs were prescribed to the patients.  Total antidiabetic drugs prescribed to the patients were 169. Out of 72 cases 39 were males and 33 were females with mean age 66.04 ± 5.80 (Mean ± SEM. The average number of drugs per prescription was 6.59 which was very high as per guidelines. Most commonly prescribed antidiabetic drug was Metformin (63.89% followed by Glimepiride (31.95%.Conclusion: This study reflects that there is need to make available the standard therapeutic optionat University Health Care Facility based upon pharmacoeconomic considerations.

  13. Improved glycemic control, pancreas protective and hepatoprotective effect by traditional poly-herbal formulation “Qurs Tabasheer” in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study was undertaken to evaluate the antihyperglycemic, antihyperlipidemic and hepatoprotective effect of a traditional unani formulation “Qurs Tabasheer” in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic wistar rats. Up till now no study was undertaken to appraise the efficacy of “Qurs Tabasheer” in the diabetic rats. Qurs Tabasheer is a unani formulation restraining preparations from five various herbs namely Tukhme Khurfa (Portulaca oleracea seed), Gule Surkh (Rosa damascena flower), Gulnar (Punica granatum flower), Tabasheer (Bambusa arundinasia dried exudate on node), Tukhme Kahu (Lactuca sativa Linn seed). Methods Effect of Qurs Tabasheer was assessed in STZ (60 mg/kg, i.p single shot) induced diabetic wistar rats. STZ produced a marked increase in the serum glucose, Total Cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, VLDL Cholesterol, Triglycerides and trim down the HDL level. We have weighed up the effect of Qurs Tabasheer on hepatic activity through estimating levels of various liver enzymes viz. Hexokinase, Glucose-6-Phosphatase and Fructose-1-6-biphosphatase in STZ diabetic wistar rats. Results In STZ-induced diabetic wistar rats level of Hexokinase, and Glucose-6-Phosphatase was decreased to a significant level while the level of fructose-1-6-biphophatase was augmented. Therapy with Qurs Tabasheer for 28 days to STZ-induced diabetic rats significantly reduces the level of serum glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1-6-biphosphatase, while magnitude of HDL cholesterol and hexokinase was amplified. Conclusion Antihyperglycemic, antihyperlipidemic activity of Qurs Tabasheer extract in STZ- induced wistar rats was found to be more effective than standard oral hypoglycemic drug Glimepiride. PMID:23305114

  14. [Contributions of SGLT-2 and new drugs under investigation].

    Mediavilla Bravo, J J

    2014-07-01

    DeFronzo spoke of the "ominous octet", in which he referred to the existence of distinct pathways and organs related to the physiopathology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). One of these key organs is the kidney, which plays an important role in regulating glucose metabolism through gluconeogenesis and through glomerular filtration and glucose reabsorption in the proximal convoluted tubules. Approximately 180 g of glucose are filtered to the renal tubule from the blood stream through the glomerulus. The filtrate is subsequently reabsorbed from the tubules to the peritubular capillaries through the action of sodium glucose cotransporters (SGLT). There are 2 main cotransporters in the kidney, SGLT1 and SGLT2, which reabsorb the glucose (10% and 90%, respectively) and return it to the blood. In persons with DM2, SGLT2 is increased, leading to greater renal absorption of glucose, which has adverse effects as it contributes to the maintenance of hyperglycemia. Selective pharmacological SGLT2 inhibition increases renal glucose excretion and secondarily reduces its plasma values. SGLT2 inhibitors act exclusively on the kidney, reduce glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) by about 0.66%, decrease blood pressure, and induce a weight loss of approximately 1.8 kg. These drugs have a low risk of hypoglycemia but carry an increased risk of genitourinary infections. Several clinical trials have shown that dapagliflozin (10mg/day), the first SGLT2 inhibitor commercialized in Spain, produces a statistically significant reduction in HbA1c of 0.82-0.97%, both in monotherapy and in combination with metformin, glimepiride, pioglitazone, or insulin. Its use produces a weight loss of between 2 and 3 kg and reduces both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, while the risk of hypoglycemias is low. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Rural y Generalista (SEMERGEN). All rights reserved.

  15. Role of wetland organic matters as photosensitizer for degradation of micropollutants and metabolites

    Lee, Eunkyung [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Yonsei-ro 50, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Shon, Ho Kyong [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), PO Box 123, Broadway, Sydney 2007, NSW (Australia); Cho, Jaeweon, E-mail: chojw@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Yonsei-ro 50, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Photodegradation of PPCPs was investigated in various NOM enriched solutions. • Direct and indirect photolysis experiments were conducted upon UV irradiation. • PPCPs showed different levels of photodegradation rates depending on their photoreactivity. • Allochthonous NOM inhibited the photolysis of target PPCPs. • Wetland NOM enhanced photodegradation of some conservative PPCPs. - Abstract: Overall photodegradation of pharmaceuticals, personal care products (PPCPs) and pharmaceutical metabolites were investigated in order to evaluate their photochemical fate in aquatic environments in various natural organic matter (NOM) enriched solutions. Tested PPCPs exhibited different rates of loss during direct and indirect photolysis. Here, only ultraviolet (UV) light source was used for direct photolysis and UV together with {sup 3}DOM{sup *}for indirect photolysis. Diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole were susceptible to photodegradation, whereas carbamazepine, caffeine, paraxanthine and tri(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) showed low levels of photodegradation rate, reflecting their conservative photoreactivity. During indirect photodegradation, in contrast to the hydrophilic autochthonous NOM, allochthonous NOM with relatively high molecular weight (MW), specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) and hydrophobicity (e.g., Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA)) revealed to significantly inhibit the photolysis of target micropollutants. The presence of Typha wetland NOM enhanced the indirect photolysis of well-known conservative micopollutants (carbamazepine and paraxanthine). And atenolol, carbamazepine, glimepiride, and N-acetyl-sulfamethoxazole were found to be sensitive to the triplet excited state of dissolved organic matter ({sup 3}DOM{sup *}) with Typha wetland NOM under deoxygenated condition. This suggests that photolysis in constructed wetlands connected to the wastewater treatment plant can enhance the degradation of some anthropogenic micropollutants

  16. In vitro antioxidant, hypoglycemic and oral glucose tolerance test of banana peels

    V.V. Navghare

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Banana fruit is claimed to have antidiabetic effects despite its high calorie content, and its peels also contain vital phytoconstituents including gallocatechin. Previously banana pulp has been studied for antihyperglycemic effects, and in the present investigation antihyperglycemic effect of ethanolic extract of inner peels of Musa sapientum (EMS, Musa paradisiaca (EMP, Musa cavendish (EMC and Musa acuminata (EMA fruit was evaluated using oral glucose tolerance test in normoglycemic rats. In vitro antioxidant study was conducted using DPPH, H2O2 radical scavenging assay and ferric reducing power assay. Wistar rats were divided into fourteen groups and twelve groups received different doses of aforementioned extracts, while control group received gum acacia solution and remaining group received standard drug, glimepiride. All the rats received glucose load at a dose of 2 g/kg body weight. Groups treated with EMC and EMA showed significant decrease in glucose level (p < 0.01 at 150 min as compared to control group. In hypoglycemic study, only EMP 500 mg/kg, p.o. treated group revealed a significant decrease (p < 0.05 in glucose level at 120 min, while other groups did not show any sign of hypoglycemia. In glucose tolerance test, animals treated with EMC and EMA depicted dose dependent antihyperglycemic effect at 150 min while EMS and EMP showed significant reduction in plasma glucose at higher doses. In a similar fashion, EMA i.e. M. acuminata demonstrated highest antioxidant activity followed by EMC against DPPH radical. In ferric reducing power and H2O2 scavenging assay, EMA demonstrated maximal antioxidant activity when compared with other extracts.

  17. Therapeutic fasting in patients with metabolic syndrome and impaired insulin resistance.

    Stange, Rainer; Pflugbeil, Christine; Michalsen, Andreas; Uehleke, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated whether a short- to mid-term fasting therapy (7-18 days) might improve insulin resistance according to the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), measured during mid-term (80 days) follow-up observation in patients with metabolic syndrome. In this open label observational study in inpatients, criteria of metabolic syndrome were defined. Before medically controlled Buchinger fasting, a wash-out period for hypoglycemic agents was conducted. Further evaluation was carried out on day 80. 25 patients (13 males, 12 females, mean age 61.3 years) were included in this study (mean fasting duration 11.5 days). Out of 16 inpatients with type 2 diabetes, 4 had been treated with metformin, 3 with insulin, and 1 with glimepiride before the intervention. After therapy, body mass index (BMI), fasting insulin, fasting glucose, and HOMA-IR were all significantly reduced. Compared to baseline, HOMA-IR decreased by 33% in all patients, by 38% in patients with type 2 diabetes, and by 23% in patients without diabetes. At day 80, BMI further improved, while other parameters showed complete (insulin) or partial (glucose, HOMA-IR) rebound. At this time, HOMA-IR values showed an only insignificant improvement in 15% of all patients, in 20% of patients with type 2 diabetes, and in 6% of patients without diabetes. There was no correlation between change in BMI and change in HOMA-IR (r(2) = 0.008, baseline minus day 80). No serious side effects were observed. Fasting as a safe and acceptable procedure may cause short- and mid-term improvement of increased insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Patients with type 2 diabetes benefit more than those without diabetes. A possible clinical significance of this effect should be explored in larger and controlled clinical trials. © 2014 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  18. Patrones de prescripción de antidiabéticos en un grupo de pacientes colombianos Antidiabetic drugs prescription patterns among a group of patients in Colombia

    Jorge Enrique Machado Alba

    2007-08-01

    prescribed from two to four. The medications prescribed were: biguanides (67.5%, sulphonylureas (64.9%, insulin (23.5%, and thiazolidinediones (0.1%. The most common oral combination-therapies were: glibenclamide and metformin (n = 2 847, metformin and insulin (n = 510, glibenclamide and insulin (n = 148, and metformin, insulin, and glibenclamide (n = 288. Of the total, 94.3% had comorbid conditions for which they had been prescribed medication: antihypertensive drugs (in 74.4% of the cases, anti-inflammatories (61.5%, hypolipemiants (45.5%, antiulcer medications (21.0%, psychoactive drugs (16.8%, antimicrobials (14.4%, asthma medication (5.3%, and salicylic acid (2.8%. Prescriptions for comorbid conditions were more common among women than men (95.6% vs. 92.7%, P < 0.001. Undertreatment with certain medications (metformin, thiazolidinediones, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, and salicylic acid, and overtreatment with others (antiulcer drugs, probably exist. CONCLUSIONS: There are significant differences in oral therapies prescribed for diabetes across the 19 cities studied, but overall, prescription patterns are appropriate. Educational strategies should be developed to address those prescribing practices that are not appropriate, and the clinical results of the medications studied should be explored.

  19. The Effects of Leucine, Zinc, and Chromium Supplements on Inflammatory Events of the Respiratory System in Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    Saeed Kolahian

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a major cause of serious micro- and macrovascular diseases that affect nearly every system in the body, including the respiratory system. Non-enzymatic protein glycation due to hyperglycaemic stress has fundamental implications due to the large capillary network and amount of connective tissue in the lung. The current study was designed to determine whether leucine, zinc, and chromium supplementations influence the function and histological structure of the respiratory tract in a rat model of type 2 diabetes. Seventy-seven rats were divided into eleven groups, consisting of 7 animals each. One group served as negative control and insulin and glibenclamide were used as positive control drugs. Thus, eight groups received the nutritional supplements alone or in combination with each other. Nutritional supplements and glibenclamide were added to the drinking water and neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin was subcutaneously injected during the 4 weeks of treatment period. The induction of type 2 diabetes in the rats caused an infiltration of mononuclear cells and edema in the submucosa of the trachea and lung, severe fibrosis around the vessels and airways, and perivascular and peribronchial infiltration of inflammatory cells and fibrin. In the diabetic group, the total inflammation score and Reid index significantly increased. Diabetes induction significantly reduced the total antioxidant status and elevated the lipid peroxidation products in the serum, lung lavage and lung tissue of the diabetic animals. Treatment with nutritional supplements significantly decreased the histopathological changes and inflammatory indices in the diabetic animals. Supplementation of diabetic rats with leucine, zinc, and chromium, alone and in combination, significantly increased the total antioxidant status and lipid peroxidation level in the diabetic animals. The nutritional supplements improved the enzymatic antioxidant activity of catalase

  20. [Effect of K-ATP channel opener-pinacidil on the liver mitochondria function in rats with different resistance to hypoxia during stress].

    Tkachenko, H M; Kurhaliuk, N M; Vovkanych, L S

    2004-01-01

    We have examined the influence of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel opener pinacidil (0.06 mg/kg) and inhibitor glibenclamide (1 mg/kg) on the changes of energy metabolism in the liver of rats under the stress conditions. The rats were divided in two groups with high and low resistance to hypoxia. The stress was modeled by placing the rats in a cage filled with water and closed with a net. The distance from water to the net was only 5 cm. The effects of KATP opener pinacidil (0.06 mg/kg) and inhibitor glibenclamide (1 mg/kg) on ADP-stimulating mitochondrial respiration by Chance, calcium capacity of organellas and processes of lipid peroxidation in the liver of rats with different resistance to hypoxia under the stress condition have been investigated. We have used the next substrates of oxidation: 0.35 mM succinate and 1 mM alpha-ketoglutarate. The additional analyses were conducted with the use of inhibitors: mitochondrial enzyme complex I 10 mM rotenone and succinate dehydrohenase 2 mM malonic acid. It was shown that the stress condition evoked the succinate oxidation and the decrease of alpha-ketoglutarate efficacy, the increase of calcium mitochondrial capacity and the intensification of lipid peroxidation processes. Under the presence of succinate, the increase of O2 uptake with simultaneous decrease of ADP/O ratio in rats with high resistance under stress was observed. Simultaneously, oxidation of alpha-ketoglutarate, a NAD-dependent substrate, was inhibited. Pinacidil caused the reorganization of mitochondrial energy metabolism in favour of NAD-dependent oxidation and the improvment of the protection against stress. The decrease of the efficacy of mitochondrial energy processes functioning was shown in animals with low resistance to hypoxia. KATP channel opener pinacidil has a protective effect on the processes of mitochondrial liver energy support under stress. These changes deal with the increase of alpha-ketoglutarate oxidation (respiratory rate and

  1. Muscarinic receptors, nitric oxide formation and cyclooxygenase pathway involved in tracheal smooth muscle relaxant effect of hydro-ethanolic extract of Lavandula angustifolia flowers.

    Naghdi, Farzaneh; Gholamnezhad, Zahra; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Bakhshesh, Morteza

    2018-06-01

    Lavandula angustifolia (L. angustifolia) Mill. (Common name Lavender) is used in traditional and folk medicines for the treatment of various diseases including respiratory disorders worldwide. The relaxant effect of the plant on the smooth muscle of some tissues was shown previously. The present study has investigated the role of different receptors and pathways in the relaxant effect of L. angustifolia on tracheal smooth muscle. Cumulative concentrations of the hydro-ethanolic extract of L. angustifolia flowers (0.5, 1, 2 and 4 mg/ml) were added on pre-contracted tracheal smooth muscle by methacholine (10 μM) or KCl (60 mM) on non-preincubated or preincubated tissues with atropine, chlorpheniramine, propranolol, diltiazem, glibenclamide, indomethacin, ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and papaverine. The results compared with of theophylline (0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 mM) as positive control and saline (1 ml) as negative control. The extract showed concentration-dependent relaxant effects in non-preincubated tracheal smooth muscle contracted by KCl and methacholine (p effect ofL. angustifolia was not significantly different between non-preincubated and preincubated tissues with chlorpheniramine, propranolol, diltiazem, glibenclamide, and papaverine. However, two higher concentrations of L. angustifolia in preincubated tissues with L-NAME (p effects than non-preincubated tissues. The EC 50 values of L. angustifolia in tissues preincubated with indomethacin was significantly higher than non-preincubated trachea (p effects of three first concentrations of the extract on KCl and methacholine-induced muscle contraction were significantly lower than those of theophylline (p effect ofL. angustifolia that was lower than the effect of theophylline. The possible mechanisms of relaxant effect of this plant on tracheal smooth muscle are muscarinic receptors blockade, inhibition of cyclooxygenase pathways and/or involvement of nitric oxide production

  2. Mechanism of action of relaxant effect of Agastache mexicana ssp.mexicana essential oil in guinea-pig trachea smooth muscle.

    Navarrete, Andrés; Ávila-Rosas, Natalia; Majín-León, Mateo; Balderas-López, José Luis; Alfaro-Romero, Alejandro; Tavares-Carvalho, José Carlos

    2017-12-01

    Agastache mexicana ssp. mexicana (Kunth) Lint & Epling (Lamiaceae), popularly known as 'toronjil morado', is used in Mexican traditional medicine for the treatment of several diseases such as hypertension, anxiety and respiratory disorders. This study investigates the relaxant action mechanism of A. mexicana ssp. mexicana essential oil (AMEO) in guinea-pig isolated trachea model. AMEO was analyzed by GC/MS. The relaxant effect of AMEO (5-50 μg/mL) was tested in guinea-pig trachea pre-contracted with carbachol (3 × 10  -   6  M) or histamine (3 × 10  -   5  M) in the presence or absence of glibenclamide (10  -   5  M), propranolol (3 × 10  -   6  M) or 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine (10  -   5  M). The antagonist effect of AMEO (10-300 μg/mL) against contractions elicited by carbachol (10  -   15 -10  -   3  M), histamine (10  -   15 -10  -   3  M) or calcium (10-300 μg/mL) was evaluated. Essential oil composition was estragole, d-limonene and linalyl anthranilate. AMEO relaxed the carbachol (EC 50  =   18.25 ± 1.03 μg/mL) and histamine (EC 50  =   13.3 ± 1.02 μg/mL)-induced contractions. The relaxant effect of AMEO was not modified by the presence of propranolol, glibenclamide or 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, suggesting that effect of AMEO is not related to β 2 -adrenergic receptors, ATP-sensitive potassium channels or adenylate cyclase activation. AMEO was more potent to antagonize histamine (pA 2 ' = -1.507 ± 0.122) than carbachol (pA 2 ' = -2.180 ± 0.357). Also, AMEO antagonized the calcium chloride-induced contractions. The results suggest that relaxant effect of AMEO might be due to blockade of calcium influx in guinea-pig trachea smooth muscle. It is possible that estragole and d-limonene could contribute majority in the relaxant effect of AMEO.

  3. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping, E-mail: wpxie@njmu.edu.cn; Wang, Hong, E-mail: hongwang@njmu.edu.cn

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that K{sub ATP} channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K{sup +} channels triggers K{sup +} efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca{sup 2+}entry through closing voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K{sup +} efflux decreases Ca{sup 2+} influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a K{sub ATP} channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective K{sub ATP} channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt

  4. Nicorandil attenuates monocrotaline-induced vascular endothelial damage and pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Makoto Sahara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An antianginal K(ATP channel opener nicorandil has various beneficial effects on cardiovascular systems; however, its effects on pulmonary vasculature under pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH have not yet been elucidated. Therefore, we attempted to determine whether nicorandil can attenuate monocrotaline (MCT-induced PAH in rats. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats injected intraperitoneally with 60 mg/kg MCT were randomized to receive either vehicle; nicorandil (5.0 mg·kg(-1·day(-1 alone; or nicorandil as well as either a K(ATP channel blocker glibenclamide or a nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor N(ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, from immediately or 21 days after MCT injection. Four or five weeks later, right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP was measured, and lung tissue was harvested. Also, we evaluated the nicorandil-induced anti-apoptotic effects and activation status of several molecules in cell survival signaling pathway in vitro using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. RESULTS: Four weeks after MCT injection, RVSP was significantly increased in the vehicle-treated group (51.0±4.7 mm Hg, whereas it was attenuated by nicorandil treatment (33.2±3.9 mm Hg; P<0.01. Nicorandil protected pulmonary endothelium from the MCT-induced thromboemboli formation and induction of apoptosis, accompanied with both upregulation of endothelial NOS (eNOS expression and downregulation of cleaved caspase-3 expression. Late treatment with nicorandil for the established PAH was also effective in suppressing the additional progression of PAH. These beneficial effects of nicorandil were blocked similarly by glibenclamide and l-NAME. Next, HUVECs were incubated in serum-free medium and then exhibited apoptotic morphology, while these changes were significantly attenuated by nicorandil administration. Nicorandil activated the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK

  5. Extent of dispensing prescription-only medications without a prescription in community drug retail outlets in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a simulated-patient study

    Erku DA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Asfaw Erku,1 Abebe Basazn Mekuria,2 Abdrrahman Shemsu Surur,1 Begashaw Melaku Gebresillassie3 1Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 2Department of Pharmacology, 3Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Purpose: This study was aimed at assessing the extent of dispensing prescription-only medications without a prescription in community drug retail outlets (CDROs of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional observational study design was used to sample 31 pharmacies, 25 drug stores, and two rural drug vendors from August 11, 2015, to October 21, 2015, through a simple random sampling method. A simulated-patient method of visit was implemented to collect data. Requests of six tracer prescription-only medicines (amoxicillin + clavulanic acid capsule, amitriptyline, captopril, glibenclamide [also known as glyburide], omeprazole capsule, and sildenafil citrate and upper respiratory tract infection were selected as the simulated clinical scenario.Results: Amoxicillin–clavulanic acid capsule was dispensed when requested in 87.93% of the dispensaries. All of the CDROs dispensed omeprazole upon request. Sildenafil citrate (Viagra was in stock in 96.55% of the CDROs, all of which issued the requested number of tablets without asking why or for whom the drug was needed. Amitriptyline, captopril, and glibenclamide (glyburide were dispensed in 84.48%, 89.65%, and 87.93% of CDROs upon the provision of an empty container. Antibiotics were obtained from 75.86% of CDROs for presentation of upper respiratory tract infection symptoms. Among the dispensed antibiotics, the most common was amoxicillin (93.18%, followed by amoxicillin–clavulanic acid capsule (72.72%, and azithromycin (50%. Only 4.5% of the dispensaries asked about drug allergies, and 15.9% of the CDROs informed the simulated patient about the possible side effects of the drugs.Conclusion: This study revealed a very high

  6. Identification of mechanisms involved in the relaxation of rabbit cavernous smooth muscle by a new nitric oxide donor ruthenium compound

    João Batista Gadelha de Cerqueira

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relaxation in vitro of cavernous smooth muscle induced by a new NO donor of the complex nitrosil-ruthenium, named trans-[Ru(NH34(caffeine(NO]C13 (Rut-Caf and sodium nitroprusside (SNP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The tissues, immersed in isolated bath systems, were pre-contracted with phenilephrine (PE (1 µM and then concentration-response curves (10-12 - 10-4 M were obtained. To clarify the mechanism of action involved, it was added to the baths ODQ (10 µM, 30 µM, oxyhemoglobin (10 µM, L-cysteine (100 µM, hydroxicobalamine (100 µM, glibenclamide, iberotoxin and apamine. Tissue samples were frozen in liquid nitrogen to measure the amount of cGMP and cAMP produced. RESULTS: The substances provoked significant relaxation of the cavernous smooth muscle. Both Rut-Caf and SNP determined dose-dependent relaxation with similar potency (pEC50 and maximum effect (Emax. The substances showed activity through activation of the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC, because the relaxations were inhibited by ODQ. Oxyhemoglobin significantly diminished the relaxation effect of the substances. L-cysteine failed to modify the relaxations caused by the agents. Hydroxicobalamine significantly diminished the relaxation effect of Rut-Caf. Glibenclamide significantly increased the efficacy of Rut-Caf (pEC50 4.09 x 7.09. There were no alterations of potency or maximum effect of the substances with the addition of the other ion channel blockers. Rut-Caf induced production of significant amounts of cGMP and cAMP during the relaxation process. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, Rut-Caf causes relaxation of smooth muscle of corpus cavernosum by means of activation of sGC with intracellular production of cGMP and cAMP; and also by release of NO in the intracellular environment. Rut-Caf releases the NO free radical and it does not act directly on the potassium ion channels.

  7. The Effects of Leucine, Zinc, and Chromium Supplements on Inflammatory Events of the Respiratory System in Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    Kolahian, Saeed; Sadri, Hassan; Shahbazfar, Amir Ali; Amani, Morvarid; Mazadeh, Anis; Mirani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major cause of serious micro- and macrovascular diseases that affect nearly every system in the body, including the respiratory system. Non-enzymatic protein glycation due to hyperglycaemic stress has fundamental implications due to the large capillary network and amount of connective tissue in the lung. The current study was designed to determine whether leucine, zinc, and chromium supplementations influence the function and histological structure of the respiratory tract in a rat model of type 2 diabetes. Seventy-seven rats were divided into eleven groups, consisting of 7 animals each. One group served as negative control and insulin and glibenclamide were used as positive control drugs. Thus, eight groups received the nutritional supplements alone or in combination with each other. Nutritional supplements and glibenclamide were added to the drinking water and neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin was subcutaneously injected during the 4 weeks of treatment period. The induction of type 2 diabetes in the rats caused an infiltration of mononuclear cells and edema in the submucosa of the trachea and lung, severe fibrosis around the vessels and airways, and perivascular and peribronchial infiltration of inflammatory cells and fibrin. In the diabetic group, the total inflammation score and Reid index significantly increased. Diabetes induction significantly reduced the total antioxidant status and elevated the lipid peroxidation products in the serum, lung lavage and lung tissue of the diabetic animals. Treatment with nutritional supplements significantly decreased the histopathological changes and inflammatory indices in the diabetic animals. Supplementation of diabetic rats with leucine, zinc, and chromium, alone and in combination, significantly increased the total antioxidant status and lipid peroxidation level in the diabetic animals. The nutritional supplements improved the enzymatic antioxidant activity of catalase, glutathione peroxidase

  8. Effect of membrane hyperpolarization induced by a K+ channel opener on histamine-induced Ca2+ mobilization in rabbit arterial smooth muscle.

    Watanabe, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, H; Itoh, T

    1996-03-01

    1. The role of membrane hyperpolarization on agonist-induced contraction was investigated in intact and alpha-toxin-skinned smooth muscles of rabbit mesenteric artery by use of the ATP-sensitive K+ channel opener, (-)-(3S,4R)-4-(N-acetyl-N-hydroxyamino)-6-cyano-3,4-dihydro-2,2- dimethyl-2H-1-benzopyran-3-ol (Y-26763), and either histamine (Hist) or noradrenaline (NA). 2. Hist (3 microM) and NA (10 microM) both produced a phasic, followed by a tonic increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and force. Y-26763 (10 microM) potently inhibited the NA-induced phasic and tonic increase in [Ca2+]i and force. In contrast, Y-26763 attenuated the Hist-induced phasic increase in [Ca2+]i and force but had almost no effect on the tonic response. However, ryanodine-treatment of muscles in order to inhibit the function of intracellular Ca2+ storage sites altered the action of Y-26763 which now attenuated the Hist-induced tonic increase in [Ca2+]i and force in a concentration-dependent manner (at concentrations > 1 microM). Glibenclamide (10 microM) attenuated the inhibitory action of Y-26763. 3. Hist (3 microM) depolarized the smooth muscle cells to the same extent as NA (10 microM). In the absence of either agonist, Y-26763 (over 30 nM) hyperpolarized the membrane and glibenclamide inhibited this hyperpolarization. Y-26763 (10 microM) almost abolished the NA-induced membrane depolarization, but only slightly attenuated the Hist-induced membrane depolarization in which the delta (delta) value (the difference before and after application of Hist) was not modified by any concentration of Y-26763. In ryanodine-treated smooth muscle cells, Y-26763 hyperpolarized the membrane and potently inhibited the membrane depolarization induced by Hist. 4. In ryanodine-treated muscle, Y-26763 had no measurable effect on the Hist-induced [Ca2+]i-force relationship. Y-26763 also had no apparent effect on the myofilament Ca(2+)-sensitivity in the presence of Hist in alpha

  9. Mechanisms of the antinociceptive action of (− Epicatechin obtained from the hydroalcoholic fraction of Combretum leprosum Mart & Eic in rodents

    Lopes Luciano da

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms of the antinociceptive activity of (− epicatechin (EPI, a compound isolated from the hydroalcoholic fraction of Combreum leprosum Mart & Eicher. Methods were assessed in the model of chemical nociception induced by glutamate (20 μmol/paw. To evaluate the mechanisms involved, the animals , male Swiss mice (25-30 g, received EPI (50 mg/kg p.o. after pretreatment with naloxone (2 mg/kg s.c. opioid antagonist, glibenclamide (2 mg/kg s.c. antagonist K + channels sensitive to ATP, ketanserin (0.3 mg/kg s.c. antagonist of receptor 5-HT2A, yoimbine (0.15 mg/kg s.c. α2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, pindolol (1 mg/kg s.c. 5-HT1a/1b receptor antagonist, atropine (0.1 mg/kg s.c. muscarinic antagonist and caffeine (3 mg/kg s.c. adenosine receptor antagonist, ondansetron (0.5 mg/kg s.c. for 5-HT3 receptor and L-arginine (600 mg/kg i.p.. Results The antinociceptive effect of EPI was reversed by pretreatment with naloxone and glibenclamide, ketanserin, yoimbine, atropine and pindolol, which demonstrates the involvement of opioid receptors and potassium channels sensitive to ATP, the serotoninergic (receptor 5HT1A and 5HT2A, adrenergic (receptor alpha 2 and cholinergic (muscarinic receptor systems in the activities that were observed. The effects of EPI, however, were not reversed by pretreatment with caffeine, L-arginine or ondansetron, which shows that there is no involvement of 5HT3 receptors or the purinergic and nitrergic systems in the antinociceptive effect of EPI. In the Open Field and Rotarod test, EPI had no significant effect, which shows that there was no central nervous system depressant or muscle relaxant effect on the results. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the antinociceptive activity of EPI in the glutamate model involves the participation of the opioid system, serotonin, adrenergic and cholinergic.

  10. TH-EF-207A-02: Imaging Pancreatic Î{sup 2}-Cell Function with 51/52Mn-PET

    Graves, S; Hernandez, R; England, C; Valdovinos, H; Jeffery, J; Barnhart, T; Cai, W; Nickles, R [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To image β-cells noninvasively using radio-manganese PET and to develop efficient small cyclotron production of {sup 51}Mn (t1/2=46m, β{sup +}=97%) and {sup 52}Mn (t1/2=5.6d, β{sup +}=29%). Methods: {sup 51}Mn and {sup 52}Mn were produced by 16 MeV proton irradiation (GE PETtrace) of electrodeposited {sup 54}Fe on silver and Cr metal pressed into a silver disc, respectively. {sup 51}Mn was radiochemically isolated from target material by anion exchange chromatography and {sup 52}Mn was isolated by ethanolic anion exchange trap-and-release. A final injectable product of {sup 51}Mn{sup 2+} or {sup 52}Mn{sup 2+} was obtained in 0.01M pH 6.0 NaOAc. To assess pancreatic uptake, fasted ICR mice were administered and intravenous bolus or infusion of {sup 52}Mn{sup 2+}. Additionally, to demonstrate the correlation between β-cell function and {sup 52}Mn{sup 2+} pancreatic uptake, prior to tracer administration groups of ICR mice were administered glibenclamide (5mg/kg) and diazoxide (20 mg/kg) as an insulin release stimulator and blocker, respectively. To validate PET ROI quantification, ex vivo biodistribtution studies were conducted on each subject after the final imaging time-point. Results: Dynamic PET data using a left atrium ROI revealed that {sup 52}Mn{sup 2+} cleared from the blood with a 10 second half-life. Significant uptake was seen in the pancreas (approximately 20% ID/g, SUVmean= 5.5), liver, kidneys, intestine, heart, and thyroid. Pancreatic uptake was found to be highly sensitive to volatile anesthesia administration (p=0.0002), insulin release stimulation by glibenclamide (p=0.017), and by insulin release inhibition by diazoxide (p=0.046). Excellent agreement was found between in vivo PET ROI quantification and ex vivo biodistribution measurements. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of using radiomanganese-PET for measuring functional β-cell mass in vivo. The decay characteristics and dosimetric properties of {sup 51}Mn are

  11. Short-term and long-term effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with renal impairment: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Li, Ruifei; Wang, Rui; Li, Haixia; Sun, Sihao; Zou, Meijuan; Cheng, Gang

    2016-09-01

    To assess the short-term and long-term effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with renal impairment, a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials of DPP-4 inhibitor interventions in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with renal impairment was performed. PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched through the end of March 2015. Randomized clinical trials were selected if (1) DPP-4 inhibitors were compared with a placebo or other active-comparators, (2) the treatment duration was ≥12 weeks and (3) data regarding changes in haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c ), changes in fasting plasma glucose or hypoglycaemia and other adverse events were reported. Of 790 studies, ten studies on eight randomized clinical trials were included. Compared with the control group, DPP-4 inhibitors were associated with a greater HbA1c reduction in both the short-term [mean differences (MD) = -0.45, 95% confidence intervals (-0.57, -0.33), p 1] and long-term [MD = -0.33, 95% confidence intervals (-0.63, -0.03), p = 0.03] treatments. However, the long-term greater reduction in HbA1c with DPP-4 inhibitor treatment was only significant when the control treatment comprised placebo plus stable background treatment, but not glipizide plus stable background treatment. DPP-4 inhibitors were associated with a greater fasting plasma glucose reduction [MD = -12.59, 95% confidence intervals (-22.01, -3.17), p = 0.009] over the short-term; however, this effect was not present over the long-term. Regarding the hypoglycaemia adverse events assessment, the long-term treatment data indicated there was no increased risk of hypoglycaemia compared with placebo or active-controlled anti-diabetic drugs. The present meta-analysis confirms that DPP-4 inhibitors are effective and equivalent to other agents in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with renal impairment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015

  12. Differences in rates of switchbacks after switching from branded to authorized generic and branded to generic drug products: cohort study

    Sarpatwari, Ameet; Dejene, Sara; Khan, Nazleen F; Lii, Joyce; Rogers, James R; Dutcher, Sarah K; Raofi, Saeid; Bohn, Justin; Connolly, John; Fischer, Michael A; Kesselheim, Aaron S; Gagne, Joshua J

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To compare rates of switchbacks to branded drug products for patients switched from branded to authorized generic drug products, which have the same active ingredients, appearance, and excipients as the branded product, with patients switched from branded to generic drug products, which have the same active ingredients as the branded product but may differ in appearance and excipients. Design Observational cohort study. Setting Private (a large commercial health plan) and public (Medicaid) insurance programs in the US. Participants Beneficiaries of a large US commercial health insurer between 2004 and 2013 (primary cohort) and Medicaid beneficiaries between 2000 and 2010 (replication cohort). Main outcome measures Patients taking branded products for one of the study drugs (alendronate tablets, amlodipine tablets, amlodipine-benazepril capsules, calcitonin salmon nasal spray, escitalopram tablets, glipizide extended release tablets, quinapril tablets, and sertraline tablets) were identified when they switched to an authorized generic or a generic drug product after the date of market entry of generic drug products. These patients were followed for switchbacks to the branded drug product in the year after their switch to an authorized generic or a generic drug product. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals after adjusting for demographics, including age, sex, and calendar year. Inverse variance meta-analysis was used to pool adjusted hazard ratios across all drug products. Results A total of 94 909 patients switched from branded to authorized generic drug products and 116 017 patients switched from branded to generic drug products and contributed to the switchback analysis. Unadjusted incidence rates of switchback varied across drug products, ranging from a low of 3.8 per 100 person years (for alendronate tablets) to a high of 17.8 per 100 person years (for amlodipine

  13. Neonatal diabetes mellitus: description of two Puerto Rican children with KCNJ11 activating gene mutation.

    Nieves-Rivera, Francisco; González-Pijem, Lilliam

    2011-06-01

    Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a rare disorder. A one-month-old boy presented with vomiting, hyperglycemia (968 mg/dl [53.8 mmol/L]), severe acetonemia, and metabolic acidosis (pH 6.95, HCO3-4.2 mmol/L). A second child (three months of age) presented with upper respiratory tract symptoms and a plasma glucose level of 835 mg/dl, without acetonemia or acidosis. Both were hospitalized and managed with intravenous fluids and then discharged on insulin. Genetic testing identified the presence of the de nova V59M and E322K activating mutations in the KCNJ11 gene encoding the sulphonylurea/potassium channel (Kir6.2 subunit) of the insulin beta cell. Both patients were switched to glibenclamide and remain off insulin. To our knowledge, these are the first children in Puerto Rico identified with NDM secondary to a KCNJ11 activating mutation. We conclude that NDM secondary to KCNJ11/Kir6.2 activating mutations, although unusual, should be considered in similar cases since patients with these mutations could come off insulin.

  14. Andrographolide reorganise hyperglycaemia and distorted antioxidant profile in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Naik, Ramavat Ravindhar; Munipally, Praveen Kumar; Nagaraju, Turlapati

    2017-10-26

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a constant and illimitable metabolic disorder that can happen even at a young age due to the virtual absence of naturally acting insulin, which uptakes and accumulates glucose; thereby reduce the use of glucose. In the present study, we evaluated the neuroprotective efficacy of andrographolide on streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic Sprague dawley rats. Diabetes was induced by intraperitonial injection of STZ (45 mg/kg B.W) in Sprague dawley rats. Andrographolide (2.5 mg/kg B.W) was administered orally to diabetic rats and Glibenclamide (25mg/kg B.W) as control for 30 days to assess its effects on blood glucose, insulin, insulin resistance and antioxidant profiles such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione and lipid peroxidation in various regions of brain namely hypothalamus, cerebellum, hippocampus and brain cerebral cortex. Oral supplementation of andrographolide extensively diminished the blood glucose levels than diabetic control. There was noteworthy reduction in the CAT, SOD and GPx activities in the hippocampus, hypothalamus and cerebral cortex cerebellum of the DM rat brain. However, andrographolide supplementation drastically reverses the CAT, GPx and SOD back to normal levels. In conclusion, the results revealed that andrographolide shown beneficial potentiality against neuropathy in STZ induced diabetic rats. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Evaluation of the hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of an ethylacetate fraction of Artocarpus heterophyllus (jak) leaves in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Chackrewarthy, S; Thabrew, M I; Weerasuriya, M K B; Jayasekera, S

    2010-07-01

    Aqueous extracts of mature leaves of Artocarpus heterophyllus (jak) are used by traditional medical practitioners in Sri Lanka and India for the treatment of diabetes. This study was conducted to investigate the hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of an ethylacetate (EA) fraction of the mature leaves of A. heterophyllus in a streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rat model. In normoglycemic rats, administration of a single dose (20 mg/kg) of the EA fraction resulted in a significant (P heterophyllus leaves daily for 5 weeks resulted in a significant lowering of serum glucose, cholesterol and triglyceride (TG) levels. Compared to control diabetic rats, the extract-treated rats had 39% less serum glucose, 23% lower serum total cholesterol and 40% lower serum TG levels and 11% higher body weight at the end of the fifth week. The percentage reductions in the serum parameters mediated by the test fraction were comparable with those produced by glibenclamide (0.6 mg/kg), the reference drug used in this study. It can be concluded that the EA fraction of A. heterophyllus leaves contains one or more hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic principles which have the potential to be developed further for the treatment of diabetes specifically associated with a hyperlipidemic state.

  16. MRP transporters as membrane machinery in the bradykinin-inducible export of ATP.

    Zhao, Yumei; Migita, Keisuke; Sun, Jing; Katsuragi, Takeshi

    2010-04-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) plays the role of an autocrine/paracrine signal molecule in a variety of cells. So far, however, the membrane machinery in the export of intracellular ATP remains poorly understood. Activation of B2-receptor with bradykinin-induced massive release of ATP from cultured taenia coli smooth muscle cells. The evoked release of ATP was unaffected by gap junction hemichannel blockers, such as 18alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid and Gap 26. Furthermore, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) coupled Cl(-) channel blockers, CFTR(inh)172, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid, Gd3(+) and glibenclamide, failed to suppress the export of ATP by bradykinin. On the other, the evoked release of ATP was greatly reduced by multidrug resistance protein (MRP) transporter inhibitors, MK-571, indomethacin, and benzbromarone. From western blotting analysis, blots of MRP 1 protein only, but not MRP 2 and MRP 3 protein, appeared at 190 kD. However, the MRP 1 protein expression was not enhanced after loading with 1 muM bradykinin for 5 min. Likewise, niflumic acid and fulfenamic acid, Ca2(+)-activated Cl(-) channel blockers, largely abated the evoked release of ATP. The possibility that the MRP transporter system couples with Ca2(+)-activated Cl(-) channel activities is discussed here. These findings suggest that MRP transporters, probably MRP 1, unlike CFTR-Cl(-) channels and gap junction hemichannels, may contribute as membrane machinery to the export of ATP induced by G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation.

  17. Amelioration of pancreatic and renal derangements in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by polyphenol extracts of Ginger (Zingiber officinale) rhizome.

    Kazeem, Mutiu Idowu; Akanji, Musbau Adewunmi; Yakubu, Musa Toyin

    2015-12-01

    Free and bound polyphenol extracts of Zingiber officinale rhizome were investigated for their antidiabetic potential in the pancreatic and renal tissues of diabetic rats at a dose of 500mg/kg body weight. Forty Wistar rats were completely randomized into five groups: A-E consisting of eight animals each. Group A (control) comprises normal healthy animals and were orally administered 1.0mL distilled water on a daily basis for 42 days while group B-E were made up of 50mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Group C and D received 1.0mL 500mg/kg body weight free and bound polyphenol extracts respectively while group E received 1.0mL 0.6mg/kg of glibenclamide. Administration of the extracts to the diabetic rats significantly reduced (pZingiber officinale could ameliorate diabetes-induced pancreatic and renal derangements in rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Combination of ACE inhibitor with nicorandil provides further protection in chronic kidney disease.

    Shiraishi, Takeshi; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Taniguchi, Kei; Higaki, Masato; Ueda, Shuko; Shima, Tomoko; Nagura, Michito; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Johnson, Richard J; Uchida, Shunya

    2014-12-15

    An inhibition in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is one of the most widely used therapies to treat chronic kidney disease. However, its effect is occasionally not sufficient and additional treatments may be required. Recently, we reported that nicorandil exhibited renoprotective effects in a mouse model of diabetic nephropathy. Here we examined if nicorandil can provide an additive protection on enalapril in chronic kidney disease. Single treatment with either enalapril or nicorandil significantly ameliorated glomerular and tubulointerstitial injury in the rat remnant kidney while the combination of these two compounds provided additive effects. In addition, an increase in oxidative stress in remnant kidney was also blocked by either enalapril or nicorandil while the combination of the drugs was more potent. A mechanism was likely due for nicorandil to preventing manganase superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and sirtuin (Sirt)3 from being reduced in injured kidneys. A study with cultured podocytes indicated that the antioxidative effect could be mediated through sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) in the mitochondrial KATP channel since blocking SUR with glibenclamide reduced MnSOD and Sirt3 expression in podocytes. In conclusion, nicorandil may synergize with enalapril to provide superior protection in chronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Evaluation of antidiabetic, antihyperlipidemic and antioxidant effects of Boehmeria nivea (L. Gaudich., Urticaceae, root extract in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Shruti Sancheti

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The potential role of 80% methanolic extract of Boehmeria nivea (L. Gaudich., Urticaceae, root in the treatment of diabetes, along with its antihyperlipidemic and antioxidant effects, was studied in streptozotocin-induced diabetic male Wistar rats. Preliminary screening of the extract revealed the presence of polyphenolics and flavonoids. The animal study was conducted with variable doses of 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg of extract for 21 days in diabetic rats. A significant effect was observed at a dose of 500 mg/kg, which was comparable to the standard drug, glibenclamide. Administration of the extract at a 500 mg/kg dose resulted in a significant reduction of fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, blood urea, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, urine sugar and urine ketone levels in diabetic rats in comparison with the diabetic control group. Additionally, this dose significantly increased body weight, hemoglobin, plasma total protein, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, liver glycogen content, superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione and catalase levels in diabetic rats at the end of 21 days of treatment. Therefore, dietary supplementation with Boehmeria nivea root extract could be beneficial for correcting hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and enhancing the antioxidant defense system.

  20. PENGARUH EKSTRAK ETANOL DAUN JAMBU AIR (Syzygium aqueum (Burm f.Alston TERHADAP GLUKOSA DARAH, UREUM DAN KREATININ TIKUS PUTIH (Rattus norvegicus

    Joni Tandi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus with complications of Diabetic Nephropathy become one of the most common cause of end-stage renal failure in the world. Impaired kidney function is measured by Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR. Where the decline in GFR was followed by increased levels of blood glucose, urea and creatinine. This study aimed to determine whether there is the content of secondary metabolites in leaves of Sizygium aqueum leaf extract, at a dose of extract what impact the blood glucose, urea and creatinine levels of male rats and whether the water extract of guava leaves have an influence on the blood glucose, urea and creatinine white male rats. This study uses a randomized block design with six treatment groups consisting of five test animals. Group I was normal control (CMC Na suspension 0.5%. Group II negative control (streptozotocin 40 mg/kg. positive control group III (suspension glibenclamide. Group IV given guava leaf extract 100 mg/kg BW. V group awarded guava leaf extract 200 mg/kg BW. Group VI given guava leaf extract 300 mg/kg BW. Treatment was given for 28 days and measured levels of blood glucose urea and creatinine on days 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28. The results showed nefroprotektif effect on all groups and most effective extract are a group of guava leaf extract 100 mg/kg BW. Keywords: Diabetic nephropathy, urea, creatinine, Syzygium aqueum

  1. Toksisitas Ekstrak Daun Sirih Merah pada Tikus Putih Penderita Diabetes Melitus (TOXICITY OF RED BETEL EXTRACT IN DIABETIC WHITE RAT

    Anak Agung Sagung Kendran

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to study the toxicity of red betel  (Piper crocatum extract in diabeticwhite rat based on ALT and AST activities. This research used 20 male white rats, which randomlydivided into five groups, P1: given only aqua; P2: given alloxan 120mg/kg bw; P3: given alloxan 120 mg/kgbw and red betel leaf extract 50 mg/kg bw; P4: given alloxan 120 mg/kg bw and red betel leaf extract 100mg/kg bw; P5: given alloxan 120 mg/kg bw and glibenclamide suspension 1 mg/kg bw. ALT and ASTactivities were measured by using reflovet plus Machine. The collected data were analyzed by usinganalysis of covariance. The result showed no significant  effect (P>0.05 was observed on giving red betelleaf extract in diabetic white rat for ALT and AST activities.  It can be concluded that red betel leaf extractis potential for diabetic treatment in white rat  and it is not toxic for the rat’s ALT and AST activities.

  2. Application of LC-ESI-MS-MS for detection of synthetic adulterants in herbal remedies.

    Bogusz, Maciej J; Hassan, Huda; Al-Enazi, Eid; Ibrahim, Zuhour; Al-Tufail, Mohammed

    2006-05-03

    Adulteration of allegedly "natural herbal medicines" with undeclared synthetic drugs is a common and dangerous phenomenon of alternative medicine. The purpose of the study was to develop a procedure for detection of most common synthetic adulterants in herbal remedies, using high-pressure liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS-MS). Eighty drugs belonging to various pharmacological classes were included in the study. For most drugs two transitions were monitored, using protonated or deprotonated molecules as precursor ions. The drugs were isolated from herbal remedies using simple methanol extraction. Chromatographic separation was done in gradient of acetonitrile-10 mM ammonium formate buffer (pH 3.0). Drugs tested were grouped in suites, comprising analgesic drugs, antibiotics, antidiabetic drugs, antiepileptic drugs, aphrodisiacs, hormones and anabolic drugs, psychotropic drugs, and weight reducing compounds. These suites were used according to the declared benefits of examined preparations. Limits of detection ranged from 5 pg to 1 ng per injected sample. Drug-free herbal remedy spiked with eight various pharmaceuticals occurring in adulterated herbal preparations was used for internal proficiency testing. The recoveries of spiked drugs ranged from 63 to 100%. The procedure was applied in everyday casework. Several undeclared drugs were identified in "herbal" remedies, like e.g. sildenafil, tadalafil, testosterone, or glibenclamide. Pharmacological properties of detected drugs always corresponded with the claims of the "natural" remedies. The method presents a valuable extension of standard GC-MS screening used for this purpose.

  3. Involvement of nitric oxide and ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the peripheral antinoceptive action of a tramadol-dexketoprofen combination in the formalin test.

    Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario A; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury; Pérez-Urizar, José; Chavarría-Bolaños, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Systemic coadministration of tramadol and dexketoprofen can produce antinociceptive synergism in animals. There has been only limited evaluation of this drug combination in the peripheral nervous system in terms of the antinociceptive interaction and its mechanisms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the peripheral antinociceptive interaction between tramadol and dexketoprofen in the formalin test and the involvement of the nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway and ATP-sensitive K(+) channels. Different doses of tramadol or dexketoprofen were administered locally to the formalin-injured mouse paw and the antinociceptive effect evaluated. ED50 values were calculated for both drugs alone and in combination. Coadministration of tramadol and dexketoprofen produced an antinociceptive synergistic interaction during the second phase of the formalin test. Pretreatment with NO antagonists, including l-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester and 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]-quinoxalin-1-one, or the ATP-sensitive K(+) channel antagonist glibenclamide reversed the antinociceptive synergistic effect of the tramadol-dexketoprofen combination, suggesting that NO and ATP-sensitive K(+) channels were involved. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Hypoglycaemia-induced myocardial infarction as a result of sulphonylurea misuse.

    Corley, B T

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent large-scale randomized trials of intensive therapy in Type 2 diabetes have reported increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patient populations who experience a high frequency of hypoglycaemic events. However, there are few descriptions of hypoglycaemia leading directly to a myocardial infarction (MI) in the medical literature to date. CASE REPORT: In this article we describe the case of a 76-year-old woman without diabetes who presented with symptoms, left bundle branch block and raised troponin, indicative of an MI. She was also noted to be hypoglycaemic with a plasma glucose level of 2.5 mmol\\/l. It was subsequently discovered that she had mistakenly been dispensed glibenclamide, a long-acting sulphonylurea, in the preceding weeks. Her cardiac symptoms resolved completely upon treatment of her hypoglycaemia and she had no significant coronary artery disease on angiography. CONCLUSION: This is the first case of sulphonylurea-induced MI in a patient without diabetes and illustrates the adverse effects of acute hypoglycaemia upon the cardiovascular system.

  5. Case Report: Hypoglycaemia-induced myocardial infarction as a result of sulphonylurea misuse.

    Corley, B T

    2010-12-24

    Background  Recent large-scale randomized trials of intensive therapy in Type 2 diabetes have reported increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patient populations who experience a high frequency of hypoglycaemic events. However, there are few descriptions of hypoglycaemia leading directly to a myocardial infarct in the medical literature to date. Case report  In this article we describe the case of a 76-year-old woman without diabetes who presented with symptoms, left bundle branch block and raised troponin, indicative of a myocardial infarction. She was also noted to be hypoglycaemic with a plasma glucose level of 2.5 mmol\\/l. It was subsequently discovered that she had mistakenly been dispensed glibenclamide, a long-acting sulphonylurea, in the preceding weeks. Her cardiac symptoms resolved completely upon treatment of her hypoglycaemia and she had no significant coronary artery disease on angiography. Conclusion  This is the first case of sulphonylurea-induced myocardial infarct in a patient without diabetes and illustrates the adverse effects of acute hypoglycaemia upon the cardiovascular system.

  6. Antihyperglycemic activity of Arbutus unedo, Ammoides pusilla and Thymelaea hirsuta.

    Bnouham, M; Merhfour, F Z; Legssyer, A; Mekhfi, H; Maâllem, S; Ziyyat, A

    2007-08-01

    The effect of the water extract (WE) of three medicinal plants used as antidiabetic medication in Eastern Morocco (Arbutus unedo: Au, Ammoides pusilla: Ap and Thymelaea hirsuta: Th) was tested in rats with the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) and Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test (IVGTT). In the OGTT the rats received water, glibenclamide (2 mg/kg) or WE (500 mg/kg for Au and 250 mg/kg for Th and Ap) 30 min before glucose loading (glucose: 1 g/kg). The WE of Au, Ap and Th produced a significant decrease in glycemia after glucose loading. In the IVGTT the WE of Ap and Th produced a significant decrease in glycemia 60 min after i.v. glucose loading (0.5 g/kg). The addition of the WE of Au (500 mg/kg), Ap or Th (250 mg/kg) induced a significant inhibition of jejunal glucose absorption, (31.6%, 28.5% and 40.5% respectively). This effect could explain in part the significant antihyperglycemic effect observed in the OGTT model but it does not exclude other effects on glucose homeostasis, particularly for Ap and Th. Toxicity tests (high LD50 value) suggest no adverse effect of the use of these plants.

  7. Mitochondria from rat uterine smooth muscle possess ATP-sensitive potassium channel

    Olga B. Vadzyuk

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to detect ATP-sensitive K+ uptake in rat uterine smooth muscle mitochondria and to determine possible effects of its activation on mitochondrial physiology. By means of fluorescent technique with usage of K+-sensitive fluorescent probe PBFI (potassium-binding benzofuran isophthalate we showed that accumulation of K ions in isolated mitochondria from rat myometrium is sensitive to effectors of KATP-channel (ATP-sensitive K+-channel – ATP, diazoxide, glibenclamide and 5HD (5-hydroxydecanoate. Our data demonstrates that K+ uptake in isolated myometrium mitochondria results in a slight decrease in membrane potential, enhancement of generation of ROS (reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial swelling. Particularly, the addition of ATP into incubation medium led to a decrease in mitochondrial swelling and ROS production, and an increase in membrane potential. These effects were eliminated by diazoxide. If blockers of KATP-channel were added along with diazoxide, the effects of diazoxide were removed. So, we postulate the existence of KATP-channels in rat uterus mitochondria and assume that their functioning may regulate physiological conditions of mitochondria, such as matrix volume, ROS generation and polarization of mitochondrial membrane. Keywords: ATP-sensitive potassium channel, Diazoxide, 5-hydroxydecanoate, Myometrium, Mitochondria, Mitochondrial swelling, Mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS

  8. Remote ischaemic preconditioning and prevention of cerebral injury.

    Rehni, Ashish K; Shri, Richa; Singh, Manjeet

    2007-03-01

    Bilateral carotid artery occlusion of 10 min followed by reperfusion for 24 hr was employed in present study to produce ischaemia and reperfusion induced cerebral injury in mice. Cerebral infarct size was measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Short-term memory was evaluated using elevated plus maze. Inclined beam walking test was employed to assess motor incoordination. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion followed by reperfusion produced cerebral infarction and impaired short-term memory, motor co-ordination and lateral push response. A preceding episode of mesenteric artery occlusion for 15 min and reperfusion of 15 min (remote mesenteric ischaemic preconditioning) prevented markedly ischaemia-reperfusion-induced cerebral injury measured in terms of infarct size, loss of short-term memory, motor coordination and lateral push response. Glibenclamide (5 mg/kg, iv) a KATP channel blocker and caffeine (7 mg/kg, iv) an adenosine receptor blocker attenuated the neuroprotective effect of remote mesenteric ischaemic preconditioning. It may be concluded that neuroprotective effect of remote mesenteric ischaemic preconditioning may be due to activation of adenosine receptors and consequent activation of KATP channels in mice.

  9. Antihyperglycemic activity of Piper betle leaf on streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Santhakumari, P; Prakasam, A; Pugalendi, K V

    2006-01-01

    Piper betle, an indigenous medicinal plant, has a folk (Siddha and Ayurvedha) reputation in the rural southern India. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of P. betle on glucose metabolism since it is consumed as betel-quid after meals. Plasma levels of glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin and activities of liver hexokinase and gluconeogenic enzymes such as glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase in control and streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats were assayed. Oral administration of leaf suspension of P. betle (75 and 150 mg/kg of body weight) for 30 days resulted in significant reduction in blood glucose (from 205.00 +/- 10.80 mg/dL to 151.30 +/- 6.53 mg/dL) and glycosylated hemoglobin and decreased activities of liver glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, while liver hexokinase increased (P betle at a dose of 75 mg/kg of body weight exhibited better sugar reduction than 150 mg/kg of body weight. In addition, protection against body weight loss of diabetic animals was also observed. The effects produced by P. betle were compared with the standard drug glibenclamide. Thus, the present study clearly shows that P. betle intake influences glucose metabolism beneficially.

  10. Analgesic effects of stem bark extracts of Trichilia monadelpha (Thonn.) JJ De Wilde.

    Woode, Eric; Amoh-Barimah, Ama Kyeraa; Abotsi, Wonder Kofi Mensah; Ainooson, George Kwaw; Owusu, George

    2012-01-01

    Various parts of Trichilia monadelpha (Thonn) JJ De Wilde (Fam. Meliaceae) are used in Ghanaian traditional medicine for the treatment of painful and inflammatory conditions. The present study examined the analgesic properties of the petroleum ether (PEE), ethyl acetate (EAE), and the hydro-ethanolic (HAE) extract of the stem bark of the plant in murine models. PEE, EAE, and HAE were assessed in chemical (acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing and formalin tests), thermal (hot plate test), and mechanical (Randall-Selitto paw pressure test) pain models. The possible mechanisms of the antinociceptive action were also examined with various antagonists in the formalin test. HAE, EAE, and PEE, each at doses of 10-100 mg/kg orally, and the positive controls (morphine and diclofenac) elicited significant dose-dependent antinociceptive activity in the chemical (acetic acid abdominal writhing and formalin tests), thermal (hot plate test), and mechanical (Randall-Selitto paw pressure test) pain models in rodents. The antinociceptive effect of HAE was partly or wholly reversed by systemic administration of atropine, naloxone, and glibenclamide. The antinociceptive effects of EAE and PEE were inhibited by atropine. The extracts HAE, EAE, and PEE caused dose-related antinociception in chemical, thermal, and mechanical models of pain in animals. The mechanism of action of HAE involves an interaction with muscarinic cholinergic, adenosinergic, opioidergic pathways, and ATP-sensitive K+ channels while that of EAE and PEE involve the muscarinic cholinergic system.

  11. An ancestral role for the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion

    Kyle S. McCommis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Transport of pyruvate into the mitochondrial matrix by the Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier (MPC is an important and rate-limiting step in its metabolism. In pancreatic β-cells, mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism is thought to be important for glucose sensing and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Methods: To evaluate the role that the MPC plays in maintaining systemic glucose homeostasis, we used genetically-engineered Drosophila and mice with loss of MPC activity in insulin-producing cells. Results: In both species, MPC deficiency results in elevated blood sugar concentrations and glucose intolerance accompanied by impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In mouse islets, β-cell MPC-deficiency resulted in decreased respiration with glucose, ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channel hyperactivity, and impaired insulin release. Moreover, treatment of pancreas-specific MPC knockout mice with glibenclamide, a sulfonylurea KATP channel inhibitor, improved defects in islet insulin secretion and abnormalities in glucose homeostasis in vivo. Finally, using a recently-developed biosensor for MPC activity, we show that the MPC is rapidly stimulated by glucose treatment in INS-1 insulinoma cells suggesting that glucose sensing is coupled to mitochondrial pyruvate carrier activity. Conclusions: Altogether, these studies suggest that the MPC plays an important and ancestral role in insulin-secreting cells in mediating glucose sensing, regulating insulin secretion, and controlling systemic glycemia. Keywords: Stimulus-coupled secretion, Insulin, β-Cell, Diabetes, Pyruvate, Mitochondria, Drosophila

  12. Methanolic Root Extract of Rauwolfia serpentina Benth Improves the Glycemic, Antiatherogenic, and Cardioprotective Indices in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Mice

    Muhammad Bilal Azmi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the phytochemistry and the effect of methanolic root extract (MREt of Rauwolfia serpentina on alloxan-induced diabetic Wister male mice. Mice were divided in control (distilled water at 1 mL/kg and alloxan-induced diabetic mice which subdivided into diabetic (distilled water at 1 mL/kg, negative (0.05% dimethyl sulfoxide at 1 mL/kg, positive (glibenclamide at 5 mg/kg controls, and three test groups (MREt at 10, 30, and 60 mg/kg. All treatments were given orally for 14 days. Qualitatively MREt showed the presence of alkaloids, carbohydrates, flavonoids, glycosides, cardiac glycosides, phlobatannins, resins, saponins, steroids, tannins, and triterpenoids, while quantitatively extract was rich in total phenols. The flavonoids, saponins and alkaloids were also determined in root powder. MREt found effective in improving the body weights, glucose and insulin levels, insulin/glucose ratio, glycosylated and total hemoglobin in test groups as compared to diabetic control. Similarly, significantly decreased levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL-c, and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-c cholesterols were found in test groups. Significant lipolysis with improved glycogenesis was also found in liver tissues of all test groups. ALT levels were found normal in all groups. Thus, MREt improves the glycemic, antiatherogenic, coronary risk, and cardioprotective indices in alloxan-induced diabetic mice.

  13. Methanolic Root Extract of Rauwolfia serpentina Benth Improves the Glycemic, Antiatherogenic, and Cardioprotective Indices in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Mice.

    Azmi, Muhammad Bilal; Qureshi, Shamim A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the phytochemistry and the effect of methanolic root extract (MREt) of Rauwolfia serpentina on alloxan-induced diabetic Wister male mice. Mice were divided in control (distilled water at 1 mL/kg) and alloxan-induced diabetic mice which subdivided into diabetic (distilled water at 1 mL/kg), negative (0.05% dimethyl sulfoxide at 1 mL/kg), positive (glibenclamide at 5 mg/kg) controls, and three test groups (MREt at 10, 30, and 60 mg/kg). All treatments were given orally for 14 days. Qualitatively MREt showed the presence of alkaloids, carbohydrates, flavonoids, glycosides, cardiac glycosides, phlobatannins, resins, saponins, steroids, tannins, and triterpenoids, while quantitatively extract was rich in total phenols. The flavonoids, saponins and alkaloids were also determined in root powder. MREt found effective in improving the body weights, glucose and insulin levels, insulin/glucose ratio, glycosylated and total hemoglobin in test groups as compared to diabetic control. Similarly, significantly decreased levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL-c), and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-c) cholesterols were found in test groups. Significant lipolysis with improved glycogenesis was also found in liver tissues of all test groups. ALT levels were found normal in all groups. Thus, MREt improves the glycemic, antiatherogenic, coronary risk, and cardioprotective indices in alloxan-induced diabetic mice.

  14. Oxygen sensing and conducted vasomotor responses in mouse cremaster arterioles in situ

    Ngo, Thuc Anh; Jensen, Lars Jørn; Riemann, Mads Achen

    2010-01-01

    .0 +/- 4.9 mum) when changing from high (PO(2) = 242.5 +/- 13.3 mm Hg) to low (PO(2) = 22.5 +/- 4.8 mm Hg) oxygen tension as seen in the intact cremaster circulation (DeltaD = 18.7 +/- 1.0 mum). Blockade of NO synthases by L: -NAME and adenosine receptors by DPCPX had no effects on vasomotor responses...... to low or high oxygen. Induction of localized low (PO(2) = 23.3 +/- 5.7 mmHg) or high (PO(2) = 300.0 +/- 25.7 mm Hg) oxygen tension caused vasodilatation or -constriction locally and at a site 1,000 mum upstream (distantly). Glibenclamide blocker of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels inhibited vasodilatation...... and -constriction to low (PO(2) = 16.0 +/- 6.4 mm Hg) and high (PO(2) = 337.4 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) oxygen tension. 1) ATP-sensitive K(+) channels seem to mediate, at least in part, vasodilatation and vasoconstriction to low and high oxygen tension; 2) Red blood cells are not necessary for inducing vasodilatation...

  15. IMB2026791, a Xanthone, Stimulates Cholesterol Efflux by Increasing the Binding of Apolipoprotein A-I to ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1

    Zijian Xie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1 plays a major role in cholesterol homeostasis and high density lipoprotein (HDL metabolism. Several laboratories have demonstrated that ABCA1 binding to lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I will mediate the assembly of nascent HDL and cellular cholesterol efflux, which suggests a possible receptor-ligand interaction between ABCA1 and apoA-I. In this study, a cell-based-ELISA-like high-throughput screening (HTS method was developed to identify the synthetic and natural compounds that can regulate binding activity of ABCA1 to apoA-I. The cell-based-ELISA-like high-throughput screen was conducted in a 96-well format using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells stably transfected with ABCA1 pIRE2-EGFP (Enhanced Green Fluorecence Protein expression vector and the known ABCA1 inhibitor glibenclamide as the antagonist control. From 2,600 compounds, a xanthone compound (IMB 2026791 was selected using this HTS assay, and it was proved as an apoA-I binding agonist to ABCA1 by a flow cytometry assay and western blot analysis. The [3H] cholesterol efflux assay of IMB2026791 treated ABCA1-CHO cells and PMA induced THP-1 macrophages (human acute monocytic leukemia cell further confirmed the compound as an accelerator of cholesterol efflux in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of 25.23 μM.

  16. Promising neuroprotective strategies for traumatic spinal cord injury with a focus on the differential effects among anatomical levels of injury [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Antigona Ulndreaj

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI is a devastating condition of motor, sensory, and autonomic dysfunction. The significant cost associated with the management and lifetime care of patients with SCI also presents a major economic burden. For these reasons, there is a need to develop and translate strategies that can improve outcomes following SCI. Given the challenges in achieving regeneration of the injured spinal cord, neuroprotection has been at the forefront of clinical translation. Yet, despite many preclinical advances, there has been limited translation into the clinic apart from methylprednisolone (which remains controversial, hypertensive therapy to maintain spinal cord perfusion, and early decompressive surgery. While there are several factors related to the limited translational success, including the clinical and mechanistic heterogeneity of human SCI, the misalignment between animal models of SCI and clinical reality continues to be an important factor. Whereas most clinical cases are at the cervical level, only a small fraction of preclinical research is conducted in cervical models of SCI. Therefore, this review highlights the most promising neuroprotective and neural reparative therapeutic strategies undergoing clinical assessment, including riluzole, hypothermia, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, glibenclamide, minocycline, Cethrin (VX-210, and anti-Nogo-A antibody, and emphasizes their efficacy in relation to the anatomical level of injury. Our hope is that more basic research will be conducted in clinically relevant cervical SCI models in order to expedite the transition of important laboratory discoveries into meaningful treatment options for patients with SCI.

  17. Air-Stimulated ATP Release from Keratinocytes Occurs through Connexin Hemichannels

    Barr, Travis P.; Albrecht, Phillip J.; Hou, Quanzhi; Mongin, Alexander A.; Strichartz, Gary R.; Rice, Frank L.

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous ATP release plays an important role in both epidermal stratification and chronic pain, but little is known about ATP release mechanisms in keratinocytes that comprise the epidermis. In this study, we analyzed ATP release from cultured human neonatal keratinocytes briefly exposed to air, a process previously demonstrated to trigger ATP release from these cells. We show that exposing keratinocytes to air by removing media for 15 seconds causes a robust, long-lasting ATP release. This air-stimulated ATP release was increased in calcium differentiated cultures which showed a corresponding increase in connexin 43 mRNA, a major component of keratinocyte hemichannels. The known connexin hemichannel inhibitors 1-octanol and carbenoxolone both significantly reduced air-stimulated ATP release, as did two drugs traditionally used as ABC transporter inhibitors (glibenclamide and verapamil). These same 4 inhibitors also prevented an increase in the uptake of a connexin permeable dye induced by air exposure, confirming that connexin hemichannels are open during air-stimulated ATP release. In contrast, activity of the MDR1 ABC transporter was reduced by air exposure and the drugs that inhibited air-stimulated ATP release had differential effects on this transporter. These results indicate that air exposure elicits non-vesicular release of ATP from keratinocytes through connexin hemichannels and that drugs used to target connexin hemichannels and ABC transporters may cross-inhibit. Connexins represent a novel, peripheral target for the treatment of chronic pain and dermatological disease. PMID:23457608

  18. Sulphated galactopyran derived from Gracilaria opuntia, a marine macroalgae restores the antioxidant metabolic enzymes during STZ induced diabetic rats

    Lavanya Rayapu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To screen the effect of sulphated galactopyran fraction isolated from Gracilaria opuntia (G. opuntia (FM4 in streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats. Methods: In vitro antioxidant assays of FM4 were estimated by DPPH, ABTS, hydroxyl free radical and Nitric oxide free radical activities. FM4 was purified and characterized by 1H-NMR spectra and FTIR as sulphated galactopyran. Diabetes was induced intraperitonially by single dose of STZ (55 mg/kg body weight. FM4 was administrated orally (80, 100, 125 mg/kg BW to diabetic rats for 60 days. The enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, catalase (CAT, glutathione-S-transferase (GST, lipid peroxidase (LPx, glutathione reduced (GSH, vitamin-C (VIT-C and vitamin-E (VIT-E levels were estimated. Glibenclamide was used as standard drug. Results: Our results demonstrated that the aqueous extract of G. opuntia possess free radical scavenging activity. During FM4 fraction treatment (100 mg/kg BW, the SOD, GPx, CAT, GST, GSH, VIT-C and VIT-E levels were significantly (P < 0.05 increased, and the LPx levels were decreased in different organs such as liver, kidney, brain and pancreas of diabetic rats. Conclusions: The sulphated galactopyran fraction of the marine macroalgae (G. opuntia possesses the antioxidant activity which might help in the prevention of oxidative damage that occurs during diabetes.

  19. Mechanisms involved in the vasorelaxant effects produced by the acute application of amfepramone in vitro to rat aortic rings

    López-Canales, J.S. [Section of Postgraduate Studies and Investigation, Higher School of Medicine from the National Polytechnic Institute, Mexico City (Mexico); Department of Cellular Biology, National Institute of Perinatology, Mexico City (Mexico); Lozano-Cuenca, J.; Muãoz-Islas, E.; Aguilar-Carrasco, J.C. [Department of Cellular Biology, National Institute of Perinatology, Mexico City (Mexico); López-Canales, O.A.; López-Mayorga, R.M.; Castillo-Henkel, E.F.; Valencia-Hernández, I.; Castillo-Henkel, C. [Section of Postgraduate Studies and Investigation, Higher School of Medicine from the National Polytechnic Institute, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2015-03-27

    Amfepramone (diethylpropion) is an appetite-suppressant drug used for the treatment of overweight and obesity. It has been suggested that the systemic and central activity of amfepramone produces cardiovascular effects such as transient ischemic attacks and primary pulmonary hypertension. However, it is not known whether amfepramone produces immediate vascular effects when applied in vitro to rat aortic rings and, if so, what mechanisms may be involved. We analyzed the effect of amfepramone on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings with or without endothelium and the influence of inhibitors or blockers on this effect. Amfepramone produced a concentration-dependent vasorelaxation in phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings that was not affected by the vehicle, atropine, 4-AP, glibenclamide, indomethacin, clotrimazole, or cycloheximide. The vasorelaxant effect of amfepramone was significantly attenuated by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and tetraethylammonium (TEA), and was blocked by removal of the vascular endothelium. These results suggest that amfepramone had a direct vasorelaxant effect on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings, and that inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and the opening of Ca{sup 2+}-activated K{sup +} channels were involved in this effect.

  20. Effects of Hydro-alcoholic Extract from Arctium lappa L. (Burdock) Root on Gonadotropins, Testosterone, and Sperm Count and Viability in Male Mice with Nicotinamide/ Streptozotocin-Induced Type 2 Diabetes.

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Oroojan, Ali Akbar; Heidari, Hamid; Ghaedi, Ehsan; Taherkhani, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive dysfunction is a complication of diabetes. Arctium lappa (burdock) root has hypoglycemic and antioxidative properties, which are traditionally used for treatment of impotence and sterility. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the effects of its hydro alcoholic extract on gonadotropin, testosterone, and sperm parameters in nicotinamide/ streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. In this experimental study, 56 adult male Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mice (30-35 g) were randomly divided into seven groups: control, diabetes, diabetes + glibenclamide (0.25 mg/kg), diabetes + extract (200 or 300 mg/kg), and extract (200 or 300 mg/kg). Diabetes was induced with intraperitoneal injection of nicotinamide (NA) and streptozotocin (STZ). Twenty-four hours after the last extract and drug administration, serum samples, testes, and cauda epididymis were removed immediately for experimental assessment. Body weight, serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and testosterone levels, and sperm count (P lappa plant has an effect on the health of the reproductive system in order to improve diabetic conditions.

  1. Antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and hepatoprotective effects of Arctium lappa root’s hydro-alcoholic extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin induced type 2 model of diabetes in male mice

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Heidari, Hamid; Oroojan, Ali Akbar; Mirzavandi, Farhang; Nasr Esfehani, Khalil; Dehghan Mohammadi, Zeinab

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Arctium lappa (burdock), (A. lappa) root has hypoglycemic and antioxidative effects, and has been used for treatment of diabetes in tradition medicine. This study was conducted to evaluate the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic properties of A. lappa root extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin (NA-STZ)-induced type2 diabetes in mice. Materials and Methods: In this investigation, 70 adult male NMRI mice (30-35g) randomly divided into 7 groups (n=10) as follow: 1-control, 2-type 2 diabetic mice, 3-diabetic mice that received glibenclamide (0.25 mg/kg) as an anti-diabetic drug, 4, 5, 6 and 7- diabetic and normal animals that were pre-treated with 200 and 300 mg/kg A. lappa root extract, respectively, for 28 days. Diabetes has been induced by intraperitoneal injection of NA and STZ. Finally, the blood sample was taken and insulin, glucose, SGOT, SGPT, alkaline phosphatase, leptin and lipid levels was evaluated. Results: Induction of diabetes decreased the level of insulin, leptin and high density lipoprotein (HDL) and increased the level of other lipids, glucose, and hepatic enzymes significantly (plappa root extract, at specific doses, has an anti-diabetic effect through its hypolipidemic and insulinotropic properties. Hence, this plant extract may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetes. PMID:28348972

  2. Antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and hepatoprotective effects of Arctium lappa root's hydro-alcoholic extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin induced type 2 model of diabetes in male mice.

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Heidari, Hamid; Oroojan, Ali Akbar; Mirzavandi, Farhang; Nasr Esfehani, Khalil; Dehghan Mohammadi, Zeinab

    2017-01-01

    Arctium lappa (burdock), (A. lappa) root has hypoglycemic and antioxidative effects, and has been used for treatment of diabetes in tradition medicine. This study was conducted to evaluate the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic properties of A. lappa root extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin (NA-STZ)-induced type2 diabetes in mice. In this investigation, 70 adult male NMRI mice (30-35g) randomly divided into 7 groups (n=10) as follow: 1-control, 2-type 2 diabetic mice, 3-diabetic mice that received glibenclamide (0.25 mg/kg) as an anti-diabetic drug, 4, 5, 6 and 7- diabetic and normal animals that were pre-treated with 200 and 300 mg/kg A. lappa root extract, respectively, for 28 days. Diabetes has been induced by intraperitoneal injection of NA and STZ. Finally, the blood sample was taken and insulin, glucose, SGOT, SGPT, alkaline phosphatase, leptin and lipid levels was evaluated. Induction of diabetes decreased the level of insulin, leptin and high density lipoprotein (HDL) and increased the level of other lipids, glucose, and hepatic enzymes significantly (plappa root extract, at specific doses, has an anti-diabetic effect through its hypolipidemic and insulinotropic properties. Hence, this plant extract may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetes.

  3. Antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and hepatoprotective effects of Arctium lappa root’s hydro-alcoholic extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin induced type 2 model of diabetes in male mice

    Akram Ahangarpour

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Arctium lappa (burdock, (A. lappa root has hypoglycemic and antioxidative effects, and has been used for treatment of diabetes in tradition medicine. This study was conducted to evaluate the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic properties of A. lappa root extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin (NA-STZ-induced type2 diabetes in mice.Materials and Methods: In this investigation, 70 adult male NMRI mice (30-35g randomly divided into 7 groups (n=10 as follow: 1-control, 2-type 2 diabetic mice, 3-diabetic mice that received glibenclamide (0.25 mg/kg as an anti-diabetic drug, 4, 5, 6 and 7- diabetic and normal animals that were pre-treated with 200 and 300 mg/kg A. lappa root extract, respectively, for 28 days. Diabetes has been induced by intraperitoneal injection of NA and STZ. Finally, the blood sample was taken and insulin, glucose, SGOT, SGPT, alkaline phosphatase, leptin and lipid levels was evaluated.Results: Induction of diabetes decreased the level of insulin, leptin and high density lipoprotein (HDL and increased the level of other lipids, glucose, and hepatic enzymes significantly (p

  4. Possible mechanisms involved in the vasorelaxant effect produced by clobenzorex in aortic segments of rats.

    Lozano-Cuenca, J; González-Hernández, A; López-Canales, O A; Villagrana-Zesati, J R; Rodríguez-Choreão, J D; Morín-Zaragoza, R; Castillo-Henkel, E F; López-Canales, J S

    2017-08-07

    Clobenzorex is a metabolic precursor of amphetamine indicated for the treatment of obesity. Amphetamines have been involved with cardiovascular side effects such as hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the direct application of 10-9-10-5 M clobenzorex on isolated phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings produces vascular effects, and if so, what mechanisms may be involved. Clobenzorex produced an immediate concentration-dependent vasorelaxant effect at the higher concentrations (10-7.5-10-5 M). The present outcome was not modified by 10-6 M atropine (an antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors), 3.1×10-7 M glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker), 10-3 M 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; a voltage-activated K+ channel blocker), 10-5 M indomethacin (a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor), 10-5 M clotrimazole (a cytochrome P450 inhibitor) or 10-5 M cycloheximide (a general protein synthesis inhibitor). Contrarily, the clobenzorex-induced vasorelaxation was significantly attenuated (Pclobenzorex on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings involved stimulation of the NO/cGMP/PKG/Ca2+-activated K+ channel pathway.

  5. Antinociceptive Effect of the Essential Oil from Croton conduplicatus Kunth (Euphorbiaceae

    Raimundo Gonçalves de Oliveira Júnior

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants have been widely used in the treatment of chronic pain. In this study, we describe the antinociceptive effect of the essential oil from Croton conduplicatus (the EO 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg, i.p., a medicinal plant native to Brazil. Antinociceptive activity was investigated by measuring the nociception induced by acetic acid, formalin, hot plate and carrageenan. A docking study was performed with the major constituents of the EO (E-caryophyllene, caryophyllene oxide, and camphor. The EO reduced nociceptive behavior at all doses tested in the acetic acid-induced nociception test (p < 0.05. The same was observed in both phases (neurogenic and inflammatory of the formalin test. When the hot-plate test was conducted, the EO (50 mg/kg extended the latency time after 60 min of treatment. The EO also reduced leukocyte migration at all doses, suggesting that its antinociceptive effect involves both central and peripheral mechanisms. Pretreatment with glibenclamide and atropine reversed the antinociceptive effect of the EO on the formalin test, suggesting the involvement of KATP channels and muscarinic receptors. The docking study revealed a satisfactory interaction profile between the major components of the EO and the different muscarinic receptor subtypes (M2, M3, and M4. These results corroborate the medicinal use of C. conduplicatus in folk medicine.

  6. Novel short chain fatty acids restore chloride secretion in cystic fibrosis

    Nguyen, Toan D.; Kim, Ug-Sung; Perrine, Susan P.

    2006-01-01

    Phenylalanine deletion at position 508 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (ΔF508-CFTR), the most common mutation in cystic fibrosis (CF), causes a misfolded protein exhibiting partial chloride conductance and impaired trafficking to the plasma membrane. 4-Phenylbutyrate corrects defective ΔF508-CFTR trafficking in vitro, but is not clinically efficacious. From a panel of short chain fatty acid derivatives, we showed that 2,2-dimethyl-butyrate (ST20) and α-methylhydrocinnamic acid (ST7), exhibiting high oral bioavailability and sustained plasma levels, correct the ΔF508-CFTR defect. Pre-incubation (≥6 h) of CF IB3-1 airway cells with ≥1 mM ST7 or ST20 restored the ability of 100 μM forskolin to stimulate an 125 I - efflux. This efflux was fully inhibited by NPPB, DPC, or glibenclamide, suggesting mediation through CFTR. Partial inhibition by DIDS suggests possible contribution from an additional Cl - channel regulated by CFTR. Thus, ST7 and ST20 offer treatment potential for CF caused by the ΔF508 mutation

  7. Role of nitric oxide and KATP channel in the protective effect mediated by nicorandil in bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis in rats.

    Mohamed, Yasmin S; Ahmed, Lamiaa A; Salem, Hesham A; Agha, Azza M

    2018-05-01

    Liver fibrosis is one of the most serious conditions affecting patients worldwide. In the present study, the role of nitric oxide and KATP channel was investigated for the first time in the possible protection mediated by nicorandil in bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis in rats. Nicorandil (3 mg/kg/day) was given orally 24 h after bile duct ligation for 14 days till the end of the experiment. Nicorandil group showed marked improvement in liver function tests, hepatic oxidative stress and inflammatory markers as well as inducible and endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein expressions. Furthermore, nicorandil administration led to significant decrement of phosphorylated protein kinase C, fibrosis and hepatic stellate cells activation as indicated by decreased alpha smooth muscle actin expression. Oral co-administration of glibenclamide (5 mg/kg/day) (a KATP channel blocker) with nicorandil mostly showed similar improvement though not reaching to that of nicorandil group. However, co-adminstration of L-NAME (15 mg/kg/day) (an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase) completely abolished the protective effects of nicorandil and produced more or less similar results to that of untreated bile duct ligated group. In conclusion, nicorandil is an effective therapy against the development of bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis in rats where nitric oxide plays a more prominent role in the protective effect of nicorandil than KATP channel opening. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Supplementation of fenugreek leaves lower lipid profile in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Annida, B; Stanely Mainzen Prince, P

    2004-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the lipid-lowering effect of fenugreek leaves in diabetes mellitus. Albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups: normal untreated rats; streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats; STZ-induced rats + fenugreek leaves (0.5 g/kg of body weight); STZ-induced rats + fenugreek leaves (1 g/kg of body weight); STZ-induced rats + glibenclamide (600 microg/kg of body weight); and STZ-induced rats + insulin (6 units/kg of body weight). Rats were made diabetic by STZ (40 mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally. Fenugreek leaves were supplemented in the diet daily to diabetic rats for 45 days, and food intake was recorded daily. Blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and free fatty acids were determined in serum, liver, heart, and kidney. Our results show that blood glucose and serum and tissue lipids were elevated in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Supplementation of fenugreek leaves lowered the lipid profile in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

  9. Antioxidative and hypolipidemic efficacy of alcoholic seed extract of Swietenia macrophylla in streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    Kalpana, Kalaivanan; Pugalendi, Kodukkur Viswanathan

    2011-06-17

    The present study was designed to examine the antioxidative potential and antihyperlipidemic activity of Swietenia macrophylla in streptozotocin diabetic rats. The experimental groups were rendered diabetic by intraperitoneal injection of a single dose of streptozotocin (STZ; 40 mg/kg body weight, BW). Rats with glucose levels >200 mg/dL were considered diabetic and were divided into five groups. Three groups of diabetic animals were orally administered daily with seed extract (SME) at a dosage of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg BW. One group of STZ rats was treated as diabetic control and another group orally administered 600 μg/kg BW glibenclamide daily. Repeated daily oral administration of S. macrophylla significantly reduced blood glucose levels after 45 days of treatment. The lipid peroxidation products such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and lipid hydroperoxides of SME treated rats decreased in the plasma, liver and kidney. Glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase activity were significantly increased in SME treated rats. Antioxidants such as reduced glutathione level in the plasma, liver and kidney and vitamins C and E levels in the plasma increased in SME treated rats. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids and free fatty acids and lipoproteins levels increased. Altered lipid profile of treated rats lead to normality with treatment of S. macrophylla. Thus, our results indicate that the administration of 100 mg/kg BW SME restores near normal blood glucose, redox status and lipid profile in STZ-diabetic rats.

  10. Altered Potassium Ion Channel Function as a Possible Mechanism of Increased Blood Pressure in Rats Fed Thermally Oxidized Palm Oil Diets.

    Nkanu, Etah E; Owu, Daniel U; Osim, Eme E

    2017-12-27

    Intake of thermally oxidized palm oil leads to cytotoxicity and alteration of the potassium ion channel function. This study investigated the effects of fresh and thermally oxidized palm oil diets on blood pressure and potassium ion channel function in blood pressure regulation. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups of eight rats. Control group received normal feed; fresh palm oil (FPO) and thermally oxidized palm oil (TPO) groups were fed a diet mixed with 15% (weight/weight) fresh palm oil and five times heated palm oil, respectively, for 16 weeks. Blood pressure was measured; blood samples, hearts, and aortas were collected for biochemical and histological analyses. Thermally oxidized palm oil significantly elevated basal mean arterial pressure (MAP). Glibenclamide (10 -5 mmol/L) and tetraethylammonium (TEA; 10 -3 mmol/L) significantly raised blood pressure in TPO compared with FPO and control groups. Levcromakalim (10 -6 mmol/L) significantly (p palm oil increases MAP probably due to the attenuation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium (K ATP ) and large-conductance calcium-dependent potassium (BK Ca ) channels, tissue peroxidation, and altered histological structures of the heart and blood vessels.

  11. Possible involvement of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the antidepressant-like effects of gabapentin in mouse forced swimming test.

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Akbarian, Reyhaneh; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Nikoui, Vahid; Zolfaghari, Samira; Chamanara, Mohsen; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2017-07-01

    Gabapentin as an anticonvulsant drug also has beneficial effects in treatment of depression. Previously, we showed that acute administration of gabapentin produced an antidepressant-like effect in the mouse forced swimming test (FST) by a mechanism that involves the inhibition of nitric oxide (NO). Considering the involvement of NO in adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channels (K ATP ), in the present study we investigated the involvement of K ATP channels in antidepressant-like effect of gabapentin. Gabapentin at different doses (5-10 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) were administrated by intraperitoneal route, 60 and 30 min, respectively, before the test. To clarify the probable involvement of K ATP channels, mice were pretreated with K ATP channel inhibitor or opener. Gabapentin at dose 10 mg/kg significantly decreased the immobility behavior of mice similar to fluoxetine (20 mg/kg). Co-administration of subeffective dose (1 mg/kg) of glibenclamide (inhibitor of K ATP channels) with gabapentin (3 mg/kg) showed a synergistic antidepressant-like effect. Also, subeffective dose of cromakalim (opener of K ATP channels, 0.1 mg/kg) inhibited the antidepressant-like effect of gabapentin (10 mg/kg). None of the treatments had any impact on the locomotor movement. Our study, for the first time, revealed that antidepressant-like effect of gabapentin in mice is mediated by blocking the K ATP channels.

  12. Hypoglycaemic and hypolipidaemic effects of crude extracts and chromatographic fractions of Morinda morindoides root bark in diabetic rats

    Johnny Olufemi Olukunle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoglycaemic and hypolipidaemic effects of different extracts and fractions of root bark from the plant Morinda morindoides (Baker Milne-Redh of the family Rubiaceae were evaluated in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. The aqueous and methanolic extracts were administered to 48 rats orally at a dose of 400 mg·kg-1 for 21 days. Fractions (hydromethanol, hexane, chloroform and ethyl acetate from bio-activity guided fractionation and chromatographic sub fractions (CsF A-F from accelerated gradient chromatography were also evaluated in 45 rats for the hypoglycaemic activity at doses of 400 mg·kg-1, 200 mg·kg-1 and 100 mg·kg-1 of solvent fractions and (CsF A-F, respectively. Glibenclamide was used as positive control. Polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate and distilled water administered to rats were used as negative controls. The dose of 400 mg·kg-1 of aqueous and methanolic extracts and 100 mg·kg-1 of chloroform CsF B of Morinda morindoides caused (62.8%, 56% and 74%, respectively reductions in blood glucose level (BGL. The aqueous extract caused significant (P -1, low density lipoprotein (66.38 ± 2.5 mg·dl-1 and significant (P -1 when compared to the control. These results confirm the folkloric claim of the hypoglycaemic and hypolipidaemic activities of Morinda morindoides root bark.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide-mediated regulation of contractility in the mouse ileum with electrical stimulation: roles of L-cysteine, cystathionine β-synthase, and K+ channels.

    Yamane, Satoshi; Kanno, Toshio; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Fujino, Hiromichi; Murayama, Toshihiko

    2014-10-05

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is considered to be a signaling molecule. The precise mechanisms underlying H2S-related events, including the producing enzymes and target molecules in gastrointestinal tissues, have not been elucidated in detail. We herein examined the involvement of H2S in contractions induced by repeated electrical stimulations (ES). ES-induced contractions were neurotoxin-sensitive and increased by aminooxyacetic acid, an inhibitor of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase, but not by D,L-propargylglycine, a selective inhibitor of cystathionine γ-lyase, in an ES trial-dependent manner. ES-induced contractions were markedly decreased in the presence of L-cysteine. This response was inhibited by aminooxyacetic acid and an antioxidant, and accelerated by L-methionine, an activator of CBS. The existence of CBS was confirmed. NaHS transiently inhibited ES- and acetylcholine-induced contractions, and sustainably decreased basal tone for at least 20 min after its addition. The treatment with glibenclamide, an ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker, reduced both the L-cysteine response and NaHS-induced inhibition of contractions. The NaHS-induced decrease in basal tone was inhibited by apamin, a small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel blocker. These results suggest that H2S may be endogenously produced via CBS in ES-activated enteric neurons, and regulates contractility via multiple K+ channels in the ileum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Lipid Based Formulations of Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS Class II Drugs: Strategy, Formulations, Methods and Saturation

    Šoltýsová I.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Active ingredients in pharmaceuticals differ by their physico-chemical properties and their bioavailability therefore varies. The most frequently used and most convenient way of administration of medicines is oral, however many drugs are little soluble in water. Thus they are not sufficiently effective and suitable for such administration. For this reason a system of lipid based formulations (LBF was developed. Series of formulations were prepared and tested in water and biorelevant media. On the basis of selection criteria, there were selected formulations with the best emulsification potential, good dispersion in the environment and physical stability. Samples of structurally different drugs included in the Class II of the Biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS were obtained, namely Griseofulvin, Glibenclamide, Carbamazepine, Haloperidol, Itraconazol, Triclosan, Praziquantel and Rifaximin, for testing of maximal saturation in formulations prepared from commercially available excipients. Methods were developed for preparation of formulations, observation of emulsification and its description, determination of maximum solubility of drug samples in the respective formulation and subsequent analysis. Saturation of formulations with drugs showed that formulations 80 % XA and 20 % Xh, 35 % XF and 65 % Xh were best able to dissolve the drugs which supports the hypothesis that it is desirable to identify limited series of formulations which could be generally applied for this purpose.

  15. Modulation of Visceral Nociception, Inflammation and Gastric Mucosal Injury by Cinnarizine

    Omar M.E. Abdel-Salam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cinnarizine, a drug used for the treatment of vertigo was assessed in animal models of visceral nociception, inflammation and gastric mucosal injury. Cinnarizine (1.25–20 mg/kg, s.c. caused dose-dependent inhibition of the abdominal constrictions evoked by i.p. injection of acetic acid by 38.7–99.4%. This effect of cinnarizine (2.5 mg/kg was unaffected by co-administration of the centrally acting dopamine D2 receptor antagonists, sulpiride, haloperidol or metoclopramide, the peripherally acting D2 receptor antagonist domperidone, but increased by the D2 receptor agonist bromocryptine and by the non-selective dopamine receptor antagonist chlorpromazine. The antinociception caused by cinnarizine was naloxone insenstive, but enhanced by propranolol, atropine and by yohimbine. The antinociceptive effect of cinnarizine was prevented by co-treatment with the adenosine receptor blocker theophylline or by the ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP blocker glibenclamide. Cinnarizine at 2.5 mg/kg reversed the baclofen-induced antinociception. Cinnarizine at 2.5 mg/kg reduced immobility time in the Porsolt’s forced-swimming test by 24%. Cinnarizine inhibited the paw oedema response to carrageenan and reduced gastric mucosal lesions caused by indomethacin in rats. It is suggested that cinnarizine exerts anti-infl ammatory, antinociceptive and gastric protective properties. The mechanism by which cinnarizine modulates pain transmission is likely to involve adenosine receptors and KATP channels.

  16. Jabuticaba-Induced Endothelium-Independent Vasodilating Effect on Isolated Arteries

    Daniela Medeiros Lobo de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Despite the important biological effects of jabuticaba, its actions on the cardiovascular system have not been clarified. Objectives: To determine the effects of jabuticaba hydroalcoholic extract (JHE on vascular smooth muscle (VSM of isolated arteries. Methods: Endothelium-denuded aortic rings of rats were mounted in isolated organ bath to record isometric tension. The relaxant effect of JHE and the influence of K+ channels and Ca2+ intra- and extracellular sources on JHE-stimulated response were assessed. Results: Arteries pre-contracted with phenylephrine showed concentration-dependent relaxation (0.380 to 1.92 mg/mL. Treatment with K+ channel blockers (tetraethyl-ammonium, glibenclamide, 4-aminopyridine hindered relaxation due to JHE. In addition, phenylephrine-stimulated contraction was hindered by previous treatment with JHE. Inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase did not change relaxation due to JHE. In addition, JHE inhibited the contraction caused by Ca2+ influx stimulated by phenylephrine and KCl (75 mM. Conclusion: JHE induces endothelium-independent vasodilation. Activation of K+ channels and inhibition of Ca2+ influx through the membrane are involved in the JHE relaxant effect.

  17. Pulse pressure and diabetes treatments: Blood pressure and pulse pressure difference among glucose lowering modality groups in type 2 diabetes.

    Alemi, Hamid; Khaloo, Pegah; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali; Rabizadeh, Soghra; Salehi, Salome Sadat; Mirmiranpour, Hossein; Meftah, Neda; Esteghamati, Alireza; Nakhjavani, Manouchehr

    2018-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with higher pulse pressure. In this study, we assessed and compared effects of classic diabetes treatments on pulse pressure (PP), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in patients with type 2 diabetes.In a retrospective cohort study, 718 non-hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes were selected and divided into 4 groups including metformin, insulin, glibenclamide+metformin, and metformin+insulin. They were followed for 4 consecutive visits lasting about 45.5 months. Effects of drug regimens on pulse and blood pressure over time were assessed separately and compared in regression models with generalized estimating equation method and were adjusted for age, duration of diabetes, sex, smoking, and body mass index (BMI).Studied groups had no significant change in PP, SBP, and DBP over time. No significant difference in PP and DBP among studied groups was observed (PP:P = 0.090; DBP:P = 0.063). Pairwise comparisons of PP, SBP, and DBP showed no statistically significant contrast between any 2 studied groups. Interactions of time and treatment were not different among groups.Our results demonstrate patients using metformin got higher PP and SBP over time. Averagely, pulse and blood pressure among groups were not different. Trends of variation in pulse and blood pressure were not different among studied diabetes treatments.

  18. Characterization of Imidazoline Receptors in Blood Vessels for the Development of Antihypertensive Agents

    Mei-Fen Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been indicated that activation of peripheral imidazoline I2-receptor (I-2R may reduce the blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs. Also, guanidinium derivatives show the ability to activate imidazoline receptors. Thus, it is of special interest to characterize the I-2R using guanidinium derivatives in blood vessels for development of antihypertensive agent(s. Six guanidinium derivatives including agmatine, amiloride, aminoguanidine, allantoin, canavanine, and metformin were applied in this study. Western blot analysis was used for detecting the expression of imidazoline receptor in tissues of Wistar rats. The isometric tension of aortic rings isolated from male rats was also estimated. The expression of imidazoline receptor on rat aorta was identified. However, guanidinium derivatives for detection of aortic relaxation were not observed except agmatine and amiloride which induced a marked relaxation in isolated aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine or KCl. Both relaxations induced by agmatine and amiloride were attenuated by glibenclamide at concentration enough to block ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channels. Meanwhile, only agmatine-induced relaxation was abolished by BU224, a selective antagonist of imidazoline I2-receptors. Taken together, we suggest that agmatine can induce vascular relaxation through activation of peripheral imidazoline I2-receptor to open KATP channels. Thus, agmatine-like compound has the potential to develop as a new therapeutic agent for hypertension in the future.

  19. The Methanolic Extract from Murraya koenigii L. Inhibits Glutamate-Induced Pain and Involves ATP-Sensitive K+ Channel as Antinociceptive Mechanism

    Nushrat Sharmin Ani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Murraya koenigii L. is a perennial shrub, belonging to the family Rutaceae. Traditionally, the leaves of this plant are extensively used in treatment of a wide range of diseases and disorders including pain and inflammation. Although researchers have revealed the antinociceptive effects of this plant’s leaves during past few years, the mechanisms underlying these effects are still unknown. Therefore, the present study evaluated some antinociceptive mechanisms of the methanolic extract of M. koenigii (MEMK leaves along with its antinociceptive potential using several animal models. The antinociceptive effects of MEMK were evaluated using formalin-induced licking and acetic acid-induced writhing tests at the doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg. In addition, we also justified the possible participations of glutamatergic system and ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the observed activities. Our results demonstrated that MEMK significantly (p<0.01 inhibited the pain thresholds induced by formalin and acetic acid in a dose-dependent manner. MEMK also significantly (p<0.01 suppressed glutamate-induced pain. Moreover, pretreatment with glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker at 10 mg/kg significantly (p<0.05 reversed the MEMK-mediated antinociception. These revealed that MEMK might have the potential to interact with glutamatergic system and the ATP-sensitive potassium channels to exhibit its antinociceptive activities. Therefore, our results strongly support the antinociceptive effects of M. koenigii leaves and provide scientific basis of their analgesic uses in the traditional medicine.

  20. Effect of an aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis on plasma and tissue glycoproteins in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    Latha, M; Pari, L

    2005-02-01

    The influence of Scoparia dulcis, a traditionally used plant for the treatment of diabetes mellitus, was examined in streptozotocin diabetic rats on dearrangement in glycoprotein levels. Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. An aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis plant was administered orally for 6 weeks. The effect of the Scoparia dulcis extract on blood glucose, plasma insulin, plasma and tissue glycoproteins studied was in comparison to glibenclamide. The levels of blood glucose and plasma glycoproteins were increased significantly whereas the level of plasma insulin was significantly decreased in diabetic rats. There was a significant decrease in the level of sialic acid and elevated levels of hexose, hexosamine and fucose in the liver and kidney of streptozotocin diabetic rats. Oral administration of Scoparia dulcis plant extract (SPEt) to diabetic rats led to decreased levels of blood glucose and plasma glycoproteins. The levels of plasma insulin and tissue sialic acid were increased whereas the levels of tissue hexose, hexosamine and fucose were near normal. The present study indicates that Scoparia dulcis possesses a significant beneficial effect on glycoproteins in addition to its antidiabetic effect.

  1. Antidiabetic and Antioxidant Activity of Scoparia dulcis Linn.

    Mishra, M R; Mishra, A; Pradhan, D K; Panda, A K; Behera, R K; Jha, S

    2013-09-01

    The hypoglycaemic activity of methanol extract of Scoparia dulcis was performed on both in vitro and in vivo models along with determination of total extractable polyphenol. Methanol extract of Scoparia dulcis contains 4.9% and water extract contains 3.2% of total extractable polyphenol. The antioxidant activity showed very promising result in both the tested methods that is 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and ferric ion reducing capacity. The antioxidant activity is directly correlated to the antidiabetic potential of drug. The two enzymes (amylase and glycosidase) found in intestine are responsible for the increasing postprandial glucose in body. In vitro model was performed on these enzymes and the results showed that methanol extract of Scoparia dulcis was effective to check the postprandial glucose level. The in vivo hypoglycaemic activity of methanol extract of Scoparia dulcis was performed on streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus showed significant inhibition of blood glucose level as compared to control and similar to that of standard glibenclamide. The overall data potentiates the traditional value of Scoparia dulcis as an antidiabetic drug.

  2. Therapeutic potency of saponin rich aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis L. in alloxan induced diabetes in rats.

    Perumal, P Saravana; Anaswara, P V; Muthuraman, A; Krishan, S

    2014-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is major metabolic disorders of carbohydrate metabolism. This leads to alter the multiple organ system. To investigate the antidiabetic and antioxidant effects of the saponin rich aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis (SRE-SD) using alloxan-induced hyperglycemic rat model. The single dose of alloxan was injected for the induction of diabetes in rats. The SRE-SD and glibenclamide were administered for 15 consecutive days from the 3(rd) day of alloxan administration. Quantity of food and water intake was measured at day 0, and 18. Further, body weight was recorded and blood samples were collected at different time intervals that is, day 0, 3, 8, 13, and 18. The oxidative biomarkers (i.e. thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH) and nitrite (NO(2-)) levels were also estimated in the serum sample. The SRE-SD showed a remarkable dose and time-dependent changes in alloxan-induced rise in the level of food consumption and water intake, serum glucose level, TBARS, NO(2-) and fall in the level of GSH. Further, significant attenuation was observed at 20 and 30 mg/kg of SRE-SD treated group. These findings demonstrate that SRE-SD has both antidiabetic and antioxidant effects on the experimental model of diabetes in rat.

  3. Study of antihyperglycaemic activity of medicinal plant extracts in alloxan induced diabetic rats.

    Attanayake, Anoja P; Jayatilaka, Kamani A P W; Pathirana, Chitra; Mudduwa, Lakmini K B

    2013-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus, for a long time, has been treated with plant derived medicines in Sri Lanka. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy and dose response of oral antihyperglycaemic activity of eight Sri Lankan medicinal plant extracts, which are used to treat diabetes in traditional medicine in diabetic rats. Medicinal plants selected for the study on the basis of documented effectiveness and wide use among traditional Ayurveda physicians in the Southern region of Sri Lanka for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. The effect of different doses of aqueous stem bark extracts of Spondias pinnata (Anacardiaceae), Kokoona zeylanica (Celastraceae), Syzygium caryophyllatum (Myrtaceae), Gmelina arborea (Verbenaceae), aerial part extracts of Scoparia dulcis (Scrophulariaceae), Sida alnifolia (Malvaceae), leaf extract of Coccinia grandis (Cucurbitaceae) and root extract of Languas galanga (Zingiberaceae) on oral glucose tolerance test was evaluated. A single dose of 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00, 1.25, 2.00 g/kg of plant extract was administered orally to alloxan induced (150 mg/kg, ip) diabetic Wistar rats (n = 6). Glibenclamide (0.50 mg/kg) was used as the standard drug. The acute effect was evaluated over a 4 h period using area under the oral glucose tolerance curve. The results were evaluated by analysis of variance followed by Dunnett's test. The eight plant extracts showed statistically significant dose dependent improvement on glucose tolerance (P dulcis, S. alnifolia, L. galanga and C. grandis possess potent acute antihyperglycaemic activity in alloxan induced diabetic rats.

  4. Antihyperlipidemic effect of Scoparia dulcis (sweet broomweed) in streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    Pari, Leelavinothan; Latha, Muniappan

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated Scoparia dulcis, an indigenous plant used in Ayurvedic medicine in India, for its possible antihyperlipidemic effect in rats with streptozotocin-induced experimental diabetes. Oral administration of an aqueous extract of S. dulcis plant (200 mg/kg of body weight) to streptozotocin diabetic rats for 6 weeks resulted in a significant reduction in blood glucose, serum and tissue cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, phospholipids, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase activity, and very low-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The decreased serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, anti-atherogenic index, and HMG-CoA reductase activity in diabetic rats were also reversed towards normalization after the treatment. Similarly, the administration of S. dulcis plant extract (SPEt) to normal animals resulted in a hypolipidemic effect. The effect was compared with glibenclamide (600 microg/kg of body weight). The results showed that SPEt had antihyperlipidemic action in normal and experimental diabetic rats in addition to its antidiabetic effect.

  5. Mechanisms involved in the vasorelaxant effects produced by the acute application of amfepramone in vitro to rat aortic rings

    López-Canales, J.S.; Lozano-Cuenca, J.; Muãoz-Islas, E.; Aguilar-Carrasco, J.C.; López-Canales, O.A.; López-Mayorga, R.M.; Castillo-Henkel, E.F.; Valencia-Hernández, I.; Castillo-Henkel, C.

    2015-01-01

    Amfepramone (diethylpropion) is an appetite-suppressant drug used for the treatment of overweight and obesity. It has been suggested that the systemic and central activity of amfepramone produces cardiovascular effects such as transient ischemic attacks and primary pulmonary hypertension. However, it is not known whether amfepramone produces immediate vascular effects when applied in vitro to rat aortic rings and, if so, what mechanisms may be involved. We analyzed the effect of amfepramone on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings with or without endothelium and the influence of inhibitors or blockers on this effect. Amfepramone produced a concentration-dependent vasorelaxation in phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings that was not affected by the vehicle, atropine, 4-AP, glibenclamide, indomethacin, clotrimazole, or cycloheximide. The vasorelaxant effect of amfepramone was significantly attenuated by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and tetraethylammonium (TEA), and was blocked by removal of the vascular endothelium. These results suggest that amfepramone had a direct vasorelaxant effect on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings, and that inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and the opening of Ca 2+ -activated K + channels were involved in this effect

  6. Planar patch clamp: advances in electrophysiology.

    Brüggemann, Andrea; Farre, Cecilia; Haarmann, Claudia; Haythornthwaite, Ali; Kreir, Mohamed; Stoelzle, Sonja; George, Michael; Fertig, Niels

    2008-01-01

    Ion channels have gained increased interest as therapeutic targets over recent years, since a growing number of human and animal diseases have been attributed to defects in ion channel function. Potassium channels are the largest and most diverse family of ion channels. Pharmaceutical agents such as Glibenclamide, an inhibitor of K(ATP) channel activity which promotes insulin release, have been successfully sold on the market for many years. So far, only a small group of the known ion channels have been addressed as potential drug targets. The functional testing of drugs on these ion channels has always been the bottleneck in the development of these types of pharmaceutical compounds.New generations of automated patch clamp screening platforms allow a higher throughput for drug testing and widen this bottleneck. Due to their planar chip design not only is a higher throughput achieved, but new applications have also become possible. One of the advantages of planar patch clamp is the possibility of perfusing the intracellular side of the membrane during a patch clamp experiment in the whole-cell configuration. Furthermore, the extracellular membrane remains accessible for compound application during the experiment.Internal perfusion can be used not only for patch clamp experiments with cell membranes, but also for those with artificial lipid bilayers. In this chapter we describe how internal perfusion can be applied to potassium channels expressed in Jurkat cells, and to Gramicidin channels reconstituted in a lipid bilayer.

  7. Antispasmodic activity of Symplocos paniculata is mediated through opening of ATP-dependent K+ channel

    Khalid Hussain Janbaz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Symplocos paniculata is a medicinal plant used by native healers to manage gastrointestinal ailments. The crude methanolic extract of S. paniculata was screened pharmacologically both in vitro and in vivo for the validation of its therapeutic potential. It suppressed the spontaneous activity of isolated rabbit jejunum preparations and also caused inhibition of the low K+ (20 mM- induced spastic contractions in isolated rabbit jejunum preparations in a manner comparable to cromakalim. The relaxant effect was found to be blocked following glibenclamide exposure of the isolated tissue preparations similar to cromakalim, suggesting that observed response was likely to be mediated through opening of ATP dependent K+ channels. Following oral administration to mice provided protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea in a manner similar to loperamide. The plant material was found safe in toxicity study up to oral dose of 8 g/kg in mice. Hence, present study provides a scientific basis for the vernacular use of S. paniculata in gastro-intestinal system.

  8. Supraoptic oxytocin and vasopressin neurons function as glucose and metabolic sensors.

    Song, Zhilin; Levin, Barry E; Stevens, Wanida; Sladek, Celia D

    2014-04-01

    Neurons in the supraoptic nuclei (SON) produce oxytocin and vasopressin and express insulin receptors (InsR) and glucokinase. Since oxytocin is an anorexigenic agent and glucokinase and InsR are hallmarks of cells that function as glucose and/or metabolic sensors, we evaluated the effect of glucose, insulin, and their downstream effector ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels on calcium signaling in SON neurons and on oxytocin and vasopressin release from explants of the rat hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system. We also evaluated the effect of blocking glucokinase and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K; mediates insulin-induced mobilization of glucose transporter, GLUT4) on responses to glucose and insulin. Glucose and insulin increased intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i). The responses were glucokinase and PI3K dependent, respectively. Insulin and glucose alone increased vasopressin release (P glucose in the presence of insulin. The oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (VP) responses to insulin+glucose were blocked by the glucokinase inhibitor alloxan (4 mM; P ≤ 0.002) and the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin (50 nM; OT: P = 0.03; VP: P ≤ 0.002). Inactivating K ATP channels with 200 nM glibenclamide increased oxytocin and vasopressin release (OT: P neurons functioning as glucose and "metabolic" sensors to participate in appetite regulation.

  9. Evaluation of antihyperglycemic activity of Cocos nucifera Linn. on streptozotocin induced type 2 diabetic rats.

    Naskar, Sagar; Mazumder, Upal K; Pramanik, Goutam; Gupta, Malaya; Kumar, R B Suresh; Bala, Asis; Islam, Aminul

    2011-12-08

    The plant Cocos nucifera Linn. (Arecaceae) is commonly known as coconut. Traditionally the juice of the young spadix when fresh is used in diarrhea and diabetes. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of antidiabetic activity and effect on lipid profile as well as cardioprotective effect of hydro-methanol extract of Cocos nucifera (HECN) on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. After 72 h of STZ (50 mg/kg, b.w. i.p.) administration, animals showing plasma sugar level more than 250 mg/dl were considered as diabetic rat. Fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels were measured on 0th (after 72 h of STZ), 5th, 10th, and 15th day. On the 15th day all the animals were sacrificed and the serum biochemical parameters and antioxidant enzyme status were measured. HECN treated animals showed a significant reduction in FBG level as compared with diabetic control group. Serum enzyme level (SGOT, SGPT, SALP), lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme level such as CAT, GSH, SOD and cholesterol and triglycerides in the HECN treated groups were restored towards normal level as compared to diabetic control groups and the values were comparable with the standard groups (glibenclamide). Improvement in the FBG and the restoration of all other biomarker as well as enzymes indicates that HECN has very good antidiabetic activity with very low side effects and provides a scientific rationale for the use as an antidiabetic agent. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of the effects of the K(+)-channel openers cromakalim and minoxidil sulphate on vascular smooth muscle.

    Wickenden, A. D.; Grimwood, S.; Grant, T. L.; Todd, M. H.

    1991-01-01

    1 The actions of the potassium channel openers, cromakalim and minoxidil sulphate, were compared in a range of isolated blood vessel preparations. 2 Cromakalim and minoxidil sulphate inhibited spontaneous mechanical activity of the guinea-pig portal vein and relaxed the noradrenaline precontracted rat aorta with similar potency. In contrast, minoxidil sulphate was less potent than cromakalim in inhibiting spontaneous activity in the rat portal vein and was essentially inactive in the noradrenaline precontracted rat mesenteric artery and rabbit aorta. 3 Minoxidil sulphate did not antagonize the effects of cromakalim in the rabbit aorta indicating it was not acting as a partial 'agonist'. 4 Charybdotoxin, noxiustoxin and rubidium failed to discriminate between cromakalim and minoxidil sulphate indicating that the apparently selective effects of minoxidil sulphate were not mediated by either Ca(2+)-activated potassium channels, delayed rectifiers or rubidium impermeable potassium channels. 5 Glibenclamide antagonized the effects of cromakalim in an apparently competitive manner whereas the effects of minoxidil sulphate were antagonized in a non-competitive manner. The involvement of subtypes of ATP-sensitive potassium channels is discussed. PMID:1878752

  11. SENSITIVE EFFECTS OF POTASSIUM AND CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKING AND ATP-SENSITIVE POTASSIUM CHANNEL ACTIVATORS ON SEMINAL VESICLE SMOOTH MUSCLE CONTRACTIONS

    H SADRAEI

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Seminal vesicle smooth muscle contraction is mediated through sympathetic and parasympathetic neurons activity. Although seminal vesicle plays an important role in male fertility, but little attention is given to mechanism involved in contraction of this organ.
    Methods. In this study effects of drugs which activate ATP - sensitive K channels and blockers of K and Ca channels were examined on contraction of guinea - pig isolated seminal vesicle due to electrical filled stimulation (EFS, noradrenaline, carbachol and KCI.
    Results. The K channel blocker tetraethyl ammonium potentate the EFS responses at all frequencies, while, the ATP - sensitive K channel inhibitor glibenclamide and the K channel opener levcromakalim, diazoxide, minoxidil and Ca channel blocker nifedipine all had relaxant effect on guinea - pig seminal vesicle.
    Discussion. This study indicate that activities of K and Ca channels is important in regulation of seminal vesicle contraction due to nerve stimulation, noradrenaline or carbachol.

  12. The action of diazoxide and minoxidil sulphate on rat blood vessels: a comparison with cromakalim.

    Newgreen, D. T.; Bray, K. M.; McHarg, A. D.; Weston, A. H.; Duty, S.; Brown, B. S.; Kay, P. B.; Edwards, G.; Longmore, J.; Southerton, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    1. The actions of diazoxide and minoxidil sulphate have been compared with those of cromakalim in rat aorta and portal vein. 2. Diazoxide and minoxidil sulphate hyperpolarized the rat portal vein in a similar manner to cromakalim. 3. Cromakalim, diazoxide and minoxidil sulphate increased 42K and 86Rb efflux from rat portal vein, although minoxidil sulphate had only a small effect on 86Rb efflux. 4. Cromakalim, diazoxide and minoxidil sulphate increased 42K efflux from rat aorta but only cromakalim and diazoxide increased 86Rb efflux from this tissue. 5. Glibenclamide inhibited the relaxant actions of cromakalim, diazoxide and minoxidil sulphate on rat aorta and the increase in 42K efflux produced by these agents in this tissue. 6. Diazoxide relaxed an 80 mM KCl-induced contraction of rat aorta, whilst cromakalim and minoxidil sulphate were without effect. 7. Cromakalim, diazoxide and minoxidil sulphate had no effect on cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP concentrations in rat aorta. 8. It is concluded that diazoxide and minoxidil sulphate like cromakalim exhibit K+ channel opening properties in vascular smooth muscle. Diazoxide exerts an additional inhibitory action not related to the production of cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP. The action of minoxidil sulphate may be primarily located at a K+ channel which is relatively impermeable to 86Rb. PMID:2167738

  13. Pharmacological basis for the medicinal use of Morus alba in gut and airways disorders

    Munasib Khan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Crude extract of Morus alba at 100 mg/kg exhibited protective effect against castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice. In isolated rabbit jejunum, M. alba (0.3-10 mg/mL inhibited the spontaneous contractions and caused glibenclamide-sensitive inhibition of low K+ (20 mM-induced contractions, with mild effect on high K+ (80 mM. Similarly, cromakalim caused inhibition of low K+, but not of high K+, while verapamil did not differentiate in its inhibitory effect on two concentrations of K+. M. alba (3.0-30 mg/kg caused suppression of carbachol (100 µg/kg-induced increase in inspiratory pressure of anaesthetized rats. In guinea-pig trachea, M. alba completely inhibited low K+ contractions, with partial effect on high K+. M. alba (0.3-1.0 mg/mL caused leftward shift of isoprenaline-induced inhibitory concentration response curves, like papaverine. These results indicate that M. alba possesses a combination of KATP channel opening, weak Ca++-antagonist and phosphodiesterase inhibitory mechanisms, which explain its medicinal use in hyperactive gut and airways disorders.

  14. Antihyperglycaemic activity of the methanol extract from leaves of Eremophila maculata (Scrophulariaceae) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Youssef, Fadia S; Ashour, Mohamed L; Ebada, Sherif S; Sobeh, Mansour; El-Beshbishy, Hesham A; Singab, Abdel Nasser; Wink, Michael

    2017-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the antihyperglycaemic activity of the methanol leaf extract of Eremophila maculata (EMM) both in vitro and in vivo. The antihyperglycaemic activity was assessed in vitro using differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, whereas in-vivo effect was evaluated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Chemical profiling of EMM was done using LC-ESI-MS techniques. Molecular modelling experiments of the identified compounds were performed using C-Docker protocol. Eremophila maculata slightly enhanced cellular glucose uptake and utilization in vitro by 3.92% relative to the untreated control. A stronger in-vivo effect was observed for EMM and its dichloromethane fraction. A pronounced elevation in serum insulin by 88.89 and 66.67%, respectively, accompanied by an apparent decline in fasting blood glucose (FBG) level by 65.60 and 70.37% comparable to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats was observed. This effect was stronger than that of the reference drug glibenclamide (GLB). Chemical profiling of EMM revealed that leucoseptoside A, verbascoside, syringaresinol-4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, pinoresinol-4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside and pinoresinol-4-O-[6″-O-(E)-feruloyl]-β-D-glucopyranoside are the major compounds. Molecular modelling showed that martynoside, verbascoside and phillygenin exhibited the highest inhibition to human pancreatic α-amylase (HPA), maltase glucoamylase (MGAM) and aldose reductase (AR), respectively. Eremophila maculata offers an interesting relatively safer antihyperglycaemic candidate comparable to synthetic analogues. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  15. Endothelium-Independent Vasorelaxant Effect of Ligusticum jeholense Root and Rhizoma on Rat Thoracic Aorta

    Bumjung Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ligusticum jeholense has been used as the traditional medicine ‘Go-Bon’ (Chinese name, Gao-ben in China and Korea. Considering the increased use of medicinal herbs to treat hypertension, in this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanisms of the vasorelaxation effect caused by L. jeholense. We tested the methanol (MeOH extract of L. jeholense root and rhizoma for vasorelaxant effects; while using an isolated organ-chamber technique, L. jeholense extract (LJE induced relaxation in the rat aortic rings by stimulating vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. LJE showed concentration-dependent relaxant effects on endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded aortic rings pre-contracted with both phenylephrine (PE and potassium chloride (KCl in Krebs-Henseleit (KH buffer. The vasorelaxant effect of LJE was partly attenuated by pre-treatment with glibenclamide or 4-aminopyridine (4-AP as K+ channel blockers. Moreover, LJE showed concentration-dependent inhibition of vasoconstriction by Ca2+ supplementation in the aortic rings that were pre-contracted with PE or KCl in Ca2+-free KH buffer. In addition, a combination of LJE and nifedipine, pre-incubated further, decreased PE-induced contractions. The results suggested that LJE-induced vasorelaxation were related to blocking K+ channels and inhibiting entry of extracellular Ca2+ via receptor-operative Ca2+ channels (ROCCs or voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs.

  16. Ameliorative effect of kaempferol, a flavonoid, on oxidative stress in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Al-Numair, Khalid S; Chandramohan, Govindasamy; Veeramani, Chinnadurai; Alsaif, Mohammed A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of kaempferol against oxidative stress in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in male, adult albino rats of the Wistar strain, by intraperitoneal administration of STZ (40 mg/kg body weight (BW)). Kaempferol (100 mg/kg BW) or glibenclamide (600 µg/kg BW) was administered orally once daily for 45 days to normal and STZ-induced diabetic rats. The STZ-induced diabetic rats showed significantly increased levels of plasma glucose, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lipid hydroperoxides, and conjugated dienes in plasma, liver, kidney, and heart whereas they showed significantly decreased level of plasma insulin. The levels of non-enzymic antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, reduced glutathione) in plasma, liver, kidney, and heart and the activities of enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione-S-transferase) in liver, kidney, and heart were significantly decreased in diabetic rats. Administration of kaempferol to diabetic rats was showed brought back in plasma glucose, insulin, lipid peroxidation products, enzymatic, and non-enzymatic antioxidants to near normal. The present study indicates that kaempferol has a good antioxidant property, as evidenced by its increase of antioxidant status and decrease of lipid peroxidation markers, thus providing protection from the risks of diabetic complications.

  17. Nicorandil directly and cyclic GMP-dependently opens K+ channels in human bypass grafts

    Marija Marinko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As we previously demonstrated the role of different K+ channels in the action of nicorandil on human saphenous vein (HSV and human internal mammary artery (HIMA, this study aimed to analyse the contribution of the cGMP pathway in nicorandil-induced vasorelaxation and to determine the involvement of cGMP in the K+ channel-activating effect of nicorandil. An inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (GC, ODQ, significantly inhibited nicorandil-induced relaxation, while ODQ plus glibenclamide, a selective ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP channel inhibitor, produced a further inhibition of both vessels. In HSV, ODQ in combination with 4-aminopyridine, a blocker of voltage-gated K+ (KV channels, did not modify the concentration-response to nicorandil compared with ODQ, whereas in HIMA, ODQ plus iberiotoxin, a selective blocker of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa channels, produced greater inhibition than ODQ alone. We showed that the cGMP pathway plays a significant role in the vasorelaxant effect of nicorandil on HSV and HIMA. It seems that nicorandil directly opens KATP channels in both vessels and BKCa channels in HIMA, although it is possible that stimulation of GC contributes to KATP channels activation in HIMA. Contrary, the activation of KV channels in HSV is probably due to GC activation and increased levels of cGMP.

  18. (-)-Epicatechin-induced relaxation of isolated human saphenous vein: Roles of K+ and Ca2+ channels.

    Marinko, Marija; Jankovic, Goran; Nenezic, Dragoslav; Milojevic, Predrag; Stojanovic, Ivan; Kanjuh, Vladimir; Novakovic, Aleksandra

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate relaxant effect of flavanol (-)-epicatechin on the isolated human saphenous vein (HSV), as a part of its cardioprotective action, and to define the mechanisms underlying this vasorelaxation. (-)-Epicatechin induced a concentration-dependent relaxation of HSV pre-contracted by phenylephrine. Among K + channel blockers, 4-aminopyridine, margatoxin, and iberiotoxin significantly inhibited relaxation of HSV, while glibenclamide considerably reduced effects of the high concentrations of (-)-epicatechin. Additionally, (-)-epicatechin relaxed contraction induced by 80 mM K + , whereas in the presence of nifedipine produced partial relaxation of HSV rings pre-contracted by phenylephrine. In Ca 2+ -free solution, (-)-epicatechin relaxed contraction induced by phenylephrine, but had no effect on contraction induced by caffeine. A sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin, significantly reduced relaxation of HSV produced by (-)-epicatechin. These results demonstrate that (-)-epicatechin produces endothelium-independent relaxation of isolated HSV rings. Vasorelaxation to (-)-epicatechin probably involves activation of 4-aminopyridine- and margatoxin-sensitive K V channels, BK Ca channels, and at least partly, K ATP channels. In addition, not only the inhibition of extracellular Ca 2+ influx, but regulation of the intracellular Ca 2+ release, via inositol-trisphosphate receptors and reuptake into sarcoplasmic reticulum, via stimulation of Ca 2+ -ATPase, as well, most likely participate in (-)-epicatechin-induced relaxation of HSV. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Diabetes and Ramadan: an update on use of glycemic therapies during fasting.

    Ahmed, Mohamed H; Abdu, Tarig A M

    2011-01-01

    The fasting of Ramadan is observed by a large proportion of Muslims with diabetes. Recommendations for the management of diabetes during Ramadan were last published in 2005 by the American Diabetes Association. Several studies in this field have since been published, some addressing the use of new pharmacological agents in managing diabetes during Ramadan. The incritin memetics are potentially safe during Ramadan; the DPP4 inhibitors vildagliptin and sitagliptin provide an effective and safe therapeutic option, administered either alone or in combination with metformin or sulfonylureas. There are no published studies on the use of GLP-1 receptor agonists during Ramadan. Among the sulfonylureas, gliclazide MR (modified release) and glimepride can be safely used during Ramadan, but glibenclamide should be avoided due to the associated risk of hypoglycemia. In selected patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, the long-acting insulin analogues glargine and detemir, as well as the premixed insulin analogues, can be used with minimal risk of metabolic derangement or hypoglycemia; the risk is higher in type 1 diabetes. Insulin pumps can potentially empower patients with diabetes and enable safe fasting during the month of Ramadan. Further clinical trials are needed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of new antidiabetic agents and new diabetes-related technologies during Ramadan.

  20. Pattern of pharmaceutical retailing of anti-diabetic products in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Famuyiwa, O O

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-four pharmacists in the city of Ibadan were surveyed through a self-administered structured questionnaire as to the extent of their involvement in the pharmaceutical retailing of antidiabetic products and their cost. Oral hypoglycemic agents especially, chlorpropamide (Diabenese) and glibenclamide (Daonil) were the most readily available drugs being obtainable from 21 (87.5%) pharmacies. Insulin was stocked regularly by only 14 (58.3%) of the pharmacists and insulin syringes and needles could be obtained from only 10 (41.6%) of the pharmacies. Among materials for urine testing, clinistix strip was the most readily available and fully one-third of the pharmacies did not stock any such material. The prices of all the products were disturbingly high and between 1983 and 1986 when retail prices were re-assessed, the cost of some materials had escalated by as much as 400%. Scarcity of antidiabetic products and their high cost pose serious challenges for those involved in the care of diabetic patients in Nigeria. Some suggestions have been made as to what steps both the government and the pharmaceutical industry can take in ensuring the availability of these life sustaining products for the increasingly large Nigerian diabetic population.

  1. Polyploidy Analysis and Attenuation of Oxidative Stress in Hepatic Tissue of STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats Treated with an Aqueous Extract of Vochysia rufa

    Izabela Barbosa Moraes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is characterized by hyperglycemia and alterations in the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins. Due to its hypoglycemic effect Vochysia rufa is frequently used in Uberlandia, Brazil, to treat DM. Despite its popularity, there is little information about its effect on hepatic tissue. Therefore, we evaluated the histoarchitecture, oxidative stress parameters, and polyploidy of liver tissue from streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic rats treated with aqueous extract of Vochysia rufa (AEV. Histology was determined by fixing the livers, processing, and staining with HE. Oxidative stress was determined by evaluating CAT, GPx, and SOD activity in liver homogenates and hepatic mitochondria fraction and by measuring GST, GSH levels and lipid peroxidation (MDA. Polyploidy was determined by subjecting isolated hepatocyte nuclei to flow cytometry. In the diabetic group, GST activity and GSH rates decreased whereas liver homogenate analysis showed that GPx, SOD activity and MDA increased. AEV treatment restored all parameters to normal levels. The oxidative stress analysis of hepatic mitochondria fraction showed similar results. Lower polyploid cell populations were found in the diabetic rat livers, even after glibenclamide treatment. Thus, AEV treatment efficiently reduced hepatic oxidative stress caused by STZ-induced diabetes and produced no morphological changes in the histological analysis.

  2. Hypoglycemic and Hypolipidemic Effects of the Cracked-Cap Medicinal Mushroom Phellinus rimosus (Higher Basidiomycetes) in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    Rony, Kuttikkadan A; Ajith, Thekkuttuparambil A; Janardhanan, Kainoor K

    2015-01-01

    Phellinus rimosus is a parasitic host specific polypore mushroom with profound antioxidant, antihepatotoxic, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and antimutagenic activities. This study investigated the hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activities of the wood-inhabiting polypore mushroom Ph. Rimosus in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (45 mg/kg) to Wistar rats. The effects of 30 days treatment with Ph. Rimosus (50 and 250 mg/ kg) and glibenclamide (0.65 mg/kg) on blood glucose level, serum insulin, serum lipid profile, liver glycogen, liver function enzymes, and non-enzymic and enzymic antioxidants activities in pancreas, liver, and kidney were evaluated in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Oral administration of Ph. Rimosus extract exhibited a significant reduction in blood glucose, triacylglycerol, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and liver function enzymes, and increased serum insulin, liver glycogen, and HDL-cholesterol levels in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Furthermore, Ph. Rimosus treatment increased antioxidant status in pancreas, liver, and kidney tissues with concomitant decreases in levels of thiobarbituric acid- reactive substances. Results of this study indicated that Ph. Rimosus possessed significant hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activities and this effect may be related to its insulinogenic and antioxidant effect.

  3. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplets for simultaneous extraction of pesticides, pharmaceuticals and personal care products

    Marube, Liziane Cardoso; Caldas, Sergiane Souza; Soares, Karina Lotz; Primel, Ednei Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplets (DLLME-SFO) has been applied to the extraction of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) and pesticides from water samples. The PPCPs included bisphenol A, sodium diclofenac, gemfibrozil, furosemide, glibenclamide, nifedipine, nimesulide, propylparaben and triclocarban. The pesticides included 2,4-D, atrazine, azoxystrobin, cyproconazole, clomazone, dichloran, difenoconazole, diuron, epoxiconazole, fenoxaprop-p-ethyl, fipronil, iprodione, irgarol, propanil, propiconazole, tebuconazole, and trifloxystrobin. The type and volume of extraction solvent, type and volume of disperser solvent, ionic strength and pH were optimized. All species were then quantified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The limits of quantification (LOQs) ranged from 50 to 500 ng L −1 , and the linearity ranged from the LOQ of each compound up to 10,000 ng L −1 . Recoveries ranged from 63 to 120 %, with relative standard deviations lower than 14 %. It is making use of a low-toxicity and affordable extraction solvent (1-dodecanol) and was successfully applied to the analysis of surface water samples. (author)

  4. PPARα-Independent Arterial Smooth Muscle Relaxant Effects of PPARα Agonists

    Neerupma Silswal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We sought to determine direct vascular effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα agonists using isolated mouse aortas and middle cerebral arteries (MCAs. The PPARα agonists GW7647, WY14643, and gemfibrozil acutely relaxed aortas held under isometric tension and dilated pressurized MCAs with the following order of potency: GW7647≫WY14643>gemfibrozil. Responses were endothelium-independent, and the use of PPARα deficient mice demonstrated that responses were also PPARα-independent. Pretreating arteries with high extracellular K+ attenuated PPARα agonist-mediated relaxations in the aorta, but not in the MCA. In the aorta, the ATP sensitive potassium (KATP channel blocker glibenclamide also impaired relaxations whereas the other K+ channel inhibitors, 4-aminopyridine and Iberiotoxin, had no effect. In aortas, GW7647 and WY14643 elevated cGMP levels by stimulating soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC, and inhibition of sGC with ODQ blunted relaxations to PPARα agonists. In the MCA, dilations were inhibited by the protein kinase C (PKC activator, phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, and also by ODQ. Our results demonstrated acute, nonreceptor-mediated relaxant effects of PPARα agonists on smooth muscle of mouse arteries. Responses to PPARα agonists in the aorta involved KATP channels and sGC, whereas in the MCA the PKC and sGC pathways also appeared to contribute to the response.

  5. Ligand binding and conformational changes of SUR1 subunit in pancreatic ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    Wu, Jing-Xiang; Ding, Dian; Wang, Mengmeng; Kang, Yunlu; Zeng, Xin; Chen, Lei

    2018-06-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K ATP ) are energy sensors on the plasma membrane. By sensing the intracellular ADP/ATP ratio of β-cells, pancreatic K ATP channels control insulin release and regulate metabolism at the whole body level. They are implicated in many metabolic disorders and diseases and are therefore important drug targets. Here, we present three structures of pancreatic K ATP channels solved by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), at resolutions ranging from 4.1 to 4.5 Å. These structures depict the binding site of the antidiabetic drug glibenclamide, indicate how Kir6.2 (inward-rectifying potassium channel 6.2) N-terminus participates in the coupling between the peripheral SUR1 (sulfonylurea receptor 1) subunit and the central Kir6.2 channel, reveal the binding mode of activating nucleotides, and suggest the mechanism of how Mg-ADP binding on nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) drives a conformational change of the SUR1 subunit.

  6. B16-BL6 melanoma cells release inhibitory factor(s) of active pump activity in isolated lymph vessels.

    Nakaya, K; Mizuno, R; Ohhashi, T

    2001-12-01

    We investigated whether supernatant cultured with melanoma cell lines B16-BL6 and K1735 or the Lewis lung carcinoma cell line (LLC) can regulate lymphatic pump activity with bioassay preparations isolated from murine iliac lymph vessels. B16-BL6 and LLC supernatants caused significant dilation of lymph microvessels with cessation of pump activity. B16-BL6 supernatant produced dose-related cessation of lymphatic pump activity. There was no significant tachyphylaxis in the supernatant-mediated inhibitory response of lymphatic pump activity. Pretreatment with 3 x 10(-5) M N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or 10(-7) M or 10(-6) M glibenclamide and 5 x 10(-4) M 5-hydroxydecanoic acid caused significant reduction of supernatant-mediated inhibitory responses. Simultaneous treatment with 10(-3) M L-arginine and 3 x 10(-5) M L-NAME significantly lessened L-NAME-induced inhibition of the supernatant-mediated response, suggesting that endogenous nitric oxide (NO) plays important roles in supernatant-mediated inhibitory responses. Chemical treatment dialyzed substances of B16-BL6 cells may release nonpeptide substance(s) of <1,000 MW, resulting in significant cessation of lymphatic pump activity via production and release of endogenous NO and activation of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+) channels.

  7. The effect of an insulin releasing agent, BTS 67582, on advanced glycation end product formation in vitro.

    Simpson, A E; Jones, R B

    1999-01-01

    BTS 67582 (1,1-dimethyl-2-(2-morpholinophenyl) guanidine fumarate) is an insulin-releasing agent currently in phase II clinical trials. Its effect on advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation was measured in the BSA/D-glucose and L-lysine/glucose-6-phosphate assay systems and Amadori product formation was measured in the BSA/D-glucose assay system, following a 3 week incubation period. In the BSA/D-glucose assay system, 200 mM BTS 67582 caused an approximate 70% inhibition in AGE formation (pBTS 67582 and 200 mM aminoguanidine-HCl retarded Amadori product formation by 88% (pBTS 67582 at 20 mM and 2 mM was shown to inhibit Amadori product formation by 67% and 57%, respectively, (pBTS 67582 and 200 mM aminoguanidine-HCl were shown to inhibit AGE formation by about 70% and 96% (p<0.001), respectively. Tolbutamide (200 microM) and glibenclamide (100 microM) had no significant effect on AGE formation.

  8. Antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic effects of ethanolic extract of leaves of Punica granatum in alloxan-induced non–insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus albino rats

    Das, Swarnamoni; Barman, Sarajita

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Punica granatum L., (Family: Punicaceae) is used in Indian Unani medicine for treatment of diabetes mellitus. Therefore, the present study was done to evaluate the antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic effects of ethanolic extract of leaves of P. granatum in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Healthy Wistar albino rats (100-150 g) were divided into four groups of six animals each. Groups A and B received normal saline [(10 ml/kg/day/per oral (p.o.)]; group C received ethanolic extract of leaves of P. granatum (500 mg/kg/p.o.); and group D received glibenclamide (0.5 mg/kg/day/p.o.). The extracts were given for 1 week in all groups. To induce diabetes, alloxan 150 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.) single dose was administered to groups B, C, and D. Blood glucose and serum lipids [Total Cholesterol (TC), Triglycerides (TG), Low Density Lipoproteins (LDL), and High Density Lipoproteins (HDL)] and the atherogenic index were estimated after one week. For mechanism of antidiabetic action glycogen estimation on the liver, cardiac and skeletal muscle, and intestinal glucose absorption was done. Results: Group B showed a significant (Pgranatum leaves possess significant antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic activity. PMID:22529479

  9. Effect of Consumption of Tribulus Terrestris on Serum Glucose and Lipid Levels in Diabetic Rats

    M Roghani

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The effect of Tribulus terrestris (TT on serum glucose and lipid levels was investigated in an experimental model of diabetes mellitus in rats. Methods: Female Wistar rats were divided into control, TT-treated control, diabetic, glibenclamide-treated, and TT-treated diabetic groups. For induction of diabetes, streptozotcin (STZ was administered (60 mg/Kg. Meanwhile, TT-treated groups received TT mixed with standard pelleted food at a weight ratio of 6.25% for 6 weeks. Serum glucose and lipid levels were determined before the study and at the 3rd and 4th week after the study. Results: Serum glucose was significantly lower in TT-treated diabetic rats at 3rd and 6th weeks as compared to untreated diabetics (p<0.01 and p<0.005, respectively. In addition, serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, and LDL-cholesterol showed a significant reduction in TT-treated diabetic rats as compared to untreated diabetics (p<0.05. On the other hand, HDL-cholesterol level did not change significantly in TT-treated diabetic group as compared to untreated diabetic group. Conclusions: Oral administration of TT has a significant hypoglycemic effect and in long term leads to appropriate changes in serum LDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels, but does not affect HDL-cholesterol levels in diabetic rats.

  10. Investigation into Hypoglycemic, Antihyperlipidemic, and Renoprotective Potentials of Dennettia tripetala (Pepper Fruit Seed in a Rat Model of Diabetes

    Innocent Anioke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the hypoglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, and renoprotective potentials of Dennettia tripetala (DT in a rat model of diabetes. The hypoglycemic activity in crude methanol seed extract of DT (CMEDT and methanol seed fraction of DT (MFDT measured by glucose oxidase method was increased by 47.37% and 28.72%, respectively, after 8 hours of administration. After 10 days of treatment, CMEDT and MFDT gave a good glycemic control with the highest percentage reduction of 75.82% and 71.34% in glucose level, respectively, which is closely compared with 79.91% in glibenclamide. Using the enzymatic assay and Friedewald’s equation, there was a significant reduction in serum level of total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL and a significant increase in high-density lipoprotein (HDL (p<0.05 following treatment with CMEDT and MFDT, when compared with the untreated group, although results varied in dosed groups, with high dose of MFDT showing a better lipid-lowering activity. High dose of MFDT improved lipid metabolism and increased percentage protection against atherogenesis by 44%. However, neither CMEDT nor MFDT ameliorated the renal biochemical alteration in urea and creatinine. Thus, the study demonstrates hypoglycemic and antihyperlipidemic potentials of DT seed in diabetes.

  11. Antinociceptive esters of N-methylanthranilic acid: Mechanism of action in heat-mediated pain.

    Pinheiro, Mariana Martins Gomes; Radulović, Niko S; Miltojević, Ana B; Boylan, Fabio; Dias Fernandes, Patrícia

    2014-03-15

    Recently, we identified a new natural antinociceptive alkaloid ternanthranin, isopropyl N-methylanthranilate (ISOAN), from the plant species Choisya ternata Kunth (Rutaceae). In this work we concentrated on the elucidation of its mechanism of action in comparison with two other esters of this acid (methyl (MAN) and propyl (PAN)). Mice orally pre-treated with ISOAN, MAN or PAN (at 0.3, 1 and 3mg/kg) were less sensitive to chemical or thermal stimuli in different nociception models (formalin-, capsaicin- and glutamate-induced licking response, tail flick and hot plate). All compounds (1 and 3mg/kg) showed significant activity in the peripheral nociception models, as well as a dose-dependent spinal antinociceptive effect in the tail flick model. We observed that glibenclamide was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of ISOAN in the hot plate model suggesting the involvement of K(+)ATP channels. The antinociceptive effect of MAN and PAN may be related to adrenergic, nitrergic and serotoninergic pathways. In addition, the antinociception of PAN was reverted by naloxone implying that the opioid pathway participates in its activity. The cholinergic and cannabinoid systems were found not be involved in the onset of the antinociceptive effects of any of the esters. In conclusion, isopropyl, methyl and propyl N-methylanthranilates produced significant peripheral and central antinociception at doses lower than that of morphine, the classical opioid analgesic drug, without causing toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Histomorphological and morphometric studies of the pancreatic islet cells of diabetic rats treated with aqueous extracts of Momordica charantia (karela fruits

    Mohammad Aftab Hossain

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect of aqueous extract of Momordica charantia (karela (M. charantia fruits on blood glucose level, pancreatic weight changes and histopathology of pancreatic changes in the streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats. Methods: Thirty-six albino rats were used in the experiment; diabetes mellitus was induced in 30 adult albino rats, using intraperitoneal injection of 55 mg/kg STZ. Six non diabetic rats remained as control (T1 . The diabetic rats were randomly assigned into five equal groups: diabetic control (T2 without any treatment, groups T3, T4, T5 and T6 were treated with aqueous extract of karela fruits daily at a doses of 250, 500 and 750 mg/kg and glibenclamide (5 mg/kg up to 90 d, respectively. At Day 90, all rats were sacrificed, the pancreases of the rats were excised and processed. Results: The results of this study indicate that aqueous extract of M. charantia fruits was able to reduce blood glucose level significantly compared with the diabetic control group (P<0.01. Histopathologically, STZ resulted severe necrotic changes in pancreatic islets. Tissues sections of pancreas in the treated groups showed regeneration of β cells and increased size of pancreatic islets. Conclusions: The present study suggests that oral feeding of M. charantia fruit juice has a significant anti-hyperglycemic effect and may have a role in the regeneration of the β cells in STZ diabetic rats.

  13. Two Cases of Allergy to Insulin in Gestational Diabetes

    Gi Jun Kim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Allergic reaction to insulin is uncommon since the introduction of human recombinant insulin preparations and is more rare in pregnant than non-pregnant females due to altered immune reaction during pregnancy. Herein, we report two cases of allergic reaction to insulin in gestational diabetes that were successfully managed. One case was a 33-year-old female using isophane-neutral protamine Hagedorn human insulin and insulin lispro. She experienced dyspnea, cough, urticaria and itching sensation at the sites of insulin injection immediately after insulin administration. We discontinued insulin therapy and started oral hypoglycemic agents with metformin and glibenclamide. The other case was a 32-year-old female using insulin lispro and insulin detemer. She experienced pruritus and burning sensation and multiple nodules at the sites of insulin injection. We changed the insulin from insulin lispro to insulin aspart. Assessments including immunoglobulin E (IgE, IgG, eosinophil, insulin antibody level and skin biopsy were performed. In the two cases, the symptoms were resolved after changing the insulin to oral agents or other insulin preparations. We report two cases of allergic reaction to human insulin in gestational diabetes due to its rarity.

  14. The protective effect of Na+/Ca2+ exchange blocker kb-r7943 on myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in hypercholesterolemic rat.

    Ren, Yongkui; Deng, Liju; Cai, Yunfei; Lv, Yan; Jia, Dalin

    2014-11-01

    KB-R7943 reduces lethal reperfusion injury under normal conditions, but its effectiveness under certain pathological states is in dispute. In the present study, we sought to determine the effect of KB-R7943 in hyperlipidemic animals and assess if the K ATP (+) are involved in the protective mechanisms. In group 1 (G1), isolated rat hearts underwent 25 min global ischemia (GI) and 120 min reperfusion (R). In group 2 (G2), G1 was repeated but the animals were subjected to a 1.5 % cholesterol-enriched diet during 6 weeks (hypercholesterolemic animals). In group 3 (G3), G2 was repeated but 1 μM KB-R7943 was added to the perfusate for 10 min from the start of reperfusion. In group 4 (G4), G3 was repeated, and glibenclamide (K ATP (+) , blocker, 0.3 μM) was administered. The infarct size was measured by triphenyltetrazolium. The infarct size was 35 ± 5.0 % in G1 and 46 ± 8.7 % in G2 (P KB-R7943 reduced the infarct size (28.6 ± 3.3 % in G3 vs. G2, P KB-R7943 attenuated apoptotic cell (G3 vs. G2, P KB-R7943. Thus, diet-induced hypercholesterolemia enhances myocardial injury; KB-R7943 reduces infarct size and apoptosis in hyperlipidemic animals through the activation of K(+)ATP channels.

  15. Affinin (Spilanthol, Isolated from Heliopsis longipes, Induces Vasodilation via Activation of Gasotransmitters and Prostacyclin Signaling Pathways

    Jesús Eduardo Castro-Ruiz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heliopsis longipes roots have been widely used in Mexican traditional medicine to relieve pain, mainly, toothaches. Previous studies have shown that affinin, the major alkamide of these roots, induces potent antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the effect of H. longipes root extracts and affinin on the cardiovascular system have not been investigated so far. In the present study, we demonstrated that the dichloromethane and ethanolic extracts of H. longipes roots, and affinin, isolated from these roots, produce a concentration-dependent vasodilation of rat aorta. Affinin-induced vasorelaxation was partly dependent on the presence of endothelium and was significantly blocked in the presence of inhibitors of NO, H2S, and CO synthesis (NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, dl-propargylglycine (PAG, and chromium mesoporphyrin (CrMP, respectively; K+ channel blockers (glibenclamide (Gli and tetraethyl ammonium (TEA, and guanylate cyclase and cyclooxygenase inhibitors (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ and indomethacin (INDO, respectively. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that affinin induces vasodilation by mechanisms that involve gasotransmitters, and prostacyclin signaling pathways. These findings indicate that this natural alkamide has therapeutic potential in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  16. Acute action of rotenone on excitability of catecholaminergic neurons in rostral ventrolateral medulla.

    Zhang, Zhaoqiang; Shi, Limin; Du, Xixun; Jiao, Qian; Jiang, Hong

    2017-09-01

    The degeneration of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) catecholaminergic neurons was responsible for some cardiovascular symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Our previous study had observed the impairment of these neurons in the early stage of PD in the rotenone-induced PD rat model, but the related mechanisms remain unclear. Rotenone is a mitochondrial inhibitor, influencing the neuronal electrophysiological activity through activation of K-ATP channels that potentially participate in cell death processes. In the present study, effects of rotenone on electrophysiological properties of RVLM catecholaminergic neurons and its underlying mechanisms were investigated. In coronal slices of brain containing the RVLM through patch clamp technique, rotenone (0.5μM) induced gradual postsynaptic inhibition on the spontaneous firing and cell membrane hyperpolarization with outward currents of catecholaminergic neurons. The electrophysiological changes were blocked by glibenclamide (30μM), a blocker of K-ATP channels, and were nearly unchanged by diazoxide (100μM), an opener of K-ATP channels. Our results also showed that effects of rotenone on catecholaminergic neurons including reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were prevented by pretreatment of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, 100μM), a scavenger of ROS. These suggest that rotenone-induced electrophysiological changes of RVLM catecholaminergic neurons are caused by the opening of K-ATP channels, which are partly related to ROS generation. The changes of K-ATP channels might account for the vulnerability of RVLM catecholaminergic neurons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The intercellular synchronization of Ca2+ oscillations evaluates Cx36-dependent coupling.

    Sabine Bavamian

    Full Text Available Connexin36 (Cx36 plays an important role in insulin secretion by controlling the intercellular synchronization of Ca(2+ transients induced during stimulation. The lack of drugs acting on Cx36 channels is a major limitation in further unraveling the molecular mechanism underlying this effect. To screen for such drugs, we have developed an assay allowing for a semi-automatic, fluorimetric quantification of Ca(2+ transients in large populations of MIN6 cells. Here, we show that (1 compared to control cells, MIN6 cells with reduced Cx36 expression or function showed decreased synchrony of glucose-induced Ca(2+ oscillations; (2 glibenclamide, a sulphonylurea which promotes Cx36 junctions and coupling, increased the number of synchronous MIN6 cells, whereas quinine, an antimalarial drug which inhibits Cx36-dependent coupling, decreased this proportion; (3 several drugs were identified that altered the intercellular Ca(2+ synchronization, cell coupling and distribution of Cx36; (4 some of them also affected insulin content. The data indicate that the intercellular synchronization of Ca(2+ oscillations provides a reliable and non-invasive measurement of Cx36-dependent coupling, which is useful to identify novel drugs affecting the function of β-cells, neurons, and neuron-related cells that express Cx36.

  18. Supraoptic oxytocin and vasopressin neurons function as glucose and metabolic sensors

    Song, Zhilin; Levin, Barry E.; Stevens, Wanida

    2014-01-01

    Neurons in the supraoptic nuclei (SON) produce oxytocin and vasopressin and express insulin receptors (InsR) and glucokinase. Since oxytocin is an anorexigenic agent and glucokinase and InsR are hallmarks of cells that function as glucose and/or metabolic sensors, we evaluated the effect of glucose, insulin, and their downstream effector ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels on calcium signaling in SON neurons and on oxytocin and vasopressin release from explants of the rat hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system. We also evaluated the effect of blocking glucokinase and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K; mediates insulin-induced mobilization of glucose transporter, GLUT4) on responses to glucose and insulin. Glucose and insulin increased intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). The responses were glucokinase and PI3K dependent, respectively. Insulin and glucose alone increased vasopressin release (P glucose in the presence of insulin. The oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (VP) responses to insulin+glucose were blocked by the glucokinase inhibitor alloxan (4 mM; P ≤ 0.002) and the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin (50 nM; OT: P = 0.03; VP: P ≤ 0.002). Inactivating KATP channels with 200 nM glibenclamide increased oxytocin and vasopressin release (OT: P neurons functioning as glucose and “metabolic” sensors to participate in appetite regulation. PMID:24477542

  19. In Vivo Hypoglycemic Effect of Kigelia africana (Lam): Studies With Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Mice.

    Njogu, Stephen M; Arika, Wycliffe M; Machocho, Alex K; Ngeranwa, Joseph J N; Njagi, Eliud N M

    2018-01-01

    The claims by the traditional herbal medicine practitioners that Kigelia africana has bioactivity against several diseases, including diabetes mellitus, were investigated in this study. Type I diabetes mellitus was induced in mice by intraperitoneal administration of alloxan monohydrate followed by treatment with the therapeutic doses of the aqueous and ethyl acetate leaf extract of K africana to the experimentally diabetic mice. The treatment effects were compared with the normal control, diabetic control, and diabetic control rats treated with a standard antidiabetic drugs (insulin administered intraperitoneally at 1 IU/kg body weight in 0.1 mL physiological saline or glibenclamide administered orally at 3 mg/kg body weight in 0.1 mL physiological saline). Phytochemical composition of the leaf extract was assessed using standard procedures and mineral elements assessed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry and total reflection X-ray fluorescence system. Oral and intraperitoneal administration of the aqueous and ethyl acetate leaf extract caused a statistically significant dose-independent reduction in plasma glucose level in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. The observed hypoglycemic activity of this plant extract could be attributed to the observed phytochemicals and trace elements, which have been associated with exhibiting antidiabetic properties. Therefore, the data appear to support the hypoglycemic effects of K africana validating its folkloric usage.

  20. Effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Rhus coriaria seed on glucose and insulin related biomarkers, lipid profile, and hepatic enzymes in nicotinamide-streptozotocin-induced type II diabetic male mice.

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Heidari, Hamid; Junghani, Majid Salehizade; Absari, Reza; Khoogar, Mehdi; Ghaedi, Ehsan

    2017-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes often leads to dislipidemia and abnormal activity of hepatic enzymes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic properties of Rhus coriaria ( R. coriaria ) seed extrac on nicotinamide-streptozotocin induced type 2 diabetic mice. In this experimental study, 56 male Naval Medical Research Institute mice (30-35 g) were randomly separated into seven groups: control, diabetic group, diabetic mice treated with glibenclamide (0.25 mg/kg, as standard antidiabetic drug) or R. coriaria seed extract in doses of 200 and 300 mg/kg, and control groups received these two doses of extract orally for 28 days. Induction of diabetes was done by intraperitoneal injection of nicotinamide and streptozotocin. Ultimately, body weight of mice, blood levels of glucose, insulin, hepatic enzymes, leptin, and lipid profile were assayed. After induction of type 2 diabetes, level of glucose, cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase increased and level of insulin and high density lipoprotein decreased remarkably. Administration of both doses of extract decreased level of glucose and cholesterol significantly in diabetic mice. LDL level decreased in treated group with dose of 300 mg/kg of the extract. Although usage of the extract improved level of other lipid profiles, insulin and hepatic enzymes, changes weren't significant. This study showed R. coriaria seeds administration has a favorable effect in controlling some blood parameters in type 2 diabetes. Therefore it may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetes.

  1. Assessment of antidiabetic activity and acute toxicity of leaf extracts from Physalis peruviana L. in guinea-pig

    Kasali, Félicien Mushagalusa; Kadima, Justin Ntokamunda; Mpiana, Pius Tshimankinda; Ngbolua, Koto-te-Nyiwa; Tshibangu, Damien Sha-Tshibey

    2013-01-01

    Objective To verify the antidiabetic activity of leaf extracts from Physalis peruviana L. popularly used in the Eastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and to point out the possible toxicity. Method Aqueous decoctions prepared from dried leaves powder were administrated to guinea pigs at the dose range of 100 mg/kg to 3.2 g/kg of body weight. The hypoglycemic activity was evaluated by glucose tolerance test, loading animals with glucose 4 g/kg and measuring blood glucose concentrations at various times. The effect was compared to the control and glibenclamide as antidiabetic reference drug. Acute toxicity was evaluated by recording mortality rate, changes on blood biomarkers and damage caused to vital organs. Results At a dose of 100 mg/kg, the aqueous extract induced a significant reduction of peak concentration at 30 min after glucose loading as compared with control or reference (PPhysalis peruviana L. present hypoglycemic activity in animal model, but at high doses the plant may cause severe intoxication.

  2. Efficacy and safety of hydroxychloroquine in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a double blind, randomized comparison with pioglitazone.

    Pareek, Anil; Chandurkar, Nitin; Thomas, Nihal; Viswanathan, Vijay; Deshpande, Alaka; Gupta, O P; Shah, Asha; Kakrani, Arjun; Bhandari, Sudhir; Thulasidharan, N K; Saboo, Banshi; Devaramani, Shashidhar; Vijaykumar, N B; Sharma, Shrikant; Agrawal, Navneet; Mahesh, M; Kothari, Kunal

    2014-07-01

    To compare efficacy and safety of hydroxychloroquine with pioglitazone in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This double-blind study randomized 267 uncontrolled type 2 diabetes patients (HbA1c ≥7.5% and ≤11.5%), post 3 months' treatment with glimepiride/gliclazide and metformin, to additionally receive hydroxychloroquine 400 mg/day (n = 135) or pioglitazone 15 mg/day (n = 132) for 24 weeks. Efficacy was assessed by changes in HbA1c, fasting (FBG) and post-prandial (PPG) blood glucose at Week 12 and Week 24. At Week 12 and Week 24, HbA1c, FBG and PPG significantly reduced from baseline in both groups. Mean reduction in glycemic parameters at Week 12 (HbA1c: -0.56% vs -0.72%, p = 0.394; FBG: -0.99 mmol/L vs -1.05 mmol/L, p = 0.878; PPG: -1.93 mmol/L vs -1.52 mmol/L, p = 0.423) and Week 24 (HbA1c: -0.87% vs -0.90%, p = 0.909; FBG: -0.79 mmol/L vs -1.02 mmol/L, p = 0.648; PPG: -1.77 mmol/L vs -1.36 mmol/L, p = 0.415) was not significantly different between the hydroxychloroquine and pioglitazone groups. Change in total cholesterol (TC) and LDL-C was significant in favor of hydroxychloroquine (TC: -0.37 mmol/L vs 0.03 mmol/L, p = 0.002; LDL-C: -0.23 mmol/L vs 0.09 mmol/L, p = 0.003). Triglycerides significantly reduced in both groups at Week 24. Mean HDL-C remained unchanged. Study treatments were well tolerated. With favorable effects on glycemic parameters and lipids, hydroxychloroquine may emerge as well tolerated therapeutic option for T2DM. The sample size for this study was small. However, based on the encouraging results of this proof-of-concept study, longer duration studies in larger population can be conducted to further confirm these findings. TRIAL REGISTRATION DETAILS: Clinical Trial Registry-India URL: http://ctri.nic.in, Registration Number: CTRI/2009/091/001036.

  3. Insulin secretagogues for prevention or delay of type 2 diabetes mellitus and its associated complications in persons at increased risk for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Hemmingsen, Bianca; Sonne, David Peick; Metzendorf, Maria-Inti; Richter, Bernd

    2016-10-17

    -analysed. We assessed the overall quality of the evidence by using the GRADE instrument. We included six RCTs with 10,018 participants; 4791 participants with data on allocation to intervention groups were randomised to a second- or third-generation sulphonylurea or a meglitinide analogue as monotherapy and 29 participants were randomised to a second-generation sulphonylurea plus metformin. Three trials investigated a second-generation sulphonylurea, two trials investigated a third-generation sulphonylurea and one trial a meglitinide analogue. A total of 4873 participants with data on allocation to control groups were randomised to a comparator group; 4820 participants were randomised to placebo, 23 to diet and exercise, and 30 participants to metformin monotherapy. One RCT of nateglinide contributed 95% of all participants. The duration of the intervention varied from six months to five years. We judged none of the included trials as at low risk of bias for all 'Risk of bias' domains.All-cause and cardiovascular mortality following sulphonylurea (glimepiride) treatment were rarely observed (very low-quality evidence). The RR for incidence of T2DM comparing glimepiride monotherapy with placebo was 0.75; 95% CI 0.54 to 1.04; P = 0.08; 2 trials; 307 participants; very low-quality evidence. One of the trials reporting on the incidence of T2DM did not define the diagnostic criteria used. The other trial diagnosed T2DM as two consecutive fasting blood glucose values ≥ 6.1 mmol/L. TSA showed that only 4.5% of the diversity-adjusted required information size was accrued so far. No trial reported data on serious adverse events, non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), non-fatal stroke, congestive heart failure (HF), health-related quality of life or socioeconomic effects.One trial with a follow-up of five years compared a meglitinide analogue (nateglinide) with placebo. A total of 310/4645 (6.7%) participants allocated to nateglinide died compared with 312/4661 (6.7%) participants

  4. Survey on the availability, price and affordability of selected essential medicines for non-communicable diseases in community pharmacies of Kathmandu valley.

    Shrestha, Rajeev; Ghale, Anish; Chapagain, Bijay Raj; Gyawali, Mahasagar; Acharya, Trishna

    2017-01-01

    The access to essential medicines for non-communicable disease treatment is unacceptably low worldwide. The fundamental right to health cannot be fulfilled without equitable access to essential medicines. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 94 community pharmacies of Kathmandu valley. Non-probability quota sampling method was adopted for the purpose. Village Development Committees with more than 5000 populations were included in the study. The availability of the selected essential medicines, their price and producer identity were observed. Data entry and analysis were carried out in Microsoft Excel and Statistical package for social science. The availability of the essential medicines was not 100% in Kathmandu valley. High competition and high price variation were seen in metformin 500 mg (254.6%) and atorvastatin 10 mg (327.6%). The study showed that maximum (54.7%) brands were manufactured in Nepal. Furthermore, atorvastatin 10 mg (0.6 day wage) was found to be quite expensive, and glibenclamide 5 mg (0.1 day wage) was the cheapest one for diabetes mellitus treatment for 1 month of treatment period compared to daily wages of other essential medicines. The availability of the selected essential medicines was found to be ununiform and insufficient in the entire region. High competition was observed in the products with high price variation, and the access to cost-effective brand was poor. Furthermore, it was found that government salary is affordable to treat non-communicable disease with the help of the essential medicines.

  5. Effect of Indian herbal hypoglycemic agents on antioxidant capacity and trace elements content in diabetic rats.

    Chandra, Anu; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Singh, Raj Kumar; Mahdi, Farzana; Chander, Ramesh

    2008-09-01

    In the present investigation we report the protective potential of some herbal hypoglycemic agents on antioxidant status and levels of metal ions in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Furthermore, in vitro antioxidant activity of the herbs was also evaluated. Induction of diabetes mellitus in rats caused an increase in blood lipid peroxide levels that was associated with the reduced activity of red blood cell (RBC) antioxidant enzymes--namely, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase--along with depletion of plasma reduced glutathione (GSH) and copper, zinc, iron, magnesium, and selenium levels. Oral treatment of diabetic rats with Allium sativum, Azadirachta indica, Momordica charantia, and Ocimum sanctum extracts (500 mg/kg of body weight) not only lowered the blood glucose level but also inhibited the formation of lipid peroxides, reactivated the antioxidant enzymes, and restored levels of GSH and metals in the above-mentioned model. The herbal extracts (50-500 microg) inhibited the generation of superoxide anions (O(2)(-.)) in both enzymatic and nonenzymatic in vitro systems. These preparations also inhibited the ferrous-sodium ascorbate-induced formation of lipid peroxides in RBCs. The in vivo and in vitro protective effects of the above-mentioned herbal drugs were also compared with that of glibenclamide. On the basis of our results, we conclude that the above-mentioned herbal plants not only possess hypoglycemic properties, but they also decrease oxidative load in diabetes mellitus. Therefore, we propose that long-term use of such agents might help in the prevention of diabetes-associated complications. However, the extrapolation of these results to humans needs further in-depth study.

  6. Age-related mitochondrial DNA depletion and the impact on pancreatic Beta cell function.

    Nile, Donna L; Brown, Audrey E; Kumaheri, Meutia A; Blair, Helen R; Heggie, Alison; Miwa, Satomi; Cree, Lynsey M; Payne, Brendan; Chinnery, Patrick F; Brown, Louise; Gunn, David A; Walker, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterised by an age-related decline in insulin secretion. We previously identified a 50% age-related decline in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in isolated human islets. The purpose of this study was to mimic this degree of mtDNA depletion in MIN6 cells to determine whether there is a direct impact on insulin secretion. Transcriptional silencing of mitochondrial transcription factor A, TFAM, decreased mtDNA levels by 40% in MIN6 cells. This level of mtDNA depletion significantly decreased mtDNA gene transcription and translation, resulting in reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity and ATP production. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was impaired following partial mtDNA depletion, but was normalised following treatment with glibenclamide. This confirms that the deficit in the insulin secretory pathway precedes K+ channel closure, indicating that the impact of mtDNA depletion is at the level of mitochondrial respiration. In conclusion, partial mtDNA depletion to a degree comparable to that seen in aged human islets impaired mitochondrial function and directly decreased insulin secretion. Using our model of partial mtDNA depletion following targeted gene silencing of TFAM, we have managed to mimic the degree of mtDNA depletion observed in aged human islets, and have shown how this correlates with impaired insulin secretion. We therefore predict that the age-related mtDNA depletion in human islets is not simply a biomarker of the aging process, but will contribute to the age-related risk of type 2 diabetes.

  7. Phytochemical composition and antinociceptive activity of Bauhinia glauca subsp. hupehana in rats.

    Xu, Jinlong; Zhao, Qizhi; Wei, Lei; Yang, Yu; Xu, Rui; Yu, Nengjiang; Zhao, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    In traditional medicine, Bauhinia glauca subsp. hupehana has long been used as an analgesic agent in China. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of the ethanol extract of the aerial parts of B. glauca subsp. hupehana (BHE) in rats and its chemical fingerprint. The antinociceptive activity of BHE was assessed in mice using chemically and heat-induced pain models, such as the acetic acid-induced writhing, hot plate, tail-flick and glutamate tests. Naltrexone hydrochloride, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, was utilized to determine the involvement of the opioid system. In addition to this, the involvements of the cGMP and ATP-sensitive K+ channel pathways were also detected using methylene blue and glibenclamide. The oral administration of BHE (at doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) produced significant and dose-related inhibitions in both the chemically and heat-induced pain models. Interestingly, in the abdominal constriction test, when the dose of BHE was increased to 800 mg/kg (p.o., n = 10), the inhibition rate was 100%. The antinociceptive mechanism may involve the cGMP pathway and ATP sensitive K+ channel pathway. The central antinociceptive effect was not antagonized by naltrexone. One phenolic acid, one lignin and five flavonoids were isolated from BHE. The antinociceptive activity of BHE was most likely due to the presence of the flavonoids. The acute toxicity results showed that BHE was safe at a high dose (2 g/kg, p.o.). The current investigation demonstrates that B. glauca subsp. hupehana is a potential candidate for the development of novel, non-opioid, analgesic phytomedicines.

  8. Hypoglycemic activity of dried extracts of Bauhinia forficata Link.

    da Cunha, A M; Menon, S; Menon, R; Couto, A G; Bürger, C; Biavatti, M W

    2010-01-01

    Leaves of the pantropical genus Bauhinia (Fabaceae) are known popularly as cow's foot, due to their unique characteristic bilobed aspect. The species Bauhinia forficata (Brazilian Orchid-tree) is widely used in folk medicine as an antidiabetic. The present work investigates the hypoglycemic activity of the dried extracts of Bauhinia forficata leaves in vivo, as well as the influence of the drying and granulation processes on this activity. The fluid extract was dried to generate oven-dried (ODE), spray-dried (SDE) and wet granulation (WGE) extracts, with the aid of colloidal silicon dioxide and/or cellulose:lactose mixture. The dried extracts were characterized by spectrophotometric, chromatographic and photo microscopy image analysis. 200 mg/kg body wt., p.o. of each dried product were administered orally to male Wistar rats over 7 days old, for biomonitoring of the hypoglycemic activity profile. The effect of the extracts was studied in STZ-induced diabetic rats. After 7 days of treatment, fasting glucose was determined, and the livers were removed, dried on tissue paper, weighed, and stored at -20 degrees C to estimate hepatic glycogen. Our results show that spray-drying or oven-drying processes applied to B. forficata extracts did not significantly alter its flavonoid profile or its hypoglycemic activity. Indeed, the dried extracts of B. forficata act differently from glibenclamide. Despite the lower active content in WGE, because of the higher concentration of adjuvants, the use of the granulation process improved the manufacturing properties of the ODE, making this material more appropriate for use in tablets or capsules.

  9. Validation of an LC-MS/MS method for analysis of anti-diabetic drugs in botanical dietary supplements labeled for blood sugar management.

    Ma, Jun; Pawar, Rahul S; Grundel, Erich

    2018-03-01

    We developed and validated a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to detect and quantitate 14 anti-diabetic, 2 anti-obesity, and 3 cholesterol-lowering drugs in botanical dietary supplements marketed for blood sugar management. Many botanical dietary supplements which carry label statements related to blood sugar management are available over the Internet. Potential adulteration of such dietary supplements with anti-diabetic and other prescription drugs, some of which have been removed from the market due to adverse events, is of concern. No significant matrix effects were observed and mean recoveries of all 19 analytes from a single product matrix were 88 to 113% at spiking concentrations from 500 to 2000 μg/g. Mean recoveries of metformin, phenformin, and sibutramine from matrices prepared from multiple product composites ranged from 93 to 115% at a spiking concentration of 100 μg/g. The relative standard deviations (RSD) (%) of intra-day analyses ranged from 0.2 to 13 for all recovery studies. Eighty dietary supplements obtained in the USA and carrying label statements related to blood sugar management were analyzed using this method and none were found to be adulterated with the above 19 drugs. Two products obtained outside of the USA and known to be adulterated were also analyzed by this method and found to contain phenformin, glibenclamide, and sibutramine. This method provided satisfactory selectivity, linearity, accuracy, precision, and sensitivity for rapid determination of 19 drugs and has broad applicability for the analysis of dietary supplements for possible adulteration with these compounds. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. The Effect of Alcohol Administration on the Corpus Cavernosum

    See Min Choi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We studied the effects of alcohol administration on the corpus cavernosum (CC using an animal model. Materials and Methods: CC sections and the aortic ring of rabbits were used in an organ bath study. After acute alcohol administration, changes in blood alcohol concentration and electrical stimulation induced intracavernosal pressure/mean arterial pressure (ICP/MAP percentage were compared in rats. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP levels in the CC were measured using immunoassays. After chronic alcohol administration, ICP/MAP percentage, cAMP and cGMP were compared in rats. Histological changes were examined using the Masson trichrome stain and the Sircol collagen assay. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS expression was examined using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Results: Alcohol relaxed the CC in a dose-dependent manner, and the relaxation response was suppressed when pretreated with propranolol, indomethacin, glibenclamide, and 4-aminopyridine. In rats with acute alcohol exposure, the cAMP level in the CC was significantly greater than was observed in the control group (p<0.05. In rats with chronic alcohol exposure, however, changes in cAMP and cGMP levels were insignificant, and the CC showed markedly smaller areas of smooth muscle, greater amounts of dense collagen (p<0.05. Immunohistochemical analysis of eNOS showed a less intense response, and western blotting showed that eNOS expression was significantly lower in this group (p<0.05. Conclusions: Acute alcohol administration activated the cAMP pathway with positive effects on erectile function. In contrast, chronic alcohol administration changed the ultrastructures of the CC and suppressed eNOS expression, thereby leading to erectile dysfunction.

  11. Single K ATP channel opening in response to action potential firing in mouse dentate granule neurons.

    Tanner, Geoffrey R; Lutas, Andrew; Martínez-François, Juan Ramón; Yellen, Gary

    2011-06-08

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP) channels) are important sensors of cellular metabolic state that link metabolism and excitability in neuroendocrine cells, but their role in nonglucosensing central neurons is less well understood. To examine a possible role for K(ATP) channels in modulating excitability in hippocampal circuits, we recorded the activity of single K(ATP) channels in cell-attached patches of granule cells in the mouse dentate gyrus during bursts of action potentials generated by antidromic stimulation of the mossy fibers. Ensemble averages of the open probability (p(open)) of single K(ATP) channels over repeated trials of stimulated spike activity showed a transient increase in p(open) in response to action potential firing. Channel currents were identified as K(ATP) channels through blockade with glibenclamide and by comparison with recordings from Kir6.2 knock-out mice. The transient elevation in K(ATP) p(open) may arise from submembrane ATP depletion by the Na(+)-K(+) ATPase, as the pump blocker strophanthidin reduced the magnitude of the elevation. Both the steady-state and stimulus-elevated p(open) of the recorded channels were higher in the presence of the ketone body R-β-hydroxybutyrate, consistent with earlier findings that ketone bodies can affect K(ATP) activity. Using perforated-patch recording, we also found that K(ATP) channels contribute to the slow afterhyperpolarization following an evoked burst of action potentials. We propose that activity-dependent opening of K(ATP) channels may help granule cells act as a seizure gate in the hippocampus and that ketone-body-mediated augmentation of the activity-dependent opening could in part explain the effect of the ketogenic diet in reducing epileptic seizures.

  12. In-vivo study for anti-hyperglycemic potential of aqueous extract of Basil seeds (Ocimum basilicum Linn) and its influence on biochemical parameters, serum electrolytes and haematological indices.

    Chaudhary, Sachin; Semwal, Amit; Kumar, Hitesh; Verma, Harish Chandra; Kumar, Amit

    2016-12-01

    The study introduced anti-hyperglycemic influence of aqueous extract of Ocimum basilicum seeds (AEOBS) in Streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats and estimating its potential to ameliorate altered level of biochemical parameters, serum electrolytes level and haematological indices along with its effect on body weight of treated rats. The albino rats were selected to observe oral glucose tolerance test by oral intake of aq. glucose solution (4g/kg, body weight) in normal rats and estimation of blood glucose level after administration of AEOBS at 250mg/kg, 500mg/kg and standard drug glibenclamide at 0.6mg/kg, body weight. Antidiabetic activity was evaluated in chronic study models by STZ induced diabetes in rats followed by blood glucose estimation. Chronic study model was selected to carry out further studies to evaluate the effect of AEOBS at 250mg/kg, 500mg/kg and standard drug on body weight, alterations in biochemical parameters including AST, ALT, ALP, total bilirubin and total protein, alterations in serum electrolytes like Na + , K + , Cl - , HCO 3 - along with estimation of haematological indices like red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), hemoglobin (Hb), lymphocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, monocytes and basophils. AEOBS significantly reduced the blood glucose level of diabetic rats at both doses. Body weight was also improved significantly. Similarly, the levels of biochemical parameters, serum electrolytes, and haematological indices were significantly ameliorated at both doses of AEOBS. The histopathological results revealed reconstitution of pancreatic islets towards normal cellular architecture in rats treated with AEOBS. The results illustrated that AEOBS have eminent antidiabetic potential in STZ effectuated diabetes in rats and can be extensively used for the treatment of diabetes mellitus-II and its associated complications including anaemia, diabetic nephropathy, liver dysfunction, and immunosuppression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  13. Gestational diabetes mellitus: Non-insulin management

    Navneet Magon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM complicates a substantial number of pregnancies. There is consensus that in patients of GDM, excellent blood glucose control, with diet and, when necessary, oral hypoglycemics and insulin results in improved perinatal outcomes, and appreciably reduces the probability of serious neonatal morbidity compared with routine prenatal care. Goals of metabolic management of a pregnancy complicated with GDM have to balance the needs of a healthy pregnancy with the requirements to control glucose level. Medical nutrition therapy is the cornerstone of therapy for women with GDM. Surveillance with daily self-monitoring of blood glucose has been found to help guide management in a much better way than blood glucose checking in labs and clinics, which tends to be less frequent. Historically, insulin has been the therapeutic agent of choice for controlling hyperglycemia in pregnant women. However, difficulty in medication administration with multiple daily injections, potential for hypoglycemia, and increase in appetite and weight make this therapeutic option cumbersome for many pregnant patients. Use of oral hypogycemic agents (OHAs in pregnancy has opened new vistas for GDM management. At present, there is a growing acceptance of glyburide (glibenclamide use as the primary therapy for GDM. Glyburide and metformin have been found to be safe, effective and economical for the treatment of gestational diabetes. Insulin, however, still has an important role to play in GDM. GDM is a window of opportunity, which needs to be seized, for prevention of diabetes in future life. Goal of our educational programs should be not only to improve pregnancy outcomes but also to promote healthy lifestyle changes for the mother that will last long after delivery. Team effort on part of obstetricians and endocrinologists is required to make " the diabetes capital of the world" into " the diabetes care capital of the world".

  14. Diabetes Drug Prescription Pattern and Awareness Among Health Care Providers in Sub-Himalayan Region of India: A Population Based Study.

    Mokta, Jatinder; Mokta, Kiran; Ranjan, Asha; Joshi, Ivan; Garg, Mahak

    2017-05-01

    To determine the pattern of diabetic drug prescription and awareness about diabetes among primary health providers in the rural areas of Himachal Pradesh situated in the western Himalayas at an elevation range from 350 meters (1,148ft) to 6900 meters (22,966ft) above sea level. Study was conducted in 20 rural areas of Himachal Pradesh, located 50 to 400 Km from state capital, at 2200 to 10,000 feet altitude. Non-pregnant diabetic adults were surveyed through 31 diabetic camps. Detailed history, weight, height, waist circumference, body mass index recorded. Fasting or random blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin, lipid profile measured and blood pressure recorded. 894 diabetic patients were included in the study (59.83% male) with the mean age of 52.94±6.78 years. Two in three patients were on oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs), and one in three on alternative approaches for diabetes control. Among OHAs, sulphonylureas (SU) were the most commonly prescribed oral agents in 76.09% of patients followed by metformin in 23.87%. Glibenclamide was the most commonly prescribed SU in 44.60%. Amlodipine and atenolol was the commonest anti-hypertensive drug prescribed in 77.85% either in combination or as individual drug. Only 10.59% were on lipid lowering therapy. For primary care providers glycemic target was the mainstay of diabetes treatment with little emphasis on blood pressure control and no emphasis on lipid reduction. Sulphonylureas were the commonest anti-diabetic drug prescribed by the primary care providers followed by metformin. Insulin was prescribed to 2.23% only. Combination of amlodipine and atenolol was the commonest anti-hypertensive drugs prescribed and only 10% of patients were prescribed statin.

  15. Cajaninstilbene acid relaxes rat renal arteries: roles of Ca2+ antagonism and protein kinase C-dependent mechanism.

    Dong-Mei Zhang

    Full Text Available Cajaninstilbene acid (CSA is a major active component present in the leaves of Cajanus cajan (L. Millsp. The present study explores the underlying cellular mechanisms for CSA-induced relaxation in rat renal arteries. Vascular reactivity was examined in arterial rings that were suspended in a Multi Myograph System and the expression of signaling proteins was assessed by Western blotting method. CSA (0.1-10 µM produced relaxations in rings pre-contracted by phenylephrine, serotonin, 9, 11-dideoxy-9α, 11α-epoxymethanoprostaglandin F(2α (U46619, and 60 mM KCl. CSA-induced relaxations did not show difference between genders and were unaffected by endothelium denudation, nor by treatment with N(G-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, indomethacin, ICI-182780, tetraethylammonium ion, BaCl(2, glibenclamide, 4-aminopyridine or propranolol. CSA reduced contraction induced by CaCl(2 (0.01-5 mM in Ca(2+-free 60 mM KCl solution and by 30 nM (--Bay K8644 in 15 mM KCl solution. CSA inhibited 60 mM KCl-induced Ca(2+ influx in smooth muscle of renal arteries. In addition, CSA inhibited contraction evoked by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, protein kinase C agonist in Ca(2+-free Krebs solution. Moreover, CSA reduced the U46619- and PMA-induced phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC at Ser19 and myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1 at Thr853 which was associated with vasoconstriction. CSA also lowered the phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKCδ at Thr505. In summary, the present results suggest that CSA relaxes renal arteries in vitro via multiple cellular mechanisms involving partial inhibition of calcium entry via nifedipine-sensitive calcium channels, protein kinase C and Rho kinase.

  16. Regulation of Substantia Nigra Pars Reticulata GABAergic Neuron Activity by H2O2 via Flufenamic Acid-Sensitive Channels and KATP Channels

    Lee, Christian R.; Witkovsky, Paul; Rice, Margaret E.

    2011-01-01

    Substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) GABAergic neurons are key output neurons of the basal ganglia. Given the role of these neurons in motor control, it is important to understand factors that regulate their firing rate and pattern. One potential regulator is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a reactive oxygen species that is increasingly recognized as a neuromodulator. We used whole-cell current clamp recordings of SNr GABAergic neurons in guinea-pig midbrain slices to determine how H2O2 affects the activity of these neurons and to explore the classes of ion channels underlying those effects. Elevation of H2O2 levels caused an increase in the spontaneous firing rate of SNr GABAergic neurons, whether by application of exogenous H2O2 or amplification of endogenous H2O2 through inhibition of glutathione peroxidase with mercaptosuccinate. This effect was reversed by flufenamic acid (FFA), implicating transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Conversely, depletion of endogenous H2O2 by catalase, a peroxidase enzyme, decreased spontaneous firing rate and firing precision of SNr neurons, demonstrating tonic control of firing rate by H2O2. Elevation of H2O2 in the presence of FFA revealed an inhibition of tonic firing that was prevented by blockade of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels with glibenclamide. In contrast to guinea-pig SNr neurons, the dominant effect of H2O2 elevation in mouse SNr GABAergic neurons was hyperpolarization, indicating a species difference in H2O2-dependent regulation. Thus, H2O2 is an endogenous modulator of SNr GABAergic neurons, acting primarily through presumed TRP channels in guinea-pig SNr, with additional modulation via KATP channels to regulate SNr output. PMID:21503158

  17. The role of K –ATP channel in the preconditioning effect of magnesium in the rat isolated heart

    Bazargan M.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest for beneficial effect of Mg in the cardiovascular disorders. A number of cardiovascular disorders including myocardial infarction, arrhythmias and congestive heart failure have been associated with low extracellular or intracellular concentrations of Mg. The aim of present study was to investigate the preconditioning effects of magnesium (Mg on cardiac function and infarct size in the globally ischemic-reperfusion in isolated rat heart. Rat hearts were Langendorff-perfused, subjected to 30 minutes of global ischemia and 90 minutes of reperfusion, and assigned to one of the following treatment groups with 7 hearts in each group: (1 control, (2 ischemic- reperfusion, (IR, (3 ischemic preconditioning, (IPC of 5 minutes of global ischemia - reperfusion before lethal ischemia; or pretreatment with (4 30 µmol/L of Diazoxide (Dia, (5 8 mmol/L magnesium, (6 10 µmol/L glibenclamid (Gli, (7 magnesium and Dia and (8 magnesium and Gli. Infarct size was measured by the triphenyltetrazolium chloride method. Left ventricular function was assessed by left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP, heart rate and coronary flow (CF. Mg limited infarct size (9.76 % vs 44.47% in IR, P< 0.001 as did Dia (10.2 % vs 44.4 % in IR P< 0.001 and IPC (8.69 % vs 44.47% in IR, P< 0.001. The protective effect of magnesium was abolished by Gli. Administration of Mg had an anti-infarct effect in ischemic-reperfusion isolated rat hearts and improved cardiac function. Blockade of K-ATP channel abolished the protective effects of magnesium and suggest that K-ATP channel has an important role in this effects.

  18. Participation of the NO/cGMP/K+ATP pathway in the antinociception induced by Walker tumor bearing in rats

    Barbosa, A.L.R.; Pinheiro, C.A.; Oliveira, G.J.; Torres, J.N.L.; Moraes, M.O.; Ribeiro, R.A.; Vale, M.L.; Souza, M.H.L.P.

    2012-01-01

    Implantation of Walker 256 tumor decreases acute systemic inflammation in rats. Inflammatory hyperalgesia is one of the most important events of acute inflammation. The L-arginine/NO/cGMP/K + ATP pathway has been proposed as the mechanism of peripheral antinociception mediated by several drugs and physical exercise. The objective of this study was to investigate a possible involvement of the NO/cGMP/K + ATP pathway in antinociception induced in Walker 256 tumor-bearing male Wistar rats (180-220 g). The groups consisted of 5-6 animals. Mechanical inflammatory hypernociception was evaluated using an electronic version of the von Frey test. Walker tumor (4th and 7th day post-implantation) reduced prostaglandin E 2 - (PGE 2 , 400 ng/paw; 50 µL; intraplantar injection) and carrageenan-induced hypernociception (500 µg/paw; 100 µL; intraplantar injection). Walker tumor-induced analgesia was reversed (99.3% for carrageenan and 77.2% for PGE 2 ) by a selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (L-NAME; 90 mg/kg, ip) and L-arginine (200 mg/kg, ip), which prevented (80% for carrageenan and 65% for PGE 2 ) the effect of L-NAME. Treatment with the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ (100% for carrageenan and 95% for PGE 2 ; 8 µg/paw) and the ATP-sensitive K + channel (KATP) blocker glibenclamide (87.5% for carrageenan and 100% for PGE 2 ; 160 µg/paw) reversed the antinociceptive effect of tumor bearing in a statistically significant manner (P < 0.05). The present study confirmed an intrinsic peripheral antinociceptive effect of Walker tumor bearing in rats. This antinociceptive effect seemed to be mediated by activation of the NO/cGMP pathway followed by the opening of KATP channels

  19. Sarcolemmal cardiac K(ATP) channels as a target for the cardioprotective effects of the fluorine-containing pinacidil analogue, flocalin.

    Voitychuk, Oleg I; Strutynskyi, Ruslan B; Yagupolskii, Lev M; Tinker, Andrew; Moibenko, Olexiy O; Shuba, Yaroslav M

    2011-02-01

    A class of drugs known as K(ATP) -channel openers induce cardioprotection. This study examined the effects of the novel K(ATP) -channel opener, the fluorine-containing pinacidil derivative, flocalin, on cardiac-specific K(ATP) -channels, excitability of native cardiac myocytes and on the ischaemic heart. The action of flocalin was investigated on: (i) membrane currents through cardiac-specific K(ATP) -channels (I(KATP) ) formed by K(IR) 6.2/SUR2A heterologously expressed in HEK-293 cells (HEK-293(₆.₂/₂A) ); (ii) excitability and intracellular Ca²(+) ([Ca²(+) ](i) ) transients of cultured rat neonatal cardiac myocytes; and (iii) functional and ultrastructural characteristics of isolated guinea-pig hearts subjected to ischaemia-reperfusion. Flocalin concentration-dependently activated a glibenclamide-sensitive I(KATP) in HEK-293(₆.₂/₂A) cells with an EC₅₀= 8.1 ± 0.4 µM. In cardiac myocytes, flocalin (5 µM) hyperpolarized resting potential by 3-5 mV, markedly shortened action potential duration, reduced the amplitude of [Ca²(+) ](i) transients by 2-3-fold and suppressed contraction. The magnitude and extent of reversibility of these effects depended on the type of cardiac myocytes. In isolated hearts, perfusion with 5 µmol·L⁻¹ flocalin, before inducing ischaemia, facilitated restoration of contraction during reperfusion, decreased the number of extrasystoles, prevented the appearance of coronary vasoconstriction and reduced damage to the cardiac tissue at the ultrastructural level (state of myofibrils, membrane integrity, mitochondrial cristae structure). Flocalin induced potent cardioprotection by activating cardiac-type K(ATP) -channels with all the benefits of the presence of fluorine group in the drug structure: higher lipophilicity, decreased toxicity, resistance to oxidation and thermal degradation, decreased metabolism in the organism and prolonged therapeutic action. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The

  20. Possible mechanisms involved in the vasorelaxant effect produced by clobenzorex in aortic segments of rats

    J. Lozano-Cuenca

    Full Text Available Clobenzorex is a metabolic precursor of amphetamine indicated for the treatment of obesity. Amphetamines have been involved with cardiovascular side effects such as hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the direct application of 10–9–10–5 M clobenzorex on isolated phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings produces vascular effects, and if so, what mechanisms may be involved. Clobenzorex produced an immediate concentration-dependent vasorelaxant effect at the higher concentrations (10–7.5–10–5 M. The present outcome was not modified by 10–6 M atropine (an antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, 3.1×10–7 M glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker, 10–3 M 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; a voltage-activated K+ channel blocker, 10–5 M indomethacin (a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor, 10–5 M clotrimazole (a cytochrome P450 inhibitor or 10–5 M cycloheximide (a general protein synthesis inhibitor. Contrarily, the clobenzorex-induced vasorelaxation was significantly attenuated (P<0.05 by 10–5 M L-NAME (a direct inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, 10–7 M ODQ (an inhibitor of nitric oxide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase, 10–6 M KT 5823 (an inhibitor of protein kinase G, 10–2 M TEA (a Ca2+-activated K+ channel blocker and non-specific voltage-activated K+ channel blocker and 10–7 M apamin plus 10–7 M charybdotoxin (blockers of small- and large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, respectively, and was blocked by 8×10–2 M potassium (a high concentration and removal of the vascular endothelium. These results suggest that the direct vasorelaxant effect by clobenzorex on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings involved stimulation of the NO/cGMP/PKG/Ca2+-activated K+ channel pathway.

  1. Protective role of 20-OH ecdysone on lipid profile and tissue fatty acid changes in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    Naresh Kumar, Rajendran; Sundaram, Ramalingam; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanatham

    2013-01-05

    Hyperlipidemia is an associated complication of diabetes mellitus. The association of hyperglycemia with an alteration of lipid parameters presents a major risk for cardiovascular complications in diabetes. The present study was designed to examine the antihyperlipidemic effect of 20-OH ecdysone on lipid profile and tissue fatty acid changes in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. The levels of blood glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, phospholipids, low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein, lipoprotein lipase, lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase, 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and fatty acid composition were estimated in plasma, liver and kidneys of control and experimental groups of rats. Oral administration of 20-OH ecdysone at a dose of 5mg/kg bodyweight per day to STZ-induced diabetic rats for a period of 30 days resulted in a significant reduction in fasting blood glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, phospholipids, low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein, 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and elevation of high density lipoprotein, lipoprotein lipase and lecithin cholesterol acyl transferasein comparison with diabetic untreated rats. Moreover, administration of 20-OH ecdysone to diabetic rats also decreased the concentrations of fatty acids, viz., palmitic, stearic (16:1) and oleic acid (18:1), whereas linolenic (18:3) and arachidonic acid (20:4) were elevated. The antihyperlipidemic effect of 20-OH ecdysone was compared with glibenclamide a well-known antihyperglycemic drug. The result of the present study indicates that 20-OH ecdysone showed an antihyperlipidemic effect in addition to its antidiabetic effect in experimental diabetes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Hypoglycemic and Hypolipidemic Effects of Leucine, Zinc, and Chromium, Alone and in Combination, in Rats with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Sadri, Hassan; Larki, Negar Nowroozi; Kolahian, Saeed

    2017-12-01

    For the increasing development of diabetes, dietary habits and using appropriate supplements can play important roles in the treatment or reduction of risk for this disease. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of leucine (Leu), zinc (Zn), and chromium (Cr) supplementation, alone or in combination, in rats with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Seventy-seven adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned in 11 groups, using nutritional supplements and insulin (INS) or glibenclamide (GLC). Supplementing Leu significantly reduced blood glucose, triglycerides (TG), nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) concentrations compared to vehicle-treated T2D animals, and those improvements were associated with reduced area under the 2-h blood glucose response curve (AUC). Supplementation of T2D animals with Zn improved serum lipid profile as well as blood glucose concentrations but was not comparable with the INS, GLC, and Leu groups. Supplementary Cr did not improve blood glucose and AUC in T2D rats, whereas it reduced serum TG and LDL and increased HDL concentrations. In conclusion, supplementation of diabetic rats with Leu was more effective in improving blood glucose and consequently decreasing glucose AUC than other nutritional supplements. Supplementary Zn and Cr only improved serum lipid profile. The combination of the nutritional supplements did not improve blood glucose level. Nevertheless, supplementation with Leu-Zn, Leu-Cr, Zn-Cr, and Leu-Zn-Cr led to an improved response in serum lipid profile over each supplement given alone.

  3. Evaluation of the anti-diabetic properties of Mucuna pruriens seed extract.

    Majekodunmi, Stephen O; Oyagbemi, Ademola A; Umukoro, Solomon; Odeku, Oluwatoyin A

    2011-08-01

    To explore the antidiabetic properties of Mucuna pruriens(M. pruriens). Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats by single intravenous injection of 120 mg/kg of alloxan monohydrate and different doses of the extract were administered to diabetic rats. The blood glucose level was determined using a glucometer and results were compared with normal and untreated diabetic rats. The acute toxicity was also determined in albino mice. Results showed that the administration of 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 100 mg/kg of the crude ethanolic extract of M. pruriens seeds to alloxan-induced diabetic rats (plasma glucose > 450 mg/dL) resulted in 18.6%, 24.9%, 30.8%, 41.4%, 49.7%, 53.1% and 55.4% reduction, respectively in blood glucose level of the diabetic rats after 8h of treatment while the administration of glibenclamide (5 mg/kg/day) resulted in 59.7% reduction. Chronic administration of the extract resulted in a significant dose dependent reduction in the blood glucose level (Ppruriens seeds resides in the methanolic and ethanolic fractions of the extract. Acute toxicity studies indicated that the extract was relatively safe at low doses, although some adverse reactions were observed at higher doses (8-32 mg/kg body weight), no death was recorded. Furthermore, oral administration of M. pruriens seed extract also significantly reduced the weight loss associated with diabetes. The study clearly supports the traditional use of M. pruriens for the treatment of diabetes and indicates that the plant could be a good source of potent antidiabetic drug. Copyright © 2011 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effect of Methanolic Extract of Otostegia persica on Serum Glucose Level and Renal Function Indicators in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    Mahdiye Hedayati

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regarding the antioxidant property of Otostegia persica extract and the role of antioxidants in Diabetes mellitus treatment, in this study the effect of extract on serum glucose level and renal function indicators was determined in diabetic male rats. Materials and Methods: Diabetes mellitus (type I was inducted in male rats using intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ (65 mg/kg. To determine blood glucose, urea, and creatinine serum levels; fasting blood samples were collected twice (before STZ injection and 5 days later. The rats with their serum glucose level exceeding 250 mg/dl were considered diabetic and divided into 10 groups separately received Otostegia persica alcoholic extract (100, 200, and 300 mg/kg/day doses, glibenclamide with 600 µg/kg dose and 0.5 ml distilled water for 3 and 6 days using gavage. After 3 and 6 days, blood samples were collected again and glucose, urea, and creatinine serum levels were assessed using spectrophotometry technique by respective kits.Results: Treating diabetic rats by Otostegia persica extract (100, 200, and 300 mg/kg/day doses for 6 days results in a significant decrease of glucose and creatinine, yet an increase of serum urea with 200 mg/kg dose. Also, administration of the extract for 3 days (300 mg/kg reduced glucose, and (in various doses urea and creatinine serum levels. Conclusion: Otostegia persica extract has hypoglycemic effect and administering it in diabetes mellitus not only had no undesirable renal side effects, but also improved renal function to some extent.

  5. L-Cysteine enhances nutrient absorption via a cystathionine-β-synthase-derived H2 S pathway in rodent jejunum.

    Xiao, Ailin; Li, Jing; Liu, Tianjian; Liu, Zhuxi; Wei, Chuanfei; Xu, Xiaomeng; Li, Qin; Li, Jingxin

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2 S) is generated endogenously from L-cysteine (L-Cys) by the enzymes cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). In addition, L-Cys is commonly used as a precursor in the food and pharmaceutical industries. The aim of the present study is to determine whether L-Cys regulates intestinal nutrient transport. To that end, the presence of CBS and CSE in the jejunum epithelium was assessed by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and the methylene blue assay. In addition, in vivo L-Cys (100 mg/kg, administered immediately after the glucose load) significantly increased blood glucose levels 30 min after the oral administration of glucose to mice. This effect of L-Cys was completely blocked by amino-oxyacetic acid (AOA; 50 mg/kg; administered at the same time as L-Cys) an inhibitor of CBS. Measurements of the short-circuit current (Isc) in the rat jejunum epithelium revealed that L-Cys (1 mmol/L; 6 min before the administration of L-alanine) enhances Na(+)-coupled L-alanine or glucose transport, and that this effect is inhibited by AOA (1 mmol/L;10 min before the administration of L-Cys), but not D,L-propargylglycine (PAG;1 mmol/L; 10 min before the administration of L-Cys), a CSE inhibitor. Notably, L-Cys-evoked enhancement of nutrient transport was alleviated by glibenclamide (Gli;0.1 mmol/L; 10 min before the administration of L-Cys), a K(+) channel blocker. Together, the data indicate that L-Cys enhances jejunal nutrient transport, suggesting a new approach to future treatment of nutrition-related maladies, including a range of serious health consequences linked to undernutrition. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. The Preventive Effect of L-Lysine on Lysozyme Glycation in Type 2 Diabetes

    Hossein Mirmiranpour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysozyme is a bactericidal enzyme whose structure and functions change in diabetes. Chemical chaperones are small molecules including polyamines (e.g. spermine, amino acids (e.g. L-lysine and polyols (e.g. glycerol. They can improve protein conformation in several stressful conditions such as glycation. In this study, the authors aimed to observe the effect of L-lysine as a chemical chaperone on structure and function of glycated lysozyme. In this study, in vitro and in vivo effects of L-lysine on lysozyme glycation were investigated. Lysozyme was incubated with glucose and/or L-lysine, followed by an investigation of its structure by electrophoresis, fluorescence spectroscopy, and circular dichroism spectroscopy and also assessment of its bactericidal activity against M. lysodeikticus. In the clinical trial, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM were randomly divided into two groups of 25 (test and control. All patients received metformin and glibenclamide for a three months period. The test group was supplemented with 3 g/day of L-lysine. The quantity and activity of lysozyme and other parameters were then measured. Among the test group, L-lysine was found to reduce the advanced glycation end products (AGEs in the sera of patients with T2DM and in vitro condition. This chemical chaperone reversed the alteration in lysozyme structure and function due to glycation and resulted in increased lysozyme activity. Structure and function of glycated lysozyme are significantly improved by l-lysine; therefore it can be considered an effective therapeutic supplementation in T2DM, decreasing the risk of infection in these patients.

  7. EFEK PEMBERIAN JUS BUAH PISANG AMBON (Musa paradisiaca var. sapientum (L. Kunt. TERHADAP KADAR GLUKOSA DARAH TIKUS JANTAN GALUR WISTAR YANG TERBEBANI GLUKOSA

    Katherine Jessica Ariani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This research is to know the effect of giving Musa paradisiaca var. sapientum (L. Kunt. juice to the blood glucose levels and to know the most effective of giving Musa paradisiaca var. sapientum (L. Kunt. dose to lower the blood glucose levels in rats with oral glucose tolerance. This research was experimental study with one way-complete-random design using 25 male rats were divided into five groups. The rats in group I (negative control were given of CMC 1%, the group II rats were given 0.64mg/kgBW doses of Glibenclamide (positive control, and group III,IV and V were given 5, 10 and 20 ml/kgBW doses of Musa paradisiaca var. sapientum (L. Kunt. juice. The hypoglycemic effect of Musa paradisiaca var. sapientum (L. Kunt. juice was tested by following the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT method. The blood-glucose contents were taken, at 0 minutes before OGTT, and also taken at minutes of 15, 20, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180, and 240 after OGTT, from the tested animal that had been gotten the pre-treatment of negative control, positive control and Musa paradisiaca var. sapientum (L. Kunt. juice. The blood glucose levels was determined by using enzymatis GOD-PAP method. The AUC0-240 was statistically analyzed using one way ANOVA and Scheffe test with 95% convidence level. The result of this research showed that Musa paradisiaca var. sapientum (L. Kunt. can lower on rats in burdened glucose. The effective dose of Musa paradisiaca var. sapientum (L. Kunt. juice can lower glucose blood levels at 5ml/kgBW.

  8. EFEK PEMBERIAN JUS BUAH PISANG KEPOK (Musa paradisiaca forma typica TERHADAP KADAR GLUKOSA DARAH TIKUS JANTAN GALUR WISTAR YANG TERBEBANI GLUKOSA

    F. Eki Supra Bawati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This research aimed to determine the effects of administration of Musa paradisiaca forma typica juice on blood glucose levels and determine what dose of Musa paradisiaca forma typica juice which is most effective for lowering blood glucose levels in rats burdened glucose. This research was experimental with study with one way complete design using 25 male rats were divided into five groups. Group I (negative control was given CMC 1%, group II (positive control was given Glibenclamide dose of 0,64 mg/kgBW and group III, IV, V the rats were given 5; 10; 20 mL/kgBW dose of Musa paradisiaca forma typica juice, all of the processes were given through the oral method. Hypoglycemic effect of Musa paradisiaca forma typica juice was tested by following the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT method. The blood-glucose contents were taken, at the 0 minutes before the OGTT and also taken at minutes of 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, and 240 after the OGTT, from the tested animal that had been gotten the pre-treatment of the negative control, positive control and Musa paradisiaca forma typica juice before. Data of blood glucose levels was statistically analyzed using one way ANOVA and Scheffe test with 95% convidence level. The result of this research showed that Musa paradisiaca forma typica juice can lowering blood glucose levels on rats in burdened glucose. Dose Musa paradisiaca forma typica juice are most effective in lowering blood glucose levels in a dose was 10 mL/kgBW. Key words: Musa paradisiaca forma typica, blood glucose levels, OGTT

  9. Comparative Effects of Some Medicinal Plants: Anacardium occidentale, Eucalyptus globulus, Psidium guajava, and Xylopia aethiopica Extracts in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Male Wistar Albino Rats

    Okpashi, Victor Eshu; Bayim, Bayim Peter-Robins; Obi-Abang, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Insulin therapy and oral antidiabetic agents/drugs used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus have not sufficiently proven to control hyperlipidemia, which is commonly associated with the diabetes mellitus. Again the hopes that traditional medicine and natural plants seem to trigger researchers in this area is yet to be discovered. This research was designed to compare the biochemical effects of some medicinal plants in alloxan-induced diabetic male Wistar rats using named plants that are best at lowering blood glucose and hyperlipidemia and ameliorating other complications of diabetes mellitus by methods of combined therapy. The results obtained showed 82% decrease in blood glucose concentration after the 10th hour to the fortieth hour. There was significant increase P 0.05 recorded in the glutathione peroxidase activity of E. globulus (100 mg/kg) when compared to the test groups of P. guajava (250 mg/kg) and X. aethiopica (250 mg/kg). Catalase activity showed significant increase P 0.05, there was no significant difference seen between test group and treated groups. Meanwhile, degree of significance was observed in other parameters analysed. The biochemical analysis conducted in this study showed positive result, attesting to facts from previous works. Though these individual plants extracts exhibited significant increase in amelorating diabetes complication and blood glucose control compared to glibenclamide, a synthetic antidiabetic drug. Greater performance was observed in the synergy groups. Therefore, a poly/combined formulation of these plants extracts yielded significant result as well as resolving some other complications associated with diabetics. PMID:25525518

  10. Hypoglycemic activity of Cassia javanica Linn. in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Urmila C Kumavat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In present work, one of the ornamentals and medicinally less known plant Cassia javanica has been explored for hypoglycemic potential. It aimed to check the hypoglycemic effect of C. javanica leaves on normal and streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats by acute and sub-acute studies. Prior to the hypoglycemic study, acute oral toxicity testing of drug was performed. Later, the effects of single and multiple doses of test drug were studied using various parameters. Dried powdered leaf material was used as an oral drug. The preliminary phytochemistry of drug was done by standard qualitative tests. Diabetes was induced in rats by single intraperitoneal injection of STZ. Single and multiple doses of test drug (0.5 g/kg body weight/day were given to normal and diabetic rats. The parameters studied were blood glucose, serum cholesterol, serum triglycerides, and serum proteins. The results of test drug were compared with standard hypoglycemic drug-glibenclamide (0.01 g/kg/day. Statistical analysis was done by ′Student′s ′t′ test′ and one way ANOVA test. In preliminary phytochemistry, antidiabetic compounds were detected. Unlike acute, subacute treatment of test drug showed highly significant reduction (37.62% in blood glucose level of diabetic rats in ten days. This effect was considerably good in comparison with standard drug (63.51%. The test drug and standard drug exhibited insignificant change in the abnormal levels of serum metabolites of diabetic rats. Preclinically, C. javanica was proved to be effective hypoglycemic agent.

  11. Role of different types of potassium channels in the antidepressant-like effect of agmatine in the mouse forced swimming test.

    Budni, Josiane; Gadotti, Vinícius M; Kaster, Manuella P; Santos, Adair R S; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2007-12-01

    The administration of agmatine elicits an antidepressant-like effect in the mouse forced swimming test by a mechanism dependent on the inhibition of the NMDA receptors and the L-arginine-nitric oxide (NO) pathway. Since it has been reported that the NO can activate different types of potassium (K(+)) channels in several tissues, the present study investigates the possibility of synergistic interactions between different types of K(+) channel inhibitors and agmatine in the forced swimming test. Treatment of mice by i.c.v. route with subeffective doses of tetraethylammonium (a non specific inhibitor of K(+) channels, 25 pg/site), glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K(+) channels inhibitor, 0.5 pg/site), charybdotoxin (a large- and intermediate-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channel inhibitor, 25 pg/site) or apamin (a small-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channel inhibitor, 10 pg/site), augmented the effect of agmatine (0.001 mg/kg, i.p.) in the forced swimming test. Furthermore, the administration of agmatine and the K(+) channel inhibitors, alone or in combination, did not affect locomotion in the open-field test. Moreover, the reduction in the immobility time elicited by an active dose of agmatine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in the forced swimming test was prevented by the pre-treatment of mice with the K(+) channel openers cromakalim (10 microg/site, i.c.v.) and minoxidil (10 microg/site, i.c.v.), without affecting locomotion. Together these data raise the possibility that the antidepressant-like effect of agmatine in the forced swimming test is related to its modulatory effects on neuronal excitability, via inhibition of K(+) channels.

  12. ANTIDIABETIC AND ANTIDYSLIPIDEMIC EFFECTS OF HELIOTROPIUM STRIGOSUM IN RAT MODELS OF TYPE I AND TYPE II DIABETES.

    Chaudhry, Shafqat Rasul; Akram, Adnan; Aslam, Naveed; Asif, Muhammad; Wajid, Muhammad; Kinfe, Thomas; Jabeen, Qaiser; Muhammad, Sajjad

    2016-11-01

    Heliotropiumz stnigosum Wilid. (Boraginaceae) is used traditionally as a laxative, diuretic, and as a treatment for snake bites and stings of nettles. Recent investigations have shown anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of H. sorigosum. However, antihyperglycemic and antidyslipidemic activity of H. strigosum has not been investigated to date and we aimed to explore these activities of the crude aqueous methanolic extract of thEaerial parts of H. strigosum (Hs.Cr). Hs.Cr was administered orally at doses of 100, 300, and 500 mg/kg in alloxan-induced diabetic rats (type I diabetes) and fructose-fed rats (type II diabetes). The fasting blood glucose (FBG) concentration was assessed by glucometer, while semum total cholesterol, triglycerides and HDL were estimated by using standard kits. The FBG concentration significantly (p < 0.05) decreased in dose-dependent pattern in both alloxan-induced diabetic and fructose-fed rats on Hs.Cr administration. The percentage glucose reductions in alloxanized rats with glibenclamide, Hs.Cr 100, 300, and 500 mg/kg were obeserved to be 67, 36, 56 and 62%, respectively. In fructose-fed rats, the percentage glucose redutions associated with metformin, Hs.Cr 100, 300, and 500 mg/kg were 23, 5, 11 and 12%, respectively. The extract also corrected the dyslipidemia associated with fructose and alloxan-induced diabetes by significantly (p < 0.00 1) decreasing the concentration of serum total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL and by increasing HDL concentration. Our data demonstrate that the H. stigosum has antidiabetic and antidyslipidemic effects, thus encouraging further studies.

  13. Isolation of Antidiabetic Principle from Fruit Rinds of Punica granatum

    Vishal Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Present study was aimed to isolate and evaluate the antidiabetic activity of phytoconstituents from fruit rinds of Punica granatum. With the above objectives Valoneic acid dilactone (VAD was isolated from methanolic fruit rind extracts of Punica granatum (MEPG and confirmed by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and mass spectral data. Antidiabetic activity was evaluated by Aldose reductase, α-amylase and PTP1B inhibition assays in in vitro and Alloxan-induced diabetes in rats was used as an in vivo model. In bioactivity studies, MEPG and VAD have showed potent antidiabetic activity in α-amylase, aldose reductase, and PTP1B inhibition assays with IC50 values of 1.02, 2.050, 26.25 μg/mL and 0.284, 0.788, 12.41 μg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, in alloxan-induced diabetes model MEPG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o. and VAD (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg, p.o. have showed significant and dose dependent antidiabetic activity by maintaining the blood glucose levels within the normal limits. Inline with the biochemical findings histopathology of MEPG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o., VAD (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg, p.o., and glibenclamide (10 mg/kg, p.o. treated animals showed significant protection against alloxan-induced pancreatic tissue damage. These findings suggest that MEPG and VAD possess significant antidiabetic activity in both in vitro and in vivo models.

  14. General anesthetic octanol and related compounds activate wild-type and delF508 cystic fibrosis chloride channels.

    Marcet, Brice; Becq, Frédéric; Norez, Caroline; Delmas, Patrick; Verrier, Bernard

    2004-03-01

    1. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is defective during cystic fibrosis (CF). Activators of the CFTR Cl(-) channel may be useful for therapy of CF. Here, we demonstrate that a range of general anesthetics like normal-alkanols (n-alkanols) and related compounds can stimulate the Cl(-) channel activity of wild-type CFTR and delF508-CFTR mutant. 2. The effects of n-alkanols like octanol on CFTR activity were measured by iodide ((125)I) efflux and patch-clamp techniques on three distinct cellular models: (1). CFTR-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells, (2). human airway Calu-3 epithelial cells and (3). human airway JME/CF15 epithelial cells which express the delF508-CFTR mutant. 3. Our data show for the first time that n-alkanols activate both wild-type CFTR and delF508-CFTR mutant. Octanol stimulated (125)I efflux in a dose-dependent manner in CFTR-expressing cells (wild-type and delF508) but not in cell lines lacking CFTR. (125)I efflux and Cl(-) currents induced by octanol were blocked by glibenclamide but insensitive to 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid, as expected for a CFTR Cl(-) current. 4. CFTR activation by octanol was neither due to cell-to-cell uncoupling properties of octanol nor to an intracellular cAMP increase. CFTR activation by octanol requires phosphorylation by protein kinase-A (PKA) since it was prevented by H-89, a PKA inhibitor. 5. n-Alkanols chain length was an important determinant for channel activation, with rank order of potencies: 1-heptanoloctanoloctanol<1-decanol. Our findings may be of valuable interest for developing novel therapeutic strategies for CF.

  15. Oxidative stress/reactive metabolite gene expression signature in rat liver detects idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants

    Leone, Angelique; Nie, Alex; Brandon Parker, J.; Sawant, Sharmilee; Piechta, Leigh-Anne; Kelley, Michael F., E-mail: mkelley2@its.jnj.com; Mark Kao, L.; Jim Proctor, S.; Verheyen, Geert; Johnson, Mark D.; Lord, Peter G.; McMillian, Michael K.

    2014-03-15

    Previously we reported a gene expression signature in rat liver for detecting a specific type of oxidative stress (OS) related to reactive metabolites (RM). High doses of the drugs disulfiram, ethinyl estradiol and nimesulide were used with another dozen paradigm OS/RM compounds, and three other drugs flutamide, phenacetin and sulindac were identified by this signature. In a second study, antiepileptic drugs were compared for covalent binding and their effects on OS/RM; felbamate, carbamazepine, and phenobarbital produced robust OS/RM gene expression. In the present study, liver RNA samples from drug-treated rats from more recent experiments were examined for statistical fit to the OS/RM signature. Of all 97 drugs examined, in addition to the nine drugs noted above, 19 more were identified as OS/RM-producing compounds—chlorpromazine, clozapine, cyproterone acetate, dantrolene, dipyridamole, glibenclamide, isoniazid, ketoconazole, methapyrilene, naltrexone, nifedipine, sulfamethoxazole, tamoxifen, coumarin, ritonavir, amitriptyline, valproic acid, enalapril, and chloramphenicol. Importantly, all of the OS/RM drugs listed above have been linked to idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity, excepting chloramphenicol, which does not have a package label for hepatotoxicity, but does have a black box warning for idiosyncratic bone marrow suppression. Most of these drugs are not acutely toxic in the rat. The OS/RM signature should be useful to avoid idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of drug candidates. - Highlights: • 28 of 97 drugs gave a positive OS/RM gene expression signature in rat liver. • The specificity of the signature for human idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants was 98%. • The sensitivity of the signature for human idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants was 75%. • The signature can help eliminate hepatotoxicants from drug development.

  16. Determination of pharmaceuticals in sewage sludge by pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

    Radjenović, J; Jelić, A; Petrović, M; Barceló, D

    2009-03-01

    In this study, we aimed at optimizing a sensitive and reliable method for a simultaneous determination of 31 pharmaceuticals belonging to predominant therapeutic classes identified in different types of sewage sludge proceeding from conventional and advanced wastewater treatment. Freeze-dried sewage sludge was extracted by pressurized liquid extraction technique using accelerated solvent extractor Dionex 300. In order to minimize interferences with matrix components and to preconcentrate target analytes, solid phase extraction was introduced in the method as a clean-up step. The entire method was validated for linearity, precision, accuracy, and method detection limits (MDLs). The method turned out to be specific, sensitive, and reliable for the analysis of sludge of different composition, type, and retention time in the process. The developed sample preparation protocol and previously published method for LC-MS/MS analysis (Gros et al., Talanta 70:678-690, 2006) were successfully applied to monitor the target pharmaceuticals in different types of sewage sludge, i.e., primary sludge, secondary sludge, treated sludge, and sludge proceeding from pilot-scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) operating in parallel to the conventional activated sludge treatment. Among the investigated pharmaceuticals, 20 were detected in the sludge proceeding from full-scale installations, whereas the MBR sludge concentrations were below MDLs for several compounds. The highest concentrations were recorded for treated and primary sludge. For example, the mean concentration of ibuprofen in the digested sludge was 299.3 +/- 70.9 ng g(-1) dw, whereas in the primary sludge, it was enriched up to 741.1 ng g(-1) dw. Other pharmaceuticals detected at relatively high concentrations were diclofenac, erythromycin, glibenclamide, ketoprofen, ofloxacin, azithromycin (up to 380.7, 164.2, 190.7, 336.3, 454.7, 299.6 ng g(-1) dw in the primary sludge, respectively), gemfibrozil, loratidine, and fluoxetine (up

  17. TMG-123, a novel glucokinase activator, exerts durable effects on hyperglycemia without increasing triglyceride in diabetic animal models.

    Tsumura, Yoshinori; Tsushima, Yu; Tamura, Azusa; Hasebe, Makiko; Kanou, Masanobu; Kato, Hirotsugu; Kobayashi, Tsunefumi

    2017-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK) plays a critical role for maintaining glucose homeostasis with regulating glucose uptake in liver and insulin secretion in pancreas. GK activators have been reported to decrease blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, clinical development of GK activators has failed due to the loss of glucose-lowering effects and increased plasma triglyceride levels after chronic treatment. Here, we generated a novel GK activator, TMG-123, examined its in vitro and in vivo pharmacological characteristics, and evaluated its risks of aforementioned clinical issues. TMG-123 selectively activated GK enzyme activity without increasing Vmax. TMG-123 improved glucose tolerance without increasing plasma insulin levels in both insulin-deficient (Goto-Kakizaki rats) and insulin-resistant (db/db mice) models. The beneficial effect on glucose tolerance was greater than results observed with clinically available antidiabetic drugs such as metformin and glibenclamide in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats. TMG-123 also improved glucose tolerance in combination with metformin. After 4 weeks of administration, TMG-123 reduced the Hemoglobin A1c levels without affecting liver and plasma triglyceride levels in Goto-Kakizaki rats and Diet-Induced Obesity mice. Moreover, TMG-123 sustained its effect on Hemoglobin A1c levels even after 24 weeks of administration without affecting triglycerides. Taken together, these data indicate that TMG-123 exerts glucose-lowering effects in both insulin-deficient and -resistant diabetes, and sustains reduced Hemoglobin A1c levels without affecting hepatic and plasma triglycerides even after chronic treatment. Therefore, TMG-123 is expected to be an antidiabetic drug that overcomes the concerns previously reported with other GK activators.

  18. Inward Rectifier K+ Currents Are Regulated by CaMKII in Endothelial Cells of Primarily Cultured Bovine Pulmonary Arteries.

    Qu, Lihui; Yu, Lei; Wang, Yanli; Jin, Xin; Zhang, Qianlong; Lu, Ping; Yu, Xiufeng; Zhong, Weiwei; Zheng, Xiaodong; Cui, Ningren; Jiang, Chun; Zhu, Daling

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium lines the interior surface of vascular walls and regulates vascular tones. The endothelial cells sense and respond to chemical and mechanical stimuli in the circulation, and couple the stimulus signals to vascular smooth muscles, in which inward rectifier K+ currents (Kir) play an important role. Here we applied several complementary strategies to determine the Kir subunit in primarily cultured pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs) that was regulated by the Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In whole-cell voltage clamp, the Kir currents were sensitive to micromolar concentrations of extracellular Ba2+. In excised inside-out patches, an inward rectifier K+ current was observed with single-channel conductance 32.43 ± 0.45 pS and Popen 0.27 ± 0.04, which were consistent with known unitary conductance of Kir 2.1. RT-PCR and western blot results showed that expression of Kir 2.1 was significantly stronger than that of other subtypes in PAECs. Pharmacological analysis of the Kir currents demonstrated that insensitivity to intracellular ATP, pinacidil, glibenclamide, pH, GDP-β-S and choleratoxin suggested that currents weren't determined by KATP, Kir2.3, Kir2.4 and Kir3.x. The currents were strongly suppressed by exposure to CaMKII inhibitor W-7 and KN-62. The expression of Kir2.1 was inhibited by knocking down CaMKII. Consistently, vasodilation was suppressed by Ba2+, W-7 and KN-62 in isolated and perfused pulmonary arterial rings. These results suggest that the PAECs express an inward rectifier K+ current that is carried dominantly by Kir2.1, and this K+ channel appears to be targeted by CaMKII-dependent intracellular signaling systems.

  19. In Vitro Antioxidant Effects of Aloe barbadensis Miller Extracts and the Potential Role of These Extracts as Antidiabetic and Antilipidemic Agents on Streptozotocin-Induced Type 2 Diabetic Model Rats

    Md. Ibrahim Khalil

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the total phenolic and flavonoid contents, the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging ability and the ferric reducing power (FRAP of Aloe vera were measured to determine the antioxidant activity of this species. The in vivo antidiabetic effects of the plant were also investigated using streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetic model rats that were divided into five groups based on the treatment received: (1 water (WC; (2 glibenclamide; (3 concentrated gel extract (Gel-C; (4 ethanol (80% gel extract (Gel-Et; and (5 ethanol (80% skin extract of Aloe vera (Skin-Et. Skin-Et, which contained the highest level of total phenolics (62.37 ± 1.34 mggallic acid/kg and flavonoids (20.83 ± 0.77 mg/kg, exhibited the highest scavenging activity (85.01 ± 0.52% and the greatest reducing power (185.98 ± 0.41 µM, indicating that the skin contained the highest level of antioxidants. The oral consumption of Gel-Et for 4 weeks a caused significant reduction in the fasting serum glucose levels of the rats. The rats in the Gel-C-, Gel-Et- and Skin-Et-treated groups experienced a reduction in their total cholesterol levels by 11%, 17% and 25%, respectively and a reduction in their LDL cholesterol levels by 45%, 3% and 69%, respectively. The in vivo experimental antioxidant parameter MDA is strongly correlated with the in vitro antioxidant parameters of flavonoids and polyphenols, namely the DPPH and FRAP values (r = 0.94, 0.92, 0.93, 0.90, thus confirming the antioxidant potential of the Aloe vera extracts.

  20. Vasorelaxant effect of Prunus yedoensis bark

    Lee Kyungjin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prunus yedoensis Matsum. is used as traditional medicine—‘Yaeng-Pi’ or ‘Hua-Pi’—in Japan and Korea. However, no studies have examined the pharmacological activities of the P. yedoensis bark. Only the antioxidant and antiviral activities of P. yedoensis fruit and the anti-hyperglycaemic effect of P. yedoensis leaf have been investigated. While studying the antihypertensive effects of several medicinal plants, we found that a methanol extract of P. yedoensis bark (MEPY had distinct vasorelaxant effects on rat aortic rings. Methods The aortic rings were removed from Sprague–Dawley rats and suspended in organ chambers containing 10 ml Krebs-Henseleit solution. The aortic rings were placed between 2 tungsten stirrups and connected to an isometric force transducer. Changes in tension were recorded via isometric transducers connected to a data acquisition system. Results MEPY relaxed the contraction induced by phenylephrine (PE both in endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded aortic rings concentration dependently. However, the vasorelaxant effects of MEPY on endothelium-denuded aortic rings were lower than endothelium-intact aortic rings. The vasorelaxant effects of MEPY on endothelium-intact aortic rings were reduced by pre-treatment with l-NAME, methylene blue, or ODQ. However, pre-treatment with indomethacin, atropine, glibenclamide, tetraethylammonium, or 4-aminopyridine had no affection. In addition, MEPY inhibited the contraction induced by extracellular Ca2+ in endothelium-denuded rat thoracic aorta rings pre-contracted by PE (1 μM or KCl (60 mM in Ca2+-free solution. Conclusions Our results suggest that MEPY exerts its vasorelaxant effects via the activation of NO formation by means of l-Arg and NO-cGMP pathways and via the blockage of extracellular Ca2+ channels.

  1. Stabilizing ability of surfactant on physicochemical properties of drug nanoparticles generated from solid dispersions.

    Thongnopkoon, Thanu; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit

    2017-07-01

    This study was aimed to examine the nanoparticle formation from redispersion of binary and ternary solid dispersions. Binary systems are composed of various ratios of glibenclamide (GBM) and polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 (PVP-K30), whereas a constant amount at 2.5%w/w of a surfactant, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) or Gelucire44/14 (GLC), was added to create ternary systems. GBM nanoparticles were collected after the systems were dispersed in water for 15 min. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized for size distribution, crystallinity, thermal behavior, molecular structure, and dissolution properties. The results indicated that GBM nanoparticles could be formed when the drug content of the systems was lower than 30%w/w in binary systems and ternary systems containing SLS. The particle size ranged from 200 to 500 nm in diameter with narrow size distribution. The particle size was increased with increasing drug content in the systems. The obtained nanoparticles were spherical and showed the amorphous state. Furthermore, because of being amorphous form and reduced particle size, the dissolution of the generated nanoparticles was markedly improved compared with the GBM powder. In contrast, all the ternary solid dispersions prepared with GLC anomalously provided the crystalline particles with the size ranging over 5 µm and irregular shape. Interestingly, this was irrelevant to the drug content in the systems. These results indicated the ability of GLC to destabilize the polymer network surrounding the particles during particle precipitation. Therefore, this study suggested that drug content, quantity, and type of surfactant incorporated in solid dispersions drastically affected the physicochemical properties of the precipitated particles.

  2. Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxant effect of procyanidin B2 on human internal mammary artery.

    Novakovic, Aleksandra; Marinko, Marija; Jankovic, Goran; Stojanovic, Ivan; Milojevic, Predrag; Nenezic, Dragoslav; Kanjuh, Vladimir; Yang, Qin; He, Guo-Wei

    2017-07-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate and characterize vasorelaxant effect of procyanidin B2 on human internal mammary artery (HIMA) as one of the mechanisms of its protective effect against vascular risk. Procyanidin B2 induced strong concentration-dependent relaxation of HIMA rings pre-contracted by phenylephrine. Pretreatment with L-NAME, a NO synthase inhibitor, hydroxocobalamin, a NO scavenger, and ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase, significantly inhibited procyanidin B2-induced relaxation of HIMA, while indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, considerably reduced effects of low concentrations. Among K + channel blockers, iberiotoxin, a selective blocker of large conductance Ca 2+ -activated K + channels (BK Ca ), abolished procyanidin B2-induced relaxation, glibenclamide, a selective ATP-sensitive K + (K ATP ) channels blocker, induced partial inhibition, while 4-aminopyridine, a blocker of voltage-gated K + (K V ) channels, and TRAM-34, an inhibitor of intermediate-conductance Ca 2+ -activated K + (IK Ca ) channels, slightly reduced maximal relaxation of HIMA. Further, procyanidin B2 relaxed contraction induced by phenylephrine in Ca 2+ -free Krebs solution, but had no effect on contraction induced by caffeine. Finally, thapsigargin, a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase inhibitor, significantly reduced relaxation of HIMA produced by procyanidin B2. These results demonstrate that procyanidin B2 produces endothelium-dependent relaxation of HIMA pre-contracted by phenylephrine. This effect is primarily the result of an increased NO synthesis and secretion by endothelial cells and partially of prostacyclin, although it involves activation of BK Ca and K ATP , as well as K V and IK Ca channels in high concentrations of procyanidin B2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Possible involvement of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the antidepressant-like effect of baclofen in mouse forced swimming test.

    Nazari, Seyedeh Khadijeh; Nikoui, Vahid; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Chegini, Zahra Hadi; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Bakhtiarian, Azam

    2016-12-01

    Previous study confirmed that the acute treatment with baclofen by inhibition of the l-arginine-nitric oxide (NO) pathway diminished the immobility behavior in the forced swimming test (FST) of mice. Considering the involvement of NO in adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channels (K ATP ), in the present study we investigated the involvement of K ATP channels in antidepressant-like effect of baclofen in the forced swimming test (FST). After assessment of locomotor behavior in the open-field test (OFT), FST was applied for evaluation of the antidepressant-like activity of baclofen in mice. Baclofen at different doses (0.1, 0.3, and 1mg/kg) and fluoxetine (20mg/kg) were administrated by intraperitoneal (ip) route, 30min before the FST or OFT. To clarify the probable involvement of K ATP channels, after determination of sub-effective doses of glibenclamide as a K ATP channel blocker and cromakalim, as an opener of these channels, they were co-administrated with the sub-effective and effective doses of baclofen, respectively. Baclofen at dose 1mg/kg significantly decreased the immobility behavior of mice similar to fluoxetine (20mg/kg). Co-administration of gelibenclamide sub-effective dose (1mg/kg) with baclofen (0.1mg/kg) showed a synergistic antidepressant-like effect in the FST. Also, sub-effective dose of cromakalim (0.1mg/kg) inhibited the antidepressant-like effect of baclofen (1mg/kg) in the FST. All aforementioned treatments had not any impact on the locomotor movement of mice in OFT. Our study for the first time revealed that antidepressant-like effect of baclofen on mice is K ATP -dependent, and baclofen seems that exert this effect by blocking the K ATP channels. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  4. Activation of muscarinic receptors by a hydroalcoholic extract of Dicksonia sellowiana Presl. HooK (Dicksoniaceae) induces vascular relaxation and hypotension in rats.

    Rattmann, Yanna D; Crestani, Sandra; Lapa, Fernanda R; Miguel, Obdúlio G; Marques, Maria C A; da Silva-Santos, J Eduardo; Santos, Adair R S

    2009-01-01

    Dicksonia sellowiana (Presl.) Hook is a native plant from the Central and South Americas that contain high levels of polyphenols, antioxidant compounds involved in protection against inflammation, cancer and cardiovascular risk. A phytomedicinal preparation obtained from aerial parts of D. sellowiana is currently under clinical evaluation in Brazil against asthma, and has been associated with several other beneficial effects. This study demonstrates that a hydroalcoholic extract obtained from D. sellowiana leaves (HEDS) fully relax, in a concentration-dependent manner, rat aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine. Moreover, administration of HEDS (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, i.v.) in anaesthetized rats resulted in a strong but reversible hypotension. Aortic relaxation induced by HEDS was abolished by endothelium removal, by incubation of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, or the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ. In addition, this effect was partially inhibited by indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and KT 5730 (a PKA inhibitor). The potassium channels blockade by either tetraethylammonium or charybdotoxin also resulted in a potent inhibition of HEDS-induced aortic relaxation, whereas apamine only slightly reduced it. In addition HEDS-induced relaxation was unchanged by 4-amynopiridine and glibenclamide. The selective muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine counteracted both aortic relaxation and blood pressure reduction generated by HEDS. Experiments using HPLC revealed the presence of high amounts of phenolic compounds in this extract. Taken together, our results reveal that the D. sellowiana possess substances with both in vivo and in vitro activities and that the vascular effect of HEDS involves activation of muscarinic receptors, stimulation of the nitric oxide pathway and opening of calcium-activated potassium channels.

  5. The Opening of ATP-Sensitive K+ Channels Protects H9c2 Cardiac Cells Against the High Glucose-Induced Injury and Inflammation by Inhibiting the ROS-TLR4-Necroptosis Pathway

    Weijie Liang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hyperglycemia activates multiple signaling molecules, including reactive oxygen species (ROS, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3, a kinase promoting necroptosis, which mediate hyperglycemia-induced cardiac injury. This study explored whether inhibition of ROS-TLR4-necroptosis pathway contributed to the protection of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP channel opening against high glucose-induced cardiac injury and inflammation. Methods: H9c2 cardiac cells were treated with 35 mM glucose (HG to establish a model of HG-induced insults. The expression of RIP3 and TLR4 were tested by western blot. Generation of ROS, cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP and secretion of inflammatory cytokines were measured as injury indexes. Results: HG increased the expression of TLR4 and RIP3. Necrostatin-1 (Nec-1, an inhibitor of necroptosis or TAK-242 (an inhibitor of TLR4 co-treatment attenuated HG-induced up-regulation of RIP3. Diazoxide (DZ, a mitochondrial KATP channel opener or pinacidil (Pin, a non-selective KATP channel opener or N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger pre-treatment blocked the up-regulation of TLR4 and RIP3. Furthermore, pre-treatment with DZ or Pin or NAC, or co-treatment with TAK-242 or Nec-1 attenuated HG-induced a decrease in cell viability, and increases in ROS generation, MMP loss and inflammatory cytokines secretion. However, 5-hydroxy decanoic acid (5-HD, a mitochondrial KATP channel blocker or glibenclamide (Gli, a non-selective KATP channel blocker pre-treatment did not aggravate HG-induced injury and inflammation. Conclusion: KATP channel opening protects H9c2 cells against HG-induced injury and inflammation by inhibiting ROS-TLR4-necroptosis pathway.

  6. Dynamic [Cl-]i measurement with chloride sensing quantum dots nanosensor in epithelial cells

    Wang Yuchi; Mao Hua; Wong, Lid B

    2010-01-01

    We have synthesized a chloride sensing quantum dots (QD) nanosensor, Cl-QD, for the dynamic measurements of chloride ion concentration in the millimolar range, a sensitivity that is applicable to most physiological intracellular chloride ion concentration ([Cl - ] i ) measurements in epithelial cells. The Cl-QD is synthesized by conjugating an anion receptor, 1-(2-mercapto-ethyl)-3-phenyl-thiourea (MEPTU) to a water soluble CdSe/ZnS QD at an emission wavelength of 620 nm. Upon binding of chloride ions to the Cl-QD, a photo-induced electron transfer mechanism caused the fluorescence of the QD to quench. This resulted in an inversely proportional relationship between the chloride ion concentration and the fluorescence intensity of the Cl-QD. We have utilized this Cl-QD to measure [Cl - ] i in T84 and CF-PAC cultured cells, with either the C1C-2 or CFTR chloride channels being manipulated by pharmacological chloride channel activators and inhibitors. Activations of C1C-2 and CFTR chloride channels in T84 by the respective lubiprostone and genistein caused predictive increases in the fluorescence of the Cl-QD, i.e., a decrease of [Cl - ] i . Conversely, glibenclamide, a chloride channel inhibitor, applied to the CF-PAC cells caused a predictable decrease in the fluorescence of Cl-QD due to the increase of [Cl - ] i . These are the first data in using QD-based chloride ion sensors for dynamic measurements of intracellular chloride ion concentrations in epithelial cells.

  7. Effectiveness and clinical inertia in patients with antidiabetic therapy.

    Machado-Duque, Manuel Enrique; Ramírez-Riveros, Adriana Carolina; Machado-Alba, Jorge Enrique

    2017-06-01

    To establish the effectiveness of antidiabetic therapy and the frequency of clinical inertia in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Colombia. A cross-sectional study with follow-up of patients who had been treated for at least 1 year and were receiving medical consultation for antidiabetic treatment. Effectiveness was established when haemoglobin-A1c levels were inertia was reached, which was defined as no therapeutic modifications despite not achieving management controls. Sociodemographic, clinical and pharmacological variables were evaluated, and multivariate analyses were performed. In total, 363 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were evaluated, with a mean age of 62.0±12.2 years. A total of 1,016 consultations were evaluated, and the therapy was effective at the end of the follow-up in 57.9% of cases. Clinical inertia was found in 56.8% of patients who did not have metabolic control. The most frequently prescribed medications were metformin (84.0%), glibenclamide (23.4%) and insulin glargine (20.7%). Moreover, 57.6% of the patients were treated with two or more antidiabetic medications. Having metabolic control in the first consult of the follow-up was a protective factor against clinical inertia in the subsequent consultations (OR: 0.08; 95%CI: 0.04-0.15; Pinertia was identifiable and quantifiable and found in similar proportions to other countries. Clinical inertia is a relevant condition given that it interferes with the possibility of controlling this pathology. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Characterization of biosynthesis and modes of action of prostaglandin E2 and prostacyclin in guinea pig mesenteric lymphatic vessels.

    Rehal, Sonia; Blanckaert, Pauline; Roizes, Simon; von der Weid, Pierre-Yves

    2009-12-01

    Rhythmical transient constrictions of the lymphatic vessels provide the means for efficient lymph drainage and interstitial tissue fluid balance. This activity is critical during inflammation, to avoid or limit oedema resulting from increased vascular permeability, mediated by the release of various inflammatory mediators. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and prostacyclin modulate lymphatic contractility in isolated guinea pig mesenteric lymphatic vessels. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to assess the expression of mRNA for enzymes and receptors involved in the production and action of PGE(2) and prostacyclin in mesenteric collecting lymphatic vessels. Frequency and amplitude of lymphatic vessel constriction were measured in the presence of these prostaglandins and the role of their respective EP and IP receptors assessed. Prostaglandin E(2) and prostacyclin decreased concentration-dependently the frequency, without affecting the amplitude, of lymphatic constriction. Data obtained in the presence of the EP(4) receptor antagonists, GW627368x (1 microM) and AH23848B (30 microM) and the IP receptor antagonist CAY10441 (0.1 microM) suggest that PGE(2) predominantly activates EP(4), whereas prostacyclin mainly stimulates IP receptors. Inhibition of responses to either prostaglandin with H89 (10 microM) or glibenclamide (1 microM) suggested a role for the activation of protein kinase A and ATP-sensitive K(+) channels. Our findings characterized the inhibition of lymphatic pumping induced by PGE(2) or prostacyclin in guinea pig mesenteric lymphatics. This action is likely to impair oedema resolution and to contribute to the pro-inflammatory actions of these prostaglandins.

  9. Intact nitric oxide production is obligatory for the sustained flow response during hypercapnic acidosis in guinea pig heart.

    Heintz, Anke; Koch, Thea; Deussen, Andreas

    2005-04-01

    The mechanisms underlying hypercapnic coronary dilation remain unsettled. This study tests the hypothesis that flow dependent NO production is obligatory for the hypercapnic flow response. In isolated, constant pressure (CP) perfused guinea pig hearts a step change of arterial pCO(2) from 38.6 to 61.4 mm Hg induced a bi-phasic flow response with an early transient (maximum 60 s) and a consecutive persisting flow rise (121.6+/-6.6 (S.D.) % after 10 min). In contrast, when perfused with constant flow (CF), perfusion pressure only transiently (2 min) fell by 7.4+/-4.8 % following the step change of arterial pCO(2). In CP perfused hearts L-NAME (100 micromol/l) specifically abolished the delayed flow rise during hypercapnic acidosis (102.37+/-2.9% after 10 min), whereas the inhibitor had no effect on perfusion pressure response in CF perfused hearts. Under CP perfusion arterial hypercapnia resulted in a transient rise of coronary cGMP release (from 0.69+/-0.35 to 1.12+/-0.68 pmol/ml), which was abolished after L-NAME. Surprisingly, the K(+)ATP channel blocker glibenclamide did not have any significant effect on the hypercapnic flow response but largely blunted reactive hyperemia after a 20 s flow stop. The delayed steady state hypercapnic flow response in guinea pig heart requires intact NO production. The absence of a persisting decrease in coronary resistance under CF perfusion points to an important role of shear stress dependent NO production.

  10. Mechanism of resveratrol-induced relaxation of the guinea pig fundus.

    Tsai, Ching-Chung; Tey, Shu-Leei; Lee, Ming-Che; Liu, Ching-Wen; Su, Yu-Tsun; Huang, Shih-Che

    2018-04-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound that can be isolated from plants and also is a constituent of red wine. Resveratrol induces relaxation of vascular smooth muscle and may prevent cardiovascular diseases. Impaired gastric accommodation plays an important role in functional dyspepsia and fundic relaxation and is a therapeutic target of functional dyspepsia. Although drugs for fundic relaxation have been developed, these types of drugs are still rare. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relaxant effects of resveratrol in the guinea pig fundus. We studied the relaxant effects of resveratrol in the guinea pig fundus. In addition, we investigated the mechanism of resveratrol-induced relaxation on the guinea pig fundus by using tetraethylammonium (a non-selective potassium channel blocker), apamine (a selective inhibitor of the small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel), iberiotoxin (an inhibitor of large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels), glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker), KT 5720 (a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A inhibitor), KT 5823 (a cGMP-dependent protein kinase G inhibitor), NG-nitro-L-arginine (a competitive inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase), tetrodotoxin (a selective neuronal Na + channel blocker), ω-conotoxin GVIA (a selective neuronal Ca 2+ channel blocker) and G-15 (a G-protein coupled estrogen receptor antagonist). The results of this study showed that resveratrol has potent and dose-dependent relaxant effects on the guinea pig fundic muscle. In addition, the results showed that resveratrol-induced relaxation of the guinea pig fundus occurs through nitric oxide and ATP-sensitive potassium channels. This study provides the first evidence concerning the relaxant effects of resveratrol in the guinea pig fundic muscle strips. Furthermore, resveratrol may be a potential drug to relieve gastrointestinal dyspepsia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Intracolonic hydrogen sulfide lowers blood pressure in rats.

    Tomasova, Lenka; Dobrowolski, Leszek; Jurkowska, Halina; Wróbel, Maria; Huc, Tomasz; Ondrias, Karol; Ostaszewski, Ryszard; Ufnal, Marcin

    2016-11-30

    Research suggests that hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is an important biological mediator involved in various physiological processes including the regulation of arterial blood pressure (BP). Although H 2 S is abundant in the colon, the effects of gut-derived H 2 S on the circulatory system have not yet been investigated. We studied the effects of intracolonic administration of Na 2 S, a H 2 S donor, on systemic hemodynamics. Hemodynamics were recorded in anesthetized, normotensive Wistar Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rats at baseline and after intracolonic injection of either saline (controls) or Na 2 S·9H 2 O saline solution at a dose range of 10-300 mg/kg of BW. The H 2 S donor produced a significant, dose-dependent decrease in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), which lasted several times longer than previously reported after parenteral infusions (>90 min). The effect was more pronounced in hypertensive than in normotensive rats. The Na 2 S-induced decrease in MABP was reduced by pretreatment with glibenclamide, an inhibitor of ATP-sensitive potassium-channels. Na 2 S did not affect mesenteric vein blood flow. Rats treated with Na 2 S showed increased portal blood levels of thiosulfate and sulfane sulfur, products of H 2 S oxidation. In contrast, rats treated with neomycin, an antibiotic, showed significantly decreased levels of thiosulfate and sulfane sulfur, and a tendency for greater hypotensive response to Na 2 S. The H 2 S donor decreased heart rate but did not affect ECG morphology and QTc interval. In conclusion the gut-derived H 2 S may contribute to the control of BP and may be one of the links between gut microbiota and hypertension. Furthermore, gut-derived H 2 S may be a therapeutic target in hypertension. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolation of Antidiabetic Principle from Fruit Rinds of Punica granatum

    Jain, Vishal; Viswanatha, G. L.; Manohar, D.; Shivaprasad, H. N.

    2012-01-01

    Present study was aimed to isolate and evaluate the antidiabetic activity of phytoconstituents from fruit rinds of Punica granatum. With the above objectives Valoneic acid dilactone (VAD) was isolated from methanolic fruit rind extracts of Punica granatum (MEPG) and confirmed by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and mass spectral data. Antidiabetic activity was evaluated by Aldose reductase, α-amylase and PTP1B inhibition assays in in vitro and Alloxan-induced diabetes in rats was used as an in vivo model. In bioactivity studies, MEPG and VAD have showed potent antidiabetic activity in α-amylase, aldose reductase, and PTP1B inhibition assays with IC50 values of 1.02, 2.050, 26.25 μg/mL and 0.284, 0.788, 12.41 μg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, in alloxan-induced diabetes model MEPG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) and VAD (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg, p.o.) have showed significant and dose dependent antidiabetic activity by maintaining the blood glucose levels within the normal limits. Inline with the biochemical findings histopathology of MEPG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.), VAD (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg, p.o.), and glibenclamide (10 mg/kg, p.o.) treated animals showed significant protection against alloxan-induced pancreatic tissue damage. These findings suggest that MEPG and VAD possess significant antidiabetic activity in both in vitro and in vivo models. PMID:22919408

  13. Three C-terminal residues from the sulphonylurea receptor contribute to the functional coupling between the KATP channel subunits SUR2A and Kir6.2

    Dupuis, Julien P; Revilloud, Jean; Moreau, Christophe J; Vivaudou, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are metabolic sensors formed by the association of the inward rectifier potassium channel Kir6.2 and the sulphonylurea receptor SUR2A. SUR2A adjusts channel gating as a function of intracellular ATP and ADP and is the target of pharmaceutical openers and blockers which, respectively, up- and down-regulate Kir6.2. In an effort to understand how effector binding to SUR2A translates into Kir6.2 gating modulation, we examined the role of a 65-residue SUR2A fragment linking transmembrane domain TMD2 and nucleotide-binding domain NBD2 that has been shown to interact with Kir6.2. This fragment of SUR2A was replaced by the equivalent residues of its close homologue, the multidrug resistance protein MRP1. The chimeric construct was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and characterized using the patch-clamp technique. We found that activation by MgADP and synthetic openers was greatly attenuated although apparent affinities were unchanged. Further chimeragenetic and mutagenetic studies showed that mutation of three residues, E1305, I1310 and L1313 (rat numbering), was sufficient to confer this defective phenotype. The same mutations had no effects on channel block by the sulphonylurea glibenclamide or by ATP, suggesting a role for these residues in activatory – but not inhibitory – transduction processes. These results indicate that, within the KATP channel complex, the proximal C-terminal of SUR2A is a critical link between ligand binding to SUR2A and Kir6.2 up-regulation. PMID:18450778

  14. Antihyperglycemic activities of leaves of three edible fruit plants (Averrhoa carambola, Ficus hispida and Syzygium samarangense) of Bangladesh.

    Shahreen, Shejuty; Banik, Joyanta; Hafiz, Abdul; Rahman, Shahnaz; Zaman, Anahita Tanzia; Shoyeb, Md Abu; Chowdhury, Majeedul H; Rahmatullah, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae), Ficus hispida L.f. (Moraceae), and Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merr. & L.M. Perry (Myrtaceae) are three common plants in Bangladesh, the fruits of which are edible. The leaves and fruits of A. carambola and F. hispida are used by folk medicinal practitioners for treatment of diabetes, while the leaves of S. samarangense are used for treatment of cold, itches, and waist pain. Since scientific studies are absent on the antihyperglycemic effects of the leaves of the three plants, it was the objective of the present study to evaluate the antihyperglycemic potential of methanolic extract of leaves of the plants in oral glucose tolerance tests carried out with glucose-loaded mice. The extracts at different doses were administered one hour prior to glucose administration and blood glucose level was measured after two hours of glucose administration (p.o.) using glucose oxidase method. Significant oral hypoglycemic activity was found with the extracts of leaves of all three plants tested. The fall in serum glucose levels were dose-dependent for every individual plant, being highest at the highest dose tested of 400 mg extract per kg body weight. At this dose, the extracts of A. carambola, F. hispida, and S. samarangense caused, respectively, 34.1, 22.7, and 59.3% reductions in serum glucose levels when compared to control animals. The standard antihyperglycemic drug, glibenclamide, caused a 57.3% reduction in serum glucose levels versus control. Among the three plants evaluated, the methanolic extract of leaves of S. samarangense proved to be the most potent in demonstrating antihyperglycemic effects. The result validates the folk medicinal uses of A. carambola and F. hispida in the treatment of diabetes, and indicates that the leaves of S. samarangense can also possibly be used for amelioration of diabetes-induced hyperglycemia.

  15. Antihyperglycaemic potential of the water-ethanol extract of Kalanchoe crenata (Crassulaceae).

    Kamgang, René; Mboumi, Rostand Youmbi; Fondjo, Angèle Foyet; Tagne, Michel Archange Fokam; N'dillé, Gabriel Patrice Roland Mengue; Yonkeu, Jeanne Ngogang

    2008-01-01

    Kalanchoe crenata is a vegetable widely used in Cameroon and largely efficient in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. The effect of the water-ethanol extract of this plant (WEKC) on blood glucose levels was investigated in fasting normal and diet-induced diabetic rats (MACAPOS 1) after a short- and medium-term treatment. Diabetes was induced by submitting Wistar rats to a hypercaloric sucrose diet over 4 months. Six hours after a single oral administration of WEKC, 135 and 200 mg kg(-1) body weight extracts significantly (P < 0.01) reduced the blood glucose levels both in normal and diabetic rats without real dose-dependent effect. During the medium-term treatment, 200 mg kg(-1) WEKC administered daily for 4 weeks significantly reduced blood glucose levels within week 1 (P < 0.05), with a maximum effect at week 4 (-52%, P < 0.01), while maintaining glycaemia within the normal range. All the WEKC-treated diabetic rats exhibited significant (P < 0.01) increase in insulin sensitivity index (K (ITT)) compared with the initial time and to the untreated diabetic animals. Animals treated for 4 weeks exhibited a slight resistance in body-weight gain and decrease in food and water intake. The WEKC activities on all parameters assessed were comparable with the glibenclamide effects. Qualitative phytochemical screening revealed that K. crenata contains terpenoids, tannins, polysaccharids, saponins, flavonoids and alkaloids. The data suggest that K. crenata might contain important chemical components that could induce significant improvement in glucose clearance and/or uptake and resistance to body-weight gain and insulin sensitivity, and could be a potent alternative or complementary therapeutic substance in the control of type 2 diabetes and other insulin-resistant conditions.

  16. Peroxynitrite-induced relaxation in isolated canine cerebral arteries and mechanisms of action

    Li Jianfeng; Li Wenyan; Altura, Bella T.; Altura, Burton M.

    2004-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the vascular actions of peroxynitrite (ONOO - ), the product of superoxide and nitric oxide (NO), in isolated canine cerebral arteries and to gain insight into its potential mechanisms of action. In the absence of any vasoactive agent, ONOO - (from 10 -7 to 10 -6 M) was able to reduce the basal tension. In prostaglandin F2α-precontracted canine basilar arterial rings, ONOO - elicited concentration-dependent relaxation at concentrations from 10 -8 to 10 -5 M. The effective concentrations producing approximately 50% maximal relaxation (EC 50 ) to ONOO - were 4.06 x 10 -6 and 4.12 x 10 -6 M in intact and denuded rings, respectively (P > 0.05). No significant differences in relaxation responses were found in ring preparations with or without endothelium (P > 0.05). The presence of either 5 μM methylene blue (MB) or 5 μM 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-α]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) significantly inhibited the relaxations induced by ONOO - . Tetraethylammonium chloride (T-2265) significantly decreased the ONOO - -induced relaxations in a concentration-dependent manner. However, ONOO - had no effect on rings precontracted by high KCL (P > 0.05). Addition of low concentrations of calyculin A (50 nM) was able to abolish the ONOO - -induced relaxation. Furthermore, ONOO - significantly inhibited calcium-induced contractions of K + -depolarized canine cerebral rings in a concentration-related manner. Lastly, a variety of pharmacological agents and antagonists including L-NMMA, L-arginine, indomethacin, atropine, naloxone, diphenhydramine, cimetine, glibenclamide, haloperidol, etc., did not influence the relaxant effects of ONOO - on the rings. Our new results suggest that ONOO - -triggered relaxation, on canine cerebral arteries, is mediated by elevation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, membrane hyperpolarization via K+ channel activation, activation of myosin light chain phosphatase activity, and interference with

  17. Protective effect of oryzanol isolated from crude rice bran oil in experimental model of diabetic neuropathy

    Somsuvra B. Ghatak

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have implicated the involvement of poor glycemic control and oxidative/nitrosative stress in the development of diabetic neuropathic pain, an important microvascular complication affecting more than 50% of diabetic patients. However, lack of understanding of the underlying etiology, development of tolerance, inadequate relief and possible toxicity associated with classical analgesics warrant the investigation of the novel agents. Therefore, the present study was carried out to investigate the effect of oryzanol (OZ, a commercially-important potent antioxidant component isolated from from crude rice bran oil (cRBO, in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic neuropathy in rats. After eight weeks, diabetic rats developed neuropathy which was evident from decreased tail-flick latency (thermal hyperalgesia and increased nociceptive behavior during the formalin test. This was accompanied by decreased motor coordination based on the evaluation of neuromuscular strength. Na+ K+ ATPase, a biochemical marker associated with the development of diabetic neuropathy, was significantly inhibited in the sciatic nerve of diabetic animals. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation levels were significantly elevated in diabetic rats, indicating the involvement of oxidative stress in diabetic neuropathy. Chronic treatment with oryzanol (OZ (50 and 100 mg/kg per oral (p.o. and standard drug glibenclamide (Gl (10 mg/kg, p.o. significantly attenuated the behavioral as well as biochemical changes associated with diabetic neuropathy. The findings provide experimental evidence to the protective effects of OZ on hyperglycemia-induced thermal hyperalgesia and oxidative stress which might be responsible for diabetes induced nerve damage.

  18. Ethanol extract of seeds of Oenothera odorata induces vasorelaxation via endothelium-dependent NO-cGMP signaling through activation of Akt-eNOS-sGC pathway.

    Kim, Hye Yoom; Oh, Hyuncheol; Li, Xiang; Cho, Kyung Woo; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2011-01-27

    The vasorelaxant effect of ethanol extract of seeds of Oenothera odorata (Onagraceae) (one species of evening primroses) (ESOO) and its mechanisms involved were defined. Changes in vascular tension, guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) levels, and Akt expression were measured in carotid arterial rings from rats. Seeds of Oenothera odorata were extracted with ethanol (94%) and the extract was filtered, concentrat