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Sample records for glenohumeral joint pathologies

  1. Concomitant glenohumeral pathologies associated with acute and chronic grade III and grade V acromioclavicular joint injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Gunnar; Millett, Peter J; Tahal, Dimitri S; Al Ibadi, Mireille; Lill, Helmut; Katthagen, Jan Christoph

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the risk of concomitant glenohumeral pathologies with acromioclavicular joint injuries grade III and V. Patients who underwent arthroscopically-assisted stabilization of acromioclavicular joint injuries grade III or grade V between 01/2007 and 12/2015 were identified in the patient databases of two surgical centres. Gender, age at index surgery, grade of acromioclavicular joint injury (Rockwood III or Rockwood V), and duration between injury and index surgery (classified as acute or chronic) were of interest. Concomitant glenohumeral pathologies were noted and their treatment was classified as debridement or reconstructive procedure. A total of 376 patients (336 male, 40 female) were included. Mean age at time of arthroscopic acromioclavicular joint reconstruction surgery was 42.1 ± 14.0 years. Overall, 201 patients (53%) had one or more concomitant glenohumeral pathologies. Lesions of the biceps tendon complex and rotator cuff were the most common. Forty-five patients (12.0%) had concomitant glenohumeral pathologies that required an additional repair. The remaining 156 patients (41.5%) received a debridement of their concomitant pathologies. Rockwood grade V compared to Rockwood grade III (p = 0.013; odds ratio 1.7), and chronic compared to acute injury were significantly associated with having a concomitant glenohumeral pathology (p = 0.019; odds ratio 1.7). The probability of having a concomitant glenohumeral pathology was also significantly associated with increasing age (p acromioclavicular joint injury of either grade III or V. Twenty-two percent of these patients with concomitant glenohumeral pathologies received an additional dedicated repair procedure. Although a significant difference in occurrence of concomitant glenohumeral pathologies was seen between Rockwood grades III and V, and between acute and chronic lesions, increasing age was identified as the most dominant predictor. Level IV, case series.

  2. Glenohumeral Joint Injections

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    Gross, Christopher; Dhawan, Aman; Harwood, Daniel; Gochanour, Eric; Romeo, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Context: Intra-articular injections into the glenohumeral joint are commonly performed by musculoskeletal providers, including orthopaedic surgeons, family medicine physicians, rheumatologists, and physician assistants. Despite their frequent use, there is little guidance for injectable treatments to the glenohumeral joint for conditions such as osteoarthritis, adhesive capsulitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Evidence Acquisition: We performed a comprehensive review of the available literature on glenohumeral injections to help clarify the current evidence-based practice and identify deficits in our understanding. We searched MEDLINE (1948 to December 2011 [week 1]) and EMBASE (1980 to 2011 [week 49]) using various permutations of intra-articular injections AND (corticosteroid OR hyaluronic acid) and (adhesive capsulitis OR arthritis). Results: We identified 1 and 7 studies that investigated intra-articular corticosteroid injections for the treatment of osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis, respectively. Two and 3 studies investigated the use of hyaluronic acid in osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis, respectively. One study compared corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid injections in the treatment of osteoarthritis, and another discussed adhesive capsulitis. Conclusion: Based on existing studies and their level of evidence, there is only expert opinion to guide corticosteroid injection for osteoarthritis as well as hyaluronic acid injection for osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis. PMID:24427384

  3. Glenohumeral joint translation and muscle activity in patients with symptomatic rotator cuff pathology: An ultrasonographic and electromyographic study with age-matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Sangeeta; Taylor, Nicholas F; Soo, Brendan; Green, Rodney A

    2018-03-02

    To determine whether patients with symptomatic rotator cuff pathology had more glenohumeral joint translation and different patterns of rotator cuff muscle activity compared to controls. Repeated measurements of glenohumeral translation and muscle activity in two positions and six testing conditions in two groups. Twenty participants with a symptomatic and diagnosed rotator cuff tear and 20 age, and gender matched controls were included. Neuromuscular activity was tested by inserting intramuscular electrodes in the rotator cuff muscles. Anterior and posterior glenohumeral translations were measured using real time ultrasound in testing conditions (with and without translation force, with and without isometric internal and external rotation), in two positions (shoulder neutral, 90° of abduction) and two force directions (anterior, posterior). Symptomatic pathology group demonstrated increased passive glenohumeral translation with posterior translation force (protator cuff muscle contraction in the pathology group limited joint translation in a similar manner to the control group, but they did not show the normal direction specific pattern in the neutral posterior position (protator cuff still controlled glenohumeral translation. These results highlight the need to consider joint translation in the assessment and management of patients with rotator cuff injury. Copyright © 2018 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The use of ultrasound in the assessment of the glenoid labrum of the glenohumeral joint. Part II: Examples of labral pathologies

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    Wojciech Krzyżanowski

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Labral pathologies of the glenohumeral joint are most commonly caused by trauma. The majority of lesions affect the anterior part of labrum, resulting from much higher frequency of anterior shoulder dislocations over posterior ones. Another subgroup of labral lesions, not directly related to joint instability, are SLAP tears. Other findings include degenerative changes of labrum and paralabral cysts. Diagnostic imaging is crucial for making a decision regarding operative treatment. Apart from a standard X-ray examination, the imaging mainly relies on magnetic resonance or computed tomography arthrography. Based on their own experience, the authors propose the use of ultrasound in the assessment of labral tears of the glenohumeral joint. Different signs indicating labral pathology may be discovered and assessed during ultrasound examination. They include permanent displacement of the labrum onto the glenoid, labral instability during dynamic examination, lack of the labrum in the anatomical position, hypoechoic zone at the base of the labrum >2 mm in width, residual or swollen labrum as well as paralabral cyst(s. The most frequent appearance of labral pathology is displacement of the anteroinferior labrum onto the external aspect of the glenoid typically seen after anterior shoulder dislocation. The another most important US feature is labral instability while dynamically examined. The swelling or reduced size of the labrum usually indicates degeneration. This article presents sonographic images of selected labral pathologies.

  5. Synovial Lipomatosis of the Glenohumeral Joint

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    Shaul Beyth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial lipomatosis (also known as lipoma arborescens is a rare and benign lesion affecting synovium-lined cavities. It is characterized by hyperplasia of mature fat tissue in the subsynovial layer. Although the most commonly affected site is the knee joint, rarely additional locations such as tendon sheath and other joints are involved. We present a case of synovial lipomatosis of the glenohumeral joint in a 44-year-old man. The clinical data radiological studies and histopathologic results are described, as well as a review of the current literature.

  6. Painful glenohumeral joint instability in athletes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, F.; Dragoni, S.; Giombini, A.

    1991-01-01

    Instability of the glenohumeral joints is a common cause of chronic shoulder pain and disability in athletes using repetitive arm movements in elevation and external rotation. A series of 29 athletes with persistent shoulder discomfort for transient subluxation was evaluated with plain radiography and tomography in right axillary projection. The purpose was to detect abnormalities in the osseous glenoid rim. Twenty-six patients (89.6% of all cases studied) had various degrees of skeletal damage, including 18 fractures (69.2%) of the anterior rim, 2 (7.6%) of the posterior rim, and 6 cases (23.07%) of local degenerative changes; 3 cases were negative for skeletal damages. The results of this study demontrate conventional radiography to be useful in the diagnostic assessment of shoulder pain in athletes, where similar problems must be promptly detected and not ignored

  7. MRI characterization of the glenohumeral joint in Apert syndrome

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    McHugh, Tami [University of Illinois-Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Wyers, Mary [Children' s Memorial Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Children' s Plaza, Box 9, Chicago, IL (United States); King, Erik [Children' s Memorial Hospital, Orthopaedic Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2007-06-15

    The features of craniosynostosis, facial dysmorphism, and distal extremity syndactyly in Apert syndrome are well known. However, there have been limited descriptions of the associated glenohumeral joint findings. We report the radiographic and MRI abnormalities of the glenohumeral joints in a 10-month-old girl with Apert syndrome. The MRI findings in the girl support the hypothesis that the pathogenesis of Apert syndrome is caused by defective cartilage segmentation with premature and abnormal ossification of a cartilage bar within a joint space. The resultant shoulder joint deformity is related to glenoid hypoplasia and growth arrest of the medial aspect of the humeral head. (orig.)

  8. Non-contrast MR imaging of the glenohumeral joint. Part II. Glenohumeral instability and labrum tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii, Mahvash

    2004-01-01

    MR imaging of the shoulder without contrast is frequently used for evaluation of glenohumeral instability in spite of the popularity of MR arthrography. With proper imaging technique, familiarity with normal anatomy and variants as well as knowledge of the expected pathologic findings high diagnostic accuracy may be achieved. (orig.)

  9. Non-contrast MR imaging of the glenohumeral joint. Part II. Glenohumeral instability and labrum tears

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    Rafii, Mahvash [NYU School of Medicine, NYU Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York (United States)

    2004-11-01

    MR imaging of the shoulder without contrast is frequently used for evaluation of glenohumeral instability in spite of the popularity of MR arthrography. With proper imaging technique, familiarity with normal anatomy and variants as well as knowledge of the expected pathologic findings high diagnostic accuracy may be achieved. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of glenohumeral joint diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieft, G.J.; Bloem, J.L.; Obermann, W.R.; Rozing, P.; Doornbos, J.

    1987-01-01

    Through the application of oblique planes and flexible surface coil techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) promises to be of great clinical value in the evaluation of a variety of pathologic conditions affecting the shoulder. In patients with joint effusions, the tendinous portion of the rotator cuff, glenoid labrum, and bicipital tendon can be readily visualized. This capability has particular relevance in patients with inflammatory disease and traumatic conditions. Rotator cuff atrophy and impingement of the coracoacromial arc upon the supraspinatus muscle and tendon can also be demonstrated. MRI is also useful in the evaluation of shoulder instability. (orig.)

  11. In Vivo Measurement of Glenohumeral Joint Contact Patterns

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    Bey MichaelJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to describe a technique for measuring in-vivo glenohumeral joint contact patterns during dynamic activities and to demonstrate application of this technique. The experimental technique calculated joint contact patterns by combining CT-based 3D bone models with joint motion data that were accurately measured from biplane x-ray images. Joint contact patterns were calculated for the repaired and contralateral shoulders of 20 patients who had undergone rotator cuff repair. Significant differences in joint contact patterns were detected due to abduction angle and shoulder condition (i.e., repaired versus contralateral. Abduction angle had a significant effect on the superior/inferior contact center position, with the average joint contact center of the repaired shoulder 12.1% higher on the glenoid than the contralateral shoulder. This technique provides clinically relevant information by calculating in-vivo joint contact patterns during dynamic conditions and overcomes many limitations associated with conventional techniques for quantifying joint mechanics.

  12. MR-guided direct arthrography of the glenohumeral joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soh, E.; Bearcroft, P.W.P.; Graves, M.J.; Black, R.; Lomas, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR)-guided direct arthrography of the glenohumeral joint with a 1.5 T MR system, performing the entire procedure in a single MR examination. Materials and methods: MR-guided direct arthrography was performed on 11 patients. MR imaging guidance and interactive MR fluoroscopy, with in-room control and display system, were used for needle placement and contrast medium injection. The outcome measures were success or failure of joint puncture, the time taken for introduction of contrast medium, and the diagnostic quality of the subsequent MR arthrography images. Results: Contrast medium was successfully instilled into the joint and diagnostic quality MR arthrography images were obtained in all cases. The median time from initial placement of the skin marker to introduction of the contrast medium was 17 min (range 11-29 min). There were no immediate post-procedure complications. Conclusion: Accurate needle placement is feasible in a single MR examination on a commercial 1.5 T closed-bore MR system, using an in-room control and display system together with interactive fluoroscopic imaging, and this was used to provide direct MR arthrography in this study

  13. T2 Mapping of Articular Cartilage of Glenohumeral Joint with Routine MRI Correlation—Initial Experience

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    Maizlin, Zeev V.; Clement, Jason J.; Patola, Wayne B.; Fenton, David M.; Gillies, Jean H.; Vos, Patrick M.; Jacobson, Jon A.

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of articular cartilage currently relies primarily on the identification of morphological alterations of the articular cartilage. Unlike anatomic imaging, T2 mapping is sensitive to changes in the chemical composition and structure of the cartilage. Clinical evaluation of T2 mapping of the glenohumeral joint has not been previously reported. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance T2 mapping of the glenohumeral joint in routine clinica...

  14. Concomitant glenohumeral pathologies in high-grade acromioclavicular separation (type III - V).

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    Markel, Jochen; Schwarting, Tim; Malcherczyk, Dominik; Peterlein, Christian-Dominik; Ruchholtz, Steffen; El-Zayat, Bilal Farouk

    2017-11-10

    Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocations are common injuries of the shoulder associated with physical activity. The diagnosis of concomitant injuries proves complicated due to the prominent clinical symptoms of acute ACJ dislocation. Because of increasing use of minimally invasive surgery techniques concomitant pathologies are diagnosed more often than with previous procedures. The aim of this study was to identify the incidence of concomitant intraarticular injuries in patients with high-grade acromioclavicular separation (Rockwood type III - V) as well as to reveal potential risk constellations. The concomitant pathologies were compiled during routine arthroscopically assisted treatment in altogether 163 patients (147 male; 16 female; mean age 36.8 years) with high-grade acromioclavicular separation (Rockwood type III: n = 60; Rockwood type IV: n = 6; Rockwood type V: n = 97). Acromioclavicular separation occurred less often in women than men (1:9). In patients under 35, the most common cause for ACJ dislocation was sporting activity (37.4%). Rockwood type V was observed significantly more often than the other types with 57.5% (Rockwood type III = 36.8%, Rockwood type IV 3.7%). Concomitant pathologies were diagnosed in 39.3% of the patients with that number rising to as much as 57.3% in patients above 35 years. Most common associated injuries were rotator cuff injuries (32.3%), chondral defects (30.6%) and SLAP-lesions (22.6%). Of all patients, 8.6% needed additional reconstructive surgery. Glenohumeral injuries are a much more common epiphenomenon during acromioclavicular separation than previously ascertained. High risk group for accompanying injuries are patients above 35 years with preexisting degenerative disease. The increasing use of minimally invasive techniques allows for an easier diagnosis and simultaneous treatment of the additional pathologies.

  15. Surgical treatment of a concurrent type 5 acromioclavicular joint dislocation and a failed anterior glenohumeral joint stabilization

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    Rashid, Abbas; Lawrence, Christopher; Tytherleigh-Strong, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic glenohumeral joint dislocation and acromioclavicular joint subluxations tend to occur in young active males. Use of the coracoid process either as a transfer in recurrent instability or in suspensory reconstructions of the coracoclavicular ligaments have gained popularity. However this requires careful consideration in the event of concomitant injuries if they both require surgery.

  16. Non-contrast MR imaging of the glenohumeral joint. Part I. Normal anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii, Mahvash

    2004-01-01

    MR imaging of the shoulder without contrast is frequently used for evaluation of glenohumeral instability in spite of the popularity of MR arthrography. With proper imaging technique, familiarity with normal anatomy and variants as well as knowledge of the expected pathologic findings high diagnostic accuracy may be achieved. (orig.)

  17. Non-contrast MR imaging of the glenohumeral joint. Part I. Normal anatomy

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    Rafii, Mahvash [NYU School of Medicine, NYU Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York (United States)

    2004-10-01

    MR imaging of the shoulder without contrast is frequently used for evaluation of glenohumeral instability in spite of the popularity of MR arthrography. With proper imaging technique, familiarity with normal anatomy and variants as well as knowledge of the expected pathologic findings high diagnostic accuracy may be achieved. (orig.)

  18. Use of the Composite Pedicled Pectoralis Minor Flap after Resection of Soft Tissue Sarcoma in Reconstruction of the Glenohumeral Joint

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    Michiel A. J. van de Sande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The surgical repair of an extensive anterior glenohumeral soft tissue defect is complicated by glenohumeral instability and subsequent significant functional deficit. This surgical note offers a relatively simple reconstruction of the anterior capsule and subscapularis muscle using a pectoralis minor pedicle flap. This reconstruction is supplemented with functional reconstruction of the anterior glenohumeral joint. A conventional deltopectoral approach is utilized and pectoralis minor is freed from its coracoid insertion, released, and mobilized without compromising the pedicle entering from the dorsum and inferior one-third of the muscle. The mobilized pectoralis minor vascular pedicle has sufficient length for the pectoralis minor to be transferred to provide coverage of the anterior shoulder joint even in full external rotation, providing anterior stability. To further improve glenohumeral stability and shoulder function, the pectoralis major muscle can be split with the clavicular part reinserted lateral to the bicipital groove onto the lesser tuberosity replacing subscapularis function while stabilising the glenohumeral joint.

  19. Rotational glenohumeral adaptations are associated with shoulder pathology in professional male handball players.

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    Lubiatowski, Przemyslaw; Kaczmarek, Piotr; Cisowski, Pawel; Breborowicz, Ewa; Grygorowicz, Monika; Dzianach, Marcin; Krupecki, Tomasz; Laver, Lior; Romanowski, Leszek

    2018-01-01

    Glenohumeral range of motion adaptations may affect throwing athletes and contribute to shoulder injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate shoulder rotation deficits among elite professional handball players and its correlation to the presence of shoulder pain and morphological changes. Eighty-seven elite professional handball players and 41 healthy non-athlete volunteers participated in the study. Evaluations included measurement of range of internal and external rotation, total arch of motion, identification of shoulder pain and ultrasound scan for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears and internal impingement. Glenohumeral rotational deficits (>20-25°) were found among 11 players group (13%). The throwing shoulders in the players group showed a decrease in internal rotation and an increase in external rotation with significantly larger ranges among players compared to the non-athlete group. Internal rotation deficit >20° was associated with higher incidence of shoulder pain among players. Both internal rotation deficits (>25°) and total arch of motion deficit (>20°) co-existed with higher incidence of internal impingement. Shoulder pain was common (36/97-41%) and was associated with decreased external rotation and total arch of motion. Internal impingement (found in 13/87-15%) correlated with decreased rotation ranges and a greater deficit in total arch of motion, whereas higher gain in external rotation correlated with a partial rotator cuff tear (found in 12/87-14%). Shoulder pathologies and problems commonly affected the group of handball players. Greater glenohumeral rotational deficits in throwing shoulders of handball players correlate with shoulder pain and internal impingement, while increased external rotation with partial rotator cuff tears. Such deficits affect 13% of the athlete population. Major clinical relevance of the study is to monitor handball players' shoulders both clinically and by proper imaging. Evaluation of range of rotation seems

  20. Glenohumeral Joint Preservation: A Review of Management Options for Young, Active Patients with Osteoarthritis

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    Olivier A. van der Meijden

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of osteoarthritis of the shoulder in young, active patients is a challenge, and the optimal treatment has yet to be completely established. Many of these patients wish to maintain a high level of activity, and arthroplasty may not be a practical treatment option. It is these patients who may be excellent candidates for joint-preservation procedures in an effort to avoid or delay joint replacement. Several palliative and restorative techniques are currently optional. Joint debridement has shown good results and a combination of arthroscopic debridement with a capsular release, humeral osteoplasty, and transcapsular axillary nerve decompression seems promising when humeral osteophytes are present. Currently, microfracture seems the most studied reparative treatment modality available. Other techniques, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation and osteochondral transfers, have reportedly shown potential but are currently mainly still investigational procedures. This paper gives an overview of the currently available joint preserving surgical techniques for glenohumeral osteoarthritis.

  1. The anterior glenohumeral joint capsule: macroscopic and MRI anatomy of the fasciculus obliquus or so-called ligamentum glenohumerale spirale

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    Merila, M.; Eller, A.; Haviko, T. [Department of Orthopaedics, Clinic of Traumatology and Orthopaedics, University of Tartu, Puusepa 8, 51014, Tartu (Estonia); Leibecke, T.; Gehl, H.B. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538, Luebeck (Germany); Busch, L.C. [Institute of Anatomy, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538, Luebeck (Germany); Russlies, M. [Clinic of Orthopaedics, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538, Luebeck (Germany); Kolts, I. [Institute of Anatomy, University of Tartu, Ravila 19, Biomedicum, 50411, Tartu (Estonia)

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the macroscopic and MRI anatomy of the fasciculus obliquus, otherwise known as the ligamentum glenohumerale spirale or spiral GHL of the anterior shoulder joint capsule. Conventional and MR arthrography (1.5-T device Somatom Symphony, Siemens with shoulder coil) images in standard planes were compared with gross anatomic dissection findings in six fresh shoulder specimens from three cadavers. The MR imaging protocol included T1, PD and DESS 3D WI sequences. The macroscopically recognisable band - the spiral GHL - was identified by anatomic dissection and MRI in all the specimens. It was best visualised by MR arthrography on axial and oblique sagittal planes (T1; PD WI) and appeared as a low signal intensity stripe within the superficial layer of the anterior joint capsule. The absence of the variable middle glenohumeral ligament did not influence the anatomic properties and the MR imaging of the spiral GHL. Diagnostic visualisation of the normal anatomic structures is a prerequisite to distinguish between normal and pathologic conditions. Anatomy of the spiral GHL can be used by radiologists for more detailed interpretation of the anterior shoulder joint capsule ligaments on MR images. (orig.)

  2. A case study of an axillary artery pseudoaneurysm following anterior dislocation of the glenohumeral joint: A rare presentation on plain film radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittam, Katie; Hardy, Maryann

    2007-01-01

    Axillary pseudoaneurysm is a rare but important complication of anterior glenohumeral joint dislocation. Diagnosis of axillary pseudoaneurysm is predominantly undertaken following clinical examination but where diagnosis is uncertain, Doppler ultrasound is the imaging examination of choice to confirm diagnosis. In this case study, the initial clinical signs of axillary pseudoaneurysm were masked by the presenting trauma and, although findings indicative of pseudoaneurysm were present on late plain film images, they were not immediately recognised. Misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis of axillary pseudoaneurysm may result in upper limb morbidity or patient mortality. Consequently, the prompt and accurate identification of an axillary pseudoaneurysm on plain film radiographs, although rare, is essential. Yet for inexperienced film readers, correctly identifying an axillary pseudoaneurysm can be difficult due to its apparent similarity to other pathologies. This article will highlight the differences in radiological appearances between a pseudoaneurysm and a gleno-humeral joint effusion to raise radiographer awareness of the risks and clinical signs of an axillary pseudoaneurysm post gleno-humeral joint dislocation and discuss the difficulties encountered in its diagnosis. Finally, this review will evaluate current diagnostic practices in comparison with best practice, as identified in the literature [Fitzgerald JF, Keates J. False aneurysm as a late complication of anterior shoulder dislocation. Ann Surg 1975;6:785-6; Drury JK, Scullion JE. Vascular complications of anterior dislocation of the shoulder. Br J Surg 1980;67(8):579-81. Waxman DL, France MP, Douglas T, Harryman I. Late lateral displacement of the humeral head after closed reduction of dislocation: a sign of vascular injury. J Bone Joint Surg 1996;78(6):907-10

  3. Single and double contrast arthrography in lesions of the glenohumeral joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahovuo, J.

    1984-01-01

    One hundred and forty-five arthrograms from single and double contrast arthrography were compared with respect to their accuracy in revealing lesions of the glenohumeral joint. Total and partial rotator cuff tears were accurately delineated by both single and double contrast arthrography. The size of the tear did not correlate with surgical findings with either technique. The volume of the injected contrast medium was larger in full-thickness rotator cuff tears than in normal arthrograms (p 2 test). No difference in filling frequency of the sheath could be observed between single and double contrast arthrography. This study did not reveal any major advantages of double contrast arthrography over single contrast examinations in lesions of the rotator cuff and those of the tendon of the long head of the biceps brachii. (orig.)

  4. Muscular activation during plyometric exercises in 90° of glenohumeral joint abduction.

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    Ellenbecker, Todd S; Sueyoshi, Tetsuro; Bailie, David S

    2015-01-01

    Plyometric exercises are frequently used to increase posterior rotator cuff and periscapular muscle strength and simulate demands and positional stresses in overhead athletes. The purpose of this study was to provide descriptive data on posterior rotator cuff and scapular muscle activation during upper extremity plyometric exercises in 90° of glenohumeral joint abduction. Levels of muscular activity in the posterior rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers will be high during plyometric shoulder exercises similar to previously reported electromyographic (EMG) levels of shoulder rehabilitation exercises. Descriptive laboratory study. Twenty healthy subjects were tested using surface EMG during the performance of 2 plyometric shoulder exercises: prone external rotation (PERP) and reverse catch external rotation (RCP) using a handheld medicine ball. Electrode application included the upper and lower trapezius (UT and LT, respectively), serratus anterior (SA), infraspinatus (IN), and the middle and posterior deltoid (MD and PD, respectively) muscles. A 10-second interval of repetitive plyometric exercise (PERP) and 3 repetitions of RCP were sampled. Peak and average normalized EMG data were generated. Normalized peak and average IN activity ranged between 73% and 102% and between 28% and 52% during the plyometric exercises, respectively, with peak and average LT activity measured between 79% and 131% and between 31% and 61%. SA activity ranged between 76% and 86% for peak and between 35% and 37% for average activity. Muscular activity levels in the MD and PD ranged between 49% and 72% and between 12% and 33% for peak and average, respectively. Moderate to high levels of muscular activity were measured in the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers during these plyometric exercises with the glenohumeral joint abducted 90°.

  5. Hip joint pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tijssen, M; van Cingel, R E H; de Visser, E

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to (a) describe the clinical presentation of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and hip labral pathology; (b) describe the accuracy of patient history and physical tests for FAI and labral pathology as confirmed by hip arthroscopy. Patients (18......-65 years) were included if they were referred to a physical therapist to gather pre-operative data and were then diagnosed during arthroscopy. Results of pre-operative patient history and physical tests were collected and compared to arthroscopy. Data of 77 active patients (mean age: 37 years) were...

  6. Accuracy of non assisted glenohumeral joint injection in the office setting

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    Sidon, Eliezer, E-mail: eli.sidon@gmail.com [Department of Orthopedics, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, Petach Tikva 49100 (Israel); Velkes, Steven, E-mail: velkes@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopedics, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, Petach Tikva 49100 (Israel); Shemesh, Shai, E-mail: shai.shemesh@gmail.com [Department of Orthopedics, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, Petach Tikva 49100 (Israel); Levy, Jakob, E-mail: Jlevy@clalit.org.il [Department of Imaging, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, Petach Tikva 49100 (Israel); Glaser, Ernesto, E-mail: glaser.ernesto@gmail.com [Department of Imaging, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, Petach Tikva 49100 (Israel); Kosashvili, Yona, E-mail: yonasofi@gmail.com [Department of Orthopedics, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, Petach Tikva 49100 (Israel)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: The diagnostic and therapeutic success of shoulder joint injection depends on its accuracy. Two recent studies reported high success (93–96%) for non-imaging-assisted anterior injection in anesthetized patients. This study examined the accuracy of anterior shoulder injection in awake patients under conditions similar to the office setting. Methods: The study group consisted of 166 consecutive patients with shoulder pain who underwent diagnostic magnetic resonance arthrography at a tertiary medical center in 2011–2012. As part of the examination, contrast material was injected into the glenohumeral joint via an anterior approach by a certified musculoskeletal radiologist without any image assistance. Success was defined as contrast material limited to the intra-articular joint on the scan, without scatter to the periauricular tissue. Results: A successful injection was verified by magnetic resonance arthography in 163 patients (98.2%). Conclusions: Non-assisted anterior shoulder injection is highly accurate (98.2%) in the hands of an experienced radiologist, even in awake patients.

  7. A quantitative method for evaluating inferior glenohumeral joint stiffness using ultrasonography.

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    Tsai, Wen-Wei; Lee, Ming-Yih; Yeh, Wen-Lin; Cheng, Shih-Chung; Soon, Kok-Soon; Lei, Kin Fong; Lin, Wen-Yen

    2013-02-01

    Subluxation of the affected shoulder in post-stroke patients is associated with nerve disorders and muscle fatigue. Clinicians must be able to accurately and reliably measure inferior glenohumeral subluxation in patients to provide appropriate treatment. However, quantitative methods for evaluating the laxity and stiffness of the glenohumeral joint (GHJ) are still being developed. The aim of this study was to develop a new protocol for evaluating the laxity and stiffness of the inferior GHJ using ultrasonography under optimal testing conditions and to investigate changes in the GHJ from a commercially available humerus brace and shoulder brace. Multistage inferior displacement forces were applied to create a glide between the most cephalad point on the visible anterosuperior surface of the humeral head and coracoid process in seven healthy volunteers. GHJ stiffness was defined as the slope of the linear regression line between the glides and different testing loads. The testing conditions were defined by different test loading mechanisms (n=2), shoulder constraining conditions (n=2), and loading modes (n=4). The optimal testing condition was defined as the condition with the least residual variance of measured laxity to the calculated stiffness under different testing loads. A paired t-test was used to compare the laxity and stiffness of the inferior GHJ using different braces. No significant difference was identified between the two test loading mechanisms (t=0.218, p=0.831) and two shoulder constraining conditions (t=-0.235, p=0.818). We concluded that ultrasonographic laxity measurements performed using a pulley set loading mechanism was as reliable as direct loading. Additionally, constraining the unloaded shoulder was proposed due to the lower mean residual variance value. Moreover, pulling the elbow downward with loading on the upper arm was suggested, as pulling the elbow downward with the elbow flexed and loading on the forearm may overestimate stiffness

  8. Glenohumeral joint injection: a comparative study of ultrasound and fluoroscopically guided techniques before MR arthrography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.J.; Collins, J.M.; Maresch, B.J.; Smeets, J.H.R.; Janssen, C.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Jager, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the variability in accuracy of contrast media introduction, leakage, required time and patient discomfort in four different centres, each using a different image-guided glenohumeral injection technique. Each centre included 25 consecutive patients. The ultrasound-guided anterior (USa) and

  9. Glenohumeral stability in simulated rotator cuff tears

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbrink, F.; Groot, J.H.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Helm, F.C.; Rozing, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears disrupt the force balance in the shoulder and the glenohumeral joint in particular, resulting in compromised arm elevation torques. The trade-off between glenohumeral torque and glenohumeral stability is not yet understood. We hypothesize that compensation of lost abduction torque

  10. Efficacy of diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging for articular cartilage lesions of the glenohumeral joint in patients with instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, Meredith L.; Collins, Mark S.; Wenger, Doris E.; Morgan, Joseph A.; Dahm, Diane L.

    2010-01-01

    -invasive method for assessment of articular cartilage damage of the glenohumeral joint prior to diagnostic arthroscopy. (orig.)

  11. Efficacy of diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging for articular cartilage lesions of the glenohumeral joint in patients with instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, Meredith L.; Collins, Mark S.; Wenger, Doris E. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Morgan, Joseph A.; Dahm, Diane L. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2010-12-15

    -invasive method for assessment of articular cartilage damage of the glenohumeral joint prior to diagnostic arthroscopy. (orig.)

  12. The effect of CT dose on glenohumeral joint congruency measurements using 3D reconstructed patient-specific bone models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalone, Emily A; Fox, Anne-Marie V; Jenkyn, Thomas R; King, Graham J W; Johnson, James A; Peters, Terry M; Kedgley, Angela E; Athwal, George S

    2011-01-01

    The study of joint congruency at the glenohumeral joint of the shoulder using computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of joint surfaces is an area of significant clinical interest. However, ionizing radiation delivered to patients during CT examinations is much higher than other types of radiological imaging. The shoulder represents a significant challenge for this modality as it is adjacent to the thyroid gland and breast tissue. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal CT scanning techniques that would minimize radiation dose while accurately quantifying joint congruency of the shoulder. The results suggest that only one-tenth of the standard applied total current (mA) and a pitch ratio of 1.375:1 was necessary to produce joint congruency values consistent with that of the higher dose scans. Using the CT scanning techniques examined in this study, the effective dose applied to the shoulder to quantify joint congruency was reduced by 88.9% compared to standard clinical CT imaging techniques.

  13. The effect of decreasing computed tomography dosage on radiostereometric analysis (RSA) accuracy at the glenohumeral joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Anne-Marie V; Kedgley, Angela E; Lalone, Emily A; Johnson, James A; Athwal, George S; Jenkyn, Thomas R

    2011-11-10

    Standard, beaded radiostereometric analysis (RSA) and markerless RSA often use computed tomography (CT) scans to create three-dimensional (3D) bone models. However, ethical concerns exist due to risks associated with CT radiation exposure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of decreasing CT dosage on RSA accuracy. Four cadaveric shoulder specimens were scanned using a normal-dose CT protocol and two low-dose protocols, where the dosage was decreased by 89% and 98%. 3D computer models of the humerus and scapula were created using each CT protocol. Bi-planar fluoroscopy was used to image five different static glenohumeral positions and two dynamic glenohumeral movements, of which a total of five static and four dynamic poses were selected for analysis. For standard RSA, negligible differences were found in bead (0.21±0.31mm) and bony landmark (2.31±1.90mm) locations when the CT dosage was decreased by 98% (p-values>0.167). For markerless RSA kinematic results, excellent agreement was found between the normal-dose and lowest-dose protocol, with all Spearman rank correlation coefficients greater than 0.95. Average root mean squared errors of 1.04±0.68mm and 2.42±0.81° were also found at this reduced dosage for static positions. In summary, CT dosage can be markedly reduced when performing shoulder RSA to minimize the risks of radiation exposure. Standard RSA accuracy was negligibly affected by the 98% CT dose reduction and for markerless RSA, the benefits of decreasing CT dosage to the subject outweigh the introduced errors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. MRI of rotator cuff muscle atrophy in relation to glenohumeral joint incongruence in brachial plexus birth injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeyhiae, Tiina H.; Nietosvaara, Yrjaenae A.; Peltonen, Jari I.; Remes, Ville M.; Kirjavainen, Mikko O.; Lamminen, Antti E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate rotator cuff muscles and the glenohumeral (GH) joint in brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI) using MRI and to determine whether any correlation exists between muscular abnormality and the development of glenoid dysplasia and GH joint incongruity. Thirty-nine consecutive BPBI patients with internal rotation contracture or absent active external rotation of the shoulder joint were examined clinically and imaged with MRI. In the physical examination, passive external rotation was measured to evaluate internal rotation contracture. Both shoulders were imaged and the glenoscapular angle, percentage of humeral head anterior to the middle of the glenoid fossa (PHHA) and the greatest thickness of the subscapular, infraspinous and supraspinous muscles were measured. The muscle ratio between the affected side and the normal side was calculated to exclude age variation in the assessment of muscle atrophy. All muscles of the rotator cuff were atrophic, with the subscapular and infraspinous muscles being most severely affected. A correlation was found between the percentage of humeral head anterior to the middle of the glenoid fossa (PHHA) and the extent of subscapular muscle atrophy (r s =0.45, P=0.01), as well as between its ratio (r s =0.5, P P=0.01). Severity of rotator cuff muscle atrophy correlated with increased glenoid retroversion and the degree of internal rotation contracture. Glenoid retroversion and subluxation of the humeral head are common in patients with BPBI. All rotator cuff muscles are atrophic, especially the subscapular muscle. Muscle atrophy due to neurogenic damage apparently results in an imbalance of the shoulder muscles and progressive retroversion and subluxation of the GH joint, which in turn lead to internal rotation contracture and deformation of the joint. (orig.)

  15. Cartilage lesions of the glenohumeral joint: diagnostic effectiveness of multidetector spiral CT arthrography and comparison with arthroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecouvet, Frederic E.; Dorzee, Benjamin; Berg, Bruno C. vande; Malghem, Jacques [Cliniques Universitaires St Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Dubuc, Jean E. [Cliniques Universitaires St Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Brussels (Belgium); Jamart, Jacques [Mont Godinne University Hospital, Center of Biostatistics, Yvoir (Belgium)

    2007-07-15

    This study assessed the diagnostic effectiveness of multidetector spiral CT arthrography (MDCTa) in detecting hyaline cartilage abnormalities of the shoulder joint, with correlation to arthroscopy. Shoulder MDCTa images prospectively obtained in 22 consecutive patients (mean age, 50 years; age range, 23-74 years; 12 female, 10 male) were evaluated for glenohumeral cartilage lesions. Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently analysed the cartilage surfaces of the humeral head and of the glenoid fossa in nine anatomical surface areas. Observations of MDCTa were compared to arthroscopic findings. The sensitivity and specificity of MDCTa for grade 2 (substance loss <50%) or higher and grade 3 (substance loss {>=}50%) or higher cartilage lesions, the Spearman correlation coefficient between arthrographic and arthroscopic grading, and K statistics for assessing Intra and Interobserver reproducibility were determined. At MDCTa, sensitivities and specificities ranged between 80% and 94% for the detection of grade 2 or higher cartilage lesions, and between 88% and 98% for the detection of grade 3 or higher cartilage lesions. Spearman correlation coefficients between MDCTa and arthroscopic grading of articular surfaces ranged between 0.532 and 0.651. Interobserver agreement was moderate for grading all articular surfaces ({kappa} = 0.457), but substantial to almost perfect for detecting lesions with substance loss ({kappa}, 0.618-0.876). In conclusion, MDCTa is accurate for the study of cartilage surface in the entire shoulder joint. This technique may beneficially impact patient's management by means of selecting the proper treatment approach. (orig.)

  16. Quantification of the Exposure of the Glenohumeral Joint from the Minimally Invasive to More Invasive Subscapularis Approach to the Anterior Shoulder: a Cadaveric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    fractures to the glenoid or proximal humerus, shoulder resurfacing, total shoulder arthroplasty, and soft tissue repair around the shoulder, including...the labrum, rotator cuff, and cartilaginous surfaces of the glenohumeral joint.13,21 A surgical approach should have the parallel goals of providing...adequate exposure for safe performance of the desired procedure, allow for minimal disruption of soft tissue attachments to the region of interest, and

  17. Construction of computational models for the stress analysis of the bones using CT imaging: application in the gleno-humeral joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisilino, Adrian; D'Amico, Diego; Buroni, Federico; Commisso, Pablo; Sammartino, Mario; Capiel, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    A methodology for the construction of computational models from CT images is presented in this work. Computational models serve for the stress analysis of the bones using the Finite Element Method. The elastic constants of the bone tissue are calculated using the density data obtained in from the CTs. The proposed methodology is demonstrated in the construction of a model for the gleno-humeral joint. (authors) [es

  18. Anatomy of the capsulolabral complex and rotator interval related to glenohumeral instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-02-01

    The glenohumeral joint with instability is a common diagnosis that often requires surgery. The aim of this review was to present an overview of the anatomy of the glenohumeral joint with emphasis on instability based on the current literature and to describe the detailed anatomy and anatomical variants of the glenohumeral joint associated with anterior and posterior shoulder instability. A review was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE using key words: Search terms were "glenohumeral", "shoulder instability", "cadaver", "rotator interval", "anatomy", and "anatomical study". During the last decade, the interest in both arthroscopic repair techniques and surgical anatomy of the glenohumeral ligament (superior, middle, and inferior), labrum, and rotator interval has increased. Understanding of the rotator interval and attachment of the inferior glenohumeral ligament on the glenoid or humeral head have evolved significantly. The knowledge of the detailed anatomy and anatomical variations is essential for the surgeon in order to understand the pathology, make a correct diagnosis of instability, and select proper treatment options. Proper understanding of anatomical variants can help us avoid misdiagnosis. Level of evidence V.

  19. Calcific tendinitis of the long head of the biceps brachii distal to the glenohumeral joint: plain film radiographic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, A B

    1989-11-01

    Calcific tendinitis is a painful condition related to deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals; it favors large joints. The shoulder, specifically the tendons of the rotator cuff and the insertion of the long head of the biceps on the superior glenoid rim, is a well-recognized location for this abnormality. The purpose of this article is to describe a second site of calcific tendinitis of the biceps, distal to the joint and corresponding to the junction of the tendon and muscle. Radiographs in 119 cases of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, obtained between 1980 and 1988, were reviewed. Twenty had calcific tendinitis in the region of the tendon of the long head of the biceps (nine at the glenoid insertion and 11 adjacent to the humeral shaft). All 11 patients with calcific tendinitis at the more distal site had a small, homogeneous deposit adjacent to the proximal humeral shaft. The densities in these 11 cases followed the normal course of the tendon of the long head of the biceps and were therefore medial to the proximal humeral shaft on the internal rotation view, lateral to the proximal humeral shaft on the external rotation view, and anterior to the proximal humeral shaft on the axillary projection. The major differential diagnosis of calcific tendinitis of the tendon of the long head of the biceps is loose bodies trapped in the biceps tendon sheath. Although the position of the soft-tissue densities in these two entities is similar, loose bodies have an appearance of bone, and their source (degenerative arthritis or recurrent dislocations) is usually apparent. A site of calcific tendinitis distal to the glenohumeral joint that is detectable on plain films is reviewed. Accurate diagnosis depends on understanding the anatomy of the tendon of the long head of the biceps brachii. The clinical charts of the 11 patients also are summarized, with emphasis on the association between the roentgen finding and bicipital tendinitis and impingement syndrome.

  20. T2 relaxation times of the glenohumeral joint at 3.0 T MRI in patients with and without primary and secondary osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So-Yeon; Park, Hee-Jin; Kwon, Heon-Ju; Kim, Mi Sung; Choi, Seon Hyeong; Choi, Yoon Jung; Kim, Eugene

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage has recently been applied to patients with osteoarthritis (OA). T2 mapping is a sensitive method of detecting changes in the chemical composition and structure of cartilage. To establish baseline T2 values of glenohumeral joint cartilage at 3.0 T and compare T2 values among subjects with and without OA. The study involved 30 patients (18 women, 12 men; median age, 67 years; age range, 51-78 years) with primary (n = 7) and secondary OA (n = 23) in the glenohumeral joint and 34 subjects without OA (19 women, 15 men; median age, 49 years; age range, 23-63 years). All subjects were evaluated by radiography and 3.0 T MRI including a multi-echo T2-weighted spin echo pulse sequence. The T2 value of the cartilage was measured by manually drawing the region of interest on the T2 map. Per-zone comparison of T2 values was performed using Mann-Whitney U test. Median T2 values differed significantly between subjects without OA (36.00 ms [interquartile range, 33.89-37.31 ms]) and those with primary (37.52 ms [36.84-39.11], P = 0.028), but not secondary (36.87 ms [34.70-41.10], P = 0.160) OA. Glenohumeral cartilage T2 values were higher in different zones between patients with primary and secondary OA than in subjects without OA. These T2 values can be used for comparison to assess cartilage degeneration in patients with shoulder OA. Significant differences in T2 were observed among subjects without OA and those with primary and secondary OA. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014.

  1. A simple method for quantitative evaluation of the missing area of the anterior glenoid in anterior instability of the glenohumeral joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barchilon, Vidal S. [Sapir Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shoulder Service, Kfar-Saba (Israel); Kotz, Eugene [Sapir Medical Center, Department of Imaging, Kfar-Saba (Israel); Barchilon Ben-Av, Mercedes [Achva College of Education, Department of Mathematics, MP Shikmim (Israel); Glazer, Ernesto [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Imaging, Petah Tikva (Israel); Nyska, Meir [Sapir Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kfar-Saba (Israel)

    2008-08-15

    The objective of this study was to describe and validate a simple method to quantitatively calculate the missing area of the anterior part of the glenoid in anterior glenohumeral instability. The calculations were developed from three-dimensional (3D)-reconstructed computerized tomography en face images of the glenoid with 'subtraction' of the humeral head in 13 consecutive cases with known anterior glenohumeral joint instability diagnosed by history and clinical examination. The inferior portion of the glenoid was approximated to a true circle whose center was determined by means of a femoral head gauge. The eroded anterior area was calculated as the ratio between the depth (a perpendicular line from the center of the circle to the eroded edge of the anterior glenoid) and the radius of the inferior glenoid circle. This data was then compared to the results obtained by two additional different methods: direct computerized measurements of the missing area and direct computerized measurement of the ratio between the radius and depth, on two dimensional computed tomography (CT) en face view reconstructions of the glenoid. We provide a function that correlates the ratio between depth and radius of the inferior glenoid circle and the area of the missing anterior glenoid. The results obtained by three different methods were comparable. Simple trigonometric calculations showed that a 5% area defect corresponds to 0.8 (12.5%) of the radius of the inferior glenoid, while a 20% area defect corresponds to 0.5 (50%) of the same radius. Using this simple method and the function provided, the eroded area of the anterior part of the glenoid in anterior glenohumeral instability can be calculated preoperatively using a 3D CT reconstruction of the glenoid with 'subtraction' of the humeral head, obviating the need for sophisticated software to obtain this critical information for preoperative decision making. (orig.)

  2. Problems of the glenohumeral joint in overhead sports - literature review. Part II - pathology and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubiatowski, Przemysław; Kaczmarek, Piotr K; Ślęzak, Marta; Długosz, Jan; Bręborowicz, Maciej; Dudziński, Witold; Romanowski, Leszek

    2014-05-23

    In throwing sports shoulder is exposed to enormous and often repetitive overloads. Some sports (contact sports) are also connected with direct trauma. We are thus dealing with traumatic injuries, overload and degenerative damage. The article discusses the most frequent injuries of the shoulder characteristic for throwing sports. These are mainly disorders of arm rotation, internal impingement, lesion of the labrum (SLAP) and rotator cuff tears (PASTA).

  3. T2 mapping of articular cartilage of the glenohumeral joint at 3.0 T in healthy volunteers: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yusuhn [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jung-Ah [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Hallym University Dongtan Sacred Heart Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hwaseong, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the T2 values of the glenohumeral joint cartilage in healthy asymptomatic individuals at 3.0 T and to analyze the T2 profile of the humeral cartilage. This prospective study was approved by our institutional review board and written informed consent was obtained. Thirteen subjects (mean age, 28.6 years; age range, 24-33 years) were included and underwent multiecho spin-echo T2-weighted MR imaging and T2 mapping was acquired. Regions of interest were placed on the humeral cartilage and glenoid cartilage on oblique coronal images. T2 profiles of humeral cartilage were measured from the bone-cartilage interface to the articular surface. Intra-observer agreement was analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). All 13 joints showed normal appearance on conventional T2-weighted images. The mean T2 values of humeral and glenoid cartilage were 50.5 ± 12.1 and 49.0 ± 9.9 ms, respectively. Intra-observer agreement was good, as determined by ICC (0.736). Longer T2 values were observed at the articular surface with a tendency to decrease toward the bone-cartilage interface. The mean cartilage T2 value was 69.03 ± 21.2 ms at the articular surface and 46.99 ± 19.6 ms at the bone-cartilage interface. T2 values of the glenohumeral joint cartilage were similar to reported values of cartilage in the knee. The T2 profile of normal humeral cartilage showed a spatial variation with an increase in T2 values from the subchondral bone to the articular surface. (orig.)

  4. Qualitative and quantitative descriptions of glenohumeral motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, A M; Bull, A M J; Wallace, A L; Johnson, G R

    2008-02-01

    Joint modelling plays an important role in qualitative and quantitative descriptions of both normal and abnormal joints, as well as predicting outcomes of alterations to joints in orthopaedic practice and research. Contemporary efforts in modelling have focussed upon the major articulations of the lower limb. Well-constrained arthrokinematics can form the basis of manageable kinetic and dynamic mathematical predictions. In order to contain computation of shoulder complex modelling, glenohumeral joint representations in both limited and complete shoulder girdle models have undergone a generic simplification. As such, glenohumeral joint models are often based upon kinematic descriptions of inadequate degrees of freedom (DOF) for clinical purposes and applications. Qualitative descriptions of glenohumeral motion range from the parody of a hinge joint to the complex realism of a spatial joint. In developing a model, a clear idea of intention is required in order to achieve a required application. Clinical applicability of a model requires both descriptive and predictive output potentials, and as such, a high level of validation is required. Without sufficient appreciation of the clinical intention of the arthrokinematic foundation to a model, error is all too easily introduced. Mathematical description of joint motion serves to quantify all relevant clinical parameters. Commonly, both the Euler angle and helical (screw) axis methods have been applied to the glenohumeral joint, although concordance between these methods and classical anatomical appreciation of joint motion is limited, resulting in miscommunication between clinician and engineer. Compounding these inconsistencies in motion quantification is gimbal lock and sequence dependency.

  5. Articular cartilage and labral lesions of the glenohumeral joint: diagnostic performance of 3D water-excitation true FISP MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Tobias Johannes [Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Kantonsspital Muensterlingen, Department of Radiology, PO Box 8596, Muensterlingen (Switzerland); Zanetti, Marco; Saupe, Nadja; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Hodler, Juerg [Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Fucentese, Sandro F. [Hospital Balgrist, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Orthopedic University, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography in the detection of articular cartilage and labral lesions of the glenohumeral joint using a transverse 3D water-excitation true fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) sequence. Seventy-five shoulders were included retrospectively. Shoulder arthroscopy was performed within 6 months of MR arthrography. MR images were evaluated separately by two radiologists. They were blinded to clinical and arthroscopic information. Arthroscopy served as the reference standard. For the detection of humeral cartilage lesions, sensitivities and specificities were 86% (12/14)/89% (50/56) for observer 1 and 93%/86% for observer 2) for the transverse true FISP sequence and 64%/86% (50%/82% for observer 2) for the coronal intermediate-weighted spin-echo images. The corresponding values for the glenoidal cartilage were 60% (6/10)/88% (51/58) (80%/76% for observer 2) and 70%/86% (60%/74% for observer 2) respectively. For the detection of abnormalities of the anterior labrum (only assessed on true FISP images) the values were 94% (15/16)/84% (36/43) (88%/79% for observer 2). The corresponding values for the posterior labrum were 67% (8/12)/77% (36/47) (observer 2: 25%/74%). The kappa values for the grading of the humeral and glenoidal cartilage lesions were 0.81 and 0.55 for true FISP images compared with 0.49 and 0.43 for intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo images. Kappa values for true FISP evaluation of the anterior and posterior part of the labrum were 0.81 and 0.70. Transverse 3D true FISP MR arthrography images are useful for the difficult diagnosis of glenohumeral cartilage lesions and suitable for detecting labral abnormalities. (orig.)

  6. Glenohumeral abduction contracture in children with unresolved neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eismann, Emily A; Little, Kevin J; Laor, Tal; Cornwall, Roger

    2015-01-21

    following neonatal brachial plexus palsy have glenohumeral abduction deformities, with contractures as severe as 65°. The abduction contracture occurs with abductor atrophy, with or without associated adductor atrophy. This contracture may improve global shoulder abduction by positioning the glenohumeral joint in abduction. Glenohumeral and scapulothoracic kinematics and muscle pathology must be further elucidated to advance an understanding of the etiology and the prevention and treatment of the complex shoulder deformity following neonatal brachial plexus palsy. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  7. The application of magnetic resonance imaging in temporomandibular joint pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehmedov, E.T.; Qahramanov, E.T.

    2007-01-01

    The diseases and damages of temporomandibular joint have compleceted diagnostic unlike other bone-joint pathologies. In 2005 for the first time in history it was implemented the magnetic resonance imaging in diagnostics of patients with with temporomandibular joints pathology. The current researches are in place till today. Being the golden standart the application of magnetic resonance tomography has a great role in differential diagnostics of the chronic arthritis, sclerosanse, deformanse arthrosis and arthrosis with internal derancement. This method guaranteed the correct valuation of the bone, disc and muscle structures of the joint and therefore brought full clearance into the problem

  8. Roentgenological semiotics of bone and bone joints pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kishkovskij, A.N.; Elashov, Yu.G.

    1984-01-01

    Physiologic and pathologic processes in bones followed by alternations of bone structure and reflected on roentgenograms are considered and described. Most frequent reasons for roentgenodiagnosis errors in diseases of bone and bone joint apparatus are presented

  9. Comparison Between Image-Guided and Landmark-Based Glenohumeral Joint Injections for the Treatment of Adhesive Capsulitis: A Cost-Effectiveness Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Abballe, Valentino; Virk, Mandeep S; Koo, James; Gold, Heather T; Subhas, Naveen

    2018-04-09

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cost-effectiveness of landmark-based and image-guided intraarticular steroid injections for the initial treatment of a population with adhesive capsulitis. A decision analytic model from the health care system perspective over a 6-month time frame for 50-year-old patients with clinical findings consistent with adhesive capsulitis was used to evaluate the incremental cost-effectiveness of three techniques for administering intraarticular steroid to the glenohumeral joint: landmark based (also called blind), ultrasound guided, and fluoroscopy guided. Input data on cost, probability, and utility estimates were obtained through a comprehensive literature search and from expert opinion. The primary effectiveness outcome was quality-adjusted life years (QALY). Costs were estimated in 2017 U.S. dollars. Ultrasound-guided injections were the dominant strategy for the base case, because it was the least expensive ($1280) and most effective (0.4096 QALY) strategy of the three options overall. The model was sensitive to the probabilities of getting the steroid into the joint by means of blind, ultrasound-guided, and fluoroscopy-guided techniques and to the costs of the ultrasound-guided and blind techniques. Two-way sensitivity analyses showed that ultrasound-guided injections were favored over blind and fluoroscopy-guided injections over a range of reasonable probabilities and costs. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that ultrasound-guided injections were cost-effective in 44% of simulations, compared with 34% for blind injections and 22% for fluoroscopy-guided injections and over a wide range of willingness-to-pay thresholds. Ultrasound-guided injections are the most cost-effective option for the initial steroid-based treatment of patients with adhesive capsulitis. Blind and fluoroscopy-guided injections can also be cost-effective when performed by a clinician likely to accurately administer the medication into the

  10. Glenohumeral osteoarthritis: overview, therapy, and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-Hernández, Salvador Israel; Morones-Alba, Juan Daniel; Miranda-Duarte, Antonio; Coronado-Zarco, Roberto; Soria-Bastida, María de Los Angeles; Nava-Bringas, Tania; Cruz-Medina, Eva; Olascoaga-Gómez, Andrea; Tallabs-Almazan, Laura Verónica; Palencia, Chanell

    2017-08-01

    Glenohumeral osteoarthritis (GHOA) is a common cause of pain and functional disability of the shoulder. Despite the limited evidence, there are several options for the treatment of this pathology. The aim of this article is to provide current information on the characteristics of the disease and the pathophysiology, evidence based on medical and surgical treatments with emphasis on the rehabilitation process. It was performed with an extensive literature review, mainly clinical practice guidelines, randomized controlled trials, reviews, focusing on the rehabilitation management. There are few clinical practice guidelines that address GHOA as a pathology with unique characteristics. Evidence based treatment recommendations are mostly supported by low-quality evidence and experts' opinions, with few high levels of evidence studies guiding treatment decisions. Despite the lack of good quality evidence, rehabilitation programs have proven to be efficient and reliable, and this revision provides information and recommendations in this field. Implication of Rehabilitation Glenohumeral osteoarthritis is a common cause of pain and functional disability of the shoulder There are few clinical practice guidelines that address Glenohumeral Osteoarthritis as a pathology with unique characteristics, and recommendations for rehabilitation and therapeutic exercise are poor The paper provides current information on the characteristics of the disease, its rehabilitation process, and could be of interest for rehabilitation professionals to direct their practices in this field.

  11. Correlação entre flexibilidade das articulações glenoumerais e coxofemorais e o desempenho funcional de idosas fisicamente ativas Association between flexibility of the glenohumeral and hip joints and functional performance in active elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AAR Geraldes

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar a relação entre a flexibilidade da flexão e extensão das articulações glenoumerais (GU e coxofemorais (CF e o desempenho funcional (DF de idosas funcionalmente independentes e fisicamente ativas. MÉTODOS: Determinou-se em 22 voluntárias (idade=70±6 anos seis conjuntos de amplitudes de movimentos por goniometria ativo-assistida (ADM na flexão e extensão das GU e CF. O DF foi determinado pelos testes: velocidade de caminhada habitual (VCH e máxima (VCM; levantar e sentar em cadeira (LSC; Timed up and Go Test (TUGT; vestir blusa (VBL; subir degraus (SE; levantar do decúbito dorsal (LDD; pegar moeda no solo (PMS; teste de caminhada de seis minutos (TC6M. As associações entre as variáveis ADM e o DF foram testadas por técnicas de correlação simples e múltipla. RESULTADOS: Houve correlações significantes (pOBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between flexibility of flexion and extension of the glenohumeral and coxofemoral joints and functional performance among physically active and functionally independent elderly women. METHODS: Six sets of range of motion (ROM measurements relating to flexion and extension of the glenohumeral and coxofemoral joints were determined in 22 volunteers (age 70±6 years, using assisted-active goniometry. Functional performance was measured using the following tests: normal walking speed (NWS; maximum walking speed (MWS; sit-to-stand test (SST; timed up and go test (TUGT; putting on a blouse (PBL; going up stairs (GUS; rising from dorsal decubitus (RDD; picking up a coin from the floor (PCF; and 6-minute walk test (6WT. The relationships between the ROM variables and functional performance were tested using simple and multiple regression techniques. RESULTS: There were significant correlations (p<0.05 between coxofemoral ROM and the SST (r=0.42 and r=0.45, GUS (r=0.52 and r=0.53 and 6WT (r=0.58 and r=0.59 (right and left sides, respectively. The multiple regression ratified

  12. Diagnostic performance of CT-arthrography and 1.5T MR-arthrography for the assessment of glenohumeral joint cartilage: a comparative study with arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omoumi, Patrick [Cliniques Universitaires St Luc - Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Rubini, Alexandra; Berg, Bruno C. vande; Lecouvet, Frederic E. [Cliniques Universitaires St Luc - Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Dubuc, Jean-Emile [Cliniques Universitaires St Luc - Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-04-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of multi-detector CT arthrography (CTA) and 1.5-T MR arthrography (MRA) in detecting hyaline cartilage lesions of the shoulder, with arthroscopic correlation. CTA and MRA prospectively obtained in 56 consecutive patients following the same arthrographic procedure were independently evaluated for glenohumeral cartilage lesions (modified Outerbridge grade ≥2 and grade 4) by two musculoskeletal radiologists. The cartilage surface was divided in 18 anatomical areas. Arthroscopy was taken as the reference standard. Diagnostic performance of CTA and MRA was compared using ROC analysis. Interobserver and intraobserver agreement was determined by κ statistics. Sensitivity and specificity of CTA varied from 46.4 to 82.4 % and from 89.0 to 95.9 % respectively; sensitivity and specificity of MRA varied from 31.9 to 66.2 % and from 91.1 to 97.5 % respectively. Diagnostic performance of CTA was statistically significantly better than MRA for both readers (all p ≤ 0.04). Interobserver agreement for the evaluation of cartilage lesions was substantial with CTA (κ = 0.63) and moderate with MRA (κ = 0.54). Intraobserver agreement was almost perfect with both CTA (κ = 0.94-0.95) and MRA (κ = 0.83-0.87). The diagnostic performance of CTA and MRA for the detection of glenohumeral cartilage lesions is moderate, although statistically significantly better with CTA. (orig.)

  13. High-resolution MR imaging of glenohumeral instability lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii, M.; Firooznia, H.; Sherman, O.; Minkoff, J.; Sherman, M.; Golimbu, C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper determines the accuracy of conventual MR imaging in the diagnosis of glenohumeral instabilities and evaluates various pathologic aspects of these lesions. Records were reviewed in 80 consecutive patients with known or suspected instability who underwent MR imaging. The routine shoulder protocol included a proton density- or T2-weighted sequence. Surgical correlation was available in 31 cases. Diagnosis of glenohumeral instability was based on the presence of a combination of findings of appropriately located tear, osseous abnormality of glenoid margin, capsular abnormalities and Hill-Sachs deformity. In 28 surgically correlated patients with glenohumeral instability an accurate diagnosis was made in all but 1 case of posterior instability. A false diagnosis of instability was suggested in 3 cases by signal abnormality of the labrum and/or a prominent capsule

  14. Knee joint examinations by magnetic resonance imaging: The correlation of pathology, age, and sex

    OpenAIRE

    Serhat Avcu; Ersan Altun; Ihsan Akpinar; Mehmet Deniz Bulut; Kemal Eresov; Tugrul Biren

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The aim of our study was to investigate the incidence and coexistence of multiple knee joint pathologies and the distribution of knee joint pathologies according to age and sex. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed using the clinical data of patients evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee joint. Data from 308 patients examined between August 2002 and July 2003 were included into this study. A Pearson correlation analysis was performed to exam...

  15. PATHOLOGY OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT INTERNAL DERANGEMENT AND OSTEOARTHROSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBONT, LGM; STEGENGA, B

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthrosis and disk displacement seem to be strongly related, but they may also represent mutually independent temporomandibular disorders. This paper presents relevant aspects of normal physiology and degeneration of synovial joints, aspects of normal

  16. Pathological Knee Joint Motion Analysis By High Speed Cinephotography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Jurg U.

    1985-02-01

    The use of cinephotography for evaluation of disturbed knee joint function was compared in three groups of patients. While a sampling rate of 50 images per second was adequate for patients with neuromuscular disorders, a higher frequency of around 300 i.p.s. is necessary in osteoarthritis and ligamentous knee joint injuries, but the task of digitizing is prohibitive unless automated.

  17. A concise evidence-based physical examination for diagnosis of acromioclavicular joint pathology: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krill, Michael K; Rosas, Samuel; Kwon, KiHyun; Dakkak, Andrew; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; McCormick, Frank

    2018-02-01

    The clinical examination of the shoulder joint is an undervalued diagnostic tool for evaluating acromioclavicular (AC) joint pathology. Applying evidence-based clinical tests enables providers to make an accurate diagnosis and minimize costly imaging procedures and potential delays in care. The purpose of this study was to create a decision tree analysis enabling simple and accurate diagnosis of AC joint pathology. A systematic review of the Medline, Ovid and Cochrane Review databases was performed to identify level one and two diagnostic studies evaluating clinical tests for AC joint pathology. Individual test characteristics were combined in series and in parallel to improve sensitivities and specificities. A secondary analysis utilized subjective pre-test probabilities to create a clinical decision tree algorithm with post-test probabilities. The optimal special test combination to screen and confirm AC joint pathology combined Paxinos sign and O'Brien's Test, with a specificity of 95.8% when performed in series; whereas, Paxinos sign and Hawkins-Kennedy Test demonstrated a sensitivity of 93.7% when performed in parallel. Paxinos sign and O'Brien's Test demonstrated the greatest positive likelihood ratio (2.71); whereas, Paxinos sign and Hawkins-Kennedy Test reported the lowest negative likelihood ratio (0.35). No combination of special tests performed in series or in parallel creates more than a small impact on post-test probabilities to screen or confirm AC joint pathology. Paxinos sign and O'Brien's Test is the only special test combination that has a small and sometimes important impact when used both in series and in parallel. Physical examination testing is not beneficial for diagnosis of AC joint pathology when pretest probability is unequivocal. In these instances, it is of benefit to proceed with procedural tests to evaluate AC joint pathology. Ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injections are diagnostic and therapeutic. An ultrasound-guided AC joint

  18. Ultrasound and PET-CT Correlation in Shoulder Pathology: A 5-Year Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Christopher J; Walter, William R; Adler, Ronald S; Babb, James S; Sanger, Joseph; Ponzo, Fabio

    2017-10-01

    To correlate shoulder ultrasound and radiography with F-FDG PET-CT to establish FDG uptake and therefore range of metabolic activity, as defined by SUV analysis, in various symptomatic shoulder pathologies. Retrospective database query was performed for shoulder ultrasound and PET-CT scans between January 2012 and January 2017. Patients who had both studies within 1 year were included. Age- and sex-matched control patients with PET-CT scans only were also included. Retrospective image review determined shoulder pathology, and F-FDG SUVmax was measured using regions of interest placed at the glenohumeral joint, rotator cuff/bursa, and bicipital groove. Glenohumeral and acromioclavicular osteoarthrosis was assessed by radiography using the Kellgren-Lawrence classification system. Thirty-three patients had both imaging studies within 1 year. Ten patients (11 cases) were included, ranging in age from 56 to 90 years (mean, 67.9 years). Control subjects were selected among patients receiving PET-CT within 1 week of symptomatic patients. Glenohumeral osteoarthrosis was mild in 3 (27%), moderate in 2 (18%), and severe in 2 (18%). Six full-thickness rotator cuff tears (55%) were identified. SUVmax means were compared between the pathologic and control groups and were significantly higher in the former: glenohumeral joint (1.96 vs 1.32; P = 0.016), rotator cuff/bursa (2.80 vs 2.0; P = 0.005), and bicipital groove (2.19 vs 1.48; P = 0.007). The highest values were seen in full-thickness rotator cuff tear and severe biceps tenosynovitis. Increased metabolic activity about the shoulder is associated with a spectrum of rotator cuff, glenohumeral joint, and other soft tissue pathology that can be correlated with diagnostic ultrasound findings.

  19. Glenohumeral interposition of rotator cuff stumps: a rare complication of traumatic rotator cuff tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Moraes Agnollitto

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present report describes a case where typical findings of traumatic glenohumeral interposition of rotator cuff stumps were surgically confirmed. This condition is a rare complication of shoulder trauma. Generally, it occurs in high-energy trauma, frequently in association with glenohumeral joint dislocation. Radiography demonstrated increased joint space, internal rotation of the humerus and coracoid process fracture. In addition to the mentioned findings, magnetic resonance imaging showed massive rotator cuff tear with interposition of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and subscapularis stumps within the glenohumeral joint. Surgical treatment was performed confirming the injury and the rotator cuff stumps interposition. It is important that radiologists and orthopedic surgeons become familiar with this entity which, because of its rarity, might be neglected in cases of shoulder trauma.

  20. [Diagnosis of temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction caused by occlusion pathology and treatment of such patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkin, V A; Rabukhina, N A; Kravchenko, D V

    2007-01-01

    Patients with temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction need complex treatment that includes prosthetic treatment in intrajoint relation stabilization. In cases of TMJ pathology it is necessary to examine patients and make axiography, function analysis, MPI-analysis, magnetic resonance tomography and zonography of TMJ, electromyography of the masticatory muscles. The authors examined 47 patients with TMJ dysfunction, 43 of them had occlusion pathology. We managed to eliminate the dysfunction symptoms and to receive stable result of the treatment in all the patients.

  1. [The elbow joint - a diagnostic challenge : anatomy, biomechanics, and pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueller-Weidekamm, C; Kainberger, F

    2008-12-01

    The elbow is one of the most commonly injured joints in sports activities. In particular, weight lifters, golfers, tennis players, and pitchers are affected. Injuries in sports involving overhead throwing are commonly based on the pathophysiologic model of valgus extension overload syndrome. The injuries are commonly complex and demand a good knowledge of the symptoms, the exact anatomy, and the biomechanics to arrive at a precise radiologic diagnosis. The characteristic patterns of injury that occur in specific sports activities are related to a combination of increased varus or valgus and extension or flexion overload that results in tensile forces and/or compression and shear stress. Acute symptoms are frequently based on chronic degeneration of the tendons and ligamentous structures due to repetitive microtrauma from overuse syndrome.

  2. Automatic segmentation of the glenohumeral cartilages from magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubert, A.; Yang, Z.; Engstrom, C.; Xia, Y.; Strudwick, M. W.; Chandra, S. S.; Crozier, S.; Fripp, J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a key role in investigating early degenerative disorders and traumatic injuries of the glenohumeral cartilages. Subtle morphometric and biochemical changes of potential relevance to clinical diagnosis, treatment planning, and evaluation can be assessed from measurements derived from in vivo MR segmentation of the cartilages. However, segmentation of the glenohumeral cartilages, using approaches spanning manual to automated methods, is technically challenging, due to their thin, curved structure and overlapping intensities of surrounding tissues. Automatic segmentation of the glenohumeral cartilages from MR imaging is not at the same level compared to the weight-bearing knee and hip joint cartilages despite the potential applications with respect to clinical investigation of shoulder disorders. In this work, the authors present a fully automated segmentation method for the glenohumeral cartilages using MR images of healthy shoulders. Methods: The method involves automated segmentation of the humerus and scapula bones using 3D active shape models, the extraction of the expected bone–cartilage interface, and cartilage segmentation using a graph-based method. The cartilage segmentation uses localization, patient specific tissue estimation, and a model of the cartilage thickness variation. The accuracy of this method was experimentally validated using a leave-one-out scheme on a database of MR images acquired from 44 asymptomatic subjects with a true fast imaging with steady state precession sequence on a 3 T scanner (Siemens Trio) using a dedicated shoulder coil. The automated results were compared to manual segmentations from two experts (an experienced radiographer and an experienced musculoskeletal anatomist) using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and mean absolute surface distance (MASD) metrics. Results: Accurate and precise bone segmentations were achieved with mean DSC of 0.98 and 0.93 for the humeral head

  3. Automatic segmentation of the glenohumeral cartilages from magnetic resonance images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubert, A., E-mail: ales.neubert@csiro.au [School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia and The Australian E-Health Research Centre, CSIRO Health and Biosecurity, Brisbane 4029 (Australia); Yang, Z. [School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia and Brainnetome Center, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Engstrom, C. [School of Human Movement Studies, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072 (Australia); Xia, Y.; Strudwick, M. W.; Chandra, S. S.; Crozier, S. [School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072 (Australia); Fripp, J. [The Australian E-Health Research Centre, CSIRO Health and Biosecurity, Brisbane, 4029 (Australia)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a key role in investigating early degenerative disorders and traumatic injuries of the glenohumeral cartilages. Subtle morphometric and biochemical changes of potential relevance to clinical diagnosis, treatment planning, and evaluation can be assessed from measurements derived from in vivo MR segmentation of the cartilages. However, segmentation of the glenohumeral cartilages, using approaches spanning manual to automated methods, is technically challenging, due to their thin, curved structure and overlapping intensities of surrounding tissues. Automatic segmentation of the glenohumeral cartilages from MR imaging is not at the same level compared to the weight-bearing knee and hip joint cartilages despite the potential applications with respect to clinical investigation of shoulder disorders. In this work, the authors present a fully automated segmentation method for the glenohumeral cartilages using MR images of healthy shoulders. Methods: The method involves automated segmentation of the humerus and scapula bones using 3D active shape models, the extraction of the expected bone–cartilage interface, and cartilage segmentation using a graph-based method. The cartilage segmentation uses localization, patient specific tissue estimation, and a model of the cartilage thickness variation. The accuracy of this method was experimentally validated using a leave-one-out scheme on a database of MR images acquired from 44 asymptomatic subjects with a true fast imaging with steady state precession sequence on a 3 T scanner (Siemens Trio) using a dedicated shoulder coil. The automated results were compared to manual segmentations from two experts (an experienced radiographer and an experienced musculoskeletal anatomist) using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and mean absolute surface distance (MASD) metrics. Results: Accurate and precise bone segmentations were achieved with mean DSC of 0.98 and 0.93 for the humeral head

  4. Biomechanics of the elbow joint in tennis players and relation to pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eygendaal, Denise; Rahussen, F Th G; Diercks, R L

    2007-11-01

    Elbow injuries constitute a sizeable percentage of tennis injuries. A basic understanding of biomechanics of tennis and analysis of the forces, loads and motions of the elbow during tennis will improve the understanding of the pathophysiology of these injuries. All different strokes in tennis have a different repetitive biomechanical nature that can result in tennis-related injuries. In this article, a biomechanically-based evaluation of tennis strokes is presented. This overview includes all tennis-related pathologies of the elbow joint, whereby the possible relation of biomechanics to pathology is analysed, followed by treatment recommendations.

  5. Joint pathology and behavioral performance in autoimmune MRL-lpr Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakić, B; Szechtman, H; Stead, R H; Denburg, J A

    1996-09-01

    Young autoimmune MRL-lpr mice perform more poorly than age-matched controls in tests of exploration, spatial learning, and emotional reactivity. Impaired behavioral performance coincides temporally with hyperproduction of autoantibodies, infiltration of lymphoid cells into the brain, and mild arthritic-like changes in hind paws. Although CNS mechanisms have been suggested to mediate behavioral deficits, it was not clear whether mild joint pathology significantly affected behavioral performance. Previously we observed that 11-week-old MRL-lpr mice showed a trend for disturbed performance when crossing a narrow beam. The first aim of the present study was to test the significance of this trend by increasing the sample size and, second, to examine the possibility that arthritis-like changes interfere with performance in brief locomotor tasks. For the purpose of the second goal, 18-week-old mice that differ widely in severity of joint disease were selectively taken from the population and tested in beam walking and swimming tasks. It was expected that the severity of joint inflammation would be positively correlated with the degree of locomotor impairment. The larger sample size revealed that young MRL-lpr mice perform significantly more poorly than controls on the beam-walking test, as evidenced by more foot slips and longer traversing time. However, significant correlation between joint pathology scores and measures of locomotion could not be detected. The lack of such relationship suggests that mild joint pathology does not significantly contribute to impaired performance in young, autoimmune MRL-lpr mice tested in short behavioral tasks.

  6. Structural knee joint pathology in patients aged 40 years or older with meniscal tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L S

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Recent studies have challenged the tenet that mechanical symptoms of the knee (i.e. the sensation of catching or locking) are caused by degenerative meniscal tears per se and relieved by surgery. We explored the potential associations between meniscal and other knee joint pathologies...... identified at meniscal surgery with the presence of patient-reported mechanical symptoms. Methods: This study included patients aged 40 years or older undergoing surgery for a meniscal tear from the Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark (KACS). Patients were consecutively recruited from February 2013...... score (KOOS), together with information on previous meniscal surgery. At arthroscopy, the operating surgeon recorded information about specific meniscal pathology (tear location, depth, type, length, meniscal tissue quality and circumferential and radial location) and other structural knee pathologies...

  7. Shoulder strengthening exercises adapted to specific shoulder pathologies can be selected using new simulation techniques: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnier, Caecilia; Lädermann, Alexandre; Kevelham, Bart; Chagué, Sylvain; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Holzer, Nicolas

    2018-02-01

    Shoulder strength training exercises represent a major component of rehabilitation protocols designed for conservative or postsurgical management of shoulder pathologies. Numerous methods are described for exercising each shoulder muscle or muscle group. Limited information is available to assess potential deleterious effects of individual methods with respect to specific shoulder pathologies. Thus, the goal of this pilot study was to use a patient-specific 3D measurement technique coupling medical imaging and optical motion capture for evaluation of a set of shoulder strength training exercises regarding glenohumeral, labral and subacromial compression, as well as elongation of the rotator cuff muscles. One volunteer underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and motion capture of the shoulder. Motion data from the volunteer were recorded during three passive rehabilitation exercises and twenty-nine strengthening exercises targeting eleven of the most frequently trained shoulder muscles or muscle groups and using four different techniques when available. For each exercise, glenohumeral and labral compression, subacromial space height and rotator cuff muscles elongation were measured on the entire range of motion. Significant differences in glenohumeral, subacromial and labral compressions were observed between sets of exercises targeting individual shoulder muscles. Muscle lengths computed by simulation compared to MRI measurements showed differences of 0-5%. This study represents the first screening of shoulder strengthening exercises to identify potential deleterious effects on the shoulder joint. Motion capture combined with medical imaging allows for reliable assessment of glenohumeral, labral and subacromial compression, as well as muscle-tendon elongation during shoulder strength training exercises.

  8. MRI EVALUATION OF PAINFUL KNEE JOINT- THE CORRELATION OF MULTIPLE COEXISTING PATHOLOGIES, AGE AND SEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukheswar Pame

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND 1. To evaluate the incidence and coexistence of multiple knee joint pathologies causing painful knee and their correlation to age and sex. 2. To evaluate the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI features in various knee pathologies and to identify the common lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective study was performed using the clinical data of patients presenting with painful knee joint which were evaluated with MRI. Data from 200 patients examined between September 2015 and August 2016 were included into this study. The data was analysed statistically to evaluate the correlation between the MR pathological findings to age and sex of the patients. RESULTS The patient’s age ranged between 8 and 75 years (mean: 36 years. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear was the commonest finding (60% followed by bursitis (55%, meniscal degeneration (54.6% and meniscal tear (52%. Primary signs of ACL tear were hyperintensity, discontinuity and nonvisualisation. Secondary signs like Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL buckling, PCL index of greater than 0.5, uncovered Lateral meniscus (LM and bone contusion assisted in diagnosis in indeterminate cases. Mid substance was the commonest site of ACL tear (64%. PCL tear accounted for only a small percentage (7%. Medial Meniscus (MM tear (35% was commoner than LM tear (17%. The posterior horn of meniscus was the commonest site of injury (86.5%. Age was significantly correlated with meniscal degeneration and tear, Medial collateral ligament (MCL degeneration, parameniscal cyst, and chondromalacia patellae. A significant correlation between male gender and ACL injury was noted. Meniscal injury was significantly correlated with bursitis, as well with MCL injury. Bone bruise was significantly correlated with ACL injury, MCL injury and Lateral collateral ligament (LCL injury. CONCLUSIONS MRI findings of certain pathologies in a painful knee can coexist and significantly correlate with each other, age and sex of

  9. The selective cathepsin K inhibitor MIV-711 attenuates joint pathology in experimental animal models of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Erik; Rizoska, Biljana; Tunblad, Karin; Edenius, Charlotte; Bendele, Alison M; Maul, Don; Larson, Michael; Shah, Neha; Yoder Otto, Valerie; Jerome, Chris; Grabowska, Urszula

    2018-03-09

    MIV-711 is a highly potent and selective cathepsin K inhibitor. The current article summarizes the therapeutic effects of MIV-711 on joint pathology in rabbits subjected to anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT), and the prophylactic effects on joint pathology in dogs subjected to partial medial meniscectomy, two surgical models of osteoarthritis (OA). Starting 1 week after surgery, rabbits were dosed daily via oral gavage with either MIV-711 or vehicle (n = 7/group) for 7 weeks. The four treatment groups were: (1) sham + vehicle; (2) ACLT + vehicle; (3) ACLT + MIV-711, 30 µmol/kg and (4) ACLT + MIV-711, 100 µmol/kg. Subchondral bone and articular cartilage structures were assessed by µCT, histomorphometry, and scoring. Dogs subjected to partial medial meniscectomy received either MIV-711 (30 µmol/kg) or vehicle (n = 15/group) via oral gavage once daily, starting 1 day before meniscectomy, for 28 days. Cartilage degradation was assessed at the macroscopic and microscopic levels. The exposures of MIV-711 were assessed in both studies and biomarkers reflecting bone resorption (HP-1 in rabbits, CTX-I in dogs) and cartilage degradation (CTX-II) were measured. In ACLT rabbits, MIV-711 decreased HP-1 levels by up to 72% (p subchondral bone plate and reduced trabecular bone volume in the femur and tibia. These effects were reversed by MIV-711. ACLT resulted in cartilage thickening, which was attenuated by MIV-711. MIV-711 did not affect osteophyte formation or Mankin scores. In dogs, MIV-711 reduced CTX-I and CTX-II levels by 86% (p subchondral bone loss and partially attenuates cartilage pathology in two animal models of OA. These beneficial effects of MIV-711 on joint pathology are observed in conjunction with decreases in bone and cartilage biomarkers that have been shown to be clinically attainable in human. The data support the further development of MIV-711 for the treatment of OA.

  10. Osteoprotegerin reduces the development of pain behaviour and joint pathology in a model of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Devi Rani; Ashraf, Sadaf; Xu, Luting; Burston, James J; Menhinick, Matthew R; Poulter, Caroline L; Bennett, Andrew J; Walsh, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2014-08-01

    Increased subchondral bone turnover may contribute to pain in osteoarthritis (OA). To investigate the analgesic potential of a modified version of osteoprotegerin (osteoprotegerin-Fc (OPG-Fc)) in the monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) model of OA pain. Male Sprague Dawley rats (140-260 g) were treated with either OPG-Fc (3 mg/kg, subcutaneously) or vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) between days 1 and 27 (pre-emptive treatment) or days 21 and 27 (therapeutic treatment) after an intra-articular injection of MIA (1 mg/50 µl) or saline. A separate cohort of rats received the bisphosphonate zoledronate (100 µg/kg, subcutaneously) between days 1 and 25 post-MIA injection. Incapacitance testing and von Frey (1-15 g) hind paw withdrawal thresholds were used to assess pain behaviour. At the end of the study, rats were killed and the knee joints and spinal cord removed for analysis. Immunohistochemical studies using Iba-1 and GFAP quantified levels of activation of spinal microglia and astrocytes, respectively. Joint sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin or Safranin-O fast green and scored for matrix proteoglycan and overall joint morphology. The numbers of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts were quantified. N=10 rats/group. Pre-emptive treatment with OPG-Fc significantly attenuated the development of MIA-induced changes in weightbearing, but not allodynia. OPG-Fc decreased osteoclast number, inhibited the formation of osteophytes and improved structural pathology within the joint similarly to the decrease seen after pretreatment with the bisphosphonate, zoledronate. Therapeutic treatment with OPG-Fc decreased pain behaviour, but did not improve pathology in rats with established joint damage. Our data suggest that early targeting of osteoclasts may reduce pain associated with OA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Temporomandibular joint MR images: Incidental head and neck findings and pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Kaan; Avsever, Hakan; Aksoy, Seçil; Seki, Umut; Bozkurt, Poyzan

    2017-10-17

    To report the number and frequency of incidental findings (IFs) detected during magnetic resonance (MR) imaging screening of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to define related diseases. Bilateral TMJ MR images in the sagittal and coronal sections, from 518 patients with TMJ symptoms were evaluated retrospectively. Patients who were diagnosed with IFs were sent for consultation and clarification of the findings. Patient age, gender, IFs, locations, and diseases were classified and noted.  Results: Seventy-eight (15%) patients were diagnosed with 117 IFs. Of them, 43 were diagnosed with a single IF, and 35 were diagnosed with more than one IF. The most frequent locations were paranasal sinuses and mastoid air cells. The most frequent diseases were inflammatory and cystic lesions.  Discussion: While examining TMJ MR images, it is important to check for evidence of IFs or pathologies that may have mimicked signs and symptoms of TMJ disorders.

  12. Anesthetic Mechanism of Myeloacupuncture in Joints аnd Spine Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Yakovlenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a literature review on the application of such method of reflexotherapy acupuncture as myeloacupuncture used in the pathology of the peri­pheral joints and spine. It is theoretically grounded and associated with a positive clinical effect as a result of regenerating influence on the processes of free radical oxidation, imbalance of the cytokine network, growth factors, vascular endothelial function, the system of nitric oxide and pro-inflammatory enzymes (matrix metalloproteinases, cyclooxygenase-2, caspase-3. Achievement of the analgesic effect by acupuncture needle injection into the spinal cord is conducted due to the impact on peripheral, spinal and sub-spinal mechanisms, synthesis of neurotransmitters and neurohormones, neuroacid, that cause vanniloid-1 reception normalization, enhancement of production of endorphins, enkephalins and endomorphins, thyrotropin-releasing hormone and P substance.

  13. Optical Enhancement of Exoskeleton-Based Estimation of Glenohumeral Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Camilo; Unzueta, Luis; de los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Ruiz, Oscar E.; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    In Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) the accurate estimation of the patient limb joint angles is critical for assessing therapy efficacy. In RAR, the use of classic motion capture systems (MOCAPs) (e.g., optical and electromagnetic) to estimate the Glenohumeral (GH) joint angles is hindered by the exoskeleton body, which causes occlusions and magnetic disturbances. Moreover, the exoskeleton posture does not accurately reflect limb posture, as their kinematic models differ. To address the said limitations in posture estimation, we propose installing the cameras of an optical marker-based MOCAP in the rehabilitation exoskeleton. Then, the GH joint angles are estimated by combining the estimated marker poses and exoskeleton Forward Kinematics. Such hybrid system prevents problems related to marker occlusions, reduced camera detection volume, and imprecise joint angle estimation due to the kinematic mismatch of the patient and exoskeleton models. This paper presents the formulation, simulation, and accuracy quantification of the proposed method with simulated human movements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the method accuracy to marker position estimation errors, due to system calibration errors and marker drifts, has been carried out. The results show that, even with significant errors in the marker position estimation, method accuracy is adequate for RAR. PMID:27403044

  14. Low-field MR arthrography of the shoulder joint: technique, indications, and clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, K.-F.; Thelen, M.; Loew, R.; Runkel, M.; Zoellner, J.

    2003-01-01

    In the age of cost containment and urgent reductions in health care expenditures, new options have to be explored to satisfy both diagnostic requirements and economic limitations. The introduction of low-field MR systems for assessment of joint disorders seemed to be an option for lower costs. The purpose of this article is to summarize available experiences with low-field MR arthrography of the glenohumeral joint with respect to image quality and diagnostic accuracy in detecting labral and rotator cuff lesions. Up to now, there has been only a limited number of studies available dealing with low-field MR arthrography of the glenohumeral joint. They reveal that, despite a minor image quality in comparison with high-field imaging, low-field MR arthrography of the shoulder allows for sufficient evaluation of intra- and extra-articular structures in the detection of major abnormalities such as glenohumeral instability or rotator cuff disease. Furthermore, open-configured MR scanners enable kinematic studies: Besides the analysis of normal motion, pathological findings in patients with instabilities and impingement syndrome can be delineated. They further offer the possibility for performing MR imaging-guided arthrography of the shoulder. This was first described using an open C-arm scanner with a vertically oriented magnetic field so that MR arthrography may be performed in one setting. (orig.)

  15. Pathology of articular cartilage and synovial membrane from elbow joints with and without degenerative joint disease in domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, M; Meuten, D; Lascelles, D

    2014-09-01

    The elbow joint is one of the feline appendicular joints most commonly and severely affected by degenerative joint disease. The macroscopic and histopathological lesions of the elbow joints of 30 adult cats were evaluated immediately after euthanasia. Macroscopic evidence of degenerative joint disease was found in 22 of 30 cats (39 elbow joints) (73.33% cats; 65% elbow joints), and macroscopic cartilage erosion ranged from mild fibrillation to complete ulceration of the hyaline cartilage with exposure of the subchondral bone. Distribution of the lesions in the cartilage indicated the presence of medial compartment joint disease (most severe lesions located in the medial coronoid process of the ulna and medial humeral epicondyle). Synovitis scores were mild overall and correlated only weakly with macroscopic cartilage damage. Intra-articular osteochondral fragments either free or attached to the synovium were found in 10 joints. Macroscopic or histologic evidence of a fragmented coronoid process was not found even in those cases with intra-articular osteochondral fragments. Lesions observed in these animals are most consistent with synovial osteochondromatosis secondary to degenerative joint disease. The pathogenesis for the medial compartmentalization of these lesions has not been established, but a fragmented medial coronoid process or osteochondritis dissecans does not appear to play a role. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Exercise therapy for treatment of supraspinatus tears does not alter glenohumeral kinematics during internal/external rotation with the arm at the side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Gerald A; Miller, R Matthew; Zlotnicki, Jason P; Tashman, Scott; Irrgang, James J; Musahl, Volker; Debski, Richard E

    2018-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a significant clinical problem, with exercise therapy being a common treatment option for patients. Failure rates of exercise therapy may be due to the failure to improve glenohumeral kinematics. Tears involving the supraspinatus may result in altered glenohumeral kinematics and joint instability for internal/external rotation with the arm at the side because not all muscles used to stabilize the glenohumeral joint are functioning normally. The objective of the study is to assess in vivo glenohumeral kinematic changes for internal/external rotation motions with the arm at the side of patients with a symptomatic full-thickness supraspinatus tear before and after a 12-week exercise therapy programme. Five patients underwent dynamic stereoradiography analysis before and after a 12-week exercise therapy protocol to measure changes in glenohumeral kinematics during transverse plane internal/external rotation with the arm at the side. Patient-reported outcomes and shoulder strength were also evaluated. No patient sought surgery immediately following exercise therapy. Significant improvements in isometric shoulder strength and patient-reported outcomes were observed (p internal/external rotation with the arm at the side. Despite satisfactory clinical outcomes following exercise therapy, glenohumeral kinematics did not change. The lack of changes may be due to the motion studied or the focus of current exercise therapy protocols being increasing shoulder strength and restoring range of motion. Current exercise therapy protocols should be adapted to also focus on restoring glenohumeral kinematics to improve joint stability since exercise therapy may have different effects depending on the motions of daily living. Prognostic study, Level II.

  17. Prevalence of Propionibacterium acnes in the glenohumeral compared with the subacromial space in primary shoulder arthroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzer, Thilo; Petersdorf, Sabine; Krauspe, Ruediger; Verde, Pablo Emilio; Henrich, Birgit; Hufeland, Martin

    2018-05-01

    We hypothesized that the prevalence of Propionibacterium acnes in patients undergoing primary shoulder arthroscopy is equal in the glenohumeral space compared with the subacromial space. Patients aged 18 years or older with shoulder arthroscopies were included. The exclusion criteria were prior shoulder operations, complete rotator cuff tears, systemic inflammatory diseases, tumors, shoulder injections within 6 months of surgery, and antibiotic therapy within 14 days preoperatively. After standardized skin disinfection with Kodan Tinktur Forte Gefärbt, a skin swab was taken at the posterior portal. Arthroscopy was performed without cannulas, prospectively randomized to start either in the glenohumeral space or in the subacromial space, with direct harvesting of a soft-tissue biopsy specimen. Sample cultivation was conducted according to standardized criteria for bone and joint aspirate samples and incubated for 14 days. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight spectrometry was used for specimen identification in positive culture results. The study prospectively included 115 consecutive patients with normal C-reactive protein levels prior to surgery (54.8% men; mean age, 47.2 ± 14.6 years). P acnes was detected on the skin after disinfection in 36.5% of patients, in the glenohumeral space in 18.9%, and in the subacromial space in 3.5% (P = .016). The prevalence of P acnes is significantly higher in the glenohumeral space compared with the subacromial space in primary shoulder arthroscopies. The results do not confirm the contamination theory but also cannot clarify whether P acnes is a commensal or enters the joint hematologically or even lymphatically or via an unknown pathway. Despite standardized surgical skin disinfection, P acnes can be detected in skin swab samples in more than one-third of patients. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Palliative surgery for acetabular metastasis with pathological central dislocation of the hip joint after radiation therapy. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Manabu; Takada, Jun; Oebisu, Naoto; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Taguchi, Susumu; Takami, Masatsugu

    2012-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery for bone metastases is mainly a palliative treatment. Pathological central dislocation of the hip joint secondary to osteonecrosis of acetabular metastasis after radiation therapy brings severe suffering to cancer patients. We performed minimally invasive palliative surgery for an elderly woman, and excellent pain relief was achieved. An 80-year-old female suffering from right hip pain was referred to our hospital. She had undergone surgery for lung cancer 5 years previously and her right acetabulum was subsequently affected by metastasis. With the aim of controlling the metastasis, radiation therapy was performed. Two years later, pathological central dislocation of the hip joint occurred with sudden onset of severe pain, and she was unable to maintain a sitting position and became bedridden. After she was referred to our hospital, we created an intentional pseudarthrosis in the femoral neck for palliation. After the surgery, excellent pain relief and remarkably improved mobility were achieved during her limited remaining lifetime. In this report, we introduce a novel method of producing a pseudarthrosis in the femoral neck for pathological dislocation. This procedure is a minimally invasive treatment and an alternative option for palliative surgery for pathological dislocation of the hip joint due to osteonecrosis after radiation therapy. (author)

  19. Failure of operative treatment for glenohumeral instability: etiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Apurva S; Karadsheh, Mark S; Sekiya, Jon K

    2011-05-01

    Failure of primary shoulder stabilization procedures is often related to uncorrected anatomic pathology. Orthopaedic surgeons must recognize excessive capsular laxity or large glenohumeral bone defects preoperatively to avoid recurrence of instability. When history, physical examination, and radiographic evaluation are used in conjunction, patients at risk for failure can be identified. The instability severity index score permits precise identification of patients at risk. When treating patients in whom prior surgical intervention has failed, the success of revision procedures correlates to the surgeon's ability to identify the essential pathology and use lesion-specific treatment strategies. Revision procedures remain technically demanding. Keen preoperative and intraoperative judgment is required to avoid additional recurrence of instability after revision procedures, particularly because results deteriorate with each successive operation. Glenoid or humeral defects with greater than 25% bone loss compromise stability provided through the mechanism of concavity compression. These defects must be specifically addressed to avoid recurrence of instability. We prefer anatomic reconstruction techniques combined with capsulolabral repair and, if bone defects are present, anatomic reconstruction with osteochondral allograft. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Unexplored Role of Intra-articular Adipose Tissue in the Homeostasis and Pathology of Articular Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminita Labusca

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Intra-articular adipose tissue deposits known as articular fat pads (AFPs are described to exist within synovial joints. Their assumed role in normal joint biomechanics is increasingly objectivized by means of advanced methods of functional imaging. AFPs possess structural similarity with body subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT, however, seems to be regulated by independent metabolic loops. AFP dimension are conserved during extreme WAT states: obesity, metabolic syndrome, lipodystrophy, and cachexia. Hoffa fat pad (HFP in the knee is increasingly recognized as a major player in pathological joint states such as anterior knee pain and osteoarthritis. HFP contains numerous population of mesenchymal and endothelial progenitors; however, the possible role of mature adipocytes in the maintenance of stem cell niche is unknown. We propose that AFP is an active component of the joint organ with multifunctional roles in the maintenance of joint homeostasis. Endowed with a rich network of sensitive nervous fibbers, AFPs may act as a proprioceptive organ. Adipokines and growth factors released by AFP-resident mature adipocytes could participate in the maintenance of progenitor stem cell niche as well as in local immune regulation. AFP metabolism may be locally controlled, correlated with but independent of WAT homeostasis. The identification of AFP role in normal joint turnover and its possible implication in pathological states could deliver diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Drug and/or cell therapies that restore AFP structure and function could become the next step in the design of disease modifying therapies for disabling joint conditions such as osteoarthritis and inflammatory arthritis.

  1. Glenohumeral contact force during flat and topspin tennis forehand drives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blache, Yoann; Creveaux, Thomas; Dumas, Raphaël; Chèze, Laurence; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2017-03-01

    The primary role of the shoulder joint in tennis forehand drive is at the expense of the loadings undergone by this joint. Nevertheless, few studies investigated glenohumeral (GH) contact forces during forehand drives. The aim of this study was to investigate GH compressive and shearing forces during the flat and topspin forehand drives in advanced tennis players. 3D kinematics of flat and topspin forehand drives of 11 advanced tennis players were recorded. The Delft Shoulder and Elbow musculoskeletal model was implemented to assess the magnitude and orientation of GH contact forces during the forehand drives. The results showed no differences in magnitude and orientation of GH contact forces between the flat and topspin forehand drives. The estimated maximal GH contact force during the forward swing phase was 3573 ± 1383 N, which was on average 1.25 times greater than during the follow-through phase, and 5.8 times greater than during the backswing phase. Regardless the phase of the forehand drive, GH contact forces pointed towards the anterior-superior part of the glenoid therefore standing for shearing forces. Knowledge of GH contact forces during real sport tasks performed at high velocity may improve the understanding of various sport-specific adaptations and causative factors for shoulder problems.

  2. A systematic review of the relationship between subchondral bone features, pain and structural pathology in peripheral joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Andrew J; Campbell, T Mark; Hopkinson, Devan; Kingsbury, Sarah R; Bowes, Mike A; Conaghan, Philip G

    2015-08-25

    Bone is an integral part of the osteoarthritis (OA) process. We conducted a systematic literature review in order to understand the relationship between non-conventional radiographic imaging of subchondral bone, pain, structural pathology and joint replacement in peripheral joint OA. A search of the Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane library databases was performed for original articles reporting association between non-conventional radiographic imaging-assessed subchondral bone pathologies and joint replacement, pain or structural progression in knee, hip, hand, ankle and foot OA. Each association was qualitatively characterised by a synthesis of the data from each analysis based upon study design, adequacy of covariate adjustment and quality scoring. In total 2456 abstracts were screened and 139 papers were included (70 cross-sectional, 71 longitudinal analyses; 116 knee, 15 hip, six hand, two ankle and involved 113 MRI, eight DXA, four CT, eight scintigraphic and eight 2D shape analyses). BMLs, osteophytes and bone shape were independently associated with structural progression or joint replacement. BMLs and bone shape were independently associated with longitudinal change in pain and incident frequent knee pain respectively. Subchondral bone features have independent associations with structural progression, pain and joint replacement in peripheral OA in the hip and hand but especially in the knee. For peripheral OA sites other than the knee, there are fewer associations and independent associations of bone pathologies with these important OA outcomes which may reflect fewer studies; for example the foot and ankle were poorly studied. Subchondral OA bone appears to be a relevant therapeutic target. PROSPERO registration number: CRD 42013005009.

  3. [Capsular retensioning in anterior unidirectional glenohumeral instability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez Pozos, Leonel; Martínez Molina, Oscar; Castañeda Landa, Ezequiel

    2007-01-01

    To present the experience of the Orthopedics Service PEMEX South Central Hospital in the management of anterior unidirectional shoulder instability with an arthroscopic technique consisting of capsular retensioning either combined with other anatomical repair procedures or alone. Thirty-one patients with anterior unidirectional shoulder instability operated-on between January 1999 and December 2005 were included. Fourteen patients underwent capsular retensioning and radiofrequency, and in 17 patients, capsular retensioning was combined with suture anchors. Patients with a history of relapsing glenohumeral dislocations and subluxations, with anterior instability with or without associated Bankart lesions were selected; all of them were young. The results were assessed considering basically the occurrence of instability during the postoperative follow-up. No cases of recurring instability occurred. Two cases had neuroma and one experienced irritation of the suture site. Six patients had residual limitation of combined lateral rotation and abduction movements, of a mean of 10 degrees compared with the healthy contralateral side. The most frequent incident was the leak of solutions to the soft tissues. Capsular retensioning, whether combined or not with other anatomical repair techniques, has proven to result in a highly satisfactory rate of glenohumeral stabilization in cases of anterior unidirectional instabilities. The arthroscopic approach offers the well-known advantages of causing less damage to the soft tissues, and a shorter time to starting rehabilitation therapy and exercises.

  4. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, J N; Arzi, B; Leale, D M; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2016-01-01

    Museum specimens (maxillae and/or mandibles) from 317 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) were examined macroscopically according to predefined criteria and 249 specimens were included in this study. The specimens were acquired between 1906 and 2011. There were 126 specimens (50.6%) from male animals, 93 (37.3%) from female animals and 30 (12.1%) from animals of unknown sex. The ages of the animals ranged from neonate to adult, with 125 adults (50.2%) and 124 young adults (49.8%) included and neonates/juveniles excluded from the study. The number of teeth available for examination was 7,638 (73.5%); 12.3% of teeth were absent artefactually, 0.8% were deemed absent due to acquired tooth loss and 13.4% were absent congenitally. With respect to tooth morphology, 20 teeth (0.26% of available teeth) in 18 specimens (7.2% of available specimens) were small vestigial structures with crowns that were flush with the level of surrounding alveolar bone. One supernumerary tooth and one tooth with enamel hypoplasia were encountered. Persistent deciduous teeth and teeth with an aberrant number of roots were not found. Relatively few teeth (3.7%) displayed attrition/abrasion, 90% of which were the maxillary and mandibular incisor teeth, in 41 polar bears (16.5%). Nearly twice as many adult specimens exhibited attrition/abrasion as those from young adults; significantly more males were affected than females. Dental fractures were noted in 52 polar bears, affecting 20.9% of specimens and 1.3% of the total number of teeth present. More adult polar bears had dental fractures than young adults. There were 21 specimens (8.4%) that displayed overt periapical disease, affecting a total of 24 dental alveoli (0.23%). Some degree of periodontitis was seen in 199 specimens (79.9%); however, only 12.6% of dental alveoli had bony changes indicative of periodontitis. Lesions consistent with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) were found in 23 specimens (9.2%). TMJ-OA was significantly

  5. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the American Black Bear (Ursus americanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, E J; Chesnutt, S R; Winer, J N; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    (22.2%). Exactly half of the specimens (n = 174) possessed lesions consistent with mild temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis. The occurrence and severity of the dental pathology encountered in this study may play an important role in the morbidity and mortality of the American black bear. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pathological study of degenerative changes of finger joints in cadavers of aged persons

    OpenAIRE

    岩田,芳之

    1987-01-01

    In the present study, soft x-ray and light microscopic examinations were carried out on 17 interphalangeal (IP) joints and 85 distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints with Heberden's nodes from 15 cadavers. Microradiograms of the IP and DIP joints were analyzed as to the degenerative changes in the antero-posterior and lateral views according to our own criteria. Degenerative changes were more severe in females than in males. Advanced degeneration was found in the index, middle and little fingers,...

  7. Flexibility of internal and external glenohumeral rotation of junior female tennis players and its correlation with performance ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ching-Cheng; Hsu, Chih-Chia; Chiang, Jinn-Yen; Chang, Weng-Cheng; Tsai, Jong-Chang

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the internal and external rotation of the dominant and nondominant shoulders of adolescent female tennis players. The correlation between the shoulder rotation range of motion and the player's ranking was also analyzed. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one female junior tennis players who were 13 to 18 years old participated in this study. A standard goniometer was used to measure the internal and external rotation of both glenohumeral joints. The difference in internal and external rotation was calculated as the glenohumeral rotation deficit. The year-end ranking of each player was obtained from the Chinese Taipei Tennis Association. [Results] The internal rotation of the dominant shoulder was significantly smaller than that of the nondominant shoulder. Moreover, player ranking was significantly and negatively correlated with the internal rotation range of motion of both shoulders. On the other hand, the correlations of the internal and external rotation ranges of motion with the age, height, and weight were not significant. [Conclusion] The flexibility of the glenohumeral internal rotation is smaller in the dominant shoulder than of the nondominant shoulder in these junior female tennis players. Flexibility of the glenohumeral internal rotation may be a factor affecting performance in junior female tennis players.

  8. An ultrasonographic study of metatarsophalangeal joint pain: synovitis, structural pathology and their relationship to symptoms and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Helen I; Redmond, Anthony; Wakefield, Richard J; Freeston, Jane; Grainger, Andrew J; Hensor, Elizabeth M A; Emery, Paul; Conaghan, Philip G

    2011-12-01

    Pain in the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) is common, though the link between pathology and symptoms is poorly understood. To examine the relationship between pain, function and ultrasound (US)-detected pathology in the first MTPJ. 33 subjects with first MTPJ pain and 20 asymptomatic controls completed questionnaires about pain and function, then underwent clinical examination, US examination and objective assessment of function using a motion tracking system. Low-level grey scale synovitis and osteophytes were common in patients and controls. Osteophytes were more prevalent in symptomatic first MTPJ [24/33 (73%) vs. 7/20 (35%), p=0.007], and greater osteophyte numbers were weakly associated with higher levels of pain [increase in pain VAS per osteophyte (95% CI)=13.78mm (0.12mm-27.43mm), p=0.048]. A power Doppler (PD) signal was present in a fifth of painful first MTPJs and absent in controls. A PD signal was associated with osteophytes and joint space narrowing but was not independently related to target joint pain. For all first MTPJs, osteophytes and the presence of a PD signal was associated with worse patient-reported function. US features did not predict objective function. Osteophytes, representing subchondral bone remodelling, were associated with the presence of first MTPJ pain and, together with more severe (PD) synovitis, also contributed to poorer function. Detailed imaging of bone may provide more information on peripheral pain associations.

  9. Understanding the Importance of the Teres Minor for Shoulder Function: Functional Anatomy and Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Matthew D; Edwards, Thomas Bradley; Walch, Gilles

    2018-03-01

    Although the teres minor is often overlooked in a normal shoulder, it becomes a key component in maintaining shoulder function when other rotator cuff tendons fail. The teres minor maintains a balanced glenohumeral joint and changes from an insignificant to the most significant external rotator in the presence of major rotator cuff pathology. The presence or absence of the teres minor provides prognostic information on the outcomes of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty and tendon transfers. Clinical tests include the Patte test, the Neer dropping sign, the external rotation lag sign, and the Hertel drop sign. Advanced imaging of the teres minor can be used for classification using the Walch system. Understanding the function and pathology surrounding the teres minor is paramount in comprehensive management of the patient with shoulder pathology. Appropriate clinical examination and imaging of the teres minor are important for preoperative stratification and postoperative expectations.

  10. Concept of Operations for the Establishment of the Joint Pathology Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-19

    the Joint Task Force National Capital Region Medical (JTF CapMed ) in collaboration with the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences (USUHS...Medical Examiner (OAFME). The Board deems the identification of appropriate support for the OAFME as critical , since with the disestablishment of...the DoD. The establishment of the JPC within JTF CapMed is a logical choice to the extent that JTF Cap Med is a joint medical organization and can

  11. The Influence of Surgical Stabilization on Glenohumeral Abduction Using 3-Dimensional Computed Tomography in Patients With Shoulder Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Neil K; Jameel, Omar F; Merrill, Zachary F; Debski, Richard E; Sekiya, Jon K

    2016-08-01

    This study compared the amount of glenohumeral abduction during arm abduction in the affected and unaffected shoulders of 3 groups of patients with shoulder instability: failed surgical stabilization, successful surgical stabilization, and unstable shoulder with no prior surgical intervention. All patients underwent bilateral shoulder computed tomography scans in 3 positions: 0° of abduction and 0° of external rotation (0-0 position), 30° of abduction and 30° of external rotation (30-30 position), and arms maximally abducted (overhead position). Three-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction was performed for both shoulders in all 3 positions. A specialized coordinate system marked specific points and directions on the humerus and glenoid of each model. These coordinates were used to calculate the glenohumeral abduction for the normal and affected sides in the 0-0, 30-30, and overhead positions. Thirty-nine patients with shoulder instability were included, of whom 14 had failed surgical repairs, 10 had successful surgical repairs, and 15 had unstable shoulders with no prior surgical intervention. In the overhead position, patients with failed surgical intervention had significantly less glenohumeral abduction in the failed shoulder (95.6° ± 12.7°) compared with the normal shoulder (101.5° ± 12.4°, P = .02). Patients with successfully stabilized shoulders had significantly less glenohumeral abduction in the successfully stabilized shoulder (93.6° ± 10.8°) compared with the normal shoulder (102.1° ± 12.5°, P = .03). Unstable shoulders with no prior surgical intervention (102.1° ± 10.3°) did not differ when compared with the normal shoulders (101.9° ± 10.9°, P = .95). Surgical intervention, regardless of its success, limits the amount of abduction at the glenohumeral joint. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tendo-ligamentous pathologies of the wrist joint: Can ultrasonography replace magnetic resonance imaging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunwarpal Singh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Characterization of tendo-ligamentous pathologies of wrist remains problematic, despite advances in imaging. By using clinical history and imaging appearance, one can determine the diagnosis. USG is used as first imaging modality whereas MRI aids in making a specific diagnosis of few of the lesions. Aims: To investigate the etiological spectrum of tendo-ligamentous pathologies of wrist on USG & MRI with statistical correlation. Patients and methods: 80 patients (male/female = 46/34 with complaint of swelling or pain in wrist were included and underwent USG and MRI of both the wrists. Results: The spectrum included ganglion cysts, vascular malformations, tenosynovitis, tendinopathy, ligament tears and fibrosis. The analysis was done using kappa coefficient and spearman's rho correlation coefficient. The strength of agreement between USG and MRI for the diagnosis of ganglion cysts, vascular malformations, tenosynovitis and tendinopathy was found to be very good. Conclusion: USG provides detailed depiction of superficial structures, is less expensive, and allows dynamic examinations of the wrist. It should be the first choice of investigation for majority of the cystic, tendinous, vascular, and fibrotic pathologies of the wrist. However, less promising results were observed for ligamentous pathologies on USG in our study. Keywords: Tendo-ligamentous pathologies, Ganglion cyst, Tenosynovitis, Ultrasonography, MRI

  13. Research plan for joint ABCC-NIH pathology studies in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-07-27

    A program for the conduct of pathology studies within fixed cohorts of Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survirors is described. It is intended that the program serve as a basis for collaborative efforts by community medical institutions and organizations together with ABCC-NIH in both cities. The report describes the scope of the program, together with epidemiologic aspects of the population base and methods of case procurement, and outlines proposed studies. Detailed descriptions of autopsy protocols, surgical pathology reports, coding procedures, and other procedural and operating matters will be considered in a subsequent report. 37 references, 4 figures, 8 tables.

  14. METHODS USED FOR THE VIRTUAL HUMAN BONES AND JOINTS RECONSTRUCTION. NORMAL AND PATHOLOGICAL HUMAN JOINTS VIRTUAL SIMULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPA Laurentiu Dragos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To understand the problems, which appear in every human joint, it is very important to know the anatomy and morphology of the human bones and the way in which the components are working together to realize a normal functionality. For this purpose was used a CAD parametric software which permits to define models with a high degree of difficulty. First, it was used a CT or MRI device to obtain the parallel sections to study each component of the bone. A 3D scanner can be used only for the outer geometry. In the second step the images were transferred to a 2D CAD software, like AutoCAD, where the outer and inner contours of the bone were approximate to polygonal lines composed by many segments. After this, the contours were transferred to a 3D CAD software, like SolidWorks, where, step by step, and section by section, was defined the virtual bone component. Additionally to the main shape can be attached other Loft, Round or Dome shapes. For some components, as vertebrae, mandible or skull bones, can be used a preliminary model obtained by parallel sections. Starting from this, the model can be defined using the main 3D curves and we can get the final virtual solid model. In some simulations, the soft components, as muscles or ligaments, were included in simulations using non-linear virtual springs. Also, sometimes were used implants or prosthetic elements. In the final of the paper, were extracted important conclusions.

  15. Glenohumeral position during CT arthrography with arthroscopic correlation: optimization of diagnostic yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeone, F.J.; Gill, Corey M.; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Taneja, Atul K. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Hospital do Coracao (HCor) and Teleimagem, Musculoskeletal Imaging, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic yield of two acquisitions of single-contrast CT arthrography (CTA) of the shoulder in internal, neutral, or external glenohumeral rotation with arthroscopic correlation. The CT study was obtained using two acquisitions (first the humerus positioned in maximum tolerated external rotation with the arm along the body and the second with the humerus in internal rotation with the palm placed flat on the table). Two independent readers blinded to the arthroscopic results evaluated the CTA images for labral tears, glenoid bone loss/fractures, and cartilage loss. For each CTA acquisition, sensitivity and specificity for detection of the aforementioned pathology were assessed. Inter-reader agreement was quantified by weighted k statistics. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting anteroinferior or posterior labral tears was highest with neutral rotation (sensitivity 91-100%, specificity 61-100%). For glenoid fracture, sensitivity (67%) was highest with external rotation and specificity (100%) was highest with internal rotation. For cartilage loss, sensitivity (64%) and specificity (89%) was highest with external rotation and neutral rotation, respectively. Neutral rotation showed high sensitivity and specificity for glenoid fractures and cartilage loss. Inter-reader agreement ranged from fair to very good. Neutral glenohumeral position in shoulder CT arthrography was adequately sensitive and specific for the detection of intra-articular pathology, avoiding the use of more than one acquisition. (orig.)

  16. Chondromalacia as pathological finding in arthroscopy of the temporomandibular joint: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Granizo, Rafael; Correa-Muñoz, Diana Carolina

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the arthroscopic findings of chondromalacia and its relation with the internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A total of 161 patients (299 TMJs) who underwent arthroscopy were included in the study. The TMJs were evaluated objectively under arthroscopic vision, and 4 groups of patients were established according to the degree of involvement, degree I, II, III and IV. Statistical analyses were conducted using logistic regression models (P chondromalacia and 66 (41%) in 88 joints exhibited some degree of chondromalacia (44 patients unilaterally and 22 bilaterally). Of the 88 joints with chondromalacia, 14 (15.9%) had chondromalacia degree I, 12 (13.6%) chondromalacia degree II, 20 (22.7%) chondromalacia degree III and 42 (47.7%) chondromalacia degree IV. The chondromalacia was more significantly found in patients with ADDwR and discal perforation (P Chondromalacia degree IV was a significant finding in cases of ADDwoR (P = 0.000619). Chondromalacia of the TMJ is a common finding in patients with internal derangement even at the early stages. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Indian Hedgehog signaling pathway members are associated with magnetic resonance imaging manifestations and pathological scores in lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuang, Feng; Zhou, Ying; Hou, Shu-Xun; Zhu, Jia-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tang, Jia-Guang

    2015-05-01

    Indian Hedgehog (HH) has been shown to be involved in osteoarthritis (OA) in articular joints, where there is evidence that Indian HH blockade could ameliorate OA. It seems to play a prominent role in development of the intervertebral disc (IVD) and in postnatal maintenance. There is little work on IHH in the IVD. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of Indian Hedgehog in the pathology of facet joint (FJ) OA. 24 patients diagnosed with lumbar intervertebral disk herniation or degenerative spinal stenosis were included. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histopathology grading system was correlated to the mRNA levels of GLI1, PTCH1, and HHIP in the FJs. The Weishaupt grading and OARSI scores showed high positive correlation (r = 0.894) (P < 0.01). MRI Weishaupt grades showed positive correlation with GLI1 (r = 0.491), PTCH1 (r = 0.444), and HHIP (r = 0.654) mRNA levels (P < 0.05 in each case). OARSI scores were also positively correlated with GLI1 (r = 0. 646), PTCH1 (r = 0. 518), and HHIP (r = 0.762) mRNA levels (P < 0.01 in each case). Cumulatively our findings indicate that Indian HH signaling is increased in OA and is perhaps a key component in OA pathogenesis and progression.

  18. MR imaging in sports-related glenohumeral instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woertler, Klaus; Waldt, Simone

    2006-01-01

    Sports-related shoulder pain and injuries represent a common problem. In this context, glenohumeral instability is currently believed to play a central role either as a recognized or as an unrecognized condition. Shoulder instabilities can roughly be divided into traumatic, atraumatic, and microtraumatic glenohumeral instabilities. In athletes, atraumatic and microtraumatic instabilities can lead to secondary impingement syndromes and chronic damage to intraarticular structures. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is superior to conventional MR imaging in the diagnosis of labro-ligamentous injuries, intrinsic impingement, and SLAP (superior labral anteroposterior) lesions, and thus represents the most informative imaging modality in the overall assessment of glenohumeral instability. This article reviews the imaging criteria for the detection and classification of instability-related injuries in athletes with special emphasis on the influence of MR findings on therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  19. In vivo glenohumeral analysis using 3D MRI models and a flexible software tool: feasibility and precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Harald; Thomas, Michael; Seiwerts, Matthias; Moche, Michael; Busse, Martin W; von Salis-Soglio, Georg; Kahn, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    To implement a PC-based morphometric analysis platform and to evaluate the feasibility and precision of MRI measurements of glenohumeral translation. Using a vertically open 0.5T MRI scanner, the shoulders of 10 healthy subjects were scanned in apprehension (AP) and in neutral position (NP), respectively. Surface models of the humeral head (HH) and the glenoid cavity (GC) were created from segmented MR images by three readers. Glenohumeral translation was determined by the projection point of the manually fitted HH center on the GC plane defined by the two main principal axes of the GC model. Positional precision, given as mean (extreme value at 95% confidence level), was 0.9 (1.8) mm for the HH center and 0.7 (1.6) mm for the GC centroid; angular GC precision was 1.3 degrees (2.3 degrees ) for the normal and about 4 degrees (7 degrees ) for the anterior and superior coordinate axes. The two-dimensional (2D) precision of the HH projection point was 1.1 (2.2) mm. A significant HH translation between AP and NP was found. Despite a limited quality of the underlying model data, our PC-based analysis platform allows a precise morphometric analysis of the glenohumeral joint. The software is easily extendable and may potentially be used for an objective evaluation of therapeutical measures.

  20. Imaging assessment of glenohumeral dysplasia secondary to brachial plexus birth palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete [Universidade de Fortaleza (UNIFOR), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Divisao de Radiologia; Dalto, Vitor Faeda, E-mail: fdalto@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao, Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Divisao de Radiologia; Crema, Michel Daoud [Department of Radiology, Quantitative Imaging Center, University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Waters, Peter M. [Orthopedic Center, Boston Children' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Gregio-Junior, Everaldo [Uniao Medica Radiologica Catanduva (UMERC), Catanduva, SP (Brazil); Mazzer, Nilton; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), Ribeirao, Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-05-15

    Objective: to assess imaging parameters related to the morphology of the glenohumeral joint in children with unilateral brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP), in comparison with those obtained for healthy shoulders. Materials and methods: we conducted a retrospective search for cases of unilateral BPBP diagnosed at our facility. Only patients with a clinical diagnosis of unilateral BPBP were included, and the final study sample consisted of 10 consecutive patients who were assessed with cross-sectional imaging. The glenoid version, the translation of the humeral head, and the degrees of glenohumeral dysplasia were assessed. Results: the mean diameter of the affected humeral heads was 1.93 cm, compared with 2.33 cm for those of the normal limbs. In two cases, there was no significant posterior displacement of the humeral head, five cases showed posterior subluxation of the humeral head, and the remaining three cases showed total luxation of the humeral head. The mean glenoid version angle of the affected limbs (90-α) was -9.6°, versus +1.6° for the normal, contralateral limbs. Conclusion: the main deformities found in this study were BPBP-associated retroversion of the glenoid cavity, developmental delay of the humeral head, and posterior translation of the humeral head. (author)

  1. Imaging assessment of glenohumeral dysplasia secondary to brachial plexus birth palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete; Waters, Peter M.; Gregio-Junior, Everaldo; Mazzer, Nilton; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to assess imaging parameters related to the morphology of the glenohumeral joint in children with unilateral brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP), in comparison with those obtained for healthy shoulders. Materials and methods: we conducted a retrospective search for cases of unilateral BPBP diagnosed at our facility. Only patients with a clinical diagnosis of unilateral BPBP were included, and the final study sample consisted of 10 consecutive patients who were assessed with cross-sectional imaging. The glenoid version, the translation of the humeral head, and the degrees of glenohumeral dysplasia were assessed. Results: the mean diameter of the affected humeral heads was 1.93 cm, compared with 2.33 cm for those of the normal limbs. In two cases, there was no significant posterior displacement of the humeral head, five cases showed posterior subluxation of the humeral head, and the remaining three cases showed total luxation of the humeral head. The mean glenoid version angle of the affected limbs (90-α) was -9.6°, versus +1.6° for the normal, contralateral limbs. Conclusion: the main deformities found in this study were BPBP-associated retroversion of the glenoid cavity, developmental delay of the humeral head, and posterior translation of the humeral head. (author)

  2. Immunohistochemical evaluation of neuroreceptors in healthy and pathological temporo-mandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favia, Gianfranco; Corsalini, Massimo; Di Venere, Daniela; Pettini, Francesco; Favia, Giorgio; Capodiferro, Saverio; Maiorano, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    A study was performed on the articular disk and periarticular tissues of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) with immunohistochemical techniques to give evidence to the presence of neuroreceptors (NRec) in these sites. The study was carried out on tissue samples obtained from 10 subjects without TMJ disease and from 7 patients with severe TMJ arthritis and arthrosis. We use antibodies directed against following antigens: Gliofibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), Leu-7, Myelin Basic Protein (MBP), Neurofilaments 68 kD (NF), Neuron Specific Enolase (NSE), S-100 protein (S-100) and Synaptophysin (SYN). This study revealed that Ruffini's-like, Pacini's-like and Golgi's-like receptors can be demonstrated in TMJ periarticular tissues and that free nervous endings are present in the subsynovial tissues but not within the articular disk. We observed elongated cytoplamic processes of chondrocytes that demonstrated strong S-100 immunoreactivity but they were unreactive with all other antibodies. These cytoplamic processes were more abundant and thicker in the samples obtained from patients with disease TMJ. The results of this study confirm that different Nrec are detectable in TMJ periarticular tissues but they are absent within the articular disk. In the latter site, only condrocytic processes are evident, especially in diseased TMJ, and they might have been confused with nervous endings in previous morphological studies. Nevertheless the absence of immunoreactivity for NF, NSE and SYN proves that they are not of neural origin.

  3. Compensatory muscle activation in patients with glenohumeral cuff tears

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbrink, Franciscus

    2010-01-01

    Patients suffering tendon tears in the glenohumeral cuff muscles show activation of muscles which pull the arm downwards during arm elevation tasks. This so-called co-activation deviates from healthy controls and is triggered by pain. Goal of this thesis was to demonstrate that deviating muscle

  4. Can shoulder joint reaction forces be estimated by neural networks?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, W.H.K.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Baten, C.T.M.; van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2016-01-01

    To facilitate the development of future shoulder endoprostheses, a long term load profile of the shoulder joint is desired. A musculoskeletal model using 3D kinematics and external forces as input can estimate the mechanical load on the glenohumeral joint, in terms of joint reaction forces. For long

  5. A Concise and Comprehensive Description of Shoulder Pathology and Procedures: The 4D Code System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Lafosse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We introduce a novel description system of shoulder pathoanatomy. Its goal is to provide a comprehensive three-dimensional picture, with an additional component of time; thus, we call it the 4D code. Methods. Each line of the code starts with right versus left and a time designation. The pillar components are recorded regardless of pathology; they include subscapularis, long head of biceps tendon, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and teres minor. Secondary elements can be added if there is observed pathology, including acromioclavicular joint, glenohumeral joint, labrum, tear configuration, location and extent of partial cuff tear, calcific tendonitis, fatty infiltration, and neuropathy. Results. We provide two illustrative examples of patients which show the ease and effectiveness of the 4D code. With a few simple lines, significant amount of information about patients’ pathology, surgery, and recovery can be easily conveyed. Discussion. We utilize existing validated classification systems for parts of the shoulder and provide a frame work to build a comprehensive picture. The alphanumeric code provides a simple language that is universally understood. The 4D code is concise yet complete. It seeks to improve efficiency and accuracy of the communication, documentation, and visualization of shoulder pathology within individual practices and between providers.

  6. Contribution of the reverse endoprosthesis to glenohumeral kinematics.

    OpenAIRE

    Bergmann, J.H.M.; de Leeuw, M.; Janssen, T.W.J.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Willems, W.J.

    2008-01-01

    After placement of a reverse shoulder endoprosthesis, range of motion is usually still compromised. To what extent this occurs from limitation in motion of the reverse endoprosthesis is, however, unclear. We measured the motion pattern of 16 patients (18 shoulders) during three active and passive range of motion tasks using a six degree-of-freedom electromagnetic tracking device. Despite rotator cuff deficiencies, glenohumeral elevation contributed roughly two-thirds of the total thoracohumer...

  7. Evidence-based rehabilitation of athletes with glenohumeral instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cools, Ann M; Borms, Dorien; Castelein, Birgit; Vanderstukken, Fran; Johansson, Fredrik R

    2016-02-01

    To give an overview of current knowledge and guidelines with respect to evidence-based rehabilitation of athletes with glenohumeral instability. This narrative review combines scientific evidence with clinical guidelines based on the current literature to highlight the different components of the rehabilitation of glenohumeral instability. Depending on the specific characteristics of the instability pattern, the severity, recurrence, and direction, the therapeutic approach may be adapted to the needs and demands of the athlete. In general, attention should go to (1) restoration of rotator cuff strength and inter-muscular balance, focusing on the eccentric capacity of the external rotators, (2) normalization of rotational range of motion with special attention to the internal rotation ROM, (3) optimization of the flexibility and muscle performance of the scapular muscles, and (4) gradually increasing the functional sport-specific load on the shoulder girdle. The functional kinetic chain should be implemented throughout all stages of the rehabilitation program. Return to play should be based on subjective assessment as well as objective measurements of ROM, strength, and function. This paper summarizes evidence-based guidelines for treatment of glenohumeral instability. These guidelines may assist the clinician in the prevention and rehabilitation of the overhead athlete. Expert opinion, Level V.

  8. Severe aberrant glenohumeral motor patterns in a young female rower: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGurk Neal

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This case features an 18-year-old female with glenohumeral dysrhythmia and subluxation-relocation patterns. This unusual case highlights the need for careful examination and consideration to the anatomical structures involved. Conventional approaches to shoulder examination include range of motion, orthopaedic tests and manual resistance tests. We also assessed the patient's cognitive ability to coordinate muscle function. With this type of assessment we found that co-contraction of local muscle groups seemed to initially improve the patients abnormal shoulder motion. With this information a rehabilitation method was instituted with a goal to maintain the improvement. Case presentation An 18-year-old female with no history of trauma, presented with painless kinesiopathology of the left shoulder (in abduction consisting of dysrhythmia of the glenohumeral joint and early lateral rotation of the scapula. Examination also showed associated muscle atrophy of the lower trapezius and surrounding general muscle weakness. We used an untested functional assessment method in addition to more conventional methods. Exercise rehabilitation interventions were subsequently prescribed and graduated in accordance with what is known as the General Physical Rehabilitation Pyramid. Conclusion This paper presents an unusual case of aberrant shoulder movement. It highlights the need for careful examination and thought regarding the anatomical structures and normal motor patterns associated with the manoeuvre being tested. It also emphasised the use of co-contraction during examination in an attempt to immediately improve a regional dysrythmia if there is suspicion of a regional aberrant motor pattern. Further research may be warranted to test this approach.

  9. Setting Up an ePathology Service at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi: Joint Collaboration With Cleveland Clinic, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahal, Ayoub; Batac, Crystal Mildred O; Slaw, Renee J; Bauer, Thomas W

    2018-04-24

    - The production of whole slide images is the most advanced form of digital pathology, in which a high-resolution digital scanner is used to rapidly scan glass microscope slides and produce a computer-generated whole slide image that can be saved, stored in a network-attached storage device, and accessed through slide management software within the hospital domain and remotely by authorized users. Digital transformation of glass slides has revolutionized the practice of anatomic pathology by facilitating and expediting consultative services, improving clinical workflow, and becoming an indispensable tool in education and research. - To highlight the institutional need of Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates) and the cultural background for obtaining the United Arab Emirates' first comprehensive digital pathology program; to describe a multiphase road map for achieving full implementation of this platform; and to describe the system's clinical applications and its future potential growth. - At Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi, we prioritized our efforts to initiate digital consultations (eConsultations) and digital immunohistochemistry services (eIHC) with Cleveland Clinic Laboratories (Cleveland, Ohio). After this, we established an internal archiving system together with a subspecialty-based, organ-specific digital library of pathologic diseases. - We describe the strategic adoption and implementation of digital pathology into the clinical workflow of the pathology and laboratory medicine institute of Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi, and we highlight its impact on clinical operations, educational activities, and patient care.

  10. Resurfacing hemiarthroplasty compared to stemmed hemiarthroplasty for glenohumeral osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe V; Olsen, Bo S; Sorensen, Anne Kathrine

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to conduct a randomised, clinical trial comparing stemmed hemiarthroplasty and resurfacing hemiarthroplasty in the treatment of glenohumeral osteoarthritis. METHODS: A total of 40 shoulders (35 patients) were randomised to stemmed hemiarthroplasty or resurfacing...... hemiarthroplasty and evaluated three and 12 months postoperatively using the Constant-Murley score (CMS) and Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder (WOOS) index. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences in age, gender or pre-operative scores except for WOOS at baseline. Two patients...

  11. HIP AND GLENOHUMERAL PASSIVE RANGE OF MOTION IN COLLEGIATE SOFTBALL PLAYERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Hillary; Brambeck, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Range of motion deficits at the hip and glenohumeral joint (GHJ) may contribute to the incidence of injury in softball players. With injury in softball players on the rise, softball related studies in the literature are important. The purpose of this study was to examine hip and GHJ passive range of motion (PROM) patterns in collegiate softball players. Hypothesis It was hypothesized that the position players would exhibit significantly different PROM patterns than pitchers. Additionally, position players would exhibit significantly different side-to-side differences in PROM for both the hip and GHJ compared to pitchers. Study Design Prospective cohort study. Methods Forty-nine collegiate softball players (19.63 ± 1.15 years; 170.88 ± 8.08 cm; 72.96 ± 19.41 kg) participated. Passive hip and GHJ internal (IR) and external rotation (ER) measures were assessed. Glenohumeral PROM was measured with the participants supine with the arm abducted to 90 °. The measurements were recorded when the scapula began to move or a firm capsular end-feel was achieved. The hip was positioned in 90 ° of flexion and passively rotated until a capsular end-feel was achieved. Total PROM was calculated by taking the sum of IR and ER for both the hip and GHJ. Results No significant side-to-side PROM differences were observed in pitchers, at the GHJ or hip joint. Position players throwing side hip IR was significantly greater than the non-throwing side hip (p = 0.002). The non-throwing side hip had significantly greater ER compared to the throwing side hip (p = 0.002). When examining side-to-side differences at the GHJ, IR was significantly greater in the non-throwing shoulder (p = 0.047). No significant differences in total range of motion of the hip and GHJ were observed. Conclusion In the current study, position players displayed side-to-side differences in hip and GHJ IR PROM while no statistically significant differences were

  12. Musculoskeletal system pathology in aids patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabala, R.; Oleaga, L.; Garcia Bolado, A.; Grande, D.; Gorrino, O.; Lecumberri, I.

    2003-01-01

    We studied 22 AIDS patients who presented musculoskeletal system pathology. The affected area underwent simple X-ray and MR. The MR study was performed using a 1 Tesla magnet. T1 and T2 weighted echo spin sequences, as well as sequences of short T1 inversion recovery (STIR). In nine cases, intravenous gadolinium was used at a dose of 0.2cc/kg. The study plane was selected depending on the location of the lesion and surface coils were used when appropriate. In those patients showing pathology which was removed from the appendicular skeleton, the principal magnet was used as both transmitter and receiver. In one case, an On-Tine Tomography (CT) was also carried out. The evaluated ata were: a) localization; b) bony erosion; c) soft-tissue mass; d) articular effusion; e) cartilaginous changes; f) and T2 signals, and g) gadolinium enhancement. A diagnosis was made on the basis of biopsy or clinical culture, and evolution. Spinal cord alterations were the most frequent, being found in 13 cases. Twelve were caused by spondylodiscitis, 10 by tuberculosis, one by staphylococcal infection and one by candidiasis. In all cases, there appeared disk damage, as well as bone marrow signal alterations in the affected area and disks soft-tissue. In the mine cases in which gadolinium was used, the disk, vertebral plates and cases in which gadolinium was used, the disk, vertebral plates and soft-tissue mass heterogeneously enhanced, demonstrating an abscess with ring enhancement, and a central necrotic area in one case. In one patient, a spinal cord alteration due to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was observed. In six cases,there was observed and infectious arthritis two in coxofemoral joints, three in knees and one in a glenohumeral joint. Isolated germs were staphylococcal in three cases one being Mycobacterium tuberculosis, another being M. kansasii and the third identified as. Candida. In all cases, there was observed joint effusion, synovial thickening, joint cartilage damage and bony

  13. Objective Assessment of Joint Stiffness: A Clinically Oriented Hardware and Software Device with an Application to the Shoulder Joint

    OpenAIRE

    McQuade, Kevin; Price, Robert; Liu, Nelson; Ciol, Marcia A

    2012-01-01

    Examination of articular joints is largely based on subjective assessment of the “end-feel” of the joint in response to manually applied forces at different joint orientations. This technical report aims to describe the development of an objective method to examine joints in general, with specific application to the shoulder, and suitable for clinical use. We adapted existing hardware and developed laptop-based software to objectively record the force/displacement behavior of the glenohumeral...

  14. Glenohumeral range of motion (ROM) and isometric strength of professional team handball athletes, part III: changes over the playing season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieseler, Georg; Jungermann, Philipp; Koke, Alexander; Irlenbusch, Lars; Delank, Karl-Stefan; Schwesig, René

    2015-12-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the relation of workload on range of motion and isometric strength of team handball athletes' shoulders over a competitive season. 31 Professional male handball athletes underwent clinical shoulder examinations. Athletes were examined subsequently during the complete playing season (week 0, 6, 22 and 40) to determine bilateral isometric shoulder rotational strength and active range of motion (ROM). In addition, relative (intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and absolute (standard error of measurement) reliability were calculated. Intraobserver reliability was excellent (ICC 0.76-0.98) for isometric strength and flexibility measurements. Internal rotation (IR) and total arc ROM in the throwing shoulder (TS) decreased significantly (p handball players' shoulders changed significantly from the beginning to the end of a season. More specifically, the repetitive forces accumulated during the competitive season resulted in altered GIRD, ERG and isometric strength of the dominant glenohumeral joint.

  15. Comparative X-ray investigation of lateral and anterior-posterior ankle-joint images - comparison with pathological and anatomical findings concerning lateral ankle-joint lesions and their clinical importance, studied in a special type of holding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, F.

    1982-01-01

    The study reports on a possibility to interpret the relation of the different bone structures of the upper ankle-joint to one another in the X-ray picture without using contrast media. Modern funtional diagnostic methods increasingly make use of X-ray pictures taken in fixed position. It seems useful to standardize such X-ray images of the ankle-joint in order to make them reproducible. The author developed a device that would suit these purposes. A diagnosis required the reproduction of the accidental mechanism. The clinical symptoms do not permit to clearly state the extent of the lesion of the ligaments. The results of the post-operative follow-up examinations confirm the urgent necessity of the standardized diagnostic method presented and the success of the therapy applied. The presented X-ray method permits safe diagnosis of ruptures of the ligaments. Location of a certain rupture is not possible with the fixed-position X-ray screening. For a clear assessment of lesions of the ligaments at the lateral ankle-joint, X-ray pictures must be taken both in the anterior-posterior path of rays and in the lateral one. A normal result in the lateral path of rays does not exclude a pathologic result in the anterior-posterior path of rays, and vice versa. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Effects of asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology on in vivo shoulder motion and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Timothy G; Dischler, Jack; Mende, Veronica; Zauel, Roger; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Siegal, Daniel S; Divine, George; Moutzouros, Vasilios; Bey, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    The incidence of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears has been reported to range from 15% to 39%, but the influence of asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology on shoulder function is not well understood. This study assessed the effects of asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology on shoulder kinematics, strength, and patient-reported outcomes. A clinical ultrasound examination was performed in 46 asymptomatic volunteers (age: 60.3 ± 7.5 years) with normal shoulder function to document the condition of their rotator cuff. The ultrasound imaging identified the participants as healthy (n = 14) or pathologic (n = 32). Shoulder motion was measured with a biplane x-ray imaging system, strength was assessed with a Biodex (Biodex Medical Systems, Inc., Shirley, NY, USA), and patient-reported outcomes were assessed using the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and visual analog scale pain scores. Compared with healthy volunteers, those with rotator cuff pathology had significantly less abduction (P = .050) and elevation (P = .041) strength, their humerus was positioned more inferiorly on the glenoid (P = .018), and the glenohumeral contact path length was longer (P = .007). No significant differences were detected in the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index, visual analog scale, range of motion, or acromiohumeral distance. The differences observed between the healthy volunteers and those with asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology lend insight into the changes in joint mechanics, shoulder strength, and conventional clinical outcomes associated with the early stages of rotator cuff pathology. Furthermore, these findings suggest a plausible mechanical progression of kinematic and strength changes associated with the development of rotator cuff pathology. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Inferior Glenohumeral Dislocation in a Division One Collegiate Wrestler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Gilmore

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: A twenty-two year old male collegiate wrestler with no previous history of any shoulder injuries experienced an inferior glenohumeral dislocation on his right arm during practice. The athlete was in in a front headlock by a teammate who attempted to roll him. The athlete was forced into hyperflexion and abduction. The athlete felt a pop and his arm was “stuck” in approximately ninety degrees of abduction. An obvious deformity was palpable in his armpit. The athlete then proceeded to make his way to the athletic training room where he was able to relax and the dislocation reduced itself. After relocation the athlete had no obvious deformity, immediate swelling, or ecchymosis. He was experiencing very generalized soreness and was tender to palpate. His range of motion was very limited due to pain and we were unable to get a good evaluation on him at the time of injury. The next day he was still pretty sore and experienced pain with internal and external rotation. He was experiencing weakness in his rotator cuff and had diffuse neuropraxia. Differential Diagnosis: Labral Tear, shoulder instability, fracture to the humeral head. Treatment: The athlete saw the team physician the day of injury, was placed in a sling, and followed up with x-rays and a visit with the team physician the next day. No bony abnormalities were shown on the x-rays. The team physician discussed options of surgery or waiting with the athlete, who was pretty set on surgery, which he ended up getting the next week. He saw the team physician one week post-operation where the surgery and pictures were reviewed and explained. Athlete was doing well with no complaints. He had good range of motion for one week post-op. At this point we had to explain to him that he needed to be patient in order to let himself heal. We were told to continue his rehabilitation program of active internal and external rotation, passive supination/pronation, and putty squeezes and that he

  18. Osteoarthritis-like pathologic changes in the knee joint induced by environmental disruption of circadian rhythms is potentiated by a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kc, Ranjan; Li, Xin; Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Summa, Keith C; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Tryniszewska, Beata; Keshavarzian, Ali; Turek, Fred W; Meng, Qing-Jun; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-11-20

    A variety of environmental factors contribute to progressive development of osteoarthritis (OA). Environmental factors that upset circadian rhythms have been linked to various diseases. Our recent work establishes chronic environmental circadian disruption - analogous to rotating shiftwork-associated disruption of circadian rhythms in humans - as a novel risk factor for the development of OA. Evidence suggests shift workers are prone to obesity and also show altered eating habits (i.e., increased preference for high-fat containing food). In the present study, we investigated the impact of chronic circadian rhythm disruption in combination with a high-fat diet (HFD) on progression of OA in a mouse model. Our study demonstrates that when mice with chronically circadian rhythms were fed a HFD, there was a significant proteoglycan (PG) loss and fibrillation in knee joint as well as increased activation of the expression of the catabolic mediators involved in cartilage homeostasis. Our results, for the first time, provide the evidence that environmental disruption of circadian rhythms plus HFD potentiate OA-like pathological changes in the mouse joints. Thus, our findings may open new perspectives on the interactions of chronic circadian rhythms disruption with diet in the development of OA and may have potential clinical implications.

  19. A prospective study of shoulder pain in primary care: Prevalence of imaged pathology and response to guided diagnostic blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNair Peter J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of imaged pathology in primary care has received little attention and the relevance of identified pathology to symptoms remains unclear. This paper reports the prevalence of imaged pathology and the association between pathology and response to diagnostic blocks into the subacromial bursa (SAB, acromioclavicular joint (ACJ and glenohumeral joint (GHJ. Methods Consecutive patients with shoulder pain recruited from primary care underwent standardised x-ray, diagnostic ultrasound scan and diagnostic injections of local anaesthetic into the SAB and ACJ. Subjects who reported less than 80% reduction in pain following either of these injections were referred for a magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA and GHJ diagnostic block. Differences in proportions of positive and negative imaging findings in the anaesthetic response groups were assessed using Fishers test and odds ratios were calculated a for positive anaesthetic response (PAR to diagnostic blocks. Results In the 208 subjects recruited, the rotator cuff and SAB displayed the highest prevalence of pathology on both ultrasound (50% and 31% respectively and MRA (65% and 76% respectively. The prevalence of PAR following SAB injection was 34% and ACJ injection 14%. Of the 59% reporting a negative anaesthetic response (NAR for both of these injections, 16% demonstrated a PAR to GHJ injection. A full thickness tear of supraspinatus on ultrasound was associated with PAR to SAB injection (OR 5.02; p p p p ≤ 0.05. Conclusions Rotator cuff and SAB pathology were the most common findings on ultrasound and MRA. Evidence of a full thickness supraspinatus tear was associated with symptoms arising from the subacromial region, and a biceps tendon sheath effusion and an intact rotator cuff were associated with an intra-articular GHJ pain source. When combined with clinical information, these results may help guide diagnostic decision making in primary care.

  20. Correlation of glenohumeral internal rotation deficit and total rotational motion to shoulder injuries in professional baseball pitchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Kevin E; Macrina, Leonard C; Fleisig, Glenn S; Porterfield, Ronald; Simpson, Charles D; Harker, Paul; Paparesta, Nick; Andrews, James R

    2011-02-01

    Glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD) indicates a 20° or greater loss of internal rotation of the throwing shoulder compared with the nondominant shoulder. To determine whether GIRD and a deficit in total rotational motion (external rotation + internal rotation) compared with the nonthrowing shoulder correlate with shoulder injuries in professional baseball pitchers. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Over 3 competitive seasons (2005 to 2007), passive range of motion measurements were evaluated on the dominant and nondominant shoulders for 170 pitcher-seasons. This included 122 professional pitchers during the 3 seasons of data collection, in which some pitchers were measured during multiple seasons. Ranges of motion were measured with a bubble goniometer during the preseason, by the same examiner each year. External and internal rotation of the glenohumeral joint was assessed with the participant supine and the arm abducted 90° in the plane of the scapula, with the scapula stabilized anteriorly at the coracoid process. The reproducibility of the test methods had an intraclass correlation coefficient of .81. Days in which the player was unable to participate because of injury or surgery were recorded during the season by the medical staff of the team and defined as an injury. Pitchers with GIRD (n = 40) were nearly twice as likely to be injured as those without but without statistical significance (P = .17). Pitchers with total rotational motion deficit greater than 5° had a higher rate of injury. Minor league pitchers were more likely than major league pitchers to be injured. However, when players were injured, major league pitchers missed a significantly greater number of games than minor league pitchers. Compared with pitchers without GIRD, pitchers with GIRD appear to be at a higher risk for injury and shoulder surgery.

  1. Videoarthroscopic treatment of glenohumeral osteoarthritis Tratamento Videoartroscópico da Osteoartrite Glenoumeral

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    Glaydson Gomes Godinho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate possible benefits obtained through the use of surgical videoarthroscopy in the management of glenohumeral osteoarthritis. METHODS: We evaluated 37 patients (38 shoulders who underwent through surgical videoarthroscopy in the period between November 1999 and May 2009 (minimum follow-up of two years. Twenty five patients attend for revaluation and thirteen were interviewed by telephonic contact. Functional assessments were performed (UCLA, Constant, and measurement of range of motion -ROM-, as well as pre and post surgical radiographics. We evaluated the influence of the following factors in the final results: the presence of chondral lesions, joint space narrowing, osteophyte presence, associated injuries (rotator cuff torn or instability, and follow-up. Among those patients interviewed by phone we evaluated the satisfaction level and if they would submit themselves again to the surgical procedure. RESULTS: It was observed significant gain towards to the function (UCLA and the internal rotation, as well as the association between dissatisfaction and pre surgical joint space reduced. Among the operated patients, 84% were satisfied with the results and 86.6% would repeat the procedure. CONCLUSION: Surgical videoarthroscopy presents a relevant role in management of the glenohumeral osteoarthritis, providing improvement of functional results and high levels of satisfaction. OBJETIVO: Avaliar possíveis benefícios obtidos mediante o uso da videoartroscopia cirúrgica no tratamento da osteoartrite glenoumeral. MÉTODOS: Avaliamos 37 pacientes (38 ombros submetidos à vídeoartroscopia cirúrgica no período compreendido entre novembro de 1999 e maio de 2009 (seguimento mínimo de dois anos. Compareceram para reavaliação 25 pacientes e 13 foram entrevistados por contato telefônico. Foram feitas avaliações funcionais (UCLA, Constant, e aferição da Amplitude de Movimento *[ADM], assim como estudo radiográfico pré e p

  2. Virtual MR arthroscopy of the shoulder: image gallery with arthroscopic correlation of major pathologies in shoulder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecco, A; Volpe, D; Volpe, N; Fornara, P; Castagna, A; Carriero, A

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare virtual MR arthroscopic reconstructions with arthroscopic images in patients affected by shoulder joint instability. MR arthrography (MR-AR) of the shoulder is now a well-assessed technique, based on the injection of a contrast medium solution, which fills the articular space and finds its way between the rotator cuff (RC) and the glenohumeral ligaments. In patients with glenolabral pathology, we used an additional sequence that provided virtual arthroscopy (VA) post-processed views, which completed the MR evaluation of shoulder pathology. We enrolled 36 patients, from whom MR arthrographic sequence data (SE T1w and GRE T1 FAT SAT) were obtained using a GE 0.5 T Signa--before any surgical or arthroscopic planned treatment; the protocol included a supplemental 3D, spoiled GE T1w positioned in the coronal plane. Dedicated software loaded on a work-station was used to elaborate VAs. Two radiologists evaluated, on a semiquantitative scale, the visibility of the principal anatomic structures, and then, in consensus, the pathology emerging from the VA images. These images were reconstructed in all patients, except one. The visualization of all anatomical structures was acceptable. VA and MR arthrographic images were fairly concordant with intraoperative findings. Although in our pilot study the VA findings did not change the surgical planning, the results showed concordance with the surgical or arthroscopic images.

  3. Joint involvement in patients with early polymyalgia rheumatica using high-resolution ultrasound and its contribution to the EULAR/ACR 2012 classification criteria for polymyalgia rheumatica.

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    Weigand, Sandra; Ehrenstein, Boris; Fleck, Martin; Hartung, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    To assess joint involvement and the contribution of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) to the novel European League Against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology (EULAR/ACR) 2012 classification criteria in patients with polymyalgia rheumatic (PMR). MSUS was performed in 54 consecutive patients with recent-onset PMR. Biceps tenosynovitis of at least 1 shoulder has been observed in 70.4% of patients, and 64.8% had a bilateral biceps tenosynovitis. Subdeltoid bursitis (27.8% unilateral, 5.6% bilateral), glenohumeral synovitis (22.2% unilateral, 9.3% bilateral), and hip involvement (22.2% unilateral, 16.7% bilateral) were observed less frequently. The sensitivities of the classification criteria were 85.2% for EULAR/ACR without MSUS and 81.5% for EULAR/ACR with MSUS. The most common MSUS pathology was a biceps tenosynovitis. However, US findings had no effect on the sensitivity of the novel EULAR/ACR criteria for PMR.

  4. The Influence of Task Constraints on the Glenohumeral Horizontal Abduction Angle of the Overarm Throw of Novice Throwers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Casey M.; Garner, John C.; Rudisill, Mary E.; Parish, Loraine E.; St. Onge, Paul M.; Campbell, Brian J.; Weimar, Wendi H.

    2009-01-01

    This study determines the effects of three baseballs and softballs of different masses (0.113 kg, 0.198 kg, 0.340 kg) and regulation diameters (22.86 and 30.48 cm, respectively) on the glenohumeral horizontal abduction angle of an overarm throw performed by young children who were novice throwers. Glenohumeral horizontal abduction angle was…

  5. Investigation Stability of Upper Limb Function in Handballers with Glenohumeral Internal Rotation Deficit

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    Noorollah Javdaneh

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, functional stability of the unstable shoulder of Hanballers with Glenohumeral Internal Rotation Deficit is lower than the functional stability of the healthy subjects; therefore, we suggest that the upper extremity stabilization exercises, specially the closed kinetic chain exercises be added to the shoulder rehabilitation programs.

  6. Glenohumeral kinematics after soft tissue interposition graft and glenoid reaming: A cadaveric study

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    Nickolas G Garbis

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Glenohumeral contact pressure is significantly improved with interposition of allograft at time zero compared to an arthritic state. Our findings suggest that concentric reaming did not differ from the arthritic model when compared to normal. These findings favor the use of allograft for interposition as a potential treatment option in patients with glenoid wear.

  7. Diagnostic glenohumeral arthroscopy fails to fully evaluate the biceps-labral complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Samuel A; Khair, M Michael; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Pearle, Andrew D; Baret, Nikolas J; Newman, Ashley M; Dy, Christopher J; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the limits of diagnostic glenohumeral arthroscopy and determine the prevalence and frequency of hidden extra-articular "bicipital tunnel" lesions among chronically symptomatic patients. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens underwent diagnostic glenohumeral arthroscopy with percutaneous tagging of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) during maximal tendon excursion. The percentage of visualized LHBT was calculated relative to the distal margin of subscapularis tendon and the proximal margin of the pectoralis major tendon. Then, a retrospective review of 277 patients who underwent subdeltoid transfer of the LHBT to the conjoint tendon were retrospectively analyzed for lesions of the biceps-labral complex. Lesions were categorized by anatomic location (inside, junctional, or bicipital tunnel). Inside lesions were labral tears. Junctional lesions were LHBT tears visualized during glenohumeral arthroscopy. Bicipital tunnel lesions were extra-articular lesions hidden from view during standard glenohumeral arthroscopy. Seventy-eight percent of LHBT were visualized relative to the distal margin of the subscapularis tendon and only 55% relative to the proximal margin of the pectoralis major tendon. No portion of the LHBT inferior to the subscapularis tendon was visualized. Forty-seven percent of patients had hidden bicipital tunnel lesions. Scarring was most common and accounted for 48% of all such lesions. Thirty-seven percent of patients had multiple lesion locations. Forty-five percent of patients with junctional lesions also had hidden bicipital tunnel lesions. The only offending lesion was in the bicipital tunnel for 18% of patients. Diagnostic glenohumeral arthroscopy fails to fully evaluate the biceps-labral complex because it visualizes only 55% of the LHBT relative to the proximal margin of the pectoralis major tendon and did not identify extra-articular bicipital tunnel lesions present in 47% of chronically

  8. Position of Immobilization After First-Time Traumatic Anterior Glenohumeral Dislocation: A Literature Review.

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    Gutkowska, Olga; Martynkiewicz, Jacek; Gosk, Jerzy

    2017-07-15

    Anterior glenohumeral dislocation affects about 2% of the general population during the lifetime. The incidence of traumatic glenohumeral dislocation ranges from 8.2 to 26.69 per 100 000 population per year. The most common complication is recurrent dislocation occurring in 17-96% of the patients. The majority of patients are treated conservatively by closed reduction and immobilization in internal rotation for 2-3 weeks. However, no clear conservative treatment protocol exists. Immobilization in external rotation can be considered an alternative. A range of external rotation braces are commercially available. The purpose of this work was to review the current literature on conservative management of glenohumeral dislocation and to compare the results of immobilization in internal and external rotation. A comprehensive literature search and review was performed using the keywords "glenohumeral dislocation", "shoulder dislocation", "immobilization", "external rotation", and "recurrent dislocation" in PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases from their inceptions to May 2016. Three cadaveric studies, 6 imaging studies, 10 clinical studies, and 4 meta-analyses were identified. The total number of 734 patients were included in the clinical studies. Literature analysis revealed better coaptation of the labrum on the glenoid rim in external rotation in cadaveric and imaging studies. However, this tendency was not confirmed by lower redislocation rates or better quality of life in clinical studies. On the basis of the available literature, we cannot confirm the superiority of immobilization in external rotation after glenohumeral dislocation when compared to internal rotation. A yet-to-be-determined group of patients with specific labroligamentous injury pattern may benefit from immobilization in external rotation. Further studies are needed to identify these patients.

  9. Significance of clinical evaluation of the metacarpophalangeal joint in relation to synovial/bone pathology in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis detected by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Millicent A; White, Lawrence M; Gladman, Dafna D; Inman, Robert D; Chaya, Sam; Lax, Matthew; Salonen, David; Weber, Deborah A; Guthrie, Judy A; Pomeroy, Emma; Podbielski, Dominik; Keystone, Edward C

    2009-12-01

    Rheumatologists base many clinical decisions regarding the management of inflammatory joint diseases on joint counts performed at clinic. We investigated the reliability and accuracy of physically examining the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints to detect inflammatory synovitis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the gold standard. MCP joints 2 to 5 in both hands of 5 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 5 with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) were assessed by 5 independent examiners for joint-line swelling (visually and by palpation); joint-line tenderness by palpation (tender joint count, TJC) and stress pain; and by MRI (1.5 Tesla superconducting magnet). Interrater reliability was assessed using kappa statistics, and agreement between examination and corresponding MRI assessment was assessed by Fisher's exact tests (p 0.8) and positive predictive value (= 0.8). For PsA, significant associations exist between TJC and MRI synovitis scores (p < 0.01) and stress pain and MRI edema scores (p < 0.04). Assessment of swelling by palpation was not significantly associated with synovitis or edema as determined by MRI in RA or PsA (p = 0.54-1.0). In inflammatory arthritis, disease activity in MCP joints can be reliably assessed at the bedside by examining for joint-line tenderness (TJC) and visual inspection for swelling. Clinical assessment may have to be complemented by other methods for evaluating disease activity in the joint, such as MRI, particularly in patients with PsA.

  10. Analysis of normal and dysplastic glenohumeral morphology at magnetic resonance imaging in children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy

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    Bunt, Fabian van de [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pearl, Michael L.; Lee, Eric K.; Peng, Lauren; Didomenico, Paul [Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-09-15

    Glenoid version and percentage of the humeral head anterior to the scapular line are commonly used 2-D measures to assess deformity of the glenohumeral joint of children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy. To assess whether glenoid version and percentage of the humeral head anterior to the scapular line would be altered by standardizing the measurements to the orientation of the scapula. Twenty-one bilateral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were evaluated by four reviewers. Measurements were performed on the axial image slices and again after applying 3-D reformatting. Three-dimensional reformatting led to intrapatient corrections up to 25 for version and -30% for percentage of the humeral head anterior to the scapular line. The mean difference on the involved side between clinical and anatomical version across all subjects from all reviewers was 2.2 ± 3.9 (range: -4.5 to 11.5 ). The mean difference in the percentage of the humeral head anterior to the scapular line after reformatting was -1.8% (range: -15.9% to 5.2%). Measurements can differ greatly for the same child depending on technical factors of image acquisition and presentation in the clinical setting. With this study, we present a clinically accessible protocol to correct for scapular orientation from MRI data of children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy. (orig.)

  11. Deficits in glenohumeral passive range of motion increase risk of elbow injury in professional baseball pitchers: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Kevin E; Macrina, Leonard C; Fleisig, Glenn S; Aune, Kyle T; Porterfield, Ron A; Harker, Paul; Evans, Timothy J; Andrews, James R

    2014-09-01

    Injuries to the elbow joint in baseball pitchers appear common. There appears to be a correlation between shoulder range of motion and elbow injuries. To prospectively determine whether decreased ROM of the throwing shoulder is correlated with the onset of elbow injuries in professional baseball pitchers. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. For 8 consecutive years (2005-2012), passive range of motion of both the throwing and nonthrowing shoulders of all major and minor league pitchers within a single professional baseball organization were measured by using a bubble goniometer during spring training. In total, 505 examinations were conducted on 296 pitchers. Glenohumeral external rotation and internal rotation were assessed in the supine position with the arm at 90° of abduction and in the plane of the scapula. The scapula was stabilized per methods previously established. Total rotation was defined as the sum of external rotation and internal rotation. Passive shoulder flexion was assessed with the subject supine and the scapula stabilized per methods previously established. Elbow injuries and days missed because of elbow injuries were assessed and recorded by the medical staff of the team. Throwing and nonthrowing shoulder measurements were compared by using Student t tests; 1-tailed Fisher exact tests were performed to identify significant associations between shoulder motion and elbow injury. Nominal logistic regression was performed to determine the odds of elbow injury. Significant differences were noted during side-to-side comparisons within subjects. There were 49 elbow injuries and 8 surgeries in 38 players, accounting for a total of 2551 days missed. Neither glenohumeral internal rotation deficit nor external rotation insufficiency was correlated with elbow injuries. Pitchers with deficits of >5° in total rotation in their throwing shoulders had a 2.6 times greater risk for injury. Pitchers with deficit of ≥5° in flexion of the throwing shoulder had

  12. Outcomes of bilateral sacroiliac joint fusions and the importance of understanding potential coexisting lumbosacral pathology that might also require surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall, Bruce E; Eden, Sonia V

    2015-06-01

    Only one study in the literature describes performing a bilateral sacroiliac joint fusion, and the results were poor. Many patients needing a bilateral sacroiliac joint fusion frequently have had previous lumbosacral surgeries and present with lumbosacral pain as well. This study reviews our results in consecutive patients having had a bilateral sacroiliac joint fusion over a five-year period. Fifteen patients had bilateral sacroiliac joint fusions with 13 having concurrent lumbosacral fusions. The modified posterior midline fascial splitting approach, first described by Belanger was utilized. Patients were followed for an average of 30.3 months. There were no infections, neurovascular injuries, lasting morbidity or deaths. One non-union of a sacroiliac joint (7%) occurred, which after revision was satisfactory. There was a statistically significant drop in pain (p=0.01488) using the VAS, and patient satisfaction rates were 86%. With all those patients saying they would have the surgery again for the same result. There was no significant increase in functionality. Patients needing bilateral sacroiliac joint fusions frequently fall into the "failed back" category, and it is important to evaluate both the sacroiliac joints and the lumbosacral spine for potential pain generators. This study shows that by treating all the pain generators in both areas there were significant decreases in pain, low complications, low re-operation rates, and high patient satisfaction scores. Overall functionality, however, was not positively affected.

  13. Comparison of dynamic ultrasound and stress radiology for assessment of inferior glenohumeral laxity in asymptomatic shoulders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, S.C.; Wallace, W.A.; Hulse, D.; Fairbairn, K.J.; Clarke, M.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the level of agreement between dynamic ultrasound imaging and stress radiography used for the measurement of inferior glenohumeral laxity in asymptomatic shoulders, and to determine the repeatability of the dynamic ultrasound technique. Using a custom-made stress device to apply an inferior displacement force of 90 N, we assessed 20 asymptomatic male subjects for inferior glenohumeral laxity, using stress radiography and dynamic ultrasound. Paired differences between the two methods were evaluated by the 95% limits of agreement method. At a separate session, 19 subjects had inferior glenohumeral laxity assessed by two observers, using dynamic ultrasound. Inter- and intra-observer repeatability was determined for the ultrasound technique. The mean [± standard deviation (SD)] inferior translation was 4.7 ± 4.1 mm by stress radiography and 4.4 ± 2.3 mm by dynamic ultrasound. The 95% limits of agreement showed good agreement between the two methods. The paired difference between the two measurement methods varied with the magnitude of the measurement (P < 0.001). Intra-observer repeatability of dynamic ultrasound was determined by the use of intra-class correlation coefficients and was 0.94 and 0.89 for the two investigators. Inter-observer repeatability was 0.85. The standard error of the measurement was 0.60 mm and 0.66 mm, for repeated measurements by the two investigators, and 0.85 mm between investigators. Repeatability coefficients demonstrated excellent consistency of measurement between sessions and good consistency between observers. Dynamic ultrasound is a valid and reproducible method for the assessment and quantification of inferior glenohumeral laxity. (orig.)

  14. Interleukin-21 receptor deficiency increases the initial toll-like receptor 2 response but protects against joint pathology by reducing Th1 and Th17 cells during streptococcal cell wall arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marijnissen, Renoud J; Roeleveld, Debbie M; Young, Deborah; Nickerson-Nutter, Cheryl; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Garcia de Aquino, Sabrina; van de Loo, Fons A J; van Spriel, Annemiek B; Boots, Annemieke M H; van den Berg, Wim B; Koenders, Marije I

    2014-04-01

    The cytokine interleukin-21 (IL-21) can have both proinflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential dual role of IL-21 in experimental arthritis in relation to Th17 cells. Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) and chronic streptococcal cell wall (SCW) arthritis were induced in IL-21 receptor-deficient (IL-21R(-/-) ) and wild-type mice. Knee joints, synovial tissue, and serum were analyzed for arthritis pathology and inflammatory markers. During AIA and chronic SCW arthritis, IL-21R deficiency protected against severe inflammation and joint destruction. This was accompanied by suppressed serum IgG1 levels and antigen-specific T cell responses. Levels of IL-17 were reduced during AIA, and synovial lymphocytes isolated during SCW arthritis for flow cytometry demonstrated that mainly IL-17+ interferon-γ (IFNγ)-positive T cells were reduced in IL-21R(-/-) mice. However, during the acute phases of SCW arthritis, significantly higher joint swelling scores were observed, consistent with enhanced tumor necrosis factor and IL-6 expression. Interestingly, IL-21R(-/-) mice were significantly less capable of up-regulating suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS-1) and SOCS-3 messenger RNA. IL-21 stimulation also affected the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2)/caspase recruitment domain 15 response to SCW fragments in vitro, indicating that impaired SOCS regulation in the absence of IL-21 signaling might contribute to the increased local activation during SCW arthritis. In contrast to the proinflammatory role of IL-21 in adaptive immunity, which drives IL-17+IFN+ cells and joint pathology during chronic experimental arthritis, IL-21 also has an important immunosuppressive role, presumably by inhibiting TLR signaling via SOCS-1 and SOCS-3. If this dual role of IL-21 in various immune processes is present in human disease, it could make IL-21 a difficult therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2014 by the American

  15. An Analysis of Pathological Activities of CCN Proteins in Joint Disorders: Mechanical Stretch-Mediated CCN2 Expression in Cultured Meniscus Cells.

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    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2017-01-01

    The multifunctional growth factor CYR61/CTGF/NOV (CCN) 2, also known as connective tissue growth factor, regulates cellular proliferation, differentiation, and tissue regeneration. Recent literatures have described important roles of CCN2 in the meniscus metabolism. However, the mechanical stress-mediated transcriptional regulation of CCN2 in the meniscus remains unclear. The meniscus is a fibrocartilaginous tissue that controls complex biomechanics of the knee joint. Therefore, the injured unstable meniscus has a poor healing potential especially in the avascular inner region. In addition, dysfunction of the meniscus correlates with the progression of degenerative knee joint disorders and joint space narrowing. Here, we describe an experimental approach that investigates the distinct cellular behavior of inner and outer meniscus cells in response to mechanical stretch. Our experimental model can analyze the relationships between stretch-induced CCN2 expression and its functional role in the meniscus homeostasis.

  16. Profile of collagen gene expression in the glenohumeral capsule of patients with traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Santoro Belangero

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To evaluate the expression of the genes COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1 and COL5A1 in the glenohumeral capsule of patients with traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder.Methods:Samples from the glenohumeral capsule of 18 patients with traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder were evaluated. Male patients with a positive grip test and a Bankart lesion seen on magnetic resonance imaging were included. All the patients had suffered more than one episode of shoulder dislocation. Samples were collected from the injured glenohumeral capsule (anteroinferior region and from the macroscopically unaffected region (anterosuperior region of each patient. The expression of collagen genes was evaluated using the polymerase chain reaction after reverse transcription with quantitative analysis (qRT-PCR.Results:The expression of COL1A1, COL1A2 and COL3A1 did not differ between the two regions of the shoulder capsule. However, it was observed that the expression of COL5A1 was significantly lower in the anteroinferior region than in the anterosuperior region (median ± interquartile range: 0.057 ±0.052 vs. 0.155 ±0.398; p = 0.028 of the glenohumeral capsule.Conclusion:The affected region of the glenohumeral capsule in patients with shoulder instability presented reduced expression of COL5A1.

  17. Musculoskeletal system pathology in aids patients; Patologia del sistema musculosqueletico en pacientes con sida

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    Zabala, R.; Oleaga, L.; Garcia Bolado, A.; Grande, D.; Gorrino, O.; Lecumberri, I. [Hospital de Basurto. Bilbao (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    We studied 22 AIDS patients who presented musculoskeletal system pathology. The affected area underwent simple X-ray and MR. The MR study was performed using a 1 Tesla magnet. T1 and T2 weighted echo spin sequences, as well as sequences of short T1 inversion recovery (STIR). In nine cases, intravenous gadolinium was used at a dose of 0.2cc/kg. The study plane was selected depending on the location of the lesion and surface coils were used when appropriate. In those patients showing pathology which was removed from the appendicular skeleton, the principal magnet was used as both transmitter and receiver. In one case, an On-Tine Tomography (CT) was also carried out. The evaluated ata were: a) localization; b) bony erosion; c) soft-tissue mass; d) articular effusion; e) cartilaginous changes; f) and T2 signals, and g) gadolinium enhancement. A diagnosis was made on the basis of biopsy or clinical culture, and evolution. Spinal cord alterations were the most frequent, being found in 13 cases. Twelve were caused by spondylodiscitis, 10 by tuberculosis, one by staphylococcal infection and one by candidiasis. In all cases, there appeared disk damage, as well as bone marrow signal alterations in the affected area and disks soft-tissue. In the mine cases in which gadolinium was used, the disk, vertebral plates and cases in which gadolinium was used, the disk, vertebral plates and soft-tissue mass heterogeneously enhanced, demonstrating an abscess with ring enhancement, and a central necrotic area in one case. In one patient, a spinal cord alteration due to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was observed. In six cases,there was observed and infectious arthritis two in coxofemoral joints, three in knees and one in a glenohumeral joint. Isolated germs were staphylococcal in three cases one being Mycobacterium tuberculosis, another being M. kansasii and the third identified as. Candida. In all cases, there was observed joint effusion, synovial thickening, joint cartilage damage and

  18. Lipoma arborescens: caso raro de ruptura do manguito rotador associado à presença de lipoma arborescens na bursa subacromial-subdeltoidea e glenoumeral Lipoma arborescens: rare case of rotator cuff tear associated with the presence of lipoma arborescens in the subacromial-subdeltoid and glenohumeral bursa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Benegas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoma arborescens é uma condição rara de moléstia intra-articular, usualmente monoarticular, caracterizada por extensa proliferação dos vilos sinoviais e hiperplasia da gordura subsinovial. O tecido sinovial é progressivamente substituído por células maduras de gordura na membrana sinovial. O presente trabalho é o relato de caso de uma condição rara de lipoma arborescens tanto intra-articular (glenoumeral como da bursa subacromial-subdeltoide além de ruptura do tendão do supraespinhoso. As apresentações clínicas, histológicas e radiográficas assim como o tratamento são discutidos no presente estudo. A apresentação do caso contempla também a avaliação radiográfica, ressonância magnética e exame patológico. Apesar do lipoma arborescens ser uma condição rara, tal hipótese deve ser considerada frente a um caso com hiperproliferação sinovial e lipossubstituição da sinovial.Lipoma arborescens is a rare intra-articular disease that is usually monoarticular and is characterized by extensive proliferation of the synovial villi and hyperplasia of the subsynovial fat. The synovial tissue is progressively replaced by mature fat cells in the synovial membrane. The present study reports a case of a rare condition of lipoma arborescens that was simultaneously intra-articular (glenohumeral joint and in the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa, in association with a torn supraspinatus tendon. The clinical, histological and radiographic presentations and treatment are discussed here. The description of this case includes radiographic and magnetic resonance evaluations and pathological examination. Although lipoma arborescens is a rare condition, it should be taken into consideration in cases presenting synovial hyperproliferation and synovial fat replacement.

  19. Computational Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, David N.; Feldman, Michael; Carter, Alexis B.; Dighe, Anand S.; Pfeifer, John D.; Bry, Lynn; Almeida, Jonas S.; Saltz, Joel; Braun, Jonathan; Tomaszewski, John E.; Gilbertson, John R.; Sinard, John H.; Gerber, Georg K.; Galli, Stephen J.; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Becich, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Context We define the scope and needs within the new discipline of computational pathology, a discipline critical to the future of both the practice of pathology and, more broadly, medical practice in general. Objective To define the scope and needs of computational pathology. Data Sources A meeting was convened in Boston, Massachusetts, in July 2014 prior to the annual Association of Pathology Chairs meeting, and it was attended by a variety of pathologists, including individuals highly invested in pathology informatics as well as chairs of pathology departments. Conclusions The meeting made recommendations to promote computational pathology, including clearly defining the field and articulating its value propositions; asserting that the value propositions for health care systems must include means to incorporate robust computational approaches to implement data-driven methods that aid in guiding individual and population health care; leveraging computational pathology as a center for data interpretation in modern health care systems; stating that realizing the value proposition will require working with institutional administrations, other departments, and pathology colleagues; declaring that a robust pipeline should be fostered that trains and develops future computational pathologists, for those with both pathology and non-pathology backgrounds; and deciding that computational pathology should serve as a hub for data-related research in health care systems. The dissemination of these recommendations to pathology and bioinformatics departments should help facilitate the development of computational pathology. PMID:26098131

  20. Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017; Venice (Italy; October 31-November 4, 2017; Session "Cardiac Physiology and Pathology"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    --- Various Authors

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017; Venice (Italy; October 31-November 4, 201758th ESPR Annual Meeting, 7th International Congress of UENPS, 3rd International Congress of EFCNIORGANIZING INSTITUTIONSEuropean Society for Paediatric Research (ESPR, European Society for Neonatology (ESN, Union of European Neonatal & Perinatal Societies (UENPS, European Foundation for the Care of Newborn Infants (EFCNIORGANIZING COMMITTEELuc Zimmermann (President of ESPR, Morten Breindahl (President of ESN, Manuel Sánchez Luna (President of UENPS, Silke Mader (Chairwoman of the Executive Board and Co-Founder of EFCNISCIENTIFIC COMMITTEEVirgilio P. Carnielli (Congress President Chair, Pierre Gressens (Past Scientific President, Umberto Simeoni, Manon Benders, Neil Marlow, Ola D. Saugstad, Petra Hüppi, Agnes van den HoogenSession "Cardiac Physiology and Pathology"ABS 1. EVALUATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PATENT DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS AND THE PLATELET MASS INDEX IN PRETERM INFANTS • M. Kara, İ. Caner, K.Ş. Tekgündüz, İ. Polat, H. KeskinABS 2. DIAGNOSIS OF DIGEORGE SYNDROME: THE CONTRIBUTION OF MOLECULAR GENETICS • Y. Halleb, H. Hadj-Abdallah, S. Nouri, A. Touati, M. Bellallah, J. Mathlouthi, N. Mahdhaoui, H. Sboui, A. Saad, D. H’midaABS 3. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SIZE OF PATENT DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS AND CO-MORBIDITIES • S. Bellis, Y. SinghABS 4. EFFICACY OF MEDICAL TREATMENT IN CLOSING PATENT DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS IN ELBW INFANTS • S. Bellis, Y. SinghABS 5. ACETAMINOPHEN FOR CLOSING PDA. SHOULD IT BE A FIRST LINE THERAPEUTIC OPTION? • I. Tofé, M.D. Ruiz, M.P. Jaraba, M.V. Rodriguez, R.L. Rueda, M.D. Ordoñez, M.J. ParragaABS 6. PATENT DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS WITH HEMODYNAMIC REPERCUSSION IN VERY LOW WEIGHT PRETERM INFANTS TREATED WITH ORAL IBUPROFEN PRESENTS A HIGH RATE OF BRONCHOPULMONARY DYSPLASIA • M.M. Lourenço, E. Sacramento, F. Carmona, C. Calixto, F. Martin-Celini, G.H. Seribelli, W.A. Gonçalves-FerriABS 7

  1. Interest in the glenoid hull method for analyzing humeral subluxation in primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouacida, Soufyane; Gauci, Marc-Olivier; Coulet, Bertrand; Lazerges, Cyril; Cyteval, Catherine; Boileau, Pascal; Chammas, Michel

    2017-07-01

    Posterior humeral subluxation is the main cause of failure of total shoulder arthroplasty. We aimed to compare humeral head subluxation in various reference planes and to search for a correlation with retroversion, inclination, and glenoid wear. We included 109 computed tomography scans of primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis and 97 of shoulder problems unrelated to shoulder osteoarthritis (controls); all computed tomography scans were reconstructed in the anatomic scapular plane and the glenoid hull plane that we defined. In both planes, we measured retroversion, inclination, glenohumeral offset (Walch index), and scapulohumeral offset. Retroversion in the scapular plane (Friedman method) was lower than that in the glenoid hull plane for controls and for arthritic shoulders. The threshold of scapulohumeral subluxation was 60% and 65% in the scapular plane and glenoid hull plane, respectively. The mean upward inclination was lower in the scapular plane (Churchill method) than in the glenoid hull plane (Maurer method). In the glenoid hull plane, 35% of type A2 glenoids showed glenohumeral offset greater than 75%, with mean retroversion of 25.6° ± 6° as compared with 7.5° ± 7.2° for the "centered" type A2 glenoids (P hull plane and r = 0.59 in the scapular plane (P hull plane may be more accurate than in the scapular plane. Thus, the glenoid hull method allows for better understanding type B3 of the modified Walch classification. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Does Temporomandibular Joint Pathology With or Without Surgical Management Affect the Stability of Counterclockwise Rotation of the Maxillomandibular Complex in Orthognathic Surgery? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Moraissi, Essam Ahmed; Wolford, Larry M

    2017-04-01

    This study was designed to determine the stability of counterclockwise rotation (CCWR) of the maxillomandibular complex (MMC) in orthognathic surgery with or without surgical correction of coexisting temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pathology. The authors implemented a systematic review and meta-analysis. A search of major databases through PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL was performed. Inclusion criteria were studies that analyzed CCWR of the MMC in regard to skeletal stability after orthognathic surgery in patients with or without pre-existing TMJ pathology that was or was not surgically corrected concomitantly. The predictor variables were patients who underwent CCWR of the MMC in the following subgroups: 1) healthy TMJs (presumed healthy based on history, clinical evaluation, and radiographic analysis but without magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] confirmation), 2) no TMJ assessment, 3) untreated TMJ disc displacement (confirmed by MRI), 4) TMJ disc displacement (confirmed by MRI) repositioned using Mitek anchors, and 5) reconstruction with TMJ total joint prosthesis. Outcome variables were surgical relapse for angular and linear measurements. Postsurgical mean changes for the occlusal plane (OP) and linear measurements using a fixed-effects model with a 95% confidence interval were analyzed. A total of 345 patients enrolled in 12 studies were included in this study. There was significant OP relapse and horizontal relapse at the B point and menton for studies with untreated TMJ disc displacement and studies without TMJ assessment (P < .005). There was significant horizontal relapse at the A point for studies with healthy TMJs, without assessment of the TMJs, and with TMJ reconstruction with total joint prostheses (P < .005). There was no significant vertical relapse at the B and A points for all subgroup analyses (P < .005). The result of the meta-analysis suggests that CCWR of the MMC is a stable procedure for patients with healthy TMJs, patients undergoing

  3. Modulation of shoulder muscle and joint function using a powered upper-limb exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen; Fong, Justin; Crocher, Vincent; Lee, Peter V S; Oetomo, Denny; Tan, Ying; Ackland, David C

    2018-04-27

    Robotic-assistive exoskeletons can enable frequent repetitive movements without the presence of a full-time therapist; however, human-machine interaction and the capacity of powered exoskeletons to attenuate shoulder muscle and joint loading is poorly understood. This study aimed to quantify shoulder muscle and joint force during assisted activities of daily living using a powered robotic upper limb exoskeleton (ArmeoPower, Hocoma). Six healthy male subjects performed abduction, flexion, horizontal flexion, reaching and nose touching activities. These tasks were repeated under two conditions: (i) the exoskeleton compensating only for its own weight, and (ii) the exoskeleton providing full upper limb gravity compensation (i.e., weightlessness). Muscle EMG, joint kinematics and joint torques were simultaneously recorded, and shoulder muscle and joint forces calculated using personalized musculoskeletal models of each subject's upper limb. The exoskeleton reduced peak joint torques, muscle forces and joint loading by up to 74.8% (0.113 Nm/kg), 88.8% (5.8%BW) and 68.4% (75.6%BW), respectively, with the degree of load attenuation strongly task dependent. The peak compressive, anterior and superior glenohumeral joint force during assisted nose touching was 36.4% (24.6%BW), 72.4% (13.1%BW) and 85.0% (17.2%BW) lower than that during unassisted nose touching, respectively. The present study showed that upper limb weight compensation using an assistive exoskeleton may increase glenohumeral joint stability, since deltoid muscle force, which is the primary contributor to superior glenohumeral joint shear, is attenuated; however, prominent exoskeleton interaction moments are required to position and control the upper limb in space, even under full gravity compensation conditions. The modeling framework and results may be useful in planning targeted upper limb robotic rehabilitation tasks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. MR and MR arthrography to identify degenerative and posttraumatic diseases in the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Shi-Uk; Lang, Philipp

    2000-01-01

    MR imaging provides a comprehensive evaluation of a wide spectrum of both intraarticular and extraarticular pathology of the shoulder. MR imaging enables the detection or exclusion of degenerative and posttraumatic diseases of the shoulder with a reasonable accuracy. MR arthrography is useful in the visualization of subtle anatomic details and further improves the differentiation. In this article, findings of MR imaging and MR arthrography of degenerative and posttraumatic shoulder diseases (impingement syndrome, rotator cuff tears, and glenohumeral instability) has been reviewed

  5. Comparative study of total shoulder arthroplasty versus total shoulder surface replacement for glenohumeral osteoarthritis with minimum 2-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, B.W.; Willems, W.J.H.; Lemmens, E.; Hartel, B.P.; Bekerom, M.P. van den; Deurzen, D.F.P. van

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Compared with total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), total shoulder surface replacement (TSSR) may offer the advantage of preservation of bone stock and shorter surgical time, possibly at the expense of glenoid component positioning and increasing lateral glenohumeral offset. We hypothesized

  6. An MRI study on the relations between muscle atrophy, shoulder function and glenohumeral deformity in shoulders of children with obstetric brachial plexus injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gelein Vitringa, V. M.; van Kooten, E.O.; Jaspers, R.T.; Mullender, M.G.; Loogman, M.H.; van der Sluijs, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: A substantial number of children with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) will develop internal rotation adduction contractures of the shoulder, posterior humeral head subluxations and glenohumeral deformities. Their active shoulder function is generally limited and a recent study

  7. Management of acromioclavicular joint injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinning; Ma, Richard; Bedi, Asheesh; Dines, David M; Altchek, David W; Dines, Joshua S

    2014-01-01

    Acromioclavicular joint injuries are among the most common shoulder girdle injuries in athletes and most commonly result from a direct force to the acromion with the arm in an adducted position. Acromioclavicular joint injuries often present with associated injuries to the glenohumeral joint, including an increased incidence of superior labrum anterior posterior (SLAP) tears that may warrant further evaluation and treatment. Anteroposterior stability of the acromioclavicular joint is conferred by the capsule and acromioclavicular ligaments, of which the posterior and superior ligaments are the strongest. Superior-inferior stability is maintained by the coracoclavicular (conoid and trapezoid) ligaments. Type-I or type-II acromioclavicular joint injuries have been treated with sling immobilization, early shoulder motion, and physical therapy, with favorable outcomes. Return to activity can occur when normal shoulder motion and strength are obtained and the shoulder is asymptomatic as compared with the contralateral normal extremity. The management of type-III injuries remains controversial and is individualized. While a return to the previous level of functional activity with nonsurgical treatment has been documented in a number of case series, surgical reduction and coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction has been associated with a favorable outcome and can be considered in patients who place high functional demands on their shoulders or in athletes who participate in overhead sports. Surgical management is indicated for high-grade (≥type IV) acromioclavicular joint injuries to achieve anatomic reduction of the acromioclavicular joint, reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments, and repair of the deltotrapezial fascia. Outcomes after surgical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments have been satisfactory with regard to achieving pain relief and return to functional activities, but further improvements in the biomechanical strength of these

  8. MR diagnosis of temporomandibular joint. A study of joint effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneda, Takashi; Yamashiro, Mitsuaki; Ozawa, Kaoru; Suzuki, Hiromi; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    1998-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the relationship between correlation of MR joint effusion of the temporomandibular joint and disk position, to evaluate the relationship between joint effusion and aging, and to assess the frequency of MR joint effusion of bilateral temporomandibular joints. The temporomandibular joints of 192 patients with clinical symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorders were imaged bilaterally using high field, surface-coil MR imaging. Oblique sagittal and coronal proton density-weighted and T2-weighted images were obtained. Imaging findings of joint effusion were correlated with disk position, aging, and bilateral temporomandibular joints. MR showed effusion in 4% of the joints with normal superior disk position, 36% of the joints with disk displacement with reduction, and 45% of the joints with disk displacement without reduction. There were significant differences in the incidence of joint effusion between normal disk position and anterior disk displacement with or without reduction. Younger patients less than 40 years were significant higher the incidence of joint effusion than those of older patients. A significant association was seen between joint effusion and aging. MR showed effusion in 17% of the unilateral temporomandibular joint, 24% of the bilateral temporomandibular joints. There was no significant difference between unilateral and bilateral case. These results indicated that joint effusion using MR imaging was associated with varied temporomandibular joint pathologic states. (author)

  9. MR-arthrography of the acetabular labrum - radiologic-pathologic correlation in 20 cadaveric hip joints; MR-Arthrographie des Labrum acetabulare - Radiologisch-anatomische Korrelation an 20 Leichenhueften

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brossmann, J.; Steffens, J.C.; Heller, M. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Ploetz, G.M.J.; Hassenpflug, J. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Orthopadie

    1999-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate frequency of acetabular labral lesions in elderly hip joints, and to determine sensitivity and specificity of MR arthrography (MRa) for the detection of these abnormalities. Materials and Methods: Twenty cadaveric hip joints were examined by MRa. For MRa, 15 ml of a solution of iodinated contrast solution (Solutrast 300) and Gd-DTPA (100:1) were injected under fluoroscopic guidance. MR imaging was performed on a 1.5 TM scanner (Vision, Siemens; FOV 16 cm, matrix 256x256, fat-suppressed 3D-FLASH). Multiplanar image reconstructions were done perpendicular to the acetabulum in the oblique-coronal, oblique-axial, and radial planes. The labral specimens were examined macroscopically. Results: In 12/20 hips (60%), a labral lesion was found on pathologic examination. In 7 specimens, the labrum was partially or completely detached in the weight-bearing superior region. One flap-like variant of the labrum was seen; in 4 hip joints, the labrum was degenerated (one cystic degeneration). Pathologic findings were confirmed by MRa in 8/12 specimens (sensitivity 67%). All degenerated labra were correctly diagnosed on MRa. Three small labral detachments and the flap-like variant were misinterpreted as being normal. There were no false positive findings (specificity 100%). The accuracy was 80%. Labral lesions were seen in 6/8 and in 6/12 of hips with and without osteoarthritis, respectively. Conclusion: MRa is well suited to delineate the acetabular labrum and to diagnose labral abnormalities. Detection of small labral detachments and anatomic variants is difficult and requires some experience. Labral lesions are correlated to osteoarthritis of the hip, but may be frequently seen in the elderly without underlying osteoarthritis. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Feststellung der Haeufigkeit von Laesionen des Labrum acetabulare bei aelteren Hueftgelenkspraeparaten und Untersuchung der Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet der MR-Arthrographie (MRa) fuer die Darstellung dieser

  10. High origin of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament: MR arthrography with anatomic and histologic correlation in cadavers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Ruiz, Francisco Alejandro; Baranski Kaniak, Beatriz Cristina; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald L.; Haghighi, Parviz

    2012-01-01

    The anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament has been described to arise from the anteroinferior labrum, but we have observed that in some persons its origin is from the anterior or anterosuperior labrum, creating diagnostic difficulties. Ten fresh unembalmed cadaveric shoulders underwent magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) using a posterior approach with a 1.5 T GE magnet, with the following sequences: T1-weighted fast spin-echo in axial, coronal and sagittal planes, and T1 fat-suppressed spin-echo in the axial plane (TR/TE 600/20, section thickness 2.5 mm, 0.5 mm interslice space, number of signals acquired, two, field of view 12 x 12 cm, and matrix 512 x 256 pixels). Following imaging, the shoulders were frozen and later sectioned using a band saw into 3-mm sections corresponding to the axial imaging plane. Histological analysis was also performed to determine the origin of the anterior band. Four of the ten shoulders had an origin of the anterior band above or at the 3 o'clock position: one at the 1 o'clock position, two at the 2 o'clock position, and one at the 3 o'clock position. In another shoulder, the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament originated from the middle glenohumeral ligament, and in five other shoulders, the anterior band originated from the anteroinferior labrum as has been described in the literature. This finding is of clinical significance as a high origin of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament leads to MR arthrographic finding that can simulate those of labral tears or detachments. (orig.)

  11. Acromioclavicular joint cyst: nine cases of a pseudotumor of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tshering Vogel, Dechen W.; Anderson, Suzanne E. [University Hospital of Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Steinbach, Lynne S. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, California (United States); Hertel, Ralph [University Hospital of Bern, Department of Orthopedics, Plastic and Hand Surgery, Bern (Switzerland); Bernhard, Juerg [Burgerspital, Department of Rheumatology, Solothurn (Switzerland); Stauffer, Edouard [University Hospital of Bern, Department of Pathology, Bern (Switzerland)

    2005-05-01

    (1) To analyse the imaging appearances of nine patients with acromioclavicular joint cysts presenting as shoulder masses for tumor staging with operative, histopathological and joint aspiration findings. Retrospective review of imaging and correlation with clinical, operative and surgical notes. Images were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists by consensus. Nine patients who presented clinically with a shoulder mass were evaluated by radiographs (n=9), ultrasound (n=1), conventional arthrography (n=3), MRI (n=6; with direct MR arthrography n=2, indirect MR arthrography n=4). All patients had a focal mass superior to the AC joint, with a size ranging from 1.5 cm to 6 cm and a mean of 3.27 cm. Correlation was available with surgery (n=7), histopathology (n=2) and cyst aspiration (n=2). Two patients were managed conservatively. Geyser sign was positive in all three arthrograms. All MRIs revealed extensive rotator cuff tears with a column of fluid extending from the glenohumeral joint through the rotator cuff tear into the acromioclavicular joint and acromioclavicular cyst. Chondrocalcinosis was seen in the acromioclavicular joint cyst (n=2) and in the glenohumeral joint (n=1). Aspirate in two patients contained calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals. (orig.)

  12. Acromioclavicular joint cyst: nine cases of a pseudotumor of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tshering Vogel, Dechen W.; Anderson, Suzanne E.; Steinbach, Lynne S.; Hertel, Ralph; Bernhard, Juerg; Stauffer, Edouard

    2005-01-01

    (1) To analyse the imaging appearances of nine patients with acromioclavicular joint cysts presenting as shoulder masses for tumor staging with operative, histopathological and joint aspiration findings. Retrospective review of imaging and correlation with clinical, operative and surgical notes. Images were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists by consensus. Nine patients who presented clinically with a shoulder mass were evaluated by radiographs (n=9), ultrasound (n=1), conventional arthrography (n=3), MRI (n=6; with direct MR arthrography n=2, indirect MR arthrography n=4). All patients had a focal mass superior to the AC joint, with a size ranging from 1.5 cm to 6 cm and a mean of 3.27 cm. Correlation was available with surgery (n=7), histopathology (n=2) and cyst aspiration (n=2). Two patients were managed conservatively. Geyser sign was positive in all three arthrograms. All MRIs revealed extensive rotator cuff tears with a column of fluid extending from the glenohumeral joint through the rotator cuff tear into the acromioclavicular joint and acromioclavicular cyst. Chondrocalcinosis was seen in the acromioclavicular joint cyst (n=2) and in the glenohumeral joint (n=1). Aspirate in two patients contained calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals. (orig.)

  13. [Pathological gambling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinsky, Yael; Iancu, Iulian; Dannon, Pinhas

    2007-10-01

    Gambling behaviour is well-known for many centuries and is growing in popularity and frequency. Its etiology is multi-factorial and in this paper we review new developments in the field of pathological gambling, both regarding etiology and treatment progress. The aim of this review is to increase the physicians' awareness towards this entity.

  14. Long bicipital tendon of the shoulder: normal anatomy and pathologic findings on MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, S J; Fitzgerald, S W; Quinn, S F; Carrera, G F; Black, K P; Lawson, T L

    1992-05-01

    The tendon of the long head of the biceps muscle (long bicipital tendon) has a complex course from its muscle belly to its insertion onto the supraglenoid tubercle/glenoid labrum. It is stabilized by numerous tendinous and ligamentous structures and is, in turn, partly responsible for maintenance of normal glenohumeral function. In this report we describe the anatomy of this tendon, correlating high-resolution MR images with cryomicrotome sections. We illustrate typical MR findings in pathologic conditions affecting the long bicipital tendon sheath, the substance of the tendon, and finally the tendon position.

  15. [Dual pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougier, A

    2008-05-01

    Dual pathology is defined as the association of two potentially epileptogenic lesions, hippocampal (sclerosis, neuronal loss) and extrahippocampal (temporal or extratemporal). Epileptic activity may be generated by either lesion and the relative importance of every lesion's epileptogenicity conditions the surgical strategy adopted. Most frequently associated with hippocampal sclerosis are cortical dysplasias. The common physiopathology of the two lesions is not clearly established. Extrahippocampal lesions may be undetectable on MRI (microdysgenesis, for example) and ictal discharge patterns may vary among dual pathology patients. The surgical strategy depends on the location of the extrahippocampal lesion and its relative role in seizure generation; however, reported surgical results suggest that simultaneous resection of mesial temporal structures along with the extrahippocampal lesion should be performed.

  16. Microglial pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Streit, Wolfgang J; Xue, Qing-Shan; Tischer, Jasmin; Bechmann, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes pathological changes that affect microglial cells in the human brain during aging and in aging-related neurodegenerative diseases, primarily Alzheimer’s disease (AD). It also provides examples of microglial changes that have been observed in laboratory animals during aging and in some experimentally induced lesions and disease models. Dissimilarities and similarities between humans and rodents are discussed in an attempt to generate a current understanding of microglial ...

  17. Microglial pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Wolfgang J; Xue, Qing-Shan; Tischer, Jasmin; Bechmann, Ingo

    2014-09-26

    This paper summarizes pathological changes that affect microglial cells in the human brain during aging and in aging-related neurodegenerative diseases, primarily Alzheimer's disease (AD). It also provides examples of microglial changes that have been observed in laboratory animals during aging and in some experimentally induced lesions and disease models. Dissimilarities and similarities between humans and rodents are discussed in an attempt to generate a current understanding of microglial pathology and its significance during aging and in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer dementia (AD). The identification of dystrophic (senescent) microglia has created an ostensible conflict with prior work claiming a role for activated microglia and neuroinflammation during normal aging and in AD, and this has raised a basic question: does the brain's immune system become hyperactive (inflamed) or does it become weakened (senescent) in elderly and demented people, and what is the impact on neuronal function and cognition? Here we strive to reconcile these seemingly contradictory notions by arguing that both low-grade neuroinflammation and microglial senescence are the result of aging-associated free radical injury. Both processes are damaging for microglia as they synergistically exhaust this essential cell population to the point where the brain's immune system is effete and unable to support neuronal function.

  18. Objective Assessment of Joint Stiffness: A Clinically Oriented Hardware and Software Device with an Application to the Shoulder Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuade, Kevin; Price, Robert; Liu, Nelson; Ciol, Marcia A

    2012-08-30

    Examination of articular joints is largely based on subjective assessment of the "end-feel" of the joint in response to manually applied forces at different joint orientations. This technical report aims to describe the development of an objective method to examine joints in general, with specific application to the shoulder, and suitable for clinical use. We adapted existing hardware and developed laptop-based software to objectively record the force/displacement behavior of the glenohumeral joint during three common manual joint examination tests with the arm in six positions. An electromagnetic tracking system recorded three-dimensional positions of sensors attached to a clinician examiner and a patient. A hand-held force transducer recorded manually applied translational forces. The force and joint displacement were time-synchronized and the joint stiffness was calculated as a quantitative representation of the joint "end-feel." A methodology and specific system checks were developed to enhance clinical testing reproducibility and precision. The device and testing protocol were tested on 31 subjects (15 with healthy shoulders, and 16 with a variety of shoulder impairments). Results describe the stiffness responses, and demonstrate the feasibility of using the device and methods in clinical settings.

  19. BILATERAL PATHOLOGICAL HIP DISLOCATION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy E. Garkavenko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pathological dislocation of the hip is one of the most severe complications of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis. The program of treatment for children with pathological hip dislocation is complex, but it has been sufficiently developed and implemented very successfully. At the same time, the available literature provides no cases of treating children with bilateral pathological hip dislocations after hematogenous osteomyelitis. There is no information on the incidence of such cases or in regards to remote functional results. Materials and methods. The results of the treatment of 18 children with bilateral pathological dislocation of the hip after hematogenous osteomyelitis are presented, which constituted 23.1% of the total number of patients (78 who underwent surgery in 2000–2016 for the diagnosis of pathological hip dislocation. Both hip joints were surgically operated on in 12 patients, while one hip joint was operated on in 6 patients. To assess the anatomical and functional state of hip joints, the clinical and roentgenological diagnostic techniques were used. Results and discussion. To stabilize and restore the function of the hip joints, 18 children underwent 30 surgical interventions: simple open hip reduction (19 and open hip reduction with hip arthroplasty with one (6 or two (5 demineralized osteochondral allogeneic grafts. The decision regarding the possibility of performing surgical intervention on the second hip joint was made only after a child's check-up examination was complete and after positive information about the anatomical and functional state of the operated hip joint was obtained. According to these criteria, 14 (77.8% children underwent surgical treatment of the second hip joint 1–1.5 years after the course of conservative measures to restore the range of motion in the previously operated hip joint. Over a period of 1–12 years, 17 patients were examined, 10 of which underwent an operation on both

  20. Shoulder biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo, Roberto; Kung, Peter; Ma, C. Benjamin [Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, University of California, San Francisco, 500 Parnassus Avenue, MU 320W-0728 San Francisco, CA 914143 (United States)], E-mail: maben@orthosurg.ucsf.edu

    2008-10-15

    The biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint depend on the interaction of both static and dynamic-stabilizing structures. Static stabilizers include the bony anatomy, negative intra-articular pressure, the glenoid labrum, and the glenohumeral ligaments along with the joint capsule. The dynamic-stabilizing structures include the rotator cuff muscles and the other muscular structures surrounding the shoulder joint. The combined effect of these stabilizers is to support the multiple degrees of motion within the glenohumeral joint. The goal of this article is to review how these structures interact to provide optimal stability and how failure of some of these mechanisms can lead to shoulder joint pathology.

  1. Effect of glenohumeral elevation on subacromial supraspinatus compression risk during simulated reaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Rebekah L; Schlangen, Dustin M; Schneider, Katelyn A; Schoenecker, Jonathan; Senger, Andrea L; Starr, William C; Staker, Justin L; Ellermann, Jutta M; Braman, Jonathan P; Ludewig, Paula M

    2017-10-01

    Mechanical subacromial rotator cuff compression is one theoretical mechanism in the pathogenesis of rotator cuff disease. However, the relationship between shoulder kinematics and mechanical subacromial rotator cuff compression across the range of humeral elevation motion is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of humeral elevation on subacromial compression risk of the supraspinatus during a simulated functional reaching task. Three-dimensional anatomical models were reconstructed from shoulder magnetic resonance images acquired from 20 subjects (10 asymptomatic, 10 symptomatic). Standardized glenohumeral kinematics from a simulated reaching task were imposed on the anatomic models and analyzed at 0, 30, 60, and 90° humerothoracic elevation. Five magnitudes of humeral retroversion were also imposed on the models at each angle of humerothoracic elevation to investigate the impact of retroversion on subacromial proximities. The minimum distance between the coracoacromial arch and supraspinatus tendon and footprint were quantified. When contact occurred, the magnitude of the intersecting volume between the supraspinatus tendon and coracoacromial arch was also quantified. The smallest minimum distance from the coracoacromial arch to the supraspinatus footprint occurred between 30 and 90°, while the smallest minimum distance to the supraspinatus tendon occurred between 0 and 60°. The magnitude of humeral retroversion did not significantly affect minimum distance to the supraspinatus tendon except at 60 or 90° humerothoracic elevation. The results of this study provide support for mechanical rotator cuff compression as a potential mechanism for the development of rotator cuff disease. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2329-2337, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. [Pathologic gambling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nespor, K

    1996-01-31

    The author presents a review on pathological gambling. Similarly as in other addictive diseases, early therapeutic intervention is important. The latter may include: 1: Evaluation of the problem 2. Recommendation that the subject should avoid places where the gambling is pursued. He should not have larger financial sums on him. 3. Recommendations pertaining to lifestyle and prevention of excessive stress. 4. Handling of printed material (the author mentions the text issued to his patients). In the paper therapeutic procedures are described, incl. the author's experience such as the foundation of the group of Gamblers anonymous. Prevention is also considered. It is important that gambling should be less readily available and the demand for it should be smaller.

  3. Cadaveric Study of the Articular Branches of the Shoulder Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmann, Maxim S; Bickelhaupt, Brittany; Fehl, Jacob; Benfield, Jonathan A; Curley, Jonathan; Rahimi, Ohmid; Nagpal, Ameet S

    This cadaveric study investigated the anatomic relationships of the articular branches of the suprascapular (SN), axillary (AN), and lateral pectoral nerves (LPN), which are potential targets for shoulder analgesia. Sixteen embalmed cadavers and 1 unembalmed cadaver, including 33 shoulders total, were dissected. Following dissections, fluoroscopic images were taken to propose an anatomical landmark to be used in shoulder articular branch blockade. Thirty-three shoulders from 17 total cadavers were studied. In a series of 16 shoulders, 16 (100%) of 16 had an intact SN branch innervating the posterior head of the humerus and shoulder capsule. Suprascapular sensory branches coursed laterally from the spinoglenoid notch then toward the glenohumeral joint capsule posteriorly. Axillary nerve articular branches innervated the posterolateral head of the humerus and shoulder capsule in the same 16 (100%) of 16 shoulders. The AN gave branches ascending circumferentially from the quadrangular space to the posterolateral humerus, deep to the deltoid, and inserting at the inferior portion of the posterior joint capsule. In 4 previously dissected and 17 distinct shoulders, intact LPNs could be identified in 14 (67%) of 21 specimens. Of these, 12 (86%) of 14 had articular branches innervating the anterior shoulder joint, and 14 (100%) of 14 LPN articular branches were adjacent to acromial branches of the thoracoacromial blood vessels over the superior aspect of the coracoid process. Articular branches from the SN, AN, and LPN were identified. Articular branches of the SN and AN insert into the capsule overlying the glenohumeral joint posteriorly. Articular branches of the LPN exist and innervate a portion of the anterior shoulder joint.

  4. Glenohumeral and scapulothoracic strength impairments exists in patients with subacromial impingement, but these are not reflected in the shoulder pain and disability index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M B; Witten, A; Holm, K

    2017-01-01

    in strength and ROM to patient-reported shoulder function is not well described, even though testing of strength is recommended in clinical guidelines. The purpose of this study was, first, to investigate impairments in glenohumeral and scapulothoracic strength and in abduction and internal rotation ROM...

  5. The effect of coracoacromial ligament excision and acromioplasty on the amount of rotator cuff force production necessary to restore intact glenohumeral biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budoff, Jeffrey E; Lin, Cheng-Li; Hong, Chih-Kai; Chiang, Florence L; Su, Wei-Ren

    2016-06-01

    Coracoacromial ligament (CAL) excision and acromioplasty increase superior and anterosuperior glenohumeral translation. It is unknown how much of an increase in rotator cuff force production is required to re-establish intact glenohumeral biomechanics after these surgical procedures. We hypothesized that, after CAL excision and acromioplasty, an increase in rotator cuff force production would not be necessary to reproduce the anterosuperior and superior translations of the intact specimens. Nine cadaveric shoulders were subjected to loading in the superior and anterosuperior directions in the intact state after CAL excision, acromioplasty, and recording of the translations. The rotator cuff force was then increased to normalize glenohumeral biomechanics. After CAL excision at 150 and 200 N of loading, an increase in the rotator cuff force by 25% decreased anterosuperior translation to the point where there was no significant difference from the intact specimen's translation. After acromioplasty (and CAL excision) at 150 and 200 N, an increase in the rotator cuff force of 25% and 30%, respectively, decreased superior translation to the point where there was no significant difference from the intact specimen's translation. At 150 to 200 N of loading, CAL excision and acromioplasty increase the rotator cuff force required to maintain normal glenohumeral biomechanics by 25% to 30%. After a subacromial decompression, the rotator cuff has an increased force production requirement to maintain baseline glenohumeral mechanics. Under many circumstances, in vivo force requirements may be even greater after surgical attenuation of the coracoacromial arch. Basic Science Study; Biomechanics. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. ARTHROSCOPIC FOR TREATMENT OF WRIST PATHOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Golubev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostics and treatment of wrist joint pathologies still remain one the key problems in hand traumatology and orthopaedics. Extremal sports availability as well as new options for recreation transportation means only sustains the statistics of such injuries. On the other hand, the technological improvements allowed to develop precise optics for surgeries on small joints. Possibilities of minimally invasive closer visualization at magnification substantially changed not only the approach to treatment of wrist joint pathology but also allowed to describe types of lesions unknown earlier. The authors describe basic principles of wrist joint arthroscopy and features of its application in various injuries: scaphoid fractures, intraarticular fractures of distal radius metaepiphysis, triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries.

  7. Prevention of the Post-traumatic Fibrotic Response in Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The American journal of forensic medicine and pathology . 1988; 9(4):310-2. 14 APPENDICES: An abstract submitted for the ORS conference...clinical problem of posttraumatic joint stiffness, a pathology that reduces the range of motion (ROM) of injured joints and contributes to the...development of osteoarthritis. The fundamental hypothesis that drives the current study is that pathological fibrotic response of injured joint tissues

  8. Experience with Ultrasound of the Knee Joint at Mulago Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    patients referred to the Radiology department with knee joint pathology were studied. ..... In Uganda, rugby and soccer sports are dominated by the elite .... Detection of Joint Effusions Academic Emergency Medicine Volume 8, Number 4 361- ...

  9. Curriculum Guidelines for Pathology and Oral Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Guidelines for dental school pathology courses describe the interrelationships of general, systemic, and oral pathology; primary educational goals; prerequisites; a core curriculum outline and behavioral objectives for each type of pathology. Notes on sequencing, faculty, facilities, and occupational hazards are included. (MSE)

  10. An instrumented implant for in vivo measurement of contact forces and contact moments in the shoulder joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhoff, P; Graichen, F; Bender, A; Rohlmann, A; Bergmann, G

    2009-03-01

    To improve implant design, fixation and preclinical testing, implant manufacturers depend on realistic data of loads acting on the shoulder joint. Furthermore, these data can help to optimize physiotherapeutic treatment and to advise patients in their everyday living conditions. Calculated shoulder joint loads vary extremely among different authors [Anglin C, Wyss UP, Pichora DR. Glenohumeral contact forces. Proc Inst Mech Eng [H] 2000;214:637-44]. Additionally the moments acting in the joint caused by friction or incongruent articular surfaces, for example, are not implemented in most models. An instrumented shoulder joint implant was developed to measure the contact forces and the contact moments acting in the glenohumeral joint. This article provides a detailed description of the implant, containing a nine-channel telemetry unit, six load sensors and an inductive power supply, all hermetically sealed inside the implant. The instrumented implant is based on a clinically proven BIOMET Biomodular shoulder replacement and was calibrated before implantation by using complex mathematical calculation routines in order to achieve an average measuring precision of approximately 2%.

  11. 3D-MR vs. 3D-CT of the shoulder in patients with glenohumeral instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillwater, Laurence; Koenig, James; Maycher, Bruce; Davidson, Michael [University of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada)

    2017-03-15

    To determine whether 3D-MR osseous reformats of the shoulder are equivalent to 3D-CT osseous reformats in patients with glenohumeral instability. Patients with glenohumeral instability, who were to be imaged with both CT and MRI, were prospectively selected. CT and MR were performed within 24 h of one another on 12 shoulders. Each MR study included an axial 3D isotropic VIBE sequence. The image data from the isotropic VIBE sequence were post-processed using subtraction and 3D software. CT data were post-processed using 3D software. The following measurements were obtained for both 3D-CT and 3D-MR post-processed images: height and width of the humeral head and glenoid, Hill-Sachs size and percent humeral head loss (if present), size of glenoid bone loss and percent glenoid bone loss (if present). Paired t-tests and two one-sided tests for equivalence were used to assess the differences between imaging modalities and equivalence. The measurement differences from the 3D-CT and 3D-MR post-processed images were not statistically significant. The measurement differences for humeral height, glenoid height and glenoid width were borderline statistically significant; however, using any adjustment for multiple comparisons, this failed to be significant. Using an equivalence margin of 1 mm for measurements and 1.5% for percent bone loss, the 3D-MR and 3D-CT post-processed images were equivalent. Three-dimensional-MR osseous models of the shoulder using a 3D isotropic VIBE sequence were equivalent to 3D-CT osseous models, and the differences between modalities were not statistically significant. (orig.)

  12. Scapular Resting Position and Gleno-Humeral Movement Dysfunction in Asymptomatic Racquet Players: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimpi, Apurv P; Bhakti, Shah; Roshni, Karnik; Rairikar, Savita A; Shyam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag K

    2015-12-01

    Racquet sports, especially lawn tennis and badminton have been gaining popularity in Asian countries like India. With this increase in popularity, the injury rate in the sport has also increased. The study will help detect the presence of gleno-humeral movement dysfunction and scapular resting position abnormality in asymptomatic racquet players, thus providing basis for screening the players and allow the clinician to determine if the asymmetry is a normal adaptation in the player or an abnormal change associated with injury. 46 asymptomatic professional players were divided into a study group of 23 players (16 tennis and 7 badminton) and control group of 23 football players. Assessment of passive gleno-humeral range of motion and distance of spine and inferior angle of scapula from corresponding spinous process were measured bilaterally and between groups. There was statistically significant reduction in range of internal rotation (62.17 ± 8.09), extension (39.78 ± 4.12) and an increase in the external rotation (106.95 ± 7.49) of dominant compared to non-dominant arm of racquet players and a statistically significant decrease in internal rotation (78.69 ± 10.24), extension (44.78 ± 3.19), adduction (37.39 ± 6.54) and an increase in external rotation (102.6 ± 5.19) of dominant arm of racquet players compared to football players. Study also showed statistically significant increase in the spino-scapular distance at the level of inferior angle of scapula (10.23 ± 1.43) on dominant side compared to non-dominant. The dominant side scapula of asymptomatic racquet players showed increased external rotation and elevation as compared to the non-dominant side. Also, reduced shoulder internal rotation, extension and adduction and gain in shoulder external rotation was observed on the dominant side of racquet players when compared to the control group.

  13. MRI of the hip joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerny, C.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.M.; Imhof, H.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed to diagnose many pathologic conditions affecting the hip joint. Either conventional MRI (without contrast enhancement of the joint cavity) or MR arthrography is used to detect and most accurately differentiate hip joint pathologies. Conventional MRI is performed in cases of bone marrow edema, necrosis, arthrosis and especially the so-called ''activated arthrosis'', as well as in inflammatory and tumorous entities. MR arthography, which has only recently become available for use, is excellently suited for diagnosing lesions of the acetabular labrum, cartilage lesions, and free articular bodies. This article provides an overview about MRI characteristics and their accuracy of hip joint diseases and the impact on the therapeutic procedure. (orig.)

  14. Simultaneous Anterior Glenohumeral Dislocation and Ipsilateral Acromioclavicular Separation: A Dual Injury of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıçaslan, Ömer Faruk; Acar, Baver; Atik, Aziz; Kose, Ozkan

    2017-08-19

    Isolated acromioclavicular separations or shoulder dislocations are common injuries. However, a combination of complete acromioclavicular separation and anterior shoulder dislocation is extremely rare. Herein we present a combination of anterior shoulder dislocation and type III acromioclavicular separation that was succesfully treated conservatively. Orthopaedic surgeons should have a high clinical suspicion in daily practice. We believe that both pathologies can be treated conservatively.

  15. Joint ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karsten Engsig

    Afhandlingen analysere de konkurrenceretlige og selskabsretlige regler som er bestemmende for hvordan et joint venture samarbejde er struktureret......Afhandlingen analysere de konkurrenceretlige og selskabsretlige regler som er bestemmende for hvordan et joint venture samarbejde er struktureret...

  16. The Danish Pathology Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Beth; Larsen, Ole B

    2011-01-01

    The National Board of Health, Denmark in 1997 published guidelines for reporting of pathology data and the Danish Pathology Register (DPR) was established.......The National Board of Health, Denmark in 1997 published guidelines for reporting of pathology data and the Danish Pathology Register (DPR) was established....

  17. Coracoclavicular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kun Sang; Park, Chan Il; Ahn, Jae Doo; Lim, Chong Won [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1970-10-15

    The coracoclvicular joint, a rear abnormality which may be the cause of pain in the shoulder and limitation of motion of the shoulder joint, is discussed. A case of coracoclvicular joint with shoulder pain was observed in 65 yrs old Korean male.

  18. Temporomandibular joint examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guarda Nardini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ it’s a joint closely related to the skull base, the spine, and the jaws; all these anatomical structures must be taken in consideration when evaluating pain involving the tmj. In order to detect patients affected by pathology or dysfunctions of the tmj, physical examination is of great value in orienting the diagnosis. Inspection must consider the symmetry of the body, the dental status and the type of occlusion. Palpation is a way to assess contractiont involving the muscles of the masticatory system and of the neck. Auscultation, based on articular noise provides means to determine whether we are dealing with degeneration of the joint or a dislocation of the intrarticular disc. In order to confirm the diagnosis obtained with the clinical evaluation, it’s useful to perform imaging techniques as opt, tomography and TC of the tmj and electromyokineosiography – index of the mandibular functionality and of the muscles status. MRI and dynamic MRI are among the non invasive exams which give the greatest amount of information, regarding the disc position and the joint degeneration. Arthroscopy is an invasive technique that allows early diagnosis of degeneration and is helpful to reveal early inflammatory processes of the joint.

  19. Septic Arthritis of The Hip Joint presenting as Acute Abdomen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These cases illustrate the maxim that any painful movement of the hip joint with associated unexplained fever should raise suspicion of septic arthritis. The close relationship of the hip joint to the pelvis sometimes confuses hip diseases with pelvic pathologies. Key Words: Septic arthritis, acute abdomen, pathological ...

  20. The prevalence of radiological glenohumeral osteoarthritis in long-term type 1 diabetes: the Dialong shoulder study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juel, N G; Brox, J I; Hellund, J C; Holte, K B; Berg, T J

    2017-12-14

    This study compares the prevalence of radiological osteoarthritis (OA) in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) for > 45 years and controls, and explores the association with shoulder pain and glycaemic burden in patients with DM1. The Dialong study is a cross-sectional, observational study with 30 years of historical data on long-term glycaemic control. We included 102 patients with DM1 and 73 diabetes-free controls. Demographic data, worst shoulder pain last week [numeric rating scale (NRS) 0-10], pain on abduction at examination (NRS 0-10), and current and historical glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA 1c ) levels were collected. Standardized shoulder X-rays were taken and interpreted for OA applying the Kellgren-Lawrence classification. In the diabetes group (49% women), the mean ± sd duration of DM1 was 50.6 ± 4.8 years, mean 30 year HbA 1c 7.4%, and age 61.9 ± 7.1 years. The mean age of controls (57% women) was 62.6 ± 7.0 years. Radiological glenohumeral OA was found in 36 diabetes patients (35%) and 10 controls (14%) [odds ratio (OR) 3.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6 to 7.5; p = 0.002]. Few persons had moderate and severe OA [6.9% vs 1.3%, OR 5.3 (95% Cl 0.6 to 44.1); p = 0.1]. Fifteen diabetes patients had painful OA versus two controls (adjusted OR 5.4, 95% CI 0.6 to 47.9; p = 0.13). There was no association between OA and long-term glycaemic burden (mean 30 year HbA 1c ) in the diabetes group (p > 0.2). Radiological glenohumeral OA was more common in patients with DM1 than in controls for mild, but not moderate and severe OA. The radiological findings were not associated with shoulder pain or long-term glycaemic burden.

  1. Guidelines for the selection of optimal glenoid augment size for moderate to severe glenohumeral osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabesan, Vani; Callanan, Mark; Sharma, Vinay

    2014-07-01

    Total shoulder arthroplasty is technically demanding in regard to implantation of the glenoid component, especially in the setting of increased glenoid deformity and posterior glenoid wear. Augmented glenoid implants are an important and innovative option; however, there is little evidence accessible to surgeons to guide in the selection of the appropriate size augmented glenoid. Solid computer models of commercially available augmented glenoid components (+3, +5, +7) contained within the software allowed placement of the best fit glenoid component within the three-dimensional reconstruct of each patient's scapula. Peg perforation, amount of bone reamed, and amount of medialization were recorded for each augment size. There was strong correlation between the medialization of the joint line and the glenoid retroversion for each augmented component at neutral correction and correction to 6° of retroversion. At neutral, the range of retroversion that restored the anatomic joint line was -3° to -17° with use of the +3 augmented glenoid, -5° to -24° with the +5 augmented glenoid, and -9° to -31° with the +7 augmented glenoid. At 6° of retroversion, the range of retroversion that restored the anatomic joint line was -4° to -21° with use of the +3 augmented glenoid, -7° to -27° with the +5 augmented glenoid, and -9° to -34° with the +7 augmented glenoid. There was a strong correlation between glenoid retroversion and medialization for all augment sizes, supporting the recommendation for glenoid retroversion as the primary guide in selecting the amount of augmentation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  2. Are professional handball players at risk for developing a glenohumeral internal rotation deficit in their dominant arm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Pedro; Van Eck, Carola F; Sá, Márcia; Torres, João

    2017-05-01

    Overhead athletes, such as baseball players, have been shown to have adaptive changes in the shoulder range of motion (ROM) of their dominant arm. Professional handball players are a unique subtype of overhead athletes with very different demands from baseball players. The aim of this study was to determine if professional handball players demonstrate differences in shoulder ROM between their dominant and non-dominant arm and try to relate them with new variables. Fifty professional male handball players were included and completed a questionnaire regarding age at which they started to play, number of hours they practice a week, field position and arm dominance. ROM measurements were performed including forward flexion (FF), external rotation with the shoulder in abduction (ABER) and with adducted arm (ADER) and internal rotation with shoulder in abduction (IR). Statistical analysis was performed to determine differences in ROM between the dominant and non-dominant shoulder and if there is a relationship between these differences and shoulder load or field position. The dominant arm showed decreased internal rotation (47 vs. 56 degrees, p handball players with a first line position have a significant risk for developing a glenohumeral internal rotation deficit, similar to the phenomenon seen in baseball pitchers.

  3. Anatomical glenohumeral internal rotation deficit and symmetric rotational strength in male and female young beach volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccol, Michele Forgiarini; Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; de Souza, Vivian Lima

    2016-08-01

    Beach volleyball is a sport with a high demand of shoulder structures that may lead to adaptations in range of motion (ROM) and strength like in other overhead sports. Despite of these possible alterations, no study evaluated the shoulder adaptations in young beach volleyball athletes. The aim of this study was to compare the bilateral ROM and rotation strength in the shoulders of young beach volleyball players. Goniometric passive shoulder ROM of motion and isometric rotational strength were evaluated in 19 male and 14 female asymptomatic athletes. External and internal ROM, total rotation motion, glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD), external rotation and internal rotation strength, bilateral deficits and external rotation to internal rotation ratio were measured. The statistical analysis included paired Student's t-test and analysis of variance with repeated measures. Significantly lower dominant GIRD was found in both groups (pvolleyball athletes present symmetric rotational strength and shoulder ROM rotational adaptations that can be considered as anatomical. These results indicate that young practitioners of beach volleyball are subject to moderate adaptations compared to those reported for other overhead sports. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Surgical Correction of Posttraumatic Scapulothoracic Bursitis, Rhomboid Major Muscle Injury, Ipsilateral Glenohumeral Instability, and Headaches Resulting from Circus Acrobatic Maneuvers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Skedros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 28-year-old transgender (male-to-female patient that had a partial tear of the rhomboid major tendon, scapulothoracic bursitis, and glenohumeral instability on the same side. These conditions resulted from traumatic events during circus acrobatic maneuvers. Additional aspects of this case that make it unique include (1 the main traumatic event occurred during a flagpole exercise, where the patient’s trunk was suspended horizontally while a vertical pole was grasped with both hands, (2 headaches were associated with the periscapular injury and they improved after scapulothoracic bursectomy and rhomboid tendon repair, (3 surgical correction was done during the same operation with an open anterior capsular-labral reconstruction, open scapulothoracic bursectomy without bone resection, and rhomboid tendon repair, (4 a postoperative complication of tearing of the serratus anterior and rhomboid muscle attachments with recurrent scapulothoracic pain occurred from patient noncompliance, and (5 the postoperative complication was surgically corrected and ultimately resulted in an excellent outcome at the one-year final follow-up.

  5. Pathology Assistant (C - Gamechanger Of Pathology Diagnostic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asel Kudaybergenova

    2016-06-01

    When the competition ended, we received many favor- able reviews and we decided to start another project a little bit similar to the competition. Every month we show three interesting and difficult to diagnose cases provided by the leading Russian pathologists. The participants can look through the clinical data and digitized histological slides, and then discuss what they see among their professional society. There are 400  specialists  from  post  USSR countries.  Moreover, we get a few proposal of partnership to start a similar project in EU. And the last product in line is Pathology Assistant. It is a game changer. Pathology Assistant is a Digital Pathology©technology driven application for pathology diagnostics, tool to innovate pathology diagnostics in more simple, proven by analytical algo- rithm, automatically delivering anticipated support way. The service provides vast and structured database of validated cases, intuitive interface, fast and convenient system of analytical search. Pathology Assistant will streamline and simplify pathologist’s way to the right decision. Pathologists from Memorial Sloan Catering and biggest EU labs are working on preparing the con- tent for the project.  

  6. Temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westesson, P.L.; Hatala, M.; Tallents, R.H.; Katzberg, R.W.; Musgrave, M.; Levitt, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the frequency of MR signs of abnormal temporomandibular joints (TMJs) in asymptomatic volunteers. Forty-two volunteers with 84 clinically normal TMJs were imaged in the sagittal and coronal planes with surface coil MR imaging. Sagittal closed and open and coronal closed views were obtained bilaterally in all volunteers. The images were classified as normal (superior disk position) or abnormal (disk displacement of degenerative joint disease). Eighteen joints in 11 volunteers were abnormal; 12 had disk displacement with reduction and six had disk displacement without reduction, with associated degenerative joint disease in three of the six. Asymptomatic internal derangement and degenerative joint disease occur in about one-fourth of asymptomatic volunteers

  7. Joint diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss how x-ray examination is essential in the diagnosis and evaluation of the arthritides. Most arthritides are first suspected by the clinician, and x-ray evaluation of these entities along with laboratory testing is important for confirmation of the clinical diagnosis and in staging of the disease process. Several arthritides are often diagnosed first by the podiatrist on x-ray evaluation, including pseudogout, ankylosing spondylitis, early rheumatoid arthritis, degenerative joint disease, and tuberculosis of bone. The joint responds to insult in only a limited number of ways that become apparent on x-ray. The soft tissues surrounding the joint, the articulating bones, and alignment of the joint space may all be involved by the arthritic process. On roentgenographic examination, the soft tissues must be examined for edema, masses, calcifications, and atrophy. The articulating bones must be examined for demineralization, erosions, osteophytes, periosteal reaction, cysts and sclerosis

  8. Joint pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or conditions. It may be linked to arthritis , bursitis , and muscle pain . No matter what causes it, ... Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus Bursitis Chondromalacia patellae Crystals in the joint: Gout (especially ...

  9. Joint Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the latest publication of The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety (JQPS). . How We Work Process improvement program breeds quality culture, empowers staff An article in Quality Progress, June ...

  10. Pathology in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, S; Patsouris, E

    2015-11-01

    Pathology is the field of medicine that studies diseases. Ancient Greece hosted some of the earliest societies that laid the structural foundations of pathology. Initially, knowledge was based on observations but later on the key elements of pathology were established based on the dissection of animals and the autopsy of human cadavers. Christianized Greece under Ottoman rule (1453-1821) was not conducive to the development of pathology. After liberation, however, a series of events took place that paved the way for the establishment and further development of the specialty. The appointment in 1849 of two Professors of Pathology at the Medical School of Athens for didactical purposes proved to be the most important step in fostering the field of pathology in modern Greece. Presently in Greece there are seven university departments and 74 pathology laboratories in public hospitals, employing 415 specialized pathologists and 90 residents. The First Department of Pathology at the Medical School of Athens University is the oldest (1849) and largest in Greece, encompassing most pathology subspecialties.

  11. Forelimb muscle and joint actions in Archosauria: insights from Crocodylus johnstoni (Pseudosuchia and Mussaurus patagonicus (Sauropodomorpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Otero

    2017-11-01

    action is highly influenced by limb posture, more so than morphology. Habitual quadrupedalism in Mussaurus is not supported by our analysis of joint range of motion, which indicates that glenohumeral protraction was severely restricted. Additionally, some active pronation of the manus may have been possible in Mussaurus, allowing semi-pronation by a rearranging of the whole antebrachium (not the radius against the ulna, as previously thought via long-axis rotation at the elbow joint. However, the muscles acting around this joint to actively pronate it may have been too weak to drive or maintain such orientations as opposed to a neutral position in between pronation and supination. Regardless, the origin of quadrupedalism in Sauropoda is not only linked to manus pronation but also to multiple shifts of forelimb morphology, allowing greater flexion movements of the glenohumeral joint and a more columnar forelimb posture.

  12. Building blocks of the GIPU, Italian Group of Ultrastructural Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, V; Costa, R; Cenacchi, G

    2016-06-01

    The Italian Group of Ultrastructural Pathology, GIPU, is a scientific organization committed to promote the art and science of Electron Microscopy (EM) in the pathology field in Italy, sharing its professional work with a public audience. The history of the GIPU goes back to 1990s when a founder group set up the Italian Group of Ultrastructural Diagnostic (GIDU) in Milan. The central focus of annual meetings was on EM, transmission and scanning one, about interesting cases in which it was instrumental in diagnosis. In the 1990s, ultrastructure was still the gold standard for cell/tissue morphology, biology, biochemistry, diagnostic pathology, and played an important role in tailored medicine. So, especially transmission EM, could play a critical role in the diagnosis of various diseases as in human as in animals. Best topics of the annual scientific meetings of the group were kidney, muscle, heart, and liver pathology, infertility, neuropathology, respiratory diseases, skin diseases, storage diseases, tumor pathology, infectious diseases, parasitology, veterinary pathology and more. Nowadays, EM is a method whose importance for diagnosis and pathology is well established: it is still essential in several pathologies, helpful in others, and welcome implemented in eclectic research pathology. Omission of EM likely makes the studies suboptimal and wasteful. So, from 2007 the name of the group has been changed to the Italian Group of Ultrastructural Pathology (GIPU) to favor broader applications of EM also to pathology research field. During last decades, GIDU/GIPU has interconnected with international (Society for Ultrastructural Pathology) and european (European Society of Pathology and Joint Meeting with the European Electron Microscopy Working Group) scientific society, according its statute. By 1991, GIPU has had 40 members: membership in this Group is still open and welcome to all pathologists, PhD, electron microscopy technologists, pathology trainees, and

  13. Clinical Validation of the Glenoid Track Concept in Anterior Glenohumeral Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaha, James S; Cook, Jay B; Rowles, Douglas J; Bottoni, Craig R; Shaha, Steven H; Tokish, John M

    2016-11-16

    Glenoid and humeral bone loss are well-described risk factors for failure of arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. Recently, consideration of the interactions of these types of bone loss (bipolar bone loss) has been used to determine if a lesion is "on-track" or "off-track." The purpose of this study was to study the relationship of the glenoid track to the outcomes of arthroscopic Bankart reconstructions. Over a 2-year period, 57 shoulders that were treated with an isolated, primary arthroscopic Bankart reconstruction performed at a single facility were included in this study. The mean patient age was 25.5 years (range, 20 to 42 years) at the time of the surgical procedure, and the mean follow-up was 48.3 months (range, 23 to 58 months). Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging was used to determine glenoid bone loss and Hill-Sachs lesion size and location and to measure the glenoid track to classify the shoulders as on-track or off-track. Outcomes were assessed according to shoulder stability on examination and subjective outcome. There were 10 recurrences (18%). Of the 49 on-track patients, 4 (8%) had treatment that failed compared with 6 (75%) of 8 off-track patients (p = 0.0001). Six (60%) of 10 patients with recurrence of instability were off-track compared with 2 (4%) of 47 patients in the stable group (p = 0.0001). The positive predictive value of an off-track measurement was 75% compared with 44% for the predictive value of glenoid bone loss of >20%. The application of the glenoid track concept to our cohort was superior to using glenoid bone loss alone with regard to predicting postoperative stability. This method of assessment is encouraged as a routine part of the preoperative evaluation of all patients under consideration for arthroscopic anterior stabilization. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2016 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  14. Pathological gambling and criminality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folino, Jorge Oscar; Abait, Patricia Estela

    2009-09-01

    To review research results on the relationship between pathological gambling and criminality, published in 2007 and 2008, in English and in Spanish. An important association between pathological gambling and criminality was confirmed in populations of anonymous gamblers, helpline callers and substance abusers. Helplines provide a timely service to gamblers who have not reached the maximum stages in the development of a pathological gambling pattern. Pathological gambling is associated with violence in couples and dysfunctional families. Inversely, violence is also an antecedent promoting vulnerability toward pathological gambling. Impulsiveness shows diverse relationships with pathological gambling and violence as well. A pathological gambler's involvement in crime is exceptionally considered without responsibility by justice, but it may be an indicator of the disorder severity and the need for special therapeutic tactics. While reviewing the present study, research work was published that contributed to a better understanding of the association between pathological gambling and criminality and went further into their complex relationship and the formulation of explanatory models related to impulsiveness.

  15. Radiographic pathology for technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mace, J.D.; Kowalczyk, N.

    1988-01-01

    This book explains the fundamentals of disease mechanisms and relates this to the practice of radiologic science. Each chapter begins with a discussion of normal anatomy and physiology, then covers pathology and demonstrates how the pathology appears on film. Imaging modalities such as computed tomography, MRI, and ultrasound are also discussed. Clinical case studies are included

  16. Pathology annual. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, P.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. Some of the titles are: Applications of in situ DNA hybridization technology to diagnostic surgical pathology; Neoplasms associated with immune deficiencies; Chronic gastritis: The pathologists's role; Necrosis in lymph nodes; Pathologic changes of osteochondrodysplasia in infancy: A review; and Immunoglobulin light chain nephropathies

  17. CONTACT SURFACES OF BIG JOINTS – SITES OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF LIMIT STATES AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fuis, Vladimír; Janíček, P.; Hlavoň, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 5 (2008), s. 381-388 ISSN 1802-1484 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : biomechanics * big joints * contact pressure * pathological joints * system approach Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  18. CLASSIFICATION OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT OSTEOARTHROSIS AND INTERNAL DERANGEMENT .2. SPECIFIC DIAGNOSTIC-CRITERIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGENGA, B; DEBONT, LGM; BOERING, G

    Separate entities of temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis and internal derangement are operationally defined. Criteria are based on an analysis of the diagnostic significance of symptoms and signs, principles of synovial joint pathology in general, and on therapeutic considerations. The primary

  19. Joint Intentionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koreň Ladislav

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the shared intentionality hypothesis proposed by Michael Tomasello, two cognitive upgrades – joint and collective intentionality, respectively – make human thinking unique. Joint intentionality, in particular, is a mindset supposed to account for our early, species-specific capacity to participate in collaborative activities involving two (or a few agents. In order to elucidate such activities and their proximate cognitive-motivational mechanism, Tomasello draws on philosophical accounts of shared intentionality. I argue that his deference to such cognitively demanding accounts of shared intentional activities is problematic if his theoretical ambition is in part to show that and how early (prelinguistic and precultural capacities for joint action contribute to the development of higher cognitive capacities.

  20. Joint imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hengst, W.

    1984-01-01

    Joint imaging is a proven diagnostic procedure which has become indispensable to the detection and treatment of different joint diseases in almost all disciplines. The method is suited for early diagnosis of joint affections both in soft tissue and bone which cannot be detected by X-ray or other procedures. The local activity accumulation depends on the rate of metabolism and is visualized in the scan, which in turn enables the extension and floridity of focal lesions to be evaluated and followed-up. Although joint scans may often give hints to probabilities relevant to differential diagnosis, the method is non-specific and only useful if based on the underlying clinical picture and X-ray finding, if possible. The radiation exposure is very low and does not represent a hazard in cases of adequate assessment of indication. In pregnant women and children the assessment of indication has to be based on very strict principles. The method is suited for out-patient diagnosis and can be applied in all installations equipped with a gamma camera and a technetium generator. (orig.) [de

  1. Joint purpose?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pristed Nielsen, Helene

    2013-01-01

    Starting from Crenshaw´s point that antiracism often fails to interrogate patriarchy and that feminism often reproduces racist practices (1991: 1252), this paper asks: What are the theoretical reasons for believing that feminism and anti-racism can be regarded as fighting for the joint purpose...

  2. Passive accessory joint mobilization in the multimodal management of chronic dysesthesia following thalamic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Kristina; O'Hearn, Michael; Franck, Carla C; Courtney, Carol A

    2018-03-20

    Case Report. Stroke is the most common cause of long-term disability. Dysesthesia, an unpleasant sensory disturbance, is common following thalamic stroke and evidence-based interventions for this impairment are limited. The purpose of this case report was to describe a decrease in dysesthesia following manual therapy intervention in a patient with history of right lacunar thalamic stroke. A 66-year-old female presented with tingling and dysesthesia in left hemisensory distribution including left trunk and upper/lower extremities, limiting function. Decreased left shoulder active range of motion, positive sensory symptoms but no sensory loss in light touch was found. She denied pain and moderate shoulder muscular weakness was demonstrated. Laterality testing revealed right/left limb discrimination deficits and neglect-like symptoms were reported. Passive accessory joint motion assessment of glenohumeral and thoracic spine revealed hypomobility and provoked dysesthesia. Interventions included passive oscillatory joint mobilization of glenohumeral joint, thoracic spine, ribs and shoulder strengthening. After six sessions, shoulder function, active range of motion, strength improved and dysesthesia decreased. Global Rating of Change Scale was +5 and QuickDASH score decreased from 45% to 22% disability. Laterality testing was unchanged. Manual therapy may be a beneficial intervention in management of thalamic stroke-related dysesthesia. Implications for Rehabilitation While pain is common following thalamic stroke, patients may present with chronic paresthesia or dysesthesia, often in a hemisensory distribution. Passive movement may promote inhibition of hyperexcitable cortical pathways, which may diminish aberrant sensations. Passive oscillatory manual therapy may be an effective way to treat sensory disturbances such as paresthesias or dysesthesia.

  3. Your Pathology Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pathology Tests Breast Cancer News February 20, 2013 Star-gazing software helps fight breast cancer See More ... Phone: (855) 807-6386 email Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Contact Us Privacy Policy Site Credits Terms of ...

  4. Stem Cell Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dah-Jiun; Miller, Andrew D; Southard, Teresa L; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Ellenson, Lora H; Nikitin, Alexander Yu

    2018-01-24

    Rapid advances in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine have opened new opportunities for better understanding disease pathogenesis and the development of new diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment approaches. Many stem cell niches are well defined anatomically, thereby allowing their routine pathological evaluation during disease initiation and progression. Evaluation of the consequences of genetic manipulations in stem cells and investigation of the roles of stem cells in regenerative medicine and pathogenesis of various diseases such as cancer require significant expertise in pathology for accurate interpretation of novel findings. Therefore, there is an urgent need for developing stem cell pathology as a discipline to facilitate stem cell research and regenerative medicine. This review provides examples of anatomically defined niches suitable for evaluation by diagnostic pathologists, describes neoplastic lesions associated with them, and discusses further directions of stem cell pathology.

  5. Pathology of pulmonary aspergillomas

    OpenAIRE

    Shah Rajeev; Vaideeswar Pradeep; Pandit Shobhana

    2008-01-01

    Aspergilloma refers to a fungal ball formed by saprophytic overgrowth of Aspergillus species and is seen secondary to cavitatory/cystic respiratory diseases. Paucity of clinical and pathological data of aspergilloma in India prompted us to analyze cases of aspergilloma over 15 years. The clinical features were recorded in all and correlated with detailed pathological examination. Aspergillomas were identified in 41 surgical excisions or at autopsy. There was male predominance; half the patien...

  6. MR findings of the temporomandibular joint with crepitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Mika; Yamaga, Takayoshi; Takahashi, Koji; Masuda, Saeko; Tagaya, Atsuko; Michi, Ken-ichi; Okano, Tomohiro

    1997-01-01

    Crepitus is an important sign for diagnosis of arthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The presence of crepitus can be evaluated by the listening test previously proposed by our group. However, TMJ can be diagnosed by MR imaging showing the disc position and related findings including bony changes and joint effusion. This study investigated the relationship between the presence of crepitus and pathology of the joint. Fourteen joints with crepitus diagnosed by the listening test were examined in this study. TMJ was categorized into four types based on findings on double spin echo MR images. The results were as follows: Of fourteen joints with crepitus, five (36%) were showed as normal superior disc position. The remaining 9 joints (64%) were diagnosed with disc displacement, of which, 6 showed reduction, one was without reduction and 2 without reduction were associated with arthrosis. Statistical analysis using the data obtained here and other data showed that the joints with crepitus tended to show disk displacement. There was no significant difference between the degree of certainty about the presence of the crepitus and the distribution of joint pathology. Joint effusion was observed only in the joints with displacement. These results indicated that TMJ with crepitus is associated with varied joint pathology. (author)

  7. MR findings of the temporomandibular joint with crepitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Mika; Yamaga, Takayoshi; Takahashi, Koji; Masuda, Saeko; Tagaya, Atsuko; Michi, Ken-ichi; Okano, Tomohiro [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1997-06-01

    Crepitus is an important sign for diagnosis of arthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The presence of crepitus can be evaluated by the listening test previously proposed by our group. However, TMJ can be diagnosed by MR imaging showing the disc position and related findings including bony changes and joint effusion. This study investigated the relationship between the presence of crepitus and pathology of the joint. Fourteen joints with crepitus diagnosed by the listening test were examined in this study. TMJ was categorized into four types based on findings on double spin echo MR images. The results were as follows: Of fourteen joints with crepitus, five (36%) were showed as normal superior disc position. The remaining 9 joints (64%) were diagnosed with disc displacement, of which, 6 showed reduction, one was without reduction and 2 without reduction were associated with arthrosis. Statistical analysis using the data obtained here and other data showed that the joints with crepitus tended to show disk displacement. There was no significant difference between the degree of certainty about the presence of the crepitus and the distribution of joint pathology. Joint effusion was observed only in the joints with displacement. These results indicated that TMJ with crepitus is associated with varied joint pathology. (author)

  8. Exercises focusing on rotator cuff and scapular muscles do not improve shoulder joint position sense in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yin-Liang; Karduna, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Proprioception is essential for shoulder neuromuscular control and shoulder stability. Exercise of the rotator cuff and scapulothoracic muscles is an important part of shoulder rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of rotator cuff and scapulothoracic muscle exercises on shoulder joint position sense. Thirty-six healthy subjects were recruited and randomly assigned into either a control or training group. The subjects in the training group received closed-chain and open-chain exercises focusing on rotator cuff and scapulothoracic muscles for four weeks. Shoulder joint position sense errors in elevation, including the humerothoracic, glenohumeral and scapulothoracic joints, was measured. After four weeks of exercise training, strength increased overall in the training group, which demonstrated the effect of exercise on the muscular system. However, the changes in shoulder joint position sense errors in any individual joint of the subjects in the training group were not different from those of the control subjects. Therefore, exercises specifically targeting individual muscles with low intensity may not be sufficient to improve shoulder joint position sense in healthy subjects. Future work is needed to further investigate which types of exercise are more effective in improving joint position sense, and the mechanisms associated with those changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Results. Different types of osteolysis were revealed in 80 (21,6% pts. Osteolytic variant of joint damage was present in 29 pts. 33 pts had acral, 48 — intra-articular osteolysis and 16 - true bone atrophy. Frequency and intensity of bone resorption were associated with severity of PA. Acral osteolysis correlated with arthritis of distal interphalangeal joints and onychodystrophy. Intra-articular osteolysis was most often present in distal interphalangeal joints of hands and metacarpophalangeal joints (39,6% and 41,7% respectively. Characteristic feature of PA was combination of prominent resorption with formation of bone ankylosis and periosteal reaction. Ankylosis was present in 33,3% of pts with intra-articular osteolysis and in 60% of pts with combination of different osteolysis variants. Systemic reaction of microcirculation in synovial biopsies was most prominent in osteolytic variant: marked thickening of capillary and venule basal membrane with high level of acid phosphatase, increased capillary and precapillary blood flow with stasis features, vascular lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, productive vasculitis with annular wall thickening, thrombovasculitis and villi deep layer sclerosis. Conclusion. Different variants of osteolysis show bone involvement in PA. Acral and intra- articular osteolysis association with bone ankylosis and periostitis proves their common pathogenetic entity.

  10. Joint Operation Planning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    .... It sets forth joint doctrine to govern the joint operation planning activities and performance of the Armed Forces of the United States in joint operations, and provides the joint doctrinal basis...

  11. [Adolescent pathological gambling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, A; Karila, L; Lejoyeux, M

    2015-05-01

    Although experts have long thought that the problems of gambling involved only adults, recent studies tend to show that teenagers are also affected. The objective of this paper is to show the characteristics of pathological gambling in adolescents. This review focuses on the clinical features, prevalence, psychopathology, prevention and treatment of this disorder. A review of the medical literature was conducted, using PubMed, using the following keywords alone or combined: pathological gambling, dependence, addiction and adolescents. We selected 12 English articles from 1997 to 2014. Recent work estimate that between 4 and 8% of adolescents suffer from problem gambling, and the prevalence of pathological gambling is 2-4 times higher in adolescents than in adults. The term adolescent pathological gambler starts early around the age of 10-12 years, with a quick change of status from casual to that of problem gambler and player. Complications appear quickly and comorbidities are common. There is no curative pharmacological treatment approved by health authorities. Pathological gambling among adolescents has grown significantly in recent years and should be promptly taken care of. Further studies must be performed to improve our understanding of this problem among adolescents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Pathologic conditions in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beomonte Zobel, B.; Tella, S.; Innacoli, M.; D'Archivio, C.; Cardone, G.; Masciocchi, C.; Gallucci, M.; Passariello, R.; Cappa, F.

    1991-01-01

    Soma authors suggested that MR imaging could rapresent an effective diagnostic alternative in the study of pathologic conditions of mother and fetus during pregnancy. To verify the actual role of MR imaging, we examined 20 patients in the 2nd and 3rd trimester of gestation, after a preliminary US examination. Fifteen patients presented fetal or placental pathologies; in 4 patients the onset of the pathologic condition occurred during pregnancy; in 1 case of US diagnosis of fetal ascites, MR findings were nornal and the newborn was healty. As for placental pathologies, our series included a case of placental cyst, two hematomas between placenta and uterine wall, and two cases of partial placenta previa. As for fetal malformation, we evaluated a case of omphalocele, one of Prune-Belly syndrome, a case of femoral asimmetry, one of thanatophoric dwarfism, a case of thoracopagus twins with cardiovascular abnormalities, two fetal hydrocephali, and three cases of pyelo-ureteral stenosis. As for maternal pathologies during pregnancy, we observed a case of subserous uterine fibromyoma, one of of right hydronephrosis, one of protrusion of lumbar invertebral disk, and a large ovarian cyst. In our experience, MR imaging exhibited high sensitivity and a large field of view, which were both useful in the investigation of the different conditions occurring during pregnancy. In the evaluation of fetal and placental abnormalities, especially during the 3rd trimester, the diagnostic yieldof MR imaging suggested it as a complementary technique to US for the evaluation of fetal malformation and of intrauterine growth retardation

  13. Audit in forensic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, M P; Opeskin, K

    2000-09-01

    Autopsy numbers in Australian hospitals have declined markedly during the past decade despite evidence of a relatively static rate of demonstrable clinical misdiagnosis during this time. The reason for this decrease in autopsy numbers is multifactorial and may include a general lack of clinical and pathologic interest in the autopsy with a possible decline in autopsy standard, a lack of clinicopathologic correlation after autopsies, and an increased emphasis on surgical biopsy reporting within hospital pathology departments. Although forensic autopsies are currently maintaining their numbers, it is incumbent on forensic pathologists to demonstrate the wealth of important information a carefully performed postmortem examination can reveal. To this end, the Pathology Division of the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine has instituted a program of minimum standards in varied types of coroner cases and commenced a system of internal and external audit. The minimum standard for a routine, sudden, presumed natural death is presented and the audit system is discussed.

  14. Dual Pathology of Mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajurkar, Suday G; Deshpande, Mohan D; Kazi, Noaman; Jadhav, Dhanashree; Ranadive, Pallavi; Ingole, Snehal

    2017-01-01

    Aneurysmal Bone cyst (ABC)is a rare benign lesion of the bone which is infrequent in craniofacial region (12%). Rapid growth pattern causing bone expansion and facial asymmetry is a characteristic feature of ABC. Giant cell lesion is another distinct pathological entity. Here we present to you a rare case of dual pathology in an 11 year old female patient who presented with a large expansile lesion in the left hemimandible. All radiographic investigations were suggestive of ABC, aspiration of the lesion resulted in blood aspirate. However only after a histologic examination the dual nature of the lesion was revealed.

  15. Otosclerosis: Temporal Bone Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesnel, Alicia M; Ishai, Reuven; McKenna, Michael J

    2018-04-01

    Otosclerosis is pathologically characterized by abnormal bony remodeling, which includes bone resorption, new bone deposition, and vascular proliferation in the temporal bone. Sensorineural hearing loss in otosclerosis is associated with extension of otosclerosis to the cochlear endosteum and deposition of collagen throughout the spiral ligament. Persistent or recurrent conductive hearing loss after stapedectomy has been associated with incomplete footplate fenestration, poor incus-prosthesis connection, and incus resorption in temporal bone specimens. Human temporal bone pathology has helped to define the role of computed tomography imaging for otosclerosis, confirming that computed tomography is highly sensitive for diagnosis, yet limited in assessing cochlear endosteal involvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anatomy and histology of the sacroiliac joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egund, Niels; Jurik, Anne Grethe

    2014-07-01

    The anatomy of joints provides an important basis for understanding the nature and imaging of pathologic lesions and their imaging appearance. This applies especially to the sacroiliac (SI) joints, which play a major role in the diagnosis of spondyloarthritis. They are composed of two different joint portions, a cartilage-covered portion ventrally and a ligamentous portion dorsally, and thus rather complex anatomically. Knowledge of anatomy and the corresponding normal imaging findings are important in the imaging diagnosis of sacroiliitis, especially by MR imaging. A certain distinction between the two joint portions by MR imaging is only obtainable by axial slice orientation. Together with a perpendicular coronal slice orientation, it provides adequate anatomical information and thereby a possibility for detecting the anatomical site of disease-specific characteristics and normal variants simulating disease. This overview describes current knowledge about the normal macroscopic and microscopic anatomy of the SI joints. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Musculoskeletal ultrasound including definitions for ultrasonographic pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakefield, RJ; Balint, PV; Szkudlarek, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has great potential as an outcome in rheumatoid arthritis trials for detecting bone erosions, synovitis, tendon disease, and enthesopathy. It has a number of distinct advantages over magnetic resonance imaging, including good patient tolerability and ability to scan multiple joints...... in a short period of time. However, there are scarce data regarding its validity, reproducibility, and responsiveness to change, making interpretation and comparison of studies difficult. In particular, there are limited data describing standardized scanning methodology and standardized definitions of US...... pathologies. This article presents the first report from the OMERACT ultrasound special interest group, which has compared US against the criteria of the OMERACT filter. Also proposed for the first time are consensus US definitions for common pathological lesions seen in patients with inflammatory arthritis....

  18. The effect of a combined glenoid and Hill-Sachs defect on glenohumeral stability: a biomechanical cadaveric study using 3-dimensional modeling of 142 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciero, Robert A; Parrino, Anthony; Bernhardson, Andrew S; Diaz-Doran, Vilmaris; Obopilwe, Elifho; Cote, Mark P; Golijanin, Petr; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Provencher, Matthew T

    2015-06-01

    Bone loss in anterior glenohumeral instability occurs on both the glenoid and the humerus; however, existing biomechanical studies have evaluated glenoid and humeral head defects in isolation. Thus, little is known about the combined effect of these bony lesions in a clinically relevant model on glenohumeral stability. The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical efficacy of a Bankart repair in the setting of bipolar (glenoid and humeral head) bone defects determined via computer-generated 3-dimensional (3D) modeling of 142 patients with recurrent anterior shoulder instability. The null hypothesis was that adding a bipolar bone defect will have no effect on glenohumeral stability after soft tissue Bankart repair. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 142 consecutive patients with recurrent anterior instability were analyzed with 3D computed tomography scans. Two Hill-Sachs lesions were selected on the basis of volumetric size representing the 25th percentile (0.87 cm(3); small) and 50th percentile (1.47 cm(3); medium) and printed in plastic resin with a 3D printer. A total of 21 cadaveric shoulders were evaluated on a custom shoulder-testing device permitting 6 degrees of freedom, and the force required to translate the humeral head anteriorly 10 mm at a rate of 2.0 mm/s with a compressive load of 50 N was determined at 60° of glenohumeral abduction and 60° of external rotation. All Bankart lesions were made sharply from the 2- to 6-o'clock positions for a right shoulder. Subsequent Bankart repair with transosseous tunnels using high-strength suture was performed. Hill-Sachs lesions were made in the cadaver utilizing a plastic mold from the exact replica off the 3D printer. Testing was conducted in the following sequence for each specimen: (1) intact, (2) posterior capsulotomy, (3) Bankart lesion, (4) Bankart repair, (5) Bankart lesion with 2-mm glenoid defect, (6) Bankart repair, (7) Bankart lesion with 2-mm glenoid defect and Hill-Sachs lesion

  19. An MRI study on the relations between muscle atrophy, shoulder function and glenohumeral deformity in shoulders of children with obstetric brachial plexus injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Doorn-Loogman Mirjam H

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A substantial number of children with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL will develop internal rotation adduction contractures of the shoulder, posterior humeral head subluxations and glenohumeral deformities. Their active shoulder function is generally limited and a recent study showed that their shoulder muscles were atrophic. This study focuses on the role of shoulder muscles in glenohumeral deformation and function. Methods This is a prospective study on 24 children with unilateral OBPL, who had internal rotation contractures of the shoulder (mean age 3.3 years, range 14.7 months to 7.3 years. Using MR imaging from both shoulders the following parameters were assessed: glenoid form, glenoscapular angle, subluxation of the humeral head, thickness and segmental volume of the subscapularis, infraspinatus and deltoid muscles. Shoulder function was assessed measuring passive external rotation of the shoulder and using the Mallet score for active function. Statistical tests used are t-tests, Spearman's rho, Pearsons r and logistic regression. Results The affected shoulders showed significantly reduced muscle sizes, increased glenoid retroversion and posterior subluxation. Mean muscle size compared to the normal side was: subscapularis 51%, infraspinatus 61% and deltoid 76%. Glenoid form was related to infraspinatus muscle atrophy. Subluxation was related to both infraspinatus and subscapularis atrophy. There was no relation between atrophy of muscles and passive external rotation. Muscle atrophy was not related to the Mallet score or its dimensions. Conclusion Muscle atrophy was more severe in the subscapularis muscle than in infraspinatus and deltoid. As the muscle ratios are not related to passive external rotation nor to active function of the shoulder, there must be other muscle properties influencing shoulder function.

  20. Degenerative Joint Diseases and Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Mariella; Skaper, Stephen D; Coaccioli, Stefano; Varrassi, Giustino; Paladini, Antonella

    2017-04-01

    Rheumatic and joint diseases, as exemplified by osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, are among the most widespread painful and disabling pathologies across the globe. Given the continuing rise in life expectancy, their prevalence is destined to grow. Osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease, is, in particular, on its way to becoming the fourth leading cause of disability worldwide by 2020, with the rising incidence of obesity in addition to age being important factors. It is estimated that 25% of osteoarthritic individuals are unable to perform daily activities. Accompanying osteoarthritis is rheumatoid arthritis, which is a chronic systemic disease that often causes pain and deformity. At least 50% of those affected are unable to remain gainfully employed within 10 years of disease onset. A growing body of evidence now points to inflammation, locally and more systemically, as a promoter of damage to joints and bones, as well as joint-related functional deficits. The pathogenesis underlying joint diseases remains unclear; however, it is currently believed that cross-talk between cartilage and subchondral bone-and loss of balance between these two structures in joint diseases-is a critical element. This view is amplified by the presence of mast cells, whose dysregulation is associated with alterations of junction structures (cartilage, bone, synovia, matrix, nerve endings, and blood vessels). In addition, persistent activation of mast cells facilitates the development of spinal neuroinflammation mediated through their interaction with microglia. Unfortunately, current treatment strategies for rheumatic and articular disease are symptomatic and do little to limit disease progression. Research now should be directed at therapeutic modalities that target osteoarticular structural elements and thereby delaying disease progression and joint replacement. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  1. Pathological Gambling Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, David D.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although pathological gambling (PG) is regarded in the 4th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as a unitary diagnostic construct, it is likely composed of distinct subtypes. In the current report, the authors used cluster analyses of personality traits with a…

  2. TC pathological Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Fontes, M.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is about different imaging techniques such as ultrasound, CT, RNM, PET-CT. These techniques permit to detect head and neck tumors, breast and digestive pathologies as well as congenital diseases and glandular tumor in the thyroid, parathyroid, muscles, lymphatic, nerves and vessels

  3. Pathological fractures in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mattos, C. B. R.; Binitie, O.; Dormans, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Pathological fractures in children can occur as a result of a variety of conditions, ranging from metabolic diseases and infection to tumours. Fractures through benign and malignant bone tumours should be recognised and managed appropriately by the treating orthopaedic surgeon. The most common benign bone tumours that cause pathological fractures in children are unicameral bone cysts, aneurysmal bone cysts, non-ossifying fibromas and fibrous dysplasia. Although pathological fractures through a primary bone malignancy are rare, these should be recognised quickly in order to achieve better outcomes. A thorough history, physical examination and review of plain radiographs are crucial to determine the cause and guide treatment. In most benign cases the fracture will heal and the lesion can be addressed at the time of the fracture, or after the fracture is healed. A step-wise and multidisciplinary approach is necessary in caring for paediatric patients with malignancies. Pathological fractures do not have to be treated by amputation; these fractures can heal and limb salvage can be performed when indicated. PMID:23610658

  4. Next-Generation Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caie, Peter D; Harrison, David J

    2016-01-01

    The field of pathology is rapidly transforming from a semiquantitative and empirical science toward a big data discipline. Large data sets from across multiple omics fields may now be extracted from a patient's tissue sample. Tissue is, however, complex, heterogeneous, and prone to artifact. A reductionist view of tissue and disease progression, which does not take this complexity into account, may lead to single biomarkers failing in clinical trials. The integration of standardized multi-omics big data and the retention of valuable information on spatial heterogeneity are imperative to model complex disease mechanisms. Mathematical modeling through systems pathology approaches is the ideal medium to distill the significant information from these large, multi-parametric, and hierarchical data sets. Systems pathology may also predict the dynamical response of disease progression or response to therapy regimens from a static tissue sample. Next-generation pathology will incorporate big data with systems medicine in order to personalize clinical practice for both prognostic and predictive patient care.

  5. Forms of pathologization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    disorder, and similar figures are found for many other mental disorders. These figures are striking, but are hard to interpret. This presentation argues in favour of the pathologization thesis, which claims that it cannot be argued in a straightforward manner that we are simply more ill and disordered than...

  6. Joint hypermobility: incidence and some clinical symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M P Isaev

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study joint mobility range among urban population aged 18 to 30 years and to assess association of joint and other connective tissue structures disorders clinical signs with hypermobility. Material and methods. 769 randomly selected individuals aged 18 to 30 (mean - 25,56 years (419 female and 350 male were examined. Hypermobility was assessed with 9-point Beighton scale. Examination included skin stretchability evaluation at elbow back surface, determination of flat feet, high palate, joint pain and deformities of knee joints, joint luxation and subluxation, hand and feet vasospastic disturbances, cardiac pain, oculist examination. Methods of variational statistics were used (x2, Student's test, Spirmen's correlation. Results. Hypermobility incidence and joint mobility in population aged 18 to 30 years in Orenburg largely comply with data received in Moscow. Joint mobility up to 5 points in women and up to 4 points in men is usual for persons of this age and in absence of additional clinical symptoms cannot be considered as pathological. Knee joint deformities, presence of high palate, cardiac pain accompanied by signs of vegetative dysfunction, hand and feet vasospastic disturbances are significantly connected with degree of joint mobility and in some cases can help in hypermobility syndrome diagnosis.

  7. The friction coefficient of shoulder joints remains remarkably low over 24 h of loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian K; Durney, Krista M; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2015-11-05

    The frictional response of whole human joints over durations spanning activities of daily living has not been reported previously. This study measured the friction of human glenohumeral joints during 24 h of reciprocal loading in a pendulum testing device, at moderate (0.2 mm/s, 4320 cycles) and low (0.02 mm/s, 432 cycles) sliding speeds, under a 200 N load. The effect of joint congruence was also investigated by testing human humeral heads against significantly larger mature bovine glenoids. Eight human joints and six bovine joints were tested in four combinations: human joints tested at moderate (hHCMS, n=6) and low speed (hHCLS, n=3), human humeral heads tested against bovine glenoids at moderate speed (LCMS, n=3), and bovine joints tested at moderate speed (bHCMS, n=3). In the first half hour the mean±standard deviation of the friction coefficient was hHCMS: 0.0016±0.0011, hHCLS: 0.0012±0.0002, LCMS: 0.0008±0.0002 and bHCMS: 0.0024±0.0008; in the last four hours it was hHCMS: 0.0057±0.0025, hHCLS: 0.0047±0.0017, LCMS: 0.0012±0.0003 and bHCMS: 0.0056±0.0016. The initial value was lower than the final value (pfriction coefficient of natural human shoulders remains remarkably low (averaging as little as 0.0015 and no greater than 0.006) for up to 24 h of continuous loading. The sustained low friction coefficients observed in incongruent joints (~0.001) likely represent rolling rather than sliding friction. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. The Friction Coefficient of Shoulder Joints Remains Remarkably Low Over 24 h of Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian K.; Durney, Krista M.; Hung, Clark T.; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2015-01-01

    The frictional response of whole human joints over durations spanning activities of daily living has not been reported previously. This study measured the friction of human glenohumeral joints during 24 h of reciprocal loading in a pendulum testing device, at moderate (0.2 mm/s, 4320 cycles) and low (0.02 mm/s, 432 cycles) sliding speeds, under a 200 N load. The effect of joint congruence was also investigated by testing human humeral heads against significantly larger mature bovine glenoids. Six human joints and six bovine joints were tested in four combinations: human joints tested at moderate (hHCMS, n=6) and low speed (hHCLS, n=3), human humeral heads tested against bovine glenoids at moderate speed (LCMS, n=3), and bovine joints tested at moderate speed (bHCMS, n=3). In the first half hour the mean ± standard deviation of the friction coefficient was hHCMS: 0.0016±0.0011, hHCLS: 0.0012±0.0002, LCMS: 0.0008±0.0002 and bHCMS: 0.0024±0.0008; in the last four hours it was hHCMS: 0.0057±0.0025, hHCLS: 0.0047±0.0017, LCMS: 0.0012±0.0003 and bHCMS: 0.0056±0.0016. The initial value was lower than the final value (pfriction coefficient of natural human shoulders remains remarkably low (averaging as little as 0.0015 and no greater than 0.006) for up to 24 h of continuous loading. The sustained low friction coefficients observed in incongruent joints (~0.001) likely represent rolling rather than sliding friction. PMID:26472306

  9. Pathology informatics fellowship training: Focus on molecular pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Mandelker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pathology informatics is both emerging as a distinct subspecialty and simultaneously becoming deeply integrated within the breadth of pathology practice. As specialists, pathology informaticians need a broad skill set, including aptitude with information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management. Currently, many of those seeking training in pathology informatics additionally choose training in a second subspecialty. Combining pathology informatics training with molecular pathology is a natural extension, as molecular pathology is a subspecialty with high potential for application of modern biomedical informatics techniques. Methods and Results: Pathology informatics and molecular pathology fellows and faculty evaluated the current fellowship program′s core curriculum topics and subtopics for relevance to molecular pathology. By focusing on the overlap between the two disciplines, a structured curriculum consisting of didactics, operational rotations, and research projects was developed for those fellows interested in both pathology informatics and molecular pathology. Conclusions: The scope of molecular diagnostics is expanding dramatically as technology advances and our understanding of disease extends to the genetic level. Here, we highlight many of the informatics challenges facing molecular pathology today, and outline specific informatics principles necessary for the training of future molecular pathologists.

  10. Pathology informatics fellowship training: Focus on molecular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelker, Diana; Lee, Roy E; Platt, Mia Y; Riedlinger, Gregory; Quinn, Andrew; Rao, Luigi K F; Klepeis, Veronica E; Mahowald, Michael; Lane, William J; Beckwith, Bruce A; Baron, Jason M; McClintock, David S; Kuo, Frank C; Lebo, Matthew S; Gilbertson, John R

    2014-01-01

    Pathology informatics is both emerging as a distinct subspecialty and simultaneously becoming deeply integrated within the breadth of pathology practice. As specialists, pathology informaticians need a broad skill set, including aptitude with information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management. Currently, many of those seeking training in pathology informatics additionally choose training in a second subspecialty. Combining pathology informatics training with molecular pathology is a natural extension, as molecular pathology is a subspecialty with high potential for application of modern biomedical informatics techniques. Pathology informatics and molecular pathology fellows and faculty evaluated the current fellowship program's core curriculum topics and subtopics for relevance to molecular pathology. By focusing on the overlap between the two disciplines, a structured curriculum consisting of didactics, operational rotations, and research projects was developed for those fellows interested in both pathology informatics and molecular pathology. The scope of molecular diagnostics is expanding dramatically as technology advances and our understanding of disease extends to the genetic level. Here, we highlight many of the informatics challenges facing molecular pathology today, and outline specific informatics principles necessary for the training of future molecular pathologists.

  11. Diagnosis of shoulder instability in dogs and cats: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardet, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    The glenohumeral joint is a remarkable articulation providing the greatest range of motion of any joint in the body. Glenohumeral stabilityresults from several mechanisms, including those that do not require expenditure of energy by muscle ('''passive mechanisms'') and those that do (''active mechanisms''). Glenohumeral instability has been recognized in 47 shoulders of 45 dogs and one cat. Cases are presented because of chronic foreleg lameness. Shoulder joint pain is obviated by theorthopedic examination. Only 57% of the involved shoulders presented with degenerative joint disease. Signs of instability are recognized under anesthesia using a craniocaudal or mediolateral drawer sign or both. This report describes the radiographic and arthroscopic findings of shoulder instability. Arthroscopy of the shoulder joint allows identification of all intra-articular pathologies. Shoulder instability notfully recognized in the past, appears to be the most common cause of shoulder lameness in the dog

  12. Male breast pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puebla, C.; Sainz, J.M.; Pujala, M.; Villavieja, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    To review the specific radiological signs of male breast pathology observed in our center over the past five years, as well as the pertinent medical literature. A retrospective study was carried out of the 47 mammographic studies performed in 41 men. Oblique mediolateral and craniocaudal views were employed. The distribution of different types of male breast pathology among our patients was as follows: gynecomastia was detected in 30 cases (73.1%), pseudogynectomastia in 4 (9.7%), carcinoma in 3(7.3%), abscess in 2 (4.9%), lipoma in 1 (2.5%) and epidermoid cyst in the remaining patient (2.5%). The results obtained agree with those reported in the literature reviewed. The most significant findings were the low incidence of carcinoma and the high rate of gynecomastia. (Author) 26 refs

  13. Pathology of pulmonary aspergillomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rajeev; Vaideeswar, Pradeep; Pandit, Shobhana P

    2008-01-01

    Aspergilloma refers to a fungal ball formed by saprophytic overgrowth of Aspergillus species and is seen secondary to cavitatory/cystic respiratory diseases. Paucity of clinical and pathological data of aspergilloma in India prompted us to analyze cases of aspergilloma over 15 years. The clinical features were recorded in all and correlated with detailed pathological examination. Aspergillomas were identified in 41 surgical excisions or at autopsy. There was male predominance; half the patients were in their fourth decade. Episodic hemoptysis was the commonest mode of presentation (85.4%). Forty aspergillomas were complex, occurring in cavitatory lesions (82.9%) or in bronchiectasis (14.6%). Simple aspergilloma was seen as an incidental finding in only one. Tuberculosis was the etiological factor in 31 patients, producing cavitatory or bronchiectatic lesions; other causes were chronic lung abscess and bronchiectasis (unrelated to tuberculosis). Surgical resections are endorsed in view of high risk of unpredictable, life-threatening hemoptysis.

  14. Pathology of pulmonary aspergillomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Rajeev

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Aspergilloma refers to a fungal ball formed by saprophytic overgrowth of Aspergillus species and is seen secondary to cavitatory/cystic respiratory diseases. Paucity of clinical and pathological data of aspergilloma in India prompted us to analyze cases of aspergilloma over 15 years. The clinical features were recorded in all and correlated with detailed pathological examination. Aspergillomas were identified in 41 surgical excisions or at autopsy. There was male predominance; half the patients were in their fourth decade. Episodic hemoptysis was the commonest mode of presentation (85.4%. Forty aspergillomas were complex, occurring in cavitatory lesions (82.9% or in bronchiectasis (14.6%. Simple aspergilloma was seen as an incidental finding in only one. Tuberculosis was the etiological factor in 31 patients, producing cavitatory or bronchiectatic lesions; other causes were chronic lung abscess and bronchiectasis (unrelated to tuberculosis. Surgical resections are endorsed in view of high risk of unpredictable, life-threatening hemoptysis.

  15. [Pathological gambling: risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouju, G; Grall-Bronnec, M; Landreat-Guillou, M; Venisse, J-L

    2011-09-01

    In France, consumption of gambling games increased by 148% between 1960 and 2005. In 2004, gamblers lost approximately 0.9% of household income, compared to 0.4% in 1960. This represents approximately 134 Euros per year and per head. In spite of this important increase, the level remains lower than the European average (1%). However, gambling practices may continue to escalate in France in the next few years, particularly with the recent announce of the legalisation of online games and sports betting. With the spread of legalised gambling, pathological gambling rates may increase in France in the next years, in response to more widely available and more attractive gambling opportunities. In this context, there is a need for better understanding of the risk factors that are implicated in the development and maintenance of pathological gambling. This paper briefly describes the major risk factors for pathological gambling by examining the recent published literature available during the first quarter of 2008. This documentary basis was collected by Inserm for the collective expert report procedure on Gambling (contexts and addictions). Seventy-two articles focusing on risk factors for pathological gambling were considered in this review. Only 47 of them were taken into account for analysis. The selection of these 47 publications was based on the guide on literature analysis established by the French National Agency for Accreditation and Assessment in Health (ANAES, 2000). Some publications from more recent literature have also been added, mostly about Internet gambling. We identify three major types of risk factors implicated in gambling problems: some of them are related to the subject (individual factors), others are related to the object of the addiction, here the gambling activity by itself (structural factors), and the last are related to environment (contextual or situational factors). Thus, the development and maintenance of pathological gambling seems to be

  16. Pathology in Undergraduate Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Raj K.C.

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pathology is a study of disease which deals with etiology, pathogenesis and morphological features and the associated clinical features. Pathology acts as a bridge that fills the gap between basic sciences and clinical medicine. With proper understanding of pathological processes, one can understand the disease process. In Nepal, since the beginning of medical school teaching, Pathology as a basic science discipline and is a component of the preclinical medical school curriculum.Pathology teaching in 19th century was vague, disorganized and very little, though precious. The lectures used to be conducted by surgeons. At Barts, surgeon Sir James Paget had taught surgical pathology. The real revolution in pathology teaching began in the early 1900s when, spurred on by increasing understanding of disease mechanisms, pathology began to be accepted as a specialty in its own right.During the early and mid of 20th century, pathology teaching was a part of clinical teaching with daily, autopsy demonstration. By the late 1980s, significant change had taken place. In many medical schools, debate started regarding relevance of vigorous preclinical teaching. Then system-based approach was incorporated and traditional preclinical course had been abandoned. With this pathology teaching also began to change with pathologists being involved in teaching histology, often alongside pathology to highlight its clinical relevance. In medical schools the pathology teaching time was cut. Autopsy demonstrations, which had been so popular with generations of medical students, were becoming irregular and less well attended.Though teaching of pathology in blocks to ‘avoid fragmentation’ has disappeared in western countries; it is still practice in Nepal. In western countries there was traditional practice of teaching general pathology in the first two years and systemic pathology in the clinical years. Now pathology teaching is integrated throughout the course. A

  17. Cortical myoclonus and cerebellar pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Thom, M; Ellison, DW; Wilkins, P; Barnes, D; Thompson, PD; Brown, P

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the electrophysiologic and pathologic findings in three patients with cortical myoclonus. In two patients the myoclonic ataxic syndrome was associated with proven celiac disease. Background: The pathologic findings in conditions associated with cortical myoclonus commonly involve

  18. Cortical myoclonus and cerebellar pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, M. A.; Thom, M.; Ellison, D. W.; Wilkins, P.; Barnes, D.; Thompson, P. D.; Brown, P.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the electrophysiologic and pathologic findings in three patients with cortical myoclonus. In two patients the myoclonic ataxic syndrome was associated with proven celiac disease. BACKGROUND: The pathologic findings in conditions associated with cortical myoclonus commonly involve

  19. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darryl Blalock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA. Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA.

  20. Joint instability and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA.

  1. Pathology Gross Photography: The Beginning of Digital Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampy, B Alan; Glassy, Eric F

    2015-06-01

    The underutilized practice of photographing anatomic pathology specimens from surgical pathology and autopsies is an invaluable benefit to patients, clinicians, pathologists, and students. Photographic documentation of clinical specimens is essential for the effective practice of pathology. When considering what specimens to photograph, all grossly evident pathology, absent yet expected pathologic features, and gross-only specimens should be thoroughly documented. Specimen preparation prior to photography includes proper lighting and background, wiping surfaces of blood, removing material such as tubes or bandages, orienting the specimen in a logical fashion, framing the specimen to fill the screen, positioning of probes, and using the right-sized scale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hypertrophic Synovitis of the Facet Joint Causing Root Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Iwatsuki M.D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritic changes in the facet joints are common in the presence of degenerative disc disease. Changes in the joint capsule accompany changes in the articular surfaces. Intraspinal synovial cysts that cause radicular pain, cauda equina syndrome, and myelopathy have been reported; however, there have been few reports in orthopedic or neurosurgical literature regarding hypertrophic synovitis of the facet joint presenting as an incidental para-articular mass. Here, we report a case of hypertrophic synovitis causing root pain. We describe the case of a 65-year-old man suffering from right sciatica and right leg pain in the L5 nerve-root dermatome for 1 year; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed an enhanced mass around the L4–5 facet joint. We investigated this mass pathologically. After right medial facetectomy, the symptoms resolved. Pathological investigation revealed this mass was hypertrophic synovitis. Hypertrophic synovitis of the facet joint might cause root pain.

  3. Computed tomography of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Byung Won; Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Park, Sung Hak; Kim, Tae Hun; Park, In Kyu; Kim, Yong Joo; Kang, Duk Sik; Kwon, Sae Hong

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosis of knee joint pathology has been mainly dependent on clinical manifestations and invasive procedures such as arthrography and arthroscopy etc. However, these procedures are invasive. Arthroscopy is performed under general anesthesia. Recently, with development of high resolution CT with thin slices and multiplanar reconstructions capability, CT could be used to verify the internal structures of knee joint in noninvasive or less invasive way. From June to December 1985, authors have experienced 19 cases of the knee joint CT. Among them, 13 cases were operated and confirmed. We concluded as follows. 1. The diagnostic accuracy of the knee CT was 100% in lateral meniscal tearing, 92.3% in medial mensical tearing, 92.3% in detachment of lateral collateral ligament, 92.3% in medial collateral ligament, 100% in tearing of cruciate ligaments. 2. CT could be considered as a primary diagnostic procedure in the knee pathology rather than more invasive arthroscopy or arthrography. 3. For the accurate diagnosis of knee joint pathology, CT, which can obtain thin slies, high resolution, multiplanar reconstructions, is indispensable.

  4. Pathological gambling: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gambling activities are popular as a form of recreation and have been a source of income for many people worldwide. Although gambling has been common across continents and time, and a subset of individuals experience problems with gambling. This review attempts to provide an overview of problem gambling for clinicians who are likely to encounter such patients in their practice. The review discusses the relevance, nosology, and epidemiology of gambling. We also discuss the associated comorbidities and principles of management of pathological gambling.

  5. [Apoptosis and pathological process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rami, Mukhammed Salim Iusef

    2007-01-01

    Apoptosis (programmed cell death) occurs normally for maitenance of tissue homeostasis and play an important role in morphogenesis, embriogenesis and tissue growth. On the other hand, apoptosis may be involved in different pathological processes such as malignancy, infectious diseases and autoimmune disorders. Apoptosis is regulated by various mediators. Caspases, death receptors, mitochondria, Bcl-2 protoncogenes and tumor supressor genes are considered to be the most important of them. Advance in apoptosis regulation research suggests enormouse facilities for therapy of wide range of human illnesses.

  6. Marketing the pathology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, E N

    1995-07-01

    Effective marketing of the pathology practice is essential in the face of an increasingly competitive market. Successful marketing begins with a market-driven planning process. As opposed to the traditional planning process used in health care organizations, a market-driven approach is externally driven. Implementing a market-driven plan also requires recognition of the definition of the service. Each market to which pathologists direct their service defines the service differently. Recognition of these different service definitions and creation of a product to meet these needs could lead to competitive advantages in the marketplace.

  7. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Foer, Bert [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: bert.defoer@GZA.be; Kenis, Christoph [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: christophkenis@hotmail.com; Van Melkebeke, Deborah [Department of Neurology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Deborah.vanmelkebeke@Ugent.be; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: jphver@yahoo.com; Somers, Thomas [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Thomas.somers@GZA.be; Pouillon, Marc [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: marc.pouillon@GZA.be; Offeciers, Erwin [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Erwin.offeciers@GZA.be; Casselman, Jan W. [Department of Radiology, AZ Sint-Jan AV Hospital, Ruddershove 10, Bruges (Belgium); Consultant Radiologist, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Academic Consultent, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: jan.casselman@azbrugge.be

    2010-05-15

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  8. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Foer, Bert; Kenis, Christoph; Van Melkebeke, Deborah; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe; Somers, Thomas; Pouillon, Marc; Offeciers, Erwin; Casselman, Jan W.

    2010-01-01

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  9. Anesthesia and Tau Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Robert A.; Bretteville, Alexis; Dickler, Maya F.; Planel, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and remains a growing worldwide health problem. As life expectancy continues to increase, the number of AD patients presenting for surgery and anesthesia will steadily rise. The etiology of sporadic AD is thought to be multifactorial, with environmental, biological and genetic factors interacting together to influence AD pathogenesis. Recent reports suggest that general anesthetics may be such a factor and may contribute to the development and exacerbation of this neurodegenerative disorder. Intra-neuronal neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), composed of hyperphosphorylated and aggregated tau protein are one of the main neuropathological hallmarks of AD. Tau pathology is important in AD as it correlates very well with cognitive dysfunction. Lately, several studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms by which anesthetic exposure might affect the phosphorylation, aggregation and function of this microtubule-associated protein. Here, we specifically review the literature detailing the impact of anesthetic administration on aberrant tau hyperphosphorylation as well as the subsequent development of neurofibrillary pathology and degeneration. PMID:23535147

  10. Critical shoulder angle in an East Asian population: correlation to the incidence of rotator cuff tear and glenohumeral osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinagawa, Kiyotsugu; Hatta, Taku; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Kawakami, Jun; Shiota, Yuki; Mineta, Mitsuyoshi; Itoi, Eiji

    2018-05-03

    Focus has recently been on the critical shoulder angle (CSA) as a factor related to rotator cuff tear and osteoarthritis (OA) in the European population. However, whether this relationship is observed in the Asian population is unclear. The correlation between the CSAs measured on anteroposterior radiographs and the presence or absence of rotator cuff tears or OA changes was assessed in 295 patients. Rotator cuff tears were diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasonography. OA findings were classified using the Samilson-Prieto classification. The CSAs among the patients with rotator cuff tears, OA changes, and those without pathologies were compared. Multivariable analyses were used to clarify the potential risks for these pathologies. The mean CSA with rotator cuff tear (33.9° ± 4.1°) was significantly greater than that without a rotator cuff tear (32.3° ± 4.5°; P = .002). Multivariable analysis also showed that a greater CSA had a significantly increased risk of rotator cuff tears, with the odds ratio of 1.08 per degree. OA findings showed no significant correlation to the CSAs. Our study demonstrates that the CSA is greater in those with a rotator cuff tear than in those without a tear or OA changes, which may be an independent risk factor for the incidence of rotator cuff tears in the Japanese population. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Computed tomography of sacro-iliac joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miquel, A.; Laredo, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Actual technologies to explore sacro-iliac joints are conventional radiography, computed tomography , scintigraphy and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Standards films are sufficient, except in beginning sacro-iliac septic inflammations where the computed tomography is superior. Two problems are generally posed for the radiologist, to differentiate a septic arthritis from a rheumatic pathology An other problem in diagnosis is to make the difference between a degenerative arthropathy (which does not need a further investigation) and an infectious rheumatic pathology where more exploration is necessary. 28 refs., 3 tabs., 13 figs

  12. International joint ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karsten Engsig

    2001-01-01

    The article analysis problems connected with corporate joint ventures. Among others the possible conflicts between the joint venture agreement and the statutes of the companies is examined, as well as certain problems connected to the fact that the joint venture partners have created commen control...... over their joint company....

  13. Coronarography in pathologic morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenberg, V.D.; Nepomnyashchikh, L.M.; Borodin, Yu.I.

    1987-01-01

    Of many years experience of the authors and data in world literature on post mortal coronarography during the most important general pathological processes in heart have been generalized in the monograph. Problems of radioanatomy of coronary artery were considered and data on use of postmortal coronarography in terms of correlation together with selective in-life coronarography are given. Much place takes the description of main coronarography semiotics of obstructive atherosclerosis injuries of the heart coronal system, compensation and decompensation processes of broken coronary circulation. Results of coronarography investigations in geronitogenesis as well as in sudden death are presented. Electrocardiographic-coronarographic and pathomorphologic parallels, clinical-anatomical diagnostical symptomocomplex - syndrom of menocoronary ''robbing'' are elucidated in detail. Technology of different techniques of postmortal coronarography in order to investigate macro-, microhemocirculation heart bed are described in detail as well as techniques of coronarogramm analysis which permits to use the monograph as a manual

  14. Pathological responses to terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehuda, Rachel; Bryant, Richard; Marmar, Charles; Zohar, Joseph

    2005-10-01

    Many important gains have been made in understanding PTSD and other responses to trauma as a result of neuroscience-based observations. Yet there are many gaps in our knowledge that currently impede our ability to predict those who will develop pathologic responses. Such knowledge is essential for developing appropriate strategies for mounting a mental health response in the aftermath of terrorism and for facilitating the recovery of individuals and society. This paper reviews clinical and biological studies that have led to an identification of pathologic responses following psychological trauma, including terrorism, and highlights areas of future-research. It is important to not only determine risk factors for the development of short- and long-term mental health responses to terrorism, but also apply these risk factors to the prediction of such responses on an individual level. It is also critical to consider the full spectrum of responses to terrorism, as well as the interplay between biological and psychological variables that contribute to these responses. Finally, it is essential to remove the barriers to collecting data in the aftermath of trauma by creating a culture of education in which the academic community can communicate to the public what is and is not known so that survivors of trauma and terrorism will understand the value of their participation in research to the generation of useful knowledge, and by maintaining the acquisition of knowledge as a priority for the government and those involved in the immediate delivery of services in the aftermath of large-scale disaster or trauma.

  15. The incidence of pathologic changes of the long head of the biceps tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthi, A M; Vosburgh, C L; Neviaser, T J

    2000-01-01

    The incidence of primary and secondary bicipital tendinitis remains unknown. In our prospective study, 200 consecutive shoulders underwent arthroscopic subacromial decompression for impingement syndrome. A biceps tenodesis was performed in 80 shoulders (40%) featuring macroscopic degeneration of the long head of the biceps; rotator cuff tears were apparent in 91% of these shoulders, the mean patient age being 55 years. In each of 120 shoulders (60%), an extraarticular tenosynovectomy was performed, and histopathologic studies revealed chronic inflammation in 63% and fibrotic degeneration in 13% of the specimens; rotator cuff tears were evident in 70% (23% full thickness) of these cases, the mean patient age being 47 years. In addition, when glenohumeral arthritis was present, it was uniformly associated with pathologic biceps tenosynovium. In summary, the high incidence of chronic inflammation of the long head of the biceps in shoulders with benign-appearing intraarticular portions viewed arthroscopically is significant, and long head of the biceps disease should also be considered in patients with painful rotator cuff disease and arthritic shoulder conditions.

  16. Biochemical and biomechanical characterisation of equine cervical facet joint cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, S A; White, J L; Hu, J C; Athanasiou, K A

    2018-04-15

    The equine cervical facet joint is a site of significant pathology. Located bilaterally on the dorsal spine, these diarthrodial joints work in conjunction with the intervertebral disc to facilitate appropriate spinal motion. Despite the high prevalence of pathology in this joint, the facet joint is understudied and thus lacking in viable treatment options. The goal of this study was to characterise equine facet joint cartilage and provide a comprehensive database describing the morphological, histological, biochemical and biomechanical properties of this tissue. Descriptive cadaver studies. A total of 132 facet joint surfaces were harvested from the cervical spines of six skeletally mature horses (11 surfaces per animal) for compiling biomechanical and biochemical properties of hyaline cartilage of the equine cervical facet joints. Gross morphometric measurements and histological staining were performed on facet joint cartilage. Creep indentation and uniaxial strain-to-failure testing were used to determine the biomechanical compressive and tensile properties. Biochemical assays included quantification of total collagen, sulfated glycosaminoglycan and DNA content. The facet joint surfaces were ovoid in shape with a flat articular surface. Histological analyses highlighted structures akin to articular cartilage of other synovial joints. In general, biomechanical and biochemical properties did not differ significantly between the inferior and superior joint surfaces as well as among spinal levels. Interestingly, compressive and tensile properties of cervical facet articular cartilage were lower than those of articular cartilage from other previously characterised equine joints. Removal of the superficial zone reduced the tissue's tensile strength, suggesting that this zone is important for the tensile integrity of the tissue. Facet surfaces were sampled at a single, central location and do not capture the potential topographic variation in cartilage properties. This

  17. Social cost of pathological gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladouceur, R; Boisvert, J M; Pépin, M; Loranger, M; Sylvain, C

    1994-12-01

    Pathological gambling creates enormous problems for the afflicted individuals, their families, employers, and society, and has numerous disastrous financial consequences. The present study evaluates the financial burdens of pathological gambling by questioning pathological gamblers in treatment in Gamblers Anonymous (n=60; 56 males, 4 females; mean age = 40 years old) about personal debts, loss of productivity at work, illegal activities, medical costs and the presence of other dependencies. Results show that important debts, loss of productivity at work and legal problems are associated with pathological gambling. Discussion is formulated in terms of the social cost of adopting a liberal attitude toward the legalization of various gambling activities.

  18. Establishment of the European College of Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ECVCP) and the current status of veterinary clinical pathology in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Brien, P.J.; Fournel-Fleury, C.; Bolliger, Adrian Marc

    2007-01-01

    congresses and a joint journal (with the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology) for communication of scientific research and information; the College also maintains a website, a joint listserv, and a newsletter; 6) collaboration in training and continuing education with relevant colleges......After 5 years of development, the European College of Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ECVCP)was formally recognized and approved on July 4, 2007 by the European Board of Veterinary Specialisation (EBVS), the European regulatory body that oversees specialization in veterinary medicine and which has......; currently there are 18 resident trainingprograms inEurope; 3) administration of 3 annual board-certifying examinations thus far,with an overall pass rate of 70%; 4) European consensus criteria for assessing the continuing education of specialists every 5 ears; 5) organization of 8 annual scientific...

  19. Identification of Foot Pathologies Based on Plantar Pressure Asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linah Wafai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Foot pathologies can negatively influence foot function, consequently impairing gait during daily activity, and severely impacting an individual’s quality of life. These pathologies are often painful and correspond with high or abnormal plantar pressure, which can result in asymmetry in the pressure distribution between the two feet. There is currently no general consensus on the presence of asymmetry in able-bodied gait, and plantar pressure analysis during gait is in dire need of a standardized method to quantify asymmetry. This paper investigates the use of plantar pressure asymmetry for pathological gait diagnosis. The results of this study involving plantar pressure analysis in fifty one participants (31 healthy and 20 with foot pathologies support the presence of plantar pressure asymmetry in normal gait. A higher level of asymmetry was detected at the majority of the regions in the feet of the pathological population, including statistically significant differences in the plantar pressure asymmetry in two regions of the foot, metatarsophalangeal joint 3 (MPJ3 and the lateral heel. Quantification of plantar pressure asymmetry may prove to be useful for the identification and diagnosis of various foot pathologies.

  20. Forest pathology in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    Native Hawaiian forests are characterised by a high degree of endemism, including pathogens as well as their hosts. With the exceptions of koa (Acacia koa Gray), possibly maile (Alyxia oliviformis Gaud.), and, in the past, sandalwood (Santalum spp.), forest species are of little commercial value. On the other hand, these forests are immensely important from a cultural, ecological, and evolutionary standpoint. Forest disease research was lacking during the mid-twentieth century, but increased markedly with the recognition of ohia (Metrosideros polymorpha Gaud.) decline in the 1970s. Because many pathogens are themselves endemic, or are assumed to be, having evolved with their hosts, research emphasis in natural areas is on understanding host-parasite interactions and evolutionary influences, rather than disease control. Aside from management of native forests, attempts at establishing a commercial forest industry have included importation of several species of pine, Araucaria, and Eucalyptus as timber crops, and of numerous ornamentals. Diseases of these species have been introduced with their hosts. The attacking of native species by introduced pathogens is problematic - for example, Armillaria mellea (Vahl ex Fr.) Que??l. on koa and mamane (Sophora chrysophylla (Salisb.) Seem.). Much work remains to be done in both native and commercial aspects of Hawaiian forest pathology.

  1. Rotator cuff pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigeau, I.; Doursounian, L.; Maigne, J.Y.; Guinet, C.; Meary, E.; Buy, J.N.; Touzard, R.C.; Vadrot, D.; Laval-Jeantet, M.

    1989-01-01

    Fifteen volunteers and 73 patients with suspected rotator cuff lesions were examined at 0.5 T with T2 * -weighted gradient-echo (GE) MR imaging (700/33/30 degrees) (oblique coronal and sagittal 3 mm thick, surface coil). Results were compared with those of arthrography (all cases), T1-weighted GE imaging (400/20/90 degrees) (35 cases), surgery (28 cases), and T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) images (2,000/60-120) (17 cases). GE images demonstrated all tears (complete, 32, partial, 12) and was superior to arthrography in determining site and size and in displaying muscles (critical point in surgical planning). In 20 cases without tears on arthrography, GE imaging demonstrated five cases of tendinitis, five cases of bursitis, and six probable intratendinous or superficial partial tears. T2 * -weighted GE imaging was superior to T2-weighted SE and T1-weighted GE imaging, with higher fluid contrast and a low fat signal. Therefore, it might replace arthrography in the diagnosis and surgical approach to this pathology

  2. MRI of the hip joint; MRT des Hueftgelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerny, C.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.M.; Imhof, H. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Medizinische Univ. Wien (Austria)

    2005-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed to diagnose many pathologic conditions affecting the hip joint. Either conventional MRI (without contrast enhancement of the joint cavity) or MR arthrography is used to detect and most accurately differentiate hip joint pathologies. Conventional MRI is performed in cases of bone marrow edema, necrosis, arthrosis and especially the so-called ''activated arthrosis'', as well as in inflammatory and tumorous entities. MR arthography, which has only recently become available for use, is excellently suited for diagnosing lesions of the acetabular labrum, cartilage lesions, and free articular bodies. This article provides an overview about MRI characteristics and their accuracy of hip joint diseases and the impact on the therapeutic procedure. (orig.)

  3. Anatomical basics, variations, and degenerative changes of the shoulder joint and shoulder girdle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescher, Andreas E-mail: dkeyserlingk@post.klinikum.rwth-aachen.de

    2000-08-01

    -lesions may occur and at the glenoid rim, where the labrum is often not fixed to the bony margin, avulsions of the labrum may occur. This well-established anatomical condition must not be mistaken for a manifest Bankart-lesion. The glenohumeral ligaments, which are located in the ventral articular capsule, have a stabilizing function for the ventral part of the glenoid labrum. The glenohumeral ligaments lift the articular lip where it crosses the glenoid notch. This 'labrum-lift effect' supports the stabilizing features of the articular lip and the glenohumeral ligaments. The rotator cuff is composed of the tendons of the teres minor, infraspinatus, supraspinatus, and subscapularis muscles. This cuff has a poorly vascularized area, due to mechanical conditions, about 1.5 cm from the major tubercle, which causes degenerative changes and eventually may lead to ruptures. Results of the impingement-syndrome and the osteoarthrotic changes of the shoulder and acromioclavicular joint are also presented and discussed. Finally, the coracoclavicular joint, which probably represents no congenital entity but appears due to a changed, lowered position of the shoulder girdle, is discussed. The paper also presents instructive figures of anatomical preparations that can be used to make more precise radiological and differential diagnoses. All preparations were done by the author and are part of a series of more than 300 preparations of the shoulder joint and girdle.

  4. Joint hypermobility leading to osteoarthrosis and chondrocalcinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, H A; Tribe, C R; Bacon, P A

    1978-06-01

    We have reviewed 21 adults referred to rheumatology clinic and considered to have generalised joint hypermobility by the criteria of Carter and Wilkinson (1964), modified by Beighton et al. (1973). They fell into two categories. 5 patients had a raised plasma viscosity (PV) and in each case a definite pathology was found to account for this, superimposed on hypermobile joints. The remaining 16 had a normal PV and this group was thought to represent the late natural history of hypermobility. 5 of these (aged 32 to 54 years) had no evidence of osteoarthrosis but the remaining 11 (aged 34 to 80 years) had widespread radiological osteoarthrosis. Synovial histology was obtained at arthroscopy in 6 of these patients and 4 (aged 60 to 75) had chondrocalcinosis. This previously undescribed finding may be the end result of hypermobile joints. Hypermobile patients with joint deformity (lax connective tissue), widespread synovial thickening (traumatic), and hot joint effusions (chondrocalcinosis) may mimic rheumatoid arthritis. They must be distinguished from patients who develop rheumatoid arthritis in hypermobile joints.

  5. Joint Replacement (Finger and Wrist Joints)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Joint Replacement Email to a friend * required fields ...

  6. FROM PHYSIOLOGICAL TO PATHOLOGICAL METEOSENSITIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Yabluchanskiy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dedicated to the problem of physiological and pathological meteosensitivity (meteodependency or meteopathy.We introduce and discuss the definition for individual meteodependency, define factors, mechanisms, clinical signs, diagnosis, and approaches to prophylaxy and treatment of individual pathological meteosensitivity.

  7. NMR imaging of osteoarticular pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frocrain, L.; Duvauferrier, R.; Gagey, N.

    1987-01-01

    NMR imaging is assuming an increasingly important role in the diagnosis of osteo-articular disorders. Semiological descriptions of the mean pathological disorders of the locomotor system are presented. Some investigation strategies are proposed to compare NMR imaging with other imaging techniques in various pathological states [fr

  8. Podocyte Pathology and Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra eMerscher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are components of the lipid rafts in plasma membranes, which are important for proper function of podocytes, a key element of the glomerular filtration barrier. Research revealed an essential role of sphingolipids and sphingolipid metabolites in glomerular disorders of genetic and non-genetic origin. The discovery that glucocerebrosides accumulate in Gaucher disease in glomerular cells and are associated with clinical proteinuria initiated intensive research into the function of other sphingolipids in glomerular disorders. The accumulation of sphingolipids in other genetic diseases including Tay-Sachs, Sandhoff, Fabry, hereditary inclusion body myopathy 2, Niemann-Pick and nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type and its implications with respect to glomerular pathology will be discussed. Similarily, sphingolipid accumulation occurs in glomerular diseases of non-genetic origin including diabetic kidney disease (DKD, HIV-associated nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS and lupus nephritis. Sphingomyelin metabolites, such as ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate have also gained tremendous interest. We recently described that sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase acid-like 3b (SMPDL3b is expressed in podocytes where it modulates acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase activity and acts as a master modulator of danger signaling. Decreased SMPDL3b expression in post-reperfusion kidney biopsies from transplant recipients with idiopathic FSGS correlates with the recurrence of proteinuria in patients and in experimental models of xenotransplantation. Increased SMPDL3b expression is associated with DKD. The consequences of differential SMPDL3b expression in podocytes in these diseases with respect to their pathogenesis will be discussed. Finally, the role of sphingolipids in the formation of lipid rafts in podocytes and their contribution to the maintenance of a functional slit diaphragm in the glomerulus will be discussed.

  9. Imaging of the temporomandibular joint: An update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asim; K; Bag; Santhosh; Gaddikeri; Aparna; Singhal; Simms; Hardin; Benson; D; Tran; Josue; A; Medina; Joel; K; Curé

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the temporomandibular joint(TMJ) is continuously evolving with advancement of imaging technologies. Many different imaging modalities are currently used to evaluate the TMJ. Magnetic resonance imaging is commonly used for evaluation of the TMJ due to its superior contrast resolution and its ability to acquire dynamic imaging for demonstration of the functionality of the joint. Computed tomography and ultrasound imaging have specific indication in imaging of the TMJ. This article focuses on state of the art imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Relevant normal anatomy and biomechanics of movement of the TMJ are discussed for better understanding of many TMJ pathologies. Imaging of internal derangements is discussed in detail. Different arthropathies and commontumors are also discussed in this article.

  10. MR tomography of the elbow joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwaan, M.; Rinast, E.; Weiss, H.D.; Pressler, M.; Vogel, H.

    1989-03-01

    MR examinations of the elbow joint of three healthy subjects and a comparison with corresponding sections of anatomical preparations show that MR tomography enables not only an excellent differentiation of muscles, tendons and of the articular capsule, but will also visualise vessels and nerve tracts. MR tomography proved superior to the conventional methods in demonstration of separate fragments and inflammatory changes in the bone on examining 11 pathological elbow joints: congenital malformation, osteochondritis dissecans, ostitis, ulnar and radial nerve lesions, completely healed radius fracture and epicondylitis of the radial and ulnar humerus. Epicondylitis could not be demonstrated by MR. Magnetic resonance tomography seems to be the only method that enables direct visualisation of the nerve paths at the elbow joint.

  11. Sonography of pathological changes in the hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dębek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Everyday medical practice shows that most common problems within the hand result from overload, injuries and degeneration. Dorsal side pathologies such as de Quervain’s and Wartenberg’s disease, intersection syndrome or degenerative lesions of carpometacarpal joint of the thumb discussed in the paper can be accurately diagnosed and differentiated by means of ultrasound examination. Ultrasound is similarly powerful in detection and grading of traumatic lesions involving extensor tendons and their sagittal bands or the flexor tendons and their pulleys. In the case of carpal tunnel syndrome one can not only visualize the median nerve but also other structures of the tunnel that may cause compression. Similarly ulnar nerve compression within the Guyon’s canal can be well evaluated. In cases of nerve trauma one can precisely define the level, and in cases of nerve discontinuity, the distance between stumps can be measured which is important in surgery planning. Often nerve trauma is a sequelae of tendon reconstruction. In such cases scars and nerve entrapment can be depicted. Tumors within a hand are usually benign, of which the most common are ganglia. On ultrasound examination a connection between a ganglion and its source (usually a joint or sheath can frequently be defined. The relationship of tumors to nerves, tendon sheaths or vessels may suggest their nature. Ultrasound with dynamic tissue assessment is a very valuable adjunct to clinical examination.

  12. Applications and limitations of quantitative sacroiliac joint scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, R.P.; Genant, H.K.; Shimshak, R.; Shames, D.

    1978-01-01

    Evaluation of sacroiliac joint pathology by quantitative analysis of radionuclide bone scanning has been advocated as a useful technique. We have examined this technique in 61 patients and controls. The procedure was useful in detecting early sacroilitis but was of limited value in patients with advanced sacroiliac joint findings radiographically. False positive values were found in patients with metabolic bone disease or structural abnormalities in the low back. Normative data must be determined for each laboratory

  13. Atypical stress-avulsion fracture of the Lisfranc joint complex.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Barry J

    2014-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic erythematosus have been associated with metatarsal stress fractures. Stress fractures of the Lisfranc joint complex are uncommon injuries but have been reported to occur most frequently in ballet dancers. We present a case of an avulsion fracture of the Lisfranc joint complex that occurred spontaneously. We have reviewed the association between systemic conditions and metatarsal fractures and proposed a series of hypothetical pathological events that may have contributed to this unusual injury.

  14. Hip joint injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicine into the joint. The provider uses a real-time x-ray (fluoroscopy) to see where to place ... Wakefield RJ. Arthrocentesis and injection of joints and soft tissue. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Gabriel SE, ...

  15. Sacroiliac joint pain - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000610.htm Sacroiliac joint pain - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a term used to describe ...

  16. Reliability of Tubular Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper the preliminary results obtained by tests on tubular joints are presented. The joints are T-joints and the loading is static. It is the intention in continuation of these tests to perform tests on other types of joints (e.g. Y-joints) and also with dynamic loading. The purpose...... of the test is partly to obtain empirical data for the ultimate load-carrying capacity of tubular T-joints and partly to obtain some experience in performing tests with tubular joints. It is well known that tubular joints are usually designed in offshore engineering on the basis of empirical formulas obtained...... by experimental test results. Therefore, there is a need for performing experimental tests in this area....

  17. Hip joint replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100006.htm Hip joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The hip joint is made up of two major parts: ...

  18. The Behavioral Economics of Substance Use Disorders: reinforcement pathologies and their repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Warren K.; Johnson, Matthew W.; Koffarnus, Mikhail N.; MacKillop, James; Murphy, James G.

    2015-01-01

    The field of behavioral economics has made important inroads into the understanding of substance use disorders through the concept of reinforcer pathology. Reinforcer pathology refers to the joint effects of (a) the persistently high valuation of a reinforcer, broadly defined to include tangible commodities and experiences, and/or (b) the excessive preference for the immediate acquisition or consumption of a commodity despite long-term negative outcomes. From this perspective, reinforcer pathology results from the recursive interactions of endogenous person-level variables and exogenous environment-level factors. The current review describes the basic principles of behavioral economics that are central to reinforcer pathology, the processes that engender reinforcer pathology, and the approaches and procedures that can repair reinforcement pathologies. The overall goal of this review is to present a new understanding of substance use disorders as viewed by recent advances in behavioral economics. PMID:24679180

  19. The behavioral economics of substance use disorders: reinforcement pathologies and their repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Warren K; Johnson, Matthew W; Koffarnus, Mikhail N; MacKillop, James; Murphy, James G

    2014-01-01

    The field of behavioral economics has made important inroads into the understanding of substance use disorders through the concept of reinforcer pathology. Reinforcer pathology refers to the joint effects of (a) the persistently high valuation of a reinforcer, broadly defined to include tangible commodities and experiences, and/or (b) the excessive preference for the immediate acquisition or consumption of a commodity despite long-term negative outcomes. From this perspective, reinforcer pathology results from the recursive interactions of endogenous person-level variables and exogenous environment-level factors. The current review describes the basic principles of behavioral economics that are central to reinforcer pathology, the processes that engender reinforcer pathology, and the approaches and procedures that can repair reinforcement pathologies. The overall goal of this review is to present a new understanding of substance use disorders as viewed by recent advances in behavioral economics.

  20. Design of mechanical joints

    CERN Document Server

    Blake, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    A cornerstone publication that covers the basic principles and practical considerations of design methodology for joints held by rivets, bolts, weld seams, and adhesive materials, Design of Mechanical Joints gives engineers the practical results and formulas they need for the preliminary design of mechanical joints, combining the essential topics of joint mechanics...strength of materials...and fracture control to provide a complete treatment of problems pertinent to the field of mechanical connections.

  1. Managing Joint Production Motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindenberg, Siegwart; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2011-01-01

    We contribute to the microfoundations of organizational performance by proffering the construct of joint production motivation. Under such motivational conditions individuals see themselves as part of a joint endeavor, each with his or her own roles and responsibilities; generate shared...... representations of actions and tasks; cognitively coordinate cooperation; and choose their own behaviors in terms of joint goals. Using goal-framing theory, we explain how motivation for joint production can be managed by cognitive/symbolic management and organizational design....

  2. Pain in the hip joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Aleksandrovich Olyunin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathological changes that develop in the hip joints (HJ have different origins and mechanisms of development, but their main manifestation is pain. The nature of this pain cannot be well established on frequent occasions. The English-language medical literature currently classifies such disorders as greater trochanter pain syndrome (GTPS. Its major signs are chronic pain and local palpatory tenderness in the outer part of HJ. The development of GTPS may be associated with inflammation of the synovial bursae situated in the greater tronchanter, as well as with tendinitis, myorrhexis, iliotibial band syndrome, and other local changes in the adjacent tissues or with systemic diseases. So GTPS may be characterized as regional pain syndrome that frequently mimics pain induced by different diseases, including myofascial pain syndrome, osteoarthrosis, spinal diseases, etc.

  3. Experimental knee joint pain during strength training and muscle strength gain in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, T J; Langberg, Henning; Hodges, P W

    2012-01-01

    Knee joint pain and reduced quadriceps strength are cardinal symptoms in many knee pathologies. In people with painful knee pathologies, quadriceps exercise reduces pain, improves physical function, and increases muscle strength. A general assumption is that pain compromises muscle function...... and thus may prevent effective rehabilitation. This study evaluated the effects of experimental knee joint pain during quadriceps strength training on muscle strength gain in healthy individuals....

  4. Is early osteoarthritis associated with differences in joint congruence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conconi, Michele; Halilaj, Eni; Parenti Castelli, Vincenzo; Crisco, Joseph J

    2014-12-18

    Previous studies suggest that osteoarthritis (OA) is related to abnormal or excessive articular contact stress. The peak pressure resulting from an applied load is determined by many factors, among which is shape and relative position and orientation of the articulating surfaces or, referring to a more common nomenclature, joint congruence. It has been hypothesized that anatomical differences may be among the causes of OA. Individuals with less congruent joints would likely develop higher peak pressure and thus would be more exposed to the risk of OA onset. The aim of this work was to determine if the congruence of the first carpometacarpal (CMC) joint differs with the early onset of OA or with sex, as the female population has a higher incidence of OA. 59 without and 38 with early OA were CT-scanned with their dominant or arthritic hand in a neutral configuration. The proposed measure of joint congruence is both shape and size dependent. The correlation of joint congruence with pathology and sex was analyzed both before and after normalization for joint size. We found a significant correlation between joint congruence and sex due to the sex-related differences in size. The observed correlation disappeared after normalization. Although joint congruence increased with size, it did not correlate significantly with the onset of early OA. Differences in joint congruence in this population may not be a primary cause of OA onset or predisposition, at least for the CMC joint. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Imaging of degenerative and posttraumatic disease in the shoulder joint with ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanetti, Marco; Hodler, Juerg

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews the examination technique of shoulder ultrasound, normal and abnormal ultrasound findings in acute (posttraumatic) and chronic (degenerative) lesions. Moreover, it reviews the effectiveness of ultrasound in relation to magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Most authors report that full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus can reliably be diagnosed by ultrasound. However, the simple diagnosis of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear is no longer sufficient for surgical management. The precise localization and size of rotator cuff tears as well as the extent of muscle degeneration is important for surgical planning. For this aspect and for partial-thickness tears of the supraspinatus, for subscapularis lesions as well as for lesions of the long biceps tendons there is no consensus regarding the diagnostic value of ultrasound. To the present, ultrasound (contrary to MR imaging) has failed to demonstrate that it consistently influences the clinician's degree of confidence in the clinical diagnosis or the treatment plan. Therefore, some orthopedic surgeons prefer MR imaging to ultrasound in the evaluation of rotator cuff tears and other abnormalities of the glenohumeral joint. Moreover, MR imaging, especially when combined with arthrography, represents a one-step investigation, which not only allows for assessment of rotator cuff lesion but also of lesions of the labrum (Bankart lesions, SLAP lesions), the joint capsule and the biceps tendon. It also demonstrates muscle atrophy, which represents an important predictor of surgical outcome in rotator cuff repair

  6. Imaging of degenerative and posttraumatic disease in the shoulder joint with ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanetti, Marco E-mail: mzanetti@balgrist.unizh.ch; Hodler, Juerg

    2000-08-01

    This article reviews the examination technique of shoulder ultrasound, normal and abnormal ultrasound findings in acute (posttraumatic) and chronic (degenerative) lesions. Moreover, it reviews the effectiveness of ultrasound in relation to magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Most authors report that full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus can reliably be diagnosed by ultrasound. However, the simple diagnosis of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear is no longer sufficient for surgical management. The precise localization and size of rotator cuff tears as well as the extent of muscle degeneration is important for surgical planning. For this aspect and for partial-thickness tears of the supraspinatus, for subscapularis lesions as well as for lesions of the long biceps tendons there is no consensus regarding the diagnostic value of ultrasound. To the present, ultrasound (contrary to MR imaging) has failed to demonstrate that it consistently influences the clinician's degree of confidence in the clinical diagnosis or the treatment plan. Therefore, some orthopedic surgeons prefer MR imaging to ultrasound in the evaluation of rotator cuff tears and other abnormalities of the glenohumeral joint. Moreover, MR imaging, especially when combined with arthrography, represents a one-step investigation, which not only allows for assessment of rotator cuff lesion but also of lesions of the labrum (Bankart lesions, SLAP lesions), the joint capsule and the biceps tendon. It also demonstrates muscle atrophy, which represents an important predictor of surgical outcome in rotator cuff repair.

  7. Utilization management in anatomic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandrowski, Kent; Black-Schaffer, Steven

    2014-01-01

    There is relatively little published literature concerning utilization management in anatomic pathology. Nonetheless there are many utilization management opportunities that currently exist and are well recognized. Some of these impact only the cost structure within the pathology department itself whereas others reduce charges for third party payers. Utilization management may result in medical legal liabilities for breaching the standard of care. For this reason it will be important for pathology professional societies to develop national utilization guidelines to assist individual practices in implementing a medically sound approach to utilization management. © 2013.

  8. Brain venous pathologies: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatico, Rosana; Gonzalez, Alejandro; Yanez, Paulina; Romero, Carlos; Trejo, Mariano; Lambre, Hector

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To describe MRI findings of the different brain venous pathologies. Material and Methods: Between January 2002 and March 2004, 18 patients were studied 10 males and 8 females between 6 and 63 years old; with different brain venous pathologies. In all cases brain MRI were performed including morphological sequences with and without gadolinium injection and angiographic venous sequences. Results: 10 venous occlusions were found, 6 venous angiomas, and 2 presented varices secondary to arteriovenous dural fistula. Conclusion: Brain venous pathologies can appear in many different clinical contexts, with different prognosis and treatment. In all the cases brain MRI was the best imaging study to disclose typical morphologic abnormalities. (author) [es

  9. ADVANCES AND CHALLENGES IN SUGARCANE BIOTECHNOLOY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY: A REVIEW OF THE IX PLANT PATHOLOGY WORKSHOP AND VI MOLECULAR BIOLOGY WORKSHOP

    Science.gov (United States)

    The IX Pathology Workshop and VI Molecular Biology Workshop of the International Society of Sugar Cane Technologists (ISSCT) were organised jointly and hosted by the Colombian Sugarcane Research Centre (CENICAÑA) from 23-27 June 2008 at the Radisson Royal Hotel in Cali, Colombia. The Workshop was we...

  10. Finding the unexpected: pathological examination of surgically resected femoral heads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornasier, V.L.; Battaglia, D.M.

    2005-01-01

    To study the clinically diagnosed disease process but also identify additional, clinically undetected pathologies in femoral heads resected for replacement arthroplasty. A retrospective review was carried out of the pathological findings in 460 surgically resected femoral heads. Serial sections were submitted to low-energy fine-detail radiography, then decalcified sections stained by the WHO method were examined. The preoperative clinical and imaging diagnoses were compared with the pathological findings and special interest was placed on assessing the clinical significance of any unexpected, clinically undetected findings. The most common findings included the presence of bone islands (solitary osteomas) and areas of avascular necrosis in addition to the primary joint disease for which the patient underwent surgery. The preoperative symptomatology did not distinguish between the known primary disease and the additional pathological findings. Some of the clinically unidentified lesions were of a size that fell below the ability of current clinical investigations to detect. However, the finding of lesions by tissue fine-detail radiography indicates that current, more sensitive clinical imaging techniques may identify them. Careful examination of surgically resected femoral heads is important to ensure that all pathologies are identified and assessed for clinical relevance. (orig.)

  11. Finding the unexpected: pathological examination of surgically resected femoral heads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornasier, V.L. [St. Michael' s Hospital, University of Toronto, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Battaglia, D.M. [St. Michael' s Hospital, University of Toronto, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); St. Michael' s Hospital, University of Toronto, Division of Pathology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2005-06-01

    To study the clinically diagnosed disease process but also identify additional, clinically undetected pathologies in femoral heads resected for replacement arthroplasty. A retrospective review was carried out of the pathological findings in 460 surgically resected femoral heads. Serial sections were submitted to low-energy fine-detail radiography, then decalcified sections stained by the WHO method were examined. The preoperative clinical and imaging diagnoses were compared with the pathological findings and special interest was placed on assessing the clinical significance of any unexpected, clinically undetected findings. The most common findings included the presence of bone islands (solitary osteomas) and areas of avascular necrosis in addition to the primary joint disease for which the patient underwent surgery. The preoperative symptomatology did not distinguish between the known primary disease and the additional pathological findings. Some of the clinically unidentified lesions were of a size that fell below the ability of current clinical investigations to detect. However, the finding of lesions by tissue fine-detail radiography indicates that current, more sensitive clinical imaging techniques may identify them. Careful examination of surgically resected femoral heads is important to ensure that all pathologies are identified and assessed for clinical relevance. (orig.)

  12. Slot Machine Response Frequency Predicts Pathological Gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob; Rømer Thomsen, Kristine; Møller, Arne

    2013-01-01

    . This study tested the hypothesis that response frequency is associated with symptom severity in pathological gambling. We tested response frequency among twenty-two pathological gambling sufferers and twenty-one non-problem gamblers on a commercially available slot machine, and screened for pathological...... in individuals with exacerbated pathological gambling symptoms. These findings may have important implications for detecting behaviors underlying pathological gambling....

  13. Systems pathology: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Jose

    2012-02-01

    The technological advances of the last twenty years together with the dramatic increase in computational power have injected new life into systems-level thinking in Medicine. This review emphasizes the close relationship of Systems Pathology to Systems Biology and delineates the differences between Systems Pathology and Clinical Systems Pathology. It also suggests an algorithm to support the application of systems-level thinking to clinical research, proposes applying systems-level thinking to the health care systems and forecasts an acceleration of preventive medicine as a result of the coupling of personal genomics with systems pathology. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Oral Pathology in Forensic Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2018-01-01

    Forensic odontology is the subdiscipline of dentistry which analyses dental evidence in the interest of justice. Oral pathology is the subdiscipline of dentistry that deals with the pathology affecting the oral and maxillofacial regions. This subdiscipline is utilized for identification through oral and maxillofacial pathologies with associated syndromes, enamel rod patterns, sex determination using exfoliative cytology, identification from occlusal morphology of teeth, and deoxyribonucleic acid profiling from teeth. This subdiscipline is also utilized for age estimation studies which include Gustafson's method, incremental lines of Retzius, perikymata, natal line formation in teeth, neonatal line, racemization of collagen in dentin, cemental incremental lines, thickness of the cementum, and translucency of dentin. Even though the expertise of an oral pathologist is not taken in forensic investigations, this paper aims to discuss the role of oral pathology in forensic investigation.

  15. Stroop performance in pathological gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertzman, Semion; Lowengrub, Katherine; Aizer, Anat; Nahum, Zeev Ben; Kotler, Moshe; Dannon, Pinhas N

    2006-05-30

    Pathological gambling is a relatively prevalent psychiatric disorder that typically leads to severe family, social, legal, and occupational problems and is associated with a high rate of suicide attempts. Understanding the neurobiological basis of pathological gambling is a current focus of research, and emerging data have demonstrated that pathological gamblers may have impaired decision-making because of an inability to inhibit irrelevant information. In this study, we examined pathological gamblers by using the Stroop Color-Word Test, a neurocognitive task used to assess interference control. The "reverse" variant of the Stroop Color-Word Test was administered to a cohort of medication-free pathological gamblers (n=62) and a cohort of age-matched controls (n=83). In the reverse variant of the Stroop task, subjects are asked to read the meaning of the word rather than name the ink color. The reverse Stroop task was chosen because it highly discriminates ability to inhibit interference in a population of psychiatric patients. In our study, performance on the reverse Stroop task in the pathological gamblers was significantly slower and less accurate than in the healthy subjects. A new finding in our study was that for pathological gamblers, the average reaction time in the neutral condition (where the color names are displayed in black letters) was slower than the average reaction time in the incongruent condition (where the meaning of the color name and the color of the printed letters are different). This controlled study extends previous findings by showing that performance on the Stroop task is impaired in a sample of medication-free pathological gamblers.

  16. Profile of the pathological gambler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, R L

    1984-12-01

    Pathological (compulsive) gambling is a serious emotional and social problem that has existed for centuries but has only recently been recognized as a distinct diagnostic entity that can be effectively treated. The development and progression of pathological gambling are outlined. The progression of the disorder through three identifiable phases leads to predictable complications. The treatment of the gambler within the framework of Gamblers Anonymous and/or by mental health professionals is described.

  17. Late radiation pathology of mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrov, S N

    1982-01-01

    The comprehensive monograph on delayed radiation effects in mammals including man comprises 3 main chapters dealing with non-neoplastic as well as neoplastic manifestations of late radiation pathology, with the prophylaxis of delayed radiation effects, and with the therapy of radiation injuries. Alterations induced by whole-body irradiation and delayed radiation effects caused by partial body irradiation are described in detail. The developmental mechanisms and pathogenesis of non-neoplastic pathological changes and of radiation-induced neoplasms are elaborated.

  18. Peripheral Nerve Fibers and Their Neurotransmitters in Osteoarthritis Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grässel, Susanne; Muschter, Dominique

    2017-04-28

    The importance of the nociceptive nervous system for maintaining tissue homeostasis has been known for some time, and it has also been suggested that organogenesis and tissue repair are under neuronal control. Changes in peripheral joint innervation are supposed to be partly responsible for degenerative alterations in joint tissues which contribute to development of osteoarthritis. Various resident cell types of the musculoskeletal system express receptors for sensory and sympathetic neurotransmitters, allowing response to peripheral neuronal stimuli. Among them are mesenchymal stem cells, synovial fibroblasts, bone cells and chondrocytes of different origin, which express distinct subtypes of adrenoceptors (AR), receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Some of these cell types synthesize and secrete neuropeptides such as SP, and they are positive for tyrosine-hydroxylase (TH), the rate limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of catecholamines. Sensory and sympathetic neurotransmitters are involved in the pathology of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) which manifests mainly in the joints. In addition, they seem to play a role in pathogenesis of priori degenerative joint disorders such as osteoarthritis (OA). Altogether it is evident that sensory and sympathetic neurotransmitters have crucial trophic effects which are critical for joint tissue and bone homeostasis. They modulate articular cartilage, subchondral bone and synovial tissue properties in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, in addition to their classical neurological features.

  19. Anatomy and Biomechanics of the Finger Proximal Interphalangeal Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Eric Quan; Yao, Jeffrey

    2018-05-01

    A complete understanding of the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the proximal interphalangeal joint is critical when treating pathology of the joint as well as in the design of new reconstructive treatments. The osseous anatomy dictates the principles of motion at the proximal interphalangeal joint. Subsequently, the joint is stabilized throughout its motion by the surrounding proximal collateral ligament, accessory collateral ligament, and volar plate. The goal of this article is to review the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the proximal interphalangeal joint and its associated structures, most importantly the proper collateral ligament, accessory collateral ligament, and volar plate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Delaying Shoulder Motion and Strengthening and Increasing Achilles Allograft Thickness for Glenoid Resurfacing Did Not Improve the Outcome for a 30-Year-Old Patient with Postarthroscopic Glenohumeral Chondrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Skedros

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although interposition soft-tissue (biologic resurfacing of the glenoid with humeral hemiarthroplasty has been considered an option for end-stage glenohumeral arthritis, the results of this procedure are highly unsatisfactory in patients less than 40 years old. Achilles tendon allograft is popular for glenoid resurfacing because it can be made robust by folding it. But one reason that the procedure might fail in younger patients is that the graft is not initially thick enough for the young active patient. Most authors report folding the graft only once to achieve two-layer thickness. We report the case of a 30-year-old male who had postarthroscopic glenohumeral chondrolysis that was treated with Achilles tendon allograft resurfacing of the glenoid and humeral hemiarthroplasty. An important aspect of our case is that the tendon was folded so that it was 50–100% thicker than most allograft constructs reported previously. We also used additional measures to enhance allograft resiliency and bone incorporation: (1 multiple nonresorbable sutures to attach the adjacent graft layers, (2 additional resorbable suture anchors and nonresorbable sutures in order to more robustly secure the graft to the glenoid, and (3 delaying postoperative motion and strengthening. However, despite these additional measures, our patient did not have an improved outcome.

  1. Patient and implant survival following joint replacement because of metastatic bone disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michala S; Gregersen, Kristine G; Grum-Schwensen, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Patients suffering from a pathological fracture or painful bony lesion because of metastatic bone disease often benefit from a total joint replacement. However, these are large operations in patients who are often weak. We examined the patient survival and complication rates after total joint...... replacement as the treatment for bone metastasis or hematological diseases of the extremities....

  2. Does Reducing the Concentration of Bupivacaine When Performing Therapeutic Shoulder Joint Injections Impact the Clinical Outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Michael G; Patrie, James T

    2016-04-01

    Mixtures of local anesthetics and steroids are routinely injected intraarticularly to temporarily relieve joint pain, even though local anesthetics have been reported to cause chondrocyte death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This study aimed to determine if intraarticular injections of bupivacaine 0.5% and bupivacaine 0.25% would provide similar pain relief. All fluoroscopically guided glenohumeral joint injections performed using 2.5 mL of bupivacaine and 0.5 mL (20 mg) of triamcinolone acetonide over a 42-month period were included if a pain score was recorded before, 5-10 minutes after, and 1 week after injection. Pain reduction of more than 2 points was considered much improved clinically with pain reduction of more than 1 point considered the minimum clinically important difference (MCID) threshold. Statistically significant and much improved pain reduction was achieved using both bupivacaine 0.5% and 0.25% 5-10 minutes (-3.7 points; 95% CI, -3.4 to -4.0 points; p ≤ 0.001; and -3.3 points; 95% CI, -3.0 to -3.5 points; p ≤ 0.001) and 1 week (-2.5 points; 95% CI, -2.2 to -2.9 points; p ≤ 0.001; and -2.1 points; 95% CI, -1.8 to -2.3 points; p ≤ 0.001) after injection, respectively. Adjusting for age, sex, pain score before injection, and indication, the mean decrease in pain was greater in the bupivacaine 0.5% group by 0.30 points 5-10 minutes after injection (95% CI, -0.03 to 0.63 points; p = 0.08) and 0.46 points 1 week after injection (95% CI, 0.13-0.77 points; p = 0.01). Both bupivacaine 0.5% and bupivacaine 0.25% provide statistically significant and much improved pain relief 5-10 minutes and 1 week after intraarticular glenohumeral injections. Bupivacaine 0.5% provided greater pain relief than bupivacaine 0.25%, but the difference was less than 0.5 points and therefore did not meet the MCID threshold.

  3. The effect of glenosphere diameter in reverse shoulder arthroplasty on muscle force, joint load, and range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langohr, G Daniel G; Giles, Joshua W; Athwal, George S; Johnson, James A

    2015-06-01

    Little is known about the effects of glenosphere diameter on shoulder joint loads. The purpose of this biomechanical study was to investigate the effects of glenosphere diameter on joint load, load angle, and total deltoid force required for active abduction and range of motion in internal/external rotation and abduction. A custom, instrumented reverse shoulder arthroplasty implant system capable of measuring joint load and varying glenosphere diameter (38 and 42 mm) and glenoid offset (neutral and lateral) was implanted in 6 cadaveric shoulders to provide at least 80% power for all variables. A shoulder motion simulator was used to produce active glenohumeral and scapulothoracic motion. All implant configurations were tested with active and passive motion with joint kinematics, loads, and moments recorded. At neutral and lateralized glenosphere positions, increasing diameter significantly increased joint load (+12 ± 21 N and +6 ± 9 N; P  .8). Passive internal rotation was reduced with increased diameter at both neutral and lateralized glenosphere positions (-6° ± 6° and -12° ± 6°; P  .05). At neutral glenosphere position, increasing diameter increased the maximum angles of both adduction (+1° ± 1°; P = .03) and abduction (+8° ± 9°; P < .05). Lateralization also increased abduction range of motion compared with neutral (P < .01). Although increasing glenosphere diameter significantly increased joint load and deltoid force, the clinical impact of these changes is presently unclear. Internal rotation, however, was reduced, which contradicts previous bone modeling studies, which we postulate is due to increased posterior capsular tension as it is forced to wrap around a larger 42 mm implant assembly. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Multibody Kinematics Optimization for the Estimation of Upper and Lower Limb Human Joint Kinematics: A Systematized Methodological Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begon, Mickaël; Andersen, Michael Skipper; Dumas, Raphaël

    2018-03-01

    Multibody kinematics optimization (MKO) aims to reduce soft tissue artefact (STA) and is a key step in musculoskeletal modeling. The objective of this review was to identify the numerical methods, their validation and performance for the estimation of the human joint kinematics using MKO. Seventy-four papers were extracted from a systematized search in five databases and cross-referencing. Model-derived kinematics were obtained using either constrained optimization or Kalman filtering to minimize the difference between measured (i.e., by skin markers, electromagnetic or inertial sensors) and model-derived positions and/or orientations. While hinge, universal, and spherical joints prevail, advanced models (e.g., parallel and four-bar mechanisms, elastic joint) have been introduced, mainly for the knee and shoulder joints. Models and methods were evaluated using: (i) simulated data based, however, on oversimplified STA and joint models; (ii) reconstruction residual errors, ranging from 4 mm to 40 mm; (iii) sensitivity analyses which highlighted the effect (up to 36 deg and 12 mm) of model geometrical parameters, joint models, and computational methods; (iv) comparison with other approaches (i.e., single body kinematics optimization and nonoptimized kinematics); (v) repeatability studies that showed low intra- and inter-observer variability; and (vi) validation against ground-truth bone kinematics (with errors between 1 deg and 22 deg for tibiofemoral rotations and between 3 deg and 10 deg for glenohumeral rotations). Moreover, MKO was applied to various movements (e.g., walking, running, arm elevation). Additional validations, especially for the upper limb, should be undertaken and we recommend a more systematic approach for the evaluation of MKO. In addition, further model development, scaling, and personalization methods are required to better estimate the secondary degrees-of-freedom (DoF).

  5. Stabilization of the sacroiliac joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffrey, Christopher I; Smith, Justin S

    2013-07-01

    Lower back pain and pain involving the area of the posterior iliac spine are extremely common. Degeneration of the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is one potential cause for lower back pain and pain radiating into the groin or buttocks. Degenerative changes to the lumbar spine and sacroiliac joints are common. A recent study evaluating SIJ abnormalities in a primary low back pain population demonstrated 31.7% of patients demonstrated SI joint abnormalities. (4) As is the case for the evaluation and management of isolated lower back pain, the evaluation, management, and role for surgical intervention in SIJ pain is very controversial. Many patients have degenerative changes of the disc, facet joints, and SIJs. A recent systematic review performed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of tests available to clinicians to identify the disc, facet joint, or SIJ as the source of low back pain concluded that tests do exist that change the probability of the disc or SIJ (but not the facet joint) as the source of low back pain. (3) It was also concluded that the usefulness of these tests in clinical practice, particularly for guiding treatment selection, remains unclear. (3) Although there is general agreement that SIJ pathological changes are a potential cause of pain, there is far less agreement about the optimal management of these conditions. A variety of conditions can cause SIJ dysfunction including degenerative and inflammatory arthritis, trauma, prior lumbosacral fusion, hip arthritis, limb length inequality, infections, and neoplasia. (8) There is increasing evidence that image intensifier-guided single periarticular injection can correctly localize pain to the SIJ but the optimal management strategy remains controversial. Recent publications have compared surgical versus injection treatments and fusion versus denervation procedures. (1 , 8) A systematic review found improvement regardless of the treatment, with most studies reporting over 40% improvement in pain as measured

  6. Mechanics of Suture Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaning; Song, Juha; Ortiz, Christine; Boyce, Mary; Ortiz Group/DMSE/MIT Team; Boyce Group/ME/MIT Team

    2011-03-01

    Biological sutures are joints which connect two stiff skeletal or skeletal-like components. These joints possess a wavy geometry with a thin organic layer providing adhesion. Examples of biological sutures include mammalian skulls, the pelvic assembly of the armored fish Gasterosteus aculeatus (the three-spined stickleback), and the suture joints in the shell of the red-eared slider turtle. Biological sutures allow for movement and compliance, control stress concentrations, transmit loads, reduce fatigue stress and absorb energy. In this investigation, the mechanics of the role of suture geometry in providing a naturally optimized joint is explored. In particular, analytical and numerical micromechanical models of the suture joint are constructed. The anisotropic mechanical stiffness and strength are studied as a function of suture wavelength, amplitude and the material properties of the skeletal and organic components, revealing key insights into the optimized nature of these ubiquitous natural joints.

  7. Expansion joints for LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzenus, M.; Hundhausen, W.; Jansing, W.

    1979-10-15

    This discourse recounts efforts put into the SNR-2 project; specifically the development of compensation devices. The various prototypes of these compensation devices are described and the state of development reviewed. The expansion joints were developed on the basis of specific design criteria whereby differentiation is made between expansion joints of small and large nominal diameter. Expansion joints for installation in the sodium-filled primary piping are equipped with safety bellows in addition to the actual working bellows.

  8. Degenerative osteoarthritis of atlanto-odontoid joint: CT findings and clinical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Aide; Wang Song; Mao Yunhua

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the CT appearances and clinical aspects of the degeneration at atlanto-odontoid(A-O) joint. Methods: Thin section axial CT scans, of AO joints were studied in 317 consecutive patients who underwent brain or cervical spine CT examinations. The images were viewed using double-blind method. Observation included: osteophytosis, changes of joint space and transverse ligament, and the clinical symptoms as well. Results: CT findings of AO joint degeneration included: formation of osteophyte, narrowing of joint space, transverse ligament calcification, and joint vacuum phenomenon. Among individuals above 40 years of age, the incidence of degeneration at AO joint went up gradually (P<0.01). Conclusion: Degeneration of AO joint was not uncommon among aged people, CT could better demonstrate the pathological changes

  9. Communication skills in diagnostic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, Hans-Anton; Bosman, Fred T

    2016-01-01

    Communication is an essential element of good medical practice also in pathology. In contrast to technical or diagnostic skills, communication skills are not easy to define, teach, or assess. Rules almost do not exist. In this paper, which has a rather personal character and cannot be taken as a set of guidelines, important aspects of communication in pathology are explored. This includes what should be communicated to the pathologist on the pathology request form, communication between pathologists during internal (interpathologist) consultation, communication around frozen section diagnoses, modalities of communication of a final diagnosis, with whom and how critical and unexpected findings should be communicated, (in-)adequate routes of communication for pathology diagnoses, who will (or might) receive pathology reports, and what should be communicated and how in case of an error or a technical problem. An earlier more formal description of what the responsibilities are of a pathologist as communicator and as collaborator in a medical team is added in separate tables. The intention of the paper is to stimulate reflection and discussion rather than to formulate strict rules.

  10. Pathological gambling: a general overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Larry L; Boehlke, Karmen K

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the course of history, gambling has been a popular activity across most cultures. In the United States, gambling has transitioned from early acceptance to prohibition to widespread proliferation. For most, gambling is a relaxing and recreational activity; however, for some individuals gambling becomes more than harmless fun. The most severe form of gambling, pathological gambling, is recognized as a mental health disorder. Pathological gambling is currently classified as an impulse control disorder in the DSM-IV-TR, but it shares many important features with substance use disorders, especially in terms of diagnostic criteria, clinical course, and treatment. Consequently, the DSM-V Task Force has suggested that pathological gambling be reclassified and included in a new category entitled "Addiction and Related Disorders." The category would include both substance-related and non-substance/behavioral addictions. This article provides a general overview of some of the available literature regarding pathological gambling and includes the presentation of a number of relevant topics including etiology, risk factors, comorbidity, prevention, and treatment. However, as with most complex, multifaceted, and multidimensional phenomena, more research is needed in order to improve both prevention and treatment efforts for pathological gambling.

  11. A nondestructive, reproducible method of measuring joint reaction force at the distal radioulnar joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canham, Colin D; Schreck, Michael J; Maqsoodi, Noorullah; Doolittle, Madison; Olles, Mark; Elfar, John C

    2015-06-01

    To develop a nondestructive method of measuring distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) joint reaction force (JRF) that preserves all periarticular soft tissues and more accurately reflects in vivo conditions. Eight fresh-frozen human cadaveric limbs were obtained. A threaded Steinmann pin was placed in the middle of the lateral side of the distal radius transverse to the DRUJ. A second pin was placed into the middle of the medial side of the distal ulna colinear to the distal radial pin. Specimens were mounted onto a tensile testing machine using a custom fixture. A uniaxial distracting force was applied across the DRUJ while force and displacement were simultaneously measured. Force-displacement curves were generated and a best-fit polynomial was solved to determine JRF. All force-displacement curves demonstrated an initial high slope where relatively large forces were required to distract the joint. This ended with an inflection point followed by a linear area with a low slope, where small increases in force generated larger amounts of distraction. Each sample was measured 3 times and there was high reproducibility between repeated measurements. The average baseline DRUJ JRF was 7.5 N (n = 8). This study describes a reproducible method of measuring DRUJ reaction forces that preserves all periarticular stabilizing structures. This technique of JRF measurement may also be suited for applications in the small joints of the wrist and hand. Changes in JRF can alter native joint mechanics and lead to pathology. Reliable methods of measuring these forces are important for determining how pathology and surgical interventions affect joint biomechanics. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Digital pathology in nephrology clinical trials, research, and pathology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisoni, Laura; Hodgin, Jeffrey B

    2017-11-01

    In this review, we will discuss (i) how the recent advancements in digital technology and computational engineering are currently applied to nephropathology in the setting of clinical research, trials, and practice; (ii) the benefits of the new digital environment; (iii) how recognizing its challenges provides opportunities for transformation; and (iv) nephropathology in the upcoming era of kidney precision and predictive medicine. Recent studies highlighted how new standardized protocols facilitate the harmonization of digital pathology database infrastructure and morphologic, morphometric, and computer-aided quantitative analyses. Digital pathology enables robust protocols for clinical trials and research, with the potential to identify previously underused or unrecognized clinically useful parameters. The integration of digital pathology with molecular signatures is leading the way to establishing clinically relevant morpho-omic taxonomies of renal diseases. The introduction of digital pathology in clinical research and trials, and the progressive implementation of the modern software ecosystem, opens opportunities for the development of new predictive diagnostic paradigms and computer-aided algorithms, transforming the practice of renal disease into a modern computational science.

  13. Transarticular invasion of bone tumours across the sacroiliac joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chhaya, S.; White, L.M.; Kandel, R.; Wunder, J.S.; Ferguson, P.; Agur, A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pattern of tumour spread across the SI articulation, correlating with cadaveric anatomic observations, in order to better understand the local spread of tumour and to assist in the assessment of local staging. Twenty-four consecutive patients (14 male, 10 female; age range 22-89 years, mean 52 years) with primary bone tumours of the iliac bone or sacrum abutting the SI joint, in whom surgical resection of the SI joint was performed, were studied following institutional ethics approval. In all patients, preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies of the pelvis and SI joint were reviewed for imaging evidence of transarticular extension across the SI joint. Gross pathologic and histologic assessment of possible transarticular SI joint tumour extension was performed in all patients. Nine cadaveric pelvic specimens without pelvic neoplastic disease (4 male, 5 female; age range 20-84 years, mean 59 years, median 58 years) were anatomically dissected and the articular anatomy of the SI joint examined macroscopically. Twelve of the twenty-four patients demonstrated imaging and histological evidence of transarticular SI joint invasion. Eight tumours infiltrated only the interosseous ligamentous aspect of the SI joint. In the remaining four cases, extensive tumour infiltrated both the cartilaginous and ligamentous aspects of the joint. No case showed tumour involvement isolated to the cartilaginous aspect of the joint. Among the cadaveric specimens studied, degenerative changes were found involving the majority of cases (6/9), with cartilage thinning and fibrillation and antero-superior marginal osteophytes seen involving the cartilaginous portion of the SI joint articulation. Four of the nine specimens demonstrated central ossification bridging the iliac and sacral aspects of the ligamentous (interosseous) SI joint. (orig.)

  14. Transarticular invasion of bone tumours across the sacroiliac joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhaya, S. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); University of Texas Health Science Centre, Department of Radiology, San Antonio, TX (United States); White, L.M. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Kandel, R. [University of Toronto, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Wunder, J.S.; Ferguson, P. [Univeristy of Toronto, University Musculoskeletal Oncology Unit, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Agur, A. [University of Toronto, Division of Anatomy, Department of Surgery, Toronto (Canada)

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pattern of tumour spread across the SI articulation, correlating with cadaveric anatomic observations, in order to better understand the local spread of tumour and to assist in the assessment of local staging. Twenty-four consecutive patients (14 male, 10 female; age range 22-89 years, mean 52 years) with primary bone tumours of the iliac bone or sacrum abutting the SI joint, in whom surgical resection of the SI joint was performed, were studied following institutional ethics approval. In all patients, preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies of the pelvis and SI joint were reviewed for imaging evidence of transarticular extension across the SI joint. Gross pathologic and histologic assessment of possible transarticular SI joint tumour extension was performed in all patients. Nine cadaveric pelvic specimens without pelvic neoplastic disease (4 male, 5 female; age range 20-84 years, mean 59 years, median 58 years) were anatomically dissected and the articular anatomy of the SI joint examined macroscopically. Twelve of the twenty-four patients demonstrated imaging and histological evidence of transarticular SI joint invasion. Eight tumours infiltrated only the interosseous ligamentous aspect of the SI joint. In the remaining four cases, extensive tumour infiltrated both the cartilaginous and ligamentous aspects of the joint. No case showed tumour involvement isolated to the cartilaginous aspect of the joint. Among the cadaveric specimens studied, degenerative changes were found involving the majority of cases (6/9), with cartilage thinning and fibrillation and antero-superior marginal osteophytes seen involving the cartilaginous portion of the SI joint articulation. Four of the nine specimens demonstrated central ossification bridging the iliac and sacral aspects of the ligamentous (interosseous) SI joint. (orig.)

  15. Movement coordination patterns between the foot joints during walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John B. Arnold

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 3D gait analysis, kinematics of the foot joints are usually reported via isolated time histories of joint rotations and no information is provided on the relationship between rotations at different joints. The aim of this study was to identify movement coordination patterns in the foot during walking by expanding an existing vector coding technique according to an established multi-segment foot and ankle model. A graphical representation is also described to summarise the coordination patterns of joint rotations across multiple patients. Methods Three-dimensional multi-segment foot kinematics were recorded in 13 adults during walking. A modified vector coding technique was used to identify coordination patterns between foot joints involving calcaneus, midfoot, metatarsus and hallux segments. According to the type and direction of joints rotations, these were classified as in-phase (same direction, anti-phase (opposite directions, proximal or distal joint dominant. Results In early stance, 51 to 75% of walking trials showed proximal-phase coordination between foot joints comprising the calcaneus, midfoot and metatarsus. In-phase coordination was more prominent in late stance, reflecting synergy in the simultaneous inversion occurring at multiple foot joints. Conversely, a distal-phase coordination pattern was identified for sagittal plane motion of the ankle relative to the midtarsal joint, highlighting the critical role of arch shortening to locomotor function in push-off. Conclusions This study has identified coordination patterns between movement of the calcaneus, midfoot, metatarsus and hallux by expanding an existing vector cording technique for assessing and classifying coordination patterns of foot joints rotations during walking. This approach provides a different perspective in the analysis of multi-segment foot kinematics, and may be used for the objective quantification of the alterations in foot joint

  16. Pathological Gambling in Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Mette Buhl; Linnet, Jakob; Thomsen, Kristine Rømer

    Pathological Gambling in Parkinson’s Disease Mette Buhl Callesen, Jakob Linnet, Kristine Rømer Thomsen, Albert Gjedde, Arne Møller PET Center, Aarhus University Hospital and Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University.   The neurotransmitter dopamine is central to many...... aspects of human functioning, e.g., reward, learning, and addiction, including Pathological Gambling (PG), and its loss is key to Parkinson’s Disease (PD). PD is a neurodegenrative disorder caused by progressive loss of dopamine-producing cells in the midbrain [1]. One type of treatment of PD symptoms...

  17. JET Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, B.E.

    1987-03-01

    The paper presents the progress report of the Joint European Torus (JET) Joint Undertaking, 1986. The report contains a survey of the scientific and technical achievements on JET during 1986; the more important articles referred to in this survey are reproduced as appendices to this Report. The last section discusses developments which might improve the overall performance of the machine. (U.K.)

  18. 13. Sacroiliac joint pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanelderen, P.; Szadek, K.M.; Cohen, S.P.; Witte, J.; Lataster, A.; Patijn, J.; Mekhail, N.; van Kleef, M.; van Zundert, J.

    2010-01-01

    The sacroiliac joint accounts for approximately 16% to 30% of cases of chronic mechanical low back pain. Pain originating in the sacroiliac joint is predominantly perceived in the gluteal region, although pain is often referred into the lower and upper lumbar region, groin, abdomen, and/ or lower

  19. Transversely Compressed Bonded Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The load capacity of bonded joints can be increased if transverse pressure is applied at the interface. The transverse pressure is assumed to introduce a Coulomb-friction contribution to the cohesive law for the interface. Response and load capacity for a bonded single-lap joint was derived using...

  20. Joint Newspaper Operating Agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Marie

    The number of competing daily newspapers in American cities has dwindled until only about 50 cities boast two papers. Of the newspapers in those cities, 23 now maintain separate editorial operations but have joint printing, advertising, and circulation departments. The concept of joint operation is 50 years old, dating from the Depression years…

  1. Joint Hub Network Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruijssen, F.C.A.M.; Borm, P.E.M.; Dullaert, W.; Hamers, H.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces a framework for joint hub network development. Building a joint physical hub for transhipment of goods is expensive and therefore involves considerable risks for the cooperating companies. In a practical setting, it is unlikely that an entire network will be built at once.

  2. Elbow joint instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Henriksen, M G; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1994-01-01

    The effect of simultaneous ulnar and radial collateral ligament division on the kinematics of the elbow joint is studied in a cadaveric model. Severance of the anterior part of the ulnar collateral ligament and the annular ligament led to significant elbow joint instability in valgus and varus...

  3. Bistable Articulated Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graighead, Norwood D., II; Preliasco, R. J.; Hult, T. D.

    1986-01-01

    Joint with four-bar-linkage geometry has following attributes: Springs to fully extended fully folded positions. Automatically locks in its extended position. Joint combines zero backlash, positive locking, and centerline pivoting. Used in folding tool handles, portable antenna booms, and many other deployable structures.

  4. MP Joint Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy MP Joint Arthritis Email to a friend * required ...

  5. Creep of timber joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Kuilen, J.W.G.

    2008-01-01

    A creep analysis has been performed on nailed, toothed-plates and split-ring joints in a varying uncontrolled climate. The load levels varied between 30% and 50% of the average ultimate short term strength of these joints, tested in accordance with ISO 6891. The climate in which the tests were

  6. Interpreting and Integrating Clinical and Anatomic Pathology Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaiah, Lila; Hinrichs, Mary Jane; Skuba, Elizabeth V; Iverson, William O; Ennulat, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    The continuing education course on integrating clinical and anatomical pathology data was designed to communicate the importance of using a weight of evidence approach to interpret safety findings in toxicology studies. This approach is necessary, as neither clinical nor anatomic pathology data can be relied upon in isolation to fully understand the relationship between study findings and the test article. Basic principles for correlating anatomic pathology and clinical pathology findings and for integrating these with other study end points were reviewed. To highlight these relationships, a series of case examples, presented jointly by a clinical pathologist and an anatomic pathologist, were used to illustrate the collaborative effort required between clinical and anatomical pathologists. In addition, the diagnostic utility of traditional liver biomarkers was discussed using results from a meta-analysis of rat hepatobiliary marker and histopathology data. This discussion also included examples of traditional and novel liver and renal biomarker data implementation in nonclinical toxicology studies to illustrate the relationship between discrete changes in biochemistry and tissue morphology.

  7. Generalised joint hypermobility and knee joint hypermobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Tina; Henriksen, Peter; Hansen, Sebrina

    2018-01-01

    . Respondents with GJHk and KJH reported lower HRQoL. CONCLUSION: GJHk and KJH were frequently reported in the Danish adult population, mostly in women. Respondents with GJHk and KJH were two times more likely to report knee joint-related symptoms such as pain, reduced performance of usual activity and lower...

  8. Learning Biology with Plant Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Juliet E.

    This monograph contains 10 plant pathology experiments that were written to correspond to portions of a biology curriculum. Each experiment is suitable to a biology topic and designed to encourage exploration of those biological concepts being taught. Experiments include: (1) The Symptoms and Signs of Disease; (2) Koch's Postulates; (3)…

  9. CT features of jejunal pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyland, R.; Chalmers, A.

    2007-01-01

    The imaging of duodenal and ileal diseases is well documented in radiological literature but the jejunum has been relatively neglected. The aim of this review is to outline the current methods of investigation of the jejunum, and provide a comprehensive review of common pathologies affecting the jejunum, with particular emphasis on investigation by computed tomography

  10. Surgical pathology of urologic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javadpour, N.; Barsky, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    This text details recent advances in methods for detecting, diagnosing, and managing genitourinary diseases. Included are chapters on imaging techniques (including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and ultrasound; tumor markers (such as alphafetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, prostatic specific antigen, and T-antigens); immunocytochemistry; pediatric urologic pathology; and other key topics

  11. [Arthroscopic therapy of the unstable shoulder joint--acceptance and critical considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerosch, J

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document and to present the acceptance of arthroscopically performed stabilising procedures of the glenohumeral joint. In a nationwide survey of instructors of the association of arthroscopy, members of the arthroscopy group of the german orthopedic society, and orthopedic and trauma surgeons with special interest in joint surgery we evaluated the current treatment modalities for patients with unstable shoulder joints. After an average of 2.09 +/- 1.0 shoulder redislocations surgery is recommended. The Bankart-operation (63.4%) is the favourite procedure for open surgery. In a descended order the Weber rotation-osteotomie, the Putti-Platt operation, the Max-Lange procedure, and in a minimal amount of the cases the Bristow-procedure are performed. Looking at the arthroscopic procedures, the distribution is much more equal. The Caspari technique is used by 27.6% and the Morgan technique by 25.1%. Bone anchors are used by 20.4% and the Suretac is used by 18.9% of the surgeons. The anchor knot technique (8%) is only rarely performed. In case of an elongated capsule the majority of the surgeons would not perform arthroscopic surgery. 42.4% of the surgeons judge the arthroscopic technique less secure. However, 38.9% do not see any difference to open procedures. Taking the available information, arthroscopic stabilising procedures seems to have slightly inferior results compared to standard open surgery. The Bankart procedure with or without a capsular shift is still the golden standard.

  12. Joint Electromagnetic Spectrum Management Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    promulgate command-specific policy and guidance for EMS use, the joint restricted frequency list (JRFL) process, the joint communications–electronics...joint communications–electronics operating instructions (JCEOI) and joint restricted frequency list (JRFL). Examples of FM include providing the...joint restricted frequency list Figure III-4. Joint Frequency Management Office Spectrum Management Process Chapter III III-10 JP 6-01 assignments

  13. Radiographic symptoms of peripheral joints; Allgemeine radiologische Symptomatologie peripherer Gelenke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klauser, Andrea Sabine [Medizinische Univ. Innsbruck (Austria). Bereich Rheuma und Sportbildgebung; Woertler, Klaus [TU Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Jaschke, Werner R. [Klinikum Mannheim (Germany). Inst. fur Klinische Radiologie

    2010-09-15

    Diagnosis of inflammatory rheumatic diseases is besides clinical parameters mainly based on the potential for differential diagnosis of radiographic symptoms obtained by systematic analysis. The initial analysis should emphasize which part of the joint is involved referring to synovial disease, cartilage disease or disease of the enthesis. Synovial arthropathies are assessed regarding soft tissue swelling, soft tissue opacification and the presence of erosions. Cartilaginous pathology is reflected by reduced or increased joint space, calcifications and subchondral bone changes. Enthesopathy is typically located at tendon-ligament and joint capsule attachment, where osteoproliferative but also erosive changes might occur. Lastly, differential diagnosis of arthropathies is mainly based on distribution and allocation of affected joints. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of peripheral joints in rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Møller, Uffe

    2004-01-01

    The need for better methods than the conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographical examinations in the management of inflammatory joint diseases is evident, since these methods are not sensitive or specific to early pathologies and subtle changes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers...... improved sensitivity to early inflammatory and destructive changes in peripheral joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and, even though less well documented, in other inflammatory joint diseases. Good evidence is available that MRI bone erosions represent true bone abnormalities and are predictors......, this chapter discusses the potential for the use of MRI in the clinical management of patients with suspected and diagnosed inflammatory joint diseases, as well as research priorities and clinical situations where the use of MRI could be suggested...

  15. Biomechanical properties of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament under stress Propriedades biomecânicas da banda anterior do ligamento glenoumeral inferior submetido a estresse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Atualpa Pinheiro Júnior

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at studying the behavior of the band of inferior glenohumeral ligament subjected to uniaxial traction. Twenty ligaments were distributed in two groups: Group I ( ligaments with bony origin and insertion and Group II ( medial portion of the ligament. Uniaxial traction was applied to all tendons utilizing a traction machine develop in the Department of Physics of UFC. Hooke's Law was used for evaluation of ligament behavior during elastic phase and the Exponential stress-strain Law, for rigidity phase. All ligaments had the same behavior, presenting a phase of elasticity , followed by one of rigidity. After evaluation of the elastic phase , applying Hooke's Law, ligaments constants were 10.507 N/mm ( group I and 13.80 N/mm ( group II, suffering a straining of 2.83% and 2.84%,respectively, until the ligament became rigid. During rigidity phase, the constants were 511.56% N/mm (group I and 156.84% N/mm (group II. It is concluded that the ligament submitted to traction suffers a small elongation until becoming rigid along with an important increase in force constants during rigidity phase.Com o objetivo de estudar o comportamento da banda anterior do ligamento glenoumeral inferior quando submetido a tração uniaxial, estudaram-se 20 ligamentos glenoumerais, especificamente sua banda anterior, divididos em dois grupos: Grupo I, ligamento com origem e inserção óssea e Grupo II, parte média do ligamento. Realizou-se tração uniaxial em máquina desenvolvida no Departamento de Física da Universidade Federal do Ceará, sendo utilizada a Lei de Hooke para avaliação do comportamento do ligamento na fase elástica e a Lei Exponencial stress-strain, para fase de rigidez . Todos os ligamentos tiveram o mesmo comportamento, tendo apresentado uma fase de elasticidade, seguida de uma de rigidez. Após avaliação da fase elástica, utilizando a Lei de Hooke, os ligamentos apresentaram as constantes de 10,507 N/mm para o grupo I e de

  16. Passive contribution of the rotator cuff to abduction and joint stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tétreault, Patrice; Levasseur, Annie; Lin, Jenny C; de Guise, Jacques; Nuño, Natalia; Hagemeister, Nicola

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare shoulder joint biomechanics during abduction with and without intact non-functioning rotator cuff tissue. A cadaver model was devised to simulate the clinical findings seen in patients with a massive cuff tear. Eight full upper limb shoulder specimens were studied. Initially, the rotator cuff tendons were left intact, representing a non-functional rotator cuff, as seen in suprascapular nerve paralysis or in cuff repair with a patch. Subsequently, a massive rotator cuff tear was re-created. Three-dimensional kinematics and force requirements for shoulder abduction were analyzed for each condition using ten abduction cycles in the plane of the scapula. Mediolateral displacements of the glenohumeral rotation center (GHRC) during abduction with an intact non-functioning cuff were minimal, but massive cuff tear resulted in significant lateral displacement of the GHRC (p non-functional cuff (p requirements were significantly less with an intact non-functioning cuff than with massive cuff tear (p requirement for abduction from 5 to 30° as compared with the results following a massive rotator cuff tear. This provides insight into the potential biomechanical effect of repairing massive rotator cuff tears with a biological or synthetic "patch," which is a new treatment for massive cuff tear.

  17. Sacroiliac joint pain as an important element of psoriatic arthritis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk-Wasielewska, Agnieszka; Skorupska, Elżbieta; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2013-04-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the coexistence of arthritis with psoriasis of the skin and nails. The sacroiliac joints were observed in 34-78% of patients with psoriatic arthritis. Due to such a high prevalence of SIJ dysfunction, understanding pathophysiology of pain and the associated pain pattern becomes a very important aspect of PsA diagnosis. As far as the etiology of SI joint dysfunction is concerned, it has not been disambiguated yet. Among the main causative factors, injuries and strains of the structures surrounding the joint are noted. Joint pathology usually manifests itself by pain occurring within the area of the joint. The causes of pain may be divided into two categories: intra-articular and extra-articular. Pain caused by the SI joint may be nociceptive or neural in nature, whereas the pain pattern characteristic of the joint correlates with its innervation and is consistent with S2 dorsal rami.

  18. BIOLOGIC JOINT RECONSTRUCTION: ALTERNATIVES TO ARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Cole

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive source of information in the management of cartilage lesions of major joints using nonoperative or surgical techniques other than total joint replacement. The text also includes chapters in basic sciences, imaging and rehabilitation.The editors are aiming to provide a reference about the latest concepts and techniques in the treatment of cartilage lesions including future aspects by a comprehensive approach to the alternative joint restoration procedures such as biological, pharmacological and surgical techniques of cartilage repairing and partial resurfacing etc.Orthopedic surgeons in sports medicine, orthopedic surgeons performing joint replacements, orthopedic resident and fellows will be the main audiences.The text is 349 pages, divided into 34 chapters in 7 sections. Section I is "Background-articular cartilage and allograft processing" including chapters about pathology, patient evaluation, imaging and allograft processing. Section II is "Nonoperative treatment" including chapters about neutraceuticals, pharmacological treatment and rehabilitation. Section III is "Operative treatment-knee" including chapters about arthroscopic debridment, microfracture, osteochondral autograft transplantation, mosaicplasty, osteochondral autograft transfer, osteochondral allografts, autologous chondrocyte implantation, existing cell-based technologies, minimally invasive second-generation autologous chondrocyte implantation, future development in cartilage repair, meniscus transplantation, management of OCD, patellafemoral chondral disease, proximal tibial and distal femoral osteotomies, unicompartmental arthritis current techniques, unicompartmental knee replacement. Section IV is "Operative treatment-Hip" including chapters about hip arthroscopy and arthroscopic partial resurfacing, related osteotomies. Section V is "operative treatment-shoulder" including chapters about arthroscopic debridment and release, biologic resurfacing and

  19. Innovations in teaching plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, G L

    2003-01-01

    The teaching environment for plant pathology is changing in both positive and negative ways. Teaching expectations are increasing and resources are decreasing, but recent educational research and instructional technology offer new approaches to meet these challenges. Plant pathologists are teaching courses that may attract new students to the discipline or at least improve agricultural awareness. The Internet offers rapid access to information and images for both students and instructors. Instructional technology provides new tools for classroom presentations, communication with students, reaching new audiences, and distance learning, but using these new tools to enhance learning requires skilled and creative instructors. In the past, many plant pathology instructors worked in relative isolation, but new communication technologies and publishing opportunities for teaching scholarship should improve the sharing of instructional resources and methods.

  20. Radioisotope studies under pathologic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeRossi; Salvatori, M.; Valenza, V.

    1987-01-01

    This article presents a general discussion on salivary pathology, before dealing with the various salivary gland diseases which can draw real advantage from radioisotope studies. Clinical problems related to the salivary glands first concern diffuse or focal glandular swelling. Focal swelling includes inflammatory or metastatic deposits in preauricular or submandibular lymph nodes, cysts, abscesses, foci of inflammation, benign and malignant neoplasms of the salivary glands themselves or of surrounding blood or lymph vessels, nerves, connective tissue, and oral mucosa. Primary tumors of the salivary glands are rare and usually benign. The combination of a systemic disease with dry mouth and dry eyes due to inflamed conjunctiva and cornea because of decreased fluid production, forms Sjogren syndrome. It may also cause diffuse glandular swelling. Chronic alcoholism, cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipoproteinemia, and malnutrition are other pathologic conditions sometimes associated with diffuse salivary gland swelling

  1. Quality in pathology laboratory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, S

    1995-06-01

    Quality refers not only to analytical quality control, a traditional area of laboratory excellence, but to the entire science of quality management. As measures of quality, structural indicators refer to staffing and physical facilities, process indicators to the institutions operations and, perhaps most importantly, outcome indicators address the ultimate patient care uses that pathology information is put to. Comparison of performance to peer laboratories, external quality control, is a practical, if limited, yardstick of performance. Customer satisfaction and turn-around-time of tests are receiving more recent attention as quality measures. Blood banking, because of its inherently complex cycle from donor phlebotomy to product infusion, requires special considerations with regard to quality management. Reporting of anatomical pathology, where the only gold standard is a consensus of experts, also does not lend itself to classical numerical quality assessment.

  2. Interleukin-22: immunobiology and pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Hanash, Alan M.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is a recently described IL-10 family cytokine that is produced by T-helper (Th)-17 cells, γδ T cells, NKT cells and newly described innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Knowledge of IL-22 biology has rapidly evolved since its discovery in 2000, and a role for IL-22 has been identified in numerous tissues including the intestines, lung, liver, kidney, thymus, pancreas and skin. IL-22 primarily targets non-hematopoietic epithelial and stromal cells where it can promote proliferation and play a role in tissue regeneration. In addition, IL-22 regulates host defense at barrier surfaces. However, IL-22 has also been linked to several conditions involving inflammatory tissue pathology. In this review, we will assess the current understanding of this cytokine, including its physiologic and pathologic effects on epithelial cell function. PMID:25706098

  3. Pharmacological Treatments in Pathological Gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Schreiber, Liana R N

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Pathological gambling (PG) is a relatively common and often disabling psychiatric condition characterized by intrusive urges to engage in deleterious gambling behavior. Although common and financially devastating to individuals and families, there currently exist no formally approved...... pharmacotherapeutic interventions for this disorder. This review seeks to examine the history of medication treatments for PG. METHODS: A systematic review of the 18 double-blind, placebo-controlled pharmacotherapy studies conducted for the treatment of pathological gambling was conducted. Study outcome and the mean...... demonstrated mixed results in controlled clinical trials. Although limited information is available, opioid antagonists and glutamatergic agents have demonstrated efficacious outcomes, especially for individuals with PG suffering from intense urges to engage in the behavior. CONCLUSIONS: Given that several...

  4. Joint Quantum Institute

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) is pursuing that goal through the work of leading quantum scientists from the Department of Physics of the University of Maryland...

  5. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects What is Dental Amalgam (Silver Filling)? Check Menstrual Calendar for Tooth Extraction Temporomandibular Joint Disorder Learn what those dental words mean. Check out how your teeth and mouth ...

  6. Hip joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hip arthroplasty; Total hip replacement; Hip hemiarthroplasty; Arthritis - hip replacement; Osteoarthritis - hip replacement ... Your hip joint is made up of 2 major parts. One or both parts may be replaced during surgery: ...

  7. Knee joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to make everyday tasks easier. Practice using a cane, walker , crutches , or a wheelchair correctly. On the ... ask your doctor Knee joint replacement - discharge Preventing falls Preventing falls - what to ask your doctor Surgical ...

  8. Concrete pavement joint deterioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Concrete pavements are an important part of our national infrastructure. In recent years the relatively small number of reported joints deteriorating prematurely in concrete pavements around Indiana has increased. Changes over the past 45 years in IN...

  9. Sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilaslan, Hakan; Arslan, Ahmet; Koç, Omer Nadir; Dalkiliç, Turker; Naderi, Sait

    2010-07-01

    Sacroiliac joint dysfunction is a disorder presenting with low back and groin pain. It should be taken into consideration during the preoperative differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation, lumbar spinal stenosis and facet syndrome. Four cases with sacroiliac dysfunction are presented. The clinical and radiological signs supported the evidence of sacroiliac dysfunction, and exact diagnosis was made after positive response to sacroiliac joint block. A percutaneous sacroiliac fixation provided pain relief in all cases. The mean VAS scores reduced from 8.2 to 2.2. It is concluded that sacroiliac joint dysfunction diagnosis requires a careful physical examination of the sacroiliac joints in all cases with low back and groin pain. The diagnosis is made based on positive response to the sacroiliac block. Sacroiliac fixation was found to be effective in carefully selected cases.

  10. The normal and pathological language

    OpenAIRE

    Espejo, Luis D.

    2014-01-01

    The extraordinary development of normal and pathological psychology has achieved in recent decades, thanks to the dual method of objective observation and oral survey enabled the researcher spirit of neuro-psychiatrist penetrate the intimate mechanism of the nervous system whose supreme manifestation is thought. It is normal psychology explaining the complicated game of perceptions: their methods of transmission, their centers of projection, its transformations and its synthesis to construct ...

  11. Informational pathologies and interest bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Wiewiura, Joachim Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    This article contends that certain configurations of information networks facilitate specific cognitive states that are instrumental for decision and action on social media. Group-related knowledge and belief states—in particular common knowledge and pluralistic ignorance—may enable strong public...... signals. Indeed, some network configurations and attitude states foster informational pathologies that may fuel interest bubbles affecting agenda-setting and the generation of narratives in public spheres....

  12. Pathological features of glutaminase toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskerville, A.; Hambleton, P.; Benbough, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    In an investigation of the toxicity of the anti-tumour enzyme glutaminase Rhesus monkeys, marmosets, rabbits and mice were given various doses of chemically modified glutaminase parenterally. The enzyme induced diarrhoea and dysentery and at all but the lowest doses caused illness which was fatal within 10 days. Pathological lesions produced were hepatic lipidosis and glycogen accumulation, and, in the primates, acute necrotizing colitis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6775661

  13. Insulin dysfunction and Tau pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noura eEl Khoury

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD include senile plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ peptides (a cleavage product of the Amyloid Precursor Protein, or APP and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein assembled in paired helical filaments (PHF. NFT pathology is important since it correlates with the degree of cognitive impairment in AD.Only a small proportion of AD is due to genetic variants, whereas the large majority of cases (~99% is late onset and sporadic in origin. The cause of sporadic AD is likely to be multifactorial, with external factors interacting with biological or genetic susceptibilities to accelerate the manifestation of the disease.Insulin dysfunction, manifested by diabetes mellitus (DM might be such factor, as there is extensive data from epidemiological studies suggesting that DM is associated with an increased relative risk for AD. Type 1 diabetes (T1DM and type 2 diabetes (T2DM are known to affect multiple cognitive functions in patients. In this context, understanding the effects of diabetes on Tau pathogenesis is important since tau pathology show a strong relationship to dementia in AD, and to memory loss in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment.Here, we reviewed preclinical studies that link insulin dysfunction to Tau protein pathogenesis, one of the major pathological hallmarks of AD. We found more than 30 studies reporting on Tau phosphorylation in a mouse or rat model of insulin dysfunction. We also payed attention to potential sources of artifacts, such as hypothermia and anesthesia, that were demonstrated to results in Tau hyperphosphorylation and could major confounding experimental factors. We found that very few studies reported the temperature of the animals, and only a handful did not use anesthesia. Overall, most published studies showed that insulin dysfunction can promote Tau hyperphosphorylation and pathology, both directly and indirectly, through hypothermia.

  14. Pathological Jealousy: An Interactive Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Mary V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to describe the psychopathology, antecedents, and current management of pathological jealousy from an interpersonal perspective. The Google Scholar database was searched with the following terms: delusional jealousy; morbid jealousy; paranoid jealousy; pathological jealousy; Othello syndrome; delusional disorder-jealous type; conjugal paranoia. From a total of 600 articles, 40 were selected based on their currency and pertinence to the interpersonal aspects of jealousy. Findings were that delusional jealousy is equally prevalent among men and women, with a greater prevalence in the elderly. Antecedents to this condition can be neurologic, drug related, and/or psychological, most often preceded by low self-esteem and excessive dependence on a romantic partner. Pathological jealousy can be triggered by the behavior of the partner and maintained by reasoning biases and by the psychological benefits that it initially bestows on the relationship. In the long run, however, it poses dangerous risks to the patient, the partner, and the imagined rival so that involuntary hospitalization is sometimes required. Treatment recommendations include couple therapy, a strong cognitive focus, antipsychotic medication, and interventions which enhance self-esteem of both partners and which address the solidarity of the existing relationship. Treatment effectiveness does not yet have a firm evidence base.

  15. Joint Hub Network Development

    OpenAIRE

    Cruijssen, F.C.A.M.; Borm, P.E.M.; Dullaert, W.; Hamers, H.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces a framework for joint hub network development. Building a joint physical hub for transhipment of goods is expensive and therefore involves considerable risks for the cooperating companies. In a practical setting, it is unlikely that an entire network will be built at once. Rather, the partners will have a more cautious attitude and build the hub facilities one-by-one. In the proposed framework, every time a new hub is introduced, partners will have the opportunity to dec...

  16. Prosthetic Joint Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Saima; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2012-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infections represent a major therapeutic challenge for both healthcare providers and patients. This paper reviews the predisposing factors, pathogenesis, microbiology, diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of prosthetic joint infection. The most optimal management strategy should be identified based on a number of considerations including type and duration of infection, antimicrobial susceptibility of the infecting pathogen, condition of infected tissues and bone stock, patient wishes and functional status. PMID:22847032

  17. Benign joint hypermobility syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Słowińska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS, commonly known as loose ligament syndrome, is a non-inflammatory rheumatic condition. It is characterised by a greater than normal range of motion of the joints of the limbs and spine. The prevalence of the syndrome in preschool-age children is estimated to be between 2% and 30%, depending on ethnic background (with higher prevalence in Asian and African populations, occurring most often in families with a history of the condition and more frequently in girls. This paper presents a case report of a 12-year-old girl. A broad differential diagnostic approach to recurrent joint inflammation with joint effusion and pain made it possible to establish a diagnosis of benign joint hypermobility syndrome. The child met the Brighton criteria; her Beighton score was 7 out of 9. Patient education aimed at eliminating abnormal joint movement and an appropriate rehabilitation programme play key roles in the treatment of BJHS.

  18. A metastructural model of mental disorders and pathological personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, A G C; Simms, L J

    2015-08-01

    Psychiatric co-morbidity is extensive in both psychiatric settings and the general population. Such co-morbidity challenges whether DSM-based mental disorders serve to effectively carve nature at its joints. In response, a substantial literature has emerged showing that a small number of broad dimensions - internalizing, externalizing and psychoticism - can account for much of the observed covariation among common mental disorders. However, the location of personality disorders within this emerging metastructure has only recently been studied, and no studies have yet examined where pathological personality traits fit within such a broad metastructural framework. We conducted joint structural analyses of common mental disorders, personality disorders and pathological personality traits in a sample of 628 current or recent psychiatric out-patients. Bridging across the psychopathology and personality trait literatures, the results provide evidence for a robust five-factor metastructure of psychopathology, including broad domains of symptoms and features related to internalizing, disinhibition, psychoticism, antagonism and detachment. These results reveal evidence for a psychopathology metastructure that (a) parsimoniously accounts for much of the observed covariation among common mental disorders, personality disorders and related personality traits, and (b) provides an empirical basis for the organization and classification of mental disorder.

  19. Joint imaging in childhood and adolescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes Viana, Sergio [Hospital da Crianca de Brasilia - Jose Alencar Clinica Vila Rica (Brazil); Machado, Ribeiro, Maria Custodia [Hospital da Crianca de Brasilia - Jose Alencar Hospital de Base do Distrito Federal (Brazil); Beber Machado, Bruno [Clinica Radiologica Med Imagem, Unimed Sul Caprixaba, Santa Casa de Misericordia de Cachoeiro de Itapemirim (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    First book to be devoted to the imaging of skeletally immature joints since the advent of cross-sectional methods. Covers a wide range of pathologic conditions. Identifies the advantages and weak points of each imaging method. Highlights anatomic and developmental peculiarities of the growing skeleton. Richly illustrated, with up-to-date references and summaries of key points. Since the advent of cross-sectional imaging methods, few works have been devoted to pediatric musculoskeletal imaging, and information is especially limited on the skeletally immature joint. Furthermore, reduced emphasis on pediatric training means that general radiologists are increasingly unfamiliar with normal and abnormal imaging findings in children and adolescents. Knowledge of the imaging appearances of the immature joint is, however, crucial for correct image interpretation. This book covers key selected topics in the imaging evaluation of the skeletally immature joint. The opening chapters consider the current role, advantages, and limitations of each modality in pediatric assessment and present the imaging appearances of anatomic and developmental peculiarities of the growing skeleton. Findings in a wide range of important conditions are then described in a series of richly illustrated chapters that document appearances on diverse imaging studies, from conventional radiography through to modern high-tech modalities. By presenting the essential information on imaging of the immature joint, the authors hope to provide radiologists (musculoskeletal specialists and generalists alike) with a new tool that will assist greatly in overcoming the daily challenges posed by interpretation of pediatric examinations in the twenty-first century. The book will also be of interest to all other specialists involved in the diagnosis and treatment of children and adolescents with articular complaints.

  20. Jointness for the Rest of Us: Reforming Joint Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    transferred to the Joint Staff. 13 DOD’s instinct to “overly centralize planning, organization, and management.”20 The authors contend that this...2. 3 John F. Schank and others, Who is Joint? Reevaluating the Joint Duty Assignment List : A Study Prepared for the Joint Staff, by the RAND...and code those billets as such. Once identified, DOD must expand the Joint Duty Assignment List (JDAL) to include billets that offer enlisted personnel

  1. Recent Advances in Computational Mechanics of the Human Knee Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, M.; Dabiri, Y.; Li, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    Computational mechanics has been advanced in every area of orthopedic biomechanics. The objective of this paper is to provide a general review of the computational models used in the analysis of the mechanical function of the knee joint in different loading and pathological conditions. Major review articles published in related areas are summarized first. The constitutive models for soft tissues of the knee are briefly discussed to facilitate understanding the joint modeling. A detailed review of the tibiofemoral joint models is presented thereafter. The geometry reconstruction procedures as well as some critical issues in finite element modeling are also discussed. Computational modeling can be a reliable and effective method for the study of mechanical behavior of the knee joint, if the model is constructed correctly. Single-phase material models have been used to predict the instantaneous load response for the healthy knees and repaired joints, such as total and partial meniscectomies, ACL and PCL reconstructions, and joint replacements. Recently, poromechanical models accounting for fluid pressurization in soft tissues have been proposed to study the viscoelastic response of the healthy and impaired knee joints. While the constitutive modeling has been considerably advanced at the tissue level, many challenges still exist in applying a good material model to three-dimensional joint simulations. A complete model validation at the joint level seems impossible presently, because only simple data can be obtained experimentally. Therefore, model validation may be concentrated on the constitutive laws using multiple mechanical tests of the tissues. Extensive model verifications at the joint level are still crucial for the accuracy of the modeling. PMID:23509602

  2. Computerized tomography of the mandibular joints and masticatory muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huels, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    A methodology for computerized tomography of the mandibular joints was developed and applied in 80 test persons. Imaging of the mandibular joints is possible with a tomographic technique with 5 mm-overlap, full utilisation of the enlargement capacity of the imaging device, and combined use of transversal and coronary tomography. The method yields full latero-medial, cranio-caudal and anterior-posterior views of the condyle and fossa contours, free of interferences and of distortions caused by the projection. Positional diagnoses are thus possible as well as diagnoses of pathological structural changes. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Intra-articular elastofibroma of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Sang-Jin; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Cho, Kyung-Ja

    2002-01-01

    A 19-year-old man presented with an elastofibroma in his left shoulder joint. The patient had had limitation of motion in his left arm for 3 years, especially when rotating internally. Radiography of his left shoulder showed bone erosion in the neck of the humerus. On MR imaging, a soft tissue mass was noted in the shoulder joint eroding bone. The mass showed similar signal intensity to that of surrounding muscles on T1- and T2-weighted images. At surgery, a soft, encapsulated mass was found attached to the subscapularis muscle. It was pathologically confirmed as an elastofibroma. This unusual manifestation of an elastofibroma is discussed. (orig.)

  4. Extensive renovation the pathology of heritage building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2015-01-01

    The pathology of heritage buildings is often related to renovation initiatives typically initiated by implementing energy savings measures.......The pathology of heritage buildings is often related to renovation initiatives typically initiated by implementing energy savings measures....

  5. Extensive renovation the pathology of heritage buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2015-01-01

    The pathology of heritage buildings is often related to renovation initiatives typically initiated by implementing energy savings measures.......The pathology of heritage buildings is often related to renovation initiatives typically initiated by implementing energy savings measures....

  6. Personality dimensions and disorders in pathological gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Schreiber, Liana R N; Grant, Jon E

    2013-01-01

    This review presents the most current research in personality dimensions and disorders with respect to pathological gambling.......This review presents the most current research in personality dimensions and disorders with respect to pathological gambling....

  7. Congruence Couple Therapy for Pathological Gambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bonnie K.

    2009-01-01

    Couple therapy models for pathological gambling are limited. Congruence Couple Therapy is an integrative, humanistic, systems model that addresses intrapsychic, interpersonal, intergenerational, and universal-spiritual disconnections of pathological gamblers and their spouses to shift towards congruence. Specifically, CCT's theoretical…

  8. Acromioclavicular joint separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devan Pandya, BS

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 30-year-old male was brought in by ambulance to the emergency department as a trauma activation after a motorcycle accident. The patient was the helmeted rider of a motorcycle traveling at an unknown speed when he lost control and was thrown off his vehicle. He denied loss of consciousness, nausea, or vomiting. The patient’s vital signs were stable and his only complaint was pain around his left shoulder. On exam, the patient had a prominent left clavicle without skin compromise. He had adequate range of motion in the left shoulder with moderate pain, and his left upper extremity was neurovascularly intact. Significant findings: Plain films of the left shoulder showed elevation of the left clavicle above the acromion. There was an increase in the acromioclavicular (AC and coracoclavicular (CC distances (increased joint distances marked with red and blue arrows, respectively. A normal AC joint measures 1-3 mm whereas a normal CC distance measures 11-13 mm.1 The injury was classified as a Rockwood type III AC joint separation. Discussion: The AC joint is a synovial joint between an oval facet on the acromion and a similar facet on the distal end of the clavicle. Horizontal stability is provided by the AC joint while axial stability is provided by the CC joint.2,3 AC joint injuries account for about 9%-12% of shoulder girdle injuries, and the most common mechanism is direct trauma.4,5 Initial evaluation with imaging includes plain films with three views: the anterior-posterior (AP view with the shoulder in internal and external rotation as well as an axillary, or scapula-Y view (sensitivity 40%, specificity 90% for all films.6,7 AC joint injuries are classified by the Rockwood system.8 Type I involves a sprain or incomplete tear of the AC ligaments with an intact CC ligament. The AC joint appears normal on X-ray, but can become widened with stress, achieved by having the patient hold a 10-15 pound weight from each

  9. Comparison of Plain MRI and MR Arthrography in the Evaluation of Lateral Ligamentous Injury of the Ankle Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Chun Chou

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: For evaluating ankle disability, using plain MRI alone is not adequate for correctly detecting lateral collateral ligamentous injury of the ankle joint. MR arthrography improves the sensitivity and the accuracy for ATaF and CF ligament injuries. It also helps in assessing coexisting pathologic lesions of ankle joints, especially impingement syndromes and osteochondral lesions, and provides more information for therapeutic decision making.

  10. Spiritual Pathology: The Case of Adolf Hitler

    OpenAIRE

    W. George Scarlett

    2012-01-01

    Hitler had a noble purpose (to save the world) and a strong faith in the laws of Nature as he understood Nature. He was, then, a spiritual person, though his spirituality was pathological and destructive. Here, the example of Hitler, his faith, and his spiritual pathology is given to both understand spiritual pathology in general and, through contrast, to understand positive spiritual development.

  11. 42 CFR 493.853 - Condition: Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Pathology. 493.853 Section 493.853 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.853 Condition: Pathology. The specialty of pathology includes, for purposes of...

  12. Ethics and Professionalism in Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Baral

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathologists spend most of their professional lives beyond direct view of the public, mostly inside the four walls of the lab. It is the clinicians who face the wrath of the public when something goes wrong. However, with the growing awareness of the public into the decisive role played by the Pathologists in the definitive diagnosis of the disease, the pathologists will soon be the target of the aggrieved patients and relatives.1 The issue of ethics can be dealt when professionalism comes before profession. "Professionalism in medicine requires that physician serve the interests of the patient above his or her own selfinterest." Professionalism aspires to philanthropy, answerability, excellence, duty, service and respect for others. "Professionalism in Pathology is based on the same tenets, but has additional dimensions."The qualities of professionalism for pathologists include 1. Communication with the patients and the clinicians. A small phone call with the clinician will solve most of the clinical mysteries not written in the lab requisition forms; 2. Empathy and Compassion towards patients', colleagues', and laboratory personnel's culture, age, gender, and disabilities; 3. Demonstration of passion, respect and understanding towards the patients; 4. Adherence to guidelines and regulations of the regulatory and accrediting bodies; and 5.Profeciency and knowledge in one's work is valued by the patients more than the credentials, which also enables one to identify deficiencies in peer performance. The basic competencies of professionalism are vital to every pathology report, which in turn is the mirror of the ethics practiced by the pathologist. Evaluating oneself is perhaps the most important tool in maintaining professionalism in the practice of pathology. One colleague recently defined professionalism as “all the things one does when no one is watching,” thus placing personal integrity at the top of the list.

  13. Forming a multinational joint venture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, N.K.; Garb, R.H.; Statton, T.D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the basis and mechanics for forming a multinational joint venture. The topics of the paper include the motivations for a joint venture, selection of the appropriate co-venturer, management of the multinational joint venture, and the joint venture agreement. The authors state that a joint venture is not applicable or desirable in all instances and to be successful, must be carefully planned

  14. Microprobe analysis in human pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.; Kupke, K.G.; Ingram, P.; Roggli, V.L.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    This tutorial paper reviews the literature on the application of microprobe analysis to practical problems in diagnostic human pathology. The goal is to allow the reader ready access to the literature on specific clinical problems. Specimen preparation and commonly encountered artifacts are also considered. It is concluded that energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis and back-scattered electron imaging are at present the most generally useful microprobe techniques for clinical work, and are no longer solely research tools. The findings often have diagnostic, therapeutic, and/or legal implications. 332 references

  15. Pathological buying and partnership status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Astrid; de Zwaan, Martina; Mitchell, James E; Zimmermann, Tanja

    2016-05-30

    This pilot study investigated the partnership status and the level of pathological buying (PB) in 157 female patients with PB and 1153 women from a German population-based sample. Slightly more than half of both samples were currently living with a partner. The results suggest a protective effect of being in a couple relationship in the representative sample. In contrast, having a partner was not related to the severity of PB among patients. Future studies should address the question of whether the characteristics and quality of partnership have an impact on the severity and course of PB, and vice versa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Facet joint syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zigrai, M.; Zakovic, J.; Brezinova, M.; Pavlovicova, M.

    2002-01-01

    It is the purpose of the study to demonstrate the clinical relevance of degenerative changes in the facet joint of patients with low back pain irradiating to the lower extremities, and discuss some problems relating to diagnosis and different diagnosis. 119 patients presenting the listed bellow syndromes are covered by the study: scoliosis, polytopic pain vertebral syndrome, paresis and history of trauma. all patients undergo comprehensive neurological examination with special attention focused on the spine: CT and plain x-rays are taken of the lumbosacral segment to assess the condition of the facet joints. The neurological examination demonstrates in all cases pain syndrome in the lumbar spine referred to one or both lower extremities. In 56% it is a matter of persisting pain, and in 44% - recurrent. More than half of the patients complain of sacroiliac (SI) dislocation and palpatory pain. Unilateral or bilateral degenerative changes are documented by imaging studies in all patients, including: subchondral thickening, osteopathy narrowing the lateral or central part of the spinal canal with ensuing nerve root compression. The lumbosacral zygoapophyseal joints are source of pseudoradicular pain. A correlation between clinical picture and GT changes is noted in all patients with facet joint syndrome. CT is an indispensable method in diagnosing facet joint syndrome. (authors)

  17. Distal radioulnar joint injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binu P Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distal radioulnar joint is a trochoid joint relatively new in evolution. Along with proximal radioulnar joint , forearm bones and interosseous membrane, it allows pronosupination and load transmission across the wrist. Injuries around distal radioulnar joint are not uncommon, and are usually associated with distal radius fractures,fractures of the ulnar styloid and with the eponymous Galeazzi or Essex_Lopresti fractures. The injury can be purely involving the soft tissue especially the triangular fibrocartilage or the radioulnar ligaments.The patients usually present with ulnar sided wrist pain, features of instability, or restriction of rotation. Difficulty in carrying loads in the hand is a major constraint for these patients. Thorough clinical examination to localize point of tenderness and appropriate provocative tests help in diagnosis. Radiology and MRI are extremely useful, while arthroscopy is the gold standard for evaluation. The treatment protocols are continuously evolving and range from conservative, arthroscopic to open surgical methods. Isolated dislocation are uncommon. Basal fractures of the ulnar styloid tend to make the joint unstable and may require operative intervention. Chronic instability requires reconstruction of the stabilizing ligaments to avoid onset of arthritis. Prosthetic replacement in arthritis is gaining acceptance in the management of arthritis.

  18. Formation of Exfoliation Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, S. J.

    2004-12-01

    The Earth's internal stresses interact with the topographic surface to affect many phenomena. Exfoliation joints, or sheeting joints, are widespread manifestations of this interaction. These opening-mode fractures form subparallel to the Earth's surface, bounding roughly concentric slabs of rock that resemble the layers of an onion. They occur worldwide in all major bedrock types, attain in-plane dimensions of hundreds of meters, exert a strong influence on groundwater flow, and help produce spectacular scenery, as in Yosemite National Park. The mechanism that causes them has been enigmatic. They are widely regarded as forming in response to "removal of overburden", but large fractures do not open in rocks merely by relieving a compressive stress. High fluid pressures, thermal effects, rock heterogeneity, and weathering also are rejected as primary causes of these fractures. Tensile stresses normal to the surface are required for large exfoliation fractures to open. Intriguingly, high surface-parallel compressive stresses are widely documented where exfoliation joints occur. Both numerical and analytical solutions for two-dimensional elastic bodies show that localized tensile stresses perpendicular to the ground surface must develop beneath certain topographies subject to strong compressive stresses parallel to the surface. This highly non-intuitive effect reflects the profound influence that topography can have on stresses near the surface of the Earth, and it can explain how exfoliation joints open. The theoretical results also indicate that exfoliation joint distributions could be used to infer the horizontal stresses near the Earth's surface.

  19. The temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, W.

    1984-01-01

    Whilst the temporomandibular joint is in many ways unique, it is subject to all the diseases and disorders found in joints in other parts of the human skeleton. By far the most common disorder is injury, followed by arthropathy, acute and chronic dislocations, ankylosis, and in rare instances, neoplasms. The diagnosis and management of the temporomandibular joint are the primary responsibility of the oral surgeon. Nevertheless, this anatomical region is an area in which the cooperation of medical and dental disciplines may be required for the satisfactory conclusion of treatment. The more so when the disease process involves either associated psychosomatic illness or malignancy. The mainstay of the diagnosis is a careful radiological examination of the joint. There exists a delicate relationship between the dentition, the muscles of mastication, and the temporomandibular articulation, which is controlled by arthrokinetic reflex activity of the branches of the 5th cranial nerve. Imbalance between one or more of the components of this integrated system frequently leads to disturbances in function. Pain-dysfunction disorders constitute the larger part of temporomandibular joint disturbances generally encountered

  20. Wide field of view CT and acromioclavicular joint instability: A technical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, David R; Troupis, John M; Kamali Moaveni, Afshin

    2015-06-01

    A 21-year-old female with a traumatic shoulder injury is investigated and managed for symptoms relating to this injury. Pathology at the acromioclavicular joint is detected clinically; however, clinical examination and multiple imaging modalities do not reach a unified diagnosis on the grading of this acromioclavicular joint injury. When management appropriate to that suggested injury grading fail to help the patient's symptoms, further investigation methods were utilised. Wide field of view, dynamic CT (4D CT) is conducted on the patient's affected shoulder using a 320 × 0.5 mm detector multislice CT. Scans were conducted with a static table as the patient completed three movements of the affected shoulder. Capturing multiple data sets per second over a z-axis of 16 cm, measurements of the acromioclavicular joint were made, to show dynamic changes at the joint. Acromioclavicular (AC) joint translations were witnessed in three planes (a previously unrecognised pathology in the grading of acromioclavicular joint injuries). Translation in multiple planes was also not evident on careful clinical examination of this patient. AC joint width, anterior-posterior translation, superior-inferior translation and coracoclavicular width were measured with planar reconstructions while volume-rendered images and dynamic sequences aiding visual understanding of the pathology. Wide field of view dynamic CT (4D CT) is an accurate and quick modality to diagnose complex acromioclavicular joint injury. It provides dynamic information that no other modality can; 4D CT shows future benefits for clinical approach to diagnosis and management of acromioclavicular joint injury, and other musculoskeletal pathologies. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  1. Total ankle joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, Andrew; Merrilees, Stephen; Mitchell, Nicola; Hill, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Andrew [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: andrewh@adhb.govt.nz; Merrilees, Stephen [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: smerrilees@adhb.govt.nz; Mitchell, Nicola [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: nmit010@ec.auckland.ac.nz; Hill, Andrew [Department of Vascular Surgery, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: ahill@adhb.govt.nz

    2008-07-15

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions.

  4. Dopamine Agonists and Pathologic Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan J. Kelley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dopamine agonists ropinirole and pramipexole exhibit highly specific affinity for the cerebral dopamine D3 receptor. Use of these medications in Parkinson’s disease has been complicated by the emergence of pathologic behavioral patterns such as hypersexuality, pathologic gambling, excessive hobbying, and other circumscribed obsessive-compulsive disorders of impulse control in people having no history of such disorders. These behavioral changes typically remit following discontinuation of the medication, further demonstrating a causal relationship. Expression of the D3 receptor is particularly rich within the limbic system, where it plays an important role in modulating the physiologic and emotional experience of novelty, reward, and risk assessment. Converging neuroanatomical, physiological, and behavioral science data suggest the high D3 affinity of these medications as the basis for these behavioral changes. These observations suggest the D3 receptor as a therapeutic target for obsessive-compulsive disorder and substance abuse, and improved understanding of D3 receptor function may aid drug design of future atypical antipsychotics.

  5. Fibroadenomas: Sonographic-pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sung; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Eun Ah; Lee, Sun Wha; Sung, Soon Hee

    1999-01-01

    To correlate sonographic appearance and histopathologic findings of fibroadenomas. Forty-one biopsy-proven fibroadenomas were retrospectively evaluate for sonographic-pathologic correlation. The fibroadenomas were histologically classified into sclerotic, myxoid, glandular and mixed type. The stromal cellularity and fibrosis were also classified into mild and severe. The internal echotexture and posterior acoustic enhancement of mass in ultrasonogram were correlated with histopathologic findings. The pathologic types of fibroadenomas were sclerotic in sixteen, myxoid in thirteen, and glandular or mixed in each of six cases. Most of the sclerotic type showed hypoechoic internal echotexture (68.8%) and myxoid and glandular types showed isoechoic internal echotexture (84.6%, 83.3% respectively). The hypoechoic masses showed 12 cases of mild (75.0%) and 4 cases of severe (25.0%) in cellularity and 3 cases of mild (18.7%) and 13 cases (81.3%) of sever degree in fibrosis. Most of the myxoid type (77%) showed posterior enhancement, and most of the sclerotic type (87.5%) did not show posterior enhancement on ultrasonogram. Posterior enhancement was absent in 22 cases, in which 4 cases (18.2%) showed mild and 18 cases (81.2%) showed severe degree of fibrosis. Sclerotic type with mild cellularity and severe fibrosis on histopathology showed hypoechogenicity on ultrasonogram; whereas myxoid and glandular types were predominantly isoechoic. Most of the myxoid type showed posterior enhancement. Sclerotic type with mild cellularity and severe fibrosis did not show posterior enhancement.

  6. Molecular pathology and thyroid FNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poller, D N; Glaysher, S

    2017-12-01

    This review summarises molecular pathological techniques applicable to thyroid FNA. The molecular pathology of thyroid tumours is now fairly well understood. Molecular methods may be used as a rule-in test for diagnosis of malignancy in thyroid nodules, eg BRAF V600E point mutation, use of a seven-gene mutational panel (BRAF V600E, RAS genes, RET/PTC or PAX8/PPARG rearrangement), or as a comprehensive multigene next-generation sequencing panel, eg ThyroSeq v2. Molecular methods can also be applied as rule-out tests for malignancy in thyroid nodules, eg Afirma or ThyroSeq v2 or as markers of prognosis, eg TERT promoter mutation or other gene mutations including BRAF V600E, TP53 and AKT1, and as tests for newly defined tumour entities such as non-invasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary like nuclei, or as a molecular marker(s) for targeted therapies. This review describes practical examples of molecular techniques as applied to thyroid FNA in routine clinical practice and the value of molecular diagnostics in thyroid FNA. It describes the range of molecular abnormalities identified in thyroid nodules and thyroid cancers with some practical applications of molecular methods to diagnosis and prognosis of thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Molecular pathology of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazares, L H; Drake, R R; Esquela-Kirscher, A; Lance, R S; Semmes, O J; Troyer, D A

    2010-01-01

    This chapter includes discussion of the molecular pathology of tissue, blood, urine, and expressed prostatic secretions. Because we are unable to reliably image the disease in vivo, a 12 core method that oversamples the peripheral zone is widely used. This generates large numbers of cores that need to be carefully processed and sampled. In spite of the large number of tissue cores, the amount of tumor available for study is often quite limited. This is a particular challenge for research, as new biomarker assays will need to preserve tissue architecture intact for histopathology. Methods of processing and reporting pathology are discussed. With the exception of ductal variants, recognized subtypes of prostate cancer are largely confined to research applications, and most prostate cancers are acinar. Biomarker discovery in urine and expressed prostatic secretions would be useful since these are readily obtained and are proximate fluids. The well-known challenges of biomarker discovery in blood and urine are referenced and discussed. Mediators of carcinogenesis can serve as biomarkers as exemplified by mutations in PTEN and TMPRSS2:ERG fusion. The use of proteomics in biomarker discovery with an emphasis on imaging mass spectroscopy of tissues is discussed. Small RNAs are of great interest, however, their usefulness as biomarkers in clinical decision making remains the subject of ongoing research. The chapter concludes with an overview of blood biomarkers such as circulating nucleic acids and tumor cells and bound/free isoforms of prostate specific antigen (PSA).

  8. Restoration of the joint geometry and outcome after stemless TESS shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Engelhardt, Lars V; Manzke, Michael; Breil-Wirth, Andreas; Filler, Timm J; Jerosch, Joerg

    2017-10-18

    To evaluate the joint geometry and the clinical outcome of stemless, anatomical shoulder arthroplasty with the TESS system. Twenty-one shoulders with a mean follow-up 18 of months were included. On scaled digital radiographs the premorbid center of rotation (CoR) was assessed and compared to the CoR of the prosthesis by using the MediCAD ® software. Additionally, the pre- and post-operative geometry of the CoR was assessed in relation to the glenoid, the acromion as well as to the proximal humerus. Radiological changes, such as radiolucencies, were also assessed. Clinical outcome was assessed with the Constant and DASH score. Both, the Constant and DASH scores improved significantly from 11% to 75% and from 70 to 30 points, P 0.05). The pre- and postoperative humeral offset, the lateral glenohumeral offset, the height of the CoR, the acromiohumeral distance as well as neck-shaft angle showed no significant changes ( P > 0.05). The mean deviation of the CoR of the prosthesis from the anatomic center was 1.0 ± 2.8 mm. Three cases showed a medial deviation of more than 3 mm. These deviations of 5.1, 5.7 and 7.6 mm and were caused by an inaccurate humeral neck cut. These 3 patients showed a relatively poor outcome scoring. TESS arthroplasty allows an anatomical joint reconstruction with a very good outcome. Outliers described in this study sensitize the surgeon for an accurate humeral neck cut.

  9. The long Tramp from Cellular Pathology to Molecular Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Guski

    2017-05-01

    Derivatives: The observation of principal identity of biological meaningful elements can be agglutinated to a ‘general theory of live’ and its manifestation. All of the investigated elements posses the same regularities, which are altered, destroyed or newly built by external influences such as disease, physical and psychological forces. Not all magnification levels that display with these elements are of the same significance. Already Virchow suggested that ‘smaller elements (molecules might be responsible for changes that are visible ‘in larger elements’ (at cellular level.  The reflection on these ideas can be associated with the implementation of molecular techniques which has been developed in the 20th century and are still ongoing today. Perspectives: Thus, cellular and molecular pathology can be integrated under one umbrella. This umbrella will lead to newly man-formed structures, such as artificial DNA and gene components or functional chip implantations.

  10. JOINT INVOLVEMENT IN SYPHILIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Zlobina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint involvement in syphilis has been considered as casuistry in recent years. At the same time, the high incidence of primary syphilis and the notified cases of late neurosyphilis may suggest that joint involvement in this disease is by no means always verified. Traditionally there are two forms of syphilitic arthritis: primary synovial (involving the articular membranes and sac and primary bone (involving the articular bones and cartilages ones. The paper describes the authors' clinical case of the primary bone form of articular syphilis in a 34-year-old man. 

  11. Expansion joints for LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzenus, M.; Hundhausen, W.; Jansing, W.

    1980-01-01

    This discourse recounts efforts put into the SNR-2 project; specifically the development of compensation devices. The various prototypes of these compensation devices are described and the state of the development reviewed. Large Na (sodium)-heat transfer systems require a lot of valuable space if the component lay-out does not include compensation devices. So, in order to condense the spatial requirement as much as possible, expansion joints must be integrated into the pipe system. There are two basic types to suit the purpose: axial expansion joints and angular expansion joints. The expansion joints were developed on the basis of specific design criteria whereby differentiation is made between expansion joints of small and large nominal diameter. Expansion joints for installation in the sodium-filled primary piping are equipped with safety bellows in addition to the actual working bellows. Expansion joints must be designed and mounted in a manner to completely withstand seismic forces. The design must exclude any damage to the bellows during intermittent operations, that is, when sodium is drained the bellows' folds must be completely empty; otherwise residual solidified sodium could destroy the bellows when restarting. The expansion joints must be engineered on the basis of the following design data for the secondary system of the SNR project: working pressure: 16 bar; failure mode pressure: 5 events; failure mode: 5 sec., 28.5 bar, 520 deg. C; working temperature: 520 deg. C; temperature transients: 30 deg. C/sec.; service life: 200,000 h; number of load cycles: 10 4 ; material: 1.4948 or 1.4919; layer thickness of folds: 0.5 mm; angular deflection (DN 800): +3 deg. C or; axial expansion absorption (DN 600): ±80 mm; calculation: ASME class. The bellows' development work is not handled within this scope. The bellows are supplied by leading manufacturers, and warrant highest quality. Multiple bellows were selected on the basis of maximum elasticity - a property

  12. Sacroiliac Joint Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto Quijano, David A; Otero Loperena, Eduardo

    2018-02-01

    Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) pain is an important cause of lower back problems. Multiple SIJ injection techniques have been proposed over the years to help in the diagnosis and treatment of this condition. However, the SIJ innervation is complex and variable, and truly intra-articular injections are sometimes difficult to obtain. Different sacroiliac joint injections have shown to provide pain relief in patients suffering this ailment. Various techniques for intraarticular injections, sacral branch blocks and radiofrequency ablation, both fluoroscopy guided and ultrasound guided are discussed in this paper. Less common techniques like prolotherapy, platelet rich plasma injections and botulism toxin injections are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prosthetic Joint Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tande, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a tremendous burden for individual patients as well as the global health care industry. While a small minority of joint arthroplasties will become infected, appropriate recognition and management are critical to preserve or restore adequate function and prevent excess morbidity. In this review, we describe the reported risk factors for and clinical manifestations of PJI. We discuss the pathogenesis of PJI and the numerous microorganisms that can cause this devastating infection. The recently proposed consensus definitions of PJI and approaches to accurate diagnosis are reviewed in detail. An overview of the treatment and prevention of this challenging condition is provided. PMID:24696437

  14. Slot Machine Response Frequency Predicts Pathological Gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob; Rømer Thomsen, Kristine; Møller, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Slot machines are among the most addictive forms of gambling, and pathological gambling slot machine players represent the largest group of treatment seekers, accounting for 35% to 93% of the population. Pathological gambling sufferers have significantly higher response frequency (games / time......) on slot machines compared with non-problem gamblers, which may suggest increased reinforcement of the gambling behavior in pathological gambling. However, to date it is unknown whether or not the increased response frequency in pathological gambling is associated with symptom severity of the disorder....... This study tested the hypothesis that response frequency is associated with symptom severity in pathological gambling. We tested response frequency among twenty-two pathological gambling sufferers and twenty-one non-problem gamblers on a commercially available slot machine, and screened for pathological...

  15. Imaging findings of charcot joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Quanfei; Zhou Chunxiang; Chen Yingming; Jiang Bo

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the MRI characters of Charcot joint, and to evaluate the diagnostic value of X-ray, CT, and MRI on Charcot joint. Methods: Eight patients with 8 Charcot joints underwent X-ray, CT, and MR examinations. 6 of them had syringomyelia, 1 patient had injury of the spinal cord, and 1 case had diabetes. All 8 patients had sensory reduction or deficit in the sick extremities. Results: There were two types of Charcot joint, hypertrophic and atrophic. Radiographic and CT features of hypertrophic joint (n=3) showed hyperostotic osteosclerosis and mammoth osteophytes in the sick bones, periarticular ossification, and articular disorganization. Radiographic and CT features of atrophic joint (n=5) showed extensive bone resorption (destruction), periarticular debris, and articular disorganization. Main MRI features of Charcot joint included hydrarthrosis within joint capsule, thickened, loose, and elongated joint capsule with para-joint, peri-diaphysis, and inter-muscular extension in a pseudopodia pattern. The irregular joint capsule wall was presented as mild hypointensity on T 1 WI, slight hyper-intensity on T 2 WI, and was markedly enhanced after Gd-DTPA was administrated, which was considered as a characteristic manifestation of the lesion. Soft tissue mass containing hypo-intense stripes on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI was commonly noted adjacent to the involved joint. Conclusion: X-rays plain film is the first choice for the diagnosis of Charcot joint, and MRI is pretty useful in the diagnosis of Charcot joint

  16. Arthroscopy of the fetlock joint of the dromedary camel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M M; Abd-Elnaeim, M

    2012-01-01

    To describe a technique for arthroscopy of the fetlock joint of the dromedary camel, and the problems that could occur during and after arthroscopy. Seven animals (4 cadaveric limbs and 3 living camels) were used in this study. Two dorsal arthroscopic portals (lateral and medial) and one palmaro-lateral portal were used. Distension of the joint capsule was effected by injecting Ringer´s lactate solution into the joint cavity. Landmarks for the dorsal arthroscopic portals were located at the centre of the groove bounded by the lateral branch of the suspensory ligament and the large metacarpus at a point 1 cm proximal to the joint. The palmaro-lateral portal was located in a triangular area between the branch of the suspensory ligament, the large metacarpus, and the sesamoid bone, with insertion of the arthroscope in a 45° joint flexion angle. Arthroscopy of the fetlock joint via the dorso-lateral portal allowed examination of the distal end of the large metacarpus and the proximal end of the first phalanx of the fourth digit. Arthroscopy via a dorso-medial approach allowed examination of the distal end of the large metacarpus and the proximal end of the first phalanx and the distal end of the third digit. The palmaro-lateral portal allowed examination of the sesamoid bones, the synovial membrane, and the synovial villi. The main complications recorded during arthroscopy were iatrogenic articular surface injury as well as obstruction of vision with the synovial villi. This is the first work to describe the normal arthroscopy of the fetlock joint in the dromedary camel, the arthroscopic portals, and the complications that could occur during and after arthroscopy. Further studies are required for diagnosis of pathological changes in the fetlock joint of the dromedary camel and for arthroscopy of other joints in the dromedary camel.

  17. Occult Interpositional Rotator Cuff - an Extremely Rare Case of Traumatic Rotator Cuff Tear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Wei Ren; Jou, I Ming [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan (China); Lin, Cheng Li [Show-Chwan Memorial Hospital, Changhua (China); Chih, Wei Hsing [Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi (China)

    2012-01-15

    Traumatic interposition of a rotator cuff tendon in the glenohumeral joint without recognizable glenohumeral dislocation is an unusual complication after shoulder trauma. Here we report the clinical and imaging presentations of a 17-year-old man with trapped rotator cuff tendons in the glenohumeral joint after a bicycle accident. The possible trauma mechanism is also discussed.

  18. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Frojo, MD

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Infection of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a rare pediatric condition resulting from the introduction of pathogens into the joint by hematogenous seeding, local extension, or trauma. Early recognition of the typical signs and symptoms including fever, trismus, preauricular swelling, and TMJ region tenderness are critical in order to initiate further evaluation and prevent feared complications of fibrosis, ankylosis, abnormal facial structure, or persistence of symptoms. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography with ancillary laboratory analysis including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and white blood cell count are beneficial in confirming the suspected diagnosis and monitoring response to therapy. Initial intervention should include empiric parenteral antibiotics, early mandibular mobilization, and joint decompression to provide synovial fluid for analysis including cultures. This report describes a case of TMJ bacterial arthritis in a healthy 6-year-old male who was promptly treated nonsurgically with intravenous antibiotics and localized needle joint decompression with return to normal function after completion of oral antibiotics and physical therapy.

  19. Joint-Use Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casstevens, Susan

    2017-01-01

    The joint-use library is a place where people of all ages, interests, and income levels can find items of interest at no personal cost. The mission of A. H. Meadows Public and High School Library in Midlothian, Texas, is to offer what other public libraries provide: educational and entertainment resources to a community. Yet, the staff also wants…

  20. Keyed shear joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus

    This report gives a summary of the present information on the behaviour of vertical keyed shear joints in large panel structures. An attemp is made to outline the implications which this information might have on the analysis and design of a complete wall. The publications also gives a short...

  1. Jointness: A Selected Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    AD-A431-767) http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA431767 Lamb , William L. Moving beyond Goldwater-Nichols: The Case for Continued Reform of the DoD...in Support of the Joint Force’." Army Aviation 55 (May 2006): 22-24. Magnuson, Stew . "Turf Battles: Strategic Command’s Expanded Portfolio

  2. Gonococcal Prosthetic Joint Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassiep, Ian; Gilpin, Bradley; Douglas, Joel; Siebert, David

    2017-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoea is a common sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Disseminated gonococcal infection is an infrequent presentation and rarely can be associated with septic arthritis. Incidence of this infection is rising, both internationally and in older age groups. We present the first documented case of N. gonorrhoea prosthetic joint infection which was successfully treated with laparoscopic debridement and antimicrobial therapy.

  3. The Neuropsychopharmacology of Pathological Gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Kourosh; Potenza, Marc N

    2012-02-01

    Pathological gambling (PG) is an impulse control disorder with prevalence estimates in the range of 0.2-2% in the general population. PG can significantly impact one's ability to function as it may negatively influence social, financial, and occupational aspects of life. Historically, PG has received relatively little attention from researchers and clinicians, and few treatments, particularly pharmacological, have been both validated and widely employed. Given the clinical relevance of PG, it is important that researchers examine pharmacological and behavioral treatments for their safety and efficacy and that clinicians use empirically validated therapies. Multiple neurochemicals, including serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and opioids, and related neurocircuitry, particularly ventral cortico-striatal pathways, have been implicated in PG. The neurobiological rationale for therapies, particularly pharmacological ones, is reviewed with a perspective on the generation of improved prevention and treatment strategies for PG.

  4. Kinematic analysis of the knee joint by cine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Akisada, Masayoshi; Anno, Izumi; Matsumoto, Kunihiko; Kuno, Shin-ya; Miyakawa, Shunpei; Inouye, Tamon; Kose, Katsumi.

    1989-01-01

    In order to obtain the MR imaging of a moving knee joint, we developed a drive system of the knee. A reciprocating reversible motor with a rope and pulleys drove a knee brace with the knee bending and extending every two seconds. Using photo sensor probe for gating cine acquisition, we got 16-time frames/cycle MR images. Such as articular cartilage, ligaments and synovial fluid, the fine components of a moving knee joint were clearly seen. In a dynamic display, these cine images demonstrated 'actual' movement of the knee joint. Moving joint fluid and defect of anterior cruciate ligament were demonstrated in the case of knee injury. These findings were not seen on static images. Cine MR imaging was also helpful for evaluating the chronic joint disease and ligament reconstruction. Through the use of the present drive system and cine acquisition, dynamic MR imaging of a moving knee joint is clearly demonstrated and it may provide useful information in the kinematic analysis of the normal and pathologic knee. (author)

  5. Two cases of joint disease in post-medieval church cemetery of St. Ilija.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durić, Marija; Rakocević, Zoran; Bumbasirević, Marko; Lesić, Aleksandar; Kelecević, Julija

    2004-01-01

    Evidence of disease was analyzed from the skeletal remains of 11 individuals dating to the post-Medieval period from church cemetery of St. Ilija in Serbia. Two individuals showed pathological condition affecting joints. It was supposed that first individual had been suffering from Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease. It seems that this condition remained untreated, with extensive bone remodeling, and that the deformity of femoral head and acetabulum caused secondary degenerative joint disease at a relatively early age of this individual. Second case was related to the bony akylosis of the hand finger, probably caused by Dupuytren's disease. In addition, we discussed development of differential diagnosis in both pathological conditions.

  6. Dialysis-related amyloidosis of the hip joints in long-term hemodialysis patients. MRI findings of hip joints in twelve female hemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hitoe; Shibuya, Asuka; Ando, Minoru; Akiba, Takashi; Nitta, Kosaku

    2007-01-01

    We report a female with amyloid arthropathy of the hip joints. She was a 67-year-old woman who had been treated by hemodialysis for 22 years. She had demonstrated a 5-month history of continuous low-grade fever and pain in her left hip and she was finally unable to walk by herself. Findings on X-ray films and MRI of the hip joints suggested avascular necrosis in both femur heads. To palliate symptoms, bipolar surgery on the left hip joint was performed. Pathological examination of bone tissue specimen demonstrated that there was some , β 2 -microglobulin (β 2 -MG)-related amyloid accumulation in the femur head. Based on this clinical experience, we performed MRI screening for amyloid lesions of the hip joints in another 11 asymptomatic female patients undergoing hemodialysis for 20 years or more. Cystic lesions of the hip joints were observed in 8 patients, amyloid arthropathy in 2 patients, and fluid trapped in the joint in 1 patient. Patients with amyloidosis had significantly lower serum β 2 -MG levels than patients without amyloidosis (28.6 mg/L versus 41.4 mg/L; p=0.0339). Our findings show that dialysis-related amyloidosis of the hip joints is one of the potential and significant problems in female patients on long-term hemodialysis therapy. It may be important to screen for this pathological condition in long-term hemodialysis patients. (author)

  7. An analysis of a joint shear model for jointed media with orthogonal joint sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koteras, J.R.

    1991-10-01

    This report describes a joint shear model used in conjunction with a computational model for jointed media with orthogonal joint sets. The joint shear model allows nonlinear behavior for both joint sets. Because nonlinear behavior is allowed for both joint sets, a great many cases must be considered to fully describe the joint shear behavior of the jointed medium. An extensive set of equations is required to describe the joint shear stress and slip displacements that can occur for all the various cases. This report examines possible methods for simplifying this set of equations so that the model can be implemented efficiently form a computational standpoint. The shear model must be examined carefully to obtain a computationally efficient implementation that does not lead to numerical problems. The application to fractures in rock is discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs

  8. Contemporary pharmacotherapy and iatrogenic pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trailović D.R.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past few decades, the pharmaceutical industry has developed into a powerful human activity highly influencing modern medicine. Thousands of synthetic therapeuticals have been developed, and these formulations enabled the successful treatment of many diseases, some of which were considered incurable. An increase in drug consumption followed the development of the pharmaceutical industry and the introduction of synthetic drugs. The widespread use of new medicals enabled the collection of data confirming their effectiveness, but also more and more data concerning side and unwanted effects were reported. Frequent side/unwanted effect reports gave rise to development of iatrogenic pathology, a new branch of clinical pathology. The knowledge of the possible unwanted effects of drugs on macro organisms did not enable the effective withdrawal of such formulations from the market. At the beginning, the reports concerning unwanted effects were not verealed. Consequently some potentially harmful formulations were used for years without methodical analyses of their side/unwanted effects. Some potentially dangerous formulations are still on the market such as drugs containing ulcerogenic, hepatotoxic, nephrotoxic substances as well as those inducing bone marrow aplasia. The administration of these potentially dangerous formulations is understandable in the case of clear therapeutic indications allowing no alternatives. In these cases the risk of harmful side effects is greatly overwhelmed by the risk from the primary disease. Otherwise the administration of the potentially harmful drug is unjustified, especially if the indication is not a disease. Many potentially harmful drugs are formulated for use in healthy animals, recommended as growth, laying and milk stimulators, those allowing higher speed and strength in sport and racing horses, estrus inducers and suppressors. The misuse or maluse medication is highly present in sport horses daily

  9. Temporomandibular joint space in children without joint disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    Bilateral assessment of the temporomandibular joint space in children without joint disease is reported. Twenty-eight children were examined with conventional radiography and 23 with tomography. High prevalence of asymmetric joint spaces with both techniques indicated that great care should be taken when using narrowing or widening of the joint space as a diagnostic criterion in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Other signs, such as restricted translation of the mandibular head, and clinical symptoms should be evaluated. (Auth.)

  10. Anaerobic prosthetic joint infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neel B; Tande, Aaron J; Patel, Robin; Berbari, Elie F

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to improve mobility and alleviate pain from degenerative and connective tissue joint disease, an increasing number of individuals are undergoing prosthetic joint replacement in the United States. Joint replacement is a highly effective intervention, resulting in improved quality of life and increased independence [1]. By 2030, it is predicted that approximately 4 million total hip and knee arthroplasties will be performed yearly in the United States [2]. One of the major complications associated with this procedure is prosthetic joint infection (PJI), occurring at a rate of 1-2% [3-7]. In 2011, the Musculoskeletal Infectious Society created a unifying definition for prosthetic joint infection [8]. The following year, the Infectious Disease Society of America published practice guidelines that focused on the diagnosis and management of PJI. These guidelines focused on the management of commonly encountered organisms associated with PJI, including staphylococci, streptococci and select aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. However, with the exception of Propionibacterium acnes, management of other anaerobic organisms was not addressed in these guidelines [1]. Although making up approximately 3-6% of PJI [9,10], anaerobic microorganisms cause devastating complications, and similar to the more common organisms associated with PJI, these bacteria also result in significant morbidity, poor outcomes and increased health-care costs. Data on diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI is mostly derived from case reports, along with a few cohort studies [3]. There is a paucity of published data outlining factors associated with risks, diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI. We therefore reviewed available literature on anaerobic PJI by systematically searching the PubMed database, and collected data from secondary searches to determine information on pathogenesis, demographic data, clinical features, diagnosis and management. We focused our search on five commonly

  11. Surgical treatment of pathological obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portie Felix, Antonio; Navarro Sanchez, Gustavo; Hernandez Solar, Abel; Grass Baldoquin, Jorge Alberto; Domloge Fernandez, Joana

    2011-01-01

    The obesity is the chronic non-communicable disease with a higher rate of growth in past 20 years. It is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure, cardiovascular and respiratory affections, infertility, sexual and functional impotence, metabolic syndrome, load joint disorders and some types of cancer (breast, colon, prostate). The metabolic bariatric surgery is the surgical treatment more effective for the morbid obesity at long -and medium- term and not the pharmacologic treatment and the isolated diets. The aim of present historical review of the international literature on the evolution of surgical techniques of the bariatric surgery (malabsorption techniques, gastric restrictive techniques and mixed techniques), is to make available to those interested in this subject, a valuable therapeutic tool to be rationally used. (author)

  12. Clinical radiation diagnostics of shoulder joint impingement syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvin, Yu.P.; Logvinenko, V.V.

    2014-01-01

    46 patients about an impingement are investigated by a syndrome of a humeral joint. Among them men was 28 (60,9 %) the person, women 18 (39,1 %). Middle age of the surveyed has made 52,6 ± 2,0 year. The traditional roentgenography is executed to all patients, a spiral computer tomography - 5 (10,9 %), an ultrasonography - 44 (95,7 %), a magnetic resonance imaging - 11 (23,9 %). Operative treatment is spent 16 (34,8 %) by the patient. Direct radial symptoms are what specify an impingement of a syndrome of a humeral joint in the reasons, indirect - symptoms of an inflammation both degenerate and dystrophic changes of structures of area of a humeral joint which are involved in pathological process. The best results are given by complex radial research at which it is possible to find out direct and indirect symptoms a syndrome impingement

  13. Interventions for increasing ankle joint dorsiflexion: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Rebekah; Nix, Sheree; Wholohan, Aaron; Bradhurst, Rachael; Reed, Lloyd

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankle joint equinus, or restricted dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM), has been linked to a range of pathologies of relevance to clinical practitioners. This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated the effects of conservative interventions on ankle joint ROM in healthy individuals and athletic populations. Methods Keyword searches of Embase, Medline, Cochrane and CINAHL databases were performed with the final search being run in August 2013. Studies were eligible for inclu...

  14. Longitudinal joint specifications and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Deterioration of longitudinal joints is widely recognized as one of the major factors contributing to failure of asphalt pavements. Finding : ways to improve the durability of longitudinal joints will lead to improved service lives and lower life cyc...

  15. Pathologic mitoses and pathology of mitosis in tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RG Steinbeck

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The gist of my hypothesis (.. is a certain abnormal chromatin constitution. Each process, which brings about this chromatin constitution, would result in the origin of a malignant tumour. Certainly, I consider irregularities with mitosis as the normal mode of the origin of an incorrectly assembled nucleus. This statement by Boveri (1914 has considered earlier observations of asymmetric divisions in human cancers (Hansemann, 1890. The hypothesis is based on the understanding of mitosis as an equational bipartition of the hereditary substance (Flemming, 1879; Roux, 1883. Latest since it was known that genes are located on chromosomes (Sturtevant, 1913, their balanced transport in anaphase appeared as a condition of correct somatic proliferation. True mitoses guarantee the constancy of terminally differentiated tissues. Politzer (1934 has performed X-ray experiments to investigate abnormal karyokinesis with regard to anomalous chromatin condensation, chromosome breakage, spindle malformation, and failure in cytokinesis. On the basis of light microscopy, further significant progress in understanding the pathology of mitosis was not possible. Tumour cases with reduced chromosome numbers seduced to the idea that mitotic activity is rather under cytoplasmic than under nuclear control (Koller, 1947.

  16. Rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkstra, J.; Dijkstra, P.F.; Klundert, W. v. d.

    1985-02-01

    The course of rheumatoid arthritis in the shoulder is evaluated in 143 patients. In a period of 29 years, 630 X-rays were taken of 286 shoulders. In this series 2 or more X-rays per shoulder were taken of 89 patients (29 male, 60 female). The various changes in the glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints were described. Gross destruction appears to be rare, compared to the more frequently seen minor cystic changes. The progress of the disease is often slow or halting. One or both of the shoulders in some of the patients (15 male and 29 female) did not have any detectable X-rays changes, although some of them were followed up for more than 20 years. During our follow-up it became apparent that the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints do not follow the same course neither in time nor in severity of joint destruction. Therefore, we divided the shoulder joint into the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joint. One normal stage and 5 stages of pathology are recognised to fit into previously published schemes of the other joints. Stage 5 appears to be a new phenomenon of neojoint formation, under the previous humeral head with the inferior glenoid rim. Joint disease in the acromioclavicular joint could be divided only into 3 stages.

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkstra, J.; Dijkstra, P.F.; Jan van Breemen Inst., Amsterdam; Klundert, W. v. d.

    1985-01-01

    The course of rheumatoid arthritis in the shoulder is evaluated in 143 patients. In a period of 29 years, 630 X-rays were taken of 286 shoulders. In this series 2 or more X-rays per shoulder were taken of 89 patients (29 male, 60 female). The various changes in the glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints were described. Gross destruction appears to be rare, compared to the more frequently seen minor cystic changes. The progress of the disease is often slow or halting. One or both of the shoulders in some of the patients (15 male and 29 female) did not have any detectable X-rays changes, although some of them were followed up for more than 20 years. During our follow-up it became apparent that the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints do not follow the same course neither in time nor in severity of joint destruction. Therefore, we divided the shoulder joint into the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joint. One normal stage and 5 stages of pathology are recognised to fit into previously published schemes of the other joints. Stage 5 appears to be a new phenomenon of neojoint formation, under the previous humeral head with the inferior glenoid rim. Joint disease in the acromioclavicular joint could be divided only into 3 stages. (orig.) [de

  18. Determination of Parachute Joint Factors using Seam and Joint Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollmann, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This paper details the methodology for determining the joint factor for all parachute components. This method has been successfully implemented on the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) for the NASA Orion crew module for use in determining the margin of safety for each component under peak loads. Also discussed are concepts behind the joint factor and what drives the loss of material strength at joints. The joint factor is defined as a "loss in joint strength...relative to the basic material strength" that occurs when "textiles are connected to each other or to metals." During the CPAS engineering development phase, a conservative joint factor of 0.80 was assumed for each parachute component. In order to refine this factor and eliminate excess conservatism, a seam and joint testing program was implemented as part of the structural validation. This method split each of the parachute structural joints into discrete tensile tests designed to duplicate the loading of each joint. Breaking strength data collected from destructive pull testing was then used to calculate the joint factor in the form of an efficiency. Joint efficiency is the percentage of the base material strength that remains after degradation due to sewing or interaction with other components; it is used interchangeably with joint factor in this paper. Parachute materials vary in type-mainly cord, tape, webbing, and cloth -which require different test fixtures and joint sample construction methods. This paper defines guidelines for designing and testing samples based on materials and test goals. Using the test methodology and analysis approach detailed in this paper, the minimum joint factor for each parachute component can be formulated. The joint factors can then be used to calculate the design factor and margin of safety for that component, a critical part of the design verification process.

  19. Results of total joint arthroplasty and joint preserving surgery in younger patients evaluated by alternative outcome measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    , hip OA is associated with FAI covering three fundamentally different hip deformities, including acetabular dysplasia; all hypothesized to initiates OA development. Where PAO is used worldwide as a joint-preserving procedure in acetabular dysplasia, TKA and THA are the treatment of choice of end stage......BACKGROUND: Knee and hip OA is the clinical and pathological outcome of a functional and structural failure of the joint, resulting in pain and physical dysfunction. Despite the similarity in clinical presentation the pathogenesis seems to differ. Where knee OA is associated with obesity and trauma...... information prior to PAO, TKA and THA surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This PhD thesis is based on three studies. Study I is a cross-sectional survey of preserved hip joints with a mean follow-up of ten years after PAO. One hundred patients (121 PAO's) were eligible for inclusion. An inquiry to the National...

  20. Pathology of the region of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aufdermaur, M.

    1981-01-01

    Radiological, clinical and pathologic-anatomical findings seen in four types of disorders of the region of the knee jointare described. An attempt is made to explain the clinical symptomatology on the basis of pathologic-anatomical findings. It is demonstrated that the histology of a giant cell neoplasm does not permit conclusions as to prognosis. Etiology and pathogenesis of villonodular synovitis and of chondrocalcinosis are unexplained. Pathologic-anatomical findings of chondromalacia patellae are those of early osteoarthrosis. (orig.) [de

  1. Pathology of the region of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufdermaur, M.

    1981-09-01

    Radiological, clinical and pathologic-anatomical findings seen in four types of disorders of the region of the knee jointare described. An attempt is made to explain the clinical symptomatology on the basis of pathologic-anatomical findings. It is demonstrated that the histology of a giant cell neoplasm does not permit conclusions as to prognosis. Etiology and pathogenesis of villonodular synovitis and of chondrocalcinosis are unexplained. Pathologic-anatomical findings of chondromalacia patellae are those of early osteoarthrosis.

  2. Spiritual Pathology: The Case of Adolf Hitler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. George Scarlett

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Hitler had a noble purpose (to save the world and a strong faith in the laws of Nature as he understood Nature. He was, then, a spiritual person, though his spirituality was pathological and destructive. Here, the example of Hitler, his faith, and his spiritual pathology is given to both understand spiritual pathology in general and, through contrast, to understand positive spiritual development.

  3. Surgical Pathology Bootcamp: A Military Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-17

    CAP 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, March 17-23, 2018 14. ABSTRACT Surgical Pathology Bootcamp: A Military Experience Nathaniel Smith...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 17/03/2018 poster 03/17/2018-03/23/2018 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Surgical Pathology ...or its Components. Background A common complaint among pathology department faculty is the variable medical knowledge and histological experience

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the knee: examples of normal anatomy and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, D M; Worthington, B S; Preston, B J; Roebuck, E J; McKim-Thomas, H; Hawkes, R C; Holland, G N; Moore, W S

    1983-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance images of the knee were obtained from three normal volunteers and from two patients. The pathology included an osteosarcoma of the distal femur and a fracture of the tibia. Steady State Free Precession (SSFP) techniques were used with a 0.15 Tesla resistive type magnet. Normal anatomy was well displayed and the size of the osteosarcoma was accurately predicted. Using SSFP techniques, the blood in the knee joint was not visualised, but the underlying tibial fracture was clearly outlined.

  5. The Pathology of Orthopedic Implant Failure Is Mediated by Innate Immune System Cytokines

    OpenAIRE

    Landgraeber, Stefan; Jäger, Marcus; Jacobs, Joshua J.; Hallab, Nadim James

    2014-01-01

    All of the over 1 million total joint replacements implanted in the US each year are expected to eventually fail after 15–25 years of use, due to slow progressive subtle inflammation at the bone implant interface. This inflammatory disease state is caused by implant debris acting, primarily, on innate immune cells, that is, macrophages. This slow progressive pathological bone loss or “aseptic loosening” is a potentially life-threatening condition due to the serious complications in older peop...

  6. Swivel Joint For Liquid Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, James F.

    1988-01-01

    Swivel joint allows liquid-nitrogen pipe to rotate through angle of 100 degree with respect to mating pipe. Functions without cracking hard foam insulation on lines. Pipe joint rotates on disks so mechanical stress not transmitted to thick insulation on pipes. Inner disks ride on fixed outer disks. Disks help to seal pressurized liquid nitrogen flowing through joint.

  7. Joint audits - benefit or burden?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Thinggaard, Frank

    a joint audit regime to a single auditor/voluntary joint audit regime. The dataset used in this paper has been collected for the full population of non-financial Danish companies listed on the Copenhagen Stock Exchange (CSE) in the years 2004 and 2005. We find that a majority of firms perceive joint...

  8. [Correlation between iridology and general pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demea, Sorina

    2002-01-01

    The research proposal is to evaluate the association between certain irian signs and general pathology of studied patients. There were studied 57 hospitalized patients; there was taken over all their iris images, which were analyzed through iridological protocols; in the same time the pathology of these patients was noted from their records in the hospital, concordant with the clinical diagnosis; all these information were included in a database for a computerised processing. The correlations resulted from, shows a high connection between the irian constitution establish through iridological criteria and the existent pathology. Iris examination can be very useful for diagnosis of a certain general pathology, in a holistic approach of the patient.

  9. Genetic basis of endocrine pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Sorokman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the review was analysis of literature data relating to the molecular genetic basis and diagnosis of endocrine pathology. We searched for published and unpublished researches using Pubmed as the search engine by the keywords: ‘genes’, ‘endocrine diseases’, ‘molecular diagnostics’, ‘prohormones’, ‘nuclear receptors and transcription factors’, taking into consideration studies conducted over the last 10 years, citation review of relevant primary and review articles, conference abstracts, personal files, and contact with expert informants. The criterion for the selection of articles for the study was based on their close relevance to the topic, thus out of 144 analyzed articles, the findings of the researchers covered in 32 articles were crucial. The described nosologies presented various heredi­tary forms of hypopituitarism, disturbances of steroid hormone biosynthesis, abnormal gender formation, monogenic forms of diabetes mellitus, endocrine tumors, etc. Pathology is identified that is associated with a mutation of genes encoding protein prohormones, receptors, steroid biosynthesis enzymes, intracellular signaling molecules, transport proteins, ion channels, and transcription factors. Among the endocrine diseases associated with defects in genes encoding protein prohormones, the defects of the GH1 gene are most common, the defects in the gene CYP21A2 (21-hydroxylase are among diseases associated with defects in genes encoding enzymes. More often mutations of genes encoding proteins belong to the class of G-protein coupled receptors. Most of the mutations associated with MEN-2A are concentrated in the rich cysteine region of the Ret receptor. More than 70 monogenic syndromes are known, in which there is a marked tolerance to glucose and some form of diabetes mellitus is diagnosed, diabetes mellitus caused by mutation of the mitochondrial gene (mutation tRNALeu, UUR is also detected. Of all the monogenic forms of

  10. [Diagnostic test scale SI5: Assessment of sacroiliac joint dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo González, Juan C; Quintero Oliveros, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Sacroiliac joint dysfunction is a known cause of low back pain. We think that a diagnostic score scale (SI5) may be performed to assess diagnostic utility of clinical signs of sacroiliac joint dysfunction. The primary aim of the present study was to conduct the pilot study of our new diagnostic score scale, the SI5, for sacroiliac joint syndrome. We reviewed the literature on clinical characteristics, diagnostic tests and imaging most commonly used in diagnosing sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Our group evaluated the diagnostic utility of these aspects and we used those considered most representative to develop the SI5 diagnostic scale. The SI5 scale was applied to 22 patients with low back pain; afterwards, the standard test for diagnosing this pathology (selective blockage of the SI joint) was also performed on these patients. The sensitivity and specificity for each sign were also assessed and the diagnostic scale called SI5 was then proposed, based on these data. The most sensitive clinical tests for diagnosing SI joint dysfunction were 2 patient-reported clinical characteristics, the Laguerre Test, sacroiliac rocking test and Yeomans test (greater than 80% sensitivity). The tests with greatest diagnostic specificity (>80%) were the Lewitt test, Piedallu test and Gillet test. The proposed SI5 test score scale showed sensitivity of 73% and specificity of 71%. Sacroiliac joint syndrome has been shown to produce low back pain frequently; however, the diagnostic value of examination tests for sacroiliac joint pain has been questioned by other authors. The pilot study on the SI5 diagnostic score scale showed good sensitivity and specificity. However, the process of statistical validation of the SI5 needs to be continued. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Joint International Accelerator School

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    2014-01-01

    The CERN and US Particle Accelerator Schools recently organised a Joint International Accelerator School on Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection, held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, Newport Beach, California, USA from 5-14 November 2014. This Joint School was the 13th in a series of such schools, which started in 1985 and also involves the accelerator communities in Japan and Russia.   Photo courtesy of Alfonse Pham, Michigan State University.   The school attracted 58 participants representing 22 different nationalities, with around half from Europe and the other half from Asia and the Americas. The programme comprised 26 lectures, each of 90 minutes, and 13 hours of case study. The students were given homework each day and had an opportunity to sit a final exam, which counted towards university credit. Feedback from the participants was extremely positive, praising the expertise and enthusiasm of the lecturers, as well as the high standard and quality of their lectures. Initial dis...

  12. Posterolateral elbow joint instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole; Nielsen, K K

    1998-01-01

    Thirty-five osteoligamentous elbows were included in a study on the kinematics of posterolateral elbow joint instability during the pivot shift test (PST) before and after separate ligament cuttings in the lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC). Division of the annular ligament or the lateral...... ulnar collateral ligament caused no laxity during the PST. Division of the lateral collateral ligament caused maximal laxity of 4 degrees and 23 degrees during forced PST in valgus and external rotation (supination), respectively. Cutting of the LCLC at the ulnar or the humeral insertion was necessary...... for any PST stressed elbow joint laxity to occur. Total division of the LCLC induced a maximal laxity of 7.9 degrees and 37 degrees during forced PST in valgus and external rotation (supination), respectively. This study suggests the lateral collateral ligament to be the primary soft tissue constraint...

  13. JET Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, B.E.; Lallia, P.; O'Hara, G.W.; Pollard, I.E.

    1987-06-01

    The paper presents the annual report of the Joint European Torus (JET) Joint Undertaking, 1986. The report is divided into two parts: a part on the scientific and technical programme of the project, and a part setting out the administration and organisation of the Project. The first part includes: a summary of the main features of the JET apparatus, the JET experimental programme, the position of the Project in the overall Euratom programme, and how JET relates to other large fusion devices throughout the world. In addition, the technical status of JET is described, as well as the results of the JET operations in 1986. The final section of the first part outlines the proposed future programme of JET. (U.K.)

  14. Peripheral degenerative joint diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilzio Antonio da Silva

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease, is the most commonrheumatic disorder mainly in a geriatric population. Manifestationsare pain, stiffness and functional loss in the affected joint.According to etiology it is classifi ed as primary (or idiopathicand secondary. Some risk factors for disease development aregenetics, race, age, sex, obesity, occupational activities andarticular biomechanics. Pathogenesis is the same for any cause orlocalization, being catabolic alterations, with synthesis, inhibitionand reparing intent of the cartilage matrix. Metalloproteinases andcytokines (IL-1,IL-6,TNF-α actions promote infl ammatory reactionand cartilage degradation. Pain, the most important symptom,does not correlate with radiologic fi ndings. Peripheral osteoarthritisoccurs predominantly in the knee, hip and hand. Diagnosis is basedon clinical features, laboratorial tests and radiological changes.Rheumatological associations’ guidelines for treatment includenon-pharmacologic (education, physiotherapy, assistive devices,and pharmacologic (analgesics, anti-infl ammatory drugs therapyand surgery. Arthroplasty seems to work better than medicines, butshould be used if other treatments have failed.

  15. Joint Counterdrug Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-02-17

    Chapter II Joint Pub 3-07.4 cocaine HCL production. There are over 150 groups trafficking in cocaine, with cartels centered in Medellin and Cali. These...nontraditional mapping products and several digital mapping data bases for geological information and intelligence systems. • Defense Security Assistance Agency...variety of means. Dissemination means include personal contact, physical transfer or courier of hard copy textual and graphic materials, digital and

  16. Jet Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, B.E.; O'Hara, G.W.; Pollard, I.E.

    1988-07-01

    The paper presents the Jet Joint Undertaking annual report 1987. A description is given of the JET and Euratom and International Fusion Programmes. The technical status of JET is outlined, including the development and improvements made to the system in 1987. The results of JET Operation in 1987 are described within the areas of: density effects, temperature improvements, energy confinement studies and other material effects. The contents also contain a summary of the future programme of JET. (U.K.)

  17. Joint Fire Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    intelligence application package for theater battle management core system ( TBMCS ) functionality at wing and squadron levels. The automated four... TBMCS , Joint Surveillance and Target Attack Radar System (Ground Control Station), and Global Command and Control System, as well as with Allied FA...The TBMCS is a force level integrated air C2 system. TBMCS provides hardware, software, and communications interfaces to support the preparation

  18. Australias Joint Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    headquarters command and control architecture , including consideration of our suggestion of formalising the strategic J staff system for the support of... architecture … to support successful joint operations.”28 Our analysis involving consultation with a number of senior officers indicates that a more...transported armies into battle since ancient Egyptian times.57 The cooperation between the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) and the Australian Army began with

  19. Formation of tough composite joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, M.K.

    1997-05-01

    Joints which exhibit tough fracture behavior were formed in a composite with a Si/SiC matrix reinforced with Textron SCS-6 fibers with either boron nitride or silicon nitride fiber coatings. In composites with BN coatings fibers were aligned uniaxially, while composites with Si 3 N 4 -coated fibers had a 0/90 degree architecture. Lapped joints (joints with overlapping fingers) were necessary to obtain tough behavior. Geometrical requirements necessary to avoid brittle joint failure have been proposed. Joints with a simple overlap geometry (only a few fingers) would have to be very long in order to prevent brittle failure. Typical failure in these joints is caused by a crack propagating along the interfaces between the joint fingers. Joints of the same overall length, but with geometry changed to be symmetric about the joint centerline and with an extra shear surface exhibited tough fractures accompanied with extensive fiber pullout. The initial matrix cracking of these joints was relatively low because cracks propagated easily through the ends of the fingers. Joints with an optimized stepped sawtooth geometry produced composite-like failures with the stress/strain curves containing an elastic region followed by a region of rising stress with an increase of strain. Increasing the fiber/matrix interfacial strength from 9 to 25 MPa, by changing the fiber coating, increased matrix cracking and ultimate strength of the composite significantly. The best joints had matrix cracking stress and ultimate strength of 138 and 240 MPa, respectively. Joint failure was preceded by multiple matrix cracking in the entire composite. The high strength of the joints will permit building of structures containing joints with only a minor reduction of design stresses

  20. Fetal Programming and Cardiovascular Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Barbara T.; Dasinger, John Henry; Intapad, Suttira

    2016-01-01

    Low birth weight serves as a crude proxy for impaired growth during fetal life and indicates a failure for the fetus to achieve its full growth potential. Low birth weight can occur in response to numerous etiologies that include complications during pregnancy, poor prenatal care, parental smoking, maternal alcohol consumption or stress. Numerous epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrate that birth weight is inversely associated with blood pressure and coronary heart disease. Sex and age impact the developmental programming of hypertension. In addition, impaired growth during fetal life also programs enhanced vulnerability to a secondary insult. Macrosomia, which occurs in response to maternal obesity, diabetes and excessive weight gain during gestation, is also associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Yet, the exact mechanisms that permanently change the structure, physiology and endocrine health of an individual across their lifespan following altered growth during fetal life are not entirely clear. Transmission of increased risk from one generation to the next in the absence of an additional prenatal insult indicates an important role for epigenetic processes. Experimental studies also indicate that the sympathetic nervous system, the renin angiotensin system, increased production of oxidative stress and increased endothelin play an important role in the developmental programming of blood pressure in later life. Thus, this review will highlight how adverse influences during fetal life and early development program an increased risk for cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure and provide an overview of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the fetal origins of cardiovascular pathology. PMID:25880521

  1. Personal and Social Disease Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe TRIBUZIO

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With the Ottawa Charter definition of the concept health is integrated and expanded, aiming at enhancing not only the "state" of health, but the "process" that leads to it, taking into account health That is considered a resource through which, the individual becomes an active player in the community. Therefore it considers very important the community aspect and the social existence of the person, it must be that within an active protagonist. Each person, therefore, should feel responsible for their own condition and must be fire "exercise opinions more control over health and over their own their environments, and to make choices conducive to health." To achieve this it is essential to enable people to learn throughout life, to prepare themselves for all of its stages and to be fire cope with injuries and chronic diseases. This should be made possible at school, at home, in the workplace and in all community settings. The purpose of the “Ottawa Charter” are really ambitious if one takes into account that not all western industrialized countries, starting from the USA, put into practice social policies that can raise standards of health, requiring structural reforms of the welfare state. The disease is the tip of the iceberg of a social pathology, which causes discomfort and influence individual, not finding answers in the institutions, become chronic changing for the worse the quality of life.

  2. Retroperitoneoscopic nephrectomy in benign pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintela, Rodrigo S; Cotta, Leonardo R; Neves, Marcelo F; Abelha, David L; Tavora, Jose E

    2006-01-01

    We report our experience with 43 retroperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomy for benign kidney disease. All patients had a poor function from obstructive uropathology and renal atrophy. None of these patients had a previous lumbotomy. Retroperitoneoscopy was performed with 4 trocar port technique in a lateral position. The retroperitoneal space is created by using a Gaur's balloon made of sterile glove. The approach to vascular pedicle was done posteriorly and vessels were clipped by metal and Hem-o-lock (Weck Closure Systems, North Carolina, USA) clips. The sample was intact extracted in an Endo-Bag prolonging one trocar incision. Median operative time was 160 minutes and median blood loss was 200 mL. Four cases (9%) were converted to open surgery: one case due to bleeding and 3 cases due to technical difficulties regarding perirenal adherences. Most patients (39) checked out from the Hospital in day two. Four of them were left over 3 days due to wound complications. Retroperitoneoscopy offers a safe, effective and reproductive access to nephrectomy for benign pathologies.

  3. Pathological Gambling: Neuropsychopharmacology and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Scott A; Potenza, Marc N

    2012-02-01

    Pathological gambling (PG) affects about 0.2-2% of adults and the impact extends to family members, employers and society as a whole. Recent research has identified similarities in the pathophysiologies of PG and substance use disorders (SUDs). As such, findings regarding SUDs provide a framework for investigating PG. The aims of the manuscript are two-fold. First, we will briefly revivew neural systems implicated in PG. Cortico-limbic circuitry involving the ventral striatum, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex are discussed as are the neurotransmitters norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine, opioids, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). This background will provide a framework for reviewing the psychopharmacological treatments that have been tested for efficacy and safety in treating PG. Of medications, the strongest data suggest the efficacy and tolerability of opioid antagonists in the treatment of PG, and other agents have varying degree of empirical support. As behavioral therapies have also shown efficacy, they will be briefly considered as well. Future research is needed to understand how treatments work in PG and for whom specific treatments might work best.

  4. Telescoping phenomenon in pathological gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Mooney, Marc E

    2012-01-01

    The course of pathological gambling (PG) in women has been described as having a later age of initiation but a shorter time to problematic gambling ("telescoped"). This study examined evidence for telescoping and its relationship with comorbidities. Seventy-one treatment-seeking individuals with PG...... underwent a diagnostic interview to examine gambling behaviors, age at initiation of gambling, and time from initiation to meeting criteria for PG. The women had a higher mean age at gambling initiation compared with that of the men (mean [SD] age, 31.3 [13.0] years, compared with 22.4 [7.9] years; p = 0.......0003) and a significantly shorter time from initiation of gambling to meeting the criteria for PG (8.33 [8.7] years compared with 11.97 [9.1] years; p = 0.0476) after controlling for demographic and clinical variables. This study presents evidence for a gender-specific course of PG unrelated to psychiatric comorbidities...

  5. Fetal programming and cardiovascular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Barbara T; Dasinger, John Henry; Intapad, Suttira

    2015-04-01

    Low birth weight serves as a crude proxy for impaired growth during fetal life and indicates a failure for the fetus to achieve its full growth potential. Low birth weight can occur in response to numerous etiologies that include complications during pregnancy, poor prenatal care, parental smoking, maternal alcohol consumption, or stress. Numerous epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrate that birth weight is inversely associated with blood pressure and coronary heart disease. Sex and age impact the developmental programming of hypertension. In addition, impaired growth during fetal life also programs enhanced vulnerability to a secondary insult. Macrosomia, which occurs in response to maternal obesity, diabetes, and excessive weight gain during gestation, is also associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Yet, the exact mechanisms that permanently change the structure, physiology, and endocrine health of an individual across their lifespan following altered growth during fetal life are not entirely clear. Transmission of increased risk from one generation to the next in the absence of an additional prenatal insult indicates an important role for epigenetic processes. Experimental studies also indicate that the sympathetic nervous system, the renin angiotensin system, increased production of oxidative stress, and increased endothelin play an important role in the developmental programming of blood pressure in later life. Thus, this review will highlight how adverse influences during fetal life and early development program an increased risk for cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure and provide an overview of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the fetal origins of cardiovascular pathology. © 2015 American Physiological Society.

  6. Pathological video-gaming among Singaporean youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Hyekyung; Gentile, Douglas A; Sim, Timothy; Li, Dongdong; Khoo, Angeline; Liau, Albert K

    2010-11-01

    Increase in internet use and video-gaming contributes to public concern on pathological or obsessive play of video games among children and adolescents worldwide. Nevertheless, little is known about the prevalence of pathological symptoms in video-gaming among Singaporean youth and the psychometric properties of instruments measuring pathological symptoms in video-gaming. A total of 2998 children and adolescents from 6 primary and 6 secondary schools in Singapore responded to a comprehensive survey questionnaire on sociodemographic characteristics, video-gaming habits, school performance, somatic symptoms, various psychological traits, social functioning and pathological symptoms of video-gaming. After weighting, the survey data were analysed to determine the prevalence of pathological video-gaming among Singaporean youth and gender differences in the prevalence. The construct validity of instrument used to measure pathological symptoms of video-gaming was tested. Of all the study participants, 8.7% were classified as pathological players with more boys reporting more pathological symptoms than girls. All variables, including impulse control problem, social competence, hostility, academic performance, and damages to social functioning, tested for construct validity, were significantly associated with pathological status, providing good evidence for the construct validity of the instrument used. The prevalence rate of pathological video-gaming among Singaporean youth is comparable with that from other countries studied thus far, and gender differences are also consistent with the findings of prior research. The positive evidence of construct validity supports the potential use of the instrument for future research and clinical screening on Singapore children and adolescents' pathological video-gaming.

  7. Relationship of Radiographic and Clinical Parameters With Hallux Valgus and Second Ray Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribbin, Caitlin K; Ellis, Scott J; Nguyen, Joseph; Williamson, Emilie; Cody, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-01

    Hallux valgus is frequently associated with additional forefoot pathologies, including hammertoes and midfoot osteoarthritis (OA). However, the pathogenesis of these concurrent pathologies remains to be elucidated. We sought to determine whether there is a relationship between demographic and radiographic parameters and the incidence of secondary pathologies in the setting of a bunion, with an emphasis on second tarsometatarsal (TMT) OA and hammertoes. A total of 153 patients (172 feet) who underwent reconstruction for hallux valgus were divided into 3 groups: (1) bunion only (61 patients), (2) bunion with hammertoe without second TMT joint OA (78 patients), and (3) bunion with second TMT joint OA (14 patients). Preoperative age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) as well as hallux valgus angle (HVA), intermetatarsal angle (IMA), metatarsus adductus angle (MAA), ratio of second to first metatarsal length, and Meary's angle were recorded. One-way analysis of variance (normality demonstrated) and Kruskal-Wallis (normality not demonstrated) tests were used to assess differences in continuous variables. Post hoc tests were conducted with the Bonferroni technique. Associations between discrete variables and the study groups were analyzed using χ 2 tests. Following the univariate analysis, multinomial logistic regression models were built to determine potential risk factors for hammertoe or TMT OA group placement. Patients in the hammertoe and TMT OA groups were significantly older than patients in the bunion only group ( P hallux valgus who are at greater risk for developing secondary pathologies. Level III, retrospective comparative series.

  8. Laboratory characterization of rock joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiung, S.M.; Kana, D.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Ghosh, A.

    1994-05-01

    A laboratory characterization of the Apache Leap tuff joints under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loads has been undertaken to obtain a better understanding of dynamic joint shear behavior and to generate a complete data set that can be used for validation of existing rock-joint models. Study has indicated that available methods for determining joint roughness coefficient (JRC) significantly underestimate the roughness coefficient of the Apache Leap tuff joints, that will lead to an underestimation of the joint shear strength. The results of the direct shear tests have indicated that both under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loadings the joint resistance upon reverse shearing is smaller than that of forward shearing and the joint dilation resulting from forward shearing recovers during reverse shearing. Within the range of variation of shearing velocity used in these tests, the shearing velocity effect on rock-joint behavior seems to be minor, and no noticeable effect on the peak joint shear strength and the joint shear strength for the reverse shearing is observed

  9. Radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging of the stifle joint in experimental osteoarthritis of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmer, W.R.; Buckwalter, K.A.; Braunstein, E.M.; Hill, M.A.; O'Connor, B.L.; Visco, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    Radiography and magnetic resonance imaging were used to evaluate osteoarthritis at 2, 6, and 12 weeks following transection of the cranial cruciate ligament of the stifle (femorotibial) joint of 6 dogs. A quantitative radiographic scoring system was used to assess the progression of hard and soft tissue changes of osteoarthritis. Mediolateral (flexed joint) and oblique (extended joint) radiographic projections enabled identification of small osteophytes on the femoral trochlear ridges, which were detected at an earlier stage of development than was previously reported. Magnetic resonance imaging was useful in detecting changes in cartilage thickness, osteophytosis and intraarticular loose bodies. Radiography and magnetic resonance imaging were complementary in the assessment of pathologic changes of osteoarthritis

  10. Arthrotomography of the normal temporo-mandibular joint. Anatomy, technique and complications. P. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzberg, R.W.; Burgener, F.A.

    1984-02-01

    Most abnormalities in the T.M. joint are due to pathological processes in the meniscus or joint capsule. They usually manifest themselves as an anterior luxation of the meniscus, which cannot be demonstrated by conventional radiological examination, even including tomography. In order to evaluate the meniscus, it is necessary to perform a contrast examination of the inferior joint space. The technique has proved valuable in 280 patients (308 arthrograms). The method is described and radiological anatomy is discussed. There were no significant complications in our series.

  11. Comparison between conventional tomography and computer tomography in diseases of the sacroiliac joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritz, J.D.; Ganter, H.; Winter, C.; Evangelisches Krankenhaus, Giessen

    1990-01-01

    16 patients with diseases of the sacroiliac joints were examined both with computer tomography and with conventional tomography. Both techniques were characterized by a high sensitivity. Computer tomography was superior in exactly delineating the extent of the pathologic changes. In conventional tomography the joint surface was more blurred, erosions were larger, and signs of ankylosis were more expanded, so that the joints seemed to be more altered in 8 cases than demonstrated by computer tomography. Very accurate changes like subchondral cysts were recognized only in the computer tomograms. In all cases in which anteroposterior radiographs revealed no clear result, the authors recommend to additionally employ computer tomography. (orig.) [de

  12. [Osteoarticular coccidioidomicosis. Clinical and pathological study of 36 Mexican patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Nájera, Manuel; de la Garza-Galván, Sergio; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Nocedal-Rustrián, Fausto C; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana Laura

    2006-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis (CM) is primarily a lung disease. Systemic spread occurs in 1% of cases and one of its manifestation is osteoarthritis. To describe the clinical and pathological characteristics of 36 patients with osteoarthritis by Coccidioides immitis (COA). The surgical pathology records of two medical institutions were reviewed; patients with clinical diagnosis of osteoarthritis and definitive histopathological diagnosis of COA were included in the study. Results were analyzed by contingence tables (RXC) and chi2 test. Twenty six adults (19 men, seven women) and 10 children (seven males, three females) were studied. The chi2 analysis demonstrated a predominance of disease in men (72.2%, p = 0.008). There was no difference between males and females in relation to history of mycotic disease or diagnosis of lung disease after the diagnosis of COA. Bone involvement (76% of cases) was more frequent that pure joint lesions and the predominant radiological lesion was of lytic type. 30.5% of patients (11 cases) had multiple bone lesions and eight of them were men with multiple vertebral bone lesions. The COA was the only manifestation of disease in 83% of the patients. Therefore is important to consider this etiology in patients of endemic area. The clinical and radiological spectrum of COA is wide and may include a dentigerous and synovial cyst or simulates metastatic disease. The recognition of the clinical manifestations of COA may contribute to an opportune diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Image processing methods and architectures in diagnostic pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar DĂŠniz

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Grid technology has enabled the clustering and the efficient and secure access to and interaction among a wide variety of geographically distributed resources such as: supercomputers, storage systems, data sources, instruments and special devices and services. Their main applications include large-scale computational and data intensive problems in science and engineering. General grid structures and methodologies for both software and hardware in image analysis for virtual tissue-based diagnosis has been considered in this paper. This methods are focus on the user level middleware. The article describes the distributed programming system developed by the authors for virtual slide analysis in diagnostic pathology. The system supports different image analysis operations commonly done in anatomical pathology and it takes into account secured aspects and specialized infrastructures with high level services designed to meet application requirements. Grids are likely to have a deep impact on health related applications, and therefore they seem to be suitable for tissue-based diagnosis too. The implemented system is a joint application that mixes both Web and Grid Service Architecture around a distributed architecture for image processing. It has shown to be a successful solution to analyze a big and heterogeneous group of histological images under architecture of massively parallel processors using message passing and non-shared memory.

  14. Multivariate analyses of rotator cuff pathologies in shoulder disability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan F Henseler

    Full Text Available Disability of the shoulder joint is often caused by a tear in the rotator cuff (RC muscles. Four RC muscles coordinate shoulder movement and stability, among them the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle which are predominantly torn. The contribution of each RC muscle to tear pathology is not fully understood. We hypothesized that muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration, features of RC muscle degeneration, are predictive of superior humeral head translation and shoulder functional disability.Shoulder features, including RC muscle surface area and fatty infiltration, superior humeral translation and RC tear size were obtained from a consecutive series of Magnetic Resonance Imaging with arthrography (MRA. We investigated patients with superior (supraspinatus, n = 39 and posterosuperior (supraspinatus and infraspinatus, n = 30 RC tears, and patients with an intact RC (n = 52 as controls. The individual or combinatorial contribution of RC measures to superior humeral translation, as a sign of RC dysfunction, was investigated with univariate or multivariate models, respectively.Using the univariate model the infraspinatus surface area and fatty infiltration in both the supraspinatus and infraspinatus had a significant contribution to RC dysfunction. With the multivariate model, however, the infraspinatus surface area only affected superior humeral translation (p<0.001 and discriminated between superior and posterosuperior tears. In contrast neither tear size nor fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus or infraspinatus contributed to superior humeral translation.Our study reveals that infraspinatus atrophy has the strongest contribution to RC tear pathologies. This suggests a pivotal role for the infraspinatus in preventing shoulder disability.

  15. Multivariate Analyses of Rotator Cuff Pathologies in Shoulder Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henseler, Jan F.; Raz, Yotam; Nagels, Jochem; van Zwet, Erik W.; Raz, Vered; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Disability of the shoulder joint is often caused by a tear in the rotator cuff (RC) muscles. Four RC muscles coordinate shoulder movement and stability, among them the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle which are predominantly torn. The contribution of each RC muscle to tear pathology is not fully understood. We hypothesized that muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration, features of RC muscle degeneration, are predictive of superior humeral head translation and shoulder functional disability. Methods Shoulder features, including RC muscle surface area and fatty infiltration, superior humeral translation and RC tear size were obtained from a consecutive series of Magnetic Resonance Imaging with arthrography (MRA). We investigated patients with superior (supraspinatus, n = 39) and posterosuperior (supraspinatus and infraspinatus, n = 30) RC tears, and patients with an intact RC (n = 52) as controls. The individual or combinatorial contribution of RC measures to superior humeral translation, as a sign of RC dysfunction, was investigated with univariate or multivariate models, respectively. Results Using the univariate model the infraspinatus surface area and fatty infiltration in both the supraspinatus and infraspinatus had a significant contribution to RC dysfunction. With the multivariate model, however, the infraspinatus surface area only affected superior humeral translation (ptears. In contrast neither tear size nor fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus or infraspinatus contributed to superior humeral translation. Conclusion Our study reveals that infraspinatus atrophy has the strongest contribution to RC tear pathologies. This suggests a pivotal role for the infraspinatus in preventing shoulder disability. PMID:25710703

  16. Diagnosis and pathology of endocrine diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shriver, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 22 papers under the headings of Diagnosis and Pathology of endocrine diseases. Topics covered include: Laboratory tests in the diagnosis and management of thyroid disorders, Pathology of thyroid diseases, Diagnosis of adrenourtical disease, Radiologic techniques in evaluating endocrine disorders; and the Pituitary and adrenal glands

  17. Musculoskeletal ultrasound including definitions for ultrasonographic pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakefield, RJ; Balint, PV; Szkudlarek, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    pathologies. This article presents the first report from the OMERACT ultrasound special interest group, which has compared US against the criteria of the OMERACT filter. Also proposed for the first time are consensus US definitions for common pathological lesions seen in patients with inflammatory arthritis....

  18. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pathological Gamblers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M.; Ammerman, Yola; Bohl, Jaime; Doersch, Anne; Gay, Heather; Kadden, Ronald; Molina, Cheryl; Steinberg, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated efficacy of psychotherapies for pathological gambling. Pathological gamblers (N = 231) were randomly assigned to (a) referral to Gamblers Anonymous (GA), (b) GA referral plus a cognitive-behavioral (CB) workbook, or (c) GA referral plus 8 sessions of individual CB therapy. Gambling and related problems were assessed…

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of labyrinthine pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsot-Dupuch, K.; Vignaud, J.; Mehdi, M.; Pharaboz, C.; Meyer, B.

    1996-01-01

    Membranous labyrinth pathologies are quite rare. They were until recently difficult to demonstrate by imaging technics, CT being the modality of choice. Our purpose was to stress the interest of MR examination for investigating patients complaining of vertigo, tinnitus, and profound sensorineural hearing loss. Normal anatomy as well as the main pathologically encountered changes are illustrated. (orig.)

  20. [Computer technologies in teaching pathological anatomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, A B; Fedorov, D N

    2015-01-01

    The paper gives experience with personal computers used at the Academician A.L. Strukov Department of Pathological Anatomy for more than 20 years. It shows the objective necessity of introducing computer technologies at all stages of acquiring skills in anatomical pathology, including lectures, students' free work, test check, etc.

  1. Pathological Demand Avoidance: Exploring the Behavioural Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Nions, Elizabeth; Viding, Essi; Greven, Corina U; Ronald, Angelica; Happé, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    "Pathological Demand Avoidance" is a term increasingly used by practitioners in the United Kingdom. It was coined to describe a profile of obsessive resistance to everyday demands and requests, with a tendency to resort to "socially manipulative" behaviour, including outrageous or embarrassing acts. Pathological demand…

  2. Egocentric social network analysis of pathological gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Matthew K; Clifton, Allan D; Mackillop, James; Miller, Joshua D; Campbell, W Keith; Goodie, Adam S

    2013-03-01

    To apply social network analysis (SNA) to investigate whether frequency and severity of gambling problems were associated with different network characteristics among friends, family and co-workers is an innovative way to look at relationships among individuals; the current study was the first, to our knowledge, to apply SNA to gambling behaviors. Egocentric social network analysis was used to characterize formally the relationships between social network characteristics and gambling pathology. Laboratory-based questionnaire and interview administration. Forty frequent gamblers (22 non-pathological gamblers, 18 pathological gamblers) were recruited from the community. The SNA revealed significant social network compositional differences between the two groups: pathological gamblers (PGs) had more gamblers, smokers and drinkers in their social networks than did non-pathological gamblers (NPGs). PGs had more individuals in their network with whom they personally gambled, smoked and drank than those with who were NPG. Network ties were closer to individuals in their networks who gambled, smoked and drank more frequently. Associations between gambling severity and structural network characteristics were not significant. Pathological gambling is associated with compositional but not structural differences in social networks. Pathological gamblers differ from non-pathological gamblers in the number of gamblers, smokers and drinkers in their social networks. Homophily within the networks also indicates that gamblers tend to be closer with other gamblers. This homophily may serve to reinforce addictive behaviors, and may suggest avenues for future study or intervention. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  3. Diagnosis and pathology of endocrine diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriver, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 22 papers under the headings of Diagnosis and Pathology of endocrine diseases. Topics covered include: Laboratory tests in the diagnosis and management of thyroid disorders, Pathology of thyroid diseases, Diagnosis of adrenourtical disease, Radiologic techniques in evaluating endocrine disorders; and the Pituitary and adrenal glands.

  4. Pathology as the enabler of human research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, James M; Tykocinski, Mark L

    2005-09-01

    Academic Pathology is a key player in human molecular science and in the powerful initiatives of the National Institutes of Health. Pathologists generate data crucial to virtually every molecular study of human tissue, and have the necessary skills and authority to oversee processing of human tissues for research analysis. We advocate that Academic Pathology is optimally positioned to drive the molecular revolution in study of human disease, through human tissue collection, analysis, and databasing. This can be achieved through playing a major role in human tissue procurement and management; establishing high-quality 'Pathology Resource Laboratories'; providing the scientific expertise for pathology data sharing; and recruiting and training physician scientists. Pathology should position itself to be the local institutional driver of technology implementation and development, by operating the resource laboratories, providing the expertise for technical and conceptual design of research projects, maintaining the databases that link molecular and morphological information on human tissues with the requisite clinical databases, providing education and mentorship of technology users, and nurturing new research through the development of preliminary data. We also consider that outstanding pathology journals are available for the publication of research emanating from such studies, to the benefit of the pathology profession as an academic enterprise. It is our earnest hope that Academic Pathology can play a leading role in the remarkable advances to be made as the 21st century unfolds.

  5. Quality assessment and improvements in pathology practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, C.C.H.J.

    2016-01-01

    Every patient has the right to receive optimal quality health care. With regard to pathology practice, a small (interpretational) difference can have major impact for the patient, because prognosis and treatment selection are often based on the pathology report. Unfortunately, it is inevitable that

  6. Endocrine pathology: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asa, Sylvia L; Mete, Ozgur

    2018-01-01

    Endocrine pathology is the subspecialty of diagnostic pathology which deals with the diagnosis and characterisation of neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases of the endocrine system. This relatively young subspecialty was initially focused mainly on thyroid and parathyroid pathology, with some participants also involved in studies of the pituitary, the endocrine pancreas, and the adrenal glands. However, the endocrine system involves much more than these traditional endocrine organs and the discipline has grown to encompass lesions of the dispersed neuroendocrine cells, including neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, thymus, breast and prostate, as well as paraganglia throughout the body, not just in the adrenals. Indeed, the production of hormones is the hallmark of the endocrine system, and some aspects of gynecological/testicular, bone and liver pathology also fall into the realm of this specialty. Many of the lesions that are the focus of this discipline are increasing in incidence and their pathology is becoming more complex with increased understanding of molecular pathology and a high incidence of familial disease. The future of endocrine pathology will demand a depth of understanding of structure, function, prognosis and prediction as pathologists play a key role in the multidisciplinary care team of patients with endocrine diseases. It is anticipated that new technologies will allow increased subspecialisation in pathology and growth of this important area of expertise. Copyright © 2017 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of labyrinthine pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsot-Dupuch, K [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Service de Radiologie, 75 - Paris (France); Vignaud, J [Val de Grace, Hopital d` Instruction du Service de Sante des Armees, 75 - Paris (France); Mehdi, M [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Service de Radiologie, 75 - Paris (France); Pharaboz, C [Hopital Begin, Hopital d` Instruction des Armees, 94 - Saint-Mande (France); Meyer, B [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Service d` ORL, 75 - Paris (France)

    1996-10-01

    Membranous labyrinth pathologies are quite rare. They were until recently difficult to demonstrate by imaging technics, CT being the modality of choice. Our purpose was to stress the interest of MR examination for investigating patients complaining of vertigo, tinnitus, and profound sensorineural hearing loss. Normal anatomy as well as the main pathologically encountered changes are illustrated. (orig.)

  8. Shifted risk preferences in pathological gambling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligneul, R.; Sescousse, G.T.; Barbalat, G.; Domenech, P.; Dreher, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pathological gambling (PG) is an impulse control disorder characterized by excessive monetary risk seeking in the face of negative consequences. We used tools from the field of behavioral economics to refine our description of risk-taking behavior in pathological gamblers. This

  9. Experimental radiation pathology and oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkel, M.P.

    1975-01-01

    The program goal is to provide basic data for evaluating the hazard to man from radioactive materials deposited within the body. The original objective, to obtain dose-response information and to provide data from several species for extrapolating animal data to man, is receiving less attention at present as effort is being put into determining how radiation causes bone cancer and whether viruses play a role. The program began with the very early radiotoxicologic investigations of materials important in the development of the atomic bomb and the necessity to establish maximum permissible levels of exposure to these materials. With the demonstration that bone cancer is the most sensitive indicator of damage from transuranic elements and some of the fission products, bone pathology became the focus of attention. When it became evident that questions of human hazard cannot be answered unequivocally on the basis of dose-response relationships, different approaches were considered, and one based on knowledge of mechanisms of cancer induction seemed most likely to be successful. The detection of viruses in both radiation-induced and spontaneous bone cancer of mice, and the present evidence for a similar virus in bone cancer of man, support the hypothesis that radiation causes cancer by activating endogenous neoplastic information, which can also be expressed as oncornavirus. Present emphases therefore concern understanding the biological, biochemical, and physical attributes of the five murine oncornaviruses that have now been isolated in the course of the program; demonstrating the existence of a comparable human oncornavirus; and discovering how radiation and virus interact in the induction of bone cancer

  10. Adult dementia: history, biopsy, pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torack, R M

    1979-05-01

    The historical events in the evolution of Alzheimer's disease are reviewed, including the initial description by Alois Alzheimer and the subsequent controversy regarding the nosological specificity of this entity. The similarity of senile dementia and Alzheimer's disease is emphasized. The basis for the modern concept of Alzheimer's disease as premature or accelerated aging is included in the review. The pathological correlates of the major categories of adult dementia have been described. The traditional criteria of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques have been re-evaluated using the current insight into these changes afforded by electron microscopy and biochemistry. The significance of amyloid has been described because it occurs within the senile plaque and also as the essential component of congophilic angiopathy. The new information regarding neuronal cell counts and the loss of choline acetyltransferase has been evaluated in terms of an indication of a pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer's disease. The current understanding of normal pressure hydrocephalus, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and multi-infarct dementia has been described. Brain biopsy in dementia has been described as having diagnostic, research, pathogenic, and prognostic value. The precautions involving the performance and handling of the biopsy have been stressed, particularly because these procedures involve conditions of possible slow virus etiology. The polemic for Alzheimer's disease as aging or slow virus infection has been summarized. At this time a consideration seems justified that Alzheimer's disease is an age-related, slow virus disease due to a hitherto unknown immune defect. Aging as an etiological agent must be clarified before Alzheimer's disease, in any form, can be considered to be an inevitable consequence of longevity.

  11. Eating pathology among Black and White smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Johnsen, Lisa A P; Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S; Spring, Bonnie J

    2005-02-01

    Among White smokers, many females use smoking as a weight control strategy. Little is known about the relationship between eating pathology and smoking among Black females, and whether smokers who enroll in treatment differ in eating pathology from smokers who decline treatment. We examined eating pathology among Black and White smokers who enrolled in a smoking cessation treatment and those who declined treatment. Participants were 100 Black and 100 White female smokers (ages 18-65) who completed three measures of eating pathology. After controlling for BMI, Whites reported greater levels of overall eating pathology than Blacks [F(1,195)=4.1; pWhite than Black smokers. However, once females seek smoking cessation treatment, these ethnic differences are not apparent.

  12. The imaging of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayamizu, Kyoko; Ito, Katsuhide; Naito, Akira

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomographic arthrography (arthro-CT) and rotator cuff sonography (RC-US) are new methods for investigating cases with shoulder disorders. We present details of these techniques and report normal and pathological findings of the shoulder joint composed of the glenoid lablum, glenoid, joint capsule and RC. Twenty nine cases with shoulder instability and RC tears were evaluated by arthro-CT. Arthro-CT findings were correlated with surgical ones in three operated cases. Arthro-CT has provided excellent visualizations of labral tears and capsular lesions and has been successfully utilized for detection of the spilled contrast material with RC tears. We examined RC-US in 9 cases who underwent surgery or arthrography on suspicion of rotator cuff tears, and 12 normal volunteers. RC-US findings indicative of the tears included (1) defect or focal thinning of the RC in 3 cases, (2) discontinuity in the homogenous echogenicity of the RC in 2 cases, (3) presence of the abnormal central echogenic band or echogenic foci in the RC in 6 cases. The defect or thinning of the RC represented full-thickness tears. RC-US is a rapid, noninvasive and reliable method of detecting RC tears. (author)

  13. Innovating undergraduate pathology education through public engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukundu Nagesh, Navin; Chiva Giurca, Bogdan; Lishman, Suzy

    2018-05-01

    The trends in modern undergraduate medical education focus on a patient-centred approach through problem-based learning over the traditional modular curriculum. Integrating pathology into this style of learning has resulted in the dilution of core scientific principles which may have contributed to reduced understanding and interest in the subject. We aim to innovate pathology education by utilising National Pathology Week which is organised by the Royal College of Pathologists to develop the public engagement model which empowers students to learn pathology by teaching the public. Through this model, we hope to generate a greater interest in pathology at both undergraduate and postgraduate stages of education. We obtained funding from the Royal College of Pathologists to organise National Pathology Week at Exeter Medical School and the Royal Devon & Exeter Hospital. We involved 125 undergraduate student volunteers from health-related courses. We designed a curriculum aiming to educate both students and public on current topics such as cancer screening programmes, antibiotic resistance, diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease and the role of pathologists. We hosted 15 pathologists, biomedical scientists and microbiologists to engage with students, share experiences and offer an insight into their careers. Through this project, we interacted with over 500 members of the public and 150 school students. The medical student volunteers developed a range of skills including competent use of microscopes to visualise pathology slides, effective communication with lay audiences to teach pathology and understanding of the clinical application of pathology. We believe the public engagement model of teaching undergraduate students has the potential to develop a greater interest in pathology whilst benefitting the wider community.

  14. Intra-articular Nodular Fasciitis: An Unexpected Diagnosis for a Joint Lesion: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MF Michelle Chan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pathological lesions in and around a joint can arise from underlying dermis, subcutis, deep muscle, bone or synovium. Clinical presentation can include joint pain, joint swelling, palpable masses and mechanical restriction. Whilst giant cell tumour of tendon sheath, pigmented villonodular synovitis, synovial chondromatosis, lipoma arborescens, juxta articular myxomas and inflammatory arthritis are the better-known conditions of the joint. Intra-articular nodular fasciitis, on the other hand, is less well recognized both clinically and radiologically. It is rarely seen in routine practice and is only described in case reports in the literature. Due to the non-specific clinical and radiological findings as well as the unfamiliarity with the entity, the diagnosis of intra-articular nodular fasciitis is usually clinched only after histological examination. We present a case of intra-articular nodular fasciitis arising in the knee joint which was not suspected clinically or radiologically.

  15. Response of knee fibrocartilage to joint destabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, N A; Hagiwara, Y; Jiang, X; Huang, J; Adams, D J; Rowe, D W

    2015-06-01

    A major challenge to understanding osteoarthritis (OA) pathology is identifying the cellular events that precede the onset of cartilage damage. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of joint destabilization on early changes to fibrocartilage in the joint. The anterior cruciate ligament was transected in collagen reporter mice (Col1CFP and ColXRFP). Mineralization labels were given every 2 weeks to measure new mineralized cartilage apposition. Novel fluorescent histology of mineralized tissue was used to characterize the changes in fibrocartilage at 2 and 4 weeks post-injury. Changes in fibrocartilaginous structures of the joint occur as early as 2 weeks after injury and are well developed by 4 weeks. The alterations are seen in multiple entheses and in the medial surface of the femoral and tibial condyles. In the responding entheses, mineral apposition towards the ligament midsubstance results in thickening of the mineralize fibrocartilage. These changes are associated with increases in ColX-RFP, Col1-CFP reporter activity and alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity. Mineral apposition also occurs in the fibrocartilage of the non-articular regions of the medial condyles by 2 weeks and develops into osteophytes by 4 weeks post-injury. An unexpected observation is punctate expression of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase activity in unmineralized fibrochondrocytes adjacent to active appositional mineralization. These observations suggest that fibrocartilage activates prior to degradation of the articular cartilage. Thus clinical and histological imaging of fibrocartilage may be an earlier indicator of disease initiation and may indicate a more appropriate time to start preventative treatment. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Temporomandibular joint motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Itou, S.; Odori, T.; Ishii, Y.; Torizuka, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates MR imaging with the therapeutic effect after splint therapy in internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Fifteen patients (19 TMJs) with internal derangement of the TMJ and five normal volunteers (10 TMJs) were examined with sagittal T1-weighted spin-echo and gradient recalled acquisition in a steady state (GRASS) MR imaging. MR studies of the patients undergoing splint therapy were performed with an without splints. Pseudodynamic images of TMJ motion provide information that was not available from spin-echo T1-weighted images

  17. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board has examined the internal appeal lodged by a former member of the personnel, a beneficiary of the CERN Pension Fund, against the calculation of his pension in the framework of the Progressive Retirement Programme.   The person concerned has not objected to the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General being brought to the attention of the members of the personnel. In application of Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations, these documents will therefore be available from 26 July to 11 August 2013 at the following link. HR Department Head Office

  18. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Luc Vos with regard to advancement. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 14 to 28 June 2002. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  19. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board has examined the internal appeal lodged by a member of the personnel against the decision to grant him only a periodic one-step advancement for the 2006 reference year. The person concerned has not objected to the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General being brought to the attention of the members of the personnel. In application of Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations, these documents will therefore be posted on the notice board of the Main building (bldg. 500) from 1 September to 14 September 2008. Human Resources Department (73911)

  20. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Poul Frandsen concerning his assimilation into the new career structure. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 13 to 24 January 2003. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  1. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

    Personnel Division

    1999-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Joào Bento with regard to residential category. As the appellant has not objected, the recommendations of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article RÊVIÊ1.20 of the Staff Regulations.The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N¡ 60) from 29 October to 12 November 1999.Personnel DivisionTel. 74128

  2. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine an appeal lodged by a member of the personnel with regard to advancement. The person concerned has requested that the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General be brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (No. 60) from 24 March to 10 April 2006. Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  3. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine an internal appeal lodged by a member of the personnel with regard to the decision not to grant him an indefinite contract. The person concerned has requested that the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General be brought to the notice of the members of the personnel, in accordance with Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice board of the Main building (Bldg. 60) from 24 September to 7 October 2007. Human Resources Department

  4. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Olivier Francis Martin with regard to indefinite contract. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 8 to 25 June 2001.

  5. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Jack Blanchard with regard to 'non recognition of specific functions'. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 12th to 26th April 2002. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  6. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mrs Judith Igo-Kemenes concerning the application of procedures foreseen by Administrative Circular N§ 26 (Rev. 3). As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 6 to 20 June 2003. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  7. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mrs Maria DIMOU with regard to a periodic one-step increase. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 30 April to 14 May 2004. Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  8. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Joël Lahaye with regard to non-resident allowance. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 18 May to 1st June 2001.

  9. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board has examined the internal appeal lodged by a member of the personnel with regard to the decision not to award him a periodic one-step advancement for the 2006 reference year. The person concerned has not objected to the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General being brought to the notice of the members of the personnel. In application of Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations, these documents will therefore be posted on the notice board of the Main building (Bldg. 500) from 17 March to 30 March 2008. Human Resources Department Tel. 73911

  10. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Bertrand Nicquevert with regard to the non-resident allowance. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 29 November to 13 December 2002. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  11. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Antonio Millich with regard to advancement. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 27 September to 11 October 2002. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  12. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine an appeal lodged by a member of the personnel with regard to a periodic one-step increase. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 1 to 15 April 2005. Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  13. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board has examined the internal appeal lodged by a member of the personnel against the decision to grant him only a periodic one-step advancement for the 2006 reference year. The person concerned has not objected to the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General being brought to the attention of the members of the personnel. In application of Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations, these documents will therefore be posted on the notice board of the Main Building (Bldg. 500) from 1 September to 14 September 2008. Human Resources Department (73911)

  14. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Gert Jan Bossen with regard to dependent child allowance. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 1st to 15 March 2002. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  15. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board has examined the internal appeal lodged by a member of the personnel with regard to the decision not to grant him an indefinite contract. The person concerned has not objected to the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General being brought to the notice of the members of the personnel. In application of Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations, these documents will therefore be posted on the notice board of the Main Building (Bldg. 500) from 26 May to 6 June 2008. Human Resources Department (73911)

  16. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Serge Peraire with regard to exceptional advancement. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 17 to 31 May 2002. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  17. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine an internal appeal lodged by a member of the personnel with regard to the decision not to grant him an indefinite contract. The person concerned has not objected to the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General being brought to the notice of the members of the personnel, in accordance with Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations. These documents will therefore be posted on the notice board of the Main Building (Bldg. 60) from 21 January to 3 February 2008. Human Resources Department (73911)

  18. Patellofemoral joint motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, W.; Phelan, J.; Albright, J.; Kathol, M.; Rooholamini, S.A.; El-Khoury, G.Y.; Palutsis, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the use of ultrafast computed tomography (CT) to obtain dynamic images of the patellofemoral joint during active motion. Thirty-eight patients underwent measurements of tangent offset, bisect offset, congruence angle, patellar tilt angle, lateral patellofemoral angle, sulcus angle, and sulcus depth made during leg movement. Selected parameters were compared with Merchant views. Significant correlations were obtained between Merchant views and comparable ultrafast CT views for all parameters except sulcus angle. Correlations between the other parameters were poor. Cine strips showed two patterns of movement; the patella remained centered either throughout excursion or until the last 20 0 of full extension, when it would sublux laterally

  19. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Aloïs Girardoz with regard to classification and advancement. As the appellant has not objected, the Board's report and the Director-General's decision will be brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 15 to 29 August 2003. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  20. [Benign tumors and pseudotumors of temporo-mandibular joint: radiologic aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, L; Caputo, M; Buffone, A; Casullo, A; Perrone, A; Sassi, S; Impara, L; Luppi, G; Mazza, D; Marini, Marina

    2005-01-01

    Benign tumors and tumor-like lesions that involve temporo mandibular joint are very rare. Those more frequent are osteochondroma, chondroma, osteoma, pigmented villonodular synovitis and synovial chondromatosis. The Authors report six cases of patients affected by these pathologies in which imaging, such as TC, MRI and/or ortopantomography have been useful to have a diagnosis.